WorldWideScience

Sample records for modulated structured light

  1. Light Modulation and Water Splitting Enhancement Using a Composite Porous GaN Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Xi, Xin; Yu, Zhiguo; Cao, Haicheng; Li, Jing; Lin, Shan; Ma, Zhanhong; Zhao, Lixia

    2018-02-14

    On the basis of the laterally porous GaN, we designed and fabricated a composite porous GaN structure with both well-ordered lateral and vertical holes. Compared to the plane GaN, the composite porous GaN structure with the combination of the vertical holes can help to reduce UV reflectance and increase the saturation photocurrent during water splitting by a factor of ∼4.5. Furthermore, we investigated the underlying mechanism for the enhancement of the water splitting performance using a finite-difference time-domain method. The results show that the well-ordered vertical holes can not only help to open the embedded pore channels to the electrolyte at both sides and reduce the migration distance of the gas bubbles during the water splitting reactions but also help to modulate the light field. Using this composite porous GaN structure, most of the incident light can be modulated and trapped into the nanoholes, and thus the electric fields localized in the lateral pores can increase dramatically as a result of the strong optical coupling. Our findings pave a new way to develop GaN photoelectrodes for highly efficient solar water splitting.

  2. Light intensity modulation in phototherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanovich, P. A.; Zon, B. A.; Kunin, A. A.; Pankova, S. N.

    2015-04-01

    A hypothesis that blocking ATP synthesis is one of the main causes of the stimulating effect is considered based on analysis of the primary photostimulation mechanisms. The light radiation intensity modulation is substantiated and the estimates of such modulation parameters are made. An explanation is offered to the stimulation efficiency decrease phenomenon at the increase of the radiation dose during the therapy. The results of clinical research of the medical treatment in preventive dentistry are presented depending on the spectrum and parameters of the light flux modulation.

  3. Plasmonics light modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babicheva, Viktoriia; Malureanu, Radu; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    Surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are waves propagating at the interface between a metal and a dielectric and, due to their tight confinement, may be used for nanoscale control of the light propagation. Thus, photonic integrated circuits can benefit from devices using SPPs because of their highly...

  4. Liquid crystal television spatial light modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Kuang; Chao, Tien-Hsin

    1989-01-01

    The spatial light modulation characteristics and capabilities of the liquid crystal television (LCTV) spatial light modulators (SLMs) are discussed. A comparison of Radio Shack, Epson, and Citizen LCTV SLMs is made.

  5. Spatial light modulation for mode conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    We demonstrate patented techniques for generating tuneable complex field distributions for controllable coupling to high-order guided modes of micro-structured fibres. The optical Fourier transform of binary phase-only patterns which are encoded on a computer-controlled spatial light modulator......, generates complex field distributions for selective launching of a desired mode. Both the amplitude and the phase of the programmable fields are modulated by straightforward and fast adjustments of simple pre-defined binary phase-only diffractive patterns. Experiments demonstrate tuneable coupling...

  6. Pulse shaping using a spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, N

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond pulse shaping can be done by different kinds of pulse shapers, such as liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LC SLM), acousto optic modulators (AOM) and deformable and movable mirrors. A few applications where pulse shaping...

  7. Bactericidal effectiveness of modulated UV light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bank, H.L.; John, J.; Schmehl, M.K.; Dratch, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Studies were designed to evaluate the effectiveness of pulsed modulated UV light waveforms for killing bacteria. Exposure of five strains of bacteria to the modulated information encoded in the light decreased the colony population from a confluent lawn to less than 20 colonies. However, approximately 2,000 colonies survived treatment with the same intensity and time of exposure to UV light lacking the modulated information

  8. Ultra-light and stable composite structure to support and cool the ATLAS pixel detector barrel electronics modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olcese, M.; Caso, C.; Castiglioni, G.; Cereseto, R.; Cuneo, S.; Dameri, M.; Gemme, C.; Glitza, K.-W.; Lenzen, G.; Mora, F.; Netchaeva, P.; Ockenfels, W.; Piano, E.; Pizzorno, C.; Puppo, R.; Rebora, A.; Rossi, L.; Thadome, J.; Vernocchi, F.; Vigeolas, E.; Vinci, A.

    2004-01-01

    The design of an ultra light structure, the so-called 'stave', to support and cool the sensitive elements of the Barrel Pixel detector, the innermost part of the ATLAS detector to be installed on the new Large Hadron Collider at CERN (Geneva), is presented. Very high-dimensional stability, minimization of the material and ability of operating 10 years in a high radiation environment are the key design requirements. The proposed solution consists of a combination of different carbon-based materials (impregnated carbon-carbon, ultra high modulus carbon fibre composites) coupled to a thin aluminum tube to form a very light support with an integrated cooling channel. Our design has proven to successfully fulfil the requirements. The extensive prototyping and testing program to fully qualify the design and release the production are discussed

  9. Gates Auto Door Car With Lights Modulated

    OpenAIRE

    Lina Carolina; Luyung Dinani, Skom, MMSi

    2002-01-01

    In scientific writing wi ll be explained about automatic gates with modulated headlights, where to find the car lights were adjusted by the relative frequency darker because of this background that the author alleviate human task in performing daily activities by using an automatic gate with the car lights modulated.

  10. Mutually-modulated cross-gain modulation and slow light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sternklar, Shmuel; Sarid, Eyal; Wart, Maxim; Granot, Er'el

    2010-01-01

    The interaction of pump and Stokes light in a Brillouin medium, where both beams are modulated, can be utilized for controlling the group velocity of the amplified Stokes (or depleted pump). The dependence of the group velocity for this mutually-modulated cross-gain modulation (MMXGM) technique on the Brillouin gain parameter is studied. A sharp transition to slow light occurs in the G 1 α/β≈1 regime, where G 1 is the Brillouin gain parameter, and α and β are the pump and Stokes modulation indices, respectively. A comparison of MMXGM slow light to the Brillouin dispersion-based slow-light technique reveals the fundamental differences between them. The formation of higher harmonics of the modulation frequency is also discussed. The theoretical predictions are experimentally corroborated and potential applications in fiber-based sensing and interferometry are discussed

  11. Smart lighting using a liquid crystal modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Alexandre; Thibault, Simon; Galstian, Tigran

    2017-08-01

    Now that LEDs have massively invaded the illumination market, a clear trend has emerged for more efficient and targeted lighting. The project described here is at the leading edge of the trend and aims at developing an evaluation board to test smart lighting applications. This is made possible thanks to a new liquid crystal light modulator recently developed for broadening LED light beams. The modulator is controlled by electrical signals and is characterized by a linear working zone. This feature allows the implementation of a closed loop control with a sensor feedback. This project shows that the use of computer vision is a promising opportunity for cheap closed loop control. The developed evaluation board integrates the liquid crystal modulator, a webcam, a LED light source and all the required electronics to implement a closed loop control with a computer vision algorithm.

  12. Manipulating light with strongly modulated photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notomi, Masaya

    2010-01-01

    Recently, strongly modulated photonic crystals, fabricated by the state-of-the-art semiconductor nanofabrication process, have realized various novel optical properties. This paper describes the way in which they differ from other optical media, and clarifies what they can do. In particular, three important issues are considered: light confinement, frequency dispersion and spatial dispersion. First, I describe the latest status and impact of ultra-strong light confinement in a wavelength-cubic volume achieved in photonic crystals. Second, the extreme reduction in the speed of light is reported, which was achieved as a result of frequency dispersion management. Third, strange negative refraction in photonic crystals is introduced, which results from their unique spatial dispersion, and it is clarified how this leads to perfect imaging. The last two sections are devoted to applications of these novel properties. First, I report the fact that strong light confinement and huge light-matter interaction enhancement make strongly modulated photonic crystals promising for on-chip all-optical processing, and present several examples including all-optical switches/memories and optical logics. As a second application, it is shown that the strong light confinement and slow light in strongly modulated photonic crystals enable the adiabatic tuning of light, which leads to various novel ways of controlling light, such as adiabatic frequency conversion, efficient optomechanics systems, photon memories and photons pinning.

  13. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2013-12-17

    We show that a flat surface of a polymer in rubber state illuminated with intense electromagnetic radiation is unstable with respect to periodic modulation. Initial periodic perturbation is amplified due to periodic thermal expansion of the material heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore, it is not related to the well-known laser induced periodic structures on polymer surfaces but may contribute to their formation and to other phenomena of light-matter interaction.

  14. Manipulating structured light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available SINGULARITY ZERO INTENSITY GAUSSIAN BEAM LAGUERRE-GAUSSIAN BEAM u(r,θ,z) = u0(r,z)exp(ilθ) Our favorite structured light field – has a helical wavefront 10/10/2016 6 Many unique measurement techniques are available for structured light NJP 13, 093014 (2011...). PRL 105(15), 153601 (2010).Nature 412, 314-316 (2001). PRL 105(5), 053904 (2010). PRL 88(25), 257901 (2002). 6? � � � ��Ψ� � �� c1 c2 c3 ∫ ∫ Ψ=Ψ== dxdyUUic nnnnn * ,)exp( φρ Create these modesPerform this integral Modal decomposition expands...

  15. Modules to enhance smart lighting education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Robert M.; Joenathan, Charles; Connor, Kenneth; Chouikha, Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Over the past several years there has been a rapid advancement in solid state lighting applications brought on by the development of high efficiency light emitting diodes. Development of lighting devices, systems and products that meet the demands of the future lighting marketplace requires workers from many disciplines including engineers, scientists, designers and architects. The National Science Foundation has recognized this fact and established the Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center that promotes research leading to smart lighting systems, partners with industry to enhance innovation and educates a diverse, world-class workforce. The lead institution is Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute with core partners Boston University and The University of New Mexico. Outreach partners include Howard University, Morgan State University, and Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. Because of the multidisciplinary nature of advanced smart lighting systems workers often have little or no formal education in basic optics, lighting and illumination. This paper describes the initial stages of the development of self-contained and universally applicable educational modules that target essential optics topics needed for lighting applications. The modules are intended to be easily incorporated into new and existing courses by a variety of educators and/or to be used in a series of stand-alone, asynchronous training exercises by new graduate students. The ultimate goal of this effort is to produce resources such as video lectures, video presentations of students-teaching-students, classroom activities, assessment tools, student research projects and laboratories integrated into learning modules. Sample modules and resources will be highlighted. Other outreach activities such as plans for coursework, undergraduate research, design projects, and high school enrichment programs will be discussed.

  16. Light Microscopy Module (LMM)-Emulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Howard G.; Smith, Trent M.; Richards, Stephanie E.

    2016-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) is a microscope facility developed at Glenn Research Center (GRC) that provides researchers with powerful imaging capability onboard the International Space Station (ISS). LMM has the ability to have its hardware recongured on-orbit to accommodate a wide variety of investigations, with the capability of remotely acquiring and downloading digital images across multiple levels of magnication.

  17. Determination of the complex refractive index segments of turbid sample with multispectral spatially modulated structured light and models approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitav, Omri; Shaul, Oren; Abookasis, David

    2017-09-01

    Spectral data enabling the derivation of a biological tissue sample's complex refractive index (CRI) can provide a range of valuable information in the clinical and research contexts. Specifically, changes in the CRI reflect alterations in tissue morphology and chemical composition, enabling its use as an optical marker during diagnosis and treatment. In the present work, we report a method for estimating the real and imaginary parts of the CRI of a biological sample using Kramers-Kronig (KK) relations in the spatial frequency domain. In this method, phase-shifted sinusoidal patterns at single high spatial frequency are serially projected onto the sample surface at different near-infrared wavelengths while a camera mounted normal to the sample surface acquires the reflected diffuse light. In the offline analysis pipeline, recorded images at each wavelength are converted to spatial phase maps using KK analysis and are then calibrated against phase-models derived from diffusion approximation. The amplitude of the reflected light, together with phase data, is then introduced into Fresnel equations to resolve both real and imaginary segments of the CRI at each wavelength. The technique was validated in tissue-mimicking phantoms with known optical parameters and in mouse models of ischemic injury and heat stress. Experimental data obtained indicate variations in the CRI among brain tissue suffering from injury. CRI fluctuations correlated with alterations in the scattering and absorption coefficients of the injured tissue are demonstrated. This technique for deriving dynamic changes in the CRI of tissue may be further developed as a clinical diagnostic tool and for biomedical research applications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the estimation of the spectral CRI of a mouse head following injury obtained in the spatial frequency domain.

  18. Visible light communications modulation and signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zhaocheng; Huang, Wei; Xu, Zhengyuan

    2018-01-01

    This informative new book on state-of-the-art visible light communication (VLC) provides, for the first time, a systematical and advanced treatment of modulation and signal processing for VLC. Visible Light Communications: Modulation and Signal Processing offers a practical guide to designing VLC, linking academic research with commercial applications. In recent years, VLC has attracted attention from academia and industry since it has many advantages over the traditional radio frequency, including wide unregulated bandwidth, high security, and low cost. It is a promising complementary technique in 5G and beyond wireless communications, especially in indoor applications. However, lighting constraints have not been fully considered in the open literature when considering VLC system design, and its importance has been underestimated. That’s why this book—written by a team of experts with both academic research experience and industrial development experience in the field—is so welcome. To help readers u...

  19. Concealing with structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingbo; Zeng, Jinwei; Wang, Xi; Cartwright, Alexander N; Litchinitser, Natalia M

    2014-02-13

    While making objects less visible (or invisible) to a human eye or a radar has captured people's imagination for centuries, current attempts towards realization of this long-awaited functionality range from various stealth technologies to recently proposed cloaking devices. A majority of proposed approaches share a number of common deficiencies such as design complexity, polarization effects, bandwidth, losses and the physical size or shape requirement complicating their implementation especially at optical frequencies. Here we demonstrate an alternative way to conceal macroscopic objects by structuring light itself. In our approach, the incident light is transformed into an optical vortex with a dark core that can be used to conceal macroscopic objects. Once such a beam passed around the object it is transformed back into its initial Gaussian shape with minimum amplitude and phase distortions. Therefore, we propose to use that dark core of the vortex beam to conceal an object that is macroscopic yet small enough to fit the dark (negligibly low intensity) region of the beam. The proposed concealing approach is polarization independent, easy to fabricate, lossless, operates at wavelengths ranging from 560 to 700 nm, and can be used to hide macroscopic objects providing they are smaller than vortex core.

  20. Planar Silicon Optical Waveguide Light Modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leistiko, Otto; Bak, H.

    1994-01-01

    that values in the nanosecond region should be possible, however, the measured values are high, 20 microseconds, due to the large area of the injector junctions, 1× 10¿2 cm2, and the limitations imposed by the detection circuit. The modulating properties of these devices are impressive, measurements......The results of an experimental investigation of a new type of optical waveguide based on planar technology in which the liglht guiding and modulation are achieved by exploiting free carrier effects in silicon are presented. Light is guided between the n+ substrate and two p+ regions, which also...... serve as carrier injectors for controling absorption. Light confinement of single mode devices is good, giving spot sizes of 9 ¿m FWHM. Insertion loss measurements indicate that the absorption losses for these waveguides are extremely low, less 1 dB/cm. Estimates of the switching speed indicate...

  1. Enhanced Interferometry with Programmable Spatial Light Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    Interferometry, Spatial Light Modulator, Surface Accuracy, Optics, Mirror, Zernike , Freeform Optics, Null Testing, Hartman, Wavefront 16. SECURITY...S L M P ix e l- c a m Tilted Flat Mirror L a s e r PV. ± 3.4 λ -Tilt by the flat mirror, ~7 waves ~ 14 fringes Interferogram 3D view (Various...Interferogram ( 3D view) x- profile y- profile (Various waveplates and telescopes not shown) SLM can compensate tilted wavefronts with an accuracy of

  2. Research on modulated structure alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, Tokuzo; Saito, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Kenki

    1982-01-01

    Research was carried out for the purposes of clarifying the cause of modulated structure formation, developing the structure control method utilizing modulated structure and clarifying the suitability of modulated structure alloys as radiation damage-resisting materials. The research on structure control method encountered a difficulty in the analysis of experimental results, bu the following results were obtained in the other items. The method of solving a diffusion equation including a nonlinear term was found in course of the clarification of the cause of modulated structure formation. As a means of detecting faint unevenness in solid solution, of which the deviation of composition is a few %, the structure analysis method utilizing magnetic property was developed. This method was applied to Ni-9.6 at.% Ti alloy, and the process of expanding amplitude in composition variation in spinodal decomposition and the formation of solute atomshort region at the time of nucleation-growth were confirmed. Utilizing the high energy electron beam generated in a superhigh voltage electron microscope, electron beam irradiation experiment was carried out on precipitation hardening alloys with modulated structure. As the result, it was found that in Ni-Ti alloy, the amount of void swelling resistance showed the change with the increase of modulated structure period. (Kako, I.)

  3. Modular crystals as modulated structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elcoro, L.; Perez-Mato, J.M.; Friese, K.

    2008-01-01

    The use of the superspace formalism is extended to the description and refinement of the homologous series of modular structures with two symmetry-related modules with different orientations. The lillianite homologous series has been taken as a study case. Starting from a commensurate modulated...... composite description with two basic subsystems corresponding to the two different modules, it is shown how a more efficient description can be achieved using so-called zigzag modulation functions. These linear zigzag modulations, newly implemented in the program JANA2006, have very large fixed amplitudes...... and introduce in the starting model the two orientations of the underlying module sublattices. We show that a composite approach with this type of function, which treats the cations and anions as two separate subsystems forming a misfit compound, is the most appropriate and robust method for the refinements....

  4. Structure-based optics of centric diatom frustules: modulation of the in vivo light field for efficient diatom photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessling, Johannes W; Su, Yanyan; Cartaxana, Paulo; Maibohm, Christian; Rickelt, Lars F; Trampe, Erik C L; Walby, Sandra L; Wangpraseurt, Daniel; Wu, Xia; Ellegaard, Marianne; Kühl, Michael

    2018-07-01

    The optical properties of diatom silicate frustules inspire photonics and nanotechnology research. Whether light interaction with the nano-structure of the frustule also affects diatom photosynthesis has remained unclear due to lack of information on frustule optical properties under more natural conditions. Here we demonstrate that the optical properties of the frustule valves in water affect light harvesting and photosynthesis in live cells of centric diatoms (Coscinodiscus granii). Microscale cellular mapping of photosynthesis around localized spot illumination demonstrated optical coupling of chloroplasts to the valve wall. Photonic structures of the three-layered C. granii valve facilitated light redistribution and efficient photosynthesis in cell regions distant from the directly illuminated area. The different porous structure of the two sides of the valve exhibited photon trapping and forward scattering of blue light enhancing photosynthetic active radiation inside the cell. Photonic structures of diatom frustules thus alter the cellular light field with implications on diatom photobiology. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Multiplicative Galois module structure

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, A

    1996-01-01

    This book is the result of a short course on the Galois structure of S-units that was given at The Fields Institute in the fall of 1993. Offering a new angle on an old problem, the main theme is that this structure should be determined by class field theory, in its cohomological form, and by the behavior of Artin L-functions at s=0. A proof of this-or even a precise formulation-is still far away, but the available evidence all points in this direction. The work brings together the current evidence that the Galois structure of S-units can be described.

  6. Light induced modulation instability of surfaces under intense illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.; Foulds, Ian G.; Goriely, A.

    2013-01-01

    heated by radiation. Periodic heating is due to focusing-defocusing effects caused by the initial surface modulation. The surface modulation has a period longer than the excitation wavelength and does not require coherent light source. Therefore

  7. Inhibition of light tunneling for multichannel excitations in longitudinally modulated waveguide arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobanov, Valery E.; Vysloukh, Victor A.; Kartashov, Yaroslav V.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the evolution of multichannel excitations in longitudinally modulated waveguide arrays where the refractive index either oscillates out-of-phase in all neighboring waveguides or when it is modulated in phase in several central waveguides surrounded by out-of-phase oscillating neighbors. Both types of modulations allow resonant inhibition of light tunneling, but only the modulation of the latter type conserves the internal structure of multichannel excitations. We show that parameter regions where light tunneling inhibition is possible depend on the symmetry and structure of multichannel excitations. Antisymmetric multichannel excitations are more robust than their symmetric counterparts and experience nonlinearity-induced delocalization at higher amplitudes.

  8. Thermal management of solid state lighting module

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, H.

    2014-01-01

    Solid-State Lighting (SSL), powered by Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs), is an energy-efficient technology for lighting systems. In contrast to incandescent lights which obtain high efficiency at high temperatures, the highest efficiency of LEDs is reached at low temperatures. The thermal management in

  9. Structural behaviour of super-light structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Anne; Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2010-01-01

    structural functions: it leads load to the skeleton, it stabilizes the compression members of the skeleton, and it redistributes loads that are not optimal for the skeleton shape. In this paper, FE analysis is used to investigated the behaviour of a series of SLS beams of concrete, under varying stiffness......A new structural concept, called Super-light Structures (SLS), has recently been invented and patented at the Technical University of Denmark. The basic concept of SLS is to construct a skeleton of a stiff and strong material, such as ordinary or high strength concrete, and stabilize this skeleton...... with a lighter and softer material, such as lightweight concrete. The combined use of stiff and light material in SLS results in structures of high stiffness and low weight. The applied technology and the advantages of SLS are elaborated upon in [1] in these proceedings. The present paper focuses...

  10. Modulations in the light of the firefly

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The amplitude of the continuous train of triangular pulses is apparently altered in accordance with the instantaneous values of a hypothetical signal, which exhibits pulse amplitude modulation (PAM). In addition to sampling in amplitude, this scheme apparently provides sampling in time, representing pulse width modulation ...

  11. Motion compensation for structured light sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Debjani; Mertz, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    In order for structured light methods to work outside, the strong background from the sun needs to be suppressed. This can be done with bandpass filters, fast shutters, and background subtraction. In general this last method necessitates the sensor system to be stationary during data taking. The contribution of this paper is a method to compensate for the motion if the system is moving. The key idea is to use video stabilization techniques that work even if the illuminator is switched on and off from one frame to another. We used OpenCV functions and modules to implement a robust and efficient method. We evaluated it under various conditions and tested it on a moving robot outdoors. We will demonstrate that one can not only do 3D reconstruction under strong ambient light, but that it is also possible to observe optical properties of the objects in the environment.

  12. Modulation of photonic structures by surface acoustic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauricio M de Lima Jr; Santos, Paulo V

    2005-01-01

    This paper reviews the interaction between coherently stimulated acoustic phonons in the form of surface acoustic waves with light beams in semiconductor based photonic structures. We address the generation of surface acoustic wave modes in these structures as well as the technological aspects related to control of the propagation and spatial distribution of the acoustic fields. The microscopic mechanisms responsible for the interaction between light and surface acoustic modes in different structures are then reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to the acousto-optical interaction in semiconductor microcavities and its application in photon control. These structures exhibit high optical modulation levels under acoustic excitation and are compatible with integrated light sources and detectors

  13. Performance comparison of binary modulation schemes for visible light communication

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Kihong

    2015-09-11

    In this paper, we investigate the power spectral density of several binary modulation schemes including variable on-off keying, variable pulse position modulation, and pulse dual slope modulation which were previously proposed for visible light communication with dimming control. We also propose a novel slope-based modulation called differential chip slope modulation (DCSM) and develop a chip-based hard-decision receiver to demodulate the resulting signal, detect the chip sequence, and decode the input bit sequence. We show that the DCSM scheme can exploit spectrum density more efficiently than the reference schemes while providing an error rate performance comparable to them. © 2015 IEEE.

  14. Structural modules in AP1000 plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, N.; Tunon-Sanjur, L.

    2007-01-01

    Structural modules are extensively used in AP1000 plant design. The shop manufacturing of modules components improves the quality and reliability of plant structures. The application of modules has a positive impact on construction schedules, and results in substantial savings in the construction cost. This paper describes various types of structural modules used for AP1000 plant structures. CA structural wall modules are steel plate modules with concrete placed, on or within the module, after module installation. The layout and design of the largest CA wall modules, CA01 and CA20, is described in detail. General discussion of structural floor modules, such as the composite and finned floors, is also included. Steel form CB modules (liners) consist of plate reinforced with angle stiffeners and tee sections. The angles and the tee sections are on the concrete side of the plate. Design of CB20 has been included as an example of CB type modules. Design codes and structural concepts related to module designs are discussed. (authors)

  15. Frequency conversion of structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, Fabian; Hermosa, Nathaniel; Pruneri, Valerio; Torres, Juan P

    2016-02-15

    Coherent frequency conversion of structured light, i.e. the ability to manipulate the carrier frequency of a wave front without distorting its spatial phase and intensity profile, provides the opportunity for numerous novel applications in photonic technology and fundamental science. In particular, frequency conversion of spatial modes carrying orbital angular momentum can be exploited in sub-wavelength resolution nano-optics and coherent imaging at a wavelength different from that used to illuminate an object. Moreover, coherent frequency conversion will be crucial for interfacing information stored in the high-dimensional spatial structure of single and entangled photons with various constituents of quantum networks. In this work, we demonstrate frequency conversion of structured light from the near infrared (803 nm) to the visible (527 nm). The conversion scheme is based on sum-frequency generation in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal pumped with a 1540-nm Gaussian beam. We observe frequency-converted fields that exhibit a high degree of similarity with the input field and verify the coherence of the frequency-conversion process via mode projection measurements with a phase mask and a single-mode fiber. Our results demonstrate the suitability of exploiting the technique for applications in quantum information processing and coherent imaging.

  16. Computing optimal interfacial structure of modulated phases

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Jie; Wang, Chu; Shi, An-Chang; Zhang, Pingwen

    2016-01-01

    We propose a general framework of computing interfacial structures between two modulated phases. Specifically we propose to use a computational box consisting of two half spaces, each occupied by a modulated phase with given position and orientation. The boundary conditions and basis functions are chosen to be commensurate with the bulk structures. It is observed that the ordered nature of modulated structures stabilizes the interface, which enables us to obtain optimal interfacial structures...

  17. Carrier Modulation Layer-Enhanced Organic Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jwo-Huei Jou

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic light-emitting diode (OLED-based display products have already emerged in the market and their efficiencies and lifetimes are sound at the comparatively low required luminance. To realize OLED for lighting application sooner, higher light quality and better power efficiency at elevated luminance are still demanded. This review reveals the advantages of incorporating a nano-scale carrier modulation layer (CML, also known as a spacer, carrier-regulating layer, or interlayer, among other terms, to tune the chromaticity and color temperature as well as to markedly improve the device efficiency and color rendering index (CRI for numerous OLED devices. The functions of the CML can be enhanced as multiple layers and blend structures are employed. At proper thickness, the employment of CML enables the device to balance the distribution of carriers in the two emissive zones and achieve high device efficiencies and long operational lifetime while maintaining very high CRI. Moreover, we have also reviewed the effect of using CML on the most significant characteristics of OLEDs, namely: efficiency, luminance, life-time, CRI, SRI, chromaticity, and the color temperature, and see how the thickness tuning and selection of proper CML are crucial to effectively control the OLED device performance.

  18. Beam-quality measurements using a spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schulze, C

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a fast and easy technique for measuring the beam propagation ratio, M2, of laser beams using a spatial light modulator. Our technique is based on digitally simulating the free-space propagation of light, thus eliminating the need...

  19. Exploration of external light trapping for photovoltaic modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, L.; van de Groep, J.; Di Vece, M.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2016-01-01

    The reflection of incident sunlight by photovoltaic modules prevents them from reaching their theoretical energy conversion limit. We explore the effectiveness of a universal external light trap that can tackle this reflection loss. A unique feature of external light traps is their capability to

  20. Microscopic structure for light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, V.K.

    1995-01-01

    The microscopic structure for light nuclei e.g. 4 He, 7 Li and 8 Be is considered in the frame work of the generator coordinate method (GCM). The physical interpretation of our GCM is also discussed. The GC amplitudes are used to calculate the various properties like charge and magnetic RMS radii, form factors, electromagnetic moments, astrophysical S-factor, Bremsstrahlung weighted cross sections, relative wavefunctions and vertex functions etc. All the calculated quantities agree well with the values determined experimentally. (author). 30 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Cost effective flat plate photovoltaic modules using light trapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, C. N.; Gordon, B. A.; Knasel, T. M.; Malinowski, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Work in optical trapping in 'thick films' is described to form a design guide for photovoltaic engineers. A thick optical film can trap light by diffusive reflection and total internal reflection. Light can be propagated reasonably long distances compared with layer thicknesses by this technique. This makes it possible to conduct light from inter-cell and intra-cell areas now not used in photovoltaic modules onto active cell areas.

  2. Laser trapping and spatial light modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    INVITED: Robotics at the macro-scale typically uses light for carrying information in machine vision for monitoring and feedback in intelligent robotic guidance systems. With light’s miniscule momentum, shrinking robots down to the micro-scale regime creates opportunities for exploiting optical f...

  3. Light Modulates Leptin and Ghrelin in Sleep-Restricted Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana G. Figueiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic sleep restrictions cause a reduction in leptin and an increase in ghrelin, both of which are associated with hunger. Given that light/dark patterns are closely tied to sleep/wake patterns, we compared, in a within-subjects study, the impact of morning light exposures (60 lux of 633-nm [red], 532-nm [green], or 475-nm [blue] lights to dim light exposures on leptin and ghrelin concentrations after subjects experienced 5 consecutive days of both an 8-hour (baseline and a 5-hour sleep-restricted schedule. In morning dim light, 5-hour sleep restriction significantly reduced leptin concentrations compared to the baseline, 8-hour sleep/dim-light condition (1,32 = 2.9; =0.007. Compared to the 5-hour sleep/dim-light condition, the red, green, and blue morning light exposures significantly increased leptin concentrations (1,32 = 5.7; <0.0001, 1,32 = 3.6; =0.001, and 1,32 = 3.0; =0.005, resp.. Morning red light and green light exposures significantly decreased ghrelin concentrations (1,32 = 3.3; <0.003 and 1,32 = 2.2; =0.04, resp., but morning blue light exposures did not. This study is the first to demonstrate that morning light can modulate leptin and ghrelin concentrations, which could have an impact on reducing hunger that accompanies sleep deprivation.

  4. Shaping and detecting mid-IR light with a spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maweza, Elijah L

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available modulator Maweza, Elijah L Gailele, Lucas M Strauss, Hencharl J Litvin, Ihar Forbes, Andrew Dudley, Angela L ABSTRACT: We demonstrate the operation and calibration of a spatial light modulator in the mid-IR region by creating and measuring...

  5. Dual Entwining Structures and Dual Entwined Modules

    OpenAIRE

    Abuhlail, Jawad Y.

    2003-01-01

    In this note we introduce and investigate the concepts of dual entwining structures and dual entwined modules. This generalizes the concepts of dual Doi-Koppinen structures and dual Doi-Koppinen modules introduced (in the infinite case over rings) by the author is his dissertation.

  6. Global model structures for ∗-modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böhme, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    We extend Schwede's work on the unstable global homotopy theory of orthogonal spaces and L-spaces to the category of ∗-modules (i.e., unstable S-modules). We prove a theorem which transports model structures and their properties from L-spaces to ∗-modules and show that the resulting global model...... structure for ∗-modules is monoidally Quillen equivalent to that of orthogonal spaces. As a consequence, there are induced Quillen equivalences between the associated model categories of monoids, which identify equivalent models for the global homotopy theory of A∞-spaces....

  7. Origin of Infrared Light Modulation in Reflectance-Mode Photoplethysmography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor S Sidorov

    Full Text Available We recently pointed out the important role of dermis deformation by pulsating arterial pressure in the formation of a photoplethysmographic signal at green light. The aim of this study was to explore the role of this novel finding in near-infrared (NIR light. A light-emitting diode (LED-based imaging photoplethysmography (IPPG system was used to detect spatial distribution of blood pulsations under frame-to-frame switching green and NIR illumination in the palms of 34 healthy individuals. We observed a significant increase of light-intensity modulation at the heartbeat frequency for both illuminating wavelengths after a palm was contacted with a glass plate. Strong positive correlation between data measured at green and NIR light was found, suggesting that the same signal was read independently from the depth of penetration. Analysis of the data shows that an essential part of remitted NIR light is modulated in time as a result of elastic deformations of dermis caused by variable blood pressure in the arteries. Our observations suggest that in contrast with the classical model, photoplethysmographic waveform originates from the modulation of the density of capillaries caused by the variable pressure applied to the skin from large blood vessels. Particularly, beat-to-beat transmural pressure in arteries compresses/decompresses the dermis and deforms its connective-tissue components, thus affecting the distance between the capillaries, which results in the modulation of absorption and scattering coefficients of both green and NIR light. These findings are important for the correct interpretation of this widely used medical technique, which may have novel applications in diagnosis and treatment monitoring of aging and skin diseases.

  8. Phototropin 1 and dim-blue light modulate the red light de-etiolation response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihai; M Folta, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Light signals regulate seedling morphological changes during de-etiolation through the coordinated actions of multiple light-sensing pathways. Previously we have shown that red-light-induced hypocotyl growth inhibition can be reversed by addition of dim blue light through the action of phototropin 1 (phot1). Here we further examine the fluence-rate relationships of this blue light effect in short-term (hours) and long-term (days) hypocotyl growth assays. The red stem-growth inhibition and blue promotion is a low-fluence rate response, and blue light delays or attenuates both the red light and far-red light responses. These de-etiolation responses include blue light reversal of red or far-red induced apical hook opening. This response also requires phot1. Cryptochromes (cry1 and cry2) are activated by higher blue light fluence-rates and override phot1's influence on hypocotyl growth promotion. Exogenous application of auxin transport inhibitor naphthylphthalamic acid abolished the blue light stem growth promotion in both hypocotyl growth and hook opening. Results from the genetic tests of this blue light effect in auxin transporter mutants, as well as phytochrome kinase substrate mutants indicated that aux1 may play a role in blue light reversal of red light response. Together, the phot1-mediated adjustment of phytochrome-regulated photomorphogenic events is most robust in dim blue light conditions and is likely modulated by auxin transport through its transporters.

  9. Optimal Fisher Discriminant Ratio for an Arbitrary Spatial Light Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D.

    1999-01-01

    Optimizing the Fisher ratio is well established in statistical pattern recognition as a means of discriminating between classes. I show how to optimize that ratio for optical correlation intensity by choice of filter on an arbitrary spatial light modulator (SLM). I include the case of additive noise of known power spectral density.

  10. Creation and detection of optical modes with spatial light modulators

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Forbes, A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available (1979). 24. J. A. Davis, K. O. Valade´z, and D. M. Cottrell, “Encoding amplitude and phase information onto a binary phase-only spatial light modulator,” Appl. Opt. 42, 2003–2008 (2003). 25. E. Bolduc, N. Bent, E. Santamato, E. Karimi, and R. W. Boyd...

  11. Absolute rate measurement by light modulation - ESR technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, K Y; Gaspar, P P

    1977-01-01

    A rate constant is deduced for the reaction of tert-butoxy radicals and trimethylsilane from the measurement of the phase shift between the modulated light source and the ESR signal of trimethylsilyl radical. The rate constant was found to be 3 x 10/sup -2/M/sup -1/. sec/sup -1/ at -50/sup 0/C.

  12. Installation of the light tight cover for the SSD modules (the modules are behind the aluminium plate). The silicon sensors are sensitive to light tight, so ambient light will increase the noise and may even damage them.

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G.

    2004-01-01

    Installation of the light tight cover for the SSD modules (the modules are behind the aluminium plate). The silicon sensors are sensitive to light tight , so ambient light will increase the noise and may even damage them.

  13. Chemical modulation of electronic structure at the excited state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Song, C.; Gu, Y. D.; Saleem, M. S.; Pan, F.

    2017-12-01

    Spin-polarized electronic structures are the cornerstone of spintronics, and have thus attracted a significant amount of interest; in particular, researchers are looking into how to modulate the electronic structure to enable multifunctional spintronics applications, especially in half-metallic systems. However, the control of the spin polarization has only been predicted in limited two-dimensional systems with spin-polarized Dirac structures and is difficult to achieve experimentally. Here, we report the modulation of the electronic structure in the light-induced excited state in a typical half-metal, L a1 /2S r1 /2Mn O3 -δ . According to the spin-transport measurements, there appears a light-induced increase in magnetoresistance due to the enhanced spin scattering, which is closely associated with the excited spin polarization. Strikingly, the light-induced variation can be enhanced via alcohol processing and reduced by oxygen annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that in the chemical process, a redox reaction occurs with a change in the valence of Mn. Furthermore, first-principles calculations reveal that the change in the valence of Mn alters the electronic structure and consequently modulates the spin polarization in the excited state. Our findings thus report a chemically tunable electronic structure, demonstrating interesting physics and the potential for multifunctional applications and ultrafast spintronics.

  14. Architectural Engineering to Super-Light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castberg, Niels Andreas

    The increasing global urbanisation creates a great demand for new buildings. In the aim to honour this, a new structural system, offering flexibility and variation at no extra cost appears beneficial. Super-Light Structures constitute such a system. This PhD thesis examines Super-Light Structures...... with architectural engineering as a starting point. The thesis is based on a two stringed hypothesis: Architectural engineering gives rise to better architecture and Super-Light Structures support and enables a static, challenging architecture. The aim of the thesis is to clarify architectural engineering's impact...... on the work process between architects and engineers in the design development. Using architectural engineering, Super-Light Structures are examined in an architectural context, and it is explained how digital tools can support architectural engineering and design of Super-Light Structures. The experiences...

  15. Light history modulates antioxidant and photosynthetic responses of biofilms to both natural (light) and chemical (herbicides) stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnineau, Chloé; Sague, Irene Gallardo; Urrea, Gemma; Guasch, Helena

    2012-05-01

    In multiple stress situations, the co-occurrence of environmental and chemical factors can influence organisms' ability to cope with toxicity. In this context, the influence of light adaptation on the response of freshwater biofilms to sudden light changes or to herbicides exposure was investigated by determining various parameters: diatom community composition, photosynthetic parameters, chlorophyll a content, antioxidant enzyme activities. Biofilms were grown in microcosms under sub-optimal, saturating, and high light intensities and showed already described characteristics of shade/light adaptation (community structure, photosynthetic adaptation, etc.). Light history modulated antioxidant and photosynthetic responses of biofilms to the stress caused by short-term exposure to sudden light changes or to herbicides. First biofilms adapted to sub-optimal light intensity (shade-adapted) were found to be more sensitive to an increase in light intensity than high-light adapted ones to a reduction in light intensity. Second, while light history influenced biofilms' response to glyphosate, it had little influence on biofilms' response to copper and none on its response to oxyfluorfen. Indeed glyphosate exposure led to a stronger decrease in photosynthetic efficiency of shade-adapted biofilms (EC(50) = 11.7 mg L(-1)) than of high-light adapted communities (EC(50) = 35.6 mg L(-1)). Copper exposure led to an activation of ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in biofilms adapted to sub-optimal and saturating light intensity while the protein content decreased in all biofilms exposed to copper. Oxyfluorfen toxicity was independent of light history provoking an increase in APX activity. In conclusion this study showed that both previous exposure to contaminants and physical habitat characteristics might influence community tolerance to disturbances strongly.

  16. Subcarrier intensity modulation for MIMO visible light communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Yasin; Akan, Aydin

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, subcarrier intensity modulation (SIM) is investigated for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) visible light communication (VLC) systems. A new modulation scheme called DC-aid SIM (DCA-SIM) is proposed for the spatial modulation (SM) transmission plan. Then, DCA-SIM is extended for multiple subcarrier case which is called DC-aid Multiple Subcarrier Modulation (DCA-MSM). Bit error rate (BER) performances of the considered system are analyzed for different MIMO schemes. The power efficiencies of DCA-SIM and DCA-MSM are shown in correlated MIMO VLC channels. The upper bound BER performances of the proposed models are obtained analytically for PSK and QAM modulation types in order to validate the simulation results. Additionally, the effect of power imbalance method on the performance of SIM is studied and remarkable power gains are obtained compared to the non-power imbalanced cases. In this work, Pulse amplitude modulation (PAM) and MSM-Index are used as benchmarks for single carrier and multiple carrier cases, respectively. And the results show that the proposed schemes outperform PAM and MSM-Index for considered single carrier and multiple carrier communication scenarios.

  17. Flicker in a twisted nematic spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Hermosillo, Yuliana; García-Márquez, Jorge; Espinosa-Luna, Rafael; Ochoa, Noé Alcalá; López, Víctor; Aguilar, Alberto; Noé-Arias, Enrique; Alayli, Yasser

    2013-06-01

    Liquid Crystal on Silicon (LCoS) Spatial Light Modulators (SLM) are widely used for their capability to control beams howbeit fluctuations in phase and amplitude. It is then necessary to understand the negative effects of these fluctuations, also known as flicker, and the means to mitigate them. The flicker is observed either as high frequency variations of polarization, attenuation or high phase fluctuations on the wave front modulated by the LCoS device. Here, we compare the flicker behavior in a twisted nematic (TN) LCoS-SLM for different polarization schemes and temperatures. The quantitative evaluation shows that flicker is effectively reduced only by chilling the LCoS panel to temperatures just below 0 °C but, the LCoS modulation capability is also affected.

  18. Speckless head-up display on two spatial light modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemion, Andrzej; Ducin, Izabela; Kakarenko, Karol; Makowski, Michał; Siemion, Agnieszka; Suszek, Jarosław; Sypek, Maciej; Wojnowski, Dariusz; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew; Kołodziejczyk, Andrzej

    2010-12-01

    There is a continuous demand for the computer generated holograms to give an almost perfect reconstruction with a reasonable cost of manufacturing. One method of improving the image quality is to illuminate a Fourier hologram with a quasi-random, but well known, light field phase distribution. It can be achieved with a lithographically produced phase mask. Up to date, the implementation of the lithographic technique is relatively complex and time and money consuming, which is why we have decided to use two Spatial Light Modulators (SLM). For the correctly adjusted light polarization a SLM acts as a pure phase modulator with 256 adjustable phase levels between 0 and 2π. The two modulators give us an opportunity to use the whole surface of the device and to reduce the size of the experimental system. The optical system with one SLM can also be used but it requires dividing the active surface into halves (one for the Fourier hologram and the second for the quasi-random diffuser), which implies a more complicated optical setup. A larger surface allows to display three Fourier holograms, each for one primary colour: red, green and blue. This allows to reconstruct almost noiseless colourful dynamic images. In this work we present the results of numerical simulations of image reconstructions with the use of two SLM displays.

  19. Tunable structures and modulators for THz light

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kužel, Petr; Kadlec, Filip

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 9, - (2008), 197-214 ISSN 1631-0705 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100100512; GA MŠk LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : terahertz radiation * tunable devices * photonic crystals * strontium titanate * gallium arsenide Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.164, year: 2008

  20. Polarized light modulates light-dependent magnetic compass orientation in birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muheim, Rachel; Sjöberg, Sissel; Pinzon-Rodriguez, Atticus

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoreception of the light-dependent magnetic compass in birds is suggested to be mediated by a radical-pair mechanism taking place in the avian retina. Biophysical models on magnetic field effects on radical pairs generally assume that the light activating the magnetoreceptor molecules is nondirectional and unpolarized, and that light absorption is isotropic. However, natural skylight enters the avian retina unidirectionally, through the cornea and the lens, and is often partially polarized. In addition, cryptochromes, the putative magnetoreceptor molecules, absorb light anisotropically, i.e., they preferentially absorb light of a specific direction and polarization, implying that the light-dependent magnetic compass is intrinsically polarization sensitive. To test putative interactions between the avian magnetic compass and polarized light, we developed a spatial orientation assay and trained zebra finches to magnetic and/or overhead polarized light cues in a four-arm “plus” maze. The birds did not use overhead polarized light near the zenith for sky compass orientation. Instead, overhead polarized light modulated light-dependent magnetic compass orientation, i.e., how the birds perceive the magnetic field. Birds were well oriented when tested with the polarized light axis aligned parallel to the magnetic field. When the polarized light axis was aligned perpendicular to the magnetic field, the birds became disoriented. These findings are the first behavioral evidence to our knowledge for a direct interaction between polarized light and the light-dependent magnetic compass in an animal. They reveal a fundamentally new property of the radical pair-based magnetoreceptor with key implications for how birds and other animals perceive the Earth’s magnetic field. PMID:26811473

  1. Structure and clusters of light unstable nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    En'yo, Yoshiko

    2010-01-01

    As it is known, cluster structures are often observed in light nuclei. In the recent evolution of unstable nuclear research (on nuclei having unbalanced number of neutron and proton) further new types of clusters are coming to be revealed. In this report, structures of light unstable nuclei and some of the theoretical models to describe them are reviewed. The following topics are picked up. 1. Cluster structure and theoretical models, 2. Cluster structure of unstable nuclei (low excited state). 3. Cluster structure of neutron excess beryllium isotopes. 4. Cluster gas like state in C isotope. 5. Dineutron structure of He isotopes. Numbers of strange nuclear structures of light nuclei are illustrated. Antisymmetrized molecular dynamics (AMD) is the recently developed theoretical framework which has been successfully used in heavy ion reactions and nuclear structure studies. Successful application of AMD to the isotopes of Be, B and C are illustrated. (S. Funahashi)

  2. Optical particle trapping and dynamic manipulation using spatial light modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge

    suitable for optical trapping. A phaseonly spatial light modulator (SLM) is used for the phase encoding of the laser beam. The SLM is controlled directly from a standard computer where phase information is represented as gray-scale image information. Experimentally, both linear and angular movements......This thesis deals with the spatial phase-control of light and its application for optical trapping and manipulation of micron-scale objects. Utilizing the radiation pressure, light exerts on dielectric micron-scale particles, functionality of optical tweezers can be obtained. Multiple intensity...... compression factors of two, which is not achievable with binary phase encoding, have been successfully demonstrated. In addition, the GPC method has been miniaturized and implemented in a planar optical platform and shown to work acceptably, with relatively high visibility. Furthermore, the GPC method has...

  3. Real Time Structured Light and Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob

    Structured light scanning is a versatile method for 3D shape acquisition. While much faster than most competing measurement techniques, most high-end structured light scans still take in the order of seconds to complete. Low-cost sensors such as Microsoft Kinect and time of flight cameras have made......, increased processing power, and methods presented in this thesis, it is possible to perform structured light scans in real time with 20 depth measurements per second. This offers new opportunities for studying dynamic scenes, quality control, human-computer interaction and more. This thesis discusses...... several aspects of real time structured light systems and presents contributions within calibration, scene coding and motion correction aspects. The problem of reliable and fast calibration of such systems is addressed with a novel calibration scheme utilising radial basis functions [Contribution B...

  4. Cluster structure of light nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iachello, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    Matter and charge densities of kα structures with k=2 (8Be), k=3 (12C) and k=4 (16O) calculated within the framework of the algebraic cluster model (ACM) are briefly reviewed and explicitly displayed. Their parameters are determined from a comparison with electron scattering data.

  5. Split coaxial RFQ structure with modulated vanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, S.

    1983-10-01

    A new split coaxial RFO structure with modulated vanes is proposed. The structure is designed to accelerate 238 U 4+ from 1.68 keV/u to 45.1 keV/u at frequency of 12.5 MHz. The cavity is 1.6 m in diameter and 8 m in length. The cavity consists of four cavity modules divided by three stems which support horizontal and vertical vanes periodically and alternatively. At the same time, problems on the beam dynamics and design procedures are described and discussed. (orig.)

  6. A fast method for optical simulation of flood maps of light-sharing detector modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Han; Du, Dong; Xu, JianFeng; Moses, William W.; Peng, Qiyu

    2015-01-01

    Optical simulation of the detector module level is highly desired for Position Emission Tomography (PET) system design. Commonly used simulation toolkits such as GATE are not efficient in the optical simulation of detector modules with complicated light-sharing configurations, where a vast amount of photons need to be tracked. We present a fast approach based on a simplified specular reflectance model and a structured light-tracking algorithm to speed up the photon tracking in detector modules constructed with polished finish and specular reflector materials. We simulated conventional block detector designs with different slotted light guide patterns using the new approach and compared the outcomes with those from GATE simulations. While the two approaches generated comparable flood maps, the new approach was more than 200–600 times faster. The new approach has also been validated by constructing a prototype detector and comparing the simulated flood map with the experimental flood map. The experimental flood map has nearly uniformly distributed spots similar to those in the simulated flood map. In conclusion, the new approach provides a fast and reliable simulation tool for assisting in the development of light-sharing-based detector modules with a polished surface finish and using specular reflector materials.

  7. LIGHT-WEIGHT LOAD-BEARING STRUCTURE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a light-weight load-bearing structure (1) with optimized compression zone (2), where along one or more compression zones (2) in the structure (1) to be cast a core (3) of strong concrete is provided, which core (3) is surrounded by concrete of less strength (4) compared...... to the core (3) of strong concrete. The invention also relates to a method of casting of light-weight load-bearing structures (1) with optimized compression zone (2) where one or more channels, grooves, ducts, pipes and/or hoses (5) formed in the load-bearing structure (1) serves as moulds for moulding one...... or more cores (3) of strong concrete in the light-weight load-bearing structure (1)....

  8. Optical trapping and tweezing using a spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ismail, Y

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available using a spatial light modulator Y.Ismail1,2, M. G. Mclaren1,3, A. Forbes1,2,4 1 CSIR National Laser Centre 2 School of Physics, University of KwaZulu-Natal 3 School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand 4 School of Physics, University... of Stellenbosch Presented at the 2009 South African Institute of Physics Annual Conference University of KwaZulu-Natal Durban, South Africa 6-10 July 2009 Optical tweezing is based on the manipulation of micron sized particles in 3 dimensions 100X...

  9. Diffuse optical imaging using spatially and temporally modulated light

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Thomas D.; Cerussi, Albert E.; Cuccia, David J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2012-07-01

    The authors describe the development of diffuse optical imaging (DOI) technologies, specifically the use of spatial and temporal modulation to control near infrared light propagation in thick tissues. We present theory and methods of DOI focusing on model-based techniques for quantitative, in vivo measurements of endogenous tissue absorption and scattering properties. We specifically emphasize the common conceptual framework of the scalar photon density wave for both temporal and spatial frequency-domain approaches. After presenting the history, theoretical foundation, and instrumentation related to these methods, we provide a brief review of clinical and preclinical applications from our research as well as our outlook on the future of DOI technology.

  10. Aberration compensation using a spatial light modulator LCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amezquita, R; Rincon, O; Torres, Y M

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic correction of aberrations introduced in optical systems have been a widely discussed topic in the past 10 years. Adaptive optics is the most important developed field where the Shack-Hartmann sensors and deformable mirrors are used for the measurement and correction of wavefronts. In this paper, an interferometric set-up which uses a Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) as an active element is proposed. Using this SLM a procedure for the compensation of all phase aberrations present in the experimental setup is shown.

  11. High throughput diffractive multi-beam femtosecond laser processing using a spatial light modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang Zheng [Laser Group, Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GQ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: z.kuang@liv.ac.uk; Perrie, Walter [Laser Group, Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GQ (United Kingdom); Leach, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Sharp, Martin; Edwardson, Stuart P. [Laser Group, Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GQ (United Kingdom); Padgett, Miles [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Dearden, Geoff; Watkins, Ken G. [Laser Group, Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool Brownlow Street, Liverpool L69 3GQ (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-30

    High throughput femtosecond laser processing is demonstrated by creating multiple beams using a spatial light modulator (SLM). The diffractive multi-beam patterns are modulated in real time by computer generated holograms (CGHs), which can be calculated by appropriate algorithms. An interactive LabVIEW program is adopted to generate the relevant CGHs. Optical efficiency at this stage is shown to be {approx}50% into first order beams and real time processing has been carried out at 50 Hz refresh rate. Results obtained demonstrate high precision surface micro-structuring on silicon and Ti6Al4V with throughput gain >1 order of magnitude.

  12. Structuring lighting retrofit projects for success

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fetters, J.L.

    1993-01-01

    Several trends are converging to create a substantial market for lighting retrofits in these uncertain economic times. Low interest rates are making investments in buildings more attractive than alternative financial investments such as CD's. With activity in the new construction market at an all time low, savvy contractors are turning to the retrofit market - restoring, renovating and upgrading existing buildings. Heightened environmental concerns are fueling lighting incentive programs from the electric utilities and the EPA. Improvements in lighting technology are arriving in the marketplace at an accelerated rate. Building occupants are demanding higher quality workplaces and managers are seeking higher levels of productivity. Replacing older lighting equipment can substantially improve lighting efficiency, decrease energy and maintenance costs and, at the same time, improve the workplace by increasing lighting quality Lighting retrofit projects have a demonstrated track record, reducing lighting costs on the order of 50%. This experience can be applied to help structure retrofit projects. But, in order to reap all the benefits available from a retrofit project, it must be structured for success. The retrofit option introduces a unique series of issues for building owners, managers and engineers. The best way to prevent these issues from undermining the success of retrofit projects is to anticipate and completely plan for them. Successful retrofit projects run smoothER and stay within budgetary constraints. Three important considerations will guide the successful project: (1) Start comprehensive planning early, (2) Investigate existing conditions, and (3) Be sensitive to owner/occupants needs keep building operational

  13. System and technique for retrieving depth information about a surface by projecting a composite image of modulated light patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassebrook, Laurence G. (Inventor); Lau, Daniel L. (Inventor); Guan, Chun (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A technique, associated system and program code, for retrieving depth information about at least one surface of an object, such as an anatomical feature. Core features include: projecting a composite image comprising a plurality of modulated structured light patterns, at the anatomical feature; capturing an image reflected from the surface; and recovering pattern information from the reflected image, for each of the modulated structured light patterns. Pattern information is preferably recovered for each modulated structured light pattern used to create the composite, by performing a demodulation of the reflected image. Reconstruction of the surface can be accomplished by using depth information from the recovered patterns to produce a depth map/mapping thereof. Each signal waveform used for the modulation of a respective structured light pattern, is distinct from each of the other signal waveforms used for the modulation of other structured light patterns of a composite image; these signal waveforms may be selected from suitable types in any combination of distinct signal waveforms, provided the waveforms used are uncorrelated with respect to each other. The depth map/mapping to be utilized in a host of applications, for example: displaying a 3-D view of the object; virtual reality user-interaction interface with a computerized device; face--or other animal feature or inanimate object--recognition and comparison techniques for security or identification purposes; and 3-D video teleconferencing/telecollaboration.

  14. Recent advances in IR liquid crystal spatial light modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fenglin; Twieg, Robert J.; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2015-09-01

    Liquid crystal (LC) is an amazing class of electro-optic media; its applications span from visible to infrared, millimeter wave, and terahertz regions. In the visible and short-wavelength infrared (SWIR) regions, most LCs are highly transparent. However, to extend the electro-optic application of LCs into MWIR and LWIR, several key technical challenges have to be overcome: (1) low absorption loss, (2) high birefringence, (3) low operation voltage, and (4) fast response time. In the MWIR and LWIR regions, several fundamental molecular vibration bands and overtones exist, which contribute to high absorption loss. The absorbed light turns to heat and then alters the birefringence locally, which in turns causes spatially non-uniform phase modulation. To suppress the optical loss, several approaches have been investigated: (1) Employing thin cell gap by choosing a high birefringence LC mixture; (2) Shifting the absorption bands outside the spectral region of interest by deuteration, fluorination, or chlorination; (3) Reducing the overtone absorption by using a short alkyl chain. In this paper, we report some recently developed chlorinated LC compounds and mixtures with low absorption loss in the SWIR and MWIR regions. To achieve fast response time, we demonstrated a polymer network liquid crystal with 2π phase change at MWIR and response time less than 5 ms. Approaches to extend such a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to long-wavelength infrared will be discussed.

  15. Virtual reality 3D headset based on DMD light modulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Evans, Allan; Tang, Edward

    2014-06-01

    We present the design of an immersion-type 3D headset suitable for virtual reality applications based upon digital micromirror devices (DMD). Current methods for presenting information for virtual reality are focused on either polarizationbased modulators such as liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices, or miniature LCD or LED displays often using lenses to place the image at infinity. LCoS modulators are an area of active research and development, and reduce the amount of viewing light by 50% due to the use of polarization. Viewable LCD or LED screens may suffer low resolution, cause eye fatigue, and exhibit a "screen door" or pixelation effect due to the low pixel fill factor. Our approach leverages a mature technology based on silicon micro mirrors delivering 720p resolution displays in a small form-factor with high fill factor. Supporting chip sets allow rapid integration of these devices into wearable displays with high-definition resolution and low power consumption, and many of the design methods developed for DMD projector applications can be adapted to display use. Potential applications include night driving with natural depth perception, piloting of UAVs, fusion of multiple sensors for pilots, training, vision diagnostics and consumer gaming. Our design concept is described in which light from the DMD is imaged to infinity and the user's own eye lens forms a real image on the user's retina resulting in a virtual retinal display.

  16. Modulated structure calculated for superconducting hydrogen sulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, Arnab; Tse, John S.; Yao, Yansun [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK (Canada)

    2017-09-11

    Compression of hydrogen sulfide using first principles metadynamics and molecular dynamics calculations revealed a modulated structure with high proton mobility which exhibits a diffraction pattern matching well with experiment. The structure consists of a sublattice of rectangular meandering SH{sup -} chains and molecular-like H{sub 3}S{sup +} stacked alternately in tetragonal and cubic slabs forming a long-period modulation. The novel structure offers a new perspective on the possible origin of the superconductivity at very high temperatures in which the conducting electrons in the SH chains are perturbed by the fluxional motions of the H{sub 3}S resulting in strong electron-phonon coupling. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Scalable Light Module for Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Light- Emitting Diode Luminaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarsa, Eric [Cree, Inc., Goleta, CA (United States)

    2015-08-31

    During this two-year program Cree developed a scalable, modular optical architecture for low-cost, high-efficacy light emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Stated simply, the goal of this architecture was to efficiently and cost-effectively convey light from LEDs (point sources) to broad luminaire surfaces (area sources). By simultaneously developing warm-white LED components and low-cost, scalable optical elements, a high system optical efficiency resulted. To meet program goals, Cree evaluated novel approaches to improve LED component efficacy at high color quality while not sacrificing LED optical efficiency relative to conventional packages. Meanwhile, efficiently coupling light from LEDs into modular optical elements, followed by optimally distributing and extracting this light, were challenges that were addressed via novel optical design coupled with frequent experimental evaluations. Minimizing luminaire bill of materials and assembly costs were two guiding principles for all design work, in the effort to achieve luminaires with significantly lower normalized cost ($/klm) than existing LED fixtures. Chief project accomplishments included the achievement of >150 lm/W warm-white LEDs having primary optics compatible with low-cost modular optical elements. In addition, a prototype Light Module optical efficiency of over 90% was measured, demonstrating the potential of this scalable architecture for ultra-high-efficacy LED luminaires. Since the project ended, Cree has continued to evaluate optical element fabrication and assembly methods in an effort to rapidly transfer this scalable, cost-effective technology to Cree production development groups. The Light Module concept is likely to make a strong contribution to the development of new cost-effective, high-efficacy luminaries, thereby accelerating widespread adoption of energy-saving SSL in the U.S.

  18. Dipolar modulation of Large-Scale Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Mijin

    For the last two decades, we have seen a drastic development of modern cosmology based on various observations such as the cosmic microwave background (CMB), type Ia supernovae, and baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO). These observational evidences have led us to a great deal of consensus on the cosmological model so-called LambdaCDM and tight constraints on cosmological parameters consisting the model. On the other hand, the advancement in cosmology relies on the cosmological principle: the universe is isotropic and homogeneous on large scales. Testing these fundamental assumptions is crucial and will soon become possible given the planned observations ahead. Dipolar modulation is the largest angular anisotropy of the sky, which is quantified by its direction and amplitude. We measured a huge dipolar modulation in CMB, which mainly originated from our solar system's motion relative to CMB rest frame. However, we have not yet acquired consistent measurements of dipolar modulations in large-scale structure (LSS), as they require large sky coverage and a number of well-identified objects. In this thesis, we explore measurement of dipolar modulation in number counts of LSS objects as a test of statistical isotropy. This thesis is based on two papers that were published in peer-reviewed journals. In Chapter 2 [Yoon et al., 2014], we measured a dipolar modulation in number counts of WISE matched with 2MASS sources. In Chapter 3 [Yoon & Huterer, 2015], we investigated requirements for detection of kinematic dipole in future surveys.

  19. Light Microscopy Module: International Space Station Premier Automated Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Foster, William M.; Motil, Brian J.; Meyer, William V.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Abbott-Hearn, Amber; Atherton, Arthur; Beltram, Alexander; Bodzioney, Christopher; Brinkman, John; hide

    2016-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009 and began hardware operations in 2010. It continues to support Physical and Biological scientific research on ISS. During 2016, if all goes as planned, three experiments will be completed: [1] Advanced Colloids Experiments with Heated base-2 (ACE-H2) and [2] Advanced Colloids Experiments with Temperature control (ACE-T1). Preliminary results, along with an overview of present and future LMM capabilities will be presented; this includes details on the planned data imaging processing and storage system, along with the confocal upgrade to the core microscope. [1] a consortium of universities from the State of Kentucky working through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Stuart Williams, Gerold Willing, Hemali Rathnayake, et al. and [2] from Chungnam National University, Daejeon, S. Korea: Chang-Soo Lee, et al.

  20. Estimation and Compensation of aberrations in Spatial Light Modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arias, Augusto; Castaneda, Roman

    2011-01-01

    The spatial light modulator (SLM) Holoeye LC-R720 is based on LCoS (Liquid Crystal on Silicon) technology. Due to the induced curvatures on the silicon plate by the production process, there are static aberrations in the wave-fronts modified by the SLM. In order to calculate the aberrated wave-front we used phase-shifting interferometry, an optimization algorithm for far field propagation, and the geometric characterization of the focal spot along the caustic. Zernike polynomials were used for expanding and comparing the wave-fronts. The aberration compensation was carried out by displaying the conjugated transmittance on the SLM. The complexity of the experimental setup and the requirements of the digital processing of each estimation method were comparatively analyzed.

  1. CFTR Modulators: Shedding Light on Precision Medicine for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening monogenic disease afflicting Caucasian people. It affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal, glandular and reproductive systems. The major cause of morbidity and mortality in CF is the respiratory disorder caused by a vicious cycle of obstruction of the airways, inflammation and infection that leads to epithelial damage, tissue remodeling and end-stage lung disease. Over the past decades, life expectancy of CF patients has increased due to early diagnosis and improved treatments; however, these patients still present limited quality of life. Many attempts have been made to rescue CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) expression, function and stability, thereby overcoming the molecular basis of CF. Gene and protein variances caused by CFTR mutants lead to different CF phenotypes, which then require different treatments to quell the patients’ debilitating symptoms. In order to seek better approaches to treat CF patients and maximize therapeutic effects, CFTR mutants have been stratified into six groups (although several of these mutations present pleiotropic defects). The research with CFTR modulators (read-through agents, correctors, potentiators, stabilizers and amplifiers) has achieved remarkable progress, and these drugs are translating into pharmaceuticals and personalized treatments for CF patients. This review summarizes the main molecular and clinical features of CF, emphasizes the latest clinical trials using CFTR modulators, sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying these new and emerging treatments, and discusses the major breakthroughs and challenges to treating all CF patients. PMID:27656143

  2. Hypersonic modulation of light in three-dimensional photonic and phononic band-gap materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimov, A V; Tanaka, Y; Pevtsov, A B; Kaplan, S F; Golubev, V G; Tamura, S; Yakovlev, D R; Bayer, M

    2008-07-18

    The elastic coupling between the a-SiO2 spheres composing opal films brings forth three-dimensional periodic structures which besides a photonic stop band are predicted to also exhibit complete phononic band gaps. The influence of elastic crystal vibrations on the photonic band structure has been studied by injection of coherent hypersonic wave packets generated in a metal transducer by subpicosecond laser pulses. These studies show that light with energies close to the photonic band gap can be efficiently modulated by hypersonic waves.

  3. Orthogonal decomposition of a optical random field using a spatial modulator of light of liquid crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Velez Juarez, Esteban; Rodriguez Garciapinna, Jorge L.; Ostrovsky, Andrey S.

    2016-01-01

    A technique for experimental determining the coherent-mode structure of electromagnetic field is proposed. This technique is based on the coherence measurements of the field in some reference basis and represents a nontrivial vector generalization of the dual-mode field correlation method recently reported by F. Ferreira and M. Belsley. The justifiability and efficiency of the proposed technique is illustrated by an example of determining the coherent-mode structure of some specially generated and experimentally characterized secondary electromagnetic source using a spatial modulator of light of liquid crystal (SLM-LC). (Author)

  4. Modeling and Analysis of DIPPM: A New Modulation Scheme for Visible Light Communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Ullah Jan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Visible Light Communication (VLC uses an Intensity-Modulation and Direct-Detection (IM/DD scheme to transmit data. However, the light source used in VLC systems is continuously switched on and off quickly, resulting in flickering. In addition, recent illumination systems include dimming support to allow users to dim the light sources to the desired level. Therefore, the modulation scheme for data transmission in VLC system must include flicker mitigation and dimming control capabilities. In this paper, the authors propose a Double Inverse Pulse Position Modulation (DIPPM scheme that minimizes flickering and supports a high level of dimming for the illumination sources in VLC systems. To form DIPPM, some changes are made in the symbol structure of the IPPM scheme, and a detailed explanation and mathematical model of DIPPM are given in this paper. Furthermore, both analytical and simulation results for the error performance of 2-DIPPM are compared with the performance of VPPM. Also, the communication performance of DIPPM is analyzed in terms of the normalized required power.

  5. Robust photometric stereo using structural light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tian-Qi; Cheng, Yue; Shen, Hui-Liang; Du, Xin

    2014-05-01

    We propose a robust photometric stereo method by using structural arrangement of light sources. In the arrangement, light sources are positioned on a planar grid and form a set of collinear combinations. The shadow pixels are detected by adaptive thresholding. The specular highlight and diffuse pixels are distinguished according to their intensity deviations of the collinear combinations, thanks to the special arrangement of light sources. The highlight detection problem is cast as a pattern classification problem and is solved using support vector machine classifiers. Considering the possible misclassification of highlight pixels, the ℓ1 regularization is further employed in normal map estimation. Experimental results on both synthetic and real-world scenes verify that the proposed method can robustly recover the surface normal maps in the case of heavy specular reflection and outperforms the state-of-the-art techniques.

  6. Bessel light sheet structured illumination microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshirvani Allahabadi, Golchehr

    Biomedical study researchers using animals to model disease and treatment need fast, deep, noninvasive, and inexpensive multi-channel imaging methods. Traditional fluorescence microscopy meets those criteria to an extent. Specifically, two-photon and confocal microscopy, the two most commonly used methods, are limited in penetration depth, cost, resolution, and field of view. In addition, two-photon microscopy has limited ability in multi-channel imaging. Light sheet microscopy, a fast developing 3D fluorescence imaging method, offers attractive advantages over traditional two-photon and confocal microscopy. Light sheet microscopy is much more applicable for in vivo 3D time-lapsed imaging, owing to its selective illumination of tissue layer, superior speed, low light exposure, high penetration depth, and low levels of photobleaching. However, standard light sheet microscopy using Gaussian beam excitation has two main disadvantages: 1) the field of view (FOV) of light sheet microscopy is limited by the depth of focus of the Gaussian beam. 2) Light-sheet images can be degraded by scattering, which limits the penetration of the excitation beam and blurs emission images in deep tissue layers. While two-sided sheet illumination, which doubles the field of view by illuminating the sample from opposite sides, offers a potential solution, the technique adds complexity and cost to the imaging system. We investigate a new technique to address these limitations: Bessel light sheet microscopy in combination with incoherent nonlinear Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM). Results demonstrate that, at visible wavelengths, Bessel excitation penetrates up to 250 microns deep in the scattering media with single-side illumination. Bessel light sheet microscope achieves confocal level resolution at a lateral resolution of 0.3 micron and an axial resolution of 1 micron. Incoherent nonlinear SIM further reduces the diffused background in Bessel light sheet images, resulting in

  7. High modulation bandwidth of a light-emitting diode with surface plasmon coupling (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Han; Tu, Charng-Gan; Yao, Yu-Feng; Chen, Sheng-Hung; Su, Chia-Ying; Chen, Hao-Tsung; Kiang, Yean-Woei; Yang, Chih-Chung

    2017-02-01

    Besides lighting, LEDs can be used for indoor data transmission. Therefore, a large modulation bandwidth becomes an important target in the development of visible LED. In this regard, enhancing the radiative recombination rate of carriers in the quantum wells of an LED is a useful method since the modulation bandwidth of an LED is related to the carrier decay rate besides the device RC time constant To increase the carrier decay rate in an LED without sacrificing its output power, the technique of surface plasmon (SP) coupling in an LED is useful. In this paper, the increases of modulation bandwidth by reducing mesa size, decreasing active layer thickness, and inducing SP coupling in blue- and green-emitting LEDs are illustrated. The results are demonstrated by comparing three different LED surface structures, including bare p-type surface, GaZnO current spreading layer, and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) for inducing SP coupling. In a single-quantum-well, blue-emitting LED with a circular mesa of 10 microns in radius, SP coupling results in a modulation bandwidth of 528.8 MHz, which is believed to be the record-high level. A smaller RC time constant can lead to a higher modulation bandwidth. However, when the RC time constant is smaller than 0.2 ns, its effect on modulation bandwidth saturates. The dependencies of modulation bandwidth on injected current density and carrier decay time confirm that the modulation bandwidth is essentially inversely proportional to a time constant, which is inversely proportional to the square-root of carrier decay rate and injected current density.

  8. Structural repertoire of immunoglobulin λ light chains

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna

    2011-03-01

    The immunoglobulin λ isotype is present in nearly all vertebrates and plays an important role in the human immune system. Despite its importance, few systematic studies have been performed to analyze the structural conformation of its variable regions, contrary to what is the case for κ and heavy chains. We show here that an analysis of the structures of λ chains allows the definition of a discrete set of recurring conformations (canonical structures) of their hypervariable loops and, most importantly, the identification of sequence constraints that can be used to predict their structure. We also show that the structural repertoire of λ chains is different and more varied than that of the κ chains, consistently with the current view of the involvement of the two major light-chain families in complementary strategies of the immune system to ensure a fine tuning between diversity and stability in antigen recognition. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Structural repertoire of immunoglobulin λ light chains

    KAUST Repository

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo; Cirillo, Davide; Tramontano, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The immunoglobulin λ isotype is present in nearly all vertebrates and plays an important role in the human immune system. Despite its importance, few systematic studies have been performed to analyze the structural conformation of its variable regions, contrary to what is the case for κ and heavy chains. We show here that an analysis of the structures of λ chains allows the definition of a discrete set of recurring conformations (canonical structures) of their hypervariable loops and, most importantly, the identification of sequence constraints that can be used to predict their structure. We also show that the structural repertoire of λ chains is different and more varied than that of the κ chains, consistently with the current view of the involvement of the two major light-chain families in complementary strategies of the immune system to ensure a fine tuning between diversity and stability in antigen recognition. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Advantages of super-light structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl

    2009-01-01

    Super-light structures with pearl-chain reinforcement is a new revolutionary technology that opens possibilities of building load-bearing structures much cheaper and with several other advantages compared to traditional constructions of concrete and steel. Some benefits are: 1 Half price or less. 2...... Architectural expressions never seen before. 3 Material savings of more than 50 %. 4 Energy and CO2 savings of more than 50 %. 5 No Scaffolding and cheaper moulds. 6 Improved durability. 7 Extreme thermal insulation. 8 Better indoor-climate. 9 User friendly operation and maintenance. 10 Increased safety...

  11. Light Microsopy Module, International Space Station Premier Automated Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, William V.; Sicker, Ronald J.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Brown, Daniel F.; O'Toole, Martin A.; Foster, William M.; Motil, Brian J.; Abbot-Hearn, Amber Ashley; Atherton, Arthur Johnson; Beltram, Alexander; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Light Microscopy Module (LMM) was launched to the International Space Station (ISS) in 2009 and began science operations in 2010. It continues to support Physical and Biological scientific research on ISS. During 2015, if all goes as planned, five experiments will be completed: [1] Advanced Colloids Experiments with a manual sample base -3 (ACE-M-3), [2] the Advanced Colloids Experiment with a Heated Base -1 (ACE-H-1), [3] (ACE-H-2), [4] the Advanced Plant Experiment -03 (APEX-03), and [5] the Microchannel Diffusion Experiment (MDE). Preliminary results, along with an overview of present and future LMM capabilities will be presented; this includes details on the planned data imaging processing and storage system, along with the confocal upgrade to the core microscope. [1] New York University: Paul Chaikin, Andrew Hollingsworth, and Stefano Sacanna, [2] University of Pennsylvania: Arjun Yodh and Matthew Gratale, [3] a consortium of universities from the State of Kentucky working through the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR): Stuart Williams, Gerold Willing, Hemali Rathnayake, et al., [4] from the University of Florida and CASIS: Anna-Lisa Paul and Rob Ferl, and [5] from the Methodist Hospital Research Institute from CASIS: Alessandro Grattoni and Giancarlo Canavese.

  12. Graphene metamaterial spatial light modulator for infrared single pixel imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kebin; Suen, Jonathan Y; Padilla, Willie J

    2017-10-16

    High-resolution and hyperspectral imaging has long been a goal for multi-dimensional data fusion sensing applications - of interest for autonomous vehicles and environmental monitoring. In the long wave infrared regime this quest has been impeded by size, weight, power, and cost issues, especially as focal-plane array detector sizes increase. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrated a new approach based on a metamaterial graphene spatial light modulator (GSLM) for infrared single pixel imaging. A frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) imaging technique is designed and implemented, and relies entirely on the electronic reconfigurability of the GSLM. We compare our approach to the more common raster-scan method and directly show FDM image frame rates can be 64 times faster with no degradation of image quality. Our device and related imaging architecture are not restricted to the infrared regime, and may be scaled to other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The study presented here opens a new approach for fast and efficient single pixel imaging utilizing graphene metamaterials with novel acquisition strategies.

  13. Neutron scattering studies of modulated magnetic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aagaard Soerensen, Steen

    1999-08-01

    This report describes investigations of the magnetic systems DyFe{sub 4}Al{sub 8} and MnSi by neutron scattering and in the former case also by X-ray magnetic resonant scattering. The report is divided into three parts: An introduction to the technique of neutron scattering with special emphasis on the relation between the scattering cross section and the correlations between the scattering entities of the sample. The theoretical framework of neutron scattering experiments using polarized beam technique is outlined. The second part describes neutron and X-ray scattering investigation of the magnetic structures of DyFe{sub 4}Al{sub 8}. The Fe sublattice of the compound order at 180 K in a cycloidal structure in the basal plane of the bct crystal structure. At 25 K the ordering of the Dy sublattice shows up. By the element specific technique of X-ray resonant magnetic scattering, the basal plane cycloidal structure was also found for the Dy sublattice. The work also includes neutron scattering studies of DyFe{sub 4}Al{sub 8} in magnetic fields up to 5 T applied along a <110> direction. The modulated structure at the Dy sublattice is quenched by a field lower than 1 T, whereas modulation is present at the Fe sublattice even when the 5 T field is applied. In the third part of the report, results from three small angle neutron experiments on MnSi are presented. At ambient pressure, a MnSi is known to form a helical spin density wave at temperature below 29 K. The application of 4.5 kbar pressure intended as hydrostatic decreased the Neel temperature to 25 K and changed the orientation of the modulation vector. To understand this reorientation within the current theoretical framework, anisotropic deformation of the sample crystal must be present. The development of magnetic critical scattering with an isotropic distribution of intensity has been studied at a level of detail higher than that of work found in the literature. Finally the potential of a novel polarization

  14. Modulated structure formation in demixing paraffin blends

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, E P

    2002-01-01

    Small angle scattering (SANS and SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry have been measured from C sub 2 sub 8 :C sub 3 sub 6 normal paraffin mixtures of varying composition quenched from the melt. Satellite peaks are observed in the SAXS whose offset in Q, relative to Bragg diffraction peaks associated with the average structure, are composition dependent. The offset is close to the position of the most intense peak observed in SANS. Scattering from the quenched structures is consistent with a correlated displacement and substitutional disorder model yielding modulations that are incommensurate with the average lattice. DSC shows an additional endotherm in the mixtures that is not present in the pure components and is associated with this superstructure formation. (orig.)

  15. Modulated structure formation in demixing paraffin blends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.P.

    2002-01-01

    Small angle scattering (SANS and SAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry have been measured from C 28 :C 36 normal paraffin mixtures of varying composition quenched from the melt. Satellite peaks are observed in the SAXS whose offset in Q, relative to Bragg diffraction peaks associated with the average structure, are composition dependent. The offset is close to the position of the most intense peak observed in SANS. Scattering from the quenched structures is consistent with a correlated displacement and substitutional disorder model yielding modulations that are incommensurate with the average lattice. DSC shows an additional endotherm in the mixtures that is not present in the pure components and is associated with this superstructure formation. (orig.)

  16. Electro-optic study of PZT ferroelectric ceramics using modulation of reflected light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniazkov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    Electro-optic coefficients of variations in the refractive index of PZT and PLZT ceramic materials induced by ac electric field are estimated using modulation of reflected light. The electro-optic coefficients of PLZT ceramics measured with the aid of conventional birefringence using the phase shift of transmitted radiation and the proposed method of birefringence using the modulation of reflected light are compared.

  17. A reversible conductivity modulation of azobenzene-based ionic liquids in aqueous solutions using UV/vis light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhiyong; Yuan, Xiaoqing; Feng, Ying; Chen, Yongkui; Zhao, Yuling; Wang, Huiyong; Xu, Qingli; Wang, Jianji

    2018-05-09

    Photo-induced conductivity modulation of stimuli-responsive materials is of great importance from the viewpoint of fundamental research and technology. In this work, 5 new kinds of azobenzene-based photo-responsive ionic liquids were synthesized and characterized, and UV/vis light modulation of their conductivity was investigated in an aqueous solution. The factors affecting the conductivity modulation of the photo-responsive fluids, such as photo-isomerization efficiency, photo-regulation aggregation, concentration and chemical structure of the ionic liquids, were examined systematically. It was found that the conductivity of the ionic liquids in water exhibited a significant increase upon UV light irradiation and the ionic liquids with a shorter alkyl spacer in the cation showed a more remarkable photo-induced conductivity enhancement with a maximum increase of 150%. In addition, the solution conductivity was restored (or very close) to the initial value upon an alternative irradiation with visible light. Thus, the solution conductivity can be modulated using alternative irradiation with UV and visible light. Although the reversible photo-isomerization of the azobenzene group under UV/vis irradiation is the origin of the conductivity modulation, the photo-regulated aggregation of the ionic liquid in water is indispensable for the maximum degree of conductivity modulation because UV irradiation can weaken, even break the aggregated cis-isomers of the ionic liquids in an aqueous solution.

  18. Light-cone quantization and hadron structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Quantum chromodynamics provides a fundamental description of hadronic and nuclear structure and dynamics in terms of elementary quark and gluon degrees of freedom. In practice, the direct application of QCD to reactions involving the structure of hadrons is extremely complex because of the interplay of nonperturbative effects such as color confinement and multi-quark coherence. In this talk, the author will discuss light-cone quantization and the light-cone Fock expansion as a tractable and consistent representation of relativistic many-body systems and bound states in quantum field theory. The Fock state representation in QCD includes all quantum fluctuations of the hadron wavefunction, including fax off-shell configurations such as intrinsic strangeness and charm and, in the case of nuclei, hidden color. The Fock state components of the hadron with small transverse size, which dominate hard exclusive reactions, have small color dipole moments and thus diminished hadronic interactions. Thus QCD predicts minimal absorptive corrections, i.e., color transparency for quasi-elastic exclusive reactions in nuclear targets at large momentum transfer. In other applications, such as the calculation of the axial, magnetic, and quadrupole moments of light nuclei, the QCD relativistic Fock state description provides new insights which go well beyond the usual assumptions of traditional hadronic and nuclear physics

  19. Self-phase modulation of laser light in laser produced plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, C.; Yamanaka, T.; Mizui, J.; Yamaguchi, N.

    1975-02-01

    A spectrum broadening due to the self-phase modulation of a laser light was observed in the laser produced deuterium and hydrogen plasma. Qualitative treatments of the density modulation due to the self-focusing process and the modulational instability were discussed. The theoretical estimation of spectrum broadening fairly accorded with the experimental results. (auth.)

  20. Assessing potential targets of calcium action in light-modulated gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, S. J.

    1995-01-01

    Light, through the mediation of the pigment phytochrome, modulates the gravitropic response of the shoots and roots of many plants. The transduction of both light and gravity stimuli appears to involve Ca(2+)-regulated steps, one or more of which may represent points of intersection between the two transduction chains. To be confident that Ca2+ plays a critical role in stimulus-response coupling for gravitropism, it will be important to identify specific targets of Ca2+ action whose function can be clearly linked to the regulation of growth. Calcium typically exerts its influence on cell metabolism through binding to and activating key regulatory proteins. The three best characterized of these proteins in plants are the calmodulins, calcium-dependent protein kinases, and annexins. In this review we summarize what is known about the structure and function of these proteins and speculate on how their activation by Ca2+ could influence the differential growth response of gravitropism.

  1. The all-optical modulator in dielectric-loaded waveguide with graphene-silicon heterojunction structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feiying; Xia, Liangping; Nie, Changbin; Shen, Jun; Zou, Yixuan; Cheng, Guiyu; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Yong; Wei, Dongshan; Yin, Shaoyun; Du, Chunlei

    2018-04-01

    All-optical modulators based on graphene show great promise for on-chip optical interconnects. However, the modulation performance of all-optical modulators is usually based on the interaction between graphene and the fiber, limiting their potential in high integration. Based on this point, an all-optical modulator in a dielectric-loaded waveguide (DLW) with a graphene-silicon heterojunction structure (GSH) is proposed. The DLW raises the waveguide mode, which provides a strong light-graphene interaction. Sufficient tuning of the graphene Fermi energy beyond the Pauli blocking effect is obtained with the presented GSH structure. Under the modulation light with a wavelength of 532 nm and a power of 60 mW, a modulation efficiency of 0.0275 dB µm-1 is achieved for light with a communication wavelength of 1.55 µm in the experiment. This modulator has the advantage of having a compact footprint, which may make it a candidate for achieving a highly integrated all-optical modulator.

  2. Modulating light propagation in ZnO-Cu₂O-inverse opal solar cells for enhanced photocurrents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yantara, Natalia; Pham, Thi Thu Trang; Boix, Pablo P; Mathews, Nripan

    2015-09-07

    The advantages of employing an interconnected periodic ZnO morphology, i.e. an inverse opal structure, in electrodeposited ZnO/Cu2O devices are presented. The solar cells are fabricated using low cost solution based methods such as spin coating and electrodeposition. The impact of inverse opal geometry, mainly the diameter and thickness, is scrutinized. By employing 3 layers of an inverse opal structure with a 300 nm pore diameter, higher short circuit photocurrents (∼84% improvement) are observed; however the open circuit voltages decrease with increasing interfacial area. Optical simulation using a finite difference time domain method shows that the inverse opal structure modulates light propagation within the devices such that more photons are absorbed close to the ZnO/Cu2O junction. This increases the collection probability resulting in improved short circuit currents.

  3. Modeling repetitive motions using structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yi; Aliaga, Daniel G

    2010-01-01

    Obtaining models of dynamic 3D objects is an important part of content generation for computer graphics. Numerous methods have been extended from static scenarios to model dynamic scenes. If the states or poses of the dynamic object repeat often during a sequence (but not necessarily periodically), we call such a repetitive motion. There are many objects, such as toys, machines, and humans, undergoing repetitive motions. Our key observation is that when a motion-state repeats, we can sample the scene under the same motion state again but using a different set of parameters; thus, providing more information of each motion state. This enables robustly acquiring dense 3D information difficult for objects with repetitive motions using only simple hardware. After the motion sequence, we group temporally disjoint observations of the same motion state together and produce a smooth space-time reconstruction of the scene. Effectively, the dynamic scene modeling problem is converted to a series of static scene reconstructions, which are easier to tackle. The varying sampling parameters can be, for example, structured-light patterns, illumination directions, and viewpoints resulting in different modeling techniques. Based on this observation, we present an image-based motion-state framework and demonstrate our paradigm using either a synchronized or an unsynchronized structured-light acquisition method.

  4. Spatially modulated structural colour in bird feathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Andrew J.; Washington, Adam L.; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O.; Hill, Christopher J.; Bianco, Antonino; Burg, Stephanie L.; Dennison, Andrew J. C.; Snape, Mary; Cadby, Ashley J.; Smith, Andrew; Prevost, Sylvain; Whittaker, David M.; Jones, Richard A. L.; Fairclough, J. Patrick. A.; Parker, Andrew R.

    2015-12-01

    Eurasian Jay (Garrulus glandarius) feathers display periodic variations in the reflected colour from white through light blue, dark blue and black. We find the structures responsible for the colour are continuous in their size and spatially controlled by the degree of spinodal phase separation in the corresponding region of the feather barb. Blue structures have a well-defined broadband ultra-violet (UV) to blue wavelength distribution; the corresponding nanostructure has characteristic spinodal morphology with a lengthscale of order 150 nm. White regions have a larger 200 nm nanostructure, consistent with a spinodal process that has coarsened further, yielding broader wavelength white reflectance. Our analysis shows that nanostructure in single bird feather barbs can be varied continuously by controlling the time the keratin network is allowed to phase separate before mobility in the system is arrested. Dynamic scaling analysis of the single barb scattering data implies that the phase separation arrest mechanism is rapid and also distinct from the spinodal phase separation mechanism i.e. it is not gelation or intermolecular re-association. Any growing lengthscale using this spinodal phase separation approach must first traverse the UV and blue wavelength regions, growing the structure by coarsening, resulting in a broad distribution of domain sizes.

  5. Spatially modulated structural colour in bird feathers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, Andrew J; Washington, Adam L; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Hill, Christopher J; Bianco, Antonino; Burg, Stephanie L; Dennison, Andrew J C; Snape, Mary; Cadby, Ashley J; Smith, Andrew; Prevost, Sylvain; Whittaker, David M; Jones, Richard A L; Fairclough, J Patrick A; Parker, Andrew R

    2015-12-21

    Eurasian Jay (Garrulus glandarius) feathers display periodic variations in the reflected colour from white through light blue, dark blue and black. We find the structures responsible for the colour are continuous in their size and spatially controlled by the degree of spinodal phase separation in the corresponding region of the feather barb. Blue structures have a well-defined broadband ultra-violet (UV) to blue wavelength distribution; the corresponding nanostructure has characteristic spinodal morphology with a lengthscale of order 150 nm. White regions have a larger 200 nm nanostructure, consistent with a spinodal process that has coarsened further, yielding broader wavelength white reflectance. Our analysis shows that nanostructure in single bird feather barbs can be varied continuously by controlling the time the keratin network is allowed to phase separate before mobility in the system is arrested. Dynamic scaling analysis of the single barb scattering data implies that the phase separation arrest mechanism is rapid and also distinct from the spinodal phase separation mechanism i.e. it is not gelation or intermolecular re-association. Any growing lengthscale using this spinodal phase separation approach must first traverse the UV and blue wavelength regions, growing the structure by coarsening, resulting in a broad distribution of domain sizes.

  6. Performance comparison of binary modulation schemes for visible light communication

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Kihong; Li, Changping; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2015-01-01

    communication with dimming control. We also propose a novel slope-based modulation called differential chip slope modulation (DCSM) and develop a chip-based hard-decision receiver to demodulate the resulting signal, detect the chip sequence, and decode the input

  7. Method and Apparatus for Characterizing Pressure Sensors using Modulated Light Beam Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    Embodiments of apparatuses and methods are provided that use light sources instead of sound sources for characterizing and calibrating sensors for measuring small pressures to mitigate many of the problems with using sound sources. In one embodiment an apparatus has a light source for directing a beam of light on a sensing surface of a pressure sensor for exerting a force on the sensing surface. The pressure sensor generates an electrical signal indicative of the force exerted on the sensing surface. A modulator modulates the beam of light. A signal processor is electrically coupled to the pressure sensor for receiving the electrical signal.

  8. Observation Platform for Dynamic Biomedical and Biotechnology Experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed "Observation platform for dynamic biomedical and biotechnology experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module" consists of a platen sized to fit the...

  9. Performance Stabilization of CdTe PV Modules using Bias and Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, T. J.; Deceglie, M. G.; Marion, B.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2014-07-01

    Reversible performance changes due to light exposure frustrate repeatable performance measurements on CdTe PV modules. It is common to use extended light-exposure to ensure that measurements are representative of outdoor performance. We quantify the extent to which such a light-exposed state depends on module temperature and consider bias in the dark to aid in stabilization. We evaluate the use of dark forward bias to bring about a performance state equivalent to that obtained with light exposure, and to maintain a light-exposed state prior to STC performance measurement. Our results indicate that the most promising method for measuring a light-exposed state is to use light exposure at controlled temperature followed by prompt STC measurement with a repeatable time interval between exposure and the STC measurement.

  10. Three-dimension reconstruction based on spatial light modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Xuejiao; Zhang Nanyang; Zeng Yanan; Yin Shiliang; Wang Weiyu

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimension reconstruction, known as an important research direction of computer graphics, is widely used in the related field such as industrial design and manufacture, construction, aerospace, biology and so on. Via such technology we can obtain three-dimension digital point cloud from a two-dimension image, and then simulate the three-dimensional structure of the physical object for further study. At present, the obtaining of three-dimension digital point cloud data is mainly based on the adaptive optics system with Shack-Hartmann sensor and phase-shifting digital holography. Referring to surface fitting, there are also many available methods such as iterated discrete fourier transform, convolution and image interpolation, linear phase retrieval. The main problems we came across in three-dimension reconstruction are the extraction of feature points and arithmetic of curve fitting. To solve such problems, we can, first of all, calculate the relevant surface normal vector information of each pixel in the light source coordinate system, then these vectors are to be converted to the coordinates of image through the coordinate conversion, so the expectant 3D point cloud get arise. Secondly, after the following procedures of de-noising, repairing, the feature points can later be selected and fitted to get the fitting function of the surface topography by means of Zernike polynomial, so as to reconstruct the determinand's three-dimensional topography. In this paper, a new kind of three-dimension reconstruction algorithm is proposed, with the assistance of which, the topography can be estimated from its grayscale at different sample points. Moreover, the previous stimulation and the experimental results prove that the new algorithm has a strong capability to fit, especially for large-scale objects .

  11. Three-dimension reconstruction based on spatial light modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Xuejiao; Zhang Nanyang; Zeng Yanan; Yin Shiliang; Wang Weiyu, E-mail: daisydelring@yahoo.com.cn [Huazhong University of Science and Technology (China)

    2011-02-01

    Three-dimension reconstruction, known as an important research direction of computer graphics, is widely used in the related field such as industrial design and manufacture, construction, aerospace, biology and so on. Via such technology we can obtain three-dimension digital point cloud from a two-dimension image, and then simulate the three-dimensional structure of the physical object for further study. At present, the obtaining of three-dimension digital point cloud data is mainly based on the adaptive optics system with Shack-Hartmann sensor and phase-shifting digital holography. Referring to surface fitting, there are also many available methods such as iterated discrete fourier transform, convolution and image interpolation, linear phase retrieval. The main problems we came across in three-dimension reconstruction are the extraction of feature points and arithmetic of curve fitting. To solve such problems, we can, first of all, calculate the relevant surface normal vector information of each pixel in the light source coordinate system, then these vectors are to be converted to the coordinates of image through the coordinate conversion, so the expectant 3D point cloud get arise. Secondly, after the following procedures of de-noising, repairing, the feature points can later be selected and fitted to get the fitting function of the surface topography by means of Zernike polynomial, so as to reconstruct the determinand's three-dimensional topography. In this paper, a new kind of three-dimension reconstruction algorithm is proposed, with the assistance of which, the topography can be estimated from its grayscale at different sample points. Moreover, the previous stimulation and the experimental results prove that the new algorithm has a strong capability to fit, especially for large-scale objects .

  12. Three-dimension reconstruction based on spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xuejiao; Zhang, Nanyang; Zeng, Yanan; Yin, Shiliang; Wang, Weiyu

    2011-02-01

    Three-dimension reconstruction, known as an important research direction of computer graphics, is widely used in the related field such as industrial design and manufacture, construction, aerospace, biology and so on. Via such technology we can obtain three-dimension digital point cloud from a two-dimension image, and then simulate the three-dimensional structure of the physical object for further study. At present, the obtaining of three-dimension digital point cloud data is mainly based on the adaptive optics system with Shack-Hartmann sensor and phase-shifting digital holography. Referring to surface fitting, there are also many available methods such as iterated discrete fourier transform, convolution and image interpolation, linear phase retrieval. The main problems we came across in three-dimension reconstruction are the extraction of feature points and arithmetic of curve fitting. To solve such problems, we can, first of all, calculate the relevant surface normal vector information of each pixel in the light source coordinate system, then these vectors are to be converted to the coordinates of image through the coordinate conversion, so the expectant 3D point cloud get arise. Secondly, after the following procedures of de-noising, repairing, the feature points can later be selected and fitted to get the fitting function of the surface topography by means of Zernike polynomial, so as to reconstruct the determinand's three-dimensional topography. In this paper, a new kind of three-dimension reconstruction algorithm is proposed, with the assistance of which, the topography can be estimated from its grayscale at different sample points. Moreover, the previous stimulation and the experimental results prove that the new algorithm has a strong capability to fit, especially for large-scale objects .

  13. Light ion reaction mechanisms and nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robson, B.A.

    1986-01-01

    Of the many contributions to the subject 'Light ion reaction mechanism and nuclear structure', a few are selected and reviewed which highlight the present state of the field. Some contributions to the conference dealing with nuclear interactions are briefly outlined in the second section following an introductory section. Lane model calculations are compared with data for 9 Be and results are given showing angular distributions of the cross sections, the analyzing powers and the spin-rotation parameters for p - 40 Ca. Real central potential for d + 32 s resulting from the FB-analysis are compared with frozen density folding and delta-function folding. The third section deals with reaction mechanism. Data are cited which show near-side and far-side contributions to the calculated analyzing powers in the 116 Sn(d,p) 117 Sn (11.2 - ) transition. Calculations are compared with experimental A y and -(A yy + 2)/3. Also given are measurements of the cross sections and analyzing powers of the continuum energy spectra for the 58 Ni(p,p'x), along with relations between the analyzing powers and momentum transfer. The fourth section addresses nuclear structure. Cross sections and analyzing powers measured at 22 MeV for the reaction 208 Pb(p,t) 206 Pb(3 2 + ) are cited and considered. (Nogami, K.)

  14. NASA-UVa light aerospace alloy and structures technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Scully, John R.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Swanson, Robert E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The general objective of the NASA-UVa Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology Program was to conduct research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and associated thermal gradient structures. The following research areas were actively investigated: (1) mechanical and environmental degradation mechanisms in advanced light metals and composites; (2) aerospace materials science; (3) mechanics of materials and composites for aerospace structures; and (4) thermal gradient structures.

  15. The generation of flat-top beams by complex amplitude modulation with a phase-only spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hendriks, A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available amplitude modulation of the light, i.e., in amplitude and phase. We outline the theoretical concept, and then illustrate its use with the example of the laser beam shaping of Gaussian beams into flat-top beams. We quantify the performance of this approach...

  16. Polydyne displacement interferometer using frequency-modulated light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arablu, Masoud; Smith, Stuart T.

    2018-05-01

    A radio-frequency Frequency-Modulated (FM) signal is used to diffract a He-Ne laser beam through an Acousto-Optic Modulator (AOM). Due to the modulation of the FM signal, the measured spectra of the diffracted beams comprise a series of phase-synchronized harmonics that have exact integer frequency separation. The first diffraction side-beam emerging from the AOM is selected by a slit to be used in a polydyne displacement interferometer in a Michelson interferometer topology. The displacement measurement is derived from the phase measurement of selected modulation harmonic pairs. Individual harmonic frequency amplitudes are measured using discrete Fourier transform applied to the signal from a single photodetector. Phase signals are derived from the changes in the amplitudes of different harmonic pairs (typically odd-even pairs) with the phase being extracted using a standard quadrature method. In this study, two different modulation frequencies of 5 and 10 kHz are used at different modulation depths. The measured displacements by different harmonic pairs are compared with a commercial heterodyne interferometer being used as a reference for these studies. Measurements obtained from five different harmonic pairs when the moving mirror of the interferometer is scanned over ranges up to 10 μm all show differences of less than 50 nm from the reference interferometer measurements. A drift test was also used to evaluate the differences between the polydyne interferometer and reference measurements that had different optical path lengths of approximately 25 mm and 50 mm, respectively. The drift test results indicate that about half of the differences can be attributed to temperature, pressure, and humidity variations. Other influences include Abbe and thermal expansion effects. Rough magnitude estimates using simple models for these two effects can account for remaining observed deviations.

  17. ALPHA-SYNUCLEIN STRUCTURE, AGGREGATION AND MODULATORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinakin K. Makwana

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-synuclein is an intrinsically unstructured protein, involved in various neurodegenerative disorders. In vitro/in vivo experiments, as well as genetic mutation studies establish a direct link between alphasynuclein and synucleinopathies. Due to its natively unfolded state, alpha synuclein can adopt numerous conformations upon interaction with its partners and cellular factors, offering explanation for its diverse interactions. Aggregated form of alpha-synuclein has been observed in the brain of patients with synucleinopathies, a hallmark of neurodegeneration, and cell death has been attributed to aggregation induced toxicity. The process of aggregation involves nucleation, followed by intermediate oligomeric states, and finally the fibrillar amyloids. Of the various conformations/species that alpha-synuclein assumes before it transforms into mature amyloid fibrils, the oligomeric species is the most toxic. Thus, an effective way to limit disease progression is by modifying/slowing down protein aggregation/deposition in the brain. Various small natural products, synthetic chemicals, peptides and antibodies specific to alpha-synuclein have been designed/identified to reduce its rate of aggregation. Unfortunately, not even a handful of the molecules have cleared the clinical trials. Even today, medications available for Parkinson’s patients are mostly the drugs that adjust for loss of dopamine in the brain, and hence do not stop the progression of the disease or cure the symptoms. Thus, more molecular level studies are warranted to fully elucidate the process of alpha-synuclein aggregation, which in turn could help in identifying novel therapeutics and preventives. The present review summarizes the insights gained into the structure, in vitro aggregation and inhibitors/modulators of alpha-synuclein aggregation, that can be used to design better and effective inhibitors against the diseases.

  18. Concepts for external light trapping and its utilization in colored and image displaying photovoltaic modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, L.; van de Groep, J.; Veldhuizen, L.W.; Di Vece, M.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2017-01-01

    The reflection of incident sunlight prevents photovoltaic modules from reaching their full energy conversion potential. Recently, we demonstrated significant absorption enhancement in various solar cells by external light trapping, using 3D-printed and milled light traps. In order to facilitate

  19. Light modulators and deflectors based on polariton effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skettrup, Torben

    1981-01-01

    , the polariton, and hence the photon part, can be deflected or modulated. The connection with geometrical optics is established, and it is shown that the deflection is due to a gradient in the refraction index created by the applied external field. Several examples with electric, magnetic, and stress fields...

  20. Light and gravity signals synergize in modulating plant development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbrink, Joshua P.; Kiss, John Z.; Herranz, Raul; Medina, F. Javier

    2014-01-01

    Tropisms are growth-mediated plant movements that help plants to respond to changes in environmental stimuli. The availability of water and light, as well as the presence of a constant gravity vector, are all environmental stimuli that plants sense and respond to via directed growth movements (tropisms). The plant response to gravity (gravitropism) and the response to unidirectional light (phototropism) have long been shown to be interconnected growth phenomena. Here, we discuss the similarities in these two processes, as well as the known molecular mechanisms behind the tropistic responses. We also highlight research done in a microgravity environment in order to decouple two tropisms through experiments carried out in the absence of a significant unilateral gravity vector. In addition, alteration of gravity, especially the microgravity environment, and light irradiation produce important effects on meristematic cells, the undifferentiated, highly proliferating, totipotent cells which sustain plant development. Microgravity produces the disruption of meristematic competence, i.e., the decoupling of cell proliferation and cell growth, affecting the regulation of the cell cycle and ribosome biogenesis. Light irradiation, especially red light, mediated by phytochromes, has an activating effect on these processes. Phytohormones, particularly auxin, also are key mediators in these alterations. Upcoming experiments on the International Space Station will clarify some of the mechanisms and molecular players of the plant responses to these environmental signals involved in tropisms and the cell cycle. PMID:25389428

  1. Light and gravity signals synergize in modulating plant development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua P. Vandenbrink

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Tropisms are growth-mediated plant movements that help plants to respond to changes in environmental stimuli. The availability of water and light, as well as the presence of a constant gravity vector, are all environmental stimuli that plants sense and respond to via directed growth movements (tropisms. The plant response to gravity (gravitropism and the response to unidirectional light (phototropism have long been shown to be interconnected growth phenomena. Here, we discuss the similarities in these two processes, as well as the known molecular mechanisms behind the tropistic responses. We also highlight experiments done in a microgravity environment in order to decouple two tropisms through experiments carried out in the absence of a significant unilateral gravity vector. In addition, alteration of gravity, especially the microgravity environment, and light irradiation produce important effects on meristematic cells, the undifferentiated, highly proliferating, totipotent cells which sustain plant development. Microgravity produces the disruption of meristematic competence, i.e. the decoupling of cell proliferation and cell growth, affecting the regulation of cell cycle and ribosome biogenesis. Light irradiation, especially red light, mediated by phytochromes, has an activating effect on these processes. Phytohormones, particularly auxin, are key mediators in these alterations. Upcoming experiments on the International Space Station will clarify some of the unknown mechanisms and molecular players of the plant responses to these environmental signals involved in tropisms and the cell cycle.

  2. Long-term storage life of light source modules by temperature cycling accelerated life test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Ningning; Tan Manqing; Li Ping; Jiao Jian; Guo Xiaofeng; Guo Wentao

    2014-01-01

    Light source modules are the most crucial and fragile devices that affect the life and reliability of the interferometric fiber optic gyroscope (IFOG). While the light emitting chips were stable in most cases, the module packaging proved to be less satisfactory. In long-term storage or the working environment, the ambient temperature changes constantly and thus the packaging and coupling performance of light source modules are more likely to degrade slowly due to different materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion in the bonding interface. A constant temperature accelerated life test cannot evaluate the impact of temperature variation on the performance of a module package, so the temperature cycling accelerated life test was studied. The main failure mechanism affecting light source modules is package failure due to solder fatigue failure including a fiber coupling shift, loss of cooling efficiency and thermal resistor degradation, so the Norris-Landzberg model was used to model solder fatigue life and determine the activation energy related to solder fatigue failure mechanism. By analyzing the test data, activation energy was determined and then the mean life of light source modules in different storage environments with a continuously changing temperature was simulated, which has provided direct reference data for the storage life prediction of IFOG. (semiconductor devices)

  3. White LEDs and modules in chip-on-board technology for general lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Paul; Wenzl, Franz P.; Sommer, Christian; Pachler, Peter; Hoschopf, Hans; Schweighart, Marko; Hartmann, Martin; Kuna, Ladislav; Jakopic, Georg; Leising, Guenther; Tasch, Stefan

    2006-08-01

    At present, light-emitting diode (LED) modules in various shapes are developed and designed for the general lighting, advertisement, emergency lighting, design and architectural markets. To compete with and to surpass the performance of traditional lighting systems, enhancement of Lumen output and the white light quality as well as the thermal management and the luminary integration are key factors for success. Regarding these issues, white LEDs based on the chip-on-board (COB) technology show pronounced advantages. State-of-the-art LEDs exploiting this technology are now ready to enter the general lighting segments. We introduce and discuss the specific properties of the Tridonic COB technology dedicated for general lighting. This technology, in combination with a comprehensive set of tools to improve and to enhance the Lumen output and the white light quality, including optical simulation, is the scaffolding for the application of white LEDs in emerging areas, for which an outlook will be given.

  4. Optical modulation in silicon-vanadium dioxide photonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kevin J.; Hallman, Kent A.; Haglund, Richard F.; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2017-08-01

    All-optical modulators are likely to play an important role in future chip-scale information processing systems. In this work, through simulations, we investigate the potential of a recently reported vanadium dioxide (VO2) embedded silicon waveguide structure for ultrafast all-optical signal modulation. With a VO2 length of only 200 nm, finite-differencetime- domain simulations suggest broadband (200 nm) operation with a modulation greater than 12 dB and an insertion loss of less than 3 dB. Predicted performance metrics, including modulation speed, modulation depth, optical bandwidth, insertion loss, device footprint, and energy consumption of the proposed Si-VO2 all-optical modulator are benchmarked against those of current state-of-the-art all-optical modulators with in-plane optical excitation.

  5. Super-light Structures with Pearl-chain Reinforcement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Bagger, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Steel structures are considered to be light compared to concrete structures. This paper presents a newly invented type of structure which is often light compared to steel structures, and therefore it is called "Super-light Structures", or SLS. The basic idea of SLS is to build a skeleton...... of prefabricated segments of a strong material, assembled by one or more prestressing wires. By means of pearl-chain reinforcement, it becomes affordable to provide structures with a wide variety of shapes. This allows a more resource-economical design, because it removes practical hindrances for application...

  6. A light-powered bio-capacitor with nanochannel modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Siyuan; Lu, Shanfu; Guo, Zhibin; Li, Yuan; Chen, Deliang; Xiang, Yan

    2014-09-03

    An artificial bio-capacitor system is established, consisting of the proton-pump protein proteorhodopsin and a modified alumina nanochannel, inspired by the capacitor-like behavior of plasma membranes realized through the cooperation of ion-pump and ion-channel proteins. Capacitor-like features of this simplified system are realized and identified, and the photocurrent duration time can be modulated by nanochannel modification to obtain favorable square-wave currents. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Photonic crystals, light manipulation, and imaging in complex nematic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravnik, Miha; Å timulak, Mitja; Mur, Urban; Čančula, Miha; Čopar, Simon; Žumer, Slobodan

    2016-03-01

    Three selected approaches for manipulation of light by complex nematic colloidal and non-colloidal structures are presented using different own custom developed theoretical and modelling approaches. Photonic crystals bands of distorted cholesteric liquid crystal helix and of nematic colloidal opals are presented, also revealing distinct photonic modes and density of states. Light propagation along half-integer nematic disclinations is shown with changes in the light polarization of various winding numbers. As third, simulated light transmission polarization micrographs of nematic torons are shown, offering a new insight into the complex structure characterization. Finally, this work is a contribution towards using complex soft matter in optics and photonics for advanced light manipulation.

  8. Non-Contact Surface Roughness Measurement by Implementation of a Spatial Light Modulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Aulbach

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The surface structure, especially the roughness, has a significant influence on numerous parameters, such as friction and wear, and therefore estimates the quality of technical systems. In the last decades, a broad variety of surface roughness measurement methods were developed. A destructive measurement procedure or the lack of feasibility of online monitoring are the crucial drawbacks of most of these methods. This article proposes a new non-contact method for measuring the surface roughness that is straightforward to implement and easy to extend to online monitoring processes. The key element is a liquid-crystal-based spatial light modulator, integrated in an interferometric setup. By varying the imprinted phase of the modulator, a correlation between the imprinted phase and the fringe visibility of an interferogram is measured, and the surface roughness can be derived. This paper presents the theoretical approach of the method and first simulation and experimental results for a set of surface roughnesses. The experimental results are compared with values obtained by an atomic force microscope and a stylus profiler.

  9. Common Envelope Light Curves. I. Grid-code Module Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galaviz, Pablo; Marco, Orsola De; Staff, Jan E.; Iaconi, Roberto [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Passy, Jean-Claude, E-mail: Pablo.Galaviz@me.com [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    The common envelope (CE) binary interaction occurs when a star transfers mass onto a companion that cannot fully accrete it. The interaction can lead to a merger of the two objects or to a close binary. The CE interaction is the gateway of all evolved compact binaries, all stellar mergers, and likely many of the stellar transients witnessed to date. CE simulations are needed to understand this interaction and to interpret stars and binaries thought to be the byproduct of this stage. At this time, simulations are unable to reproduce the few observational data available and several ideas have been put forward to address their shortcomings. The need for more definitive simulation validation is pressing and is already being fulfilled by observations from time-domain surveys. In this article, we present an initial method and its implementation for post-processing grid-based CE simulations to produce the light curve so as to compare simulations with upcoming observations. Here we implemented a zeroth order method to calculate the light emitted from CE hydrodynamic simulations carried out with the 3D hydrodynamic code Enzo used in unigrid mode. The code implements an approach for the computation of luminosity in both optically thick and optically thin regimes and is tested using the first 135 days of the CE simulation of Passy et al., where a 0.8  M {sub ⊙} red giant branch star interacts with a 0.6  M {sub ⊙} companion. This code is used to highlight two large obstacles that need to be overcome before realistic light curves can be calculated. We explain the nature of these problems and the attempted solutions and approximations in full detail to enable the next step to be identified and implemented. We also discuss our simulation in relation to recent data of transients identified as CE interactions.

  10. Virtual reality 3D headset based on DMD light modulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Evans, Allan; Tang, Edward

    2014-06-13

    We present the design of an immersion-type 3D headset suitable for virtual reality applications based upon digital micro-mirror devices (DMD). Our approach leverages silicon micro mirrors offering 720p resolution displays in a small form-factor. Supporting chip sets allow rapid integration of these devices into wearable displays with high resolution and low power consumption. Applications include night driving, piloting of UAVs, fusion of multiple sensors for pilots, training, vision diagnostics and consumer gaming. Our design is described in which light from the DMD is imaged to infinity and the user’s own eye lens forms a real image on the user’s retina.

  11. Light intensity modulates corneal power and refraction in the chick eye exposed to continuous light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Yuval; Belkin, Michael; Yehezkel, Oren; Avni, Isaac; Polat, Uri

    2008-09-01

    Continuous exposure of chicks to light was shown to result in severe hyperopia, accompanied by anterior segment changes, such as severe corneal flattening. Since rearing chicks in complete darkness results only in mild hyperopia and minor changes in corneal curvature, we hypothesized that light intensity may play a role in the development of refractive changes under continuous light illumination. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of rearing chicks under various continuous light intensities. More specifically, we investigated the refractive parameters of the chicks' eyes, and avoided light cycling effects on ocular development. To this end, thirty-eight chicks were reared under 24-h incandescent illumination, at three different light intensities: 10,000 lux (n=13), 500 lux (n=12), and 50 lux (n=13). Their eyes underwent repeated retinoscopy, keratometry, and ultrasound biometry, as well as caliper measurements of enucleated eyes. Both refraction and corneal refractive power were found to be correlated with light intensity. On day 90 after hatching, exposure to light intensities of 10,000, 500, and 50 lux resulted in hyperopia of +11.97+/-3.7 (mean+/-SD) +7.9+/-4.08 and +0.63+/-3.61 diopters (D), respectively. Under those intensities, corneal refractive power was 46.10+/-3.62, 49.72+/-4.16, and 56.88+/-4.92D, respectively. Axial length did not differ significantly among the groups. The vitreous chamber was significantly deeper in the high than in the low-intensity groups. Thus, during the early life of chicks exposed to continuous lighting, light intensity affects the vitreous chamber depth as well as the anterior segment parameters, most notably the cornea. The higher the intensity, the more severe was the corneal flattening observed and the hyperopia that developed, whereas continuous illumination at low intensities resulted in emmetropia. Thus, light intensity is an important factor that should be taken into account when studying refractive

  12. Manipulating Light and Matter with Photonic Structures: Numerical Investigations on Photonic Crystals and Optical Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng

    The highly developed nano-fabrication techniques allow light to be modulated with photonic structures in a more intensive way. These photonic structures involve photonic crystals, metals supporting surface plasmon polaritons, metamaterials, etc. In this thesis work, three different ways for light manipulation are numerically investigated. First, the light propagation is modulated using a photonic crystal with Dirac cones. It is demonstrated that the zero-index behavior of this photonic crystal which happens for normal incident waves, is lost at oblique incidence. A new method combining complex-k band calculations and absorbing boundary conditions for Bloch modes is developed to analyze the Bloch mode interaction in details. Second, the mechanic states of graphene are modulated through the optical gradient force. This force is induced by the coupled surface plasmons on the double graphene sheets and is greatly enhanced in comparison to the regular waveguides. By applying different strengths of forces in accordance to the input power, the mechanic state transition is made possible, accompanied by an abrupt change in the transmission and reflection spectra. Third, the helicity/chirality of light is studied to modulate the lateral force on a small particle. A left-hand material slab which supports coherent TE ad TM plasmons simultaneously is introduced. By mixing the TE and TM surface plasmons with different relative phases, the lateral force on a chiral particle can be changed, which will be beneficial for chiral particle sorting.

  13. Correction of Motion Artifacts for Real-Time Structured Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    While the problem of motion is often mentioned in conjunction with structured light imaging, few solutions have thus far been proposed. A method is demonstrated to correct for object or camera motion during structured light 3D scene acquisition. The method is based on the combination of a suitabl...

  14. Light modulated toxicity of isoproturon toward natural stream periphyton photosynthesis: a comparison between constant and dynamic light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviale, Martin; Prygiel, Jean; Créach, Anne

    2010-05-10

    This study tested if a variation in light intensity, in comparison to constant light required in well-designed toxicity test, could have measurable consequences on the sensitivity of phototrophic biofilms (periphyton) to isoproturon. Two independent experiments were carried out to investigate the combined effects of light and isoproturon on the photochemical behavior of intact natural biofilms by measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and pigment composition. Experiment 1 consisted of exposing biofilms to series of isoproturon concentrations (0-2 mg L(-1)) for 7 h under constant light at different irradiance levels (25-300 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). In experiment 2, biofilms were exposed using more environmentally realistic conditions to three selected concentrations of isoproturon (2, 6 and 20 microg L(-1)) during a 7-h-simulated daily light cycle. Our results demonstrated that light, considered here as a direct physical stressor, slightly modulated the acute toxicity of isoproturon on these diatom dominated communities. This was attributed to the fact that these two factors act specifically on the photosynthetic activity. Furthermore, it was shown that a dynamic light regime increased periphyton sensitivity to isoproturon by challenging its photoprotective mechanisms such as the xanthophyll cycle, therefore implying that traditional ecotoxicological bioassays lead to underestimate the effect of isoproturon. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Generating shaped femtosecond pulses in the far infrared using a spatial light modulator and difference frequency generation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Botha, N

    2010-08-31

    Full Text Available Femtosecond pulse shaping can be done by different kinds of pulse shapers, such as liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LC SLM), acousto optic modulators (AOM) and deformable and movable mirrors. A few applications where pulse shaping...

  16. Transfer-matrix approach for modulated structures with defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostyrko, T.

    2000-01-01

    We consider scattering of electrons by defects in a periodically modulated, quasi-one-dimensional structure, within a tight-binding model. Combining a transfer matrix method and a Green function method we derive a formula for a Landauer conductance and show its equivalence to the result of Kubo linear response theory. We obtain explicitly unperturbed lattice Green functions from their equations of motion, using the transfer matrices. We apply the presented formalism in computations of the conductance of several multiband modulated structures with defects: (a) carbon nanotubes (b) two-dimensional (2D) superlattice (c) modulated leads with 1D wire in the tunneling regime. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  17. Acoustic Design of Super-light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jacob Ellehauge; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Brunskog, Jonas

    in a controlled laboratory environment have been conducted with the element in order to evaluate its performance in airborne and impact sound insulation. These results have been employed in simulations of the flanking transmission to estimate the in-situ performance of the super-light slab element. The flanking...... aggregate (leca) along with a newly developed technology called pearl-chain reinforcement, which is a system for post-tensioning. Here, it is shown how to combine these technologies within a precast super-light slab element, while honoring the requirements of a holistic design. Acoustic experiments...

  18. A New Light Weight Structural Material for Nuclear Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2016-01-01

    Radiation shielding materials are commonly used in nuclear facilities to attenuate the background ionization radiations to a minimum level for creating a safer workplace, meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining high quality performance. The conventional radiation shielding materials have a number of drawbacks: heavy concrete contains a high amount of elements that are not desirable for an effective shielding such as oxygen, silicon, and calcium; a well known limitation of lead is its low machinability and toxicity, which is causing a major environmental concern. Therefore, an effective and environmentally friendly shielding material with increased attenuation and low mass density is desirable. Close-cell composite metal foams (CMFs) and open-cell Al foam with fillers are light-weight candidate materials that we have studied in this project. Close-cell CMFs possess several suitable properties that are unattainable by conventional radiation shielding materials such as low density and high strength for structural applications, high surface area to volume ratio for excellent thermal isolation with an extraordinary energy absorption capability. Open-cell foam is made up of a network of interconnected solid struts, which allows gas or fluid media to pass through it. This unique structure provided a further motive to investigate its application as radiation shields by infiltrating original empty pores with high hydrogen or boron compounds, which are well known for their excellent neutron shielding capability. The resulting open-cell foam with fillers will not only exhibit light weight and high specific surface area, but also possess excellent radiation shielding capability and good processability. In this study, all the foams were investigated for their radiation shielding efficiency in terms of X-ray, gamma ray and neutron. X-ray transmission measurements were carried out on a high-resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) system. Gamma-emitting sources: 3.0m

  19. A New Light Weight Structural Material for Nuclear Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiei, Afsaneh [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Radiation shielding materials are commonly used in nuclear facilities to attenuate the background ionization radiations to a minimum level for creating a safer workplace, meeting regulatory requirements and maintaining high quality performance. The conventional radiation shielding materials have a number of drawbacks: heavy concrete contains a high amount of elements that are not desirable for an effective shielding such as oxygen, silicon, and calcium; a well known limitation of lead is its low machinability and toxicity, which is causing a major environmental concern. Therefore, an effective and environmentally friendly shielding material with increased attenuation and low mass density is desirable. Close-cell composite metal foams (CMFs) and open-cell Al foam with fillers are light-weight candidate materials that we have studied in this project. Close-cell CMFs possess several suitable properties that are unattainable by conventional radiation shielding materials such as low density and high strength for structural applications, high surface area to volume ratio for excellent thermal isolation with an extraordinary energy absorption capability. Open-cell foam is made up of a network of interconnected solid struts, which allows gas or fluid media to pass through it. This unique structure provided a further motive to investigate its application as radiation shields by infiltrating original empty pores with high hydrogen or boron compounds, which are well known for their excellent neutron shielding capability. The resulting open-cell foam with fillers will not only exhibit light weight and high specific surface area, but also possess excellent radiation shielding capability and good processability. In this study, all the foams were investigated for their radiation shielding efficiency in terms of X-ray, gamma ray and neutron. X-ray transmission measurements were carried out on a high-resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) system. Gamma-emitting sources: 3.0m

  20. The velocity of light intensity increase modulates the photoprotective response in coastal diatoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasco Giovagnetti

    Full Text Available In aquatic ecosystems, the superimposition of mixing events to the light diel cycle exposes phytoplankton to changes in the velocity of light intensity increase, from diurnal variations to faster mixing-related ones. This is particularly true in coastal waters, where diatoms are dominant. This study aims to investigate if coastal diatoms differently activate the photoprotective responses, xanthophyll cycle (XC and non-photochemical fluorescence quenching (NPQ, to cope with predictable light diel cycle and unpredictable mixing-related light variations. We compared the effect of two fast light intensity increases (simulating mixing events with that of a slower increase (corresponding to the light diel cycle on the modulation of XC and NPQ in the planktonic coastal diatom Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata. During each light treatment, the photon flux density (PFD progressively increased from darkness to five peaks, ranging from 100 to 650 µmol photons m-2 s-1. Our results show that the diel cycle-related PFD increase strongly activates XC through the enhancement of the carotenoid biosynthesis and induces a moderate and gradual NPQ formation over the light gradient. In contrast, during mixing-related PFD increases, XC is less activated, while higher NPQ rapidly develops at moderate PFD. We observe that together with the light intensity and its increase velocity, the saturation light for photosynthesis (Ek is a key parameter in modulating photoprotection. We propose that the capacity to adequately regulate and actuate alternative photoprotective 'safety valves' in response to changing velocity of light intensity increase further enhances the photophysiological flexibility of diatoms. This might be an evolutionary outcome of diatom adaptation to turbulent marine ecosystems characterized by unpredictable mixing-related light changes over the light diel cycle.

  1. Enhancement of mosquito trapping efficiency by using pulse width modulated light emitting diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yu-Nan; Liu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yi-Chian; Ma, Hsin-Yi; Lee, Hsiao-Yi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a light-driving bug zapper is presented for well controlling the diseases brought by insects, such as mosquitoes. In order to have the device efficient to trap the insect pests in off-grid areas, pulse width modulated light emitting diodes (PWM-LED) combined with a solar power module are proposed and implemented. With specific PWM electric signals to drive the LED, it is found that no matter what the ability of catching insects or the consumed power efficiency can be enhanced t...

  2. Super-resolution with an optically-addressable liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McOrist, J.; Sharma, M.D.; Sheppard, C.J.R.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: An optically-addressable liquid crystal spatial light modulator has been used to generate super-resolving masks. This approach avoids problems of low efficiency and coupling between amplitude and phase modulation, that occur when using conventional liquid crystal modulators. When addressed by a programmed light intensity distribution, it allows filters to be changed rapidly to modify the response of a system or permit the investigation of different filter designs. The device used is not pixellated, with a spatial resolution of 30 line pairs/mm over an area 18mm X 18mm, and can achieve continuously-variable phase modulation up to 1.5 wavelengths. The system consists of a write-beam that is collimated from a white-light source. An input mask was used in our experiments determines the modulation pattern of the read-beam. The read-beam from a HeNe laser reflects from the modulator and is focused by a microscope objective. The value of the phase change induced by the transparent regions of the mask can be altered continuously by adjusting the brightness of the write-beam. We have used this system to attain super-resolution by simple Toraldo filters, consisting of arrays of rings. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  3. Color design model of high color rendering index white-light LED module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Shang-Ping; Fu, Han-Kuei; Hsieh, Hsin-Hsin; Hsieh, Kun-Yang

    2017-05-10

    The traditional white-light light-emitting diode (LED) is packaged with a single chip and a single phosphor but has a poor color rendering index (CRI). The next-generation package comprises two chips and a single phosphor, has a high CRI, and retains high luminous efficacy. This study employs two chips and two phosphors to improve the diode's color tunability with various proportions of two phosphors and various densities of phosphor in the silicone used. A color design model is established for color fine-tuning of the white-light LED module. The maximum difference between the measured and color-design-model simulated CIE 1931 color coordinates is approximately 0.0063 around a correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2500 K. This study provides a rapid method to obtain the color fine-tuning of a white-light LED module with a high CRI and luminous efficacy.

  4. Disorder Improves Light Absorption in Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells with Hybrid Light Trapping Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanpeng Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a systematic simulation study on the impact of disorder in thin film silicon solar cells with hybrid light trapping structure. For the periodical structures introducing certain randomness in some parameters, the nanophotonic light trapping effect is demonstrated to be superior to their periodic counterparts. The nanophotonic light trapping effect can be associated with the increased modes induced by the structural disorders. Our study is a systematic proof that certain disorder is conceptually an advantage for nanophotonic light trapping concepts in thin film solar cells. The result is relevant to the large field of research on nanophotonic light trapping which currently investigates and prototypes a number of new concepts including disordered periodic and quasiperiodic textures. The random effect on the shape of the pattern (position, height, and radius investigated in this paper could be a good approach to estimate the influence of experimental inaccuracies for periodic or quasi-periodic structures.

  5. Road crossing behavior under traffic light conflict: Modulating effects of green light duration and signal congruency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Florian; Haiduk, Michael; Boos, Moritz; Tinschert, Peter; Schwarze, Anke; Eggert, Frank

    2016-10-01

    A large number of pedestrians and cyclists regularly ignore the traffic lights to cross the road illegally. In a recent analysis, illegal road crossing behavior has been shown to be enhanced in the presence of incongruent stimulus configurations. Pedestrians and cyclists are more likely to cross against a red light when exposed to an irrelevant conflicting green light. Here, we present experimental and observational data on the factors moderating the risk associated with incongruent traffic lights. In an observational study, we demonstrated that the conflict-related increase in illegal crossing rates is reduced when pedestrian and cyclist green light periods are long. In a laboratory experiment, we manipulated the color of the irrelevant signals to expose participants to different degrees of incongruency. Results revealed that individuals' performance gradually varied as a function of incongruency, suggesting that the negative impact of a conflicting green light can be reduced by slightly adjusting its color. Our findings highlight that the observation of real-world behavior at intersections and the experimental analysis of psychological processes under controlled laboratory conditions can complement each other in identifying risk factors of risky road crossing behavior. Based on this combination, our study elaborates on promising measures to improve safety at signalized intersections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Exploiting total internal reflection geometry for efficient optical modulation of terahertz light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Liu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Efficient methods to modulate terahertz (THz light are essential for realizing rapid THz imaging and communication applications. Here we report a novel THz modulator which utilizes the evanescent wave in a total internal reflection setup coupled with a conductive interface to enhance the attenuation efficiency of THz light. This approach makes it possible to achieve close to 100% modulation with a small interface conductivity of 12 mS. The frequency dependence of this technique is linked to the optical properties of the materials: a material with close to frequency independent conductivity that is also controllable will result in an achromatic modulation response, and the device performance can be optimized further by tuning the internal reflection angle. In this work, we focus on applying the technique in the terahertz frequency range. Using an LED array with a pump intensity of 475 mW/cm2 to produce carriers in a silicon wafer, we have achieved a modulation depth of up to 99.9% in a broad frequency range of 0.1 THz–0.8 THz. The required pumping power for the generation of the required free carriers is low because the sheet conductivity needed is far less than required for traditional transmission techniques. Consequently, the device can be modulated by an LED making it a very practical, low cost, and scalable solution for THz modulation.

  7. Micropatterned Azopolymer Surfaces Modulate Cell Mechanics and Cytoskeleton Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rianna, Carmela; Ventre, Maurizio; Cavalli, Silvia; Radmacher, Manfred; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-09-30

    Physical and chemical characteristics of materials are important regulators of cell behavior. In particular, cell elasticity is a fundamental parameter that reflects the state of a cell. Surface topography finely modulates cell fate and function via adhesion mediated signaling and cytoskeleton generated forces. However, how topographies alter cell mechanics is still unclear. In this work we have analyzed the mechanical properties of peripheral and nuclear regions of NIH-3T3 cells on azopolymer substrates with different topographic patterns. Micrometer scale patterns in the form of parallel ridges or square lattices of surface elevations were encoded on light responsive azopolymer films by means of contactless optical methods. Cell mechanics was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cells and consequently the cell cytoskeleton were oriented along the linear patterns affecting cytoskeletal structures, e.g., formation of actin stress fibers. Our data demonstrate that topographic substrate patterns are recognized by cells and mechanical information is transferred by the cytoskeleton. Furthermore, cytoskeleton generated forces deform the nucleus, changing its morphology that appears to be related to different mechanical properties in the nuclear region.

  8. Study of LED modulation effect on the photometric quantities and beam homogeneity of automotive lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelka, Petr; Hanulak, Patrik; Jaros, Jakub; Papes, Martin; Latal, Jan; Siska, Petr; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2015-07-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of a light emitting diode based visible light communication system for optical vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications in road safety applications. The widespread use of LEDs as light sources has reached into automotive fields. For example, LEDs are used for taillights, daytime running lights, brake lights, headlights, and traffic signals. Future in the optical vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications will be based on an optical wireless communication technology that using LED transmitter and a camera receiver (OCI; optical communication image sensor). Utilization of optical V2V communication systems in automotive industry naturally brings a lot of problems. Among them belongs necessity of circuit implementation into the current concepts of electronic LED lights control that allows LED modulation. These circuits are quite complicated especially in case of luxury cars. Other problem is correct design of modulation circuits so that final vehicle lightning using optical vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication meets standard requirements on Photometric Quantities and Beam Homogeneity. Authors of this article performed research on optical vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication possibilities of headlight (Jaguar) and taillight (Skoda) in terms of modulation circuits (M-PSK, M-QAM) implementation into the lamp concepts and final fulfilment of mandatory standards on Photometric Quantities and Beam Homogeneity.

  9. Light Robotics Structure-mediated Nanobiophotonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Jesper; Palima, Darwin

    2017-01-01

    Scientific disciplines constantly evolve and create new offspring—subdisciplines— that combine the favorable characteristics from its forerunners. The merger of biology and photonics has within the last decade produced one such offspring, Biophotonics, which harnesses light to study biological mat...... the contributors from across four continents to whom we owe a debt of gratitude for the time, effort, and expertise devoted into formulating their respective chapters. Thank you very much!...

  10. Large-signal modulation characteristics of a GaN-based micro-LED for Gbps visible-light communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Pengfei; Wu, Zhengyuan; Liu, Xiaoyan; Fang, Zhilai; Zhang, Shuailong; Zhou, Xiaolin; Liu, Kefu; Liu, Ming-Gang; Chen, Shu-Jhih; Lee, Chia-Yu; Cong, Chunxiao; Hu, Laigui; Qiu, Zhi-Jun; Zheng, Lirong; Liu, Ran

    2018-04-01

    The large-signal modulation characteristics of a GaN-based micro-LED have been studied for Gbps visible-light communication. With an increasing signal modulation depth the modulation bandwidth decreases, which matches up with the increase in the sum of the signal rise time and fall time. By simulating the band diagram and the carrier recombination rate of the micro-LED under large-signal modulation, carrier recombination and the carrier sweep-out effect are analyzed and found to be the dominant mechanisms behind the variation of modulation bandwidth. These results give further insight into improving the modulation bandwidth for high-speed visible-light communication.

  11. Microtruss structures with enhanced elasticity fabricated through visible light photocuring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Nanthakumar

    Full Text Available We report on the fabrication of an open cellular solid structure using visible light photocuring in combination with light-induced self-writing. A visible light sensitive photopolymer is irradiated with multiple arrays of microscale optical beams, which are generated from LEDs. These beams undergo self-trapping and elicit the inscription of microscale, solid struts into the medium. This process creates a structure consisting of multiple, intersecting struts that form a microtruss structure. Such structures retain their elasticity at higher temperatures as compared to a bulk film of the same thickness. This is the first demonstration of visible light photocuring of photopolymers into a microtruss structure, as well as investigation into their elastic properties under tension. Keywords: Polymers, Self-trapping, Microstructures, Cellular solids

  12. Real-Time 3D Profile Measurement Using Structured Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, L; Zhang, Z J; Ma, H; Yu, Y J

    2006-01-01

    The paper builds a real-time system of 3D profile measurement using structured-light imaging. It allows a hand-held object to rotate free in the space-time coded light field, which is projected by the projector. The surface of measured objects with projected coded light is imaged; the system shows surface reconstruction results of objects online. This feedback helps user to adjust object's pose in the light field according to the dismissed or error data, which would achieve the integrality of data used in reconstruction. This method can acquire denser data cloud and have higher reconstruction accuracy and efficiency. According to the real-time requirements, the paper presents the non-restricted light plane modelling which suits stripe structured light system, designs the three-frame stripes space-time coded pattern, and uses the advance ICP algorithms to acquire 3D data alignment from multiple view

  13. Universal holonomic single quantum gates over a geometric spin with phase-modulated polarized light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Naoki; Nakamura, Takaaki; Tanaka, Touta; Mishima, Shota; Kano, Hiroki; Kuroiwa, Ryota; Sekiguchi, Yuhei; Kosaka, Hideo

    2018-05-15

    We demonstrate universal non-adiabatic non-abelian holonomic single quantum gates over a geometric electron spin with phase-modulated polarized light and 93% average fidelity. This allows purely geometric rotation around an arbitrary axis by any angle defined by light polarization and phase using a degenerate three-level Λ-type system in a negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. Since the control light is completely resonant to the ancillary excited state, the demonstrated holonomic gate not only is fast with low power, but also is precise without the dynamical phase being subject to control error and environmental noise. It thus allows pulse shaping for further fidelity.

  14. The Spectrophotometer II: A Module on the Spectral Properties of Light. Tech Physics Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Nathaniel; And Others

    This module is designed to give the learner an understanding of the nature of light and how its properties are used in the design of spectrophotometers. Problems promote the use of spectrophotometers in qualitative analysis, the optical elements used in a monochromator, and the physical properties of the prism and the diffraction grating. Other…

  15. Patterning and Conductivity Modulation of Conductive Polymers by UV Light Exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edberg, Jesper; Iandolo, Donata; Brooke, Robert

    2016-01-01

    to control the conductivity in the conjugated polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):tosylate by more than six orders of magnitude in addition to producing high-resolution patterns and optical gradients. The mechanism behind the modulation in the polymerization kinetics by UV light irradiation as well...

  16. Confinement and quark structure of light hadrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, G.V.; Ivanov, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    We present a quark confinement model (QCM) for the description of the low-energy physics of light hadrons (mesons and baryons). The model is based on two hypotheses. First, the quark confinement is realized as averaging over vacuum gluon fields which are believed to provide the confinement of any colour objects. Second, hadrons are treated as collective colourless excitations of quark-gluon interactions. The description of strong, electromagnetic and weak interactions of mesons and baryons at the low energy is given from a unique point of view

  17. Electronic structure of the light actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunlap, B.D.

    1976-01-01

    In the last few years, considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the properties of the light actinides. Although these are 5f transition elements formally equivalent to the lanthanide (4f) elements, these materials show a much more varied behavior due to the larger spatial extent and ionizability of the 5f electrons. A review is given of some areas of current interest, especially where hyperfine measurements have played an active role. These include studies of a variety of magnetic phenomena, systematics of isomer shift measurements, and studies of paramagnetic relaxation

  18. Method for measuring retardation of infrared wave-plate by modulated-polarized visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Song, Feijun

    2012-11-01

    A new method for precisely measuring the optical phase retardation of wave-plates in the infrared spectral region is presented by using modulated-polarized visible light. An electro-optic modulator is used to accurately determine the zero point by the frequency-doubled signal of the Modulated-polarized light. A Babinet-Soleil compensator is employed to make the phase delay compensation. Based on this method, an instrument is set up to measure the retardations of the infrared wave-plates with visible region laser. Measurement results with high accuracy and sound repetition are obtained by simple calculation. Its measurement precision is less than and repetitive precision is within 0.3%.

  19. Decorated Ising models with competing interactions and modulated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tragtenberg, M.H.R.; Yokoi, C.S.O.; Salinas, S.R.A.

    1988-01-01

    The phase diagrams of a variety of decorated Ising lattices are calculated. The competing interactions among the decorating spins may induce different types of modulated orderings. In particular, the effect of an applied field on the phase diagram of the two-dimensional mock ANNNI model is considered, where only the original horizontal bonds on a square lattice are decorated. Some Bravais lattices and Cayley trees where all bonds are equally decorated are then studied. The Bravais lattices display a few stable modulated structures. The Cayley trees, on the other hand, display a large number of modulated phases, which increases with the lattice coordination number. (authors) [pt

  20. Diffraction of polarized light on periodic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukanina, V; Divakov, D; Tyutyunnik, A; Hohlov, A

    2012-01-01

    Periodic structures as photonic crystals are widely used in modern laser devices, communication technologies and for creating various beam splitters and filters. Diffraction gratings are applied for creating 3D television sets, DVD and Blu-ray drives and reflective structures (Berkley mirror). It is important to simulate diffraction on such structures to design optical systems with predetermined properties based on photonic crystals and diffraction gratings. Methods of simulating diffraction on periodic structures uses theory of Floquet-Bloch and rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA). Current work is dedicated to analysis of photonic band gaps and simulating diffraction on one-dimensional binary diffraction grating using RCWA. The Maxwell's equations for isotropic media and constitutive relations based on the cgs system were used as a model.

  1. The importance of macro- versus microstructure in modulating light levels inside coral colonies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaniewska, Paulina; Magnusson, Sveinn H.; Anthony, Ken R. N.

    2011-01-01

    Adjusting the light exposure and capture of their symbiotic photosynthetic dinoflagellates (genus Symbiodinium Freud.) is central to the success of reef-building corals (order Scleractinia) across high spatio-temporal variation in the light environment of coral reefs. We tested the hypothesis...... irradiances at the level of coral photosymbionts. Key index words: irradiance; morphology; photoacclimation; scale; scleractinian coral; Symbiodinium Abbreviations: a chl a, specific absorption coefficient of chl a; Ddn, diadinoxanthin; Dtn, diatoxanthin; GBR, Great Barrier Reef; GFP, green fluorescent...... that optical properties of tissues in some coral species can provide light management at the tissue scale comparable to light modulation by colony architecture in other species. We compared within-tissue scalar irradiance in two coral species from the same light habitat but with contrasting colony growth forms...

  2. Thermodynamic Upper Bound on Broadband Light Coupling with Photonic Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zongfu; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2012-01-01

    to an upper bound dictated by the second law of thermodynamics. Such bound limits how efficient light can be coupled to any photonic structure. As one example of application, we use this upper bound to derive the limit of light absorption in broadband solar

  3. Quantum correlations and light localization in disordered nanophotonic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan

    This thesis reports results on quantum properties of light in multiple-scattering nano-structured materials. Spatial quantum correlations of photons are demonstrated experimentally that are induced by multiple scattering of squeezed light and of purely quantum origin. By varying the quantum state...

  4. Optimization of particle trapping and patterning via photovoltaic tweezers: role of light modulation and particle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matarrubia, J; García-Cabañes, A; Plaza, J L; Agulló-López, F; Carrascosa, M

    2014-01-01

    The role of light modulation m and particle size on the morphology and spatial resolution of nano-particle patterns obtained by photovoltaic tweezers on Fe : LiNbO 3 has been investigated. The impact of m when using spherical as well as non-spherical (anisotropic) nano-particles deposited on the sample surface has been elucidated. Light modulation is a key parameter determining the particle profile contrast that is optimum for spherical particles and high-m values (m ∼ 1). The minimum particle periodicities reachable are also investigated obtaining periodic patterns up to 3.5 µm. This is a value at least one order of magnitude shorter than those obtained in previous reported experiments. Results are successfully explained and discussed in light of the previous reported models for photorefraction including nonlinear carrier transport and dielectrophoretic trapping. From the results, a number of rules for particle patterning optimization are derived. (paper)

  5. Pump-probe nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustelny, S.; Gawlik, W.; Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Rochester, S. M.; Yashchuk, V. V.; Budker, D.

    2006-01-01

    Specific types of atomic coherences between Zeeman sublevels can be generated and detected using a method based on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light. Linearly polarized, frequency-modulated light is employed to selectively generate ground-state coherences between Zeeman sublevels for which Δm=2 and Δm=4 in 85 Rb and 87 Rb atoms, and additionally Δm=6 in 85 Rb. The atomic coherences are detected with a separate, unmodulated probe light beam. Separation of the pump and probe beams enables independent investigation of the processes of creation and detection of the atomic coherences. With the present technique the transfer of the Zeeman coherences, including high-order coherences, from excited to ground state by spontaneous emission has been observed

  6. Plant experiments with light-emitting diode module in Svet space greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilieva, Iliyana; Ivanova, Tania; Naydenov, Yordan; Dandolov, Ivan; Stefanov, Detelin

    Light is necessary for photosynthesis and shoot orientation in the space plant growth facilities. Light modules (LM) must provide sufficient photosynthetic photon flux for optimal efficiency of photosynthetic processes and also meet the constraints for power, volume and mass. A new LM for SVET Space Greenhouse using Cree R XLamp R 7090 XR light-emitting diodes (LEDs) is developed. Three types of monochromic LEDs emitting in the red, green, and blue region of the spectrum are used. The new LM contains 36 LED spots - 30 LED spots with one red, green and blue LED and 6 LED spots with three red LEDs. DMX programming device controls the LED spots and can set 231 levels of light intensity thus achieving Photosynthetic Photon Flux Density (PPFD) in the range 0-400 µmol.m-2 .s-1 and different percentages of the red, green and blue light, depending on the experimental objectives. Two one-month experiments with "salad-type" plants - lettuce and chicory were carried at 400 µmol.m-2 .s-1 PPFD (high light - HL) and 220 µmol.m-2 .s-1 PPFD (low light - LL) and composition 70% red, 20% green and 10% blue light. In vivo modulated chlorophyll fluorescence was measured by a PAM fluorometer on leaf discs and the following parameters: effective quantum yield of Photosystem II (ΦP SII ) and non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) were calculated. Both lettuce and chicory plants grown at LL express higher photochemical activity of Photosystem II (PSII) than HL grown plants, evaluated by the actual PSII quantum yield, ΦP SII . The calculated steady state NPQ values did not differ significantly in lettuce and chicory. The rapid phase of the NPQ increase was accelerated in all studied LL leaves. In conclusion low light conditions ensured more effective functioning of PSII than HL when lettuce and chicory plants were grown at 70% red, 20% green and 10% blue light composition.

  7. Tilt-effect of holograms and images displayed on a spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harm, Walter; Roider, Clemens; Bernet, Stefan; Ritsch-Marte, Monika

    2015-11-16

    We show that a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCOS-SLM) can be used to display amplitude images, or phase holograms, which change in a pre-determined way when the display is tilted, i.e. observed under different angles. This is similar to the tilt-effect (also called "latent image effect") known from various security elements ("kinegrams") on credit cards or bank notes. The effect is achieved without any specialized optical components, simply by using the large phase shifting capability of a "thick" SLM, which extends over several multiples of 2π, in combination with the angular dependence of the phase shift. For hologram projection one can use the fact that the phase of a monochromatic wave is only defined modulo 2π. Thus one can design a phase pattern extending over several multiples of 2π, which transforms at different readout angles into different 2π-wrapped phase structures, due to the angular dependence of the modulo 2π operation. These different beams then project different holograms at the respective readout angles. In amplitude modulation mode (with inserted polarizer) the intensity of each SLM pixel oscillates over several periods when tuning its control voltage. Since the oscillation period depends on the readout angle, it is possible to find a certain control voltage which produces two (or more) selectable gray levels at a corresponding number of pre-determined readout angles. This is done with all SLM pixels individually, thus constructing different images for the selected angles. We experimentally demonstrate the reconstruction of multiple (Fourier- and Fresnel-) holograms, and of different amplitude images, by readout of static diffractive patterns in a variable angular range between 0° and 60°.

  8. Update on nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Oscar Javier, E-mail: javierh@triumf.ca; Dinur, Nir Nevo; Ji, Chen; Bacca, Sonia [TRIUMF (Canada); Barnea, Nir [The Hebrew University, Racah Institute of Physics (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    We present calculations of the nuclear structure corrections to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms, using state-of-the-art nuclear potentials. We outline updated results on finite nucleon size contributions.

  9. An Error Analysis of Structured Light Scanning of Biological Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sebastian Hoppe Nesgaard; Wilm, Jakob; Aanæs, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an error analysis and correction model for four structured light methods applied to three common types of biological tissue; skin, fat and muscle. Despite its many advantages, structured light is based on the assumption of direct reflection at the object surface only......, statistical linear model based on the scan geometry. As such, scans can be corrected without introducing any specially designed pattern strategy or hardware. We can effectively reduce the error in a structured light scanner applied to biological tissue by as much as factor of two or three........ This assumption is violated by most biological material e.g. human skin, which exhibits subsurface scattering. In this study, we find that in general, structured light scans of biological tissue deviate significantly from the ground truth. We show that a large portion of this error can be predicted with a simple...

  10. Structural slow light can enhance Beer-Lambert absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Dicaire Isabelle; Chin Sanghoon; Thévenaz Luc

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that structural slow light can enhance Beer-Lambert absorption. A 4-fold reduction of the group velocity induced by mere cavity effects has caused an increase of molecular absorption by 130%.

  11. Hadron structure with light dynamical quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.G.; Richards, D.G.; Fleming, G.T.; Haegler, P.; Negele, J.W.; Orginos, K.; Pochinsky, A.; Renner, D.B.; Schroers, W.

    2005-09-01

    Generalized parton distributions encompass a wealth of information concerning the three-dimensional quark and gluon structure of the nucleon, and thus provide an ideal focus for the study of hadron structure using lattice QCD. The special limits corresponding to form factors and parton distributions are well explored experimentally, providing clear tests of lattice calculations, and the lack of experimental data for more general cases provides opportunities for genuine predictions and for guiding experiment. We present results from hybrid calculations with improved staggered (Asqtad) sea quarks and domain wall valence quarks at pion masses down to 350 MeV. (orig.)

  12. Modulation of controlled-not gate using light beams carrying orbital angular momentum in a nonlinear atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Li, YuanYuan; Zhang, YunZhe

    2018-03-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a controlled-not gate with light beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM) through a degenerate four-wave mixing process via a photonic band gap structure satisfying the phase-matching condition. By employing the different topological charges of a Laguerre-Gaussian beam as a qubit in this nonlinear process, the controlled-not gate with OAM can be realized. Moreover, we investigate the evolution of the controlled-not gate, which can be modulated by the frequency and the power of the incident beam, i.e., under electromagnetically induced transparency conditions. The study results are useful for applications in quantum communication and information storage.

  13. Development and utilization of liquid quartz light modulating film. Ekisho choko film no kaihatsu to riyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, M. (Ajinomoto Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-03-01

    This paper introduces the polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC) ACT'' sheet, a liquid quartz light modulating film, developed by the Ajinomoto Company in Japan. A mixture of liquid crystal and polymer precursor is sandwiched between polyethylene terephthalate films imparted with transparency conductor made of indium tin oxide (ITO), which is then polymerized by heating or irradiating ultraviolet rays to obtain a PDLC. The film has a thickness as thin as about 0.3 mm, and good processibility. The sheet uses light modulating elements functioning on scatter and permeation of light. Clarification was made on the voltage dependence of cloudiness, total light permeability, straight and parallel light permeability, the response, and the operating voltage. The system consumes small amount of power with a threshold value of about 35V, and is suitable to operate large areas when working on the utility power supply. An incident light having a high diffusion capability when the electric field is turned off exhibits a high clouding function. The system gives an excellent feel of colorlessness and transparency when the electric field is turned on. The performances in heat insulation, infrared reflection capability and noise resistance are expected to be compounded for a functional versatility. 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. All-digital wavefront sensing for structured light beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available the topology of neutral pairs of closely positioned phase singularities in speckle fields [21]. Apart from implementing Stokes polarimetry to investigate phase singularities, it can be used to study polarization singularities in coherent beams [22... together with digital holograms en- coded on a spatial light modulator (SLM). Since these holograms are dynamic, we can demon- strate for the first time Stokes polarimetry in real-time on propagating beams. We illustrate the robustness of our technique...

  15. Effects of nano-structured photonic crystals on light extraction enhancement of nitride light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, G.M.; Yen, C.C.; Chien, H.W.; Lu, H.C.; Chang, T.W.; Nee, T.E.

    2011-01-01

    The light extraction efficiency of an InGaN/GaN light-emitting diode (LED) can be enhanced by incorporating nano-structured photonic crystals inside the LED structure. We employed plane wave expansion (PWE) method and finite difference time domain (FDTD) method to reveal the optical confinement effects with the relevant parameters. The results showed that band-gap modulation could increase the efficiency for light extraction at the lattice constant of 200 nm and depth of 200 nm for the 468-nm LED. Focused ion beam (FIB) using Ga created the desired nano-structured patterns. The LED device micro-PL (photoluminescence) results have demonstrated that the triangular photonic crystal arrays could increase the peak illumination intensity by 58%. The peak wavelength remained unchanged. The integrated area under the illumination peak was increased by 75%. As the patterned area ratio was increased to 85%, the peak intensity enhancement was further improved to 91%, and the integrated area was achieved at 106%.

  16. Influence of thermal light correlations on photosynthetic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mendoza, Adriana; Manrique, Pedro; Caycedo-Soler, Felipe; Johnson, Neil F.; Rodríguez, Ferney J.; Quiroga, Luis

    2014-03-01

    The thermal light from the sun is characterized by both classical and quantum mechanical correlations. These correlations have left a fingerprint on the natural harvesting structures developed through five billion years of evolutionary pressure, specially in photosynthetic organisms. In this work, based upon previous extensive studies of spatio-temporal correlations of light fields, we hypothesize that structures involving photosensitive pigments like those present in purple bacteria vesicles emerge as an evolutionary response to the different properties of incident light. By using burstiness and memory as measures that quantify higher moments of the photon arrival statistics, we generate photon-time traces. They are used to simulate absorption on detectors spatially extended over regions comparable to these light fields coherence length. Finally, we provide some insights into the connection between these photo-statistical features with the photosynthetic membrane architecture and the lights' spatial correlation. Facultad de Ciencias Uniandes.

  17. A stable blue-light-derived signal modulates ultraviolet-light-induced activation of the chalcone-synthase gene in cultured parsley cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohl, S.; Hahlbrock, K.; Schäfer, E.

    1989-01-01

    Run-off transcription assays were used to demonstrate that both the ultraviolet (UV)-B and blue-light receptors control transcription rates for chalcone-synthase mRNA in the course of light-induced flavonoid synthesis in parsley (Petroselinum crispum Miller (A.W. Hill)) cell-suspension cultures. Blue and red light alone, presumably acting via a blue-light receptor and active phytochrome (far-red absorbing form) respectively, can induce accumulation of chalcone-synthase mRNA. The extent of the response is however considerably smaller than that obtained when these wavebands are applied in combination with UV light. A preirradiation with blue light strongly increases the response to a subsequent UV pulse and this modulating effect of blue light is stable for at least 20 h. The modulating effect is abolished by a UV induction but can be reestablished by a second irradiation with blue light. (author)

  18. The physics of light distribution in hollow structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, L.A. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to serve as an introduction, for non-physicists, to the subject of light distribution in hollow structures. The motivation for light distribution is the importance of getting the maximum value from available light. We all recognize that photons cost money (one photon costs about $10{sup -25} to make) so we obviously want to try to make the maximum number of photons for a given cost. What is often overlooked, however, is that these photons have the highest value only if they are delivered to the right place in the correct quantity. This means that there is often substantial economic value in the high quality distribution of light. This problem is discussed from a very general perspective, in order to show the role of general optical films for manipulating light. The underlying physics at work in such films is described, and examples of common optical light deistribution films are provided.

  19. Module-based structure design of wheeled mobile robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Luo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an innovative and systematic approach for synthesizing mechanical structures of wheeled mobile robots. The principle and terminologies used for the proposed synthesis method are presented by adopting the concept of modular design, isomorphic and non-isomorphic, and set theory with its associated combinatorial mathematics. The modular-based innovative synthesis and design of wheeled robots were conducted at two levels. Firstly at the module level, by creative design and analysing the structures of classic wheeled robots, a wheel module set containing four types of wheel mechanisms, a suspension module set consisting of five types of suspension frames and a chassis module set composed of five types of rigid or articulated chassis were designed and generalized. Secondly at the synthesis level, two kinds of structure synthesis modes, namely the isomorphic-combination mode and the non-isomorphic combination mode were proposed to synthesize mechanical structures of wheeled robots; which led to 241 structures for wheeled mobile robots including 236 novel ones. Further, mathematical models and a software platform were developed to provide appropriate and intuitive tools for simulating and evaluating performance of the wheeled robots that were proposed in this paper. Eventually, physical prototypes of sample wheeled robots/rovers were developed and tested so as to prove and validate the principle and methodology presented in this paper.

  20. Brightness masking is modulated by disparity structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelekanos, Vassilis; Ban, Hiroshi; Welchman, Andrew E

    2015-05-01

    The luminance contrast at the borders of a surface strongly influences surface's apparent brightness, as demonstrated by a number of classic visual illusions. Such phenomena are compatible with a propagation mechanism believed to spread contrast information from borders to the interior. This process is disrupted by masking, where the perceived brightness of a target is reduced by the brief presentation of a mask (Paradiso & Nakayama, 1991), but the exact visual stage that this happens remains unclear. In the present study, we examined whether brightness masking occurs at a monocular-, or a binocular-level of the visual hierarchy. We used backward masking, whereby a briefly presented target stimulus is disrupted by a mask coming soon afterwards, to show that brightness masking is affected by binocular stages of the visual processing. We manipulated the 3-D configurations (slant direction) of the target and mask and measured the differential disruption that masking causes on brightness estimation. We found that the masking effect was weaker when stimuli had a different slant. We suggest that brightness masking is partly mediated by mid-level neuronal mechanisms, at a stage where binocular disparity edge structure has been extracted. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with modulated light in tilted magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustelny, S.; Gawlik, W.; Rochester, S. M.; Kimball, D. F. Jackson; Yashchuk, V. V.; Budker, D.

    2006-01-01

    Larmor precession of laser-polarized atoms contained in antirelaxation-coated cells, detected via nonlinear magneto-optical rotation (NMOR), is a promising technique for a new generation of ultrasensitive atomic magnetometers. For magnetic fields directed along the light propagation direction, resonances in NMOR appear when linearly polarized light is frequency or amplitude modulated at twice the Larmor frequency. Because the frequency of these resonances depends on the magnitude but not the direction of the field, they are useful for scalar magnetometry. Additional NMOR resonances at the Larmor frequency appear when the magnetic field is tilted away from the light propagation direction in the plane defined by the light propagation and polarization vectors. These resonances, studied both experimentally and with a density matrix calculation in the present work, offer a convenient method of achieving additional information about a direction of the magnetic field

  2. Modulation of the pupil function of microscope objective lens for multifocal multi-photon microscopy using a spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoya; Okazaki, Shigetoshi; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Takashi; Terakawa, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    We propose a method for high precision modulation of the pupil function of a microscope objective lens to improve the performance of multifocal multi-photon microscopy (MMM). To modulate the pupil function, we adopt a spatial light modulator (SLM) and place it at the conjugate position of the objective lens. The SLM can generate an arbitrary number of spots to excite the multiple fluorescence spots (MFS) at the desired positions and intensities by applying an appropriate computer-generated hologram (CGH). This flexibility allows us to control the MFS according to the photobleaching level of a fluorescent protein and phototoxicity of a specimen. However, when a large number of excitation spots are generated, the intensity distribution of the MFS is significantly different from the one originally designed due to misalignment of the optical setup and characteristics of the SLM. As a result, the image of a specimen obtained using laser scanning for the MFS has block noise segments because the SLM could not generate a uniform MFS. To improve the intensity distribution of the MFS, we adaptively redesigned the CGH based on the observed MFS. We experimentally demonstrate an improvement in the uniformity of a 10 × 10 MFS grid using a dye solution. The simplicity of the proposed method will allow it to be applied for calibration of MMM before observing living tissue. After the MMM calibration, we performed laser scanning with two-photon excitation to observe a real specimen without detecting block noise segments.

  3. Orion Crew Module / Service Module Structural Weight and Center of Gravity Simulator and Vehicle Motion Simulator Hoist Structure for Orion Service Module Umbilical Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Peter A.; Haddock, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    An Orion Crew Module Service Module Structural Weight and Center of Gravity Simulator and a Vehicle Motion Simulator Hoist Structure for Orion Service Module Umbilical Testing were designed during a summer 2014 internship in Kennedy Space Centers Structures and Mechanisms Design Branch. The simulator is a structure that supports ballast, which will be integrated into an existing Orion mock-up to simulate the mass properties of the Exploration Mission-1 flight vehicle in both fueled and unfueled states. The simulator mimics these configurations through the use of approximately 40,000 lbf of steel and water ballast, and a steel support structure. Draining four water tanks, which house the water ballast, transitions the simulator from the fueled to unfueled mass properties. The Ground Systems Development and Operations organization will utilize the simulator to verify and validate equipment used to maneuver and transport the Orion spacecraft in its fueled and unfueled configurations. The second design comprises a cantilevered tripod hoist structure that provides the capability to position a large Orion Service Module Umbilical in proximity to the Vehicle Motion Simulator. The Ground Systems Development and Operations organization will utilize the Vehicle Motion Simulator, with the hoist structure attached, to test the Orion Service Module Umbilical for proper operation prior to installation on the Mobile Launcher. Overall, these two designs provide NASA engineers viable concepts worthy of fabricating and placing into service to prepare for the launch of Orion in 2017.

  4. Gigascale Silicon Photonic Transmitters Integrating HBT-based Carrier-injection Electroabsorption Modulator Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Enjin

    injection modulators and light-emitting diodes (LED) with drive voltage requirements below 1.5V. Measurement results show an optical link based on a 70MHz red LED work well at 300Mbps by using the pre-emphasis driver module. A traveling wave electrode (TWE) modulator structure is presented, including a novel design methodology to address process limitations imposed by a commercial silicon fabrication technology. Results from 3D full wave EM simulation demonstrate the application of the design methodology to achieve specifications, including phase velocity matching, insertion loss, and impedance matching. Results show the HBT-based TWE-EAM system has the bandwidth higher than 60GHz.

  5. Trinary Encoder, Decoder, Multiplexer and Demultiplexer Using Savart Plate and Spatial Light Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Amal K.; Singha Roy, Souradip; Mandal, Sudipta; Basuray, Amitabha

    Optoelectronic processors have already been developed with the strong potentiality of optics in information and data processing. Encoder, Decoder, Multiplexers and Demultiplexers are the most important components in modern system designs and in communications. We have implemented the same using trinary logic gates with signed magnitude defined as Modified Trinary Number (MTN). The Spatial Light Modulator (SLM) based optoelectronic circuit is suitable for high speed data processing and communications using photon as carrier. We also presented here a possible method of implementing the same using light with photon as carrier of information. The importance of the method is that all the basic gates needed may be fabricated based on basic building block.

  6. Coherent Structures and Entropy in Constrained, Modulationally Unstable, Nonintegrable Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumpf, Benno; Newell, Alan C.

    2001-01-01

    Many studies have shown that nonintegrable systems with modulational instabilities constrained by more than one conservation law exhibit universal long time behavior involving large coherent structures in a sea of small fluctuations. We show how this behavior can be explained in detail by simple thermodynamic arguments

  7. New insight on bismuth cuprates with incommensurate modulated structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mironov, A. V.; Petříček, Václav; Khasanova, N. R.; Antipov, E. V.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 3 (2016), s. 395-403 ISSN 2052-5206 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : modulated structure * high Tc superconductor * superspace approach Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.032, year: 2016

  8. Weiss oscillations in the electronic structure of modulated graphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, M; Sabeeh, K; MacKinnon, A

    2007-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structure of modulated graphene in the presence of a perpendicular magnetic field. The density of states and the bandwidth for the Dirac electrons in this system are determined. The appearance of unusual Weiss oscillations in the bandwidth and density of states is the main focus of this work

  9. An electro-optic spatial light modulator for thermoelastic generation of programmably focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    The concept proposed is an electro-optic technique that would make it possible to spatially modulate a high power pulsed laser beam to thermoelastically induce focused ultrasound in a test material. Being a purely electro-optic device, the modulator, and therefore the depth at which the acoustic focus occurs, can be programmed electronically at electronic speeds. If successful, it would become possible to scan ultrasound continuously in three dimensions within the component or structure under test.

  10. Impact damage detection in light composite sandwich panels using piezo-based nonlinear vibro-acoustic modulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieczonka, L; Ukowski, P; Klepka, A; Staszewski, W J; Uhl, T; Aymerich, F

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear vibro-acoustic modulation technique is used for impact damage detection in light composite sandwich panels. The method utilizes piezo-based low-frequency vibration and high-frequency ultrasonic excitations. The work presented focuses on the analysis of modulation intensity. The results show that the method can be used for impact damage detection reliably separating damage-related from vibro-acoustic modulations from other intrinsic nonlinear modulations. (paper)

  11. Differential signaling spread-spectrum modulation of the LED visible light wireless communications using a mobile-phone camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Hao; Chow, Chi-Wai

    2015-02-01

    Visible light communication (VLC) using spread spectrum modulation (SSM) and differential signaling (DS), detected by a mobile-phone camera is proposed and demonstrated for the first time to provide high immunity to background ambient light interference. The SSM signal provides the coding gain while the DS scheme enhances the clock recovery particular under high background ambient light. Experiment results confirm the feasibility of the proposed scheme, showing that the proposed system has 6-dB gain comparing with the traditional on-off keying (OOK) modulation under background ambient light of 3000 lux. The direct incident ambient light to the mobile-phone camera is 520 lux.

  12. Structure of elementary module of Solanum dulcamara L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina A. Zhuravlyeva

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The structures (metamers of Solanum dulcamara at the level of elementary module have been studied. The features for identification of their variability have been ascertained. 44 variants of metamers are described. The characteristic is represented for such individual features as: the type of lateral organ (leaf of a middle formation and axillary structure (bud, shoot, serial complex; the degree of development of the generative organs; and the presence and type of roots.

  13. Icosahedral symmetry described by an incommensurately modulated crystal structure model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolny, Janusz; Lebech, Bente

    1986-01-01

    A crystal structure model of an incommensurately modulated structure is presented. Although six different reciprocal vectors are used to describe the model, all calculations are done in three dimensions making calculation of the real-space structure trivial. Using this model, it is shown that both...... the positions of the bragg reflections and information about the relative intensities of these reflections are in full accordance with the diffraction patterns reported for microcrystals of the rapidly quenched Al86Mn14 alloy. It is also shown that at least the local structure possesses full icosahedral...

  14. Gray Scale Operation Of A Multichannel Optical Convolver Using The Semetex Magnetooptic Spatial Light Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey A.; Day, Timothy; Lilly, Roger A.; Taber, Donald B.; Liu, Hua-Kuang; Davis, J. A.; Day, T.; Lilly, R. A.; Taber, D. B.; Liu, H.-K.

    1988-02-01

    We present a new multichannel optical correlator/convolver architecture which uses an acoustooptic light modulator (AOLM) for the input channel and a Semetex magnetooptic spatial light modulator (MOSLM) for the set of parallel reference channels. Details of the anamorphic optical system are discussed. Experimental results illustrate use of the system as a convolver for performing digital multiplication by analog convolution (DMAC). A limited gray scale capability for data stored by the MOSLM is demonstrated by implementing this DMAC algorithm with trinary logic. Use of the MOSLM allows the number of parallel channels for the convolver to be increased significantly compared with previously reported techniques while retaining the capability for updating both channels at high speeds.

  15. Enhancement of mosquito trapping efficiency by using pulse width modulated light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Nan; Liu, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yi-Chian; Ma, Hsin-Yi; Lee, Hsiao-Yi

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a light-driving bug zapper is presented for well controlling the diseases brought by insects, such as mosquitoes. In order to have the device efficient to trap the insect pests in off-grid areas, pulse width modulated light emitting diodes (PWM-LED) combined with a solar power module are proposed and implemented. With specific PWM electric signals to drive the LED, it is found that no matter what the ability of catching insects or the consumed power efficiency can be enhanced thus. It is demonstrated that 40% of the UV LED consumed power and 25.9% of the total load power consumption can be saved, and the trapped mosquitoes are about 250% increased when the PWM method is applied in the bug zapper experiments.

  16. Two spatial light modulator system for laboratory simulation of random beam propagation in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Toselli, Italo; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-02-10

    An optical system consisting of a laser source and two independent consecutive phase-only spatial light modulators (SLMs) is shown to accurately simulate a generated random beam (first SLM) after interaction with a stationary random medium (second SLM). To illustrate the range of possibilities, a recently introduced class of random optical frames is examined on propagation in free space and several weak turbulent channels with Kolmogorov and non-Kolmogorov statistics.

  17. A low-voltage high-speed terahertz spatial light modulator using active metamaterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Rout

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An all solid-state metamaterial based terahertz (THz spatial light modulator (SLM is presented which uses high mobility 2DEG to manipulate the metamaterial resonant frequency (0.45 THz leading to terahertz wave modulation. The 2DEG is created by embedding pseudomorphic high-electron mobility transistors in the capacitive gap of each electrical-LC resonator, allowing the charge density to be controlled with very low voltage (1 V and modulating speeds up to 10 MHz while consuming sub-milliwatt power. We have demonstrated our SLM as a 2 × 2 pixel array operating around 0.45 THz by raster scanning a 6 × 6 image of an occluded metal object behind a thick polystyrene screen using a single-pixel THz imaging setup.

  18. Parameter study for polymer solar modules based on various cell lengths and light intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slooff, L.H.; Burgers, A.R.; Bende, E.E.; Kroon, J.M. [ECN Solar Energy, P.O. Box 1, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Veenstra, S.C. [ECN Solar Energy, Solliance, High Tech Campus 5, P63, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2013-10-15

    Polymer solar cells may be applied in portable electronic devices, where light intensity and spectral distribution of the illuminating source can be very different compared to outdoor applications. As the power output of solar cells depends on temperature, light intensity and spectrum, the design of the module must be optimized for the specific illumination conditions in the different applications. The interconnection area between cells in a module must be as narrow as possible to maximize the active area, also called geometrical fill factor, of the module. Laser scribing has the potential to realize this. The optimal width of the interconnection zone depends both on technological limitations, e.g. laser scribe width and the minimal distance between scribes, and electrical limitations like resistive losses. The latter depends on the generated current in the cell and thus also on illumination intensity. Besides that, also the type of junction, i.e. a single or tandem junction, will influence the optimal geometry. In this paper a calculation model is presented that can be used for electrical modeling of polymer cells and modules in order to optimize the performance for the specific illumination conditions.

  19. Analysis of the response of a photovoltaic module subjected to pulsating light of variable duty cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuñiga-Reyes, Marco A.; Sevilla-Camacho, P.Y.; Robles-Ocampo, J.B.; Lopez-Villarea, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The present work analyzes the time domain response of polycrystalline and amorphous silicon modules subjected to a pulsed light signal, applied under conditions of darkness and controlled temperature. The applied light has a wavelength of 625 nm, a constant power of 5 Watts, a constant frequency of 10 kHz and a variable duty cycle. The response of the modules was analyzed in both direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC). The results of the research showed differences between the waveform and the amplitude of the output voltage of each of the manufacturing technologies of the modules. To validate the obtained results, the simulation of the response of a solar cell using its equivalent circuit in CA was performed. From the experimental and simulation tests it is observed that the relation between the duty cycle and the response of the modules of different technologies can be used for the monitoring and detection of faults or for the determination of the components of the AC equivalent circuit from the solar cells. (author)

  20. Reduced thermal conductivity of isotopically modulated silicon multilayer structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracht, H.; Wehmeier, N.; Eon, S.

    2012-01-01

    We report measurements of the thermal conductivity of isotopically modulated silicon that consists of alternating layers of highly enriched silicon-28 and silicon-29. A reduced thermal conductivity of the isotopically modulated silicon compared to natural silicon was measured by means of time......-resolved x-ray scattering. Comparison of the experimental results to numerical solutions of the corresponding heat diffusion equations reveals a factor of three lower thermal conductivity of the isotope structure compared to natural Si. Our results demonstrate that the thermal conductivity of silicon can...

  1. Light intensity modulates the response of two Antarctic diatom species to ocean acidification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Pascale Heiden

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is largely unknown how rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations and changes in the upper mixed layer depth, with its subsequent effects on light availability will affect phytoplankton physiology in the Southern Ocean. Linking seasonal variations in the availability of CO2 and light to abundances and physiological traits of key phytoplankton species could aid to understand their abilities to acclimate to predicted future climatic conditions. To investigate the combined effects of CO2 and light on two ecologically relevant Antarctic diatoms (Fragilariopsis curta and Odontella weisflogii a matrix of three light intensities (LL=20, ML=200, HL=500 µmol photons m-2 s-1 and three pCO2 levels (low=180, ambient=380, high=1000 µatm was applied assessing their effects on growth, particulate organic carbon (POC fixation and photophysiology. Under ambient pCO2, POC production rates were highest already at low light in Fragilariopsis, indicating saturation of photosynthesis, while in Odontella highest rates were only reached at medium irradiances. In both species ocean acidification did not stimulate, but rather inhibited, growth and POC production under low and medium light. This effect was, however, amended under high growth irradiances. Low pCO2 levels inhibited growth and POC production in both species at low and medium light, and further decreased absETRs under high light. Our results suggest that Southern Ocean diatoms were sensitive to changes in pCO2, showing species-specific responses, which were further modulated by light intensity. The two diatom species represent distinct ecotypes and revealed discrete physiological traits that matched their seasonal occurrence with the related physical conditions in Antarctic coastal waters.

  2. Enhancement of white light OLED efficiency by combining both internal and external light extraction structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, I.-Ling; Ku, Chun-Neng; Chen, Yi-Ping; Lin, Ding-Zheng

    2012-09-01

    We proposed an internal nanostructure with a high reflective index planarization layer to solve the optical loss due to the reflective index mismatch between ITO and glass substrate. In our experiments, we found the electrical property of OLED device was significantly influenced by the internal nanostructures without planarization layer. Moreover, the internal extraction structure (IES) is not necessarily beneficial for light extraction. Therefore, we proposed a new substrate combine both internal and external extraction structure (EES) to extract trapping light. We successfully developed a high refractive index (N 1.7) planarization material with flat surface (RMS roughness < 2 nm), and improved about 70% device efficiency compared to traditional glass substrate.

  3. Cellular structures using U_q-tilting modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Stroppel, Catharina; Tubbenhauer, Daniel

    We use the theory of Uq-tilting modules to construct cellular bases for centralizer algebras. Our methods are quite general and work for any quantum group Uq attached to a Cartan matrix and include the non semi-simple cases for q being a root of unity and ground fields of positive characteristic........ Our approach also generalize to certain categories containing infinite dimensional modules. As an application, we recover several known cellular structures (which can all be fit into our general set-up) as we illustrate in a list of examples.......We use the theory of Uq-tilting modules to construct cellular bases for centralizer algebras. Our methods are quite general and work for any quantum group Uq attached to a Cartan matrix and include the non semi-simple cases for q being a root of unity and ground fields of positive characteristic...

  4. Structured Light-Matter Interactions Enabled By Novel Photonic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litchinitser, Natalia [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States); Feng, Liang [Univ. at Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2017-05-02

    The synergy of complex materials and complex light is expected to add a new dimension to the science of light and its applications [1]. The goal of this program is to investigate novel phenomena emerging at the interface of these two branches of modern optics. While metamaterials research was largely focused on relatively “simple” linearly or circularly polarized light propagation in “complex” nanostructured, carefully designed materials with properties not found in nature, many singular optics studies addressed “complex” structured light transmission in “simple” homogeneous, isotropic, nondispersive transparent media, where both spin and orbital angular momentum are independently conserved. However, if both light and medium are complex so that structured light interacts with a metamaterial whose optical materials properties can be designed at will, the spin or angular momentum can change, which leads to spin-orbit interaction and many novel optical phenomena that will be studied in the proposed project. Indeed, metamaterials enable unprecedented control over light propagation, opening new avenues for using spin and quantum optical phenomena, and design flexibility facilitating new linear and nonlinear optical properties and functionalities, including negative index of refraction, magnetism at optical frequencies, giant optical activity, subwavelength imaging, cloaking, dispersion engineering, and unique phase-matching conditions for nonlinear optical interactions. In this research program we focused on structured light-matter interactions in complex media with three particularly remarkable properties that were enabled only with the emergence of metamaterials: extreme anisotropy, extreme material parameters, and magneto-electric coupling–bi-anisotropy and chirality.

  5. Fundamental limit of light trapping in grating structures

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zongfu

    2010-08-11

    We use a rigorous electromagnetic approach to analyze the fundamental limit of light-trapping enhancement in grating structures. This limit can exceed the bulk limit of 4n 2, but has significant angular dependency. We explicitly show that 2D gratings provide more enhancement than 1D gratings. We also show the effects of the grating profile’s symmetry on the absorption enhancement limit. Numerical simulations are applied to support the theory. Our findings provide general guidance for the design of grating structures for light-trapping solar cells.

  6. Thermodynamic Upper Bound on Broadband Light Coupling with Photonic Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Zongfu

    2012-10-01

    The coupling between free space radiation and optical media critically influences the performance of optical devices. We show that, for any given photonic structure, the sum of the external coupling rates for all its optical modes are subject to an upper bound dictated by the second law of thermodynamics. Such bound limits how efficient light can be coupled to any photonic structure. As one example of application, we use this upper bound to derive the limit of light absorption in broadband solar absorbers. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  7. SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLE MODULATIONS ASSOCIATED WITH COHERENT MAGNETIC STRUCTURES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trenchi, L.; Bruno, R.; D'amicis, R.; Marcucci, M. F.; Telloni, D.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Weberg, M.

    2013-01-01

    In situ observations of solar energetic particles (SEPs) often show rapid variations of their intensity profile, affecting all energies simultaneously, without time dispersion. A previously proposed interpretation suggests that these modulations are directly related to the presence of magnetic structures with a different magnetic topology. However, no compelling evidence of local changes in magnetic field or in plasma parameters during SEP modulations has been reported. In this paper, we performed a detailed analysis of SEP events and we found several signatures in the local magnetic field and/or plasma parameters associated with SEP modulations. The study of magnetic helicity allowed us to identify magnetic boundaries, associated with variations of plasma parameters, which are thought to represent the borders between adjacent magnetic flux tubes. It is found that SEP dispersionless modulations are generally associated with such magnetic boundaries. Consequently, we support the idea that SEP modulations are observed when the spacecraft passes through magnetic flux tubes, filled or devoid of SEPs, which are alternatively connected and not connected with the flare site. In other cases, we found SEP dropouts associated with large-scale magnetic holes. A possible generation mechanism suggests that these holes are formed in the high solar corona as a consequence of magnetic reconnection. This reconnection process modifies the magnetic field topology, and therefore, these holes can be magnetically isolated from the surrounding plasma and could also explain their association with SEP dropouts.

  8. Graphene based silicon–air grating structure to realize electromagnetically-induced-transparency and slow light effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Buzheng; Liu, Huaiqing [Key Lab of All Optical Network & Advanced Telecommunication Network of EMC, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Institute of Lightwave Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Ren, Guobin, E-mail: gbren@bjtu.edu.cn [Key Lab of All Optical Network & Advanced Telecommunication Network of EMC, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Institute of Lightwave Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Yang, Yuguang; Ye, Shen; Pei, Li; Jian, Shuisheng [Key Lab of All Optical Network & Advanced Telecommunication Network of EMC, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Institute of Lightwave Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China)

    2017-01-23

    Highlights: • The EIT and slow light effect are achieved by our novel graphene based structure. • Excellent tunability of wide wavelength range can be obtained only by a small change in Fermi energy level. • The group velocity of incident light is reduced to more than 1/600 of that in vacuum. • Position control is realized by designing a graded period grating. - Abstract: A broad band tunable graphene based silicon–air grating structure is proposed. Electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) window can be successfully tuned by virtually setting the desired Fermi energy levels on graphene sheets. Carrier mobility plays an important role in modulating the resonant depth. Furthermore, by changing the grating periods, light can be trapped at corresponding resonant positions where slow down factor is relatively larger than in the previous works. This structure can be used as a highly tunable optoelectronic device such as optical filter, broad-band modulator, plasmonic switches and buffers.

  9. Light Management in Optoelectronic Devices with Disordered and Chaotic Structures

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Yasser

    2012-07-01

    With experimental realization, energy harvesting capabilities of chaotic microstructures were explored. Incident photons falling into chaotic trajectories resulted in energy buildup for certain frequencies. As a consequence, many fold enhancement in light trapping was observed. These ellipsoid like chaotic microstructures demonstrated 25% enhancement in light trapping at 450nm excitation and 15% enhancement at 550nm excitation. Optimization of these structures can drive novel chaos-assisted energy harvesting systems. In subsequent sections of the thesis, prospect of broadband light extraction from white light emitting diodes were investigated, which is an unchallenged but quintessential problem in solid-state lighting. Size dependent scattering allows microstructures to interact strongly with narrow-band light. If disorder is introduced in spread and sizes of microstructures, broadband light extraction is possible. A novel scheme with Voronoi tessellation to quantify disorder in physical systems was also introduced, and a link between voronoi disorder and state disorder of statistical mechanics was established. Overall, in this thesis some nascent concepts regarding disorder and chaos were investigated to efficiently manage electromagnetic waves in optoelectronic devices.

  10. External motion tracking for brain imaging: structured light tracking with invisible light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    The importance of motion correction in 3D medical imaging increases with increasing scanner resolution. It is necessary for scanners with long image acquisition and low contrast images to correct for patient motion in order to optimize image quality. We present a near infrared structured light...... stereo depth map system for head motion estimation inside 3D medical scanners with limited space....

  11. In Situ Caging of Biomolecules in Graphene Hybrids for Light Modulated Bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Han, Xiao-Hui; Hao, Si-Jie; Nisic, Merisa; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2018-01-31

    Remote and noninvasive modulation of protein activity is essential for applications in biotechnology and medicine. Optical control has emerged as the most attractive approach owing to its high spatial and temporal resolutions; however, it is challenging to engineer light responsive proteins. In this work, a near-infrared (NIR) light-responsive graphene-silica-trypsin (GST) nanoreactor is developed for modulating the bioactivity of trypsin molecules. Biomolecules are spatially confined and protected in the rationally designed compartment architecture, which not only reduces the possible interference but also boosts the bioreaction efficiency. Upon NIR irradiation, the photothermal effect of the GST nanoreactor enables the ultrafast in situ heating for remote activation and tuning of the bioactivity. We apply the GST nanoreactor for remote and ultrafast proteolysis of proteins, which remarkably enhances the proteolysis efficiency and reduces the bioreaction time from the overnight of using free trypsin to seconds. We envision that this work not only provides a promising tool of ultrafast and remotely controllable proteolysis for in vivo proteomics in study of tissue microenvironment and other biomedical applications but also paves the way for exploring smart artificial nanoreactors in biomolecular modulation to gain insight in dynamic biological transformation.

  12. Neutron and X-ray diffraction from modulated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, P.

    1994-07-01

    This thesis describes X-ray and neutron scattering experiments performed on two examples of modulated structures. After an introduction to the subject of modulated structures, the thesis is divided in three parts. A single crystal elastic neutron scattering experiment between 4.2 and 115 Κ has been performed and four-circle X-ray data have been collected at 8 Κ for the monoclinic low-temperature phase of the layered perovskite PAMC. The results from the neutron scattering experiment indicate that magnetoelastic effects influence the ordering of the crystal. The X-ray experiments have made it possible to determine the crystal structure in the low-temperature phase. The superspace group is P2 1 /b(β-30)Os, with β = 1/3. A small-angle neutron scattering experiment has been performed on the magnetic structure of manganese silicide. When a magnetic field is applied, the modulation vectors turn towards the field direction, showing domain growth and diverging peak widths as they approach the field direction. Phase 'A' is established to have the modulation vectors directed perpendicular to the field direction. Cooling in zero field shows increasing peak widths at low temperatures, indicating a lock-in transition below the lowest reached temperature. To be able to analyse the data of the magnetic order in MnSi, and analytical calculation of the three dimensional resolution function for a small-angle neutron scattering spectrometer has been performed. The calculation is done by application of a combination of phase space analysis and Gaussian approximations for the neutron distribution as well as for the transmission functions of the different apertures. A finite mosaic spread of the crystal and finite correlation widths of the Bragg reflections have been included in the cross section. (au) (3 tabs., 48 ills., 100 refs.)

  13. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thuy Tuong; Slaughter, David C.; Max, Nelson; Maloof, Julin N.; Sinha, Neelima

    2015-01-01

    Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants. This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces) and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud regi...

  14. Motion tracking in narrow spaces: A structured light approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel tracking system for patient head motion inside 3D medical scanners. Currently, the system is targeted at the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Partial face surfaces are reconstructed using a miniaturized structured light system. The reconstructed 3D...

  15. CO2 emissions from Super-light Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Bagger, Anne

    2011-01-01

    CO2 emission from the construction of buildings is seldom taken into account because focus is primarily on building operation. New technologies have therefore mainly been developed to reduce the energy consumption connected to operation. Super-light technology is a new structural principle giving...

  16. Fresh meat color evaluation using a structured light imaging system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinderup, Camilla Himmelstrup; Kim, Yuan H. Brad

    2015-01-01

    an equivalent meat color assessment compared to the colorimeter. The CVS had a significantly higher correlation with the panel scores for the lighter and more color stable samples compared to the colorimeter. These results indicate that the CVS with structured light could be an appropriate alternative...... to the traditional colorimeter by offering improved precision and accuracy over the colorimeter....

  17. Precision and Accuracy Parameters in Structured Light 3-D Scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiríksson, Eyþór Rúnar; Wilm, Jakob; Pedersen, David Bue

    2016-01-01

    measure is the established VDI/VDE 2634 (Part 2) guideline using precision made calibration artifacts. Experiments are performed on our own structured light setup, consisting of two cameras and a projector. We place our focus on the influence of calibration design parameters, the calibration procedure...

  18. Spatial light modulators for full cross-connections in optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juday, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A polarization-independent optical switch is disclosed for switching at least one incoming beam from at least one input source to at least one output drain. The switch includes a polarizing beam splitter to split each of the at least one incoming beam into a first input beam and a second input beam, wherein the first input beam and the second input beams are independently polarized; a wave plate optically coupled to the second input beam for converting the polarization of the second input beam to an appropriately polarized second input beam; a beam combiner optically coupled to the first input beam and the modified second input beam, wherein the beam combiner accepts the first input beam and the modified second input beam to produce a combined beam; the combined beam is invariant to the polarization state of the input source's polarization; and a controllable spatial light modulator optically coupled to the combined beam, wherein the combined beam is diffracted by the controllable spatial light modulator to place light at a plurality of output locations.

  19. A transfer-matrix method for spatially modulated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surda, A.

    1991-03-01

    A cluster transfer-matrix method convenient for calculation of spatially modulated structures of a wide class of lattice-gas models is developed. The method formulates the problem of calculation of the partition function in terms of non-linear mapping of effective multi-site fields. It is applied to a lattice-gas model qualitatively describing the system of oxygen atoms in the basal planes of high-temperature superconductors. The properties of an incommensurate structure occurring at intermediate temperatures are discussed in detail. (author). 21 refs, 15 figs

  20. Third sound in one and two dimensional modulated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komuro, T.; Kawashima, H., Shirahama, K.; Kono, K.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental technique is developed to study acoustic transmission in one and two dimensional modulated structures by employing third sound of a superfluid helium film. In particular, the Penrose lattice, which is a two dimensional quasiperiodic structure, is studied. In two dimensions, the scattering of third sound is weaker than in one dimension. Nevertheless, the authors find that the transmission spectrum in the Penrose lattice, which is a two dimensional prototype of the quasicrystal, is observable if the helium film thickness is chosen around 5 atomic layers. The transmission spectra in the Penrose lattice are explained in terms of dynamical theory of diffraction

  1. Nano-honeycomb structured transparent electrode for enhanced light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Xiao-Bo; Qian, Min; Wang, Zhao-Kui, E-mail: zkwang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn; Liao, Liang-Sheng, E-mail: zkwang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lsliao@suda.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

    2015-06-01

    A universal nano-sphere lithography method has been developed to fabricate nano-structured transparent electrode, such as indium tin oxide (ITO), for light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Perforated SiO{sub 2} film made from a monolayer colloidal crystal of polystyrene spheres and tetraethyl orthosilicate sol-gel is used as a template. Ordered nano-honeycomb pits on the ITO electrode surface are obtained by chemical etching. The proposed method can be utilized to form large-area nano-structured ITO electrode. More than two folds' enhancement in both current efficiency and power efficiency has been achieved in a red phosphorescent OLED which was fabricated on the nano-structured ITO substrate.

  2. Fault identification in crystalline silicon PV modules by complementary analysis of the light and dark current-voltage characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spataru, Sergiu; Sera, Dezso; Hacke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes a fault identification method, based on the complementary analysis of the light and dark current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the photovoltaic (PV) module, to distinguish between four important degradation modes that lead to power loss in PV modules: (a) degradation of t...

  3. Structured Light Scanning of Skin, Muscle and Fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilm, Jakob; Jensen, Sebastian Hoppe Nesgaard; Aanæs, Henrik

    of error that various encoding strategies show, and propose an error correcting model, which can bring down the measurement bias considerably. Samples of raw and unprocessed pig tissue were used with the number of sampled surface points Nmeat = 1.2 * 106, Nskin = 4.0 * 106 and Nfat = 2.1 * 106 from 8......We investigate the quality of structured light 3D scanning on pig skin, muscle and fat. These particular materials are interesting in a number of industrial and medical use-cases, and somewhat challenging because they exhibit subsurface light scattering. Our goal therefor is to quantify the amount...

  4. Index mismatch aberration correction over long working distances using spatial light modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjonaj, Bergin; Johnson, Patrick; Bonn, Mischa; Domke, Katrin F

    2012-11-20

    For many microscopy applications, millimeters-long free working distances (LWD) are required. However, the high resolution and contrast of LWD objectives operated in air are lost when introducing glass and/or liquid with the sample. We propose to use spatial light modulation to correct for such beam aberrations caused by refractive index mismatches. Focusing a monochromatic laser beam with a 10 mm working distance air objective (50×, 0.5 NA) through air, glass, and water, we manage to restore a sharp, intense focus (FWHMLWD air objectives, extending their usage beyond applications in air.

  5. Optically controlled reflection modulator using GaAs-AlGaAs n-i-p-i/multiple-quantum-well structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, K.-K.; Simes, R. J.; Coldren, L. A.; Gossard, A. C.; Maserjian, J.

    1989-01-01

    An optically controlled reflection modulator has been demonstrated that consists of a combination of a GaAs-AlGaAs n-i-p-i doping structure with a multiple-quantum-well structures on top of a distributed Bragg reflector, all grown by MBE. A modulation of approximately 60 percent is obtained on the test structure, corresponding to a differential change of absorption coefficient in the quantum wells of approximately 7500/cm. Changes in reflectance can be observed with a control beam power as low as 1.5 microW. This device structure has the potential of being developed as an optically addressed spatial light modulator for optical information processing.

  6. Improvement of diffraction efficiency of three-dimensional magneto-optic spatial light modulator with magnetophotonic crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, K.; Takagi, H., E-mail: takagi@ee.tut.ac.jp; Lim, P. B.; Inoue, M., E-mail: inoue@tut.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441 8580 (Japan); Goto, Taichi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441 8580 (Japan); JST, PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Horimai, H. [HolyMine Corporation, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243 0813 (Japan); Yoshikawa, H. [Department of Computer Engineering, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Funabashi, Chiba 274 8501 (Japan); Bove, V. M. [MIT Media Lab, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2016-01-11

    We have developed three-dimensional magneto-optic spatial light modulators (3D-MOSLMs) that use magnetic domains as submicron scale pixels to represent holograms. Our display system uses a submicron-scale magnetic pixel array on an amorphous TbFe film to create a wide viewing angle hologram. However, in previous work the reconstructed images had a low intensity and a low optical contrast; brightness of the reconstructed image was 4.4 × 10{sup −2 }cd/m{sup 2} with 532 nm illumination light at 10.8 mW/cm{sup 2}, while display standard ISO13406 recommends 100 cd/m{sup 2} or more. In this paper, we describe our development of a 3D-MOSLM composed of an artificial magnetic lattice structure of magnetophotonic crystals (MPCs). The MPCs enhance the diffraction efficiency of reconstructed 3D images and reduce the power consumption for controlling the magnetic pixels by a light localization effect. We demonstrate reconstructed 3D images using the MPC and show significant brightness improvement.

  7. Structural attributes of stand overstory and light under the canopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Angelini

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available  This paper reviews the literature relating to the relationship between light availability in the understory and the main qualitative and quantitative attributes of stand overstory usually considered in forest management and planning (species composition, density, tree sizes, etc. as well as their changes as consequences of harvesting. The paper is divided in two sections: the first one reviews studies which investigated the influence of species composition on understory light conditions; the second part examines research on the relationships among stand parameters determined from dendrometric field data and the radiation on understory layer. The objective was to highlight which are the most significant stand traits and management features to build more practical models for predicting light regimes in any forest stand and, in more general terms, to support forest managers in planning and designing silvicultural treatments that retain structure in different way in order to meet different objectives.

  8. Apo-bacteriophytochromes modulate bacterial photosynthesis in response to low light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixen, Kathryn R; Baker, Anna W; Stojkovic, Emina A; Beatty, J Thomas; Harwood, Caroline S

    2014-01-14

    Bacteriophytochromes (BphPs) are light-sensing regulatory proteins encoded by photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic bacteria. This protein class has been characterized structurally, but its biological activities remain relatively unexplored. Two BphPs in the anoxygenic photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris, designated regulatory proteins RpBphP2 and RpBphP3, are configured as light-regulated histidine kinases, which initiate a signal transduction system that controls expression of genes for the low light harvesting 4 (LH4) antenna complex. In vitro, RpBphP2 and RpBphP3 respond to light quality by reversible photoconversion, a property that requires the light-absorbing chromophore biliverdin. In vivo, RpBphP2 and RpBphP3 are both required for the expression of the LH4 antenna complex under anaerobic conditions, but biliverdin requires oxygen for its synthesis by heme oxygenase. On further investigation, we found that the apo-bacteriophytochrome forms of RpBphP2 and RpBphP3 are necessary and sufficient to control LH4 expression in response to light intensity in conjunction with other signal transduction proteins. One possibility is that the system senses a reduced quinone pool generated when light energy is absorbed by bacteriochlorophyll. The biliverdin-bound forms of the BphPs have the additional property of being able to fine-tune LH4 expression in response to light quality. These observations support the concept that some bacteriophytochromes can function with or without a chromophore and may be involved in regulating physiological processes not directly related to light sensing.

  9. Ultra-low power anti-crosstalk collision avoidance light detection and ranging using chaotic pulse position modulation approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Jie; Gong Ma-li; Du Peng-fei; Lu Bao-jie; Zhang Fan; Zhang Hai-tao; Fu Xing

    2016-01-01

    A novel concept of collision avoidance single-photon light detection and ranging (LIDAR) for vehicles has been demonstrated, in which chaotic pulse position modulation is applied on the transmitted laser pulses for robust anti-crosstalk purposes. Besides, single-photon detectors (SPD) and time correlated single photon counting techniques are adapted, to sense the ultra-low power used for the consideration of compact structure and eye safety. Parameters including pulse rate, discrimination threshold, and number of accumulated pulses have been thoroughly analyzed based on the detection requirements, resulting in specified receiver operating characteristics curves. Both simulation and indoor experiments were performed to verify the excellent anti-crosstalk capability of the presented collision avoidance LIDAR despite ultra-low transmitting power. (paper)

  10. Structuring Light to Manipulate Multipolar Resonances for Metamaterial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tanya

    Multipolar electromagnetic phenomena in sub-wavelength resonators are at the heart of metamaterial science and technology. Typically, researchers engineer multipolar light-matter interactions by modifying the size, shape, and composition of the resonators. Here, we instead engineer multipolar interactions by modifying properties of the incident radiation. In this dissertation, we propose a new framework for determining the scattering response of resonators based on properties of the local excitation field. First, we derive an analytical theory to determine the scattering response of spherical nanoparticles under any type of illumination. Using this theory, we demonstrate the ability to drastically manipulate the scattering properties of a spherical nanoparticle by varying the illumination and demonstrate excitation of a longitudinal quadrupole mode that cannot be accessed with conventional illumination. Next, we investigate the response of dielectric dimer structures illuminated by cylindrical vector beams. Using finite-difference time-domain simulations, we demonstrate significant modification of the scattering spectra of dimer antennas and reveal how the illumination condition gives rise to these spectra through manipulation of electric and magnetic mode hybridization. Finally, we present a simple and efficient numerical simulation based on local field principles for extracting the multipolar response of any resonator under illumination by structured light. This dissertation enhances the understanding of fundamental light-matter interactions in metamaterials and lays the foundation for researchers to identify, quantify, and manipulate multipolar light-matter interactions through optical beam engineering.

  11. Metal–insulator–metal light absorber: a continuous structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, M

    2013-01-01

    A type of light absorber made of continuous layers of metal and dielectric films is studied. The metal films can have thicknesses close to their skin depths in the wavelength range concerned, which allows for both light transmission and reflection. Resonances induced by multiple reflections in the structure, when combined with the inherent lossy nature of metals, result in strong absorption spectral features. An eigen-mode analysis is carried out for the plasmonic multilayer nanostructures which provides a generic understanding of the absorption features. Experimentally, the calculation is verified by a reflection measurement with a representative structure. Such an absorber is simple to fabricate. The highly efficient absorption characteristics can be potentially deployed for optical filter designs, sensors, accurate photothermal temperature control in a micro-environment and even for backscattering reduction of small particles, etc. (paper)

  12. Precision and Accuracy Parameters in Structured Light 3-D Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiríksson, E. R.; Wilm, J.; Pedersen, D. B.; Aanæs, H.

    2016-04-01

    Structured light systems are popular in part because they can be constructed from off-the-shelf low cost components. In this paper we quantitatively show how common design parameters affect precision and accuracy in such systems, supplying a much needed guide for practitioners. Our quantitative measure is the established VDI/VDE 2634 (Part 2) guideline using precision made calibration artifacts. Experiments are performed on our own structured light setup, consisting of two cameras and a projector. We place our focus on the influence of calibration design parameters, the calibration procedure and encoding strategy and present our findings. Finally, we compare our setup to a state of the art metrology grade commercial scanner. Our results show that comparable, and in some cases better, results can be obtained using the parameter settings determined in this study.

  13. Motion tracking in narrow spaces: a structured light approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel tracking system for patient head motion inside 3D medical scanners. Currently, the system is targeted at the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Partial face surfaces are reconstructed using a miniaturized structured light system. The reconstructed 3D...... the system to a standard optical motion tracker based on a rigid tracking tool. Our system achieves an angular RMSE of 0.11 degrees demonstrating its relevance for motion compensated 3D scan image reconstructions as well as its competitiveness against the standard optical system with an RMSE of 0.08 degrees...... point clouds are matched to a reference surface using a robust iterative closest point algorithm. A main challenge is the narrow geometry requiring a compact structured light system and an oblique angle of observation. The system is validated using a mannequin head mounted on a rotary stage. We compare...

  14. Confinement of light in periodic structures with negative phase velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driss Bria; Abdelmajid Essadqui; Bahram Djafari-Rouhani; Mohamed Azizi; Abdellah Daoudi; Abdelkrim Nougaoui

    2008-08-01

    We discuss unusual features of wave propagation in periodic arrays of slabs made of transparent left-handed metamaterials with simultaneously negative dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability, and demonstrate the possibility of light confinement due to the appearance of complete photonic band-gaps in such one-dimensional structures. With an appropriate choice of the parameters, we show that it is possible to realize an absolute (or omnidirectional) band gap for either transverse electric (TE) or transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations of the electromagnetic waves. A combination of two multilayer structures composed of right-handed material (RHM) and left-handed metamaterials LHM is proposed to realize, in a certain range of frequency, an omnidirectional reflector of light for both polarizations. (author)

  15. Light scattering measurements supporting helical structures for chromatin in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, A M; Cotter, R I; Pardon, J F

    1978-05-01

    Laser light scattering measurements have been made on a series of polynucleosomes containing from 50 to 150 nucleosomes. Radii of gyration have been determined as a function of polynucleosome length for different ionic strength solutions. The results suggest that at low ionic strength the chromatin adopts a loosely helical structure rather than a random coil. The helix becomes more regular on increasing the ionic strength, the dimension resembling those proposed by Finch and Klug for their solenoid model.

  16. Electronic structure of ternary hydrides based on light elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgaz, E. [Departamento de Fisica y Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 04510 Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: orgaz@eros.pquim.unam.mx; Membrillo, A. [Departamento de Fisica y Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 04510 Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Castaneda, R. [Departamento de Fisica y Quimica Teorica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 04510 Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Aburto, A. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, CP 04510 Coyoacan, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-12-08

    Ternary hydrides based on light elements are interesting owing to the high available energy density. In this work we focused into the electronic structure of a series of known systems having the general formula AMH{sub 4}(A=Li,Na,M=B,Al). We computed the energy bands and the total and partial density of states using the linear-augmented plane waves method. In this report, we discuss the chemical bonding in this series of complex hydrides.

  17. Diamond-based structures to collect and guide light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castelletto, S [Centre for Micro-Photonics, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Mail H 34 Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia); Harrison, J P; Marseglia, L; Stanley-Clarke, A C; Hadden, J P; Ho, Y-L D; O' Brien, J L; Rarity, J G [Centre for Quantum Photonics, H H Wills Physics Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Bristol, Merchant Venturers Building, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UB (United Kingdom); Gibson, B C; Fairchild, B A; Ganesan, K; Huntington, S T; Greentree, A D; Prawer, S [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne VIC 3010 (Australia); Hiscocks, M P; Ladouceur, F, E-mail: scastelletto@swin.edu.au, E-mail: luca.marseglia@bristol.ac.uk [School of EE and T, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2011-02-15

    We examine some promising photonic structures for collecting and guiding light in bulk diamond. The aim of this work is to optimize single photon sources and single spin read-out from diamond color centers, specifically NV{sup -} centers. We review the modeling and fabrication (by focused ion beam and reactive ion etching) of solid immersion lenses, waveguides and photonic crystal cavities in monolithic diamond.

  18. A Structured Light Scanner for Hyper Flexible Industrial Automation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kent; Pedersen, Jeppe; Sølund, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A current trend in industrial automation implies a need for doing automatic scene understanding, from optical 3D sensors, which in turn imposes a need for a lightweight and reliable 3D optical sensor to be mounted on a collaborative robot e.g., Universal Robot UR5 or Kuka LWR. Here, we empirically...... contribute to the robustness of the system. Hereby, we demonstrate that structured light scanning is a technology well suited for hyper flexible industrial automation, by proposing an appropriate system....

  19. A hole modulator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Tan, Swee Tiam; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-02-01

    The low p-type doping efficiency of the p-GaN layer has severely limited the performance of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) due to the ineffective hole injection into the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) active region. The essence of improving the hole injection efficiency is to increase the hole concentration in the p-GaN layer. Therefore, in this work, we have proposed a hole modulator and studied it both theoretically and experimentally. In the hole modulator, the holes in a remote p-type doped layer are depleted by the built-in electric field and stored in the p-GaN layer. By this means, the overall hole concentration in the p-GaN layer can be enhanced. Furthermore, the hole modulator is adopted in the InGaN/GaN LEDs, which reduces the effective valance band barrier height for the p-type electron blocking layer from ˜332 meV to ˜294 meV at 80 A/cm2 and demonstrates an improved optical performance, thanks to the increased hole concentration in the p-GaN layer and thus the improved hole injection into the MQWs.

  20. A hole modulator for InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Kyaw, Zabu; Liu, Wei; Ji, Yun; Wang, Liancheng; Tan, Swee Tiam; Sun, Xiao Wei; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2015-01-01

    The low p-type doping efficiency of the p-GaN layer has severely limited the performance of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) due to the ineffective hole injection into the InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) active region. The essence of improving the hole injection efficiency is to increase the hole concentration in the p-GaN layer. Therefore, in this work, we have proposed a hole modulator and studied it both theoretically and experimentally. In the hole modulator, the holes in a remote p-type doped layer are depleted by the built-in electric field and stored in the p-GaN layer. By this means, the overall hole concentration in the p-GaN layer can be enhanced. Furthermore, the hole modulator is adopted in the InGaN/GaN LEDs, which reduces the effective valance band barrier height for the p-type electron blocking layer from ∼332 meV to ∼294 meV at 80 A/cm 2 and demonstrates an improved optical performance, thanks to the increased hole concentration in the p-GaN layer and thus the improved hole injection into the MQWs

  1. Demonstration of spatial-light-modulation-based four-wave mixing in cold atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juo, Jz-Yuan; Lin, Jia-Kang; Cheng, Chin-Yao; Liu, Zi-Yu; Yu, Ite A.; Chen, Yong-Fan

    2018-05-01

    Long-distance quantum optical communications usually require efficient wave-mixing processes to convert the wavelengths of single photons. Many quantum applications based on electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) have been proposed and demonstrated at the single-photon level, such as quantum memories, all-optical transistors, and cross-phase modulations. However, EIT-based four-wave mixing (FWM) in a resonant double-Λ configuration has a maximum conversion efficiency (CE) of 25% because of absorptive loss due to spontaneous emission. An improved scheme using spatially modulated intensities of two control fields has been theoretically proposed to overcome this conversion limit. In this study, we first demonstrate wavelength conversion from 780 to 795 nm with a 43% CE by using this scheme at an optical density (OD) of 19 in cold 87Rb atoms. According to the theoretical model, the CE in the proposed scheme can further increase to 96% at an OD of 240 under ideal conditions, thereby attaining an identical CE to that of the previous nonresonant double-Λ scheme at half the OD. This spatial-light-modulation-based FWM scheme can achieve a near-unity CE, thus providing an easy method of implementing an efficient quantum wavelength converter for all-optical quantum information processing.

  2. Visible-Light Modulation on Lattice Dielectric Responses of a Piezo-Phototronic Soft Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, E-Wen; Hsu, Yu-Hsiang; Chuang, Wei-Tsung; Ko, Wen-Ching; Chang, Chung-Kai; Lee, Chih-Kung; Chang, Wen-Chi; Liao, Tzu-Kang; Thong, Hao Cheng

    2015-12-16

    In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction is used to investigate a three-way piezo-phototronic soft material. This new system is composed of a semi-crystalline poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-trifluoroethylene) piezoelectric polymer and titanium oxide nanoparticles. Under light illumination, photon-induced piezoelectric responses are nearly two times higher at both the lattice-structure and the macroscopic level than under conditions without light illumination. A mechanistic model is proposed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. p3d--Python module for structural bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fufezan, Christian; Specht, Michael

    2009-08-21

    High-throughput bioinformatic analysis tools are needed to mine the large amount of structural data via knowledge based approaches. The development of such tools requires a robust interface to access the structural data in an easy way. For this the Python scripting language is the optimal choice since its philosophy is to write an understandable source code. p3d is an object oriented Python module that adds a simple yet powerful interface to the Python interpreter to process and analyse three dimensional protein structure files (PDB files). p3d's strength arises from the combination of a) very fast spatial access to the structural data due to the implementation of a binary space partitioning (BSP) tree, b) set theory and c) functions that allow to combine a and b and that use human readable language in the search queries rather than complex computer language. All these factors combined facilitate the rapid development of bioinformatic tools that can perform quick and complex analyses of protein structures. p3d is the perfect tool to quickly develop tools for structural bioinformatics using the Python scripting language.

  4. p3d – Python module for structural bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fufezan Christian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput bioinformatic analysis tools are needed to mine the large amount of structural data via knowledge based approaches. The development of such tools requires a robust interface to access the structural data in an easy way. For this the Python scripting language is the optimal choice since its philosophy is to write an understandable source code. Results p3d is an object oriented Python module that adds a simple yet powerful interface to the Python interpreter to process and analyse three dimensional protein structure files (PDB files. p3d's strength arises from the combination of a very fast spatial access to the structural data due to the implementation of a binary space partitioning (BSP tree, b set theory and c functions that allow to combine a and b and that use human readable language in the search queries rather than complex computer language. All these factors combined facilitate the rapid development of bioinformatic tools that can perform quick and complex analyses of protein structures. Conclusion p3d is the perfect tool to quickly develop tools for structural bioinformatics using the Python scripting language.

  5. Light transport and lasing in complex photonic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Seng Fatt

    Complex photonic structures refer to composite optical materials with dielectric constant varying on length scales comparable to optical wavelengths. Light propagation in such heterogeneous composites is greatly different from homogeneous media due to scattering of light in all directions. Interference of these scattered light waves gives rise to many fascinating phenomena and it has been a fast growing research area, both for its fundamental physics and for its practical applications. In this thesis, we have investigated the optical properties of photonic structures with different degree of order, ranging from periodic to random. The first part of this thesis consists of numerical studies of the photonic band gap (PBG) effect in structures from 1D to 3D. From these studies, we have observed that PBG effect in a 1D photonic crystal is robust against uncorrelated disorder due to preservation of long-range positional order. However, in higher dimensions, the short-range positional order alone is sufficient to form PBGs in 2D and 3D photonic amorphous structures (PASS). We have identified several parameters including dielectric filling fraction and degree of order that can be tuned to create a broad isotropic PBG. The largest PBG is produced by the dielectric networks due to local uniformity in their dielectric constant distribution. In addition, we also show that deterministic aperiodic structures (DASs) such as the golden-angle spiral and topological defect structures can support a wide PBG and their optical resonances contain unexpected features compared to those in photonic crystals. Another growing research field based on complex photonic structures is the study of structural color in animals and plants. Previous studies have shown that non-iridescent color can be generated from PASs via single or double scatterings. For better understanding of the coloration mechanisms, we have measured the wavelength-dependent scattering length from the biomimetic samples. Our

  6. Optical feedback-induced light modulation for fiber-based laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-11-01

    Optical fibers have been used as a minimally invasive tool in various medical fields. However, due to excessive heat accumulation, the distal end of a fiber often suffers from severe melting or devitrification, leading to the eventual fiber failure during laser treatment. In order to minimize thermal damage at the fiber tip, an optical feedback sensor was developed and tested ex vivo. Porcine kidney tissue was used to evaluate the feasibility of optical feedback in terms of signal activation, ablation performance, and light transmission. Testing various signal thresholds demonstrated that 3 V was relatively appropriate to trigger the feedback sensor and to prevent the fiber deterioration during kidney tissue ablation. Based upon the development of temporal signal signatures, full contact mode rapidly activated the optical feedback sensor possibly due to heat accumulation. Modulated light delivery induced by optical feedback diminished ablation efficiency by 30% in comparison with no feedback case. However, long-term transmission results validated that laser ablation assisted with optical feedback was able to almost consistently sustain light delivery to the tissue as well as ablation efficiency. Therefore, an optical feedback sensor can be a feasible tool to protect optical fiber tips by minimizing debris contamination and delaying thermal damage process and to ensure more efficient and safer laser-induced tissue ablation.

  7. Increasing the efficiency of silicon heterojunction solar cells and modules by light soaking

    KAUST Repository

    Kobayashi, Eiji

    2017-06-24

    Silicon heterojunction solar cells use crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafers as optical absorbers and employ bilayers of doped/intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) to form passivating contacts. Recently, we demonstrated that such solar cells increase their operating voltages and thus their conversion efficiencies during light exposure. We found that this performance increase is due to improved passivation of the a-Si:H/c-Si interface and is induced by injected charge carriers (either by light soaking or forward-voltage biasing of the device). Here, we discuss this counterintuitive behavior and establish that: (i) the performance increase is observed in solar cells as well as modules; (ii) this phenomenon requires the presence of doped a-Si:H films, but is independent from whether light is incident from the a-Si:H(p) or the a-Si:H(n) side; (iii) UV and blue photons do not play a role in this effect; (iv) the performance increase can be observed under illumination intensities as low as 20Wm (0.02-sun) and appears to be almost identical in strength when under 1-sun (1000Wm); (v) the underlying physical mechanism likely differs from annealing-induced surface passivation.

  8. Structural features of subtype-selective EP receptor modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovič, Tijana; Jakopin, Žiga; Dolenc, Marija Sollner; Mlinarič-Raščan, Irena

    2017-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 is a potent endogenous molecule that binds to four different G-protein-coupled receptors: EP1-4. Each of these receptors is a valuable drug target, with distinct tissue localisation and signalling pathways. We review the structural features of EP modulators required for subtype-selective activity, as well as the structural requirements for improved pharmacokinetic parameters. Novel EP receptor subtype selective agonists and antagonists appear to be valuable drug candidates in the therapy of many pathophysiological states, including ulcerative colitis, glaucoma, bone healing, B cell lymphoma, neurological diseases, among others, which have been studied in vitro, in vivo and in early phase clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Modulating nanoparticle superlattice structure using proteins with tunable bond distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMillan, Janet R.; Brodin, Jeffrey D.; Millan, Jaime A.; Lee, Byeongdu; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we investigate the use of proteins with tunable DNA modification distributions to modulate nanoparticle superlattice structure. Using Beta-galactosidase (βgal) as a model system, we have employed the orthogonal chemical reactivities of surface amines and thiols to synthesize protein-DNA conjugates with 36 evenly distributed or 8 specifically positioned oligonucleotides. When assembled into crystalline superlattices with AuNPs, we find that the distribution of DNA modifications modulates the favored structure: βgal with uniformly distributed DNA bonding elements results in body-centered cubic crystals, whereas DNA functionalization of cysteines results in AB 2 packing. We probe the role of protein oligonucleotide number and conjugate size on this observation, which revealed the importance of oligonucleotide distribution and number in this observed assembly behavior. These results indicate that proteins with defined DNA-modification patterns are powerful tools to control the nanoparticle superlattices architecture, and establish the importance of oligonucleotide distribution in the assembly behavior of protein-DNA conjugates.

  10. Detection for flatness of large surface based on structured light

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wenyan; Cao, Xuedong; Long, Kuang; Peng, Zhang

    2016-09-01

    In order to get flatness of a large plane, this paper set up a measurement system, composed by Line Structured Light, imaging system, CCD, etc. Line Structured Light transmits parallel fringes at a proper angle onto the plane which is measured; the imaging system and CCD locate above the plane to catch the fringes. When the plane is perfect, CCD will catch straight fringes; however, the real plane is not perfect; according to the theory of projection, the fringes caught by CCD will be distorted by convex and concave. Extract the center of line fringes to obtain the distortion of the fringe, according to the functional relationship between the distortion of fringes and the height which is measured, then we will get flatness of the entire surface. Data from experiment approached the analysis of theory. In the simulation, the vertical resolution is 0.0075 mm per pixel when measuring a plane of 400mm×400mm, choosing the size of CCD 4096×4096, at the angle 85°. Helped by sub-pixel, the precision will get the level of submicron. There are two obvious advantages: method of surface sampling can increase the efficiency for auto-repairing of machines; considering the center of fringe is required mainly in this system, as a consequence, there is no serious demand for back light.

  11. Passive cooling of standalone flat PV module with cotton wick structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekar, M.; Suresh, S.; Senthilkumar, T.; Ganesh karthikeyan, M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A simple passive cooling system is developed for standalone flat PV modules. • 30% Reduction in module temperature is observed with developed cooling system. • 15.61% Increase in output power of PV module is found with developed cooling system. • Module efficiency is increased by 1.4% with cooling arrangement. • Lower thermal degradation due to narrow range of temperature characteristics. - Abstract: In common, PV module converts only 4–17% of the incoming solar radiation into electricity. Thus more than 50% of the incident solar energy is converted as heat and the temperature of PV module is increased. The increase in module temperature in turn decreases the electrical yield and efficiency of the module with a permanent structural damage of the module due to prolonged period of thermal stress (also known as thermal degradation of the module). An effective way of improving efficiency and reducing the rate of thermal degradation of a PV module is to reduce the operating temperature of PV module. This can be achieved by cooling the PV module during operation. Hence in the present work, a simple passive cooling system with cotton wick structures is developed for standalone flat PV modules. The thermal and electrical performance of flat PV module with cooling system consisting of cotton wick structures in combination with water, Al 2 O 3 /water nanofluid and CuO/water nanofluid are investigated experimentally. The experimental results are also compared with the thermal and electrical performance of flat PV module without cooling system

  12. Photonic Structures for Light Trapping in Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells: Design and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ding

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the foremost challenges in designing thin-film silicon solar cells (TFSC is devising efficient light-trapping schemes due to the short optical path length imposed by the thin absorber thickness. The strategy relies on a combination of a high-performance back reflector and an optimized texture surface, which are commonly used to reflect and scatter light effectively within the absorption layer, respectively. In this paper, highly promising light-trapping structures based on a photonic crystal (PC for TFSCs were investigated via simulation and experiment. Firstly, a highly-reflective one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D-PC was designed and fabricated. Then, two types of 1D-PC-based back reflectors (BRs were proposed: Flat 1D-PC with random-textured aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO or random-textured 1D-PC with AZO. These two newly-designed BRs demonstrated not only high reflectivity and sufficient conductivity, but also a strong light scattering property, which made them efficient candidates as the electrical contact and back reflector since the intrinsic losses due to the surface plasmon modes of the rough metal BRs can be avoided. Secondly, conical two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D-PC-based BRs were investigated and optimized for amorphous a-SiGe:H solar cells. The maximal absorption value can be obtained with an aspect ratio of 1/2 and a period of 0.75 µm. To improve the full-spectral optical properties of solar cells, a periodically-modulated PC back reflector was proposed and experimentally demonstrated in the a-SiGe:H solar cell. This periodically-modulated PC back reflector, also called the quasi-crystal structure (QCS, consists of a large periodic conical PC and a randomly-textured Ag layer with a feature size of 500–1000 nm. The large periodic conical PC enables conformal growth of the layer, while the small feature size of Ag can further enhance the light scattering. In summary, a comprehensive study of the design, simulation

  13. A multi-modal stereo microscope based on a spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M P; Gibson, G M; Bowman, R; Bernet, S; Ritsch-Marte, M; Phillips, D B; Padgett, M J

    2013-07-15

    Spatial Light Modulators (SLMs) can emulate the classic microscopy techniques, including differential interference (DIC) contrast and (spiral) phase contrast. Their programmability entails the benefit of flexibility or the option to multiplex images, for single-shot quantitative imaging or for simultaneous multi-plane imaging (depth-of-field multiplexing). We report the development of a microscope sharing many of the previously demonstrated capabilities, within a holographic implementation of a stereo microscope. Furthermore, we use the SLM to combine stereo microscopy with a refocusing filter and with a darkfield filter. The instrument is built around a custom inverted microscope and equipped with an SLM which gives various imaging modes laterally displaced on the same camera chip. In addition, there is a wide angle camera for visualisation of a larger region of the sample.

  14. Efficient illumination of spatial light modulators for optical trapping and manipulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Kopylov, Oleksii; Raaby, Peter

    Energy efficiency is always desirable. This is particularly true with lasers that find many applications in research and industry. Combined with spatial light modulators (SLMs) lasers are used for optical trapping and manipulation, sorting, microscopy or biological stimulation1. Besides efficiency....... We have also shown dynamic SLM-generated patterns for materials processing and biological research. To efficiently illuminate an SLM, we used a compact pen-sized GPC-LS in place of an iris. For the same input power, hologram reconstructions are ~3x brighter or alternatively ~3x more focal spots can...... be addressed. This allows better response or increased parallel addressing for e.g. optical manipulation and sorting. Simple yet effective, a GPC-LS could save substantial power in applications that truncate lasers to a specific shape....

  15. Visible light communication using DC-biased optical filter bank multi-carrier modulation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Rui

    2018-03-19

    Filter bank multicarrier (FBMC) has become a promising candidate to replace conventional orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) scheme in 5G technology due to its better spectral confinement which results in a reduced inter-channel interference (ICI). However, the viability of using FBMC in visible light communication has not been verified. In this work we present the first experimental validation of the DC-biased optical filter bank multicarrier (DCO-FBMC) modulation scheme over a free-space optical channel. Under different receiving powers, up to three times bit error rate performance improvement has been achieved using DCO-FBMC with different overlapping factors compared to that of conventional DCO-OFDM.

  16. Modulation response, mixed-mode oscillations and chaotic spiking in quantum dot light emitting diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Husseini, Hussein B.; Al Naimee, Kais A.; Al Khursan, Amin H.; Abdalah, Sora F.; Khedir, Ali H.; Meucci, Riccardo; Arecchi, F. Tito

    2015-01-01

    In this work quantum dot light emitting diode (QD-LED) was modeled in a dimensionless rate equations system where it is not done earlier. The model was examined first under bias current without any external perturbation where it exhibits chaotic phenomena since the model has multi-degrees of freedom. Then, it is perturbed by both small signal and direct current modulations (DCM), separately. The system exhibits mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) under DCM. This behavior was reasoned to continuous states of two dimensional wetting layer (WL) which works as a reservoir to quantum dot (QD) states. QD capture was the dominant rate controlling the dynamic behavior in QD-LED. The nonlinear dynamic behavior of our model is compared very well to the experimental observations in the QD-LED

  17. Optical Implementation Of The Hopfield Model Using A Spatial Light Modulator Discussion Of Properties And Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torzynski, Marc

    1989-01-01

    In this paper we propose an optical design for implementation of neuronic Hopfield network. We describe the algorithm and its potential possibilities as associative (or content addressable) memory. We then describe the optical set (using a magneto-optic spatial light modulator) and explaning its operating mode: the binary transparency of the SLM does not allow a direct and accurate experimental realisation of the theoretical algorithm. However, there is a particular setup that can implemented it powerfully but with a reduction of the effective number of neurons. The operating speed is then evaluated from the characteristics of the SLM "Sight-Mod" manufactured by SEMETEX corp.: the maximun operating frequency seems limited by the speed of the optical valve.

  18. Efficient and accurate laser shaping with liquid crystal spatial light modulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxson, Jared M.; Bartnik, Adam C.; Bazarov, Ivan V. [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    A phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) is capable of precise transverse laser shaping by either functioning as a variable phase grating or by serving as a variable mask via polarization rotation. As a phase grating, the highest accuracy algorithms, based on computer generated holograms (CGHs), have been shown to yield extended laser shapes with <10% rms error, but conversely little is known about the experimental efficiency of the method in general. In this work, we compare the experimental tradeoff between error and efficiency for both the best known CGH method and polarization rotation-based intensity masking when generating hard-edged flat top beams. We find that the masking method performs comparably with CGHs, both having rms error < 10% with efficiency > 15%. Informed by best practices for high efficiency from a SLM phase grating, we introduce an adaptive refractive algorithm which has high efficiency (92%) but also higher error (16%), for nearly cylindrically symmetric cases.

  19. Visible light communication using DC-biased optical filter bank multi-carrier modulation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Rui; Park, Kihong; Shen, Chao; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2018-01-01

    Filter bank multicarrier (FBMC) has become a promising candidate to replace conventional orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) scheme in 5G technology due to its better spectral confinement which results in a reduced inter-channel interference (ICI). However, the viability of using FBMC in visible light communication has not been verified. In this work we present the first experimental validation of the DC-biased optical filter bank multicarrier (DCO-FBMC) modulation scheme over a free-space optical channel. Under different receiving powers, up to three times bit error rate performance improvement has been achieved using DCO-FBMC with different overlapping factors compared to that of conventional DCO-OFDM.

  20. Adaptive electron beam shaping using a photoemission gun and spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxson, Jared; Lee, Hyeri; Bartnik, Adam C.; Kiefer, Jacob; Bazarov, Ivan

    2015-02-01

    The need for precisely defined beam shapes in photoelectron sources has been well established. In this paper, we use a spatial light modulator and simple shaping algorithm to create arbitrary, detailed transverse laser shapes with high fidelity. We transmit this shaped laser to the photocathode of a high voltage dc gun. Using beam currents where space charge is negligible, and using an imaging solenoid and fluorescent viewscreen, we show that the resultant beam shape preserves these detailed features with similar fidelity. Next, instead of transmitting a shaped laser profile, we use an active feedback on the unshaped electron beam image to create equally accurate and detailed shapes. We demonstrate that this electron beam feedback has the added advantage of correcting for electron optical aberrations, yielding shapes without skew. The method may serve to provide precisely defined electron beams for low current target experiments, space-charge dominated beam commissioning, as well as for online adaptive correction of photocathode quantum efficiency degradation.

  1. Generating structured light with phase helix and intensity helix using reflection-enhanced plasmonic metasurface at 2 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yifan; Du, Jing; Zhang, Jinrun; Shen, Li; Wang, Jian

    2018-04-01

    Mid-infrared (2-20 μm) light has been attracting great attention in many areas of science and technology. Beyond the extended wavelength range from visible and near-infrared to mid-infrared, shaping spatial structures may add opportunities to grooming applications of mid-infrared photonics. Here, we design and fabricate a reflection-enhanced plasmonic metasurface and demonstrate efficient generation of structured light with the phase helix and intensity helix at 2 μm. This work includes two distinct aspects. First, structured light (phase helix, intensity helix) generation at 2 μm, which is far beyond the ability of conventional spatial light modulators, is enabled by the metasurface with sub-wavelength engineered structures. Second, the self-referenced intensity helix against environmental noise is generated without using a spatially separated light. The demonstrations may open up advanced perspectives to structured light applications at 2 μm, such as phase helix for communications and non-communications (imaging, sensing) and intensity helix for enhanced microscopy and advanced metrology.

  2. Spatial light modulator array with heat minimization and image enhancement features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kanti [Briarcliff Manor, NY; Sweatt, William C [Albuquerque, NM; Zemel, Marc [New Rochelle, NY

    2007-01-30

    An enhanced spatial light modulator (ESLM) array, a microelectronics patterning system and a projection display system using such an ESLM for heat-minimization and resolution enhancement during imaging, and the method for fabricating such an ESLM array. The ESLM array includes, in each individual pixel element, a small pixel mirror (reflective region) and a much larger pixel surround. Each pixel surround includes diffraction-grating regions and resolution-enhancement regions. During imaging, a selected pixel mirror reflects a selected-pixel beamlet into the capture angle of a projection lens, while the diffraction grating of the pixel surround redirects heat-producing unused radiation away from the projection lens. The resolution-enhancement regions of selected pixels provide phase shifts that increase effective modulation-transfer function in imaging. All of the non-selected pixel surrounds redirect all radiation energy away from the projection lens. All elements of the ESLM are fabricated by deposition, patterning, etching and other microelectronic process technologies.

  3. Airborne and impact sound transmission in super-light structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jacob Ellehauge; Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Brunskog, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    -aggregate concrete. A super-light deck element is developed. It is intended to be lighter than traditional deck structures without compromising the acoustic performance. It is primarily the airborne sound insulation, which is of interest as the requirements for the impact sound insulation to a higher degree can...... be fulfilled by external means such as floorings. The acoustical performance of the slab element is enhanced by several factors. Load carrying internal arches stiffens the element. This causes a decrease in the modal density, which is further improved by the element being lighter. These parameters also...

  4. Light-induced metastable structural changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, H. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Light-induced defects (LID) in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and its alloys limit the ultimate efficiency of solar panels made with these materials. This paper reviews a variety of attempts to find the origin of and to eliminate the processes that give rise to LIDs. These attempts include novel deposition processes and the reduction of impurities. Material improvements achieved over the past decade are associated more with the material`s microstructure than with eliminating LIDs. We conclude that metastable LIDs are a natural by-product of structural changes which are generally associated with non-radiative electron-hole recombination in amorphous semiconductors.

  5. Geometric calibration between PET scanner and structured light scanner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjer, Hans Martin; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2011-01-01

    Head movements degrade the image quality of high resolution Positron Emission Tomography (PET) brain studies through blurring and artifacts. Manny image reconstruction methods allows for motion correction if the head position is tracked continuously during the study. Our method for motion tracking...... is a structured light scanner placed just above the patient tunnel on the High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT, Siemens). It continuously registers point clouds of a part of the patient's face. The relative motion is estimated as the rigid transformation between frames. A geometric calibration between...

  6. Revolving supramolecular chiral structures powered by light in nanomotor-doped liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Tetiana; Lancia, Federico; Loussert, Charles; Iamsaard, Supitchaya; Katsonis, Nathalie; Brasselet, Etienne

    2018-04-01

    Molecular machines operated by light have been recently shown to be able to produce oriented motion at the molecular scale1,2 as well as do macroscopic work when embedded in supramolecular structures3-5. However, any supramolecular movement irremediably ceases as soon as the concentration of the interconverting molecular motors or switches reaches a photo-stationary state6,7. To circumvent this limitation, researchers have typically relied on establishing oscillating illumination conditions—either by modulating the source intensity8,9 or by using bespoke illumination arrangements10-13. In contrast, here we report a supramolecular system in which the emergence of oscillating patterns is encoded at the molecular level. Our system comprises chiral liquid crystal structures that revolve continuously when illuminated, under the action of embedded light-driven molecular motors. The rotation at the supramolecular level is sustained by the diffusion of the motors away from a localized illumination area. Above a critical irradiation power, we observe a spontaneous symmetry breaking that dictates the directionality of the supramolecular rotation. The interplay between the twist of the supramolecular structure and the diffusion14 of the chiral molecular motors creates continuous, regular and unidirectional rotation of the liquid crystal structure under non-equilibrium conditions.

  7. Low level light in combination with metabolic modulators for effective therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Tingting; Zhang, Qi; Hamblin, Michael R.; Wu, Mei X.

    2015-03-01

    Vascular damage occurs frequently at the injured brain causing hypoxia and is associated with poor outcomes in the clinics. We found high levels of glycolysis, reduced ATP generation, and increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis in neurons under hypoxia. Strikingly, these adverse events were reversed significantly by noninvasive exposure of injured brain to low-level light (LLL). LLL illumination sustained the mitochondrial membrane potential, constrained cytochrome C leakage in hypoxic cells, and protected them from apoptosis, underscoring a unique property of LLL. The effect of LLL was further bolstered by combination with metabolic substrates such as pyruvate or lactate both in vivo and in vitro. The combinational treatment retained memory and learning activities of injured mice to a normal level, whereas those treated with LLL or pyruvate alone, or sham light displayed partial or severe deficiency in these cognitive functions. In accordance with well-protected learning and memory function, the hippocampal region primarily responsible for learning and memory was completely protected by a combination of LLL and pyruvate, in marked contrast to the severe loss of hippocampal tissue due to secondary damage in control mice. These data clearly suggest that energy metabolic modulators can additively or synergistically enhance the therapeutic effect of LLL in energy-producing insufficient tissues like injured brain. Keywords:

  8. Vocal effort modulates the motor planning of short speech structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taitz, Alan; Shalom, Diego E.; Trevisan, Marcos A.

    2018-05-01

    Speech requires programming the sequence of vocal gestures that produce the sounds of words. Here we explored the timing of this program by asking our participants to pronounce, as quickly as possible, a sequence of consonant-consonant-vowel (CCV) structures appearing on screen. We measured the delay between visual presentation and voice onset. In the case of plosive consonants, produced by sharp and well defined movements of the vocal tract, we found that delays are positively correlated with the duration of the transition between consonants. We then used a battery of statistical tests and mathematical vocal models to show that delays reflect the motor planning of CCVs and transitions are proxy indicators of the vocal effort needed to produce them. These results support that the effort required to produce the sequence of movements of a vocal gesture modulates the onset of the motor plan.

  9. Structural studies on serum albumins under green light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comorosan, Sorin; Polosan, Silviu; Popescu, Irinel; Ionescu, Elena; Mitrica, Radu; Cristache, Ligia; State, Alina Elena

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents two new experimental results: the protective effect of green light (GL) on ultraviolet (UV) denaturation of proteins, and the effect of GL on protein macromolecular structures. The protective effect of GL was revealed on two serum albumins, bovine (BSA) and human (HSA), and recorded by electrophoresis, absorption, and circular dichroism spectra. The effect of GL irradiation on protein structure was recorded by using fluorescence spectroscopy and electrophoresis. These new effects were modeled by quantum-chemistry computation using Gaussian 03 W, leading to good fit between theoretical and experimental absorption and circular dichroism spectra. A mechanism for these phenomena is suggested, based on a double-photon absorption process. This nonlinear effect may lead to generation of long-lived Rydberg macromolecular systems, capable of long-range interactions. These newly suggested systems, with macroscopic quantum coherence behaviors, may block the UV denaturation processes.

  10. An algorithm for sensing venous oxygenation using ultrasound-modulated light enhanced by microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeysett, Jack E.; Stride, Eleanor; Deng, Jing; Leung, Terence S.

    2012-02-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) can provide an estimate of the mean oxygen saturation in tissue. This technique is limited by optical scattering, which reduces the spatial resolution of the measurement, and by absorption, which makes the measurement insensitive to oxygenation changes in larger deep blood vessels relative to that in the superficial tissue. Acousto-optic (AO) techniques which combine focused ultrasound (US) with diffuse light have been shown to improve the spatial resolution as a result of US-modulation of the light signal, however this technique still suffers from low signal-to-noise when detecting a signal from regions of high optical absorption. Combining an US contrast agent with this hybrid technique has been proposed to amplify an AO signal. Microbubbles are a clinical contrast agent used in diagnostic US for their ability to resonate in a sound field: in this work we also make use of their optical scattering properties (modelled using Mie theory). A perturbation Monte Carlo (pMC) model of light transport in a highly absorbing blood vessel containing microbubbles surrounded by tissue is used to calculate the AO signal detected on the top surface of the tissue. An algorithm based on the modified Beer-Lambert law is derived which expresses intravenous oxygen saturation in terms of an AO signal. This is used to determine the oxygen saturation in the blood vessel from a dual wavelength microbubble-contrast AO measurement. Applying this algorithm to the simulation data shows that the venous oxygen saturation is accurately recovered, and this measurement is robust to changes in the oxygenation of the superficial tissue layer.

  11. Robust pattern decoding in shape-coded structured light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Suming; Zhang, Xu; Song, Zhan; Song, Lifang; Zeng, Hai

    2017-09-01

    Decoding is a challenging and complex problem in a coded structured light system. In this paper, a robust pattern decoding method is proposed for the shape-coded structured light in which the pattern is designed as grid shape with embedded geometrical shapes. In our decoding method, advancements are made at three steps. First, a multi-template feature detection algorithm is introduced to detect the feature point which is the intersection of each two orthogonal grid-lines. Second, pattern element identification is modelled as a supervised classification problem and the deep neural network technique is applied for the accurate classification of pattern elements. Before that, a training dataset is established, which contains a mass of pattern elements with various blurring and distortions. Third, an error correction mechanism based on epipolar constraint, coplanarity constraint and topological constraint is presented to reduce the false matches. In the experiments, several complex objects including human hand are chosen to test the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. The experimental results show that our decoding method not only has high decoding accuracy, but also owns strong robustness to surface color and complex textures.

  12. Unified studies of structure and reactions in light unstable nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The generalized two-center cluster model (GTCM, which can treat covalent, ionic and atomic configurations in general systems with two inert cores plus valence nucleons, is formulated in the basis of the microscopic cluster model. In this model, the covalent configurations constructed by the molecular orbital (MO method and the atomic (or ionic configuration obtained by the valence bonding (VB method can be described in a consistent manner. GTCM is applied to the light neutron-rich system, 10,12Be = α + α + XN (X = 2,4, and the unified studies of the structural changes and the reaction problem are performed. In the structure study, the calculated energy levels are characterized in terms of the chemical bonding like structures, such as the covalent MO or ionic VB structures. The chemical bonding structures changes from level to level within a small energy interval. In the unbound region, the structure problem with the total system of α + α + XN and the reaction problem, induced by the collision of an asymptotic VB state of α+6,8He, are combined by GTCM. The properties of unbound resonant states are discussed in a close connection to the reaction mechanism, and some enhancement factors originated from the properties of the intrinsic states are predicted in the reaction observables. The unified calculation of the structures and the reactions is applied to the Coulomb shift problem in the mirror system, such the 10Be and 10C nuclei. The Coulomb displacement energy of the mirror systems are discussed.

  13. Affects of binary and continuous phase modulations on the structure of Bessel beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors implement a novel technique to operate a phase-only spatial light modulator (SLM) in amplitude mode, allowing them to reproduce Durnin’s ring slit on a liquid crystal display (LCD). The affects of binary and continuous phase modulations...

  14. Local electrophoresis deposition assisted by laser trapping coupled with a spatial light modulator for three-dimensional microfabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Toshiki; Takai, Takanari; Iwata, Futoshi

    2017-10-01

    We describe a novel three-dimensional fabrication technique using local electrophoresis deposition assisted by laser trapping coupled with a spatial light modulator (SLM). In a solution containing nanometer-scale colloidal Au particles, multiple laser spots formed on a conductive substrate by the SLM gathered the nanoparticles together, and then the nanoparticles were electrophoretically deposited onto the substrate by an applied electrical field. However, undesirable sub-spots often appeared due to optical interference from the multiple laser spots, which deteriorated the accuracy of the deposition. To avoid the appearance of undesirable sub-spots, we proposed a method using quasi-multiple spots, which we realized by switching the position of a single spot briefly using the SLM. The method allowed us to deposit multiple dots on the substrate without undesirable sub-dot deposition. By moving the substrate downward during deposition, multiple micro-pillar structures could be fabricated. As a fabrication property, the dependence of the pillar diameter on laser intensity was investigated by changing the number of laser spots. The smallest diameter of the four pillars fabricated in this study was 920 nm at the laser intensity of 2.5 mW. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the method, multiple spiral structures were fabricated. Quadruple spirals of 46 µm in height were successfully fabricated with a growth rate of 0.21 µm/s using 2200 frames of the CGH patterns displayed in the SLM at a frame rate of 10 fps.

  15. Terahertz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation from Femtosecond Laser Modulation of the Electron Beam at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, John M.; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C.; Robin, David S.; Sannibale, Fernando; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Zholents, Alexander A.; Zolotorev, Max S.

    2005-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the ''femtoslicing'' beamline is in operation since 1999 for the production of x-ray synchrotron radiation pulses with femtosecond duration. The mechanism used for generating the short x-ray pulses induces at the same time temporary structures in the electron bunch longitudinal distribution with very short characteristic length. Such structures emit intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range. These CSR pulses were first observed at the ALS, and the measurement of their intensity is now routinely used as a diagnostics for the tune-up of the femtoslicing x-ray experiments. At the same time, these CSR pulses synchronous with the modulating laser, represent a potential source of terahertz radiation with very interesting features. Several measurements have been performed for their characterization and in this paper we present an updated description of the experimental results and of their interpretation. In particular, we include more data on the interesting interaction, previously observed at the ALS, between the slicing and the microbunching instability (MBI), where under particular circumstances, the slicing seems to trigger the onset of the instability

  16. Exploring the spatial distribution of light interception and photosynthesis of canopies by means of a functional–structural plant model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlikioti, V.; de Visser, P. H. B.; Marcelis, L. F. M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims At present most process-based models and the majority of three-dimensional models include simplifications of plant architecture that can compromise the accuracy of light interception simulations and, accordingly, canopy photosynthesis. The aim of this paper is to analyse canopy heterogeneity of an explicitly described tomato canopy in relation to temporal dynamics of horizontal and vertical light distribution and photosynthesis under direct- and diffuse-light conditions. Methods Detailed measurements of canopy architecture, light interception and leaf photosynthesis were carried out on a tomato crop. These data were used for the development and calibration of a functional–structural tomato model. The model consisted of an architectural static virtual plant coupled with a nested radiosity model for light calculations and a leaf photosynthesis module. Different scenarios of horizontal and vertical distribution of light interception, incident light and photosynthesis were investigated under diffuse and direct light conditions. Key Results Simulated light interception showed a good correspondence to the measured values. Explicitly described leaf angles resulted in higher light interception in the middle of the plant canopy compared with fixed and ellipsoidal leaf-angle distribution models, although the total light interception remained the same. The fraction of light intercepted at a north–south orientation of rows differed from east–west orientation by 10 % on winter and 23 % on summer days. The horizontal distribution of photosynthesis differed significantly between the top, middle and lower canopy layer. Taking into account the vertical variation of leaf photosynthetic parameters in the canopy, led to approx. 8 % increase on simulated canopy photosynthesis. Conclusions Leaf angles of heterogeneous canopies should be explicitly described as they have a big impact both on light distribution and photosynthesis. Especially, the vertical

  17. Exploring the spatial distribution of light interception and photosynthesis of canopies by means of a functional-structural plant model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarlikioti, V; de Visser, P H B; Marcelis, L F M

    2011-04-01

    At present most process-based models and the majority of three-dimensional models include simplifications of plant architecture that can compromise the accuracy of light interception simulations and, accordingly, canopy photosynthesis. The aim of this paper is to analyse canopy heterogeneity of an explicitly described tomato canopy in relation to temporal dynamics of horizontal and vertical light distribution and photosynthesis under direct- and diffuse-light conditions. Detailed measurements of canopy architecture, light interception and leaf photosynthesis were carried out on a tomato crop. These data were used for the development and calibration of a functional-structural tomato model. The model consisted of an architectural static virtual plant coupled with a nested radiosity model for light calculations and a leaf photosynthesis module. Different scenarios of horizontal and vertical distribution of light interception, incident light and photosynthesis were investigated under diffuse and direct light conditions. Simulated light interception showed a good correspondence to the measured values. Explicitly described leaf angles resulted in higher light interception in the middle of the plant canopy compared with fixed and ellipsoidal leaf-angle distribution models, although the total light interception remained the same. The fraction of light intercepted at a north-south orientation of rows differed from east-west orientation by 10 % on winter and 23 % on summer days. The horizontal distribution of photosynthesis differed significantly between the top, middle and lower canopy layer. Taking into account the vertical variation of leaf photosynthetic parameters in the canopy, led to approx. 8 % increase on simulated canopy photosynthesis. Leaf angles of heterogeneous canopies should be explicitly described as they have a big impact both on light distribution and photosynthesis. Especially, the vertical variation of photosynthesis in canopy is such that the

  18. Higher order magnetic modulation structures in rare earth metal, alloys and compounds under extreme conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, S.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic materials consisting of rare earth ions form modulation structures such as a helical or sinusoidal structure caused by the oscillating magnetic interaction between rare earth ions due to RKKY magnetic interaction. These modulation structures, in some cases, develop further to higher order modulation structures by additional modulations caused by higher order crystalline electric field, magnetic interactions such as spin-lattice interaction, external magnetic field and pressure. The higher order modulation structures are observed in a spin-slip structure or a helifan structure in Ho, and a tilt helix structure in a TbEr alloy. Paramagnetic ions originated from frustration generate many magnetic phases under applied external magnetic field. KUR neutron diffraction groups have performed the development and adjustment of high-pressure instruments and external magnetic fields for neutron diffraction spectrometers. The studies of 'neutron diffraction under extreme conditions' by the seven groups are described in this report. (Y. Kazumata)

  19. Disentangling the co-structure of multilayer interaction networks: degree distribution and module composition in two-layer bipartite networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astegiano, Julia; Altermatt, Florian; Massol, François

    2017-11-13

    Species establish different interactions (e.g. antagonistic, mutualistic) with multiple species, forming multilayer ecological networks. Disentangling network co-structure in multilayer networks is crucial to predict how biodiversity loss may affect the persistence of multispecies assemblages. Existing methods to analyse multilayer networks often fail to consider network co-structure. We present a new method to evaluate the modular co-structure of multilayer networks through the assessment of species degree co-distribution and network module composition. We focus on modular structure because of its high prevalence among ecological networks. We apply our method to two Lepidoptera-plant networks, one describing caterpillar-plant herbivory interactions and one representing adult Lepidoptera nectaring on flowers, thereby possibly pollinating them. More than 50% of the species established either herbivory or visitation interactions, but not both. These species were over-represented among plants and lepidopterans, and were present in most modules in both networks. Similarity in module composition between networks was high but not different from random expectations. Our method clearly delineates the importance of interpreting multilayer module composition similarity in the light of the constraints imposed by network structure to predict the potential indirect effects of species loss through interconnected modular networks.

  20. The Effect of Anisotropy on Light Extraction of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Photonic Crystal Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The light extraction efficiency of organic light-emitting diodes (OLED is greatly limited due to the difference in refractive indexes between materials of OLED. We fabricated OLED with photonic crystal microstructures in the interface between the glass substrate and the ITO anode. The light extraction efficiency can be improved by utilizing photonic crystals; however, the anisotropy effect of light extraction was clearly observed in experiment. To optimize the device performance, the effect of photonic crystal on both light extraction and angular distribution was investigated using finite-difference time domain (FDTD method. We simulated the photonic crystals with the structure of square lattice and triangle lattice. We analyzed the improvement of these structures in the light extraction efficiency of the OLED and the influence of arrangement, depth, period, and diameter on anisotropy. The optimized geometric parameters were provided, which will provide the theoretical support for designing the high performance OLED.

  1. Light-reflection random-target method for measurement of the modulation transfer function of a digital video-camera

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšil, Jaroslav; Jakubík, P.; Machala, L.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 116, - (2005), s. 573-585 ISSN 0030-4026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : random-target measuring method * light-reflection white - noise target * digital video camera * modulation transfer function * power spectral density Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.395, year: 2005

  2. Utilization of a liquid crystal spatial light modulator in a gray scale detour phase method for Fourier holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makey, Ghaith; El-Daher, Moustafa Sayem; Al-Shufi, Kanj

    2012-11-10

    This paper introduces a new modification for the well-known binary detour phase method, which is largely used to represent Fourier holograms; the modification utilizes gray scale level control provided by a liquid crystal spatial light modulator to improve the traditional binary detour phase. Results are shown by both simulation and experiment.

  3. Correcting the wavefront aberration of membrane mirror based on liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Wei, Yin; Chen, Xinhua; Tang, Minxue

    2014-11-01

    Membrane mirror with flexible polymer film substrate is a new-concept ultra lightweight mirror for space applications. Compared with traditional mirrors, membrane mirror has the advantages of lightweight, folding and deployable, low cost and etc. Due to the surface shape of flexible membrane mirror is easy to deviate from the design surface shape, it will bring wavefront aberration to the optical system. In order to solve this problem, a method of membrane mirror wavefront aberration correction based on the liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LCSLM) will be studied in this paper. The wavefront aberration correction principle of LCSLM is described and the phase modulation property of a LCSLM is measured and analyzed firstly. Then the membrane mirror wavefront aberration correction system is designed and established according to the optical properties of a membrane mirror. The LCSLM and a Hartmann-Shack sensor are used as a wavefront corrector and a wavefront detector, respectively. The detected wavefront aberration is calculated and converted into voltage value on LCSLM for the mirror wavefront aberration correction by programming in Matlab. When in experiment, the wavefront aberration of a glass plane mirror with a diameter of 70 mm is measured and corrected for verifying the feasibility of the experiment system and the correctness of the program. The PV value and RMS value of distorted wavefront are reduced and near diffraction limited optical performance is achieved. On this basis, the wavefront aberration of the aperture center Φ25 mm in a membrane mirror with a diameter of 200 mm is corrected and the errors are analyzed. It provides a means of correcting the wavefront aberration of membrane mirror.

  4. Discontinuous modulation functions and their application for analysis of modulated structures with the computing system JANA2006

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petříček, Václav; Eigner, Václav; Dušek, Michal; Čejchan, Antonín

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 231, č. 5 (2016), s. 301-312 ISSN 2194-4946 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1603 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : crystal structure analysis * Jana2006 * modulated structures Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.179, year: 2016

  5. A general theory for ball lightning structure and light output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, R.

    2018-03-01

    A general theory for free-floating ball lightning is presented which unifies the phantom plasma ball theory involving the production of very little light, with theories for ball lightning involving light output produced by burning particles from the soil. The mechanism for the formation of plasma balls is shown to be quite general, producing very similar plasma balls independent of initial ion densities over four orders of magnitude. All that is required is an excess of positive ions in the initial ball of ions. The central plasma density after 1 s is shown to be the reciprocal of the ion neutralization coefficient for all cases, both analytically and computationally. Further, the plasma region has zero electric field in all cases. Surrounding the plasma ball is a sphere of positive ions moving away from the centre via their own space-charge field; this space-charge field, which is the same in all cases near the plasma ball, drives negative ions and negative particles towards the plasma centre. The connection with burning particle theories is the proposition that the burning particles are highly-charged which is very likely after a lightning strike. Burning negatively charged particles would be driven into the plasma ball region and trapped while any positively charged particles would be driven away. The plasma ball structure is shown to last more than 10 s and the ‘burnout time’ for a typical coal particle (as an example) has been measured at 5-10 s this is comparable with the lifetimes observed for ball lightning. The light output from a few hundred particles is estimated to be ~1 W, a typical output for ball lightning. Finally, suggestions are made for the generation of ball lightning in the laboratory.

  6. Selective Negative Allosteric Modulation Of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors - A Structural Perspective of Ligands and Mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Kasper; Isberg, Vignir; Tehan, Benjamin G

    2015-01-01

    modulators. In this analysis, we make the first comprehensive structural comparison of all metabotropic glutamate receptors, placing selective negative allosteric modulators and critical mutants into the detailed context of the receptor binding sites. A better understanding of how the different m......Glu allosteric modulator binding modes relates to selective pharmacological actions will be very valuable for rational design of safer drugs....

  7. Dual multispectral and 3D structured light laparoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, Neil T.; Lin, Jianyu; Arya, Shobhit; Hanna, George B.; Elson, Daniel S.

    2015-03-01

    Intraoperative feedback on tissue function, such as blood volume and oxygenation would be useful to the surgeon in cases where current clinical practice relies on subjective measures, such as identification of ischaemic bowel or tissue viability during anastomosis formation. Also, tissue surface profiling may be used to detect and identify certain pathologies, as well as diagnosing aspects of tissue health such as gut motility. In this paper a dual modality laparoscopic system is presented that combines multispectral reflectance and 3D surface imaging. White light illumination from a xenon source is detected by a laparoscope-mounted fast filter wheel camera to assemble a multispectral image (MSI) cube. Surface shape is then calculated using a spectrally-encoded structured light (SL) pattern detected by the same camera and triangulated using an active stereo technique. Images of porcine small bowel were acquired during open surgery. Tissue reflectance spectra were acquired and blood volume was calculated at each spatial pixel across the bowel wall and mesentery. SL features were segmented and identified using a `normalised cut' algoritm and the colour vector of each spot. Using the 3D geometry defined by the camera coordinate system the multispectral data could be overlaid onto the surface mesh. Dual MSI and SL imaging has the potential to provide augmented views to the surgeon supplying diagnostic information related to blood supply health and organ function. Future work on this system will include filter optimisation to reduce noise in tissue optical property measurement, and minimise spot identification errors in the SL pattern.

  8. Interaction of light with hematite hierarchical structures: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distaso, Monica; Zhuromskyy, Oleksander; Seemann, Benjamin; Pflug, Lukas; Mačković, Mirza; Encina, Ezequiel; Taylor, Robin Klupp; Müller, Rolf; Leugering, Günter; Spiecker, Erdmann; Peschel, Ulf; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    Mesocrystalline particles have been recognized as a class of multifunctional materials with potential applications in different fields. However, the internal organization of nanocomposite mesocrystals and its influence on the final properties have not yet been investigated. In this paper, a novel strategy based on electrodynamic simulations is developed to shed light on how the internal structure of mesocrystals influences their optical properties. In a first instance, a unified design protocol is reported for the fabrication of hematite/PVP particles with different morphologies such as pseudo-cubes, rods-like and apple-like structures and controlled particle size distributions. The optical properties of hematite/PVP mesocrystals are effectively simulated by taking their aggregate and nanocomposite structure into consideration. The superposition T-Matrix approach accounts for the aggregate nature of mesocrystalline particles and validate the effective medium approximation used in the framework of the Mie theory and electromagnetic simulation such as Finite Element Method. The approach described in our paper provides the framework to understand and predict the optical properties of mesocrystals and more general, of hierarchical nanostructured particles.

  9. Wind induced fatigue of slender light weight structures in structural dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staalduinen, P.C. van; Courage, W.M.G.

    1996-01-01

    The paper presents a simplified analytical method for calculating the stress ranges in light weight slender structures due to wind loading. The background and assumptions of the method have been explained as well as the derivation of the relevant formula. The application of the simplified method on

  10. Reverse-absorbance-modulation-optical lithography for optical nanopatterning at low light levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumder, Apratim, E-mail: apratim.majumder@utah.edu; Wan, Xiaowen; Masid, Farhana; Menon, Rajesh [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States); Pollock, Benjamin J.; Andrew, Trisha L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Soppera, Olivier [Mulhouse Institute for Material Sciences, CNRS LRC 7228, BP2488, Mulhouse 68200 (France)

    2016-06-15

    Absorbance-Modulation-Optical Lithography (AMOL) has been previously demonstrated to be able to confine light to deep sub-wavelength dimensions and thereby, enable patterning of features beyond the diffraction limit. In AMOL, a thin photochromic layer that converts between two states via light exposure is placed on top of the photoresist layer. The long wavelength photons render the photochromic layer opaque, while the short-wavelength photons render it transparent. By simultaneously illuminating a ring-shaped spot at the long wavelength and a round spot at the short wavelength, the photochromic layer transmits only a highly confined beam at the short wavelength, which then exposes the underlying photoresist. Many photochromic molecules suffer from a giant mismatch in quantum yields for the opposing reactions such that the reaction initiated by the absorption of the short-wavelength photon is orders of magnitude more efficient than that initiated by the absorption of the long-wavelength photon. As a result, large intensities in the ring-shaped spot are required for deep sub-wavelength nanopatterning. In this article, we overcome this problem by using the long-wavelength photons to expose the photoresist, and the short-wavelength photons to confine the “exposing” beam. Thereby, we demonstrate the patterning of features as thin as λ/4.7 (137 nm for λ = 647 nm) using extremely low intensities (4-30 W/m{sup 2}, which is 34 times lower than that required in conventional AMOL). We further apply a rigorous model to explain our experiments and discuss the scope of the reverse-AMOL process.

  11. Error of image saturation in the structured-light method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhaoshuai; Wang, Zhao; Huang, Junhui; Xing, Chao; Gao, Jianmin

    2018-01-01

    In the phase-measuring structured-light method, image saturation will induce large phase errors. Usually, by selecting proper system parameters (such as the phase-shift number, exposure time, projection intensity, etc.), the phase error can be reduced. However, due to lack of a complete theory of phase error, there is no rational principle or basis for the selection of the optimal system parameters. For this reason, the phase error due to image saturation is analyzed completely, and the effects of the two main factors, including the phase-shift number and saturation degree, on the phase error are studied in depth. In addition, the selection of optimal system parameters is discussed, including the proper range and the selection principle of the system parameters. The error analysis and the conclusion are verified by simulation and experiment results, and the conclusion can be used for optimal parameter selection in practice.

  12. Performance characterization of structured light-based fingerprint scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassebrook, Laurence G.; Wang, Minghao; Daley, Raymond C.

    2013-05-01

    Our group believes that the evolution of fingerprint capture technology is in transition to include 3-D non-contact fingerprint capture. More specifically we believe that systems based on structured light illumination provide the highest level of depth measurement accuracy. However, for these new technologies to be fully accepted by the biometric community, they must be compliant with federal standards of performance. At present these standards do not exist for this new biometric technology. We propose and define a set of test procedures to be used to verify compliance with the Federal Bureau of Investigation's image quality specification for Personal Identity Verification single fingerprint capture devices. The proposed test procedures include: geometric accuracy, lateral resolution based on intensity or depth, gray level uniformity and flattened fingerprint image quality. Several 2-D contact analogies, performance tradeoffs and optimization dilemmas are evaluated and proposed solutions are presented.

  13. Extreme electronic modulation of the cofacial porphyrin structural motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, James T; Therien, Michael J

    2002-04-24

    The synthesis, electrochemistry, and optical spectroscopy of an extensive series of cofacial bis[(porphinato)zinc(II)] compounds are reported. These species were synthesized using sequential palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling and cobalt-mediated [2+2+2] cycloaddition reactions. This modular methodology enables facile control of the nature of macrocycle-to-macrocycle connectivity and allows unprecedented modulation of the redox properties of face-to-face porphyrin species. We report the synthesis of 5,6-bis[(5',5''-10',20'-bis[4-(3-methoxy-3-methylbutoxy)phenyl]porphinato)zinc(II)]indane (1), 5,6-bis[(2'-5',10',15',20'-tetraphenylporphinato)zinc(II)]indane (2), 5-([2'-5',10',15',20'-tetraphenylporphinato]zinc(II))-6-[(5"-10'',20''-bis[4-(3-methoxy-3-methylbutoxy)phenyl]porphinato)zinc(II)]indane (3), 5-([2'-5',10',15',20'-tetrakis(trifluoromethyl)porphinato]zinc(II))-6-[(5' '-10' ',20' '-bis[4-(3-methoxy-3-methylbutoxy)phenyl]porphinato)zinc(II)]indane (4), 5-(2'-5',10',15',20'-[tetrakis(trifluoromethyl)porphinato]zinc(II))-6-[(2''-5'',10'',15'',20''-tetraphenylporphinato)zinc(II)]indane (5), 5,6-bis([2'-5',15'-diphenyl-10',20'-(trifluoromethyl)porphinato]zinc(II))indane (6), and 5,6-bis([2'-5',10',15',20'-tetrakis(trifluoromethyl)porphinato]zinc(II))indane (7); 4-7 define the first examples of cofacial bis[(porphinato)metal] compounds in which sigma-electron-withdrawing perfluoroalkyl groups serve as macrocycle substituents, while 2, 6, and 7 constitute the first such structures that possess a beta-to-beta linkage topology. Cyclic voltammetric studies show that the electrochemically determined HOMO and LUMO energy levels of these cofacial bis(porphinato) complexes can be lowered by 780 and 945 mV, respectively, relative to the archetypal members of this class of compounds; importantly, these orbital energy levels can be modulated over well-defined increments throughout these wide potentiometric domains. Analyses of these cofacial bis

  14. Structured white light scanning of rabbit Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Alex; Easton, Katrina; Devanaboyina, Pavan Teja; Wu, Jian-Ping; Kirk, Thomas Brett; Lloyd, David

    2016-11-07

    The cross-sectional area (CSA) of a material is used to calculate stress under load. The mechanical behaviour of soft tissue is of clinical interest in the management of injury; however, measuring CSA of soft tissue is challenging as samples are geometrically irregular and may deform during measurement. This study presents a simple method, using structured light scanning (SLS), to acquire a 3D model of rabbit Achilles tendon in vitro for measuring CSA of a tendon. The Artec Spider™ 3D scanner uses structured light and stereophotogrammetry technologies to acquire shape data and reconstruct a 3D model of an object. In this study, the 3D scanner was integrated with a custom mechanical rig, permitting 360-degree acquisition of the morphology of six New Zealand White rabbit Achilles tendons. The reconstructed 3D model was then used to measure CSA of the tendon. SLS, together with callipers and micro-CT, was used to measure CSA of objects with a regular or complex shape, such as a drill flute and human cervical vertebra, for validating the accuracy and repeatability of the technique. CSA of six tendons was measured with a coefficient of variation of less than 2%. The mean CSA was 9.9±1.0mm 2 , comparable with those reported by other researchers. Scanning of phantoms demonstrated similar results to μCT. The technique developed in this study offers a simple and accurate method for effectively measuring CSA of soft tissue such as tendons. This allows for localised calculation of stress along the length, assisting in the understanding of the function, injury mechanisms and rehabilitation of tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lighting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  16. Single-photon three-qubit quantum logic using spatial light modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagalwala, Kumel H; Di Giuseppe, Giovanni; Abouraddy, Ayman F; Saleh, Bahaa E A

    2017-09-29

    The information-carrying capacity of a single photon can be vastly expanded by exploiting its multiple degrees of freedom: spatial, temporal, and polarization. Although multiple qubits can be encoded per photon, to date only two-qubit single-photon quantum operations have been realized. Here, we report an experimental demonstration of three-qubit single-photon, linear, deterministic quantum gates that exploit photon polarization and the two-dimensional spatial-parity-symmetry of the transverse single-photon field. These gates are implemented using a polarization-sensitive spatial light modulator that provides a robust, non-interferometric, versatile platform for implementing controlled unitary gates. Polarization here represents the control qubit for either separable or entangling unitary operations on the two spatial-parity target qubits. Such gates help generate maximally entangled three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger and W states, which is confirmed by tomographical reconstruction of single-photon density matrices. This strategy provides access to a wide range of three-qubit states and operations for use in few-qubit quantum information processing protocols.Photons are essential for quantum information processing, but to date only two-qubit single-photon operations have been realized. Here the authors demonstrate experimentally a three-qubit single-photon linear deterministic quantum gate by exploiting polarization along with spatial-parity symmetry.

  17. Holographic Fabrication of Designed Functional Defect Lines in Photonic Crystal Lattice Using a Spatial Light Modulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Lutkenhaus

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the holographic fabrication of designed defect lines in photonic crystal lattices through phase engineering using a spatial light modulator (SLM. The diffracted beams from the SLM not only carry the defect’s content but also the defect related phase-shifting information. The phase-shifting induced lattice shifting in photonic lattices around the defects in three-beam interference is less than the one produced by five-beam interference due to the alternating shifting in lattice in three beam interference. By designing the defect line at a 45 degree orientation and using three-beam interference, the defect orientation can be aligned with the background photonic lattice, and the shifting is only in one side of the defect line, in agreement with the theory. Finally, a new design for the integration of functional defect lines in a background phase pattern reduces the relative phase shift of the defect and utilizes the different diffraction efficiency between the defect line and background phase pattern. We demonstrate that the desired and functional defect lattice can be registered into the background lattice through the direct imaging of designed phase patterns.

  18. PHASE QUANTIZATION STUDY OF SPATIAL LIGHT MODULATOR FOR EXTREME HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing, E-mail: jpdou@niaot.ac.cn, E-mail: jiangpeidou@gmail.com [Physics and Astronomy Department, California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States)

    2016-11-20

    Direct imaging of exoplanets by reflected starlight is extremely challenging due to the large luminosity ratio to the primary star. Wave-front control is a critical technique to attenuate the speckle noise in order to achieve an extremely high contrast. We present a phase quantization study of a spatial light modulator (SLM) for wave-front control to meet the contrast requirement of detection of a terrestrial planet in the habitable zone of a solar-type star. We perform the numerical simulation by employing the SLM with different phase accuracy and actuator numbers, which are related to the achievable contrast. We use an optimization algorithm to solve the quantization problems that is matched to the controllable phase step of the SLM. Two optical configurations are discussed with the SLM located before and after the coronagraph focal plane mask. The simulation result has constrained the specification for SLM phase accuracy in the above two optical configurations, which gives us a phase accuracy of 0.4/1000 and 1/1000 waves to achieve a contrast of 10{sup -10}. Finally, we have demonstrated that an SLM with more actuators can deliver a competitive contrast performance on the order of 10{sup -10} in comparison to that by using a deformable mirror.

  19. Adaptive electron beam shaping using a photoemission gun and spatial light modulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Maxson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The need for precisely defined beam shapes in photoelectron sources has been well established. In this paper, we use a spatial light modulator and simple shaping algorithm to create arbitrary, detailed transverse laser shapes with high fidelity. We transmit this shaped laser to the photocathode of a high voltage dc gun. Using beam currents where space charge is negligible, and using an imaging solenoid and fluorescent viewscreen, we show that the resultant beam shape preserves these detailed features with similar fidelity. Next, instead of transmitting a shaped laser profile, we use an active feedback on the unshaped electron beam image to create equally accurate and detailed shapes. We demonstrate that this electron beam feedback has the added advantage of correcting for electron optical aberrations, yielding shapes without skew. The method may serve to provide precisely defined electron beams for low current target experiments, space-charge dominated beam commissioning, as well as for online adaptive correction of photocathode quantum efficiency degradation.

  20. Two-dimensional magneto-optical light modulation in EuTiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann-Holder, Annette; Roleder, Krystian; Stuhlhofer, Benjamin; Logvenov, Gennady; Simon, Arndt; KöHler, Jürgen

    EuTiO3 is antiferromagnetic at low temperature, namely below TN = 5.7K. In the high temperature paramagnetic phase the strongly nonlinear coupling between the lattice and the nomnially silent Eu 4f7 spins induces magnetic correlations which become apparent in muon spin rotation experiments and more recently in birefringence measurments in an external magnetic field. It is shown here, that high quality films of insulating EuTiO3 deposited on a thin SrTiO3 substrate are versatile tools for light modulation. The operating temperature is close to room temperature and admits multiple device engineering. By using small magnetic fields the birefringence of the samples can be switched off and on. Similarly, rotation of the sample in the field can modify its birefringence Δn. In addition, Δn can be increased by a factor of 4 in very modest fields with simultaneously enhancing the operating temperature by almost 100K. The results can be understood in terms of paramagnon phonon interaction where spin activity is achieved via the local spin-phonon double-well potential.

  1. Dynamic wavefront sensing and correction with low-cost twisted nematic spatial light modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, Vicente; Climent, Vicent; Lancis, Jesus; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Bara, Salvador; Arines, Justo; Ares, Jorge; Andres, Pedro; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    Off-the-shelf twisted nematic liquid crystal displays (TNLCDs) show some interesting features such as high spatial resolution, easy handling, wide availability, and low cost. We describe a compact adaptive optical system using just one TNLCD to measure and compensate optical aberrations. The current system operates at a frame rate of the order of 10 Hz with a four level codification scheme. Wavefront estimation is performed through conventional Hartmann-Shack sensing architecture. The system has proved to work properly with a maximum rms aberration of 0.76 microns and wavefront gradient of 50 rad/mm at a wavelength of 514 nm. These values correspond to typical aberrations found in human eyes. The key of our approach is careful characterization and optimization of the TNLCD for phase-only modulation. For this purpose, we exploit the so-called retarder-rotator approach for twisted nematic liquid crystal cells. The optimization process has been successfully applied to SLMs working either in transmissive or in reflective mode, even when light depolarization effects are observed.

  2. Multi-kW coherent combining of fiber lasers seeded with pseudo random phase modulated light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Angel; Ehrehreich, Thomas; Holten, Roger; Anderson, Brian; Dajani, Iyad

    2016-03-01

    We report efficient coherent beam combining of five kilowatt-class fiber amplifiers with a diffractive optical element (DOE). Based on a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration, the amplifiers were seeded with pseudo random phase modulated light. Each non-polarization maintaining fiber amplifier was optically path length matched and provides approximately 1.2 kW of near diffraction-limited output power (measured M2polarization control. A low power sample of the combined beam after the DOE provided an error signal for active phase locking which was performed via Locking of Optical Coherence by Single-Detector Electronic-Frequency Tagging (LOCSET). After phase stabilization, the beams were coherently combined via the 1x5 DOE. A total combined output power of 4.9 kW was achieved with 82% combining efficiency and excellent beam quality (M2splitter loss was 5%. Similarly, losses due in part to non-ideal polarization, ASE content, uncorrelated wavefront errors, and misalignment errors contributed to the efficiency reduction.

  3. Ce3+-Doping to Modulate Photoluminescence Kinetics for Efficient CsPbBr3 Nanocrystals Based Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ji-Song; Ge, Jing; Han, Bo-Ning; Wang, Kun-Hua; Yao, Hong-Bin; Yu, Hao-Lei; Li, Jian-Hai; Zhu, Bai-Sheng; Song, Ji-Zhong; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Qun; Zeng, Hai-Bo; Luo, Yi; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2018-03-14

    Inorganic perovskite CsPbBr 3 nanocrystals (NCs) are emerging, highly attractive light emitters with high color purity and good thermal stability for light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Their high photo/electroluminescence efficiencies are very important for fabricating efficient LEDs. Here, we propose a novel strategy to enhance the photo/electroluminescence efficiency of CsPbBr 3 NCs through doping of heterovalent Ce 3+ ions via a facile hot-injection method. The Ce 3+ cation was chosen as the dopant for CsPbBr 3 NCs by virtue of its similar ion radius and formation of higher energy level of conduction band with bromine in comparison with the Pb 2+ cation to maintain the integrity of perovskite structure without introducing additional trap states. It was found that by increasing the doping amount of Ce 3+ in CsPbBr 3 NCs to 2.88% (atomic percentage of Ce compared to Pb) the photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of CsPbBr 3 NCs reached up to 89%, a factor of 2 increase in comparison with the native, undoped ones. The ultrafast transient absorption and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy revealed that Ce 3+ -doping can significantly modulate the PL kinetics to enhance the PL efficiency of doped CsPbBr 3 NCs. As a result, the LED device fabricated by adopting Ce 3+ -doped CsPbBr 3 NCs as the emitting layers exhibited a pronounced improvement of electroluminescence with external quantum efficiency (EQE) from 1.6 to 4.4% via Ce 3+ -doping.

  4. Glass-based confined structures enabling light control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiappini, Andrea; Normani, Simone; Chiasera, Alessandro [IFN–CNR CSMFO Lab., and FBK Photonics Unit via alla Cascata 56/C Povo, 38123 Trento (Italy); Lukowiak, Anna [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research PAS, Okolna St. 2, 50-422 Wroclaw (Poland); Vasilchenko, Iustyna [IFN–CNR CSMFO Lab., and FBK Photonics Unit via alla Cascata 56/C Povo, 38123 Trento (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trento, via Sommarive 14 Povo, 38123Trento (Italy); Ristic, Davor [Institut Ruđer Bošković, Bijenička cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Boulard, Brigitte [IMMM, CNRS Equipe Fluorures, Université du Maine, Av. Messiaen, 72085 Le Mans cedex 9 (France); Dorosz, Dominik [Department of Power Engineering, Photonics and Lighting Technology, Bialystok University of Technology, Wiejska Street 45D, 15-351 Bialystok (Poland); Scotognella, Francesco [Center for Nano Science and Technology@PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Giovanni Pascoli, 70/3, 20133, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Vaccari, Alessandro [FBK -CMM, ARES Unit, 38123 Trento (Italy); Taccheo, Stefano [College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, SA2 8PP, Swansea (United Kingdom); Pelli, Stefano; Righini, Giancarlo C. [IFAC - CNR, MiPLab., 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro di Studi e Ricerche “Enrico Fermi”, Piazza del Viminale 1, 00184 Roma (Italy); Conti, Gualtiero Nunzi [IFAC - CNR, MiPLab., 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Ramponi, Roberta [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie CNR, Piazza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); and others

    2015-04-24

    When a luminescent ion is confined in a system characterized by one or more specific properties such as spatial size, geometrical dimension and shape, refractive index, local crystal field, cut-off vibrational energy and so on, it's possible to control its emission. The control of branching ratios as a function of the composition, the luminescence enhancement induced by a photonic crystal, or the laser action in a microresonator, are well known examples of light control. Photonic glass-based structures are extremely viable systems to exploit the above mentioned properties and in our research team we have successfully fabricated luminescent photonic structures by different techniques, including sol-gel, rf sputtering, drawing, melting, and physical vapour deposition. Here we will discuss some of them with the aim to make the reader aware of the chemical-physical properties related to each specific system. We will demonstrate that glass ceramic waveguides in some cases present superior spectroscopic properties in respect to the parent glass, that compositional properties can play a positive role in reducing luminescence quenching and in developing novel planar waveguides and fibers, that colloids allow to obtain high internal quantum efficiency and that photonic crystals, microcavities and microresonators can enable the handling of the rare earth luminescence. Finally, the pros and cons of the systems and of the different techniques employed for their fabrication will be discussed and some perspectives concerning the glass photonics will be proposed looking at both possible applications and investigation of physical properties.

  5. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thuy Tuong; Slaughter, David C; Max, Nelson; Maloof, Julin N; Sinha, Neelima

    2015-07-29

    Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants. This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces) and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud registration and plant feature measurement). This paper demonstrates the ability to produce 3D models of whole plants created from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different viewing angles, without the need to destructively cut away any parts of a plant. The ability to accurately predict phenotyping features, such as the number of leaves, plant height, leaf size and internode distances, is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that, for plants having a range of leaf sizes and a distance between leaves appropriate for the hardware design, the algorithms successfully predict phenotyping features in the target crops, with a recall of 0.97 and a precision of 0.89 for leaf detection and less than a 13-mm error for plant size, leaf size and internode distance.

  6. Structured Light-Based 3D Reconstruction System for Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thuy Tuong Nguyen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Camera-based 3D reconstruction of physical objects is one of the most popular computer vision trends in recent years. Many systems have been built to model different real-world subjects, but there is lack of a completely robust system for plants. This paper presents a full 3D reconstruction system that incorporates both hardware structures (including the proposed structured light system to enhance textures on object surfaces and software algorithms (including the proposed 3D point cloud registration and plant feature measurement. This paper demonstrates the ability to produce 3D models of whole plants created from multiple pairs of stereo images taken at different viewing angles, without the need to destructively cut away any parts of a plant. The ability to accurately predict phenotyping features, such as the number of leaves, plant height, leaf size and internode distances, is also demonstrated. Experimental results show that, for plants having a range of leaf sizes and a distance between leaves appropriate for the hardware design, the algorithms successfully predict phenotyping features in the target crops, with a recall of 0.97 and a precision of 0.89 for leaf detection and less than a 13-mm error for plant size, leaf size and internode distance.

  7. Glass-based confined structures enabling light control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiappini, Andrea; Normani, Simone; Chiasera, Alessandro; Lukowiak, Anna; Vasilchenko, Iustyna; Ristic, Davor; Boulard, Brigitte; Dorosz, Dominik; Scotognella, Francesco; Vaccari, Alessandro; Taccheo, Stefano; Pelli, Stefano; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Conti, Gualtiero Nunzi; Ramponi, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    When a luminescent ion is confined in a system characterized by one or more specific properties such as spatial size, geometrical dimension and shape, refractive index, local crystal field, cut-off vibrational energy and so on, it's possible to control its emission. The control of branching ratios as a function of the composition, the luminescence enhancement induced by a photonic crystal, or the laser action in a microresonator, are well known examples of light control. Photonic glass-based structures are extremely viable systems to exploit the above mentioned properties and in our research team we have successfully fabricated luminescent photonic structures by different techniques, including sol-gel, rf sputtering, drawing, melting, and physical vapour deposition. Here we will discuss some of them with the aim to make the reader aware of the chemical-physical properties related to each specific system. We will demonstrate that glass ceramic waveguides in some cases present superior spectroscopic properties in respect to the parent glass, that compositional properties can play a positive role in reducing luminescence quenching and in developing novel planar waveguides and fibers, that colloids allow to obtain high internal quantum efficiency and that photonic crystals, microcavities and microresonators can enable the handling of the rare earth luminescence. Finally, the pros and cons of the systems and of the different techniques employed for their fabrication will be discussed and some perspectives concerning the glass photonics will be proposed looking at both possible applications and investigation of physical properties

  8. Improved performance of quantum dot light emitting diode by modulating electron injection with yttrium-doped ZnO nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingling; Guo, Qiling; Jin, Hu; Wang, Kelai; Xu, Dehua; Xu, Yongjun; Xu, Gang; Xu, Xueqing

    2017-10-01

    In a typical light emitting diode (QD-LED), with ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) serving as the electron transport layer (ETL) material, excessive electron injection driven by the matching conduction band maximum (CBM) between the QD and this oxide layer usually causes charge imbalance and degrades the device performance. To address this issue, the electronic structure of ZnO NPs is modified by the yttrium (Y) doping method. We demonstrate that the CBM of ZnO NPs has a strong dependence on the Y-doping concentration, which can be tuned from 3.55 to 2.77 eV as the Y doping content increases from 0% to 9.6%. This CBM variation generates an enlarged barrier between the cathode and this ZnO ETL benefits from the modulation of electron injection. By optimizing electron injection with the use of a low Y-doped (2%) ZnO to achieve charge balance in the QD-LED, device performance is significantly improved with maximum luminance, peak current efficiency, and maximal external quantum efficiency increase from 4918 cd/m2, 11.3 cd/A, and 4.5% to 11,171 cd/m2, 18.3 cd/A, and 7.3%, respectively. This facile strategy based on the ETL modification enriches the methodology of promoting QD-LED performance.

  9. Aluminum nitride coatings using response surface methodology to optimize the thermal dissipated performance of light-emitting diode modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Ming-Der; Lei, Peng-Da; Kong, Ling-Hua; Liu, Cheng-Wu

    2018-05-01

    This study optimizes the thermal dissipation ability of aluminum nitride (AlN) ceramics to increase the thermal performance of light-emitting diode (LED) modulus. AlN powders are deposited on heat sink as a heat interface material, using an electrostatic spraying process. The junction temperature of the heat sink is developed by response surface methodology based on Taguchi methods. In addition, the structure and properties of the AlN coating are examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In the XPS analysis, the AlN sub-peaks are observed at 72.79 eV for Al2p and 398.88 eV for N1s, and an N1s sub-peak is assigned to N-O at 398.60eV and Al-N bonding at 395.95eV, which allows good thermal properties. The results have shown that the use of AlN ceramic material on a heat sink can enhance the thermal performance of LED modules. In addition, the percentage error between the predicted and experimental results compared the quadric model with between the linear and he interaction models was found to be within 7.89%, indicating that it was a good predictor. Accordingly, RSM can effectively enhance the thermal performance of an LED, and the beneficial heat dissipation effects for AlN are improved by electrostatic spraying.

  10. Adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope using liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator: Performance study with involuntary eye movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongxin; Toyoda, Haruyoshi; Inoue, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    The performance of an adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) using a liquid crystal on silicon spatial light modulator and Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor was investigated. The system achieved high-resolution and high-contrast images of human retinas by dynamic compensation for the aberrations in the eyes. Retinal structures such as photoreceptor cells, blood vessels, and nerve fiber bundles, as well as blood flow, could be observed in vivo. We also investigated involuntary eye movements and ascertained microsaccades and drifts using both the retinal images and the aberrations recorded simultaneously. Furthermore, we measured the interframe displacement of retinal images and found that during eye drift, the displacement has a linear relationship with the residual low-order aberration. The estimated duration and cumulative displacement of the drift were within the ranges estimated by a video tracking technique. The AO-SLO would not only be used for the early detection of eye diseases, but would also offer a new approach for involuntary eye movement research.

  11. Effect of the light spectrum of various substrates for inkjet printed conductive structures sintered with intense pulsed light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weise, Dana; Mitra, Kalyan Yoti; Ueberfuhr, Peter; Baumann, Reinhard R.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the novel method of intense pulsed light (IPL) sintering of a nanoparticle silver ink is presented. Various patterns are printed with the Inkjet technology on two flexible foils with different light spectra. One is a clear Polyethylenterephthalat [PET] foil and the second is a light brownish Polyimide [PI] foil. The samples are flashed with different parameters regarding to pulse intensity and pulse length. Microscopic images are indicating the impact of the flashing parameters and the different light spectra of the substrates on the sintered structures. Sheet and line resistance are measured and the conductivity is calculated. A high influence of the property of the substrate with respect to light absorption and thermal conductivity on the functionality of printed conductive structures could be presented. With this new method of IPL sintering, highly conductive inkjet printed silver patterns could be manufactured within milliseconds on flexible polymeric foils without damaging the substrate

  12. Using structure to inform carbohydrate binding module function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, D. Wade; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Generally, non-catalytic carbohydrate binding module (CBM) specificity has been shown to parallel the catalytic activity of the carbohydrate active enzyme (CAZyme) module it is appended to. With the rapid expansion in metagenomic sequence space for the potential discovery of new CBMs in addition to

  13. Crystal structure of the commensurately modulated ζ phase of PAMC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, P.; Larsen, F.K.; Lebech, B.

    1994-01-01

    phase, indicating a 'lock-in' and phase shift between adjacent modulated layers. The modulation waves do not change much from the values of the epsilon phase, which confirms the lock-in of the modulation vector; only some components of the modulations of the propylammonium chains appear......The commensurately modulated zeta low-temperature phase of bis(propylammonium) tetrachloromanganate(II), [NH3(C3H7)]2MnCl4, has been determined at 8 K. a = 7.437 (5), b = 7.082 (5), c = 13.096 (8) Angstrom, alpha = 105.59 (1)degrees. Superspace group P2(1)/b(0 beta 0)(1) over bar s, with beta = 1...... to be significantly different, these chains appear to be responsible for the phase shift across the layers....

  14. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  15. Study the effects of varying interference upon the optical properties of turbid samples using NIR spatial light modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaul, Oren; Fanrazi-Kahana, Michal; Meitav, Omri; Pinhasi, Gad A.; Abookasis, David

    2018-03-01

    Optical properties of biological tissues are valuable diagnostic parameters which can provide necessary information regarding tissue state during disease pathogenesis and therapy. However, different sources of interference, such as temperature changes may modify these properties, introducing confounding factors and artifacts to data, consequently skewing their interpretation and misinforming clinical decision-making. In the current study, we apply spatial light modulation, a type of diffuse reflectance hyperspectral imaging technique, to monitor the variation in optical properties of highly scattering turbid media in the presence varying levels of the following sources of interference: scattering concentration, temperature, and pressure. Spatial near-infrared (NIR) light modulation is a wide-field, non-contact emerging optical imaging platform capable of separating the effects of tissue scattering from those of absorption, thereby accurately estimating both parameters. With this technique, periodic NIR illumination patterns at alternately low and high spatial frequencies, at six discrete wavelengths between 690 to 970 nm, were sequentially projected upon the medium while a CCD camera collects the diffusely reflected light. Data analysis based assumptions is then performed off-line to recover the medium's optical properties. We conducted a series of experiments demonstrating the changes in absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of commercially available fresh milk and chicken breast tissue under different interference conditions. In addition, information on the refractive index was study under increased pressure. This work demonstrates the utility of NIR spatial light modulation to detect varying sources of interference upon the optical properties of biological samples.

  16. Three-Dimensional parton structure of light nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopetta, Sergio; Del Dotto, Alessio; Kaptari, Leonid; Pace, Emanuele; Rinaldi, Matteo; Salmè, Giovanni

    2018-03-01

    Two promising directions beyond inclusive deep inelastic scattering experiments, aimed at unveiling the three dimensional structure of the bound nucleon, are reviewed, considering in particular the 3He nuclear target. The 3D structure in coordinate space can be accessed through deep exclusive processes, whose non-perturbative part is encoded in generalized parton distributions. In this way, the distribution of partons in the transverse plane can be obtained. As an example of a deep exclusive process, coherent deeply virtual Compton scattering off 3He nuclei, important to access the neutron generalized parton distributions (GPDs), will be discussed. In Impulse Approximation (IA), the sum of the two leading twist, quark helicity conserving GPDs of 3He, H and E, at low momentum transfer, turns out to be dominated by the neutron contribution. Besides, a technique, able to take into account the nuclear effects included in the Impulse Approximation analysis, has been developed. The spin dependent GPD \\tilde H of 3He is also found to be largely dominated, at low momentum transfer, by the neutron contribution. The knowledge of the GPDs H,E and \\tilde H of 3He is relevant for the planning of coherent DVCS off 3He measurements. Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes access the momentum space 3D structure parameterized through transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. A distorted spin-dependent spectral function has been recently introduced for 3He, in a non-relativistic framework, to take care of the final state interaction between the observed pion and the remnant in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering off transversely polarized 3He. The calculation of the Sivers and Collins single spin asymmetries for 3He, and a straightforward procedure to effectively take into account nuclear dynamics and final state interactions, will be reviewed. The Light-front dynamics generalization of the analysis is also addressed.

  17. Manipulating femtosecond laser interactions in bulk glass and thin-film with spatial light modulation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimohammadian, Ehsan; Ho, Stephen; Ertorer, Erden; Gherghe, Sebastian; Li, Jianzhao; Herman, Peter R.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial Light Modulators (SLM) are emerging as a power tool for laser beam shaping whereby digitally addressed phase shifts can impose computer-generated hologram patterns on incoming laser light. SLM provide several additional advantages with ultrashort-pulsed lasers in controlling the shape of both surface and internal interactions with materials. Inside transparent materials, nonlinear optical effects can confine strong absorption only to the focal volume, extend dissipation over long filament tracks, or reach below diffraction-limited spot sizes. Hence, SLM beam shaping has been widely adopted for laser material processing applications that include parallel structuring, filamentation, fiber Bragg grating formation and optical aberration correction. This paper reports on a range of SLM applications we have studied in femtosecond processing of transparent glasses and thin films. Laser phase-fronts were tailored by the SLM to compensate for spherical surface aberration, and to further address the nonlinear interactions that interplay between Kerr-lens self-focusing and plasma defocusing effects over shallow and deep focusing inside the glass. Limits of strong and weak focusing were examined around the respective formation of low-loss optical waveguides and long uniform filament tracks. Further, we have employed the SLM for beam patterning inside thin film, exploring the limits of phase noise, resolution and fringe contrast during interferometric intra-film structuring. Femtosecond laser pulses of 200 fs pulse duration and 515 nm wavelength were shaped by a phase-only LCOS-SLM (Hamamatsu X10468-04). By imposing radial phase profiles, axicon, grating and beam splitting gratings, volume shape control of filament diameter, length, and uniformity as well as simultaneous formation of multiple filaments has been demonstrated. Similarly, competing effects of spherical surface aberration, self-focusing, and plasma de-focusing were studied and delineated to enable formation

  18. Report on achievements in fiscal 1998. Development of technologies to put photovoltaic power generation systems into practical use - Development of solar beam power generation and utilization systems and ancillary technologies (Research and development of building material integrated solar cell modules - modules with new multi-layer structure); 1998 nendo taiyoko hatsuden system jitsuyoka gijutsu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Taiyoko hatsuden riyo system shuhen gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu (shinkenzai ittaigata taiyo denchi module no kenkyu kaihatsu (shinfukuso kozo module))

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Development is being made on a panel type module that can be used together with an air bubble concrete board (ALC board), and is provided with design characteristics. The development work includes trial fabrication and evaluation of a module with new multi-layer structure, and development of a technology to unitize cells and submodules, and a systematizing method. In the trial fabrication and evaluation, flame retardant and uninflammable modules using fluororesin, and modules with as large area as 4 m{sup 2} were fabricated on a trial basis, in addition to the modules with the basic structure. These modules were given evaluations on such wall material properties as wind pressure resistance, heat and cracking resistance, and fire resistance. In a deformation resistance test considering the integrated use with the ALC board, the developed modules showed a good result. In developing the cells with design characteristics, discussions were given on the inter-cell wiring methods. Development was made on a method to establish a unit structure based on the design and size of a building. In developing the systematization method, the trial fabrication method was applied to a module with lamination structure, a module integrated with the ALC board, and a large-area hollow module to have fabricated the top-light spandrels. (NEDO)

  19. Roles of Protein Kinase A and Adenylate Cyclase in Light-Modulated Cellulase Regulation in Trichoderma reesei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, André; Tisch, Doris; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway represents a central signaling cascade with crucial functions in all organisms. Previous studies of Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina) suggested a function of cAMP signaling in regulation of cellulase gene expression. We were therefore interested in how the crucial components of this pathway, adenylate cyclase (ACY1) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), would affect cellulase gene expression. We found that both ACY1 and PKA catalytic subunit 1 (PKAC1) are involved in regulation of vegetative growth but are not essential for sexual development. Interestingly, our results showed considerably increased transcript abundance of cellulase genes in darkness compared to light (light responsiveness) upon growth on lactose. This effect is strongly enhanced in mutant strains lacking PKAC1 or ACY1. Comparison to the wild type showed that ACY1 has a consistently positive effect on cellulase gene expression in light and darkness, while PKAC1 influences transcript levels of cellulase genes positively in light but negatively in darkness. A function of PKAC1 in light-modulated cellulase gene regulation is also reflected by altered complex formation within the cel6a/cbh2 promoter in light and darkness and in the absence of pkac1. Analysis of transcript levels of cellulase regulator genes indicates that the regulatory output of the cAMP pathway may be established via adjustment of XYR1 abundance. Consequently, both adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A are involved in light-modulated cellulase gene expression in T. reesei and have a dampening effect on the light responsiveness of this process. PMID:22286997

  20. Light-modulated release of RFamide-like neuropeptides from nervus terminalis axon terminals in the retina of goldfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, A J; Stell, W K

    1997-03-01

    The nervus terminalis of teleosts, a cranial nerve anatomically associated with the olfactory system, projects to visual system targets including retina and optic tectum. It is known to contain gonadotropin-releasing hormone and RFamide-like peptides, but its function remains unknown. We have probed nervus terminalis function in goldfish by measuring peptide content in retina and tectum with a radioimmunoassay for A18Famide (neuropeptide AF; bovine morphine-modulating peptide). We found that retinal peptide content increased in the dark and decreased in the light, whereas tectal peptide content decreased in the dark and increased in the light. In addition, RFamide-like peptide content in the retina was transiently decreased by severing both olfactory tracts, increased in light-adapted eyes treated with a GABAergic agonist (isoguvacine), and decreased in dark-adapted eyes treated with GABAergic antagonists (bicuculline and picrotoxin). We also found that RFamide-like peptide release could be induced in dark-adapted isolated-superfused retinas by exposure to light or a high concentration (102.5 mM) of potassium ions. We interpret the increase and decrease in peptide content as reflecting a decrease and increase, respectively, in rate of peptide release. We propose that the release and accumulation of RFamide-like peptides in axon terminals of nervus terminalis processes in the retina are modulated primarily by neurons intrinsic to the retina and regulated by light. Peptide release appears to be inhibited tonically in the dark by GABA acting through GABAA receptors; light facilitates peptide release by disinhibition due to a reduction in GABA release. In addition, we propose that electrical signals originating outside the retina can override these intrinsic release-modulating influences.

  1. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  2. N-terminus of Cardiac Myosin Essential Light Chain Modulates Myosin Step-Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yihua; Ajtai, Katalin; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Burghardt, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle myosin cyclically hydrolyzes ATP to translate actin. Ventricular cardiac myosin (βmys) moves actin with three distinct unitary step-sizes resulting from its lever-arm rotation and with step-frequencies that are modulated in a myosin regulation mechanism. The lever-arm associated essential light chain (vELC) binds actin by its 43 residue N-terminal extension. Unitary steps were proposed to involve the vELC N-terminal extension with the 8 nm step engaging the vELC/actin bond facilitating an extra ~19 degrees of lever-arm rotation while the predominant 5 nm step forgoes vELC/actin binding. A minor 3 nm step is the unlikely conversion of the completed 5 to the 8 nm step. This hypothesis was tested using a 17 residue N-terminal truncated vELC in porcine βmys (Δ17βmys) and a 43 residue N-terminal truncated human vELC expressed in transgenic mouse heart (Δ43αmys). Step-size and step-frequency were measured using the Qdot motility assay. Both Δ17βmys and Δ43αmys had significantly increased 5 nm step-frequency and coincident loss in the 8 nm step-frequency compared to native proteins suggesting the vELC/actin interaction drives step-size preference. Step-size and step-frequency probability densities depend on the relative fraction of truncated vELC and relate linearly to pure myosin species concentrations in a mixture containing native vELC homodimer, two truncated vELCs in the modified homodimer, and one native and one truncated vELC in the heterodimer. Step-size and step-frequency, measured for native homodimer and at two or more known relative fractions of truncated vELC, are surmised for each pure species by using a new analytical method. PMID:26671638

  3. Study of light-absorbing crystal birefringence and electrical modulation mechanisms for coupled thermal-optical effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji; He, Zhihong; Ma, Yu; Dong, Shikui

    2014-09-20

    This paper discusses Gaussian laser transmission in double-refraction crystal whose incident light wavelength is within its absorption wave band. Two scenarios for coupled radiation and heat conduction are considered: one is provided with an applied external electric field, the other is not. A circular heat source with a Gaussian energy distribution is introduced to present the crystal's light-absorption process. The electromagnetic field frequency domain analysis equation and energy equation are solved to simulate the phenomenon by using the finite element method. It focuses on the influence of different values such as wavelength, incident light intensity, heat transfer coefficient, ambient temperature, crystal thickness, and applied electric field strength. The results show that the refraction index of polarized light increases with the increase of crystal temperature. It decreases as the strength of the applied electric field increases if it is positive. The mechanism of electrical modulation for the thermo-optical effect is used to keep the polarized light's index of refraction constant in our simulation. The quantitative relation between thermal boundary condition and strength of applied electric field during electrical modulation is determined. Numerical results indicate a possible approach to removing adverse thermal effects such as depolarization and wavefront distortion, which are caused by thermal deposition during linear laser absorption.

  4. Summary of 2016 Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Physical Science Experiments on ISS. Update of LMM Science Experiments and Facility Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicker, Ronald J.; Meyer, William V.; Foster, William M.; Fletcher, William A.; Williams, Stuart J.; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will feature a series of short, entertaining, and informative videos that describe the current status and science support for the Light Microscopy Module (LMM) facility on the International Space Station. These interviews will focus on current experiments and provide an overview of future capabilities. The recently completed experiments include nano-particle haloing, 3-D self-assembly with Janus particles and a model system for nano-particle drug delivery. The videos will share perspectives from the scientists, engineers, and managers working with the NASA Light Microscopy program.

  5. Real-time range acquisition by adaptive structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koninckx, Thomas P; Van Gool, Luc

    2006-03-01

    The goal of this paper is to provide a "self-adaptive" system for real-time range acquisition. Reconstructions are based on a single frame structured light illumination. Instead of using generic, static coding that is supposed to work under all circumstances, system adaptation is proposed. This occurs on-the-fly and renders the system more robust against instant scene variability and creates suitable patterns at startup. A continuous trade-off between speed and quality is made. A weighted combination of different coding cues--based upon pattern color, geometry, and tracking--yields a robust way to solve the correspondence problem. The individual coding cues are automatically adapted within a considered family of patterns. The weights to combine them are based on the average consistency with the result within a small time-window. The integration itself is done by reformulating the problem as a graph cut. Also, the camera-projector configuration is taken into account for generating the projection patterns. The correctness of the range maps is not guaranteed, but an estimation of the uncertainty is provided for each part of the reconstruction. Our prototype is implemented using unmodified consumer hardware only and, therefore, is cheap. Frame rates vary between 10 and 25 fps, dependent on scene complexity.

  6. Light extinction in metallic powder beds: Correlation with powder structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rombouts, M.; Froyen, L.; Gusarov, A.V.; Bentefour, E.H.; Glorieux, C.

    2005-01-01

    A theoretical correlation between the effective extinction coefficient, the specific surface area, and the chord length distribution of powder beds is verified experimentally. The investigated powder beds consist of metallic particles of several tens of microns. The effective extinction coefficients are measured by a light-transmission technique at a wavelength of 540 nm. The powder structure is characterized by a quantitative image analysis of powder bed cross sections resulting in two-point correlation functions and chord length distributions. The specific surface area of the powders is estimated by laser-diffraction particle-size analysis and by the two-point correlation function. The theoretically predicted tendency of increasing extinction coefficient with specific surface area per unit void volume is confirmed by the experiments. However, a significant quantitative discrepancy is found for several powders. No clear correlation of the extinction coefficient with the powder material and particle size, and morphology is revealed, which is in line with the assumption of geometrical optics

  7. Structural, electrical and luminescent characteristics of ultraviolet light emitting structures grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Y. Polyakov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Electrical and luminescent properties of near-UV light emitting diode structures (LEDs prepared by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE were studied. Variations in photoluminescence and electroluminescence efficiency observed for LEDs grown under nominally similar conditions could be attributed to the difference in the structural quality (dislocation density, density of dislocations agglomerates of the GaN active layers, to the difference in strain relaxation achieved by growth of AlGaN/AlGaN superlattice and to the presence of current leakage channels in current confining AlGaN layers of the double heterostructure.

  8. Inhibition of light modulation of chloroplast enzyme activity by sulfite. One of the lethal effects of SO/sub 2/

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, L E; Duggan, J X

    1977-01-01

    The capacity of a particulate pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaf chloroplast system for light-modulation of enzyme activity is diminished by brief exposure to sodium sulfite and, when intact seedlings are exposed to atmospheric SO/sub 2/, the same system is inactivated. The destructive effect of this pollutant on green plants may therefore be due to disruption of the mechanism for control of carbon dioxide fixation.

  9. Parity generator and parity checker in the modified trinary number system using savart plate and spatial light modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Amal K.

    2010-09-01

    The parity generators and the checkers are the most important circuits in communication systems. With the development of multi-valued logic (MVL), the proposed system with parity generators and checkers is the most required using the recently developed optoelectronic technology in the modified trinary number (MTN) system. This system also meets up the tremendous needs of speeds by exploiting the savart plates and spatial light modulators (SLM) in the optical tree architecture (OTA).

  10. Light Modulates Ocular Complications in an Albino Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrawus, Elias; Veildbaum, Gizi; Zemel, Esther; Leibu, Rina; Perlman, Ido; Shehadeh, Naim

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess potential interactions of light exposure and hyperglycemia upon ocular complications in diabetic rats. Streptozotocin-induced (STZ-induced) diabetic rats ( N = 39) and non-diabetic rats ( N = 9) were distributed into eight groups according to the irradiance and color of the light phase during the 12/12-hour light/dark regime. Follow-up lasted 90 days and included assessment of cataract development and electroretinogram (ERG) recordings. Stress to the retina was also assessed by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunocytochemistry. Cataract development was fast in diabetic rats that were exposed to unattenuated white light or to bright colored lights during the light phase. Diabetic rats that were kept under attenuated brown or yellow light during the light phase exhibited slower rate of cataract development. Electroretinogram responses indicated very severe retinal damage in diabetic rats kept under bright colored lights in the blue-yellow range or bright white light during the light phase. Electroretinogram damage was milder in rats kept under bright red light or attenuated yellow or brown light during the light phase. Glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Müller cells was consistent with ERG assessment of retinal damage. Attenuating white light and filtering out short wavelengths have a protective effect on the eyes of diabetic rats as evident by slower rate of cataract formation and a smaller degree of retinal damage. Our findings suggest that special glasses attenuating light exposure and filtering out short wavelengths (400-530 nm) may be beneficial for diabetic patients.

  11. Measurement of replication structures at the nanometer scale using super-resolution light microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddeley, D; Chagin, V O; Schermelleh, L; Martin, S; Pombo, A; Carlton, P M; Gahl, A; Domaing, P; Birk, U; Leonhardt, H; Cremer, C; Cardoso, M C

    2010-01-01

    DNA replication, similar to other cellular processes, occurs within dynamic macromolecular structures. Any comprehensive understanding ultimately requires quantitative data to establish and test models of genome duplication. We used two different super-resolution light microscopy techniques to directly measure and compare the size and numbers of replication foci in mammalian cells. This analysis showed that replication foci vary in size from 210 nm down to 40 nm. Remarkably, spatially modulated illumination (SMI) and 3D-structured illumination microscopy (3D-SIM) both showed an average size of 125 nm that was conserved throughout S-phase and independent of the labeling method, suggesting a basic unit of genome duplication. Interestingly, the improved optical 3D resolution identified 3- to 5-fold more distinct replication foci than previously reported. These results show that optical nanoscopy techniques enable accurate measurements of cellular structures at a level previously achieved only by electron microscopy and highlight the possibility of high-throughput, multispectral 3D analyses.

  12. Modulation of recognition memory performance by light requires both melanopsin and classical photoreceptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Shu K. E.; Hasan, Sibah; Hughes, Steven; Hankins, Mark W.; Foster, Russell G.; Bannerman, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute light exposure exerts various effects on physiology and behaviour. Although the effects of light on brain network activity in humans are well demonstrated, the effects of light on cognitive performance are inconclusive, with the size, as well as direction, of the effect depending on the nature of the task. Similarly, in nocturnal rodents, bright light can either facilitate or disrupt performance depending on the type of task employed. Crucially, it is unclear whether the effects of light on behavioural performance are mediated via the classical image-forming rods and cones or the melanopsin-expressing photosensitive retinal ganglion cells. Here, we investigate the modulatory effects of light on memory performance in mice using the spontaneous object recognition task. Importantly, we examine which photoreceptors are required to mediate the effects of light on memory performance. By using a cross-over design, we show that object recognition memory is disrupted when the test phase is conducted under a bright light (350 lux), regardless of the light level in the sample phase (10 or 350 lux), demonstrating that exposure to a bright light at the time of test, rather than at the time of encoding, impairs performance. Strikingly, the modulatory effect of light on memory performance is completely abolished in both melanopsin-deficient and rodless–coneless mice. Our findings provide direct evidence that melanopsin-driven and rod/cone-driven photoresponses are integrated in order to mediate the effect of light on memory performance. PMID:28003454

  13. THREE DIMENSIONAL DIGITIZATION OF HUMAN HEAD BY FUSING STRUCTURED LIGHT AND CONTOURS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Gang; Li Dehua; Hu Hanping; Hu Bing

    2002-01-01

    Three dimensional digitization of human head is desired in many applications. In this paper, an information fusion based scheme is presented to obtain 3-D information of human head. Structured light technology is employed to measure depth. For the special reflection areas,in which the structured light stripe can not be detected directly, the shape of the structured light stripe can be calculated from the corresponding contour. By fusing the information of structured light and the contours, the problem of reflectance influence is solved, and the whole shape of head,including hair area, can be obtained. Some good results are obtained.

  14. Damage Analysis and Evaluation of Light Steel Structures Exposed to Wind Hazards

    OpenAIRE

    Na Yang; Fan Bai

    2017-01-01

    Compared to hot-rolled steel structures, cold-formed steel structures are susceptible to extreme winds because of the light weight of the building and its components. Many modern cold-formed steel structures have sustained significant structural damage ranging from loss of cladding to complete collapse in recent cyclones. This article first provides some real damage cases for light steel structures induced by the high winds. After that, the paper reviews research on the damage analysis and e...

  15. Micro and nano-structured green gallium indium nitride/gallium nitride light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Christoph J. M.

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are commonly designed and studied based on bulk material properties. In this thesis different approaches based on patterns in the nano and micrometer length scale range are used to tackle low efficiency in the green spectral region, which is known as “green gap”. Since light generation and extraction are governed by microscopic processes, it is instructive to study LEDs with lateral mesa sizes scaled to the nanometer range. Besides the well-known case of the quantum size effect along the growth direction, a continuous lateral scaling could reveal the mechanisms behind the purported absence of a green gap in nanowire LEDs and the role of their extraction enhancement. Furthermore the possibility to modulate strain and piezoelectric polarization by post growth patterning is of practical interest, because the internal electric fields in conventional wurtzite GaN LEDs cause performance problems. A possible alternative is cubic phase GaN, which is free of built-in polarization fields. LEDs on cubic GaN could show the link between strong polarization fields and efficiency roll-off at high current densities, also known as droop. An additional problem for all nitride-based LEDs is efficient light extraction. For a planar GaN LED only roughly 8% of the generated light can be extracted. Novel lightextraction structures with extraction-favoring geometry can yield significant increase in light output power. To investigate the effect of scaling the mesa dimension, micro and nano-sized LED arrays of variable structure size were fabricated. The nano-LEDs were patterned by electron beam lithography and dry etching. They contained up to 100 parallel nano-stripe LEDs connected to one common contact area. The mesa width was varied over 1 μm, 200 nm, and 50 nm. These LEDs were characterized electrically and optically, and the peak emission wavelength was found to depend on the lateral structure size. An electroluminescence (EL) wavelength shift of 3 nm

  16. Effects of a modulated vortex structure on the diffraction dynamics of ring Airy Gaussian beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianwei; Shi, Xiaohui; Deng, Zhixiang; Bai, Yanfeng; Fu, Xiquan

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of the ring Airy Gaussian beams with a modulated vortex in free space is numerically investigated. Compared with the unmodulated vortex, the unique property is that the beam spots first break up, and then gather. The evolution of the beams is influenced by the parameters of the vortex modulation, and the splitting phenomenon gets enhanced with multiple rings becoming light spots if the modulation depth increases. The symmetric branch pattern of the beam spots gets changed when the number of phase folds increases, and the initial modulation phase only impacts the angle of the beam spots. Moreover, a large distribution factor correlates to a hollow Gaussian vortex shape and weakens the splitting and gathering trend. By changing the initial parameters of the vortex modulation and the distribution factor, the peak intensity is greatly affected. In addition, the energy flow and the angular momentum are elucidated with the beam evolution features being confirmed.

  17. NMR structure of the first Ig module of mouse FGFR1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiselyov, V.V.; Bock, Elisabeth Marianne; Berezin, V.

    2006-01-01

    of this module. We describe here the NMR structure of the Ig1 module of mouse FGFR1. The three-dimensional fold of the module belongs to the intermediate Ig subgroup and can be described as a beta-barrel consisting of two beta-sheets. One sheet is formed by A', G, F, C, and C', and the other by A, B, B', E...

  18. Color and illuminance level of lighting can modulate willingness to eat bell peppers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenbeck, Aimee; Cho, Sungeun; Meullenet, Jean-François; Tokar, Tonya; Yang, Famous; Huddleston, Elizabeth A; Seo, Han-Seok

    2014-08-01

    Food products are often encountered under colored lighting, particularly in restaurants and retail stores. However, relatively little attention has been paid to whether the color of ambient lighting can affect consumers' motivation for consumption. This study aimed to determine whether color (Experiment 1) and illuminance level (Experiment 2) of lighting can influence consumers' liking of appearance and their willingness to eat bell peppers. For red, green, and yellow bell peppers, yellow and blue lighting conditions consistently increased participants' liking of appearance the most and the least, respectively. Participants' willingness to consume bell peppers increased the most under yellow lighting and the least under blue lighting. In addition, a dark condition (i.e. low level of lighting illuminance) decreased liking of appearance and willingness to eat the bell peppers compared to a bright condition (i.e. high level of lighting illuminance). Our findings demonstrate that lighting color and illuminance level can influence consumers' hedonic impression and likelihood to consume bell peppers. Furthermore, the influences of color and illuminance level of lighting appear to be dependent on the surface color of bell peppers. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. The thermal structural transition of alpha-crystallin modulates subunit interactions and increases protein solubility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maulucci

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alpha crystallin is an oligomer composed of two types of subunits, alpha-A and alpha-B crystallin, and is the major constituent of human lens. The temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin, the main cause for eye lens opacification (cataract, is a two step-process, a nucleation followed by an aggregation phase, and a protective effect towards the aggregation is exhibited over the alpha crystallin phase transition temperature (Tc = 318.16 K. METHODS/RESULTS: To investigate if a modulation of the subunit interactions over Tc could trigger the protective mechanism towards the aggregation, we followed, by using simultaneously static and dynamic light scattering, the temperature induced condensation of alpha-crystallin. By developing a mathematical model able to uncouple the nucleation and aggregation processes, we find a previously unobserved transition in the nucleation rate constant. Its temperature dependence allows to determine fundamental structural parameters, the chemical potential (Δμ and the interfacial tension (γ of the aggregating phase, that characterize subunit interactions. CONCLUSIONS/GENERAL SIGNIFICANCE: The decrease of both Δμ and γ at Tc, and a relative increase in solubility, reveal a significative decrease in the strenght of alpha-crystallin subunits interactions, which protects from supramolecolar condensation in hypertermic conditions. On the whole, we suggest a general approach able to understand the structural and kinetic mechanisms involved in aggregation-related diseases and in drugs development and testing.

  20. Exploring Protein Structure and Dynamics through a Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipchock, James M.; Ginther, Patrick S.; Douglas, Bonnie B.; Bird, Kelly E.; Loria, J. Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Here, we present a 10-week project-oriented laboratory module designed to provide a course-based undergraduate research experience in biochemistry that emphasizes the importance of biomolecular structure and dynamics in enzyme function. This module explores the impact of mutagenesis on an important active site loop for a biomedically-relevant…

  1. New intelligent multifunctional SiO2/VO2 composite films with enhanced infrared light regulation performance, solar modulation capability, and superhydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhao, Li; Liang, Zihui; Dong, Binghai; Wan, Li; Wang, Shimin

    2017-01-01

    Highly transparent, energy-saving, and superhydrophobic nanostructured SiO 2 /VO 2 composite films have been fabricated using a sol-gel method. These composite films are composed of an underlying infrared (IR)-regulating VO 2 layer and a top protective layer that consists of SiO 2 nanoparticles. Experimental results showed that the composite structure could enhance the IR light regulation performance, solar modulation capability, and hydrophobicity of the pristine VO 2 layer. The transmittance of the composite films in visible region ( T lum ) was higher than 60%, which was sufficient to meet the requirements of glass lighting. Compared with pristine VO 2 films and tungsten-doped VO 2 film, the near IR control capability of the composite films was enhanced by 13.9% and 22.1%, respectively, whereas their solar modulation capability was enhanced by 10.9% and 22.9%, respectively. The water contact angles of the SiO 2 /VO 2 composite films were over 150°, indicating superhydrophobicity. The transparent superhydrophobic surface exhibited a high stability toward illumination as all the films retained their initial superhydrophobicity even after exposure to 365 nm light with an intensity of 160 mW . cm -2 for 10 h. In addition, the films possessed anti-oxidation and anti-acid properties. These characteristics are highly advantageous for intelligent windows or solar cell applications, given that they can provide surfaces with anti-fogging, rainproofing, and self-cleaning effects. Our technique offers a simple and low-cost solution to the development of stable and visible light transparent superhydrophobic surfaces for industrial applications.

  2. Structured light optical microscopy for three-dimensional reconstruction of technical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettel, Johannes; Reinecke, Holger; Müller, Claas

    2016-04-01

    In microsystems technology quality control of micro structured surfaces with different surface properties is playing an ever more important role. The process of quality control incorporates three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of specularand diffusive reflecting technical surfaces. Due to the demand on high measurement accuracy and data acquisition rates, structured light optical microscopy has become a valuable solution to solve this problem providing high vertical and lateral resolution. However, 3D reconstruction of specular reflecting technical surfaces still remains a challenge to optical measurement principles. In this paper we present a measurement principle based on structured light optical microscopy which enables 3D reconstruction of specular- and diffusive reflecting technical surfaces. It is realized using two light paths of a stereo microscope equipped with different magnification levels. The right optical path of the stereo microscope is used to project structured light onto the object surface. The left optical path is used to capture the structured illuminated object surface with a camera. Structured light patterns are generated by a Digital Light Processing (DLP) device in combination with a high power Light Emitting Diode (LED). Structured light patterns are realized as a matrix of discrete light spots to illuminate defined areas on the object surface. The introduced measurement principle is based on multiple and parallel processed point measurements. Analysis of the measured Point Spread Function (PSF) by pattern recognition and model fitting algorithms enables the precise calculation of 3D coordinates. Using exemplary technical surfaces we demonstrate the successful application of our measurement principle.

  3. Advanced composites structural concepts and materials technologies for primary aircraft structures. Structural response and failure analysis: ISPAN modules users manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairr, John W.; Huang, Jui-Ten; Ingram, J. Edward; Shah, Bharat M.

    1992-01-01

    The ISPAN Program (Interactive Stiffened Panel Analysis) is an interactive design tool that is intended to provide a means of performing simple and self contained preliminary analysis of aircraft primary structures made of composite materials. The program combines a series of modules with the finite element code DIAL as its backbone. Four ISPAN Modules were developed and are documented. These include: (1) flat stiffened panel; (2) curved stiffened panel; (3) flat tubular panel; and (4) curved geodesic panel. Users are instructed to input geometric and material properties, load information and types of analysis (linear, bifurcation buckling, or post-buckling) interactively. The program utilizing this information will generate finite element mesh and perform analysis. The output in the form of summary tables of stress or margins of safety, contour plots of loads or stress, and deflected shape plots may be generalized and used to evaluate specific design.

  4. Novel electro-optical phase modulator based on GaInAs/InP modulation-doped quantum-well structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thirstrup, C.

    1992-01-01

    A novel electro-optical phase modulator working at 1.55 µm is analyzed and proposed. It is shown by a numerical model that in a GaInAs/InP pn-nin-pn multiple-quantum-well waveguide structure, large optical phase modulation can be obtained at small intensity modulation and with improved performance...

  5. Commensurate and incommensurate '5M' modulated crystal structures in Ni-Mn-Ga martensitic phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righi, L.; Albertini, F.; Pareti, L.; Paoluzi, A.; Calestani, G.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the composition of ferromagnetic shape memory Ni-Mn-Ga Heusler alloys determines both temperature of martensitic transformations and the structure type of the product phase. In the present work we focused our attention on the structural study of the so-called '5M' modulated structure. In particular, the structure of Ni 1.95 Mn 1.19 Ga 0.86 martensitic phase is analysed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and compared with that of the stoichiometric Ni 2 MnGa martensite. The study of the diffraction data reveals the occurrence of commensurate (C) structural modulation in Ni 1.95 Mn 1.19 Ga 0.86 ; this contrasts with Ni 2 MnGa, where an incommensurate (IC) structural modulation was evident. The two phases also differ in the symmetry of the fundamental martensitic lattice. In fact, the incommensurate modulation is related to an orthorhombic basic structure, while the commensurate variant presents a monoclinic symmetry. The commensurate modulated structure has been investigated by using the superspace approach already adopted to solve the structure of Ni 2 MnGa martensite. The structure has been determined by Rietveld refinement of PXRD data

  6. Image quality affected by diffraction of aperture structure arrangement in transparent active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Mao-Hsiu; Jeng, Wei-de; Huang, Ting-Wei; Lo, Kuo-Lung; Ou-Yang, Mang

    2015-10-01

    Transparent display is one of the main technologies in next-generation displays, especially for augmented reality applications. An aperture structure is attached on each display pixel to partition them into transparent and black regions. However, diffraction blurs caused by the aperture structure typically degrade the transparent image when the light from a background object passes through finite aperture window. In this paper, the diffraction effect of an active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display (AMOLED) is studied. Several aperture structures have been proposed and implemented. Based on theoretical analysis and simulation, the appropriate aperture structure will effectively reduce the blur. The analysis data are also consistent with the experimental results. Compared with the various transparent aperture structure on AMOLED, diffraction width (zero energy position of diffraction pattern) of the optimize aperture structure can be reduced 63% and 31% in the x and y directions in CASE 3. Associated with a lenticular lens on the aperture structure, the improvement could reach to 77% and 54% of diffraction width in the x and y directions. Modulation transfer function and practical images are provided to evaluate the improvement of image blurs.

  7. Controlling the evolution of nondiffracting speckle by complex amplitude modulation on a phase-only spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available for both a uniform and a normal distribution is investigated. We find that we are able to engineer whether the nondiffracting field will appear as speckle or a structured zero-order Bessel beam by adjusting the standard deviation in the distribution. Having...

  8. Correlation between modulation structure and electronic inhomogeneity on Pb-doped Bi-2212 single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, A.; Kashiwaya, S.; Eisaki, H.; Yamaguchi, H.; Oka, K.; Kashiwaya, H.; Tsuchiura, H.; Tanaka, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The correlation between nanometer-size electronic states and surface structure is investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) on Pb-doped Bi 2-x Pb x Sr 2 CaCu2O 8+y (Pb-Bi-2212) single crystals. The advantage of the Pb-Bi-2212 samples is that the modulation structure can be totally or locally suppressed depending on the Pb contents and annealing conditions. The superconducting gap (Δ) distribution on modulated Pb-Bi-2212 samples showed the lack of correlation with modulation structure except a slight reduction of superconducting island size for the b-axis direction. On the other hand, the optimal doped Pb-Bi-2212 (x = 0.6) samples obtained by reduced-annealing showed totally non-modulated structure in topography, however, the spatial distribution of Δ still showed inhomogeneity of which features were quite similar to those of modulated samples. These results suggest that the modulation structure is not the dominant origin of inhomogeneity although it modifies the streaky Δ structure sub-dominantly. From the gap structure variation around the border of narrow gap and broad gap regions, a trend of the coexistence of two separated phases i.e., superconducting phase and pseudogap like phase, is detected

  9. [Spectral analysis of fiber bragg grating modulated by double long period grating and its application in smart structure monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ji-Yun; Liang, Da-Kai; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Zhu

    2009-12-01

    Spectrum of fiber bragg grating (FBG) sensor modulated by double long period grating (LPFG) is proposed in the paper. Double LPFG consists of two LPFGS whose center wavelengths are the same and reflection spectrum of FBG sensor is located in linear range of double LPFG transmission spectrum. Based on spectral analysis of FBG and double LPFG, reflection spectrum of FBG modulated by double LPFG is obtained and studied by use of band-hider filter characteristics for double LPFG. An FBG sensor is attached on the surface of thin steel beam, which is strained by bending, and the center wavelength of FBG sensor will shift. The spectral peak of FBG sensor modulated by double LPFG is changed correspondingly, and the spectral change will lead to variation in exit light intensity from double LPFG. Experiment demonstrates that the relation of filtering light intensity from double LPFG monitored by optical power meter to center wavelength change of FBG sensor is linear and the minimum strain of material (steel beam) detected by the modulation and demodulation system is 1.05 microepsilon. This solution is used in impact monitoring of optical fibre smart structure, and FBG sensor is applied for impulse response signal monitoring induced by low-velocity impact, when impact pendulum is loaded to carbon fiber-reinforced plastics (CFP). The acquired impact response signal and fast Fourier transform of the signal detected by FBG sensor agree with the measurement results of eddy current displacement meter attached to the FBG sensor. From the results, the present method using FBG sensor is found to be effective for monitoring the impact. The research provides a practical reference in dynamic monitoring of optical fiber smart structure field.

  10. Simulation of modulated protein crystal structure and diffraction data in a supercell and in superspace

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lovelace, J.J.; Simone, P.D.; Petříček, Václav; Borgstahl, G.E.O.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 69, Part 6 (2013), 1062-1072 ISSN 0907-4449 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : protein crystallograhy * superspace approach * incommensurately modulated structures Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.232, year: 2013

  11. CommWalker: correctly evaluating modules in molecular networks in light of annotation bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecken, M D; Page, M J T; Crosby, A J; Mason, S; Reinert, G; Deane, C M

    2018-03-15

    Detecting novel functional modules in molecular networks is an important step in biological research. In the absence of gold standard functional modules, functional annotations are often used to verify whether detected modules/communities have biological meaning. However, as we show, the uneven distribution of functional annotations means that such evaluation methods favor communities of well-studied proteins. We propose a novel framework for the evaluation of communities as functional modules. Our proposed framework, CommWalker, takes communities as inputs and evaluates them in their local network environment by performing short random walks. We test CommWalker's ability to overcome annotation bias using input communities from four community detection methods on two protein interaction networks. We find that modules accepted by CommWalker are similarly co-expressed as those accepted by current methods. Crucially, CommWalker performs well not only in well-annotated regions, but also in regions otherwise obscured by poor annotation. CommWalker community prioritization both faithfully captures well-validated communities and identifies functional modules that may correspond to more novel biology. The CommWalker algorithm is freely available at opig.stats.ox.ac.uk/resources or as a docker image on the Docker Hub at hub.docker.com/r/lueckenmd/commwalker/. deane@stats.ox.ac.uk. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Selective visualization of gene structure with ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.; Becker, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of the ultraviolet (UV) footprinting technique to detect chromatin has been investigated in vitro. Two basic types of chromatin, a phased nucleosome and a phased nucleosome containing a phased H1 protein, have been reconstituted onto a cloned 5S ribosomal RNA gene from sea urchin. The histone-DNA interactions in each complex have been probed with exonuclease III, DNase I, dimethyl sulfate, and UV light. Whereas DNase I and exonuclease III readily detect interactions between histones and DNA, UV light and dimethyl sulfate do not. In contrast to histone-DNA interactions, we demonstrate that intimate sequence-specific contacts between the same sea urchin 5S DNA and the Xenopus laevis transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA) are readily detected with UV light. Since the sensitivity of UV light for TFIIIA contacts is similar to its sensitivity for other regulatory protein-DNA contacts, these studies demonstrate the feasibility of using UV light to selectively visualize regulatory protein-DNA interactions in vivo with little or no interference from histone-DNA interactions

  13. Improved outcoupling of light in organic light emitting devices, utilizing a holographic DFB-structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinke, Nils [Organische Funktionsmaterialien, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany)]. E-mail: nils.reinke@physik.uni-augsburg.de; Fuhrmann, Thomas [Macromolecular Chemistry and Molecular Materials, University of Kassel (Germany); Perschke, Alexandra [Organische Funktionsmaterialien, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany); Franke, Hilmar [Organische Funktionsmaterialien, University of Duisburg-Essen (Germany)

    2004-12-10

    In this work organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) were fabricated implementing gratings, in order to extract waveguided electroluminescence (EL). The gratings were recorded by exposing thin films of the molecular azo glass N, N'-bis (4-phenyl)-N, N'-bis [(4-phenylazo)-phenyl] benzidine (AZOPD) to holographic light patterns. The photopatterned AZOPD serves as hole transport material for devices with aluminum-tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) doped with 1% of 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(4-dimethylaminostyryl)-4H-pyran (Alq{sub 3}:DCM) as emissive/electron transport layer. The corrugated devices showed enhanced emission in the forward direction. The emitted light is polarized preferably parallel to the grating lines. In addition, we have found a doubling in the total luminance with respect to the unstructured device.

  14. Nuclear structure of light Ca and heavy Cr isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, A.

    2007-01-01

    In the present thesis, the shell structure in exotic nuclei has been investigated. The focus of the work was on finding new experimental data in neutron-rich Cr and proton-rich Ca isotopes. The investigation of light Ca isotopes concentrated on the nucleus 36 Ca which was produced in a knockout reaction from a radioactive 37 Ca beam. For 36 Ca, the excitation energy of the first 2 + state has been measured for the first time. Furthermore, momentum distributions were analyzed using a Monte-Carlo simulation of the knockout reaction. This analysis yielded the contributions of neutrons from individual orbitals to the total knockout cross section. In principle, these may be used to calculate spectroscopic factors, but such a calculation is hampered by difficulties of present knockout-reaction models in predicting precise single-particle cross sections. The measured branching ratio to the ground and excited states, on the other hand, is close to the predicted value. A remaining difference might be due to emission of protons which cannot be detected with the present experimental setup. Both the branching ratio and the large excitation energy are compatible with a large N=16 gap in 36 Ca that leads to relatively pure configurations both in the ground state and the excited 2 + state. As a by-product of the experiment, two excitation energies in the T=2 nuclei 32 Ar and 28 S have been confirmed, and two γ-ray transitions have been observed for the first time in 37 Ca. While the mirror energy differences in the T=2 pairs 36 Ca- 36 S, 32 Ar- 32 Si, and 28 S- 28 Mg can be reproduced in shell model calculations using a modified USD interaction, these modifications are not sufficient to explain the mirror energy differences for the pair 37 Ca- 37 Cl. In the heavy Cr isotopes, new experimental evidence for a sub-shell closure at N=32 was found in a measurement of B(E2) values using high-energy Coulomb excitation of radioactive beams. Prior to this experiment, the assumption of a

  15. Nuclear structure of light Ca and heavy Cr isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, A.

    2007-07-01

    In the present thesis, the shell structure in exotic nuclei has been investigated. The focus of the work was on finding new experimental data in neutron-rich Cr and proton-rich Ca isotopes. The investigation of light Ca isotopes concentrated on the nucleus {sup 36}Ca which was produced in a knockout reaction from a radioactive {sup 37}Ca beam. For {sup 36}Ca, the excitation energy of the first 2{sup +} state has been measured for the first time. Furthermore, momentum distributions were analyzed using a Monte-Carlo simulation of the knockout reaction. This analysis yielded the contributions of neutrons from individual orbitals to the total knockout cross section. In principle, these may be used to calculate spectroscopic factors, but such a calculation is hampered by difficulties of present knockout-reaction models in predicting precise single-particle cross sections. The measured branching ratio to the ground and excited states, on the other hand, is close to the predicted value. A remaining difference might be due to emission of protons which cannot be detected with the present experimental setup. Both the branching ratio and the large excitation energy are compatible with a large N=16 gap in {sup 36}Ca that leads to relatively pure configurations both in the ground state and the excited 2{sup +} state. As a by-product of the experiment, two excitation energies in the T=2 nuclei {sup 32}Ar and {sup 28}S have been confirmed, and two {gamma}-ray transitions have been observed for the first time in {sup 37}Ca. While the mirror energy differences in the T=2 pairs {sup 36}Ca-{sup 36}S, {sup 32}Ar-{sup 32}Si, and {sup 28}S-{sup 28}Mg can be reproduced in shell model calculations using a modified USD interaction, these modifications are not sufficient to explain the mirror energy differences for the pair {sup 37}Ca-{sup 37}Cl. In the heavy Cr isotopes, new experimental evidence for a sub-shell closure at N=32 was found in a measurement of B(E2) values using high

  16. Light intensity modulation by coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi as a micro-photo-regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukawa, Yuri; Miyashita, Yuito; Satoh, Manami; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Iwasaka, Masakazu

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we present experimental evidence showing that coccoliths have light-scattering anisotropy that contributes to a possible control of solar light exposure in the ocean. Changing the angle between the incident light and an applied magnetic field causes differences in the light-scattering intensities of a suspension of coccoliths isolated from Emiliania huxleyi. The magnetic field effect is induced by the diamagnetic torque force directing the coccolith radial plane perpendicular to the applied magnetic fields at 400 to 500 mT. The developed technique reveals the light-scattering anisotropies in the 3-μm-diameter floating coccoliths by orienting themselves in response to the magnetic fields. The detached coccolith scatters radially the light incident to its radial plane. The experimental results on magnetically oriented coccoliths show that an individual coccolith has a specific direction of light scattering, although the possible physiological effect of the coccolith remains for further study, focusing on the light-scattering anisotropies of coccoliths on living cells.

  17. Development and Experimental Investigations of Motion Detection Module for Smart Lighting System

    OpenAIRE

    Matveev, I.; Siemens, E.; Yurchenko, Aleksey Vasilievich; Kuznetsov, D.

    2016-01-01

    This work considers motion sensors as parts of the smart lighting system on basis of Beaglebone microcomputer. Detection system is designed for the smart lighting system. Experimental investigations of the detection system were made with different motion sensors. Based on the results comparative analysis was performed and optimal conditions for the detection system operation were found.

  18. Environmental light and time of day modulate subjective liking and wanting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Itzhacki, Jacob; Te Lindert, Bart H W; van der Meijden, Wisse P; Kringelbach, Morten L; Mendoza, Jorge; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2018-01-01

    Several studies demonstrated effects of light on affect via projections from the retina of the eye to the circadian clock or via projections to areas involved in mood and reward. Few field studies investigated how naturally fluctuating light levels affect positive and negative mood in everyday life,

  19. Heat transfer and structure stress analysis of micro packaging component of high power light emitting diode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chih-Neng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the heat transfer and structural stress analysis of the micro- scale packaging structure of a high-power light emitting diode. The thermal-effect and thermal-stress of light emitting diode are determined numerically. Light emitting diode is attached to the silicon substrate through the wire bonding process by using epoxy as die bond material. The silicon substrate is etched with holes at the bottom and filled with high conductivity copper material. The chip temperature and structure stress increase with input power consumption. The micro light emitting diode is mounted on the heat sink to increase the heat dissipation performance, to decrease chip temperature, to enhance the material structure reliability and safety, and to avoid structure failure as well. This paper has successfully used the finite element method to the micro-scale light emitting diode heat transfer and stress concentration at the edges through etched holes.

  20. Reversible structural modulation of Fe-Pt bimetallic surfaces and its effect on reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Teng; Fu, Qiang; Su, Hai-Yan; Liu, Hong-Yang; Cui, Yi; Wang, Zhen; Mu, Ren-Tao; Li, Wei-Xue; Bao, Xin-He

    2009-05-11

    Tunable surface: The surface structure of the Fe-Pt bimetallic catalyst can be reversibly modulated between the iron-oxide-rich Pt surface and the Pt-skin structure with subsurface Fe via alternating reduction and oxidation treatments (see figure). The regenerated active Pt-skin structure is active in reactions involving CO and/or O.

  1. Light-operated machines based on threaded molecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Credi, Alberto; Silvi, Serena; Venturi, Margherita

    2014-01-01

    Rotaxanes and related species represent the most common implementation of the concept of artificial molecular machines, because the supramolecular nature of the interactions between the components and their interlocked architecture allow a precise control on the position and movement of the molecular units. The use of light to power artificial molecular machines is particularly valuable because it can play the dual role of "writing" and "reading" the system. Moreover, light-driven machines can operate without accumulation of waste products, and photons are the ideal inputs to enable autonomous operation mechanisms. In appropriately designed molecular machines, light can be used to control not only the stability of the system, which affects the relative position of the molecular components but also the kinetics of the mechanical processes, thereby enabling control on the direction of the movements. This step forward is necessary in order to make a leap from molecular machines to molecular motors.

  2. Organic light emission structures — XXI century technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokin V. M.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The given review allows to believe, that the decision of a complex technological, materialstechnological, technical problems at creation modern OLED- and PLED-devices in nearest 5—10 years will result in creation of devices with power efficiency more than 100 lm/W and service life till 100 000 hours. The realization of such parameters will allow to expand area of application of the considered systems and to create in the future unique flat powereffective organic lighting systems of new generation — light sources XXI of century.

  3. Automated identification of RNA 3D modules with discriminative power in RNA structural alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theis, Corinna; Höner zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress in predicting RNA structure is moving towards filling the 'gap' in 2D RNA structure prediction where, for example, predicted internal loops often form non-canonical base pairs. This is increasingly recognized with the steady increase of known RNA 3D modules. There is a general...... comparative evidence. Subsequently, the modules, initially represented by a graph, are turned into models for the RMDetect program, which allows to test their discriminative power using real and randomized Rfam alignments. An initial extraction of 22495 3D modules in all PDB files results in 977 internal loop...

  4. Slowdown of group velocity of light in dual-frequency laser-pumped cascade structure of Er3+-doped optical fiber at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Yang, Yujing; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Jianjun; Lv, Pin; Jiang, Qiuli

    2018-04-01

    Slow light is demonstrated in the cascade structure of an erbium-doped fiber with two forward propagation pumps. The results of the numerical simulation of the time delay and the optimum modulation frequency complement each other. The time delay and the optimum modulation frequency depend on the pump ratio G (G  =  {{P}1480}:{{P}980} ). The discussion results of this paper show that a larger time delay of slow light propagation can be obtained in the cascade structure of Er3+-doped optical fibers with dual-frequency laser pumping. Compared to previous research methods, the dual-frequency laser-pumped cascade structure of an Er3+-doped optical fiber is more controllable. Based on our discussion the pump ratio G should be selected in order to obtain a more appropriate time delay and the slowdown of group velocity.

  5. Computational hologram synthesis and representation on spatial light modulators for real-time 3D holographic imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichelt, Stephan; Leister, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    In dynamic computer-generated holography that utilizes spatial light modulators, both hologram synthesis and hologram representation are essential in terms of fast computation and high reconstruction quality. For hologram synthesis, i.e. the computation step, Fresnel transform based or point-source based raytracing methods can be applied. In the encoding step, the complex wave-field has to be optimally represented by the SLM with its given modulation capability. For proper hologram reconstruction that implies a simultaneous and independent amplitude and phase modulation of the input wave-field by the SLM. In this paper, we discuss full complex hologram representation methods on SLMs by considering inherent SLM parameter such as modulation type and bit depth on their reconstruction performance such as diffraction efficiency and SNR. We review the three implementation schemes of Burckhardt amplitude-only representation, phase-only macro-pixel representation, and two-phase interference representation. Besides the optical performance we address their hardware complexity and required computational load. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate holographic reconstructions of different representation schemes as obtained by functional prototypes utilizing SeeReal's viewing-window holographic display technology. The proposed hardware implementations enable a fast encoding of complex-valued hologram data and thus will pave the way for commercial real-time holographic 3D imaging in the near future.

  6. Omnidirectional light absorption of disordered nano-hole structure inspired from Papilio ulysses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Fang, Xiaotian; Huang, Yiqiao; Liu, Qinglei; Bai, Mingwen; Zhang, Di

    2014-07-15

    Butterflies routinely produce nanostructured surfaces with useful properties. Here, we report a disordered nano-hole structure with ridges inspired by Papilio ulysses that produce omnidirectional light absorption compared with the common ordered structure. The result shows that the omnidirectional light absorption is affected by polarization, the incident angle, and the wavelength. Using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the stable omnidirectional light absorption is achieved in the structure inspired from the Papilio ulysses over a wide incident angle range and with various wavelengths. This explains some of the mysteries of the structure of the Papilio ulysses butterfly. These conclusions can guide the design of omnidirectional absorption materials.

  7. Doping of nano structures for light emitting diode applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, S. W.; Yoo, H. J.; Jeong, E. S.; Park, S. H.

    2006-04-01

    Lighting Emitting Diodes (LED) have been widely studied and developed for practical applications and the LED market in the world have been dramatically expended. GaN-based LEDs are mostly used. However, for diverse application, we should first solved several problems in the GaN-based LEDs, thermal heating effects and low light emitting efficiency. The thermal heating effects reduce the life time of LEDs and the low light emitting efficiency are disadvantageous in competition with electric lights. In this project, we studied the possibility of ZnO nanomaterials as LEDs. We have developed a techniques to fabricated reproducible ZnO nanorod arrays on various substrates with 40 - 100 nm diameters. We have successfully fabricated two-dimensional ZnO film growth on one-dimensional nanorods. We have also systematically studied ZnO nanorod growth on GaN and Al 2 O 3 substrated with different proton treatments to understand the ZnO nanorod growth mechanism. These techniques will be used to develop p-ZnO/n-ZnO nanomaterials as LEDs

  8. Light emitting structures porous silicon-silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monastyrskii, L.S.; Olenych, I.B.; Panasjuk, M.R.; Savchyn, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    The research of spectroscopic properties of porous silicon has been done. Complex of photoluminescence, electroluminescence, cathodoluminescence, thermostimulated depolarisation current analyte methods have been applied to study of geterostructures and free layers of porous silicon. Light emitting processes had tendency to decrease. The character of decay for all kinds of luminescence were different

  9. Impact of crystal orientation on the modulation bandwidth of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monavarian, M.; Rashidi, A.; Aragon, A. A.; Oh, S. H.; Rishinaramangalam, A. K.; DenBaars, S. P.; Feezell, D.

    2018-01-01

    High-speed InGaN/GaN blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are needed for future gigabit-per-second visible-light communication systems. Large LED modulation bandwidths are typically achieved at high current densities, with reports close to 1 GHz bandwidth at current densities ranging from 5 to 10 kA/cm2. However, the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of InGaN/GaN LEDs is quite low at high current densities due to the well-known efficiency droop phenomenon. Here, we show experimentally that nonpolar and semipolar orientations of GaN enable higher modulation bandwidths at low current densities where the IQE is expected to be higher and power dissipation is lower. We experimentally compare the modulation bandwidth vs. current density for LEDs on nonpolar (10 1 ¯ 0 ), semipolar (20 2 ¯ 1 ¯) , and polar (" separators="|0001 ) orientations. In agreement with wavefunction overlap considerations, the experimental results indicate a higher modulation bandwidth for the nonpolar and semipolar LEDs, especially at relatively low current densities. At 500 A/cm2, the nonpolar LED has a 3 dB bandwidth of ˜1 GHz, while the semipolar and polar LEDs exhibit bandwidths of 260 MHz and 75 MHz, respectively. A lower carrier density for a given current density is extracted from the RF measurements for the nonpolar and semipolar LEDs, consistent with the higher wavefunction overlaps in these orientations. At large current densities, the bandwidth of the polar LED approaches that of the nonpolar and semipolar LEDs due to coulomb screening of the polarization field. The results support using nonpolar and semipolar orientations to achieve high-speed LEDs at low current densities.

  10. CARES (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) Version 1.0, seismic module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Philippacopoulas, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.

    1990-07-01

    During FY's 1988 and 1989, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed the CARES system (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). CARES is a PC software system which has been designed to perform structural response computations similar to those encountered in licensing reviews of nuclear power plant structures. The documentation of the Seismic Module of CARES consists of three volumes. This report represents Volume 3 of the volume documentation of the Seismic Module of CARES. It presents three sample problems typically encountered in the Soil-Structure Interaction analyses. 14 refs., 36 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Spatial light modulators and applications III; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 7, 8, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efron, Uzi (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Recent advances in the technology and applications of spatial light modulators (SLMs) are discussed in review essays by leading experts. Topics addressed include materials for SLMs, SLM devices and device technology, applications to optical data processing, and applications to artificial neural networks. Particular attention is given to nonlinear optical polymers, liquid crystals, magnetooptic SLMs, multiple-quantum-well SLMs, deformable-mirror SLMs, three-dimensional optical memories, applications of photorefractive devices to optical computing, photonic neurocomputers and learning machines, holographic associative memories, SLMs as parallel memories for optoelectronic neural networks, and coherent-optics implementations of neural-network models.

  12. Trinary flip-flops using Savart plate and spatial light modulator for optical computation in multivalued logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Amal K.; Basuray, Amitabha

    2008-11-01

    The memory devices in multi-valued logic are of most significance in modern research. This paper deals with the implementation of basic memory devices in multi-valued logic using Savart plate and spatial light modulator (SLM) based optoelectronic circuits. Photons are used here as the carrier to speed up the operations. Optical tree architecture (OTA) has been also utilized in the optical interconnection network. We have exploited the advantages of Savart plates, SLMs and OTA and proposed the SLM based high speed JK, D-type and T-type flip-flops in a trinary system.

  13. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  14. Design and practice for a picture archiving and communication system based structured report module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Junzhang; Jiang Guihua; Zheng Liyin; Ou Jingchai; Wu Pingyang; Hong Wensong; Jin Lin; Huang Dajiang; Zhang Xuelin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To design and explore structured report module based on PACS, and to make diagnostic reports with pictures and words in application of computer implementing synchronous transmission of reports and pictures. Methods: 1000 Mb trunk net was adopted in PACS and 100 Mb was exchanged on tabletop. Structured report was designed with six function modules including basic item area, image sign area, diagnostic impression area, advice area, signature area, and picture area by application of programming language such as Delphi 6.0 and VC ++ 6.0. DICOM. Medical images or waveform were inserted directly in the diagnosis report through citing DICOM composite object. Basic function library was designed and constructed in whole system environment. Results: The structured report module based on PACS could structure image diagnosis report in inerrability structure in term of compute. The time and period of reports were shortened and utilization of report original datum were improved. Conclusion: The structured report module was in favor of promotion to combine with clinic teaching and scientific research. The quality and efficiency of image diagnosis work were raised by structured report module

  15. Structural Insights into the HWE Histidine Kinase Family: The Brucella Blue Light-Activated Histidine Kinase Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Jimena; Arrar, Mehrnoosh; Sycz, Gabriela; Cerutti, María Laura; Berguer, Paula M; Paris, Gastón; Estrín, Darío Ariel; Martí, Marcelo Adrián; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto

    2016-03-27

    In response to light, as part of a two-component system, the Brucella blue light-activated histidine kinase (LOV-HK) increases its autophosphorylation, modulating the virulence of this microorganism. The Brucella histidine kinase (HK) domain belongs to the HWE family, for which there is no structural information. The HWE family is exclusively present in proteobacteria and usually coupled to a wide diversity of light sensor domains. This work reports the crystal structure of the Brucella HK domain, which presents two different dimeric assemblies in the asymmetric unit: one similar to the already described canonical parallel homodimers (C) and the other, an antiparallel non-canonical (NC) dimer, each with distinct relative subdomain orientations and dimerization interfaces. Contrary to these crystallographic structures and unlike other HKs, in solution, the Brucella HK domain is monomeric and still active, showing an astonishing instability of the dimeric interface. Despite this instability, using cross-linking experiments, we show that the C dimer is the functionally relevant species. Mutational analysis demonstrates that the autophosphorylation activity occurs in cis. The different relative subdomain orientations observed for the NC and C states highlight the large conformational flexibility of the HK domain. Through the analysis of these alternative conformations by means of molecular dynamics simulations, we also propose a catalytic mechanism for Brucella LOV-HK. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tracking the Reorganization of Module Structure in Time-Varying Weighted Brain Functional Connectivity Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christoph; Piper, Diana; Pester, Britta; Mierau, Andreas; Witte, Herbert

    2018-05-01

    Identification of module structure in brain functional networks is a promising way to obtain novel insights into neural information processing, as modules correspond to delineated brain regions in which interactions are strongly increased. Tracking of network modules in time-varying brain functional networks is not yet commonly considered in neuroscience despite its potential for gaining an understanding of the time evolution of functional interaction patterns and associated changing degrees of functional segregation and integration. We introduce a general computational framework for extracting consensus partitions from defined time windows in sequences of weighted directed edge-complete networks and show how the temporal reorganization of the module structure can be tracked and visualized. Part of the framework is a new approach for computing edge weight thresholds for individual networks based on multiobjective optimization of module structure quality criteria as well as an approach for matching modules across time steps. By testing our framework using synthetic network sequences and applying it to brain functional networks computed from electroencephalographic recordings of healthy subjects that were exposed to a major balance perturbation, we demonstrate the framework's potential for gaining meaningful insights into dynamic brain function in the form of evolving network modules. The precise chronology of the neural processing inferred with our framework and its interpretation helps to improve the currently incomplete understanding of the cortical contribution for the compensation of such balance perturbations.

  17. The effect of spatial light modulator (SLM) dependent dispersion on spatial beam shaping

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Spangenberg, D-M

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available on the pixels between zero and two pi for a specific wavelength. It is therefore unavoidable when using the same SLM, to do beam shaping of a source which emits multiple wavelengths or a wide bandwidth, that the device will not modulate all wavelengths between...

  18. Deep modulation of second-harmonic light by wavelength detuning of a laser diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mathias; Hansen, Anders Kragh; Noordegraaf, Danny

    2017-01-01

    ) master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser diode with separate electrical contacts for the MO and the PA. A modulation depth in excess of 97% from 0.1 Hz to 10 kHz is demonstrated. This is done by wavelength tuning of the laser diode using only a 40 mA adjustment of the current through the MO...

  19. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode Parking Structure Lighting at U.S. Department of Labor Headquarters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael

    2013-03-01

    This report documents a solid-state lighting (SSL) technology demonstration at the parking structure of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) Headquarters in Washington, DC, in which light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires were substituted for the incumbent high-pressure sodium (HPS) luminaires and evaluated for relative light quantity and performance. The demonstration results show energy savings of 52% from the initial conversion of HPS to the LED product. These savings were increased to 88% by using occupancy sensor controls that were ultimately set to reduce power to 10% of high state operation after a time delay of 2.5 minutes. Because of the relatively high cost of the LED luminaires at their time of purchase for this project (2010), the simple payback periods were 6.5 years and 4.9 years for retrofit and new construction scenarios, respectively. Staff at DOL Headquarters reported high satisfaction with the operation of the LED product.

  20. Study of the structure of light neutron rich nucleus with the Tonnerre array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietri, St.

    2003-06-01

    This work concern the technical development made on the multidetector TONNERRE and the study of the 34 Si nucleus by a complete beta-neutron-gamma spectroscopy. In the first part various tests performed on modules of the detector in the 'Centre d'Etude de Bruyere le Chatel' are presented. A modification of the embassies of the photomultipliers tubes allows to gain more than 50% in the neutron efficiency and to obtain a threshold lower than 300 keV for the neutron energy. A complete C++ simulation of the neutron propagation in the array was carried out. It explains that the slow component of the light output of the scintillator may be responsible of the shape of the time-of-flight spectrum. The second part of these report presents the experiment devoted to the study of the structure of the 34 Si from the beta decay of the 34 Al. It was performed at the GANIL facility using the TONNERRE array and germanium of ENOGAM. The 34 Al was produced by projectile fragmentation of a 36 S beam of 50 MeV/A in a target of 9 Be. A complete beta scheme of the 34 Al is proposed. Eight neutron lines following the 34 Al decay were observed for the first time. Finally we suggest that a monopolar transition could occur in the 34 Si nucleus signing a O + 2 state at 2133 keV. (author)

  1. Structure of a fibronectin type III-like module from Clostridium thermocellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alahuhta, Markus; Xu, Qi; Brunecky, Roman; Adney, William S.; Ding, Shi-You; Himmel, Michael E.; Lunin, Vladimir V.

    2010-01-01

    The 1.6 Å resolution structure of a fibronectin type III-like module from Clostridium thermocellum with two molecules in the asymmetric unit is reported. The 1.6 Å resolution structure of a fibronectin type III-like module from Clostridium thermocellum with two molecules in the asymmetric unit is reported. The crystals used for data collection belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 35.43, b = 45.73, c = 107.72 Å, and the structure was refined to an R factor of 0.166. Structural comparisons found over 800 similar structures in the Protein Data Bank. The broad range of different proteins or protein domains with high structural similarity makes it especially demanding to classify these proteins. Previous studies of fibronectin type III-like modules have indicated that they might function as ligand-binding modules, as a compact form of peptide linkers or spacers between other domains, as cellulose-disrupting modules or as proteins that help large enzyme complexes remain soluble

  2. Melatonin modulates monochromatic light-induced melatonin receptor expression in the hypothalamus of chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liwei; Chen, Funing; Cao, Jing; Dong, Yulan; Wang, Zixu; Chen, Yaoxing

    2017-09-01

    To study the mechanism of the effect of monochromatic light on physiological function in chicken, a total of 192 newly hatched chicks were randomly divided into intact, sham-operated and pinealectomy groups then exposed to white light (WL), red light (RL), green light (GL) and blue light (BL) using a light-emitting diode (LED) system for two weeks. At P14, the hypothalami were immediately collected for immunohistochemical staining of melatonin receptor subtypes (Mel1a and Mel1b) and detection of Mel1a and Mel1b expressions using RT-PCR and western blot. Immunohistochemical staining of the hypothalamus showed that the Mel1a-ir cells were distributed in the preoptic area (POA), nucleus preopticus periventricularis (POP) and suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), and the Mel1b-ir cells were presented in the POA and SCN. Analysis of RT-PCR and western blot showed that the mRNA and protein levels of Mel1a and Mel1b in the hypothalamus of chick exposed to GL were increased by 10.7-29.3%, 9.18-35.9% and 8.97-27.3% compared to those in the chicks exposed to WL (P=0.029-0.002), RL (P=0.027-0.001) and BL (P=0.038-0.007) in the intact group, respectively. After pinealectomy, however, these parameters decreased and there were no significant differences among the WL, RL, GL and BL groups. These findings suggested that melatonin plays a critical role in GL illumination-enhanced Mel1a and Mel1b expressions in the hypothalamus of chicks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of 5f electrons in the structural stability of light actinide (Th-U) mononitrides under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modak, P; Verma, Ashok K

    2016-03-28

    Pressure induced structural sequences and their mechanism for light actinide (Th-U) mononitrides were studied as a function of 5f-electron number using first-principles total energy and electronic structure calculations. Zero pressure lattice constants, bulk module and C11 elastic module vary systematically with 5f-electron number implying its direct role on crystal binding. There is a critical 5f-electron number below which the system makes B1-B2 and above it B1-R3̄m-B2 structural sequence under pressure. Also, the B1-B2 transition pressure increases with increasing 5f-electron number whereas an opposite trend is obtained for the B1-R3̄m transition pressure. The ascending of N p anti-bonding states through the Fermi level at high pressure is responsible for the structural instability of the system. Above the critical 5f-electron number in the system a narrow 5f-band occurs very close to the Fermi level which allows the system to lower its symmetry via band Jahn-Teller type lattice distortion and the system undergoes a B1-R3̄m phase transition. However, below the critical 5f-electron number this mechanism is not favorable due to a lack of sufficient 5f-state occupancy and thus the system undergoes a B1-B2 phase transition like other ionic solids.

  4. Light as a central modulator of circadian rhythms, sleep and affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeGates, T.A.; Fernandez, D.C.; Hattar, S

    2014-01-01

    Light has profoundly influenced the evolution of life on earth. As widely appreciated, light allows us to generate images of our environment. However, light, through the atypical intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs; Box 1), also influences behaviors that are essential for our health and quality of life, yet are independent of image formation. These include the synchronization of the circadian clock to the solar day, tracking of seasonal changes, and regulation of sleep. Irregular light environments lead to problems in circadian rhythms and sleep, which eventually cause mood and learning deficits. Recently, it was found that irregular light can also directly impact mood and learning without producing major disruptions in circadian rhythms and sleep. Here, we will discuss the indirect and direct influence of light on mood and learning and provide a model for how light, the circadian clock, and sleep interact to influence mood and cognitive functions. Box 1Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs)Retinal photoreceptors transduce light energy into electrical signals that initiate vision. The classical photoreceptors, rods and cones, possess modified cilia that consist of stacks of membranes in which photopigments (rhodopsin and cone opsins) are concentrated. Rods are exquisitely sensitive and are able to detect even a few photons. Rods are therefore used for night vision. Cones are less sensitive than rods and are used for day and color vision. Color vision is mediated by cone photoreceptors that express cone-opsins with sensitivity peaks at different wavelengths (colors) of light. Humans have three cone types: short, mid and long wavelength sensitive cones (for simplicity, we will refer to these as blue, green and red cones, respectively). Rods and cones relay photic information through multisynaptic pathways to retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), which innervate different areas in the brain for complex visual processing13.A

  5. Structure and properties of visible-light absorbing homodisperse nanoparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedict, Jason

    2018-04-05

    Broadly, the scientific progress from this award focused in two main areas: developing time-resolved X-ray diffraction methods and the synthesis and characterization of molecular systems relevant to solar energy harvesting. The knowledge of photo‐induced non‐equilibrium states is central to our understanding of processes involved in solar‐energy capture. More specifically, knowledge of the geometry changes on excitation and their relation to lifetimes and variation with adsorption of chromophores on the substrates is of importance for the design of molecular devices used in light capture.

  6. Electron scattering and correlation structure of light nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodhi, M.A.K.

    1976-01-01

    It has been known for some time that the short-range correlations due to the repulsive part of the nuclear interaction is exhibited in the nuclear form factors as obtained from high energy electron scattering. In this work the harmonic oscillator basis functions are used. The nuclear form factors as obtained from elastic electron scattering are calculated, with Jastrow's technique by means of the cluster expansion of Iwamoto Yamada, in the Born approximation. The correlated wave function is given. The results for nuclear form factors calculated with the wave function are presented for some light nuclei. (Auth.)

  7. CARES (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) Version 1.0, seismic module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Philippacopoulas, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.

    1990-07-01

    During FY's 1988 and 1989, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed the CARES system (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). CARES is a PC software system which has been designed to perform structural response computations similar to those encountered in licensing reviews of nuclear power plant structures. The documentation of the Seismic Module of CARES consists of three volumes. This report is Volume 2 of the three volume documentation of the Seismic Module of CARES and represents the User's Manual. 14 refs

  8. CARES (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) Version 1.0, seismic module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Philippacopoulas, A.J.; Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.

    1990-07-01

    During FY's 1988 and 1989, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed the CARES system (Computer Analysis for Rapid Evaluation of Structures) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). CARES is a PC software system which has been designed to perform structural response computations similar to those encountered in licencing reviews of nuclear power plant structures. The docomentation of the Seismic Module of CARES consists of three volumes. This report represents Volume 1 of the three volume documentation of the Seismic Module of CARES. It concentrates on the theoretical basis of the system and presents modeling assumptions and limitations as well as solution schemes and algorithms of CARES. 31 refs., 6 figs

  9. Using nonlinearity and spatiotemporal property modulation to control effective structural properties: dynamic rods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel; Blekhman, Iliya I.

    2007-01-01

    What are the effective properties of a generally nonlinear material or structure, whose local properties are modulated in both space and time? It has been suggested to use spatiotemporal modulation of structural properties to create materials and structures with adjustable effective properties......, and to call these dynamic materials or spatiotemporal composites. Also, according to theoretical predictions, structural nonlinearity enhances the possibilities of achieving specific effective properties. For example, with an elastic rod having cubical elastic nonlinearities, it seems possible to control......, and exemplified. Then simple approximate analytical expressions are derived for the effective wave speed and natural frequencies for one-dimensional wave propagation in a nonlinear elastic rod, where the spatiotemporal modulation is imposed as a high-frequency standing wave, supposed to be given. Finally the more...

  10. Damage Analysis and Evaluation of Light Steel Structures Exposed to Wind Hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Compared to hot-rolled steel structures, cold-formed steel structures are susceptible to extreme winds because of the light weight of the building and its components. Many modern cold-formed steel structures have sustained significant structural damage ranging from loss of cladding to complete collapse in recent cyclones. This article first provides some real damage cases for light steel structures induced by the high winds. After that, the paper reviews research on the damage analysis and evaluation of light steel structures caused by strong winds, which include connection failure, fatigue failure, purlin buckling, and primary frame component instability problems. Moreover, this review will mention some applications of structure damage assessment methods in this area, such as vulnerability analysis and performance-based theory, etc.

  11. Ultraviolet light induced refractive index structures in germanosilica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svalgaard, Mikael

    1997-01-01

    The focus of the research presented in this ph.d. thesis is refractive index structures photoinduced in germanonsilica waveguides with ultra-violet (UV) radiation. The physical mechanisms involved in photosensitivity and applications of a wide range of UV induced refractive index structures in both...... application of a scanning near-field optical microscope to obtain high resolution images of UV induced refractive index structures and by monitoring the dynamics of UV induced index changes and luminescence. During part of my ph.d. project I have worked at the National Institute of Standards and Technolgy...

  12. Structured Low-Density Parity-Check Codes with Bandwidth Efficient Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Michael K.; Divsalar, Dariush; Duy, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    In this work, we study the performance of structured Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) Codes together with bandwidth efficient modulations. We consider protograph-based LDPC codes that facilitate high-speed hardware implementations and have minimum distances that grow linearly with block sizes. We cover various higher- order modulations such as 8-PSK, 16-APSK, and 16-QAM. During demodulation, a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples into reliability information that feeds the binary LDPC decoder. We will compare various low-complexity demappers and provide simulation results for assorted coded-modulation combinations on the additive white Gaussian noise and independent Rayleigh fading channels.

  13. Higher light intensity induces modulations in brain activity even during regular daytime working hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders, K.C.H.J.; de Kort, Y.A.W.; Cluitmans, P.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of exposure to bright white light as compared to a commonly experienced illuminance (1000 lx vs. 200 lx at eye level, 4000 K) on electroencephalography spectral power density during daytime. Spectral power density was measured during one hour of exposure in the morning and

  14. Light management in large area thin-film silicon solar modules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Losio, P.A.; Caglar, O.; Cashmore, J.S.; Hötzel, J.E.; Ristau, S.; Holovský, Jakub; Remeš, Zdeněk; Sinicco, I.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 143, Dec (2015), s. 375-385 ISSN 0927-0248 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05053S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : micromorph * thin-film silicon solar cells * light management * ZnO Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.732, year: 2015

  15. Low light intensity and nitrogen starvation modulate the chlorophyll content of Scenedesmus dimorphus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, V S; Pinto, R F; Sant'Anna, C

    2016-03-01

    Chlorophyll is a photosynthetic pigment found in plants and algal organisms and is a bioproduct with human health benefits and a great potential for use in the food industry. The chlorophyll content in microalgae strains varies in response to environmental factors. In this work, we assessed the effect of nitrogen depletion and low light intensity on the chlorophyll content of the Scenedesmus dimorphus microalga. The growth of S. dimorphus under low light intensity led to a reduction in cell growth and volume as well as increased cellular chlorophyll content. Nitrogen starvation led to a reduction in cell growth and the chlorophyll content, changes in the yield and productivity of chlorophylls a and b. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the ultrastructural changes in the S. dimorphus exposed to nitrogen and light deficiency. In contrast to nitrogen depletion, low light availability was an effective mean for increasing the total chlorophyll content of green microalga S. dimorphus. The findings acquired in this work are of great biotechnological importance to extend knowledge of choosing the right culture condition to stimulate the effectiveness of microalgae strains for chlorophyll production purposes. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Modulation of fluorescence signals from biomolecules along nanowires due to interaction of light with oriented nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Rune Schøneberg; Alarcon-Llado, Esther; Madsen, Morten H.

    2015-01-01

    High aspect ratio nanostructures have gained increasing interest as highly sensitive platforms for biosensing. Here, well-defined biofunctionalized vertical indium arsenide nanowires are used to map the interaction of light with nanowires depending on their orientation and the excitation waveleng...

  17. Modulation of horizontal cell receptive fields in the light adapted goldfish retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verweij, J.; Kamermans, M.; van den Aker, E. C.; Spekreijse, H.

    1996-01-01

    In the isolated goldfish retina, 700 nm background illumination increases the horizontal cell receptive field size, as measured with 565 nm slits of light, but decreases the receptive field size, when measured with 660 nm slits. These background-induced changes in receptive field size are absent

  18. Amazon forest structure generates diurnal and seasonal variability in light utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas C. Morton; Jeremy Rubio; Bruce D. Cook; Jean-Philippe Gastellu-Etchegorry; Marcos Longo; Hyeungu Choi; Maria Hunter; Michael Keller

    2016-01-01

    The complex three-dimensional (3-D) structure of tropical forests generates a diversity of light environments for canopy and understory trees. Understanding diurnal and seasonal changes in light availability is critical for interpreting measurements of net ecosystem exchange and improving ecosystem models. Here, we used the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART...

  19. Unravelling the molecular basis for light modulated cellulase gene expression - the role of photoreceptors in Neurospora crassa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Light represents an important environmental cue, which exerts considerable influence on the metabolism of fungi. Studies with the biotechnological fungal workhorse Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) have revealed an interconnection between transcriptional regulation of cellulolytic enzymes and the light response. Neurospora crassa has been used as a model organism to study light and circadian rhythm biology. We therefore investigated whether light also regulates transcriptional regulation of cellulolytic enzymes in N. crassa. Results We show that the N. crassa photoreceptor genes wc-1, wc-2 and vvd are involved in regulation of cellulase gene expression, indicating that this phenomenon is conserved among filamentous fungi. The negative effect of VVD on production of cellulolytic enzymes is thereby accomplished by its role in photoadaptation and hence its function in White collar complex (WCC) formation. In contrast, the induction of vvd expression by the WCC does not seem to be crucial in this process. Additionally, we found that WC-1 and WC-2 not only act as a complex, but also have individual functions upon growth on cellulose. Conclusions Genome wide transcriptome analysis of photoreceptor mutants and evaluation of results by analysis of mutant strains identified several candidate genes likely to play a role in light modulated cellulase gene expression. Genes with functions in amino acid metabolism, glycogen metabolism, energy supply and protein folding are enriched among genes with decreased expression levels in the wc-1 and wc-2 mutants. The ability to properly respond to amino acid starvation, i. e. up-regulation of the cross pathway control protein cpc-1, was found to be beneficial for cellulase gene expression. Our results further suggest a contribution of oxidative depolymerization of cellulose to plant cell wall degradation in N. crassa. PMID:22462823

  20. Spontaneous phase transitions in magnetic films with a modulated structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arzamastseva, G. V.; Evtikhov, M. G.; Lisovskii, F. V.; Mansvetova, E. G.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of monoperiodic and biperiodic bias fields on the nucleation of domain structures in quasi-uniaxial magnetic films near the Curie point has been studied experimentally. The main types of observed nonuniform magnetic moment distributions have been established and chains of a devil’s staircase phase transitions are shown to be realized when the films are slowly cooled.

  1. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    1963-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  2. Advanced light emitting device structures for optoelectronic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovac, J.

    2002-01-01

    Several factors are driving the recent development of light emitting devices (LED,s). The most important ones are brightness, available efficiency, architecture form flexibility, rugged construction and low applied voltages. These are contributing to growth in markets such as traffic lights, automotive brake signals and instrument displays, video displays, traffic signals, decorative signs and the many uses of the new white LED-based products. A new developments are directed to various materials used for high brightness HB-LED,s based on AlGaAs (red), AlInGaP (yellow-green to red) and InGaN (blue, green and white) devices. The development of LED,s depends on epitaxial growth advances, mainly molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). As a technology improved, the performace of visible LED,s increased at the rate 10x per decade from less than 0.1 lm/W to the best red and orange LED,s now providing about 100 lm/W. The main engineering challenge is now the extraction or the ability to get all the light out of the chip to where it is needed. This has led to novel changes in the shape of the LED chip and to the replacement of GaAs with transparent GaP substrate throught wafer bonding after the LED has been produced. Most of the focus for nitride devices (InGaN) is to develop improved or new substrate materials to replace sapphire and enable the growth of lower defect density materials. Organic LED,s (OLED,s) have been undergone dramatic improvements in performace in the last five years. Two main technologies for OLED,s have emerged in the last decade, either based on conjaguated polymers, or sublimed films of small molecules. Recent improvements have taken OLED,s to luminous efficiency greater than 20 lm/W. However, in contrast to conventional LED,s, OLED,s share many of the properties associated with other organic substances and polymers. They allow more design flexibility than inorganic LED,s and thus lead to the high

  3. STRUCTURED-LIGHT BASED 3D LASER SCANNING OF SEMI-SUBMERGED STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. van der Lucht

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we look at 3D acquisition of semi-submerged structures with a triangulation based underwater laser scanning system. The motivation is that we want to simultaneously capture data above and below water to create a consistent model without any gaps. The employed structured light scanner consist of a machine vision camera and a green line laser. In order to reconstruct precise surface models of the object it is necessary to model and correct for the refraction of the laser line and camera rays at the water-air boundary. We derive a geometric model for the refraction at the air-water interface and propose a method for correcting the scans. Furthermore, we show how the water surface is directly estimated from sensor data. The approach is verified using scans captured with an industrial manipulator to achieve reproducible scanner trajectories with different incident angles. We show that the proposed method is effective for refractive correction and that it can be applied directly to the raw sensor data without requiring any external markers or targets.

  4. Structured-Light Based 3d Laser Scanning of Semi-Submerged Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lucht, J.; Bleier, M.; Leutert, F.; Schilling, K.; Nüchter, A.

    2018-05-01

    In this work we look at 3D acquisition of semi-submerged structures with a triangulation based underwater laser scanning system. The motivation is that we want to simultaneously capture data above and below water to create a consistent model without any gaps. The employed structured light scanner consist of a machine vision camera and a green line laser. In order to reconstruct precise surface models of the object it is necessary to model and correct for the refraction of the laser line and camera rays at the water-air boundary. We derive a geometric model for the refraction at the air-water interface and propose a method for correcting the scans. Furthermore, we show how the water surface is directly estimated from sensor data. The approach is verified using scans captured with an industrial manipulator to achieve reproducible scanner trajectories with different incident angles. We show that the proposed method is effective for refractive correction and that it can be applied directly to the raw sensor data without requiring any external markers or targets.

  5. Load-carrying capacity of lightly reinforced, prefabricated walls of lightweight aggregate concrete with open structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goltermann, Per

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents and evaluates the results of a coordinated testing of prefabricated, lightly reinforced walls of lightweight aggregate concrete with open structure. The coordinated testing covers all wall productions in Denmark and will therefore provide a representative assessment...

  6. Light-induced dynamic structural color by intracellular 3D photonic crystals in brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Garcia, Martin; Masters, Nathan; O'Brien, Heath E; Lennon, Joseph; Atkinson, George; Cryan, Martin J; Oulton, Ruth; Whitney, Heather M

    2018-04-01

    Natural photonic crystals are responsible for strong reflectance at selective wavelengths in different natural systems. We demonstrate that intracellular opal-like photonic crystals formed from lipids within photosynthetic cells produce vivid structural color in the alga Cystoseira tamariscifolia . The reflectance of the opaline vesicles is dynamically responsive to environmental illumination. The structural color is present in low light-adapted samples, whereas higher light levels produce a slow disappearance of the structural color such that it eventually vanishes completely. Once returned to low-light conditions, the color re-emerges. Our results suggest that these complex intracellular natural photonic crystals are responsive to environmental conditions, changing their packing structure reversibly, and have the potential to manipulate light for roles beyond visual signaling.

  7. Slow and fast light in SOA-EA structures for phased-array antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sales, S.; Öhman, Filip; Bermejo, A.

    We present an SOA-EA structure for controlling the phase and amplitude of optically fed phased-array antennas. Phase shifts of 40 degrees are obtained through slow and fast light effects by changing only the reverse voltage....

  8. Measurement of elastic modules of structural ceramic by acoustic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Bong Young; Lee Seong Suck; Kim, Young Gil

    1993-01-01

    Elastic moduli of structural ceramic materials, Al 2 O 3 , SiC, Si 3 N 4 , were measured by acoustic resonance method. Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio were calculated from the torsional and flexural resonant frequencies, densities, and the dimensions of the specimen. The results by acoustic resonance method were compared with the results by ultrasonic method and the differences were less than 4%.

  9. In situ observation of modulated light emission of fiber fuse synchronized with void train over hetero-core splice point.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichi Todoroki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fiber fuse is a process of optical fiber destruction under the action of laser radiation, found 20 years ago. Once initiated, opical discharge runs along the fiber core region to the light source and leaves periodic voids whose shape looks like a bullet pointing the direction of laser beam. The relation between damage pattern and propagation mode of optical discharge is still unclear even after the first in situ observation three years ago. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fiber fuse propagation over hetero-core splice point (Corning SMF-28e and HI 1060 was observed in situ. Sequential photographs obtained at intervals of 2.78 micros recorded a periodic emission at the tail of an optical discharge pumped by 1070 nm and 9 W light. The signal stopped when the discharge ran over the splice point. The corresponding damage pattern left in the fiber core region included a segment free of periodicity. CONCLUSIONS: The spatial modulation pattern of the light emission agreed with the void train formed over the hetero-core splice point. Some segments included a bullet-shaped void pointing in the opposite direction to the laser beam propagation although the sequential photographs did not reveal any directional change in the optical discharge propagation.

  10. Sparing functional anatomical structures during intensity-modulated radiotherapy: an old problem, a new solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wenyong; Han, Guang; Wei, Shaozhong; Hu, Desheng

    2014-08-01

    During intensity-modulated radiotherapy, an organ is usually assumed to be functionally homogeneous and, generally, its anatomical and spatial heterogeneity with respect to radiation response are not taken into consideration. However, advances in imaging and radiation techniques as well as an improved understanding of the radiobiological response of organs have raised the possibility of sparing the critical functional structures within various organs at risk during intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Here, we discuss these structures, which include the critical brain structure, or neural nuclei, and the nerve fiber tracts in the CNS, head and neck structures related to radiation-induced salivary and swallowing dysfunction, and functional structures in the heart and lung. We suggest that these structures can be used as potential surrogate organs at risk in order to minimize their radiation dose and/or irradiated volume without compromising the dose coverage of the target volume during radiation treatment.

  11. A New Tuning Module for Resonant Coupling Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Vaccaro, Vittorio G; De Martinis, Carlo; Giove, Dario; Masullo, Maria R; Mauri, Marco; Rainò, Antonio; Variale, Vincenzo

    2005-01-01

    In order to have efficient particle acceleration it is fundamental that the particles experience, in the accelerating gap, field amplitudes as uniform and as high as possible from gap to gap. Because of the unavoidable fabrication errors, an accelerating structure, when assembled, exhibits field values lower than the nominal ones and/or not uniform. All the usual procedures developed in order to adjust the parameter deviations responsible of the malfunction of these structures, are based on field amplitude measurements, by using the bead pull technique, which is a very invasive technique. In this paper the philosophy is reversed: it is assumed that all the information can be got by Sounding the Modes of the whole System (SMS) and correct the deviation of each frequency mode from its nominal value by means of an appropriate tuning of the cavities: resorting to a perturbative technique applied to a circuit model representing this kind of structures, it is possible to calculate the amount of tuning to give to th...

  12. Investigation of the thermal and optical performance of a spatial light modulator with high average power picosecond laser exposure for materials processing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, G.; Whitehead, D.; Perrie, W.; Allegre, O. J.; Olle, V.; Li, Q.; Tang, Y.; Dawson, K.; Jin, Y.; Edwardson, S. P.; Li, L.; Dearden, G.

    2018-03-01

    Spatial light modulators (SLMs) addressed with computer generated holograms (CGHs) can create structured light fields on demand when an incident laser beam is diffracted by a phase CGH. The power handling limitations of these devices based on a liquid crystal layer has always been of some concern. With careful engineering of chip thermal management, we report the detailed optical phase and temperature response of a liquid cooled SLM exposed to picosecond laser powers up to 〈P〉  =  220 W at 1064 nm. This information is critical for determining device performance at high laser powers. SLM chip temperature rose linearly with incident laser exposure, increasing by only 5 °C at 〈P〉  =  220 W incident power, measured with a thermal imaging camera. Thermal response time with continuous exposure was 1-2 s. The optical phase response with incident power approaches 2π radians with average power up to 〈P〉  =  130 W, hence the operational limit, while above this power, liquid crystal thickness variations limit phase response to just over π radians. Modelling of the thermal and phase response with exposure is also presented, supporting experimental observations well. These remarkable performance characteristics show that liquid crystal based SLM technology is highly robust when efficiently cooled. High speed, multi-beam plasmonic surface micro-structuring at a rate R  =  8 cm2 s-1 is achieved on polished metal surfaces at 〈P〉  =  25 W exposure while diffractive, multi-beam surface ablation with average power 〈P〉  =100 W on stainless steel is demonstrated with ablation rate of ~4 mm3 min-1. However, above 130 W, first order diffraction efficiency drops significantly in accord with the observed operational limit. Continuous exposure for a period of 45 min at a laser power of 〈P〉  =  160 W did not result in any detectable drop in diffraction efficiency, confirmed afterwards by the efficient

  13. Room-temperature Coulomb staircase in semiconducting InP nanowires modulated with light illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Yamada, Hidenori; Lohn, Andrew J; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko P

    2011-02-04

    Detailed electron transport analysis is performed for an ensemble of conical indium phosphide nanowires bridging two hydrogenated n(+)-silicon electrodes. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics exhibit a Coulomb staircase in the dark with a period of ∼ 1 V at room temperature. The staircase is found to disappear under light illumination. This observation can be explained by assuming the presence of a tiny Coulomb island, and its existence is possible due to the large surface depletion region created within contributing nanowires. Electrons tunnel in and out of the Coulomb island, resulting in the Coulomb staircase I-V. Applying light illumination raises the electron quasi-Fermi level and the tunneling barriers are buried, causing the Coulomb staircase to disappear.

  14. Light modulation in phase change disordered metamaterial - A smart cermet concept

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar , Sunil; Maury , Francis; Bahlawane , Naoufal

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Cermet coatings are popular solar selective absorbers as they allow capturing most of the solar energywhile minimising radiative losses. Embedded metallic nanoparticles in dielectric matrices promotemultiple internal reflection of light and provide an overall low emissivity. VO2 in the metamaterial stateis regarded in this study as a responsive mixed phase comprising metallic rutile VO2 inclusions insemiconducting monoclinic VO2 phase mimicking cermet. The smart cermet...

  15. LOFT fuel module structural response during loss-of-coolant experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saffell, B.F. Jr.; Selcho, H.S.

    1979-01-01

    The structural response of the reactor fuel modules installed in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility have been analyzed for subcooled blowdown loading conditions associated with loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCE). Three independent analyses using the WHAM, SHOCK, and SAP computer codes have been interfaced to calculate the transient mechanical behavior of the LOFT fuel. Test data from two LOCEs indicate the analysis method is conservative. Structural integrity of the fuel modules has been assessed by monitoring guide tube temperatures and control rod drop times during the LOCEs. The analysis and experimental test data indicate the fuel module structural integrity will be maintained for the duration of the LOFT experimental program

  16. Fibre-reinforced composite structures based on thermoplastic matrices with embedded piezoceramic modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hufenbach, Werner A; Modler, Niels; Winkler, Anja; Ilg, Juergen; Rupitsch, Stefan J

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents recent developments for the integration of piezoceramic modules into fibre-reinforced composite structures based on thermoplastic matrices. An adapted hot pressing technology is conceptualized that allows for material homogeneous integration of the active modules. The main focus of this contribution is on the development of a robust and continuous manufacturing process of such novel active composites as well as on the operational testing of the produced samples. Therefore, selected specimens are manufactured as bending beams and investigated by means of electrical impedance measurements, modal analysis and structural excitation tests. In particular, the functionality of representative specimens is characterized based on frequency as well as spatially resolved deflection measurements. Moreover, the mentioned samples are compared to non-integrated piezoceramic modules and to equivalent passive reinforced composite structures. (paper)

  17. Fluorescence relaxation spectroscopy : light on dynamical structures of flavoproteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burten - Bastiaens, P.I.H.

    1992-01-01

    Refinements in technique and data analysis have opened new avenues for a detailed interpretation of protein fluorescence. What is more, by combining new insights in protein structure and dynamics with improved knowledge of photophysics of biological chromophores, the coupling between

  18. Disrupted Module Efficiency of Structural and Functional Brain Connectomes in Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaou Liu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated disrupted topological organization of brain connectome in multiple sclerosis (MS. However, whether the communication efficiency between different functional systems is affected in the early stage of MS remained largely unknown. In this study, we constructed the structural connectivity (SC and functional connectivity (FC networks in 41 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS, 32 MS patients and 35 healthy controls (HC based on diffusion and resting-state functional MRI. To quantify the communication efficiency within and between different functional systems, we proposed two measures called intra- and inter-module efficiency. Based on the module parcellation of functional backbone network, the intra- and inter-module efficiency of SC and FC networks was calculated for each participant. For the SC network, CIS showed decreased inter-module efficiency between the sensory-motor network (SMN, the visual network (VN, the default-mode network (DMN and the fronto-parietal network (FPN compared with HC, while MS showed more widespread decreased module efficiency both within and between modules relative to HC and CIS. For the FC network, no differences were found between CIS and HC, and a decreased inter-module efficiency between SMN and FPN and between VN and FPN was identified in MS, compared with HC and CIS. Moreover, both intra- and inter-module efficiency of SC network were correlated with the disability and cognitive scores in MS. Therefore, our results demonstrated early SC changes between modules in CIS, and more widespread SC alterations and inter-module FC changes were observed in MS, which were further associated with cognitive impairment and physical disability.

  19. Network Structure as a Modulator of Disturbance Impacts in Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, S.; Tullos, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    This study examines how river network structure affects the propagation of geomorphic and anthropogenic disturbances through streams. Geomorphic processes such as debris flows can alter channel morphology and modify habitat for aquatic biota. Anthropogenic disturbances such as road construction can interact with the geomorphology and hydrology of forested watersheds to change sediment and water inputs to streams. It was hypothesized that the network structure of streams within forested watersheds would influence the location and magnitude of the impacts of debris flows and road construction on sediment size and channel width. Longitudinal surveys were conducted every 50 meters for 11 kilometers of third-to-fifth order streams in the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in the Western Cascade Range of Oregon. Particle counts and channel geometry measurements were collected to characterize the geomorphic impacts of road crossings and debris flows as disturbances. Sediment size distributions and width measurements were plotted against the distance of survey locations through the network to identify variations in longitudinal trends of channel characteristics. Thresholds for the background variation in sediment size and channel width, based on the standard deviations of sample points, were developed for sampled stream segments characterized by location as well as geomorphic and land use history. Survey locations were classified as "disturbed" when they deviated beyond the reference thresholds in expected sediment sizes and channel widths, as well as flow-connected proximity to debris flows and road crossings. River network structure was quantified by drainage density and centrality of nodes upstream of survey locations. Drainage density and node centrality were compared between survey locations with similar channel characteristic classifications. Cluster analysis was used to assess the significance of survey location, proximity of survey location to debris flows and road

  20. An Explication of Concordance between Man's Mental Structure and the Narrative Structure in the Light of Vygotsky's SCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azabdaftari, Behrooz

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to throw light on the concordance between man's mental structure and the structure of narrative with regard to Vygotsky's sociocultural theory. In so doing, the author first provides the backdrop of the literature on the topic by first explaining Vygotsky's approach to the genesis of mind, and then gives a synoptic account of the…

  1. Omnidirectional narrow optical filters for circularly polarized light in a nanocomposite structurally chiral medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño, Carlos G; Palomares, Laura O

    2018-04-20

    We consider the propagation of electromagnetic waves throughout a nanocomposite structurally chiral medium consisting of metallic nanoballs randomly dispersed in a structurally chiral material whose dielectric properties can be represented by a resonant effective uniaxial tensor. It is found that an omnidirectional narrow pass band and two omnidirectional narrow band gaps are created in the blue optical spectrum for right and left circularly polarized light, as well as narrow reflection bands for right circularly polarized light that can be controlled by varying the light incidence angle and the filling fraction of metallic inclusions.

  2. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Advanced Seismic Soil Structure Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolisetti, Chandrakanth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Coleman, Justin Leigh [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Risk calculations should focus on providing best estimate results, and associated insights, for evaluation and decision-making. Specifically, seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in some instances the current SPRA approach has large uncertainties, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it was not the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility). SPRA’s are performed by convolving the seismic hazard (this is the estimate of all likely damaging earthquakes at the site of interest) with the seismic fragility (the conditional probability of failure of a structure, system, or component given the occurrence of earthquake ground motion). In this calculation, there are three main pieces to seismic risk quantification, 1) seismic hazard and nuclear power plants (NPPs) response to the hazard, 2) fragility or capacity of structures, systems and components (SSC), and 3) systems analysis. Two areas where NLSSI effects may be important in SPRA calculations are, 1) when calculating in-structure response at the area of interest, and 2) calculation of seismic fragilities (current fragility calculations assume a lognormal distribution for probability of failure of components). Some important effects when using NLSSI in the SPRA calculation process include, 1) gapping and sliding, 2) inclined seismic waves coupled with gapping and sliding of foundations atop soil, 3) inclined seismic waves coupled with gapping and sliding of deeply embedded structures, 4) soil dilatancy, 5) soil liquefaction, 6) surface waves, 7) buoyancy, 8) concrete cracking and 9) seismic isolation The focus of the research task presented here-in is on implementation of NLSSI into the SPRA calculation process when calculating in-structure response at the area

  3. Momentum distributions in light halo nuclei and structure constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The core recoil momentum distribution of neutron-rich isotopes of light exotic nuclei is studied within a three-body model, where the nuclei are described by a core and two neutrons, with interactions dominated by the s-wave channel. In our framework, the two-body subsystems should have large scattering lengths in comparison with the interaction range allowing to use a three-body model with a zero-range force. The ground-state halo wave functions in momentum space are obtained by using as inputs the two-neutron separation energy and the energies of the singlet neutron-neutron and neutron-core virtual states. Within our model, we obtain the momentum probability densities for the Borromean exotic nuclei 11Li and 22C. In the case of the core recoil momentum distribution of 11Li, a fair reproduction of the experimental data was obtained, without free parameters, considering only the two-body low-energies. By analysing the obtained core momentum distribution in face of recent experimental data, we verify that such data are constraining the 22C two-neutron separation energy to a value between 100 and 400 keV.

  4. Two-Dimensional Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure Determination Module for Introductory Biochemistry: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Lyso-Glycerophospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Teresa A.; Rose, Rebecca L.; Bell, Sidney M.

    2013-01-01

    In this laboratory module, introductory biochemistry students are exposed to two-dimensional [superscript 1]H-nuclear magnetic resonance of glycerophospholipids (GPLs). Working in groups of three, students enzymatically synthesized and purified a variety of 2-acyl lyso GPLs. The structure of the 2-acyl lyso GPL was verified using [superscript…

  5. Investigation of structure in the modular light pipe component for LED automotive lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsi-Chao; Zhou, Yang; Huang, Chien-Sheng; Jhong, Wan-Ling; Cheng, Bo-Wei; Jhang, Jhe-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) have the advantages of small length, long lifetime, fast response time (μs), low voltage, good mechanical properties and environmental protection. Furthermore, LEDs could replace the halogen lamps to avoid the mercury pollution and economize the use of energy. Therefore, the LEDs could instead of the traditional lamp in the future and became an important light source. The proposal of this study was to investigate the effects of the structure and length of the reflector component for a LED automotive lamp. The novel LED automotive lamp was assembled by several different modularization columnar. The optimized design of the different structure and the length to the reflector was simulated by software TracePro. The design result must met the vehicle regulation of United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE) such as ECE-R19 etc. The structure of the light pipe could be designed by two steps structure. Then constitute the proper structure and choose different power LED to meet the luminous intensity of the vehicle regulation. The simulation result shows the proper structure and length has the best total luminous flux and a high luminous efficiency for the system. Also, the stray light could meet the vehicle regulation of ECE R19. Finally, the experimental result of the selected structure and length of the light pipe could match the simulation result above 80%.

  6. RNA 3D modules in genome-wide predictions of RNA 2D structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theis, Corinna; Zirbel, Craig L; Zu Siederdissen, Christian Höner

    2015-01-01

    . These modules can, for example, occur inside structural elements which in RNA 2D predictions appear as internal loops. Hence one question is if the use of such RNA 3D information can improve the prediction accuracy of RNA secondary structure at a genome-wide level. Here, we use RNAz in combination with 3D......Recent experimental and computational progress has revealed a large potential for RNA structure in the genome. This has been driven by computational strategies that exploit multiple genomes of related organisms to identify common sequences and secondary structures. However, these computational...... approaches have two main challenges: they are computationally expensive and they have a relatively high false discovery rate (FDR). Simultaneously, RNA 3D structure analysis has revealed modules composed of non-canonical base pairs which occur in non-homologous positions, apparently by independent evolution...

  7. High-speed Si/GeSi hetero-structure Electro Absorption Modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastronardi, L; Banakar, M; Khokhar, A Z; Hattasan, N; Rutirawut, T; Bucio, T Domínguez; Grabska, K M; Littlejohns, C; Bazin, A; Mashanovich, G; Gardes, F Y

    2018-03-19

    The ever-increasing demand for integrated, low power interconnect systems is pushing the bandwidth density of CMOS photonic devices. Taking advantage of the strong Franz-Keldysh effect in the C and L communication bands, electro-absorption modulators in Ge and GeSi are setting a new standard in terms of device footprint and power consumption for next generation photonics interconnect arrays. In this paper, we present a compact, low power electro-absorption modulator (EAM) Si/GeSi hetero-structure based on an 800 nm SOI overlayer with a modulation bandwidth of 56 GHz. The device design and fabrication tolerant process are presented, followed by the measurement analysis. Eye diagram measurements show a dynamic ER of 5.2 dB at a data rate of 56 Gb/s at 1566 nm, and calculated modulator power is 44 fJ/bit.

  8. Simulating atmospheric turbulence using a phase-only spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Burger, L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available is zero and the outer scale is infinity. These assumptions lead to a well-defined distribution for the randomness in the refractive index of the atmosphere, which can be applied in the laboratory, giving a good approximation for a real atmosphere.1.... There are two basic aims: first, to expound on the steps required to actually simulate atmospheric turbulence in the laboratory, and second, to point out some of the limitations in using spatial light modula- Research Articles South African Journal of Science...

  9. Light structures phototroph, bacterial and fungal communities at the soil surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence O Davies

    Full Text Available The upper few millimeters of soil harbour photosynthetic microbial communities that are structurally distinct from those of underlying bulk soil due to the presence of light. Previous studies in arid zones have demonstrated functional importance of these communities in reducing soil erosion, and enhancing carbon and nitrogen fixation. Despite being widely distributed, comparative understanding of the biodiversity of the soil surface and underlying soil is lacking, particularly in temperate zones. We investigated the establishment of soil surface communities on pasture soil in microcosms exposed to light or dark conditions, focusing on changes in phototroph, bacterial and fungal communities at the soil surface (0-3 mm and bulk soil (3-12 mm using ribosomal marker gene analyses. Microbial community structure changed with time and structurally similar phototrophic communities were found at the soil surface and in bulk soil in the light exposed microcosms suggesting that light can influence phototroph community structure even in the underlying bulk soil. 454 pyrosequencing showed a significant selection for diazotrophic cyanobacteria such as Nostoc punctiforme and Anabaena spp., in addition to the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus. The soil surface also harboured distinct heterotrophic bacterial and fungal communities in the presence of light, in particular, the selection for the phylum Firmicutes. However, these light driven changes in bacterial community structure did not extend to the underlying soil suggesting a discrete zone of influence, analogous to the rhizosphere.

  10. Lattice investigation of nucleon structure at light quark masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanotti, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Lattice simulations of hadronic structure are now reaching a level where they are able to not only complement, but also provide guidance to current and forthcoming experimental programmes at, e.g. Jefferson Lab, COMPASS/CERN and FAIR/GSI. By considering new simulations at low quark masses and on large volumes, we review the recent progress that has been made in this exciting area by the QCDSF/UKQCD collaboration. In particular, results obtained close to the physical point for several quantities, including electromagnetic form factors and moments of ordinary parton distribution functions, show some indication of approaching their phenomenological values.

  11. Modulating emission intensity of GaN-based green light emitting diodes on c-plane sapphire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Chunhua; Ma, Ziguang; Zhou, Junming; Lu, Taiping; Jiang, Yang; Jia, Haiqiang; Liu, Wuming; Chen, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The asymmetric dual-wavelength (green/blue) coupled InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells were proposed to modulate the green emission intensity. Electroluminescent measurements demonstrate the conspicuous increment of the green light intensity by decreasing the coupled barrier thickness. This was partly attributed to capture of more carriers when holes tunnel across the thinner barrier from the blue quantum wells, as a hole reservoir, to the green quantum wells. While lower effective barrier height of the blue quantum wells benefits improved hole transportation from p-GaN to the active region. Efficiency droop of the green quantum wells was partially alleviated due to the enhanced injection efficiency of holes

  12. High-efficiency and flexible generation of vector vortex optical fields by a reflective phase-only spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Meng-Qiang; Wang, Zhou-Xiang; Liang, Juan; Wang, Yan-Kun; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2017-08-01

    The scheme for generating vector optical fields should have not only high efficiency but also flexibility for satisfying the requirements of various applications. However, in general, high efficiency and flexibility are not compatible. Here we present and experimentally demonstrate a solution to directly, flexibly, and efficiently generate vector vortex optical fields (VVOFs) with a reflective phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) based on optical birefringence of liquid crystal molecules. To generate the VVOFs, this approach needs in principle only a half-wave plate, an LC-SLM, and a quarter-wave plate. This approach has some advantages, including a simple experimental setup, good flexibility, and high efficiency, making the approach very promising in some applications when higher power is need. This approach has a generation efficiency of 44.0%, which is much higher than the 1.1% of the common path interferometric approach.

  13. Investigation of effective base transit time and current gain modulation of light-emitting transistors under different ambient temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hao-Hsiang; Tu, Wen-Chung; Wang, Hsiao-Lun [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, 1, Roosevelt Road, Sec. 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Wu, Chao-Hsin, E-mail: chaohsinwu@ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics, National Taiwan University, 1, Roosevelt Road, Sec. 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Roosevelt Road, Sec. 4, Taipei106, Taiwan (China)

    2014-11-03

    In this report, the modulation of current gain of InGaP/GaAs light-emitting transistors under different ambient temperatures are measured and analyzed using thermionic emission model of quantum well embedded in the transistor base region. Minority carriers captured by quantum wells gain more energy at high temperatures and escape from quantum wells resulting in an increase of current gain and lower optical output, resulting in different I-V characteristics from conventional heterojunction bipolar transistors. The effect of the smaller thermionic lifetime thus reduces the effective base transit time of transistors at high temperatures. The unique current gain enhancement of 27.61% is achieved when operation temperature increase from 28 to 85 °C.

  14. Schottky junctions on perovskite single crystals: light-modulated dielectric constant and self-biased photodetection

    KAUST Repository

    Shaikh, Parvez Abdul Ajij

    2016-08-16

    Schottky junctions formed between semiconductors and metal contacts are ubiquitous in modern electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here we report on the physical properties of Schottky-junctions formed on hybrid perovskite CH3NH3PbBr3 single crystals. It is found that light illumination can significantly increase the dielectric constant of perovskite junctions by 2300%. Furthermore, such Pt/perovskite junctions are used to fabricate self-biased photodetectors. A photodetectivity of 1.4 × 1010 Jones is obtained at zero bias, which increases to 7.1 × 1011 Jones at a bias of +3 V, and the photodetectivity remains almost constant in a wide range of light intensity. These devices also exhibit fast responses with a rising time of 70 μs and a falling time of 150 μs. As a result of the high crystal quality and low defect density, such single-crystal photodetectors show stable performance after storage in air for over 45 days. Our results suggest that hybrid perovskite single crystals provide a new platform to develop promising optoelectronic applications. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Multimodal stimulation of Colorado potato beetle reveals modulation of pheromone response by yellow light.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Otálora-Luna

    Full Text Available Orientation of insects to host plants and conspecifics is the result of detection and integration of chemical and physical cues present in the environment. Sensory organs have evolved to be sensitive to important signals, providing neural input for higher order multimodal processing and behavioral output. Here we report experiments to determine decisions made by Colorado potato beetle (CPB, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, in response to isolated stimuli and multimodal combinations of signals on a locomotion compensator. Our results show that in complete darkness and in the absence of other stimuli, pheromonal stimulation increases attraction behavior of CPB as measured in oriented displacement and walking speed. However, orientation to the pheromone is abolished when presented with the alternative stimulation of a low intensity yellow light in a dark environment. The ability of the pheromone to stimulate these diurnal beetles in the dark in the absence of other stimuli is an unexpected but interesting observation. The predominance of the phototactic response over that to pheromone when low intensity lights were offered as choices seems to confirm the diurnal nature of the insect. The biological significance of the response to pheromone in the dark is unclear. The phototactic response will play a key role in elucidating multimodal stimulation in the host-finding process of CPB, and perhaps other insects. Such information might be exploited in the design of applications to attract and trap CPB for survey or control purposes and other insect pests using similar orientation mechanisms.

  16. Infrared to visible image up-conversion using optically addressed spatial light modulator utilizing liquid crystal and InGaAs photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solodar, A., E-mail: asisolodar@gmail.com; Arun Kumar, T.; Sarusi, G.; Abdulhalim, I. [Department of Electro-Optics Engineering and The Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-01-11

    Combination of InGaAs/InP heterojunction photodetector with nematic liquid crystal (LC) as the electro-optic modulating material for optically addressed spatial light modulator for short wavelength infra-red (SWIR) to visible light image conversion was designed, fabricated, and tested. The photodetector layer is composed of 640 × 512 photodiodes array based on heterojunction InP/InGaAs having 15 μm pitch on InP substrate and with backside illumination architecture. The photodiodes exhibit extremely low, dark current at room temperature, with optimum photo-response in the SWIR region. The photocurrent generated in the heterojunction, due to the SWIR photons absorption, is drifted to the surface of the InP, thus modulating the electric field distribution which modifies the orientation of the LC molecules. This device can be attractive for SWIR to visible image upconversion, such as for uncooled night vision goggles under low ambient light conditions.

  17. Multi-point laser spark generation for internal combustion engines using a spatial light modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyon, Elliott; Kuang, Zheng; Dearden, Geoff; Cheng, Hua; Page, Vincent; Shenton, Tom

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on a technique demonstrating for the first time successful multi-point laser-induced spark generation, which is variable in three dimensions and derived from a single laser beam. Previous work on laser ignition of internal combustion engines found that simultaneously igniting in more than one location resulted in more stable and faster combustion – a key potential advantage over conventional spark ignition. However, previous approaches could only generate secondary foci at fixed locations. The work reported here is an experimental technique for multi-point laser ignition, in which several sparks with arbitrary spatial location in three dimensions are created by variable diffraction of a pulsed single laser beam source and transmission through an optical plug. The diffractive multi-beam arrays and patterns are generated using a spatial light modulator on which computer generated holograms are displayed. A gratings and lenses algorithm is used to accurately modulate the phase of the input laser beam and create multi-beam output. The underpinning theory, experimental arrangement and results obtained are presented and discussed. (paper)

  18. Modulating the line shape of magnetoconductance by varying the charge injection in polymer light-emitting diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidya Chitraningrum

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We fabricate the phenyl-substituted poly(p-phenylene vinylene copolymer (super yellow, SY-PPV-based polymer light-emitting diodes (PLEDs with different device architectures to modulate the injection of opposite charge carriers and investigate the corresponding magnetoconductance (MC responses. At the first glance, we find that all PLEDs exhibit the positive MC responses. By applying the mathematical analysis to fit the curves with two empirical equations of a non-Lorentzian and a Lorentzian function, we are able to extract the hidden negative MC component from the positive MC curve. We attribute the growth of the negative MC component to the reduced interaction of the triplet excitons with charges to generate the free charge carriers as modulated by the applied magnetic field, known as the triplet exciton-charge reaction, by analyzing MC responses for PLEDs of the charge-unbalanced and hole-blocking device configurations. The negative MC component causes the broadening of the line shape in MC curves.

  19. Enhancement of TE polarized light extraction efficiency in nanoscale (AlN)m /(GaN)n (m>n) superlattice substitution for Al-rich AlGaN disorder alloy: ultra-thin GaN layer modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Xin-he; Shi, Jun-jie; Zhong, Hong-xia; Huang, Pu; Ding, Yi-min; Yu, Tong-jun; Shen, Bo; Lu, Jing; Zhang, Min; Wang, Xihua

    2014-01-01

    The problem of achieving high light extraction efficiency in Al-rich Al x Ga 1−x N is of paramount importance for the realization of AlGaN-based deep ultraviolet (DUV) optoelectronic devices. To solve this problem, we investigate the microscopic mechanism of valence band inversion and light polarization, a crucial factor for enhancing light extraction efficiency, in Al-rich Al x Ga 1−x N alloy using the Heyd–Scuseria–Ernzerhof hybrid functional, local-density approximation with 1/2 occupation, and the Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof functional, in which the spin–orbit coupling effect is included. We find that the microscopic Ga-atom distribution can effectively modulate the valence band structure of Al-rich Al x Ga 1−x N. Moreover, we prove that the valence band arrangement in the decreasing order of heavy hole, light hole, and crystal-field split-off hole can be realized by using nanoscale (AlN) m /(GaN) n (m>n) superlattice (SL) substituting for Al-rich Al x Ga 1−x N disorder alloy as the active layer of optoelectronic devices due to the ultra-thin GaN layer modulation. The valence band maximum, i.e., the heavy hole band, has p x - and p y -like characteristics and is highly localized in the SL structure, which leads to the desired transverse electric (TE) polarized (E⊥c) light emission with improved light extraction efficiency in the DUV spectral region. Some important band-structure parameters and electron/hole effective masses are also given. The physical origin for the valence band inversion and TE polarization in (AlN) m /(GaN) n SL is analyzed in depth. (paper)

  20. Microstrip linear phase low pass filter based on defected ground structures for partial response modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimoli, Bruno; Johansen, Tom Keinicke; Olmos, Juan Jose Vegas

    2018-01-01

    We report a high performance linear phase low pass filter (LPF) designed for partial response (PR) modulations. For the implementation, we adopted microstrip technology and a variant of the standard stepped‐impedance technique. Defected ground structures (DGS) are used for increasing the characte......We report a high performance linear phase low pass filter (LPF) designed for partial response (PR) modulations. For the implementation, we adopted microstrip technology and a variant of the standard stepped‐impedance technique. Defected ground structures (DGS) are used for increasing...... the characteristic impedance of transmission lines. Experimental results prove that the proposed filter can successfully modulate a non‐return‐to‐zero (NRZ) signal into a five levels PR one....

  1. Early developmental responses to seedling environment modulate later plasticity to light spectral quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J B von Wettberg

    Full Text Available Correlations between developmentally plastic traits may constrain the joint evolution of traits. In plants, both seedling de-etiolation and shade avoidance elongation responses to crowding and foliage shade are mediated by partially overlapping developmental pathways, suggesting the possibility of pleiotropic constraints. To test for such constraints, we exposed inbred lines of Impatiens capensis to factorial combinations of leaf litter (which affects de-etiolation and simulated foliage shade (which affects phytochrome-mediated shade avoidance. Increased elongation of hypocotyls caused by leaf litter phenotypically enhanced subsequent elongation of the first internode in response to low red:far red (R:FR. Trait expression was correlated across litter and shade conditions, suggesting that phenotypic effects of early plasticity on later plasticity may affect variation in elongation traits available to selection in different light environments.

  2. Virulence Effects and Signaling Partners Modulated by Brucella melitensis Light-sensing Histidine Kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Christopher R.

    The facultative intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis utilizes diverse virulence factors. A Brucella light sensing histidine kinase can influence in vitro virulence of the bacteria during intracellular infection. First, we demonstrated that the B. melitensis light sensing kinase (BM-LOV-HK) affects virulence in an IRF-1-/- mouse model of infection. Infection with a Δ BM-LOV-HK strain resulted in less bacterial colonization of IRF-1-/- spleens and extended survivorship compared to mice infected with wild type B. melitensis 16M. Second, using PCR arrays, we observed less expression of innate and adaptive immune system activation markers in ΔBM-LOV-HK infected mouse spleens than wild type B. melitensis 16M infected mouse spleens 6 days after infection. Third, we demonstrated by microarray analysis of B. melitensis that deletion of BM-LOV-HK alters bacterial gene expression. Downregulation of genes involved in control of the general stress response system included the alternative sigma factor RpoE1 and its anti-anti sigma factor PhyR. Conversely, genes involved in flagella production, quorum sensing, and the type IV secretion system (VirB operon) were upregulated in the Δ BM-LOV-HK strain compared to the wild type B. melitensis 16M. Analysis of genes differentially regulated in Δ BM-LOV-HK versus the wild type strain indicated an overlap of 110 genes with data from previous quorum sensing regulator studies of Δ vjbR and/ΔblxR(babR) strains. Also, several predicted RpoE1 binding sites located upstream of genes were differentially regulated in the ΔBM-LOV-HK strain. Our results suggest BM-LOV-HK is important for in vivo Brucella virulence, and reveals that BM-LOV-HK directly or indirect regulates members of the Brucella quorum sensing, type IV secretion, and general stress systems.

  3. Perfect coupling of light to a periodic dielectric/metal/dielectric structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengling; Li, Shiqiang; Chang, R. P. H.; Ketterson, John B.

    2014-07-01

    Using the finite difference time domain method, it is demonstrated that perfect coupling can be achieved between normally incident light and a periodic dielectric/metal/dielectric structure. The structure serves as a diffraction grating that excites modes related to the long range surface plasmon and short range surface plasmon modes that propagate on continuous metallic films. By optimizing the structural dimensions, perfect coupling is achieved between the incident light and these modes. A high Q of 697 and an accompanying ultrasharp linewidth of 0.8 nm are predicted for a 10 nm silver film for optimal conditions.

  4. Nuclear structure studies with low-energy light ions: fundamental and applied

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazumdar, I.

    2016-01-01

    Studies in low and medium energy nuclear physics have been dominated by heavy-ion induced reactions for last five decades. Heavy-ion induced nuclear reactions have enriched our knowledge of the structural evolutions and intricacies of reaction dynamics of the nuclear many-body systems. However, the emergence and rise of heavy-ion physics have seen a general decline in studies with low- and medium-energy light-ion beams. The harsh reality of dwindling number of low-energy light ion facilities adversely affect research in nuclear physics. Very low-energy and high current light-ion facilities immediately conjures up in our minds the studies in nuclear astrophysics. Measurements of light-ion capture cross sections and astrophysical S factors are the major themes of research at most of the light-ion facilities. However, the importance low energy light-ion beams is multifarious. A variety of measurements providing vital support and inputs to heavy-ion research can only be carried out at the low-energy, light-ion facilities. Light-ion beams are also useful for generation of mono-energetic neutron beams. In this talk I will draw from some of our recent measurements to show the importance of light-ion beams in nuclear astrophysics and also in applied nuclear physics. (author)

  5. Analysis of the unmodulated diffraction beam of the phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator and a method for reducing its influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qi, Yue; Li, Dayu; Hu, Lifa; Xuan, Li; Xia, Mingliang

    2012-01-01

    As a wavefront corrector, the phase-only liquid crystal spatial light modulator has been widely using in adaptive optics systems. However, the unmodulated diffracted beam of the modulator will affect the light spot centroid detection accuracy of a Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and decrease the image quality after correction. In this paper, we have diminished the effect by introducing a modified weight algorithm in our closed-loop adaptive optics system. The Strehl ratio of the image is higher than 0.8 after correction, even when the wavefront aberration is larger than 3 μm. The correction precision and image quality are both improved significantly. (paper)

  6. NASA-UVA light aerospace alloy and structures technology program (LA(sup 2)ST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Haviland, John K.; Herakovich, Carl T.; Pilkey, Walter D.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Scully, John R.; Starke, Edgar A., Jr.; Stoner, Glenn E.; Thornton, Earl A.; Wawner, Franklin E., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The general objective of the Light Aerospace Alloy and Structures Technology (LA(sup 2)ST) Program is to conduct interdisciplinary graduate student research on the performance of next generation, light weight aerospace alloys, composites, and thermal gradient structures in collaboration with Langley researchers. Specific technical objectives are established for each research project. We aim to produce relevant data and basic understanding of material behavior and microstructure, new monolithic and composite alloys, advanced processing methods, new solid and fluid mechanics analyses, measurement advances, and critically, a pool of educated graduate students for aerospace technologies. Four research areas are being actively investigated, including: (1) Mechanical and Environmental Degradation Mechanisms in Advanced Light Metals and Composites; (2) Aerospace Materials Science; (3) Mechanics of Materials and Composites for Aerospace Structures; and (4) Thermal Gradient Structures.

  7. Modulated (Ga,TM)N structures: optics and magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grois, A.

    2015-01-01

    Gallium nitride and related compounds are not only the building blocks of many state of the art devices (e.g. blue and white LEDs, high electron mobility transistors), but once combined with magnetic dopants (i.e. transition metals and rare earths), further functionalities (e.g. spintronics - the simultaneous utilisation of the electrons electric charge and magnetic moment) are enabled. The incorporation of the magnetic dopants depends on the growth conditions and the type of dopant. As a function of these parameters various phases with quite different properties can be produced. In this work the optical and magnetic properties of three of these phases which are interesting from a technological and fundamental point of view and can be produced by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy are studied by advanced structural, chemical, spectroscopic and magnetometric techniques as a function of the transition metal concentration, growth temperature and codopant concentration. These phases are dilute (Ga,Mn)N and (Ga,Fe)N, iron nitride and galfenol nanocrystals embedded in (Ga,Fe)N, and Mn-Mgx [Mg tief x] complexes in (Ga,Mn)N:Mg. Dilute (Ga,Mn)N is found to be a superexchange ferromagnet with Mn3+ [Mn hoch 3+] concentration dependent Curie temperature, which is of the order of 1 K for the highest studied Mn concentration of approximately 3 %. The lack of carrier mediated ferromagnetism is explained by confirming the presence of strong coupling between the Mn 3d electrons and valence band holes via giant Zeeman effect measurements. Upon Si donor codoping the charge state of Mn is reduced to 2+, and hints towards superexchange antiferromagnetism between the Mn2+ [Mn hoch 2+] ions are observed. The magnetic properties of a single planar array of [gamma]'-Gax [Ga tief x]Fe4-x [Fe tief 4-x]N nanocrystals embedded in GaN are analysed and a clear uniaxial shape anisotropy is revealed. The puzzling finding of a six-fold in-plane anisotropy is discussed and various possible

  8. Laser beam shaping limitations for laboratory simulation of turbulence using a phase-only spatial light modulator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Litvin, IA

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available ) where ],[ 10∈ρ and ],[ πθ 20∈ , in an infinite series of these polynomials will be complete. The circle polynomials of Zernike have the form of complex angular function modulated by a real radial polynomial: θρθρ immnmn eRnZ )()1....0 − ⎥⎥⎦ ⎤ ⎢⎢⎣ ⎡ = ∫ h h n dhhCkr , (8) where h is the height from some reference level, usually ground or sea level. The key parameter in the turbulence model is the refractive index structure constant, 2nC , which in general...

  9. Autostereoscopic three-dimensional display by combining a single spatial light modulator and a zero-order nulled grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanfeng; Cai, Zhijian; Liu, Quan; Lu, Yifan; Guo, Peiliang; Shi, Lingyan; Wu, Jianhong

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, an autostereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) display system based on synthetic hologram reconstruction is proposed and implemented. The system uses a single phase-only spatial light modulator to load the synthetic hologram of the left and right stereo images, and the parallax angle between two reconstructed stereo images is enlarged by a grating to meet the split angle requirement of normal stereoscopic vision. To realize the crosstalk-free autostereoscopic 3D display with high light utilization efficiency, the groove parameters of the grating are specifically designed by the rigorous coupled-wave theory for suppressing the zero-order diffraction, and then the zero-order nulled grating is fabricated by the holographic lithography and the ion beam etching. Furthermore, the diffraction efficiency of the fabricated grating is measured under the illumination of a laser beam with a wavelength of 532 nm. Finally, the experimental verification system for the proposed autostereoscopic 3D display is presented. The experimental results prove that the proposed system is able to generate stereoscopic 3D images with good performances.

  10. Short - Term Exposure To Visible And Ultraviolet Light Modulates Dacarbazine Toxicity To Human Blood Cells In Vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopjar, N.; Zunec, S.; Lucic Vrdoljak, A.; Zeljezic, D.; Mladinic, M.

    2015-01-01

    Dacarbazine (DTIC), i.e. 5-(3,3-dimethyltriazeno)imidazol-4-carboxamide, is an alkylating cytostatic used in the treatment of various types of human cancer. It is prone to photodegradation, the products of which cause adverse effects in treated patients. In the present study, we evaluated the relationships between photo genotoxicity, cytotoxicity, lipid peroxidation and AChE activity in in vitro DTIC - treated human blood after illumination with visible and ultraviolet light for 30 and 60 minutes. AChE activity was measured in erythrocytes. The extent of lipid peroxidation was measured in plasma. Cell death and morphological changes in the nuclei were studied in isolated peripheral blood lymphocytes using the fluorescent dye exclusion method. Primary DNA damage in lymphocytes was studied by alkaline comet assay immediately after treatment and 60 minutes later. The obtained results suggest that short-term exposure to UV and visible light modulated DTIC toxicity. Most of the effects were dose-dependent. We assume that photodegradation products, together with the parent compound, were responsible for increased LPO in plasma, along with cytotoxicity and infliction of primary DNA damage in lymphocytes. Erythrocyte AChE activity, on the other hand, was strongly impaired by the parent drug. Our findings suggest the need for a simultaneous evaluation of cyto-/genotoxicity and biochemical markers, as such an approach would provide much better insight into the mechanisms underlying drug toxicity in general. (author).

  11. Pulse oximeter using a gain-modulated avalanche photodiode operated in a pseudo lock-in light detection mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Tsuyoshi; Iwata, Tetsuo; Araki, Tsutomu

    2006-01-01

    We propose a reflection-type pulse oximeter, which employs two pairs of a light-emitting diode (LED) and a gated avalanche photodiode (APD). One LED is a red one with an emission wavelength λ = 635 nm and the other is a near-infrared one with that λ = 945 nm, which are both driven with a pulse mode at a frequency f (=10 kHz). Superposition of a transistor-transistor-logic (TTL) gate pulse on a direct-current (dc) bias, which is set so as not exceeding the breakdown voltage of each APD, makes the APD work in a gain-enhanced operation mode. Each APD is gated at a frequency 2f (=20 kHz) and its output signal is fed into a laboratory-made lock-in amplifier that works in synchronous with the pulse modulation signal of each LED at a frequency f (=10 kHz). A combination of the gated APD and the lock-in like signal detection scheme is useful for the reflection-type pulse oximeter thanks to the capability of detecting a weak signal against a large background (BG) light.

  12. Computer module for scheduling of transportation of composite beam bridge structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożejko Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the theoretical basis, an algorithm and a computer module system supporting scheduling of transportation and assembly of structures of the composite beam bridge implemented in a Just In Time system (JIT. Tabu search method has been used in the optimization procedure.

  13. Vibro-Acoustic modulation based damage identification in a composite skin-stiffener structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooijevaar, T.H.; Loendersloot, Richard; Rogge, M.D.; Akkerman, Remko; Tinga, Tiedo; Le Cam, V.; Mevel, L.; Schoefs, F.

    2014-01-01

    The vibro-acoustic modulation method is applied to a composite skin-stiffener structure to investigate the possibilities to utilise this method for damage identification in terms of detection, localisation and damage quantification. The research comprises a theoretical part and an experimental part.

  14. Pumped shot noise in adiabatically modulated graphene-based double-barrier structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rui; Lai, Maoli

    2011-11-16

    Quantum pumping processes are accompanied by considerable quantum noise. Based on the scattering approach, we investigated the pumped shot noise properties in adiabatically modulated graphene-based double-barrier structures. It is found that compared with the Poisson processes, the pumped shot noise is dramatically enhanced where the dc pumped current changes flow direction, which demonstrates the effect of the Klein paradox.

  15. Pumped shot noise in adiabatically modulated graphene-based double-barrier structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Rui; Lai, Maoli

    2011-11-01

    Quantum pumping processes are accompanied by considerable quantum noise. Based on the scattering approach, we investigated the pumped shot noise properties in adiabatically modulated graphene-based double-barrier structures. It is found that compared with the Poisson processes, the pumped shot noise is dramatically enhanced where the dc pumped current changes flow direction, which demonstrates the effect of the Klein paradox.

  16. Cucurbit[8]uril templated supramolecular ring structure formation and protein assembly modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaekers, M.; Wijnands, S.P.W.; van Dongen, J.L.J.; Brunsveld, L.; Dankers, P.Y.W.

    2015-01-01

    The interplay of Phe-Gly-Gly (FGG)-tagged proteins and bivalent FGG-tagged penta(ethylene glycol) as guest molecules with cucurbit[8]uril (Q8) hosts is studied to modulate the supramolecular assembly process. Ring structure formation of the bivalent guest molecule with Q8 leads to enhanced binding

  17. Hidden symmetries and critical dimensions in the theory of modulated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babich, A.V.; Berezovsky, S.V.; Klepikov, V.F.

    2009-01-01

    Some aspects of the theory of the critical phenomena in systems with spontaneous symmetry breaking are considered. The applicability range of the mean field approximation for the systems with modulated structures is discussed. Connection between symmetries of a corresponding model and the existence of exact solutions is showed. The role of symmetries in the theory of dynamic long range ordering is discussed

  18. Ray calibration and phase mapping for structured-light-field 3D reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Zewei; Liu, Xiaoli; Peng, Xiang; Gao, Bruce Z

    2018-03-19

    In previous work, we presented a structured light field (SLF) method combining light field imaging with structured illumination to perform multi-view depth measurement. However, the previous work just accomplishes depth rather than 3D reconstruction. In this paper, we propose a novel active method involving ray calibration and phase mapping, to achieve SLF 3D reconstruction. We performed the ray calibration for the first time to determine each light field ray with metric spatio-angular parameters, making the SLF realize multi-view 3D reconstruction. Based on the ray parametric equation, we further derived the phase mapping in the SLF that spatial coordinates can be directly mapped from phase. A flexible calibration strategy was correspondently designed to determine mapping coefficients for each light field ray, achieving high-efficiency SLF 3D reconstruction. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method was suitable for high-efficiency multi-view 3D reconstruction in the SLF.

  19. Gamma-Ray Pulsar Light Curves as Probes of Magnetospheric Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    The large number of gamma-ray pulsars discovered by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope since its launch in 2008 dwarfs the handful that were previously known. The variety of observed light curves makes possible a tomography of both the ensemble-averaged field structure and the high-energy emission regions of a pulsar magnetosphere. Fitting the gamma-ray pulsar light curves with model magnetospheres and emission models has revealed that most of the high-energy emission, and the particles acceleration, takes place near or beyond the light cylinder, near the current sheet. As pulsar magnetosphere models become more sophisticated, it is possible to probe magnetic field structure and emission that are self-consistently determined. Light curve modeling will continue to be a powerful tool for constraining the pulsar magnetosphere physics.

  20. Mechanical and structural modules in a nuclear power plant advantages of the innovative approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlandi, S.; De Angelis, F.; Marconi, M.

    2010-01-01

    The modular layout design of a Nuclear Power Plant like the Westinghouse AP600/AP1000 has been developed basically to gain advantages in erection time schedule as well as in minimizing commissioning and start up test to be performed in the field. It is the first time for a Nuclear Power Plant to have a layout configuration fully designed as structured integrated mechanical Modules; this approach has been studied and implemented also to consider already in design phase decommissioning requirements which are mandatory to be able to perform dismantling at the end of the Plant Operation Life. Nevertheless it is the first time the possibility has been investigated to erect the civil structures as structural prefabricated modules: it means to have developed special composite structures which cannot be considered traditional reinforced concrete structures as well as structural beams frames. An approach like the above promotes impressive advantages in terms of extensive prefabrication in the workshops both for mechanical and structural modules, arranging in the workshops also factory acceptance tests as well as specific pre-acceptance commissioning activities. It means also that specific requirements have to be implemented in order to promote the implementation of this technology. Construction and adjustments flexibility in the field during NPP erection is heavily decreased due to modular prefabricated assemblies as well as it is mandatory to complete all the lay out plant design before entering the prefabrication phase in the workshops. Also structural design codes have to be qualified or properly readjusted to manage structural problems in composite structural frames which are innovative for organization, structural behaviour and which have different working ways starting from prefabrication, transportation, lifting up to the installation in the field and concrete pouring. (authors)

  1. Retinoic acid modulation of ultraviolet light-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, N.J.; Breeding, J.

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation of skin with ultraviolet light of sunburn range (UVB) leads to a large and rapid induction of the polyamine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase in the epidermis. Induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase also occurs following application of the tumor promoting agent 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate and topical retinoic acid is able to block both this ornithine decarboxylase induction and skin tumor promotion. In the studies described below, topical application of retinoic acid to hairless mouse skin leads to a significant inhibition of UVB-induced epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity. The degree of this inhibition was dependent on the dose, timing, and frequency of the application of retinoic acid. To show significant inhibition of UVB-induced ornithine decarboxylase the retinoic acid had to be applied within 5 hr of UVB irradiation. If retinoic acid treatment was delayed beyond 7 hr following UVB, then no inhibition of UVB-induced ornithine decarboxylase was observed. The quantities of retinoic acid used (1.7 nmol and 3.4 nmol) have been shown effective at inhibiting 12-0-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13 acetate induced ornithine decarboxylase. The results show that these concentrations of topical retinoic acid applied either before or immediately following UVB irradiation reduces the UVB induction of epidermal ornithine decarboxylase. The effect of retinoic acid in these regimens on UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis is currently under study

  2. Understanding the proton radius puzzle: Nuclear structure effects in light muonic atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present calculations of nuclear structure effects to the Lamb shift in light muonic atoms. We adopt a modern ab-initio approach by combining state-of-the-art nuclear potentials with the hyperspherical harmonics method. Our calculations are instrumental to the determination of nuclear charge radii in the Lamb shift measurements, which will shed light on the proton radius puzzle.

  3. Proceedings of the workshop nuclear structure of light nuclei far from stability experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klotz, G.

    1991-01-01

    The volume discuss nuclear structure of light and nuclei far from stability. The discussions took place in five sessions. In session 1 β decay, in session 2 nuclei near N=20, in session 3 radioactive ion beams' study with help of electromagnetic separators, in session 4 beta decay of light nuclei, in session 5 further papers were discussed in shell models, binding energy and chart of nuclides. (G.P.)

  4. Complex modal properties of coupled moderately light equipment-structure systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, A.K.; Jaw Jingwen

    1986-01-01

    A new improved perturbation method for evaluating complex modal properties of coupled equipment-structure systems is presented. The method is applicable even when the equipment is not very light, and when the secondary system (equipment) introduces static constraint on the primary system (structure). The new method is applied to nine 8DOF coupled multiply connected equipment-structure systems. It is shown that the new method yields results which are in excellent agreement with the corresponding exact results. (orig.)

  5. Structured light generation by magnetic metamaterial half-wave plates at visible wavelength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jinwei; Luk, Ting S.; Gao, Jie; Yang, Xiaodong

    2017-12-01

    Metamaterial or metasurface unit cells functioning as half-wave plates play an essential role for realizing ideal Pancharatnam-Berry phase optical elements capable of tailoring light phase and polarization as desired. Complex light beam manipulation through these metamaterials or metasurfaces unveils new dimensions of light-matter interactions for many advances in diffraction engineering, beam shaping, structuring light, and holography. However, the realization of metamaterial or metasurface half-wave plates in visible spectrum range is still challenging mainly due to its specific requirements of strong phase anisotropy with amplitude isotropy in subwavelength scale. Here, we propose magnetic metamaterial structures which can simultaneously exploit the electric field and magnetic field of light for achieving the nanoscale half-wave plates at visible wavelength. We design and demonstrate the magnetic metamaterial half-wave plates in linear grating patterns with high polarization conversion purity in a deep subwavelength thickness. Then, we characterize the equivalent magnetic metamaterial half-wave plates in cylindrical coordinate as concentric-ring grating patterns, which act like an azimuthal half-wave plate and accordingly exhibit spatially inhomogeneous polarization and phase manipulations including spin-to-orbital angular momentum conversion and vector beam generation. Our results show potentials for realizing on-chip beam converters, compact holograms, and many other metamaterial devices for structured light beam generation, polarization control, and wavefront manipulation.

  6. Pipeline inwall 3D measurement system based on the cross structured light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Da; Lin, Zhipeng; Xue, Lei; Zheng, Qiang; Wang, Zichi

    2014-01-01

    In order to accurately realize the defect detection of pipeline inwall, this paper proposes a measurement system made up of cross structured light, single CCD camera and a smart car, etc. Based on structured light measurement technology, this paper mainly introduces the structured light measurement system, the imaging mathematical model, and the parameters and method of camera calibration. Using these measuring principles and methods, the camera in remote control car platform achieves continuous shooting of objects and real-time rebound processing as well as utilizing established model to extract 3D point cloud coordinate to reconstruct pipeline defects, so it is possible to achieve 3D automatic measuring, and verifies the correctness and feasibility of this system. It has been found that this system has great measurement accuracy in practice.

  7. Unique structural modulation of a non-native substrate by cochaperone DnaJ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Satyam; Kumar, Vignesh; Jayaraj, Gopal Gunanathan; Maiti, Souvik; Mapa, Koyeli

    2013-02-12

    The role of bacterial DnaJ protein as a cochaperone of DnaK is strongly appreciated. Although DnaJ unaccompanied by DnaK can bind unfolded as well as native substrate proteins, its role as an individual chaperone remains elusive. In this study, we demonstrate that DnaJ binds a model non-native substrate with a low nanomolar dissociation constant and, more importantly, modulates the structure of its non-native state. The structural modulation achieved by DnaJ is different compared to that achieved by the DnaK-DnaJ complex. The nature of structural modulation exerted by DnaJ is suggestive of a unique unfolding activity on the non-native substrate by the chaperone. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the zinc binding motif along with the C-terminal substrate binding domain of DnaJ is necessary and sufficient for binding and the subsequent binding-induced structural alterations of the non-native substrate. We hypothesize that this hitherto unknown structural alteration of non-native states by DnaJ might be important for its chaperoning activity by removing kinetic traps of the folding intermediates.

  8. Structured Light in Structured Media: From Classical to Quantum Optics Incubator, OSA Workshop, Washington, DC 28 September-1 October 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-02

    division- multiplexing , MDM) as a possible next domain to exploit. One MDM approach is multiplexing of optical beams carrying orbital angular momentum...of pseudo-spin with optical angular momentum (AM) and corresponding peculiar spatial structure of a laser beam. Specifically, we study AM dynamics... Angular Momentum of Light Forces Materials to Become Chiral Nano- Structures, Takashige Omatsu, Chiba University Laser beams termed ‘Optical vortex

  9. Structure of the higher plant light harvesting complex I: In vivo characterization and structural interdependence of the Lhca proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimmek, F.; Ganeteg, U.; Ihalainen, J.A.; van Roon, H.; Jensen, P.E.; Scheller, H.V.; Dekker, J.P.; Jansson, S.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the structure of the higher plant light harvesting complex of photosystem I (LHCI) by analyzing PSI-LHCI particles isolated from a set of Arabidopsis plant lines, each lacking a specific Lhca (Lhca1-4) polypeptide. Functional antenna size measurements support the recent finding

  10. Structure of some relative relation modules of finite p-groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamin, M.

    1990-06-01

    Let G be a finite p-group generated by (g i , 1 ≤ i ≤ d), G i the cyclic subgroup generated by g i , E the free product of the G i , 1 ≤ i ≤ d, and S the kernel of the natural epimorphism of E onto G. The largest elementary abelian p-quotient S-circumflex = S/S'S p , regarded as an IF p G-module via conjugation in E, is called a relative relation module of G. If d is the minimum number of generaters for G, the author has proved that S-circumflex is nonprojective and indecomposable. The aim of this paper is to give an alternative proof for the indecomposability of S-circumflex; the proof here is more informative as it deals with Loewy structure and generating sets of S-circumflex and other associated modules. (author). 9 refs

  11. Structured Light-Based Motion Tracking in the Limited View of an MR Head Coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikshøj, M.; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Conradsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    A markerless motion tracking (MT) system developed for use in PET brain imaging has been tested in the limited field of view (FOV) of the MR head coil from the Siemens Biograph mMR. The system is a 3D surface scanner that uses structured light (SL) to create point cloud reconstructions of the fac......A markerless motion tracking (MT) system developed for use in PET brain imaging has been tested in the limited field of view (FOV) of the MR head coil from the Siemens Biograph mMR. The system is a 3D surface scanner that uses structured light (SL) to create point cloud reconstructions...

  12. Light Absorption Enhancement of Silicon-Based Photovoltaic Devices with Multiple Bandgap Structures of Porous Silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuen-Hsien Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Porous-silicon (PS multi-layered structures with three stacked PS layers of different porosity were prepared on silicon (Si substrates by successively tuning the electrochemical-etching parameters in an anodization process. The three PS layers have different optical bandgap energy and construct a triple-layered PS (TLPS structure with multiple bandgap energy. Photovoltaic devices were fabricated by depositing aluminum electrodes of Schottky contacts on the surfaces of the developed TLPS structures. The TLPS-based devices exhibit broadband photoresponses within the spectrum of the solar irradiation and get high photocurrent for the incident light of a tungsten lamp. The improved spectral responses of devices are owing to the multi-bandgap structures of TLPS, which are designed with a layered configuration analog to a tandem cell for absorbing a wider energy range of the incidental sun light. The large photocurrent is mainly ascribed to an enhanced light-absorption ability as a result of applying nanoporous-Si thin films as the surface layers to absorb the short-wavelength light and to improve the Schottky contacts of devices. Experimental results reveal that the multi-bandgap PS structures produced from electrochemical-etching of Si wafers are potentially promising for development of highly efficient Si-based solar cells.

  13. Light extraction from GaN-based LED structures on silicon-on-insulator substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathy, S.; Teo, S.L.; Lin, V.K.X.; Chen, M.F. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A*STAR (Agency for Science, Technology, and Research), 117602 (Singapore); Dadgar, A.; Krost, A. [Institut fuer Exerimentelle Physik, Otto-von Guericke Universitaet Magdeburg, Universitaetsplatz 1, 39016 Magdeburg (Germany); AZZURRO Semiconductors AG, Universitaetsplatz 1, 39016 Magdeburg (Germany); Christen, J. [Institut fuer Exerimentelle Physik, Otto-von Guericke Universitaet Magdeburg, Universitaetsplatz 1, 39016 Magdeburg (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    Nano-patterning of GaN-based devices is a promising technology in the development of high output power devices. Recent researches have been focused on the realization of two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PhC) structure to improve light extraction efficiency and to control the direction of emission. In this study, we have demonstrated improved light extraction from green light emitting diode (LED) structures on thin silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates using surface nanopatterning. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is used to probe the size, shape, and etch depth of nano-patterns on the LED surfaces. Different types of nanopatterns were created by e-beam lithography and inductively coupled plasma etching. The LED structures after post processing are studied by photoluminescence (PL) measurements. The GaN nanophotonic structures formed by ICP etching led to more than five-fold increase in the intensity of the green emission. The improved light extraction is due to the combination of SOI substrate reflectivity and photonic structures on top GaN LED surfaces. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Polarized light scattering as a probe for changes in chromosome structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, Daniel Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Measurements and calculations of polarized light scattering are applied to chromosomes. Calculations of the Mueller matrix, which completely describes how the polarization state of light is altered upon scattering, are developed for helical structures related to that of chromosomes. Measurements of the Mueller matrix are presented for octopus sperm heads, and dinoflagellates. Comparisons of theory and experiment are made. A working theory of polarized light scattering from helices is developed. The use of the first Born approximation vs the coupled dipole approximation are investigated. A comparison of continuous, calculated in this work, and discrete models is also discussed. By comparing light scattering measurements with theoretical predictions the average orientation of DNA in an octopus sperm head is determined. Calculations are made for the Mueller matrix of DNA plectonemic helices at UV, visible and X-ray wavelengths. Finally evidence is presented that the chromosomes of dinoflagellates are responsible for observed differential scattering of circularly-polarized light. This differential scattering is found to vary in a manner that is possibly correlated to the cell cycle of the dinoflagellates. It is concluded that by properly choosing the wavelength probe polarized light scattering can provide a useful tool to study chromosome structure.

  15. STUDY ON THE STRUCTURAL BASIS OF PERIPHERAL LIGHT HARVESTING COMPLEXES (LH2 IN PURPLE NON-SULPHUR PHOTOSYNTHETIC BACTERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatas H.P. Brotosudarmo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis provides an example of a natural process that has been optimized during evolution to harness solar energy efficiently and safely, and finally to use it to produce a carbon-based fuel. Initially, solar energy is captured by the light harvesting pigment-protein complexes. In purple bacteria these antenna complexes are constructed on a rather simple modular basis. Light absorbed by these antenna complexes is funnelled downhill to reaction centres, where light drives a trans-membrane redox reaction. The light harvesting proteins not only provide the scaffolding that correctly positions the bacteriochlorophyll a and carotenoid pigments for optimal energy transfer but also creates an environment that can modulate the wavelength at which different bacteriochlorophyll molecules absorb light thereby creating the energy funnel. How these proteins can modulate the absorption spectra of the bacteriochlorophylls will be discussed in this review.

  16. Effects of light intensity on components and topographical structures of extracellular polysaccharides from the cyanobacteria Nostoc sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hongmei; Xia, Ling; Zhou, Xuping; Zhang, Delu; Hu, Chunxiang

    2014-02-01

    A study on the effects of light intensity (40 and 80 μE/m(2)/sec) on the components and topographical structures of extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) was carried out in cyanobacteria Nostoc sp.. EPS yield increased with light intensity. However, light intensity did not significantly affect the EPS fractions and monosaccharide composition. Higher light intensity generally resulted in higher protein content of EPS in similar fractions. The topographical structure of EPS, investigated by atomic force microscopy, appeared as spherical lumps, chains and networks. The long chains were observed at higher light intensity. Thus, light intensity affected the yield and nature of EPS.

  17. Development of Hydrogen Separation Module with Structured Catalyst for Use in Membrane Reformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isamu Yasuda; Tatsuya Tsuneki; Yoshinori Shirasaki; Toru Shimamori; Hidekazu Shigaki; Hiroyuki Tanaka

    2006-01-01

    A new type of hydrogen separation module for use in a membrane reformer was proposed and developed. The new module, what we call MOC (Membrane On Catalyst), was designed to have a membrane of palladium-based alloy prepared on the surface of the tubular structured catalyst that has catalytic activity for steam reforming reaction, thermal expansion matching with the membrane material, proper porosity, mechanical strength and thermal conductivity. The best composition of the structured catalyst was identified in the composites of metallic Ni and YSZ (Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia). A hydrogen separation module was manufactured by electroless plating of Pd with thickness of 7 to 15 microns on the surface of porous sintered tube of Ni-YSZ with an approximate size of 9 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length. The hydrogen permeability measurements have shown hydrogen flux of 25 to 35 cc/min at 550 to 600 C, which is higher than the permeability of the conventional modules using rolled Pd film. (authors)

  18. Double-Grating Displacement Structure for Improving the Light Extraction Efficiency of LEDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhibin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the light extraction efficiency of light-emitting diodes (LEDs, grating patterns were etched on GaN and silver film surfaces. The grating-patterned surface etching enabled the establishment of an LED model with a double-grating displacement structure that is based on the surface plasmon resonance principle. A numerical simulation was conducted using the finite difference time domain method. The influence of different grating periods for GaN surface and silver film thickness on light extraction efficiency was analyzed. The light extraction efficiency of LEDs was highest when the grating period satisfied grating coupling conditions. The wavelength of the highest value was also close to the light wavelength of the medium. The plasmon resonance frequencies on both sides of the silver film were affected by silver film thickness. With increasing film thickness, plasmon resonance frequency tended toward the same value and light extraction efficiency reached its maximum. When the grating period for the GaN surface was 365 nm and the silver film thickness was 390 nm, light extraction efficiency reached a maximum of 55%.

  19. Terahertz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation from Femtosecond Laser Modulation of the Electron Beam at the Advanced Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, John; Martin, Michael C; Robin, David; Sannibale, Fernando; Schönlein, Robert W; Zholents, Alexander; Zolotorev, Max S

    2005-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the "femtoslicing" beamline is in operation since 1999 for the production of x-ray synchrotron radiation pulses with femtosecond duration. The mechanism used for generating the short x-ray pulses induces at the same time temporary structures in the electron bunch longitudinal distribution with very short characteristic length. Such structures emit intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range. This CSR, whose measured intensity is routinely used as a diagnostics for the tune-up of the femtoslicing experiments, represents a potential source of terahertz radiation with very interesting features. Several measurements have been performed for its characterization and in this paper an updated description of the experimental results and of their interpretation is presented.

  20. Super-light and pearl-chain technology for support of ancient structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Kristian Dahl; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Goltermann, Per

    2014-01-01

    optimal and often curved paths of strong concrete assembled from smaller segments by prestressing wires, so that expensive curved moulds and supports can be avoided. Pearl-chains can provide a resistance to impact and earthquake of ancient structures. High-strength concrete and prestressed carbon fibre......The patented super-light technology is inspired by ancient Roman concrete structures with strong concrete placed, where the engineer would like the forces to be, and light concrete fills out the shape stabilizing the strong and protecting it. Pearl-chain technology is invented in order to create...... reinforcement may be applied, because the new technology solves the main problems for that, since the light aggregate concrete provides a fire protection needed for both materials and provides a stabilization of the slender cores in compression. The paper explains more about the new technology...

  1. Structural study of concentrated micelle-solutions of sodium octanoate by light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayoun, Marc

    1982-05-01

    Structural investigation of sodium octanoate (CH 3 -(CH 2 ) 6 -COONa) by light scattering has been made to study properties of concentrated aqueous micelle-solutions. From static light scattering data, the micellar weight and shape have been determined. The monomer aggregation number and the apparent micellar charge have been confirmed. Quasi-elastic light scattering, has been used to measure the effective diffusion coefficient as a function of the volume fraction. Extrapolation to the c.m.c. give the hydrodynamic radius of the micelles. At low micelle-concentration, strong exchange reaction between monomers and micelles affects the Brownian motion and resulting is an increase in the diffusion coefficient. The experimental data show a strong hydrodynamic contribution to S(q) (factor structure) and D(q) (effective diffusion coefficient) arising from hard spheres interactions with a large repulsive potential. (author) [fr

  2. Fabrication of multilayered conductive polymer structures via selective visible light photopolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Andrew T.; Price, Aaron D.

    2017-04-01

    Electropolymerization of pyrrole is commonly employed to fabricate intrinsically conductive polymer films that exhibit desirable electromechanical properties. Due to their monolithic nature, electroactive polypyrrole films produced via this process are typically limited to simple linear or bending actuation modes, which has hindered their application in complex actuation tasks. This initiative aims to develop the specialized fabrication methods and polymer formulations required to realize three-dimensional conductive polymer structures capable of more elaborate actuation modes. Our group has previously reported the application of the digital light processing additive manufacturing process for the fabrication of three-dimensional conductive polymer structures using ultraviolet radiation. In this investigation, we further expand upon this initial work and present an improved polymer formulation designed for digital light processing additive manufacturing using visible light. This technology enables the design of novel electroactive polymer sensors and actuators with enhanced capabilities and brings us one step closer to realizing more advanced electroactive polymer enabled devices.

  3. Structural Basis for Prereceptor Modulation of Plant Hormones by GH3 Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, Corey S.; Zubieta, Chloe; Herrmann, Jonathan; Kapp, Ulrike; Nanao, Max H.; Jez, Joseph M. (WU); (EMBL); (ESRF)

    2013-04-08

    Acyl acid amido synthetases of the GH3 family act as critical prereceptor modulators of plant hormone action; however, the molecular basis for their hormone selectivity is unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of benzoate-specific Arabidopsis thaliana AtGH3.12/PBS3 and jasmonic acid-specific AtGH3.11/JAR1. These structures, combined with biochemical analysis, define features for the conjugation of amino acids to diverse acyl acid substrates and highlight the importance of conformational changes in the carboxyl-terminal domain for catalysis. We also identify residues forming the acyl acid binding site across the GH3 family and residues critical for amino acid recognition. Our results demonstrate how a highly adaptable three-dimensional scaffold is used for the evolution of promiscuous activity across an enzyme family for modulation of plant signaling molecules.

  4. Full color organic light-emitting devices with microcavity structure and color filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiwei; Liu, Hongyu; Sun, Runguang

    2009-05-11

    This letter demonstrated the fabrication of the full color passive matrix organic light-emitting devices based on the combination of the microcavity structure, color filter and a common white polymeric OLED. In the microcavity structure, patterned ITO terraces with different thickness were used as the anode as well as cavity spacer. The primary color emitting peaks were originally generated by the microcavity and then the second resonance peak was absorbed by the color filter.

  5. Polycrystalline magnetic garnet films comprising weakly coupled crystallites for piezoelectrically-driven magneto-optic spatial light modulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mito, S.; Sakurai, H.; Takagi, H.; Inoue, M. [Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Baryshev, A. V. [Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-01

    We have investigated the magnetization process of the polycrystalline magnetic garnet films in order to determine the most suitable composition of garnet films for piezoelectrically-driven magneto-optic spatial light modulators (MOSLMs). For experiment, the bismuth-dysprosium-aluminum-substituted yttrium iron (Bi{sub 1.3}Dy{sub 0.7}Y{sub 1.0}Fe{sub 3.1}Al{sub 1.9}O{sub 12}) garnet films were deposited by an RF magnetron sputter and annealed at 700 deg. C in air. The annealing time was varied in a range of several minutes to control the grain size. The saturation magnetization, the remanent magnetization and the composition of the fabricated garnet films slightly changed versus the annealing time. Experiments showed that the coercivity and the grain size increased at longer annealing; the coercivity was larger for films with bigger grains. This work shows that garnet films with smaller coercivity are most suitable for controlling the magnetization of garnet and, correspondingly, the magneto-optical rotation of MOSLM pixels driven by piezoelectrics.

  6. Reaction of photochemical resists used in screen printing under the influence of digitally modulated ultra violet light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmuender, T.

    2017-02-01

    Different chemical photo-reactive emulsions are used in screen printing for stencil production. Depending on the bandwidth, optical power and depth of field from the optical system, the reaction / exposure speed has a diverse value. In this paper, the emulsions get categorized and validated in a first step. After that a mathematical model gets developed and adapted due to heuristic experience to estimate the exposure speed under the influence of digitally modulated ultra violet (UV) light. The main intention is to use the technical specifications (intended wavelength, exposure time, distance to the stencil, electrical power, stencil configuration) in the emulsion data sheet primary written down with an uncertainty factor for the end user operating with large projector arc lamps and photo films. These five parameters are the inputs for a mathematical formula which gives as an output the exposure speed for the Computer to Screen (CTS) machine calculated for each emulsion / stencil setup. The importance of this work relies in the possibility to rate with just a few boundaries the performance and capacity of an exposure system used in screen printing instead of processing a long test series for each emulsion / stencil configuration.

  7. Generation of sinusoidal fringes with a holographic phase grating and a phase-only spatial light modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berberova, Natalia; Stoykova, Elena; Sainov, Ventseslav

    2012-01-01

    A variety of pattern projection methods for the three-dimensional capture of objects is based on the generation of purely sinusoidal fringes. This is not an easy task, especially when a portable non-interferometric system for outdoor usage is required. The use of phase gratings with coherent illumination as a possible solution has the advantage of providing good stability and a large measurement volume. In this work, we analyze the quality of fringes projected with two sinusoidal phase gratings. The first grating is recorded on a silver-halide holographic plate by means of a Michelson interferometer. The spatial resolution of the silver-halide material used is greater than 6000 lines per millimeter, and the recorded grating is practically analogous to a smooth variation of the phase profile. The second grating is formed as a sinusoidal phase variation on a liquid crystal-on-silicon phase-only reflective display with a resolution of 1920×1080 pixels, a pixel pitch of 8 μm and 256 phase levels. The frequency content of the fringes projected with both gratings is analyzed and compared on the basis of the calculated Fresnel diffraction pattern, taking into account that the sinusoidal phase distribution in the case of a spatial light modulator is both sampled and quantized. Experimental fringe patterns projected using both gratings are also provided.

  8. Magnetically modulated electroluminescence from hybrid organic/inorganic light-emitting diodes based on electron donor-acceptor exciplex blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zhiyong; Baniya, Sangita; Zhang, Chuang; Sun, Dali; Vardeny, Z. Valy

    2016-03-01

    We report room temperature magnetically modulated electroluminescence from a hybrid organic/inorganic light-emitting diode (h-OLED), in which an inorganic magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) with large room temperature magnetoresistance is coupled to an N,N,N ',N '-Tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)benzidine (MeO-TPD): tris-[3-(3-pyridyl)mesityl]borane (3TPYMB) [D-A] based OLED that shows thermally activated delayed luminescence. The exciplex-based OLED provides two spin-mixing channels: upper energy channel of polaron pairs and lower energy channel of exciplexes. In operation, the large resistance mismatch between the MTJ and OLED components is suppressed due to the non-linear I-V characteristic of the OLED. This leads to enhanced giant magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) at room temperature. We measured MEL of ~ 75% at ambient conditions. Supported by SAMSUNG Global Research Outreach (GRO) program, and also by the NSF-Material Science & Engineering Center (MRSEC) program at the University of Utah (DMR-1121252).

  9. Light-reflection random-target method for measurement of the modulation transfer function of a digital video-camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospisil, J.; Jakubik, P.; Machala, L.

    2005-11-01

    This article reports the suggestion, realization and verification of the newly developed measuring means of the noiseless and locally shift-invariant modulation transfer function (MTF) of a digital video camera in a usual incoherent visible region of optical intensity, especially of its combined imaging, detection, sampling and digitizing steps which are influenced by the additive and spatially discrete photodetector, aliasing and quantization noises. Such means relates to the still camera automatic working regime and static two-dimensional spatially continuous light-reflection random target of white-noise property. The introduced theoretical reason for such a random-target method is also performed under exploitation of the proposed simulation model of the linear optical intensity response and possibility to express the resultant MTF by a normalized and smoothed rate of the ascertainable output and input power spectral densities. The random-target and resultant image-data were obtained and processed by means of a processing and evaluational PC with computation programs developed on the basis of MATLAB 6.5E The present examples of results and other obtained results of the performed measurements demonstrate the sufficient repeatability and acceptability of the described method for comparative evaluations of the performance of digital video cameras under various conditions.

  10. 3D reconstruction of internal structure of animal body using near-infrared light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Trung Nghia; Yamamoto, Kohei; Namita, Takeshi; Kato, Yuji; Shimizu, Koichi

    2014-03-01

    To realize three-dimensional (3D) optical imaging of the internal structure of animal body, we have developed a new technique to reconstruct CT images from two-dimensional (2D) transillumination images. In transillumination imaging, the image is blurred due to the strong scattering in the tissue. We had developed a scattering suppression technique using the point spread function (PSF) for a fluorescent light source in the body. In this study, we have newly proposed a technique to apply this PSF for a light source to the image of unknown light-absorbing structure. The effectiveness of the proposed technique was examined in the experiments with a model phantom and a mouse. In the phantom experiment, the absorbers were placed in the tissue-equivalent medium to simulate the light-absorbing organs in mouse body. Near-infrared light was illuminated from one side of the phantom and the image was recorded with CMOS camera from another side. Using the proposed techniques, the scattering effect was efficiently suppressed and the absorbing structure can be visualized in the 2D transillumination image. Using the 2D images obtained in many different orientations, we could reconstruct the 3D image. In the mouse experiment, an anesthetized mouse was held in an acrylic cylindrical holder. We can visualize the internal organs such as kidneys through mouse's abdomen using the proposed technique. The 3D image of the kidneys and a part of the liver were reconstructed. Through these experimental studies, the feasibility of practical 3D imaging of the internal light-absorbing structure of a small animal was verified.

  11. Scattering of light by a periodic structure in the presence of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the method developed till now, the detection of periodic structures involves the detection of the central peak, first peak and second peak in the scattered intensity of light, located at scattering wave vectors = 0, , 2, respectively, where = 2/, their distinct identities being obfuscated by the fact that the peaks have ...

  12. Detection of internal structure by scattered light intensity: Application to kidney cell sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsby, C. L.; Kunze, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Scattered light measurements in flow cytometry were sucessfully used to distinguish cells on the basis of differing morphology and internal structure. Differences in scattered light patterns due to changes in internal structure would be expected to occur at large scattering angles. Practically, the results of these calculations suggest that in experimental situations an array of detectors would be useful. Although in general the detection of the scattered light intensity at several intervals within the 10 to 60 region would be sufficient, there are many examples where increased sensitivity could be acheived at other angles. The ability to measure at many different angular intervals would allow the experimenter to empirically select the optimum intervals for the varying conditions of cell size, N/C ratio, granule size and internal structure from sample to sample. The feasibility of making scattered light measurements at many different intervals in flow cytometry was demonstrated. The implementation of simplified versions of these techniques in conjunction with independant measurements of cell size could potentially improve the usefulness of flow cytometry in the study of the internal structure of cells.

  13. Structured light 3D tracking system for measuring motions in PET brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Jørgensen, Morten Rudkjær; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    Patient motion during scanning deteriorates image quality, especially for high resolution PET scanners. A new proposal for a 3D head tracking system for motion correction in high resolution PET brain imaging is set up and demonstrated. A prototype tracking system based on structured light with a ...

  14. Crystallographic Structure of Xanthorhodopsin, the Light-Driven Proton Pump With a Dual Chromophore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecke, H.; Schobert, B.; Stagno, J.; Imasheva, E.S.; Wang, J.M.; Balashov, S.P.; Lanyi, J.K

    2008-01-01

    Homologous to bacteriorhodopsin and even more to proteorhodopsin, xanthorhodopsin is a light-driven proton pump that, in addition to retinal, contains a noncovalently bound carotenoid with a function of a light-harvesting antenna. We determined the structure of this eubacterial membrane protein-carotenoid complex by X-ray diffraction, to 1.9-(angstrom) resolution. Although it contains 7 transmembrane helices like bacteriorhodopsin and archaerhodopsin, the structure of xanthorhodopsin is considerably different from the 2 archaeal proteins. The crystallographic model for this rhodopsin introduces structural motifs for proton transfer during the reaction cycle, particularly for proton release, that are dramatically different from those in other retinal-based transmembrane pumps. Further, it contains a histidine-aspartate complex for regulating the pK a of the primary proton acceptor not present in archaeal pumps but apparently conserved in eubacterial pumps. In addition to aiding elucidation of a more general proton transfer mechanism for light-driven energy transducers, the structure defines also the geometry of the carotenoid and the retinal. The close approach of the 2 polyenes at their ring ends explains why the efficiency of the excited-state energy transfer is as high as ∼45%, and the 46 o angle between them suggests that the chromophore location is a compromise between optimal capture of light of all polarization angles and excited-state energy transfer

  15. Research on a Micro-Nano Si/SiGe/Si Double Heterojunction Electro-Optic Modulation Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Feng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The electro-optic modulator is a very important device in silicon photonics, which is responsible for the conversion of optical signals and electrical signals. For the electro-optic modulator, the carrier density of waveguide region is one of the key parameters. The traditional method of increasing carrier density is to increase the external modulation voltage, but this way will increase the modulation loss and also is not conducive to photonics integration. This paper presents a micro-nano Si/SiGe/Si double heterojunction electro-optic modulation structure. Based on the band theory of single heterojunction, the barrier heights are quantitatively calculated, and the carrier concentrations of heterojunction barrier are analyzed. The band and carrier injection characteristics of the double heterostructure structure are simulated, respectively, and the correctness of the theoretical analysis is demonstrated. The micro-nano Si/SiGe/Si double heterojunction electro-optic modulation is designed and tested, and comparison of testing results between the micro-nano Si/SiGe/Si double heterojunction micro-ring electro-optic modulation and the micro-nano Silicon-On-Insulator (SOI micro-ring electro-optic modulation, Free Spectrum Range, 3 dB Bandwidth, Q value, extinction ratio, and other parameters of the micro-nano Si/SiGe/Si double heterojunction micro-ring electro-optic modulation are better than others, and the modulation voltage and the modulation loss are lower.

  16. Stability and structure of the membrane protein transporter Ffh is modulated by substrates and lipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Marika Ejby; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    the apoprotein. Escherichia coli lipid and DOPG (and to a smaller extent DOPC) increase Ffh's α-helical content, possibly related to Ffh's role in guiding membrane proteins to the membrane. Binding is largely mediated by electrostatic interactions but does not protect Ffh against trypsinolysis. We conclude...... that Ffh is a structurally flexible and dynamic protein whose stability is significantly modulated by the environment. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved....

  17. Study Modules for Calculus-Based General Physics. [Includes Modules 31-34: Inductance; Wave Properties of Light; Interference; and Introduction to Quantum Physics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Robert G., Ed.; And Others

    This is Part of a series of 41 Calculus Based Physics (CBP) modules totaling about 1,000 Pages. The modules include study guides, practice tests, and mastery tests for a full-year individualized courses in calculus-based physics based on the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). The units are not intended to be used without outside materials;…

  18. Socio-Cognitive Phenotypes Differentially Modulate Large-Scale Structural Covariance Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valk, Sofie L; Bernhardt, Boris C; Böckler, Anne; Trautwein, Fynn-Mathis; Kanske, Philipp; Singer, Tania

    2017-02-01

    Functional neuroimaging studies have suggested the existence of 2 largely distinct social cognition networks, one for theory of mind (taking others' cognitive perspective) and another for empathy (sharing others' affective states). To address whether these networks can also be dissociated at the level of brain structure, we combined behavioral phenotyping across multiple socio-cognitive tasks with 3-Tesla MRI cortical thickness and structural covariance analysis in 270 healthy adults, recruited across 2 sites. Regional thickness mapping only provided partial support for divergent substrates, highlighting that individual differences in empathy relate to left insular-opercular thickness while no correlation between thickness and mentalizing scores was found. Conversely, structural covariance analysis showed clearly divergent network modulations by socio-cognitive and -affective phenotypes. Specifically, individual differences in theory of mind related to structural integration between temporo-parietal and dorsomedial prefrontal regions while empathy modulated the strength of dorsal anterior insula networks. Findings were robust across both recruitment sites, suggesting generalizability. At the level of structural network embedding, our study provides a double dissociation between empathy and mentalizing. Moreover, our findings suggest that structural substrates of higher-order social cognition are reflected rather in interregional networks than in the the local anatomical markup of specific regions per se. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Structural basis for the ATP-independent proteolytic activity of LonB proteases and reclassification of their AAA+ modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Young Jun; Na, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Myung-Il; Cha, Sun-Shin

    2015-10-01

    Lon proteases degrade defective or denature proteins as well as some folded proteins for the control of cellular protein quality. There are two types of Lon proteases, LonA and LonB. Each consists of two functional components: a protease component and an ATPase associated with various cellular activities (AAA+ module). Here, we report the 2.03 -resolution crystal structure of the isolated AAA+ module (iAAA+ module) of LonB from Thermococcus onnurineus NA1 (TonLonB). The iAAA+ module, having no bound nucleotide, adopts a conformation virtually identical to the ADP-bound conformation of AAA+ modules in the hexameric structure of TonLonB; this provides insights into the ATP-independent proteolytic activity observed in a LonB protease. Structural comparison of AAA+ modules between LonA and LonB revealed that the AAA+ modules of Lon proteases are separated into two distinct clades depending on their structural features. The AAA+ module of LonB belongs to the -H2 & Ins1 insert clade (HINS clade)- defined for the first time in this study, while the AAA+ module of LonA is a member of the HCLR clade.

  20. Module structure of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP may provide bases for its complex role in the visual cycle – structure/function study of Xenopus IRBP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Debashis

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein's (IRBP remarkable module structure may be critical to its role in mediating the transport of all-trans and 11-cis retinol, and 11-cis retinal between rods, cones, RPE and Müller cells during the visual cycle. We isolated cDNAs for Xenopus IRBP, and expressed and purified its individual modules, module combinations, and the full-length polypeptide. Binding of all-trans retinol, 11-cis retinal and 9-(9-anthroyloxy stearic acid were characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring ligand-fluorescence enhancement, quenching of endogenous protein fluorescence, and energy transfer. Finally, the X-ray crystal structure of module-2 was used to predict the location of the ligand-binding sites, and compare their structures among modules using homology modeling. Results The full-length Xenopus IRBP cDNA codes for a polypeptide of 1,197 amino acid residues beginning with a signal peptide followed by four homologous modules each ~300 amino acid residues in length. Modules 1 and 3 are more closely related to each other than either is to modules 2 and 4. Modules 1 and 4 are most similar to the N- and C-terminal modules of the two module IRBP of teleosts. Our data are consistent with the model that vertebrate IRBPs arose through two genetic duplication events, but that the middle two modules were lost during the evolution of the ray finned fish. The sequence of the expressed full-length IRBP was confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The recombinant full-length Xenopus IRBP bound all-trans retinol and 11-cis retinaldehyde at 3 to 4 sites with Kd's of 0.2 to 0.3 μM, and was active in protecting all-trans retinol from degradation. Module 2 showed selectivity for all-trans retinol over 11-cis retinaldehyde. The binding data are correlated to the results of docking of all-trans-retinol to the crystal structure of Xenopus module 2 suggesting two ligand-binding sites