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Sample records for modulate cytoskeletal dynamics

  1. VEGF-A, cytoskeletal dynamics, and the pathological vascular phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Janice A.; Senger, Donald R.

    2006-01-01

    Normal angiogenesis is a complex process involving the organization of proliferating and migrating endothelial cells (ECs) into a well-ordered and highly functional vascular network. In contrast, pathological angiogenesis, which is a conspicuous feature of tumor growth, ischemic diseases, and chronic inflammation, is characterized by vessels with aberrant angioarchitecture and compromised barrier function. Herein we review the subject of pathological angiogenesis, particularly that driven by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A), from a new perspective. We propose that the serious structural and functional anomalies associated with VEGF-A-elicited neovessels, reflect, at least in part, imbalances in the internal molecular cues that govern the ordered assembly of ECs into three dimensional vascular networks and preserve vessel barrier function. Adopting such a viewpoint widens the focus from solely on specific pro-angiogenic stimuli such as VEGF-A to include a key set of cytoskeletal regulatory molecules, the Rho GTPases, which are known to direct multiple aspects of vascular morphogenesis including EC motility, alignment, multi-cellular organization, as well as intercellular junction integrity. We offer this perspective to draw attention to the importance of endothelial cytoskeletal dynamics for proper neovascularization and to suggest new therapeutic strategies with the potential to improve the pathological vascular phenotype

  2. Active Polar Gels: a Paradigm for Cytoskeletal Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julicher, Frank

    2006-03-01

    The cytoskeleton of eucaryotic cells is an intrinsically dynamic network of rod-like filaments. Active processes on the molecular scale such as the action of motor proteins and the polymerization and depolymerization of filaments drive active dynamic behaviors while consuming chemical energy in the form of a fuel. Such emergent dynamics is regulated by the cell and is important for many cellular processes such as cell locomotion and cell division. From a general point of view the cytoskeleton represents an active gel-like material with interesting material properties. We present a general theory of active viscoelastic materials made of polar filaments which is motivated by the the cytoskeleton. The continuous consumption of a fuel generates a non- equilibrium state characterized by the generation of flows and stresses. Our theory can be applied to experiments in which cytoskeletal patterns are set in motion by active processes such as those which are at work in cells. It can also capture generic aspects of the flows and stress profiles which occur during cell locomotion.

  3. Changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology with metastatic ability in cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughlin, Mark F; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine if changes in cancer cell biophysical properties facilitate metastasis, we quantified cytoskeletal biophysics in well-characterized human skin, bladder, prostate and kidney cell line pairs that differ in metastatic ability. Using magnetic twisting cytometry with optical detection, cytoskeletal dynamics was observed through spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads and nonlinear rheology was characterized through large amplitude forced oscillations of probe beads. Measurements of cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology differed between strongly and weakly metastatic cells. However, no set of biophysical parameters changed systematically with metastatic ability across all cell lines. Compared to their weakly metastatic counterparts, the strongly metastatic kidney cancer cells exhibited both increased cytoskeletal dynamics and stiffness at large deformation which are thought to facilitate the process of vascular invasion. (paper)

  4. Microvillar ion channels: cytoskeletal modulation of ion fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, K

    2000-10-21

    movement of the system (electro-mechanical coupling). Because ionic transmission through linear polyelectrolytes is very slow compared with electronic conduction, only low-frequency electromagnetic fields can interact with the condensed counterion systems of linear polyelectrolytes. The delineated characteristics of microvillar ion conduction are strongly supported by the phenomenon of electro-mechanical coupling (reverse transduction) in microvilli of the audioreceptor (hair) cells and the recently reported dynamics of Ca(2+)signaling in microvilli of audio- and photoreceptor cells. Due to the cell-specific expression of different types and combinations of ion channels and transporters in the microvillar tip membrane of differentiated cells, the functional properties of this cell surface organelle are highly variable serving a multitude of different cellular functions including receptor-mediated effects such as Ca(2+)signaling, regulation of glucose and amino acid transport, as well as modulation of membrane potential. Even mechanical channel activation involved in cell volume regulation can be deduced from the systematic properties of the microvillar channel concept. In addition, the specific ion conduction properties of microfilaments combined with their proposed role in Ca(2+)signaling make microvilli the most likely cellular site for the interaction with external electric and magnetic fields. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Dendritic Cytoskeletal Architecture Is Modulated by Combinatorial Transcriptional Regulation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ravi; Bhattacharjee, Shatabdi; Patel, Atit A; Harris, Jenna M; Bhattacharya, Surajit; Letcher, Jamin M; Clark, Sarah G; Nanda, Sumit; Iyer, Eswar Prasad R; Ascoli, Giorgio A; Cox, Daniel N

    2017-12-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) have emerged as essential cell autonomous mediators of subtype specific dendritogenesis; however, the downstream effectors of these TFs remain largely unknown, as are the cellular events that TFs control to direct morphological change. As dendritic morphology is largely dictated by the organization of the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletons, elucidating TF-mediated cytoskeletal regulatory programs is key to understanding molecular control of diverse dendritic morphologies. Previous studies in Drosophila melanogaster have demonstrated that the conserved TFs Cut and Knot exert combinatorial control over aspects of dendritic cytoskeleton development, promoting actin and MT-based arbor morphology, respectively. To investigate transcriptional targets of Cut and/or Knot regulation, we conducted systematic neurogenomic studies, coupled with in vivo genetic screens utilizing multi-fluor cytoskeletal and membrane marker reporters. These analyses identified a host of putative Cut and/or Knot effector molecules, and a subset of these putative TF targets converge on modulating dendritic cytoskeletal architecture, which are grouped into three major phenotypic categories, based upon neuromorphometric analyses: complexity enhancer, complexity shifter, and complexity suppressor. Complexity enhancer genes normally function to promote higher order dendritic growth and branching with variable effects on MT stabilization and F-actin organization, whereas complexity shifter and complexity suppressor genes normally function in regulating proximal-distal branching distribution or in restricting higher order branching complexity, respectively, with spatially restricted impacts on the dendritic cytoskeleton. Collectively, we implicate novel genes and cellular programs by which TFs distinctly and combinatorially govern dendritogenesis via cytoskeletal modulation. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. Differential Modulation of Transcription Factors and Cytoskeletal Proteins in Prostate Carcinoma Cells by a Bacterial Lactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil R. Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study tested the effect of a bacterial lactone N-(3-oxododecanoyl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL on the cytoskeletal and transcriptional genes and proteins in prostate adenocarcinoma (PA cells (DU145 and LNCaP and prostate small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SCNC PC3 cells including their cellular viability and apoptosis. Our data indicate that cell migration and colony formation were affected in the presence of C12-HSL. C12-HSL induced apoptosis and altered viability of both PA and SCNC cells in a concentration dependent manner as measured by fluorescence and chemiluminescence assays. Compared to PCa cells, noncancerous prostate epithelial cells (RWPE1 were resistant to modification by C12-HSL. Further, the viability of PC3 cells in 3D matrix was suppressed by C12-HSL treatment as detected using calcein AM fluorescence in situ. C12-HSL treatment induced cytoskeletal associated protein expression of vinculin and RhoC, which may have implications in cancer cell motility, adhesion, and metastasis. IQGAP protein expression was reduced in DU145 and RWPE1 cells in the presence of C12-HSL. C12-HSL decreased STAT3 phosphorylation in DU145 cells but increased STAT1 protein phosphorylation in PC3 and LNCaP cells. Overall, these studies indicate that C12-HSL can trigger changes in transcription factors and cytoskeletal proteins and thereby modulate growth and migration properties of PCa cells.

  7. Cytoskeletal-assisted dynamics of the mitochondrial reticulum in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Michelle K; Guenza, Marina G; Capaldi, Roderick A; Marcus, Andrew H

    2002-11-12

    Subcellular organelle dynamics are strongly influenced by interactions with cytoskeletal filaments and their associated motor proteins, and lead to complex multiexponential relaxations that occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Here we report spatio-temporal measurements of the fluctuations of the mitochondrial reticulum in osteosarcoma cells by using Fourier imaging correlation spectroscopy, over time and distance scales of 10(-2) to 10(3) s and 0.5-2.5 microm. We show that the method allows a more complete description of mitochondrial dynamics, through the time- and length-scale-dependent collective diffusion coefficient D(k,tau), than available by other means. Addition of either nocodazole to disrupt microtubules or cytochalasin D to disassemble microfilaments simplifies the intermediate scattering function. When both drugs are used, the reticulum morphology of mitochondria is retained even though the cytoskeletal elements have been de-polymerized. The dynamics of the organelle are then primarily diffusive and can be modeled as a collection of friction points interconnected by elastic springs. This study quantitatively characterizes organelle dynamics in terms of collective cytoskeletal interactions in living cells.

  8. Actin dynamics and the elasticity of cytoskeletal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The structural integrity of a cell depends on its cytoskeleton, which includes an actin network. This network is transient and depends upon the continual polymerization and depolymerization of actin. The degradation of an actin network, and a corresponding reduction in cell stiffness, can indicate the presence of disease. Numerical simulations will be invaluable for understanding the physics of these systems and the correlation between actin dynamics and elasticity. Here we develop a model that is capable of generating actin network structures. In particular, we develop a model of actin dynamics which considers the polymerization, depolymerization, nucleation, severing, and capping of actin filaments. The structures obtained are then fed directly into a mechanical model. This allows us to qualitatively assess the effects of changing various parameters associated with actin dynamics on the elasticity of the material.

  9. Vacuolar and cytoskeletal dynamics during elicitor-induced programmed cell death in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Takumi; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Goh, Tatsuaki; Hayashi, Teruyuki; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Sano, Toshio; Hasezawa, Seiichiro; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2008-09-01

    Responses of plant cells to environmental stresses often involve morphological changes, differentiation and redistribution of various organelles and cytoskeletal network. Tobacco BY-2 cells provide excellent model system for in vivo imaging of these intracellular events. Treatment of the cell cycle-synchronized BY-2 cells with a proteinaceous oomycete elicitor, cryptogein, induces highly synchronous programmed cell death (PCD) and provide a model system to characterize vacuolar and cytoskeletal dynamics during the PCD. Sequential observation revealed dynamic reorganization of the vacuole and actin microfilaments during the execution of the PCD. We further characterized the effects cryptogein on mitotic microtubule organization in cell cycle-synchronized cells. Cryptogein treatment at S phase inhibited formation of the preprophase band, a cortical microtubule band that predicts the cell division site. Cortical microtubules kept their random orientation till their disruption that gradually occurred during the execution of the PCD twelve hours after the cryptogein treatment. Possible molecular mechanisms and physiological roles of the dynamic behavior of the organelles and cytoskeletal network in the pathogenic signal-induced PCD are discussed.

  10. Cytoskeletal dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    I worked with reconstitutted contractile acto-myosin systems containing mainly actin, actin cross-linkers and myosin motors. Contractility and rheology of such systems was studied using confocal microscopy and rheology.......I worked with reconstitutted contractile acto-myosin systems containing mainly actin, actin cross-linkers and myosin motors. Contractility and rheology of such systems was studied using confocal microscopy and rheology....

  11. Cytoskeletal Configuration Modulates Mechanically Induced Changes in Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenesis, Morphology, and Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongkitwitoon, Suphannee; Uzer, Gunes; Rubin, Janet; Judex, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) responding to mechanical cues generated by physical activity is critical for skeletal development and remodeling. Here, we utilized low intensity vibrations (LIV) as a physiologically relevant mechanical signal and hypothesized that the confined cytoskeletal configuration imposed by 2D culture will enable human bone marrow MSCs (hBMSC) to respond more robustly when LIV is applied in-plane (horizontal-LIV) rather than out-of-plane (vertical-LIV). All LIV signals enhanced hBMSC proliferation, osteogenic differentiation, and upregulated genes associated with cytoskeletal structure. The cellular response was more pronounced at higher frequencies (100 Hz vs 30 Hz) and when applied in the horizontal plane. Horizontal but not vertical LIV realigned the cell cytoskeleton, culminating in increased cell stiffness. Our results show that applying very small oscillatory motions within the primary cell attachment plane, rather than perpendicular to it, amplifies the cell’s response to LIV, ostensibly facilitating a more effective transfer of intracellular forces. Transcriptional and structural changes in particular with horizontal LIV, together with the strong frequency dependency of the signal, emphasize the importance of intracellular cytoskeletal configuration in sensing and responding to high-frequency mechanical signals at low intensities.

  12. Modulators of cytoskeletal reorganization in CA1 hippocampal neurons show increased expression in patients at mid-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia F Kao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available During the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD, hippocampal neurons undergo cytoskeletal reorganization, resulting in degenerative as well as regenerative changes. As neurofibrillary tangles form and dystrophic neurites appear, sprouting neuronal processes with growth cones emerge. Actin and tubulin are indispensable for normal neurite development and regenerative responses to injury and neurodegenerative stimuli. We have previously shown that actin capping protein beta2 subunit, Capzb2, binds tubulin and, in the presence of tau, affects microtubule polymerization necessary for neurite outgrowth and normal growth cone morphology. Accordingly, Capzb2 silencing in hippocampal neurons resulted in short, dystrophic neurites, seen in neurodegenerative diseases including AD. Here we demonstrate the statistically significant increase in the Capzb2 expression in the postmortem hippocampi in persons at mid-stage, Braak and Braak stage (BB III-IV, non-familial AD in comparison to controls. The dynamics of Capzb2 expression in progressive AD stages cannot be attributed to reactive astrocytosis. Moreover, the increased expression of Capzb2 mRNA in CA1 pyramidal neurons in AD BB III-IV is accompanied by an increased mRNA expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB, mediator of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. Thus, the up-regulation of Capzb2 and TrkB may reflect cytoskeletal reorganization and/or regenerative response occurring in hippocampal CA1 neurons at a specific stage of AD progression.

  13. Neoplastic progression of the human breast cancer cell line G3S1 is associated with elevation of cytoskeletal dynamics and upregulation of MT1-MMP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tolde, O.; Rosel, D.; Mierke, C.T.; Paňková, D.; Folk, P.; Veselý, Pavel; Brabek, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 4 (2010), s. 833-839 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06061 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : invasiveness * neoplastic progression * cytoskeletal dynamics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.571, year: 2010

  14. Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling of Cytoskeletal Proteins: Molecular Mechanism and Biological Significance

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    Masahiro Kumeta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Various nuclear functional complexes contain cytoskeletal proteins as regulatory subunits; for example, nuclear actin participates in transcriptional complexes, and actin-related proteins are integral to chromatin remodeling complexes. Nuclear complexes such as these are involved in both basal and adaptive nuclear functions. In addition to nuclear import via classical nuclear transport pathways or passive diffusion, some large cytoskeletal proteins spontaneously migrate into the nucleus in a karyopherin-independent manner. The balance of nucleocytoplasmic distribution of such proteins can be altered by several factors, such as import versus export, or capture and release by complexes. The resulting accumulation or depletion of the nuclear populations thereby enhances or attenuates their nuclear functions. We propose that such molecular dynamics constitute a form of cytoskeleton-modulated regulation of nuclear functions which is mediated by the translocation of cytoskeletal components in and out of the nucleus.

  15. The integrin alphav beta3 increases cellular stiffness and cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics to facilitate cancer cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The process of cancer cell invasion through the extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissue plays a prominent role in tumor progression and is based fundamentally on biomechanics. Cancer cell invasion usually requires cell adhesion to the ECM through the cell-matrix adhesion receptors integrins. The expression of the αvβ3 integrin is increased in several tumor types and is consistently associated with increased metastasis formation in patients. The hypothesis was that the αvβ3 integrin expression increases the invasiveness of cancer cells through increased cellular stiffness, and increased cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics. Here, the invasion of cancer cells with different αvβ3 integrin expression levels into dense three-dimensional (3D) ECMs has been studied. Using a cell sorter, two subcell lines expressing either high or low amounts of αvβ3 integrins (αvβ3high or αvβ3low cells, respectively) have been isolated from parental MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. αvβ3high cells showed a threefold increased cell invasion compared to αvβ3low cells. Similar results were obtained for A375 melanoma, 786-O kidney and T24 bladder carcinoma cells, and cells in which the β3 integrin subunit was knocked down using specific siRNA. To investigate whether contractile forces are essential for αvβ3 integrin-mediated increased cellular stiffness and subsequently enhanced cancer cell invasion, invasion assays were performed in the presence of myosin light chain kinase inhibitor ML-7 and Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. Indeed, cancer cell invasiveness was reduced after addition of ML-7 and Y27632 in αvβ3high cells but not in αvβ3low cells. Moreover, after addition of the contractility enhancer calyculin A, an increase in pre-stress in αvβ3low cells was observed, which enhanced cellular invasiveness. In addition, inhibition of the Src kinase, STAT3 or Rac1 strongly reduced the invasiveness of αvβ3high cells, whereas the invasiveness of β3 specific knock

  16. The integrin alphav beta3 increases cellular stiffness and cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics to facilitate cancer cell invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2013-01-01

    The process of cancer cell invasion through the extracellular matrix (ECM) of connective tissue plays a prominent role in tumor progression and is based fundamentally on biomechanics. Cancer cell invasion usually requires cell adhesion to the ECM through the cell-matrix adhesion receptors integrins. The expression of the αvβ3 integrin is increased in several tumor types and is consistently associated with increased metastasis formation in patients. The hypothesis was that the αvβ3 integrin expression increases the invasiveness of cancer cells through increased cellular stiffness, and increased cytoskeletal remodeling dynamics. Here, the invasion of cancer cells with different αvβ3 integrin expression levels into dense three-dimensional (3D) ECMs has been studied. Using a cell sorter, two subcell lines expressing either high or low amounts of αvβ3 integrins (αvβ3 high or αvβ3 low cells, respectively) have been isolated from parental MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. αvβ3 high cells showed a threefold increased cell invasion compared to αvβ3 low cells. Similar results were obtained for A375 melanoma, 786-O kidney and T24 bladder carcinoma cells, and cells in which the β3 integrin subunit was knocked down using specific siRNA. To investigate whether contractile forces are essential for αvβ3 integrin-mediated increased cellular stiffness and subsequently enhanced cancer cell invasion, invasion assays were performed in the presence of myosin light chain kinase inhibitor ML-7 and Rho kinase inhibitor Y27632. Indeed, cancer cell invasiveness was reduced after addition of ML-7 and Y27632 in αvβ3 high cells but not in αvβ3 low cells. Moreover, after addition of the contractility enhancer calyculin A, an increase in pre-stress in αvβ3 low cells was observed, which enhanced cellular invasiveness. In addition, inhibition of the Src kinase, STAT3 or Rac1 strongly reduced the invasiveness of αvβ3 high cells, whereas the invasiveness of β3 specific knock

  17. Role of cyclic nucleotide-dependent actin cytoskeletal dynamics:Ca(2+](i and force suppression in forskolin-pretreated porcine coronary arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle M Hocking

    Full Text Available Initiation of force generation during vascular smooth muscle contraction involves a rise in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+]i and phosphorylation of myosin light chains (MLC. However, reversal of these two processes alone does not account for the force inhibition that occurs during relaxation or inhibition of contraction, implicating that other mechanisms, such as actin cytoskeletal rearrangement, play a role in the suppression of force. In this study, we hypothesize that forskolin-induced force suppression is dependent upon changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. To focus on the actin cytoskeletal changes, a physiological model was developed in which forskolin treatment of intact porcine coronary arteries (PCA prior to treatment with a contractile agonist resulted in complete suppression of force. Pretreatment of PCA with forskolin suppressed histamine-induced force generation but did not abolish [Ca(2+]i rise or MLC phosphorylation. Additionally, forskolin pretreatment reduced filamentous actin in histamine-treated tissues, and prevented histamine-induced changes in the phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory proteins HSP20, VASP, cofilin, and paxillin. Taken together, these results suggest that forskolin-induced complete force suppression is dependent upon the actin cytoskeletal regulation initiated by the phosphorylation changes of the actin regulatory proteins and not on the MLC dephosphorylation. This model of complete force suppression can be employed to further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for smooth muscle tone, and may offer cues to pathological situations, such as hypertension and vasospasm.

  18. Modeling cytoskeletal flow over adhesion sites: competition between stochastic bond dynamics and intracellular relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabass, Benedikt; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2010-01-01

    In migrating cells, retrograde flow of the actin cytoskeleton is related to traction at adhesion sites located at the base of the lamellipodium. The coupling between the moving cytoskeleton and the stationary adhesions is mediated by the continuous association and dissociation of molecular bonds. We introduce a simple model for the competition between the stochastic dynamics of elastic bonds at the moving interface and relaxation within the moving actin cytoskeleton represented by an internal viscous friction coefficient. Using exact stochastic simulations and an analytical mean field theory, we show that the stochastic bond dynamics lead to biphasic friction laws as observed experimentally. At low internal dissipation, stochastic bond dynamics lead to a regime of irregular stick-and-slip motion. High internal dissipation effectively suppresses cooperative effects among bonds and hence stabilizes the adhesion.

  19. The Stereociliary Paracrystal Is a Dynamic Cytoskeletal Scaffold In Vivo

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    Philsang Hwang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Permanency of mechanosensory stereocilia may be the consequence of low protein turnover or rapid protein renewal. Here, we devise a system, using optical techniques in live zebrafish, to distinguish between these mechanisms. We demonstrate that the stereocilium’s abundant actin cross-linker fascin 2b exchanges, without bias or a phosphointermediate, orders of magnitude faster (t1/2 of 76.3 s than any other known hair bundle protein. To establish the logic of fascin 2b’s exchange, we examine whether filamentous actin is dynamic and detect substantial β-actin exchange within the stereocilium’s paracrystal (t1/2 of 4.08 hr. We propose that fascin 2b’s behavior may enable cross-linking at fast timescales of stereocilia vibration while noninstructively facilitating the slower process of actin exchange. Furthermore, tip protein myosin XVa fully exchanges in hours (t1/2 of 11.6 hr, indicating that delivery of myosin-associated cargo occurs in mature stereocilia. These findings suggest that stereocilia permanency is underpinned by vibrant protein exchange.

  20. Cellular automata in cytoskeletal lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S A; Watt, R C; Hameroff, S R

    1984-01-01

    Cellular automata (CA) activities could mediate biological regulation and information processing via nonlinear electrodynamic effects in cytoskeletal lattice arrays. Frohlich coherent oscillations and other nonlinear mechanisms may effect discrete 10/sup -10/ to 10/sup -11/ s interval events which result in dynamic patterns in biolattices such as cylindrical protein polymers: microtubules (MT). Structural geometry and electrostatic forces of MT subunit dipole oscillations suggest neighbor rules among the hexagonally packed protein subunits. Computer simulations using these suggested rules and MT structural geometry demonstrate CA activities including dynamical and stable self-organizing patterns, oscillators, and traveling gliders. CA activities in MT and other cytoskeletal lattices may have important biological regulatory functions. 23 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  1. Cytoskeletal dynamics in interphase, mitosis and cytokinesis analysed through Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation of tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, H; Green, P; Sambade, A; Doonan, J H; Lloyd, C W

    2011-04-01

    Transient transformation with Agrobacterium is a widespread tool allowing rapid expression analyses in plants. However, the available methods generate expression in interphase and do not allow the routine analysis of dividing cells. Here, we present a transient transformation method (termed 'TAMBY2') to enable cell biological studies in interphase and cell division. Agrobacterium-mediated transient gene expression in tobacco BY-2 was analysed by Western blotting and quantitative fluorescence microscopy. Time-lapse microscopy of cytoskeletal markers was employed to monitor cell division. Double-labelling in interphase and mitosis enabled localization studies. We found that the transient transformation efficiency was highest when BY-2/Agrobacterium co-cultivation was performed on solid medium. Transformants produced in this way divided at high frequency. We demonstrated the utility of the method by defining the behaviour of a previously uncharacterized microtubule motor, KinG, throughout the cell cycle. Our analyses demonstrated that TAMBY2 provides a flexible tool for the transient transformation of BY-2 with Agrobacterium. Fluorescence double-labelling showed that KinG localizes to microtubules and to F-actin. In interphase, KinG accumulates on microtubule lagging ends, suggesting a minus-end-directed function in vivo. Time-lapse studies of cell division showed that GFP-KinG strongly labels preprophase band and phragmoplast, but not the metaphase spindle. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Solar dynamic power module design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secunde, Richard R.; Labus, Thomas L.; Lovely, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Studies have shown that the use of solar dynamic (SD) power for the growth areas of the Space Station Freedom program will result in life cycle cost savings when compared to power supplied by photovoltaic sources. In the SD power module, a concentrator collects and focuses solar energy into a heat receiver which has integral thermal energy storage. A Power Conversion Unit (PCU) based on the closed Brayton cycle removes thermal energy from the receiver and converts that energy to electrical energy. Since the closed Brayton cycle is a single phase gas cycle, the conversion hardware (heat exchangers, turbine, compressor, etc.) can be designed for operation in low earth orbit, and tested with confidence in test facilities on earth before launch into space. The concentrator subassemblies will be aligned and the receiver/PCU/radiator combination completely assembled and charged with gas and cooling liquid on earth before launch to, and assembly on, orbit.

  3. Modulation of phosducin-like protein 3 (PhLP3 levels promotes cytoskeletal remodelling in a MAPK and RhoA-dependent manner.

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    Nandini V L Hayes

    Full Text Available Phosducin-like protein 3 (PhLP3 forms a ternary complex with the ATP-dependent molecular chaperone CCT and its folding client tubulin. In vitro studies suggest PhLP3 plays an inhibitory role in β-tubulin folding while conversely in vivo genetic studies suggest PhLP3 is required for the correct folding of β-tubulin. We have a particular interest in the cytoskeleton, its chaperones and their role in determining cellular phenotypes associated with high level recombinant protein expression from mammalian cell expression systems.As studies into PhLP3 function have been largely carried out in non mammalian systems, we examined the effect of human PhLP3 over-expression and siRNA silencing using a single murine siRNA on both tubulin and actin systems in mammalian Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell lines. We show that over-expression of PhLP3 promotes an imbalance of α and β tubulin subunits, microtubule disassembly and cell death. In contrast, β-actin levels are not obviously perturbed. On-the-other-hand, RNA silencing of PhLP3 increases RhoA-dependent actin filament formation and focal adhesion formation and promotes a dramatic elongated fibroblast-like change in morphology. This was accompanied by an increase in phosphorylated MAPK which has been associated with promoting focal adhesion assembly and maturation. Transient overexpression of PhLP3 in knockdown experiments rescues cells from the morphological change observed during PhLP3 silencing but mitosis is perturbed, probably reflecting a tipping back of the balance of PhLP3 levels towards the overexpression state.Our results support the hypothesis that PhLP3 is important for the maintenance of β-tubulin levels in mammalian cells but also that its modulation can promote actin-based cytoskeletal remodelling by a mechanism linked with MAPK phosphorylation and RhoA-dependent changes. PhLP3 levels in mammalian cells are thus finely poised and represents a novel target for engineering industrially

  4. Biotechnological aspects of cytoskeletal regulation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komis, George; Luptovciak, Ivan; Doskocilova, Anna; Samaj, Jozef

    2015-11-01

    The cytoskeleton is a protein-based intracellular superstructure that evolved early after the appearance of bacterial prokaryotes. Eventually cytoskeletal proteins and their macromolecular assemblies were established in eukaryotes and assumed critical roles in cell movements, intracellular organization, cell division and cell differentiation. In biomedicine the small-molecules targeting cytoskeletal elements are in the frontline of anticancer research with plant-derived cytoskeletal drugs such as Vinca alkaloids and toxoids, being routinely used in the clinical practice. Moreover, plants are also major material, food and energy resources for human activities ranging from agriculture, textile industry, carpentry, energy production and new material development to name some few. Most of these inheritable traits are associated with cell wall synthesis and chemical modification during primary and secondary plant growth and inevitably are associated with the dynamics, organization and interactions of the plant cytoskeleton. Taking into account the vast intracellular spread of microtubules and actin microfilaments the cytoskeleton collectively assumed central roles in plant growth and development, in determining the physical stance of plants against the forces of nature and becoming a battleground between pathogenic invaders and the defense mechanisms of plant cells. This review aims to address the role of the plant cytoskeleton in manageable features of plants including cellulose biosynthesis with implications in wood and fiber properties, in biofuel production and the contribution of plant cytoskeletal elements in plant defense responses against pathogens or detrimental environmental conditions. Ultimately the present work surveys the potential of cytoskeletal proteins as platforms of plant genetic engineering, nominating certain cytoskeletal proteins as vectors of favorable traits in crops and other economically important plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All

  5. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

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    Poulomi Ray

    Full Text Available Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF, Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis.

  6. PTP-PEST controls EphA3 activation and ephrin-induced cytoskeletal remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Mariam; Nievergall, Eva; Gegenbauer, Kristina; Llerena, Carmen; Atapattu, Lakmali; Hallé, Maxime; Tremblay, Michel L; Janes, Peter W; Lackmann, Martin

    2016-01-15

    Eph receptors and their corresponding membrane-bound ephrin ligands regulate cell positioning and establish tissue patterns during embryonic and oncogenic development. Emerging evidence suggests that assembly of polymeric Eph signalling clusters relies on cytoskeletal reorganisation and underlies regulation by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs). PTP-PEST (also known as PTPN12) is a central regulator of actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, we demonstrate that an N-terminal fragment of PTP-PEST, generated through an ephrinA5-triggered and spatially confined cleavage mediated by caspase-3, attenuates EphA3 receptor activation and its internalisation. Isolation of EphA3 receptor signalling clusters within intact plasma membrane fragments obtained by detergent-free cell fractionation reveals that stimulation of cells with ephrin triggers effective recruitment of this catalytically active truncated form of PTP-PEST together with key cytoskeletal and focal adhesion proteins. Importantly, modulation of actin polymerisation using pharmacological and dominant-negative approaches affects EphA3 phosphorylation in a similar manner to overexpression of PTP-PEST. We conclude that PTP-PEST regulates EphA3 activation both by affecting cytoskeletal remodelling and through its direct action as a PTP controlling EphA3 phosphorylation, indicating its multifaceted regulation of Eph signalling. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma inhibits thyroid papillary cancer cell invasion via cytoskeletal modulation, altered MMP-2/-9/uPA activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Won Chang

    Full Text Available Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is defined as a partially or completely ionized gas that includes a mixture of electrons and ions. Advances in plasma physics have made it possible to use non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP in cancer research. However, previous studies have focused mainly on apoptotic cancer cell death mediated by NTP as a potential cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of NTP on invasion or metastasis, as well as the mechanism by which plasma induces anti-migration and anti-invasion properties in human thyroid papillary cancer cell lines (BHP10-3 and TPC1. Wound healing, pull-down, and Transwell assays demonstrated that NTP reduced cell migration and invasion. In addition, NTP induced morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements, as detected by scanning electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry. We also examined matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2/-9 and urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA activity using gelatin zymography, uPA assays and RT-PCR. FAK, Src, and paxillin expression was detected using Western blot analyses and immunocytochemistry. NTP decreased FAK, Src, and paxillin expression as well as MMP/uPA activity. In conclusion, NTP inhibited the invasion and metastasis of BHP10-3 and TPC1 cells by decreasing MMP-2/-9 and uPA activities and rearranging the cytoskeleton, which is regulated by the FAK/Src complex. These findings suggest novel actions for NTP and may aid in the development of new therapeutic strategies for locally invasive and metastatic cancers.

  8. Identify Dynamic Network Modules with Temporal and Spatial Constraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, R; McCallen, S; Liu, C; Almaas, E; Zhou, X J

    2007-09-24

    Despite the rapid accumulation of systems-level biological data, understanding the dynamic nature of cellular activity remains a difficult task. The reason is that most biological data are static, or only correspond to snapshots of cellular activity. In this study, we explicitly attempt to detangle the temporal complexity of biological networks by using compilations of time-series gene expression profiling data.We define a dynamic network module to be a set of proteins satisfying two conditions: (1) they form a connected component in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network; and (2) their expression profiles form certain structures in the temporal domain. We develop the first efficient mining algorithm to discover dynamic modules in a temporal network, as well as frequently occurring dynamic modules across many temporal networks. Using yeast as a model system, we demonstrate that the majority of the identified dynamic modules are functionally homogeneous. Additionally, many of them provide insight into the sequential ordering of molecular events in cellular systems. We further demonstrate that identifying frequent dynamic network modules can significantly increase the signal to noise separation, despite the fact that most dynamic network modules are highly condition-specific. Finally, we note that the applicability of our algorithm is not limited to the study of PPI systems, instead it is generally applicable to the combination of any type of network and time-series data.

  9. Alternative cytoskeletal landscapes: cytoskeletal novelty and evolution in basal excavate protists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Scott C.; Paredez, Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Microbial eukaryotes encompass the majority of eukaryotic evolutionary and cytoskeletal diversity. The cytoskeletal complexity observed in multicellular organisms appears to be an expansion of components present in genomes of diverse microbial eukaryotes such as the basal lineage of flagellates, the Excavata. Excavate protists have complex and diverse cytoskeletal architectures and life cycles – essentially alternative cytoskeletal “landscapes” – yet still possess conserved microtubule- and actin-associated proteins. Comparative genomic analyses have revealed that a subset of excavates, however, lack many canonical actin-binding proteins central to actin cytoskeleton function in other eukaryotes. Overall, excavates possess numerous uncharacterized and “hypothetical” genes, and may represent an undiscovered reservoir of novel cytoskeletal genes and cytoskeletal mechanisms. The continued development of molecular genetic tools in these complex microbial eukaryotes will undoubtedly contribute to our overall understanding of cytoskeletal diversity and evolution. PMID:23312067

  10. An abstract machine model of dynamic module replacement

    OpenAIRE

    Walton, Chris; Kırlı, Dilsun; Gilmore, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we define an abstract machine model for the mλ typed intermediate language. This abstract machine is used to give a formal description of the operation of run-time module replacement for the programming language Dynamic ML. The essential technical device which we employ for module replacement is a modification of two-space copying garbage collection. We show how the operation of module replacement could be applied to other garbage-collected languages such as Java.

  11. Nanosecond electric pulses modulate skeletal muscle calcium dynamics and contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Chris; Jirjis, Michael B.; Roth, Caleb C.; Barnes, Ronald A.; Ibey, Bennett L.

    2017-02-01

    Irreversible electroporation therapy is utilized to remove cancerous tissues thru the delivery of rapid (250Hz) and high voltage (V) (1,500V/cm) electric pulses across microsecond durations. Clinical research demonstrated that bipolar (BP) high voltage microsecond pulses opposed to monophasic waveforms relieve muscle contraction during electroporation treatment. Our group along with others discovered that nanosecond electric pulses (nsEP) can activate second messenger cascades, induce cytoskeletal rearrangement, and depending on the nsEP duration and frequency, initiate apoptotic pathways. Of high interest across in vivo and in vitro applications, is how nsEP affects muscle physiology, and if nuances exist in comparison to longer duration electroporation applications. To this end, we exposed mature skeletal muscle cells to monopolar (MP) and BP nsEP stimulation across a wide range of electric field amplitudes (1-20 kV/cm). From live confocal microscopy, we simultaneously monitored intracellular calcium dynamics along with nsEP-induced muscle movement on a single cell level. In addition, we also evaluated membrane permeability with Yo-PRO-1 and Propidium Iodide (PI) across various nsEP parameters. The results from our findings suggest that skeletal muscle calcium dynamics, and nsEP-induced contraction exhibit exclusive responses to both MP and BP nsEP exposure. Overall the results suggest in vivo nsEP application may elicit unique physiology and field applications compared to longer pulse duration electroporation.

  12. Implementation of intensity modulation with dynamic multileaf collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, J W; Yu, C; Jaffray, D [William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The computer-controlled multileaf collimator (MLC) marks one of the most important advances in radiation therapy. The device efficiently replaces manual blocking to shape fields and can be used to modulate beam intensity. The results of a research programme at William Beaumont Hospital, aimed at bringing dynamic intensity modulation into clinical use, are discussed.

  13. A new kymogram-based method reveals unexpected effects of marker protein expression and spatial anisotropy of cytoskeletal dynamics in plant cell cortex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cvrčková, F.; Oulehlová, Denisa

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 13, MAR 27 (2017), č. článku 19. ISSN 1746-4811 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : green fluorescent protein * cortical microtubule arrays * actin stochastic dynamics * arabidopsis-thaliana * epidermal-cells * quantitative-analysis * binding domain * gfp-tubulin * f-actin * microscopy * Actin * Microtubules * Lifeact * Variable angle fluorescence microscopy * Spinning disc confocal microscopy * Kymogram * Structure stability * Lateral mobility * Anisotropy * FH1 (At3g25500) Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Cell biology Impact factor: 3.510, year: 2016

  14. Force Factor Modulation in Electro Dynamic Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risbo, Lars; Agerkvist, Finn T.; Tinggaard, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between the non-linear phenomenon of ’reluctance force’ and the position dependency of the voice coil inductance was established in 1949 by Cunningham, who called it ’magnetic attraction force’. This paper revisits Cunningham’s analysis and expands it into a generalised form...... that includes the frequency dependency and applies to coils with non-inductive (lossy) blocked impedance. The paper also demonstrates that Cunningham’s force can be explained physically as a modulation of the force factor which again is directly linked to modulation of the flux of the coil. A verification based...... on both experiments and simulations is presented along discussions of the impact of force factor modulation for various motor topologies. Finally, it is shown that the popular L2R2 coil impedance model does not correctly predict the force unless the new analysis is applied....

  15. Modulation of neuronal dynamic range using two different adaptation mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The capability of neurons to discriminate between intensity of external stimulus is measured by its dynamic range. A larger dynamic range indicates a greater probability of neuronal survival. In this study, the potential roles of adaptation mechanisms (ion currents in modulating neuronal dynamic range were numerically investigated. Based on the adaptive exponential integrate-and-fire model, which includes two different adaptation mechanisms, i.e. subthreshold and suprathreshold (spike-triggered adaptation, our results reveal that the two adaptation mechanisms exhibit rather different roles in regulating neuronal dynamic range. Specifically, subthreshold adaptation acts as a negative factor that observably decreases the neuronal dynamic range, while suprathreshold adaptation has little influence on the neuronal dynamic range. Moreover, when stochastic noise was introduced into the adaptation mechanisms, the dynamic range was apparently enhanced, regardless of what state the neuron was in, e.g. adaptive or non-adaptive. Our model results suggested that the neuronal dynamic range can be differentially modulated by different adaptation mechanisms. Additionally, noise was a non-ignorable factor, which could effectively modulate the neuronal dynamic range.

  16. Stress and strain in the contractile and cytoskeletal filaments of airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Linhong; Bosse, Ynuk; Brown, Nathan; Chin, Leslie Y M; Connolly, Sarah C; Fairbank, Nigel J; King, Greg G; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y; Stephen, Newman L

    2009-10-01

    Stress and strain are omnipresent in the lung due to constant lung volume fluctuation associated with respiration, and they modulate the phenotype and function of all cells residing in the airways including the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. There is ample evidence that the ASM cell is very sensitive to its physical environment, and can alter its structure and/or function accordingly, resulting in either desired or undesired consequences. The forces that are either conferred to the ASM cell due to external stretching or generated inside the cell must be borne and transmitted inside the cytoskeleton (CSK). Thus, maintaining appropriate levels of stress and strain within the CSK is essential for maintaining normal function. Despite the importance, the mechanisms regulating/dysregulating ASM cytoskeletal filaments in response to stress and strain remained poorly understood until only recently. For example, it is now understood that ASM length and force are dynamically regulated, and both can adapt over a wide range of length, rendering ASM one of the most malleable living tissues. The malleability reflects the CSK's dynamic mechanical properties and plasticity, both of which strongly interact with the loading on the CSK, and all together ultimately determines airway narrowing in pathology. Here we review the latest advances in our understanding of stress and strain in ASM cells, including the organization of contractile and cytoskeletal filaments, range and adaptation of functional length, structural and functional changes of the cell in response to mechanical perturbation, ASM tone as a mediator of strain-induced responses, and the novel glassy dynamic behaviors of the CSK in relation to asthma pathophysiology.

  17. Small-molecule intramimics of formin autoinhibition: a new strategy to target the cytoskeletal remodeling machinery in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, L Leanne; Wallar, Bradley J; Turner, Julie D; Vroegop, Steven M; Kilkuskie, Robert E; Kitchen-Goosen, Susan M; Xu, H Eric; Alberts, Arthur S

    2013-11-15

    Although the cancer cell cytoskeleton is a clinically validated target, few new strategies have emerged for selectively targeting cell division by modulating the cytoskeletal structure, particularly ways that could avoid the cardiotoxic and neurotoxic effects of current agents such as taxanes. We address this gap by describing a novel class of small-molecule agonists of the mammalian Diaphanous (mDia)-related formins, which act downstream of Rho GTPases to assemble actin filaments, and their organization with microfilaments to establish and maintain cell polarity during migration and asymmetric division. GTP-bound Rho activates mDia family members by disrupting the interaction between the DID and DAD autoregulatory domains, which releases the FH2 domain to modulate actin and microtubule dynamics. In screening for DID-DAD disruptors that activate mDia, we identified two molecules called intramimics (IMM-01 and -02) that were sufficient to trigger actin assembly and microtubule stabilization, serum response factor-mediated gene expression, cell-cycle arrest, and apoptosis. In vivo analysis of IMM-01 and -02 established their ability to slow tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model of colon cancer. Taken together, our work establishes the use of intramimics and mDia-related formins as a new general strategy for therapeutic targeting of the cytoskeletal remodeling machinery of cancer cells. ©2013 AACR

  18. Interplay between cytoskeletal stresses and cell adaptation under chronic flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepika Verma

    Full Text Available Using stress sensitive FRET sensors we have measured cytoskeletal stresses in α-actinin and the associated reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton in cells subjected to chronic shear stress. We show that long-term shear stress reduces the average actinin stress and this effect is reversible with removal of flow. The flow-induced changes in cytoskeletal stresses are found to be dynamic, involving a transient decrease in stress (phase-I, a short-term increase (3-6 min (Phase-II, followed by a longer-term decrease that reaches a minimum in ~20 min (Phase-III, before saturating. These changes are accompanied by reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton from parallel F-actin bundles to peripheral bundles. Blocking mechanosensitive ion channels (MSCs with Gd(3+ and GsMTx4 (a specific inhibitor eliminated the changes in cytoskeletal stress and the corresponding actin reorganization, indicating that Ca(2+ permeable MSCs participate in the signaling cascades. This study shows that shear stress induced cell adaptation is mediated via MSCs.

  19. Dynamical investigation of modulated Kepler RR Lyrae stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plachy E.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We performed a non-linear dynamical analysis on the Blazhko modulation for the first time. Our results suggest that the detection of chaotic nature behind the phenomenon is limited by the instrumental effects and the data processing problems of the Kepler pipeline concerning high-amplitude variable stars.

  20. Topography on a subcellular scale modulates cellular adhesions and actin stress fiber dynamics in tumor associated fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azatov, Mikheil; Sun, Xiaoyu; Suberi, Alexandra; Fourkas, John T.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2017-12-01

    Cells can sense and adapt to mechanical properties of their environment. The local geometry of the extracellular matrix, such as its topography, has been shown to modulate cell morphology, migration, and proliferation. Here we investigate the effect of micro/nanotopography on the morphology and cytoskeletal dynamics of human pancreatic tumor-associated fibroblast cells (TAFs). We use arrays of parallel nanoridges with variable spacings on a subcellular scale to investigate the response of TAFs to the topography of their environment. We find that cell shape and stress fiber organization both align along the direction of the nanoridges. Our analysis reveals a strong bimodal relationship between the degree of alignment and the spacing of the nanoridges. Furthermore, focal adhesions align along ridges and form preferentially on top of the ridges. Tracking actin stress fiber movement reveals enhanced dynamics of stress fibers on topographically patterned surfaces. We find that components of the actin cytoskeleton move preferentially along the ridges with a significantly higher velocity along the ridges than on a flat surface. Our results suggest that a complex interplay between the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions coordinates the cellular response to micro/nanotopography.

  1. Cytoskeletal Components Define Protein Location to Membrane Microdomains*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymanski, Witold G.; Zauber, Henrik; Erban, Alexander; Gorka, Michal; Wu, Xu Na; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2015-01-01

    The plasma membrane is an important compartment that undergoes dynamic changes in composition upon external or internal stimuli. The dynamic subcompartmentation of proteins in ordered low-density (DRM) and disordered high-density (DSM) membrane phases is hypothesized to require interactions with cytoskeletal components. Here, we systematically analyzed the effects of actin or tubulin disruption on the distribution of proteins between membrane density phases. We used a proteomic screen to identify candidate proteins with altered submembrane location, followed by biochemical or cell biological characterization in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that several proteins, such as plasma membrane ATPases, receptor kinases, or remorins resulted in a differential distribution between membrane density phases upon cytoskeletal disruption. Moreover, in most cases, contrasting effects were observed: Disruption of actin filaments largely led to a redistribution of proteins from DRM to DSM membrane fractions while disruption of tubulins resulted in general depletion of proteins from the membranes. We conclude that actin filaments are necessary for dynamic movement of proteins between different membrane phases and that microtubules are not necessarily important for formation of microdomains as such, but rather they may control the protein amount present in the membrane phases. PMID:26091700

  2. Arabidopsis FH1 Formin Affects Cotyledon Pavement Cell Shape by Modulating Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosero, Amparo; Oulehlová, Denisa; Stillerová, Lenka; Schiebertová, Petra; Grunt, Michal; Žárský, Viktor; Cvrčková, Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis involves concerted rearrangements of microtubules and actin microfilaments. We previously reported that FH1, the main Arabidopsis thaliana housekeeping Class I membrane-anchored formin, contributes to actin dynamics and microtubule stability in rhizodermis cells. Here we examine the effects of mutations affecting FH1 (At3g25500) on cell morphogenesis and above-ground organ development in seedlings, as well as on cytoskeletal organization and dynamics, using a combination of confocal and variable angle epifluorescence microscopy with a pharmacological approach. Homozygous fh1 mutants exhibited cotyledon epinasty and had larger cotyledon pavement cells with more pronounced lobes than the wild type. The pavement cell shape alterations were enhanced by expression of the fluorescent microtubule marker GFP-microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4). Mutant cotyledon pavement cells exhibited reduced density and increased stability of microfilament bundles, as well as enhanced dynamics of microtubules. Analogous results were also obtained upon treatments with the formin inhibitor SMIFH2 (small molecule inhibitor of formin homology 2 domains). Pavement cell shape in wild-type (wt) and fh1 plants in some situations exhibited a differential response towards anti-cytoskeletal drugs, especially the microtubule disruptor oryzalin. Our observations indicate that FH1 participates in the control of microtubule dynamics, possibly via its effects on actin, subsequently influencing cell morphogenesis and macroscopic organ development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Regulation of cytoskeletal organization by syndecan transmembrane proteoglycans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoneda, Atsuko; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    have recently suggested that signaling through core protein of syndecans can regulate cytoskeletal organization through their clustering, association with cytoskeletal structures, binding to cytoplasmic binding proteins, and intracellular phosphorylation. Here we will review current understanding...... of signaling through syndecans in cytoskeletal organization....

  4. NKCC1 Regulates Migration Ability of Glioblastoma Cells by Modulation of Actin Dynamics and Interacting with Cofilin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Schiapparelli

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in adults. The mechanisms that confer GBM cells their invasive behavior are poorly understood. The electroneutral Na+-K+-2Cl− co-transporter 1 (NKCC1 is an important cell volume regulator that participates in cell migration. We have shown that inhibition of NKCC1 in GBM cells leads to decreased cell migration, in vitro and in vivo. We now report on the role of NKCC1 on cytoskeletal dynamics. We show that GBM cells display a significant decrease in F-actin content upon NKCC1 knockdown (NKCC1-KD. To determine the potential actin-regulatory mechanisms affected by NKCC1 inhibition, we studied NKCC1 protein interactions. We found that NKCC1 interacts with the actin-regulating protein Cofilin-1 and can regulate its membrane localization. Finally, we analyzed whether NKCC1 could regulate the activity of the small Rho-GTPases RhoA and Rac1. We observed that the active forms of RhoA and Rac1 were decreased in NKCC1-KD cells. In summary, we report that NKCC1 regulates GBM cell migration by modulating the cytoskeleton through multiple targets including F-actin regulation through Cofilin-1 and RhoGTPase activity. Due to its essential role in cell migration NKCC1 may serve as a specific therapeutic target to decrease cell invasion in patients with primary brain cancer.

  5. Random and systematic beam modulator errors in dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parsai, Homayon; Cho, Paul S; Phillips, Mark H; Giansiracusa, Robert S; Axen, David

    2003-01-01

    This paper reports on the dosimetric effects of random and systematic modulator errors in delivery of dynamic intensity modulated beams. A sliding-widow type delivery that utilizes a combination of multileaf collimators (MLCs) and backup diaphragms was examined. Gaussian functions with standard deviations ranging from 0.5 to 1.5 mm were used to simulate random positioning errors. A clinical example involving a clival meningioma was chosen with optic chiasm and brain stem as limiting critical structures in the vicinity of the tumour. Dose calculations for different modulator fluctuations were performed, and a quantitative analysis was carried out based on cumulative and differential dose volume histograms for the gross target volume and surrounding critical structures. The study indicated that random modulator errors have a strong tendency to reduce minimum target dose and homogeneity. Furthermore, it was shown that random perturbation of both MLCs and backup diaphragms in the order of σ = 1 mm can lead to 5% errors in prescribed dose. In comparison, when MLCs or backup diaphragms alone was perturbed, the system was more robust and modulator errors of at least σ = 1.5 mm were required to cause dose discrepancies greater than 5%. For systematic perturbation, even errors in the order of ±0.5 mm were shown to result in significant dosimetric deviations

  6. Dynamic Aperture Extrapolation in Presence of Tune Modulation

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannozzi, Massimo; Todesco, Ezio

    1998-01-01

    In hadron colliders, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to be built at CERN, the long-term stability of the single-particle motion is mostly determined by the field-shape quality of the superconducting magnets. The mechanism of particle loss may be largely enhanced by modulation of betatron tunes, induced either by synchro-betatron coupling (via the residual uncorrected chromaticity), or by unavoidable power supply ripple. This harmful effect is investigated in a simple dynamical system model, the Henon map with modulated linear frequencies. Then, a realistic accelerator model describing the injection optics of the LHC lattice is analyzed. Orbital data obtained with long-term tracking simulations ($10^5$-$10^7$ turns) are post-processed to obtain the dynamic aperture. It turns out that the dynamic aperture can be interpolated using a simple mpirical formula, and it decays proportionally to a power of the inverse logarithm of the number of turns. Furthermore, the extrapolation of tracking data at $10^5$ t...

  7. On modulated complex non-linear dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, G.M.; Mohamed, A.A.; Rauh, A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of an approximate analytical method to investigate periodic solutions and their stability in the case of modulated non-linear dynamical systems whose equation of motion is describe. Such differential equations appear, for example, in problems of colliding particle beams in high-energy accelerators or one-mass systems with two or more degrees of freedom, e.g. rotors. The significance of periodic solutions lies on the fact that all non-periodic responses, if convergent, would approach to periodic solutions at the steady-state conditions. The example shows a good agreement between numerical and analytical results for small values of ε. The effect of the periodic modulation on the stability of the 2π-periodic solutions is discussed

  8. Dynamic modulation of phosphoprotein expression in ovarian cancer xenograft models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koussounadis, Antonis; Langdon, Simon P.; Um, Inhwa; Kay, Charlene; Francis, Kyle E.; Harrison, David J.; Smith, V. Anne

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic changes that occur in protein expression after treatment of a cancer in vivo are poorly described. In this study we measure the effect of chemotherapy over time on the expression of a panel of proteins in ovarian cancer xenograft models. The objective was to identify phosphoprotein and other protein changes indicative of pathway activation that might link with drug response. Two xenograft models, platinum-responsive OV1002 and platinum-unresponsive HOX424, were used. Treatments were carboplatin and carboplatin-paclitaxel. Expression of 49 proteins over 14 days post treatment was measured by quantitative immunofluorescence and analysed by AQUA. Carboplatin treatment in the platinum-sensitive OV1002 model triggered up-regulation of cell cycle, mTOR and DDR pathways, while at late time points WNT, invasion, EMT and MAPK pathways were modulated. Estrogen receptor-alpha (ESR1) and ERBB pathways were down-regulated early, within 24 h from treatment administration. Combined carboplatin-paclitaxel treatment triggered a more extensive response in the OV1002 model modulating expression of 23 of 49 proteins. Therefore the cell cycle and DDR pathways showed similar or more pronounced changes than with carboplatin alone. In addition to expression of pS6 and pERK increasing, components of the AKT pathway were modulated with pAKT increasing while its regulator PTEN was down-regulated early. WNT signaling, EMT and invasion markers were modulated at later time points. Additional pathways were also observed with the NFκB and JAK/STAT pathways being up-regulated. ESR1 was down-regulated as was HER4, while further protein members of the ERBB pathway were upregulated late. By contrast, in the carboplatin-unresponsive HOX 424 xenograft, carboplatin only modulated expression of MLH1 while carboplatin-paclitaxel treatment modulated ESR1 and pMET. Thirteen proteins were modulated by carboplatin and a more robust set of changes by carboplatin-paclitaxel. Early changes included

  9. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide affects human gingival fibroblast cytoskeletal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina

    2008-04-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that plays a key role in maintaining cell morphology and function. This study investigates the effect of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a strong inflammatory agent, on the dynamics and organization of actin, tubulin, vimentin, and vinculin proteins in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). A time-dependent study showed a noticeable change in actin architecture after 1.5 h of incubation with LPS (1 microg/ml) with the formation of orthogonal fibers and further accumulation of actin filament at the cell periphery by 24 h. When 0.01-10 microg/ml of LPS was added to human gingival fibroblast cultures, cells acquired a round, flat shape and gradually developed cytoplasmic ruffling. Lipopolysaccharides extracted from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans periodontopathogenic bacteria promoted alterations in F-actin stress fibres of human gingival cells. Normally, human gingival cells have F-actin fibres that are organized in linear distribution throughout the cells, extending along the cell's length. LPS-treated cells exhibited changes in cytoskeletal protein organization, and F-actin was reorganized by the formation of bundles underneath and parallel to the cell membrane. We also found the reorganization of the vimentin network into vimentin bundling after 1.5 h of treatment. HGF cells exhibited diffuse and granular gamma-tubulin stain. There was no change in LPS-treated HGF. However, vinculin plaques distributed in the cell body diminished after LPS treatment. We conclude that the dynamic and structured organization of cytoskeletal filaments and actin assembly in human gingival fibroblasts is altered by LPS treatment and is accompanied by a decrease in F-actin pools.

  10. Fragility of foot process morphology in kidney podocytes arises from chaotic spatial propagation of cytoskeletal instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele V Falkenberg

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Kidney podocytes' function depends on fingerlike projections (foot processes that interdigitate with those from neighboring cells to form the glomerular filtration barrier. The integrity of the barrier depends on spatial control of dynamics of actin cytoskeleton in the foot processes. We determined how imbalances in regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics could result in pathological morphology. We obtained 3-D electron microscopy images of podocytes and used quantitative features to build dynamical models to investigate how regulation of actin dynamics within foot processes controls local morphology. We find that imbalances in regulation of actin bundling lead to chaotic spatial patterns that could impair the foot process morphology. Simulation results are consistent with experimental observations for cytoskeletal reconfiguration through dysregulated RhoA or Rac1, and they predict compensatory mechanisms for biochemical stability. We conclude that podocyte morphology, optimized for filtration, is intrinsically fragile, whereby local transient biochemical imbalances may lead to permanent morphological changes associated with pathophysiology.

  11. Multicompartment Drug Release System for Dynamic Modulation of Tissue Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Aaron H; Mahal, Rajwant S; Udell, Jillian; Wu, Michelle; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2017-10-01

    Pharmacological modulation of responses to injury is complicated by the need to deliver multiple drugs with spatiotemporal resolution. Here, a novel controlled delivery system containing three separate compartments with each releasing its contents over different timescales is fabricated. Core-shell electrospun fibers create two of the compartments in the system, while electrosprayed spheres create the third. Utility is demonstrated by targeting the foreign body response to implants because it is a dynamic process resulting in implant failure. Sequential delivery of a drug targeting nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and an antifibrotic is characterized in in vitro experiments. Specifically, macrophage fusion and p65 nuclear translocation in the presence of releasate or with macrophages cultured on the surfaces of the constructs are evaluated. In addition, releasate from pirfenidone scaffolds is shown to reduce transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-induced pSMAD3 nuclear localization in fibroblasts. In vivo, drug eluting constructs successfully mitigate macrophage fusion at one week and fibrotic encapsulation in a dose-dependent manner at four weeks, demonstrating effective release of both drugs over different timescales. Future studies can employ this system to improve and prolong implant lifetimes, or load it with other drugs to modulate other dynamic processes. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Evaluation of the neuronal apoptotic pathways involved in cytoskeletal disruption-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordà, Elvira G; Verdaguer, Ester; Jimenez, Andrés; Arriba, S Garcia de; Allgaier, Clemens; Pallàs, Mercè; Camins, Antoni

    2005-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is critical to neuronal functioning and survival. Cytoskeletal alterations are involved in several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. We studied the possible pathways involved in colchicine-induced apoptosis in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Although colchicine evoked an increase in caspase-3, caspase-6 and caspase-9 activation, selective caspase inhibitors did not attenuate apoptosis. Inhibitors of other cysteine proteases such as PD150606 (a calpain-specific inhibitor), Z-Phe-Ala fluoromethyl ketone (a cathepsins-inhibitors) and N(alpha)-p-tosyl-l-lysine chloromethyl ketone (serine-proteases inhibitor) also had no effect on cell death/apoptosis induced by colchicine. However, BAPTA-AM 10 microM (intracellular calcium chelator) prevented apoptosis mediated by cytoskeletal alteration. These data indicate that calcium modulates colchicine-induced apoptosis in CGNs. PARP-1 inhibitors did not prevent apoptosis mediated by colchicine. Finally, colchicine-induced apoptosis in CGNs was attenuated by kenpaullone, a cdk5 inhibitor. Kenpaullone and indirubin also prevented cdk5/p25 activation mediated by colchicine. These findings indicate that cytoskeletal alteration can compromise cdk5 activation, regulating p25 formation and suggest that cdk5 inhibitors attenuate apoptosis mediated by cytoskeletal alteration. The present data indicate the potential therapeutic value of drugs that prevent the formation of p25 for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  13. Modeling of carrier dynamics in quantum-well electroabsorption modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højfeldt, Sune; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    We present a comprehensive drift-diffusion-type electroabsorption modulator (EAM) model. The model allows us to investigate both steady-state properties and to follow the sweep-out of carriers after pulsed optical excitation. Furthermore, it allows for the investigation of the influence that vari...... in the field near each well affect the escape of carriers from that well. Finally, we look at the influence that the separate-confinement heterostructure barriers have on the carrier sweep-out....... that various design parameters have on the device properties, in particular how they affect the carrier dynamics and the corresponding field dynamics. A number of different types of results are presented. We calculate absorption spectra and steady-state field screening due to carrier pile-up at the separate......-confinement heterobarriers. We then move on to look at carrier sweep-out upon short-pulse optical excitation. For a structure with one well, we analyze how the well position affects the carrier sweep-out and the absorption recovery. We calculate the field dynamics in a multiquantum-well structure and discuss how the changes...

  14. Molecular dynamics simulation of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiaoli; Martini, Ashlie; Egberts, Philip; Dong, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to model amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM). In this novel simulation, the model AFM tip responds to both tip–substrate interactions and to a sinusoidal excitation signal. The amplitude and phase shift of the tip oscillation observed in the simulation and their variation with tip–sample distance were found to be consistent with previously reported trends from experiments and theory. These simulation results were also fit to an expression enabling estimation of the energy dissipation, which was found to be smaller than that in a corresponding experiment. The difference was analyzed in terms of the effects of tip size and substrate thickness. Development of this model is the first step toward using MD to gain insight into the atomic-scale phenomena that occur during an AM-AFM measurement. (paper)

  15. Cell elasticity with altered cytoskeletal architectures across multiple cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Martha E; Composto, Russell J; Eckmann, David M

    2016-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is primarily responsible for providing structural support, localization and transport of organelles, and intracellular trafficking. The structural support is supplied by actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, which contribute to overall cell elasticity to varying degrees. We evaluate cell elasticity in five different cell types with drug-induced cytoskeletal derangements to probe how actin filaments and microtubules contribute to cell elasticity and whether it is conserved across cell type. Specifically, we measure elastic stiffness in primary chondrocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells (HUVEC), hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HUH-7), and fibrosarcoma cells (HT 1080) subjected to two cytoskeletal destabilizers: cytochalasin D and nocodazole, which disrupt actin and microtubule polymerization, respectively. Elastic stiffness is measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the disruption of the cytoskeleton is confirmed using fluorescence microscopy. The two cancer cell lines showed significantly reduced elastic moduli values (~0.5kPa) when compared to the three healthy cell lines (~2kPa). Non-cancer cells whose actin filaments were disrupted using cytochalasin D showed a decrease of 60-80% in moduli values compared to untreated cells of the same origin, whereas the nocodazole-treated cells showed no change in elasticity. Overall, we demonstrate actin filaments contribute more to elastic stiffness than microtubules but this result is cell type dependent. Cancer cells behaved differently, exhibiting increased stiffness as well as stiffness variability when subjected to nocodazole. We show that disruption of microtubule dynamics affects cancer cell elasticity, suggesting therapeutic drugs targeting microtubules be monitored for significant elastic changes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Damping Effects of Drogue Parachutes on Orion Crew Module Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubuchon, Vanessa V.; Owens, D. Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Because simulations of the Orion Crew Module (CM) dynamics with drogue parachutes deployed were under-predicting the amount of damping seen in free-flight tests, an attach-point damping model was applied to the Orion system. A key hypothesis in this model is that the drogue parachutes' net load vector aligns with the CM drogue attachment point velocity vector. This assumption seems reasonable and has historically produced good results, but has never been experimentally verified. The wake of the CM influences the drogue parachutes, which makes performance predictions of the parachutes difficult. Many of these effects are not currently modeled in the simulations. A forced oscillation test of the CM with parachutes was conducted in the NASA LaRC 20-Ft Vertical Spin Tunnel (VST) to gather additional data to validate and refine the attach-point damping model. A second loads balance was added to the original Orion VST model to measure the drogue parachute loads independently of the CM. The objective of the test was to identify the contribution of the drogues to CM damping and provide additional information to quantify wake effects and the interactions between the CM and parachutes. The drogue parachute force vector was shown to be highly dependent on the CM wake characteristics. Based on these wind tunnel test data, the attach-point damping model was determined to be a sufficient approximation of the parachute dynamics in relationship to the CM dynamics for preliminary entry vehicle system design. More wake effects should be included to better model the system.

  17. Cytoskeletal defects in Bmpr2-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer A; Hemnes, Anna R; Perrien, Daniel S; Schuster, Manfred; Robinson, Linda J; Gladson, Santhi; Loibner, Hans; Bai, Susan; Blackwell, Tom R; Tada, Yuji; Harral, Julie W; Talati, Megha; Lane, Kirk B; Fagan, Karen A; West, James

    2012-03-01

    The heritable form of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is typically caused by a mutation in bone morphogenic protein receptor type 2 (BMPR2), and mice expressing Bmpr2 mutations develop PAH with features similar to human disease. BMPR2 is known to interact with the cytoskeleton, and human array studies in PAH patients confirm alterations in cytoskeletal pathways. The goal of this study was to evaluate cytoskeletal defects in BMPR2-associated PAH. Expression arrays on our Bmpr2 mutant mouse lungs revealed cytoskeletal defects as a prominent molecular consequence of universal expression of a Bmpr2 mutation (Rosa26-Bmpr2(R899X)). Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells cultured from these mice have histological and functional cytoskeletal defects. Stable transfection of different BMPR2 mutations into pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells revealed that cytoskeletal defects are common to multiple BMPR2 mutations and are associated with activation of the Rho GTPase, Rac1. Rac1 defects are corrected in cell culture and in vivo through administration of exogenous recombinant human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (rhACE2). rhACE2 reverses 77% of gene expression changes in Rosa26-Bmpr2(R899X) transgenic mice, in particular, correcting defects in cytoskeletal function. Administration of rhACE2 to Rosa26-Bmpr2(R899X) mice with established PAH normalizes pulmonary pressures. Together, these findings suggest that cytoskeletal function is central to the development of BMPR2-associated PAH and that intervention against cytoskeletal defects may reverse established disease.

  18. Module type plant system dynamics analysis code (MSG-COPD). Code manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Takaaki

    2002-11-01

    MSG-COPD is a module type plant system dynamics analysis code which involves a multi-dimensional thermal-hydraulics calculation module to analyze pool type of fast breeder reactors. Explanations of each module and the methods for the input data are described in this code manual. (author)

  19. Verification and Validation of the New Dynamic Mooring Modules Available in FAST v8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Fabian F.; Andersen, Morten Thøtt; Robertson, Amy N.

    2016-01-01

    The open-source, aero-hydro-servo-elastic wind turbine simulation software FAST v8 (created by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory) was recently coupled to two newly developed mooring dynamics modules: MoorDyn and FEAMooring. MoorDyn is a lumped-mass-based mooring dynamics module developed b...

  20. Verification and Validation of the New Dynamic Mooring Modules Available in FAST v8: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Fabian; Robertson, Amy; Jonkman, Jason; Andersen, Morten T.

    2016-08-01

    The open-source aero-hydro-servo-elastic wind turbine simulation software, FAST v8, was recently coupled to two newly developed mooring dynamics modules: MoorDyn and FEAMooring. MoorDyn is a lumped-mass-based mooring dynamics module developed by the University of Maine, and FEAMooring is a finite-element-based mooring dynamics module developed by Texas A&M University. This paper summarizes the work performed to verify and validate these modules against other mooring models and measured test data to assess their reliability and accuracy. The quality of the fairlead load predictions by the open-source mooring modules MoorDyn and FEAMooring appear to be largely equivalent to what is predicted by the commercial tool OrcaFlex. Both mooring dynamic model predictions agree well with the experimental data, considering the given limitations in the accuracy of the platform hydrodynamic load calculation and the quality of the measurement data.

  1. Role of density modulation in the spatially resolved dynamics of strongly confined liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Shibu; Dasgupta, Chandan

    2016-08-07

    Confinement by walls usually produces a strong modulation in the density of dense liquids near the walls. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we examine the effects of the density modulation on the spatially resolved dynamics of a liquid confined between two parallel walls, using a resolution of a fraction of the interparticle distance in the liquid. The local dynamics is quantified by the relaxation time associated with the temporal autocorrelation function of the local density. We find that this local relaxation time varies in phase with the density modulation. The amplitude of the spatial modulation of the relaxation time can be quite large, depending on the characteristics of the wall and thermodynamic parameters of the liquid. To disentangle the effects of confinement and density modulation on the spatially resolved dynamics, we compare the dynamics of a confined liquid with that of an unconfined one in which a similar density modulation is induced by an external potential. We find several differences indicating that density modulation alone cannot account for all the features seen in the spatially resolved dynamics of confined liquids. We also examine how the dynamics near a wall depends on the separation between the two walls and show that the features seen in our simulations persist in the limit of large wall separation.

  2. Phase dynamics of a Josephson junction ladder driven by modulated currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, T.

    2011-01-01

    Phase dynamics of disordered Josephson junction ladders (JJLs) driven by external currents which are spatially and temporally modulated is studied using a numerical simulation based on a random field XY model. This model is considered theoretically as an effective model of JJLs with structural disorder in a magnetic field. The spatiotemporal modulation of external currents causes peculiar dynamical effects of phases in the system under certain conditions, such as the directed motion of phases and the mode-locking in the absence of dc currents. We clarify the details of effects of the spatiotemporal modulation on the phase dynamics.

  3. Reinforcement versus fluidization in cytoskeletal mechanoresponsiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaswamy Krishnan

    Full Text Available Every adherent eukaryotic cell exerts appreciable traction forces upon its substrate. Moreover, every resident cell within the heart, great vessels, bladder, gut or lung routinely experiences large periodic stretches. As an acute response to such stretches the cytoskeleton can stiffen, increase traction forces and reinforce, as reported by some, or can soften and fluidize, as reported more recently by our laboratory, but in any given circumstance it remains unknown which response might prevail or why. Using a novel nanotechnology, we show here that in loading conditions expected in most physiological circumstances the localized reinforcement response fails to scale up to the level of homogeneous cell stretch; fluidization trumps reinforcement. Whereas the reinforcement response is known to be mediated by upstream mechanosensing and downstream signaling, results presented here show the fluidization response to be altogether novel: it is a direct physical effect of mechanical force acting upon a structural lattice that is soft and fragile. Cytoskeletal softness and fragility, we argue, is consistent with early evolutionary adaptations of the eukaryotic cell to material properties of a soft inert microenvironment.

  4. Intracellular transport driven by cytoskeletal motors: General mechanisms and defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appert-Rolland, C.; Ebbinghaus, M.; Santen, L.

    2015-09-01

    Cells are the elementary units of living organisms, which are able to carry out many vital functions. These functions rely on active processes on a microscopic scale. Therefore, they are strongly out-of-equilibrium systems, which are driven by continuous energy supply. The tasks that have to be performed in order to maintain the cell alive require transportation of various ingredients, some being small, others being large. Intracellular transport processes are able to induce concentration gradients and to carry objects to specific targets. These processes cannot be carried out only by diffusion, as cells may be crowded, and quite elongated on molecular scales. Therefore active transport has to be organized. The cytoskeleton, which is composed of three types of filaments (microtubules, actin and intermediate filaments), determines the shape of the cell, and plays a role in cell motion. It also serves as a road network for a special kind of vehicles, namely the cytoskeletal motors. These molecules can attach to a cytoskeletal filament, perform directed motion, possibly carrying along some cargo, and then detach. It is a central issue to understand how intracellular transport driven by molecular motors is regulated. The interest for this type of question was enhanced when it was discovered that intracellular transport breakdown is one of the signatures of some neuronal diseases like the Alzheimer. We give a survey of the current knowledge on microtubule based intracellular transport. Our review includes on the one hand an overview of biological facts, obtained from experiments, and on the other hand a presentation of some modeling attempts based on cellular automata. We present some background knowledge on the original and variants of the TASEP (Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process), before turning to more application oriented models. After addressing microtubule based transport in general, with a focus on in vitro experiments, and on cooperative effects in the

  5. Design of Simulink module for dynamic reactivity simulation of marine reactor automatic control rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhiyun; Luo Lei; Chen Wenzhen; Gui Xuewen

    2010-01-01

    The power of marine reactor varies frequently and acutely, which induces the frequent and acute adjustment of the automatic control rod. According to the characteristics of marine reactor and the problem of improper control rod reactivity insertion in previous literatures, the Simulink module for dynamic reactivity simulation of automatic control rod was designed and adopted as a sub-module of Simulink program for the fast calculation of the physical and thermal parameters of marine reactor. A typical dynamic process of the marine reactor was used as the benchmark, which indicates that the designed Simulink module is capable of the dynamic simulation of automatic control rod position and reactivity, and is adequate to the fast calculation of physic and thermal parameters. The Simulink module is of significant meaning to the simulation of the dynamic process of marine reactor and the fast calculation of the operating parameters. (authors)

  6. Observation Platform for Dynamic Biomedical and Biotechnology Experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed "Observation platform for dynamic biomedical and biotechnology experiments using the ISS Light Microscopy Module" consists of a platen sized to fit the...

  7. Exploring Protein Structure and Dynamics through a Project-Oriented Biochemistry Laboratory Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipchock, James M.; Ginther, Patrick S.; Douglas, Bonnie B.; Bird, Kelly E.; Loria, J. Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Here, we present a 10-week project-oriented laboratory module designed to provide a course-based undergraduate research experience in biochemistry that emphasizes the importance of biomolecular structure and dynamics in enzyme function. This module explores the impact of mutagenesis on an important active site loop for a biomedically-relevant…

  8. Seasonal module dynamics of Turbinaria triquetra (Fucales, Phaeophyceae) in the southern Red Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ateweberhan, Mebrahtu; Bruggemann, J. Henrich; Breeman, Anneke M.

    2006-01-01

    Module dynamics in the fucoid alga Turbinaria triquetra (J. Agardh) Kutzing were studied on a shallow reef flat in the southern Red Sea. Seasonal patterns in thallus density and size were determined, and the initiation, growth, reproduction, and shedding of modules were studied using a tagging

  9. Self-modulated dynamics of a relativistic charged particle beam in plasma wake field excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhter, T.; Fedele, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica ‘Ettore Pancini’, Università di Napoli Federico II and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Nicola, S. De [CNR-SPIN and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Tanjia, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica ‘Ettore Pancini’, Università di Napoli Federico II and INFN Sezione di Napoli, Napoli (Italy); Jovanović, D. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Mannan, A. [Department of Physics, Jahangirnagar University, Savar, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2016-09-01

    The self-modulated dynamics of a relativistic charged particle beam is provided within the context of the theory of plasma wake field excitation. The self-consistent description of the beam dynamics is provided by coupling the Vlasov equation with a Poisson-type equation relating the plasma wake potential to the beam density. An analysis of the beam envelope self-modulation is then carried out and the criteria for the occurrence of the instability are discussed thereby.

  10. p21-Activated kinase (PAK regulates cytoskeletal reorganization and directional migration in human neutrophils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asako Itakura

    Full Text Available Neutrophils serve as a first line of defense in innate immunity owing in part to their ability to rapidly migrate towards chemotactic factors derived from invading pathogens. As a migratory function, neutrophil chemotaxis is regulated by the Rho family of small GTPases. However, the mechanisms by which Rho GTPases orchestrate cytoskeletal dynamics in migrating neutrophils remain ill-defined. In this study, we characterized the role of p21-activated kinase (PAK downstream of Rho GTPases in cytoskeletal remodeling and chemotactic processes of human neutrophils. We found that PAK activation occurred upon stimulation of neutrophils with f-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP, and PAK accumulated at the actin-rich leading edge of stimulated neutrophils, suggesting a role for PAK in Rac-dependent actin remodeling. Treatment with the pharmacological PAK inhibitor, PF3758309, abrogated the integrity of RhoA-mediated actomyosin contractility and surface adhesion. Moreover, inhibition of PAK activity impaired neutrophil morphological polarization and directional migration under a gradient of fMLP, and was associated with dysregulated Ca(2+ signaling. These results suggest that PAK serves as an important effector of Rho-family GTPases in neutrophil cytoskeletal reorganization, and plays a key role in driving efficient directional migration of human neutrophils.

  11. Dynamic simulator for nuclear power plants (DSNP): development, verification, and expansion of modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, H.A.; Dean, E.M.; Koenig, J.F.; Gale, J.G.; Lehto, W.K.

    1984-01-01

    The DSNP Simulation Language facilitates whole reactor plant simulation and design. Verification includes DSNP dynamic modeling of Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) plant experiments as well as comparisons with verified simulation programs. Great flexibility is allowed in expanding the DSNP language and accommodate other computer languages. The component modules of DSNP, contained in libraries, are continually updated with new, improved, and verified modules. The modules are used to simulate the dynamic response of LMFBR reactor systems to upset and transient conditions, with special emphasis on investigations of inherent shutdown mechanisms

  12. Pulsewidth modulated DC-to-DC power conversion circuits, dynamics, and control designs

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Byungcho

    2013-01-01

    This is the definitive reference for anyone involved in pulsewidth modulated DC-to-DC power conversion Pulsewidth Modulated DC-to-DC Power Conversion: Circuits, Dynamics, and Control Designs provides engineers, researchers, and students in the power electronics field with comprehensive and complete guidance to understanding pulsewidth modulated (PWM) DC-to-DC power converters. Presented in three parts, the book addresses the circuitry and operation of PWM DC-to-DC converters and their dynamic characteristics, along with in-depth discussions of control design of PWM DC-to

  13. Dynamic range in BOLD modulation: lifespan aging trajectories and association with performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Kristen M; Boylan, Maria A; Rieck, Jenny R; Foster, Chris M; Rodrigue, Karen M

    2017-12-01

    Alteration of dynamic range of modulation to cognitive difficulty has been proposed as a salient predictor of cognitive aging. Here, we examine in 171 adults (aged 20-94 years) the effects of age on dynamic modulation of blood oxygenation-level dependent activation to difficulty in parametrically increasing working memory (WM) load (0-, 2-, 3-, and 4-back conditions). First, we examined parametric increases and decreases in activation to increasing WM load (positive modulation effect and negative modulation effect). Second, we examined the effect of age on modulation to difficulty (WM load) to identify regions that differed with age as difficulty increased (age-related positive and negative modulation effects). Weakened modulation to difficulty with age was found in both the positive modulation (middle frontal, superior/inferior parietal) and negative modulation effect (deactivated) regions (insula, cingulate, medial superior frontal, fusiform, and parahippocampal gyri, hippocampus, and lateral occipital cortex). Age-related alterations to positive modulation emerged later in the lifespan than negative modulation. Furthermore, these effects were significantly coupled in that greater upmodulation was associated with lesser downmodulation. Importantly, greater fronto-parietal upmodulation to difficulty and greater downmodulation of deactivated regions were associated with better task accuracy and upmodulation with better WM span measured outside the scanner. These findings suggest that greater dynamic range of modulation of activation to cognitive challenge is in service of current task performance, as well as generalizing to cognitive ability beyond the scanner task, lending support to its utility as a marker of successful cognitive aging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Kynurenic Acid Prevents Cytoskeletal Disorganization Induced by Quinolinic Acid in Mixed Cultures of Rat Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierozan, Paula; Biasibetti-Brendler, Helena; Schmitz, Felipe; Ferreira, Fernanda; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina; Wyse, Angela T S

    2018-06-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is a neuroactive metabolite of tryptophan known to modulate a number of mechanisms involved in neural dysfunction. Although its activity in the brain has been widely studied, the effect of KYNA counteracting the actions of quinolinic acid (QUIN) remains unknown. The present study aims at describing the ability of 100 μM KYNA preventing cytoskeletal disruption provoked by QUIN in astrocyte/neuron/microglia mixed culture. KYNA totally preserved cytoskeletal organization, cell morphology, and redox imbalance in mixed cultures exposed to QUIN. However, KYNA partially prevented morphological alteration in isolated primary astrocytes and failed to protect the morphological alterations of neurons caused by QUIN exposure. Moreover, KYNA prevented QUIN-induced microglial activation and upregulation of ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1) and partially preserved tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level in mixed cultures. TNF-α level was also partially preserved in astrocytes. In addition to the mechanisms dependent on redox imbalance and microglial activation, KYNA prevented downregulation of connexin-43 and the loss of functionality of gap junctions (GJs), preserving cell-cell contact, cytoskeletal organization, and cell morphology in QUIN-treated cells. Furthermore, the toxicity of QUIN targeting the cytoskeleton of mixed cultures was not prevented by the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist MK-801. We suggest that KYNA protects the integrity of the cytoskeleton of mixed cultures by complex mechanisms including modulating microglial activation preventing oxidative imbalance and misregulated GJs leading to disrupted cytoskeleton in QUIN-treated cells. This study contributed to elucidate the molecular basis of KYNA protection against QUIN toxicity.

  15. Dismissing Attachment Characteristics Dynamically Modulate Brain Networks Subserving Social Aversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, Anna Linda; Borchardt, Viola; Li, Meng; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Demenescu, Liliana Ramona; Strauss, Bernhard; Kirchmanny, Helmut; Buchheim, Anna; Metzger, Coraline D.; Nolte, Tobias; Walter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Attachment patterns influence actions, thoughts and feeling through a person's "inner working model". Speech charged with attachment-dependent content was proposed to modulate the activation of cognitive-emotional schemata in listeners. We performed a 7 Tesla rest-task-rest functional magnetic

  16. Dynamics of simple magnetorheological suspensions under rotating magnetic fields with modulated Mason number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calderon, Oscar G; Melle, Sonia

    2002-01-01

    We study theoretically the dynamics of a system of two magnetizable particles suspended in a non-magnetic fluid subject to a rotating magnetic field when a modulation on the Mason number (ratio of viscous to magnetic forces) is applied. We find, using a periodic modulation, that a resonant-like phenomenon between the periodic modulation of the Mason number and the intrinsic radial oscillation of the system without modulation occurs. For a random perturbation of the Mason number, we obtain an optimum noise strength at which the average interparticle distance reaches the lowest value. When a weak periodic modulation and a noise source are included in the Mason number, stochastic resonance (SR) is found for different frequencies and amplitudes of the modulation. An interpretation of this SR phenomenon is made by means of a threshold crossing mechanism

  17. Dynamic e-learning modules for student lecture preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy McIntyre

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed and demonstrated the effectiveness of a set of online interactive learning modules to accompany physics courses at first- and second-year university levels. Students access the modules prior to attending lectures to familiarize themselves with content which is then discussed and reaffirmed in class. Student surveys and access data show that students were much more likely to use material presented in this form, rather than a textbook, when preparing for lectures given in an active learning format. The students found that interactive simulations, videos of problem-solving approaches prepared by course staff, and quick-check immediate feedback questions were all useful tools for lecture preparation–none of which are available when using a traditional textbook for lecture preparation.

  18. Tune modulation due to synchrotron oscillations and chromaticity, and the dynamic aperture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzen, G.

    1995-01-01

    A tracking study was done of the effects of a tune modulations, due to synchrotron oscillations and the tune dependence on momentum (chromaticity), on the dynamic aperture. The studies were done using several RHIC lattices and tracking runs of about 1 x 10 6 turns. The dynamic aperture was found to decrease roughly linearly with the amplitude of the tune modulation. Lower order non-linear resonances, like the 1/3 and 1/4 resonance are not crossed because of the tune modulation. Three different cases were studied, corresponding to RHIC lattices with different β*, and with different synchrotron oscillation amplitudes. In each case, the tune modulation amplitude was varied by changing the chromaticity. In each case, roughly the same result, was found. The result found here for the effect of a tune modulation due to chromaticity may be compared with the result found for the effect of a tune modulation due to a gradient ripple in the quadrupoles. The effect of a tune modulation due to a gradient ripple appears to be about 4 times stronger than the effect of a tune modulation due to chromaticity and synchrotron oscillations

  19. A dynamic plasmonic manipulation technique assisted by phase modulation of an incident optical vortex beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, G H; Wang, Q; Tan, P S; Lin, J; Yuan, X-C

    2012-01-01

    A novel phase modulation method for dynamic manipulation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with a phase engineered optical vortex (OV) beam illuminating on nanoslits is experimentally demonstrated. Because of the unique helical phase carried by an OV beam, dynamic control of SPP multiple focusing and standing wave generation is realized by changing the OV beam’s topological charge constituent with the help of a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator. Measurement of SPP distributions with near-field scanning optical microscopy showed an excellent agreement with numerical predictions. The proposed phase modulation technique for manipulating SPPs features has seemingly dynamic and reconfigurable advantages, with profound potential for development of SPP coupling, routing, multiplexing and high-resolution imaging devices on plasmonic chips. (paper)

  20. Dynamic range of frontoparietal functional modulation is associated with working memory capacity limitations in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakun, Jonathan G; Johnson, Nathan F

    2017-11-01

    Older adults tend to over-activate regions throughout frontoparietal cortices and exhibit a reduced range of functional modulation during WM task performance compared to younger adults. While recent evidence suggests that reduced functional modulation is associated with poorer task performance, it remains unclear whether reduced range of modulation is indicative of general WM capacity-limitations. In the current study, we examined whether the range of functional modulation observed over multiple levels of WM task difficulty (N-Back) predicts in-scanner task performance and out-of-scanner psychometric estimates of WM capacity. Within our sample (60-77years of age), age was negatively associated with frontoparietal modulation range. Individuals with greater modulation range exhibited more accurate N-Back performance. In addition, despite a lack of significant relationships between N-Back and complex span task performance, range of frontoparietal modulation during the N-Back significantly predicted domain-general estimates of WM capacity. Consistent with previous cross-sectional findings, older individuals with less modulation range exhibited greater activation at the lowest level of task difficulty but less activation at the highest levels of task difficulty. Our results are largely consistent with existing theories of neurocognitive aging (e.g. CRUNCH) but focus attention on dynamic range of functional modulation asa novel marker of WM capacity-limitations in older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamic functional modules in co-expressed protein interaction networks of dilated cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyang Yen-Jen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular networks represent the backbone of molecular activity within cells and provide opportunities for understanding the mechanism of diseases. While protein-protein interaction data constitute static network maps, integration of condition-specific co-expression information provides clues to the dynamic features of these networks. Dilated cardiomyopathy is a leading cause of heart failure. Although previous studies have identified putative biomarkers or therapeutic targets for heart failure, the underlying molecular mechanism of dilated cardiomyopathy remains unclear. Results We developed a network-based comparative analysis approach that integrates protein-protein interactions with gene expression profiles and biological function annotations to reveal dynamic functional modules under different biological states. We found that hub proteins in condition-specific co-expressed protein interaction networks tended to be differentially expressed between biological states. Applying this method to a cohort of heart failure patients, we identified two functional modules that significantly emerged from the interaction networks. The dynamics of these modules between normal and disease states further suggest a potential molecular model of dilated cardiomyopathy. Conclusions We propose a novel framework to analyze the interaction networks in different biological states. It successfully reveals network modules closely related to heart failure; more importantly, these network dynamics provide new insights into the cause of dilated cardiomyopathy. The revealed molecular modules might be used as potential drug targets and provide new directions for heart failure therapy.

  2. Comparison of Static and Dynamic Elastic Modules of Different Strength Concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyanık, Osman; Sabbaǧ, Nevbahar

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the static and dynamic elastic (Young) modules of concrete with different strength was intended to compare. For this purpose 150mm dimensions 9 for each design cubic samples prepared and they were subjected to water cure during 28 days. After Seismic Ultrasonic P and S wave travel time measurements of samples, P and S wave velocities and taking advantage of elasticity theory the dynamic elastic modules were calculated. Concrete strength was obtained from the uniaxial compression tests in order to calculate the static elastic modules of the samples. The static elastic modulus is calculated by using the empirical relationships used in international standards. The obtained static and dynamic elastic modules have been associated. A curve was obtained from this association result that approximately similar to the stress-strain curve of obtaining at failure criterion of the sample. This study was supported with OYP05277-DR-14 Project No. by SDU and State Hydraulic Works 13th Regional/2012-01 Project No. Keywords: Concrete Strength, P and S wave Velocities, Static, Dynamic, Young Modules

  3. Pressure-modulation dynamic attenuated-total-reflectance (ATR) FT-IR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcott, C.; Story, G. M.; Noda, I.; Bibby, A.; Manning, C. J.

    1998-06-01

    A single-reflectance attenuated-total-reflectance (ATR) accessory with a diamond internal-reflection element was modified by the addition of a piezoelectric transducer. Initial dynamic pressure-modulation experiments have been performed in the sample compartment of a step-scanning FT-IR spectrometer. A sinusoidal pressure modulation applied to samples of isotactic polypropylene and linear low density polyethylene resulted in dynamic responses which appear to be similar to those observed in previous dynamic 2D IR experiments. Preliminary pressure-modulation dynamic ATR results are also reported for a styrene-butadiene-styrene triblock copolymer. The new method has the advantages that a much wider variety of sample types and geometries can be studied and less sample preparation is required. Dynamic 2D IR experiments carried out by ATR no longer require thin films of large area and sufficient strength to withstand the dynamic strain applied by a rheometer. The ability to obtain dynamic IR spectroscopic information from a wider variety of sample types and thicknesses would greatly expand the amount of useful information that could be extracted from normally complicated, highly overlapped IR spectra.

  4. Optical particle trapping and dynamic manipulation using spatial light modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge

    suitable for optical trapping. A phaseonly spatial light modulator (SLM) is used for the phase encoding of the laser beam. The SLM is controlled directly from a standard computer where phase information is represented as gray-scale image information. Experimentally, both linear and angular movements......This thesis deals with the spatial phase-control of light and its application for optical trapping and manipulation of micron-scale objects. Utilizing the radiation pressure, light exerts on dielectric micron-scale particles, functionality of optical tweezers can be obtained. Multiple intensity...... compression factors of two, which is not achievable with binary phase encoding, have been successfully demonstrated. In addition, the GPC method has been miniaturized and implemented in a planar optical platform and shown to work acceptably, with relatively high visibility. Furthermore, the GPC method has...

  5. Abnormal expression of leiomyoma cytoskeletal proteins involved in cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ura, Blendi; Scrimin, Federica; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Athanasakis, Emmanouil; Aloisio, Michelangelo; Monasta, Lorenzo; Ricci, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are monoclonal tumors. Several factors are involved in the neoplastic transformation of the myometrium. In our study we focused on dysregulated cytoskeletal proteins in the leiomyoma as compared to the myometrium. Paired tissue samples of ten leiomyomas and adjacent myometria were obtained and analyzed by two‑dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Mass spectrometry was used for protein identification, and western blotting for 2-DE data validation. The values of ten cytoskeletal proteins were found to be significantly different: eight proteins were upregulated in the leiomyoma and two proteins were downregulated. Three of the upregulated proteins (myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9, four and a half LIM domains protein 1 and LIM and SH3 domain protein 1) are involved in cell migration, while downregulated protein transgelin is involved in replicative senescence. Myosin regulatory light polypeptide 9 (MYL9) was further validated by western blotting because it is considered to be a cell migration marker in several cancers and could play a key role in leiomyoma development. Our data demonstrate significant alterations in the expression of cytoskeletal proteins involved in leiomyoma growth. A better understanding of the involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in leiomyoma pathogenesis may contribute to the identification of new therapeutic targets and the development of new pharmacological approaches.

  6. Detection of cytoskeletal proteins in small cell lung carcinoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hložánková, M.; Lukáš, Z.; Viklický, Vladimír

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 18, - (1999), s. 47-49 ISSN 0231-5882 Grant - others:MŠk1(CZ) OE10a/EU1450 Keywords : cytoskeletal proteins * small cell lung carcinoma Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 0.400, year: 1999

  7. MODELING OF DYNAMIC SYSTEMS WITH MODULATION BY MEANS OF KRONECKER VECTOR-MATRIX REPRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Vasilyev

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with modeling of dynamic systems with modulation by the possibilities of state-space method. This method, being the basis of modern control theory, is based on the possibilities of vector-matrix formalism of linear algebra and helps to solve various problems of technical control of continuous and discrete nature invariant with respect to the dimension of their “input-output” objects. Unfortunately, it turned its back on the wide group of control systems, which hardware environment modulates signals. The marked system deficiency is partially offset by this paper, which proposes Kronecker vector-matrix representations for purposes of system representation of processes with signal modulation. The main result is vector-matrix representation of processes with modulation with no formal difference from continuous systems. It has been found that abilities of these representations could be effectively used in research of systems with modulation. Obtained model representations of processes with modulation are best adapted to the state-space method. These approaches for counting eigenvalues of Kronecker matrix summaries, that are matrix basis of model representations of processes described by Kronecker vector products, give the possibility to use modal direction in research of dynamics for systems with modulation. It is shown that the use of controllability for eigenvalues of general matrixes applied to Kronecker structures enabled to divide successfully eigenvalue spectrum into directed and not directed components. Obtained findings including design problems for models of dynamic processes with modulation based on the features of Kronecker vector and matrix structures, invariant with respect to the dimension of input-output relations, are applicable in the development of alternate current servo drives.

  8. Dynamic excitatory and inhibitory gain modulation can produce flexible, robust and optimal decision-making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritwik K Niyogi

    Full Text Available Behavioural and neurophysiological studies in primates have increasingly shown the involvement of urgency signals during the temporal integration of sensory evidence in perceptual decision-making. Neuronal correlates of such signals have been found in the parietal cortex, and in separate studies, demonstrated attention-induced gain modulation of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Although previous computational models of decision-making have incorporated gain modulation, their abstract forms do not permit an understanding of the contribution of inhibitory gain modulation. Thus, the effects of co-modulating both excitatory and inhibitory neuronal gains on decision-making dynamics and behavioural performance remain unclear. In this work, we incorporate time-dependent co-modulation of the gains of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons into our previous biologically based decision circuit model. We base our computational study in the context of two classic motion-discrimination tasks performed in animals. Our model shows that by simultaneously increasing the gains of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons, a variety of the observed dynamic neuronal firing activities can be replicated. In particular, the model can exhibit winner-take-all decision-making behaviour with higher firing rates and within a significantly more robust model parameter range. It also exhibits short-tailed reaction time distributions even when operating near a dynamical bifurcation point. The model further shows that neuronal gain modulation can compensate for weaker recurrent excitation in a decision neural circuit, and support decision formation and storage. Higher neuronal gain is also suggested in the more cognitively demanding reaction time than in the fixed delay version of the task. Using the exact temporal delays from the animal experiments, fast recruitment of gain co-modulation is shown to maximize reward rate, with a timescale that is surprisingly near the

  9. Variability and Order in Cytoskeletal Dynamics of Motile Amoeboid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsin-Fang; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Westendorf, Christian; Gholami, Azam; Pumir, Alain; Tarantola, Marco; Beta, Carsten

    2017-10-01

    The chemotactic motion of eukaryotic cells such as leukocytes or metastatic cancer cells relies on membrane protrusions driven by the polymerization and depolymerization of actin. Here we show that the response of the actin system to a receptor stimulus is subject to a threshold value that varies strongly from cell to cell. Above the threshold, we observe pronounced cell-to-cell variability in the response amplitude. The polymerization time, however, is almost constant over the entire range of response amplitudes, while the depolymerization time increases with increasing amplitude. We show that cell-to-cell variability in the response amplitude correlates with the amount of Arp2 /3 , a protein that enhances actin polymerization. A time-delayed feedback model for the cortical actin concentration is consistent with all our observations and confirms the role of Arp2 /3 in the observed cell-to-cell variability. Taken together, our observations highlight robust regulation of the actin response that enables a reliable timing of cell movement.

  10. Regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics by phospholipase D and phosphatidic acid

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pleskot, Roman; Li, J.J.; Žárský, Viktor; Potocký, Martin; Staiger, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 9 (2013), s. 496-504 ISSN 1360-1385 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-19073S Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : cytoskeleton * microtubules * phosphatidic acid Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 13.479, year: 2013

  11. Dynamic Efficiency Measurements for Irradiated ATLAS Pixel Single Chip Modules

    CERN Document Server

    Pfaff, Mike; Grosse-Knetter, Jorn

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is the innermost subdetector of the ATLAS experiment. Due to this, the pixel detector has to be particularly radiation hard. In this diploma thesis effects on the sensor and the electronics which are caused by irradiation are examined. It is shown how the behaviour changes between an unirradiated sample and a irradiated sample, which was treated with the same radiation dose that is expected at the end of the lifetime of ATLAS. For this study a laser system, which is used for dynamic efficiency measurements was constructed. Furthermore, the behaviour of the noise during the detection of a particle was evaluated studied.

  12. Dismissing Attachment Characteristics Dynamically Modulate Brain Networks Subserving Social Aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Anna Linda; Borchardt, Viola; Li, Meng; van Tol, Marie-José; Demenescu, Liliana Ramona; Strauss, Bernhard; Kirchmann, Helmut; Buchheim, Anna; Metzger, Coraline D; Nolte, Tobias; Walter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Attachment patterns influence actions, thoughts and feeling through a person's "inner working model". Speech charged with attachment-dependent content was proposed to modulate the activation of cognitive-emotional schemata in listeners. We performed a 7 Tesla rest-task-rest functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)-experiment, presenting auditory narratives prototypical of dismissing attachment representations to investigate their effect on 23 healthy males. We then examined effects of participants' attachment style and childhood trauma on brain state changes using seed-based functional connectivity (FC) analyses, and finally tested whether subjective differences in responsivity to narratives could be predicted by baseline network states. In comparison to a baseline state, we observed increased FC in a previously described "social aversion network" including dorsal anterior cingulated cortex (dACC) and left anterior middle temporal gyrus (aMTG) specifically after exposure to insecure-dismissing attachment narratives. Increased dACC-seeded FC within the social aversion network was positively related to the participants' avoidant attachment style and presence of a history of childhood trauma. Anxious attachment style on the other hand was positively correlated with FC between the dACC and a region outside of the "social aversion network", namely the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which suggests decreased network segregation as a function of anxious attachment. Finally, the extent of subjective experience of friendliness towards the dismissing narrative was predicted by low baseline FC-values between hippocampus and inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Taken together, our study demonstrates an activation of networks related to social aversion in terms of increased connectivity after listening to insecure-dismissing attachment narratives. A causal interrelation of brain state changes and subsequent changes in social reactivity was further supported by our observation of

  13. Dismissing attachment characteristics dynamically modulate brain networks subserving social aversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Linda eKrause

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Attachment patterns influence actions, thoughts and feeling through a person’s ‘Inner Working Model’. Speech charged with attachment-dependent content was proposed to modulate the activation of cognitive-emotional schemata in listeners. We performed a 7 Tesla rest-task-rest fMRI-experiment, presenting auditory narratives prototypical of dismissing attachment representations to investigate their effect on 23 healthy males. We then examined effects of participants’ attachment style and childhood trauma on brain state changes using seed-based functional connectivity (FC analyses, and finally tested whether subjective differences in responsivity to narratives could be predicted by baseline network states. In comparison to a baseline state, we observed increased FC in a previously described ‘social aversion network’ including dorsal anterior cingulated cortex (dACC and left anterior middle temporal gyrus (aMTG specifically after exposure to insecure-dismissing attachment narratives. Increased dACC-seeded FC within the social aversion network was positively related to the participants’ avoidant attachment style and presence of a history of childhood trauma. Anxious attachment style on the other hand was positively correlated with FC between the dACC and a region outside of the ‘social aversion network’, namely the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which suggests decreased network segregation as a function of anxious attachment. Finally, the extent of subjective experience of friendliness towards the dismissing narrative was predicted by low baseline FC-values between hippocampus and inferior parietal lobule. Taken together, our study demonstrates an activation of networks related to social aversion in terms of increased connectivity after listening to insecure-dismissing attachment narratives. A causal interrelation of brain state changes and subsequent changes in social reactivity was further supported by our observation of direct

  14. Synapse geometry and receptor dynamics modulate synaptic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Freche

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission relies on several processes, such as the location of a released vesicle, the number and type of receptors, trafficking between the postsynaptic density (PSD and extrasynaptic compartment, as well as the synapse organization. To study the impact of these parameters on excitatory synaptic transmission, we present a computational model for the fast AMPA-receptor mediated synaptic current. We show that in addition to the vesicular release probability, due to variations in their release locations and the AMPAR distribution, the postsynaptic current amplitude has a large variance, making a synapse an intrinsic unreliable device. We use our model to examine our experimental data recorded from CA1 mice hippocampal slices to study the differences between mEPSC and evoked EPSC variance. The synaptic current but not the coefficient of variation is maximal when the active zone where vesicles are released is apposed to the PSD. Moreover, we find that for certain type of synapses, receptor trafficking can affect the magnitude of synaptic depression. Finally, we demonstrate that perisynaptic microdomains located outside the PSD impacts synaptic transmission by regulating the number of desensitized receptors and their trafficking to the PSD. We conclude that geometrical modifications, reorganization of the PSD or perisynaptic microdomains modulate synaptic strength, as the mechanisms underlying long-term plasticity.

  15. Spiral-wave dynamics in excitable medium with excitability modulated by rectangle wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Guo-Yong

    2011-01-01

    We numerically study the dynamics of spiral waves in the excitable system with the excitability modulated by a rectangle wave. The tip trajectories and their variations with the modulation period T are explained by the corresponding spectrum analysis. For a large T, the external modulation leads to the occurrence of more frequency peaks and these frequencies change with the modulation period according to their specific rules, respectively. Some of the frequencies and a primary frequency f 1 determine the corresponding curvature periods, which are locked into rational multiplies of the modulation period. These frequency-locking behaviours and the limited life-span of the frequencies in their variations with the modulation period constitute many resonant entrainment bands in the T axis. In the main bands, which follow the relation T/T 12 = m/n, the size variable R x of the tip trajectory is a monotonic increasing function of T. The rest of the frequencies are linear combinations of the two ones. Due to the complex dynamics, many unique tip trajectories appear at some certain T. We find also that spiral waves are eliminated when T is chosen from the end of the main resonant bands. This offers a useful method of controling the spiral wave. (general)

  16. Milankovitch Modulation of the Ecosystem Dynamics of Fossil Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, J. H.; Olsen, P. E.; Eglinton, T. I.; Cornet, B.; Huber, P.; McDonald, N. G.

    2008-12-01

    Triassic and Early Jurassic lacustrine deposits of eastern North American rift basins preserve a spectacular record of precession-related Milankovitch forcing in the Pangean tropics. The abundant and well-preserved fossil fish assemblages from these great lakes demonstrate a sequence of cyclical changes that track the permeating hierarchy of climatic cycles. To detail ecosystem processes correlating with succession of fish communities, we measured bulk δ13Corg through a 100 ky series of Early Jurassic climatic precession-forced lake level cycles in the lower Shuttle Meadow Formation of the Hartford rift basin, CT. The deep-water phase of one of these cycles, the Bluff Head bed, has produced thousands of articulated fish. We observe fluctuations in the bulk δ13Corg of the cyclical strata that reflect differing degrees of lake water stratification, nutrient levels, and relative proportion of algal vs. plant derived organic matter that trace fish community changes. We can exclude extrinsic changes in the global exchangeable reservoirs as an origin of this variability because molecule-level δ13C of n-alkanes of plant leaf waxes from the same strata show no such variability. While at higher taxonomic levels the fish communities responded largely by sorting of taxa by environmental forcing, at the species level the holostean genus Semionotus responded by in situ evolution, and ultimately extinction, of a species flock. Fluctuations at the higher frequency, climatic precessional scale are mirrored at lower frequency, eccentricity modulated, scales, all following the lake-level hierarchical pattern. Thus, lacustrine isotopic ratios amplify the Milankovitch climate signal that was already intensified by sequelae of the end-Triassic extinctions. The degree to which the ecological structure of modern lakes responds to similar environmental cyclicity is largely unknown, but we suspect similar patterns and processes within the Neogene history of the East African great lakes

  17. Implementation of a Research-Based Lab Module in a High School Chemistry Curriculum: A Study of Classroom Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarz, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    For this study, a research-based lab module was implemented in two high school chemistry classes for the purpose of examining classroom dynamics throughout the process of students completing the module. A research-based lab module developed for use in undergraduate laboratories by the Center for Authentic Science Practice in Education (CASPiE) was…

  18. Dynamic optical arbitrary waveform shaping based on cascaded optical modulators of single FBG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingyuan; Li, Peili

    2015-08-10

    A dynamic optical arbitrary waveform generation (O-AWG) with amplitude and phase independently controlled in optical modulators of single fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) has been proposed. This novel scheme consists of several optical modulators. In the optical modulator (O-MOD), a uniform FBG is used to filter spectral component of the input signal. The amplitude is controlled by fiber stretcher (FS) in Mach-Zehnder interference (MZI) structure through interference of two MZI arms. The phase is manipulated via the second FS in the optical modulator. This scheme is investigated by simulation. Consequently, optical pulse trains with different waveforms as well as pulse trains with nonuniform pulse intensity, pulse spacing and pulse width within each period are obtained through FSs adjustment to alter the phase shifts of signal in each O-MOD.

  19. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Xionggao; Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi; Zhang, Shaochong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Vitreous induces morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements in RPE cells. ► Rac1 is activated in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. ► Rac inhibition prevents morphological changes in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. ► Rac inhibition suppresses cytoskeletal rearrangements in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. ► The vitreous-induced effects are mediated by a Rac1 GTPase/LIMK1/cofilin pathway. -- Abstract: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is mainly caused by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration, invasion, proliferation and transformation into fibroblast-like cells that produce the extracellular matrix (ECM). The vitreous humor is known to play an important role in PVR. An epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) of human RPE cells induced by 25% vitreous treatment has been linked to stimulation of the mesenchymal phenotype, migration and invasion. Here, we characterized the effects of the vitreous on the cell morphology and cytoskeleton in human RPE cells. The signaling pathway that mediates these effects was investigated. Serum-starved RPE cells were incubated with 25% vitreous, and the morphological changes were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Filamentous actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, Smad2/3, LIM kinase (LIMK) 1 and cofilin was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Vitreous treatment induced cytoskeletal rearrangements, activated Rac1 and enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and Smad2/3. When the cells were treated with a Rac activation-specific inhibitor, the cytoskeletal rearrangements were prevented, and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was blocked. Vitreous treatment also enhanced the phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin and the Rac inhibitor blocked this effect. We propose that vitreous-transformed human RPE cells undergo cytoskeletal rearrangements via Rac1 GTPase-dependent pathways that modulate LIMK1 and

  20. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xionggao [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Ophthalmology, Hainan Medical College, Haikou (China); Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Shaochong, E-mail: zhshaochong@163.com [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-03-09

    -transformed human RPE cells undergo cytoskeletal rearrangements via Rac1 GTPase-dependent pathways that modulate LIMK1 and cofilin activity. The TGF{beta}-like activity of the vitreous may participate in this effect. Actin polymerization causes the cytoskeletal rearrangements that lead to the plasticity of vitreous-transformed RPE cells in PVR.

  1. Dynamic regime of coherent population trapping and optimization of frequency modulation parameters in atomic clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudin, V I; Taichenachev, A V; Basalaev, M Yu; Kovalenko, D V

    2017-02-06

    We theoretically investigate the dynamic regime of coherent population trapping (CPT) in the presence of frequency modulation (FM). We have formulated the criteria for quasi-stationary (adiabatic) and dynamic (non-adiabatic) responses of atomic system driven by this FM. Using the density matrix formalism for Λ system, the error signal is exactly calculated and optimized. It is shown that the optimal FM parameters correspond to the dynamic regime of atomic-field interaction, which significantly differs from conventional description of CPT resonances in the frame of quasi-stationary approach (under small modulation frequency). Obtained theoretical results are in good qualitative agreement with different experiments. Also we have found CPT-analogue of Pound-Driver-Hall regime of frequency stabilization.

  2. Hierarchical classification of dynamically varying radar pulse repetition interval modulation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Martikainen, Kalle; Ruotsalainen, Ulla

    2010-12-01

    The central purpose of passive signal intercept receivers is to perform automatic categorization of unknown radar signals. Currently, there is an urgent need to develop intelligent classification algorithms for these devices due to emerging complexity of radar waveforms. Especially multifunction radars (MFRs) capable of performing several simultaneous tasks by utilizing complex, dynamically varying scheduled waveforms are a major challenge for automatic pattern classification systems. To assist recognition of complex radar emissions in modern intercept receivers, we have developed a novel method to recognize dynamically varying pulse repetition interval (PRI) modulation patterns emitted by MFRs. We use robust feature extraction and classifier design techniques to assist recognition in unpredictable real-world signal environments. We classify received pulse trains hierarchically which allows unambiguous detection of the subpatterns using a sliding window. Accuracy, robustness and reliability of the technique are demonstrated with extensive simulations using both static and dynamically varying PRI modulation patterns. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Strong anticipation: Multifractal cascade dynamics modulate scaling in synchronization behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephen, Damian G.; Dixon, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → We investigated anticipatory behaviors in response to chaotic metronomes. → We assessed multifractal structure in tap intervals and onset intervals. → Strength of multifractality in tap intervals appears to match that in onset intervals. - Abstract: Previous research on anticipatory behaviors has found that the fractal scaling of human behavior may attune to the fractal scaling of an unpredictable signal [Stephen DG, Stepp N, Dixon JA, Turvey MT. Strong anticipation: Sensitivity to long-range correlations in synchronization behavior. Physica A 2008;387:5271-8]. We propose to explain this attunement as a case of multifractal cascade dynamics [Schertzer D, Lovejoy S. Generalised scale invariance in turbulent phenomena. Physico-Chem Hydrodyn J 1985;6:623-5] in which perceptual-motor fluctuations are coordinated across multiple time scales. This account will serve to sharpen the contrast between strong and weak anticipation: whereas the former entails a sensitivity to the intermittent temporal structure of an unpredictable signal, the latter simply predicts sensitivity to an aggregate description of an unpredictable signal irrespective of actual sequence. We pursue this distinction through a reanalysis of Stephen et al.'s data by examining the relationship between the widths of singularity spectra for intertap interval time series and for each corresponding interonset interval time series. We find that the attunement of fractal scaling reported by Stephen et al. was not the trivial result of sensitivity to temporal structure in aggregate but reflected a subtle sensitivity to the coordination across multiple time scales of fluctuation in the unpredictable signal.

  4. Reverse micelles as a tool for probing solvent modulation of protein dynamics: Reverse micelle encapsulated hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Camille J.; Dantsker, David; Heller, Elizabeth R.; Sabat, Joseph E.; Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-08-01

    Hydration waters impact protein dynamics. Dissecting the interplay between hydration waters and dynamics requires a protein that manifests a broad range of dynamics. Proteins in reverse micelles (RMs) have promise as tools to achieve this objective because the water content can be manipulated. Hemoglobin is an appropriate tool with which to probe hydration effects. We describe both a protocol for hemoglobin encapsulation in reverse micelles and a facile method using PEG and cosolvents to manipulate water content. Hydration properties are probed using the water-sensitive fluorescence from Hb bound pyranine and covalently attached Badan. Protein dynamics are probed through ligand recombination traces derived from photodissociated carbonmonoxy hemoglobin on a log scale that exposes the potential role of both α and β solvent fluctuations in modulating protein dynamics. The results open the possibility of probing hydration level phenomena in this system using a combination of NMR and optical probes.

  5. A Multi-Cycle Q-Modulation for Dynamic Optimization of Inductive Links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byunghun; Yeon, Pyungwoo; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new method, called multi-cycle Q-modulation, which can be used in wireless power transmission (WPT) to modulate the quality factor (Q) of the receiver (Rx) coil and dynamically optimize the load impedance to maximize the power transfer efficiency (PTE) in two-coil links. A key advantage of the proposed method is that it can be easily implemented using off-the-shelf components without requiring fast switching at or above the carrier frequency, which is more suitable for integrated circuit design. Moreover, the proposed technique does not need any sophisticated synchronization between the power carrier and Q-modulation switching pulses. The multi-cycle Q-modulation is analyzed theoretically by a lumped circuit model, and verified in simulation and measurement using an off-the-shelf prototype. Automatic resonance tuning (ART) in the Rx, combined with multi-cycle Q-modulation helped maximizing PTE of the inductive link dynamically in the presence of environmental and loading variations, which can otherwise significantly degrade the PTE in multi-coil settings. In the prototype conventional 2-coil link, the proposed method increased the power amplifier (PA) plus inductive link efficiency from 4.8% to 16.5% at ( R L = 1 kΩ, d 23 = 3 cm), and from 23% to 28.2% at ( R L = 100 Ω, d 23 = 3 cm) after 11% change in the resonance capacitance, while delivering 168.1 mW to the load (PDL).

  6. Modulator Dynamics Shape the Design Space for Stepwise-Elution Simulated Moving Bed Chromatographic Separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Chris J; Velayudhan, Ajoy

    2018-03-31

    For proteins and other biological macromolecules, SMB chromatography is best operated non-isocratically. However, traditional modes of non-isocratic SMB operation generate significant mobile-phase modulator dynamics. The mechanisms by which these modulator dynamics affect a separation's success, and thus frame the design space, have yet to be explained quantitatively. Here, the dynamics of the modulator (e.g., salts in ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography) are explicitly accounted for. This leads to the elucidation of two new design constraints, presented as dimensionless numbers, which quantify the effects of the modulator phenomena and thus predict the success of a non-isocratic SMB separation. Consequently, these two new design constraints re-define the SMB design space. Computational and experimental studies at the boundaries of this design space corroborate the theoretical predictions. The design of efficient and robust operating conditions through use of the new design space is also demonstrated. © 2018 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Strong adhesion by regulatory T cells induces dendritic cell cytoskeletal polarization and contact-dependent lethargy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiahuan; Ganguly, Anutosh; Mucsi, Ashley D; Meng, Junchen; Yan, Jiacong; Detampel, Pascal; Munro, Fay; Zhang, Zongde; Wu, Mei; Hari, Aswin; Stenner, Melanie D; Zheng, Wencheng; Kubes, Paul; Xia, Tie; Amrein, Matthias W; Qi, Hai; Shi, Yan

    2017-02-01

    Dendritic cells are targeted by regulatory T (T reg) cells, in a manner that operates as an indirect mode of T cell suppression. In this study, using a combination of single-cell force spectroscopy and structured illumination microscopy, we analyze individual T reg cell-DC interaction events and show that T reg cells exhibit strong intrinsic adhesiveness to DCs. This increased DC adhesion reduces the ability of contacted DCs to engage other antigen-specific cells. We show that this unusually strong LFA-1-dependent adhesiveness of T reg cells is caused in part by their low calpain activities, which normally release integrin-cytoskeleton linkage, and thereby reduce adhesion. Super resolution imaging reveals that such T reg cell adhesion causes sequestration of Fascin-1, an actin-bundling protein essential for immunological synapse formation, and skews Fascin-1-dependent actin polarization in DCs toward the T reg cell adhesion zone. Although it is reversible upon T reg cell disengagement, this sequestration of essential cytoskeletal components causes a lethargic state of DCs, leading to reduced T cell priming. Our results reveal a dynamic cytoskeletal component underlying T reg cell-mediated DC suppression in a contact-dependent manner. © 2017 Chen et al.

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization using frequency modulation at 3.34 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovav, Y; Feintuch, A; Vega, S; Goldfarb, D

    2014-01-01

    During dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments polarization is transferred from unpaired electrons to their neighboring nuclear spins, resulting in dramatic enhancement of the NMR signals. While in most cases this is achieved by continuous wave (cw) irradiation applied to samples in fixed external magnetic fields, here we show that DNP enhancement of static samples can improve by modulating the microwave (MW) frequency at a constant field of 3.34 T. The efficiency of triangular shaped modulation is explored by monitoring the (1)H signal enhancement in frozen solutions containing different TEMPOL radical concentrations at different temperatures. The optimal modulation parameters are examined experimentally and under the most favorable conditions a threefold enhancement is obtained with respect to constant frequency DNP in samples with low radical concentrations. The results are interpreted using numerical simulations on small spin systems. In particular, it is shown experimentally and explained theoretically that: (i) The optimal modulation frequency is higher than the electron spin-lattice relaxation rate. (ii) The optimal modulation amplitude must be smaller than the nuclear Larmor frequency and the EPR line-width, as expected. (iii) The MW frequencies corresponding to the enhancement maxima and minima are shifted away from one another when using frequency modulation, relative to the constant frequency experiments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Predicting the effects of organ motion on the dose delivered by dynamic intensity modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, C.X.; Jaffray, David; Martinez, A.A.; Wong, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Computer-optimized treatment plans, aimed to enhance tumor control and reduce normal tissue complication, generally require non-uniform beam intensities. One of the techniques for delivering intensity-modulated beams is the use of dynamic multileaf collimation, where the beam aperture and field shape change during irradiation. When intensity-modulated beams are delivered with dynamic collimation, intra-treatment organ motion may not only cause geometric misses at the field boundaries but also create hot and cold spots in the target. The mechanism for producing such effects has not been well understood. This study analyzes the dosimetric effects of intra-treatment organ motion on dynamic intensity modulation. A numerical method is developed for predicting the intensity distributions in a moving target before dose is delivered with dynamic intensity modulation. Material and Methods: In the numerical algorithm, the change in position and shape of the beam aperture with time were modeled as a three-dimensional 'tunnel', with the shape of the field aperture described in the x-y plane and its temporal position shown in the z-dimension. A point in the target had to be in the tunnel in order to receive irradiation and the dose to the point was proportional to the amount of time that this point stayed in the tunnel. Since each point in the target were analyzed separately, non-rigid body variations could easily be handled. The dependency of the dose variations on all parameters involved, including the speed of collimator motion, the frequency and amplitude of the target motion, and the size of the field segments, was analyzed. The algorithm was verified by irradiating moving phantoms with beams of dynamically modulated intensities. Predictions were also made for a treatment of a thoracic tumor using a dynamic wedge. The changes of target position with time were based on the MRI images of the chest region acquired using fast MRI scans in a cine fashion for a duration

  10. Using nonlinearity and spatiotemporal property modulation to control effective structural properties: dynamic rods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel; Blekhman, Iliya I.

    2007-01-01

    What are the effective properties of a generally nonlinear material or structure, whose local properties are modulated in both space and time? It has been suggested to use spatiotemporal modulation of structural properties to create materials and structures with adjustable effective properties......, and to call these dynamic materials or spatiotemporal composites. Also, according to theoretical predictions, structural nonlinearity enhances the possibilities of achieving specific effective properties. For example, with an elastic rod having cubical elastic nonlinearities, it seems possible to control......, and exemplified. Then simple approximate analytical expressions are derived for the effective wave speed and natural frequencies for one-dimensional wave propagation in a nonlinear elastic rod, where the spatiotemporal modulation is imposed as a high-frequency standing wave, supposed to be given. Finally the more...

  11. Shifts of Gamma Phase across Primary Visual Cortical Sites Reflect Dynamic Stimulus-Modulated Information Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserve, Michel; Lowe, Scott C; Logothetis, Nikos K; Schölkopf, Bernhard; Panzeri, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Distributed neural processing likely entails the capability of networks to reconfigure dynamically the directionality and strength of their functional connections. Yet, the neural mechanisms that may allow such dynamic routing of the information flow are not yet fully understood. We investigated the role of gamma band (50-80 Hz) oscillations in transient modulations of communication among neural populations by using measures of direction-specific causal information transfer. We found that the local phase of gamma-band rhythmic activity exerted a stimulus-modulated and spatially-asymmetric directed effect on the firing rate of spatially separated populations within the primary visual cortex. The relationships between gamma phases at different sites (phase shifts) could be described as a stimulus-modulated gamma-band wave propagating along the spatial directions with the largest information transfer. We observed transient stimulus-related changes in the spatial configuration of phases (compatible with changes in direction of gamma wave propagation) accompanied by a relative increase of the amount of information flowing along the instantaneous direction of the gamma wave. These effects were specific to the gamma-band and suggest that the time-varying relationships between gamma phases at different locations mark, and possibly causally mediate, the dynamic reconfiguration of functional connections.

  12. Cardiac Exposure in the Dynamic Conformal Arc Therapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy of Lung Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Ming

    Full Text Available To retrospectively evaluate the cardiac exposure in three cohorts of lung cancer patients treated with dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT, or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT at our institution in the past seven years.A total of 140 lung cancer patients were included in this institutional review board approved study: 25 treated with DCAT, 70 with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All plans were generated in a same commercial treatment planning system and have been clinically accepted and delivered. The dose distribution to the heart and the effects of tumor laterality, the irradiated heart volume and the beam-to-heart distance on the cardiac exposure were investigated.The mean dose to the heart among all 140 plans was 4.5 Gy. Specifically, the heart received on average 2.3, 5.2 and 4.6 Gy in the DCAT, IMRT and VMAT plans, respectively. The mean heart doses for the left and right lung tumors were 4.1 and 4.8 Gy, respectively. No patients died with evidence of cardiac disease. Three patients (2% with preexisting cardiac condition developed cardiac disease after treatment. Furthermore, the cardiac exposure was found to increase linearly with the irradiated heart volume while decreasing exponentially with the beam-to-heart distance.Compared to old technologies for lung cancer treatment, modern radiotherapy treatment modalities demonstrated better heart sparing. But the heart dose in lung cancer radiotherapy is still higher than that in the radiotherapy of breast cancer and Hodgkin's disease where cardiac complications have been extensively studied. With strong correlations of mean heart dose with beam-to-heart distance and irradiated heart volume, cautions should be exercised to avoid long-term cardiac toxicity in the lung cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy.

  13. Relaxation dynamics of glass transition in PMMA + SWCNT composites by temperature-modulated DSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, N. R.; Iannacchione, G. S.

    2010-03-01

    The experimental technique offered by temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimeter (TMDSC) used to investigate the thermal relaxation dynamics through the glass transition as a function of frequency was studied for pure PMMA and PMMA-single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) composites. A strong dependence of the temperature dependence peak in the imaginary part of complex heat capacity (Tmax) is found during the transition from the glass-like to the liquid-like region. The frequency dependence of Tmax of the imaginary part of heat capacity (Cp) is described by Arrhenius law. The activation energy obtained from the fitting shows increases while the characteristic relaxation time decreases with increasing mass fraction (phim) of SWCNTs. The dynamics of the composites during glass transition, at slow and high scan rates, are also the main focus of this experimental study. The change in enthalpy during heating and cooling is also reported as a function of scan rate and frequency of temperature modulation. The glass transition temperature (Tg) shows increases with increasing frequency of temperature modulation and phim of SWCNTs inside the polymer host. Experimental results show that Tg is higher at higher scan rates but as the frequency of temperature modulation increases, the Tg values of different scan rates coincide with each other and alter the scan rate dependence. From the imaginary part of heat capacity, it is obvious that Tmax is not the actual glass transition temperature of pure polymer but Tmax and Tg values can be superimposed when phim increases in the polymer host or when the sample undergoes a transition with a certain frequency of temperature modulation.

  14. Development of an empirical dynamic model for a Nexa PEM fuel cell power module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soltani, Mehdi; Mohammad Taghi Bathaee, S. [Power Systems Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering, K.N. Toosi University of Technology, 16317-14191 Tehran (Iran)

    2010-12-15

    The goal of this study is to develop a fuel cell model which is capable of characterizing fuel cell steady-state performance as well as dynamic behavior. In this paper a new dynamic model of a 1.2 kW Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is developed and validated through a series of experiments. The experimental results have been obtained from a Nexa trademark PEM fuel cell power module under different load conditions. Based on this model, a simulator software package has been developed using the MATLAB {sup registered} and Simulink {sup registered} software and simulation results have been carried out. The proposed model exhibits good agreement with experiment results in steady-state and dynamic performance. (author)

  15. Unique expression of cytoskeletal proteins in human soft palate muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Farhan; Berggren, Diana; Holmlund, Thorbjörn; Levring Jäghagen, Eva; Stål, Per

    2016-03-01

    The human oropharyngeal muscles have a unique anatomy with diverse and intricate functions. To investigate if this specialization is also reflected in the cytoarchitecture of muscle fibers, intermediate filament proteins and the dystrophin-associated protein complex have been analyzed in two human palate muscles, musculus uvula (UV) and musculus palatopharyngeus (PP), with immunohistochenmical and morphological techniques. Human limb muscles were used as reference. The findings show that the soft palate muscle fibers have a cytoskeletal architecture that differs from the limb muscles. While all limb muscles showed immunoreaction for a panel of antibodies directed against different domains of cytoskeletal proteins desmin and dystrophin, a subpopulation of palate muscle fibers lacked or had a faint immunoreaction for desmin (UV 11.7% and PP 9.8%) and the C-terminal of the dystrophin molecule (UV 4.2% and PP 6.4%). The vast majority of these fibers expressed slow contractile protein myosin heavy chain I. Furthermore, an unusual staining pattern was also observed in these fibers for β-dystroglycan, caveolin-3 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase nNOS, which are all membrane-linking proteins associated with the dystrophin C-terminus. While the immunoreaction for nNOS was generally weak or absent, β-dystroglycan and caveolin-3 showed a stronger immunostaining. The absence or a low expression of cytoskeletal proteins otherwise considered ubiquitous and important for integration and contraction of muscle cells indicate a unique cytoarchitecture designed to meet the intricate demands of the upper airway muscles. It can be concluded that a subgroup of muscle fibers in the human soft palate appears to have special biomechanical properties, and their unique cytoarchitecture must be taken into account while assessing function and pathology in oropharyngeal muscles. © 2015 Anatomical Society.

  16. Enhanced Microgrid Dynamic Performance Using a Modulated Power Filter Based on Enhanced Bacterial Foraging Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Othman

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a design of microgrid (MG with enhanced dynamic performance. Distributed energy resources (DER are widely used in MGs to match the various load types and profiles. DERs include solar PV cells, wind energy sources, fuel cells, batteries, micro gas-engines and storage elements. MG will include AC/DC circuits, developed power electronics devices, inverters and power electronic controllers. A novel modulated power filters (MPF device will be applied in MG design. Enhanced bacterial foraging optimization (EBFO will be proposed to optimize and set the MPF parameters to enhance and tune the MG dynamic response. Recent dynamic control is applied to minimize the harmonic reference content. EBFO will adapt the gains of MPF dynamic control. The present research achieves an enhancement of MG dynamic performance, in addition to ensuring improvements in the power factor, bus voltage profile and power quality. MG operation will be evaluated by the dynamic response to be fine-tuned by MPF based on EBFO. Digital simulations have validated the results to show the effectiveness and efficient improvement by the proposed strategy.

  17. Cholera toxin can catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaslow, H.R.; Groppi, V.E.; Abood, M.E.; Bourne, H.R.

    1981-01-01

    Cholera toxin catalyzes transfer of radiolabel from [ 32 P]NAD + to several peptides in particulate preparations of human foreskin fibroblasts. Resolution of these peptides by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis allowed identification of two peptides of M/sub r/ = 42,000 and 52,000 as peptide subunits of a regulatory component of adenylate cyclase. The radiolabeling of another group of peptides (M/sub r/ = 50,000 to 65,000) suggested that cholera toxin could catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins. This suggestion was confirmed by showing that incubation with cholera toxin and [ 32 P]NAD + caused radiolabeling of purified microtubule and intermediate filament proteins

  18. Thermal Equilibrium Dynamic Control Based on DPWM Dual-Mode Modulation of High Power NPC Three-Level Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Zhou Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In some special applications of NPC three-level inverters, such as mine hoist, there exist special conditions of overloading during the whole hoisting process and large overload in starting stage, during which the power-loss calculation of power devices and thermal control are important factors affecting the thermal stability of inverters. The principles of SVPWM and DPWM were described in this paper firstly, based on which the dynamic power losses of the two modulations of hoist in single period were calculated. Secondly, a thermal equilibrium dynamic control based on DPMW dual-mode modulation was proposed, which can switch the modulation dynamically according to the change of dynamic power loss to realize dynamic control of power loss and thermal equilibrium of inverter. Finally, simulation and experiment prove the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  19. Dynamic modulation of epileptic high frequency oscillations by the phase of slower cortical rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, George M; Wong, Simeon M; Anderson, Ryan A; Singh-Cadieux, Gabrielle; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Ochi, Ayako; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Okanishi, Tohru; Valiante, Taufik A; Donner, Elizabeth; Rutka, James T; Snead, O Carter; Doesburg, Sam M

    2014-01-01

    Pathological high frequency oscillations (pHFOs) have been proposed to be robust markers of epileptic cortex. Oscillatory activity below this frequency range has been shown to be modulated by phase of lower frequency oscillations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that dynamic cross-frequency interactions involving pHFOs are concentrated within the epileptogenic cortex. Intracranial electroencephalographic recordings from 17 children with medically-intractable epilepsy secondary to focal cortical dysplasia were obtained. A time-resolved analysis was performed to determine topographic concentrations and dynamic changes in cross-frequency amplitude-to-phase coupling (CFC). CFC between pHFOs and the phase of theta and alpha rhythms was found to be significantly elevated in the seizure-onset zone compared to non-epileptic regions (pfrequency oscillations at which pHFO amplitudes were maximal was inconsistent at seizure initiation, yet consistently at the trough of the low frequency rhythm at seizure termination. Amplitudes of pHFOs were most significantly modulated by the phase of alpha-band oscillations (p<0.01). These results suggest that increased CFC between pHFO amplitude and alpha phase may constitute a marker of epileptogenic brain areas and may be relevant for understanding seizure dynamics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamic nuclear polarization by frequency modulation of a tunable gyrotron of 260GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Dongyoung; Soundararajan, Murari; Cuanillon, Philippe; Braunmueller, Falk; Alberti, Stefano; Ansermet, Jean-Philippe

    2016-01-01

    An increase in Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) signal intensity is obtained with a tunable gyrotron producing frequency modulation around 260GHz at power levels less than 1W. The sweep rate of frequency modulation can reach 14kHz, and its amplitude is fixed at 50MHz. In water/glycerol glassy ice doped with 40mM TEMPOL, the relative increase in the DNP enhancement was obtained as a function of frequency-sweep rate for several temperatures. A 68 % increase was obtained at 15K, thus giving a DNP enhancement of about 80. By employing λ/4 and λ/8 polarizer mirrors, we transformed the polarization of the microwave beam from linear to circular, and achieved an increase in the enhancement by a factor of about 66% for a given power. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of cytoskeletal and junctional proteins expressed by cells cultured from human arachnoid granulation tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Bhavya C

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arachnoid granulations (AGs are projections of the arachnoid membrane into the dural venous sinuses. They function, along with the extracranial lymphatics, to circulate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF to the systemic venous circulation. Disruption of normal CSF dynamics may result in increased intracranial pressures causing many problems including headaches and visual loss, as in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and hydrocephalus. To study the role of AGs in CSF egress, we have grown cells from human AG tissue in vitro and have characterized their expression of those cytoskeletal and junctional proteins that may function in the regulation of CSF outflow. Methods Human AG tissue was obtained at autopsy, and explanted to cell culture dishes coated with fibronectin. Typically, cells migrated from the explanted tissue after 7–10 days in vitro. Second or third passage cells were seeded onto fibronectin-coated coverslips at confluent densities and grown to confluency for 7–10 days. Arachnoidal cells were tested using immunocytochemical methods for the expression of several common cytoskeletal and junctional proteins. Second and third passage cultures were also labeled with the common endothelial markers CD-31 or VE-cadherin (CD144 and their expression was quantified using flow cytometry analysis. Results Confluent cultures of arachnoidal cells expressed the intermediate filament protein vimentin. Cytokeratin intermediate filaments were expressed variably in a subpopulation of cells. The cultures also expressed the junctional proteins connexin43, desmoplakin 1 and 2, E-cadherin, and zonula occludens-1. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that second and third passage cultures failed to express the endothelial cell markers CD31 or VE-cadherin in significant quantities, thereby showing that these cultures did not consist of endothelial cells from the venous sinus wall. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of

  2. Visualization of cytoskeletal elements by the atomic force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berdyyeva, T.; Woodworth, C.D.; Sokolov, I.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a novel application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) to directly visualize cytoskeletal fibers in human foreskin epithelial cells. The nonionic detergent Triton X-100 in a low concentration was used to remove the membrane, soluble proteins, and organelles from the cell. The remaining cytoskeleton can then be directly visualized in either liquid or air-dried ambient conditions. These two types of scanning provide complimentary information. Scanning in liquid visualizes the surface filaments of the cytoskeleton, whereas scanning in air shows both the surface filaments and the total 'volume' of the cytoskeletal fibers. The smallest fibers observed were ca. 50 nm in diameter. The lateral resolution of this technique was ca.20 nm, which can be increased to a single nanometer level by choosing sharper AFM tips. Because the AFM is a true 3D technique, we are able to quantify the observed cytoskeleton by its density and volume. The types of fibers can be identified by their size, similar to electron microscopy

  3. Modal resonant dynamics of cables with a flexible support: A modulated diffraction problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tieding; Kang, Houjun; Wang, Lianhua; Liu, Qijian; Zhao, Yueyu

    2018-06-01

    Modal resonant dynamics of cables with a flexible support is defined as a modulated (wave) diffraction problem, and investigated by asymptotic expansions of the cable-support coupled system. The support-cable mass ratio, which is usually very large, turns out to be the key parameter for characterizing cable-support dynamic interactions. By treating the mass ratio's inverse as a small perturbation parameter and scaling the cable tension properly, both cable's modal resonant dynamics and the flexible support dynamics are asymptotically reduced by using multiple scale expansions, leading finally to a reduced cable-support coupled model (i.e., on a slow time scale). After numerical validations of the reduced coupled model, cable-support coupled responses and the flexible support induced coupling effects on the cable, are both fully investigated, based upon the reduced model. More explicitly, the dynamic effects on the cable's nonlinear frequency and force responses, caused by the support-cable mass ratio, the resonant detuning parameter and the support damping, are carefully evaluated.

  4. Level-one modules library for DSNP: Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power-plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saphier, D.

    1978-09-01

    The Dynamic Simulator for Nuclear Power-plants (DSNP) is a system of programs and data sets by which a nuclear power plant or part thereof can be simulated at different levels of sophistication. The acronym DSNP is used interchangeably for the DSNP language, for the DSNP precompiler, for the DSNP libraries, and for the DSNP document generator. The DSNP language is a set of simple block oriented statements, which together with the appropriate data, comprise a simulation of a nuclear power plant. The majority of the DSNP statements will result in the inclusion of a simulated physical module into the program. FORTRAN statements can be inserted with no restrictions among DSNP statements

  5. Expression analysis of cellulose synthase and main cytoskeletal protein genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinousky, Dmitry; Padvitski, Tsimafei; Bayer, Galina; Pirko, Yaroslav; Pydiura, Nikolay; Anisimova, Natallia; Nikitinskaya, Tatyana; Khotyleva, Liubov; Yemets, Alla; Kilchevsky, Aleksandr; Blume, Yaroslav

    2017-08-09

    Fiber flax is an important source of natural fiber and a comprehensive model for the plant fiber biogenesis studies. Cellulose-synthase (CesA) and cytoskeletal genes are known to be important for the cell wall biogenesis in general and for the biogenesis of flax fibers in particular. Currently, knowledge about activity of these genes during the plant growth is limited. In this study, we have investigated flax fiber biogenesis by measuring expression of CesA and cytoskeletal genes at two stages of the flax development (seedlings and stems at the rapid growth stage) in several flax subspecies (elongatum, mediterraneum, crepitans). RT-qPCR has been used to quantify the expression of LusСesA1, LusСesA4, LusСesA7, LusСesA6, Actin, and α-Tubulin genes in plant samples. We report that CesA genes responsible for the secondary cell wall synthesis (LusCesA4, LusCesA7) have different expression pattern compared with CesA genes responsible for the primary cell wall synthesis (LusCesA1, LusCesA6): an average expression of LusCesA4 and LusCesA7 genes is relatively high in seedlings and further increases in stems at the rapid growth stage, whereas an average expression of LusCesA1 and LusCesA6 genes decreases. Interestingly, LusCesA1 is the only studied gene with different expression dynamics between the flax subspecies: its expression decreases by 5.2-10.7 folds in elongatum and mediterraneum but does not change in crepitans subspecies when the rapid growth stage and seedlings are compared. The expression of cytoskeleton genes (coding actin and α-tubulin) is relatively stable and significantly higher than the expression of cellulose-synthase genes in all the studied samples. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  6. Hierarchical Distribution of the Tau Cytoskeletal Pathology in the Thalamus of Alzheimer's Disease Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueb, Udo; Stratmann, Katharina; Heinsen, Helmut; Del Turco, Domenico; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Seidel, Kay; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2015-01-01

    In spite of considerable progress in neuropathological research on Alzheimer's disease (AD), knowledge regarding the exact pathoanatomical distribution of the tau cytoskeletal pathology in the thalamus of AD patients in the advanced Braak and Braak AD stages V or VI of the cortical cytoskeletal

  7. Dynamics of the spectrum of a self-modulated powerful laser pulse in an underdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreev, N.E.; Kirsanov, V.I.; Sakharov, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    The evolution of the spectrum of a powerful laser pulse during its self-modulation in an underdense plasma is studied analytically and numerically. It is shown that, in the early stages of the self-modulation instability, the linear theory gives a qualitatively correct description of the dynamics of the pulse spectrum in most cases. Depending on the parameters of the laser pulse and of the plasma, this spectrum contains either Stocks satellites (downshifted from the fundamental frequency to a value equal to the plasma frequency), or both Stocks and anti-Stocks satellites of the fundamental frequency. When the three-dimensional mechanism for the instability is dominant and the pulse power is close to the critical power for relativistic self-focusing, the numerical calculations show that the intensity of the blue satellite exceeds the intensity of the red one. This specific feature of the spectrum, which does not arise when the instability is one-dimensional, cannot be explained in terms of the linear para-axial theory, and can be used to identify the three-dimensional mechanism for the instability in experiments on the self-modulation of powerful laser pulses. It is shown that the transition to the nonlinear stage of the instability is accompanied by the occurrence of cascades (at frequencies separated from the laser carrier frequency by intervals equal to an integer number of plasma frequencies) in the spectrum of the laser pulse

  8. Relaxation Dynamics of the Glass Transition in PMMA+SWCNT Composites by Temperature-Modulated DSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Nihar; Iannacchione, Germano

    2010-03-01

    Temperature Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimeter (TMDSC) used to investigate the thermal relaxation dynamics of PMMA-Single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through the glass transition as a function of frequency. A strong dependence of the temperature dependence peak in imaginary part of complex heat capacity (Tmax) was found during the transition from glass like to liquid like region and can be described by Arhenius law. The activation energy shows increases while the charactersistic time decreases with increasing mass fraction (φm) of SWCNTs. Decreasing of enthalpy, while heating and slowly increasing while cooling at 2.0 K/min scan rate was observed and as frequency of temperature modulation increases. There is no relative change of enthalpy in heating and cooling observed at sufficiently slow scan rate. The glass transition temperature (Tg) shows increases as a function of frequency of temperature modulation, φm of SWCNTs and with increasing scan rate. From imaginary part of heat capacity, it obvious that Tmax is not the actual glass transition temperature of pure polymer but Tmax and Tg values can be superimpose when φm of SWCNT increases in polymer.

  9. Dead zone analysis of ECAL barrel modules under static and dynamic load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre-Emile, T.; Anduze, M.

    2018-03-01

    In the context of ILD project, impact studies of environmental loads on the Electromagnetic CALorimeter (ECAL) have been initiated. The ECAL part considered is the barrel and it consists of several independent modules which are mounted on the Hadronic CALorimeter barrel (HCAL) itself mounted on the cryostat coil and the yoke. The estimate of the gap required between each ECAL modules is fundamental to define the assembly step and avoid mechanical contacts over the barrel lifetime. In the meantime, it has to be done in consideration to the dead spaces reduction and detector hermiticity optimization. Several Finite Element Analysis (FEA) with static and dynamic loads have been performed in order to define correctly the minimum values for those gaps. Due to the implantation site of the whole project in Japan, seismic analysis were carried out in addition to the static ones. This article shows results of these analysis done with the Finite Element Method (FEM) in ANSYS. First results show the impact of HCAL design on the ECAL modules motion in static load. The second study dedicated to seismic approach on a larger model (including yoke and cryostat) gives additional results on earthquake consequences.

  10. Exploring protein structure and dynamics through a project-oriented biochemistry laboratory module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipchock, James M; Ginther, Patrick S; Douglas, Bonnie B; Bird, Kelly E; Patrick Loria, J

    2017-09-01

    Here, we present a 10-week project-oriented laboratory module designed to provide a course-based undergraduate research experience in biochemistry that emphasizes the importance of biomolecular structure and dynamics in enzyme function. This module explores the impact of mutagenesis on an important active site loop for a biomedically-relevant human enzyme, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B). Over the course of the semester students guide their own mutant of PTP1B from conception to characterization in a cost-effective manner and gain exposure to fundamental techniques in biochemistry, including site-directed DNA mutagenesis, bacterial recombinant protein expression, affinity column purification, protein quantitation, SDS-PAGE, and enzyme kinetics. This project-based approach allows an instructor to simulate a research setting and prepare students for productive research beyond the classroom. Potential modifications to expand or contract this module are also provided. © 2017 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(5):403-410, 2017. © 2017 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  11. Proteomic and Microscopic Strategies towards the Analysis of the Cytoskeletal Networks in Major Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joëlle V. F. Coumans

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mental health disorders have become worldwide health priorities. It is estimated that in the next 20 years they will account for a 16 trillion United State dollars (US$ loss. Up to now, the underlying pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders remains elusive. Altered cytoskeleton proteins expression that may influence the assembly, organization and maintenance of cytoskeletal integrity has been reported in major depressive disorders, schizophrenia and to some extent bipolar disorders. The use of quantitative proteomics, dynamic microscopy and super-resolution microscopy to investigate disease-specific protein signatures holds great promise to improve our understanding of these disorders. In this review, we present the currently available quantitative proteomic approaches use in neurology, gel-based, stable isotope-labelling and label-free methodologies and evaluate their strengths and limitations. We also reported on enrichment/subfractionation methods that target the cytoskeleton associated proteins and discuss the need of alternative methods for further characterization of the neurocytoskeletal proteome. Finally, we present live cell imaging approaches and emerging dynamic microscopy technology that will provide the tools necessary to investigate protein interactions and their dynamics in the whole cells. While these areas of research are still in their infancy, they offer huge potential towards the understanding of the neuronal network stability and its modification across neuropsychiatric disorders.

  12. THE EFFECT OF A DYNAMIC INNER HELIOSHEATH THICKNESS ON COSMIC-RAY MODULATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manuel, R.; Ferreira, S. E. S.; Potgieter, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    The time-dependent modulation of galactic cosmic rays in the heliosphere is studied over different polarity cycles by computing 2.5 GV proton intensities using a two-dimensional, time-dependent modulation model. By incorporating recent theoretical advances in the relevant transport parameters in the model, we showed in previous work that this approach gave realistic computed intensities over a solar cycle. New in this work is that a time dependence of the solar wind termination shock (TS) position is implemented in our model to study the effect of a dynamic inner heliosheath thickness (the region between the TS and heliopause) on the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays. The study reveals that changes in the inner heliosheath thickness, arising from a time-dependent shock position, does affect cosmic-ray intensities everywhere in the heliosphere over a solar cycle, with the smallest effect in the innermost heliosphere. A time-dependent TS position causes a phase difference between the solar activity periods and the corresponding intensity periods. The maximum intensities in response to a solar minimum activity period are found to be dependent on the time-dependent TS profile. It is found that changing the width of the inner heliosheath with time over a solar cycle can shift the time of when the maximum or minimum cosmic-ray intensities occur at various distances throughout the heliosphere, but more significantly in the outer heliosphere. The time-dependent extent of the inner heliosheath, as affected by solar activity conditions, is thus an additional time-dependent factor to be considered in the long-term modulation of cosmic rays

  13. Dynamic and Progressive Control of DNA Origami Conformation by Modulating DNA Helicity with Chemical Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haorong; Zhang, Hanyu; Pan, Jing; Cha, Tae-Gon; Li, Shiming; Andréasson, Joakim; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2016-05-24

    DNA origami has received enormous attention for its ability to program complex nanostructures with a few nanometer precision. Dynamic origami structures that change conformation in response to environmental cues or external signals hold great promises in sensing and actuation at the nanoscale. The reconfiguration mechanism of existing dynamic origami structures is mostly limited to single-stranded hinges and relies almost exclusively on DNA hybridization or strand displacement. Here, we show an alternative approach by demonstrating on-demand conformation changes with DNA-binding molecules, which intercalate between base pairs and unwind DNA double helices. The unwinding effect modulates the helicity mismatch in DNA origami, which significantly influences the internal stress and the global conformation of the origami structure. We demonstrate the switching of a polymerized origami nanoribbon between different twisting states and a well-constrained torsional deformation in a monomeric origami shaft. The structural transformation is shown to be reversible, and binding isotherms confirm the reconfiguration mechanism. This approach provides a rapid and reversible means to change DNA origami conformation, which can be used for dynamic and progressive control at the nanoscale.

  14. Dynamic modulation of thymidylate synthase gene expression and fluorouracil sensitivity in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Wakasa

    Full Text Available Biomarkers have revolutionized cancer chemotherapy. However, many biomarker candidates are still in debate. In addition to clinical studies, a priori experimental approaches are needed. Thymidylate synthase (TS expression is a long-standing candidate as a biomarker for 5-fluorouracil (5-FU treatment of cancer patients. Using the Tet-OFF system and a human colorectal cancer cell line, DLD-1, we first constructed an in vitro system in which TS expression is dynamically controllable. Quantitative assays have elucidated that TS expression in the transformant was widely modulated, and that the dynamic range covered 15-fold of the basal level. 5-FU sensitivity of the transformant cells significantly increased in response to downregulated TS expression, although being not examined in the full dynamic range because of the doxycycline toxicity. Intriguingly, our in vitro data suggest that there is a linear relationship between TS expression and the 5-FU sensitivity in cells. Data obtained in a mouse model using transformant xenografts were highly parallel to those obtained in vitro. Thus, our in vitro and in vivo observations suggest that TS expression is a determinant of 5-FU sensitivity in cells, at least in this specific genetic background, and, therefore, support the possibility of TS expression as a biomarker for 5-FU-based cancer chemotherapy.

  15. Selective ablation of the androgen receptor in mouse sertoli cells affects sertoli cell maturation, barrier formation and cytoskeletal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariane Willems

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The observation that mice with a selective ablation of the androgen receptor (AR in Sertoli cells (SC (SCARKO mice display a complete block in meiosis supports the contention that SC play a pivotal role in the control of germ cell development by androgens. To delineate the physiological and molecular mechanism responsible for this control, we compared tubular development in pubertal SCARKO mice and littermate controls. Particular attention was paid to differences in SC maturation, SC barrier formation and cytoskeletal organization and to the molecular mediators potentially involved. Functional analysis of SC barrier development by hypertonic perfusion and lanthanum permeation techniques and immunohistochemical analysis of junction formation showed that SCARKO mice still attempt to produce a barrier separating basal and adluminal compartment but that barrier formation is delayed and defective. Defective barrier formation was accompanied by disturbances in SC nuclear maturation (immature shape, absence of prominent, tripartite nucleoli and SC polarization (aberrant positioning of SC nuclei and cytoskeletal elements such as vimentin. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to study the transcript levels of genes potentially related to the described phenomena between day 8 and 35. Differences in the expression of SC genes known to play a role in junction formation could be shown from day 8 for Cldn11, from day 15 for Cldn3 and Espn, from day 20 for Cdh2 and Jam3 and from day 35 for ZO-1. Marked differences were also noted in the transcript levels of several genes that are also related to cell adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics but that have not yet been studied in SC (Actn3, Ank3, Anxa9, Scin, Emb, Mpzl2. It is concluded that absence of a functional AR in SC impedes the remodeling of testicular tubules expected at the onset of spermatogenesis and interferes with the creation of the specific environment needed for germ cell development.

  16. Chaotic Dynamics of a Josephson Junction with a Ratchet Potential and Current-Modulating Damping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Li, Wenwu; Xu, Lan

    2018-04-01

    The chaotic dynamics of a Josephson junction with a ratchet potential and current-modulating damping are studied. Under the first-order approximation, we construct the general solution of the first-order equation whose boundedness condition contains the famous Melnikov chaotic criterion. Based on the general solution, the incomputability and unpredictability of the system's chaotic behavior are discussed. For the case beyond perturbation conditions, the evolution of stroboscopic Poincaré sections shows that the system undergoes a quasi-periodic transition to chaos with an increasing intensity of the rf-current. Through a suitable feedback controlling strategy, the chaos can be effectively suppressed and the intensity of the controller can vary in a large range. It is also found that the current between the two separated superconductors increases monotonously in some specific parameter spaces.

  17. Role of internal demagnetizing field for the dynamics of a surface-modulated magnonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, M.; Röder, F.; Gallardo, R. A.; Schneider, T.; Stienen, S.; Gatel, C.; Hübner, R.; Bischoff, L.; Lenz, K.; Lindner, J.; Landeros, P.; Fassbender, J.

    2017-05-01

    This work aims to demonstrate and understand the key role of local demagnetizing fields in hybrid structures consisting of a continuous thin film with a stripe modulation on top. To understand the complex spin dynamics of these structures, the magnonic crystal was reconstructed in two different ways—performing micromagnetic simulations based on the structural shape as well as based on the internal demagnetizing field, which both are mapped on the nanoscale using electron holography. The simulations yield the frequency-field dependence as well as the angular dependence revealing the governing role of the internal field landscape around the backward-volume geometry. Simple rules for the propagation vector and the mode localization are formulated in order to explain the calculated mode profiles. Treating internal demagnetizing fields equivalent to anisotropies, the complex angle-dependent spin-wave behavior is described for an in-plane rotation of the external field.

  18. Quasi-periodic dynamics in system with multilevel pulse modulated control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gol'tsov, Yu A.; Kizhuk, A. S.; Rubanov, V. G.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the authors describe the transitions from the regular periodic mode to quasiperiodicity that can be observed in a multilevel pulse-width modulated control system for a high-power heating unit. The behavior of such system can be described by a set of two coupled non-autonomous differential equations with discontinuous right-hand sides. The authors reduce the investigation of this system to the studying of a two-dimensional piecewise-smooth map. The authors demonstrate how a closed invariant curve associated with quasiperiodic dynamics can arise from a stable periodic motion through a border-collision bifurcation. The paper also considers a variety of interesting nonlinear phenomena, including phase-locking modes, the coexistence of several stable closed invariant curves, embedded one into the other and with their basins of attraction separated by intervening repelling closed curves.

  19. A terahertz EO detector with large dynamical range, high modulation depth and signal-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xinjian; Cai, Yi; Zeng, Xuanke; Zheng, Shuiqin; Li, Jingzhen; Xu, Shixiang

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents a novel design for terahertz (THz) free-space time domain electro-optic (EO) detection where the static birefringent phases of the two balanced arms are set close to zero but opposite to each other. Our theoretical and numerical analyses show this design has much stronger ability to cancel the optical background noise than both THz ellipsometer and traditional crossed polarizer geometry (CPG). Its optical modulation depth is about twice as high as that of traditional CPG, but about ten times as high as that of THz ellipsometer. As for the dynamical range, our improved design is comparable to the THz ellipsometer but obviously larger than the traditional CPG. Some experiments for comparing our improved CPG with traditional CPG agree well with the corresponding theoretical predictions. Our experiments also show that the splitting ratio of the used non-polarization beam splitter is critical for the performance of our design.

  20. Modulations of 'late' event-related brain potentials in humans by dynamic audiovisual speech stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebib, Riadh; Papo, David; Douiri, Abdel; de Bode, Stella; Gillon Dowens, Margaret; Baudonnière, Pierre-Marie

    2004-11-30

    Lipreading reliably improve speech perception during face-to-face conversation. Within the range of good dubbing, however, adults tolerate some audiovisual (AV) discrepancies and lipreading, then, can give rise to confusion. We used event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to study the perceptual strategies governing the intermodal processing of dynamic and bimodal speech stimuli, either congruently dubbed or not. Electrophysiological analyses revealed that non-coherent audiovisual dubbings modulated in amplitude an endogenous ERP component, the N300, we compared to a 'N400-like effect' reflecting the difficulty to integrate these conflicting pieces of information. This result adds further support for the existence of a cerebral system underlying 'integrative processes' lato sensu. Further studies should take advantage of this 'N400-like effect' with AV speech stimuli to open new perspectives in the domain of psycholinguistics.

  1. Gas flow characteristics of a time modulated APPJ: the effect of gas heating on flow dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, S; Sobota, A; Van Veldhuizen, E M; Bruggeman, P J

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the flow dynamics of a radio-frequency (RF) non-equilibrium argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The RF power is at a frequency of 50 Hz or 20 kHz. Combined flow pattern visualizations (obtained by shadowgraphy) and gas temperature distributions (obtained by Rayleigh scattering) are used to study the formation of transient vortex structures in initial flow field shortly after the plasma is switched on and off in the case of 50 Hz modulation. The transient vortex structures correlate well with observed temperature differences. Experimental results of the fast modulated (20 kHz) plasma jet that does not induce changes of the gas temperature are also presented. The latter result suggests that momentum transfer by ions does not have dominant effect on the flow pattern close to the tube. It is argued that the increased gas temperature and corresponding gas velocity increase at the tube exit due to the plasma heating increases the admixing of surrounding air and reduces the effective potential core length. With increasing plasma power a reduction of the effective potential core length is observed with a minimum length for 5.6 W after which the length extends again. Possible mechanisms related to viscosity effects and ionic momentum transfer are discussed. (paper)

  2. Physiological modules for generating discrete and rhythmic movements: action identification by a dynamic recurrent neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengoetxea, Ana; Leurs, Françoise; Hoellinger, Thomas; Cebolla, Ana M; Dan, Bernard; McIntyre, Joseph; Cheron, Guy

    2014-01-01

    In this study we employed a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) in a novel fashion to reveal characteristics of control modules underlying the generation of muscle activations when drawing figures with the outstretched arm. We asked healthy human subjects to perform four different figure-eight movements in each of two workspaces (frontal plane and sagittal plane). We then trained a DRNN to predict the movement of the wrist from information in the EMG signals from seven different muscles. We trained different instances of the same network on a single movement direction, on all four movement directions in a single movement plane, or on all eight possible movement patterns and looked at the ability of the DRNN to generalize and predict movements for trials that were not included in the training set. Within a single movement plane, a DRNN trained on one movement direction was not able to predict movements of the hand for trials in the other three directions, but a DRNN trained simultaneously on all four movement directions could generalize across movement directions within the same plane. Similarly, the DRNN was able to reproduce the kinematics of the hand for both movement planes, but only if it was trained on examples performed in each one. As we will discuss, these results indicate that there are important dynamical constraints on the mapping of EMG to hand movement that depend on both the time sequence of the movement and on the anatomical constraints of the musculoskeletal system. In a second step, we injected EMG signals constructed from different synergies derived by the PCA in order to identify the mechanical significance of each of these components. From these results, one can surmise that discrete-rhythmic movements may be constructed from three different fundamental modules, one regulating the co-activation of all muscles over the time span of the movement and two others elliciting patterns of reciprocal activation operating in orthogonal directions.

  3. Dynamic intensity-modulated non-coplanar arc radiotherapy (INCA) for head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krayenbuehl, Jerome; Davis, J. Bernard; Ciernik, I. Frank

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To define the potential advantages of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) applied using a non-coplanar dynamic arc technique for the treatment of head and neck cancer. Materials and methods: External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was planned in ten patients with head and neck cancer using coplanar IMRT and non-coplanar arc techniques, termed intensity modulated non-coplanar arc EBRT (INCA). Planning target volumes (PTV1) of first order covered the gross tumor volume and surrounding clinical target volume treated with 68-70 Gy, whereas PTV2 covered the elective lymph nodes with 54-55 Gy using a simultaneous internal boost. Treatment plan comparison between IMRT and INCA was carried out using dose-volume histogram and 'equivalent uniform dose' (EUD). Results: INCA resulted in better dose coverage and homogeneity of the PTV1, PTV2, and reduced dose delivered to most of the organs at risk (OAR). For the parotid glands, a reduction of the mean dose of 2.9 (±2.0) Gy was observed (p 0.002), the mean dose to the larynx was reduced by 6.9 (±2.9) Gy (p 0.003), the oral mucosa by 2.4 (±1.1) Gy (p < 0.001), and the maximal dose to the spinal cord by 3.2 (±1.7) Gy (p = 0.004). The mean dose to the brain was increased by 3.0 (±1.4) Gy (p = 0.002) and the mean lung dose increased by 0.2 (±0.4) Gy (p = 0.87). The EUD suggested better avoidance of the OAR, except for the lung, and better coverage and dose uniformity were achieved with INCA compared to IMRT. Conclusion: Dose delivery accuracy with IMRT using a non-coplanar dynamic arc beam geometry potentially improves treatment of head and neck cancer

  4. An ELMO2-RhoG-ILK network modulates microtubule dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Bradley C; Ivanova, Iordanka A; Dagnino, Lina

    2015-07-15

    ELMO2 belongs to a family of scaffold proteins involved in phagocytosis and cell motility. ELMO2 can simultaneously bind integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and RhoG, forming tripartite ERI complexes. These complexes are involved in promoting β1 integrin-dependent directional migration in undifferentiated epidermal keratinocytes. ELMO2 and ILK have also separately been implicated in microtubule regulation at integrin-containing focal adhesions. During differentiation, epidermal keratinocytes cease to express integrins, but ERI complexes persist. Here we show an integrin-independent role of ERI complexes in modulation of microtubule dynamics in differentiated keratinocytes. Depletion of ERI complexes by inactivating the Ilk gene in these cells reduces microtubule growth and increases the frequency of catastrophe. Reciprocally, exogenous expression of ELMO2 or RhoG stabilizes microtubules, but only if ILK is also present. Mechanistically, activation of Rac1 downstream from ERI complexes mediates their effects on microtubule stability. In this pathway, Rac1 serves as a hub to modulate microtubule dynamics through two different routes: 1) phosphorylation and inactivation of the microtubule-destabilizing protein stathmin and 2) phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β, which leads to the activation of CRMP2, promoting microtubule growth. At the cellular level, the absence of ERI species impairs Ca(2+)-mediated formation of adherens junctions, critical to maintaining mechanical integrity in the epidermis. Our findings support a key role for ERI species in integrin-independent stabilization of the microtubule network in differentiated keratinocytes. © 2015 Jackson et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  5. Phase matching of high order harmonic generation using dynamic phase modulation caused by a non-collinear modulation pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Oren; Kapteyn, Henry C.; Mumane, Margaret M.

    2010-02-16

    Phase matching high harmonic generation (HHG) uses a single, long duration non-collinear modulating pulse intersecting the driving pulse. A femtosecond driving pulse is focused into an HHG medium (such as a noble gas) to cause high-harmonic generation (HHG), for example in the X-ray region of the spectrum, via electrons separating from and recombining with gas atoms. A non-collinear pulse intersects the driving pulse within the gas, and modulates the field seen by the electrons while separated from their atoms. The modulating pulse is low power and long duration, and its frequency and amplitude is chosen to improve HHG phase matching by increasing the areas of constructive interference between the driving pulse and the HHG, relative to the areas of destructive interference.

  6. Segmental and dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivery techniques for micro-multileaf collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agazaryan, Nzhde; Solberg, Timothy D.

    2003-01-01

    A leaf sequencing algorithm has been implemented to deliver segmental and dynamic multileaf collimated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SMLC-IMRT and DMLC-IMRT, respectively) using a linear accelerator equipped with a micro-multileaf collimator (mMLC). The implementation extends a previously published algorithm for the SMLC-IMRT to include the dynamic MLC-IMRT method and several dosimetric considerations. The algorithm has been extended to account for the transmitted radiation and minimize the leakage between opposing and neighboring leaves. The underdosage problem associated with the tongue-and-groove design of the MLC is significantly reduced by synchronizing the MLC leaf movements. The workings of the leaf sequencing parameters have been investigated and the results of the planar dosimetric investigations show that the sequencing parameters affect the measured dose distributions as intended. Investigations of clinical cases suggest that SMLC and DMLC delivery methods produce comparable results with leaf sequences obtained by root-mean-square (RMS) errors specification of 1.5% and lower, approximately corresponding to 20 or more segments. For SMLC-IMRT, there is little to be gained by using an RMS error specification smaller than 2%, approximately corresponding to 15 segments; however, more segments directly translate to longer treatment time and more strain on the MLC. The implemented leaf synchronization method does not increase the required monitor units while it reduces the measured TG underdoses from a maximum of 12% to a maximum of 3% observed with single field measurements of representative clinical cases studied

  7. Curcumin modulates endothelial permeability and monocyte transendothelial migration by affecting endothelial cell dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfoulet, Laurent-Emmanuel; Mercier, Sylvie; Bayle, Dominique; Tamaian, Radu; Barber-Chamoux, Nicolas; Morand, Christine; Milenkovic, Dragan

    2017-11-01

    Curcumin is a phenolic compound that exhibits beneficial properties for cardiometabolic health. We previously showed that curcumin reduced the infiltration of immune cells into the vascular wall and prevented atherosclerosis development in mice. This study aimed to investigate the effect of curcumin on monocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration (TEM) and to decipher the underlying mechanisms of these actions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to curcumin (0.5-1μM) for 3h prior to their activation by Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNF-α). Endothelial permeability, monocyte adhesion and transendothelial migration assays were conducted under static condition and shear stress that mimics blood flow. We further investigated the impact of curcumin on signaling pathways and on the expression of genes using macroarrays. Pre-exposure of endothelial cells to curcumin reduced monocyte adhesion and their transendothelial migration in both static and shear stress conditions. Curcumin also prevented changes in both endothelial permeability and the area of HUVECs when induced by TNF-α. We showed that curcumin modulated the expression of 15 genes involved in the control of cytoskeleton and endothelial junction dynamic. Finally, we showed that curcumin inhibited NF-κB signaling likely through an antagonist interplay with several kinases as suggested by molecular docking analysis. Our findings demonstrate the ability of curcumin to reduce monocyte TEM through a multimodal regulation of the endothelial cell dynamics with a potential benefit on the vascular endothelial function barrier. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Monte Carlo dosimetric quality assurance system for dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takegawa, Hideki; Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Miyabe, Yuki; Teshima, Teruki; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Yano, Shinsuke; Mizowaki, Takashi; Nagata, Yasushi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation system, which can resolve dosimetric issues derived from multileaf collimator (MLC) design for routine dosimetric quality assurance (QA) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The treatment head of the medical linear accelerator equipped with MLC was modeled using the EGS4 MC code. A graphical user interface (GUI) application was developed to implement MC dose computation in the CT-based patient model and compare the MC calculated results with those of a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning (RTP) system, Varian Eclipse. To reduce computation time, the EGS4 MC code has been parallelized on massive parallel processing (MPP) system using the message passing interface (MPI). The MC treatment head model and MLC model were validated by the measurement data sets of percentage depth dose (PDD) and off-center ratio (OCR) in the water phantom and the film measurements for the static and dynamic test patterns, respectively. In the treatment head model, the MC calculated results agreed with those of measurements for both of PDD and OCR. The MC could reproduce all of the MLC dosimetric effects. A quantitative comparison between the results of MC and Eclipse was successfully performed with the GUI application. Parallel speed-up became almost linear. An MC dosimetric QA system for dynamic IMRT has been developed, however there were large dose discrepancies between the MC and the measurement in the MLC model simulation, which are now being investigated. (author)

  9. Direct current stimulation of the left temporoparietal junction modulates dynamic humor appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaby, Isabella; Holmes, Amanda; Moran, Joseph M; Eddy, Marianna D; Mahoney, Caroline R; Taylor, Holly A; Brunyé, Tad T

    2015-11-11

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of transcranial direct current stimulation targeting the left temporoparietal junction (TPJ) on humor appreciation during a dynamic video rating task. In a within-participants design, we targeted the left TPJ with anodal, cathodal, or no transcranial direct current stimulation, centered at electrode site C3 using a 4×1 targeted stimulation montage. During stimulation, participants dynamically rated a series of six stand-up comedy videos for perceived humor. We measured event-related (time-locked to crowd laughter) modulation of humor ratings as a function of stimulation condition. Results showed decreases in rated humor during anodal (vs. cathodal or none) stimulation; this pattern was evident for the majority of videos and was only partially predicted by individual differences in humor style. We discuss the possibility that upregulation of neural circuits involved in the theory of mind and empathizing with others may reduce appreciation of aggressive humor. In conclusion, the present data show that neuromodulation of the TPJ can alter the mental processes underlying humor appreciation, suggesting critical involvement of this cortical region in detecting, comprehending, and appreciating humor.

  10. Mg2+ in the major groove modulates B-DNA structure and dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Guéroult

    Full Text Available This study investigates the effect of Mg(2+ bound to the DNA major groove on DNA structure and dynamics. The analysis of a comprehensive dataset of B-DNA crystallographic structures shows that divalent cations are preferentially located in the DNA major groove where they interact with successive bases of (A/GpG and the phosphate group of 5'-CpA or TpG. Based on this knowledge, molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on a DNA oligomer without or with Mg(2+ close to an ApG step. These simulations showed that the hydrated Mg(2+ forms a stable intra-strand cross-link between the two purines in solution. ApG generates an electrostatic potential in the major groove that is particularly attractive for cations; its intrinsic conformation is well-adapted to the formation of water-mediated hydrogen bonds with Mg(2+. The binding of Mg(2+ modulates the behavior of the 5'-neighboring step by increasing the BII (ε-ζ>0° population of its phosphate group. Additional electrostatic interactions between the 5'-phosphate group and Mg(2+ strengthen both the DNA-cation binding and the BII character of the 5'-step. Cation binding in the major groove may therefore locally influence the DNA conformational landscape, suggesting a possible avenue for better understanding how strong DNA distortions can be stabilized in protein-DNA complexes.

  11. Scaling dynamic response and destructive metabolism in an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system modulated by different external periodic interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanzhi Shao

    Full Text Available On the basis of two universal power-law scaling laws, i.e. the scaling dynamic hysteresis in physics and the allometric scaling metabolism in biosystem, we studied the dynamic response and the evolution of an immunosurveillant anti-tumor system subjected to a periodic external intervention, which is equivalent to the scheme of a radiotherapy or chemotherapy, within the framework of the growth dynamics of tumor. Under the modulation of either an abrupt or a gradual change external intervention, the population density of tumors exhibits a dynamic hysteresis to the intervention. The area of dynamic hysteresis loop characterizes a sort of dissipative-therapeutic relationship of the dynamic responding of treated tumors with the dose consumption of accumulated external intervention per cycle of therapy. Scaling the area of dynamic hysteresis loops against the intensity of an external intervention, we deduced a characteristic quantity which was defined as the theoretical therapeutic effectiveness of treated tumor and related with the destructive metabolism of tumor under treatment. The calculated dose-effectiveness profiles, namely the dose cumulant per cycle of intervention versus the therapeutic effectiveness, could be well scaled into a universal quadratic formula regardless of either an abrupt or a gradual change intervention involved. We present a new concept, i.e., the therapy-effect matrix and the dose cumulant matrix, to expound the new finding observed in the growth and regression dynamics of a modulated anti-tumor system.

  12. Transient Response Dynamic Module Modifications to Include Static and Kinetic Friction Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misel, J. E.; Nenno, S. B.; Takahashi, D.

    1984-01-01

    A methodology that supports forced transient response dynamic solutions when both static and kinetic friction effects are included in a structural system model is described. Modifications that support this type of nonlinear transient response solution are summarized for the transient response dynamics (TRD) NASTRAN module. An overview of specific modifications for the NASTRAN processing subroutines, INITL, TRD1C, and TRD1D, are described with further details regarding inspection of nonlinear input definitions to define the type of nonlinear solution required, along with additional initialization requirements and specific calculation subroutines to successfully solve the transient response problem. The extension of the basic NASTRAN nonlinear methodology is presented through several stages of development to the point where constraint equations and residual flexibility effects are introduced into the finite difference Newmark-Beta recurrsion formulas. Particular emphasis is placed on cost effective solutions for large finite element models such as the Space Shuttle with friction degrees of freedom between the orbiter and payloads mounted in the cargo bay. An alteration to the dynamic finite difference equations of motion is discussed, which allows one to include friction effects at reasonable cost for large structural systems such as the Space Shuttle. Data are presented to indicate the possible impact of transient friction loads to the payload designer for the Space Shuttle. Transient response solution data are also included, which compare solutions without friction forces and those with friction forces for payloads mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. These data indicate that payload components can be sensitive to friction induced loads.

  13. Selective attention to phonology dynamically modulates initial encoding of auditory words within the left hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoncheva, Yuliya; Maurer, Urs; Zevin, Jason D; McCandliss, Bruce D

    2014-08-15

    Selective attention to phonology, i.e., the ability to attend to sub-syllabic units within spoken words, is a critical precursor to literacy acquisition. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence has demonstrated that a left-lateralized network of frontal, temporal, and posterior language regions, including the visual word form area, supports this skill. The current event-related potential (ERP) study investigated the temporal dynamics of selective attention to phonology during spoken word perception. We tested the hypothesis that selective attention to phonology dynamically modulates stimulus encoding by recruiting left-lateralized processes specifically while the information critical for performance is unfolding. Selective attention to phonology was captured by manipulating listening goals: skilled adult readers attended to either rhyme or melody within auditory stimulus pairs. Each pair superimposed rhyming and melodic information ensuring identical sensory stimulation. Selective attention to phonology produced distinct early and late topographic ERP effects during stimulus encoding. Data-driven source localization analyses revealed that selective attention to phonology led to significantly greater recruitment of left-lateralized posterior and extensive temporal regions, which was notably concurrent with the rhyme-relevant information within the word. Furthermore, selective attention effects were specific to auditory stimulus encoding and not observed in response to cues, arguing against the notion that they reflect sustained task setting. Collectively, these results demonstrate that selective attention to phonology dynamically engages a left-lateralized network during the critical time-period of perception for achieving phonological analysis goals. These findings suggest a key role for selective attention in on-line phonological computations. Furthermore, these findings motivate future research on the role that neural mechanisms of attention may

  14. Modulation of dynamic modes by interplay between positive and negative feedback loops in gene regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liu-Suo; Li, Ning-Xi; Chen, Jing-Jia; Zhang, Xiao-Peng; Liu, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2018-04-01

    A positive and a negative feedback loop can induce bistability and oscillation, respectively, in biological networks. Nevertheless, they are frequently interlinked to perform more elaborate functions in many gene regulatory networks. Coupled positive and negative feedback loops may exhibit either oscillation or bistability depending on the intensity of the stimulus in some particular networks. It is less understood how the transition between the two dynamic modes is modulated by the positive and negative feedback loops. We developed an abstract model of such systems, largely based on the core p53 pathway, to explore the mechanism for the transformation of dynamic behaviors. Our results show that enhancing the positive feedback may promote or suppress oscillations depending on the strength of both feedback loops. We found that the system oscillates with low amplitudes in response to a moderate stimulus and switches to the on state upon a strong stimulus. When the positive feedback is activated much later than the negative one in response to a strong stimulus, the system exhibits long-term oscillations before switching to the on state. We explain this intriguing phenomenon using quasistatic approximation. Moreover, early switching to the on state may occur when the system starts from a steady state in the absence of stimuli. The interplay between the positive and negative feedback plays a key role in the transitions between oscillation and bistability. Of note, our conclusions should be applicable only to some specific gene regulatory networks, especially the p53 network, in which both oscillation and bistability exist in response to a certain type of stimulus. Our work also underscores the significance of transient dynamics in determining cellular outcome.

  15. Selective attention to phonology dynamically modulates initial encoding of auditory words within the left hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoncheva; Maurer, Urs; Zevin, Jason; McCandliss, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Selective attention to phonology, i.e., the ability to attend to sub-syllabic units within spoken words, is a critical precursor to literacy acquisition. Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging evidence has demonstrated that a left-lateralized network of frontal, temporal, and posterior language regions, including the visual word form area, supports this skill. The current event-related potential (ERP) study investigated the temporal dynamics of selective attention to phonology during spoken word perception. We tested the hypothesis that selective atten tion to phonology dynamically modulates stimulus encoding by recruiting left-lateralized processes specifically while the information critical for performance is unfolding. Selective attention to phonology was captured by ma nipulating listening goals: skilled adult readers attended to either rhyme or melody within auditory stimulus pairs. Each pair superimposed rhyming and melodic information ensuring identical sensory stimulation. Selective attention to phonology produced distinct early and late topographic ERP effects during stimulus encoding. Data- driven source localization analyses revealed that selective attention to phonology led to significantly greater re cruitment of left-lateralized posterior and extensive temporal regions, which was notably concurrent with the rhyme-relevant information within the word. Furthermore, selective attention effects were specific to auditory stimulus encoding and not observed in response to cues, arguing against the notion that they reflect sustained task setting. Collectively, these results demonstrate that selective attention to phonology dynamically engages a left-lateralized network during the critical time-period of perception for achieving phonological analysis goals. These findings support the key role of selective attention to phonology in the development of literacy and motivate future research on the neural bases of the interaction between phonological

  16. Actin grips: circular actin-rich cytoskeletal structures that mediate the wrapping of polymeric microfibers by endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Desiree; Park, DoYoung; Anghelina, Mirela; Pécot, Thierry; Machiraju, Raghu; Xue, Ruipeng; Lannutti, John J; Thomas, Jessica; Cole, Sara L; Moldovan, Leni; Moldovan, Nicanor I

    2015-06-01

    Interaction of endothelial-lineage cells with three-dimensional substrates was much less studied than that with flat culture surfaces. We investigated the in vitro attachment of both mature endothelial cells (ECs) and of less differentiated EC colony-forming cells to poly-ε-capro-lactone (PCL) fibers with diameters in 5-20 μm range ('scaffold microfibers', SMFs). We found that notwithstanding the poor intrinsic adhesiveness to PCL, both cell types completely wrapped the SMFs after long-term cultivation, thus attaining a cylindrical morphology. In this system, both EC types grew vigorously for more than a week and became increasingly more differentiated, as shown by multiplexed gene expression. Three-dimensional reconstructions from multiphoton confocal microscopy images using custom software showed that the filamentous (F) actin bundles took a conspicuous ring-like organization around the SMFs. Unlike the classical F-actin-containing stress fibers, these rings were not associated with either focal adhesions or intermediate filaments. We also demonstrated that plasma membrane boundaries adjacent to these circular cytoskeletal structures were tightly yet dynamically apposed to the SMFs, for which reason we suggest to call them 'actin grips'. In conclusion, we describe a particular form of F-actin assembly with relevance for cytoskeletal organization in response to biomaterials, for endothelial-specific cell behavior in vitro and in vivo, and for tissue engineering. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Attenuation of LDHA expression in cancer cells leads to redox-dependent alterations in cytoskeletal structure and cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arseneault, Robert; Chien, Andrew; Newington, Jordan T; Rappon, Tim; Harris, Richard; Cumming, Robert C

    2013-09-28

    Aerobic glycolysis, the preferential use of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen to meet cellular metabolic demands, is a near universal feature of cancer. This unique type of metabolism is thought to protect cancer cells from damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the mitochondria. Using the cancer cell line MDA-MB-435 it is shown that shRNA mediated knockdown of lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA), a key mediator of aerobic glycolysis, results in elevated mitochondrial ROS production and a concomitant decrease in cell proliferation and motility. Redox-sensitive proteins affected by oxidative stress associated with LDHA knockdown were identified by Redox 2D-PAGE and mass spectrometry. In particular, tropomyosin (Tm) isoforms Tm4, Tm5NM1 and Tm5NM5, proteins involved in cell migration and cytoskeletal dynamics, exhibited changes in disulfide bonding and co-localized with peri-nuclear actin aggregates in LDHA knockdown cells. In contrast, treatment with the thiol-based antioxidant N-acetylcysteine promoted the relocalization of Tms to cortical actin microfilaments and partially rescued the migration defects associated with attenuated LDHA expression. These results suggest that aerobic glycolysis and reduced mitochondrial ROS production create an environment conducive to cytoskeletal remodeling; key events linked to the high cell motility associated with cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Multi-dimensional modulations of alpha and gamma cortical dynamics following mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in Major Depressive Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenberg, P.L.; Speckens, A.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    To illuminate candidate neural working mechanisms of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) in the treatment of recurrent depressive disorder, parallel to the potential interplays between modulations in electro-cortical dynamics and depressive symptom severity and self-compassionate experience.

  19. ECM-dependent HIF induction directs trophoblast stem cell fate via LIMK1-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa J Choi

    Full Text Available The Hypoxia-inducible Factor (HIF family of transcriptional regulators coordinates the expression of dozens of genes in response to oxygen deprivation. Mammalian development occurs in a hypoxic environment and HIF-null mice therefore die in utero due to multiple embryonic and placental defects. Mouse embryonic stem cells do not differentiate into placental cells; therefore, trophoblast stem cells (TSCs are used to study mouse placental development. Consistent with a requirement for HIF activity during placental development in utero, TSCs derived from HIF-null mice exhibit severe differentiation defects and fail to form trophoblast giant cells (TGCs in vitro. Interestingly, differentiating TSCs induce HIF activity independent of oxygen tension via unclear mechanisms. Here, we show that altering the extracellular matrix (ECM composition upon which TSCs are cultured changes their differentiation potential from TGCs to multinucleated syncytiotropholasts (SynTs and blocks oxygen-independent HIF induction. We further find that modulation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase-1/2 (MAP2K1/2, MEK-1/2 signaling by ECM composition is responsible for this effect. In the absence of ECM-dependent cues, hypoxia-signaling pathways activate this MAPK cascade to drive HIF induction and redirect TSC fate along the TGC lineage. In addition, we show that integrity of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton is critical for TGC fate determination. HIF-2α ensures TSC cytoskeletal integrity and promotes invasive TGC formation by interacting with c-MYC to induce non-canonical expression of Lim domain kinase 1-an enzyme that regulates microtubule and actin stability, as well as cell invasion. Thus, we find that HIF can integrate positional and metabolic cues from within the TSC niche to regulate placental development by modulating the cellular cytoskeleton via non-canonical gene expression.

  20. Antibodies to cytoskeletal proteins as evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy and radioimmunoassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zugehoer, M.; Struy, H.; Morenz, J.

    1987-01-01

    In patients suffering from chronic hepatitis, collagenosis and infectious mononucleosis, resp., as well as in blood donors antibodies against cytoskeletal antigens such as actin, myosin, actinin, desmin, keratin, and tubulin were determined by radioimmunoassay

  1. Antibodies to cytoskeletal proteins as evidenced by immunofluorescence microscopy and radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zugehoer, M; Struy, H; Morenz, J

    1987-01-01

    In patients suffering from chronic hepatitis, collagenosis and infectious mononucleosis, resp., as well as in blood donors antibodies against cytoskeletal antigens such as actin, myosin, actinin, desmin, keratin, and tubulin were determined by radioimmunoassay.

  2. Analysis of plasma dynamic response to modulated electron cyclotron heating in TCV tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, I.

    2008-01-01

    different types of modulating signals. This set-up was used to study simultaneous propagation of heat waves induced by MECH in non-sawtoothing plasmas, and in discharges with sawtooth activity. A new analysis method for the characterization of the plasma non-linear dynamic response to modulated heating was developed on the basis of Higher Order Spectral Analysis (HOSA) technique. This method applied to signals from different diagnostics, such as electron cyclotron emission and soft X-ray measurements, was extensively used to quantitatively characterize the effect of nonlinear phase coupling. In sawtooth free discharges a detailed analysis of the propagation of heat waves demonstrated that their phase coupling is solely related to properties of heat sources. It was demonstrated that if two heat waves are induced by non-coupled power sources (multi-beam MECH) then no phase coupling occurs. In the opposite case, when a source of perturbation (MECH) contains coupled harmonics, the corresponding heat waves demonstrate phase coupling. It was shown that these coupled heat waves loose their phase coherence while propagating in plasma. The dissipation of phase coupling is due to different phase velocities of heat waves and their diffusive damping. The new type of ECH power modulation accompanied with bicoherence analysis was proposed as a candidate for a reliable identification of EC power deposition location in a case of high frequency and low modulation depth MECH, including multi-beam heating. This type of MECH can be particularly important for real time control applications. In cases when MECH is applied to sawtoothing plasmas a direct experimental evidence of MECH-sawtooth non-linear phase coupling has been demonstrated using HOSA techniques, in particular bispectrum and bicoherence profiles. The detailed analysis presented here demonstrates a direct proof of periodic modification of sawtooth behavior by modulated ECH. It was shown that a simple diffusive model for the

  3. Visual dynamic e-module as a tool to fulfill informational needs and care continuum for diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Shinde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes can be envisaged as a lifelong phenomenon having the ominous odds for multisystemic involvement in the duration of disease. The probabilities of the occurrence of these events are influenced by the adopted lifestyle. Hence, information about the disease and lifestyle modification are vital from the perspective of prognostics. This study attempts to explore the potential of a "visual dynamic tool" for imparting knowledge and consequently  received acumen by diabetic patients. Objectives: To appraise the effectiveness of a constructed visual dynamic module (encompassing the various dimensions related to and affected by diabetes by capturing the opinions, perceptions, and experiences of the diabetic patients who underwent intervention through the module. Materials and Methods: A visual e-module with dynamically imposed and animated images in the vernacular (Hindi was prepared. This module was instituted among the diabetic patients in a logical sequence for consecutive 3 days. All the diabetic patients who underwent this intervention were interviewed in depth in order to ascertain the effectiveness of the module. These interviews were analyzed by thematic and framework analyses. Result: The visual module was perceived by the diabetic patients as an optically engaging tool for receiving, connecting, and synthesizing information about diabetes. They sensed and expressed the ease to connect with the images and labeled the received information as inclusive. Conclusion: Initial evidences suggest that visual e-module is an effective and efficient tool for knowledge management in diabetes. This issue may be further explored at diverse academic and clinical settings for gathering more information for efficacy.

  4. Conversational module-based simulation system as a human interface to versatile dynamic simulation of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, H.; Nakaya, K.; Wakabayashi, J.

    1986-01-01

    A new conversational simulation system is proposed which aims at effective re-utilization of software resources as module database, and conducting versatile simulations easily by automatic module integration with the help of user-friendly interfaces. The whole simulation system is composed of the four parts: master module library and pre-compiler system as the core system, while module database management system and simulation execution support system for the user interfaces. Basic methods employed in the system are mentioned with their knowledge representation and the relationship with the human information processing. An example practice of an LMFBR reactor dynamic simulation by the system demonstrated its capability to integrate a large simulation program and the related input/output files automatically by a single user

  5. Module generator of plans for dynamic processes; Modulo generdor de planes para procesos dinamicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes B, Alberto; Fernandez J, Jose L [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    This work describes the generating module of plans (Geplan) as a part of the project: Development of Techniques of Intelligent Planning for Dynamic Processes, based on techniques of artificial intelligence, and that is being developed in the Gerencia de Control e Instrumentacion the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE). The study case corresponds to the elaboration of a plan to help the plant operators in the task of taking a combined cycle central (CCC) to a stable state of operation given a specific load level. The architecture of the module generator of plans is presented and the codification of the actions allowed (ACT) is illustrated by means of rules, in addition the challenges that are due to face so that the system operates in line with the process. Also the technical aspects of the generator of plans, as well as the benefits and expectations of their use in any CCC are mentioned. [Spanish] En este trabajo se describe el modulo generador de planes (Geplan) como parte del proyecto Desarrollo de Tecnicas de Planificacion Inteligente para Procesos Dinamicos, basado en tecnicas de inteligencia Artificial, y que estan desarrollandose en la Gerencia de Control e Instrumentacion del Instituto de Investigaciones Electrica (IIE). El caso de estudio corresponde a la elaboracion de un plan para asistir a los operadores de planta en la tarea de llevar una central de ciclo combinado (CCC) a un estado estable de operacion dedo un nivel de carga especifico. Se presenta la arquitectura del modulo generador de planes y se ilustra la codificacion de las acciones permitidas (ACT) mediante reglas, ademas los retos que se deben enfrentar para que el sistema opere en linea con el proceso. Tambien se mencionan los aspectos tecnicos del generador de planes, asi como los beneficios y expectativas de su uso en cualquier CCC.

  6. Density Structures, Dynamics, and Seasonal and Solar Cycle Modulations of Saturn's Inner Plasma Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, M. K. G.; Shebanits, O.; Wahlund, J.-E.; Morooka, M. W.; Vigren, E.; André, N.; Garnier, P.; Persoon, A. M.; Génot, V.; Gilbert, L. K.

    2017-12-01

    We present statistical results from the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) Langmuir probe measurements recorded during the time interval from orbit 3 (1 February 2005) to 237 (29 June 2016). A new and improved data analysis method to obtain ion density from the Cassini LP measurements is used to study the asymmetries and modulations found in the inner plasma disk of Saturn, between 2.5 and 12 Saturn radii (1 RS=60,268 km). The structure of Saturn's plasma disk is mapped, and the plasma density peak, nmax, is shown to be located at ˜4.6 RS and not at the main neutral source region at 3.95 RS. The shift in the location of nmax is due to that the hot electron impact ionization rate peaks at ˜4.6 RS. Cassini RPWS plasma disk measurements show a solar cycle modulation. However, estimates of the change in ion density due to varying EUV flux is not large enough to describe the detected dependency, which implies that an additional mechanism, still unknown, is also affecting the plasma density in the studied region. We also present a dayside/nightside ion density asymmetry, with nightside densities up to a factor of 2 larger than on the dayside. The largest density difference is found in the radial region 4 to 5 RS. The dynamic variation in ion density increases toward Saturn, indicating an internal origin of the large density variability in the plasma disk rather than being caused by an external source origin in the outer magnetosphere.

  7. Trajectory optimization for dynamic couch rotation during volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Gregory; Bamber, Jeffrey C.; Evans, Philip M.; Bedford, James L.

    2013-11-01

    Non-coplanar radiation beams are often used in three-dimensional conformal and intensity modulated radiotherapy to reduce dose to organs at risk (OAR) by geometric avoidance. In volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) non-coplanar geometries are generally achieved by applying patient couch rotations to single or multiple full or partial arcs. This paper presents a trajectory optimization method for a non-coplanar technique, dynamic couch rotation during VMAT (DCR-VMAT), which combines ray tracing with a graph search algorithm. Four clinical test cases (partial breast, brain, prostate only, and prostate and pelvic nodes) were used to evaluate the potential OAR sparing for trajectory-optimized DCR-VMAT plans, compared with standard coplanar VMAT. In each case, ray tracing was performed and a cost map reflecting the number of OAR voxels intersected for each potential source position was generated. The least-cost path through the cost map, corresponding to an optimal DCR-VMAT trajectory, was determined using Dijkstra’s algorithm. Results show that trajectory optimization can reduce dose to specified OARs for plans otherwise comparable to conventional coplanar VMAT techniques. For the partial breast case, the mean heart dose was reduced by 53%. In the brain case, the maximum lens doses were reduced by 61% (left) and 77% (right) and the globes by 37% (left) and 40% (right). Bowel mean dose was reduced by 15% in the prostate only case. For the prostate and pelvic nodes case, the bowel V50 Gy and V60 Gy were reduced by 9% and 45% respectively. Future work will involve further development of the algorithm and assessment of its performance over a larger number of cases in site-specific cohorts.

  8. Observation Platform for Dynamic Biomedical and Biotechnology Experiments Using the International Space Station (ISS) Light Microscopy Module (LMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurk, Michael A. (Andy)

    2015-01-01

    Techshot, Inc., has developed an observation platform for the LMM on the ISS that will enable biomedical and biotechnology experiments. The LMM Dynamic Stage consists of an electronics module and the first two of a planned suite of experiment modules. Specimens and reagent solutions can be injected into a small, hollow microscope slide-the heart of the innovation-via a combination of small reservoirs, pumps, and valves. A life science experiment module allows investigators to load up to two different fluids for on-orbit, real-time image cytometry. Fluids can be changed to initiate a process, fix biological samples, or retrieve suspended cells. A colloid science experiment module conducts microparticle and nanoparticle tests for investigation of colloid self-assembly phenomena. This module includes a hollow glass slide and heating elements for the creation of a thermal gradient from one end of the slide to the other. The electronics module supports both experiment modules and contains a unique illuminator/condenser for bright and dark field and phase contrast illumination, power supplies for two piezoelectric pumps, and controller boards for pumps and valves. This observation platform safely contains internal fluids and will greatly accelerate the research and development (R&D) cycle of numerous experiments, products, and services aboard the ISS.

  9. Hes6 is required for actin cytoskeletal organization in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malone, Caroline M.P.; Domaschenz, Renae; Amagase, Yoko [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research Centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); Dunham, Ian [EMBL-European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SD (United Kingdom); Murai, Kasumi [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research Centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom); Jones, Philip H., E-mail: phj20@cam.ac.uk [MRC Cancer Cell Unit, Hutchison-MRC Research Centre, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge CB2 0XZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-01

    Hes6 is a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors that regulate proliferating cell fate in development and is known to be expressed in developing muscle. Here we investigate its function in myogenesis in vitro. We show that Hes6 is a direct transcriptional target of the myogenic transcription factors MyoD and Myf5, indicating that it is integral to the myogenic transcriptional program. The localization of Hes6 protein changes during differentiation, becoming predominantly nuclear. Knockdown of Hes6 mRNA levels by siRNA has no effect on cell cycle exit or induction of myosin heavy chain expression in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts, but F-actin filament formation is disrupted and both cell motility and myoblast fusion are reduced. The knockdown phenotype is rescued by expression of Hes6 cDNA resistant to siRNA. These results define a novel role for Hes6 in actin cytoskeletal dynamics in post mitotic myoblasts.

  10. Mertk deficiency affects macrophage directional migration via disruption of cytoskeletal organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Tang

    Full Text Available Mertk belongs to the Tyro3, Axl and Mertk (TAM family of receptor tyrosine kinases, and plays a pivotal role in regulation of cytoskeletal rearrangement during phagocytosis. Phagocytosis by either professional or non-professional phagocytes is impaired in the Mertk deficient individual. In the present study, we further investigated the effects of Mertk mutation on peritoneal macrophage morphology, attachment, spreading and movement. Mertk-mutated macrophages exhibited decreased attachment, weak spreading, loss of spindle-like body shape and lack of clear leading and trailing edges within the first few hours of culture, as observed by environmental scanning electron microscopy. Time-lapse video photography recording showed that macrophage without Mertk conducted mainly random movement with oscillating swing around the cell body, and lost the directional migration action seen on the WT cells. Western blotting showed a decreased phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK. Immunocytochemistry revealed that actin filaments and dynamic protein myosin II failed to concentrate in the leading edge of migrating cells. Microtubules were localized mainly in one side of mutant cell body, with no clear MTOC and associated radially-distributed microtubule bundles, which were clearly evident in the WT cells. Our results suggest that Mertk deficiency affects not only phagocytosis but also cell shape and migration, likely through a common regulatory mechanism on cytoskeletons.

  11. Hes6 is required for actin cytoskeletal organization in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malone, Caroline M.P.; Domaschenz, Renae; Amagase, Yoko; Dunham, Ian; Murai, Kasumi; Jones, Philip H.

    2011-01-01

    Hes6 is a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors that regulate proliferating cell fate in development and is known to be expressed in developing muscle. Here we investigate its function in myogenesis in vitro. We show that Hes6 is a direct transcriptional target of the myogenic transcription factors MyoD and Myf5, indicating that it is integral to the myogenic transcriptional program. The localization of Hes6 protein changes during differentiation, becoming predominantly nuclear. Knockdown of Hes6 mRNA levels by siRNA has no effect on cell cycle exit or induction of myosin heavy chain expression in differentiating C2C12 myoblasts, but F-actin filament formation is disrupted and both cell motility and myoblast fusion are reduced. The knockdown phenotype is rescued by expression of Hes6 cDNA resistant to siRNA. These results define a novel role for Hes6 in actin cytoskeletal dynamics in post mitotic myoblasts.

  12. Dynamical patterning modules: physico-genetic determinants of morphological development and evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, Stuart A; Bhat, Ramray

    2008-01-01

    The shapes and forms of multicellular organisms arise by the generation of new cell states and types and changes in the numbers and rearrangements of the various kinds of cells. While morphogenesis and pattern formation in all animal species are widely recognized to be mediated by the gene products of an evolutionarily conserved 'developmental-genetic toolkit', the link between these molecular players and the physics underlying these processes has been generally ignored. This paper introduces the concept of 'dynamical patterning modules' (DPMs), units consisting of one or more products of the 'toolkit' genes that mobilize physical processes characteristic of chemically and mechanically excitable meso- to macroscopic systems such as cell aggregates: cohesion, viscoelasticity, diffusion, spatiotemporal heterogeneity based on lateral inhibition and multistable and oscillatory dynamics. We suggest that ancient toolkit gene products, most predating the emergence of multicellularity, assumed novel morphogenetic functions due to change in the scale and context inherent to multicellularity. We show that DPMs, acting individually and in concert with each other, constitute a 'pattern language' capable of generating all metazoan body plans and organ forms. The physical dimension of developmental causation implies that multicellular forms during the explosive radiation of animal body plans in the middle Cambrian, approximately 530 million years ago, could have explored an extensive morphospace without concomitant genotypic change or selection for adaptation. The morphologically plastic body plans and organ forms generated by DPMs, and their ontogenetic trajectories, would subsequently have been stabilized and consolidated by natural selection and genetic drift. This perspective also solves the apparent 'molecular homology-analogy paradox', whereby widely divergent modern animal types utilize the same molecular toolkit during development by proposing, in contrast to the Neo

  13. Nuclear shape changes are induced by knockdown of the SWI/SNF ATPase BRG1 and are independent of cytoskeletal connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Imbalzano

    Full Text Available Changes in nuclear morphology occur during normal development and have been observed during the progression of several diseases. The shape of a nucleus is governed by the balance of forces exerted by nuclear-cytoskeletal contacts and internal forces created by the structure of the chromatin and nuclear envelope. However, factors that regulate the balance of these forces and determine nuclear shape are poorly understood. The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzyme ATPase, BRG1, has been shown to contribute to the regulation of overall cell size and shape. Here we document that immortalized mammary epithelial cells show BRG1-dependent nuclear shape changes. Specifically, knockdown of BRG1 induced grooves in the nuclear periphery that could be documented by cytological and ultrastructural methods. To test the hypothesis that the observed changes in nuclear morphology resulted from altered tension exerted by the cytoskeleton, we disrupted the major cytoskeletal networks and quantified the frequency of BRG1-dependent changes in nuclear morphology. The results demonstrated that disruption of cytoskeletal networks did not change the frequency of BRG1-induced nuclear shape changes. These findings suggest that BRG1 mediates control of nuclear shape by internal nuclear mechanisms that likely control chromatin dynamics.

  14. Integrin β1 regulates leiomyoma cytoskeletal integrity and growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Minnie; Segars, James; Catherino, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are characterized by an excessive extracellular matrix, increased mechanical stress, and increased active RhoA. Previously, we observed that mechanical signaling was attenuated in leiomyoma, but the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. Integrins, especially integrin β1, are transmembrane adhesion receptors that couple extracellular matrix stresses to the intracellular cytoskeleton to influence cell proliferation and differentiation. Here we characterized integrin and laminin to signaling in leiomyoma cells. We observed a 2.25 ± 0.32 fold increased expression of integrin β1 in leiomyoma cells, compared to myometrial cells. Antibody-mediated inhibition of integrin β1 led to significant growth inhibition in leiomyoma cells and a loss of cytoskeletal integrity. Specifically, polymerization of actin filaments and formation of focal adhesions were reduced by inhibition of integrin p1. Inhibition of integrin β1 in leiomyoma cells led to 0.81 ± 0.02 fold decrease in active RhoA, and resembled levels found in serum-starved cells. Likewise, inhibition of integrin β1 was accompanied by a decrease in phospho-ERK. Compared to myometrial cells, leiomyoma cells demonstrated increased expression of integrin α6 subunit to laminin receptor (1.91 ± 0.11 fold), and increased expression of laminin 5α (1.52±0.02), laminin 5β (3.06±0.92), and laminin 5γ (1.66 ± 0.06). Of note, leiomyoma cells grown on laminin matrix appear to realign themselves. Taken together, the findings reveal that the attenuated mechanical signaling in leiomyoma cells is accompanied by an increased expression and a dependence on integrin β1 signaling in leiomyoma cells, compared to myometrial cells. PMID:23023061

  15. Structures of a Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Module Bound to MbtH-like Proteins Support a Highly Dynamic Domain Architecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bradley R.; Drake, Eric J.; Shi, Ce; Aldrich, Courtney C.; Gulick, Andrew M. (UMM); (HWMRI)

    2016-09-05

    Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) produce a wide variety of peptide natural products. During synthesis, the multidomain NRPSs act as an assembly line, passing the growing product from one module to the next. Each module generally consists of an integrated peptidyl carrier protein, an amino acid-loading adenylation domain, and a condensation domain that catalyzes peptide bond formation. Some adenylation domains interact with small partner proteins called MbtH-like proteins (MLPs) that enhance solubility or activity. A structure of an MLP bound to an adenylation domain has been previously reported using a truncated adenylation domain, precluding any insight that might be derived from understanding the influence of the MLP on the intact adenylation domain or on the dynamics of the entire NRPS module. Here, we present the structures of the full-length NRPS EntF bound to the MLPs from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These new structures, along with biochemical and bioinformatics support, further elaborate the residues that define the MLP-adenylation domain interface. Additionally, the structures highlight the dynamic behavior of NRPS modules, including the module core formed by the adenylation and condensation domains as well as the orientation of the mobile thioesterase domain.

  16. Influence of atomization quality modulation on flame dynamics in a hypergolic rocket engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Schulze

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For the numerical evaluation of the thermoacoustic stability of rocket engines often hybrid methods are applied, which separate the computation of wave propagation in the combustor from the analysis of the flame response to acoustic perturbations. Closure requires a thermoacoustic feedback model which provides the heat release fluctuation in the source term of the employed wave transport equations. The influence of the acoustic fluctuations in the combustion chamber on the heat release fluctuations from the modulation of the atomization of the propellants in a hypergolic upper stage rocket engine is studied. Numerical modeling of a single injector provides the time mean reacting flow field. A network of transfer functions representing all aspects relevant for the feedback model is presented. Analytical models for the injector admittances and for the atomization transfer functions are provided. The dynamics of evaporation and combustion are studied numerically and the numerical results are analyzed. An analytical approximation of the computed flame transfer function is combined with the analytical models for the injector and the atomization quality to derive the feedback model for the wave propagation code. The evaluation of this model on the basis of the Rayleigh index reveals the thermoacoustic driving potential originating from the fluctuating spray quality.

  17. Modulation of the Conformational Dynamics of Apo-Adenylate Kinase through a π-Cation Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Ritaban; Manna, Rabindra Nath; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Jana, Biman

    2017-06-15

    Large-scale conformational transition from open to closed state of adenylate kinase (ADK) is essential for its catalytic cycle. Apo-ADK undergoes conformational transition in a way that closely resembles an open-to-closed conformational transition. Here, equilibrium simulations, free-energy simulations, and quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations in combination with several bioinformatics approaches have been used to explore the molecular origin of this conformational transition in apo-ADK. In addition to its conventional open state, Escherichia coli apo-ADK adopts conformations that resemble a closed-like intermediate, the "half-open-half-closed" (HOHC) state, and a π-cation interaction can account for the stability of this HOHC state. Energetics and the electronic properties of this π-cation interaction have been explored using QM/MM calculations. Upon rescinding the π-cation interaction, the conformational landscape of the apo-ADK changes completely. The apo-ADK population is shifted completely toward the open state. This π-cation interaction is highly conserved in bacterial ADK; the cationic guanidinium moiety of a conserved ARG interacts with the delocalized π-electron cloud of either PHE or TYR. Interestingly, this study demonstrates the modulation of a principal protein dynamics by a conserved specific π-cation interaction across different organisms.

  18. Externally induced frontoparietal synchronization modulates network dynamics and enhances working memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violante, Ines R; Li, Lucia M; Carmichael, David W; Lorenz, Romy; Leech, Robert; Hampshire, Adam; Rothwell, John C; Sharp, David J

    2017-03-14

    Cognitive functions such as working memory (WM) are emergent properties of large-scale network interactions. Synchronisation of oscillatory activity might contribute to WM by enabling the coordination of long-range processes. However, causal evidence for the way oscillatory activity shapes network dynamics and behavior in humans is limited. Here we applied transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) to exogenously modulate oscillatory activity in a right frontoparietal network that supports WM. Externally induced synchronization improved performance when cognitive demands were high. Simultaneously collected fMRI data reveals tACS effects dependent on the relative phase of the stimulation and the internal cognitive processing state. Specifically, synchronous tACS during the verbal WM task increased parietal activity, which correlated with behavioral performance. Furthermore, functional connectivity results indicate that the relative phase of frontoparietal stimulation influences information flow within the WM network. Overall, our findings demonstrate a link between behavioral performance in a demanding WM task and large-scale brain synchronization.

  19. DMPD: Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor mediated signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15662540 Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor mediated signaling. Li X, Qin J.... J Mol Med. 2005 Apr;83(4):258-66. Epub 2005 Jan 21. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Modulation of Toll-i...nterleukin 1 receptor mediated signaling. PubmedID 15662540 Title Modulation of Toll-interleukin 1 receptor

  20. An electrically driven terahertz metamaterial diffractive modulator with more than 20 dB of dynamic range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karl, N.; Reichel, K.; Mendis, R.; Mittleman, D. M.; Chen, H.-T.; Taylor, A. J.; Brener, I.; Benz, A.; Reno, J. L.

    2014-01-01

    We design and experimentally demonstrate a switchable diffraction grating for terahertz modulation based on planar active metamaterials, where a Schottky gate structure is implemented to tune the metamaterial resonances in real-time via the application of an external voltage bias. The diffraction grating is formed by grouping the active split-ring resonators into an array of independent columns with alternate columns biased. We observe off-axis diffraction over a wide frequency band in contrast to the narrow-band resonances, which permits operation of the device as a relatively high-speed, wide-bandwidth, high-contrast modulator, with more than 20 dB of dynamic range

  1. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, P.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced......-to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system. The dosimetric results were evaluated using gamma index evaluation with static target measurements as reference. Results: The plan quality...

  2. Spatiotemporal brain dynamics of emotional face processing modulations induced by the serotonin 1A/2A receptor agonist psilocybin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, Fosco; Schmidt, André; Pokorny, Thomas; Kometer, Michael; Seifritz, Erich; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2014-12-01

    Emotional face processing is critically modulated by the serotonergic system. For instance, emotional face processing is impaired by acute psilocybin administration, a serotonin (5-HT) 1A and 2A receptor agonist. However, the spatiotemporal brain mechanisms underlying these modulations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the spatiotemporal brain dynamics underlying psilocybin-induced modulations during emotional face processing. Electrical neuroimaging analyses were applied to visual evoked potentials in response to emotional faces, following psilocybin and placebo administration. Our results indicate a first time period of strength (i.e., Global Field Power) modulation over the 168-189 ms poststimulus interval, induced by psilocybin. A second time period of strength modulation was identified over the 211-242 ms poststimulus interval. Source estimations over these 2 time periods further revealed decreased activity in response to both neutral and fearful faces within limbic areas, including amygdala and parahippocampal gyrus, and the right temporal cortex over the 168-189 ms interval, and reduced activity in response to happy faces within limbic and right temporo-occipital brain areas over the 211-242 ms interval. Our results indicate a selective and temporally dissociable effect of psilocybin on the neuronal correlates of emotional face processing, consistent with a modulation of the top-down control. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Hierarchical Distribution of the Tau Cytoskeletal Pathology in the Thalamus of Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüb, Udo; Stratmann, Katharina; Heinsen, Helmut; Del Turco, Domenico; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Seidel, Kay; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Korf, Horst-Werner

    2016-01-01

    In spite of considerable progress in neuropathological research on Alzheimer's disease (AD), knowledge regarding the exact pathoanatomical distribution of the tau cytoskeletal pathology in the thalamus of AD patients in the advanced Braak and Braak AD stages V or VI of the cortical cytoskeletal pathology is still fragmentary. Investigation of serial 100 μm-thick brain tissue sections through the thalamus of clinically diagnosed AD patients with Braak and Braak AD stage V or VI cytoskeletal pathologies immunostained with the anti-tau AT8 antibody, along with the affection of the extraterritorial reticular nucleus of the thalamus, reveals a consistent and severe tau immunoreactive cytoskeletal pathology in the limbic nuclei of the thalamus (e.g., paraventricular, anterodorsal and laterodorsal nuclei, limitans-suprageniculate complex). The thalamic nuclei integrated into the associative networks of the human brain (e.g., ventral anterior and mediodorsal nuclei) are only mildly affected, while its motor precerebellar (ventral lateral nucleus) and sensory nuclei (e.g., lateral and medial geniculate bodies, ventral posterior medial and lateral nuclei, parvocellular part of the ventral posterior medial nucleus) are more or less spared. The highly stereotypical and characteristic thalamic distribution pattern of the AD-related tau cytoskeletal pathology represents an anatomical mirror of the hierarchical topographic distribution of the cytoskeletal pathology in the interconnected regions of the cerebral cortex of AD patients. These pathoanatomical parallels support the pathophysiological concept of a transneuronal spread of the disease process of AD along anatomical pathways. The AD-related tau cytoskeletal pathology in the thalamus most likely contributes substantially to the neuropsychiatric disease symptoms (e.g., dementia), attention deficits, oculomotor dysfunctions, altered non-discriminative aspects of pain experience of AD patients, and the disruption of their

  4. Cytoskeletal remodeling of connective tissue fibroblasts in response to static stretch is dependent on matrix material properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rosalyn D; Koptiuch, Cathryn; Iatridis, James C; Howe, Alan K; Badger, Gary J; Langevin, Helene M

    2012-01-01

    In areolar “loose” connective tissue, fibroblasts remodel their cytoskeleton within minutes in response to static stretch resulting in increased cell body cross-sectional area that relaxes the tissue to a lower state of resting tension. It remains unknown whether the loosely arranged collagen matrix, characteristic of areolar connective tissue, is required for this cytoskeletal response to occur. The purpose of this study was to evaluate cytoskeletal remodeling of fibroblasts in and dissociated from areolar and dense connective tissue in response to 2 hours of static stretch in both native tissue and collagen gels of varying crosslinking. Rheometric testing indicated that the areolar connective tissue had a lower dynamic modulus and was more viscous than the dense connective tissue. In response to stretch, cells within the more compliant areolar connective tissue adopted a large “sheet-like” morphology that was in contrast to the smaller dendritic morphology in the dense connective tissue. By adjusting the in vitro collagen crosslinking, and the resulting dynamic modulus, it was demonstrated that cells dissociated from dense connective tissue are capable of responding when seeded into a compliant matrix, while cells dissociated from areolar connective tissue can lose their ability to respond when their matrix becomes stiffer. This set of experiments indicated stretch-induced fibroblast expansion was dependent on the distinct matrix material properties of areolar connective tissues as opposed to the cells’ tissue of origin. These results also suggest that disease and pathological processes with increased crosslinks, such as diabetes and fibrosis, could impair fibroblast responsiveness in connective tissues. PMID:22552950

  5. CONSERVED ROLES FOR CYTOSKELETAL COMPONENTS IN DETERMINING LATERALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Gary S.; Lemire, Joan M.; Paré, Jean-Francois; Cammarata, Garrett; Lowery, Laura Anne; Levin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Consistently-biased left-right (LR) patterning is required for the proper placement of organs including the heart and viscera. The LR axis is especially fascinating as an example of multi-scale pattern formation, since here chiral events at the subcellular level are integrated and amplified into asymmetric transcriptional cascades and ultimately into the anatomical patterning of the entire body. In contrast to the other two body axes, there is considerable controversy about the earliest mechanisms of embryonic laterality. Many molecular components of asymmetry have not been widely tested among phyla with diverse bodyplans, and it is unknown whether parallel (redundant) pathways may exist that could reverse abnormal asymmetry states at specific checkpoints in development. To address conservation of the early steps of LR patterning, we used the Xenopus laevis (frog) embryo to functionally test a number of protein targets known to direct asymmetry in plants, fruit fly, and rodent. Using the same reagents that randomize asymmetry in Arabidopsis, Drosophila, and mouse embryos, we show that manipulation of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton immediately post-fertilization, but not later, results in laterality defects in Xenopus embryos. Moreover, we observed organ-specific randomization effects and a striking dissociation of organ situs from effects on the expression of left side control genes, which parallel data from Drosophila and mouse. Remarkably, some early manipulations that disrupt laterality of transcriptional asymmetry determinants can be subsequently “rescued” by the embryo, resulting in normal organ situs. These data reveal the existence of novel corrective mechanisms, demonstrate that asymmetric expression of Nodal is not a definitive marker of laterality, and suggest the existence of amplification pathways that connect early cytoskeletal processes to control of organ situs bypassing Nodal. Counter to alternative models of symmetry breaking

  6. Directional and dynamic modulation of the optical emission of an individual GaAs nanowire using surface acoustic waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Jörg B; Rudolph, Daniel; Bichler, Max; Abstreiter, Gerhard; Finley, Jonathan J; Koblmüller, Gregor; Wixforth, Achim; Krenner, Hubert J

    2011-04-13

    We report on optical experiments performed on individual GaAs nanowires and the manipulation of their temporal emission characteristics using a surface acoustic wave. We find a pronounced, characteristic suppression of the emission intensity for the surface acoustic wave propagation aligned with the axis of the nanowire. Furthermore, we demonstrate that this quenching is dynamical as it shows a pronounced modulation as the local phase of the surface acoustic wave is tuned. These effects are strongly reduced for a surface acoustic wave applied in the direction perpendicular to the axis of the nanowire due to their inherent one-dimensional geometry. We resolve a fully dynamic modulation of the nanowire emission up to 678 MHz not limited by the physical properties of the nanowires.

  7. SU-E-J-254: Utility of Pinnacle Dynamic Planning Module Utilizing Deformable Image Registration in Adaptive Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jani, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose For certain highly conformal treatment techniques, changes in patient anatomy due to weight loss and/or tumor shrinkage can result in significant changes in dose distribution. Recently, the Pinnacle treatment planning system added a Dynamic Planning module utilizing Deformable Image Registration (DIR). The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of this software in adapting to altered anatomy and adjusting treatment plans to account for it. Methods We simulated significant tumor response by changing patient thickness and altered chin positions using a commercially-available head and neck (H and N) phantom. In addition, we studied 23 CT image sets of fifteen (15) patients with H and N tumors and eight (8) patients with prostate cancer. In each case, we applied deformable image registration through Dynamic Planning module of our Pinnacle Treatment Planning System. The dose distribution of the original CT image set was compared to the newly computed dose without altering any treatment parameter. Result was a dose if we did not adjust the plan to reflect anatomical changes. Results For the H and N phantom, a tumor response of up to 3.5 cm was correctly deformed by the Pinnacle Dynamic module. Recomputed isodose contours on new anatomies were within 1 mm of the expected distribution. The Pinnacle system configuration allowed dose computations resulting from original plans on new anatomies without leaving the planning system. Original and new doses were available side-by-side with both CT image sets. Based on DIR, about 75% of H and N patients (11/15) required a re-plan using new anatomy. Among prostate patients, the DIR predicted near-correct bladder volume in 62% of the patients (5/8). Conclusions The Dynamic Planning module of the Pinnacle system proved to be an accurate and useful tool in our ability to adapt to changes in patient anatomy during a course of radiotherapy

  8. Evaluation of dynamic elasticity module in samples of Portland (type 1) cement paste exposed to neutronic irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa Junior, A.A.; Lucki, G.

    1986-01-01

    The fast neutron radiation effects and temperature on Portland cement are studied. The Dynamic Elasticity Module (Ed) in samples of Portland cement paste was evaluated. Ultrassonic technics were applied (resonance frequency and pulse velocity). The samples were irradiated with fast neutrons to fluence of 7,2 x 10 18 n/cm 2 (E approx. 1 MeV), at temperature of 120 + - 5 0 C, due to gamma heating. This temperature was simulated in laboratory in a microwave oven. (Author) [pt

  9. Thermal Equilibrium Dynamic Control Based on DPWM Dual-Mode Modulation of High Power NPC Three-Level Inverter

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Shi-Zhou; He, Feng-You

    2016-01-01

    In some special applications of NPC three-level inverters, such as mine hoist, there exist special conditions of overloading during the whole hoisting process and large overload in starting stage, during which the power-loss calculation of power devices and thermal control are important factors affecting the thermal stability of inverters. The principles of SVPWM and DPWM were described in this paper firstly, based on which the dynamic power losses of the two modulations of hoist in single pe...

  10. Assembly of the MreB-associated cytoskeletal ring of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, Purva; Shih, Yu-Ling; Rothfield, Lawrence

    2009-04-01

    The Escherichia coli actin homologue MreB is part of a helical cytoskeletal structure that winds around the cell between the two poles. It has been shown that MreB redistributes during the cell cycle to form circumferential ring structures that flank the cytokinetic FtsZ ring and appear to be associated with division and segregation of the helical cytoskeleton. We show here that the MreB cytoskeletal ring also contains the MreC, MreD, Pbp2 and RodA proteins. Assembly of MreB, MreC, MreD and Pbp2 into the ring structure required the FtsZ ring but no other known components of the cell division machinery, whereas assembly of RodA into the cytoskeletal ring required one or more additional septasomal components. Strikingly, MreB, MreC, MreD and RodA were each able to independently assemble into the cytoskeletal ring and coiled cytoskeletal structures in the absence of any of the other ring components. This excludes the possibility that one or more of these proteins acts as a scaffold for incorporation of the other proteins into these structures. In contrast, incorporation of Pbp2 required the presence of MreC, which may provide a docking site for Pbp2 entry.

  11. Formation and Dynamics of Waves in a Cortical Model of Cholinergic Modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Roach

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine (ACh is a regulator of neural excitability and one of the neurochemical substrates of sleep. Amongst the cellular effects induced by cholinergic modulation are a reduction in spike-frequency adaptation (SFA and a shift in the phase response curve (PRC. We demonstrate in a biophysical model how changes in neural excitability and network structure interact to create three distinct functional regimes: localized asynchronous, traveling asynchronous, and traveling synchronous. Our results qualitatively match those observed experimentally. Cortical activity during slow wave sleep (SWS differs from that during REM sleep or waking states. During SWS there are traveling patterns of activity in the cortex; in other states stationary patterns occur. Our model is a network composed of Hodgkin-Huxley type neurons with a M-current regulated by ACh. Regulation of ACh level can account for dynamical changes between functional regimes. Reduction of the magnitude of this current recreates the reduction in SFA the shift from a type 2 to a type 1 PRC observed in the presence of ACh. When SFA is minimal (in waking or REM sleep state, high ACh patterns of activity are localized and easily pinned by network inhomogeneities. When SFA is present (decreasing ACh, traveling waves of activity naturally arise. A further decrease in ACh leads to a high degree of synchrony within traveling waves. We also show that the level of ACh determines how sensitive network activity is to synaptic heterogeneity. These regimes may have a profound functional significance as stationary patterns may play a role in the proper encoding of external input as memory and traveling waves could lead to synaptic regularization, giving unique insights into the role and significance of ACh in determining patterns of cortical activity and functional differences arising from the patterns.

  12. Surface dynamics in allosteric regulation of protein-protein interactions: modulation of calmodulin functions by Ca2+.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Y Kuttner

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the structural basis of protein-protein interactions (PPI is of fundamental importance for understanding the organization and functioning of biological networks and advancing the design of therapeutics which target PPI. Allosteric modulators play an important role in regulating such interactions by binding at site(s orthogonal to the complex interface and altering the protein's propensity for complex formation. In this work, we apply an approach recently developed by us for analyzing protein surfaces based on steered molecular dynamics simulation (SMD to the study of the dynamic properties of functionally distinct conformations of a model protein, calmodulin (CaM, whose ability to interact with target proteins is regulated by the presence of the allosteric modulator Ca(2+. Calmodulin is a regulatory protein that acts as an intracellular Ca(2+ sensor to control a wide variety of cellular processes. We demonstrate that SMD analysis is capable of pinpointing CaM surfaces implicated in the recognition of both the allosteric modulator Ca(2+ and target proteins. Our analysis of changes in the dynamic properties of the CaM backbone elicited by Ca(2+ binding yielded new insights into the molecular mechanism of allosteric regulation of CaM-target interactions.

  13. Physical and clinical aspects of the dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy of 21 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engler, Mark J.; Tsai, J.-S.; Ulin, Kenneth; Wu Julian; Ling, Marilyn N.; Fagundes, Marcio; Kramer, Bradley; Wazer, David E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the physical and clinical aspects of the dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy of 21 patients. Methods and Materials: Dynamic, intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMR) was given to 21 patients with advanced or recurrent disease. 13 patients were immobilized with head screws, and 8, with non-invasive thermoplastic masks. The system was selected because it was designed de novo from a well established simulated annealing optimization model (SA), and with stringent leakage requirements and rapid leaf transit time for a multi leaf collimator (MLC). The system included a 6 MV linear accelerator (linac), an MLC, a quad processing computer system with SA software, a computer MLC controller with inclinometers and interlocks to stop radiation upon potential MLC or linac gantry fault detection, and immobilization devices attached to CT and treatment tables. The MLC was built around a 2 x 20 array of leaves with 9 half value layers of attenuation of the primary beam (99.8%). Over a trillion (2 40 ) beamlet patterns were dynamically changeable per deg. of linac gantry rotation. With all leaves shut, transmission was within a secondary collimator standard of < 0.5% of the primary beam. MLC control was via touch screen computer, and a disk drive which read beam pattern sequences from a disk generated by the planning system. Planning included 3D CT and magnetic resonance localization of regions of interest (ROI). The SA cost function incorporated idealized dose-volume parameter sets of up to 21 ROI/patient. Relative importance and spatial pre-eminance of each ROI were quantified into the constraint set, together with an instrument data file (IDR) built from depth dose and crossplot data of 8 x 8 to 20 x 200 mm field sizes and patterns measured with small diodes in a water tanc phantom. Planner output included dose volume histograms, tabulated dosimetry statistics, 2D dose distributions, and 3D translucent renderings of patient surfaces with underlying colored

  14. Optimal sensitometric curves of Kodak EDR2 film for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suriyapee, S; Pitaxtarnin, N; Oonsiri, S; Jumpangern, C; Israngkul Na Ayuthaya, I

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the optimal sensitometric curves of extended dose range (EDR2) radiographic film in terms of depth, field size, dose range and processing conditions for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dosimetry verification with 6 MV X-ray beams. A Varian Clinac 23 EX linear accelerator with 6 MV X-ray beam was used to study the response of Kodak EDR2 film. Measurements were performed at depths of 5, 10 and 15 cm in MedTec virtual water phantom and with field sizes of 2x2, 3x3, 10x10 and 15x15 cm(2). Doses ranging from 20 to 450 cGy were used. The film was developed with the Kodak RP X-OMAT Model M6B automatic film processor. Film response was measured with the Vidar model VXR-16 scanner. Sensitometric curves were applied to the dose profiles measured with film at 5 cm in the virtual water phantom with field sizes of 2x2 and 10x10 cm(2) and compared with ion chamber data. Scanditronix/Wellhofer OmniPro(TM) IMRT software was used for the evaluation of the IMRT plan calculated by Eclipse treatment planning. Investigation of the reproducibility and accuracy of the film responses, which depend mainly on the film processor, was carried out by irradiating one film nine times with doses of 20 to 450 cGy. A maximum standard deviation of 4.9% was found which decreased to 1.9% for doses between 20 and 200 cGy. The sensitometric curves for various field sizes at fixed depth showed a maximum difference of 4.2% between 2x2 and 15x15 cm(2) at 5 cm depth with a dose of 450 cGy. The shallow depth tended to show a greater effect of field size responses than the deeper depths. The sensitometric curves for various depths at fixed field size showed slightly different film responses; the difference due to depth was within 1.8% for all field sizes studied. Both field size and depth effect were reduced when the doses were lower than 450 cGy. The difference was within 2.5% in the dose range from 20 to 300 cGy for all field sizes and depths studied. Dose profiles

  15. Double-Wavelet Approach to Studying the Modulation Properties of Nonstationary Multimode Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovtseva, Olga; Mosekilde, Erik; Pavlov, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    On the basis of double-wavelet analysis, the paper proposes a method to study interactions in the form of frequency and amplitude modulation in nonstationary multimode data series. Special emphasis is given to the problem of quantifying the strength of modulation for a fast signal by a coexisting...

  16. Effects of a modulated vortex structure on the diffraction dynamics of ring Airy Gaussian beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianwei; Shi, Xiaohui; Deng, Zhixiang; Bai, Yanfeng; Fu, Xiquan

    2017-09-01

    The evolution of the ring Airy Gaussian beams with a modulated vortex in free space is numerically investigated. Compared with the unmodulated vortex, the unique property is that the beam spots first break up, and then gather. The evolution of the beams is influenced by the parameters of the vortex modulation, and the splitting phenomenon gets enhanced with multiple rings becoming light spots if the modulation depth increases. The symmetric branch pattern of the beam spots gets changed when the number of phase folds increases, and the initial modulation phase only impacts the angle of the beam spots. Moreover, a large distribution factor correlates to a hollow Gaussian vortex shape and weakens the splitting and gathering trend. By changing the initial parameters of the vortex modulation and the distribution factor, the peak intensity is greatly affected. In addition, the energy flow and the angular momentum are elucidated with the beam evolution features being confirmed.

  17. Quantitative Evaluation of Stomatal Cytoskeletal Patterns during the Activation of Immune Signaling in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Shimono

    Full Text Available Historically viewed as primarily functioning in the regulation of gas and water vapor exchange, it is now evident that stomata serve an important role in plant immunity. Indeed, in addition to classically defined functions related to cell architecture and movement, the actin cytoskeleton has emerged as a central component of the plant immune system, underpinning not only processes related to cell shape and movement, but also receptor activation and signaling. Using high resolution quantitative imaging techniques, the temporal and spatial changes in the actin microfilament array during diurnal cycling of stomatal guard cells has revealed a highly orchestrated transition from random arrays to ordered bundled filaments. While recent studies have demonstrated that plant stomata close in response to pathogen infection, an evaluation of stimulus-induced changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics during immune activation in the guard cell, as well as the relationship of these changes to the function of the actin cytoskeleton and stomatal aperture, remains undefined. In the current study, we employed quantitative cell imaging and hierarchical clustering analyses to define the response of the guard cell actin cytoskeleton to pathogen infection and the elicitation of immune signaling. Using this approach, we demonstrate that stomatal-localized actin filaments respond rapidly, and specifically, to both bacterial phytopathogens and purified pathogen elicitors. Notably, we demonstrate that higher order temporal and spatial changes in the filament array show distinct patterns of organization during immune activation, and that changes in the naïve diurnal oscillations of guard cell actin filaments are perturbed by pathogens, and that these changes parallel pathogen-induced stomatal gating. The data presented herein demonstrate the application of a highly tractable and quantifiable method to assign transitions in actin filament organization to the activation of

  18. Espins are multifunctional actin cytoskeletal regulatory proteins in the microvilli of chemosensory and mechanosensory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekerková, Gabriella; Zheng, Lili; Loomis, Patricia A.; Changyaleket, Benjarat; Whitlon, Donna S.; Mugnaini, Enrico; Bartles, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Espins are associated with the parallel actin bundles of hair cell stereocilia and are the target of mutations that cause deafness and vestibular dysfunction in mice and humans. Here, we report that espins are also concentrated in the microvilli of a number of other sensory cells: vomeronasal organ sensory neurons, solitary chemoreceptor cells, taste cells and Merkel cells. Moreover, we show that hair cells and these other sensory cells contain novel espin isoforms that arise from a different transcriptional start site and differ significantly from other espin isoforms in their complement of ligand-binding activities and their effects on actin polymerization. The novel espin isoforms of sensory cells bundled actin filaments with high affinity in a Ca2+-resistant fashion, bound actin monomer via a WASP homology 2 domain, bound profilin via a single proline-rich peptide, and caused a dramatic elongation of microvillus-type parallel actin bundles in transfected epithelial cells. In addition, the novel espin isoforms of sensory cells differed from other espin isoforms in that they potently inhibited actin polymerization in vitro, did not bind the Src homology 3 domain of the adapter protein insulin receptor substrate p53 and did not bind the acidic, signaling phospholipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5- bisphosphate. Thus, the espins constitute a family of multifunctional actin cytoskeletal regulatory proteins with the potential to differentially influence the organization, dimensions, dynamics and signaling capabilities of the actin filament-rich, microvillus-type specializations that mediate sensory transduction in a variety of mechanosensory and chemosensory cells. PMID:15190118

  19. The dynamics of integrate-and-fire: mean versus variance modulations and dependence on baseline parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, Joanna; Troyer, Todd W

    2011-05-01

    The leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) is the simplest neuron model that captures the essential properties of neuronal signaling. Yet common intuitions are inadequate to explain basic properties of LIF responses to sinusoidal modulations of the input. Here we examine responses to low and moderate frequency modulations of both the mean and variance of the input current and quantify how these responses depend on baseline parameters. Across parameters, responses to modulations in the mean current are low pass, approaching zero in the limit of high frequencies. For very low baseline firing rates, the response cutoff frequency matches that expected from membrane integration. However, the cutoff shows a rapid, supralinear increase with firing rate, with a steeper increase in the case of lower noise. For modulations of the input variance, the gain at high frequency remains finite. Here, we show that the low-frequency responses depend strongly on baseline parameters and derive an analytic condition specifying the parameters at which responses switch from being dominated by low versus high frequencies. Additionally, we show that the resonant responses for variance modulations have properties not expected for common oscillatory resonances: they peak at frequencies higher than the baseline firing rate and persist when oscillatory spiking is disrupted by high noise. Finally, the responses to mean and variance modulations are shown to have a complementary dependence on baseline parameters at higher frequencies, resulting in responses to modulations of Poisson input rates that are independent of baseline input statistics.

  20. Quinolinic acid neurotoxicity: Differential roles of astrocytes and microglia via FGF-2-mediated signaling in redox-linked cytoskeletal changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierozan, Paula; Biasibetti, Helena; Schmitz, Felipe; Ávila, Helena; Parisi, Mariana M; Barbe-Tuana, Florencia; Wyse, Angela T S; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2016-12-01

    QUIN is a glutamate agonist playing a role in the misregulation of the cytoskeleton, which is associated with neurodegeneration in rats. In this study, we focused on microglial activation, FGF2/Erk signaling, gap junctions (GJs), inflammatory parameters and redox imbalance acting on cytoskeletal dynamics of the in QUIN-treated neural cells of rat striatum. FGF-2/Erk signaling was not altered in QUIN-treated primary astrocytes or neurons, however cytoskeleton was disrupted. In co-cultured astrocytes and neurons, QUIN-activated FGF2/Erk signaling prevented the cytoskeleton from remodeling. In mixed cultures (astrocyte, neuron, microglia), QUIN-induced FGF-2 increased level failed to activate Erk and promoted cytoskeletal destabilization. The effects of QUIN in mixed cultures involved redox imbalance upstream of Erk activation. Decreased connexin 43 (Cx43) immunocontent and functional GJs, was also coincident with disruption of the cytoskeleton in primary astrocytes and mixed cultures. We postulate that in interacting astrocytes and neurons the cytoskeleton is preserved against the insult of QUIN by activation of FGF-2/Erk signaling and proper cell-cell interaction through GJs. In mixed cultures, the FGF-2/Erk signaling is blocked by the redox imbalance associated with microglial activation and disturbed cell communication, disrupting the cytoskeleton. Thus, QUIN signal activates differential mechanisms that could stabilize or destabilize the cytoskeleton of striatal astrocytes and neurons in culture, and glial cells play a pivotal role in these responses preserving or disrupting a combination of signaling pathways and cell-cell interactions. Taken together, our findings shed light into the complex role of the active interaction of astrocytes, neurons and microglia in the neurotoxicity of QUIN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery using dynamic micro-multileaf collimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, Stanley H.; Cardinale, Robert M.; Wu Qiuwen; Zwicker, Robert D.; Broaddus, William C.; Mohan, Radhe

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The implementation of dynamic leaf motion on a micro-multileaf collimator system provides the capability for intensity-modulated stereotactic radiosurgery (IMSRS), and the consequent potential for improved dose distributions for irregularly shaped tumor volumes adjacent to critical organs. This study explores the use of IMSRS to provide improved tumor coverage and normal tissue sparing for small cranial tumors relative to plans based on multiple fixed uniform-intensity beams or traditional circular collimator arc-based stereotactic techniques. Methods and Materials: Four patient cases involving small brain lesions are presented and analyzed. The cases were chosen to include a representative selection of target shapes, number of targets, and adjacent critical areas. Patient plans generated for these comparisons include standard arcs with multiple circular collimators, and fixed noncoplanar static fields with uniform-intensity beams and IMSRS. Parameters used for evaluation of the plans include the percentage of irradiated volume to tumor volume (PITV), normal tissue dose-volume histograms, and dose-homogeneity ratios. All IMSRS plans were computed using previously established IMRT techniques adapted for use with the BrainLAB M3 micro-multileaf collimator. The algorithms comprising the IMRT system for optimization of intensity distributions and conversion into leaf trajectories of the BrainLab M3 were developed at our institution. The ADAC Pinnacle 3 radiation treatment-planning system was used for dose calculations and for input of contours for target volumes and normal critical structures. Results: For all cases, the IMSRS plans showed a high degree of conformity of the dose distribution with the target shape. The IMSRS plans provided either (1) a smaller volume of normal tissue irradiated to significant dose levels, generally taken as doses greater than 50% of the prescription, or (2) a lower dose to an important adjacent critical organ. The reduction in

  2. Hippocampal Ripple Oscillations and Inhibition-First Network Models: Frequency Dynamics and Response to GABA Modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso, José R; Schmitz, Dietmar; Maier, Nikolaus; Kempter, Richard

    2018-03-21

    Hippocampal ripples are involved in memory consolidation, but the mechanisms underlying their generation remain unclear. Models relying on interneuron networks in the CA1 region disagree on the predominant source of excitation to interneurons: either "direct," via the Schaffer collaterals that provide feedforward input from CA3 to CA1, or "indirect," via the local pyramidal cells in CA1, which are embedded in a recurrent excitatory-inhibitory network. Here, we used physiologically constrained computational models of basket-cell networks to investigate how they respond to different conditions of transient, noisy excitation. We found that direct excitation of interneurons could evoke ripples (140-220 Hz) that exhibited intraripple frequency accommodation and were frequency-insensitive to GABA modulators, as previously shown in in vitro experiments. In addition, the indirect excitation of the basket-cell network enabled the expression of intraripple frequency accommodation in the fast-gamma range (90-140 Hz), as in vivo In our model, intraripple frequency accommodation results from a hysteresis phenomenon in which the frequency responds differentially to the rising and descending phases of the transient excitation. Such a phenomenon predicts a maximum oscillation frequency occurring several milliseconds before the peak of excitation. We confirmed this prediction for ripples in brain slices from male mice. These results suggest that ripple and fast-gamma episodes are produced by the same interneuron network that is recruited via different excitatory input pathways, which could be supported by the previously reported intralaminar connectivity bias between basket cells and functionally distinct subpopulations of pyramidal cells in CA1. Together, our findings unify competing inhibition-first models of rhythm generation in the hippocampus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The hippocampus is a part of the brain of humans and other mammals that is critical for the acquisition and

  3. Precortical phase of Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-related tau cytoskeletal pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratmann, Katharina; Heinsen, Helmut; Korf, Horst-Werner; Del Turco, Domenico; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Seidel, Kay; Bouzrou, Mohamed; Grinberg, Lea T.; Bohl, Jürgen; Wharton, Stephen B; den Dunnen, Wilfred; Rüb, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) represents the most frequent progressive neuropsychiatric disorder worldwide leading to dementia and accounts for 60 to 70% of demented individuals. In view of the early appearance of neuronal deposits of the hyperphosphorylated cytoskeletal protein tau in the transentorhinal and entorhinal regions of the allocortex (i.e. in Braak and Braak AD stage I in the evolution of the AD-related cortical tau cytoskeletal pathology) it has been believed for a long time that these allocortical regions represent the first brain targets of the AD-related tau cytoskeletal pathology. However, recent pathoanatomical studies suggested that the subcortical brain nuclei that send efferent projections to the transentorhinal and entorhinal regions may also comprise AD-related cytoskeletal changes already at very early Braak and Braak AD stages. In order to corroborate these initial results we systematically investigated the presence and extent of the AD-related cytoskeletal pathology in serial thick tissue sections through all the subcortical nuclei known to send efferent projections to these vulnerable allocortical regions of three individuals with Braak and Braak AD stage 0 and fourteen individuals with Braak and Braak AD stage I by means of immunostainings with the anti-tau antibody AT8. These investigations revealed consistent AT8 immunoreactive neuronal tau cytoskeletal pathology in a subset of these subcortical nuclei (i.e. medial septal nucleus, nuclei of the vertical and horizontal limbs of the diagonal band of Broca, basal nucleus of Meynert; claustrum; hypothalamic ventromedial, tuberomamillary and supramamillary nuclei, perifornical region and lateral area; thalamic central medial, laterodorsal, subparafascicular, and central lateral nuclei, medial pulvinar and limitans-suprageniculate complex; peripeduncular nucleus, dopaminergic substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, periaqueductal gray, midbrain and pontine dorsal raphe nuclei, locus

  4. Modelling the heat dynamics of building integrated and ventilated photovoltaic modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friling, N.; Jimenez, M.J.; Bloem, H.

    2009-01-01

    the heat transfer from the PV module. The experiment and data originate from a test reference module the EC-JRC Ispra. The set-up provides the opportunity of changing physical parameters, the ventilation speed and the type of air flow, and this makes it possible to determine the preferable set......, are applied in the set-up combined with high level of air flow. The improved description by the model is mainly seen in periods with high solar radiation....

  5. Requirements for a Dynamic Solvent Extraction Module to Support Development of Advanced Technologies for the Recycle of Used Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, Jack; Rutledge, Veronica; Pereira, Candido; Copple, Jackie; Frey, Kurt; Krebs, John; Maggos, Laura; Nichols, Kevin; Wardle, Kent; Sadasivan, Pratap; DeAlmieda, Valmor; Depaoli, David

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program has been established to create and deploy next generation, verified and validated nuclear energy modeling and simulation capabilities for the design, implementation, and operation of future nuclear energy systems to improve the U.S. energy security. As part of the NEAMS program, Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC's) are being produced to significantly advance the status of modeling and simulation of energy systems beyond what is currently available to the extent that the new codes be readily functional in the short term and extensible in the longer term. The four IPSC areas include Safeguards and Separations, Reactors, Fuels, and Waste Forms. As part of the Safeguards and Separations (SafeSeps) IPSC effort, interoperable process models are being developed that enable dynamic simulation of an advanced separations plant. A SafeSepss IPSC 'toolkit' is in development to enable the integration of separation process modules and safeguards tools into the design process by providing an environment to compose, verify and validate a simulation application to be used for analysis of various plant configurations and operating conditions. The modules of this toolkit will be implemented on a modern, expandable architecture with the flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options while preserving their stand-alone usability. Modules implemented at the plant-level will initially incorporate relatively simple representations for each process through a reduced modeling approach. Final versions will incorporate the capability to bridge to subscale models to provide required fidelity in chemical and physical processes. A dynamic solvent extraction model and its module implementation are needed to support the development of this integrated plant model. As a stand-alone application, it will also support solvent development of extraction flowsheets and integrated

  6. Requirements for a Dynamic Solvent Extraction Module to Support Development of Advanced Technologies for the Recycle of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jack Law; Veronica Rutledge; Candido Pereira; Jackie Copple; Kurt Frey; John Krebs; Laura Maggos; Kevin Nichols; Kent Wardle; Pratap Sadasivan; Valmor DeAlmieda; David Depaoli

    2011-06-01

    The Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Program has been established to create and deploy next generation, verified and validated nuclear energy modeling and simulation capabilities for the design, implementation, and operation of future nuclear energy systems to improve the U.S. energy security. As part of the NEAMS program, Integrated Performance and Safety Codes (IPSC's) are being produced to significantly advance the status of modeling and simulation of energy systems beyond what is currently available to the extent that the new codes be readily functional in the short term and extensible in the longer term. The four IPSC areas include Safeguards and Separations, Reactors, Fuels, and Waste Forms. As part of the Safeguards and Separations (SafeSeps) IPSC effort, interoperable process models are being developed that enable dynamic simulation of an advanced separations plant. A SafeSepss IPSC 'toolkit' is in development to enable the integration of separation process modules and safeguards tools into the design process by providing an environment to compose, verify and validate a simulation application to be used for analysis of various plant configurations and operating conditions. The modules of this toolkit will be implemented on a modern, expandable architecture with the flexibility to explore and evaluate a wide range of process options while preserving their stand-alone usability. Modules implemented at the plant-level will initially incorporate relatively simple representations for each process through a reduced modeling approach. Final versions will incorporate the capability to bridge to subscale models to provide required fidelity in chemical and physical processes. A dynamic solvent extraction model and its module implementation are needed to support the development of this integrated plant model. As a stand-alone application, it will also support solvent development of extraction flowsheets

  7. Reverse micelles as a tool for probing solvent modulation of protein dynamics: Reverse micelle encapsulated hemoglobin☆

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Camille J.; Dantsker, David; Heller, Elizabeth R.; Sabat, Joseph E.; Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Hydration waters impact protein dynamics. Dissecting the interplay between hydration waters and dynamics requires a protein that manifests a broad range of dynamics. Proteins in reverse micelles (RMs) have promise as tools to achieve this objective because the water content can be manipulated. Hemoglobin is an appropriate tool with which to probe hydration effects. We describe both a protocol for hemoglobin encapsulation in reverse micelles and a facile method using PEG and cosolvents to mani...

  8. Volume of interest CBCT and tube current modulation for image guidance using dynamic kV collimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, David, E-mail: david.parsons@dal.ca, E-mail: james.robar@nshealth.ca [Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 1V7 (Canada); Robar, James L., E-mail: david.parsons@dal.ca, E-mail: james.robar@nshealth.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology and Department of Physics and Atmospheric Science, Dalhousie University, 5820 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 1V7 (Canada)

    2016-04-15

    Purpose: The focus of this work is the development of a novel blade collimation system enabling volume of interest (VOI) CBCT with tube current modulation using the kV image guidance source on a linear accelerator. Advantages of the system are assessed, particularly with regard to reduction and localization of dose and improvement of image quality. Methods: A four blade dynamic kV collimator was developed to track a VOI during a CBCT acquisition. The current prototype is capable of tracking an arbitrary volume defined by the treatment planner for subsequent CBCT guidance. During gantry rotation, the collimator tracks the VOI with adjustment of position and dimension. CBCT image quality was investigated as a function of collimator dimension, while maintaining the same dose to the VOI, for a 22.2 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom with a 9 mm diameter bone insert centered on isocenter. Dose distributions were modeled using a dynamic BEAMnrc library and DOSXYZnrc. The resulting VOI dose distributions were compared to full-field CBCT distributions to quantify dose reduction and localization to the target volume. A novel method of optimizing x-ray tube current during CBCT acquisition was developed and assessed with regard to contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and imaging dose. Results: Measurements show that the VOI CBCT method using the dynamic blade system yields an increase in contrast-to-noise ratio by a factor of approximately 2.2. Depending upon the anatomical site, dose was reduced to 15%–80% of the full-field CBCT value along the central axis plane and down to less than 1% out of plane. The use of tube current modulation allowed for specification of a desired SNR within projection data. For approximately the same dose to the VOI, CNR was further increased by a factor of 1.2 for modulated VOI CBCT, giving a combined improvement of 2.6 compared to full-field CBCT. Conclusions: The present dynamic blade system provides significant improvements in CNR for the same

  9. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy: dynamic MLC (DMLC) therapy, multisegment therapy and tomotherapy. An example of QA in DMLC therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, S.

    1998-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy will make a quantum leap in tumor control. It is the new radiation therapy for the new millennium. The major methods to achieve IMRT are: 1. Dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) therapy, 2. multisegment therapy, and 3. tomotherapy. The principles of these 3 techniques are briefly reviewed. Each technique presents unique QA issues which are outlined. As an example this paper will present the results of a recent new study of an important QA concern in DMLC therapy. (orig.) [de

  10. Cooperation of the BTB-Zinc finger protein, Abrupt, with cytoskeletal regulators in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezaket Turkel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The deregulation of cell polarity or cytoskeletal regulators is a common occurrence in human epithelial cancers. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence in human epithelial cancer that BTB-ZF genes, such as Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, are oncogenic. From our previous studies in the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, we have identified a cooperative interaction between a mutation in the apico-basal cell polarity regulator Scribble (Scrib and overexpression of the BTB-ZF protein Abrupt (Ab. Herein, we show that co-expression of ab with actin cytoskeletal regulators, RhoGEF2 or Src64B, in the developing eye-antennal epithelial tissue results in the formation of overgrown amorphous tumours, whereas ab and DRac1 co-expression leads to non-cell autonomous overgrowth. Together with ab, these genes affect the expression of differentiation genes, resulting in tumours locked in a progenitor cell fate. Finally, we show that the expression of two mammalian genes related to ab, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, which are oncogenes in mammalian epithelial cancers, significantly correlate with the upregulation of cytoskeletal genes or downregulation of apico-basal cell polarity neoplastic tumour suppressor genes in colorectal, lung and other human epithelial cancers. Altogether, this analysis has revealed that upregulation of cytoskeletal regulators cooperate with Abrupt in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis, and that high expression of human BTB-ZF genes, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, shows significant correlations with cytoskeletal and cell polarity gene expression in specific epithelial tumour types. This highlights the need for further investigation of the cooperation between these genes in mammalian systems.

  11. A Legionella Effector Disrupts Host Cytoskeletal Structure by Cleaving Actin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaires' disease, replicates intracellularly in protozoan and human hosts. Successful colonization and replication of this pathogen in host cells requires the Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system, which translocates approximately 300 effector proteins into the host cell to modulate various cellular processes. In this study, we identified RavK as a Dot/Icm substrate that targets the host cytoskeleton and reduces actin filament abundance in mammalian cells upon ectopic expression. RavK harbors an H95EXXH99 motif associated with diverse metalloproteases, which is essential for the inhibition of yeast growth and for the induction of cell rounding in HEK293T cells. We demonstrate that the actin protein itself is the cellular target of RavK and that this effector cleaves actin at a site between residues Thr351 and Phe352. Importantly, RavK-mediated actin cleavage also occurs during L. pneumophila infection. Cleavage by RavK abolishes the ability of actin to form polymers. Furthermore, an F352A mutation renders actin resistant to RavK-mediated cleavage; expression of the mutant in mammalian cells suppresses the cell rounding phenotype caused by RavK, further establishing that actin is the physiological substrate of RavK. Thus, L. pneumophila exploits components of the host cytoskeleton by multiple effectors with distinct mechanisms, highlighting the importance of modulating cellular processes governed by the actin cytoskeleton in the intracellular life cycle of this pathogen.

  12. Simulating forest fuel and fire risk dynamics across landscapes--LANDIS fuel module design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong S. He; Bo Z. Shang; Thomas R. Crow; Eric J. Gustafson; Stephen R. Shifley

    2004-01-01

    Understanding fuel dynamics over large spatial (103-106 ha) and temporal scales (101-103 years) is important in comprehensive wildfire management. We present a modeling approach to simulate fuel and fire risk dynamics as well as impacts of alternative fuel treatments. The...

  13. Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor-factor VIII-derived peptide MSP68 is a cytoskeletal immunomodulator of neutrophils that inhibits Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Louie; Aziz, Monowar; Yang, Weng-Lang; Nicastro, Jeffrey; Coppa, Gene F; Symons, Marc; Wang, Ping

    2017-02-01

    Prolonged neutrophil infiltration leads to exaggerated inflammation and tissue damage during sepsis. Neutrophil migration requires rearrangement of their cytoskeleton. Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor-factor VIII-derived short peptide 68 (MSP68) has recently been shown to be beneficial in sepsis-induced tissue injury and mortality. We hypothesize that MSP68 inhibits neutrophil migration by modulating small GTPase Rac1-dependent cytoskeletal rearrangements. Bone marrow-derived neutrophils (BMDNs) or whole lung digest isolated neutrophils were isolated from 8 to 10 wk old C57BL/6 mice by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. The purity of BMDN was verified by flow cytometry with CD11b/Gr-1 staining. Neutrophils were stimulated with N-formylmethionine-leucine-phenylalanine (f-MLP) (10 nM) in the presence or absence of MSP68 at 10 nM or cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) was used to induce sepsis, and MSP68 was administered at 1 mg/kg intravenously. Cytoskeletal organization was assessed by phalloidin staining, followed by analysis using fluorescence microscopy. Activity of the Rac1 GTPase in f-MLP or CLP-activated BMDN in the presence or absence of MSP68 was assessed by GTPase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activity was determined by western blot densitometry. BMDN treatment with f-MLP increased cytoskeletal remodeling as revealed by the localization of filamentous actin to the periphery of the neutrophil. By contrast, cells pretreated with MSP68 had considerably reduced filamentous actin polymerization. Cytoskeletal spreading is associated with the activation of the small GTPase Rac1. We found BMDN-treated with f-MLP or that were exposed to sepsis by CLP had increased Rac1 signaling, whereas the cells pretreated with MSP68 had significantly reduced Rac1 activation (P Rac1-MAP kinase-mediated neutrophil motility. Thus, MSP68 is a novel therapeutic candidate for regulating inflammation and tissue damage caused

  14. Construction of a dynamic model for a PEM power module with applications to distributed power generation. Paper no. IGEC-1-086

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z.; Jiang, J.; Wu, B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with dynamic model construction for a PEM fuel cell power module with potential applications for distributed power generation. In particular, the effects of temperature and variations in the internal impedance as load changes have been considered. Analytical models are synthesized first by using the measurements taken at different operating conditions, and then these models are validated by performing static as well as dynamic tests on the fuel cells. The results have indicated that the models indeed represent the dynamic behaviour of the fuel cell power module accurately. (author)

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Host Cytoskeletal Rearrangements by Shigella Invasins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hyuck Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen-induced reorganization of the host cell cytoskeleton is a common strategy utilized in host cell invasion by many facultative intracellular bacteria, such as Shigella, Listeria, enteroinvasive E. coli and Salmonella. Shigella is an enteroinvasive intracellular pathogen that preferentially infects human epithelial cells and causes bacillary dysentery. Invasion of Shigella into intestinal epithelial cells requires extensive remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton with the aid of pathogenic effector proteins injected into the host cell by the activity of the type III secretion system. These so-called Shigella invasins, including IpaA, IpaC, IpgB1, IpgB2 and IpgD, modulate the actin-regulatory system in a concerted manner to guarantee efficient entry of the bacteria into host cells.

  16. Dosimetric and qualitative analysis of kinetic properties of millennium 80 multileaf collimator system for dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj Anup

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyze the positional accuracy, kinetic properties of the dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC and dosimetric evaluation of fractional dose delivery for the intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT for step and shoot and sliding window (dynamic techniques of Varian multileaf collimator millennium 80. Various quality assurance tests such as accuracy in leaf positioning and speed, stability of dynamic MLC output, inter and intra leaf transmission, dosimetric leaf separation and multiple carriage field verification were performed. Evaluation of standard field patterns as pyramid, peaks, wedge, chair, garden fence test, picket fence test and sweeping gap output was done. Patient dose quality assurance procedure consists of an absolute dose measurement for all fields at 5 cm depth on solid water phantom using 0.6cc water proof ion chamber and relative dose verification using Kodak EDR-2 films for all treatment fields along transverse and coronal direction using IMRT phantom. The relative dose verification was performed using Omni Pro IMRT film verification software. The tests performed showed acceptable results for commissioning the millennium 80 MLC and Clinac DHX for dynamic and step and shoot IMRT treatments.

  17. Energetic changes caused by antigenic module insertion in a virus-like particle revealed by experiment and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    Full Text Available The success of recombinant virus-like particles (VLPs for human papillomavirus and hepatitis B demonstrates the potential of VLPs as safe and efficacious vaccines. With new modular designs emerging, the effects of antigen module insertion on the self-assembly and structural integrity of VLPs should be clarified so as to better enabling improved design. Previous work has revealed insights into the molecular energetics of a VLP subunit, capsomere, comparing energetics within various solution conditions known to drive or inhibit self-assembly. In the present study, molecular dynamics (MD simulations coupled with the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA method were performed to examine the molecular interactions and energetics in a modular capsomere of a murine polyomavirus (MPV VLP designed to protect against influenza. Insertion of an influenza antigenic module is found to lower the binding energy within the capsomere, and a more active state is observed in Assembly Buffer as compared with that in Stabilization Buffer, which has been experimentally validated through measurements using differential scanning calorimetry. Further in-depth analysis based on free-energy decomposition indicates that destabilized binding can be attributed to electrostatic interaction induced by the chosen antigen module. These results provide molecular insights into the conformational stability of capsomeres and their abilities to be exploited for antigen presentation, and are expected to be beneficial for the biomolecular engineering of VLP vaccines.

  18. Analytical formulation for modulation of time-resolved dynamical Franz-Keldysh effect by electron excitation in dielectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otobe, T.

    2017-12-01

    Analytical formulation of subcycle modulation (SCM) of dielectrics including electron excitation is presented. The SCM is sensitive to not only the time-resolved dynamical Franz-Keldysh effect (Tr-DFKE) [T. Otobe et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 045124 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.045124], which is the nonlinear response without the electron excitation, but also the excited electrons. The excited electrons enhance the modulation with even harmonics of pump laser frequency, and generate the odd-harmonics components. The new aspect of SCM is a consequence of (i) the interference between the electrons excited by the pump laser and those excited by the probe-pulse laser and (ii) oscillation of the generated wave packed by the pump laser. When the probe- and pump-pulse polarizations are parallel, the enhancement of the even harmonics and the generation of the odd-harmonics modulation appear. However, if the polarizations are orthogonal, the effect arising from the electron excitations becomes weak. By comparing the parabolic and cosine band models, I found that the electrons under the intense laser field move as quasifree particles.

  19. Zearalenone altered the cytoskeletal structure via ER stress- autophagy- oxidative stress pathway in mouse TM4 Sertoli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wanglong; Wang, Bingjie; Si, Mengxue; Zou, Hui; Song, Ruilong; Gu, Jianhong; Yuan, Yan; Liu, Xuezhong; Zhu, Guoqiang; Bai, Jianfa; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, ZongPing

    2018-02-20

    The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the destruction of cytoskeletal structure by Zearalenone (ZEA) in mouse-derived TM4 cells. In order to investigate the role of autophagy, oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum(ER) stress in the process of destruction of cytoskeletal structure, the effects of ZEA on the cell viability, cytoskeletal structure, autophagy, oxidative stress, ER stress, MAPK and PI3K- AKT- mTOR signaling pathways were studied. The data demonstrated that ZEA damaged the cytoskeletal structure through the induction of autophagy that leads to the alteration of cytoskeletal structure via elevated oxidative stress. Our results further showed that the autophagy was stimulated by ZEA through PI3K-AKT-mTOR and MAPK signaling pathways in TM4 cells. In addition, ZEA also induced the ER stress which was involved in the induction of the autophagy through inhibiting the ERK signal pathway to suppress the phosphorylation of mTOR. ER stress was involved in the damage of cytoskeletal structure through induction of autophagy by producing ROS. Taken together, this study revealed that ZEA altered the cytoskeletal structure via oxidative stress - autophagy- ER stress pathway in mouse TM4 Sertoli cells.

  20. Localized nonlinear waves and dynamical stability in spinor Bose–Einstein condensates with time–space modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yu-Qin; Han, Wei; Li, Ji; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2018-05-01

    Nonlinearity is one of the most remarkable characteristics of Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs). Much work has been done on one- and two-component BECs with time- or space-modulated nonlinearities, while there is little work on spinor BECs with space–time-modulated nonlinearities. In the present paper we investigate localized nonlinear waves and dynamical stability in spinor Bose–Einstein condensates with nonlinearities dependent on time and space. We solve the three coupled Gross–Pitaevskii equations by similarity transformation and obtain two families of exact matter wave solutions in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions and the Mathieu equation. The localized states of the spinor matter wave describe the dynamics of vector breathing solitons, moving breathing solitons, quasi-breathing solitons and resonant solitons. The results show that one-order vector breathing solitons, quasi-breathing solitons, resonant solitons and the moving breathing solitons ψ ±1 are all stable, but the moving breathing soliton ψ 0 is unstable. We also present the experimental parameters to realize these phenomena in future experiments.

  1. Dynamic Circadian Modulation in a Biomathematical Model for the Effects of Sleep and Sleep Loss on Waking Neurobehavioral Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Peter; Kalachev, Leonid V.; Mollicone, Daniel J.; Banks, Siobhan; Dinges, David F.; Van Dongen, Hans P. A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental observations and theoretical advances have indicated that the homeostatic equilibrium for sleep/wake regulation—and thereby sensitivity to neurobehavioral impairment from sleep loss—is modulated by prior sleep/wake history. This phenomenon was predicted by a biomathematical model developed to explain changes in neurobehavioral performance across days in laboratory studies of total sleep deprivation and sustained sleep restriction. The present paper focuses on the dynamics of neurobehavioral performance within days in this biomathematical model of fatigue. Without increasing the number of model parameters, the model was updated by incorporating time-dependence in the amplitude of the circadian modulation of performance. The updated model was calibrated using a large dataset from three laboratory experiments on psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) performance, under conditions of sleep loss and circadian misalignment; and validated using another large dataset from three different laboratory experiments. The time-dependence of circadian amplitude resulted in improved goodness-of-fit in night shift schedules, nap sleep scenarios, and recovery from prior sleep loss. The updated model predicts that the homeostatic equilibrium for sleep/wake regulation—and thus sensitivity to sleep loss—depends not only on the duration but also on the circadian timing of prior sleep. This novel theoretical insight has important implications for predicting operator alertness during work schedules involving circadian misalignment such as night shift work. Citation: McCauley P; Kalachev LV; Mollicone DJ; Banks S; Dinges DF; Van Dongen HPA. Dynamic circadian modulation in a biomathematical model for the effects of sleep and sleep loss on waking neurobehavioral performance. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1987-1997. PMID:24293775

  2. Dynamic range enhancement and amplitude regeneration in single pump fibre optic parametric amplifiers using DPSK modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peucheret, Christophe; Lorenzen, Michael Rodas; Seoane, Jorge

    2008-01-01

    Input power dynamic range enhancement and amplitude regeneration of highly distorted signals are demonstrated experimentally for 40 Gbit/s RZ-DPSK in a single-pump fibre parametric amplifier with 22 dB smallsignal gain.......Input power dynamic range enhancement and amplitude regeneration of highly distorted signals are demonstrated experimentally for 40 Gbit/s RZ-DPSK in a single-pump fibre parametric amplifier with 22 dB smallsignal gain....

  3. Trusted Bytecode Virtual Machine Module: A Novel Method for Dynamic Remote Attestation in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songzhu Mei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing bring a tremendous complexity to information security. Remote attestation can be used to establish trust relationship in cloud. TBVMM is designed to extend the existing chain of trust into the software layers to support dynamic remote attestation for cloud computing. TBVMM uses Bayesian network and Kalman filter to solve the dynamicity of the trusted relationship. It is proposed to fill the trust gap between the infrastructure and upper software stacks.

  4. Dynamics of neuromodulatory feedback determines frequency modulation in a reduced respiratory network: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporikova, Natalia; Butera, Robert J

    2013-02-01

    Neuromodulators, such as amines and neuropeptides, alter the activity of neurons and neuronal networks. In this work, we investigate how neuromodulators, which activate G(q)-protein second messenger systems, can modulate the bursting frequency of neurons in a critical portion of the respiratory neural network, the pre-Bötzinger complex (preBötC). These neurons are a vital part of the ponto-medullary neuronal network, which generates a stable respiratory rhythm whose frequency is regulated by neuromodulator release from the nearby Raphe nucleus. Using a simulated 50-cell network of excitatory preBötC neurons with a heterogeneous distribution of persistent sodium conductance and Ca(2+), we determined conditions for frequency modulation in such a network by simulating interaction between Raphe and preBötC nuclei. We found that the positive feedback between the Raphe excitability and preBötC activity induces frequency modulation in the preBötC neurons. In addition, the frequency of the respiratory rhythm can be regulated via phasic release of excitatory neuromodulators from the Raphe nucleus. We predict that the application of a G(q) antagonist will eliminate this frequency modulation by the Raphe and keep the network frequency constant and low. In contrast, application of a G(q) agonist will result in a high frequency for all levels of Raphe stimulation. Our modeling results also suggest that high [K(+)] requirement in respiratory brain slice experiments may serve as a compensatory mechanism for low neuromodulatory tone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytoskeletal Tropomyosin Tm5NM1 Is Required for Normal Excitation–Contraction Coupling in Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Vlahovich, Nicole; Kee, Anthony J.; Van der Poel, Chris; Kettle, Emma; Hernandez-Deviez, Delia; Lucas, Christine; Lynch, Gordon S.; Parton, Robert G.; Gunning, Peter W.; Hardeman, Edna C.

    2009-01-01

    The functional diversity of the actin microfilaments relies in part on the actin binding protein tropomyosin (Tm). The muscle-specific Tms regulate actin-myosin interactions and hence contraction. However, there is less known about the roles of the numerous cytoskeletal isoforms. We have shown previously that a cytoskeletal Tm, Tm5NM1, defines a Z-line adjacent cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle. Recently, we identified a second cytoskeletal Tm in this region, Tm4. Here we show that Tm4 and Tm5N...

  6. Kaempferol inhibits Entamoeba histolytica growth by altering cytoskeletal functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolaños, Verónica; Díaz-Martínez, Alfredo; Soto, Jacqueline; Marchat, Laurence A; Sanchez-Monroy, Virginia; Ramírez-Moreno, Esther

    2015-11-01

    The flavonoid kaempferol obtained from Helianthemum glomeratum, an endemic Mexican medicinal herb used to treat gastrointestinal disorders, has been shown to inhibit growth of Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites in vitro; however, the mechanisms associated with this activity have not been documented. Several works reported that kaempferol affects cytoskeleton in mammalian cells. In order to gain insights into the action mechanisms involved in the anti-amoebic effect of kaempferol, here we evaluated the effect of this compound on the pathogenic events driven by the cytoskeleton during E. histolytica infection. We also carried out a two dimensional gel-based proteomic analysis to evidence modulated proteins that could explain the phenotypical changes observed in trophozoites. Our results showed that kaempferol produces a dose-dependent effect on trophozoites growth and viability with optimal concentration being 27.7 μM. Kaempferol also decreased adhesion, it increased migration and phagocytic activity, but it did not affect erythrocyte binding nor cytolytic capacity of E. histolytica. Congruently, proteomic analysis revealed that the cytoskeleton proteins actin, myosin II heavy chain and cortexillin II were up-regulated in response to kaempferol treatment. In conclusion, kaempferol anti-amoebic effects were associated with deregulation of proteins related with cytoskeleton, which altered invasion mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code. Marine Hydrokinetic Module User's Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James, Scott Carlton; Roberts, Jesse D

    2014-03-01

    This document describes the marine hydrokinetic (MHK) input file and subroutines for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC), which is a combined hydrodynamic, sediment transport, and water quality model based on the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) developed by John Hamrick [1], formerly sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and now maintained by Tetra Tech, Inc. SNL-EFDC has been previously enhanced with the incorporation of the SEDZLJ sediment dynamics model developed by Ziegler, Lick, and Jones [2-4]. SNL-EFDC has also been upgraded to more accurately simulate algae growth with specific application to optimizing biomass in an open-channel raceway for biofuels production [5]. A detailed description of the input file containing data describing the MHK device/array is provided, along with a description of the MHK FORTRAN routine. Both a theoretical description of the MHK dynamics as incorporated into SNL-EFDC and an explanation of the source code are provided. This user manual is meant to be used in conjunction with the original EFDC [6] and sediment dynamics SNL-EFDC manuals [7]. Through this document, the authors provide information for users who wish to model the effects of an MHK device (or array of devices) on a flow system with EFDC and who also seek a clear understanding of the source code, which is available from staff in the Water Power Technologies Department at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  8. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E.; Klip, Janna E.; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J.; Danen, Erik H. J.; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  9. Dosimetric verification for primary focal hypermetabolism of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yong; Wang, Jia-Yang; Li, Liang; Tang, Tian-You; Liu, Gui-Hong; Wang, Jian-She; Xu, Yu-Mei; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Long-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    To make sure the feasibility with (18F)FDG PET/CT to guided dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients, by dosimetric verification before treatment. Chose 11 patients in III~IVA nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with functional image-guided IMRT and absolute and relative dosimetric verification by Varian 23EX LA, ionization chamber, 2DICA of I'mRT Matrixx and IBA detachable phantom. Drawing outline and making treatment plan were by different imaging techniques (CT and (18F)FDG PET/CT). The dose distributions of the various regional were realized by SMART. The absolute mean errors of interest area were 2.39%±0.66 using 0.6 cc ice chamber. Results using DTA method, the average relative dose measurements within our protocol (3%, 3 mm) were 87.64% at 300 MU/min in all filed. Dosimetric verification before IMRT is obligatory and necessary. Ionization chamber and 2DICA of I'mRT Matrixx was the effective dosimetric verification tool for primary focal hyper metabolism in functional image-guided dynamic IMRT for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Our preliminary evidence indicates that functional image-guided dynamic IMRT is feasible.

  10. Relaxation dynamics of femtosecond-laser-induced temperature modulation on the surfaces of metals and semiconductors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Levy, Yoann; Derrien, Thibault; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Gurevich, E.L.; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 374, Jun (2016), s. 157-164 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/01.0027 Grant - others:HILASE(XE) CZ.1.05/2.1.00/01.0027; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143; OP VK 6(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0143 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : LIPSS * modulated temperature relaxation * two-temperature model * nano-melting Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.387, year: 2016

  11. Assessing and Modulating Kynurenine Pathway Dynamics in Huntington's Disease: Focus on Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyasaikumar, Korrapati V; Breda, Carlo; Schwarcz, Robert; Giorgini, Flaviano

    2018-01-01

    The link between disturbances in kynurenine pathway (KP) metabolism and Huntington's disease (HD) pathogenesis has been explored for a number of years. Several novel genetic and pharmacological tools have recently been developed to modulate key regulatory steps in the KP such as the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). This insight has offered new options for exploring the mechanistic link between this metabolic pathway and HD, and provided novel opportunities for the development of candidate drug-like compounds. Here, we present an overview of the field, focusing on some novel approaches for interrogating the pathway experimentally.

  12. Real-Time Dynamic MLC Tracking for Intensity Modulated Arc Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Marianne

    Motion management of intra-fraction tumour motion during radiotherapy treatment can be a challenging task in order to achieve tumour control as well as minimizing the dose to the surrounding healthy tissue. Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking is a novel method for intra-fraction...

  13. Dynamic alterations of hepatocellular function by on-demand elasticity and roughness modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uto, K; Aoyagi, T; DeForest, C A; Ebara, M

    2018-05-01

    Temperature-responsive cell culture substrates reported here can be dynamically programmed to induce bulk softening and surface roughness changes in the presence of living cells. Alterations in hepatocellular function following temporally controlled substrate softening depend on the extent of stiff mechanical priming prior to user-induced material transition.

  14. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppert, M.M.J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F.H.; Viergever, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This

  15. Diversity of Histologic Patterns and Expression of Cytoskeletal Proteins in Canine Skeletal Osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, E; Hirayama, K; Matsuda, K; Okamoto, M; Ohmachi, T; Kadosawa, T; Taniyama, H

    2015-09-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS), the most common bone tumor, includes OS of the head (OSH) and appendicular OS (OSA). In dogs, it is classified into 6 histologic subtypes: osteoblastic, chondroblastic, fibroblastic, telangiectatic, giant cell, and poorly differentiated. This study investigated the significance of the histologic classification relevant to clinical outcome and the histologic and immunohistochemical relationships between pleomorphism and expression of cytoskeletal proteins in 60 cases each of OSH and OSA. Most neoplasms exhibited histologic diversity, and 64% of OS contained multiple subtypes. In addition to the above 6 subtypes, myxoid, round cell, and epithelioid subtypes were observed. Although the epithelioid subtypes were observed in only OSH, no significant difference in the frequency of other subtypes was observed. Also, no significant relevance was observed between the clinical outcome and histologic subtypes. Cytokeratin (CK) was expressed in both epithelioid and sarcomatoid tumor cells in various subtypes, and all CK-positive tumor cells also expressed vimentin. Vimentin and α-smooth muscle actin (SMA) were expressed in all subtypes. A few SMA-positive spindle-shaped tumor cells exhibited desmin expression. Glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive tumor cells were observed in many subtypes, and some of these cells showed neurofilament expression. Although OSH exhibited significantly stronger immunoreactivity for SMA than OSA, no significant difference in other cytoskeletal proteins was observed. Some tumor cells had cytoskeletal protein expression compatible with the corresponding histologic subtypes, such as CK in the epithelioid subtype and SMA in the fibroblastic subtype. Thus, canine skeletal OS is composed of pleomorphic and heterogenous tumor cells as is reflected in the diversity of histologic patterns and expression of cytoskeletal proteins. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Ultrafine particles cause cytoskeletal dysfunctions in macrophages: role of intracellular calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown David M

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particulate air pollution is reported to cause adverse health effects in susceptible individuals. Since most of these particles are derived form combustion processes, the primary composition product is carbon with a very small diameter (ultrafine, less than 100 nm in diameter. Besides the induction of reactive oxygen species and inflammation, ultrafine particles (UFP can cause intracellular calcium transients and suppression of defense mechanisms of alveolar macrophages, such as impaired migration or phagocytosis. Methods In this study the role of intracellular calcium transients caused by UFP was studied on cytoskeleton related functions in J774A.1 macrophages. Different types of fine and ultrafine carbon black particles (CB and ufCB, respectively, such as elemental carbon (EC90, commercial carbon (Printex 90, diesel particulate matter (DEP and urban dust (UD, were investigated. Phagosome transport mechanisms and mechanical cytoskeletal integrity were studied by cytomagnetometry and cell viability was studied by fluorescence microscopy. Macrophages were exposed in vitro with 100 and 320 μg UFP/ml/million cells for 4 hours in serum free medium. Calcium antagonists Verapamil, BAPTA-AM and W-7 were used to block calcium channels in the membrane, to chelate intracellular calcium or to inhibit the calmodulin signaling pathways, respectively. Results Impaired phagosome transport and increased cytoskeletal stiffness occurred at EC90 and P90 concentrations of 100 μg/ml/million cells and above, but not with DEP or UD. Verapamil and W-7, but not BAPTA-AM inhibited the cytoskeletal dysfunctions caused by EC90 or P90. Additionally the presence of 5% serum or 1% bovine serum albumin (BSA suppressed the cytoskeletal dysfunctions. Cell viability showed similar results, where co-culture of ufCB together with Verapamil, W-7, FCS or BSA produced less cell dead compared to the particles only.

  17. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Cytoskeletal Protein HMW2 and the Architecture of the Terminal Organelle▿

    OpenAIRE

    Bose, Stephanie R.; Balish, Mitchell F.; Krause, Duncan C.

    2009-01-01

    The terminal organelle of Mycoplasma pneumoniae mediates cytadherence and gliding motility and functions in cell division. The defining feature of this complex membrane-bound cell extension is an electron-dense core of two segmented rods oriented longitudinally and enlarging to form a bulb at the distal end. While the components of the core have not been comprehensively identified, previous evidence suggested that the cytoskeletal protein HMW2 forms parallel bundles oriented lengthwise to yie...

  18. The dosimetric impact of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plan modulation for real-time dynamic MLC tracking delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falk, Marianne; Larsson, Tobias; Keall, Paul; Chul Cho, Byung; Aznar, Marianne; Korreman, Stine; Poulsen, Per; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Real-time dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking for management of intrafraction tumor motion can be challenging for highly modulated beams, as the leaves need to travel far to adjust for target motion perpendicular to the leaf travel direction. The plan modulation can be reduced by using a leaf position constraint (LPC) that reduces the difference in the position of adjacent MLC leaves in the plan. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of the LPC on the quality of inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans and the effect of the MLC motion pattern on the dosimetric accuracy of MLC tracking delivery. Specifically, the possibility of predicting the accuracy of MLC tracking delivery based on the plan modulation was investigated. Methods: Inversely optimized arc radiotherapy plans were created on CT-data of three lung cancer patients. For each case, five plans with a single 358 deg. arc were generated with LPC priorities of 0 (no LPC), 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, and 1 (highest possible LPC), respectively. All the plans had a prescribed dose of 2 Gy x 30, used 6 MV, a maximum dose rate of 600 MU/min and a collimator angle of 45 deg. or 315 deg. To quantify the plan modulation, an average adjacent leaf distance (ALD) was calculated by averaging the mean adjacent leaf distance for each control point. The linear relationship between the plan quality [i.e., the calculated dose distributions and the number of monitor units (MU)] and the LPC was investigated, and the linear regression coefficient as well as a two tailed confidence level of 95% was used in the evaluation. The effect of the plan modulation on the performance of MLC tracking was tested by delivering the plans to a cylindrical diode array phantom moving with sinusoidal motion in the superior-inferior direction with a peak-to-peak displacement of 2 cm and a cycle time of 6 s. The delivery was adjusted to the target motion using MLC tracking, guided in real-time by an infrared optical system

  19. Leaf trajectory verification during dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy using an amorphous silicon flat panel imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Ploeger, Lennert S.; Brand, Bob; Smitsmans, Monique H.P.; Herk, Marcel van

    2004-01-01

    An independent verification of the leaf trajectories during each treatment fraction improves the safety of IMRT delivery. In order to verify dynamic IMRT with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID), the EPID response should be accurate and fast such that the effect of motion blurring on the detected moving field edge position is limited. In the past, it was shown that the errors in the detected position of a moving field edge determined by a scanning liquid-filled ionization chamber (SLIC) EPID are negligible in clinical practice. Furthermore, a method for leaf trajectory verification during dynamic IMRT was successfully applied using such an EPID. EPIDs based on amorphous silicon (a-Si) arrays are now widely available. Such a-Si flat panel imagers (FPIs) produce portal images with superior image quality compared to other portal imaging systems, but they have not yet been used for leaf trajectory verification during dynamic IMRT. The aim of this study is to quantify the effect of motion distortion and motion blurring on the detection accuracy of a moving field edge for an Elekta iViewGT a-Si FPI and to investigate its applicability for the leaf trajectory verification during dynamic IMRT. We found that the detection error for a moving field edge to be smaller than 0.025 cm at a speed of 0.8 cm/s. Hence, the effect of motion blurring on the detection accuracy of a moving field edge is negligible in clinical practice. Furthermore, the a-Si FPI was successfully applied for the verification of dynamic IMRT. The verification method revealed a delay in the control system of the experimental DMLC that was also found using a SLIC EPID, resulting in leaf positional errors of 0.7 cm at a leaf speed of 0.8 cm/s

  20. A 1-V 60-μW 85-dB dynamic range continuous-time third-order sigma-delta modulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuanwen; Qi Da; Dong Yifeng; Xu Jun; Ren Junyan

    2009-01-01

    A 1-V third order one-bit continuous-time (CT) EA modulator is presented. Designed in the SMIC mixed-signal 0.13-μm CMOS process, the modulator utilizes active RC integrators to implement the loop filter. An efficient circuit design methodology for the CT ΣΔ modulator is proposed and verified. Low power dissipation is achieved through the use of two-stage class A/AB amplifiers. The presented modulator achieves 81.4-dB SNDR and 85-dB dynamic range in a 20-kHz bandwidth with an over sampling ratio of 128. The total power consumption of the modulator is only 60 μW from a 1-V power supply and the prototype occupies an active area of 0.12 mm 2 . (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  1. Acute fluoride poisoning alters myocardial cytoskeletal and AMPK signaling proteins in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerselvam, Lakshmikanthan; Raghunath, Azhwar; Perumal, Ekambaram

    2017-02-15

    Our previous findings revealed that increased oxidative stress, apoptosis and necrosis were implicated in acute fluoride (F - ) induced cardiac dysfunction apart from hypocalcemia and hyperkalemia. Cardiac intermediate filaments (desmin and vimentin) and cytoskeleton linker molecule vinculin plays an imperative role in maintaining the architecture of cardiac cytoskeleton. In addition, AMPK is a stress activated kinase that regulates the energy homeostasis during stressed state. The present study was aimed to examine the role of cytoskeletal proteins and AMPK signaling molecules in acute F - induced cardiotoxicity in rats. In order to study this, male Wistar rats were treated with single oral doses of 45 and 90mg/kgF - for 24h. Acute F - intoxicated rats showed declined cytoskeletal protein expression of desmin, vimentin and vinculin in a dose dependent manner compared to control. A significant increase in phosphorylation of AMPKα (Thr172), AMPKß1 (Ser108) and Acetyl-coA carboxylase (ACC) (Ser79) in the myocardium and associated ATP deprivation were found in acute F - intoxicated rats. Further, ultra-structural studies confirmed myofibril lysis with interruption of Z lines, dilated sarcoplasmic reticulum and damaged mitochondrion were observed in both the groups of F - intoxicated rats. Taken together, these findings reveal that acute F - exposure causes sudden heart failure by altering the expression of cytoskeletal proteins and AMPK signaling molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Field control of anisotropic spin transport and spin helix dynamics in a modulation-doped GaAs quantum well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, S.; Passmann, F.; Singh, A.; Ruppert, C.; Poshakinskiy, A. V.; Tarasenko, S. A.; Moore, J. N.; Yusa, G.; Mano, T.; Noda, T.; Li, X.; Bristow, A. D.; Betz, M.

    2018-03-01

    Electron spin transport and dynamics are investigated in a single, high-mobility, modulation-doped, GaAs quantum well using ultrafast two-color Kerr-rotation microspectroscopy, supported by qualitative kinetic theory simulations of spin diffusion and transport. Evolution of the spins is governed by the Dresselhaus bulk and Rashba structural inversion asymmetries, which manifest as an effective magnetic field that can be extracted directly from the experimental coherent spin precession. A spin-precession length λSOI is defined as one complete precession in the effective magnetic field. It is observed that application of (i) an out-of-plane electric field changes the spin decay time and λSOI through the Rashba component of the spin-orbit coupling, (ii) an in-plane magnetic field allows for extraction of the Dresselhaus and Rashba parameters, and (iii) an in-plane electric field markedly modifies both the λSOI and diffusion coefficient.

  3. Investigation of the redox-dependent modulation of structure and dynamics in human cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Mizue; Saio, Tomohide; Kumeta, Hiroyuki; Uchida, Takeshi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2016-01-22

    Redox-dependent changes in the structure and dynamics of human cytochrome c (Cyt c) were investigated by solution NMR. We found significant structural changes in several regions, including residues 23-28 (loop 3), which were further corroborated by chemical shift differences between the reduced and oxidized states of Cyt c. These differences are essential for discriminating redox states in Cyt c by cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) during electron transfer reactions. Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments identified that the region around His33 undergoes conformational exchanges on the μs-ms timescale, indicating significant redox-dependent structural changes. Because His33 is not part of the interaction site for CcO, our data suggest that the dynamic properties of the region, which is far from the interaction site for CcO, contribute to conformational changes during electron transfer to CcO. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitrate modulates stem cell dynamics in Arabidopsis shoot meristems through cytokinins

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Sten Henrik; Meyerowitz,; Landrein, Benoit Pierre; Formosa-Jordan,; Malivert,; Schuster, C; Melnyk, CW; Yang, W; Turnbull,; Locke, James Charles

    2018-01-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) is responsible for the generation of all of the aerial parts of plants. Given its critical role, dynamical changes in SAM activity should play a central role in the adaptation of plant architecture to the environment. Using quantitative microscopy, grafting experiments and genetic perturbations, we connect the plant environment to the SAM, by describing the molecular mechanism by which cytokinins signal the level of nutrient availability to the SAM. We show tha...

  5. Antiepileptic teratogen valproic acid (VPA) modulates organisation and dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, P S; Skladchikova, G; Kawa, A

    1999-01-01

    for the VPA mediated inhibition of motility. In addition it is shown that the actomyosin cytoskeleton of VPA-treated cells was capable of contraction upon exposure to ATP, indicating that the reduced motility of VPA-treated cells was not caused by an inhibition of actomyosin contraction. On the other hand...... state. These findings indicate that VPA affects cell morphology and motility through interference with the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton....

  6. Dynamic circadian modulation in a biomathematical model for the effects of sleep and sleep loss on waking neurobehavioral performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Peter; Kalachev, Leonid V; Mollicone, Daniel J; Banks, Siobhan; Dinges, David F; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2013-12-01

    Recent experimental observations and theoretical advances have indicated that the homeostatic equilibrium for sleep/wake regulation--and thereby sensitivity to neurobehavioral impairment from sleep loss--is modulated by prior sleep/wake history. This phenomenon was predicted by a biomathematical model developed to explain changes in neurobehavioral performance across days in laboratory studies of total sleep deprivation and sustained sleep restriction. The present paper focuses on the dynamics of neurobehavioral performance within days in this biomathematical model of fatigue. Without increasing the number of model parameters, the model was updated by incorporating time-dependence in the amplitude of the circadian modulation of performance. The updated model was calibrated using a large dataset from three laboratory experiments on psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) performance, under conditions of sleep loss and circadian misalignment; and validated using another large dataset from three different laboratory experiments. The time-dependence of circadian amplitude resulted in improved goodness-of-fit in night shift schedules, nap sleep scenarios, and recovery from prior sleep loss. The updated model predicts that the homeostatic equilibrium for sleep/wake regulation--and thus sensitivity to sleep loss--depends not only on the duration but also on the circadian timing of prior sleep. This novel theoretical insight has important implications for predicting operator alertness during work schedules involving circadian misalignment such as night shift work.

  7. Community landscapes: an integrative approach to determine overlapping network module hierarchy, identify key nodes and predict network dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István A Kovács

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Network communities help the functional organization and evolution of complex networks. However, the development of a method, which is both fast and accurate, provides modular overlaps and partitions of a heterogeneous network, has proven to be rather difficult. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we introduce the novel concept of ModuLand, an integrative method family determining overlapping network modules as hills of an influence function-based, centrality-type community landscape, and including several widely used modularization methods as special cases. As various adaptations of the method family, we developed several algorithms, which provide an efficient analysis of weighted and directed networks, and (1 determine persvasively overlapping modules with high resolution; (2 uncover a detailed hierarchical network structure allowing an efficient, zoom-in analysis of large networks; (3 allow the determination of key network nodes and (4 help to predict network dynamics. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The concept opens a wide range of possibilities to develop new approaches and applications including network routing, classification, comparison and prediction.

  8. Signaling and Adaptation Modulate the Dynamics of the Photosensoric Complex of Natronomonas pharaonis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp S Orekhov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Motile bacteria and archaea respond to chemical and physical stimuli seeking optimal conditions for survival. To this end transmembrane chemo- and photoreceptors organized in large arrays initiate signaling cascades and ultimately regulate the rotation of flagellar motors. To unravel the molecular mechanism of signaling in an archaeal phototaxis complex we performed coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of a trimer of receptor/transducer dimers, namely NpSRII/NpHtrII from Natronomonas pharaonis. Signaling is regulated by a reversible methylation mechanism called adaptation, which also influences the level of basal receptor activation. Mimicking two extreme methylation states in our simulations we found conformational changes for the transmembrane region of NpSRII/NpHtrII which resemble experimentally observed light-induced changes. Further downstream in the cytoplasmic domain of the transducer the signal propagates via distinct changes in the dynamics of HAMP1, HAMP2, the adaptation domain and the binding region for the kinase CheA, where conformational rearrangements were found to be subtle. Overall these observations suggest a signaling mechanism based on dynamic allostery resembling models previously proposed for E. coli chemoreceptors, indicating similar properties of signal transduction for archaeal photoreceptors and bacterial chemoreceptors.

  9. Investigation of the redox-dependent modulation of structure and dynamics in human cytochrome c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Mizue [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Saio, Tomohide [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Kumeta, Hiroyuki [Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Uchida, Takeshi [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Inagaki, Fuyuhiko [Faculty of Advanced Life Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Ishimori, Koichiro, E-mail: koichiro@sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    Redox-dependent changes in the structure and dynamics of human cytochrome c (Cyt c) were investigated by solution NMR. We found significant structural changes in several regions, including residues 23–28 (loop 3), which were further corroborated by chemical shift differences between the reduced and oxidized states of Cyt c. These differences are essential for discriminating redox states in Cyt c by cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) during electron transfer reactions. Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion experiments identified that the region around His33 undergoes conformational exchanges on the μs-ms timescale, indicating significant redox-dependent structural changes. Because His33 is not part of the interaction site for CcO, our data suggest that the dynamic properties of the region, which is far from the interaction site for CcO, contribute to conformational changes during electron transfer to CcO. - Highlights: • Solution structure and dynamics analysis for human Cyt c by NMR. • Structural changes responsible for the discrimination of the redox state in Cyt c. • Conformational exchange in the region outside of the interaction site for CcO. • Less flexibility and rigid structure of the interaction site on Cyt c for CcO.

  10. Dynamic characteristics of two-state lasing quantum dot lasers under large signal modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lv, Zun-Ren; Ji, Hai-Ming; Luo, Shuai; Gao, Feng; Xu, Feng; Yang, Tao; Xiao, De-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Large signal modulation characteristics of the simultaneous ground-state (GS) and excited-state (ES) lasing quantum dot lasers are theoretically investigated. Relaxation oscillations of ‘0 → 1’ and ‘1 → 0’ in the GS lasing region (Region I), the transition region from GS lasing to two-state lasing (Region II) and the two-state lasing region (Region III) are compared and analyzed. It is found that the overshooting power and settling time in both Regions I and III decrease as the bias current increases. However, there exist abnormal behaviors of the overshooting power and settling time in Region II owing to the occurrence of ES lasing, which lead to fuzzy eye diagrams of the GS and ES lasing. Moreover, the ES lasing in Region III possesses much better eye diagrams because of its shorter settling time and smaller overshooting power over the GS lasing in Region I

  11. On delta-modulated control: A simple system with complex dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Xiaohua [Department of Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)]. E-mail: xxia@postino.up.ac.za; Chen Guanrong [Department of Electronic Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)]. E-mail: gchen@ee.cityu.edu.hk

    2007-08-15

    In this paper, we investigate some interesting properties of a scalar system controlled by {delta}-modulated feedback. We show that there are three different cases. In the first case, there is a minimal global attractor which consists of only two points. The two points form either one 2-periodic orbit or two 1-periodic orbits (fixed points). We also characterize the attracting region for each of these two points. In the second case, the maximal stabilizable region is bounded, and there is a minimal local attractor inside this stabilizable region. In the third case, the maximal stabilizable set is a Cantor set, which is a repeller of the system, and the system is chaotic on the Cantor set.

  12. A carboxylesterase, Esterase-6, modulates sensory physiological and behavioral response dynamics to pheromone in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chertemps Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insects respond to the spatial and temporal dynamics of a pheromone plume, which implies not only a strong response to 'odor on', but also to 'odor off'. This requires mechanisms geared toward a fast signal termination. Several mechanisms may contribute to signal termination, among which odorant-degrading enzymes. These enzymes putatively play a role in signal dynamics by a rapid inactivation of odorants in the vicinity of the sensory receptors, although direct in vivo experimental evidences are lacking. Here we verified the role of an extracellular carboxylesterase, esterase-6 (Est-6, in the sensory physiological and behavioral dynamics of Drosophila melanogaster response to its pheromone, cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA. Est-6 was previously linked to post-mating effects in the reproductive system of females. As Est-6 is also known to hydrolyze cVA in vitro and is expressed in the main olfactory organ, the antenna, we tested here its role in olfaction as a putative odorant-degrading enzyme. Results We first confirm that Est-6 is highly expressed in olfactory sensilla, including cVA-sensitive sensilla, and we show that expression is likely associated with non-neuronal cells. Our electrophysiological approaches show that the dynamics of olfactory receptor neuron (ORN responses is strongly influenced by Est-6, as in Est-6° null mutants (lacking the Est-6 gene cVA-sensitive ORN showed increased firing rate and prolonged activity in response to cVA. Est-6° mutant males had a lower threshold of behavioral response to cVA, as revealed by the analysis of two cVA-induced behaviors. In particular, mutant males exhibited a strong decrease of male-male courtship, in association with a delay in courtship initiation. Conclusions Our study presents evidence that Est-6 plays a role in the physiological and behavioral dynamics of sex pheromone response in Drosophila males and supports a role of Est-6 as an odorant-degrading enzyme (ODE in male

  13. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kirsty A.; Stearne, Sarah M.; Alderson, Jacqueline A.; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J.; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running. PMID:27054319

  14. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsty A McDonald

    Full Text Available Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert, and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption and the arch (energy production during recoil. This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running.

  15. The Role of Arch Compression and Metatarsophalangeal Joint Dynamics in Modulating Plantar Fascia Strain in Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kirsty A; Stearne, Sarah M; Alderson, Jacqueline A; North, Ian; Pires, Neville J; Rubenson, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Elastic energy returned from passive-elastic structures of the lower limb is fundamental in lowering the mechanical demand on muscles during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the two length-modulating mechanisms of the plantar fascia, namely medial longitudinal arch compression and metatarsophalangeal joint (MPJ) excursion, and to determine how these mechanisms modulate strain, and thus elastic energy storage/return of the plantar fascia during running. Eighteen runners (9 forefoot and 9 rearfoot strike) performed three treadmill running trials; unrestricted shod, shod with restricted arch compression (via an orthotic-style insert), and barefoot. Three-dimensional motion capture and ground reaction force data were used to calculate lower limb kinematics and kinetics including MPJ angles, moments, powers and work. Estimates of plantar fascia strain due to arch compression and MPJ excursion were derived using a geometric model of the arch and a subject-specific musculoskeletal model of the plantar fascia, respectively. The plantar fascia exhibited a typical elastic stretch-shortening cycle with the majority of strain generated via arch compression. This strategy was similar in fore- and rear-foot strike runners. Restricting arch compression, and hence the elastic-spring function of the arch, was not compensated for by an increase in MPJ-derived strain. In the second half of stance the plantar fascia was found to transfer energy between the MPJ (energy absorption) and the arch (energy production during recoil). This previously unreported energy transfer mechanism reduces the strain required by the plantar fascia in generating useful positive mechanical work at the arch during running.

  16. Ras Activity Oscillates in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus and Modulates Circadian Clock Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serchov, Tsvetan; Jilg, Antje; Wolf, Christian T; Radtke, Ina; Stehle, Jörg H; Heumann, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    Circadian rhythms, generated in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), are synchronized to the environmental day-night changes by photic input. The activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1,2) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB)-mediated transcription play a critical role in this photoentrainment. The small GTPase Ras is one of the major upstream regulators of the ERK1,2/CREB pathway. In contrast to the well-described role of Ras in structural and functional synaptic plasticity in the adult mouse brain, the physiological regulation of Ras by photic sensory input is yet unknown. Here, we describe for the first time a circadian rhythm of Ras activity in the mouse SCN. Using synRas transgenic mice, expressing constitutively activated V12-Ha-Ras selectively in neurons, we demonstrate that enhanced Ras activation causes shortening of the circadian period length. We found upregulated expression and decreased inhibitory phosphorylation of the circadian period length modulator, glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3β), in the SCN of synRas mice. Conversely, downregulation of Ras activity by blocking its function with an antibody in oscillating cell cultures reduced protein levels and increased phosphorylation of GSK3β and lengthened the period of BMAL1 promoter-driven luciferase activity. Furthermore, enhanced Ras activity in synRas mice resulted in a potentiation of light-induced phase delays at early subjective night, and increased photic induction of pERK1,2/pCREB and c-Fos. In contrast, at late subjective night, photic activation of Ras/ERK1,2/CREB in synRas mice was not sufficient to stimulate c-Fos protein expression and phase advance the clock. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Ras activity fine tunes the period length and modulates photoentrainment of the circadian clock.

  17. Study Modules for Calculus-Based General Physics. [Includes Modules 11-14: Collisions; Equilibrium of Rigid Bodies; Rotational Dynamics; and Fluid Mechanics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Robert G., Ed.; And Others

    This is part of a series of 42 Calculus Based Physics (CBP) modules totaling about 1,000 pages. The modules include study guides, practice tests, and mastery tests for a full-year individualized course in calculus-based physics based on the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI). The units are not intended to be used without outside materials;…

  18. Preliminary studies of the dynamic stiffness modules of soil samples from the Solvay Sodium Plant waste landfill in Krakow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilecka Elżbieta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of laboratory tests for determining the dynamic modules of the elasticity M and the shear G, for soil samples from the landfill of the closed Solvay Sodium Plant in Krakow. The tests were performed using a triaxial apparatus equipped with “bender” piezoelements. The samples subjected to these tests were taken from two boreholes, located in the area known as the “white seas”, whose formation is the result of Solvay Plant activity throughout the 20th century. The location of the test holes was planned at the place in which a road known as the “Łagiewnicka route” was planned. Studies on soil stiffness were also conducted as part of the one of the dissertation from 2008 to 2010 in the Cracow University of Technology. The results of these tests and the results of the laboratory tests that are presented in the article will be used in the designing of a computer model. This model is intended to help in assessing the dynamic impact of motor vehicle traffic on the planned Łagiewnicka route on the structure of the existing buildings located in the former Solvay Plant.

  19. Dynamic modulation of corticospinal excitability and short-latency afferent inhibition during onset and maintenance phase of selective finger movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun Joo; Panyakaew, Pattamon; Thirugnanasambandam, Nivethida; Wu, Tianxia; Hallett, Mark

    2016-06-01

    During highly selective finger movement, corticospinal excitability is reduced in surrounding muscles at the onset of movement but this phenomenon has not been demonstrated during maintenance of movement. Sensorimotor integration may play an important role in selective movement. We sought to investigate how corticospinal excitability and short-latency afferent inhibition changes in active and surrounding muscles during onset and maintenance of selective finger movement. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and paired peripheral stimulation, input-output recruitment curve and short-latency afferent inhibition (SAI) were measured in the first dorsal interosseus and abductor digiti minimi muscles during selective index finger flexion. Motor surround inhibition was present only at the onset phase, but not at the maintenance phase of movement. SAI was reduced at onset but not at the maintenance phase of movement in both active and surrounding muscles. Our study showed dynamic changes in corticospinal excitability and sensorimotor modulation for active and surrounding muscles in different movement states. SAI does not appear to contribute to motor surround inhibition at the movement onset phase. Also, there seems to be different inhibitory circuit(s) other than SAI for the movement maintenance phase in order to delineate the motor output selectively when corticospinal excitability is increased in both active and surrounding muscles. This study enhances our knowledge of dynamic changes in corticospinal excitability and sensorimotor interaction in different movement states to understand normal and disordered movements. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  20. Dynamics of wide and snake-like pulses in coupled Schrödinger equations with full-modulated nonlinearities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yomba, Emmanuel, E-mail: emmanuel.yomba@csun.edu; Zakeri, Gholam-Ali, E-mail: ali.zakeri@csun.edu

    2016-02-05

    We investigate the existence of various solitary wave solutions in coupled Schrödinger equations with specific cubic and quintic nonlinearities. This system arises in wave propagation in fiber optics with focusing and defocusing with modulated nonlinearities. We obtain front–front, bright–bright, dark–dark, and dark–bright like solitons using a direct approach, and then, by reducing the system of equations to a single auxiliary equation of a Duffing-type ordinary differential equation, we provide a large class of Jacobi-elliptic solutions. These solutions are presented in the exact form and analyzed. We find a class of wide localized and snake-like (in both space and time) vector solitons. One of the novel aspects of this study is that we have shown that the qualitative behavior of the solutions is independent of the choice of similarity variables. Numerical results show that the solutions of the above system are stable with up to 10% white noises. - Highlights: • Dynamics of wide and snake-like pulses is analyzed for coupled Schrödinger equations. • Qualitative appearance of solutions is analyzed using various similarity variables. • Effect of change in parameter-values on dynamics of the solutions is investigated. • Vectors front–front, bright–bright, dark–dark and dark–bright solitons are obtained.

  1. Vesicular transport protein Arf6 modulates cytoskeleton dynamics for polar body extrusion in mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xing; Zhang, Hao-Lin; Pan, Meng-Hao; Zhang, Yu; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2018-02-01

    Arf6 (ADP-ribosylation factor 6) is known to play important roles in membrane dynamics through the regulation of actin filament reorganization for multiple cellular processes such as cytokinesis, phagocytosis, cell migration and tumor cell invasion. However, the functions of Arf6 in mammalian oocyte meiosis have not been clarified. In present study we showed that Arf6 expressed in mouse oocytes and was mainly distributed around the spindle during meiosis. Depletion of Arf6 by morpholino microinjection caused oocytes failing to extrude first polar body. Further analysis indicated that Arf6 knock down caused the aberrant actin distribution, which further induced the failure of meiotic spindle movement. And the loss of oocyte polarity also confirmed this. The regulation of Arf6 on actin filaments in mouse oocytes might be due to its effects on the phosphorylation level of cofilin and the expression of Arp2/3 complex. Moreover, we found that the decrease of Arf6 caused the disruption of spindle formation, indicating the multiple roles of Arf6 on cytoskeleton dynamics in meiosis. In summary, our results indicated that Arf6 was involved in mouse oocyte meiosis through its functional roles in actin-mediated spindle movement and spindle organization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A modified method of planning and delivery for dynamic multileaf collimator intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogan, Nesrin; Leybovich, Leonid B.; Sethi, Anil; Krasin, Matthew; Emami, Bahman

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a modified planning and delivery technique that reduces dose nonuniformity for tomographic delivery of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: The NOMOS-CORVUS system delivers IMRT in a tomographic paradigm. This type of delivery is prone to create multiple dose nonuniformity regions at the arc abutment regions. The modified technique was based on the cyclical behavior of arc positions as a function of a target length. With the modified technique, two plans are developed for the same patient, one with the original target and the second with a slightly increased target length and the abutment regions shifted by ∼5 mm compared to the first plan. Each plan is designed to deliver half of the target prescription dose delivered on alternate days, resulting in periodic shifts of abutment regions. This method was experimentally tested in phantoms with and without intentionally introduced errors in couch indexing. Results: With the modified technique, the degree of dose nonuniformity was reduced. For example, with 1 mm error in couch indexing, the degree of dose nonuniformity changed from ∼25% to ∼12%. Conclusion: Use of the modified technique reduces dose nonuniformity due to periodic shifts of abutment regions during treatment delivery

  3. Nonlinear instability in flagellar dynamics: a novel modulation mechanism in sperm migration?

    KAUST Repository

    Gadelha, H.

    2010-05-12

    Throughout biology, cells and organisms use flagella and cilia to propel fluid and achieve motility. The beating of these organelles, and the corresponding ability to sense, respond to and modulate this beat is central to many processes in health and disease. While the mechanics of flagellum-fluid interaction has been the subject of extensive mathematical studies, these models have been restricted to being geometrically linear or weakly nonlinear, despite the high curvatures observed physiologically. We study the effect of geometrical nonlinearity, focusing on the spermatozoon flagellum. For a wide range of physiologically relevant parameters, the nonlinear model predicts that flagellar compression by the internal forces initiates an effective buckling behaviour, leading to a symmetry-breaking bifurcation that causes profound and complicated changes in the waveform and swimming trajectory, as well as the breakdown of the linear theory. The emergent waveform also induces curved swimming in an otherwise symmetric system, with the swimming trajectory being sensitive to head shape-no signalling or asymmetric forces are required. We conclude that nonlinear models are essential in understanding the flagellar waveform in migratory human sperm; these models will also be invaluable in understanding motile flagella and cilia in other systems.

  4. Dynamic wavefront sensing and correction with low-cost twisted nematic spatial light modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, Vicente; Climent, Vicent; Lancis, Jesus; Tajahuerce, Enrique; Bara, Salvador; Arines, Justo; Ares, Jorge; Andres, Pedro; Jaroszewicz, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    Off-the-shelf twisted nematic liquid crystal displays (TNLCDs) show some interesting features such as high spatial resolution, easy handling, wide availability, and low cost. We describe a compact adaptive optical system using just one TNLCD to measure and compensate optical aberrations. The current system operates at a frame rate of the order of 10 Hz with a four level codification scheme. Wavefront estimation is performed through conventional Hartmann-Shack sensing architecture. The system has proved to work properly with a maximum rms aberration of 0.76 microns and wavefront gradient of 50 rad/mm at a wavelength of 514 nm. These values correspond to typical aberrations found in human eyes. The key of our approach is careful characterization and optimization of the TNLCD for phase-only modulation. For this purpose, we exploit the so-called retarder-rotator approach for twisted nematic liquid crystal cells. The optimization process has been successfully applied to SLMs working either in transmissive or in reflective mode, even when light depolarization effects are observed.

  5. Distal loop flexibility of a regulatory domain modulates dynamics and activity of C-terminal SRC kinase (csk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulyman Barkho

    Full Text Available The Src family of tyrosine kinases (SFKs regulate numerous aspects of cell growth and differentiation and are under the principal control of the C-terminal Src Kinase (Csk. Csk and SFKs share a modular design with the kinase domain downstream of the N-terminal SH2 and SH3 domains that regulate catalytic function and membrane localization. While the function of interfacial segments in these multidomain kinases are well-investigated, little is known about how surface sites and long-range, allosteric coupling control protein dynamics and catalytic function. The SH2 domain of Csk is an essential component for the down-regulation of all SFKs. A unique feature of the SH2 domain of Csk is the tight turn in place of the canonical CD loop in a surface site far removed from kinase domain interactions. In this study, we used a combination of experimental and computational methods to probe the importance of this difference by constructing a Csk variant with a longer SH2 CD loop to mimic the flexibility found in homologous kinase SH2 domains. Our results indicate that while the fold and function of the isolated domain and the full-length kinase are not affected by loop elongation, native protein dynamics that are essential for efficient catalysis are perturbed. We also identify key motifs and routes through which the distal SH2 site might influence catalysis at the active site. This study underscores the sensitivity of intramolecular signaling and catalysis to native protein dynamics that arise from modest changes in allosteric regions while providing a potential strategy to alter intrinsic activity and signaling modulation.

  6. Opto-electronic conversion logic behaviour through dynamic modulation of electron/energy transfer states at the TiO2-carbon quantum dot interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Zhang, Yonglai; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xuefeng; Shen, Mingrong; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Kang, Zhenhui

    2013-03-07

    Here we show a bias-mediated electron/energy transfer process at the CQDs-TiO(2) interface for the dynamic modulation of opto-electronic properties. Different energy and electron transfer states have been observed in the CQDs-TNTs system due to the up-conversion photoluminescence and the electron donation/acceptance properties of the CQDs decorated on TNTs.

  7. Path-length-resolved measurements of multiple scattered photons in static and dynamic turbid media using phase-modulated low-coherence interferometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varghese, Babu; Rajan, Vinayakrishnan; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2007-01-01

    In optical Doppler measurements, the path length of the light is unknown. To facilitate quantitative measurements, we develop a phase-modulated Mach-Zehnder interferometer with separate fibers for illumination and detection. With this setup, path-length-resolved dynamic light scattering measurements

  8. High-Frequency Dynamics Modulated by Collective Magnetization Reversal in Artificial Spin Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Sklenar, Joseph; Ding, Junjia; Park, Jungsik; Pearson, John E.; Novosad, Valentine; Schiffer, Peter; Hoffmann, Axel

    2017-12-01

    Spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance arises in heavy metal-ferromagnet heterostructures when an alternating charge current is passed through the bilayer stack. The methodology to detect the resonance is based on the anisotropic magnetoresistance, which is the change in the electrical resistance due to different orientations of the magnetization. In connected networks of ferromagnetic nanowires, known as artificial spin ice, the magnetoresistance is rather complex owing to the underlying collective behavior of the geometrically frustrated magnetic domain structure. Here, we demonstrate spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance investigations in a square artificial spin-ice system and correlate our observations to magnetotransport measurements. The experimental findings are described using a simulation approach that highlights the importance of the correlated dynamics response of the magnetic system. Our results open the possibility of designing reconfigurable microwave oscillators and magnetoresistive devices based on connected networks of nanomagnets.

  9. High-Frequency Dynamics Modulated by Collective Magnetization Reversal in Artificial Spin Ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jungfleisch, Matthias B.; Sklenar, Joseph; Ding, Junjia; Park, Jungsik; Pearson, John E.; Novosad, Valentine; Schiffer, Peter; Hoffmann, Axel

    2017-12-01

    Spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance arises in heavy metal-ferromagnet heterostructures when an alternating charge current is passed through the bilayer stack. The methodology to detect the resonance is based on the anisotropic magnetoresistance, which is the change in the electrical resistance due to different orientations of the magnetization. In connected networks of ferromagnetic nanowires, known as artificial spin ice, the magnetoresistance is rather complex owing to the underlying collective behavior of the geometrically frustrated magnetic domain structure. Here, we demonstrate spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance investigations in a square artificial spin-ice system and correlate our observations to magneto-transport measurements. The experimental findings are described using a simulation approach that highlights the importance of the correlated dynamics response of the magnetic system. Our results open the possibility of designing reconfigurable microwave oscillators and magnetoresistive devices based on connected networks of nanomagnets.

  10. Dynamics of Longitudinal Phase-Space Modulations in an rf Compressor for Electron Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Free Electron Lasers (FELs) operating in the UV or x-ray radiation spectrum require peak beam currents that are generally higher than those obtainable by present electron sources, thus making bunch compression necessary. Compression, however, may heighten the effects of collective forces and degrade the beam quality. In this paper they provide a framework for investigating some of these effects in rf compressors by focusing on the longitudinal dynamics of small-amplitude density perturbations, which have the potential to cause the disruptive appearance of the so-called microbunching instability. They develop a linear theory valid for low-to-moderate compression factors under the assumption of a 1D impedance model of longitudinal space charge and provide validation against macroparticle simulations.

  11. Cytoskeletal actin dynamics shape a ramifying actin network underpinning immunological synapse formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzsche, Marco; Fernandes, Ricardo A.; Chang, Veronica T.

    2017-01-01

    optical microscopes to analyze resting and activated T cells, we show that, following contact formation with activating surfaces, these cells sequentially rearrange their cortical actin across the entire cell, creating a previously unreported ramifying actin network above the immunological synapse...

  12. Entrainment to a real time fractal visual stimulus modulates fractal gait dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhea, Christopher K; Kiefer, Adam W; D'Andrea, Susan E; Warren, William H; Aaron, Roy K

    2014-08-01

    Fractal patterns characterize healthy biological systems and are considered to reflect the ability of the system to adapt to varying environmental conditions. Previous research has shown that fractal patterns in gait are altered following natural aging or disease, and this has potential negative consequences for gait adaptability that can lead to increased risk of injury. However, the flexibility of a healthy neurological system to exhibit different fractal patterns in gait has yet to be explored, and this is a necessary step toward understanding human locomotor control. Fifteen participants walked for 15min on a treadmill, either in the absence of a visual stimulus or while they attempted to couple the timing of their gait with a visual metronome that exhibited a persistent fractal pattern (contained long-range correlations) or a random pattern (contained no long-range correlations). The stride-to-stride intervals of the participants were recorded via analog foot pressure switches and submitted to detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to determine if the fractal patterns during the visual metronome conditions differed from the baseline (no metronome) condition. DFA α in the baseline condition was 0.77±0.09. The fractal patterns in the stride-to-stride intervals were significantly altered when walking to the fractal metronome (DFA α=0.87±0.06) and to the random metronome (DFA α=0.61±0.10) (both p<.05 when compared to the baseline condition), indicating that a global change in gait dynamics was observed. A variety of strategies were identified at the local level with a cross-correlation analysis, indicating that local behavior did not account for the consistent global changes. Collectively, the results show that a gait dynamics can be shifted in a prescribed manner using a visual stimulus and the shift appears to be a global phenomenon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Capillary-wave dynamics and interface structure modulation in binary Bose-Einstein condensate mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indekeu, Joseph O.; Van Thu, Nguyen; Lin, Chang-You; Phat, Tran Huu

    2018-04-01

    The localized low-energy interfacial excitations, or interfacial Nambu-Goldstone modes, of phase-segregated binary mixtures of Bose-Einstein condensates are investigated analytically. To this end a double-parabola approximation (DPA) is performed on the Lagrangian density in Gross-Pitaevskii theory for a system in a uniform potential. This DPA entails a model in which analytic expressions are obtained for the excitations underlying capillary waves or ripplons for arbitrary strength K (>1 ) of the phase segregation. The dispersion relation ω (k ) ∝k3 /2 is derived directly from the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations in the limit that the wavelength 2 π /k is much larger than the interface width. The proportionality constant in the dispersion relation provides the static interfacial tension. A correction term in ω (k ) of order k5 /2 is calculated analytically within the DPA model. The combined result is tested against numerical diagonalization of the exact Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. Satisfactory agreement is obtained in the range of physically relevant wavelengths. The ripplon dispersion relation is relevant to state-of-the-art experiments using (quasi)uniform optical-box traps. Furthermore, within the DPA model explicit expressions are obtained for the structural deformation of the interface due to the passing of the capillary wave. It is found that the amplitude of the wave is enhanced by an amount that is quadratic in the ratio of the phase velocity ω /k to the sound velocity c . For generic mixtures consisting of condensates with unequal healing lengths, an additional modulation is predicted of the common value of the condensate densities at the interface.

  14. Dosimetric verification of the dynamic intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMR) of 21 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, J.-S.; Engler, Mark J.; Ling, Marilyn N.; Wu, Julian; Kramer, Bradley; Fagundes, Marcio; Dipetrillo, Thomas; Wazer, David E.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To verify the accuracy of conformal isodose distributions and absolute doses delivered with a dynamic IMR system. Methods and materials: 21 patients treated with advanced or recurrent disease with a dynamic IMR system, of which 13 were immobilized with head screws, and 8, with non-invasive plastic masks. The system included immobilization techniques, computerized tomography (CT), a dynamic pencil beam multileaf collimator (MLC), a collimator controller computer, collimator safety interlocks, a simulated annealing optimization implemented on a dedicated quad processing computer system, phantoms embedded with dosemeters, patient setup and dose delivery techniques, in vivo dose verification, and a comprehensive quality assurance program. The collimator consisted of a 2 x 20 array of Tungsten leaves, each programmable to be either fully open or shut, thus offering 2 40 beam patterns with cross sectional areas of up to 4 x 20 cm at the linear accelerator (linac) gantry rotational axis. Any of these patterns were dynamically changeable per degree sign of gantry rotation. An anthropomorphic phantom composed of transverse anatomic slabs helped simulate patient geometry relative to immobilization devices, fiducial markers, CT and treatment room lasers, and linac rotational axis. Before each treatment regimen, the compliance of measured to planned doses was tested in phantom irradiations using each patient's fiducial markers, immobilization system, anatomic positioning, and collimator sequencing. Films and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD) were embedded in the phantom to measure absolute doses and dose distributions. Because the planner didn't account for variable electron density distributions in head and neck targets, the air cavities of the anthropomorphic phantom were filled with tissue equivalent bolus. Optical density distributions of films exposed to the dynamic IMR of each patient were obtained with a Hurter-Driffield calibration curved based on films

  15. Dosimetric comparison of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), DMlC (Dynamic IMRT), and 3DCRT in left breast cancer after breast conserving surgery receiving left breast irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pratibha, Bauskar; Vibhay, Pareek; Rajendra, Bhalavat; Chandra, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the risk of ischemic heart disease is increased as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation in women treated for breast cancer. Alternative radiation techniques, such as dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (DMLC), volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT), have been shown to improve dosimetric parameters of the heart and substructures. However, these techniques have not been compared with each other to potentially guide treatment decisions. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a novel extension of conventional intensity-modulated radiotherapy (c-IMRT), in which an optimized three dimensional dose distribution may be delivered in a single gantry rotation. VMAT is the predecessor to Rapid-Arc (Varian Medical System). This study uses VMAT, DMLC and 3DCRT to compare target volume coverage and doses to organs at risk (OARs), especially lung and heart doses, using these three techniques in whole breast irradiation after breast conserving surgery in left breast cancer cases

  16. Dosimetric study comparing volumetric arc modulation with RapidArc and fixed dynamic intensity-modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tie Jian; Sun Yan; Gong Jian; Han Shukui; Jiang Fan; Wu Hao

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the dosimetric difference between volumetric are modulation with RapidArc and fixed field dynamic IMRT for breast cancer radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Methods: Twenty patients with early left-sided breast cancer received radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. After target definition, treatment planning was performed by RapidArc and two fixed fields dynamic IMRT respectively on the same CT scan. The target dose distribution, homogeneity of the breast, and the irradiation dose and volume for the lungs, heart, and contralateral breast were read in the dose-volume histogram (DVH) and compared between RapidArc and IMRT. The treatment delivery time and monitor units were also compared. Results: In comparison with the IMRT planning,the homogeneity of clinical target volume (CTV), the volume proportion of 95% prescribed dose (V 95% ) was significantly higher by 0.65% in RapidArc (t=5.16, P=0.001), and the V 105% and V 110% were lower by 10.96% and 1.48 % respectively, however, without statistical significance (t=-2.05, P=0.055 and t=-1.33, P=0.197). The conformal index of planning target volume (PTV) by the RapidArc planning was (0.88±0.02), significantly higher than that by the IMRT planning [(0.74±0.03), t=18.54, P<0.001]. The homogeneity index (HI) of PTV by the RapidArc planning was 1.11±0.01, significantly lower than that by the IMRT planning (1.12±0.02, t=-2.44, P=0.02). There were no significant differences in the maximum dose (D max ) and V 20 for the ipsilateral lung between the RapidArc and IMRT planning, but the values of V 10 , V 5 , D min and D mean by RapidArc planning were all significantly higher than those by the IMRT planning (all P<0.01). The values of max dose and V 30 for the heart were similar by both techniques, but the values of V 10 and V 5 by the RapidArc planning were significantly higher (by 18% and 50%, respectively). The V 5 of the contralateral breast and lung by the RapidArc planning were

  17. Dynamic Modeling and Control of Distributed Heat Transfer Mechanisms: Application to a Membrane Distillation Module

    KAUST Repository

    Eleiwi, Fadi

    2015-12-01

    Sustainable desalination technologies are the smart solution for producing fresh water and preserve the environment and energy by using sustainable renewable energy sources. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology which can be driven by renewable energy. It is an innovative method for desalinating seawater and brackish water with high quality production, and the gratitude is to its interesting potentials. MD includes a transfer of water vapor from a feed solution to a permeate solution through a micro-porous hydrophobic membrane, rejecting other non-volatile constituents present in the influent water. The process is driven by the temperature difference along the membrane boundaries. Different control applications and supervision techniques would improve the performance and the efficiency of the MD process, however controlling the MD process requires comprehensive mathematical model for the distributed heat transfer mechanisms inside the process. Our objective is to propose a dynamic mathematical model that accounts for the time evolution of the involved heat transfer mechanisms in the process, and to be capable of hosting intermittent energy supplies, besides managing the production rate of the process, and optimizing its energy consumption. Therefore, we propose the 2D Advection-Diffusion Equation model to account for the heat diffusion and the heat convection mechanisms inside the process. Furthermore, experimental validations have proved high agreement between model simulations and experiments with less than 5% relative error. Enhancing the MD production is an anticipated goal, therefore, two main control strategies are proposed. Consequently, we propose a nonlinear controller for a semi-discretized version of the dynamic model to achieve an asymptotic tracking for a desired temperature difference. Similarly, an observer-based feedback control is used to track sufficient temperature difference for better productivity. The second control strategy

  18. Dynamic ligand modulation of EPO receptor pools, and dysregulation by polycythemia-associated EPOR alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Singh

    Full Text Available Erythropoietin (EPO and its cell surface receptor (EPOR are essential for erythropoiesis; can modulate non-erythroid target tissues; and have been reported to affect the progression of certain cancers. Basic studies of EPOR expression and trafficking, however, have been hindered by low-level EPOR occurrence, and the limited specificity of anti-EPOR antibodies. Consequently, these aspects of EPOR biology are not well defined, nor are actions of polycythemia- associated mutated EPOR alleles. Using novel rabbit monoclonal antibodies to intracellular, PY- activated and extracellular EPOR domains, the following properties of the endogenous hEPOR in erythroid progenitors first are unambiguously defined. 1 High- Mr EPOR forms become obviously expressed only when EPO is limited. 2 EPOR-68K plus -70K species sequentially accumulate, and EPOR-70K comprises an apparent cell surface EPOR population. 3 Brefeldin A, N-glycanase and associated analyses point to EPOR-68K as a core-glycosylated intracellular EPOR pool (of modest size. 4 In contrast to recent reports, EPOR inward trafficking is shown (in UT7epo cells, and primary proerythroblasts to be sharply ligand-dependent. Beyond this, when C-terminal truncated hEPOR-T mutant alleles as harbored by polycythemia patients are co-expressed with the wild-type EPOR in EPO-dependent erythroid progenitors, several specific events become altered. First, EPOR-T alleles are persistently activated upon EPO- challenge, yet are also subject to apparent turn-over (to low-Mr EPOR products. Furthermore, during exponential cell growth EPOR-T species become both over-represented, and hyper-activated. Interestingly, EPOR-T expression also results in an EPO dose-dependent loss of endogenous wild-type EPOR's (and, therefore, a squelching of EPOR C-terminal- mediated negative feedback effects. New knowledge concerning regulated EPOR expression and trafficking therefore is provided, together with new insight into mechanisms via

  19. Dynamic Ligand Modulation of EPO Receptor Pools, and Dysregulation by Polycythemia-Associated EPOR Alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Seema; Verma, Rakesh; Pradeep, Anamika; Leu, Karen; Mortensen, R. Bruce; Young, Peter R.; Oyasu, Miho; Schatz, Peter J.; Green, Jennifer M.; Wojchowski, Don M.

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) and its cell surface receptor (EPOR) are essential for erythropoiesis; can modulate non-erythroid target tissues; and have been reported to affect the progression of certain cancers. Basic studies of EPOR expression and trafficking, however, have been hindered by low-level EPOR occurrence, and the limited specificity of anti-EPOR antibodies. Consequently, these aspects of EPOR biology are not well defined, nor are actions of polycythemia- associated mutated EPOR alleles. Using novel rabbit monoclonal antibodies to intracellular, PY- activated and extracellular EPOR domains, the following properties of the endogenous hEPOR in erythroid progenitors first are unambiguously defined. 1) High- Mr EPOR forms become obviously expressed only when EPO is limited. 2) EPOR-68K plus -70K species sequentially accumulate, and EPOR-70K comprises an apparent cell surface EPOR population. 3) Brefeldin A, N-glycanase and associated analyses point to EPOR-68K as a core-glycosylated intracellular EPOR pool (of modest size). 4) In contrast to recent reports, EPOR inward trafficking is shown (in UT7epo cells, and primary proerythroblasts) to be sharply ligand-dependent. Beyond this, when C-terminal truncated hEPOR-T mutant alleles as harbored by polycythemia patients are co-expressed with the wild-type EPOR in EPO-dependent erythroid progenitors, several specific events become altered. First, EPOR-T alleles are persistently activated upon EPO- challenge, yet are also subject to apparent turn-over (to low-Mr EPOR products). Furthermore, during exponential cell growth EPOR-T species become both over-represented, and hyper-activated. Interestingly, EPOR-T expression also results in an EPO dose-dependent loss of endogenous wild-type EPOR's (and, therefore, a squelching of EPOR C-terminal- mediated negative feedback effects). New knowledge concerning regulated EPOR expression and trafficking therefore is provided, together with new insight into mechanisms via which

  20. Rapid Evaluation for Position-Dependent Dynamics of a 3-DOF PKM Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-wei Luo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Based on the substructure synthesis and modal reduction technique, a computationally efficient elastodynamic model for a fully flexible 3-RPS parallel kinematic machine (PKM tool is proposed, in which the frequency response function (FRF at the end of the tool can be obtained at any given position throughout its workspace. In the proposed elastodynamic model, the whole system is divided into a moving platform subsystem and three identical RPS limb subsystems, in which all joint compliances are included. The spherical joint and the revolute joint are treated as lumped virtual springs with equal stiffness; the platform is treated as a rigid body and the RPS limbs are modelled with modal reduction techniques. With the compatibility conditions at interfaces between the limbs and the platform, an analytical system governing differential equation is derived. Based on the derived model, the position-dependent dynamic characteristics such as natural frequencies, mode shapes, and FRFs of the 3-RPS PKM are simulated. The simulation results indicate that the distributions of natural frequencies throughout the workspace are strongly dependant on mechanism's configurations and demonstrate an axial-symmetric tendency. The following finite element analysis and modal tests both validate the analytical results of natural frequencies, mode shapes, and the FRFs.

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis Of Optical Payload For Lasercomm Science (OPALS) sealed enclosure module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin R.; Zayas, Daniel; Turner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) using the commercial CFD package CFDesign has been performed at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in support of the Phaeton Early Career Hire Program's Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) mission. The OPALS project is one which involves an International Space Station payload that will be using forced convection cooling in a hermetically sealed enclosure at 1 atm of air to cool "off-the-shelf" vendor electronics. The CFD analysis was used to characterize the thermal and fluid flow environment within a complicated labyrinth of electronics boards, fans, instrumentation, harnessing, ductwork and heat exchanger fins. The paradigm of iteratively using CAD/CAE tools and CFD was followed in order to determine the optimum flow geometry and heat sink configuration to yield operational convective film coefficients and temperature survivability limits for the electronics payload. Results from this current CFD analysis and correlation of the CFD model against thermal test data will be presented. Lessons learned and coupled thermal / flow modeling strategies will be shared in this paper.

  2. Study on the physical properties of the dynamic filter: unidimensional modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Roberto Salomon de

    2005-10-01

    The present work shows an characterization of the Varian linear accelerator EDW physical properties, through experimental determinations, comparing them with calculations made by CadPlan treatment planning system, under the same conditions. The following parameters were determined: EDW factor for square and rectangular fields on the central axis and off-axis, EDW factor dependency with the static collimator, percentage depth dose, EDW factor dependency with the depth on the central axis and off-axis, EDW angles and field profiles on several depths. It was verified that the EDW factor diminishes with the field size increment and with EDW nominal angle increment, and increases with energy increment. It is independent of the X collimator and dynamic collimator, except for small field sizes. It doesn't vary with depth on the central axis, but varies on the off-axis distances. A difference between EDW nominal angles and the EDW obtained experimentally was found, but it doesn't interfere in the treatment results. At the end of this work, a set of physical parameters to be determined for the commissioning, clinical implementation and quality assurance of the EDW is suggested. (author)

  3. Kaolin modulates ABA and IAA dynamics and physiology of grapevine under Mediterranean summer stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, L-T; Bernardo, S; Luzio, A; Pinto, G; Meijón, M; Pintó-Marijuan, M; Cotado, A; Correia, C; Moutinho-Pereira, J

    2018-01-01

    The foliar exogenous application of kaolin, a radiation-reflecting inert mineral, has proven to be an effective short-term climate change mitigation strategy for Mediterranean vineyards. In this work, we address the hypothesis that kaolin could improve both the hormonal dynamics and physiological responses of grapevines growing in Douro Region, northern Portugal. For this purpose, the leaf water potential, gas exchange and chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters were monitored, as well as the abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) quantification and immunolocalization were assessed. The study revealed a slight decrease in ABA and an increase in IAA in the kaolin treatment, which in turn were associated with the improvement of physiological performance. A month after spraying, kaolin improves the water potential respectively, 30% and 17% in the predawn and midday periods. Besides, plants treated with kaolin showed higher values of stomatal conductance, net CO 2 assimilation rate and intrinsic water use efficiency. Kaolin also ameliorates the effective PSII efficiency (67%), as well as the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II and the photosynthetic electron transport rate (>73%). These results were consistent with the higher photochemical quenching and the lower non-photochemical quenching observed in treated leaves and with the better performance obtained by the JIP test parameters. Physiological and hormonal analysis confirmed that kaolin effectively enhance grapevine summer stress tolerance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Dynamic modulation of platelet aggregation, albumin and nonesterified fatty acids during physical exercise in Thoroughbred horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfuso, F; Giannetto, C; Giudice, E; Fazio, F; Piccione, G

    2016-02-01

    The effect of exercise on platelet aggregation, albumin and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) values and the correlation among these parameters were evaluated in ten clinically healthy and regularly trained Thoroughbred horses. All horses were subjected to two simulated races. Blood samples were collected by jugular venipuncture before and after the first simulated race (T0PRE and T0POST), every 7 days at rest condition for a month (T1R-T2R-T3R), and before and after the second simulated race (T4PRE and T4POST) in order to assess platelet aggregation, albumin and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs) levels. One-way analysis of variance showed a significant effect of exercise (P<0.01) on platelet aggregation, albumin and NEFAs values. A negative correlation between platelet aggregation and albumin or NEFAs values, and a positive correlation between albumin and NEFAs values, were found both at T0POST and T4POST (P<0.05). These findings are likely related to dynamic physiological adaptations to exercise that allow re-establishment of the homeostatic equilibrium of the organism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Modulation of actin dynamics as potential macrophage subtype-targeting anti-tumour strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergola, Carlo; Schubert, Katrin; Pace, Simona; Ziereisen, Jana; Nikels, Felix; Scherer, Olga; Hüttel, Stephan; Zahler, Stefan; Vollmar, Angelika M; Weinigel, Christina; Rummler, Silke; Müller, Rolf; Raasch, Martin; Mosig, Alexander; Koeberle, Andreas; Werz, Oliver

    2017-01-30

    Tumour-associated macrophages mainly comprise immunosuppressive M2 phenotypes that promote tumour progression besides anti-tumoural M1 subsets. Selective depletion or reprogramming of M2 may represent an innovative anti-cancer strategy. The actin cytoskeleton is central for cellular homeostasis and is targeted for anti-cancer chemotherapy. Here, we show that targeting G-actin nucleation using chondramide A (ChA) predominantly depletes human M2 while promoting the tumour-suppressive M1 phenotype. ChA reduced the viability of M2, with minor effects on M1, but increased tumour necrosis factor (TNF)α release from M1. Interestingly, ChA caused rapid disruption of dynamic F-actin filaments and polymerization of G-actin, followed by reduction of cell size, binucleation and cell division, without cellular collapse. In M1, but not in M2, ChA caused marked activation of SAPK/JNK and NFκB, with slight or no effects on Akt, STAT-1/-3, ERK-1/2, and p38 MAPK, seemingly accounting for the better survival of M1 and TNFα secretion. In a microfluidically-supported human tumour biochip model, circulating ChA-treated M1 markedly reduced tumour cell viability through enhanced release of TNFα. Together, ChA may cause an anti-tumoural microenvironment by depletion of M2 and activation of M1, suggesting induction of G-actin nucleation as potential strategy to target tumour-associated macrophages in addition to neoplastic cells.

  6. Dynamic Fluid Flow Mechanical Stimulation Modulates Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Minyi; Yeh, Robbin; Lien, Michelle; Teeratananon, Morgan; Agarwal, Kunal; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2013-03-01

    Osteoblasts are derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which initiate and regulate bone formation. New strategies for osteoporosis treatments have aimed to control the fate of MSCs. While functional disuse decreases MSC growth and osteogenic potentials, mechanical signals enhance MSC quantity and bias their differentiation toward osteoblastogenesis. Through a non-invasive dynamic hydraulic stimulation (DHS), we have found that DHS can mitigate trabecular bone loss in a functional disuse model via rat hindlimb suspension (HLS). To further elucidate the downstream cellular effect of DHS and its potential mechanism underlying the bone quality enhancement, a longitudinal in vivo study was designed to evaluate the MSC populations in response to DHS over 3, 7, 14, and 21 days. Five-month old female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups for each time point: age-matched control, HLS, and HLS+DHS. DHS was delivered to the right mid-tibiae with a daily "10 min on-5 min off-10 min on" loading regime for five days/week. At each sacrifice time point, bone marrow MSCs of the stimulated and control tibiae were isolated through specific cell surface markers and quantified by flow cytometry analysis. A strong time-dependent manner of bone marrow MSC induction was observed in response to DHS, which peaked on day 14. After 21 days, this effect of DHS was diminished. This study indicates that the MSC pool is positively influenced by the mechanical signals driven by DHS. Coinciding with our previous findings of mitigation of disuse bone loss, DHS induced changes in MSC number may bias the differentiation of the MSC population towards osteoblastogenesis, thereby promoting bone formation under disuse conditions. This study provides insights into the mechanism of time-sensitive MSC induction in response to mechanical loading, and for the optimal design of osteoporosis treatments.

  7. Cellular volume regulation and substrate stiffness modulate the detachment dynamics of adherent cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuehua; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2018-03-01

    Quantitative characterizations of cell detachment are vital for understanding the fundamental mechanisms of cell adhesion. Experiments have found that cell detachment shows strong rate dependence, which is mostly attributed to the binding-unbinding kinetics of receptor-ligand bond. However, our recent study showed that the cellular volume regulation can significantly regulate the dynamics of adherent cell and cell detachment. How this cellular volume regulation contributes to the rate dependence of cell detachment remains elusive. Here, we systematically study the role of cellular volume regulation in the rate dependence of cell detachment by investigating the cell detachments of nonspecific adhesion and specific adhesion. We find that the cellular volume regulation and the bond kinetics dominate the rate dependence of cell detachment at different time scales. We further test the validity of the traditional Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) contact model and the detachment model developed by Wyart and Gennes et al (W-G model). When the cell volume is changeable, the JKR model is not appropriate for both the detachments of convex cells and concave cells. The W-G model is valid for the detachment of convex cells but is no longer applicable for the detachment of concave cells. Finally, we show that the rupture force of adherent cells is also highly sensitive to substrate stiffness, since an increase in substrate stiffness will lead to more associated bonds. These findings can provide insight into the critical role of cell volume in cell detachment and might have profound implications for other adhesion-related physiological processes.

  8. Induction of Plant Curvature by Magnetophoresis and Cytoskeletal Changes during Root Graviresponse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenstein, Karl H.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Blancaflor, Eilson B.

    1996-01-01

    High gradient magnetic fields (HGMF) induce curvature in roots and shoots. It is considered that this response is likely to be based on the intracellular displacement of bulk starch (amyloplasts) by the ponderomotive force generated by the HGMF. This process is called magnetophoresis. The differential elongation during the curvature along the concave and convex flanks of growing organs may be linked to the microtubular and/or microfilament cytoskeleton. The possible existence of an effect of the HGMF on the cytoskeleton was tested for, but none was found. The application of cytoskeletal stabilizers or depolymerizers showed that neither microtubules, nor microfilaments, are involved in the graviresponse.

  9. The effect of the cytoskeletal inhibitors on the splenic lymphocyte traffic and homing in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Huibin

    1989-01-01

    The rat splenic lymphocyte traffic and homing in vivo and the effect of cytoskeletal inhibitors on this process were investigated using the technique of γ-counting of 51 Cr-labelled lymphocytes. The results suggests that:(1) After 2 of intravenous injection, the 51 Cr-labelled lymphocytes from donor rat spleen mainly home to recipient rat spleen, liver, lungs, mesenteric lymph modes (MLN) and gut-associated lymphoid tissues. (2) A significant inhibiting effect on the ability of preferential homing of splenic lymphocytes treated with sodium azide, cytochalasin B or colchicine shows that microtubles and microfilaments play an important role in the lymphocyte traffic and homing

  10. The phosphorylation status and cytoskeletal remodeling of striatal astrocytes treated with quinolinic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; Ortiz de Lima, Bárbara; Gonçalves Fernandes, Carolina; Totarelli Monteforte, Priscila; Castro Medaglia, Natalia de; Bincoletto, Claudia; Soubhi Smaili, Soraya; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a glutamate agonist which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neural cells to excitotoxicity. QUIN is produced from the amino acid tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway (KP). Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. In this study we treated striatal astrocytes in culture with QUIN and assayed the endogenous phosphorylating system associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. After 24 h incubation with 100 µM QUIN, cells were exposed to 32 P-orthophosphate and/or protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase dependent of Ca 2+ /calmodulin II (PKCaMII) or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, H89 (20 μM), KN93 (10 μM) and staurosporin (10 nM), respectively. Results showed that hyperphosphorylation was abrogated by PKA and PKC inhibitors but not by the PKCaMII inhibitor. The specific antagonists to ionotropic NMDA and non-NMDA (50 µM DL-AP5 and CNQX, respectively) glutamate receptors as well as to metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR; 50 µM MCPG), mGLUR1 (100 µM MPEP) and mGLUR5 (10 µM 4C3HPG) prevented the hyperphosphorylation provoked by QUIN. Also, intra and extracellular Ca 2+ quelators (1 mM EGTA; 10 µM BAPTA-AM, respectively) prevented QUIN-mediated effect, while Ca 2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channel type L (L-VDCC) (blocker: 10 µM verapamil) is not implicated in this effect. Morphological analysis showed dramatically altered actin cytoskeleton with concomitant change of morphology to fusiform and/or flattened cells with retracted cytoplasm and disruption of the GFAP meshwork, supporting misregulation of actin cytoskeleton. Both hyperphosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling were reversed 24 h after QUIN removal. Astrocytes are highly plastic cells and the vulnerability of astrocyte cytoskeleton may have important implications for understanding the neurotoxicity of QUIN in neurodegenerative disorders. - Highlights:

  11. The phosphorylation status and cytoskeletal remodeling of striatal astrocytes treated with quinolinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; Ortiz de Lima, Bárbara; Gonçalves Fernandes, Carolina [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003 (Brazil); Totarelli Monteforte, Priscila; Castro Medaglia, Natalia de; Bincoletto, Claudia; Soubhi Smaili, Soraya [Departamento de Farmacologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pessoa-Pureur, Regina, E-mail: rpureur@ufrgs.br [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003 (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a glutamate agonist which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neural cells to excitotoxicity. QUIN is produced from the amino acid tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway (KP). Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. In this study we treated striatal astrocytes in culture with QUIN and assayed the endogenous phosphorylating system associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. After 24 h incubation with 100 µM QUIN, cells were exposed to {sup 32}P-orthophosphate and/or protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase dependent of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin II (PKCaMII) or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, H89 (20 μM), KN93 (10 μM) and staurosporin (10 nM), respectively. Results showed that hyperphosphorylation was abrogated by PKA and PKC inhibitors but not by the PKCaMII inhibitor. The specific antagonists to ionotropic NMDA and non-NMDA (50 µM DL-AP5 and CNQX, respectively) glutamate receptors as well as to metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR; 50 µM MCPG), mGLUR1 (100 µM MPEP) and mGLUR5 (10 µM 4C3HPG) prevented the hyperphosphorylation provoked by QUIN. Also, intra and extracellular Ca{sup 2+} quelators (1 mM EGTA; 10 µM BAPTA-AM, respectively) prevented QUIN-mediated effect, while Ca{sup 2+} influx through voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channel type L (L-VDCC) (blocker: 10 µM verapamil) is not implicated in this effect. Morphological analysis showed dramatically altered actin cytoskeleton with concomitant change of morphology to fusiform and/or flattened cells with retracted cytoplasm and disruption of the GFAP meshwork, supporting misregulation of actin cytoskeleton. Both hyperphosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling were reversed 24 h after QUIN removal. Astrocytes are highly plastic cells and the vulnerability of astrocyte cytoskeleton may have important implications for understanding the neurotoxicity of QUIN in neurodegenerative

  12. The Emerging Role of the Cytoskeleton in Chromosome Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Spichal

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomes underlie a dynamic organization that fulfills functional roles in processes like transcription, DNA repair, nuclear envelope stability, and cell division. Chromosome dynamics depend on chromosome structure and cannot freely diffuse. Furthermore, chromosomes interact closely with their surrounding nuclear environment, which further constrains chromosome dynamics. Recently, several studies enlighten that cytoskeletal proteins regulate dynamic chromosome organization. Cytoskeletal polymers that include actin filaments, microtubules and intermediate filaments can connect to the nuclear envelope via Linker of the Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton (LINC complexes and transfer forces onto chromosomes inside the nucleus. Monomers of these cytoplasmic polymers and related proteins can also enter the nucleus and play different roles in the interior of the nucleus than they do in the cytoplasm. Nuclear cytoskeletal proteins can act as chromatin remodelers alone or in complexes with other nuclear proteins. They can also act as transcription factors. Many of these mechanisms have been conserved during evolution, indicating that the cytoskeletal regulation of chromosome dynamics is an essential process. In this review, we discuss the different influences of cytoskeletal proteins on chromosome dynamics by focusing on the well-studied model organism budding yeast.

  13. Application of Pfortran and Co-Array Fortran in the Parallelization of the GROMOS96 Molecular Dynamics Module

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Bała

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available After at least a decade of parallel tool development, parallelization of scientific applications remains a significant undertaking. Typically parallelization is a specialized activity supported only partially by the programming tool set, with the programmer involved with parallel issues in addition to sequential ones. The details of concern range from algorithm design down to low-level data movement details. The aim of parallel programming tools is to automate the latter without sacrificing performance and portability, allowing the programmer to focus on algorithm specification and development. We present our use of two similar parallelization tools, Pfortran and Cray's Co-Array Fortran, in the parallelization of the GROMOS96 molecular dynamics module. Our parallelization started from the GROMOS96 distribution's shared-memory implementation of the replicated algorithm, but used little of that existing parallel structure. Consequently, our parallelization was close to starting with the sequential version. We found the intuitive extensions to Pfortran and Co-Array Fortran helpful in the rapid parallelization of the project. We present performance figures for both the Pfortran and Co-Array Fortran parallelizations showing linear speedup within the range expected by these parallelization methods.

  14. Azadirachtin(A) distinctively modulates subdomain 2 of actin - novel mechanism to induce depolymerization revealed by molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravin Kumar, R; Roopa, L; Sudheer Mohammed, M M; Kulkarni, Naveen

    2016-12-01

    Azadirachtin(A) (AZA), a potential insecticide from neem, binds to actin and induces depolymerization in Drosophila. AZA binds to the pocket same as that of Latrunculin A (LAT), but LAT inhibits actin polymerization by stiffening the actin structure and affects the ADP-ATP exchange. The mechanism by which AZA induces actin depolymerization is not clearly understood. Therefore, different computational experiments were conducted to delineate the precise mechanism of AZA-induced actin depolymerization. Molecular dynamics studies showed that AZA strongly interacted with subdomain 2 and destabilized the interactions between subdomain 2 of one actin and subdomains 1 and 4 of the adjacent actin, causing the separation of actin subunits. The separation was observed between subdomain 3 of subunit n and subdomain 4 of subunit n + 2. However, the specific triggering point for the separation of the subunits was the destabilization of direct interactions between subdomain 2 of subunit n (Arg39, Val45, Gly46 and Arg62) and subdomain 4 of subunit n + 2 (Asp286, Ile287, Asp288, Ile289, Asp244 and Lys291). These results reveal a unique mechanism of an actin filament modulator that induces depolymerization. This mechanism of AZA can be used to design similar molecules against mammalian actins for cancer therapy.

  15. Light modulated toxicity of isoproturon toward natural stream periphyton photosynthesis: a comparison between constant and dynamic light conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviale, Martin; Prygiel, Jean; Créach, Anne

    2010-05-10

    This study tested if a variation in light intensity, in comparison to constant light required in well-designed toxicity test, could have measurable consequences on the sensitivity of phototrophic biofilms (periphyton) to isoproturon. Two independent experiments were carried out to investigate the combined effects of light and isoproturon on the photochemical behavior of intact natural biofilms by measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and pigment composition. Experiment 1 consisted of exposing biofilms to series of isoproturon concentrations (0-2 mg L(-1)) for 7 h under constant light at different irradiance levels (25-300 micromol m(-2) s(-1)). In experiment 2, biofilms were exposed using more environmentally realistic conditions to three selected concentrations of isoproturon (2, 6 and 20 microg L(-1)) during a 7-h-simulated daily light cycle. Our results demonstrated that light, considered here as a direct physical stressor, slightly modulated the acute toxicity of isoproturon on these diatom dominated communities. This was attributed to the fact that these two factors act specifically on the photosynthetic activity. Furthermore, it was shown that a dynamic light regime increased periphyton sensitivity to isoproturon by challenging its photoprotective mechanisms such as the xanthophyll cycle, therefore implying that traditional ecotoxicological bioassays lead to underestimate the effect of isoproturon. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device for verification of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greer, Peter B.; Popescu, Carmen C.

    2003-01-01

    Dosimetric properties of an amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device (EPID) for verification of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivery were investigated. The EPID was utilized with continuous frame-averaging during the beam delivery. Properties studied included effect of buildup, dose linearity, field size response, sampling of rapid multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf speeds, response to dose-rate fluctuations, memory effect, and reproducibility. The dependence of response on EPID calibration and a dead time in image frame acquisition occurring every 64 frames were measured. EPID measurements were also compared to ion chamber and film for open and wedged static fields and IMRT fields. The EPID was linear with dose and dose rate, and response to MLC leaf speeds up to 2.5 cm s-1 was found to be linear. A field size dependent response of up to 5% relative to d max ion-chamber measurement was found. Reproducibility was within 0.8% (1 standard deviation) for an IMRT delivery recorded at intervals over a period of one month. The dead time in frame acquisition resulted in errors in the EPID that increased with leaf speed and were over 20% for a 1 cm leaf gap moving at 1.0 cm s-1. The EPID measurements were also found to depend on the input beam profile utilized for EPID flood-field calibration. The EPID shows promise as a device for verification of IMRT, the major limitation currently being due to dead-time in frame acquisition

  17. Biallelic Mutations in TBCD, Encoding the Tubulin Folding Cofactor D, Perturb Microtubule Dynamics and Cause Early-Onset Encephalopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flex, Elisabetta; Niceta, Marcello; Cecchetti, Serena; Thiffault, Isabelle; Au, Margaret G.; Capuano, Alessandro; Piermarini, Emanuela; Ivanova, Anna A.; Francis, Joshua W.; Chillemi, Giovanni; Chandramouli, Balasubramanian; Carpentieri, Giovanna; Haaxma, Charlotte A.; Ciolfi, Andrea; Pizzi, Simone; Douglas, Ganka V.; Levine, Kara; Sferra, Antonella; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Pfundt, Rolph R.; Le Pichon, Jean-Baptiste; Farrow, Emily; Baas, Frank; Piemonte, Fiorella; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Graham, John M.; Saunders, Carol J.; Bertini, Enrico; Kahn, Richard A.; Koolen, David A.; Tartaglia, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are dynamic cytoskeletal elements coordinating and supporting a variety of neuronal processes, including cell division, migration, polarity, intracellular trafficking, and signal transduction. Mutations in genes encoding tubulins and microtubule-associated proteins are known to cause

  18. ATG5 overexpression is neuroprotective and attenuates cytoskeletal and vesicle-trafficking alterations in axotomized motoneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Rodríguez, Tatiana; Romeo-Guitart, David; Marmolejo-Martínez-Artesero, Sara; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Bosch, Assumpció; Forés, Joaquim; Casas, Caty

    2018-05-24

    Injured neurons should engage endogenous mechanisms of self-protection to limit neurodegeneration. Enhancing efficacy of these mechanisms or correcting dysfunctional pathways may be a successful strategy for inducing neuroprotection. Spinal motoneurons retrogradely degenerate after proximal axotomy due to mechanical detachment (avulsion) of the nerve roots, and this limits recovery of nervous system function in patients after this type of trauma. In a previously reported proteomic analysis, we demonstrated that autophagy is a key endogenous mechanism that may allow motoneuron survival and regeneration after distal axotomy and suture of the nerve. Herein, we show that autophagy flux is dysfunctional or blocked in degenerated motoneurons after root avulsion. We also found that there were abnormalities in anterograde/retrograde motor proteins, key secretory pathway factors, and lysosome function. Further, LAMP1 protein was missorted and underglycosylated as well as the proton pump v-ATPase. In vitro modeling revealed how sequential disruptions in these systems likely lead to neurodegeneration. In vivo, we observed that cytoskeletal alterations, induced by a single injection of nocodazole, were sufficient to promote neurodegeneration of avulsed motoneurons. Besides, only pre-treatment with rapamycin, but not post-treatment, neuroprotected after nerve root avulsion. In agreement, overexpressing ATG5 in injured motoneurons led to neuroprotection and attenuation of cytoskeletal and trafficking-related abnormalities. These discoveries serve as proof of concept for autophagy-target therapy to halting the progression of neurodegenerative processes.

  19. Cytoskeletal proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid as biomarker of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Roberto; Farace, Cristiano; Tolu, Paola; Solinas, Giuliana; Asara, Yolande; Sotgiu, Maria Alessandra; Delogu, Lucia Gemma; Prados, Jose Carlos; Sotgiu, Stefano; Montella, Andrea

    2013-02-01

    The axonal cytoskeleton is a finely organized system, essential for maintaining the integrity of the axon. Axonal degeneration is implicated in the pathogenesis of unremitting disability of multiple sclerosis (MS). Purpose of this study is to evaluate levels of cytoskeletal proteins such as neurofilament light protein (NFL), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and β-tubulin (β-Tub) isoforms II and III in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients and their correlation with MS clinical indices. CSF levels of cytoskeletal proteins were determined in 51 patients: 33 with MS and 18 with other neurological diseases (OND). NFL, GFAP and β-Tub II proteins were significantly higher (p 0.05) was found between MS and OND with regard to β-Tub III. Interestingly, levels of β-Tub III and NFL were higher in progressive than in remitting MS forms; on the contrary, higher levels of β-Tub II and GFAP were found in remitting MS forms. However, with the exception of β-Tub III, all proteins tend to decrease their CSF levels concomitantly with the increasing disability (EDSS) score. Overall, our results might indicate β-Tub II as a potential candidate for diagnostic and β-Tub III as a possible prognostic biomarker of MS. Therefore, further analyses are legitimated and desirable.

  20. Intracellular Transport of Cargo in a Sub-diffusive Environment over an Explicit Cytoskeletal Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maelfeyt, Bryan; Gopinathan, Ajay

    Intracellular transport occurs in nearly all eukaryotic cells, where materials such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids travel to target locations through phases of passive, diffusion-based transport and active, motor-driven transport along filaments that make up the cell's cytoskeleton.We develop a computational model of the process with explicit cytoskeletal filament networks. In the active transport phase, cargo moves in straight lines along these filaments that are spread throughout the cell. To model the passive transport phase of cargo in the cytoplasm, where anomalous sub-diffusion is thought to take place, we implement a continuous-time random walk. We use this approach to provide a stepping stone to a predictive model where we can determine transport properties over a cytoskeletal network provided by experimental images of real filaments. We illustrate our approach by modeling the transport of insulin out of the cell and determining the impact of network geometry, anomalous sub-diffusion and motor number on the first-passage time distributions for insulin granules reaching their target destinations on the membrane.

  1. Demonstration of mechanical connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nucleoplasm that stabilize nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniotis, A. J.; Chen, C. S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    We report here that living cells and nuclei are hard-wired such that a mechanical tug on cell surface receptors can immediately change the organization of molecular assemblies in the cytoplasm and nucleus. When integrins were pulled by micromanipulating bound microbeads or micropipettes, cytoskeletal filaments reoriented, nuclei distorted, and nucleoli redistributed along the axis of the applied tension field. These effects were specific for integrins, independent of cortical membrane distortion, and were mediated by direct linkages between the cytoskeleton and nucleus. Actin microfilaments mediated force transfer to the nucleus at low strain; however, tearing of the actin gel resulted with greater distortion. In contrast, intermediate filaments effectively mediated force transfer to the nucleus under both conditions. These filament systems also acted as molecular guy wires to mechanically stiffen the nucleus and anchor it in place, whereas microtubules acted to hold open the intermediate filament lattice and to stabilize the nucleus against lateral compression. Molecular connections between integrins, cytoskeletal filaments, and nuclear scaffolds may therefore provide a discrete path for mechanical signal transfer through cells as well as a mechanism for producing integrated changes in cell and nuclear structure in response to changes in extracellular matrix adhesivity or mechanics.

  2. Cytoskeletal proteins in the follicular wall of normal andcystic ovaries of sows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiano J.F. de Sant'Ana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The expression of cytoskeletal proteins was evaluated immunohistochemically in 36 normal ovaries sampled from 18 sows and 44 cystic ovaries sampled from of 22 sows, was evaluated. All sows had history of reproductive problems, such as infertility or subfertility. The immunohistochemically stained area (IHCSA was quantified through image analysis to evaluate the expression of these proteins in the follicular wall of secondary, tertiary, and cystic follicles. Cytokeratins (CK immunoreactivity was strong in the granulosa cell layer (GC and mild in the theca interna (TI and externa (TE of the normal follicles. There was severe reduction of the reaction to CK in the GC in the cystic follicles, mainly in the luteinized cysts. The immunoreactivity for vimentin was higher in the GC from normal and cystic follicles in contrast with the other follicular structures. In the luteinized cysts, the IHCSA for vimentin was significantly higher in TI and in both observed cysts, the labeling was more accentuated in TE. Immunohistochemical detection of desmin and α-SMA was restricted to the TE, without differences between the normal and cystic follicles. The results of the current study show that the development of ovarian cysts in sows is associated to changes in the expression of the cytoskeletal proteins CK and vimentin.

  3. MAL Overexpression Leads to Disturbed Expression of Genes That Influence Cytoskeletal Organization and Differentiation of Schwann Cells

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    Daniela Schmid

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In the developing peripheral nervous system, a coordinated reciprocal signaling between Schwann cells and axons is crucial for accurate myelination. The myelin and lymphocyte protein MAL is a component of lipid rafts that is important for targeting proteins and lipids to distinct domains. MAL overexpression impedes peripheral myelinogenesis, which is evident by a delayed onset of myelination and reduced expression of the myelin protein zero (Mpz/P0 and the low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75NTR . This study shows that MAL overexpression leads to a significant reduction of Mpz and p75NTR expression in primary mouse Schwann cell cultures, which was already evident before differentiation, implicating an effect of MAL in early Schwann cell development. Their transcription was robustly reduced, despite normal expression of essential transcription factors and receptors. Further, the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB and phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathways important for Schwann cell differentiation were correctly induced, highlighting that other so far unknown rate limiting factors do exist. We identified novel genes expressed by Schwann cells in a MAL-dependent manner in vivo and in vitro. A number of those, including S100a4, RhoU and Krt23, are implicated in cytoskeletal organization and plasma membrane dynamics. We showed that S100a4 is predominantly expressed by nonmyelinating Schwann cells, whereas RhoU was localized within myelin membranes, and Krt23 was detected in nonmyelinating as well as in myelinating Schwann cells. Their differential expression during early peripheral nerve development further underlines their possible role in influencing Schwann cell differentiation and myelination.

  4. Biosynthesis of intestinal microvillar proteins. Rapid expression of cytoskeletal components in microvilli of pig small intestinal mucosal explants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cowell, G M; Danielsen, E M

    1984-01-01

    Using alkaline extraction to separate cytoskeletal and membrane proteins of intestinal microvilli, the kinetics of assembly of these two microvillar protein compartments was studied by pulse-chase labelling of pig small intestinal mucosal explants, kept in organ culture. Following a 10 min pulse...... of [35S]methionine, the membrane proteins did not appear in the microvillar fraction until after 40-60 min of chase. In contrast, the cytoskeletal components, of which the 110-kDa protein and villin were immunologically identified, were expressed in the microvillar fraction immediately after the 10 min...

  5. Modulational effects in accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satogata, T.

    1997-01-01

    We discuss effects of field modulations in accelerators, specifically those that can be used for operational beam diagnostics and beam halo control. In transverse beam dynamics, combined effects of nonlinear resonances and tune modulations influence diffusion rates with applied tune modulation has been demonstrated. In the longitudinal domain, applied RF phase and voltage modulations provide mechanisms for parasitic halo transport, useful in slow crystal extraction. Experimental experiences with transverse tune and RF modulations are also discussed

  6. Modulating weak interactions for molecular recognition: a dynamic combinatorial analysis for assessing the contribution of electrostatics to the stability of CH-π bonds in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Moreno, Ester; Gómez, Ana M; Bastida, Agatha; Corzana, Francisco; Jiménez-Oses, Gonzalo; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Asensio, Juan Luis

    2015-03-27

    Electrostatic and charge-transfer contributions to CH-π complexes can be modulated by attaching electron-withdrawing substituents to the carbon atom. While clearly stabilizing in the gas phase, the outcome of this chemical modification in water is more difficult to predict. Herein we provide a definitive and quantitative answer to this question employing a simple strategy based on dynamic combinatorial chemistry. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Development of e-module combining science process skills and dynamics motion material to increasing critical thinking skills and improve student learning motivation senior high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengky Adie Perdana

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Learning media is one of the most components in the teaching and learning process. This research was conducted to design and develop the electronic modules combining science process skills and dynamics motion content for increasing critical thinking skills and improve student learning motivation for senior high school. The Methods used in this research is Research and Development (R&D. Model research and development using a research 4D Thiagarajan model. Physics module was developed using science process skills approach: observing, formulating the problem, formulating a hypothesis, identify variables, conduct experiments, analyse the data, summarise and communicate. The results showed that: 1 the electronics module has been developed by integrating the science process skills for enhancing critical thinking skills and student motivation. 2 Electronic Module Physics-based science process skills meet the criteria very well, judging from the results of validation content, validation media, validation of peer education and practitioners, with an average value of 3.80 is greater than the minimum eligibility 3.78. 3 effectiveness the modules of science process skills got N-gain value obtained from a large trial in grade samples of 0.67 and 0.59 in the control group were categorised as moderate. 4 Implementation of electronic modules Physics-based science process skills is considered an effective to enhance the students' motivation. Statistical analysis showed a significance value of 0.027 is lower than the significance level α = 0.05, this means that there are significant differences between learning motivation grade sample and the control class. As a result of analysis data obtained from the research, it was seen that the students' motivation that uses Physics module based science process skills better than conventional learning.

  8. Location of and post-mortem changes in some cytoskeletal proteins in pork and cod muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, E.H.; Bremner, Allan; Purslow, P.P.

    2000-01-01

    The cytoskeletal proteins actin, nebulin, spectrin, desmin, vinculin and talin were labelled immunohistochemically in sections of muscle from commercially available pigs and cod (Gadus morhua) taken pre-rigor and from samples stored for several days. Actin, nebulin and spectrin gave similar...... labelling patterns in both pork and cod muscle which remained the same in stored samples. Desmin was intensely labelled at the cell boundaries and within the body of the cells in both pork and cod in the initial and the stored samples. Vinculin was readily labelled in pork muscle but showed only diffuse...... labelling in fish. Labelling for talin in pork muscle was intense at the sarcolemma but was not present in samples stored for 4 days. In contrast, the label for talin was concentrated at the myotendinous junction of the cod muscle throughout the storage period. These are the first reports of the detection...

  9. Distribution of cytoskeletal proteins, integrins, leukocyte adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins in plastic-embedded human and rat kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H; Coers, W; van der Horst, MLC; Suurmeijer, AJH

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the distribution of cytoskeletal proteins (actin, alpha -actinin, vinculin, beta -tubulin, keratin, vimentin, desmin), adhesion molecules for cell-matrix interations (very later antigens [VLA1-6], beta1, beta2 [CD18], vitronectin receptor [alphav beta3], CD 11b), leukocyte

  10. Cytoskeletal actin genes function downstream of HNF-3beta in ascidian notochord development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, W R; Ewing, N; Machula, J; Olsen, C L; Swalla, B J

    1998-11-01

    We have examined the expression and regulation of cytoskeletal actin genes in ascidians with tailed (Molgula oculata) and tailless larvae (Molgula occulta). Four cDNA clones were isolated representing two pairs of orthologous cytoskeletal actin genes (CA1 and CA2), which encode proteins differing by five amino acids in the tailed and tailless species. The CA1 and CA2 genes are present in one or two copies, although several related genes may also be present in both species. Maternal CA1 and CA2 mRNA is present in small oocytes but transcript levels later decline, suggesting a role in early oogenesis. In the tailed species, embryonic CA1 and CA2 mRNAs first appear in the presumptive mesenchyme and muscle cells during gastrulation, subsequently accumulate in the presumptive notochord cells, and can be detected in these tissues through the tadpole stage. CA1 mRNAs accumulate initially in the same tissues in the tailless species but subsequently disappear, in concert with the arrest of notochord and tail development. In contrast, CA2 mRNAs were not detected in embryos of the tailless species. Fertilization of eggs of the tailless species with sperm of the tailed species, which restores the notochord and the tail, also results in the upregulation of CA1 and CA2 gene expression in hybrid embryos. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotide experiments suggest that CA1 and CA2 expression in the notochord, but not in the muscle cells, is dependent on prior expression of Mocc FHI, an ascidian HNF-3beta-like gene. The expression of the CA1 and CA2 genes in the notochord in the tailed species, downregulation in the tailless species, upregulation in interspecific hybrids, and dependence on HNF-3beta activity is consistent with a role of these genes in development of the ascidian notochord.

  11. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha F Kornfeld

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as

  12. Magnolol inhibits migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karki, Rajendra; Kim, Seong-Bin; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute importantly to the formation of both atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of magnolol on VSMC migration. Methods: The proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulated VSMCs was performed by gelatin zymography. VSMC migration was assessed by wound healing and Boyden chamber methods. Collagen induced VSMC adhesion was determined by spectrofluorimeter and stress fibers formation was evaluated by fluorescence microscope. The expression of signaling molecules involved in stress fibers formation was determined by western blot. The phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) was determined by urea-glycerol polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of β1-integrin and collagen type I in the injured carotid arteries of rats on day 35 after vascular injury. Results: VSMC migration was strongly inhibited by magnolol without affecting MMPs expression. Also, magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, FAK phosphorylation and RhoA and Cdc42 activation to inhibit the collagen induced stress fibers formation. Moreover, magnolol inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC20. Our in vivo results showed that magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, collagen type I deposition and FAK phosphorylation in injured carotid arteries without affecting MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: Magnolol inhibited VSMC migration via inhibition of cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation. General significance: This study provides a rationale for further evaluation of magnolol for the management of atherosclerosis and restenosis. - Highlights: • Magnolol strongly inhibited migration of VSMCs. • Magnolol inhibited stress fibers formation. • MLC20 phosphorylation was also inhibited by magnolol. • Anti

  13. Quinolinic acid induces disrupts cytoskeletal homeostasis in striatal neurons. Protective role of astrocyte-neuron interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-02-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway involved in several neurological disorders. Among the several mechanisms involved in QUIN-mediated toxicity, disruption of the cytoskeleton has been demonstrated in striatally injected rats and in striatal slices. The present work searched for the actions of QUIN in primary striatal neurons. Neurons exposed to 10 µM QUIN presented hyperphosphorylated neurofilament (NF) subunits (NFL, NFM, and NFH). Hyperphosphorylation was abrogated in the presence of protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors H89 (20 μM) and staurosporine (10 nM), respectively, as well as by specific antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (50 µM DL-AP5) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (100 µM MPEP). Also, intra- and extracellular Ca(2+) chelators (10 µM BAPTA-AM and 1 mM EGTA, respectively) and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (10 µM verapamil) are implicated in QUIN-mediated effects. Cells immunostained for the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2 showed altered neurite/neuron ratios and neurite outgrowth. NF hyperphosphorylation and morphological alterations were totally prevented by conditioned medium from QUIN-treated astrocytes. Cocultured astrocytes and neurons interacted with one another reciprocally, protecting them against QUIN injury. Cocultured cells preserved their cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology together with unaltered activity of the phosphorylating system associated with the cytoskeleton. This article describes cytoskeletal disruption as one of the most relevant actions of QUIN toxicity in striatal neurons in culture with soluble factors secreted by astrocytes, with neuron-astrocyte interaction playing a role in neuroprotection. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Why is cytoskeletal contraction required for cardiac fusion before but not after looping begins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunfei; Varner, Victor D.; Taber, Larry A.

    2015-02-01

    Cytoskeletal contraction is crucial to numerous morphogenetic processes, but its role in early heart development is poorly understood. Studies in chick embryos have shown that inhibiting myosin-II-based contraction prior to Hamburger-Hamilton (HH) stage 10 (33 h incubation) impedes fusion of the mesodermal heart fields that create the primitive heart tube (HT), as well as the ensuing process of cardiac looping. If contraction is inhibited at or after looping begins at HH10, however, fusion and looping proceed relatively normally. To explore the mechanisms behind this seemingly fundamental change in behavior, we measured spatiotemporal distributions of tissue stiffness, stress, and strain around the anterior intestinal portal (AIP), the opening to the foregut where contraction and cardiac fusion occur. The results indicate that stiffness and tangential tension decreased bilaterally along the AIP with distance from the embryonic midline. The gradients in stiffness and tension, as well as strain rate, increased to peaks at HH9 (30 h) and decreased afterward. Exposure to the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin reduced these effects, suggesting that they are mainly generated by active cytoskeletal contraction, and finite-element modeling indicates that the measured mechanical gradients are consistent with a relatively uniform contraction of the endodermal layer in conjunction with constraints imposed by the attached mesoderm. Taken together, our results suggest that, before HH10, endodermal contraction pulls the bilateral heart fields toward the midline where they fuse to create the HT. By HH10, however, the fusion process is far enough along to enable apposing cardiac progenitor cells to keep ‘zipping’ together during looping without the need for continued high contractile forces. These findings should shed new light on a perplexing question in early heart development.

  15. Why is cytoskeletal contraction required for cardiac fusion before but not after looping begins?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yunfei; Taber, Larry A; Varner, Victor D

    2015-01-01

    Cytoskeletal contraction is crucial to numerous morphogenetic processes, but its role in early heart development is poorly understood. Studies in chick embryos have shown that inhibiting myosin-II-based contraction prior to Hamburger–Hamilton (HH) stage 10 (33 h incubation) impedes fusion of the mesodermal heart fields that create the primitive heart tube (HT), as well as the ensuing process of cardiac looping. If contraction is inhibited at or after looping begins at HH10, however, fusion and looping proceed relatively normally. To explore the mechanisms behind this seemingly fundamental change in behavior, we measured spatiotemporal distributions of tissue stiffness, stress, and strain around the anterior intestinal portal (AIP), the opening to the foregut where contraction and cardiac fusion occur. The results indicate that stiffness and tangential tension decreased bilaterally along the AIP with distance from the embryonic midline. The gradients in stiffness and tension, as well as strain rate, increased to peaks at HH9 (30 h) and decreased afterward. Exposure to the myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin reduced these effects, suggesting that they are mainly generated by active cytoskeletal contraction, and finite-element modeling indicates that the measured mechanical gradients are consistent with a relatively uniform contraction of the endodermal layer in conjunction with constraints imposed by the attached mesoderm. Taken together, our results suggest that, before HH10, endodermal contraction pulls the bilateral heart fields toward the midline where they fuse to create the HT. By HH10, however, the fusion process is far enough along to enable apposing cardiac progenitor cells to keep ‘zipping’ together during looping without the need for continued high contractile forces. These findings should shed new light on a perplexing question in early heart development. (paper)

  16. Magnolol inhibits migration of vascular smooth muscle cells via cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karki, Rajendra [Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmacy, University of Missouri-Kansas City (United States); Department of Oriental Medicine Resources, Mokpo National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong-Bin [Jeollanamdo Development Institute for Korean Traditional Medicine, Jangheung gun, Jeollanamdo (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Wook, E-mail: dbkim@mokpo.ac.kr [Department of Oriental Medicine Resources, Mokpo National University (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-10

    Background: Increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contribute importantly to the formation of both atherosclerotic and restenotic lesions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of magnolol on VSMC migration. Methods: The proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) stimulated VSMCs was performed by gelatin zymography. VSMC migration was assessed by wound healing and Boyden chamber methods. Collagen induced VSMC adhesion was determined by spectrofluorimeter and stress fibers formation was evaluated by fluorescence microscope. The expression of signaling molecules involved in stress fibers formation was determined by western blot. The phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC20) was determined by urea-glycerol polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the expression of β1-integrin and collagen type I in the injured carotid arteries of rats on day 35 after vascular injury. Results: VSMC migration was strongly inhibited by magnolol without affecting MMPs expression. Also, magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, FAK phosphorylation and RhoA and Cdc42 activation to inhibit the collagen induced stress fibers formation. Moreover, magnolol inhibited the phosphorylation of MLC20. Our in vivo results showed that magnolol inhibited β1-integrin expression, collagen type I deposition and FAK phosphorylation in injured carotid arteries without affecting MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: Magnolol inhibited VSMC migration via inhibition of cytoskeletal remodeling pathway to attenuate neointima formation. General significance: This study provides a rationale for further evaluation of magnolol for the management of atherosclerosis and restenosis. - Highlights: • Magnolol strongly inhibited migration of VSMCs. • Magnolol inhibited stress fibers formation. • MLC20 phosphorylation was also inhibited by magnolol. • Anti

  17. Dynamic method for the measurement of Young'S modulus. Application to nuclear graphites; Methode de mesure dynamique du module d'Young. Application aux graphites nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattou, F; Trutt, J C

    1963-07-01

    A dynamic method has been developed for measuring Young's modulus and the rigidity modulus using the 'Forster Elastomat'. The principle consists in the determination of the resonance frequencies of graphite samples submitted to transverse, longitudinal, and torsional vibrations. The first two modes of vibration make it possible to calculate the elasticity modulus or the Young's modulus E, the third mode makes possible the calculation of the rigidity modulus G. The relationships from which the moduli E and G are measured are given. A systematic study has been made of graphite samples produced by extrusion or compression and submitted afterwards to one or several impregnations with pitch. For graphites made from the same coke by the same method, a linear relationship has been found for Young's modulus as a function of the apparent density. For the same apparent density, graphites made from different starting materials have generally different Young's moduli that bear a relationship to the crystalline characteristics of the material. The measurements of the rigidity modulus C made on different graphites also show the influence of crystallite orientation. (authors) [French] Une methode de mesure dynamique du module d'Young et du module de rigidite du graphite utilisant 'l'Elastomat Forster' a ete mise au point. Le principe consiste a determiner les frequences de resonance d'echantillons de graphite soumis a des vibrations transversales, longitudinales et de torsion. Les deux premiers modes de vibration permettent de calculer le module d'elasticite ou module d'Young E, le troisieme mode de vibration permet de calculer le module de rigidite G. Apres avoir decrit la methode de mesure, on rappelle les relations qui permettent de calculer les modules E et G. L'etude systematique d'echantillons de graphite, fabriques par filage ou pressage et ayant subi eventuellement une ou plusieurs impregnations au brai a ete effectuee. Pour les graphites issus du meme coke et fabriques

  18. Ligand mobility modulates immunological synapse formation and T cell activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jung Hsu

    Full Text Available T cell receptor (TCR engagement induces clustering and recruitment to the plasma membrane of many signaling molecules, including the protein tyrosine kinase zeta-chain associated protein of 70 kDa (ZAP70 and the adaptor SH2 domain-containing leukocyte protein of 76 kDa (SLP76. This molecular rearrangement results in formation of the immunological synapse (IS, a dynamic protein array that modulates T cell activation. The current study investigates the effects of apparent long-range ligand mobility on T cell signaling activity and IS formation. We formed stimulatory lipid bilayers on glass surfaces from binary lipid mixtures with varied composition, and characterized these surfaces with respect to diffusion coefficient and fluid connectivity. Stimulatory ligands coupled to these surfaces with similar density and orientation showed differences in their ability to activate T cells. On less mobile membranes, central supramolecular activation cluster (cSMAC formation was delayed and the overall accumulation of CD3ζ at the IS was reduced. Analysis of signaling microcluster (MC dynamics showed that ZAP70 MCs exhibited faster track velocity and longer trajectories as a function of increased ligand mobility, whereas movement of SLP76 MCs was relatively insensitive to this parameter. Actin retrograde flow was observed on all surfaces, but cell spreading and subsequent cytoskeletal contraction were more pronounced on mobile membranes. Finally, increased tyrosine phosphorylation and persistent elevation of intracellular Ca(2+ were observed in cells stimulated on fluid membranes. These results point to ligand mobility as an important parameter in modulating T cell responses.

  19. One- and two-dimensional gap solitons and dynamics in the PT-symmetric lattice potential and spatially-periodic momentum modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Yan, Zhenya; Li, Xin

    2018-02-01

    The influence of spatially-periodic momentum modulation on beam dynamics in parity-time (PT) symmetric optical lattice is systematically investigated in the one- and two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equations. In the linear regime, we demonstrate that the momentum modulation can alter the first and second PT thresholds of the classical lattice, periodically or regularly change the shapes of the band structure, rotate and split the diffraction patterns of beams leading to multiple refraction and emissions. In the Kerr-nonlinear regime for one-dimension (1D) case, a large family of fundamental solitons within the semi-infinite gap can be found to be stable, even beyond the second PT threshold; it is shown that the momentum modulation can shrink the existing range of fundamental solitons and not change their stability. For two-dimension (2D) case, most solitons with higher intensities are relatively unstable in their existing regions which are narrower than those in 1D case, but we also find stable fundamental solitons corroborated by linear stability analysis and direct beam propagation. More importantly, the momentum modulation can also utterly change the direction of the transverse power flow and control the energy exchange among gain or loss regions.

  20. Altered expression and modulation of activity-regulated cytoskeletal associated protein (Arc) in serotonin transporter knockout rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molteni, R.; Calabrese, F.; Maj, P.F.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Racagni, G.; Ellenbroek, A.A.; Riva, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    A gene variant in the human serotonin transporter (SERT) can increase the vulnerability to mood disorders. SERT knockout animals show similarities to the human condition and represent an important tool to investigate the mechanisms underlying the pathologic condition in humans. Along this line of

  1. Phosphomimetic mutation of cysteine string protein-α increases the rate of regulated exocytosis by modulating fusion pore dynamics in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Chiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cysteine string protein-α (CSPα is a chaperone to ensure protein folding. Loss of CSPα function associates with many neurological diseases. However, its function in modulating regulated exocytosis remains elusive. Although cspα-knockouts exhibit impaired synaptic transmission, overexpression of CSPα in neuroendocrine cells inhibits secretion. These seemingly conflicting results lead to a hypothesis that CSPα may undergo a modification that switches its function in regulating neurotransmitter and hormone secretion. Previous studies implied that CSPα undergoes phosphorylation at Ser10 that may influence exocytosis by altering fusion pore dynamics. However, direct evidence is missing up to date. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using amperometry, we investigated how phosphorylation at Ser10 of CSPα (CSPα-Ser10 modulates regulated exocytosis and if this modulation involves regulating a specific kinetic step of fusion pore dynamics. The real-time exocytosis of single vesicles was detected in PC12 cells overexpressing control vector, wild-type CSPα (WT, the CSPα phosphodeficient mutant (S10A, or the CSPα phosphomimetic mutants (S10D and S10E. The shapes of amperometric signals were used to distinguish the full-fusion events (i.e., prespike feet followed by spikes and the kiss-and-run events (i.e., square-shaped flickers. We found that the secretion rate was significantly increased in cells overexpressing S10D or S10E compared to WT or S10A. Further analysis showed that overexpression of S10D or S10E prolonged fusion pore lifetime compared to WT or S10A. The fraction of kiss-and-run events was significantly lower but the frequency of full-fusion events was higher in cells overexpressing S10D or S10E compared to WT or S10A. Advanced kinetic analysis suggests that overexpression of S10D or S10E may stabilize open fusion pores mainly by inhibiting them from closing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CSPα may modulate fusion pore dynamics

  2. Estradiol influences the mechanical properties of human fetal osteoblasts through cytoskeletal changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muthukumaran, Padmalosini; Lim, Chwee Teck; Lee, Taeyong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Estradiol induced stiffness changes of osteoblasts were quantified using AFM. ► Estradiol causes significant decrease in the stiffness of osteoblasts. ► Decreased stiffness was caused by decreased density of f-actin network. ► Stiffness changes were not associated with mineralized matrix of osteoblasts. ► Estradiol increases inherent alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblasts. -- Abstract: Estrogen is known to have a direct effect on bone forming osteoblasts and bone resorbing osteoclasts. The cellular and molecular effects of estrogen on osteoblasts and osteoblasts-like cells have been extensively studied. However, the effect of estrogen on the mechanical property of osteoblasts has not been studied yet. It is important since mechanical property of the mechanosensory osteoblasts could be pivotal to its functionality in bone remodeling. This is the first study aimed to assess the direct effect of estradiol on the apparent elastic modulus (E ∗ ) and corresponding cytoskeletal changes of human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19). The cells were cultured in either medium alone or medium supplemented with β-estradiol and then subjected to Atomic Force Microscopy indentation (AFM) to determine E ∗ . The underlying changes in cytoskeleton were studied by staining the cells with TRITC-Phalloidin. Following estradiol treatment, the cells were also tested for proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization. With estradiol treatment, E ∗ of osteoblasts significantly decreased by 43–46%. The confocal images showed that the changes in f-actin network observed in estradiol treated cells can give rise to the changes in the stiffness of the cells. Estradiol also increases the inherent alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells. Estradiol induced stiffness changes of osteoblasts were not associated with changes in the synthesized mineralized matrix of the cells. Thus, a decrease in osteoblast stiffness with estrogen treatment was

  3. Estradiol influences the mechanical properties of human fetal osteoblasts through cytoskeletal changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muthukumaran, Padmalosini [Department of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Lim, Chwee Teck [Department of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Mechanobiology Institute, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART), National University of Singapore (Singapore); Lee, Taeyong, E-mail: bielt@nus.edu.sg [Department of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2012-07-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol induced stiffness changes of osteoblasts were quantified using AFM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol causes significant decrease in the stiffness of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decreased stiffness was caused by decreased density of f-actin network. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stiffness changes were not associated with mineralized matrix of osteoblasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estradiol increases inherent alkaline phosphatase activity of osteoblasts. -- Abstract: Estrogen is known to have a direct effect on bone forming osteoblasts and bone resorbing osteoclasts. The cellular and molecular effects of estrogen on osteoblasts and osteoblasts-like cells have been extensively studied. However, the effect of estrogen on the mechanical property of osteoblasts has not been studied yet. It is important since mechanical property of the mechanosensory osteoblasts could be pivotal to its functionality in bone remodeling. This is the first study aimed to assess the direct effect of estradiol on the apparent elastic modulus (E{sup Asterisk-Operator }) and corresponding cytoskeletal changes of human fetal osteoblasts (hFOB 1.19). The cells were cultured in either medium alone or medium supplemented with {beta}-estradiol and then subjected to Atomic Force Microscopy indentation (AFM) to determine E{sup Asterisk-Operator }. The underlying changes in cytoskeleton were studied by staining the cells with TRITC-Phalloidin. Following estradiol treatment, the cells were also tested for proliferation, alkaline phosphatase activity and mineralization. With estradiol treatment, E{sup Asterisk-Operator} of osteoblasts significantly decreased by 43-46%. The confocal images showed that the changes in f-actin network observed in estradiol treated cells can give rise to the changes in the stiffness of the cells. Estradiol also increases the inherent alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells. Estradiol induced stiffness

  4. Manipulating Si(100) at 5 K using qPlus frequency modulated atomic force microscopy: Role of defects and dynamics in the mechanical switching of atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetman, A.; Jarvis, S.; Danza, R.; Bamidele, J.; Kantorovich, L.; Moriarty, P.

    2011-08-01

    We use small-amplitude qPlus frequency modulated atomic force microscopy (FM-AFM), at 5 K, to investigate the atomic-scale mechanical stability of the Si(100) surface. By operating at zero applied bias the effect of tunneling electrons is eliminated, demonstrating that surface manipulation can be performed by solely mechanical means. Striking differences in surface response are observed between different regions of the surface, most likely due to variations in strain associated with the presence of surface defects. We investigate the variation in local energy surface by ab initio simulation, and comment on the dynamics observed during force spectroscopy.

  5. High-speed three-dimensional shape measurement for dynamic scenes using bi-frequency tripolar pulse-width-modulation fringe projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chao; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua; Feng, Shijie; Feng, Fangxiaoyu; Li, Rubin; Shen, Guochen

    2013-08-01

    This paper introduces a high-speed three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement technique for dynamic scenes by using bi-frequency tripolar pulse-width-modulation (TPWM) fringe projection. Two wrapped phase maps with different wavelengths can be obtained simultaneously by our bi-frequency phase-shifting algorithm. Then the two phase maps are unwrapped using a simple look-up-table based number-theoretical approach. To guarantee the robustness of phase unwrapping as well as the high sinusoidality of projected patterns, TPWM technique is employed to generate ideal fringe patterns with slight defocus. We detailed our technique, including its principle, pattern design, and system setup. Several experiments on dynamic scenes were performed, verifying that our method can achieve a speed of 1250 frames per second for fast, dense, and accurate 3-D measurements.

  6. Using Force to Probe Single-Molecule Receptor-Cytoskeletal Anchoring Beneath the Surface of a Living Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evans, Evan; Kinoshita, Koji

    2007-01-01

    -cytoskeletal unbinding increased exponentially with the level of force, suggesting disruption at a site of single-molecule interaction. Since many important enzymes and signaling molecules are closely associated with a membrane receptor-cytoskeletal linkage, pulling on a receptor could alter interactions among its......The ligation of cell surface receptors often communicates a signal that initiates a cytoplasmic chemical cascade to implement an important cell function. Less well understood is how physical stress applied to a cell surface adhesive bond propagates throughout the cytostructure to catalyze...... or trigger important steps in these chemical processes. Probing the nanoscale impact of pulling on cell surface bonds, we discovered that receptors frequently detach prematurely from the interior cytostructure prior to failure of the exterior adhesive bond [Evans, E., Heinrich, V., Leung, A., and Kinoshita...

  7. Covalent modification of cytoskeletal proteins in neuronal cells by tryptamine-4,5-dione

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoji Kato

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin, 5-hydroxytryptamine, is a systemic bioactive amine that acts in the gut and brain. As a substrate of myeloperoxidase in vitro, serotonin is oxidized to tryptamine-4,5-dione (TD, which is highly reactive with thiols. In this work, we successively prepared a monoclonal antibody to quinone-modified proteins and found that the antibody preferentially recognizes the TD–thiol adduct. Using the antibody, we observed that the chloride ion, the predominant physiological substrate for myeloperoxidase in vivo, is not competitive toward the enzyme catalyzed serotonin oxidation process, suggesting that serotonin is a plausible physiological substrate for the enzyme in vivo. Immunocytochemical analyses revealed that TD staining was observed in the cytosol of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells while blot analyses showed that some cellular proteins were preferentially modified. Pull-down analyses confirmed that the cytoskeletal proteins tubulins, vimentin, and neurofilament-L were modified. When pure tubulins were exposed to micromolar levels of synthetic TD, self-polymerization was initially enhanced and then suppressed. These results suggest that serotonin oxidation by myeloperoxidase or the action of other oxidants could cause functional alteration of cellular proteins, which may be related to neurodegeneration processes or irritable bowel syndrome.

  8. Comparative study of cyanotoxins affecting cytoskeletal and chromatin structures in CHO-K1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gácsi, Mariann; Antal, Otilia; Vasas, Gábor; Máthé, Csaba; Borbély, György; Saker, Martin L; Gyori, János; Farkas, Anna; Vehovszky, Agnes; Bánfalvi, Gáspár

    2009-06-01

    In this study we compared the effects of the two frequently occuring and most dangerous cyanobacterial toxins on the cellular organization of microfilaments, microtubules and on the chromatin structure in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells. These compounds are the widely known microcystin-LR (MC-LR) and cylindrospermopsin (CYN) classified as the highest-priority cyanotoxin. Toxic effects were tested in a concentration and time dependent manner. The hepatotoxic MC-LR did not cause significant cytotoxicity on CHO-K1 cells under 20 microM, but caused apoptotic changes at higher concentrations. Apoptotic shrinkage was associated with the shortening and loss of actin filaments and with a concentration dependent depolymerization of microtubules. No necrosis was observed over the concentration range (1-50 microM MC-LR) tested. Cylindrospermopsin did cause apoptosis at low concentrations (1-2 microM) and over short exposure periods (12h). Necrosis was observed at higher concentrations (5-10 microM) and following longer exposure periods (24 or 48h). Cyanotoxins also affected the chromatin structure. The condensation process was inhibited by MC-LR at a later stage and manifested as broken elongated prechromosomes. CYN inhibited chromatin condensation at the early fibrillary stage leading to blurred fluorescent images of apoptotic bodies and preventing the formation of metaphase chromosomes. Cylindrospermopsin exhibited a more pronounced toxic effect causing cytoskeletal and nuclear changes as well as apoptotic and necrotic alterations.

  9. Inhibition of phospholipase C disrupts cytoskeletal organization and gravitropic growth in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, Zornitza; Barton, Deborah; Armour, William J; Li, Min Y; Liao, Li-Fen; McKellar, Heather L; Pethybridge, Kylie A; Marc, Jan

    2010-10-01

    The phospholipase protein superfamily plays an important role in hormonal signalling and cellular responses to environmental stimuli. There is also growing evidence for interactions between phospholipases and the cytoskeleton. In this report we used a pharmacological approach to investigate whether inhibiting a member of the phospholipase superfamily, phospholipase C (PLC), affects microtubules and actin microfilaments as well as root growth and morphology of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Inhibiting PLC activity using the aminosteroid U73122 significantly inhibited root elongation and disrupted root morphology in a concentration-dependent manner, with the response being saturated at 5 μM, whereas the inactive analogue U73343 was ineffective. The primary root appeared to lose growth directionality accompanied by root waving and formation of curls. Immunolabelling of roots exposed to increasingly higher U73122 concentrations revealed that the normal transverse arrays of cortical microtubules in the elongation zone became progressively more disorganized or depolymerized, with the disorganization appearing within 1 h of incubation. Likewise, actin microfilament arrays also were disrupted. Inhibiting PLC using an alternative inhibitor, neomycin, caused similar disruptions to both cytoskeletal organization and root morphology. In seedlings gravistimulated by rotating the culture plates by 90°, both U73122 and neomycin disrupted the normal gravitropic growth of roots and etiolated hypocotyls. The effects of PLC inhibitors are therefore consistent with the notion that, as with phospholipases A and D, PLC likewise interacts with the cytoskeleton, alters growth morphology, and is involved in gravitropism.

  10. Differential proteomics study of platelets in asymptomatic constitutional macrothrombocytopenia: altered levels of cytoskeletal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Shilpita; Saha, Sutapa; Banerjee, Debasis; Chakrabarti, Abhijit

    2015-01-01

    Harris platelet syndrome (HPS), also known as asymptomatic constitutional macrothrombocytopenia (ACMT), is an autosomal dominant platelet disorder characterized by mild-to-severe thrombocytopenia and giant platelets with normal platelet aggregation and absence of bleeding symptoms. We have attempted a comparative proteomics study for profiling of platelet proteins in healthy vs. pathological states to discover characteristic protein expression changes in macrothrombocytes and decipher the factors responsible for the functionally active yet morphologically distinct platelets. We have used 2-D gel-based protein separation techniques coupled with MALDI-ToF/ToF-based mass spectrometric identification and characterization of the proteins to investigate the differential proteome profiling of platelet proteins isolated from the peripheral blood samples of patients and normal volunteers. Our study revealed altered levels of actin-binding proteins such as myosin light chain, coactosin-like protein, actin-related protein 2/3 complex, and transgelin2 that hint toward the cytoskeletal changes necessary to maintain the structural and functional integrity of macrothrombocytes. We have also observed over expressed levels of peroxiredoxin2 that signifies the prevailing oxidative stress in these cells. Additionally, altered levels of protein disulfide isomerase and transthyretin provide insights into the measures adapted by the macrothrombocytes to maintain their normal functional activity. This first proteomics study of platelets from ACMT may provide an understanding of the structural stability and normal functioning of these platelets in spite of their large size. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Oestradiol and progesterone differentially alter cytoskeletal protein expression and flame cell morphology in Taenia crassiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Javier R; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Palacios-Arreola, M Isabel; Ruíz-Rosado, Azucena; Sánchez-Orellana, Pedro L; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Nava-Castro, Karen E; Martínez-Velázquez, Nancy; Escobedo, Galileo; Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    We examined the effects of oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) on cytoskeletal protein expression in the helminth Taenia crassiceps - specifically actin, tubulin and myosin. These proteins assemble into flame cells, which constitute the parasite excretory system. Total protein extracts were obtained from E2- and P4-treated T. crassiceps cysticerci and untreated controls, and analysed by one- and two-dimensional protein electrophoresis, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and videomicroscopy. Exposure of T. crassiceps cysticerci to E2 and P4 induced differential protein expression patterns compared with untreated controls. Changes in actin, tubulin and myosin expression were confirmed by flow cytometry of parasite cells and immunofluorescence. In addition, parasite morphology was altered in response to E2 and P4 versus controls. Flame cells were primarily affected at the level of the ciliary tuft, in association with the changes in actin, tubulin and myosin. We conclude that oestradiol and progesterone act directly on T. crassiceps cysticerci, altering actin, tubulin and myosin expression and thus affecting the assembly and function of flame cells. Our results increase our understanding of several aspects of the molecular crosstalk between host and parasite, which might be useful in designing anthelmintic drugs that exclusively impair parasitic proteins which mediate cell signaling and pathogenic reproduction and establishment. Copyright © 2014 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A novel system of cytoskeletal elements in the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Waidner

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenicity of the human pathogen Helicobacter pylori relies upon its capacity to adapt to a hostile environment and to escape from the host response. Therefore, cell shape, motility, and pH homeostasis of these bacteria are specifically adapted to the gastric mucus. We have found that the helical shape of H. pylori depends on coiled coil rich proteins (Ccrp, which form extended filamentous structures in vitro and in vivo, and are differentially required for the maintenance of cell morphology. We have developed an in vivo localization system for this pathogen. Consistent with a cytoskeleton-like structure, Ccrp proteins localized in a regular punctuate and static pattern within H. pylori cells. Ccrp genes show a high degree of sequence variation, which could be the reason for the morphological diversity between H. pylori strains. In contrast to other bacteria, the actin-like MreB protein is dispensable for viability in H. pylori, and does not affect cell shape, but cell length and chromosome segregation. In addition, mreB mutant cells displayed significantly reduced urease activity, and thus compromise a major pathogenicity factor of H. pylori. Our findings reveal that Ccrp proteins, but not MreB, affect cell morphology, while both cytoskeletal components affect the development of pathogenicity factors and/or cell cycle progression.

  13. Heterogeneous Cytoskeletal Force Distribution Delineates the Onset Ca2+ Influx Under Fluid Shear Stress in Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad M. Maneshi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical perturbations increase intracellular Ca2+ in cells, but the coupling of mechanical forces to the Ca2+ influx is not well understood. We used a microfluidic chamber driven with a high-speed pressure servo to generate defined fluid shear stress to cultured astrocytes, and simultaneously measured cytoskeletal forces using a force sensitive actinin optical sensor and intracellular Ca2+. Fluid shear generated non-uniform forces in actinin that critically depended on the stimulus rise time emphasizing the presence of viscoelasticity in the activating sequence. A short (ms shear pulse with fast rise time (2 ms produced an immediate increase in actinin tension at the upstream end of the cell with minimal changes at the downstream end. The onset of Ca2+ rise began at highly strained areas. In contrast to stimulus steps, slow ramp stimuli produced uniform forces throughout the cells and only a small Ca2+ response. The heterogeneity of force distribution is exaggerated in cells having fewer stress fibers and lower pre-tension in actinin. Disruption of cytoskeleton with cytochalasin-D (Cyt-D eliminated force gradients, and in those cells Ca2+ elevation started from the soma. Thus, Ca2+ influx with a mechanical stimulus depends on local stress within the cell and that is time dependent due to viscoelastic mechanics.

  14. Title: Cytoskeletal proteins in cortical development and diseasesubtitle: Actin associated proteins in periventricular heterotopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gewei eLian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The actin cytoskeleton regulates many important cellular processes in the brain, including cell division and proliferation, migration, and cytokinesis and differentiation. These developmental processes can be regulated through actin dependent vesicle and organelle movement, cell signaling, and the establishment and maintenance of cell junctions and cell shape. Many of these processes are mediated by extensive and intimate interactions of actin with cellular membranes and proteins. Disruption in the actin cytoskeleton in the brain gives rise to periventricular heterotopia (PH, a malformation of cortical development, characterized by abnormal neurons clustered deep in the brain along the lateral ventricles. This disorder can give rise to seizures, dyslexia and psychiatric disturbances. Anatomically, PH is characterized by a smaller brain (impaired proliferation, heterotopia (impaired initial migration and disruption along the neuroependymal lining (impaired cell-cell adhesion. Genes causal for PH have also been implicated in actin-dependent processes. The current review provides mechanistic insight into actin cytoskeletal regulation of cortical development in the context of this malformation of cortical development.

  15. Mycoplasma pneumoniae cytoskeletal protein HMW2 and the architecture of the terminal organelle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Stephanie R; Balish, Mitchell F; Krause, Duncan C

    2009-11-01

    The terminal organelle of Mycoplasma pneumoniae mediates cytadherence and gliding motility and functions in cell division. The defining feature of this complex membrane-bound cell extension is an electron-dense core of two segmented rods oriented longitudinally and enlarging to form a bulb at the distal end. While the components of the core have not been comprehensively identified, previous evidence suggested that the cytoskeletal protein HMW2 forms parallel bundles oriented lengthwise to yield the major rod of the core. In the present study, we tested predictions emerging from that model by ultrastructural and immunoelectron microscopy analyses of cores from wild-type M. pneumoniae and mutants producing HMW2 derivatives. Antibodies specific for the N or C terminus of HMW2 labeled primarily peripheral to the core along its entire length. Furthermore, truncation of HMW2 did not correlate specifically with core length. However, mutant analysis correlated specific HMW2 domains with core assembly, and examination of core-enriched preparations confirmed that HMW2 was a major component of these fractions. Taken together, these findings yielded a revised model for HMW2 in terminal organelle architecture.

  16. Mycoplasma pneumoniae Cytoskeletal Protein HMW2 and the Architecture of the Terminal Organelle▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Stephanie R.; Balish, Mitchell F.; Krause, Duncan C.

    2009-01-01

    The terminal organelle of Mycoplasma pneumoniae mediates cytadherence and gliding motility and functions in cell division. The defining feature of this complex membrane-bound cell extension is an electron-dense core of two segmented rods oriented longitudinally and enlarging to form a bulb at the distal end. While the components of the core have not been comprehensively identified, previous evidence suggested that the cytoskeletal protein HMW2 forms parallel bundles oriented lengthwise to yield the major rod of the core. In the present study, we tested predictions emerging from that model by ultrastructural and immunoelectron microscopy analyses of cores from wild-type M. pneumoniae and mutants producing HMW2 derivatives. Antibodies specific for the N or C terminus of HMW2 labeled primarily peripheral to the core along its entire length. Furthermore, truncation of HMW2 did not correlate specifically with core length. However, mutant analysis correlated specific HMW2 domains with core assembly, and examination of core-enriched preparations confirmed that HMW2 was a major component of these fractions. Taken together, these findings yielded a revised model for HMW2 in terminal organelle architecture. PMID:19717588

  17. The Drosophila HEM-2/NAP1 homolog KETTE controls axonal pathfinding and cytoskeletal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hummel, T; Leifker, K; Klämbt, C

    2000-04-01

    In Drosophila, the correct formation of the segmental commissures depends on neuron-glial interactions at the midline. The VUM midline neurons extend axons along which glial cells migrate in between anterior and posterior commissures. Here, we show that the gene kette is required for the normal projection of the VUM axons and subsequently disrupts glial migration. Axonal projection defects are also found for many other moto- and interneurons. In addition, kette affects the cell morphology of mesodermal and epidermal derivatives, which show an abnormal actin cytoskeleton. The KETTE protein is homologous to the transmembrane protein HEM-2/NAP1 evolutionary conserved from worms to vertebrates. In vitro analysis has shown a specific interaction of the vertebrate HEM-2/NAP1 with the SH2-SH3 adapter protein NCK and the small GTPase RAC1, which both have been implicated in regulating cytoskeleton organization and axonal growth. Hypomorphic kette mutations lead to axonal defects similar to mutations in the Drosophila NCK homolog dreadlocks. Furthermore, we show that kette and dock mutants genetically interact. NCK is thought to interact with the small G proteins RAC1 and CDC42, which play a role in axonal growth. In line with these observations, a kette phenocopy can be obtained following directed expression of mutant DCDC42 or DRAC1 in the CNS midline. In addition, the kette mutant phenotype can be partially rescued by expression of an activated DRAC1 transgene. Our data suggest an important role of the HEM-2 protein in cytoskeletal organization during axonal pathfinding.

  18. Cadmium-induced glutathionylation of actin occurs through a ROS-independent mechanism: Implications for cytoskeletal integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choong, Grace; Liu, Ying; Xiao, Weiqun; Templeton, Douglas M., E-mail: doug.templeton@utoronto.ca

    2013-10-15

    Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in rat mesangial cells, and we have previously shown that this involves a complex interplay involving activation of kinase signaling, protein translocation, and disruption of focal adhesions. Here we investigate the role that glutathionylation of actin plays in Cd{sup 2+}-associated cytoskeletal reorganization. Low concentrations of Cd{sup 2+} (0.5–2 μM) caused an increase in actin glutathionylation by 6 h, whereas at higher concentrations glutathionylation remained at basal levels. Although oxidation with diamide increased glutathionylation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were not involved in the Cd{sup 2+}-dependent effect, as only Cd{sup 2+} concentrations above 2 μM were sufficient to increase ROS. However, low [Cd{sup 2+}] increased total glutathione levels without affecting the ratio of reduced/oxidized glutathione, and inhibition of glutathione synthesis suppressed actin glutathionylation. Cadmium increased the activity of the enzyme glutaredoxin, which influences the equilibrium between glutathionylated and deglutathionylated proteins and thus may influence levels of glutathionylated actin. Together these observations show that cadmium-dependent effects on actin glutathionylation are affected by glutathione metabolism and not by direct effects of ROS on thiol chemistry. In vitro polymerization assays with glutathionylated actin show a decreased rate of polymerization. In contrast, immunofluorescence of cytoskeletal structure in intact cells suggests that increases in actin glutathionylation accompanying increased glutathione levels occurring under low Cd{sup 2+} exposure are protective in vivo, with cytoskeletal disruption ensuing only when higher Cd{sup 2+} concentrations increase ROS levels and prevent an increase in actin–glutathione conjugates. - Highlights: • Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in mesangial cells. • Cadmium induces glutathionylation of actin at low concentrations.

  19. Parathyroid hormone promotes the disassembly of cytoskeletal actin and myosin in cultured osteoblastic cells: Mediation by cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, J.J.; Gronowicz, G.; Rodan, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) alters the shape of osteoblastic cells both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we examined the effect of PTH on cytoskeletal actin and myosin, estimated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of Triton X-100 (1%) nonextractable proteins. After 2-5 minutes, PTH caused a rapid and transient decrease of 50-60% in polymerized actin and myosin associated with the Triton X-100 nonextractable cytoskeleton. Polymerized actin returned to control levels by 30 min. The PTH effect was dose-dependent with an IC50 of about 1 nM, and was partially inhibited by the (3-34) PTH antagonist. PTH caused a rapid transient rise in cyclic AMP (cAMP) in these cells that peaked at 4 min, while the nadir in cytoskeletal actin and myosin was recorded around 5 min. The intracellular calcium chelator Quin-2/AM (10 microM) also decreased cytoskeletal actin and myosin, to the same extent as did PTH (100 nM). To distinguish between cAMP elevation and Ca++ reduction as mediators of PTH action, we measured the phosphorylation of the 20 kD (PI 4.9) myosin light chain in cells preincubated with [32P]-orthophosphate. The phosphorylation of this protein decreased within 2-3 min after PTH addition and returned to control levels after 5 min. The calcium ionophore A-23187 did not antagonize this PTH effect. Visualization of microfilaments with rhodamine-conjugated phalloidin showed that PTH altered the cytoskeleton by decreasing the number of stress fibers. These changes in the cytoskeleton paralleled changes in the shape of the cells from a spread configuration to a stellate form with retracting processes. The above findings indicate that the alteration in osteoblast shape produced by PTH involve relatively rapid and transient changes in cytoskeletal organization that appear to be mediated by cAMP

  20. Cadmium-induced glutathionylation of actin occurs through a ROS-independent mechanism: Implications for cytoskeletal integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choong, Grace; Liu, Ying; Xiao, Weiqun; Templeton, Douglas M.

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in rat mesangial cells, and we have previously shown that this involves a complex interplay involving activation of kinase signaling, protein translocation, and disruption of focal adhesions. Here we investigate the role that glutathionylation of actin plays in Cd 2+ -associated cytoskeletal reorganization. Low concentrations of Cd 2+ (0.5–2 μM) caused an increase in actin glutathionylation by 6 h, whereas at higher concentrations glutathionylation remained at basal levels. Although oxidation with diamide increased glutathionylation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were not involved in the Cd 2+ -dependent effect, as only Cd 2+ concentrations above 2 μM were sufficient to increase ROS. However, low [Cd 2+ ] increased total glutathione levels without affecting the ratio of reduced/oxidized glutathione, and inhibition of glutathione synthesis suppressed actin glutathionylation. Cadmium increased the activity of the enzyme glutaredoxin, which influences the equilibrium between glutathionylated and deglutathionylated proteins and thus may influence levels of glutathionylated actin. Together these observations show that cadmium-dependent effects on actin glutathionylation are affected by glutathione metabolism and not by direct effects of ROS on thiol chemistry. In vitro polymerization assays with glutathionylated actin show a decreased rate of polymerization. In contrast, immunofluorescence of cytoskeletal structure in intact cells suggests that increases in actin glutathionylation accompanying increased glutathione levels occurring under low Cd 2+ exposure are protective in vivo, with cytoskeletal disruption ensuing only when higher Cd 2+ concentrations increase ROS levels and prevent an increase in actin–glutathione conjugates. - Highlights: • Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in mesangial cells. • Cadmium induces glutathionylation of actin at low concentrations. • Glutathionylation requires glutathione

  1. The regulation of cytoskeletal and liver-specific gene expression during liver regeneration and primary hepatocyte culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, G.S.

    1989-01-01

    The focus of this dissertation is to determine what role(s) the extracellular matrix and expression of certain cytoskeletal genes play in the regulation of hepatocyte growth and the maintenance of a differential state. The expression of several cytoskeletal and liver-specific genes was examined during liver regeneration and in hepatocyte cultures maintained in a hormonally-defined, serum-free medium and plated on two different matrices: rat tail collagen and the EHS matrix. During liver regeneration and in hepatocytes cultured on rat tail collagen, there was a dramatic increase in tubulin mRNA levels coincident with but not linked to DNA synthesis. The message levels for other cytoskeletal genes similarly increased, while a decrease was observed in the mRNA levels of the liver-specific genes, serum albumin and alpha 1 inhibitor III. Hepatocytes cultured on the EHS matrix resulted in the maintenance of low levels of cytoskeletal gene expression and high levels of liver-specific gene expression, similar to that observed in the normal liver. Results from subcellar fractionation and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of 35 S-labelled proteins paralleled the results seen at the mRNA level. Preliminary work suggests that microtubule organization may play a role in the expression of the liver-specific genes which encode secreted proteins. These studies, which compare hepatocytes cultured on collagen or the EHS matrix gel, reveal that both cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions play a major role in the maintenance of the differential phenotype in hepatocytes

  2. [Results of statistical analysis of the dynamics of ionizing radiation dose fields in the service module of the International Space Station in 2000-2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrikas, V G

    2014-01-01

    The on-going 24th solar cycle (SC) is distinguished from the previous ones by low activity. On the contrary, levels of proton fluxes from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are high, which increases the proton flow striking the Earth's radiation belts (ERB). Therefore, at present the absorbed dose from ERB protons should be calculated with consideration of the tangible increase of protons intensity built into the model descriptions based on experimental measurements during the minimum between cycles 19 and 20, and the cycle 21 maximum. The absorbed dose from GCR and ERB protons copies galactic protons dynamics, while the ERB electrons dose copies SC dynamics. The major factors that determine the absorbed dose value are SC phase, ISS orbital altitude and shielding of the dosimeter readings of which are used in analysis. The paper presents the results of dynamic analysis of absorbed doses measured by a variety of dosimeters, namely, R-16 (2 ionization chambers), DB8-1, DB8-2, DB8-3, DB8-4 as a function of ISS orbit altitude and SC phase. The existence of annual variation in the absorbed dose dynamics has been confirmed; several additional variations with the periods of 17 and 52 months have been detected. Modulation of absorbed dose variations by the SC and GCR amplitudes has been demonstrated.

  3. Progressive supranuclear palsy: neuronal and glial cytoskeletal pathology in the higher order processing autonomic nuclei of the lower brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüb, U; Del Tredici, K; Schultz, C; de Vos, R A I; Jansen Steur, E N H; Arai, K; Braak, H

    2002-02-01

    The medial and lateral parabrachial nuclei (MPB, LPB), the gigantocellular reticular nucleus (GI), the raphes magnus (RMG) and raphes obscurus nuclei (ROB), as well as the intermediate reticular zone (IRZ) represent pivotal subordinate brainstem centres, all of which control autonomic functions. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and severity of the neuronal and glial cytoskeletal pathology in these six brainstem nuclei from 17 individuals with clinically diagnosed and neuropathologically confirmed progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). The association between the severity of the pathology and the duration of the disease was investigated by means of correlation analysis. The brainstem nuclei in all of the PSP cases were affected by the neuronal cytoskeletal pathology, with the IRZ and GI regularly showing severe involvement, the MPB, RMG, and ROB marked involvement, and the LPB mild involvement. In the six nuclear greys studied, glial cells undergo alterations of their cytoskeleton on an irregular basis, whereby diseased oligodendrocytes predominantly presented as coiled bodies and affected astrocytes as thorn-shaped astrocytes. In all six nuclei, the severity of the neuronal or glial cytoskeletal pathology showed no correlation with the duration of PSP. In view of their functional role, the neuronal pathology in the nuclei studied offers a possible explanation for the autonomic dysfunctions that eventually develop in the course of PSP.

  4. Cytoskeletal Tropomyosin Tm5NM1 Is Required for Normal Excitation–Contraction Coupling in Skeletal Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovich, Nicole; Kee, Anthony J.; Van der Poel, Chris; Kettle, Emma; Hernandez-Deviez, Delia; Lucas, Christine; Lynch, Gordon S.; Parton, Robert G.; Gunning, Peter W.

    2009-01-01

    The functional diversity of the actin microfilaments relies in part on the actin binding protein tropomyosin (Tm). The muscle-specific Tms regulate actin-myosin interactions and hence contraction. However, there is less known about the roles of the numerous cytoskeletal isoforms. We have shown previously that a cytoskeletal Tm, Tm5NM1, defines a Z-line adjacent cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle. Recently, we identified a second cytoskeletal Tm in this region, Tm4. Here we show that Tm4 and Tm5NM1 define separate actin filaments; the former associated with the terminal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and other tubulovesicular structures. In skeletal muscles of Tm5NM1 knockout (KO) mice, Tm4 localization was unchanged, demonstrating the specificity of the membrane association. Tm5NM1 KO muscles exhibit potentiation of T-system depolarization and decreased force rundown with repeated T-tubule depolarizations consistent with altered T-tubule function. These results indicate that a Tm5NM1-defined actin cytoskeleton is required for the normal excitation–contraction coupling in skeletal muscle. PMID:19005216

  5. Cytoskeletal tropomyosin Tm5NM1 is required for normal excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahovich, Nicole; Kee, Anthony J; Van der Poel, Chris; Kettle, Emma; Hernandez-Deviez, Delia; Lucas, Christine; Lynch, Gordon S; Parton, Robert G; Gunning, Peter W; Hardeman, Edna C

    2009-01-01

    The functional diversity of the actin microfilaments relies in part on the actin binding protein tropomyosin (Tm). The muscle-specific Tms regulate actin-myosin interactions and hence contraction. However, there is less known about the roles of the numerous cytoskeletal isoforms. We have shown previously that a cytoskeletal Tm, Tm5NM1, defines a Z-line adjacent cytoskeleton in skeletal muscle. Recently, we identified a second cytoskeletal Tm in this region, Tm4. Here we show that Tm4 and Tm5NM1 define separate actin filaments; the former associated with the terminal sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and other tubulovesicular structures. In skeletal muscles of Tm5NM1 knockout (KO) mice, Tm4 localization was unchanged, demonstrating the specificity of the membrane association. Tm5NM1 KO muscles exhibit potentiation of T-system depolarization and decreased force rundown with repeated T-tubule depolarizations consistent with altered T-tubule function. These results indicate that a Tm5NM1-defined actin cytoskeleton is required for the normal excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal muscle.

  6. Effect of Rapid Chilling on Beef Quality and Cytoskeletal Protein Degradation in of Chinese Yellow Crossbred Bulls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanwei Mao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of rapid chilling (RC on beef quality and the degradation of cytoskeletal proteins. Twenty Chinese Yellow crossbred bulls were selected and randomly divided into two groups. RC and conventional chilling (CC were applied to left and right sides of the carcasses respectively after slaughtering. To determine whether electrical stimulation (ES treatment can alleviate the potential hazard of RC on meat quality, ES was applied to one group. The effects of RC and ES were determined by meat color, shear force and cytoskeletal protein degradation postmortem (PM. The results showed that RC decreased beef tenderness at 1 d and 3 d postmortem, but had no detrimental effect on meat color. Western blotting showed that RC decreased the degradation rate of desmin and troponin-T, but the effects weakened gradually as postmortem aging extended. Degradation rates of both desmin and troponin-T were accelerated by ES. The combination of RC and ES could improve beef color, accelerate degradation rate of cytoskeletal protein and improve beef tenderness.

  7. Two-Dimensional SiO2/VO2 Photonic Crystals with Statically Visible and Dynamically Infrared Modulated for Smart Window Deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yujie; Balin, Igal; Wang, Ning; Lu, Qi; Tok, Alfred Iing Yoong; White, Timothy J; Magdassi, Shlomo; Abdulhalim, Ibrahim; Long, Yi

    2016-12-07

    Two-dimensional (2D) photonic structures, widely used for generating photonic band gaps (PBG) in a variety of materials, are for the first time integrated with the temperature-dependent phase change of vanadium dioxide (VO 2 ). VO 2 possesses thermochromic properties, whose potential remains unrealized due to an undesirable yellow-brown color. Here, a SiO 2 /VO 2 core/shell 2D photonic crystal is demonstrated to exhibit static visible light tunability and dynamic near-infrared (NIR) modulation. Three-dimensional (3D) finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulations predict that the transmittance can be tuned across the visible spectrum, while maintaining good solar regulation efficiency (ΔT sol = 11.0%) and high solar transmittance (T lum = 49.6%). Experiments show that the color changes of VO 2 films are accompanied by NIR modulation. This work presents a novel way to manipulate VO 2 photonic structures to modulate light transmission as a function of wavelength at different temperatures.

  8. Notch-RBP-J signaling regulates the mobilization and function of endothelial progenitor cells by dynamic modulation of CXCR4 expression in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Wang

    Full Text Available Bone marrow (BM-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPC have therapeutic potentials in promoting tissue regeneration, but how these cells are modulated in vivo has been elusive. Here, we report that RBP-J, the critical transcription factor mediating Notch signaling, modulates EPC through CXCR4. In a mouse partial hepatectomy (PHx model, RBP-J deficient EPC showed attenuated capacities of homing and facilitating liver regeneration. In resting mice, the conditional deletion of RBP-J led to a decrease of BM EPC, with a concomitant increase of EPC in the peripheral blood. This was accompanied by a down-regulation of CXCR4 on EPC in BM, although CXCR4 expression on EPC in the circulation was up-regulated in the absence of RBP-J. PHx in RBP-J deficient mice induced stronger EPC mobilization. In vitro, RBP-J deficient EPC showed lowered capacities of adhering, migrating, and forming vessel-like structures in three-dimensional cultures. Over-expression of CXCR4 could at least rescue the defects in vessel formation by the RBP-J deficient EPC. These data suggested that the RBP-J-mediated Notch signaling regulated EPC mobilization and function, at least partially through dynamic modulation of CXCR4 expression. Our findings not only provide new insights into the regulation of EPC, but also have implications for clinical therapies using EPC in diseases.

  9. High Affinity vs. Native Fibronectin in the Modulation of αvβ3 Integrin Conformational Dynamics: Insights from Computational Analyses and Implications for Molecular Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Paladino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how binding events modulate functional motions of multidomain proteins is a major issue in chemical biology. We address several aspects of this problem by analyzing the differential dynamics of αvβ3 integrin bound to wild type (wtFN10, agonist or high affinity (hFN10, antagonist mutants of fibronectin. We compare the dynamics of complexes from large-scale domain motions to inter-residue coordinated fluctuations to characterize the distinctive traits of conformational evolution and shed light on the determinants of differential αvβ3 activation induced by different FN sequences. We propose an allosteric model for ligand-based integrin modulation: the conserved integrin binding pocket anchors the ligand, while different residues on the two FN10's act as the drivers that reorganize relevant interaction networks, guiding the shift towards inactive (hFN10-bound or active states (wtFN10-bound. We discuss the implications of results for the design of integrin inhibitors.

  10. A rational approach to the modulation of the dynamics of the magnetisation in a dysprosium-nitronyl-nitroxide radical complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poneti, Giordano; Bernot, Kevin; Bogani, Lapo; Caneschi, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Gatteschi, Dante

    2007-05-14

    A control of the dynamics of the magnetisation is chemically achieved in a ring-like Dy-radical based molecule, allowing the estimation of the quantum tunneling frequency with a (4)He-cooled susceptometer.

  11. Correlative STED and Atomic Force Microscopy on Live Astrocytes Reveals Plasticity of Cytoskeletal Structure and Membrane Physical Properties during Polarized Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Rouach

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The plasticity of the cytoskeleton architecture and membrane properties is important for the establishment of cell polarity, adhesion and migration. Here, we present a method which combines stimulated emission depletion (STED super-resolution imaging and atomic force microscopy (AFM to correlate cytoskeletal structural information with membrane physical properties in live astrocytes. Using STED compatible dyes for live cell imaging of the cytoskeleton, and simultaneously mapping the cell surface topology with AFM, we obtain unprecedented detail of highly organized networks of actin and microtubules in astrocytes. Combining mechanical data from AFM with optical imaging of actin and tubulin further reveals links between cytoskeleton organization and membrane properties. Using this methodology we illustrate that scratch-induced migration induces cytoskeleton remodeling. The latter is caused by a polarization of actin and microtubule elements within astroglial cell processes, which correlates strongly with changes in cell stiffness. The method opens new avenues for the dynamic probing of the membrane structural and functional plasticity of living brain cells. It is a powerful tool for providing new insights into mechanisms of cell structural remodeling during physiological or pathological processes, such as brain development or tumorigenesis.

  12. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor activation affects the C13NJ microglia cell line proteome leading to alterations in glycolysis, motility, and cytoskeletal architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhart, Eva; Kollroser, Manfred; Rechberger, Gerald; Reicher, Helga; Heinemann, Akos; Schratl, Petra; Hallström, Seth; Wintersperger, Andrea; Nusshold, Christoph; DeVaney, Trevor; Zorn-Pauly, Klaus; Malli, Roland; Graier, Wolfgang; Malle, Ernst; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Microglia, the immunocompetent cells of the CNS, are rapidly activated in response to injury and microglia migration towards and homing at damaged tissue plays a key role in CNS regeneration. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is involved in signaling events evoking microglia responses through cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Here we show that human immortalized C13NJ microglia express LPA receptor subtypes LPA1, LPA2, and LPA3 on mRNA and protein level. LPA activation of C13NJ cells induced Rho and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation and enhanced cellular ATP production. In addition, LPA induced process retraction, cell spreading, led to pronounced changes of the actin cytoskeleton and reduced cell motility, which could be reversed by inhibition of Rho activity. To get an indication about LPA-induced global alterations in protein expression patterns a 2-D DIGE/LC-ESI-MS proteomic approach was applied. On the proteome level the most prominent changes in response to LPA were observed for glycolytic enzymes and proteins regulating cell motility and/or cytoskeletal dynamics. The present findings suggest that naturally occurring LPA is a potent regulator of microglia biology. This might be of particular relevance in the pathophysiological context of neurodegenerative disorders where LPA concentrations can be significantly elevated in the CNS. PMID:19899077

  13. Wavelength-Modulated Differential Photoacoustic (WM-DPA) imaging: a high dynamic range modality towards noninvasive diagnosis of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    This study explores wavelength-modulated differential photo-acoustic (WM-DPA) imaging for non-invasive early cancer detection via sensitive characterization of functional information such as hemoglobin oxygenation (sO2) levels. Well-known benchmarks of tumor formation such as angiogenesis and hypoxia can be addressed this way. While most conventional photo-acoustic imaging has almost entirely employed high-power pulsed lasers, frequency-domain photo-acoustic radar (FD-PAR) has seen significant development as an alternative technique. It employs a continuous wave laser source intensity-modulated and driven by frequency-swept waveforms. WM-DPA imaging utilizes chirp modulated laser beams at two distinct wavelengths for which absorption differences between oxy- and deoxygenated hemoglobin are minimum (isosbestic point, 805 nm) and maximum (680 nm) to simultaneously generate two signals detected using a standard commercial array transducer as well as a single-element transducer that scans the sample. Signal processing is performed using Lab View and Matlab software developed in-house. Minute changes in total hemoglobin concentration (tHb) and oxygenation levels are detectable using this method since background absorption is suppressed due to the out-of-phase modulation of the laser sources while the difference between the two signals is amplified, thus allowing pre-malignant tumors to become identifiable. By regulating the signal amplitude ratio and phase shift the system can be tuned to applications like cancer screening, sO2 quantification and hypoxia monitoring in stroke patients. Experimental results presented demonstrate WM-DPA imaging of sheep blood phantoms in comparison to single-wavelength FD-PAR imaging. Future work includes the functional PA imaging of small animals in vivo.

  14. The effects of near-UV radiation on elasmobranch lens cytoskeletal actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigman, S; Rafferty, N S; Scholz, D L; Lowe, K

    1992-08-01

    The role of near-UV radiation as a cytoskeletal actin-damaging agent was investigated. Two procedures were used to analyse fresh smooth dogfish (Mustelus canis) eye lenses that were incubated for up to 22 hr in vitro, with elasmobranch Ringer's medium, and with or without exposure to a near-UV lamp (emission principally at 365 nm; irradiance of 2.5 mW cm-2). These were observed histologically using phalloidin-rhodamine specific staining and by transmission electron microscopy. In addition, solutions of purified polymerized rabbit muscle actin were exposed to the same UV conditions and depolymerization was assayed by ultracentrifugation and high-pressure liquid chromatography. While the two actins studied do differ very slightly in some amino acid sequences, they would react physically nearly identically. The results showed that dogfish lenses developed superficial opacities due to near-UV exposure. Whole mounts of lens epithelium exhibited breakdown of actin filaments in the basal region of the cells within 18 hr of UV exposure. TEM confirmed the breakdown of actin filaments due to UV exposure. SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting positively identified actin in these cells. Direct exposure of purified polymerized muscle actin in polymerizing buffer led to an increase in actin monomer of approximately 25% in the UV-exposed solutions within 3-18 hr, whether assayed by ultracentrifugation or HPLC. The above indicates that elasmobranch lens epithelial cells contain UV-labile actin filaments, and that near-UV radiation, as is present in the sunlit environment, can break down the actin structure in these cells. Furthermore, breakdown of purified polymerized muscle actin does occur due to near-UV light exposure.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Freezing tolerance of sea urchin embryonic cells: Differentiation commitment and cytoskeletal disturbances in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odintsova, Nelly A; Ageenko, Natalya V; Kipryushina, Yulia O; Maiorova, Mariia A; Boroda, Andrey V

    2015-08-01

    This study focuses on the freezing tolerance of sea urchin embryonic cells. To significantly reduce the loss of physiological activity of these cells that occurs after cryopreservation and to study the effects of ultra-low temperatures on sea urchin embryonic cells, we tested the ability of the cells to differentiate into spiculogenic or pigment directions in culture, including an evaluation of the expression of some genes involved in pigment differentiation. A morphological analysis of cytoskeletal disturbances after freezing in a combination of penetrating (dimethyl sulfoxide and ethylene glycol) and non-penetrating (trehalose and polyvinylpyrrolidone) cryoprotectants revealed that the distribution pattern of filamentous actin and tubulin was similar to that in the control cultures. In contrast, very rare spreading cells and a small number of cells with filamentous actin and tubulin were detected after freezing in the presence of only non-penetrating cryoprotectants. The largest number of pigment cells was found in cultures frozen with trehalose or trehalose and dimethyl sulfoxide. The ability to induce the spicule formation was lost in the cells frozen only with non-penetrating cryoprotectants, while it was maximal in cultures frozen in a cryoprotective mixture containing both non-penetrating and penetrating cryoprotectants (particularly, when ethylene glycol was present). Using different markers for cell state assessment, an effective cryopreservation protocol for sea urchin cells was developed: three-step freezing with a low cooling rate (1-2°C/min) and a combination of non-penetrating and penetrating cryoprotectants made it possible to obtain a high level of cell viability (up to 65-80%). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fisetin antagonizes cell fusion, cytoskeletal organization and bone resorption in RANKL-differentiated murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Jung; Park, Sin-Hye; Han, Seon-Young; Kang, Soon Ah; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-03-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is comprised of several stage s including progenitor survival, differentiation to mononuclear preosteoclasts, cell fusion to multinuclear mature osteoclasts, and activation to osteoclasts with bone resorbing activity. Botanical antioxidants are now being increasingly investigated for their health-promoting effects on bone. This study investigated that fisetin, a flavonol found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, suppressed osteoclastogenesis by disturbing receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated signaling pathway and demoting osteoclastogenic protein induction. Nontoxic fisetin at ≤10 μM inhibited the induction of RANK, tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and the activation of NF-κB in RANKL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. In RANKL-differentiated osteoclasts cell fusion protein of E-cadherin was induced, which was dampened by fisetin. The formation of tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated osteoclasts was suppressed by adding fisetin to RANKL-exposed macrophages. It was also found that fisetin reduced actin ring formation and gelsolin induction of osteclasts enhanced by RANKL through disturbing c-Src-proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 signaling. Fisetin deterred preosteoclasts from the cell-cell fusion and the organization of the cytoskeleton to seal the resorbing area and to secret protons for bone resorption. Consistently, the 5 day-treatment of fisetin diminished RANKL-induced cellular expression of carbonic anhydrase II and integrin β3 concurrently with a reduction of osteoclast bone-resorbing activity. Therefore, fisetin was a natural therapeutic agent retarding osteoclast fusion and cytoskeletal organization such as actin rings and ruffled boarder, which is a property of mature osteoclasts and is required for osteoclasts to resorb bone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Neutrophil microparticle production and inflammasome activation by hyperglycemia due to cytoskeletal instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Stephen R; Bhopale, Veena M; Yu, Kevin; Huang, Weiliang; Kane, Maureen A; Margolis, David J

    2017-11-03

    Microparticles are lipid bilayer-enclosed vesicles produced by cells under oxidative stress. MP production is elevated in patients with diabetes, but the underlying cellular mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesized that raising glucose above the physiological level of 5.5 mm would stimulate leukocytes to produce MPs and activate the nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat pyrin domain-containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. We found that when incubated in buffer with up to 20 mm glucose, human and murine neutrophils, but not monocytes, generate progressively more MPs with high interleukin (IL)-1β content. Enhanced MP production required generation of reactive chemical species by mitochondria, NADPH oxidase, and type 2 nitric-oxide synthase (NOS-2) and resulted in S -nitrosylation of actin. Depleting cells of capon (C-terminal PDZ ligand of neuronal nitric-oxide synthase protein), apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing C-terminal caspase recruitment domain (ASC), or pro-IL-1β prevented the hyperglycemia-induced enhancement of reactive species production, MP generation, and IL-1β synthesis. Additional components required for these responses included inositol 1,3,5-triphosphate receptors, PKC, and enhancement of filamentous-actin turnover. Numerous proteins become localized to short filamentous actin in response to S -nitrosylation, including vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, focal adhesion kinase, the membrane phospholipid translocation enzymes flippase and floppase, capon, NLRP3, and ASC. We conclude that an interdependent oxidative stress response to hyperglycemia perturbs neutrophil cytoskeletal stability leading to MP production and IL-1β synthesis. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Ras1 interacts with multiple new signaling and cytoskeletal loci in Drosophila eggshell patterning and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnorr, J D; Holdcraft, R; Chevalier, B; Berg, C A

    2001-10-01

    Little is known about the genes that interact with Ras signaling pathways to regulate morphogenesis. The synthesis of dorsal eggshell structures in Drosophila melanogaster requires multiple rounds of Ras signaling followed by dramatic epithelial sheet movements. We took advantage of this process to identify genes that link patterning and morphogenesis; we screened lethal mutations on the second chromosome for those that could enhance a weak Ras1 eggshell phenotype. Of 1618 lethal P-element mutations tested, 13 showed significant enhancement, resulting in forked and fused dorsal appendages. Our genetic and molecular analyses together with information from the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project reveal that 11 of these lines carry mutations in previously characterized genes. Three mutations disrupt the known Ras1 cell signaling components Star, Egfr, and Blistered, while one mutation disrupts Sec61beta, implicated in ligand secretion. Seven lines represent cell signaling and cytoskeletal components that are new to the Ras1 pathway; these are Chickadee (Profilin), Tec29, Dreadlocks, POSH, Peanut, Smt3, and MESK2, a suppressor of dominant-negative Ksr. A twelfth insertion disrupts two genes, Nrk, a "neurospecific" receptor tyrosine kinase, and Tpp, which encodes a neuropeptidase. These results suggest that Ras1 signaling during oogenesis involves novel components that may be intimately associated with additional signaling processes and with the reorganization of the cytoskeleton. To determine whether these Ras1 Enhancers function upstream or downstream of the Egf receptor, four mutations were tested for their ability to suppress an activated Egfr construct (lambdatop) expressed in oogenesis exclusively in the follicle cells. Mutations in Star and l(2)43Bb had no significant effect upon the lambdatop eggshell defect whereas smt3 and dock alleles significantly suppressed the lambdatop phenotype.

  19. SU-G-JeP4-13: Continuous Intra-Fractional Monitoring of the Prostate Using Dynamic KV Collimation and Tube Current Modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, D [Dalhousie Unviersity, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Robar, J [Dalhousie Unviersity, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Nova Scotia Health Authority, Halifax, NS (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The focus of this work is to improve the available kV image quality for continuous intra-fraction monitoring of the prostate. This is investigated using a novel blade collimation system enabling modulated volume-of-interest (VOI) imaging of prostate fiducial markers. Methods: A four-blade dynamic kV collimator was used to track a VOI during gantry rotation. Planar image quality was investigated as a function of collimator dimension, while maintaining the same dose to isocenter, for a 22.2 cm diameter cylindrical water phantom with a 9 mm diameter bone insert. A sample prostate anatomy was defined in the planning system, including three fiducial markers within the CTV. The VOI margin around each marker was set to be 2σ of the population covariance matrix characterizing prostate motion. DRRs were used to calculate the kV attenuation for each VOI as a function of angle. The optimal marker and tube current were determined using kV attenuation. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate the imaging dose to the phantom and MV scatter dose to the imaging panel. Results: Preliminary measurements show an increase in CNR by a factor of 1.3 with the VOI method, when decreasing from an 6×6 to 2×2 cm{sup 2} field. Attenuation calculations show a change in kV fluence at the detector by a factor of 21.6 with fiducial optimization; resultant tube current modulation increases maximum dose by a factor of 1.4 compared to no modulation. MV scatter contribution to the kV detector changes by approximately a factor of two over a complete gantry rotation. Conclusion: The dynamic collimation system allows single fiducial marker tracking at a very low dose, with reduction of scatter and improvement of image quality, compared to imaging the entire prostate. The approach is compatible with tube current modulation, which enables consistent image quality throughout the range of gantry rotation. This project was funded by Varian Medical Systems.

  20. Quasi-Steady-State Analysis based on Structural Modules and Timed Petri Net Predict System’s Dynamics: The Life Cycle of the Insulin Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Scheidel

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The insulin-dependent activation and recycling of the insulin receptor play an essential role in the regulation of the energy metabolism, leading to a special interest for pharmaceutical applications. Thus, the recycling of the insulin receptor has been intensively investigated, experimentally as well as theoretically. We developed a time-resolved, discrete model to describe stochastic dynamics and study the approximation of non-linear dynamics in the context of timed Petri nets. Additionally, using a graph-theoretical approach, we analyzed the structure of the regulatory system and demonstrated the close interrelation of structural network properties with the kinetic behavior. The transition invariants decomposed the model into overlapping subnetworks of various sizes, which represent basic functional modules. Moreover, we computed the quasi-steady states of these subnetworks and demonstrated that they are fundamental to understand the dynamic behavior of the system. The Petri net approach confirms the experimental results of insulin-stimulated degradation of the insulin receptor, which represents a common feature of insulin-resistant, hyperinsulinaemic states.

  1. Toward structural dynamics: protein motions viewed by chemical shift modulations and direct detection of C'N multiple-quantum relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Mirko; Kateb, Fatiha; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Piccioli, Mario; Abergel, Daniel

    2010-03-17

    Multiple quantum relaxation in proteins reveals unexpected relationships between correlated or anti-correlated conformational backbone dynamics in alpha-helices or beta-sheets. The contributions of conformational exchange to the relaxation rates of C'N coherences (i.e., double- and zero-quantum coherences involving backbone carbonyl (13)C' and neighboring amide (15)N nuclei) depend on the kinetics of slow exchange processes, as well as on the populations of the conformations and chemical shift differences of (13)C' and (15)N nuclei. The relaxation rates of C'N coherences, which reflect concerted fluctuations due to slow chemical shift modulations (CSMs), were determined by direct (13)C detection in diamagnetic and paramagnetic proteins. In well-folded proteins such as lanthanide-substituted calbindin (CaLnCb), copper,zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn SOD), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP12), slow conformational exchange occurs along the entire backbone. Our observations demonstrate that relaxation rates of C'N coherences arising from slow backbone dynamics have positive signs (characteristic of correlated fluctuations) in beta-sheets and negative signs (characteristic of anti-correlated fluctuations) in alpha-helices. This extends the prospects of structure-dynamics relationships to slow time scales that are relevant for protein function and enzymatic activity.

  2. Liquid rocket propulsion dynamic flow modeling using the ROCETS engineering modules in the EASY5x environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follett, Randolph F.; Taylor, Robert P.; Nunez, Stephen C.

    1993-01-01

    A report on the progress of porting the ROCETS (ROCket Engine Transient Simulator) into the EASY5x simulation environment is presented. Brief descriptions of each of the software systems, information regarding the actual port process, and examples comparing the results of the two systems are given. It is shown that EASY5x is a suitable environment for utilization of the ROCETS engineering modules, and that, for the example systems shown, EASY5x actually seems to give more accurate solutions than the straight ROCETS code.

  3. Impact of elevated CO2 concentration on dynamics of leaf photosynthesis in Fagus sylvatica is modulated by sky conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Otmar; Klem, Karel; Holišová, Petra; Šigut, Ladislav; Šprtová, Miroslava; Teslová-Navrátilová, P.; Zitová, Martina; Špunda, Vladimír; Marek, Michal V.; Grace, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 185, FEB 2014 (2014), s. 271-280 ISSN 0269-7491 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010007; GA ČR(CZ) GAP501/10/0340 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : diurnal dynamics * DEPS * european beech * fluorescence * photorespiration * stomatal conductance * xanthophylls Subject RIV: GK - Forestry Impact factor: 4.143, year: 2014

  4. Cognitive-motor dual-task interference modulates mediolateral dynamic stability during gait in post-stroke individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisserand, R; Armand, S; Allali, G; Schnider, A; Baillieul, S

    2018-04-01

    Gait asymmetry and dynamic balance impairments observed in post-stroke individuals increase their risk of fall. Moreover, walking while performing a cognitive task (i.e. dual-task) disturbs the control of balance in post-stroke individuals. Here we investigated the mediolateral dynamic stability in twenty-two community-dwelling participants (12 post-strokes and 10 healthy controls) while walking in single-task (normal gait) and four different dual-tasks (cognitive-motor interference). Positions of the extrapolated center of mass and mediolateral widths of both margin of stability and base of support were extracted from 35 marker trajectories. Post-stroke participants presented larger margin of stability and base of support than controls during single-task (both p dual-task was found between groups. In post-stroke participants, dual-task induced slight modification of the mediolateral stability strategy, as the margin of stability was not different between the two limbs at foot-strike, and significantly reduced the performance in every cognitive task. Post-stroke participants increased their dynamic stability in the frontal plane in single-task by extending their base of support and mainly relying on their non-paretic limb. Under cognitive-motor interference (dual-task), post-stroke participants prioritized dynamic stability over cognitive performance to ensure a safe locomotion. Thus, rehabilitation programs should consider both dynamic balance and dual-task training, even at a chronic delay following stroke, to reduce the risk of fall in post-stroke individuals. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Dynamics of Linker Residues Modulate the Nucleic Acid Binding Properties of the HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Zinc Fingers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargarian, Loussiné; Tisné, Carine; Barraud, Pierre; Xu, Xiaoqian; Morellet, Nelly; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is a small basic protein containing two zinc fingers (ZF) separated by a short linker. It is involved in several steps of the replication cycle and acts as a nucleic acid chaperone protein in facilitating nucleic acid strand transfers occurring during reverse transcription. Recent analysis of three-dimensional structures of NC-nucleic acids complexes established a new property: the unpaired guanines targeted by NC are more often inserted in the C-terminal zinc finger (ZF2) than in the N-terminal zinc finger (ZF1). Although previous NMR dynamic studies were performed with NC, the dynamic behavior of the linker residues connecting the two ZF domains remains unclear. This prompted us to investigate the dynamic behavior of the linker residues. Here, we collected 15N NMR relaxation data and used for the first time data at several fields to probe the protein dynamics. The analysis at two fields allows us to detect a slow motion occurring between the two domains around a hinge located in the linker at the G35 position. However, the amplitude of motion appears limited in our conditions. In addition, we showed that the neighboring linker residues R29, A30, P31, R32, K33 displayed restricted motion and numerous contacts with residues of ZF1. Our results are fully consistent with a model in which the ZF1-linker contacts prevent the ZF1 domain to interact with unpaired guanines, whereas the ZF2 domain is more accessible and competent to interact with unpaired guanines. In contrast, ZF1 with its large hydrophobic plateau is able to destabilize the double-stranded regions adjacent to the guanines bound by ZF2. The linker residues and the internal dynamics of NC regulate therefore the different functions of the two zinc fingers that are required for an optimal chaperone activity. PMID:25029439

  6. Documentation of the dynamic parameter, water-use, stream and lake flow routing, and two summary output modules and updates to surface-depression storage simulation and initial conditions specification options with the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan, R. Steve; LaFontaine, Jacob H.

    2017-10-05

    This report documents seven enhancements to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) hydrologic simulation code: two time-series input options, two new output options, and three updates of existing capabilities. The enhancements are (1) new dynamic parameter module, (2) new water-use module, (3) new Hydrologic Response Unit (HRU) summary output module, (4) new basin variables summary output module, (5) new stream and lake flow routing module, (6) update to surface-depression storage and flow simulation, and (7) update to the initial-conditions specification. This report relies heavily upon U.S. Geological Survey Techniques and Methods, book 6, chapter B7, which documents PRMS version 4 (PRMS-IV). A brief description of PRMS is included in this report.

  7. The autonomic higher order processing nuclei of the lower brain stem are among the early targets of the Alzheimer's disease-related cytoskeletal pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüb, U; Del Tredici, K; Schultz, C; Thal, D R; Braak, E; Braak, H

    2001-06-01

    The nuclei of the pontine parabrachial region (medial parabrachial nucleus, MPB; lateral parabrachial nucleus, LPB; subpeduncular nucleus, SPP) together with the intermediate zone of the medullary reticular formation (IRZ) are pivotal relay stations within central autonomic regulatory feedback systems. This study was undertaken to investigate the evolution of the Alzheimer's disease-related cytoskeletal pathology in these four sites of the lower brain stem. We examined the MPB, LPB, SPP and IRZ in 27 autopsy cases and classified the cortical Alzheimer-related cytoskeletal anomalies according to an established staging system (neurofibrillary tangle/neuropil threads [NFT/NT] stages I-VI). The lesions were visualized either with the antibody AT8, which is immunospecific for the abnormally phosphorylated form of the cytoskeletal protein tau, or with a modified Gallyas silver iodide stain. The MPB, SPB, and IRZ display cytoskeletal pathology in stage I and the LPB in stage II, whereby bothstages correspond to the preclinical phase of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In stages III-IV (incipient AD), the MPB and SPP are severely affected. In all of the stage III-IV cases, the lesions in the LPB and IRZ are well developed. In stages V and VI (clinical phase of AD), the MPB and SPP are filled with the abnormal intraneuronal material. At stages V-VI, the LPB is moderately involved and the IRZ shows severe damage. The pathogenesis of the AD-related cytoskeletal lesions in the nuclei of the pontine parabrachial region and in the IRZ conforms with the cortical NFT/NT staging sequence I-VI. In the event that the cytoskeletal pathology observed in this study impairs the function of the nerve cells involved, it is conceivable that autonomic mechanisms progressively deteriorate with advancing cortical NFT/NT stages. This relationship remains to be established, but it could provide insights into the illusive correlation between the AD-related cytoskeletal pathology and the function of

  8. Nonlinear dynamics of non-equilibrium holes in p-type modulation-doped GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amann Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nonlinear charge transport parallel to the layers of p-modulation-doped GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs is studied both theoretically and experimentally. Experimental results show that at low temperature, T = 13 K, the presence of an applied electric field of about 6 kV/cm leads to the heating of the high mobility holes in the GaInNAs QWs, and their real-space transfer (RST into the low-mobility GaAs barriers. This results in a negative differential mobility and self-generated oscillatory instabilities in the RST regime. We developed an analytical model based upon the coupled nonlinear dynamics of the real-space hole transfer and of the interface potential barrier controlled by space-charge in the doped GaAs layer. Our simulation results predict dc bias-dependent self-generated current oscillations with frequencies in the high microwave range.

  9. Dual frequency modulation with two cantilevers in series: a possible means to rapidly acquire tip–sample interaction force curves with dynamic AFM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solares, Santiago D; Chawla, Gaurav

    2008-01-01

    One common application of atomic force microscopy (AFM) is the acquisition of tip–sample interaction force curves. However, this can be a slow process when the user is interested in studying non-uniform samples, because existing contact- and dynamic-mode methods require that the measurement be performed at one fixed surface point at a time. This paper proposes an AFM method based on dual frequency modulation using two cantilevers in series, which could be used to measure the tip–sample interaction force curves and topography of the entire sample with a single surface scan, in a time that is comparable to the time needed to collect a topographic image with current AFM imaging modes. Numerical simulation results are provided along with recommended parameters to characterize tip–sample interactions resembling those of conventional silicon tips and carbon nanotube tips tapping on silicon surfaces

  10. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de Las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy......Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present...... and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity...

  11. Hotspot mutations in KIT receptor differentially modulate its allosterically coupled conformational dynamics: impact on activation and drug sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaure Chauvot de Beauchêne

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinase KIT controls many signal transduction pathways and represents a typical allosterically regulated protein. The mutation-induced deregulation of KIT activity impairs cellular physiological functions and causes serious human diseases. The impact of hotspots mutations (D816H/Y/N/V and V560G/D localized in crucial regulatory segments, the juxtamembrane region (JMR and the activation (A- loop, on KIT internal dynamics was systematically studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The mutational outcomes predicted in silico were correlated with in vitro and in vivo activation rates and drug sensitivities of KIT mutants. The allosteric regulation of KIT in the native and mutated forms is described in terms of communication between the two remote segments, JMR and A-loop. A strong correlation between the communication profile and the structural and dynamical features of KIT in the native and mutated forms was established. Our results provide new insight on the determinants of receptor KIT constitutive activation by mutations and resistance of KIT mutants to inhibitors. Depiction of an intra-molecular component of the communication network constitutes a first step towards an integrated description of vast communication pathways established by KIT in physiopathological contexts.

  12. Representational momentum in dynamic facial expressions is modulated by the level of expressed pain: Amplitude and direction effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigent, Elise; Amorim, Michel-Ange; de Oliveira, Armando Mónica

    2018-01-01

    Humans have developed a specific capacity to rapidly perceive and anticipate other people's facial expressions so as to get an immediate impression of their emotional state of mind. We carried out two experiments to examine the perceptual and memory dynamics of facial expressions of pain. In the first experiment, we investigated how people estimate other people's levels of pain based on the perception of various dynamic facial expressions; these differ both in terms of the amount and intensity of activated action units. A second experiment used a representational momentum (RM) paradigm to study the emotional anticipation (memory bias) elicited by the same facial expressions of pain studied in Experiment 1. Our results highlighted the relationship between the level of perceived pain (in Experiment 1) and the direction and magnitude of memory bias (in Experiment 2): When perceived pain increases, the memory bias tends to be reduced (if positive) and ultimately becomes negative. Dynamic facial expressions of pain may reenact an "immediate perceptual history" in the perceiver before leading to an emotional anticipation of the agent's upcoming state. Thus, a subtle facial expression of pain (i.e., a low contraction around the eyes) that leads to a significant positive anticipation can be considered an adaptive process-one through which we can swiftly and involuntarily detect other people's pain.

  13. Dynamics and stimulus-dependence of pacemaker control during behavioral modulations in the weakly electric fish, Apteronotus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, J

    1987-08-01

    1. Weakly electric fish generate around their bodies low-amplitude, AC electric fields which are used both for the detection of objects and intraspecific communication. The types of modulation in this signal of which the high-frequency wave-type gymnotiform, Apteronotus, is capable are relatively few and stereotyped. Chief among these is the chirp, a signal used in courtship and agonistic displays. Chirps are brief and rapid accelerations in the normally highly regular electric organ discharge (EOD) frequency. 2. Chirping can be elicited artificially in these animals by the use of a stimulus regime identical to that typically used to elicit another behavior, the jamming avoidance response (JAR). The neuronal basis for the JAR, a much slower and lesser alteration in EOD frequency, is well understood. Examination of the stimulus features which induce chirping show that, like the JAR, there is a region of frequency differences between the fish's EOD and the interfering signal that maximally elicits the response. Moreover, the response is sex-specific with regard to the sign of the frequency difference, with females chirping preferentially on the positive and most males on the negative Df. These features imply that the sensory mechanisms involved in the triggering of these communicatory behaviors are fundamentally similar to those explicated for the JAR. 3. Additionally, two other modulatory behaviors of unknown significance are described. The first is a non-selective rise in EOD frequency associated with a JAR stimulus, occurring regardless of the sign of the Df. This modulation shares many characteristics with the JAR. The second behavior, which we have termed a 'yodel', is distinct from and kinetically intermediate to chirping and the JAR. Moreover, unlike the other studied electromotor behaviors it is generally produced only after the termination of the eliciting stimulus.

  14. Cytoskeletal Regulation Dominates Temperature-Sensitive Proteomic Changes of Hibernation in Forebrain of 13-Lined Ground Squirrels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, Allyson G.; Martin, Sandra L.

    2013-01-01

    13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy – wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins dihydropyrimidinase

  15. Cytoskeletal regulation dominates temperature-sensitive proteomic changes of hibernation in forebrain of 13-lined ground squirrels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson G Hindle

    Full Text Available 13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy - wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins

  16. Cytoskeletal protein translation and expression in the rat brain are stressor-dependent and region-specific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Sántha

    Full Text Available Stress is an integral component of life that can sometimes cause a critical overload, depending on the qualitative and quantitative natures of the stressors. The involvement of actin, the predominant component of dendritic integrity, is a plausible candidate factor in stress-induced neuronal cytoskeletal changes. The major aim of this study was to compare the effects of three different stress conditions on the transcription and translation of actin-related cytoskeletal genes in the rat brain. Male Wistar rats were exposed to one or other of the frequently used models of physical stress, i.e. electric foot shock stress (EFSS, forced swimming stress (FSS, or psychosocial stress (PSS for periods of 3, 7, 14, or 21 days. The relative mRNA and protein expressions of β-actin, cofilin and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK-1 were determined by qRT- PCR and western blotting from hippocampus and frontal cortex samples. Stressor-specific alterations in both β-actin and cofilin expression levels were seen after stress. These alterations were most pronounced in response to EFSS, and exhibited a U-shaped time course. FSS led to a significant β-actin mRNA expression elevation in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex after 3 and 7 days, respectively, without any subsequent change. PSS did not cause any change in β-actin or cofilin mRNA or protein expression in the examined brain regions. EFSS, FSS and PSS had no effect on the expression of MAPK-1 mRNA at any tested time point. These findings indicate a very delicate, stress type-dependent regulation of neuronal cytoskeletal components in the rat hippocampus and frontal cortex.

  17. Organoselenium compounds prevent hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins induced by the neurotoxic agent diphenyl ditelluride in cerebral cortex of young rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moretto, M.B.; Funchal, C.; Zeni, G.; Rocha, J.B.T.; Pessoa-Pureur, R.

    2005-01-01

    In this work we investigated the protective ability of the selenium compounds ebselen and diphenyl diselenide against the effect of diphenyl ditelluride on the in vitro incorporation of 32 P into intermediate filament (IF) proteins from slices of cerebral cortex of 17-day-old rats. We observed that ditelluride in the concentrations of 1, 15 and 50 μM induced hyperphosphorylation of the high-salt Triton insoluble neurofilament subunits (NF-M and NF-L), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, without altering the immunocontent of these proteins. Concerning the selenium compounds, diselenide (1, 15 and 50 μM) did not induce alteration of the in vitro phosphorylation of the IF proteins. Otherwise, ebselen induced an altered in vitro phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal proteins in a dose-dependent manner. At intermediate concentrations (15 and 30 μM) it increased the in vitro phosphorylation even though, at low (5 μM) or high (50 and 100 μM) concentrations this compound was ineffective in altering the activity of the cytoskeletal-associated phosphorylating system. In addition, 15 μM diselenide and 5 μM ebselen, presented a protective effect against the action of ditelluride, on the phosphorylation of the proteins studied. Considering that hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins is associated with neuronal dysfunction and neurodegeneration, it is probable that the effects of ditelluride could be related to the remarkable neurotoxicity of this organic form of tellurium. Furthermore the neuroprotective action of selenium compounds against tellurium effects could be a promising route to be exploited for a possible treatment of organic tellurium poisoning

  18. Cytoskeletal stability and metabolic alterations in primary human macrophages in long-term microgravity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svantje Tauber

    and non-significant cytoskeletal alterations represent a stable "steady state" after adaptive processes are initiated in the new microgravity environment. Due to the utmost importance of the human macrophage system for the elimination of pathogens and the clearance of apoptotic cells, its apparent robustness to a low gravity environment is crucial for human health and performance during long-term space missions.

  19. Disturbed flow mediated modulation of shear forces on endothelial plane: A proposed model for studying endothelium around atherosclerotic plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaguru, Uma Maheswari; Sundaresan, Lakshmikirupa; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Majunathan, Reji; Mani, Krishnapriya; Swaminathan, Akila; Venkatesan, Saravanakumar; Kasiviswanathan, Dharanibalan; Chatterjee, Suvro

    2016-06-01

    Disturbed fluid flow or modulated shear stress is associated with vascular conditions such as atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and aneurysm. In vitro simulation of the fluid flow around the plaque micro-environment remains a challenging approach. Currently available models have limitations such as complications in protocols, high cost, incompetence of co-culture and not being suitable for massive expression studies. Hence, the present study aimed to develop a simple, versatile model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Current observations of CFD have shown the regions of modulated shear stress by the disturbed fluid flow. To execute and validate the model in real sense, cell morphology, cytoskeletal arrangement, cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) profile, nitric oxide production and disturbed flow markers under the above condition were assessed. Endothelium at disturbed flow region which had been exposed to low shear stress and swirling flow pattern showed morphological and expression similarities with the pathological disturbed flow environment reported previously. Altogether, the proposed model can serve as a platform to simulate the real time micro-environment of disturbed flow associated with eccentric plaque shapes and the possibilities of studying its downstream events.

  20. Early cytoskeletal protein modifications precede overt structural degeneration in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Nicole Wilson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport deficits precede structural loss in glaucoma and other neurodegenerations. Impairments in structural support, including modified cytoskeletal proteins and microtubule-destabilizing elements, could be initiating factors in glaucoma pathogenesis. We investigated the time course of changes in protein levels and post-translational modifications in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma. Using anterograde tract tracing of the retinal projection, we assessed major cytoskeletal and transported elements as a function of transport integrity in different stages of pathological progression. Using capillary-based electrophoresis, single- and multiplex immunosorbent assays, and immunofluorescence, we quantified hyperphosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain, phosphorylated tau (ptau, calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown product (145/150kDa, β –tubulin, and amyloid-β42 proteins based on age and transport outcome to the superior colliculus (SC, the main retinal target in mice. Phosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain (pNF-H was elevated within the optic nerve (ON and SC of 8-10 month-old DBA/2J mice, but was not evident in the retina until 12-15 months, suggesting that cytoskeletal modifications first appear in the distal retinal projection. As expected, higher pNF-H levels in the SC and retina were correlated with axonal transport deficits. Elevations in hyperphosphorylated tau (ptau occurred in ON and SC between 3-8 month of age while retinal ptau accumulations occurred at 12-15 months in DBA/2J mice. In vitro co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggested increased affinity of ptau for the retrograde motor complex protein, dynactin. We observed a transport-related decrease of β-tubulin in ON of 10-12 month-old DBA/2J mice, suggesting destabilized microtubule array. Elevations in calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown product were seen in ON and SC at the earliest age examined, well before axonal transport loss is evident. Finally, transport

  1. Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Lawrence E

    2001-01-01

    Beginning text presents complete theoretical treatment of mechanical model systems and deals with technological applications. Topics include introduction to calculus of vectors, particle motion, dynamics of particle systems and plane rigid bodies, technical applications in plane motions, theory of mechanical vibrations, and more. Exercises and answers appear in each chapter.

  2. Electron dynamics and optical properties modulation of monolayer MoS{sub 2} by femtosecond laser pulse: a simulation using time-dependent density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Xiaoxing; Jiang, Lan [Beijing Institute of Technology, Laser Micro/Nano Fabrication Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing (China); Wang, Feng [Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Physics, Beijing (China); Su, Gaoshi [Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Mechatronical Engineering, Beijing (China); Qu, Liangti [Beijing Institute of Technology, Key Laboratory of Cluster Science, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry, Beijing (China); Lu, Yongfeng [University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Department of Electrical Engineering, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2017-07-15

    In this study, we adopted time-dependent density functional theory to investigate the optical properties of monolayer MoS{sub 2} and the effect of intense few-cycle femtosecond laser pulses on these properties. The electron dynamics of monolayer MoS{sub 2} under few-cycle and multi-cycle laser irradiation were described. The polarization direction of the laser had a marked effect on the energy absorption and electronic excitation of monolayer MoS{sub 2} because of anisotropy. Change in the polarization direction of few-cycle pulse changed the absorbed energy by a factor over 4000. Few-cycle pulse showed a higher sensitivity to the electronic property of material than multi-cycle pulse. The modulation of the dielectric properties of the material was observed on the femtosecond time scale. The negative divergence appeared in the real part of the function at low frequencies and photoinduced blue shift occurred due to Burstein-Moss effect. The irradiation of femtosecond laser caused the dielectric response within the infrared region and introduced anisotropy to the in-plane optical properties. Laser-based engineering of optical properties through controlling transient electron dynamics expands the functionality of MoS{sub 2} and has potential applications in direction-dependent optoelectronic devices. (orig.)

  3. Dynamic environments of fungus-farming termite mounds exert growth-modulating effects on fungal crop parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katariya, Lakshya; Ramesh, Priya B; Borges, Renee M

    2018-03-01

    This study investigated for the first time the impact of the internal mound environment of fungus-growing termites on the growth of fungal crop parasites. Mounds of the termite Odontotermes obesus acted as (i) temperature and relative humidity (RH) 'stabilisers' showing dampened daily variation and (ii) 'extreme environments' exhibiting elevated RH and CO 2 levels, compared to the outside. Yet, internal temperatures exhibited seasonal dynamics as did daily and seasonal CO 2 levels. During in situ experiments under termite-excluded conditions within the mound, the growth of the crop parasite Pseudoxylaria was greater inside than outside the mound, i.e., Pseudoxylaria is 'termitariophilic'. Also, ex situ experiments on parasite isolates differing in growth rates and examined under controlled conditions in the absence of termites revealed a variable effect with fungal growth decreasing only under high CO 2 and low temperature conditions, reflecting the in situ parasite growth fluctuations. In essence, the parasite appears to be adapted to survive in the termite mound. Thus the mound microclimate does not inhibit the parasite but the dynamic environmental conditions of the mound affect its growth to varying extents. These results shed light on the impact of animal-engineered structures on parasite ecology, independent of any direct role of animal engineers. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. β-subunit myristoylation functions as an energy sensor by modulating the dynamics of AMP-activated Protein Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nada; Ling, Naomi; Krishnamurthy, Srinath; Oakhill, Jonathan S; Scott, John W; Stapleton, David I; Kemp, Bruce E; Anand, Ganesh Srinivasan; Gooley, Paul R

    2016-12-21

    The heterotrimeric AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), consisting of α, β and γ subunits, is a stress-sensing enzyme that is activated by phosphorylation of its activation loop in response to increases in cellular AMP. N-terminal myristoylation of the β-subunit has been shown to suppress Thr172 phosphorylation, keeping AMPK in an inactive state. Here we use amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to investigate the structural and dynamic properties of the mammalian myristoylated and non-myristoylated inactivated AMPK (D139A) in the presence and absence of nucleotides. HDX MS data suggests that the myristoyl group binds near the first helix of the C-terminal lobe of the kinase domain similar to other kinases. Our data, however, also shows that ATP.Mg 2+ results in a global stabilization of myristoylated, but not non-myristoylated AMPK, and most notably for peptides of the activation loop of the α-kinase domain, the autoinhibitory sequence (AIS) and the βCBM. AMP does not have that effect and HDX measurements for myristoylated and non-myristoylated AMPK in the presence of AMP are similar. These differences in dynamics may account for a reduced basal rate of phosphorylation of Thr172 in myristoylated AMPK in skeletal muscle where endogenous ATP concentrations are very high.

  5. Platelet activating factor enhances synaptic vesicle exocytosis via PKC, elevated intracellular calcium, and modulation of synapsin 1 dynamics and phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennetta W Hammond

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet activating factor (PAF is an inflammatory phospholipid signaling molecule implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory and neurotoxicity during neuroinflammation. However, little is known about the intracellular mechanisms mediating PAF’s physiological or pathological effects on synaptic facilitation. We show here that PAF receptors are localized at the synapse. Using fluorescent reporters of presynaptic activity we show that a non-hydrolysable analogue of PAF (cPAF enhances synaptic vesicle release from individual presynaptic boutons by increasing the size or release of the readily releasable pool and the exocytosis rate of the total recycling pool. cPAF also activates previously silent boutons resulting in vesicle release from a larger number of terminals. The underlying mechanism involves elevated calcium within presynaptic boutons and protein kinase C (PKC activation. Furthermore, cPAF increases synapsin I phosphorylation at sites 1 and 3, and increases dispersion of synapsin I from the presynaptic compartment during stimulation, freeing synaptic vesicles for subsequent release. These findings provide a conceptual framework for how PAF, regardless of its cellular origin, can modulate synapses during normal and pathologic synaptic activity.

  6. Kinesin Khc-73/KIF13B modulates retrograde BMP signaling by influencing endosomal dynamics at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Edward H; Gray, Lindsay; Tsurudome, Kazuya; El-Mounzer, Wassim; Elazzouzi, Fatima; Baim, Christopher; Farzin, Sarah; Calderon, Mario R; Kauwe, Grant; Haghighi, A Pejmun

    2018-01-01

    Retrograde signaling is essential for neuronal growth, function and survival; however, we know little about how signaling endosomes might be directed from synaptic terminals onto retrograde axonal pathways. We have identified Khc-73, a plus-end directed microtubule motor protein, as a regulator of sorting of endosomes in Drosophila larval motor neurons. The number of synaptic boutons and the amount of neurotransmitter release at the Khc-73 mutant larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) are normal, but we find a significant decrease in the number of presynaptic release sites. This defect in Khc-73 mutant larvae can be genetically enhanced by a partial genetic loss of Bone Morphogenic Protein (BMP) signaling or suppressed by activation of BMP signaling in motoneurons. Consistently, activation of BMP signaling that normally enhances the accumulation of phosphorylated form of BMP transcription factor Mad in the nuclei, can be suppressed by genetic removal of Khc-73. Using a number of assays including live imaging in larval motor neurons, we show that loss of Khc-73 curbs the ability of retrograde-bound endosomes to leave the synaptic area and join the retrograde axonal pathway. Our findings identify Khc-73 as a regulator of endosomal traffic at the synapse and modulator of retrograde BMP signaling in motoneurons.

  7. Augmenting static and dynamic mechanical strength of carbon nanotube/epoxy soft nanocomposites via modulation of purification and functionalization routes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billing, Beant Kaur; Dhar, Purbarun; Singh, Narinder; Agnihotri, Prabhat K

    2018-01-03

    A detailed experimental investigation was carried out to establish the relationship between CNT purification and functionalization routes and the average response of CNT/epoxy nanocomposites under static and dynamic loading. It was shown that the relative improvement in the mechanical properties of the epoxy matrix due to the addition of CNTs depends on the choice of purification and functionalization steps. A better dispersion of CNTs was recorded for the functionalized CNTs as compared to the oxidized and CVD grown CNTs. Moreover, tensile, 3-point bending and nanoDMA testing performed on nanocomposites processed with CVD-grown, oxidized and functionalized CNTs revealed that COOH functionalization after the oxidation of CNTs at 350 °C is the optimized processing route to harness the excellent properties of CNTs in CNT/epoxy nanocomposites.

  8. The metal chaperone Atox1 regulates the activity of the human copper transporter ATP7B by modulating domain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Corey H; Yang, Nan; Bothe, Jameson; Tonelli, Marco; Nokhrin, Sergiy; Dolgova, Natalia V; Braiterman, Lelita; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Dmitriev, Oleg Y

    2017-11-03

    The human transporter ATP7B delivers copper to the biosynthetic pathways and maintains copper homeostasis in the liver. Mutations in ATP7B cause the potentially fatal hepatoneurological disorder Wilson disease. The activity and intracellular localization of ATP7B are regulated by copper, but the molecular mechanism of this regulation is largely unknown. We show that the copper chaperone Atox1, which delivers copper to ATP7B, and the group of the first three metal-binding domains (MBD1-3) are central to the activity regulation of ATP7B. Atox1-Cu binding to ATP7B changes domain dynamics and interactions within the MBD1-3 group and activates ATP hydrolysis. To understand the mechanism linking Atox1-MBD interactions and enzyme activity, we have determined the MBD1-3 conformational space using small angle X-ray scattering and identified changes in MBD dynamics caused by apo -Atox1 and Atox1-Cu by solution NMR. The results show that copper transfer from Atox1 decreases domain interactions within the MBD1-3 group and increases the mobility of the individual domains. The N-terminal segment of MBD1-3 was found to interact with the nucleotide-binding domain of ATP7B, thus physically coupling the domains involved in copper binding and those involved in ATP hydrolysis. Taken together, the data suggest a regulatory mechanism in which Atox1-mediated copper transfer activates ATP7B by releasing inhibitory constraints through increased freedom of MBD1-3 motions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. 4-(1-Ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide – A new pleiotropic HDAC inhibitor targeting cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal organisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahal, Katharina, E-mail: katharina.mahal@uni-bayreuth.de [Organic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Bayreuth, Universitätsstrasse 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Kahlen, Philip, E-mail: philip.kahlen@uni-bayreuth.de [Department of Genetics, University of Bayreuth, Universitätsstrasse 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Biersack, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.biersack@yahoo.com [Organic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Bayreuth, Universitätsstrasse 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Schobert, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.schobert@uni-bayreuth.de [Organic Chemistry Laboratory, University of Bayreuth, Universitätsstrasse 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) which play a crucial role in cancer cell proliferation are promising drug targets. However, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) modelled on natural hydroxamic acids such as trichostatin A frequently lead to resistance or even an increased agressiveness of tumours. As a workaround we developed 4-(1-ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide (etacrox), a hydroxamic acid that combines HDAC inhibition with synergistic effects of the 4,5-diarylimidazole residue. Etacrox proved highly cytotoxic against a panel of metastatic and resistant cancer cell lines while showing greater specificity for cancer over non-malignant cells when compared to the approved HDACi vorinostat. Like the latter, etacrox and the closely related imidazoles bimacroxam and animacroxam acted as pan-HDACi yet showed some specificity for HDAC6. Akt signalling and interference with nuclear beta-catenin localisation were elicited by etacrox at lower concentrations when compared to vorinostat. Moreover, etacrox disrupted the microtubule and focal adhesion dynamics of cancer cells and inhibited the proteolytic activity of prometastatic and proangiogenic matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, etacrox acted strongly antimigratory and antiinvasive against various cancer cell lines in three-dimensional transwell invasion assays and also antiangiogenic in vivo with respect to blood vessel formation in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. These pleiotropic effects and its water-solubility and tolerance by mice render etacrox a promising new HDACi candidate. - Graphical abstract: A novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with pleiotropic anticancer effects. - Highlights: • Etacrox is a new HDACi with cytotoxic, antiangiogenic and antiinvasive activity. • Etacrox causes aberrant cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal reorganisation. • Pro-metastatic and angiogenic matrix metalloproteinases are inhibited by etacrox. • Etacrox impairs blood vessel maturation in vivo and cancer cell

  10. 4-(1-Ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide – A new pleiotropic HDAC inhibitor targeting cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal organisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahal, Katharina; Kahlen, Philip; Biersack, Bernhard; Schobert, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) which play a crucial role in cancer cell proliferation are promising drug targets. However, HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) modelled on natural hydroxamic acids such as trichostatin A frequently lead to resistance or even an increased agressiveness of tumours. As a workaround we developed 4-(1-ethyl-4-anisyl-imidazol-5-yl)-N-hydroxycinnamide (etacrox), a hydroxamic acid that combines HDAC inhibition with synergistic effects of the 4,5-diarylimidazole residue. Etacrox proved highly cytotoxic against a panel of metastatic and resistant cancer cell lines while showing greater specificity for cancer over non-malignant cells when compared to the approved HDACi vorinostat. Like the latter, etacrox and the closely related imidazoles bimacroxam and animacroxam acted as pan-HDACi yet showed some specificity for HDAC6. Akt signalling and interference with nuclear beta-catenin localisation were elicited by etacrox at lower concentrations when compared to vorinostat. Moreover, etacrox disrupted the microtubule and focal adhesion dynamics of cancer cells and inhibited the proteolytic activity of prometastatic and proangiogenic matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, etacrox acted strongly antimigratory and antiinvasive against various cancer cell lines in three-dimensional transwell invasion assays and also antiangiogenic in vivo with respect to blood vessel formation in the chorioallantoic membrane assay. These pleiotropic effects and its water-solubility and tolerance by mice render etacrox a promising new HDACi candidate. - Graphical abstract: A novel histone deacetylase inhibitor with pleiotropic anticancer effects. - Highlights: • Etacrox is a new HDACi with cytotoxic, antiangiogenic and antiinvasive activity. • Etacrox causes aberrant cancer cell signalling and cytoskeletal reorganisation. • Pro-metastatic and angiogenic matrix metalloproteinases are inhibited by etacrox. • Etacrox impairs blood vessel maturation in vivo and cancer cell

  11. Study on the physical properties of the dynamic filter: unidimensional modulation; Estudo das propriedades fisicas do filtro dinamico: modulacao unidimensional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Roberto Salomon de

    2005-10-15

    The present work shows an characterization of the Varian linear accelerator EDW physical properties, through experimental determinations, comparing them with calculations made by CadPlan treatment planning system, under the same conditions. The following parameters were determined: EDW factor for square and rectangular fields on the central axis and off-axis, EDW factor dependency with the static collimator, percentage depth dose, EDW factor dependency with the depth on the central axis and off-axis, EDW angles and field profiles on several depths. It was verified that the EDW factor diminishes with the field size increment and with EDW nominal angle increment, and increases with energy increment. It is independent of the X collimator and dynamic collimator, except for small field sizes. It doesn't vary with depth on the central axis, but varies on the off-axis distances. A difference between EDW nominal angles and the EDW obtained experimentally was found, but it doesn't interfere in the treatment results. At the end of this work, a set of physical parameters to be determined for the commissioning, clinical implementation and quality assurance of the EDW is suggested. (author)

  12. [Dynamic observation on the short-term change of xerostomia after intensity-modulated radiotherapy for patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanjie; Zhao, Changqing

    2015-01-01

    To dynamically analyze the change of xerostomia in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy by DW MRI. Twenty-three nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients confirmed by pathology were enrolled. Male/Female: 19/4. The age was from 37 to 69 years. The patients were divided into two groups: G1, Dmeanxerostomia was assessed. SPSS 13.0 and SAS 8.2 software were used to analyze the data. At the end of IMRT, the change tendency of ADC in parotid and submandibular glands value was different in patients with different degree of xerostomia (F = 11.52, P xerostomia could be found in patients within different irradiation dose groups (Z = -3.622, P xerostomia for patients at the end of IMRT (Z value was -0.791, -0.949, 2.488, all P > 0.05). A significant difference of xerostomia degree in patients was found at the various follow-up time after IMRT (χ(2) = 19.59, P xerostomia in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma after radiotherapy. The degrees of salivary gland function and dry mouth in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma damage evaluate with illuminated dose increases. The function of salivary gland gradually restored and the degree of dry mouth gradually reduce with the extension of time after radiotherapy.

  13. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  14. Study on the physical properties of the dynamic filter: unidimensional modulation; Estudo das propriedades fisicas do filtro dinamico: modulacao unidimensional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Roberto Salomon de

    2005-10-15

    The present work shows an characterization of the Varian linear accelerator EDW physical properties, through experimental determinations, comparing them with calculations made by CadPlan treatment planning system, under the same conditions. The following parameters were determined: EDW factor for square and rectangular fields on the central axis and off-axis, EDW factor dependency with the static collimator, percentage depth dose, EDW factor dependency with the depth on the central axis and off-axis, EDW angles and field profiles on several depths. It was verified that the EDW factor diminishes with the field size increment and with EDW nominal angle increment, and increases with energy increment. It is independent of the X collimator and dynamic collimator, except for small field sizes. It doesn't vary with depth on the central axis, but varies on the off-axis distances. A difference between EDW nominal angles and the EDW obtained experimentally was found, but it doesn't interfere in the treatment results. At the end of this work, a set of physical parameters to be determined for the commissioning, clinical implementation and quality assurance of the EDW is suggested. (author)

  15. Dynamic Recruitment of Functionally Distinct Swi/Snf Chromatin Remodeling Complexes Modulates Pdx1 Activity in Islet β Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian McKenna

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pdx1 is a transcription factor of fundamental importance to pancreas formation and adult islet β cell function. However, little is known about the positive- and negative-acting coregulators recruited to mediate transcriptional control. Here, we isolated numerous Pdx1-interacting factors possessing a wide range of cellular functions linked with this protein, including, but not limited to, coregulators associated with transcriptional activation and repression, DNA damage response, and DNA replication. Because chromatin remodeling activities are essential to developmental lineage decisions and adult cell function, our analysis focused on investigating the influence of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeler on Pdx1 action. The two mutually exclusive and indispensable Swi/Snf core ATPase subunits, Brg1 and Brm, distinctly affected target gene expression in β cells. Furthermore, physiological and pathophysiological conditions dynamically regulated Pdx1 binding to these Swi/Snf complexes in vivo. We discuss how context-dependent recruitment of coregulatory complexes by Pdx1 could impact pancreas cell development and adult islet β cell activity.

  16. How diffusivity, thermocline and incident light intensity modulate the dynamics of deep chlorophyll maximum in Tyrrhenian Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Valenti

    Full Text Available During the last few years theoretical works have shed new light and proposed new hypotheses on the mechanisms which regulate the spatio-temporal behaviour of phytoplankton communities in marine pelagic ecosystems. Despite this, relevant physical and biological issues, such as effects of the time-dependent mixing in the upper layer, competition between groups, and dynamics of non-stationary deep chlorophyll maxima, are still open questions. In this work, we analyze the spatio-temporal behaviour of five phytoplankton populations in a real marine ecosystem by using a one-dimensional reaction-diffusion-taxis model. The study is performed, taking into account the seasonal variations of environmental variables, such as light intensity, thickness of upper mixed layer and profiles of vertical turbulent diffusivity, obtained starting from experimental findings. Theoretical distributions of phytoplankton cell concentration was converted in chlorophyll concentration, and compared with the experimental profiles measured in a site of the Tyrrhenian Sea at four different times (seasons of the year, during four different oceanographic cruises. As a result we find a good agreement between theoretical and experimental distributions of chlorophyll concentration. In particular, theoretical results reveal that the seasonal changes of environmental variables play a key role in the phytoplankton distribution and determine the properties of the deep chlorophyll maximum. This study could be extended to other marine ecosystems to predict future changes in the phytoplankton biomass due to global warming, in view of devising strategies to prevent the decline of the primary production and the consequent decrease of fish species.

  17. Modulational instability, beak-shaped rogue waves, multi-dark-dark solitons and dynamics in pair-transition-coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Yan, Zhenya; Wen, Xiao-Yong

    2017-07-01

    The integrable coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations with four-wave mixing are investigated. We first explore the conditions for modulational instability of continuous waves of this system. Secondly, based on the generalized N -fold Darboux transformation (DT), beak-shaped higher-order rogue waves (RWs) and beak-shaped higher-order rogue wave pairs are derived for the coupled model with attractive interaction in terms of simple determinants. Moreover, we derive the simple multi-dark-dark and kink-shaped multi-dark-dark solitons for the coupled model with repulsive interaction through the generalizing DT. We explore their dynamics and classifications by different kinds of spatial-temporal distribution structures including triangular, pentagonal, 'claw-like' and heptagonal patterns. Finally, we perform the numerical simulations to predict that some dark solitons and RWs are stable enough to develop within a short time. The results would enrich our understanding on nonlinear excitations in many coupled nonlinear wave systems with transition coupling effects.

  18. Lithium-modulated conduction band edge shifts and charge-transfer dynamics in dye-sensitized solar cells based on a dicyanamide ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yu; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Min; Wang, Peng

    2011-04-19

    Lithium ions are known for their potent function in modulating the energy alignment at the oxide semiconductor/dye/electrolyte interface in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs), offering the opportunity to control the associated multichannel charge-transfer dynamics. Herein, by optimizing the lithium iodide content in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium dicyanamide-based ionic liquid electrolytes, we present a solvent-free DSC displaying an impressive 8.4% efficiency at 100 mW cm(-2) AM1.5G conditions. We further scrutinize the origins of evident impacts of lithium ions upon current density-voltage characteristics as well as photocurrent action spectra of DSCs based thereon. It is found that, along with a gradual increase of the lithium content in ionic liquid electrolytes, a consecutive diminishment of the open-circuit photovoltage arises, primarily owing to a noticeable downward movement of the titania conduction band edge. The conduction band edge displacement away from vacuum also assists the formation of a more favorable energy offset at the titania/dye interface, and thereby leads to a faster electron injection rate and a higher exciton dissociation yield as implied by transient emission measurements. We also notice that the adverse influence of the titania conduction band edge downward shift arising from lithium addition upon photovoltage is partly compensated by a concomitant suppression of the triiodide involving interfacial charge recombination. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. In vitro fermentation of lupin seeds (Lupinus albus) and broad beans (Vicia faba): dynamic modulation of the intestinal microbiota and metabolomic output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullón, Patricia; Gullón, Beatriz; Tavaria, Freni; Vasconcelos, Marta; Gomes, Ana Maria

    2015-10-01

    Broad beans (Vicia faba) and lupin seeds (Lupinus albus) are legumes rich in a wide range of compounds, which may represent a useful dietary approach for modulating the human gut microbiome. In this work, after in vitro digestion, legume samples were used as carbon sources in anaerobic batch cultures to evaluate their impact on the intestinal microbiota composition and on their metabolic products. The fermentations were monitored by a decrease in pH, generation of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and lactate and the changes in the dynamic bacterial populations by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The total SCFA at the end of fermentation was 81.52 mM for lupin seeds and 78.41 mM for broad beans accompanied by a decrease of the pH for both legumes. The microbial groups that increased significantly (P spp., Lactobacillus-Enterococcus, Atopobium, Bacteroides-Pretovella, Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Roseburia intestinalis. This impact on the intestinal microbiota suggests that lupin seeds and broad beans may be used in the development of novel functional foods, which can be included in dietary strategies for human health promotion.

  20. Resonance modulation, annihilation and generation of anti-resonance and anti-phasonance in 3D neuronal systems: interplay of resonant and amplifying currents with slow dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotstein, Horacio G

    2017-08-01

    Subthreshold (membrane potential) resonance and phasonance (preferred amplitude and zero-phase responses to oscillatory inputs) in single neurons arise from the interaction between positive and negative feedback effects provided by relatively fast amplifying currents and slower resonant currents. In 2D neuronal systems, amplifying currents are required to be slave to voltage (instantaneously fast) for these phenomena to occur. In higher dimensional systems, additional currents operating at various effective time scales may modulate and annihilate existing resonances and generate antiresonance (minimum amplitude response) and antiphasonance (zero-phase response with phase monotonic properties opposite to phasonance). We use mathematical modeling, numerical simulations and dynamical systems tools to investigate the mechanisms underlying these phenomena in 3D linear models, which are obtained as the linearization of biophysical (conductance-based) models. We characterize the parameter regimes for which the system exhibits the various types of behavior mentioned above in the rather general case in which the underlying 2D system exhibits resonance. We consider two cases: (i) the interplay of two resonant gating variables, and (ii) the interplay of one resonant and one amplifying gating variables. Increasing levels of an amplifying current cause (i) a response amplification if the amplifying current is faster than the resonant current, (ii) resonance and phasonance attenuation and annihilation if the amplifying and resonant currents have identical dynamics, and (iii) antiresonance and antiphasonance if the amplifying current is slower than the resonant current. We investigate the underlying mechanisms by extending the envelope-plane diagram approach developed in previous work (for 2D systems) to three dimensions to include the additional gating variable, and constructing the corresponding envelope curves in these envelope-space diagrams. We find that antiresonance and

  1. Novelty-induced activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc) expression in frontal cortex requires serotonin 2A receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santini, Martin; Klein, A B; El-Sayed, M

    2011-01-01

    environment. As an output of FC activation we measured expression of activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc). Novelty-exposure (open-field arena) robustly up-regulated FC Arc mRNA expression (∼160%) in mice compared to home-cage controls. This response was inhibited with the 5-HT(2A...

  2. Novelty-induced activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc) expression in frontal cortex requires serotonin 2A receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santini, Martin; Klein, A B; El-Sayed, M

    2011-01-01

    environment. As an output of FC activation we measured expression of activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc). Novelty-exposure (open-field arena) robustly up-regulated FC Arc mRNA expression (~160%) in mice compared to home-cage controls. This response was inhibited with the 5-HT(2A...

  3. Synthetic polymeric substrates as potent pro-oxidant versus anti-oxidant regulators of cytoskeletal remodeling and cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hak-Joon; Chandra, Prafulla; Treiser, Matthew D; Liu, Er; Iovine, Carmine P; Moghe, Prabhas V; Kohn, Joachim

    2009-03-01

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cell signal transduction pathways emanating from engineered cell substrates remains unclear. To elucidate the role, polymers derived from the amino acid L-tyrosine were used as synthetic matrix substrates. Variations in their chemical properties were created by co-polymerizing hydrophobic L-tyrosine derivatives with uncharged hydrophilic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG, Mw = 1,000 Da), and negatively charged desaminotyrosyl-tyrosine (DT). These substrates were characterized for their intrinsic ability to generate ROS, as well as their ability to elicit Saos-2 cell responses in terms of intracellular ROS production, actin remodeling, and apoptosis. PEG-containing substrates induced both exogenous and intracellular ROS production, whereas the charged substrates reduced production of both types, indicating a coupling of exogenous ROS generation and intracellular ROS production. Furthermore, PEG-mediated ROS induction caused nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and an increase in caspase-3 activity, confirming a link with apoptosis. PEG-rich pro-oxidant substrates caused cytoskeletal actin remodeling through beta-actin cleavage by caspase-3 into fractins. The fractins co-localized to the mitochondria and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential. The remnant cytosolic beta-actin was polymerized and condensed, events consistent with apoptotic cell shrinkage. The cytoskeletal remodeling was integral to the further augmentation of intracellular ROS production. Conversely, the anti-oxidant DT-containing charged substrates suppressed the entire cascade of apoptotic progression. We demonstrate that ROS activity serves an important role in "outside-in" signaling for cells grown on substrates: the ROS activity couples exogenous stress, driven by substrate composition, to changes in intracellular signaling. This signaling causes cell apoptosis, which is mediated by actin remodeling.

  4. Effect of collagen I and fibronectin on the adhesion, elasticity and cytoskeletal organization of prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheva, Denitsa; Padula, Daniela; Schieker, Matthias; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke

    2010-11-12

    Despite of intensive research efforts, the precise mechanism of prostate cancer metastasis in bone is still not fully understood. Several studies have suggested that specific matrix production by the bone cells, such as collagen I, supports cancer cell invasion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of collagen I (COL1) and fibronectin (FN) on cell adhesion, cell elasticity and cytoskeletal organization of prostate cancer cells. Two cell lines, bone marrow- (PC3) and lymph node-derived (LNCaP) were cultivated on COL1 and FN (control protein). By using a quantitative adhesion assay and time-lapse analysis, it was found that PC3, but not LNCaP, adhered strongly and were more spread on COL1. Next, PC3 and LNCaP were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and flatness shape factor and cellular Young's modulus were calculated. The shape analysis revealed that PC3 were significantly flatter when grown on COL1 in comparison to LNCaP. In general, PC3 were also significantly stiffer than LNCaP and furthermore, their stiffness increased upon interaction with COL1. Since cell stiffness is strongly dependent on actin organization, phalloidin-based actin staining was performed and revealed that, of the two cell types as well as the two different matrix proteins, only PC3 grown on COL1 formed robust actin cytoskeleton. In conclusion, our study showed that PC3 cells have a strong affinity towards COL1. On this matrix protein, the cells adhered strongly and underwent a specific cell flattening. Moreover, with the establishment of PC3 contact to COL1 a significant increase of PC3 stiffness was observed due to a profound cytoskeletal rearrangement. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton via transcriptional regulation of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes by myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs/MAL/MKLs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Tsuyoshi; Mayanagi, Taira; Sobue, Kenji

    2007-01-01

    RhoA is a crucial regulator of stress fiber and focal adhesion formation through the activation of actin nucleation and polymerization. It also regulates the nuclear translocation of myocardin-related transcription factor-A and -B (MRTF-A/B, MAL or MKL 1/2), which are co-activators of serum response factor (SRF). In dominant-negative MRTF-A (DN-MRTF-A)-expressing NIH 3T3 cell lines, the expressions of several cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes were down-regulated, and the formation of stress fiber and focal adhesion was severely diminished. MRTF-A/B-knockdown cells also exhibited such cytoskeletal defects. In reporter assays, both RhoA and MRTF-A enhanced promoter activities of these genes in a CArG-box-dependent manner, and DN-MRTF-A inhibited the RhoA-mediated activation of these promoters. In dominant-negative RhoA (RhoA-N19)-expressing NIH 3T3 cell lines, the nuclear translocation of MRTF-A/B was predominantly prevented, resulting in the reduced expression of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion proteins. Further, constitutive-active MRTF-A/B increased the expression of endogenous cytoskeletal/focal adhesion proteins, and thereby rescued the defective phenotype of stress fibers and focal adhesions in RhoA-N19 expressing cells. These results indicate that MRTF-A/B act as pivotal mediators of stress fiber and focal adhesion formation via the transcriptional regulation of a subset of cytoskeletal/focal adhesion genes

  6. A non-invasive immobilization system and related quality assurance for dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy of intracranial and head and neck disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai Jensan; Engler, Mark J.; Ling, Marilyn N.; Wu, Julian K.; Kramer, Bradley; Dipetrillo, Thomas; Wazer, David E.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and implement a non-invasive immobilization system guided by a dedicated quality assurance (QA) program for dynamic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) of intracranial and head and neck disease, with IMRT delivered using the NOMOS Corporation's Peacock System and MIMiC collimator. Methods and Materials: Thermoplastic face masks are combined with cradle-shaped polyurethane foaming agents and a dedicated quality assurance program to create a customized headholder system (CHS). Plastic shrinkage was studied to understand its effect on immobilization. Fiducial points for computerized tomography (CT) are obtained by placing multiple dabs of barium paste on mask surfaces at intersections of laser projections used for patient positioning. Fiducial lines are drawn on the cradle along laser projections aligned with nasal surfaces. Lateral CT topograms are annotated with a crosshair indicating the origin of the treatment planning and delivery coordinate system, and with lines delineating the projections of superior-inferior field borders of the linear accelerator's secondary collimators, or with those of the fully open MIMiC. Port films exposed with and without the MIMiC are compared to annotated topograms to measure positional variance (PV) in superior-inferior (SI), right-left (RL), and anterior posterior (AP) directions. MIMiC vane patterns superposed on port films are applied to verify planned patterns. A 12-patient study of PV was performed by analyzing positions of 10 anatomic points on repeat CT topograms, plotting histograms of PV, and determining average PV. Results and Discussion: A 1.5 ± 0.3 mm SD shrinkage per 70 cm of thermoplastic was observed over 24 h. Average PV of 1.0 ± 0.8, 1.2 ± 1.1, and 1.3 ± 0.8 mm were measured in SI, AP, and RL directions, respectively. Lateral port films exposed with and without the MIMiC showed PV of 0.2 ± 1.3 and 0.8 ± 2.2 mm in AP and SI directions. Vane patterns superimposed on port films

  7. Heat transfer study on open heat exchangers used in jaggery production modules – Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation and field data assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Madrid, Raul; Marcelo, Daniel; Orbegoso, Elder Mendoza; Saavedra, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Heat transfer modeling and simulation between flue gases and sugar cane juice. • Use of Computational Fluid Dynamics to get thermal parameters of a jaggery furnace. • Data acquisition system installed in the jaggery production module. • Parametric analysis changing the flue-gases velocity to represent temperature drops. - Abstract: Jaggery (also called organic sugar) is a concentrated product of sugarcane juice that is produced in rural communities in the highlands and jungle of Peru. In the last few years there has been an increase in the exports of jaggery and higher volumes of production are required driving this activity from a rural process with small production to an industry seeking greater productivity. In this framework, optimization of the use of energy becomes essential for the proper development of the process of production and the correct performance of the involved equipment. Open heat exchangers made of stainless steel are used in the production of jaggery. These heat exchangers containing sugarcane juice are placed over a flue gas duct. The thermal energy contained in the gas is used to evaporate the water contained in the sugarcane juice thickening the juice and after evaporating almost all the water, a pasty crystalline yellow substance is left in the boiling pan which becomes solid after cooling, this is the jaggery. The modeling and simulation of heat transfer between the combustion gases and the juice is very important in order to improve the thermal efficiency of the process. It permits to know with a high level of detail the physical phenomena of heat transfer occurring from bagasse combustion flue gases to sugarcane juice. This paper presents the results of the numerical simulation of heat transfer phenomena in the open heat exchangers and those results are compared to field measured data. Numerical results about temperature drop of flue gases in the several locations of the jaggery furnace are in good accordance with

  8. TH-C-12A-09: Planning and Delivery of the Fully Dynamic Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Application to Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, J; Atwood, T; Fahimian, B; Chin, E; Hristov, D; Otto, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: A novel trajectory modulated arc therapy (TMAT) system was developed that uses source motion trajectory involving synchronized gantry rotation with translational and rotational couch movement. MLC motion and dose rate were fully optimized for dynamic beam delivery. This work presents a platform for planning deliverable TMAT on a collision free coronal trajectory and evaluates its benefit for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a prone position. Methods: The TMAT algorithm was built on VMAT with modifications (physical properties on couch movement were defined) and enhancements (pencil beam dose calculation engine to support extended SSDs) to make it feasible for TMAT delivery. A Matlab software environment for TMAT optimization and dose calculation was created to allow any user specified motion axis. TMAT delivery was implemented on Varian TrueBeamTM STx via XML scripts. 10 prone breast irradiation cases were evaluated in VMAT and compared with a 6- field non-coplanar IMRT plan. Patient selection/exclusion criteria and structure contouring followed the guidelines of NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol. Results: TMAT delivery time was ∼4.5 minutes. 251.5°±7.88° of non-isocentric couch arc was achieved by the optimized trajectory with 180– 210 control points at 1°–2° couch increments. The improved dose distribution by TMAT was most clearly observed by the marked reduction in the volume of irradiated normal breast tissue in the high dose region. The ratios of the normal breast tissue volume receiving more than 50%, 80% and 100% of the prescription dose for TMAT versus IMRT were: V50%(TMAT/IMRT) = 78.38%±13.03%, V80%(TMAT/IMRT) = 44.19%±9.04% and V100% (TMAT/IMRT) = 9.96%±7.55%, all p≤0.01. Conclusion: The study is the first demonstration of planning and delivery implementation of a fully dynamic APBI TMAT system with continuous couch motion. TMAT achieved significantly improved dosimetry over noncoplanar IMRT on dose volume parameters

  9. TH-C-12A-09: Planning and Delivery of the Fully Dynamic Trajectory Modulated Arc Therapy: Application to Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, J; Atwood, T; Fahimian, B; Chin, E; Hristov, D [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, CA (United States); Otto, K [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, BC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: A novel trajectory modulated arc therapy (TMAT) system was developed that uses source motion trajectory involving synchronized gantry rotation with translational and rotational couch movement. MLC motion and dose rate were fully optimized for dynamic beam delivery. This work presents a platform for planning deliverable TMAT on a collision free coronal trajectory and evaluates its benefit for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in a prone position. Methods: The TMAT algorithm was built on VMAT with modifications (physical properties on couch movement were defined) and enhancements (pencil beam dose calculation engine to support extended SSDs) to make it feasible for TMAT delivery. A Matlab software environment for TMAT optimization and dose calculation was created to allow any user specified motion axis. TMAT delivery was implemented on Varian TrueBeamTM STx via XML scripts. 10 prone breast irradiation cases were evaluated in VMAT and compared with a 6- field non-coplanar IMRT plan. Patient selection/exclusion criteria and structure contouring followed the guidelines of NSABP B-39/RTOG 0413 protocol. Results: TMAT delivery time was ∼4.5 minutes. 251.5°±7.88° of non-isocentric couch arc was achieved by the optimized trajectory with 180– 210 control points at 1°–2° couch increments. The improved dose distribution by TMAT was most clearly observed by the marked reduction in the volume of irradiated normal breast tissue in the high dose region. The ratios of the normal breast tissue volume receiving more than 50%, 80% and 100% of the prescription dose for TMAT versus IMRT were: V50%(TMAT/IMRT) = 78.38%±13.03%, V80%(TMAT/IMRT) = 44.19%±9.04% and V100% (TMAT/IMRT) = 9.96%±7.55%, all p≤0.01. Conclusion: The study is the first demonstration of planning and delivery implementation of a fully dynamic APBI TMAT system with continuous couch motion. TMAT achieved significantly improved dosimetry over noncoplanar IMRT on dose volume parameters

  10. The calcium-modulated proteins, S100A1 and S100B, as potential regulators of the dynamics of type III intermediate filaments

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    M. Garbuglia

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ca2+-modulated, dimeric proteins of the EF-hand (helix-loop-helix type, S100A1 and S100B, that have been shown to inhibit microtubule (MT protein assembly and to promote MT disassembly, interact with the type III intermediate filament (IF subunits, desmin and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, with a stoichiometry of 2 mol of IF subunit/mol of S100A1 or S100B dimer and an affinity of 0.5-1.0 µM in the presence of a few micromolar concentrations of Ca2+. Binding of S100A1 and S100B results in inhibition of desmin and GFAP assemblies into IFs and stimulation of the disassembly of preformed desmin and GFAP IFs. S100A1 and S100B interact with a stretch of residues in the N-terminal (head domain of desmin and GFAP, thereby blocking the head-to-tail process of IF elongation. The C-terminal extension of S100A1 (and, likely, S100B represents a critical part of the site that recognizes desmin and GFAP. S100B is localized to IFs within cells, suggesting that it might have a role in remodeling IFs upon elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration by avoiding excess IF assembly and/or promoting IF disassembly in vivo. S100A1, that is not localized to IFs, might also play a role in the regulation of IF dynamics by binding to and sequestering unassembled IF subunits. Together, these observations suggest that S100A1 and S100B may be regarded as Ca2+-dependent regulators of the state of assembly of two important elements of the cytoskeleton, IFs and MTs, and, potentially, of MT- and IF-based activities.

  11. The expression of VE-cadherin in breast cancer cells modulates cell dynamics as a function of tumor differentiation and promotes tumor-endothelial cell interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Maryam; Cao, Jiahui; Friedrich, Katrin; Kemper, Björn; Brendel, Oliver; Grosser, Marianne; Adrian, Manuela; Baretton, Gustavo; Breier, Georg; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim

    2018-01-01

    The cadherin switch has profound consequences on cancer invasion and metastasis. The endothelial-specific vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin) has been demonstrated in diverse cancer types including breast cancer and is supposed to modulate tumor progression and metastasis, but underlying mechanisms need to be better understood. First, we evaluated VE-cadherin expression by tissue microarray in 392 cases of breast cancer tumors and found a diverse expression and distribution of VE-cadherin. Experimental expression of fluorescence-tagged VE-cadherin (VE-EGFP) in undifferentiated, fibroblastoid and E-cadherin-negative MDA-231 (MDA-VE-EGFP) as well as in differentiated E-cadherin-positive MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines (MCF-VE-EGFP), respectively, displayed differentiation-dependent functional differences. VE-EGFP expression reversed the fibroblastoid MDA-231 cells to an epithelial-like phenotype accompanied by increased β-catenin expression, actin and vimentin remodeling, increased cell spreading and barrier function and a reduced migration ability due to formation of VE-cadherin-mediated cell junctions. The effects were largely absent in both MDA-VE-EGFP and in control MCF-EGFP cell lines. However, MCF-7 cells displayed a VE-cadherin-independent planar cell polarity and directed cell migration that both developed in MDA-231 only after VE-EGFP expression. Furthermore, VE-cadherin expression had no effect on tumor cell proliferation in monocultures while co-culturing with endothelial cells enhanced tumor cell proliferation due to integration of the tumor cells into monolayer where they form VE-cadherin-mediated cell contacts with the endothelium. We propose an interactive VE-cadherin-based crosstalk that might activate proliferation-promoting signals. Together, our study shows a VE-cadherin-mediated cell dynamics and an endothelial-dependent proliferation in a differentiation-dependent manner.

  12. Dynamic in vivo binding of transcription factors to cis-regulatory modules of cer and gsc in the stepwise formation of the Spemann–Mangold organizer

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    Sudou, Norihiro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Ogino, Hajime; Taira, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    How multiple developmental cues are integrated on cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) for cell fate decisions remains uncertain. The Spemann–Mangold organizer in Xenopus embryos expresses the transcription factors Lim1/Lhx1, Otx2, Mix1, Siamois (Sia) and VegT. Reporter analyses using sperm nuclear transplantation and DNA injection showed that cerberus (cer) and goosecoid (gsc) are activated by the aforementioned transcription factors through CRMs conserved between X. laevis and X. tropicalis. ChIP-qPCR analysis for the five transcription factors revealed that cer and gsc CRMs are initially bound by both Sia and VegT at the late blastula stage, and subsequently bound by all five factors at the gastrula stage. At the neurula stage, only binding of Lim1 and Otx2 to the gsc CRM, among others, persists, which corresponds to their co-expression in the prechordal plate. Based on these data, together with detailed expression pattern analysis, we propose a new model of stepwise formation of the organizer, in which (1) maternal VegT and Wnt-induced Sia first bind to CRMs at the blastula stage; then (2) Nodal-inducible Lim1, Otx2, Mix1 and zygotic VegT are bound to CRMs in the dorsal endodermal and mesodermal regions where all these genes are co-expressed; and (3) these two regions are combined at the gastrula stage to form the organizer. Thus, the in vivo dynamics of multiple transcription factors highlight their roles in the initiation and maintenance of gene expression, and also reveal the stepwise integration of maternal, Nodal and Wnt signaling on CRMs of organizer genes to generate the organizer. PMID:22492356

  13. Dynamic in vivo binding of transcription factors to cis-regulatory modules of cer and gsc in the stepwise formation of the Spemann-Mangold organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudou, Norihiro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Ogino, Hajime; Taira, Masanori

    2012-05-01

    How multiple developmental cues are integrated on cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) for cell fate decisions remains uncertain. The Spemann-Mangold organizer in Xenopus embryos expresses the transcription factors Lim1/Lhx1, Otx2, Mix1, Siamois (Sia) and VegT. Reporter analyses using sperm nuclear transplantation and DNA injection showed that cerberus (cer) and goosecoid (gsc) are activated by the aforementioned transcription factors through CRMs conserved between X. laevis and X. tropicalis. ChIP-qPCR analysis for the five transcription factors revealed that cer and gsc CRMs are initially bound by both Sia and VegT at the late blastula stage, and subsequently bound by all five factors at the gastrula stage. At the neurula stage, only binding of Lim1 and Otx2 to the gsc CRM, among others, persists, which corresponds to their co-expression in the prechordal plate. Based on these data, together with detailed expression pattern analysis, we propose a new model of stepwise formation of the organizer, in which (1) maternal VegT and Wnt-induced Sia first bind to CRMs at the blastula stage; then (2) Nodal-inducible Lim1, Otx2, Mix1 and zygotic VegT are bound to CRMs in the dorsal endodermal and mesodermal regions where all these genes are co-expressed; and (3) these two regions are combined at the gastrula stage to form the organizer. Thus, the in vivo dynamics of multiple transcription factors highlight their roles in the initiation and maintenance of gene expression, and also reveal the stepwise integration of maternal, Nodal and Wnt signaling on CRMs of organizer genes to generate the organizer.

  14. Comparative dosimetric study of three-dimensional conformal, dynamic conformal arc, and intensity-modulated radiotherapy for brain tumor treatment using Novalis system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Meisong; Newman, Francis M.S.; Kavanagh, Brian D.; Stuhr, Kelly M.S.; Johnson, Tim K.; Gaspar, Laurie E.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric differences among three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for brain tumor treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients treated with Novalis were selected. We performed 3D-CRT, DCAT, and IMRT plans for all patients. The margin for the planning target volume (PTV) was 1 mm, and the specific prescription dose was 90% for all plans. The target coverage at the prescription dose, conformity index (CI), and heterogeneity index were analyzed for all plans. Results: For small tumors (PTV ≤2 cm 3 ), the three dosimetric parameters had approximate values for both 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. The CI for the IMRT plans was high. For medium tumors (PTV >2 to ≤100 cm 3 ), the three plans were competitive with each other. The IMRT plans had a greater CI, better target coverage at the prescription dose, and a better heterogeneity index. For large tumors (PTV >100 cm 3 ), the IMRT plan had good target coverage at the prescription dose and heterogeneity index and approximate CI values as those in the 3D-CRT and DCAT plans. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that DCAT is suitable for most cases in the treatment of brain tumors. For a small target, 3D-CRT is useful, and IMRT is not recommended. For larger tumors, IMRT is superior to 3D-CRT and very competitive in sparing critical structures, especially for big tumors

  15. The ADF/Cofilin-Pathway and Actin Dynamics in Podocyte Injury

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    Beina Teng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ADF/cofilins are the major regulators of actin dynamics in mammalian cells. The activation of ADF/cofilins is controlled by a variety of regulatory mechanisms. Dysregulation of ADF/cofilin may result in loss of a precisely organized actin cytoskeletal architecture and can reduce podocyte migration and motility. Recent studies suggest that cofilin-1 can be regulated through several extracellular signals and slit diaphragm proteins. Cofilin knockdown and knockout animal models show dysfunction of glomerular barrier and filtration with foot process effacement and loss of secondary foot processes. This indicates that cofilin-1 is necessary for modulating actin dynamics in podocytes. Podocyte alterations in actin architecture may initiate or aid the progression of a large variety of glomerular diseases, and cofilin activity is required for reorganization of an intact filtration barrier. Since almost all proteinuric diseases result from a similar phenotype with effacement of the foot processes, we propose that cofilin-1 is at the centre stage of the development of proteinuria and thus may be an attractive drug target for antiproteinuric treatment strategies.

  16. RIT1 controls actin dynamics via complex formation with RAC1/CDC42 and PAK1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer Zum Büschenfelde, Uta; Brandenstein, Laura Isabel; von Elsner, Leonie; Flato, Kristina; Holling, Tess; Zenker, Martin; Rosenberger, Georg; Kutsche, Kerstin

    2018-05-01

    RIT1 belongs to the RAS family of small GTPases. Germline and somatic RIT1 mutations have been identified in Noonan syndrome (NS) and cancer, respectively. By using heterologous expression systems and purified recombinant proteins, we identified the p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) as novel direct effector of RIT1. We found RIT1 also to directly interact with the RHO GTPases CDC42 and RAC1, both of which are crucial regulators of actin dynamics upstream of PAK1. These interactions are independent of the guanine nucleotide bound to RIT1. Disease-causing RIT1 mutations enhance protein-protein interaction between RIT1 and PAK1, CDC42 or RAC1 and uncouple complex formation from serum and growth factors. We show that the RIT1-PAK1 complex regulates cytoskeletal rearrangements as expression of wild-type RIT1 and its mutant forms resulted in dissolution of stress fibers and reduction of mature paxillin-containing focal adhesions in COS7 cells. This effect was prevented by co-expression of RIT1 with dominant-negative CDC42 or RAC1 and kinase-dead PAK1. By using a transwell migration assay, we show that RIT1 wildtype and the disease-associated variants enhance cell motility. Our work demonstrates a new function for RIT1 in controlling actin dynamics via acting in a signaling module containing PAK1 and RAC1/CDC42, and highlights defects in cell adhesion and migration as possible disease mechanism underlying NS.

  17. Mena associates with Rac1 and modulates connexin 43 remodeling in cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Rashmi; Wescott, Andrew P; Varandas, Katherine; Dirksen, Robert T; Blaxall, Burns C

    2014-01-01

    Mena, a member of the Ena/VASP family of actin regulatory proteins, modulates microfilaments and interacts with cytoskeletal proteins associated with heart failure. Mena is localized at the intercalated disc (ICD) of adult cardiac myocytes, colocalizing with numerous cytoskeletal proteins. Mena's role in the maintainence of mechanical myocardial stability at the cardiomyocyte ICD remains unknown. We hypothesized that Mena may modulate signals from the sarcolemma to the actin cytoskeleton at the ICD to regulate the expression and localization of connexin 43 (Cx43). The small GTPase Rac1 plays a pivotal role in the regulation of actin cytoskeletal reorganization and mediating morphological and transcriptional changes in cardiomyocytes. We found that Mena is associated with active Rac1 in cardiomyocytes and that RNAi knockdown of Mena increased Rac1 activity significantly. Furthermore, Mena knockdown increased Cx43 expression and altered Cx43 localization and trafficking at the ICD, concomitant with faster intercellular communication, as assessed by dye transfer between cardiomyocyte pairs. In mice overexpressing constitutively active Rac1, left ventricular Mena expression was increased significantly, concomitant with lateral redistribution of Cx43. These results suggest that Mena is a critical regulator of the ICD and is required for normal localization of Cx43 in part via regulation of Rac1.

  18. Effect of collagen I and fibronectin on the adhesion, elasticity and cytoskeletal organization of prostate cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Docheva, Denitsa [Experimental Surgery and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU), Nussbaumstr. 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Padula, Daniela [Experimental Surgery and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU), Nussbaumstr. 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Department of Precision- and Micro-Engineering, Engineering Physics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstr. 34, 80335 Munich (Germany); Center for NanoScience (CeNS), Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 Munich (Germany); Schieker, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.schieker@med.uni-muenchen.de [Experimental Surgery and Regenerative Medicine, Department of Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University (LMU), Nussbaumstr. 20, 80336 Munich (Germany); Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke, E-mail: clausen-schaumann@hm.edu [Department of Precision- and Micro-Engineering, Engineering Physics, Munich University of Applied Sciences, Lothstr. 34, 80335 Munich (Germany); Center for NanoScience (CeNS), Geschwister-Scholl-Platz 1, 80539 Munich (Germany)

    2010-11-12

    Research highlights: {yields} Depending on the metastatic origin, prostate cancer cells differ in their affinity to COL1. {yields} COL1 affects specifically the F-actin and cell elasticity of bone-derived prostate cancer cells. {yields} Cell elasticity can be used as a biomarker for cancer cells from different metastases. -- Abstract: Despite of intensive research efforts, the precise mechanism of prostate cancer metastasis in bone is still not fully understood. Several studies have suggested that specific matrix production by the bone cells, such as collagen I, supports cancer cell invasion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of collagen I (COL1) and fibronectin (FN) on cell adhesion, cell elasticity and cytoskeletal organization of prostate cancer cells. Two cell lines, bone marrow- (PC3) and lymph node-derived (LNCaP) were cultivated on COL1 and FN (control protein). By using a quantitative adhesion assay and time-lapse analysis, it was found that PC3, but not LNCaP, adhered strongly and were more spread on COL1. Next, PC3 and LNCaP were evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and flatness shape factor and cellular Young's modulus were calculated. The shape analysis revealed that PC3 were significantly flatter when grown on COL1 in comparison to LNCaP. In general, PC3 were also significantly stiffer than LNCaP and furthermore, their stiffness increased upon interaction with COL1. Since cell stiffness is strongly dependent on actin organization, phalloidin-based actin staining was performed and revealed that, of the two cell types as well as the two different matrix proteins, only PC3 grown on COL1 formed robust actin cytoskeleton. In conclusion, our study showed that PC3 cells have a strong affinity towards COL1. On this matrix protein, the cells adhered strongly and underwent a specific cell flattening. Moreover, with the establishment of PC3 contact to COL1 a significant increase of PC3 stiffness was observed due to a profound

  19. Identification of mechanosensitive genes during skeletal development: alteration of genes associated with cytoskeletal rearrangement and cell signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Rebecca A; Nowlan, Niamh C; Kenny, Elaine M; Cormican, Paul; Morris, Derek W; Prendergast, Patrick J; Kelly, Daniel; Murphy, Paula

    2014-01-20

    Mechanical stimulation is necessary for regulating correct formation of the skeleton. Here we test the hypothesis that mechanical stimulation of the embryonic skeletal system impacts expression levels of genes implicated in developmentally important signalling pathways in a genome wide approach. We use a mutant mouse model with altered mechanical stimulation due to the absence of limb skeletal muscle (Splotch-delayed) where muscle-less embryos show specific defects in skeletal elements including delayed ossification, changes in the size and shape of cartilage rudiments and joint fusion. We used Microarray and RNA sequencing analysis tools to identify differentially expressed genes between muscle-less and control embryonic (TS23) humerus tissue. We found that 680 independent genes were down-regulated and 452 genes up-regulated in humeri from muscle-less Spd embryos compared to littermate controls (at least 2-fold; corrected p-value ≤0.05). We analysed the resulting differentially expressed gene sets using Gene Ontology annotations to identify significant enrichment of genes associated with particular biological processes, showing that removal of mechanical stimuli from muscle contractions affected genes associated with development and differentiation, cytoskeletal architecture and cell signalling. Among cell signalling pathways, the most strongly disturbed was Wnt signalling, with 34 genes including 19 pathway target genes affected. Spatial gene expression analysis showed that both a Wnt ligand encoding gene (Wnt4) and a pathway antagonist (Sfrp2) are up-regulated specifically in the developing joint line, while the expression of a Wnt target gene, Cd44, is no longer detectable in muscle-less embryos. The identification of 84 genes associated with the cytoskeleton that are down-regulated in the absence of muscle indicates a number of candidate genes that are both mechanoresponsive and potentially involved in mechanotransduction, converting a mechanical stimulus

  20. A novel Toxoplasma gondii nuclear factor TgNF3 is a dynamic chromatin-associated component, modulator of nucleolar architecture and parasite virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Olguin-Lamas

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In Toxoplasma gondii, cis-acting elements present in promoter sequences of genes that are stage-specifically regulated have been described. However, the nuclear factors that bind to these cis-acting elements and regulate promoter activities have not been identified. In the present study, we performed affinity purification, followed by proteomic analysis, to identify nuclear factors that bind to a stage-specific promoter in T. gondii. This led to the identification of several nuclear factors in T. gondii including a novel factor, designated herein as TgNF3. The N-terminal domain of TgNF3 shares similarities with the N-terminus of yeast nuclear FK506-binding protein (FKBP, known as a histone chaperone regulating gene silencing. Using anti-TgNF3 antibodies, HA-FLAG and YFP-tagged TgNF3, we show that TgNF3 is predominantly a parasite nucleolar, chromatin-associated protein that binds specifically to T. gondii gene promoters in vivo. Genome-wide analysis using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identified promoter occupancies by TgNF3. In addition, TgNF3 has a direct role in transcriptional control of genes involved in parasite metabolism, transcription and translation. The ectopic expression of TgNF3 in the tachyzoites revealed dynamic changes in the size of the nucleolus, leading to a severe attenuation of virulence in vivo. We demonstrate that TgNF3 physically interacts with H3, H4 and H2A/H2B assembled into bona fide core and nucleosome-associated histones. Furthermore, TgNF3 interacts specifically to histones in the context of stage-specific gene silencing of a promoter that lacks active epigenetic acetylated histone marks. In contrast to virulent tachyzoites, which express the majority of TgNF3 in the nucleolus, the protein is exclusively located in the cytoplasm of the avirulent bradyzoites. We propose a model where TgNF3 acts essentially to coordinate nucleolus and nuclear functions by modulating

  1. Antinuclear, Cytoskeletal, Antineuronal Antibodies in the Serum Samples of Children with Tic Disorders and Obsessive Compulsive Disorders

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    Işık Görker

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available streptococcus infections in the development of tic and obsessive compulsive disorders (OCD is controversial. The autoimmune hypothesis states that during infection, formation of autoantibodies leads to an autoimmune disorder, which in turn results in movement disorders, tic disorders and/or OCD. In order to test this hypothesis, we assayed these antibodies in children and adolescents diagnosed with tic disorders and/or OCD.Material and Methods: Children and adolescents who were diagnosed with either tic disorders or OCD according to DSM-IV criteria (n=28, were compared with healthy controls (n=15 having similar age and gender characteristics. Regardless of a streptococcus infection history, serum samples of all patients and controls underwent antinuclear, cytoskeletal, and antineuronal antibody assay using indirect immunofluorescence.Results: The rates of antinuclear antibody positivity were 21% and 20% in the patient and control groups respectively (p>0.05. Antineuronal antibody was positive in 2 (7% of 28 patients versus in 1 (6% of 15 controls (p>0.05.Conclusion: These results suggest that such antibodies may not be involved in the pathogenesis of tic disorders/OCD.

  2. The cytoskeletal binding domain of band 3 is required for multiprotein complex formation and retention during erythropoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchwell, Timothy J; Hawley, Bethan R; Bell, Amanda J; Ribeiro, M. Leticia; Toye, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    Band 3 is the most abundant protein in the erythrocyte membrane and forms the core of a major multiprotein complex. The absence of band 3 in human erythrocytes has only been reported once, in the homozygous band 3 Coimbra patient. We used in vitro culture of erythroblasts derived from this patient, and separately short hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of band 3, to investigate the development of a band 3-deficient erythrocyte membrane and to specifically assess the stability and retention of band 3 dependent proteins in the absence of this core protein during terminal erythroid differentiation. Further, using lentiviral transduction of N-terminally green fluorescent protein-tagged band 3, we demonstrated the ability to restore expression of band 3 to normal levels and to rescue secondary deficiencies of key proteins including glycophorin A, protein 4.2, CD47 and Rh proteins arising from the absence of band 3 in this patient. By transducing band 3-deficient erythroblasts from this patient with band 3 mutants with absent or impaired ability to associate with the cytoskeleton we also demonstrated the importance of cytoskeletal connectivity for retention both of band 3 and of its associated dependent proteins within the reticulocyte membrane during the process of erythroblast enucleation. PMID:25344524

  3. Beta-actin deficiency with oxidative posttranslational modifications in Rett syndrome erythrocytes: insights into an altered cytoskeletal organization.

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    Alessio Cortelazzo

    Full Text Available Beta-actin, a critical player in cellular functions ranging from cell motility and the maintenance of cell shape to transcription regulation, was evaluated in the erythrocyte membranes from patients with typical Rett syndrome (RTT and methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MECP2 gene mutations. RTT, affecting almost exclusively females with an average frequency of 1∶10,000 female live births, is considered the second commonest cause of severe cognitive impairment in the female gender. Evaluation of beta-actin was carried out in a comparative cohort study on red blood cells (RBCs, drawn from healthy control subjects and RTT patients using mass spectrometry-based quantitative analysis. We observed a decreased expression of the beta-actin isoforms (relative fold changes for spots 1, 2 and 3: -1.82±0.15, -2.15±0.06, and -2.59±0.48, respectively in pathological RBCs. The results were validated by western blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, beta-actin from RTT patients also showed a dramatic increase in oxidative posttranslational modifications (PTMs as the result of its binding with the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE. Our findings demonstrate, for the first time, a beta-actin down-regulation and oxidative PTMs for RBCs of RTT patients, thus indicating an altered cytoskeletal organization.

  4. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

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    Amol Bhargava

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1, suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  5. MARCKS-related protein regulates cytoskeletal organization at cell-cell and cell-substrate contacts in epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Itallie, Christina M; Tietgens, Amber Jean; Aponte, Angel; Gucek, Marjan; Cartagena-Rivera, Alexander X; Chadwick, Richard S; Anderson, James M

    2018-02-02

    Treatment of epithelial cells with interferon-γ and TNF-α (IFN/TNF) results in increased paracellular permeability. To identify relevant proteins mediating barrier disruption, we performed proximity-dependent biotinylation (BioID) of occludin and found that tagging of MARCKS-related protein (MRP; also known as MARCKSL1) increased ∼20-fold following IFN/TNF administration. GFP-MRP was focused at the lateral cell membrane and its overexpression potentiated the physiological response of the tight junction barrier to cytokines. However, deletion of MRP did not abrogate the cytokine responses, suggesting that MRP is not required in the occludin-dependent IFN/TNF response. Instead, our results reveal a key role for MRP in epithelial cells in control of multiple actin-based structures, likely by regulation of integrin signaling. Changes in focal adhesion organization and basal actin stress fibers in MRP-knockout (KO) cells were reminiscent of those seen in FAK-KO cells. In addition, we found alterations in cell-cell interactions in MRP-KO cells associated with increased junctional tension, suggesting that MRP may play a role in focal adhesion-adherens junction cross talk. Together, our results are consistent with a key role for MRP in cytoskeletal organization of cell contacts in epithelial cells. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Dual inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 perturbs cytoskeletal organization and impairs endothelial cell elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji-Tamura, Kiyomi; Ogawa, Minetaro

    2018-02-26

    Elongation of endothelial cells is an important process in vascular formation and is expected to be a therapeutic target for inhibiting tumor angiogenesis. We have previously demonstrated that inhibition of mTORC1 and mTORC2 impaired endothelial cell elongation, although the mechanism has not been well defined. In this study, we analyzed the effects of the mTORC1-specific inhibitor everolimus and the mTORC1/mTORC2 dual inhibitor KU0063794 on the cytoskeletal organization and morphology of endothelial cell lines. While both inhibitors equally inhibited cell proliferation, KU0063794 specifically caused abnormal accumulation of F-actin and disordered distribution of microtubules, thereby markedly impairing endothelial cell elongation and tube formation. The effects of KU0063794 were phenocopied by paclitaxel treatment, suggesting that KU0063794 might impair endothelial cell morphology through over-stabilization of microtubules. Although mTORC1 is a key signaling molecule in cell proliferation and has been considered a target for preventing angiogenesis, mTORC1 inhibitors have not been sufficient to suppress angiogenesis. Our results suggest that mTORC1/mTORC2 dual inhibition is more effective for anti-angiogenic therapy, as it impairs not only endothelial cell proliferation, but also endothelial cell elongation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects Of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements (γ- and β-actin and α-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either α-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide revealed that cycloheximide repressed accumulation of α-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or γ rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure. (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of MRNA for actin genes; and that cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to γ rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of α-tubulin and fibronectin MRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. in addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons

  8. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Felcher, P.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of radiation dose-rate and of the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide on expression of cytoskeletal elements (γ- and β-actin and α-tubulin) and matrix elements (fibronectin) in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Past work from our laboratory had already demonstrated optimum time points and doses for examination of radiation effects on accumulation of specific transcripts. Our results here demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for JANUS fission spectrum neutrons when comparing expression of either α-tubulin or fibronectin genes. Past work had already documented similar results for expression of actin transcripts. Effects of cycloheximide, however, revealed several interesting and novel findings: (1) Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of α-tubulin following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or γ rays; this did not occur following similar low dose-rate exposure (2) Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of mRNA for actin genes. Cycloheximide abrogated the moderate induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to γ rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of α-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to ionizing radiation. In addition, they suggest that the cellular/molecular response to low dose-rate neutrons may be different from the response to high dose-rate neutrons

  9. A novel research approach on the dynamic properties of photogenerated charge carriers at Ag{sub 2}S quantum-dots-sensitized TiO{sub 2} films by a frequency-modulated surface photovoltage technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Wei [Liaoning Key Laboratory for Green Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry of Advanced Materials, College of Chemistry, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Xie, Tengfeng; Wang, Dejun [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Song, Xi-Ming, E-mail: songlab@lnu.edu.cn [Liaoning Key Laboratory for Green Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry of Advanced Materials, College of Chemistry, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: The changed SPV with chopping frequencies indicate the separation speeds of photogenerated charge carriers in different films. - Highlights: • Ag{sub 2}S-sensitized TiO{sub 2} films show good photoelectric responses in visible-light region. • Frequency-modulated SPV give dynamic information and evidence of Ag{sub 2}S QDSSCs’ performance. • Frequency-modulated SPV can supply complementary information in the study of Ag{sub 2}S ODSSCs. - Abstract: Ag{sub 2}S quantum-dots-sensitized TiO{sub 2} films with different amount of Ag{sub 2}S were fabricated by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The separation and transport of photogenerated charge carriers at different spectral regions were studied by the frequency-modulated surface photovoltage technology. Some novel dynamic information of photogenerated charge carriers in a wide spectral range is found. The results indicate that the rate and direction of separation (diffusion) for photogenerated charge carriers are closely related to the performance of quantum-dots-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) based on the Ag{sub 2}S/TiO{sub 2} nano-structure.

  10. TiO2 nanoparticles disrupt cell adhesion and the architecture of cytoskeletal networks of human osteoblast-like cells in a size dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed; Schoelermann, Julia; Mustafa, Kamal; Cimpan, Mihaela R

    2018-04-30

    Human exposure to titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO 2 ) is increasing. An internal source of nano-TiO 2 is represented by titanium-based orthopedic and dental implants can release nanoparticles (NPs) upon abrasion. Little is known about how the size of NPs influences their interaction with cytoskeletal protein networks and the functional/homeostatic consequences that might follow at the implant-bone interface with regard to osteoblasts. We investigated the effects of size of anatase nano-TiO 2 on SaOS-2 human osteoblast-like cells exposed to clinically relevant concentrations (0.05, 0.5, 5 mg/L) of 5 and 40 nm spherical nano-TiO 2 . Cell viability and proliferation, adhesion, spread and migration were assessed, as well as the orientation of actin and microtubule cytoskeletal networks. The phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK Y397 ) and the expression of vinculin in response to nano-TiO 2 were also assessed. Treatment with nano-TiO 2 disrupted the actin and microtubule cytoskeletal networks leading to morphological modifications of SaOS-2 cells. The phosphorylation of p-FAK Y397 and the expression of vinculin were also modified depending on the particle size, which affected cell adhesion. Consequently, the cell migration was significantly impaired in the 5 nm-exposed cells compared to unexposed cells. The present work shows that the orientation of cytoskeletal networks and the focal adhesion proteins and subsequently the adhesion, spread and migration of SaOS-2 cells were affected by the selected nano-TiO 2 in a size dependent manner. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. cAMP/PKA signalling reinforces the LATS–YAP pathway to fully suppress YAP in response to actin cytoskeletal changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minchul; Kim, Miju; Lee, Seunghee; Kuninaka, Shinji; Saya, Hideyuki; Lee, Ho; Lee, Sookyung; Lim, Dae-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Actin cytoskeletal damage induces inactivation of the oncoprotein YAP (Yes-associated protein). It is known that the serine/threonine kinase LATS (large tumour suppressor) inactivates YAP by phosphorylating its Ser127 and Ser381 residues. However, the events downstream of actin cytoskeletal changes that are involved in the regulation of the LATS–YAP pathway and the mechanism by which LATS differentially phosphorylates YAP on Ser127 and Ser381 in vivo have remained elusive. Here, we show that cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) phosphorylates LATS and thereby enhances its activity sufficiently to phosphorylate YAP on Ser381. We also found that PKA activity is involved in all contexts previously reported to trigger the LATS–YAP pathway, including actin cytoskeletal damage, G-protein-coupled receptor activation, and engagement of the Hippo pathway. Inhibition of PKA and overexpression of YAP cooperate to transform normal cells and amplify neural progenitor pools in developing chick embryos. We also implicate neurofibromin 2 as an AKAP (A-kinase-anchoring protein) scaffold protein that facilitates the function of the cAMP/PKA–LATS–YAP pathway. Our study thus incorporates PKA as novel component of the Hippo pathway. PMID:23644383

  12. Cytoskeletal proteins from human skin fibroblasts, peripheral blood leukocytes, and a lymphoblastoid cell line compared by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giometti, C.S.; Willard, K.E.; Anderson, N.L.

    1982-01-01

    Differences in proteins between cells grown as suspension cultures and those grown as attached cultures were studied by comparing the proteins of detergent-resistant cytoskeletons prepared from peripheral blood leukocytes and a lymphoblastoid cell line (GM607) (both grown as suspension cultures) and those of human skin fibroblasts (grown as attached cultures) by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The major cytoskeletal proteins of the leukocytes were also present in the protein pattern of GM607 cytoskeletons. In contrast, the fibroblast cytoskeletal protein pattern contained four groups of proteins that differed from the patterns of the leukocytes and GM607. In addition, surface labeling of GM607 and human fibroblasts with 125 I demonstrated that substantial amounts of vimentin and actin are exposed at the surface of the attached fibroblasts, but there is little evidence of similar exposure at the surface of the suspension-grown GM607. These results demonstrate some differences in cytoskeletal protein composition between different types of cells could be related to their ability or lack of ability to grow as attached cells in tissue culture

  13. Protein Kinase CK2 Regulates Cytoskeletal Reorganization during Ionizing Radiation-Induced Senescence of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daojing; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2009-08-21

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are critical for tissue regeneration. How hMSC respond to genotoxic stresses and potentially contribute to aging and cancer remain underexplored. We demonstrated that ionizing radiation induced cellular senescence of hMSC over a period of 10 days, showing a critical transition between day 3 and day 6. This was confirmed by senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, protein expression profiles of key cell cycle regulators (retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, p53, p21{sup waf1/Cip1}, and p16{sup INK4A}), and senescence-associated secretory phenotypes (SASPs) (IL-8, IL-12, GRO, and MDC). We observed dramatic cytoskeletal reorganization of hMSC through reduction of myosin-10, redistribution of myosin-9, and secretion of profilin-1. Using a SILAC-based phosphoproteomics method, we detected significant reduction of myosin-9 phosphorylation at Ser1943, coinciding with its redistribution. Importantly, through treatment with cell permeable inhibitors (4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzotriazole (TBB) and 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT)), and gene knockdown using RNA interference, we identified CK2, a kinase responsible for myosin-9 phosphorylation at Ser1943, as a key factor contributing to the radiation-induced senescence of hMSC. We showed that individual knockdown of CK2 catalytic subunits CK2{alpha} and CK2{alpha}{prime} induced hMSC senescence. However, only knockdown of CK2{alpha} resulted in morphological phenotypes resembling those of radiation-induced senescence. These results suggest that CK2{alpha} and CK2{alpha}{prime} play differential roles in hMSC senescence progression, and their relative expression might represent a novel regulatory mechanism for CK2 activity.

  14. Cytoskeletal role in the transition from compensated to decompensated hypertrophy during adult canine left ventricular pressure overloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, H.; Koide, M.; Sato, H.; Zile, M. R.; Carabello, B. A.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1998-01-01

    Increased microtubule density causes cardiocyte contractile dysfunction in right ventricular (RV) pressure-overload hypertrophy, and these linked phenotypic and contractile abnormalities persist and progress during the transition to failure. Although more severe in cells from failing than hypertrophied RVs, the mechanical defects are normalized in each case by microtubule depolymerization. To define the role of increased microtubule density in left ventricular (LV) pressure-overload hypertrophy and failure, in a given LV we examined ventricular mechanics, sarcomere mechanics, and free tubulin and microtubule levels in control dogs and in dogs with aortic stenosis both with LV hypertrophy alone and with initially compensated hypertrophy that had progressed to LV muscle failure. In comparing initial values with those at study 8 weeks later, dogs with hypertrophy alone had a very substantial increase in LV mass but preservation of a normal ejection fraction and mean systolic wall stress. Dogs with hypertrophy and associated failure had a substantial but lesser increase in LV mass and a reduction in ejection fraction, as well as a marked increase in mean systolic wall stress. Cardiocyte contractile function was equivalent, and unaffected by microtubule depolymerization, in cells from control LVs and those with compensated hypertrophy. In contrast, cardiocyte contractile function in cells from failing LVs was quite depressed but was normalized by microtubule depolymerization. Microtubules were increased only in failing LVs. These contractile and cytoskeletal changes, when assayed longitudinally in a given dog by biopsy, appeared in failing ventricles only when wall stress began to increase and function began to decrease. Thus, the microtubule-based cardiocyte contractile dysfunction characteristic of pressure-hypertrophied myocardium, originally described in the RV, obtains equally in the LV but is shown here to have a specific association with increased wall stress.

  15. Microcystin-LR induced reactive oxygen species mediate cytoskeletal disruption and apoptosis of hepatocytes in Cyprinus carpio L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlin Jiang

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are a group of cyclic hepatotoxic peptides produced by cyanobacteria. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR contains Leucine (L and Arginine (R in the variable positions, and is one of the most common and potently toxic peptides. MC-LR can inhibit protein phosphatase type 1 and type 2A (PP1 and PP2A activities and induce excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The underlying mechanism of the inhibition of PP1 and PP2A has been extensively studied. The over-production of ROS is considered to be another main mechanism behind MC-LR toxicity; however, the detailed toxicological mechanism involved in over-production of ROS in carp (Cyprinus carpio L. remains largely unclear. In our present study, the hydroxyl radical (•OH was significantly induced in the liver of carp after a relatively short-term exposure to MC-LR. The elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS production may play an important role in the disruption of microtubule structure. Pre-injection of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC provided significant protection to the cytoskeleton, however buthionine sulfoximine (BSO exacerbated cytoskeletal destruction. In addition, the elevated ROS formation induced the expression of apoptosis-related genes, including p38, JNKa, and bcl-2. A significant increase in apoptotic cells was observed at 12-48 hours. Our study further supports evidence that ROS are involved in MC-LR induced damage to liver cells in carp, and indicates the need for further study of the molecular mechanisms behind MC-LR toxicity.

  16. Microcystin-LR Induced Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Cytoskeletal Disruption and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes in Cyprinus carpio L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jinlin; Shan, Zhengjun; Xu, Weili; Wang, Xiaorong; Zhou, Junying; Kong, Deyang; Xu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are a group of cyclic hepatotoxic peptides produced by cyanobacteria. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) contains Leucine (L) and Arginine (R) in the variable positions, and is one of the most common and potently toxic peptides. MC-LR can inhibit protein phosphatase type 1 and type 2A (PP1 and PP2A) activities and induce excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The underlying mechanism of the inhibition of PP1 and PP2A has been extensively studied. The over-production of ROS is considered to be another main mechanism behind MC-LR toxicity; however, the detailed toxicological mechanism involved in over-production of ROS in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) remains largely unclear. In our present study, the hydroxyl radical (•OH) was significantly induced in the liver of carp after a relatively short-term exposure to MC-LR. The elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production may play an important role in the disruption of microtubule structure. Pre-injection of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) provided significant protection to the cytoskeleton, however buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) exacerbated cytoskeletal destruction. In addition, the elevated ROS formation induced the expression of apoptosis-related genes, including p38, JNKa, and bcl-2. A significant increase in apoptotic cells was observed at 12 - 48 hours. Our study further supports evidence that ROS are involved in MC-LR induced damage to liver cells in carp, and indicates the need for further study of the molecular mechanisms behind MC-LR toxicity. PMID:24376844

  17. One isoform of Arg/Abl2 tyrosine kinase is nuclear and the other seven cytosolic isoforms differently modulate cell morphology, motility and the cytoskeleton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianchi, Cristina; Torsello, Barbara; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A.; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Silvia; Perego, Roberto A.

    2013-01-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abelson related gene (Arg/Abl2) regulates cell migration and morphogenesis by modulating the cytoskeleton. Arg promotes actin-based cell protrusions and spreading, and inhibits cell migration by attenuating stress fiber formation and contractility via activation of the RhoA inhibitor, p190RhoGAP, and by regulating focal adhesion dynamics also via CrkII phosphorylation. Eight full-length Arg isoforms with different N- and C-termini are endogenously expressed in human cells. In this paper, the eight Arg isoforms, subcloned in the pFLAG-CMV2 vector, were transfected in COS-7 cells in order to study their subcellular distribution and role in cell morphology, migration and cytoskeletal modulation. The transfected 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution and phosphorylates CrkII in the nucleus, whilst the other isoforms are detected in the cytoplasm. The 1BLCTL, 1BSCTL, 1ASCTS isoforms were able to significantly decrease stress fibers, induce cell shrinkage and filopodia-like protrusions with a significant increase in p190RhoGAP phosphorylation. In contrast, 1ALCTL, 1ALCTS, 1ASCTL and 1BLCTS isoforms do not significantly decrease stress fibers and induce the formation of retraction tail-like protrusions. The 1BLCTL and 1ALCTL isoforms have different effects on cell migration and focal adhesions. All these data may open new perspectives to study the mechanisms of cell invasiveness. -Highlights: • Each of the eight Arg isoforms was transfected in COS-7 cells. • Only the 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution in transfected cells. • The cytoplasmic isoforms and F-actin colocalize cortically and in cell protrusions. • Arg isoforms differently phosphorylate p190RhoGAP and CrkII. • Arg isoforms differently modulate stress fibers, cell protrusions and motility

  18. One isoform of Arg/Abl2 tyrosine kinase is nuclear and the other seven cytosolic isoforms differently modulate cell morphology, motility and the cytoskeleton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, Cristina; Torsello, Barbara; Di Stefano, Vitalba; Zipeto, Maria A.; Facchetti, Rita; Bombelli, Silvia; Perego, Roberto A., E-mail: roberto.perego@unimib.it

    2013-08-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Abelson related gene (Arg/Abl2) regulates cell migration and morphogenesis by modulating the cytoskeleton. Arg promotes actin-based cell protrusions and spreading, and inhibits cell migration by attenuating stress fiber formation and contractility via activation of the RhoA inhibitor, p190RhoGAP, and by regulating focal adhesion dynamics also via CrkII phosphorylation. Eight full-length Arg isoforms with different N- and C-termini are endogenously expressed in human cells. In this paper, the eight Arg isoforms, subcloned in the pFLAG-CMV2 vector, were transfected in COS-7 cells in order to study their subcellular distribution and role in cell morphology, migration and cytoskeletal modulation. The transfected 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution and phosphorylates CrkII in the nucleus, whilst the other isoforms are detected in the cytoplasm. The 1BLCTL, 1BSCTL, 1ASCTS isoforms were able to significantly decrease stress fibers, induce cell shrinkage and filopodia-like protrusions with a significant increase in p190RhoGAP phosphorylation. In contrast, 1ALCTL, 1ALCTS, 1ASCTL and 1BLCTS isoforms do not significantly decrease stress fibers and induce the formation of retraction tail-like protrusions. The 1BLCTL and 1ALCTL isoforms have different effects on cell migration and focal adhesions. All these data may open new perspectives to study the mechanisms of cell invasiveness. -Highlights: • Each of the eight Arg isoforms was transfected in COS-7 cells. • Only the 1BSCTS Arg isoform has a nuclear distribution in transfected cells. • The cytoplasmic isoforms and F-actin colocalize cortically and in cell protrusions. • Arg isoforms differently phosphorylate p190RhoGAP and CrkII. • Arg isoforms differently modulate stress fibers, cell protrusions and motility.

  19. Hypertrophic stimulation increases beta-actin dynamics in adult feline cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaravadivel Balasubramanian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The myocardium responds to hemodynamic stress through cellular growth and organ hypertrophy. The impact of cytoskeletal elements on this process, however, is not fully understood. While alpha-actin in cardiomyocytes governs muscle contraction in combination with the myosin motor, the exact role of beta-actin has not been established. We hypothesized that in adult cardiomyocytes, as in non-myocytes, beta-actin can facilitate cytoskeletal rearrangement within cytoskeletal structures such as Z-discs. Using a feline right ventricular pressure overload (RVPO model, we measured the level and distribution of beta-actin in normal and pressure overloaded myocardium. Resulting data demonstrated enriched levels of beta-actin and enhanced translocation to the Triton-insoluble cytoskeletal and membrane skeletal complexes. In addition, RVPO in vivo and in vitro hypertrophic stimulation with endothelin (ET or insulin in isolated adult cardiomyocytes enhanced the content of polymerized fraction (F-actin of beta-actin. To determine the localization and dynamics of beta-actin, we adenovirally expressed GFP-tagged beta-actin in isolated adult cardiomyocytes. The ectopically expressed beta-actin-GFP localized to the Z-discs, costameres, and cell termini. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP measurements of beta-actin dynamics revealed that beta-actin at the Z-discs is constantly being exchanged with beta-actin from cytoplasmic pools and that this exchange is faster upon hypertrophic stimulation with ET or insulin. In addition, in electrically stimulated isolated adult cardiomyocytes, while beta-actin overexpression improved cardiomyocyte contractility, immunoneutralization of beta-actin resulted in a reduced contractility suggesting that beta-actin could be important for the contractile function of adult cardiomyocytes. These studies demonstrate the presence and dynamics of beta-actin in the adult cardiomyocyte and reinforce its usefulness in measuring

  20. The Using of Scientific Based Physics Module in Learning to Enhance High School Students’ Critical Thinking Skills on Rotation Dynamics and Equilibrium of Rigid Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhimas Nur Setyawan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of using a scientific based physics module to improve high school students' critical thinking skills. This study is a quasi experimental study which uses two classes taken at random experiment consists of one class and the control class. Class experiments using the scientific study using scientific-based modules and classroom experiments using books that have been owned by students. Experimental class numbered 25 students and control class numbered 28 students. The research was conducted in the first half (one Academic Year 2016/2017. The method used is the test method with a pretest-posttest design. Data were analyzed with quantitative and qualitative methods. Data were analyzed using a pretest form of the homogeneity test to find out that the experimental class and controls used homogeneous. Posttest results were analyzed using normality test to determine the normally distributed data, N-gain to determine the increase critical thinking skills, as well as test two parties not bound to determine whether or not there is a difference in the increase in critical thinking skills. Conclusions and recommendations are the use of scientifically-based modules effectively improve the ability to think critically and use physics-based scientific modules should be adjusted to the prevailing syllabus and curriculum so that learning can take place properly.

  1. Dynamical heat transport amplification in a far-field thermal transistor of VO{sub 2} excited with a laser of modulated intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez-Miranda, Jose, E-mail: jose.ordonez@cnrs.pprime.fr; Ezzahri, Younès; Drevillon, Jérémie; Joulain, Karl [Institut Pprime, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ISAE-ENSMA, F-86962 Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France)

    2016-05-28

    Far-field radiative heat transport in a thermal transistor made up of a vanadium dioxide base excited with a laser of modulated intensity is analytically studied and optimized. This is done by solving the equation of energy conservation for the steady-state and modulated components of the temperature and heat fluxes that the base exchanges with the collector and emitter. The thermal bistability of VO{sub 2} is used to find an explicit condition on the laser intensity required to maximize these heat fluxes to values higher than the incident flux. For a 1 μm-thick base heated with a modulation frequency of 0.5 Hz, it is shown that both the DC and AC components of the heat fluxes are about 4 times the laser intensity, while the AC temperature remains an order of magnitude smaller than the DC one at around 343 K. Higher AC heat fluxes are obtained for thinner bases and/or lower frequencies. Furthermore, we find that out of the bistability temperatures associated with the dielectric-to-metal and metal-to-dielectric transitions of VO{sub 2}, the amplification of the collector-to-base and base-to-emitter heat fluxes is still possible, but at modulation frequencies lower than 0.1 Hz.

  2. A composite role of vitronectin and urokinase in the modulation of cell morphology upon expression of the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Thore; Engelholm, Lars H; Ingvarsen, Signe

    2008-01-01

    The urokinase receptor, urokinase receptor (uPAR), is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane protein engaged in pericellular proteolysis and cellular adhesion, migration, and modulation of cell morphology. A direct matrix adhesion is mediated through the binding of uPAR to vitronectin......, and this event is followed by downstream effects including changes in the cytoskeletal organization. However, it remains unclear whether the adhesion through uPAR-vitronectin is the only event capable of initiating these morphological rearrangements or whether lateral interactions between uPAR and integrins can...... a different single-site mutant, uPAR(Y57A), in the presence of a synthetic uPAR-binding peptide, as well as with wild-type uPAR, which underwent cytoskeletal rearrangements even when cultivated in uPA-deficient serum. Blocking of integrins with an Arg-Gly-Asp-containing peptide counteracted the matrix...

  3. Cytoskeleton dynamics: Fluctuations within the network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursac, Predrag; Fabry, Ben; Trepat, Xavier; Lenormand, Guillaume; Butler, James P.; Wang, Ning; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; An, Steven S.

    2007-01-01

    Out-of-equilibrium systems, such as the dynamics of a living cytoskeleton (CSK), are inherently noisy with fluctuations arising from the stochastic nature of the underlying biochemical and molecular events. Recently, such fluctuations within the cell were characterized by observing spontaneous nano-scale motions of an RGD-coated microbead bound to the cell surface [Bursac et al., Nat. Mater. 4 (2005) 557-561]. While these reported anomalous bead motions represent a molecular level reorganization (remodeling) of microstructures in contact with the bead, a precise nature of these cytoskeletal constituents and forces that drive their remodeling dynamics are largely unclear. Here, we focused upon spontaneous motions of an RGD-coated bead and, in particular, assessed to what extent these motions are attributable to (i) bulk cell movement (cell crawling), (ii) dynamics of focal adhesions, (iii) dynamics of lipid membrane, and/or (iv) dynamics of the underlying actin CSK driven by myosin motors

  4. Ultraviolet light-irradiated collagen III modulates expression of cytoskeletal and surface adhesion molecules in rat aortic smooth muscle cells in vitro

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bačáková, Lucie; Lisá, Věra; Kubínová, Lucie; Wilhelm, J.; Novotná, J.; Eckhardt, Adam; Herget, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 440, č. 1 (2002), s. 50-62 ISSN 0945-6317 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/97/S070; GA MŠk LN00A069 Grant - others:GA UK(XC) 188/98/C Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : integrins * focal adhesion proteins * alpha-actin Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 2.045, year: 2002

  5. Massive elimination of multinucleated osteoclasts by eupatilin is due to dual inhibition of transcription and cytoskeletal rearrangement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Young Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is an aging-associated disease requiring better therapeutic modality. Eupatilin is a major flavonoid from Artemisia plants such as Artemisia princeps and Artemisia argyi which has been reported to possess various beneficial biological effects including anti-inflammation, anti-tumor, anti-cancer, anti-allergy, and anti-oxidation activity. Complete blockade of RANK-dependent osteoclastogenesis was accomplished upon stimulation prior to the receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK-ligand (RANKL treatment or post-stimulation of bone marrow macrophages (BMCs in the presence of RANKL with eupatilin. This blockade was accompanied by inhibition of rapid phosphorylation of Akt, GSK3β, ERK and IκB as well as downregulation of c-Fos and NFATc1 at protein, suggesting that transcriptional suppression is a key mechanism for anti-osteoclastogenesis. Transient reporter assays or gain of function assays confirmed that eupatilin was a potent transcriptional inhibitor in osteoclasts (OC. Surprisingly, when mature osteoclasts were cultured on bone scaffolds in the presence of eupatilin, bone resorption activity was also completely blocked by dismantling the actin rings, suggesting that another major acting site of eupatilin is cytoskeletal rearrangement. The eupatilin-treated mature osteoclasts revealed a shrunken cytoplasm and accumulation of multi-nuclei, eventually becoming fibroblast-like cells. No apoptosis occurred. Inhibition of phosphorylation of cofilin by eupatilin suggests that actin may play an important role in the morphological change of multinucleated cells (MNCs. Human OC similarly responded to eupatilin. However, eupatilin has no effects on osteoblast differentiation and shows cytotoxicity on osteoblast in the concentration of 50 μM. When eupatilin was administered to LPS-induced osteoporotic mice after manifestation of osteoporosis, it prevented bone loss. Ovariectomized (OVX mice remarkably exhibited bone protection effects

  6. Spatial Terahertz Modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhenwei; Wang, Xinke; Ye, Jiasheng; Feng, Shengfei; Sun, Wenfeng; Akalin, Tahsin; Zhang, Yan

    2013-11-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology is a developing and promising candidate for biological imaging, security inspection and communications, due to the low photon energy, the high transparency and the broad band properties of the THz radiation. However, a major encountered bottleneck is lack of efficient devices to manipulate the THz wave, especially to modulate the THz wave front. A wave front modulator should allow the optical or electrical control of the spatial transmission (or reflection) of an input THz wave and hence the ability to encode the information in a wave front. Here we propose a spatial THz modulator (STM) to dynamically control the THz wave front with photo-generated carriers. A computer generated THz hologram is projected onto a silicon wafer by a conventional spatial light modulator (SLM). The corresponding photo-generated carrier spatial distribution will be induced, which forms an amplitude hologram to modulate the wave front of the input THz beam. Some special intensity patterns and vortex beams are generated by using this method. This all-optical controllable STM is structure free, high resolution and broadband. It is expected to be widely used in future THz imaging and communication systems.

  7. Irreducible Specht modules are signed Young modules

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmer, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Recently Donkin defined signed Young modules as a simultaneous generalization of Young and twisted Young modules for the symmetric group. We show that in odd characteristic, if a Specht module $S^\\lambda$ is irreducible, then $S^\\lambda$ is a signed Young module. Thus the set of irreducible Specht modules coincides with the set of irreducible signed Young modules. This provides evidence for our conjecture that the signed Young modules are precisely the class of indecomposable self-dual module...

  8. Dynamic link: user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Hiroo; Asai, Kiyoshi; Kihara, Kazuhisa.

    1981-09-01

    The purpose of dynamic link facility is to link a load module dynamically only when it is used in execution time. The facility is very useful for development, execution and maintenance of a large scale computer program which is too big to be saved as one load module in main memory, or it is poor economy to save it due to many unused subroutines depending on an input. It is also useful for standardization and common utilization of programs. Standard usage of dynamic link facility of FACOM M-200 computer system, a software tool which analyzes the effect of dynamic link facility and application of dynamic link to nuclear codes are described. (author)

  9. Single frequency thermal wave radar: A next-generation dynamic thermography for quantitative non-destructive imaging over wide modulation frequency ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Alexander; Chen, Liangjie; Ramirez Venegas, Diego; Sivagurunathan, Koneswaran; Sun, Qiming; Mandelis, Andreas; Rodriguez, Ignacio Rojas

    2018-04-01

    Single-Frequency Thermal Wave Radar Imaging (SF-TWRI) was introduced and used to obtain quantitative thickness images of coatings on an aluminum block and on polyetherketone, and to image blind subsurface holes in a steel block. In SF-TWR, the starting and ending frequencies of a linear frequency modulation sweep are chosen to coincide. Using the highest available camera frame rate, SF-TWRI leads to a higher number of sampled points along the modulation waveform than conventional lock-in thermography imaging because it is not limited by conventional undersampling at high frequencies due to camera frame-rate limitations. This property leads to large reduction in measurement time, better quality of images, and higher signal-noise-ratio across wide frequency ranges. For quantitative thin-coating imaging applications, a two-layer photothermal model with lumped parameters was used to reconstruct the layer thickness from multi-frequency SF-TWR images. SF-TWRI represents a next-generation thermography method with superior features for imaging important classes of thin layers, materials, and components that require high-frequency thermal-wave probing well above today's available infrared camera technology frame rates.

  10. Single frequency thermal wave radar: A next-generation dynamic thermography for quantitative non-destructive imaging over wide modulation frequency ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Alexander; Chen, Liangjie; Ramirez Venegas, Diego; Sivagurunathan, Koneswaran; Sun, Qiming; Mandelis, Andreas; Rodriguez, Ignacio Rojas

    2018-04-01

    Single-Frequency Thermal Wave Radar Imaging (SF-TWRI) was introduced and used to obtain quantitative thickness images of coatings on an aluminum block and on polyetherketone, and to image blind subsurface holes in a steel block. In SF-TWR, the starting and ending frequencies of a linear frequency modulation sweep are chosen to coincide. Using the highest available camera frame rate, SF-TWRI leads to a higher number of sampled points along the modulation waveform than conventional lock-in thermography imaging because it is not limited by conventional undersampling at high frequencies due to camera frame-rate limitations. This property leads to large reduction in measurement time, better quality of images, and higher signal-noise-ratio across wide frequency ranges. For quantitative thin-coating imaging applications, a two-layer photothermal model with lumped parameters was used to reconstruct the layer thickness from multi-frequency SF-TWR images. SF-TWRI represents a next-generation thermography method with superior features for imaging important classes of thin layers, materials, and components that require high-frequency thermal-wave probing well above today's available infrared camera technology frame rates.

  11. Insights into the Impact of CD8+ Immune Modulation on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Evolutionary Dynamics in Distinct Anatomical Compartments by Using Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaque Models of AIDS Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rife Magalis, Brittany; Nolan, David J; Autissier, Patrick; Burdo, Tricia H; Williams, Kenneth C; Salemi, Marco

    2017-12-01

    A thorough understanding of the role of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) intrahost evolution in AIDS pathogenesis has been limited by the need for longitudinally sampled viral sequences from the vast target space within the host, which are often difficult to obtain from human subjects. CD8 + lymphocyte-depleted macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) provide an increasingly utilized model of pathogenesis due to clinical manifestations similar to those for HIV-1 infection and AIDS progression, as well as a characteristic rapid disease onset. Comparison of this model with SIV-infected non-CD8 + lymphocyte-depleted macaques also provides a unique opportunity to investigate the role of CD8 + cells in viral evolution and population dynamics throughout the duration of infection. Using several different phylogenetic methods, we analyzed viral gp120 sequences obtained from extensive longitudinal sampling of multiple tissues and enriched leukocyte populations from SIVmac251-infected macaques with or without CD8 + lymphocyte depletion. SIV evolutionary and selection patterns in non-CD8 + lymphocyte-depleted animals were characterized by sequential population turnover and continual viral adaptation, a scenario readily comparable to intrahost evolutionary patterns during human HIV infection in the absence of antiretroviral therapy. Alternatively, animals that were depleted of CD8 + lymphocytes exhibited greater variation in population dynamics among tissues and cell populations over the course of infection. Our findings highlight the major role for CD8 + lymphocytes in prolonging disease progression through continual control of SIV subpopulations from various anatomical compartments and the potential for greater independent viral evolutionary behavior among these compartments in response to immune modulation. IMPORTANCE Although developments in combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) strategies have successfully prolonged the time to AIDS onset in HIV-1

  12. Active site CP-loop dynamics modulate substrate binding, catalysis, oligomerization, stability, over-oxidation and recycling of 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamariah, Neelagandan; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank; Grüber, Gerhard

    2018-04-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) catalyse the rapid reduction of hydrogen peroxide, organic hydroperoxide and peroxynitrite, using a fully conserved peroxidatic cysteine (C P ) located in a conserved sequence Pxxx(T/S)xxC P motif known as C P -loop. In addition, Prxs are involved in cellular signaling pathways and regulate several redox-dependent process related disease. The effective catalysis of Prxs is associated with alterations in the C P -loop between reduced, Fully Folded (FF), and oxidized, Locally Unfolded (LU) conformations, which are linked to dramatic changes in the oligomeric structure. Despite many studies, little is known about the precise structural and dynamic roles of the C P -loop on Prxs functions. Herein, the comprehensive biochemical and biophysical studies on Escherichia coli alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C (EcAhpC) and the C P -loop mutants, EcAhpC-F45A and EcAhpC-F45P reveal that the reduced form of the C P -loop adopts conformational dynamics, which is essential for effective peroxide reduction. Furthermore, the point mutants alter the structure and dynamics of the reduced form of the C P -loop and, thereby, affect substrate binding, catalysis, oligomerization, stability and overoxidiation. In the oxidized form, due to restricted C P -loop dynamics, the EcAhpC-F45P mutant favours a decamer formation, which enhances the effective recycling by physiological reductases compared to wild-type EcAhpC. In addition, the study reveals that residue F45 increases the specificity of Prxs-reductase interactions. Based on these studies, we propose an evolution of the C P -loop with confined sequence conservation within Prxs subfamilies that might optimize the functional adaptation of Prxs into various physiological roles. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. MRI before and after external beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy of patients with prostate cancer: The feasibility of monitoring of radiation-induced tissue changes using a dynamic contrast-enhanced inversion-prepared dual-contrast gradient echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franiel, Tobias; Luedemann, Lutz; Taupitz, Matthias; Boehmer, Dirk; Beyersdorff, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To identify and quantify suitable pharmacokinetic MRI parameters for monitoring tissue changes after external beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Material and methods: Six patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer (initial PSA, 6.0-81.4 ng/ml) underwent MRI at 1.5 T using a combined endorectal/body phased-array coil and a dynamic contrast-enhanced inversion-prepared dual-contrast gradient echo sequence (T1/T2*w; 1.65 s temporal resolution). MRI was performed before and immediately after radiotherapy, at 3 months and at 1 year. Perfusion, blood volume, mean transit time, delay, dispersion, interstitial volume, and extraction coefficient were calculated in prostate cancer and normal prostate for all four time points using a sequential 3-compartment model. Results: Prostate cancer and normal prostate tissue showed a statistically significant decrease in perfusion (p = 0.006, p = 0.001) and increase in extraction coefficient (p = 0.004, p 3 min, p = 0.028) and a smaller extraction coefficient (0.42 vs. 0.64, p = 0.028). Conclusions: Two pharmacokinetic parameters, perfusion and extraction coefficient, appear to be suitable candidates for monitoring the response to percutaneous intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modeling and analysis of Pd-based membrane module for CO{sub 2} capture from H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} binary gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Dong-Yoon; Park, Myung-June [Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kyung-Ran; Park, Jong-Soo [Korea Institute of Energy Research, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A Pd-based membrane module for the capture of CO{sub 2} from a H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} binary gas mixture was considered, and computational fluid dynamics modeling was used to predict the module performance. Detailed models of momentum and mass balances, including local flux as a function of local linear velocity, satisfactorily described CO{sub 2} fraction in a retentate tube when compared to the experimental data under various feed flow rates. By using the model, several cases having different geometries, including the location and diameter of feed tube and the number and location of the feed and retentate tubes, were considered. Among tested geometries, the case of two feed tubes with each offset by an angle, θ, of 45° from the center line, and a feed tube diameter of 2.45mm showed the increase of the feed flow rate up to 11.80% compared to the reference case while a CO{sub 2} fraction of 90% in the retentate, which was the criterion for effective CO{sub 2} capture in the present study, was guaranteed. This would result in a plausible reduction in capital expenditures for the CO{sub 2} capture process.

  15. Implementation of a Marauding Insect Module (MIM, version 1.0) in the Integrated BIosphere Simulator (IBIS, version 2.6b4) dynamic vegetation-land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Jean-Sébastien; Price, David T.; Ramankutty, Navin; Parrott, Lael; Damon Matthews, H.

    2016-04-01

    Insects defoliate and kill plants in many ecosystems worldwide. The consequences of these natural processes on terrestrial ecology and nutrient cycling are well established, and their potential climatic effects resulting from modified land-atmosphere exchanges of carbon, energy, and water are increasingly being recognized. We developed a Marauding Insect Module (MIM) to quantify, in the Integrated BIosphere Simulator (IBIS), the consequences of insect activity on biogeochemical and biogeophysical fluxes, also accounting for the effects of altered vegetation dynamics. MIM can simulate damage from three different insect functional types: (1) defoliators on broadleaf deciduous trees, (2) defoliators on needleleaf evergreen trees, and (3) bark beetles on needleleaf evergreen trees, with the resulting impacts being estimated by IBIS based on the new, insect-modified state of the vegetation. MIM further accounts for the physical presence and gradual fall of insect-killed dead standing trees. The design of MIM should facilitate the addition of other insect types besides the ones already included and could guide the development of similar modules for other process-based vegetation models. After describing IBIS-MIM, we illustrate the usefulness of the model by presenting results spanning daily to centennial timescales for vegetation dynamics and cycling of carbon, energy, and water in a simplified setting and for bark beetles only. More precisely, we simulated 100 % mortality events from the mountain pine beetle for three locations in western Canada. We then show that these simulated impacts agree with many previous studies based on field measurements, satellite data, or modelling. MIM and similar tools should therefore be of great value in assessing the wide array of impacts resulting from insect-induced plant damage in the Earth system.

  16. Modulation of friction dynamics in water by changing the combination of the loop- and graft-type poly(ethylene glycol) surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji-Hun; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Kobari, Akinori; Shimojo, Masayuki; Hanawa, Takao; Yui, Nobuhiko

    2015-02-07

    A Velcro-like poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) interface was prepared in order to control the friction dynamics of material surfaces. Graft- and loop-type PEGs were formed on mirror-polished Ti surfaces using an electrodeposition method with mono- and di-amine functionalized PEGs. The friction dynamics of various combinations of PEG surfaces (i.e., graft-on-graft, loop-on-loop, graft-on-loop, and loop-on-graft) were investigated by friction testing. Here, only the Velcro-like combinations (graft-on-loop and loop-on-graft) exhibited a reversible friction behavior (i.e., resetting the kinetic friction coefficient and the reappearance of the maximum static friction coefficient) during the friction tests. The same tendency was observed when the molecular weights of loop- and graft-type PEGs were tested at 1 k and 10 k, respectively. This indicates that a Velcro-like friction behavior could be induced by simply changing the conformation of PEGs, which suggests a novel concept of altering polymer surfaces for the effective control of friction dynamics.

  17. Diabetes ongoing sustainable care and treatment (DOST: A strategy for informational deliverance through visual dynamic modules sustained by near peer mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The informational continuity for a diabetic patient is of paramount importance. This study on a pilot basis explores the process utility of structured educational modular sessions grounded on the principle of near-peer mentoring. Methodology: Visual modules were prepared for diabetic patients. These modules were instituted to 25 diabetic patients in logical sequences. In the next phase, 4 persons of these 25 patients were designated as diabetic-diabetes ongoing sustainable care and treatment (DOST. Each diabetic-DOST was clubbed with two patients for modular session and informational deliverance during the next 7 days. Process analysis was performed with “proxy-indicators,” namely, monthly glycemic status, knowledge assessment scores, and quality of life. Data were analyzed by interval estimates and through nonparametric analysis. Results: Nonparametric analysis indicated a significant improvement in glycemic status in terms with fasting blood sugar (W = 78 z = 3.04, P = 0.002, 2 h-postprandial blood sugar (W = 54, z = 2.01, P = 0.035, and in knowledge score (c2 = 19.53, df = 3; P = 0.0002. Quality of life score showed significant improvement in 2 out of 7 domains, namely, satisfaction with treatment ([difference in mean score = 1.40 [1.94 to 0.85] and symptom botherness (difference in mean score = 0.98 [1.3–0.65]. Conclusion: Because of inherent methodological limitations and innate biases, at this juncture no conclusive statement can be drawn. Although, primitive process evidences indicate the promising role of the diabetic-DOST strategy.

  18. Diabetes ongoing sustainable care and treatment (DOST): A strategy for informational deliverance through visual dynamic modules sustained by near peer mentoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Ankur; Arutagi, Vishwanath; Nahar, Nitin; Tiwari, Sharad; Singh, Daneshwar; Sethia, Soumitra

    2016-01-01

    The informational continuity for a diabetic patient is of paramount importance. This study on a pilot basis explores the process utility of structured educational modular sessions grounded on the principle of near-peer mentoring. Visual modules were prepared for diabetic patients. These modules were instituted to 25 diabetic patients in logical sequences. In the next phase, 4 persons of these 25 patients were designated as diabetic-diabetes ongoing sustainable care and treatment (DOST). Each diabetic-DOST was clubbed with two patients for modular session and informational deliverance during the next 7 days. Process analysis was performed with "proxy-indicators," namely, monthly glycemic status, knowledge assessment scores, and quality of life. Data were analyzed by interval estimates and through nonparametric analysis. Nonparametric analysis indicated a significant improvement in glycemic status in terms with fasting blood sugar (W = 78 z = 3.04, P = 0.002), 2 h-postprandial blood sugar (W = 54, z = 2.01, P = 0.035), and in knowledge score (χ 2 = 19.53, df = 3; P = 0.0002). Quality of life score showed significant improvement in 2 out of 7 domains, namely, satisfaction with treatment ([difference in mean score = 1.40 [1.94 to 0.85]) and symptom botherness (difference in mean score = 0.98 [1.3-0.65]). Because of inherent methodological limitations and innate biases, at this juncture no conclusive statement can be drawn. Although, primitive process evidences indicate the promising role of the diabetic-DOST strategy.

  19. MDA-9/Syntenin (SDCBP) modulates small GTPases RhoA and Cdc42 via transforming growth factor β1 to enhance epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Mitchell E; Shen, Xue-Ning; Das, Swadesh K; Emdad, Luni; Sarkar, Devanand; Fisher, Paul B

    2016-12-06

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is one of the decisive steps regulating cancer invasion and metastasis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this transition require further clarification. MDA-9/syntenin (SDCBP) expression is elevated in breast cancer patient samples as well as cultured breast cancer cells. Silencing expression of MDA-9 in mesenchymal metastatic breast cancer cells triggered a change in cell morphology in both 2D- and 3D-cultures to a more epithelial-like phenotype, along with changes in EMT markers, cytoskeletal rearrangement and decreased invasion. Conversely, over expressing MDA-9 in epithelial non-metastatic breast cancer cells instigated a change in morphology to a more mesenchymal phenotype with corresponding changes in EMT markers, cytoskeletal rearrangement and an increase in invasion. We also found that MDA-9 upregulated active levels of known modulators of EMT, the small GTPases RhoA and Cdc42, via TGFβ1. Reintroducing TGFβ1 in MDA-9 silenced cells restored active RhoA and cdc42 levels, modulated cytoskeletal rearrangement and increased invasion. We further determined that MDA-9 interacts with TGFβ1 via its PDZ1 domain. Finally, in vivo studies demonstrated that silencing the expression of MDA-9 resulted in decreased lung metastasis and TGFβ1 re-expression partially restored lung metastases. Our findings provide evidence for the relevance of MDA-9 in mediating EMT in breast cancer and support the potential of MDA-9 as a therapeutic target against metastatic disease.

  20. Signed Young Modules and Simple Specht Modules

    OpenAIRE

    Danz, Susanne; Lim, Kay Jin

    2015-01-01

    By a result of Hemmer, every simple Specht module of a finite symmetric group over a field of odd characteristic is a signed Young module. While Specht modules are parametrized by partitions, indecomposable signed Young modules are parametrized by certain pairs of partitions. The main result of this article establishes the signed Young module labels of simple Specht modules. Along the way we prove a number of results concerning indecomposable signed Young modules that are of independent inter...

  1. Memory Modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive

  2. Module descriptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincenti, Gordon; Klausen, Bodil; Kjær Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The Module Descriptor including a Teacher’s Guide explains and describes how to work innovatively and co-creatively with wicked problems and young people. The descriptor shows how interested educators and lecturers in Europe can copy the lessons of the Erasmus+ project HIP when teaching their own...

  3. Experimental quantification of the fluid dynamics in blood-processing devices through 4D-flow imaging: A pilot study on a real oxygenator/heat-exchanger module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatti, Filippo; Palumbo, Maria Chiara; Consolo, Filippo; Pluchinotta, Francesca; Greiser, Andreas; Sturla, Francesco; Votta, Emiliano; Siryk, Sergii V; Vismara, Riccardo; Fiore, Gianfranco Beniamino; Lombardi, Massimo; Redaelli, Alberto

    2018-02-08

    The performance of blood-processing devices largely depends on the associated fluid dynamics, which hence represents a key aspect in their design and optimization. To this aim, two approaches are currently adopted: computational fluid-dynamics, which yields highly resolved three-dimensional data but relies on simplifying assumptions, and in vitro experiments, which typically involve the direct video-acquisition of the flow field and provide 2D data only. We propose a novel method that exploits space- and time-resolved magnetic resonance imaging (4D-flow) to quantify the complex 3D flow field in blood-processing devices and to overcome these limitations. We tested our method on a real device that integrates an oxygenator and a heat exchanger. A dedicated mock loop was implemented, and novel 4D-flow sequences with sub-millimetric spatial resolution and region-dependent velocity encodings were defined. Automated in house software was developed to quantify the complex 3D flow field within the different regions of the device: region-dependent flow rates, pressure drops, paths of the working fluid and wall shear stresses were computed. Our analysis highlighted the effects of fine geometrical features of the device on the local fluid-dynamics, which would be unlikely observed by current in vitro approaches. Also, the effects of non-idealities on the flow field distribution were captured, thanks to the absence of the simplifying assumptions that typically characterize numerical models. To the best of our knowledge, our approach is the first of its kind and could be extended to the analysis of a broad range of clinically relevant devices. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Schmid, Tobias; Brauß, Thilo [Institut für Biochemie I (Pathobiochemie), Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Pleli, Thomas [Medizinische Klinik 1, Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Piiper, Albrecht [Medizinische Klinik 1, Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Pfeilschifter, Josef [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Eberhardt, Wolfgang, E-mail: w.eberhardt@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D{sub 1} encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E{sub 2} synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on

  5. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel; Schmid, Tobias; Brauß, Thilo; Pleli, Thomas; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar; Piiper, Albrecht; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Eberhardt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D 1 encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E 2 synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on different Hu

  6. RIT1 controls actin dynamics via complex formation with RAC1/CDC42 and PAK1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Meyer Zum Büschenfelde

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available RIT1 belongs to the RAS family of small GTPases. Germline and somatic RIT1 mutations have been identified in Noonan syndrome (NS and cancer, respectively. By using heterologous expression systems and purified recombinant proteins, we identified the p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1 as novel direct effector of RIT1. We found RIT1 also to directly interact with the RHO GTPases CDC42 and RAC1, both of which are crucial regulators of actin dynamics upstream of PAK1. These interactions are independent of the guanine nucleotide bound to RIT1. Disease-causing RIT1 mutations enhance protein-protein interaction between RIT1 and PAK1, CDC42 or RAC1 and uncouple complex formation from serum and growth factors. We show that the RIT1-PAK1 complex regulates cytoskeletal rearrangements as expression of wild-type RIT1 and its mutant forms resulted in dissolution of stress fibers and reduction of mature paxillin-containing focal adhesions in COS7 cells. This effect was prevented by co-expression of RIT1 with dominant-negative CDC42 or RAC1 and kinase-dead PAK1. By using a transwell migration assay, we show that RIT1 wildtype and the disease-associated variants enhance cell motility. Our work demonstrates a new function for RIT1 in controlling actin dynamics via acting in a signaling module containing PAK1 and RAC1/CDC42, and highlights defects in cell adhesion and migration as possible disease mechanism underlying NS.</