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Sample records for modified 9cr-1mo martensitic

  1. Microstructural evolution in modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic steel irradiated with mixed high-energy proton and neutron spectra at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sencer, B.H.; Garner, F.A.; Gelles, D.S.; Bond, G.M.; Maloy, S.A.

    2002-01-01

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic steel was exposed at 32-57 deg. C to a mixed proton/neutron particle flux and spectrum at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The microstructure of unirradiated 9Cr-1Mo consists of laths, dislocations and carbides. Examination of electron diffraction patterns obtained from extraction replicas of unirradiated 9Cr-1Mo revealed that the precipitate microstructure was primarily dominated by M 23 C 6 carbides. The post-irradiation microstructure contained black-spot damage in addition to precipitates and dislocations. Examination of electron diffraction patterns revealed diffuse rings from M 23 C 6 carbides, indicating amorphization and/or nanocrystallinity. Crystalline MC carbides were also found. No cavity formation was found although a significant amount of helium and hydrogen generation had been generated. TEM-EDS examination of extraction replicas for carbides from unirradiated and irradiated samples did not show any detectable changes in composition of either M 23 C 6 or MC carbides. There was also no evident change in carbide size. Lattice images of M 23 C 6 carbides revealed an amorphous microstructure following irradiation, but MC carbides were still crystalline

  2. Residual creep life assessment by change of martensitic lath structure in modified 9Cr-1Mo steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Kota; Takeda, Masaaki; Maruyama, Kouichi; Komine, Ryuji; Nagae, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel has a martensitic lath structure. Recovery of the lath structure takes place in the course of creep. Microstructural degradation due to the recovery results in the acceleration of creep rate and the subsequent failure of a specimen. Change of lath width during creep of the steel was quantitatively investigated to propose a residual life assessment methodology based on the recovery process. Since the steel was tempered at 1053 K, the lath structure is thermally stable at the testing temperatures (848 K - 923 K). However, recovery of lath structure readily takes place during creep, indicating that the recovery is induced by creep deformation. Lath width d increases with creep strain and saturates to a value d s determined by creep stress. The increase of d is faster at a higher stress and temperature. A normalized change in lath width, Δd/Δd s , was introduced to explain the variation of lath growth rate with creep stress and temperature. Δd is the change in lath width from the initial value d 0 , and Δd s is the difference between d s , and d 0 . Δd/Δd s is uniquely related to creep strain ε and the relationship is independent of creep stress as well as creep temperature. This Δd/Δd s -ε relationship obtained by an accelerated creep test at a higher temperature or stress is applicable to any creep condition including service conditions of engineering plants. Creep strain can be evaluated from the measurement of Δd/Δd s based on the Δd/Δd s -ε relationship. A creep curve under any creep condition can readily be calculated by creep data of the steel. Combining these information one can assess residual life of a structural component made of the steel. (author)

  3. Creep behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhary, B.K.; Isaac Samuel, E.

    2011-01-01

    Creep deformation and fracture behaviour of indigenously developed modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for steam generator (SG) tube application has been examined at 823, 848 and 873 K. Creep tests were performed on flat creep specimens machined from normalised and tempered SG tubes at stresses ranging from 125 to 275 MPa. The stress dependence of minimum creep rate obeyed Norton's power law. Similarly, the rupture life dependence on stress obeyed a power law. The fracture mode remained transgranular at all test conditions examined. The analysis of creep data indicated that the steel obey Monkman-Grant and modified Monkman-Grant relationships and display high creep damage tolerance factor. The tertiary creep was examined in terms of the variations of time to onset of tertiary creep with rupture life, and a recently proposed concept of time to reach Monkman-Grant ductility, and its relationship with rupture life that depends only on damage tolerance factor. SG tube steel exhibited creep-rupture strength comparable to those reported in literature and specified in the nuclear design code RCC-MR.

  4. Influence of dynamic sodium environment on the creep-fatigue behaviour of Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, R.; Ganesan, V.; Mariappan, K.; Sukumaran, G.; Sandhya, R.; Mathew, M.D.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The effects of dynamic sodium on the CFI behaviour of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel has investigated. → The cyclic stress response of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel under flowing sodium environment is similar to that of air environment. → The creep-fatigue endurance of the alloy is found to decrease with introduction of hold time and with increase in the duration of hold time and the factor of life increase in sodium compared to air environment is reduced with increase in hold time. → In contrast to air environment, tensile holds were found to be more damaging than compression hold in sodium environment. → Design rules based on air environment can be safely applied for the components operating in sodium environment. - Abstract: The use of liquid sodium as a heat transfer medium for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) necessitates a clear understanding of the effects of dynamic sodium on low cycle fatigue (LCF), creep and creep-fatigue interaction (CFI) behaviour of reactor structural materials. Mod. 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel is the material of current interest for the steam generator components of sodium cooled fast reactors. The steam generator has a design life of 30-40 years. The effects of dynamic sodium on the LCF and CFI behaviour of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel have been investigated at 823 and 873 K. The CFI life of the steel showed marginal increase under flowing sodium environment when compared to air environment. Hence, the design rules for creep-fatigue interaction based on air tests can be safely applied for components operating in sodium environment. This paper attempts to explain the observed LCF and CFI results based on the detailed metallography and fractography conducted on the failed samples.

  5. Substitution of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel for austentic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, V.K.

    1982-04-01

    This report describes the current program to develop a high-strength ferritic-martensitic steel. The alloy is essentially Fe-9% Cr-1% Mo with small additions of V and Nb and is known as modifed 9 Cr-1 Mo steel. Its elevated-temperature properties and design allowable stresses match those of type 304 stainless steel for temperatures up to 600 0 C and exceed those of other ferritic steels by factors of 2 to 3. The improved strength of this alloy permits its use in place of stainless steels for many applications

  6. Fracture behavior of unirradiated HT-9 and modified 9Cr-1Mo welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1983-05-01

    Fracture toughness tests on HT-9 weld and HAZ samples and modified 9Cr-1Mo weld samples were performed at 93, 205, 427 and 538 0 C. Specimens were of circular compact tension type fabricated from welded material with the notch orientation parallel to the fusion line. The test results were analyzed using the J-integral approach. The results demonstrated that the toughness of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo was not significantly reduced due to welding. However, the tearing modulus of the welded material was lower than that of base metal, indicating that the alloys become less resistant to crack propagation as a result of welding

  7. The rate(time)- dependent mechanical behavior modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moosbrugger, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, constitutive equations are presented for the nonisothermal small strain behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel between 25degC - 600degC. The basic framework uses the superposition of nonlinear kinematic hardening rules as proposed by Chaboche and coworkes. A framework for accounting for isotropic softening is presented wherein this softening can be included in a drag stress, in a yield stress or as a decrease in the saturation level of kinematic hardening or some combination of these; a single isotropic softening equation is used as determined from experiments. The behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel between 25degC - 600degC has been investigated by Swindeman, and Majors et. al. and many important features have been discussed. Here, model parameters are determined from available isothermal uniaxial data and some correlations with isothermal and nonisothermal tests are presented. (J.P.N.)

  8. Stress-controlled inelastic behavior of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, Kosei.

    1989-01-01

    Interest in the ferritic steels of higher chromium concentration has increased recently because of an economical combination of mechanical and corrosion properties at elevated temperatures. A modified 9 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel, developed in the United States, has been expected as an alternative structural material for fast breeder reactor components, in which Type 304 stainless steel or 2.25 Cr-1 Mo steel is currently used. For application of this material to the structural components, a lot of work has been done to develop evaluation methods for the deformation behavior and strength properties. The authors have studied the inelastic behavior and the creep-fatigue properties of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel at elevated temperatures, and proposed a constitutive equation and a creep-fatigue damage equation based on the overstress concept. In this paper, the applicability is discussed of the constitutive equation to stress-controlled inelastic behavior, such as creep strain hardening and stress cycling

  9. Quantification by image analysis of grain size of the high temperature phase (austenite) of martensitic steels 9Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelo, F.; Brachet, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    In martensitic steels, the austenitic grain size before transformation may influence mechanical properties. 9Cr-1Mo steel (EM10) is used in hexagonal pipes fabrication in fast neutrons reactors. Image analysis allows to quantify the older grain size in function of the austenization heat treatment conditions. (A.B.). 2 figs

  10. Characteristics of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel for Reactor Pressure Vessel of Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Ryu, W. S.; Han, Chang Hee; Yoon, J. H.; Chang, Jong Hwa

    2004-11-15

    Many researches and developments have been progressed for the construction of VHTR by 2020 in Korea. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been receiving attention for the application to the reactor pressure vessel material of VHTR. We collected and analyzed the research data for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in order to understand the characteristics of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. The modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is a modified alloy system similar to conventional 9Cr-1Mo grade ferritic steel. Modifications include additions of vanadium, niobium, and nitrogen, as well as lower carbon content. In this report, we summarized the change of microstructure and mechanical properties after tempering, thermal aging, and irradiation. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has high strength and thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and good resistance to corrosion. But the irradiation embrittlement behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel should be evaluated and the evaluation methodology also should be developed. At the same time, the characteristics of weldment which is the weak part in pressure vessel should be evaluated.

  11. Creep-fatigue evaluation method for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Y.; Aoto, K.

    1997-01-01

    As creep-fatigue evaluation methods on normalized and tempered Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for design use, the time fraction rule and the simplified conventional ductility exhaustion rule are investigated for the prediction of tension strain hold creep-fatigue damage of this material. For the above investigation, stress relaxation behaviour during strain hold has to be analyzed using stress-strain-time relation. The initial value of stress relaxation was determined by cyclic stress-strain curves in continuous cycling fatigue tests. Cyclic stress-strain behaviour of Mod.9Cr-1Mo(NT) steel is different from that of austenitic stainless steels, so this effect was considered. Stress relaxation analysis was performed using static creep strain-time relation and conventional hardening rule. The time fraction by using the above stress relaxation analysis results can give good prediction for creep-fatigue life of Mod.9Cr-1Mo(NT) steel. For design use it is practical to be able to estimate creep damages conservatively by both strain behaviour of cyclic plastic (in continuous cycling fatigue tests) and monotonic creep (in standard creep tests). The life reduction by strain hold at the minimum peak of compressive stress in creep-fatigue tests was examined, and this effects can be evaluated by the relationship between the location of oxidation and the effective deformation at crack tip. In an accelerated oxidation environment, for example in high temperature and high pressure steam, a different approach for life reduction should be developed based on the mechanism of growth of oxide and crack growth with oxidation. However, in the creep damage dominant region, its effect is saturated and the effect of cavity growth along grain boundary becomes dominant for long-term strain hold in the high temperature conditions. (author). 6 refs, 6 figs

  12. Reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blass, J.J.; Battiste, R.L.; O'Connor, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The provisions of ASME B ampersand PV Code Case N-47 currently include reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of weldments. To provide experimental confirmation of such factors for modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, tests of tubular specimens were conducted at 538 degree C (1000 degree F). Three creep-rupture specimens with longitudinal welds were tested in tension; and, of three with circumferential welds, two were tested in tension and one in torsion. In each specimen with a circumferential weld, a nonuniform axial distribution of strain was easily visible. The test results were compared to an existing empirical model of creep-rupture life. For the torsion test, the comparison was based on a definition of equivalent normal stress recently adopted in Code Case N-47. Some 27 fatigue specimens, with longitudinal, circumferential, or no welds, were tested under axial or torsional strain control. In specimens with welds, fatigue cracking initiated at fusion lines. In axial tests cracks grew in the circumferential direction, and in torsional tests cracks grew along fusion lines. The test results were compared to empirical models of fatigue life based on two definition of equivalent normal strain range. The results have provided some needed confirmation of the reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel weldments currently under consideration by ASME Code committees. 8 refs., 5 figs

  13. Tensile properties and flow behavior analysis of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanwarjeet; Latha, S.; Nandagopal, M.; Mathew, M. D.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-11-01

    The tensile properties and flow behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube have been investigated in the framework of various constitutive equations for a wide range of temperatures (300-923 K) and strain rates (3 × 10-3 s-1, 3 × 10-4 s-1 and 3 × 10-5 s-1). The tensile flow behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube was most accurately described by Voce equation. The variation of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and σθ with stress (σ) indicated two stage behavior characterized by rapid decrease at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in high stresses (Stage III). The variation of work hardening parameters and work hardening rate in terms of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ with temperature exhibited three distinct regimes. Rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters and rapid shift of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ towards low stresses with increase in temperature indicated dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Tensile properties of the material have been best predicted from Voce equation.

  14. Tensile properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by shear punch testing and correlation with microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karthik, V., E-mail: karthik@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India); Laha, K.; Parameswaran, P.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Kasiviswanathan, K.V.; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, Baldev [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu 603102 (India)

    2011-10-15

    Modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel (P91) is subjected to a series of heat treatments consisting of soaking for 5 min at the selected temperatures in the range 973 K-1623 K (below Ac{sub 1} to above Ac{sub 4}) followed by oil quenching and tempering at 1033 K for 1 h to obtain different microstructural conditions. The tensile properties of the different microstructural conditions are evaluated from small volumes of material by shear punch test technique. A new methodology for evaluating yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and strain hardening exponent from shear punch test by using correlation equations without employing empirical constants is presented and validated. The changes in the tensile properties are related to the microstructural changes of the steel investigated by electron microscopic studies. The steel exhibits minimum strength and hardness when soaked between Ac{sub 1} and Ac{sub 3} (intercritical range) temperatures due to the replacement of original lath martensitic structure with subgrains. The finer martensitic microstructure produced in the steel after soaking at temperatures above Ac{sub 3} leads to a monotonic increase in hardness and strength with decreasing strain hardening exponent. For soaking temperatures above Ac{sub 4}, the hardness and strength of the steel increases marginally due to the formation of soft {delta} ferrite. - Highlights: > A methodology presented for computing tensile properties from shear punch test. > UTS and strain hardening estimated using extended analysis of blanking models. > The analysis methodology validated for different heat treated 9Cr-1Mo steel. > Changes in tensile properties of steel correlated with microstructures.

  15. Postirradiation notch ductility tests of ESR alloy HT-9 and modified 9Cr-1Mo alloy from UBR reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    During this period, irradiation exposures at 300 0 C and 150 0 C to approx. 8 x 10 19 n/cm 2 , E > 0.1 MeV, were completed for the Alloy HT-9 plate and the modified Alloy 9Cr-1Mo plates, respectively. Postirradiation tests of Charpy-V (C/sub v/) specimens were completed for both alloys; other specimen types included in the reactor assemblies were fatigue precracked Charpy-V (PCC/sub v/), half-size Charpy-V, and in the case of the modified 9Cr-1Mo, 2.54 mm thick compact tension specimens

  16. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for advanced steam generator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasa, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from several types of mechanical property tests conducted on a number of commercial heats of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Data from long term creep-rupture tests conducted on base and weldment material were compared with an analytical model which has been shown to give good agreement between measured and predicted values. Weldment material had somewhat inferior creep-rupture strength in comparison to base material due to a soft zone at the edge of the HAZ. Data are presented from elevated temperature tensile and creep-rupture tests conducted on material thermally aged for periods of up to 75,000 h (8.6 years). Some reduction in strength was shown to occur in comparison to unaged material. Models were developed for predicting the reduction in short term elevated temperature tensile and yield strength for material thermally aged in the temperature range of 482 to 704 degrees C. Results from Charpy impact tests conducted on material thermally aged at 538 degrees C for periods of up to 75,000 h show an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature

  17. High temperature tensile testing of modified 9Cr-1Mo after irradiation with high energy protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toloczko, M.B.; Hamilton, M.L.; Maloy, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the effect of tensile test temperatures ranging from 50 to 600 deg. C on the tensile properties of a modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel after high energy proton irradiation at about 35-67 deg. C to doses from 1 to 3 dpa and 9 dpa. For the specimens irradiated to doses between 1 and 3 dpa, it was observed that the yield strength and ultimate strength decreased monotonically as a function of tensile test temperature, whereas the uniform elongation (UE) remained at approximately 1% for tensile test temperatures up to 250 deg. C and then increased for tensile test temperatures up to and including 500 deg. C. At 600 deg. C, the UE was observed to be less than the values at 400 and 500 deg. C. UE of the irradiated material tensile tested at 400-600 deg. C was observed to be greater than the values for the unirradiated material at the same temperatures. Tensile tests on the 9 dpa specimens followed similar trends

  18. Reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of modified 9Cr-1 Mo steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blass, J.J.; Battiste, R.L.; O'Connor, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on the provisions of ASME B and PV code Case N-47 currently include reduction factors for creep strength and fatigue life of weldments. To provide experimental confirmation of such factors for modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, tests of tubular specimens were conducted at 538 degrees C (1000 degrees F). Three creep-rupture specimens with longitudinal welds were tested in tension; and, of three with circumferential welds, two were tested in tension and one in torsion. In each specimen with a circumferential weld, a nonuniform axial distribution of strain was easily visible. The test results were compared to an existing empirical model of creep-rupture life. For the torsion test, the comparison was based on a definition of equivalent normal stress recently adopted in code Case N-47. some 27 fatigue specimens, with longitudinal, circumferential, or no welds, were tested under axial or torsional strain control. In specimens with welds, fatigue cracking initiated at fusion lines. In axial tests cracks grew in the circumferential direction, and in torsional tests cracks grew along fusion lines

  19. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for advanced steam generator applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinkman, C.R.; Alexander, D.J.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Results are reported from several types of mechanical property tests conducted on a number of commercial heats of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. Data from long term creep-rupture tests conducted on base and weldment material were compared with an analytical model which has been shown to give good agreement between measured and predicted values. Weldment material had somewhat inferior creep-rupture strength in comparison to base material due to a soft zone at the edge of the HAZ. Data are presented from elevated temperature tensile and creep-rupture tests conducted n material thermally aged for periods of up to 75,000 h (8.6 years). Some reduction in strength was shown to occur in comparison to unaged material. Models were developed for predicting the reduction in short term elevated temperature tensile and yield strength for material thermally aged in the temperature range of 482 to 704 degree C. Results from Charpy impact tests conducted on material thermally aged at 538 degree C for periods of up to 75,000 h showed an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature. Finally, results from transmission electron microscopy studies were presented to explain changes in mechanical properties due to thermal aging. These observations showed that Laves phase precipitation and recovery occurs on prolonged exposure of this alloy in this temperature range. 9 refs

  20. Evaluation of creep residual life for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel based on Omega method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonaka, Isamu; Torihata, Shoji; Kihara, Shigemitu; Umaki, Hideo; Maruyama, Kouichi.

    1997-01-01

    In order to study the accuracy of creep residual life prediction by the Omega method which is based on creep deformation, a series of creep tests on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel were conducted at 500degC, 550degC and 600degC, and the Omega method was applied to the residual life estimation. The main results obtained are as follows: (1) There was a obvious linear portion, which corresponded to the tertiary creep, in the relationship between logarithm of strain and strain. So it was easy to define the Omega value as a gradient of linear portion. (2) It was proved that the Omega value depended on stress and temperature in such a way as it was the larger, the lower the stress and the lower the temperature. (3) By using the Omega value and strain rate which were determined experimentally, the residual life could be predicted within a factor of 1.5 at the stage of 50% and 80% of actual life. It was confirmed that the accuracy of this method was higher than that of the former method based on rupture time. (4) To apply this method to the residual life evaluation of operating plant materials, the Omega value has to be determined in the lower stress condition. So it is important to develop the extrapolation method of the Omega value based on the laboratory acceleration test to the longer service life. (author)

  1. Wastage Behavior of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Tube Material by Sodium-Water Reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Tae Joon; Choi, Jong Hyeun; Kim, Byung Ho; Park, Nam Cook

    2009-01-01

    The development of a sodium-heated steam generator with safety and reliability is an essential requirement from the viewpoint of the economic efficiency of a sodium-cooled fast reactor. In most cases, these steam generators, which are in the process of development or operating, are of a shell-in tube type, with a high pressure water/steam inside the tubes and low pressure sodium on the shell-side, with a single wall tube as a barrier between these fluids. Therefore, if there is a hole or a crack in a heat transfer tube, a leakage of water/steam into the sodium may occur, resulting in a sodium-water reaction. When such a leak occurs, so-called 'wastage' is the result which may cause damage to or a failure of the adjacent tubes. If a steam generator is operated for some time in this condition, it is possible that it might create an intermediate leak state which would then give rise to the problems of a multi-target wastage in a very short time. Therefore, it is very important to predict these phenomena quantitatively from the view of designing a steam generator and its leak detection systems. The objective of this study is a basic investigating of the sodium-water reaction phenomena by small water/steam leaks. For this, wastage tests for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel were conducted

  2. Wastage Characteristics of a Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Tube Material for a SFR SG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji-Young; Kim, Jong-Man; Kim, Tae-Joon; Choi, Jong-Hyeun; Kim, Byung-Ho; Park, Nam-Cook

    2009-01-01

    The development of a sodium heated steam generator with a safety and reliability is an essential requirement from the viewpoint of the economical efficiency of a sodium cooled fast reactor. In most cases these steam generators which are in the process of development, or operating, are of a shell-in tube type, with a high pressure water/steam inside the tubes and low pressure sodium on the shell-side, with a single wall tube as a barrier between these fluids. Therefore, if there is a hole or a crack in a heat transfer tube, a leakage of water/steam into the sodium may occur, resulting in a sodium-water reaction. When such a leak occurs, important phenomena, so-called 'wastage' is the result which may cause damage to or a failure of the adjacent tubes. If a steam generator is operated for some time with this condition, it is possible that it might create an intermediate leak state which would then give rise to the problems of a multi-target wastage in a very short time. Therefore, it is very important to predict these phenomena quantitatively from the view of designing a steam generator and its leak detection systems. The objective of this study is a basic investigating of the sodium-water reaction phenomena by small water/steam leaks. For this, wastage tests for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel are being prepared

  3. Ratchetting deformation behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and applicability of existing constitutive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaguchi, Masatsugu; Takahashi, Yukio

    2001-01-01

    A series of ratchetting deformation tests was conducted on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel at 550degC under uniaxial and multiaxial stress conditions. Ratchetting behavior depended on various parameters such as mean stress, stress/strain rate and those range, hold time and prior cyclic deformation. Under uniaxial conditions, untraditional ratchetting behavior was observed; the ratchetting deformation rate was the fastest when the stress ratio was equal to -1, while no ratchetting deformation was predicted by conventional constitutive models. In order to discuss the reason for this untraditional ratchetting behavior, a lot of monotonic compression tests were conducted and compared with tension data. The material showed a difference of deformation resistance of about 30 MPa between tension and compression at high strain rates. Furthermore, the authors' previous model and Ohno-Wang model were applied to the test conditions to evaluate their description capability for ratchetting behavior of the material. It was shown that the authors' model has a tendency to overestimate the ratchetting deformation and that the Ohno-Wang model has a tendency to underestimate the uniaxial ratchetting deformation at small stress rates. (author)

  4. Creep damage behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakthivel, T.; Laha, K.; Vasudevan, M.; Panneer Selvi, S.

    2016-01-01

    Creep deformation and rupture behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints fabricated by single-pass activated TIG (A-TIG) and shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) processes have been investigated at 923 K over a stress range of 50 to 110 MPa after post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The weld joints exhibited significantly lower creep rupture lives than the base metal at lower applied stresses. Creep rupture location of the weld joints were found to occur in the ICHAZ. An extensive localized creep deformation, coarsening of M 23 C 6 precipitates in the ICHAZ with creep exposure led to the premature type IV failure of the joints. The coarsening of M 23 C 6 precipitates was extensive in the mid-section of the ICHAZ than the sub-surface of the joints, and was more predominant in the SMAW joint. While A-TIG weld joint exhibited reduced creep cavitation and coarsening of M 23 C 6 precipitates due to lower deformation constraints by adjacent regions in the ICHAZ. Hence, A-TIG weld joint exhibited higher creep rupture life than the SMAW joint. (author)

  5. The morphology and ageing behaviour of δ-ferrite in a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, R.; Singh, R.N.; Sinha, T.K.; Kashyap, B.P.

    1992-01-01

    Dual phase (martensite + δ-ferrite) microstructures were developed in a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, by austenitising at 1523-1623 K, followed by water-quenching. These duplex structures were thermally aged at 973 K for ageing periods varying from 30 min to 21 h. Morphological aspects of δ-ferrite phase and its response to age-hardening were studied by optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis and microhardness testing. It was observed that austenitizing at 1523 K produced fine, acicular δ-ferrite while the δ-ferrite formed by austenitising at higher temperatures (1573-623 K) were massive, irregular-shaped and banded. Moreover the presence of δ-ferrite caused an abnormally strong (110) reflection, observed in X-ray diffraction patterns of martensite plus δ-ferrite structures. This behaviour is thought to be due to development of (110) texture in δ-ferrite phase. Thermal ageing at 973 K caused age-hardening of δ-ferrite with a peak hardness attained after 3.6 ks of ageing. Electron microscopic results suggest that the observed hardening was caused by the formation of Fe 2 Mo Laves phase. (orig.)

  6. Characterizing microstructural changes in ferritic steels by positron annihilation spectroscopy: Studies on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hari Babu, S., E-mail: shb@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Rajkumar, K.V. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Hussain, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kokilamedu 603 104, TN (India); Amarendra, G.; Sundar, C.S. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, TN (India)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Positron lifetime technique probing microstructure of ferritic/martensitic steels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Correlation between positron lifetime, ultrasonic and hardness. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Complementary nature of positron annihilation spectroscopy in probing defects. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Distinguishing precipitation stages by positron annihilation spectroscopy. - Abstract: Applicability of positron annihilation spectroscopy in probing the microstructural changes in ferritic steels has been investigated with thermal treatment studies on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, during 300-1273 K. Positron lifetime results are compared with those of ultrasonic velocity and hardness techniques with two initial microstructural conditions i.e., normalized and tempered condition as well as only normalized condition. In first case, positron lifetime is found to be sensitive to small changes in metal carbide precipitation which could not be probed by other two techniques. In later case, positron lifetime is found to be sensitive to defect annealing until 673 K and in distinguishing the growth and coarsening of metal carbide precipitation stages during 773-1073 K. The present study suggests that by combining positron lifetime, ultrasonic velocity and hardness measurements, it is possible to distinguish distinct microstructures occurring at different stages.

  7. Effect of Alloy 625 Buffer Layer on Hardfacing of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Using Nickel Base Hardfacing Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Gopa; Das, C. R.; Albert, S. K.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Murugesan, S.; Dasgupta, Arup

    2016-04-01

    Dashpot piston, made up of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, is a part of diverse safety rod used for safe shutdown of a nuclear reactor. This component was hardfaced using nickel base AWS ER NiCr-B alloy and extensive cracking was experienced during direct deposition of this alloy on dashpot piston. Cracking reduced considerably and the component was successfully hardfaced by application of Inconel 625 as buffer layer prior to hardface deposition. Hence, a separate study was undertaken to investigate the role of buffer layer in reducing the cracking and on the microstructure of the hardfaced deposit. Results indicate that in the direct deposition of hardfacing alloy on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, both heat-affected zone (HAZ) formed and the deposit layer are hard making the thickness of the hard layer formed equal to combined thickness of both HAZ and deposit. This hard layer is unable to absorb thermal stresses resulting in the cracking of the deposit. By providing a buffer layer of Alloy 625 followed by a post-weld heat treatment, HAZ formed in the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is effectively tempered, and HAZ formed during the subsequent deposition of the hardfacing alloy over the Alloy 625 buffer layer is almost completely confined to Alloy 625, which does not harden. This reduces the cracking susceptibility of the deposit. Further, unlike in the case of direct deposition on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, dilution of the deposit by Ni-base buffer layer does not alter the hardness of the deposit and desired hardness on the deposit surface could be achieved even with lower thickness of the deposit. This gives an option for reducing the recommended thickness of the deposit, which can also reduce the risk of cracking.

  8. Microstructure and annealing behavior of a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel after dynamic plastic deformation to different strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Mishin, Oleg; Tao, N.R.

    2015-01-01

    The microstructure, hardness and tensile properties of a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel processed by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD) to different strains (0.5 and 2.3) have been investigated in the as-deformed and annealed conditions. It is found that significant structural refinement and a high level...... in a loss of strength with only a small gain in ductility, coarsening combined with pronounced partial recrystallization enables a combination of appreciably increased ductility and comparatively high strength....

  9. Basic investigation for life assessment technology of modified 9CR-1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Hiroyuki [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Ohtani, Ryuichi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Fujii, Kazuya [Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Kimura, Kazushige; Ishii, Ryuichi; Fujiyama, Kazunari; Hongo, Shigetada; Iseki, Takashi; Uchida, Hiroshi [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    For the basic study of life assessment technologies for aged components made of mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, specimens were artificially deteriorated by aging, creep and fatigue tests at elevated temperatures. And metallurgical and mechanical properties were examined. The change in the precipitates caused the decrease in toughness. The creep damage in base metal corresponded to the decrease in hardness. The fatigue damage in base metal correlated to the maximum length of a crack among micro-cracks initiated during fatigue cycle. In the welded joint, the creep fracture occurred by the formation and growth of voids in the fine grained region of HAZ near base metal. The creep damage was associated with the increase in both number and area fraction of voids. (orig.)

  10. Ion bombardment damage in a modified Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrell, K.; Lee, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    A normalized-and-tempered Fe-9Cr-1Mo steel, with small Nb and V additions, was bombarded with 4-MeV iron ions to 100 dpa at 400, 450, 500, 550, and 600 0 C. Major damage feature was dislocation tangles which coarsened with increasing bombardment temperature. Sparse cavities were heterogeneously distributed at 500 and 550 0 C. Incorporation of helium and deuterium simultaneously in the bombardments at rates of 10 and 45 appM/dpa, respectively, introduced very high concentrations of small cavities at all temperatures, many of them on grain boundaries. These cavities were shown to be promoted by helium. A small fraction of the matrix cavities exhibited bias-driven growth at 500 and 550 0 C, with swelling 0 C higher than the peak swelling temperature found in neutron irradiations, which is compatible with the higher damage rate used in the ion bombardments. High concentrations of subgrain boundaries and dislocations resulting from the heat treatment, and unbalanced cavity and dislocation sink strengths in the damage structures contribute to the swelling resistance. Such resistance may not be permanent. High densities of bubbles on grain boundaries indicate a need for helium embrittlement tests

  11. Transfer of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel technology through cooperative programs (1980-1985)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikka, V.K.; DiStefano, J.R.; Patriarca, P.

    1986-06-01

    The principal objective of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) 9Cr-1Mo steel development program has been to provide the data and analyses required by designers for use of the alloy in advanced liquid metal reactors to reduce technical tasks and plant capital costs. It was recognized early that designers would not consider use of any material for nuclear applications unless there was a considerable body of experience already established. Toward this end, the plan has been to get the alloy accepted in Section I (Power Boilers), Section II (Materials Specifications), Section VIII (Pressure Vessels), and Section III (Nuclear power Plant Components) of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel (BPV) Code as logical steps in the process. To achieve this objective, extensive interaction with the industrial community was considered mandatory. Accordingly, an intensive effort to achieve technology transfer was initiated, which resulted in the involvement of many organizations. This report is a compilation of 47 status sheets describing 35 participating organizations and funding sources, purpose of the interactions, material and product forms utilized, summary of the work completed, findings, and appropriate references. These interactions contributed significantly toward the fulfillment of the program goals

  12. Postirradiation fracture toughness tests of ESR alloy HT-9 and modified 9Cr-1Mo alloy from UBR reactor experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorne, J.R.; Reed, J.R.; Sprague, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Alloy HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo are being evaluated for potential applications as first wall materials in magnetic fusion reactors. Objectives of the current research task were to test fatigue-precracked Charpy-V (PCC/sub v/) specimens from representative plates irradiated in the UBR reactor at 149 0 C or 300 0 C, and, to compare the results against postirradiation notch ductility data developed previously for the materials. Both plates represent electroslag refined (ESR) melt processing. PCC/sub v/ specimens of Alloy HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo alloy were irradiated at 300 0 C and 149 0 C, respectively, to approx.0.8 X 10 20 n/cm 2 , E > 0.1 MeV. During this period, postirradiation tests for fracture toughness were completed and results compared to notch ductility determinations from standard Charpy-V (C/sub v/) specimens irradiated in the same reactor experiments. Fracture surface examinations by SEM are also reported

  13. Effect of normalization heat treatment on creep and tensile properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panneer Selvi, S.; Sakthivel, T.; Parameswaran, P.; Laha, K.

    2016-01-01

    Creep and tensile properties have been investigated on modified 9Cr-1Mo steel subjected to single and double normalization heat treatments. Optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopic investigation revealed the presence of refined prior austenite grain size and fine M 23 C 6 precipitates in the double normalized steel compared to the steel subjected to single normalization heat treatment. Increased creep strain and significant reduction in creep rupture life were observed with the double normalized steel in comparison with single normalized steel. Increased tensile ductility coupled with marginal decrease in tensile strength at higher test temperature was observed with double normalized steel compared to single normalized steel. It has been attributed to the presence of refined prior austenite grain size and coarsening of Nb rich MX precipitates in double normalized steel. (author)

  14. In-situ Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies on the pitting corrosion of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in neutral chloride solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, S.; Nanda Gopala Krishna, D.; Mudali, U. Kamachi

    2018-01-01

    In-situ Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies were performed for the identification of native and corroded surface oxide layers of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. The Raman data obtained for native oxide layer of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel revealed that it was mainly composed of oxides of Fe and Cr. The presence of alloying element Mo was found to be less significant in the native oxide film. The oxides of Cr were dominant at the surface and were found to be decreasing closer to metal/oxide layer interface. The changes in the chemical composition of the native films upon in-situ pitting during potentiostatic polarization experiment were characterized by in-situ Raman analysis. The corrosion products of potentiostatically polarized modified 9Cr-1Mo steel was composed of dominant Fe (III) phases viz., γ- Fe2O3, α and γ - FeOOH along with the oxides of chromium. The results from Raman analysis were corroborated with the XPS experiments on as received and pitted samples of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel specimens. It was observed that the oxides of Cr and Mo contributed for the stability of the surface layer by forming Cr2O3 and MoO3. Also, the study attempted to find out the intermediate corrosion products inside the metastable pits to account for the pseudo passive behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel in 0.1 M NaCl solution.

  15. Application of Chaboche viscoplastic theory for predicting the cyclic behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo (T91)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chellapandi, P.; Ramesh, R.; Chetal, S.C.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1997-01-01

    Modified 9Cr 1Mo (grade 91) is the structural material for the SG of 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor. This material is codified in RCC-MR (1993). SG top tubesheet and its connecting shell see the hot sodium temperature of about 800 K. The steam temperature is about 770 K at 17 MPa. It is envisaged that this component can meet the creep fatigue damage rules of RCC-MR with 'elastic route' itself. One of the important material data needed to use the simplified rules given in RCC-MR (1993) is 'symmetrization coefficient' (Ks) which is not yet included in RCC-MR. Ks values are established from numerous stress strain cyclic data generated theoretically by using Chaboche viscoplastic model and recommended for the inclusion in the RCC-MR. The Chaboche model for grade 91 material has 20 material parameters which are identified based on the uniaxial monotonic and cyclic data available in RCC-MR (1993) as well as the published data and many uniaxial monotonic, cyclic, creep data are compared well with the predictions. (author). 4 refs, 21 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Wastage Behavior of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Tube Material by Sodium-Water Reaction (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji Young; Kim, Jong Man; Kim, Tae Joon; Choi, Jong Hyeun; Kim, Byung Ho; Lee, Yong Bum; Park, Nam Cook

    2010-01-01

    The Korea Advanced LIquid MEtal Reactor (KALIMER) steam generator is a helical coil, vertically oriented, shell-and-tube type heat exchanger with fixed tube-sheet. The conceptual design and outline drawing of the steam generator are shown. Flow is counter-current, with sodium on the shell side and water/steam on the tube side. Sodium flow enters the steam generator through the upper inlet nozzles and then flows down through the tube bundle. Feedwater enters the steam generator through the feedwater nozzles at the bottom of steam generator. Therefore, if there is a hole or a crack in a heat transfer tube, a leakage of water/steam into the sodium may occur, resulting in a sodium-water reaction. When such a leak occurs, so-called 'wastage' is the result which may cause damage to or a failure of the adjacent tubes. If a steam generator is operated for some time in this condition, it is possible that it might create an intermediate leak state which would then give rise to the problems of a multi-target wastage in a very short time. Therefore, it is very important to predict these phenomena quantitatively from the view of designing a steam generator and its leak detection systems. The objective of this study is a basic investigating of the sodium-water reaction phenomena by small water/steam leaks. For this, wastage tests for modified 9Cr-1Mo steel tube material were conducted, and an empirical formula of the wastage rate for this material was obtained from the results

  17. Fatigue behaviour of a 9Cr1MoNbV martensitic steel in a liquid metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Jean-Bernard; Serre, Ingrid [Ecole National Superieure de Chimie de Lille (France); Verleene, Arnaud [Ecole National Superieure de Chimie de Lille (France); Michelin, Clermond Ferrand (France)

    2009-07-01

    The low cycle fatigue behaviour of the T91 martensitic steel is studied in the range {delta}{epsilon}{sub t} from 0.4% to 2.4%, at 300 C, in air and in liquid Lead Bismuth Eutectic (LBE). It is shown that the cyclic stress response consists of a cyclic softening that is not modified by the environment. However, the fatigue life is reduced after fatigue in LBE as compared to air and the effect is especially marked at high strain range. Metallographic analysis of the external surfaces and of transverse cross sections of specimen show that the short crack density is very low in the specimen failed in liquid metal while it is high for tests in air. Fracture surface observations show that multiple crack initiations occurred in air. In liquid metal, the fracture surfaces were flat and contained widely spaced fatigue striations. Strain localization promoted by the liquid metal is responsible for the decrease in fatigue resistance. (orig.)

  18. Effect of Activated Flux on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, and Residual Stresses of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maduraimuthu, V.; Vasudevan, M.; Muthupandi, V.; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2012-02-01

    A novel variant of tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding called activated-TIG (A-TIG) welding, which uses a thin layer of activated flux coating applied on the joint area prior to welding, is known to enhance the depth of penetration during autogenous TIG welding and overcomes the limitation associated with TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a specific activated flux for enhancing the depth of penetration during autogeneous TIG welding of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. In the current work, activated flux composition is optimized to achieve 6 mm depth of penetration in single-pass TIG welding at minimum heat input possible. Then square butt weld joints are made for 6-mm-thick and 10-mm-thick plates using the optimized flux. The effect of flux on the microstructure, mechanical properties, and residual stresses of the A-TIG weld joint is studied by comparing it with that of the weld joints made by conventional multipass TIG welding process using matching filler wire. Welded microstructure in the A-TIG weld joint is coarser because of the higher peak temperature in A-TIG welding process compared with that of multipass TIG weld joint made by a conventional TIG welding process. Transverse strength properties of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel weld produced by A-TIG welding exceeded the minimum specified strength values of the base materials. The average toughness values of A-TIG weld joints are lower compared with that of the base metal and multipass weld joints due to the presence of δ-ferrite and inclusions in the weld metal caused by the flux. Compressive residual stresses are observed in the fusion zone of A-TIG weld joint, whereas tensile residual stresses are observed in the multipass TIG weld joint.

  19. Influence of microstructural development during annealing at 780oC on creep resistance of ferritic-martensitic T91 (9%Cr-1%Mo-V-Nb) steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Cicco, H; Zavaleta Gutierrez, N; Marrero, J; Luppo, M.I; Danon, C.A

    2006-01-01

    Due to its good properties of creep resistance, toughness and rust resistance, martensitic-ferritic 9%Cr-1%Mo steels are widely used for the production of heating plant components, boilers, heat exchangers, piping and tubing, etc. The effectiveness in steels of MX carbonitrides such as (Nb,V) (C,N) on improving creep resistance at high temperatures is well known. Controlling the behavior of the MX phases to precipitation, during annealing, is essential for obtaining a stable microstructure that can resist high temperatures. This study investigates the relationship between creep resistance and the microstructural changes that occur at different annealing times at a temperature of 780 o C -used industrially during the production and post-welding- in T91 steel. Creep trials were carried out at 600 o C and 190 MPa, and the samples were characterized using optic microscopy (OM), inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the latter including a facility for energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Based on its morphological characteristics, the MX precipitates are classified into three types, types I, II and III. Tempering time at 780 o C has been found to be one of the factors that determines which MX is dominant in the annealed steel. The presence of type MX-III, formed by the secondary precipitation of a VN particle adhering to a NbX, commonly called 'wing', seems to favor creep resistance in these steels. This type of of precipitate, then, fills an effective role in the anchoring of dislocations during creep (cw)

  20. Fatigue Properties of Aged Mod. 9Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Chan Bock

    2007-01-01

    Ferritic/Martensitic steel has a good mechanical properties and a lower thermal expansion coefficient than austenitic stainless steel. Mechanical property of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel is less than austenitic stainless steel at high temperature. High temperature mechanical properties are affected by precipitation for Mod. 9Cr-1Mo. FMS steel is used for long time at high temperature and the effect of aging on mechanical properties is very important. In this study, low cycle fatigue properties with aging were investigated

  1. Cyclic creep, mechanical ratchetting and amplitude history dependence of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and evaluation of unified constitutive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Yamada, Hiroshi

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to elucidate inelastic behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel as a candidate material for the next-generation fast breeder reactor and to provide the information for the formulation of a unified constitutive model. For this purpose, cyclic creep, mechanical ratchetting and amplitude history dependence of cyclic hardening were first examined at 550degC. As a result, systematic cyclic creep and mechanical ratchetting behavior were observed under various loading conditions, and little amplitude history dependence was found. Then these results were simulated by three unified constitutive models, i.e. the Chaboche, Bodner-Partom and modified Chaboche models. The simulated results show that these models cannot describe the cyclic creep and mechanical ratchetting behavior with high accuracy, but succeed in describing the inelastic behavior of amplitude variation experiments. (author)

  2. Microstructural changes due to laser peening in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel subjected to creep damage at 823K and 923K in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasone, Yuji; Kizuki, Yuta; Suzuki, Hayao; Minowa, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    The present study has investigated microstructural changes due to laser peening in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel subjected to creep. The EBSD or Electron Backscatter Diffraction studies have been made on round-bar type specimens creeping at applied stresses of 230 and 240 MPa at 823 K and 105 MPa at 923K in air. Prior to the creep tests, laser peening was applied to specimens at laser power of 8.4-22GW/cm 2 per pulse in water. Microstructural change in each specimen after its creep test was investigated by EBSD/SEM. The EBSD/SEM analyses revealed that the laser peening treatment makes creep rupture time longer and it reveals local misorientation value for rupture. (author)

  3. Inelastic behavior of modified 9Cr-1 Mo steel under basic loading conditions at elevated temperature and evaluation of two unified constitutive models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Eiichi; Mizuno, Mamoru.

    1993-01-01

    The purposes of this paper are to elucidate fundamental material properties of modified 9Cr-1 Mo steel as a candidate material for next-generation fast breeder reactors and to obtain information for the formulation of a practical unified constitutive model. For these purposes, monotonous tension, uniaxial symmetric cycles, uniaxial symmetric cycles with hold time, creep, stress control uniaxial symmetric cycles, cyclic relaxation and circular cyclic loading tests are performed. Then these results are simulated by two unified constitutive models, i.e. the Chaboche model and Bodner-Partom model. The results of simulation show that the Chaboche model can describe all the experimental results with relatively high accuracy, and that the identification of material constants of the model is easy. The Bodner-Partom model can similarly describe the results, but the determination of material constants is difficult. (author)

  4. Thermomechanical Model and Bursting Tests to Evaluate the Risk of Swelling and Bursting of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Steam Generator Tubes during a Sodium-Water Reaction Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The MECTUB code was developed to evaluate the risk of swelling and bursting of Steam Generator (SG tubes. This code deals with the physic of intermediate steam-water leaks into sodium which induce a Sodium-Water Reaction (SWR. It is based on a one-dimensional calculation to describe the thermomechanical behavior of tubes under a high internal pressure and a fast external overheating. The mechanical model of MECTUB is strongly correlated with the kind of the material of the SG tubes. It has been developed and validated by using experiments performed on the alloy 800. A change to tubes made of Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel requires more knowledge of Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel behavior which influences the bursting time at high temperatures (up to 1200°C. Studies have been initiated to adapt the mechanical model and to qualify it for this material. The first part of this paper focuses on the mechanical law modelling (elasticity, plasticity, and creep for Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and on overheating thermal data. In a second part, the results of bursting tests performed on Modified 9Cr-1Mo tubes in the SQUAT facility of CEA are used to validate the mechanical model of MECTUB for the Modified 9Cr-1Mo material.

  5. Thermal Aging Evaluation of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo Steel using Nonlinear Rayleigh Waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Young-Sang; Kim, Hoe-Woong; Kim, Jong-Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Marino, Daniel; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Jacobs, L.J [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta (United States); Ruiz, Alberto [UMSNH, Morelia (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    Thermal aging can pose a high risk to decreases in the mechanical properties such as strength or creep resistance. This can lead to an unexpected failure during long term operation. Nonlinear NDE techniques are preferred over conventional NDE techniques (linear ultrasonic measurements) because nonlinear ultrasonic techniques have shown their capability to detect a microstructural damage in the structures undergoing fatigue and creep. These nonlinear ultrasonic techniques make use of the fact that the dislocation density increases, which will create a nonlinear distortion of an ultrasonic wave; this damage causes the generation of measurable higher harmonic components in an initially mono-chromatic ultrasonic signal. This study investigates the recently developed non-contact nonlinear ultrasonic technique to detect the microstructural damage of mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel based on nonlinear Rayleigh wave with varying propagation distances. Nonlinear Rayleigh surface wave measurements using a non-contact, air-coupled ultrasonic transducer have been applied for the thermal aging evaluation of modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel. Thermal aging for various heat treatment times of mod.. 9Cr-1Mo steel specimens is performed to obtain the nucleation and growth of precipitated particles in specimens. The amplitudes of the first and second harmonics are measured along the propagation distance and the relative nonlinearity parameter is obtained from these amplitudes. The relative nonlinearity parameter shows a similar trend with the Rockwell C hardness.

  6. Creep Rupture Analysis and Life Estimation of 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 2.25Cr-1Mo and Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Prabir Kumar

    2018-04-01

    This paper highlights a comparative assessment of creep life of 1.25Cr-0.5Mo, 2.25Cr-1Mo and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels based on accelerated creep rupture tests. Creep rupture test data have been analysed and creep life of the above mentioned materials have been assessed using Larson Miller parameter at the stress levels of 60 and 42 MPa for different temperatures. Limiting steam temperatures for minimum design life of 105 h at 42 and 60 MPa for the above mentioned steels have also been calculated. Microstructural studies for the three above mentioned steels are also done.

  7. Temperature dependence of liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel under low cycle fatigue in lead-bismuth eutectic at 160-450 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xing; Marmy, Pierre; Qin, Ling; Verlinden, Bert; Wevers, Martine; Seefeldt, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Low cycle fatigue properties of a 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steel (T91) have been tested in a low oxygen concentration (LOC) lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) environment and in vacuum at 160-450 °C. The results show a clear fatigue endurance "trough" in LOC LBE, while no such a strong temperature dependence of the fatigue endurance is observed when the steel is tested in vacuum. The fractographic observations by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show that ductile microdimples are prevalent on the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in vacuum, whereas the fracture surfaces produced in LOC LBE at all the temperatures are characterized by quasi-cleavage. Interestingly, using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), martensitic laths close to the fatigue crack walls or to the fracture surfaces of the specimens tested in vacuum are found to have transformed into very fine equiaxed subgrains. Nevertheless, such microstructural modifications do not happen to the specimens tested in LOC LBE at 160-450 °C. These interesting microstructural distinctions indicate that liquid metal embrittlement (LME) is able to occur throughout the fatigue crack propagation phase in the full range of the temperatures investigated, i.e. LME is not very sensitive to temperature during the fatigue crack propagation.

  8. Influence of Normalizing Temperature on the Microstructure and Hardness of 9Cr-1Mo ODS Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Ki Nam; Kim, Tae Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyu Tae [Dongguk University, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthened(ODS) steel has superior high-temperature strength and creep properties because fine oxide particles having an excellent stability at high temperatures are uniformly distributed in the matrix. ODS steel has being developed for structure materials of sodium fast cooled reactor(SFR) because of its excellent irradiation resistance and mechanical properties. 9Cr-1Mo ODS steel has better high temperature strength and irradiation resistance than common 9Cr-1Mo steel because Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nano-sized particles which interrupt dislocation movement and grain boundary slip are uniformly dispersed in the martensite matrix. The mechanical properties of the ODS steels are mainly determined by their microstructures, and the microstructure is considerably decided by the heat-treatment conditions. This study focused on the effect of normalizing temperature on microstructure and hardness of 9Cr-1Mo martensitic ODS steel so as to optimize the heat-treatment condition. In this study, the effect of normalizing temperature on mechanical property and microstructures of 9Cr-1Mo martensitic ODS steel was investigated. It was shown that the microhardness was steadily increased with increasing of the normalizing temperature. According to TEM observation, mechanical property of 9Cr-1Mo ODS steel was significantly affected by lath width. These observations, could be useful to understand the relationship between normalizing temperature and microstructure.

  9. Creep-fatigue-environment interaction of 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Akiyoshi; Asada, Yasuhide

    1996-01-01

    An extension of the creep-fatigue damage model has been conducted in the present study. The original damage model has been developed to the predict the creep-fatigue life of 9Cr-1Mo-V-Nb steel (Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel) in a very high vacuum environment. The present study is to extend an applicability of the model to the creep-fatigue damage accumulation in the air environment. (orig.)

  10. An evaluation procedure of sodium environmental effects on FBR grade SUS316 (316FR) and Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. On the basis of the studies up to the fiscal year of 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of sodium environmental effects on structural materials of fast breeder reactors (FBR's) is one of the key issues for the integrity of the plants. The Elevated Temperature Structural Design Guide for Monju (ETSDG) incorporated an evaluation procedure of sodium environmental effects in the Appendix MA.2, for the conventional steels, such as SUS304, SUS316, SUS321 and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo. Following the establishment of the ETSDG, a new material with superior elevated temperature properties, FBR grade SUS316 (316FR), has been developed, and studies on Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel (Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel) has been performed, for the application to demonstration reactors and successive large-scale reactors. These materials were shown to have, at least equal, or better compatibility with sodium compared with the conventional steels. Moreover, studies have been continued with the conventional steels, particularly with SUS304, for the further validation of the procedure in the ETSDG, especially in terms of long-term properties. Those studies provide basis for the study on 316FR. This report proposed an evaluation procedure of sodium environmental effects on 316FR and Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, which is to be incorporated into the structural design guide for demonstration fast breeder reactors. The procedure is summarized as follows: (1) Corrosion allowance of 316FR and Mod.9Cr-1Mo can be evaluated by the equation determined in the ETSTG. (2) Strength reduction factors on design allowable values are not necessary for either steel. Strength reduction due to the transfer of carbon and nitrogen, etc does not occur with 316FR, which was the same as SUS304. Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel does not show strength reduction, contrary to 2 l/4Cr-1Mo, similar ferritic steel. (3) Corrosion allowance can be determined separately for thin-walled components. The procedure allows design without correction factors for Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, which was not possible for 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in the ETSDG. (author)

  11. Irradiation hardening of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo-Seog; Kim, Sung-Ho; Choo, Kee-Nam; Kim, Do-Sik

    2009-01-01

    An irradiation test of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel was carried out in the OR5 test hole of HANARO of a 30 MW thermal power at 390±10degC up to a fast neutron fluence of 4.4x10 19 (n/cm 2 ) (E > 1.0 MeV). The dpa of the irradiated specimens was evaluated to be 0.034 - 0.07. Tensile and impact tests of the irradiated Mod.9Cr-1Mo were done in the hot cell of the IMEF. The change of the tensile strength by irradiation was similar to the change of the yield strength. The increase of the yield and tensile strengths was up to 18% and 10% respectively. The elongation reduction of the weldment was up to 65%. (author)

  12. Influence of the initial metallurgical state and the austenizing conditions on the distribution of austenitc grain size of the martensitic-ferritic steel T91(9%Cr-1%Mo-V-Nb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavaleta Gutierrez, N; Luppo, M.I; Danon, C.A; Garcia de Andres, C

    2006-01-01

    It is a known fact that the austenizing conditions (speed of heating to the austenite temperature and austenizing time) as well as the initial metallurgical state of the material strongly influence the distribution of austenitic grain size in steels. This distribution will be one of the parameters that will control the behavior of the material in a later transformation from the austenite -by continuous cooling or in the isothermal case - and this behavior will determine the product's final mechanical properties. Based on the published literature, we have studied the influence of the initial metallurgical state and the speed of heating to austenite on the distribution of austenitic grain size for a certain austenizing temperature and time for a martensitic-iron ASTM A213 grade T91 steel. Two-stage thermal cycles were designed for this, that is, tempering for a variable period of time at the industrial tempering temperature (780 o C) followed by the austenizing (1050 o C, 30 minutes) 'in situ'. We have analyzed the following as a whole: 1) the role of the stabilizing elements (Nb, V) that eventually control the anchoring of the austenitic grain boundary by carbide or carbonitride precipitation. Therefore, we have tried to vary the fraction of these elements present in solid solution by annealing before austenizing. 2) the role of the speed of heating to austenite. In this case, we have considered two different values (1 and 30 o C/s), previously reported as inferior and superior, respectively, to the speed of 'critical' heat needed to produce a distribution of heterogeneous austenitic grain size when the metallurgical state before the austenizing is quenched and tempered. Preliminary results suggest that a annealing stage after tempering in the plant and prior to eventual austenizing significantly reduces the influence of the heating to austenite speed in the development of a heterogeneous structure of austenitic grains (CW)

  13. Impingement wastage experiments with 9Cr 1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, S., E-mail: skishore@igcar.gov.in [IGCAR (India); Beauchamp, François; Allou, Alexandre [CEA (France); Kumar, A. Ashok; Chandramouli, S.; Rajan, K.K. [IGCAR (India)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Sodium heated steam generators are crucial components of fast breeder reactors. • A leak in steam generator tube will cause sodium water reaction that damages the tubes. • A collaborative study by CEA and IGCAR was conducted to quantify the extent of damage on 9Cr 1Mo tube due to a steam/water leak. • It was compared against the predictions of PROPANA code. - Abstract: Steam Generator (SG) is one of the vital components of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR). The main safety concern with SG is a probable sodium–water reaction. In case, one of its water/steam carrying tubes leaks, water/steam gets into contact with sodium causing sodium-water reaction, which is highly exothermic and producing corrosive NaOH and hydrogen. The ejecting reaction products at high temperature, impinges upon adjacent tubes by a process called impingement wastage. It could damage one of the neighboring tubes in a short time, if the detection and protection systems are failing. IGCAR and CEA carried out a collaborative study on impingement wastage of 9Cr 1Mo steel, which is one of the candidate materials for SFR SG tubes. The studies comprise of experimental works at IGCAR and simulation works with PROPANA code at CEA. This paper brings out the data and experience gained through this cooperative work.

  14. Effects of HFIR irradiation at 550C on the microstructure and toughness of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.; Huang, F.H.; Johnson, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    Results are reported for base metal and weld metal specimens of HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo following irradiation in HFIR at 55 0 C to 5 dpa. The DBTT shifts in irradiated base metal specimens were 30 0 C for HT-9 and 90 0 C for 9Cr-1Mo with further shifts of 20 0 C for weld metal. Concurrently, strength as measured by hardness increased 15 percent for HT-9 and 25 percent for 9Cr-1Mo. The hardness increases can be attributed in part to defect clusters 1.5 to 3.0 nm in diameter at densities approaching 10 17 cm -3 and also to lower rates of cavity nucleation ahead of the propagating crack

  15. Interaction of high cycle fatigue and creep in 9%Cr-1%Mo steel at elevated temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasina, R.; Lukas, P.; Kunz, L.; Sklenicka, V.

    1995-01-01

    High-cycle-fatigue/creep experiments were performed on a 9%Cr-1%Mo tempered martensite ferritic steel at 873 K in air. The stress ratio R = σ min /σ max ranged from -1 (''pure'' fatigue) to 1 (''pure'' creep). The maximum stress σ max was kept constant at 240 MPa.The lifetime depends on the stress ratio R in a non-monotonic way. In the stress ratio interval 0.6 mean of the stress cycle. In the stress ratio interval -1 a . The fatigue/creep interaction occurs in between these intervals. The fatigue/creep loading induces transformation of the tempered martensite ferritic structure into an equiaxed subgrain structure. The resulting subgrain size depends strongly on the stress ratio. (author)

  16. The oxidation behaviour of Fe-9Cr-1Mo steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, P.C.; Holmes, D.R.; Whittaker, A.; Brierley, R.A.; Garrett, J.C.P.

    1983-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of Fe9Cr1Mo steels over a wide range of conditions covering likely operating environments has been determined. In particular the effects of temperature, gas composition and materials variables on production materials have been investigated. From this work the mechanisms of protective and breakaway corrosion have broadly been elucidated. The vital role of carbon deposition in the oxide and carburisation of the metal has been determined. Aspects of the breakaway and protective oxidation mechanisms have been incorporated into a statistical model for predicting breakaway initiation and boiler component life. The results obtained from the tube life calculations indicate very low probabilities of component failure for coolant gas compositions containing up to the equivalent of 825 vppm H 2 O and 1%CO. For a more aggressive gas at the upper limit of CO concentration (2%CO) there is a small probability of failure within 25 years for finned boiler tubes. Current work may in time allow these constraints composition to be relaxed. The information gained has been used in the design of Heysham II/Torness to reduce the probabilities of 9Cr component failure to insignificant levels. (author)

  17. Influence of cooling rates on the transformation behaviour of 9Cr-1Mo-0.07C steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saroja, S.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Raghunathan, V.S.

    1992-01-01

    The choice of various decomposition mechanisms of austenite in a 9Cr-1 Mo-0.07C steel under different rates of cooling has been studied. The techniques employed were electron probe micro-analysis, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. The observed morphological features may be explained based on the predominance of the two types of transformation, austenite → martensite and austenite → ferrite during cooling. In the steel used in this study, decomposition of austenite to proeutectoid ferrite was favoured at cooling rates less than about 2 Ks -1 . The mechanism by which the supersaturated proeutectoid ferrite relieves its excess solute concentration was also studied. A ''microstructural map'' has been proposed to predict the constitution at the end of any given cooling rate for 9Cr-1 Mo-0.07C steel. The choice of commercial treatment has been rationalized with respect to the resultant microstructural constituents. (Author)

  18. Experimental study and modelling of high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaffard, V.

    2004-12-01

    Chromium martensitic stainless steels are under development since the 70's with the prospect of using them as structural components in thermal and nuclear power plants. The modified 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel is already used, especially in England and Japan, as a material for structural components in thermal power plants where welding is a commonly used joining technique. New generations of chromium martensitic stainless steels with improved mechanical properties for high pressure and temperature use are currently under development. However, observations of several in-service premature failures of welded components in 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel, outline a strong need for understanding the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments. The present study aimed at experimentally determining and then modelling the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of both 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments (typically in the temperature range from 450 C to 650 C). The base metal was first studied as the reference material. It was especially evidenced that tempered chromium martensitic steels exhibit a change in both creep flow and damage behaviour for long term creep exposure. As a consequence, the classically performed extrapolation of 1,000 hours creep data to 100,000 hours creep lifetime predictions might be very hazardous. Based on experimental observations, a new model, integrating and coupling multiple creep flow and damage mechanisms, was developed in the framework of the mechanics of porous media. It was then successfully used to represent creep flow and damage behaviour of the base metal from high to low stress levels even for complex multiaxial loading conditions. Although the high temperature creep properties of the base metal are quite good, the occurrence of premature failure in weldments in high temperature creep conditions largely focused the attention of the scientific community. The lower creep strength of the weld component was also

  19. Effects of welding on toughness of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, W. S.; Kim, S. H.; Yoon, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear energy is being seriously considered to meet the increasing demand for a world-wide energy supply without environmental effects. Generation IV reactors are being developed to produce a reliable energy safely and with an economic benefit. Since these new reactors require an elevated temperature, ferritic/martensitic steels are attracting attention as candidate materials for the reactor vessel of a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) and the cladding of a sodium fast reactor (SFR,) due to their high strength and thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and good resistance to corrosion. in recent years, new ferritic/martensitic steels have been developed for ultra supercritical fossil power plants. Advanced technologies for a steel fabrication have improved the elevated temperature properties of ferritic/martensitic steels to make them comparable with austenitic stainless steels. The microstructural stability of the pressure vessel, cladding and core structural materials of the VHTR and SCWR is very important. Welding process affects the microstructure and residual stress, so the toughness of ferritic/martensitic steels decreases in general. In this paper; Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel is welded by SMAW with V-groove, and the effects of welding on tensile and impact properties are evaluated. The upper self energy of the weldment was only 57% of that of the base metal, and the DBTT T 41J and T 68J index temperatures of the weldment were higher than those of the base metal by 17 deg. C, 38 deg. C and 37 deg. C, respectively. (authors)

  20. Nondestructive testing for microstructural characterization in 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel towards assessment of fabrication quality and in-service degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, T.; Rao, K.B.S.; Raj, Baldev [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1999-07-01

    The paper discusses the usefulness of non destructive testing for microstructural characterization in 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements and spectral analysis have been used in a complementary way for characterizing Ac{sub 1} and Ac{sub 3} temperatures, amount of martensite and ferrite, dissolution of V{sub 4}C{sub 3} and NbC and formation of {delta}-ferrite. The microstructural degradation occurring due to thermal ageing and creep has also been studied by ultrasonic velocity measurements. Magnetic Barkhausen noise technique has been used for estimating the extent of various regions in heat affected zone (HAZ) of 9Cr-1Mo ferritic steel weldment. The same technique has been used for the assessment of low cycle fatigue damage in 9Cr-1Mo steel. The study establishes that non destructive methods can be used for the assessment of fabrication quality and in service degradation of the components. (author)

  1. The Effect of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue in 9Cr-1Mo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Tae Young; Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Yong Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Baek, Kyoung Ho [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    9Cr-1Mo steel is a candidate material for reactor vessel for VHTR. Because 9Cr-1Mo steel has a good mechanical properties and a lower thermal expansion coefficient than austenitic stainless steel. The reactor vessel of VHTR is operated at about 450 .deg. C. At this temperature, fatigue occurs during start-up and cool-down, and creep occurs during normal operation. Creep-fatigue damage by the interaction between fatigue and creep is an important factor that limits VHTR reactor vessel life. In this study, Effect of hold time on low cycle fatigue behavior of 9Cr-1Mo at 600 .deg. C was investigated in air.

  2. The Effect of Hold Time on Creep-Fatigue in 9Cr-1Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Tae Young; Kim, Dae Whan; Kim, Yong Wan; Baek, Kyoung Ho

    2009-01-01

    9Cr-1Mo steel is a candidate material for reactor vessel for VHTR. Because 9Cr-1Mo steel has a good mechanical properties and a lower thermal expansion coefficient than austenitic stainless steel. The reactor vessel of VHTR is operated at about 450 .deg. C. At this temperature, fatigue occurs during start-up and cool-down, and creep occurs during normal operation. Creep-fatigue damage by the interaction between fatigue and creep is an important factor that limits VHTR reactor vessel life. In this study, Effect of hold time on low cycle fatigue behavior of 9Cr-1Mo at 600 .deg. C was investigated in air

  3. Experimental study and modelling of high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel weldments; Etude experimentale et modelisation, du comportement, de l'endommagement et de la rupture en fluage a haute temperature de joint soudes en acier 9Cr1Mo-NbV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffard, V

    2004-12-15

    Chromium martensitic stainless steels are under development since the 70's with the prospect of using them as structural components in thermal and nuclear power plants. The modified 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel is already used, especially in England and Japan, as a material for structural components in thermal power plants where welding is a commonly used joining technique. New generations of chromium martensitic stainless steels with improved mechanical properties for high pressure and temperature use are currently under development. However, observations of several in-service premature failures of welded components in 9Cr1Mo-NbV steel, outline a strong need for understanding the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments. The present study aimed at experimentally determining and then modelling the high temperature creep flow and damage behaviour of both 9Cr1Mo-NbV steels and weldments (typically in the temperature range from 450 C to 650 C). The base metal was first studied as the reference material. It was especially evidenced that tempered chromium martensitic steels exhibit a change in both creep flow and damage behaviour for long term creep exposure. As a consequence, the classically performed extrapolation of 1,000 hours creep data to 100,000 hours creep lifetime predictions might be very hazardous. Based on experimental observations, a new model, integrating and coupling multiple creep flow and damage mechanisms, was developed in the framework of the mechanics of porous media. It was then successfully used to represent creep flow and damage behaviour of the base metal from high to low stress levels even for complex multiaxial loading conditions. Although the high temperature creep properties of the base metal are quite good, the occurrence of premature failure in weldments in high temperature creep conditions largely focused the attention of the scientific community. The lower creep strength of the weld component was also

  4. Evaluation of strength property variations across 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints using automated ball indentation (ABI) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaraju, S.; GaneshKumar, J.; Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.; Laha, K.

    2017-01-01

    The variations of strength properties across 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints fabricated by different arc welding processes such as shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), tungsten inert gas (TIG) and activated tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) have been evaluated employing automatic ball indentation (ABI) technique. ABI tests were conducted at 298 K across various zones of the weld joints comprising of base metal, weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ) regions. The flow curves obtained from ABI tests were correlated with corresponding conventional tensile test results. In general, the tensile strength decreased systematically across the weld joint from weld metal to base metal. Inter critical HAZ exhibited the least strength implying that it is the weakest zone. The incomplete phase transformation in the ICHAZ during weld thermal cycle caused the softening. The A-TIG weld metal exhibited higher UTS and strain hardening values due to higher carbon in the martensite. The strain hardening exponent exhibited only slight variation across the various regions of the weld joints. A-TIG weld joint exhibited higher weld metal and HAZ strength, marginally higher UTS to YS ratio in the weld metal and HAZ compared to that of the other two processes. Hence, among the three welding processes chosen, A-TIG welding process is found to be superior in producing a 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint with better strength properties.

  5. Evaluation of strength property variations across 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints using automated ball indentation (ABI) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaraju, S. [Nuclear Recycle Board, BARCF, Kalpakkam (India); GaneshKumar, J.; Vasantharaja, P. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Vasudevan, M., E-mail: dev@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Laha, K. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2017-05-17

    The variations of strength properties across 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints fabricated by different arc welding processes such as shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), tungsten inert gas (TIG) and activated tungsten inert gas (A-TIG) have been evaluated employing automatic ball indentation (ABI) technique. ABI tests were conducted at 298 K across various zones of the weld joints comprising of base metal, weld metal, heat affected zone (HAZ) and intercritical HAZ (ICHAZ) regions. The flow curves obtained from ABI tests were correlated with corresponding conventional tensile test results. In general, the tensile strength decreased systematically across the weld joint from weld metal to base metal. Inter critical HAZ exhibited the least strength implying that it is the weakest zone. The incomplete phase transformation in the ICHAZ during weld thermal cycle caused the softening. The A-TIG weld metal exhibited higher UTS and strain hardening values due to higher carbon in the martensite. The strain hardening exponent exhibited only slight variation across the various regions of the weld joints. A-TIG weld joint exhibited higher weld metal and HAZ strength, marginally higher UTS to YS ratio in the weld metal and HAZ compared to that of the other two processes. Hence, among the three welding processes chosen, A-TIG welding process is found to be superior in producing a 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint with better strength properties.

  6. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Reactor Pressure Vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potirniche, Gabriel; Barlow, Fred D.; Charit, Indrajit; Rink, Karl

    2013-01-01

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  7. Prediction and Monitoring Systems of Creep-Fracture Behavior of 9Cr-1Mo Steels for Teactor Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potirniche, Gabriel [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Barlow, Fred D. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Rink, Karl [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States)

    2013-11-26

    A recent workshop on next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) topics underscored the need for research studies on the creep fracture behavior of two materials under consideration for reactor pressure vessel (RPV) applications: 9Cr-1Mo and SA-5XX steels. This research project will provide a fundamental understanding of creep fracture behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel welds for through modeling and experimentation and will recommend a design for an RPV structural health monitoring system. Following are the specific objectives of this research project: Characterize metallurgical degradation in welded modified 9Cr-1Mo steel resulting from aging processes and creep service conditions; Perform creep tests and characterize the mechanisms of creep fracture process; Quantify how the microstructure degradation controls the creep strength of welded steel specimens; Perform finite element (FE) simulations using polycrystal plasticity to understand how grain texture affects the creep fracture properties of welds; Develop a microstructure-based creep fracture model to estimate RPVs service life; Manufacture small, prototypic, cylindrical pressure vessels, subject them to degradation by aging, and measure their leak rates; Simulate damage evolution in creep specimens by FE analyses; Develop a model that correlates gas leak rates from welded pressure vessels with the amount of microstructural damage; Perform large-scale FE simulations with a realistic microstructure to evaluate RPV performance at elevated temperatures and creep strength; Develop a fracture model for the structural integrity of RPVs subjected to creep loads; and Develop a plan for a non-destructive structural health monitoring technique and damage detection device for RPVs.

  8. Mechanical behavior of 9Cr-1Mo-1V steel due to creep fatigue deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sang Tae; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Lee, Hak Sun; Oh, Sang Hyun; Kwun, Sook In; Kim, Chung Seok

    2005-01-01

    Creep-fatigue tests with trapezoid load wave were performed on a 9Cr-1Mo-1V steel at high temperature(550 .deg. C). Trapezoid load wave is considering about hold time for creep effects. we could find out some information in the relationship between number of cycles to failure and hold time. The number of cycles to failure depended on hold time. The cyclic behavior of 9Cr-1Mo-1V steel was characterized by cyclic softening with increasing number of cycles in high temperature. Also we could observe some cavity in the specimens. The size of cavity was different from each hold time

  9. Evaluation of dynamic fracture toughness of cold worked 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyanarayanan, S.; Sasikala, G.; Ray, S.K.

    2004-01-01

    Dynamic J-R curves for cold worked 9Cr-1Mo steel have been estimated from instrumented impact test data at ambient temperature on pre-cracked Charpy specimens using three methods of analysis, namely those by Ray et al., Schindler, and Sreenivasan and Mannan. It is concluded that of these three, Schindler's method is the best suited for the purpose since it gives consistent variations with cold work of dynamic J-R curves and dynamic fracture toughness. Cold work results in substantial degradation in dynamic fracture toughness of 9Cr-1Mo steel

  10. Fractographic examination of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo Charpy specimens irradiated in the AD-2 test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.; Hu, W.L.

    1983-01-01

    Fracture surface topologies have been examined using scanning electron microscopy for 20 selected half sized Charpy impact specimens of HT-9 and Modified 9Cr-1Mo in order to provide improved understanding of fracture toughness degradation as a result of irradiation for Path E alloys. The specimen matrix included unirradiated specimens and specimens irradiated in EBR-II in the AD-2 experiment. Also, hardness measurements have been made on selected irradiated Charpy specimens. The results of examinations indicate that irradiation hardening due to G-phase formation at 390 0 C is responsible for the large shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) found in HT-9. Toughness degradation in HT-9 observed following higher temperature irradiations is attributed to precipitation at delta ferrite stringers. Reductions in toughness as a consequence of irradiation in Modified 9Cr-1Mo are attributed to in-reactor precipitation of (V,Nb)C and M 23 C 6 . It is shown that crack propagation rates for ductile and brittle failure modes can be measured, that they differ by over an order of magnitude and that unexpected multiple shifts in fracture mode from ductile to brittle failure can be attributed to the effect of delta ferrite stringers on crack propagation rates

  11. Some elevated temperature tensile and strain-controlled fatigue properties for a 9%Cr1Mo steel heat treated to simulate thick section material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, S.J.; Jacques, S.

    Current interest has been expressed in the usage of thick section 9%Cr1%Mo steel, particularly for UK Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) steam generator tubeplates. This paper presents the results of some preliminary mechanical property test work on a single cast of the steel, heat treated to simulate heavy ruling sections encompassing thicknesses likely to be met in the CDFR context. The microstructures of the simulated thick section material were found to remain predominantly as tempered martensite even at the slowest transformation cooling rates used (50 deg. C/h). The effect of microstructure is reflected in the elevated temperature proof stress, tensile strength and strain-controlled fatigue endurance which were found to be comparable with the properties established for thin section normalised and tempered 9%Cr1%Mo steel. These results are extremely encouraging and, taken in conjunction with the results from other simulation work on this material, further demonstrate the potential of thick section 9%Cr1%Mo steel. (author)

  12. Processing parameters for the mechanical working of 9 Cr-1 Mo steel: processing maps approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaprasad, P.V.; Mannan, S.L.; Prasad, Y.V.R.K. [Indira Ghandi Centre for Atomic Research, Tamilnadu (India)

    2004-12-15

    Processing and instability maps using a dynamic materials model have been developed for 9Cr-1Mo steel in the temperature range 850 to 1200{sup o}C and strain rate range 0.001-100 s{sup -1} with a view to optimising its hot workability. The efficiency of power dissipation increased with increase in temperature and decrease in strain rate. The 9Cr-1Mo material exhibited two dynamic recrystallisation domains, one with a peak efficiency of 37% occurring at 950{sup o}C and 0.001 s{sup -1} and the other with a peak efficiency of 35% occurring at 1200{sup o}C and 0.1 s{sup -1}. These results are in good agreement with those found in industry. (author)

  13. Microstructure and elevated-temperature erosion-oxidation behaviour of aluminized 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Huttunen, E.; Honkanen, M.; Tsipas, Sophia Alexandra; Omar, H.; Tsipas, D.

    2012-01-01

    Degradation of materials by a combination of erosive wear and atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures constitutes a problem in some power generation processes, such as fluidized-bed combustion. In this work, 9Cr-1Mo steel, a common tube material in combustion chambers, is coated by a pack cementation method from an Al-containing pack in order to improve the resistance to erosion-oxidation at elevated temperatures. The resulting coating is studied in terms of microstructure and microhar...

  14. The integrity of 9Cr-1Mo to stainless steel transition joints in AGR steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, D.W.; Neumann, P.; Soo, J.

    1982-01-01

    The metallurgical aspects of the transition joint between 9Cr-1Mo and 316 stainless steel boiler tube sections are reviewed. A large minimum superheat margin (106 0 C) between the dryout zone and the 9Cr-1Mo to stainless steel transition joint was specified in the original design to eliminate the risk of wetting the stainless steel which is susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. However, small defects were discovered in the welds between the 9Cr-1Mo and Sanicro (72%Ni-16%Cr-10%Fe) transition piece, resulting from dilution of the weld pool by nickel from the transition piece. This led to the possibility of weld failure as a result of creep crack growth in service, and any significant reduction in operating temperature would mean that the large superheat margin could not be sustained. The creep properties of the joints, together with the transition joint temperature distribution, enabled tube failure rates to be determined as a function of operating temperature. A probabilistic model was developed so that the transition joint could be operated within a temperature 'window', the lower temperature limit being determined by stress corrosion considerations and the upper limit being set by creep rate limitations. This allows full load performance from the boilers throughout the anticipated life of the plant. (author)

  15. Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-08-21

    The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

  16. Fatigue crack growth and endurance data on 9% Cr 1% Mo steels for AGR applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Priddle, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental investigations have been carried out on 9%Cr 1%Mo steels to examine: (1) The significance of carburisation on the fatigue endurance of plain and welded boiler tubes, and tube spacer strip; (2) the high cycle fatigue endurance of spacer strip and spacer weld metal; (3) fatigue crack growth rates in spacer strip and spacer weld metal. This report summarises the results of these investigations and where necessary compares the data to that in current data sheets. The effects of carburisation are variable depending on the structure and type of carburisation. The fatigue endurance properties of spacer strip and spacer weld metal are also similar and need not be considered separately for assessment or design purposes. Fatigue crack growth rates in spacer strip and space weld metal are similar and are influenced by both stress ratio and temperature. A design curve from a fast reactor data sheet may be used as an upper bound to these fatigue crack growth results. (author)

  17. Unified inelastic constitutive equations incorporating dynamic strain aging for Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaguchi, Masatsugu; Takahashi, Yukio

    1998-01-01

    A unified constitutive model considering dynamic strain aging effect was developed in order to describe inelastic deformation behavior of the Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel precisely. The inelastic behavior of the steel was summarized as follows. A rate dependent deformation was observed above 500degC, and there was no rate dependency under 400degC. However, stress relaxation behavior was observed even at rate independent temperature region. Further, a stress after relaxation depended on prior loading strain rate, and it showed a higher value as the strain rate was slow. A feature of the proposed constitutive model was that an applied stress consists of three stress components: a back stress, an overstress and an aging stress which corresponds to dynamics strain aging and shows a negative strain rate dependency. The aging stress was measured by strain rate change tests, and it showed larger values as the strain rates were slow and the temperatures were low. The backstress and the overstress were measured by strain dip tests. The backstress was approximately rate independent under 400degC, however it showed rate dependency above 500degC. The overstress showed larger values as the strain rates were fast and the temperatures were high. The material constants were determined systematically based on the measured values of each internal variable. In order to evaluate the validity of the constitutive model, numerical simulations were done for various inelastic deformation behavior of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel. The simulations agreed with experimental results very well in all cases. (author)

  18. Creep behavior and evolution of microstructure of modified Grade 91 welded joint after short term exposure at 500 deg C; Fluage a 500 deg C d'un joint soude d'un acier 9Cr-1Mo modifie. Evolution de la microstructure et comportement mecanique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivier, F.

    2009-03-15

    With the increase in worldwide energy demand, the nuclear industry is a way of producing electricity on a large scale and to answer to this need. For the design of a new generation of fission nuclear reactors and among six chosen fission reactor systems, France develops in particularly the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concept. This implies the use of materials that are more and more resistant to high temperature for long-term exposure. AREVA focuses on materials already used in fossil-fuel power plant, so that the mechanical behaviour of Grade 91 (Fe{sub 9}Cr{sub 1}MoNbV) has to be investigated. This ferritic-martensitic steel is considered to be a potential candidate for welded components. Such structures are combined with welded joints, which have to be studied. Three industrial partners (AREVA, CEA, EDF) have launched a study with the Centre des Materiaux in order to investigate the creep of welded joint of Grade 91. The aim of this work is to complete the available database about the mechanical behaviour of Grade 91, base metal and welded joint, during creep tests performed at 500 C up to 4500 h exposure. Thermal aging tests, tensile tests, and creep tests were performed at 450 C and 500 C using both base metal and cross-weld samples. Several geometries of cross-weld creep specimens were tested. The microstructure has not remarkably changed after tests concerning both nature and size of precipitates, and the characteristic size of the matrix sub-structure. The creep damage is not developed in the ruptured specimens after creep tests. Only little damage by cavity nucleation and growth was found in the creep specimens. Creep fracture at 500 C takes places by viscoplastic flow, contrary to tests performed at 625 C where the creep-induced damage governs the creep rupture at least for long-term lifetime. From creep curves of base metal and cross-weld specimens, a phenomenological model is proposed. The flow rule is a Norton power law with a stress exponent

  19. Microstructure and elevated-temperature erosion-oxidation behaviour of aluminized 9Cr-1Mo Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen-Saarivirta, E.; Honkanen, M.; Tsipas, S. A.; Omar, H.; Tsipas, D.

    2012-10-01

    Degradation of materials by a combination of erosive wear and atmospheric oxidation at elevated temperatures constitutes a problem in some power generation processes, such as fluidized-bed combustion. In this work, 9Cr-1Mo steel, a common tube material in combustion chambers, is coated by a pack cementation method from an Al-containing pack in order to improve the resistance to erosion-oxidation at elevated temperatures. The resulting coating is studied in terms of microstructure and microhardness and tested for its resistance against impacts by sand particles in air at temperatures of 550-700 °C under several conditions, with thickness changes and appearance of the exposed surfaces being studied. The coating was found to contain several phases and layers, the outermost of which was essentially Al-rich and contained e.g., small AlN precipitates. The microhardness values for such coating ranged from 950 to 1100 HV20g. The coating provided the substrate with increased protection particularly against normal particle impacts, as manifested by smaller thickness losses for coated specimens as compared to uncoated counterparts. However, much of the coating was lost under all test conditions, despite the fact that particle debris formed a homogeneous layer on the surface. These results are described and discussed in this paper.

  20. Microstructural changes during creep and life assessment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Kota; Maruyama, Kouichi; Komine, Ryuji; Nagae, Yuji.

    1997-01-01

    Several microstructural changes take place in a material during the course of creep. These changes can be a measure of creep life. In this paper, microstructural changes in Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel were studied and it was examined which is a good measure of creep life. Microscopic structural changes, such as void growth, lath structure uniformly oriented to the tensile axis and elongation of grains, are evident only in the necked portion of ruptured specimens. These macroscopic structural changes are not useful for creep life assessment. Lath width increases and dislocation density within lath decreases with increasing creep duration. These changes in dislocation substructure start in the early stage of creep life, and cause the increase of strain rate in the tertiary creep stage. The lath width and the dislocation density reach a saturated value before rupture. The saturated values are independent of temperature, and uniquely related to creep stress normalized by shear modulus. The extent of these microstructural changes are greater at lower stresses under which the material is practically used. These facts suggest that the lath width and the dislocation density within lath can be a useful measure of creep life. Hardness of crept specimens is closely related to the lath width and the dislocation density within lath. The changes of these microstructural features can be evaluated by the measurement of hardness. (author)

  1. Impression creep behaviour of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridhin Raj, V.R.; Kottda, Ravi Sankar; Kamaraj, M.; Maduraimuthu, V.M.; Vasudevan, M.

    2016-01-01

    P91 steel (9Cr-1Mo) steel is extensively used in power plants for super heater coils, headers and steam piping. The aim of the present work is to study the creep behaviour of different zones of A-TIG weld joint using impression creep technique and compare it with that of the TIG weld joint. P91 steel weld joints were made by A-TIG welding without using any filler material and multi-pass TIG welding is done using ER90S-B9 filler rods. Welds were subjected to post-weld heat treatment (PWHT). Impression creep tests were carried out at 650 °C on the base metal, weld metal and HAZ regions. Optical Microscope and TEM were used to correlate microstructures with observed creep rates. The FGHAZ showed significantly higher impression creep rate compared to that of the base metal and weld metal. Fine grain size and relatively coarser M 23 C 6 carbide particles are responsible for higher creep rate. The impression creep rate of A-TIG weld metal and coarse grain HAZ was found to be lower than that of base metal. This is attributed to the higher grain size in weld metal and coarse HAZ attributed to the higher grain size in weld metal and to the higher peak temperature observed during A-TIG welding. (author)

  2. Life assessment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel. Quantitative evaluation of microstructural damage in creep interrupted specimens and in creep-fatigue specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Kouichi; Kato, Syoichi; Nagae, Yuji

    1999-02-01

    Boiler and steam turbine components in power generating plants are used under creep and creep-fatigue conditions. It is important to measure both creep and creep-fatigue damage of the components in order to assess the residual life of the components. Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, a candidate material for steam generator in FBR, has a tempered martensitic lath structure. It was proposed in the second report that lath width in the lath structure is closely related to creep strain, and using this relation one can assess residual creep life of a structural component made of the steel. The objectives of this study are to investigate the change of the lath structure during creep.fatigue deformation, and to estimate creep strain by measuring area of cell composing the lath structure. The area of cell can be a better measure of creep deformation than the lath width. The lath structure is covered during creep-fatigue deformation. The lath structure becomes equiaxed cell structure under creep-fatigue more quickly compared with the lath structure recovered during creep. The lath structure recovered under creep-fatigue has a stationary value of the lath width determined by maximum stress at Nf/2. (Nf: number of cycles) If the recovery process of the lath structure can be investigated under creep-fatigue, the lath width can be a measure of the life assessment under creep-fatigue. Area of cell composing the lath structure increases with creep deformation and reaches a stationary value S s determined by creep stress. The rate of increase in the area is faster at a higher stress and temperature. A normalized change in the area of cell, ΔS/ΔS s , was introduced as a measure of the recovery process of martensitic lath structure. ΔS is the change in area of cell from the initial value S 0 , ΔS s is the difference between S s and S 0 . ΔS/ΔS s is uniquely related to creep strain independent of creep conditions. However, the scatter of data in ΔS/ΔS s -strain relation is wider than

  3. Mechanical behaviour of SFR materials: proposition of fatigue weld joint coefficient for MOD9CR-1MO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ancelet, O.; Matheron, Ph.

    2012-01-01

    Mod 9Cr-1Mo steel (T91) is a candidate material for steam generator of SFR (Sodium Fast Reactors). In order to validate this choice, it is necessary, firstly to verify that it is able to withstand the planned environmental and operating conditions, and secondly to check if it is covered by the existing design codes, concerning its procurement, fabrication, welding, examination methods and mechanical design rules. A large R and D program on mod9Cr-1Mo steel has been undertaken at CEA in order to characterize the behavior of this material and of its welded junctions. In this program, the role of the Laboratory for structural Integrity and Standards (LISN) is to develop high temperature defect assessment procedures under fatigue and creep loadings. In this frame, complementary studies are conducted in order to validate the existing methods (developed for the fast reactors) and to get new experimental data on Mod9Cr-1Mo steel. In particular, some new experiments are conducted on specimen with a weld joint and compared with classical experiments on base metal specimen. These results associated with finite element modeling allow to propose a weld joint coefficient at 550 degrees C for the Mod9Cr1Mo steel. (authors)

  4. An examination of the potential for 9%Cr1%Mo steel as thick section tubeplates in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, J.; Sanderson, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    The steam generator units of future commercial demonstration fast reactors are likely to have a requirement for heavy section tubeplates (up to 500mm thick) with good elevated temperature strength and creep-fatigue resistance. A comparison of the mechanical properties available for ferritic steels has suggested that 9%Cr1%Mo steel would be a strong candidate material for this application. Although this steel is covered in some national specifications for tubes, pipes, plates and forgings and is also well established in the UK nuclear industry, international experience to date is confined to sections less than ca 150mm. The potential of 9%Cr1%Mo steel for use in thick sections has therefore been assessed in the present study by using simulation heat treatments. The work reported here involved the laboratory-scale cooling of bar samples to simulate water-quenching rates in cylindrical sections up to 720mm diameter (ie: equivalent to 500mm thick plate). The tensile properties at ambient and 525 0 C and impact fracture appearance transition temperatures were determined for material tempered after cooling at simulated thick section rates; the transformation characteristics as influenced by the net chromium equivalent were also established. The results of this work show that 9%Cr1%Mo steel may be fully hardened in the equivalent of the section sizes examined,and the mechanical properties of tempered material show only a small reduction from those of thin section normalised and tempered 9%Cr1%Mo steel. These findings support the potential usage of heavy section 9%Cr1%Mo steel envisaged for fast reactor steam generator tubeplates

  5. Cyclic Creep Behavior of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel at 600 .deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Kim, Dae Whan; Jang, Jin Sung; Park, Jae Young

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic deformation behavior is important in practice because high-temperature structural components are exposed under the cyclic conditions of repeated loading. In static creep (SC), the response of the material is simple as a static state of monotonic loading. However, in cyclic creep (CC), it is complex as dynamic loading. Cyclic creep data have been rarely reported until now. In particular, it is not understood well whether cyclic creep will accelerate or retard the creep rate compared with static creep, because it is not only the plastic deformation under cyclic loading is drastically different from monotonic loading, but also the cyclic response is dependent on the cycling frequency, stress range, stress ratio, and hold periods of cycling. Therefore, it is necessary to clarify the cyclic creep behavior influencing the creep deformation and fracture process. In this study, a series of cyclic creep tests was carried out using magnitudes of stress range of constant stress ratio (R=0.1) under continuous tension-tension loading cycles at a hold time of 10 minutes. Cyclic curves were monitored and obtained with time variations, and the properties of the cyclic creep tests were compared with those of static creep tests. The fracture microstructures were observed and analyzed

  6. An experimental study on impingement wastage of Mod 9Cr 1Mo steel due to sodium water reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore, S., E-mail: skishore@igcar.gov.in [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Ashok Kumar, A.; Chandramouli, S.; Nashine, B.K.; Rajan, K.K.; Kalyanasundaram, P.; Chetal, S.C. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium heated steam generators are crucial components of fast breeder reactors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A leak in steam generator tube will cause sodium water reaction that damages the tubes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental study was conducted to quantify the extent of damage on Mod 9Cr 1Mo tube due to a water leak. - Abstract: Sodium heated steam generator (SG) is a crucial component in the heat transport system of a fast breeder reactor (FBR). In case, one of its water/steam carrying tubes becomes defective, water/steam leaks into sodium, flowing in the shell side, causing sodium-water reaction, which is highly exothermic and producing corrosive NaOH. The reaction jet originating from a leaking tube may impinge on its adjacent tube, resulting in damage of the tube. Impingement wastage refers to this kind of damage, occurring to a tube of sodium heated SG, owing to a small water/steam leak from a neighboring tube. Extensive research works have been conducted all over the world to study various aspects of this phenomenon. Experimental studies were carried out in Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR) to understand the effect of impingement wastage on Mod 9Cr 1Mo, which is the tube material of prototype fast breeder reactor (PFBR) SG. This paper brings out the data and experience gained through the experiments.

  7. Influence of microstructure on the room temperature flow behaviour of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore, R.; Singh, R.N.; Kashyap, B.P.

    2005-01-01

    The normalizing heat treatment conditions of T-91 grade steel were altered in order to get different austenite/martensite packet grain sizes. Tempering of the steel was carried out at (1) peak hardening temperature and (2) at temperature closer to commercial treatment. Tempering of these specimens, austenitized at a chosen temperature, at the two tempering temperatures resulted in the modification of the fine scale structure by the formation of different carbide types and their distribution. Tensile testing of these specimens (under all the three conditions) was conducted at ambient temperature in order to study the influence of the microstructures on the deformation behaviour. The flow stress, hardness and room temperature impact toughness showed an inverse relation with the martensite packet/austenite grain size. The deformation behavior of the specimens under the three heat treatment conditions was analyzed according to Ashby's model was made assuming. The slip length, λ g , was estimated from the σ-ε 1/2 plot and compared with the relevant microstructure parameters. The as-received material was seen to undergo aligatoring damage during cold rolling and a modification in their microstructure could render a defect free product. (author)

  8. Effect of Welding Processes on the Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Residual Stresses of Plain 9Cr-1Mo Steel Weld Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraju, S.; Vasantharaja, P.; Brahadees, G.; Vasudevan, M.; Mahadevan, S.

    2017-12-01

    9Cr-1Mo steel designated as P9 is widely used in the construction of power plants and high-temperature applications. It is chosen for fabricating hexcan fuel subassembly wrapper components of fast breeder reactors. Arc welding processes are generally used for fabricating 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints. A-TIG welding process is increasingly being adopted by the industries. In the present study, shielded metal arc (SMA), tungsten inert gas (TIG) and A-TIG welding processes are used for fabricating the 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints of 10 mm thickness. Effect of the above welding processes on the microstructure evolution, mechanical properties and residual stresses of the weld joints has been studied in detail. All the three weld joints exhibited comparable strength and ductility values. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint fabricated by SMAW process exhibited lower impact toughness values caused by coarser grain size and inclusions. 9Cr-1Mo steel weld joint fabricated by TIG welding exhibited higher toughness due to finer grain size, while the weld joint fabricated by A-TIG welding process exhibited adequate toughness values. SMA steel weld joint exhibited compressive residual stresses in the weld metal and HAZ, while TIG and A-TIG weld joint exhibited tensile residual stresses in the weld metal and HAZ.

  9. Impurity Antimony-Induced Creep Property Deterioration and Its Suppression by Rare Earth Ceriumfor a 9Cr-1Mo Ferritic Heat-Resistant Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yewei Xu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature creep properties of three groups of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel samples, undoped, doped with Sb, and doped with Sb and Ce, are evaluated under the applied stresses from 150 MPa to 210 MPa and at the temperatures from 873–923 K. The creep behavior follows the temperature-compensated power law as well as the Monkman-Grant relation. The creep activation energy for the Sb-doped steel (519 kJ/mol is apparently lower than that for the undoped one (541 kJ/mol, but it is considerably higher for the Sb+Ce-doped steel (621 kJ/mol. Based on the obtained relations, both the creep lifetimes under 50 MPa, 80 MPa, and 100 MPa in the range 853–923 K and the 105 h creep rupture strengths at 853 K, 873 K, and 893 K are predicted. It is demonstrated that the creep properties of the Sb-doped steel are considerably deteriorated but those of the Sb+Ce-doped steel are significantly improved as compared with the undoped steel. Microstructural and microchemical characterizations indicate that the minor addition of Ce can stabilize the microstructure of the steel by segregating to grain boundaries and dislocations, thereby offsetting the deleterious effect of Sb by coarsening the microstructure and weakening the grain boundary.

  10. Enhancement effect of inter-pass annealing during equal channel angular pressing on grain refinement and ductility of 9Cr1Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Ting, E-mail: hao.ting@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Tangi, Haiyin [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Luo, Guangnan [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Wang, Xianping; Liu, Changsong [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China); Fang, Qianfeng, E-mail: qffang@issp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 1129, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2016-06-14

    To obtain enhanced mechanical property in both the strength and the ductility, 9Cr1Mo steel (T91) was severely deformed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) combined with an additional inter-pass annealing. Tensile results show that the additional inter-pass annealing can significantly improve the ductility (i.e. 18% of the total elongation after four-pass extrusion with the inter-pass annealing) but slightly decrease the tensile strength comparing with the case without the inter-pass annealing (i.e. 10% of the total elongation after four-pass ECAP processing). The average grain size of the two passes ECAP-processed materials with the inter-pass annealing (~0.8 µm) is smaller than that of the sample without inter-pass annealing (~2 µm), and the fraction of the high angle grain boundaries in the samples with the inter-pass annealing (~40%) is higher than that of ~34% (two-pass ECAP) without the inter-pass annealing based on electron backscattering diffraction analysis. The crystallite size and dislocation density were evaluated by means of the modified Williamson-Hall plot based on X-ray diffraction analysis. The microstructural analysis indicates that the enhanced ductility of the ECAP processed and inter-pass annealed materials can be attributed to the relatively smaller grain sizes, larger crystallite sizes and lower dislocation densities.

  11. Enhancement effect of inter-pass annealing during equal channel angular pressing on grain refinement and ductility of 9Cr1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, Ting; Tangi, Haiyin; Luo, Guangnan; Wang, Xianping; Liu, Changsong; Fang, Qianfeng

    2016-01-01

    To obtain enhanced mechanical property in both the strength and the ductility, 9Cr1Mo steel (T91) was severely deformed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) combined with an additional inter-pass annealing. Tensile results show that the additional inter-pass annealing can significantly improve the ductility (i.e. 18% of the total elongation after four-pass extrusion with the inter-pass annealing) but slightly decrease the tensile strength comparing with the case without the inter-pass annealing (i.e. 10% of the total elongation after four-pass ECAP processing). The average grain size of the two passes ECAP-processed materials with the inter-pass annealing (~0.8 µm) is smaller than that of the sample without inter-pass annealing (~2 µm), and the fraction of the high angle grain boundaries in the samples with the inter-pass annealing (~40%) is higher than that of ~34% (two-pass ECAP) without the inter-pass annealing based on electron backscattering diffraction analysis. The crystallite size and dislocation density were evaluated by means of the modified Williamson-Hall plot based on X-ray diffraction analysis. The microstructural analysis indicates that the enhanced ductility of the ECAP processed and inter-pass annealed materials can be attributed to the relatively smaller grain sizes, larger crystallite sizes and lower dislocation densities.

  12. Creep life assessment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel. Pt. 2. Quantitative evaluation of microstructural damage in creep-interrupted specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Kota; Maruyama, Kouichi; Komine, Ryuji; Nagae, Yuji

    1998-02-01

    Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel has a martensitic lath structure. Recovery of the lath structure takes place in the course of creep. Microstructural degradation due to the recovery results in the acceleration of creep rate and the subsequent failure of a specimen. Change of lath width during creep of the steel was quantitatively investigated to propose a residual life assessment methodology based on the recovery process. Since the steel was tempered at 1053K, the lath structure is thermally stable at the testing temperatures (848K-923K). However, recovery of lath structure readily takes place during creep, indicating that the recovery is induced by creep deformation. Lath width d increases with creep strain and saturates to a value d s determined by creep stress. The increase of d is faster at a higher stress and temperature. A normalized change in lath width, Δd/Δd s , was introduced to explain the variation of lath growth rate with creep stress and temperature. Δd is the change in lath width from the initial value d 0 , and Δd s is the difference between d s and d 0 . Δd/Δd s is uniquely related to creep strain ε and the relationship is independent of creep stress as well as creep temperature. This Δd/Δd s -ε relationship obtained by an accelerated creep test at a higher temperature or stress is applicable to any creep condition including service conditions of engineering plants. Creep strain can be evaluated from the measurement of Δd/Δd s based on the Δd/Δd s -ε relationship. A creep curve under any creep condition can readily be calculated by creep data of the steel. Combining these information one can assess residual life of a structural component made of the steel. (author)

  13. Comparison of the effects of long-term thermal aging and HFIR irradiation on the microstructural evolution of 9Cr-1MoVNb steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    Both thermal aging at 482--704 degree C for up to 25,000h and HFIR irradiation at 300--600 degree C for up to 39 dpa produce substantial changes in the as-tempered microstructure of 9Cr-1MoVNb martensitic/ferritic steel. However, the changes in the dislocation/subgrain boundary and the precipitate structures caused by thermal aging or neutron irradiation are quite different in nature. During thermal aging, the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary and carbide precipitate structures remain stable below 650 degree C, but coarsen and recover somewhat at 650--704 degree C. The formation of abundant intergranular Laves phase, intra-lath dislocation networks, and fine dispersions of VC needles are thermal aging effects that are superimposed upon the as-tempered microstructure at 482--593 degree C. HFIR irradiation produces dense dispersions of very small ''black'' dislocations loops at 300 degree C and produces helium bubbles and voids at 400 degree C At 300--500 degree C, there is considerable recovery of the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary structure and microstructural/microcompositional instability of the as-tempered carbide precipitates during irradiation. By contrast, the as-tempered microstructure remains essentially unchanged during irradiation at 600 degree C. Comparison of thermally aged with irradiation material suggests that the instabilities of the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary and precipitate structures at lower irradiation temperatures are radiation-induced effects, whereas the absence of both Laves phase and fine VC needles during irradiation is a radiation-retarded thermal effect

  14. Creep-fatigue evaluation method for weld joint of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel Part II: Plate bending test and proposal of a simplified evaluation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Masanori, E-mail: ando.masanori@jaea.go.jp; Takaya, Shigeru, E-mail: takaya.shigeru@jaea.go.jp

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Creep-fatigue evaluation method for weld joint of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel is proposed. • A simplified evaluation method is also proposed for the codification. • Both proposed evaluation method was validated by the plate bending test. • For codification, the local stress and strain behavior was analyzed. - Abstract: In the present study, to develop an evaluation procedure and design rules for Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints, a method for evaluating the creep-fatigue life of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints was proposed based on finite element analysis (FEA) and a series of cyclic plate bending tests of longitudinal and horizontal seamed plates. The strain concentration and redistribution behaviors were evaluated and the failure cycles were estimated using FEA by considering the test conditions and metallurgical discontinuities in the weld joints. Inelastic FEA models consisting of the base metal, heat-affected zone and weld metal were employed to estimate the elastic follow-up behavior caused by the metallurgical discontinuities. The elastic follow-up factors determined by comparing the elastic and inelastic FEA results were determined to be less than 1.5. Based on the estimated elastic follow-up factors obtained via inelastic FEA, a simplified technique using elastic FEA was proposed for evaluating the creep-fatigue life in Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints. The creep-fatigue life obtained using the plate bending test was compared to those estimated from the results of inelastic FEA and by a simplified evaluation method.

  15. Creep-fatigue evaluation method for weld joint of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel Part II: Plate bending test and proposal of a simplified evaluation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masanori; Takaya, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Creep-fatigue evaluation method for weld joint of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel is proposed. • A simplified evaluation method is also proposed for the codification. • Both proposed evaluation method was validated by the plate bending test. • For codification, the local stress and strain behavior was analyzed. - Abstract: In the present study, to develop an evaluation procedure and design rules for Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints, a method for evaluating the creep-fatigue life of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints was proposed based on finite element analysis (FEA) and a series of cyclic plate bending tests of longitudinal and horizontal seamed plates. The strain concentration and redistribution behaviors were evaluated and the failure cycles were estimated using FEA by considering the test conditions and metallurgical discontinuities in the weld joints. Inelastic FEA models consisting of the base metal, heat-affected zone and weld metal were employed to estimate the elastic follow-up behavior caused by the metallurgical discontinuities. The elastic follow-up factors determined by comparing the elastic and inelastic FEA results were determined to be less than 1.5. Based on the estimated elastic follow-up factors obtained via inelastic FEA, a simplified technique using elastic FEA was proposed for evaluating the creep-fatigue life in Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel weld joints. The creep-fatigue life obtained using the plate bending test was compared to those estimated from the results of inelastic FEA and by a simplified evaluation method.

  16. Effect of dynamic plastic deformation on microstructure and annealing behaviour of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Mishin, Oleg V.; Tao, N. R.

    2015-01-01

    after quasi- static compression. The microstructure after dynamic plastic deformation is however less stable than the microstructure after quasi- static compression. Annealing at 675 and 700 degrees C leads to structural coarsening and recrystallisation in each sample, but with recrystallisation...... occurring faster in the sample annealed after dynamic plastic deformation. The lower thermal stability of the microstructure produced by dynamic plastic deformation is attributed to a higher driving force for recrystallisation in the dynamically deformed material....

  17. Self-wastage Behavior of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel as Heat Transfer Tube Material for a SFR SG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ji-Young; Kim, Tae-Joon; Kim, Jong-Man; Choi, Jong-Hyeun; Kim, Byung-Ho; Park, Nam-Cook

    2008-01-01

    Sodium cooled fast reactors adopt sodium heated steam generators in a secondary sodium circuit to raise the steam to drive the turbine. In most cases these steam generators are of a shell-in tube type, with a high pressure water/steam inside the tubes and low pressure sodium on the shell-side, with a single wall tube as a barrier between these fluids. Therefore, if there is a hole or a crack in a heat transfer tube, a leakage of water/steam into the sodium may occur, resulting in a sodium-water reaction. When such a leak occurs, there results an important phenomena, so-called 'self-wastage' which may cause damage to the inside of the leakage site itself. If a steam generator is operated for some time with this condition, it is possible that it will damage the leak hole itself, which may eventually become a much larger opening. There is a danger that the resultant leak rate caused by a self-wastage might create the state of a small leak, or even an intermediate leak which would then give rise to the problems of a multi-target wastage. It has been observed in this study and others that the diameter of the nozzle hole grows to become a larger size in a very short time. Therefore, it is very important to predict these phenomena quantitatively from the view of designing a steam generator and its leak detection systems. The objective this study is a basic investigating of the sodium water reaction phenomena by small water/steam leaks

  18. Heat treatment effects on impact toughness of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels irradiated to 100 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    Plates of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels were given four different heat treatments: two normalizing treatments were used and for each normalizing treatment two tempers were used. Miniature Charpy specimens from each heat treatment were irradiated to ∼19.5 dpa at 365 degrees C and to ∼100 dpa at 420 degrees C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). In previous work, the same materials were irradiated to 4-5 dpa at 365 degrees C and 35-36 dpa at 420 degrees C in FFTF. The tests indicated that prior austenite grain size, which was varied by the different normalizing treatments, had a significant effect on impact behavior of the 9Cr-1MoVNb but not on the 12Cr-1MoVW. Tempering treatment had relatively little effect on the shift in DBTT for both steels. Conclusions are presented on how heat treatment can be used to optimize impact properties

  19. Heat treatment effects on impact toughness of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels irradiated to 100 dpa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Plates of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels were given four different heat treatments: two normalizing treatments were used and for each normalizing treatment two tempers were used. Miniature Charpy specimens from each heat treatment were irradiated to {approx}19.5 dpa at 365{degrees}C and to {approx}100 dpa at 420{degrees}C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). In previous work, the same materials were irradiated to 4-5 dpa at 365{degrees}C and 35-36 dpa at 420{degrees}C in FFTF. The tests indicated that prior austenite grain size, which was varied by the different normalizing treatments, had a significant effect on impact behavior of the 9Cr-1MoVNb but not on the 12Cr-1MoVW. Tempering treatment had relatively little effect on the shift in DBTT for both steels. Conclusions are presented on how heat treatment can be used to optimize impact properties.

  20. Cooperation on impingement wastage experiment of Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel using SWAT-1R sodium-water reaction test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauchamp, F.; Allou, A.; Nishimura, M.; Umeda, R.

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: • 6 experiments were carried out in the SWAT-1R facility of JAEA Oarai R&D Center to study the wastage resistance of the Mod. 9Cr-1Mo steel (T91) straight tubes. • These experiments were performed under the cooperation between CEA and JAEA. • The experiments were conducted successfully: - all the tubes were punctured by the reaction jet, - wastage and steam/water leak rates were obtained, - experimental results brought some new determining sets of wastage data on T91. • This fruitful cooperation has contributed to: - expanding the wastage database on T91, - upgrading wastage rates prediction from modelling, - the safety demonstration of future steam generators units

  1. An analysis of a set of creep data for a 9Cr-1Mo-0.2V (P91 type) steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadek, J.; Sustek, V.; Pahutova, M.

    1997-01-01

    Recently published creep data for a 9Cr-1Mo-0.2V steel are analysed and an attempt is made to interpret them applying the concept of thermally activated detachment of dislocations from carbide particles as the rate controlling process. For the data, very high and stress dependent apparent activation energy of creep, Q c , and very high and temperature dependent apparent stress exponent, m c , are characteristic. The modelling of creep behavior applying the above mentioned concept is shown to fail to account for this temperature and applied stress dependence of minimum creep strain rate and/or the values of Q c and m c following from the data analysis. It is suggested that the behavior of the dislocation substructure, which is affected by the presence of carbide particles, must be introduced into any model to adequately describe the unusual creep behavior of the steel of interest. (orig.)

  2. Formation of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl coatings on a 9Cr-1Mo steel, and corrosion evaluation in flowing Pb-17Li loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumdar, Sanjib, E-mail: sanjib@barc.gov.in [High Temperature Materials Development Section, Materials Processing & Corrosion Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Paul, Bhaskar [High Temperature Materials Development Section, Materials Processing & Corrosion Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Chakraborty, Poulami [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Kishor, Jugal; Kain, Vivekanand [High Temperature Materials Development Section, Materials Processing & Corrosion Engineering Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Dey, Gautam Kumar [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Materials Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-01

    Iron aluminide coating layers were formed on a ferritic martensitic grade 9Cr-1Mo (P 91) steel using pack aluminizing process. The formation of different aluminide compositions such as orthorhombic-Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5}, B2-FeAl and A2-Fe(Al) on the pack chemistry and heat treatment conditions have been established. About 4–6 μm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} scale was formed on the FeAl phase by controlled heat treatment. The corrosion tests were conducted using both the FeAl and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl coated specimens in an electro-magnetic pump driven Pb-17Li Loop at 500 °C for 5000 h maintaining a flow velocity of 1.5 m/s. The detailed characterization studies using scanning electron microscopy, back-scattered electron imaging and energy dispersive spectrometry revealed no deterioration of the coating layers after the corrosion tests. Self-healing oxides were formed at the cracks generated in the aluminide layers during thermal cycling and protected the base alloy (steel) from any kind of elemental dissolution or microstructural degradation. - Highlights: •Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/FeAl coating produced on P91 steel by pack aluminizing and heat treatment. •Corrosion tests of coated steel conducted in flowing Pb-17Li loop at 500 °C for 5000 h. •Coating was protective against molten metal corrosion during prolonged exposure. •Self-healing protective oxides formed in the cracks generated in aluminide layers.

  3. Void formation and helium effects in 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels irradiated in HFIR and FFTF at 400/degree/C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Klueh, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    Martensitic/ferritic 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels doped with up to 2 wt% Ni have up to 450 appm He after HFIR irradiation to /approximately/38 dpa, but only 5 appm He after 47 dpa in FFTF. No fine He bubbles and few or no larger voids were observable in any of these steels after FFTF irradiation at 407/degree/C. By contrast, many voids were found in the undoped steels (30-90 appm He) irradiated in HFIR at 400/degree/C, while voids plus many more fine He bubbles were found in the Ni-doped steels (400-450 appm He). Irradiation in both reactors at /approximately/400/degree/C produced significant changes in the as-tempered lath/subgrain boundary, dislocation, and precipitation structures that were sensitive to alloy composition, including doping with Ni. However, for each specific alloy the irradiation-produced changes were exactly the same comparing samples irradiated in FFTF and HFIR, particularly the Ni-doped steels. Therefore, the increased void formation appears solely due to the increased helium generation found in HFIR. While the levels of void swelling are relatively low after 37-39 dpa in HFIR (0.1-0.4%), details of the microstructural evolution suggest that void nucleation is still progressing, and swelling could increase with dose. The effect of helium on void swelling remains a valid concern for fusion application that requires higher dose experiments. 15 refs., 14 figs., 8 tabs

  4. Creep life assessment of Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel. Pt. 1. Quantitative evaluation of microstructural damage in creep rupture specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Kota; Maruyama, Kouichi; Komine, Ryuji; Nagae, Yuji

    1997-03-01

    Several microstructural changes take place in a material during the course of creep. These changes can be a measure of creep life consumption. In this paper, microstructural changes in Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel were studied in order to examine their ability as the measure of creep life consumption. Macroscopic structural changes, such as void growth, rotation of lath structure toward the tensile axis and elongation of grains, are evident only in the necked portion of ruptured specimens. These macroscopic structural changes are not useful for creep life assessment. Lath width increases and dislocation density within lath decreases with increasing creep duration. These changes in dislocation substructure start in the early stage of creep life, and cause the increase of strain rate in the tertiary creep stage. The lath width and the dislocation density reach a stationary value before rupture. The stationary values are independent of temperature, and uniquely related to creep stress normalized by shear modulus. The extent of these microstructural changes are greater at lower stresses under which the material is practically used. These facts suggest that the lath width and the dislocation density within lath can be a useful measure of creep life consumption. Hardness of crept specimens is closely related to the lath width and the dislocation density within lath. The changes of these microstructural features can be evaluated by the measurement of hardness. (author)

  5. Construction of long-term isochronous stress-strain curves by a modeling of short-term creep curves for a Grade 9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo-Gon; Yin, Song-Nan; Koo, Gyeong-Hoi

    2009-01-01

    This study dealt with the construction of long-term isochronous stress-strain curves (ISSC) by a modeling of short-term creep curves for a Grade 9Cr-1Mo steel (G91) which is a candidate material for structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactors as well as in fusion reactors. To do this, tensile material data used in the inelastic constitutive equations was obtained by tensile tests at 550degC. Creep curves were obtained by a series of creep tests with different stress levels of 300MPa to 220MPa at an identical controlled temperature of 550degC. On the basis of these experimental data, the creep curves were characterized by Garofalo's creep model. Three parameters of P 1 , P 2 and P 3 in Garofalo's model were properly optimized by a nonlinear least square fitting (NLSF) analysis. The stress dependency of the three parameters was found to be a linear relationship. But, the P 3 parameter representing the steady state creep rate exhibited a two slope behavior with different stress exponents at a transient stress of about 250 MPa. The long-term creep curves of the G91 steel was modeled by Garofalo's model with only a few short-term creep data. Using the modeled creep curves, the long-term isochronous curves up to 10 5 hours were successfully constructed. (author)

  6. Influencia de la composición y tratamiento térmico sobre el comportamiento a fluencia de aceros ferrítico-martensíticos del tipo 9Cr1MoVNb utilizados en calderas supercríticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez Urrutia, I.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, creep behaviour on various ferritic-martensitic steels (type 9Cr1MoVNb from last generation were studied. They’re amply used as high pressure and temperature tubes in supercritical boilers for advanced thermoelectric plant. The material used was produced with vacuum high frecuency induction furnace hot-rolling followed by normalizing plus and tempering heat treatments. Creep testing carry out with different stress (also constant lower than yield strength (σ < Re and temperatures at 600±50ºC. Influence by variation of some chemical elements (B, Ti, V, Nb, V, C, as well assessment Larson-Miller, Manson-Haferd and Orr-Sherby-Dorn parameters, they’re likewise studied.

    Se estudia el comportamiento a fluencia de varios aceros ferrítico-martensíticos de última generación, del tipo 9Cr1MoVNb, que son ampliamente utilizados como tubos presurizados de alta temperatura en calderas supercríticas para centrales térmicas avanzadas de producción de energía eléctrica. El material utilizado fue fabricado en hornos de inducción de alta frecuencia y al vacío, laminado en caliente y posteriormente aplicado diferentes tratamientos térmicos de Normalizado y Revenido. En los ensayos de fluencia se aplicaron diferentes y ctes. σ < Re y temperaturas de 550, 600 y 650º C. La influencia de la variación de determinados elementos (C, N, V, Nb, Ti, B de su composición química así como observar los valores que toman los parámetros de Larson-Miller, Manson-Haferd y Orr-Sherby-Dorn, son asimismo contemplados.

  7. Microstructural Analysis of Orientation-Dependent Recovery and Recrystallization in a Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel Deformed by Compression at a High Strain Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Zhang, Yubin; Mishin, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    energies in 〈111〉- and 〈100〉-oriented regions in deformed and annealed samples, as well as investigations of the growth of recrystallizing grains, are used to analyze the annealing behavior. It is concluded that recrystallization in the given material occurs by a combination of oriented nucleation...

  8. Behavior of helium gas atoms and bubbles in low activation 9Cr martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Shiraishi, Haruki; Matsui, Hideki; Abe, Katsunori

    1994-09-01

    The behavior of helium-gas release from helium-implanted 9Cr martensitic steels (500 appm implanted at 873 K) during tensile testing at 873 K was studied. Modified 9Cr-1Mo, low-activation 9Cr-2W and 9Cr-0.5V were investigated. Cold-worked AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was also investigated as a reference which was susceptible helium embrittlement at high temperature. A helium release peak was observed at the moment of rupture in all the specimens. The total quantity of helium released from these 9Cr steels was in the same range but smaller than that of 316CW steel. Helium gas in the 9Cr steels should be considered to remain in the matrix at their lath-packets even if deformed at 873 K. This is the reason why the martensitic steels have high resistance to helium embrittlement.

  9. Behavior of helium gas atoms and bubbles in low activation 9Cr martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Shiraishi, Haruki; Matsui, Hideki; Abe, Katsunori

    1994-01-01

    The behavior of helium-gas release from helium-implanted 9Cr martensitic steels (500 appm implanted at 873 K) during tensile testing at 873 K was studied. Modified 9Cr-1Mo, low-activation 9Cr-2W and 9Cr-0.5V were investigated. Cold-worked AISI 316 austenitic stainless steel was also investigated as a reference which was susceptible helium embrittlement at high temperature. A helium release peak was observed at the moment of rupture in all the specimens. The total quantity of helium released from these 9Cr steels was in the same range but smaller than that of 316CW steel. Helium gas in the 9Cr steels should be considered to remain in the matrix at their lath-packets even if deformed at 873 K. This is the reason why the martensitic steels have high resistance to helium embrittlement. ((orig.))

  10. Assessment of martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareing, J.; Tavassoli, A.A.

    1995-01-01

    Martensitic steels are currently considered in Europe to be prime structural candidate materials for the first wall and breeding blanket of the DEMO fusion reactor. In this design, reactor power and wall loading will be significantly higher than those of an experimental reactor. ITER and will give rise to component operating temperatures in the range 250 to 550 0 C with neutron doses higher than 70 dpa. These conditions render austenitic stainless steel, which will be used in ITER, less favourable. Factors contributing to the promotion of martensitic steels are their excellent resistance to irradiation induced swelling, low thermal expansion and high thermal conductivity allied to advanced industrial maturity, compared to other candidate materials vanadium alloys. This paper described the development and optimisation of the steel and weld metal. Using data design rules generated on modified 9 Cr 1 Mo steel during its qualification as a steam generator material for the European Fast Reactor (EFR), interim design guidelines are formulated. Whilst the merits of the steel are validated, it is shown that irradiation embrittlement at low temperature, allied to the need for prolonged post-weld hat treatment and the long term creep response of welds remain areas of some concern. (author). 18 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Neutron irradiation effects on the ductile-brittle transition of ferritic/martensitic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels such as the conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb (Fe-9Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.06Nb-0.1C) and 12Cr-1MoVW (Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C) steels have been considered potential structural materials for future fusion power plants. The major obstacle to their use is embrittlement caused by neutron irradiation. Observations on this irradiation embrittlement is reviewed. Below 425-450{degrees}C, neutron irradiation hardens the steels. Hardening reduces ductility, but the major effect is an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy, as measured by a Charpy impact test. After irradiation, DBTT values can increase to well above room temperature, thus increasing the chances of brittle rather than ductile fracture.

  12. Characteristics of modified martensitic stainless steel surfaces under tribocorrosion conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rozing, Goran; Marusic, Vlatko; Alar, Vesna

    2017-01-01

    Stainless steel samples were tested in the laboratory and under real conditions of tribocorrosion wear. Electrochemical tests were also carried out to verify the corrosion resistance of modified steel surfaces. Metallographic analysis and hardness testing were conducted on stainless steel samples X20Cr13 and X17CrNi16 2. The possibilities of applications of modified surfaces of the selected steels were investigated by testing the samples under real wear conditions. The results have shown that the induction hardened and subsequently nitrided martensitic steels achieved an average wear resistance of up to three orders of magnitude higher as compared to the delivered condition.

  13. Characteristics of modified martensitic stainless steel surfaces under tribocorrosion conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozing, Goran [Osijek Univ. (Croatia). Chair of Mechanical Engineering; Marusic, Vlatko [Osijek Univ. (Croatia). Dept. of Engineering Materials; Alar, Vesna [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Dept. Materials

    2017-04-01

    Stainless steel samples were tested in the laboratory and under real conditions of tribocorrosion wear. Electrochemical tests were also carried out to verify the corrosion resistance of modified steel surfaces. Metallographic analysis and hardness testing were conducted on stainless steel samples X20Cr13 and X17CrNi16 2. The possibilities of applications of modified surfaces of the selected steels were investigated by testing the samples under real wear conditions. The results have shown that the induction hardened and subsequently nitrided martensitic steels achieved an average wear resistance of up to three orders of magnitude higher as compared to the delivered condition.

  14. An enhanced Brinson model with modified kinetics for martensite transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young-Jin; Lee, Jung Ju [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Ju-Won [Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jae Hyuk [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    We propose an enhanced Brinson model with modified kinetics for martensite transformation. Two additional material constants are considered to follow the stress-temperature diagram above austenite start temperature (As) along with treatment to keep the continuity of the martensite volume fraction and the path dependency of the phase transformation. To demonstrate the performance of the proposed model, we implement this algorithm into ABAQUS user subroutine, then conduct several numerical simulations and compare their results with SMA wire experiments as well as those of three-dimensional SMA constitutive models. From the results, it turns out that the proposed model is as accurate as the three-dimensional models and shows better accuracy over original Brinson model in terms of recovery stress.

  15. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabruri, Efendi, E-mail: effe004@lipi.go.id; Anwar, Moch Syaiful, E-mail: moch.syaiful.anwar@lipi.go.id; Prifiharni, Siska, E-mail: siska.prifiharni@lipi.go.id; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang [Research Center for Metallurgy and Materials, Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) Kawasan Puspiptek Gd. 470 Serpong, Tangerang Selatan 15314 (Indonesia)

    2016-04-19

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  16. Tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Anwar, Moch Syaiful; Prifiharni, Siska; Romijarso, Toni B.; Adjiantoro, Bintang

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports the influence of Mo and Ni on the tensile properties of the modified 13Cr martensitic stainless steels in tempered condition. Four steels with different content of Mo and Ni were prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The experimental results showed that the addition of about 1% and 3% Mo has a beneficial effect to increase both the tensile strength and the elongation of the steels. On the contrary, the addition of about 3% Ni into the martensitic stainless steel results in decreasing of both the tensile strength and the elongation. Among the alloys investigated the 13Cr3Mo type steel exhibited largest tensile strength of 1348 MPa and largest elongation of 12%. The observation on the tensile fractured surfaces by using scanning electron microscope supported these findings.

  17. Development of an extensive database of mechanical properties for Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Ando, M.; Wakai, E.; Jitsukawa, S.; Hirose, T.; Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.; Kohyama, A.; Kohno, Y.; Klueh, R.L.; Sokolov, M.; Stoller, R.; Zinklek, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, G.; Kurtz, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems, as they have been developed based on massive industrial experience of ferritic/martensitic steel replacing Mo and Nb of high chromium heat resistant martensitic steels (such as modified 9Cr-1Mo) with W and Ta, respectively. F82H (8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.04Ta-0.1C) and JLF-1 (9Cr-2W-0.2V-0.08Ta-0.1C) are RAFMs, which have been developed and studied in Japan and the various effects of irradiation were reported. F82H is designed with emphasis on high temperature property and weldablility, and was provided and evaluated in various countries as a part of the IEA fusion materials development collaboration. The Japan/US collaboration program also has been conducted with the emphasis on heavy irradiation effects of F82H, JLF-1 and ORNL9Cr2WVTa over the past two decades using Fast Flux Testing Facility (FFTF) of PNNL and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL, and the irradiation condition of the irradiation capsules of those reactors were precisely controlled by the well matured capsule designing and instrumentation. Now, among the existing database for RAFMs the most extensive one is that for F82H. The objective of this paper is to review the database status of RAFMs, mainly on F82H, to identify the key issues for the future development of database. Tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties and microstructural studies before and after irradiation are summarized. (authors)

  18. Development of an extensive database of mechanical properties for Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Ando, M.; Wakai, E.; Jitsukawa, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.; Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., lnstitute of Advanced Energy (Japan); Kohno, Y. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran, Hokkaido (Japan); Klueh, R.L. [0ak Ridge Noational Laboratory, TN (United States); Sokolov, M.; Stoller, R.; Zinklek, S. [0ak Ridge Noational Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., TN (United States); Yamamoto, T.; Odette, G. [UCSB, Dept. of Chemical Engineering UCSB, Santa-Barbara (United States); Kurtz, R.J. [Pacifie Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFMs) are recognized as the primary candidate structural materials for fusion blanket systems, as they have been developed based on massive industrial experience of ferritic/martensitic steel replacing Mo and Nb of high chromium heat resistant martensitic steels (such as modified 9Cr-1Mo) with W and Ta, respectively. F82H (8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.04Ta-0.1C) and JLF-1 (9Cr-2W-0.2V-0.08Ta-0.1C) are RAFMs, which have been developed and studied in Japan and the various effects of irradiation were reported. F82H is designed with emphasis on high temperature property and weldablility, and was provided and evaluated in various countries as a part of the IEA fusion materials development collaboration. The Japan/US collaboration program also has been conducted with the emphasis on heavy irradiation effects of F82H, JLF-1 and ORNL9Cr2WVTa over the past two decades using Fast Flux Testing Facility (FFTF) of PNNL and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL, and the irradiation condition of the irradiation capsules of those reactors were precisely controlled by the well matured capsule designing and instrumentation. Now, among the existing database for RAFMs the most extensive one is that for F82H. The objective of this paper is to review the database status of RAFMs, mainly on F82H, to identify the key issues for the future development of database. Tensile, fracture toughness, creep and fatigue properties and microstructural studies before and after irradiation are summarized. (authors)

  19. Microstructural evolution of martensitic steels during fast neutron iradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Irradiation of martensitic/ferritic steels with fast neutrons (E > 0.1 MeV) to displacement damage levels of 30--50 dpa at temperatures of 300--500 degree C produces significant changes in the as-tempered microstructure. Dislocation loops and networks can be produced, irradiation-induced precipitates can form, the lath/subgrain boundary structure and the thermal precipitates produced during tempering can become unstable, and if helium is present, bubbles and voids can form. These microstructural changes caused by irradiation can have important effects on the properties of this class of steels for both fast breeder reactor (FBR) and magnetic fusion reactor (MFR) applications. The purpose of this paper is to compare reactor-irradiated and long-term thermally aged 9Cr--1MoVNb specimens, in order to distinguish effects due to displacement damage from those caused by elevated-temperature exposure alone. 7 refs., 1 fig

  20. Metallurgical Characterization of Reduced Activation Martensitic Steel F-82H Modified

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lapena, J.; Lancha, A.M.; Gomez-Briceno, D.; Schirra, M.

    1999-12-01

    During 1995-1998 within of research and development programs on reduced ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion, metallurgical characterization of 8Cr-2WVTa steel, denominated F-28H modified, have been carried out. The work has focused on studying the microstructural and mechanical (tensile, creep, low cycle fatigue and charpy) characteristics of as-received state and aged material in the temperature range 300 degree centigrade to 600 degree centigrade for periods up to 5000 h. (Author) 45 refs

  1. Influencia de la temperatura de austenización y tiempo de permanencia sobre el tamaño de grano en aceros ferrítico-martensíticos del tipo 9Cr1MoVNb utilizados en calderas supercríticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez-Urrutia, L.

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to determine the influence of austenitizing temperature holding time and heating velocity on grain size of ferritic-martensitic type 9CrlMoVNb steels developed for Oak Ridge National Laboratories & Combustion Engineering, T91/P91[1] Steels (USA and X10CrMoVNb 9.1 (Europe. The potential benefits of this material, in term of high resistance, good ductily and oxidation resistance, weldability and in particular good high temperature creep strength, are now widely acknowledged, particulary by supercritical boilers (P = 300 bar, T = 550±50 °C. The studied steels have been produced in, high frecuency induction vacum furnaces and hot-rolled.

    Se estudia la influencia de la temperatura de austenización, tiempo de permanencia a esta temperatura y velocidad de calentamiento sobre el tamaño de grano de varios aceros ferrítico-martensíticos de última generación del tipo 9CrlMoVNb, desarrollados por Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL conjuntamente con Combustion Enginering en USA, conocidos por ASME/ASTM por las designaciones T91/P91[1] y en Europa como X10CrMoVNb9.1. Son aceros ductiles y tenaces que presentan muy buenas propiedades de resistencia a fluencia, soldabilidad y conductividad térmica. Son cada vez más utilizados como tubos de alta temperatura (550±50 °C y presión (300 bar en calderas supercríticas para centrales térmicas avanzadas. Los aceros estudiados se han fabricado en hornos de inducción de alta frecuencia al vacío y laminados en caliente.

  2. Effects of iron spallation products Ti, P and S on the physical metallurgy of 9Cr martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danylova, O.; Carlan, Y. de; Hamon, D.; Brachet, J.C.; Alamo, A.

    2002-01-01

    The design of an Accelerator Driven System (ADS) requires that the 'window', which separates the proton accelerator from the spallation target, be able to withstand very severe irradiation conditions. Fe-9/12Cr martensitic steels are good candidates for the window material due to their intrinsic stability under neutron irradiation, but the influence of iron spallation elements on their behaviour is not known. To elucidate the effects of the spallation elements titanium, phosphorus and sulphur on the behaviour of martensitic steels, it was decides to obtain different castings of 9Cr 1Mo steels doped with these elements. The aim of this paper is to present the data obtained on the physical metallurgy of these steels and to show the possible methods of obtaining titanium, phosphorus and sulphur in solid solution for subsequent study of the evolution of the microstructure and mechanical properties. (authors)

  3. Effect of high temperature tempering on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the modified 410 martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabruri, Efendi; Pasaribu, Rahmat Ramadhan; Sugandi, Moh. Tri; Sunardi

    2018-05-01

    This paper reports the influence of high tempering temperature and holding time on the mechanical properties and microstructure of the recently modified 410 martensitic stainless steel. The modified steel was prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging, quenching and tempering. The hardness and tensile strength of the steels decreased with increasing tempering temperature from 600 to 700 °C and with increasing holding time from 1 to 6 h. Based on microstructural images, it was observed the coarsening of lath martensite and of the metal carbides as well. However, a relatively high hardness and strength were still exibited by this steel after tempering at a such high temperature of 600-700 °C. The partition of Mo into the carbides identified by EDS analysis may correlate with this situation.

  4. Nanostructures in a ferritic and an oxide dispersion strengthened steel induced by dynamic plastic deformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo

    fission and fusion reactors. In this study, two candidate steels for nuclear reactors, namely a ferritic/martensitic steel (modified 9Cr-1Mo steel) and an oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel (PM2000), were nanostructured by dynamic plastic deformation (DPD). The resulting microstructure...

  5. Development of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for application to high temperature and irradiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambard, V.

    2000-01-01

    Iron oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are candidate for nuclear fuel cladding. Therefore, it is crucial to control their microstructure in order to optimise their mechanical properties at temperatures up to 700 deg C. The industrial candidates, ODS ferritic alloys, present an anisotropic microstructure which induces a weakening of mechanical properties in transversal direction as well as the precipitation of brittle phases under thermal aging and irradiation. For this purpose, we tried to develop a material with isotropic properties. We studied several 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic alloys, strengthened or not by oxide dispersion. The mechanical alloying was performed by attribution and powders were consolidated by hot extrusion. In this work, different metallurgical characterisation techniques and modelling were used to optimise a new martensitic ODS alloy. Microstructural and chemical characterization of matrix has been done. The effect of austenitizing and isochronal tempering treatments on microstructure and hardness has been studied. Oxide distribution, size and chemical composition have been studied before and after high temperature thermal treatment. The study of phase transformation upon heating has permitted the extrapolation to the equilibrium temperature formation of austenite. Phase transformation diagrams upon cooling have been determined and the transformation kinetics have been linked to austenite grain size by a simple relation. Fine grain size is unfavourable for the targeted application, so a particular thermal treatment inducing a coarser grain structure has been developed. Finally, tensile properties have been determined for the different microstructures. (author)

  6. Viscoplastic equations incorporated into a finite element model to predict deformation behavior of irradiated reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuanyuan, E-mail: 630wyy@163.com [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Jijun, E-mail: zhaojj@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhang, Chi [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials of Ministry of Education, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The initial internal variable in the Anand model is modified by considering both temperature and irradiation dose. • The tensile stress-strain response is examined and analyzed under different temperatures and irradiation doses. • Yield strengths are predicted as functions of strain rate, temperature and irradiation dose. - Abstract: The viscoplastic equations with a modified initial internal variable are implemented into the finite element code to investigate stress-strain response and irradiation hardening of the materials under increased temperature and at different levels of irradiated dose. We applied this model to Mod 9Cr-1Mo steel. The predicted results are validated by the experimentally measured data. Furthermore, they show good agreement with the previous data from a constitutive crystal plasticity model in account of dislocation and interstitial loops. Three previous hardening models for predicting the yield strength of the material are discussed and compared with our simulation results.

  7. Optimum alloy compositions in reduced-activation martensitic 9Cr steels for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, F.; Noda, T.; Okada, M.

    1992-01-01

    In order to obtain potential reduced-activation ferritic steels suitable for fusion reactor structures, the effect of alloying elements W and V on the microstructural evolution, toughness, high-temperature creep and irradiation hardening behavior was investigated for simple 9Cr-W and 9Cr-V steels. The creep strength of the 9Cr-W steels increased but their toughness decreased with increasing W concentration. The 9Cr-V steels exhibited poor creep rupture strength, far below that of a conventional 9Cr-1MoVNb steel and poor toughness after aging at 873 K. It was also found that the Δ-ferrite should be avoided, because it degraded both the roughness and high-temperature creep strength. Based on the results on the simple steels, optimized martensitic 9Cr steels were alloy-designed from a standpoint of enough thoughness and high-temperature creep strength. Two kinds of optimized 9Cr steels with low and high levels of W were obtained; 9Cr-1WVTa and 9Cr-3WVTa. These steels indeed exhibited excellent toughness and creep strength, respectively. The 9Cr-1WVTa steel exhibiting an excellent roughness was shown to be the most promising for relatively low-temperature application below 500deg C, where irradiation embrittlement is significant. The 9Cr-3WVTa steel was the most promising for high temperature application above 500deg C from the standpoint of enough high-temperature strength. (orig.)

  8. Microstructure and mechanical properties of unirradiated low activation ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.Y.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron micrographs of normalized and tempered 9Cr-2.5W-0.3V-0.15C low activation ferritic steel showed tempered lath-type martensite with precipitation of rod and plate-like carbides at lath and grain boundaries. X-ray diffraction analysis of the extracted replicas revealed nearly 100% M 23 C 6 carbides (a=1.064 nm), with no indication of Fe 2 W-type Laves phase even after thermal aging at 600 0 C/1000 h. Thermal aging increased the number density of rod-like M 23 C 6 along prior austenite grain boundaries and martensite lath boundaries. The elevated-temperature tensile strengths of this steel are about 10% higher than the average strengths of commercial heats of 9Cr-1Mo and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels up to 650 0 C, with equivalent uniform elongation and ∝50% decrease in total elongation. The DBTT was determined to be -25 0 C which is similar to other 9Cr-1Mo steels. Fractographic examination of tensile tested specimens shows a mixed mode of equiaxed and elongated dimples at test temperatures above 400 0 C. Modification of the Ga3X alloy composition for opimization of materials properties is discussed. However, the proposed low activation ferritic steel shows the promise of improved mechanical properties over 9Cr-1Mo steels. (orig.)

  9. Effect of tempering on microstructure and tensile properties of niobium modified martensitic 9Cr heat resistant steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, A., E-mail: anupmetal@gmail.com; Bandyopadhay, T.K.

    2015-01-03

    The effect of tempering on the microstructure of niobium modified 8.8 wt% chromium steel has been evaluated. Steel has been prepared using the conventional melting and casting route. Homogenization and forging is done at 1100 °C. Dilatometric study shows that the Ac{sub 1}, Ac{sub 3} and M{sub s} temperatures are 800, 855, and 131 °C, respectively. Initial cast and forged microstructures consist of martensite/ferrite. The samples are subsequently tempered at 500–800 °C for various intervals of time (1–5 h). The microstructure of the tempered sample is analyzed using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) is used to identify the precipitate. Nanometer-sized precipitates (50–200 nm) are observed after tempering at 700 °C for 1 h. Niobium rich MC type carbide precipitates and chromium rich M{sub 23}C{sub 6} type precipitates are observed after tempering at 700 °C. Tensile strength decreases with increasing tempering temperature. Maximum tensile strength of 920 MPa is observed after tempering at 700 °C and maximum elongation of ∼11% is observed after tempering at 750 °C.

  10. Inelastic constitutive models for the simulation of a cyclic softening behavior of modified 9Cr-lMo steel at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, Jae Han

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the inelastic constitutive models for the simulations of the cyclic softening behavior of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel, which has a significant cyclic softening characteristic especially in elevated temperature regions, are investigated in detail. To do this, the plastic modulus, which primarily governs the calculation scheme of the plasticity, is formulated for the inelastic constitutive models such as the Armstrong-Frederick model, Chaboche model, and Ohno-Wang model. By implementing the extracted plastic modulus and the consistency conditions into the computer program, the inelastic constitutive parameters are identified to present the best fit of the uniaxial cyclic test data by strain-controlled simulations. From the computer simulations by using the obtained constitutive parameters, it is found that the Armstrong-Frederick model is simple to use but it causes significant overestimated strain results when compared with the Chaboche and the Ohno-Wang models. And from the ratcheting simulation results, it is found that the cyclic softening behavior of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel can invoke a ratcheting instability when the applied cyclic loads exceed a certain level of the ratchet loading condition

  11. Development of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for application to high temperature and irradiation environment; Developpement d'une nouvelle nuance martensitique ODS pour utilisation sous rayonnement a haute temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambard, V

    2000-07-01

    Iron oxide dispersion strengthened alloys are candidate for nuclear fuel cladding. Therefore, it is crucial to control their microstructure in order to optimise their mechanical properties at temperatures up to 700 deg C. The industrial candidates, ODS ferritic alloys, present an anisotropic microstructure which induces a weakening of mechanical properties in transversal direction as well as the precipitation of brittle phases under thermal aging and irradiation. For this purpose, we tried to develop a material with isotropic properties. We studied several 9Cr-1Mo ferritic/martensitic alloys, strengthened or not by oxide dispersion. The mechanical alloying was performed by attribution and powders were consolidated by hot extrusion. In this work, different metallurgical characterisation techniques and modelling were used to optimise a new martensitic ODS alloy. Microstructural and chemical characterization of matrix has been done. The effect of austenitizing and isochronal tempering treatments on microstructure and hardness has been studied. Oxide distribution, size and chemical composition have been studied before and after high temperature thermal treatment. The study of phase transformation upon heating has permitted the extrapolation to the equilibrium temperature formation of austenite. Phase transformation diagrams upon cooling have been determined and the transformation kinetics have been linked to austenite grain size by a simple relation. Fine grain size is unfavourable for the targeted application, so a particular thermal treatment inducing a coarser grain structure has been developed. Finally, tensile properties have been determined for the different microstructures. (author)

  12. Martensitic cubic → tetragonal transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumann, H.

    1983-01-01

    Indium-thallium alloys containing 14 to 30% At. Tl have a cubic face-centred beta phase wich changes into a tetragonal face-centred alpha martensite during solidification. The martensite contains twin crystals that are large enough to be seen by means of a light microscope. The phenomenological crystallographic martensite theory was used to calculate Miller's index of the habit plane, the formation of the surface relief, the orientation relations and the critical thickness ratio of the twins. In a beta monocrystal frequently only one of the 24 crystallographic possible habit planes are formed at one end of the sample and migrate through the whole crystal when the temperature drops. Externally applied tension and compression influence in different ways the direction in which the habit plane moves and can even destroy the twinned structure, i.e. they can modify the substructure of the martensite crystal. This induces superelasticity, an effect that has also been described quantitatively. (author)

  13. Improvement of impact toughness by modified hot working and heat treatment in 13%Cr martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivatsa, Kulkarni, E-mail: srivatsa.kulkarni@kcssl.com; Srinivas, Perla; Balachandran, G.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2016-11-20

    Improvement of the general mechanical properties and in particular sub-zero impact toughness in a 0.2%C-13%Cr martensitic stainless steel has been explored by varying the hot deformation and heat treatment conditions. The deformation conditions include hot rolling an ingot in one case and cogging the ingot to a semis followed by hot rolling in another case. The bars made from both routes were subjected to a single hardening heat treatment at 980 °C and 1040 °C oil quenched and a double hardening heat treatment at 1040 °C followed by 980 °C oil quenched. The hardened steels were subjected to a standard two stage tempering at 710 °C followed by 680 °C. The impact toughness was found to be doubled in the cogged and rolled steel in double hardened condition. Other processing conditions show varying impact toughness levels. The toughness observed was correlated to the grain size and the carbide distribution in the matrix and the fractography features.

  14. A study on a relationship between localization of recovery in lath structure and creep damage in Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagae, Yuji; Aoto, Kazumi

    2000-09-01

    In this study, the change of lath structure with the increase of distance from fractured surface was observed in detail and the localization of creep damage to decide fracture position was investigated. As the results of the relationship between lath width and distance from fractured surface, the lath width obviously increased as a distance from fractured surface decreased. Lath widths in different positions of as-received specimen were almost same. These result indicates that recovery of lath structure localizes with creep damage. It was considered that the coarsening of precipitates caused localization of recovery in lath structure. Area fraction of precipitates and cross-section of each precipitate in different positions from fractured surface were measured and compared. There were no differences in area fraction of precipitates and cross-section of each precipitate in different positions. Therefore it was found out that the reason for localization of recovery of lath structure was not coarsening of precipitates. (author)

  15. On the ductile-to-brittle transition behavior of martensitic alloys neutron irradiated to 26 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Charpy impact tests were conducted on specimens made of HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo in various heat treatment conditions which were irradiated in EBR-II to 26 dpa at 390 to 500 0 C. The results are compared with previous results on specimens irradiated to 13 dpa. HT-9 base metal irradiated at low temperatures showed a small additional increase in ductile brittle transition temperature and a decrease in upper shelf energy from 13 to 26 dpa. No fluence effect was observed in 9Cr-1Mo base metal. The 9Cr-1Mo weldment showed degraded DBTT but improved USE response compared to base metal, contrary to previous findings on HT-9. Significant differences were observed in HT-9 base metal between mill annealed material and normalized and tempered material. The highest DBTT for HT-9 alloys was 50 0 C higher than for the worst case in 9Cr-1Mo alloys. Fractography and hardness measurements were also obtained. Significant differences in fracture appearance were observed in different product forms, although no dependence on fluence was observed. Failure was controlled by the preirradiation microstructure

  16. A comparison of low-chromium and high-chromium reduced-activation steels for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Alexander, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    Ferritic steels have been considered candidate structural materials for first wall and blanket structures for fusion power plants since the late 1970s. The first steels considered in the United States were the conventional Cr-Mo steels Sandvik HT9 (nominally 12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C, here designated l2Cr-1MoVW), modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (9Cr-1Mo-0.2V-0.06Nb-0. IC, designated 9Cr-1MoVNb) and, to a lesser extent, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel (2.25Cr-Mo-0.1C). All compositions are in wt. %. The normalized-and-tempered 9 and 12Cr steels had a tempered martensite microstructure, and the normalized-and-tempered 2 1/4 Cr steel had a tempered bainite microstructure. This report describes chromium steels tested in normalized and tempered conditions. Miniature tensile and Charpy specimens were tested

  17. Isothermal Martensite Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo

    Isothermal (i.e. time dependent) martensite formation in steel was first observed in the 40ies of the XXth century and is still treated as an anomaly in the description of martensite formation which is considered as a-thermal (i.e. independent of time). Recently, the clarification of the mechanism...... of lattice strains provided fundamental information on the state of stress in the material and clarified the role of the strain energy on martensite formation. Electron backscatter diffraction revealed that the microstructure of the material and the morphology of martensite were independent on the cooling...... leading to isothermal kinetics acquired new practical relevance because of the identification of isothermal martensite formation as the most likely process responsible for enhanced performances of sub-zero Celsius treated high carbon steel products. In the present work, different iron based alloys...

  18. Creep behavior and evolution of microstructure of modified Grade 91 welded joint after short term exposure at 500 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vivier, F.

    2009-03-01

    With the increase in worldwide energy demand, the nuclear industry is a way of producing electricity on a large scale and to answer to this need. For the design of a new generation of fission nuclear reactors and among six chosen fission reactor systems, France develops in particularly the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concept. This implies the use of materials that are more and more resistant to high temperature for long-term exposure. AREVA focuses on materials already used in fossil-fuel power plant, so that the mechanical behaviour of Grade 91 (Fe 9 Cr 1 MoNbV) has to be investigated. This ferritic-martensitic steel is considered to be a potential candidate for welded components. Such structures are combined with welded joints, which have to be studied. Three industrial partners (AREVA, CEA, EDF) have launched a study with the Centre des Materiaux in order to investigate the creep of welded joint of Grade 91. The aim of this work is to complete the available database about the mechanical behaviour of Grade 91, base metal and welded joint, during creep tests performed at 500 C up to 4500 h exposure. Thermal aging tests, tensile tests, and creep tests were performed at 450 C and 500 C using both base metal and cross-weld samples. Several geometries of cross-weld creep specimens were tested. The microstructure has not remarkably changed after tests concerning both nature and size of precipitates, and the characteristic size of the matrix sub-structure. The creep damage is not developed in the ruptured specimens after creep tests. Only little damage by cavity nucleation and growth was found in the creep specimens. Creep fracture at 500 C takes places by viscoplastic flow, contrary to tests performed at 625 C where the creep-induced damage governs the creep rupture at least for long-term lifetime. From creep curves of base metal and cross-weld specimens, a phenomenological model is proposed. The flow rule is a Norton power law with a stress exponent of 19 in

  19. The role of hardness and microstructure in high temperature pitting in the impact wear of 9Cr boiler material. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morri, J.

    1987-11-01

    This report describes impact wear experiments on 9Cr1Mo finned boiler tube specimens in 3 different heat treated forms. The objective of the tests was to establish whether a high temperature, high wear rate, pitting form of wear was dependent upon the residual microstructure and hardness. Although a x2 reduction in specific wear rate was achieved for the martensitic structure, the pitting characteristic remained. It is concluded that modifying the as-received 9Cr microstructure has not suppressed the high temperature severe form of wear. (author)

  20. In-situ studies of the TGO growth stresses and the martensitic transformation in the B2 phase in commercial Pt-modified NiAl and NiCoCrAlY bond coat alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovis, D.; Hu, L.; Reddy, A.; Heuer, A.H. [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Paulikas, A.P.; Veal, B.W. [Materials Science Div., Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States)

    2007-12-15

    Oxide growth stresses were measured in situ at 1100 C on commercial Pt-modified NiAl and NiCoCrAlY bond coat alloys using synchrotron X-rays. Measurements were taken on samples that had no preoxidation, as well as on samples that had experienced 24 one-hour thermal exposures at 1150 C, a condition known to induce rumpling in the Pt-modified NiAl alloy, but not in the NiCoCrAlY alloy. The NiCoCrAlY alloy showed continuous stress relaxation under all conditions, whereas the Pt-modified NiAl alloys would typically stabilize at a fixed (often non-zero) stress suggesting a higher creep strength in the 'Thermally Grown Oxide' on the latter alloy, though the precise behavior was dependent on initial surface preparation. The formation of martensite in the Pt-modified NiAl alloys was also observed upon cooling and occurred at temperatures below 200 C for all of the samples observed. Based on existing models, this M{sub s} temperature is too low to account for the rumpling observed in these alloys. (orig.)

  1. Martens-ite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druce Dunne

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Martensite and martensitic transformations in metals and alloys have been intensively studied for more than a century and many comprehensive and informative reviews have been published. The current review differs insofar as the analysis is performed largely through the prism of detailed studies of the changes in the martensitic transformation in Fe3Pt alloy as a result of austenite ordering. This important alloy is the first ferrous alloy identified as exhibiting thermoelastic transformation and shape memory. The effect of parent phase order on the martensitic transformation offers significant insights into general understanding of the nature of martensitic transformation, particularly the factors contributing to reversible and irreversible transformation. It is concluded that for crystallograhically reversible transformation to occur both strain limiting and strain accommodating factors must be present and that these factors collectively constitute the sufficient condition for reversible martensitic transformation. Although the crystallography of individual plates formed in a given alloy can change with their temperature of formation, this intrinsic variability has not been considered in analyses using phenomenological theory. Significant variability can exist in measured quantities such as habit plane normals and orientation relationships used to test theoretical predictions. Measured lattice parameters, essential data for theoretical calculations, can also differ from the actual parameters existing at the temperature of plate formation.

  2. Carbon diffusion and kinetics during the lath martensite formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Zuyao

    1995-01-01

    Calculations verify that carbon diffusion may occur during the lath martensite formation. Accordingly, the diffusion of interstitial atoms or ions must be taken into account when martensitic transformation is defined as a diffusionless transformation. In derivation of the kinetics equation of the athermal martensitic transformation, regarding the carbon diffusion, i.e. the enrichment of the austenite during the lath martensite formation, and ΔG γ fehler being function of the temperature and the carbon content in austenite, the kinetics equation is modified to a general form as: f=1-exp[β(C1-C0)-α(Ms-Tq)] where C0 and C1 are carbon contents in the austenite before and after quenching respectively. Consequently, the alloying element not only influences Ms, but also the diffusibility of carbon and both factors govern the amount of retained austenite in quenched steel which dominates in determing the toughness of the steel. (orig.)

  3. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV

  4. Microstructure and tensile properties of high strength duplex ferrite-martensite (DFM) steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborti, P.C.; Mitra, M.K.

    2007-01-01

    Duplex ferrite-martensite (DFM) steels containing 38-80% martensite of varying morphologies were developed by batch intercritical annealing of a commercial variety vanadium bearing 0.2% C-Mn steel at different temperatures. Microstructures before intercritical annealing were found to control the morphological distribution of the phase constituents of the developed DFM steels. Tensile test results revealed best strength-ductility combination for finely distributed lamellar ferrite-martensite phase aggregate containing ∼60% martensite developed from a prior martensitic structure. Taking consideration of the modified law of mechanical mixture the experimental tensile strength data of the developed DFM steels has been formulated with some success and very good estimation for tensile strengths of pure ferrite and low carbon martensite has been made from tensile strength data of DFM steels

  5. Martensitic phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petry, W.; Neuhaus, J.

    1996-01-01

    Many elements transform from a high temperature bcc phase to a more dense packed temperature phase. The great majority of these transitions are of 1st order, displacive and reconstructive. The lattice potentials which govern these martensitic transitions can be probed by inelastic neutron scattering, thereby answering fundamental questions like : Will the transition be announced by dynamical or static fluctuations? What are the trajectories for the displacements needed for the transformation? Does the vibrational entropy stabilize the high temperature phase? Are the unusual transport properties in these materials related to their ability to transform? (author) 17 figs., 1 tab., 46 refs

  6. Martensitic phase transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petry, W; Neuhaus, J [Techn. Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E13, Munich (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Many elements transform from a high temperature bcc phase to a more dense packed temperature phase. The great majority of these transitions are of 1st order, displacive and reconstructive. The lattice potentials which govern these martensitic transitions can be probed by inelastic neutron scattering, thereby answering fundamental questions like : Will the transition be announced by dynamical or static fluctuations? What are the trajectories for the displacements needed for the transformation? Does the vibrational entropy stabilize the high temperature phase? Are the unusual transport properties in these materials related to their ability to transform? (author) 17 figs., 1 tab., 46 refs.

  7. Martensitic transformation in zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville, Sylvain; Guenin, Gerard; Chevalier, Jerome

    2004-01-01

    We investigate by atomic force microscopy (AFM) the surface relief resulting from martensitic tetragonal to monoclinic phase transformation induced by low temperature autoclave aging in ceria-stabilized zirconia. AFM appears as a very powerful tool to investigate martensite relief quantitatively and with a great precision. The crystallographic phenomenological theory is used to predict the expected relief induced by the transformation, for the particular case of lattice correspondence ABC1, where tetragonal c axis becomes the monoclinic c axis. A model for variants spatial arrangement for this lattice correspondence is proposed and validated by the experimental observations. An excellent agreement is found between the quantitative calculations outputs and the experimental measurements at nanometer scale yielded by AFM. All the observed features are explained fully quantitatively by the calculations, with discrepancies between calculations and quantitative experimental measurements within the measurements and calculations precision range. In particular, the crystallographic orientation of the transformed grains is determined from the local characteristics of transformation induced relief. It is finally demonstrated that the strain energy is the controlling factor of the surface transformation induced by low temperature autoclave treatments in this material

  8. Comparison of the mechanical strength properties of several high-chromium ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booker, M.K.; Sikka, V.K.; Booker, B.L.P.

    1981-01-01

    A modified 9 Cr-1 Mo ferritic steel has been selected as an alternative material for breeder reactors. Different 9 Cr-1 Mo steels are already being used commercially in UK and USA and a 9 Cr-2 Mo steel (EM12) is being used commercially in France. The 12% Cr steel alloy HT9 is also often recommended for high-temperature service. Creep-rupture data for all six seels were analyzed to yield rupture life as a function of stress, temperature, and lot-to-lot variations. Yield and tensile strength data for the three 9 Cr-1 Mo materials were also examined. All results were compared with Type 304 stainless steel, and the tensile and creep properties of the modified and British 9 Cr-1 Mo materials were used to calculate allowable stress values S 0 per Section VIII, Division 1 and S/sub m/ per code Case N-47 to section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. these values were compared with code listings for American commercial 9 Cr-1 Mo steel, 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel, and Type 304 stainless steel. The conclusion is made that the modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel displays tensile and creep strengths superior to those of the other ferritic materials examined and is at least comparable to Type 304 stainless steel from room temperature to about 625 0 C. 31 figures

  9. Gaseous surface hardening of martensitic stainless steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibollo, Chiara; Villa, Matteo; Christiansen, Thomas L.

    The present work addresses heat and surface treatments of martensitic stainless steel EN 1.4028. Different combinations of heat treatments and surface treatments were performed: conventional austenitisation, cryogenic treatment and in particular high temperature solution nitriding (HTSN) and low...... that cubic lath martensite in conventionally austenitised EN 1.4028 dissolves nitrogen and develops expanded martensite (ferrite) during LTSH. HTSN leads to a microstructure of tetragonal plate martensite and retained austenite. The content of retained austenite can be reduced by a cryo...

  10. Nitrogen-alloyed martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berns, H.

    1988-01-01

    A report is presented on initial results with pressure-nitrided martensitic steels. In heat-resistant steels, thermal stability and toughness are raised by nitrogen. In cold work steel, there is a more favourable corrosion behaviour. (orig./MM) [de

  11. Creep damage development in welded X20 and P91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brett, Steve; Holmstrom, Stefan; Hald, John; Borg, Ulrik; Aakjaer Jensen, Soeren; Vulpen, Rijk Van; Degnan, Craig; Vinter Dahl, Kristian; Vilhelmsen, Tommy

    2011-03-15

    The Martensitic steel X20CrMoV121 (hereinafter called X20) and the modified 9Cr1Mo steel (hereinafter called P91) have been used for a number of years in high temperature applications since they posses superior creep strength compared to low alloyed steels. Due to the simple fact that very few failures were observed, almost no knowledge as to the evolution of creep damage in welds were available despite long operation times exceeding well over 100.000 hours. It has been suggested that X20 will develop creep damage in a different manner compared to low alloyed steel, i.e damage initiation should be slow followed by accelerated growth. The research work presented in this report included systematic investigations of the first components of X20, which has developed creep during long-term operation. All of the investigated components showed creep damage evolution similar to low alloy steels

  12. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam- 603 102 (India)

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  13. Effect of liquid metal embrittlement on low cycle fatigue properties and fatigue crack propagation behavior of a modified 9Cr–1Mo ferritic–martensitic steel in an oxygen-controlled lead–bismuth eutectic environment at 350 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Xing, E-mail: gongxingzfl@hotmail.com [SCK-CEN (Belgian Nuclear Research Centre), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); KU Leuven, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, Box 2450, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Marmy, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.marmy@sckcen.be [SCK-CEN (Belgian Nuclear Research Centre), Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Qin, Ling, E-mail: Ling.Qin@mtm.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, Box 2450, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Verlinden, Bert, E-mail: Bert.Verlinden@mtm.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, Box 2450, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Wevers, Martine, E-mail: Martine.Wevers@mtm.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, Box 2450, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Seefeldt, Marc, E-mail: Marc.Seefeldt@mtm.kuleuven.be [KU Leuven, Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44, Box 2450, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium)

    2014-11-17

    The low cycle fatigue properties of a modified 9Cr–1Mo ferritic–martensitic steel (T91) have been tested in stagnant liquid lead–bismuth eutectic (LBE) with oxygen concentrations ranging from 1.16×10{sup −6} to 6.0×10{sup −10} wt% at 350 °C. The effect of liquid metal embrittlement (LME) on fatigue endurance, fatigue crack propagation modes and secondary cracking has been studied. The results showed that the fatigue lives of T91 steel in a low oxygen concentration LBE were drastically reduced compared to those in vacuum due to the presence of LME. The microstructural observations on the fatigue crack propagation modes revealed that fatigue cracks in LBE mainly propagate across prior-austenite grain boundaries and then cut through martensitic lath boundaries, simultaneously leaving a few plastic flow traces and characteristic brittle features. Intergranular and interlath cracking occurred occasionally and their occurrence depended on the orientation of the boundaries relative to the stress axis. The complexity of the LME-induced fracture features can be attributed to a mixture of the multiple failure modes. No obvious plastic shear strain localization was present around the crack tips when LME occurred. However, using a high resolution electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique, highly localized plastic shear strain was observed in the vicinity of the crack tips in vacuum, manifested by the presence of very fine subgrains along the crack walls. A qualitative mechanism was proposed to account for the LME phenomenon in the T91/LBE system. In addition, the secondary cracking at fatigue striations was different in the presence of LBE compared to vacuum. This phenomenon was elucidated by taking into account the influence of the LME on the fatigue crack propagation rate.

  14. Deformation induced martensitic transformation in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, E.; Mertinger, V.; Tranta, F.; Solyom, J.

    2003-01-01

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation was investigated in metastable austenitic stainless steel. This steel can present a microstructure of austenite (γ), α' martensite and non magnetic ε martensite. Uni-axial tensile test was used for loading at different temperatures below room temperature (from -120 to 20 deg. C). During the deformation the transformation takes place at certain places in an anisotropic way and texture also develops. Quantitative phase analysis was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and magnetic methods while the texture was described by X-ray diffraction using a special inverse pole figure. The quantitative phase analysis has shown that the formation of α' and ε martensite from austenite is the function of deformation rate, and deformation temperature. The transformation of the textured austenite takes place in an anisotropic way and a well defined crystallographic relationship between the parent and α' martensite phase has been measured

  15. Development status und future possibilities for martensitic creep resistant steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hald, J. [Technical Univ. Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    In the last four decades new stronger modified 9%Cr martensitic creep resistant steels have been introduced in power plants, which has enabled increases in maximum achievable steam conditions from the previous 250 bar and 540-560 C up to the values of 300 bar and 600-620 C currently being introduced all over the world. In order to further increase the steam parameters of steel based power plants up to a target value of 650 C/325 bar it is necessary to double the creep strength of the martensitic steels. At the same time the resistance against steam oxidation must be improved by an increase of the chromium content in the steels from 9% to 12%. However, so far all attempts to make stronger 12%Cr steels have led to breakdowns in long-term creep strength. Significant progress has been achieved in the understanding of microstructure stability of the martensitic 9-12%Cr steels: Observed microstructure instabilities in 11-12%Cr steels are explained by Z-phase precipitation, which dissolves fine MN nitrides. Improved understanding of effects of B and N on long-term creep properties has formed the basis of a series of new stronger 9%Cr test alloys with improved creep strength. In parallel 9%Cr test steels with low C content show very promising behavior in long-term tests. However, the 9%Cr steels must be surface coated to protect against steam oxidation at high temperature applications above 620%C. A possibility to use fine Z-phases for strengthening of the martensitic steels has been identified, and this opens a new pathway for development of stable strong 12%Cr steels. There are still good prospects for the realization of a 325 bar / 650 C steam power plant all based on steel. (orig.)

  16. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  17. Microstructure of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available and martensite with 10% ferrite for Material B. Table 7 - Proposed martensitic stainless steel alloys for laser cladding Material C* Cr Ni Mn Si Mo Co Ms (ºC)* Cr eq Ni eq Material A 0.4 13 - 1 0.5 2.5 5.5 120 16.5 12.5 Material B 0.2 15 2 1 0.7 2.5 5.5 117... dilution, low heat input, less distortion, increased mechanical and corrosion properties excellent repeatability and control of process parameters. Solidification of laser cladded martensitic stainless steel is primarily austenitic. Microstructures...

  18. The basic elementary particles as martensitic nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguinaco-Bravo, V. J.; Onoro, J.

    1999-01-01

    The martensitic transformation is a diffusional structural change that produces an important modification of the microstructure and properties of materials. In this paper we propose how the martensitic phase is nucleated from a basic elementary particle (bep). The bep is formed in several stages. Vacancies, divacancies, etc. are formed at high temperature, which collapse into prismatic dislocation loops during the cooling process. We define a bep as a dislocation loop reaching a critical radius and fulfilling certain elastic energy conditions. A martensitic nucleus is a bep that coincides crystallographically with the habit plane of the matrix. (Author) 16 refs

  19. Effect of ferrite-martensite interface morphology on bake hardening response of DP590 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, Arnab; Adhikary, Manashi; Venugopalan, T.; Singh, Virender; Nanda, Tarun; Kumar, B. Ravi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of martensite spatial distribution and its interface morphology on the bake hardening characteristics of a dual phase steel was investigated. In one case, typical industrial continuous annealing line parameters were employed to anneal a 67% cold rolled steel to obtain a dual phase microstructure. In the other case, a modified annealing process with changed initial heating rates and peak annealing temperature was employed. The processed specimens were further tensile pre-strained within 1–5% strain range followed by a bake hardening treatment at 170 °C for 20 min. It was observed that industrial continuous annealing line processed specimen showed a peak of about 70 MPa in bake-hardening index at 2% pre-strain level. At higher pre-strain values a gradual drop in bake-hardening index was observed. On the contrary, modified annealing process showed near uniform bake-hardening response at all pre-strain levels and a decrease could be noted only above 4% pre-strain. The evolving microstructure at each stage of annealing process and after bake-hardening treatment was studied using field emission scanning electron microscope. The microstructure analysis distinctly revealed differences in martensite spatial distribution and interface morphologies between each annealing processes employed. The modified process showed predominant formation of martensite within the ferrite grains with serrated lath martensite interfaces. This nature of the martensite was considered responsible for the observed improvement in the bake-hardening response. Furthermore, along with improved bake-hardening response negligible loss in tensile ductility was also noted. This behaviour was correlated with delayed micro-crack initiation at martensite interface due to serrated nature.

  20. Cubic martensite in high carbon steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yulin; Xiao, Wenlong; Jiao, Kun; Ping, Dehai; Xu, Huibin; Zhao, Xinqing; Wang, Yunzhi

    2018-05-01

    A distinguished structural characteristic of martensite in Fe-C steels is its tetragonality originating from carbon atoms occupying only one set of the three available octahedral interstitial sites in the body-centered-cubic (bcc) Fe lattice. Such a body-centered-tetragonal (bct) structure is believed to be thermodynamically stable because of elastic interactions between the interstitial carbon atoms. For such phase stability, however, there has been a lack of direct experimental evidence despite extensive studies of phase transformations in steels over one century. In this Rapid Communication, we report that the martensite formed in a high carbon Fe-8Ni-1.26C (wt%) steel at room temperature induced by applied stress/strain has actually a bcc rather than a bct crystal structure. This finding not only challenges the existing theories on the stability of bcc vs bct martensite in high carbon steels, but also provides insights into the mechanism for martensitic transformation in ferrous alloys.

  1. Theory and Model for Martensitic Transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1986-01-01

    Martensitic transformations are shown to be driven by the interplay between two fluctuating strain components. No soft mode is needed, but a central peak occurs representing the dynamics of strain clusters. A two-dimensional magnetic-analog model with the martensitic-transition symmetry is constr......Martensitic transformations are shown to be driven by the interplay between two fluctuating strain components. No soft mode is needed, but a central peak occurs representing the dynamics of strain clusters. A two-dimensional magnetic-analog model with the martensitic-transition symmetry...... is constructed and analyzed by computer simulation and by a theory which accounts for correlation effects. Dramatic precursor effects at the first-order transition are demonstrated. The model is also of relevance for surface reconstruction transitions....

  2. Ionic nitriding of high chromium martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhl, S.P; Charadia, R; Vaca, L.S; Cimetta, J

    2008-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are used in industrial applications where resistance to corrosion and mechanical resistance are needed simultaneously. These steels are normally used in tempering and annealing condition which gives them hardnesses of 500 and 600 HV (about 54 HRC). Ionic nitriding is an assisted diffusion technique that has recently been successfully applied to harden austenitic stainless steels without reducing their resistance to corrosion. The application with AISI 420 martensitic steels has not given good results yet, because in most cases, it affects their corrosion resistance. This work presents the results of the pulsed nitriding of martensitic steels with a higher chrome content, such as the M340 and M333 Boehler steels and they are compared with the same materials after tempering and annealing, without nitriding. The influence of the variations in the parameters of the process, such as the percentage of active time in the pulsed wave, partial nitrogen pressure, current density and effective tension in the microstructure, hardness and wear and corrosion resistance was studied. The microstructure was studied with an optic microscope; the wear resistance with abrasion tests following ASTM G-65 and corrosion with 100 hour long saline haze tests, in a device built according to ASTM B117. Hardness was found to rise to values of 1000 to 1350 HV in all the steels after ionic nitriding, the modified layers oscillated from 3 to 15 microns. As a result, wear resistance also increased, with differences depending on the microstructure and the thickness of the modified layer. However, corrosion resistance was not good, except in the case of the M333 steel test piece with less hardness and a less thick nitrided layer without a noticeable interphase (au)

  3. Microstructural and crystallographic characteristics of modulated martensite, non-modulated martensite, and pre-martensitic tweed austenite in Ni-Mn-Ga alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Le; Schneider, Matthew M.; Giri, Anit; Cho, Kyu; Sohn, Yongho

    2017-01-01

    A combinatorial approach using diffusion couples and TEM analyses was carried out to investigate the composition-dependent martensitic transformation in NiMnGa alloys. The compositions cover a large portion of the off-stoichiometric Ni 2 MnGa compositions and some Mn-rich compositions. Crystallographic variations of the martensitic phase, including non-modulated (NM) martensite, modulated (5M or 7M) martensite, and austenitic phase were identified in the diffusion couples and investigated with respect to their microstructure and crystallography. The 5M and 7M martensitic structures were only found near the interphase boundary between austenite and martensite, while the NM martensitic structures were found mostly away from the interphase boundary. The tetragonality ratio (c/a) for NM martensite generally increases with e/a ratio, but was also dependent on the composition. The habit plane and martensitic microstructure that consists of twinned variants with differing orientations were documented using electron diffraction. The pre-martensitic state was observed in the austenitic phase that was located near the interphase boundary between austenite and martensite, with distinctive tweed microstructure and a strain field originating from the local lattice distortions. The combinatorial approach proves to be efficient and systematic in studying the composition-dependent martensitic transformation in NiMnGa alloys and can be potentially applied to other shape memory alloys.

  4. Orientation relationship in Eurofer martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcelo, F.; De Carlan, Y.; Bechade, J.L.; Fournier, B.

    2009-01-01

    Both TEM and SEM/EBSD orientation measurements are carried out on a Eurofer97 martensitic steel. The influence of the prior austenitic grain size is studied using dedicated heat treatments. The intra laths misorientation is estimated by TEM. SEM/EBSD orientation mapping enable to study the actual orientation relationship (OR) between the parent austenitic phase and the martensitic phase. Neither the Nishiyama-Wasserman nor the Kurdjumov-Sachs OR is able to account for both the misorientation angle distributions, the pole figure and the misorientation axes measured. The mixed OR recently proposed by Gourgues et al. (Electron backscattering diffraction study of acicular ferrite, bainite, and martensite steel microstructures, Mater. Sci. Tech. 16 (2000), p. 26-40.) and Sonderegger et al. (Martensite laths in creep resistant martensitic 9-12% Cr steels - Calculation and measurement of misorientations, Mater. Characterization (2006), in Press.) seems to be able to account for most of these results. Based on this OR, a new angular criterion is proposed to detect blocks of laths. (authors)

  5. Crystallographic theory of the martensitic transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar A. Torres-López

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The martensitic transformation is one of the most researched topics in the materials science during the 20th century. The second half of this century was mainly remembered by the development of several theories related with the kinetics of phase transformation, the mechanisms involved in the nucleation phenomenon, and the way as the crystallographic change is produced. In this paper are described the fundamental concepts that are defined in the crystallographic framework of the martensitic transformation. The study is focused on the application of the most outstanding crystallographic models: the Bain; the Wechsler, Lieberman & Read; and the Bowles & Mackenzie. The topic is presented based upon the particular features of the martensitic transformation, such as its non-diffusional character, type of interface between parent (austenite and product (martensite phases, the formation of substructural defects, and the shape change; all of these features are mathematically described by equations aimed to predict how the transformation will take place rather than to explain the actual movement of the atoms within the structure. This mathematical development is known as the Phenomenological Theory of Martensite Crystallography (PTMC.

  6. Characterization of martensitic transformations using acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatro, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) is a highly sensitive technique which can reveal changes in materials not detectable by other means. The goal of this project was to obtain basic information on the AE response to martensitic transformation in steel. This information will enable the use of AE for improved quality assurance testing of rough-cut component blanks and semifinished parts. The AE response was measured as a function of temperature in four steels undergoing martensitic transformation, and the AE response was compared with martensitic start temperature M/sub s/ and finish temperature M/sub f/ obtained by other methods. As measured by AE activity, M/sub s/ occurred as much as 26 0 C higher than previously reported using less sensitive measurement techniques. It was also found that 10 to 30% of an alloy of Fe-0.2% C-27% Ni transformed to martensite during one AE burst. These results show that AE can be used to study transformations both inside and outside the classical M/sub s/-M/sub f/ ranges. The findings will help to achieve the goal of using AE for quality assurance testing, and will add to the knowledge of the basic materials science of martensitic transformations

  7. Influence of strain-induced martensitic transformation on fatigue short crack behaviour in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baffie, N.; Stolarz, J.; Magnin, Th.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of martensitic transformation induced by cyclic straining on the mechanisms of low cycle fatigue damage in a metastable austenitic stainless steel with different grain sizes has been investigated using macroscopic measurements and microscopic observations of short crack evolutions. The amount of martensite formed during cyclic straining increases with increasing plastic strain amplitude and cumulative plastic strain but the dominant parameter is the grain size of austenite. The fine microstructure (D = 10 μm) with maximum martensite fraction of about 20% is characterised by a better fatigue resistance than the coarse one (D 40μm and only 2% of martensite) for the same plastic strain amplitude. Martensitic transformation is found to radically modify the cyclic response of the alloy and consequently the damage mechanisms. Indeed, both short crack nucleation and growth take place exclusively in the transformed regions. A mechanism of short crack propagation based on the γ→ α' transformation assisted by stress concentration at the crack tip is proposed. The indirect influence of grain boundaries in the austenite on crack propagation in the martensite is demonstrated. The better fatigue resistance of metastable alloys with fine granular structure can thus be understood. (authors)

  8. Ferritic/martensitic steels: Promises and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Ehrlich, K.; Abe, F.

    1992-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic steels are candidate structural materials for fusion reactors because of their higher swelling resistance, higher thermal conductivity, lower thermal expansion, and better liquid-metal compatibility than austenitic steels. Irradiation effects will ultimately determine the applicability of these steels, and the effects of irradiation on microstructure and swelling, and on the tensile, fatigue, and impact properties of the ferritic/martensitic steels are discussed. Most irradiation studies have been carried out in fast reactors, where little transmutation helium forms. Helium has been shown to enhance swelling and affect tensile and fracture behavior, making helium a critical issue, since high helium concentrations will be generated in conjunction with displacement damage in a fusion reactor. These issues are reviewed to evaluate the status of ferritic/martensitic steels and to assess the research required to insure that such steels are viable candidates for fusion applications

  9. Microstructure and cleavage in lath martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, John W Jr; Kinney, Chris; Pytlewski, Ken; Adachi, Y

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the microstructure of lath martensitic steels and the mechanisms by which it controls cleavage fracture. The specific experimental example is a 9Ni (9 wt% Ni) steel annealed to have a large prior austenite grain size, then examined and tested in the as-quenched condition to produce a relatively coarse lath martensite. The microstructure is shown to approximate the recently identified ‘classic’ lath martensite structure: prior austenite grains are divided into packets, packets are subdivided into blocks, and blocks contain interleaved laths whose variants are the two Kurjumov–Sachs relations that share the same Bain axis of the transformation. When the steel is fractured in brittle cleavage, the laths in the block share {100} cleavage planes and cleave as a unit. However, cleavage cracks deflect or blunt at the boundaries between blocks with different Bain axes. It follows that, as predicted, the block size governs the effective grain size for cleavage. (paper)

  10. Time-temperature equivalence in Martensite tempering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackenberg, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thomas, Grant A. [CSM; Speer, John G. [CSM; Matlock, David K. [CSM; Krauss, George [CSM

    2008-06-16

    The relationship between time and temperature is of great consequence in many materials-related processes including the tempering of martensite. In 1945, Hollomon and Jaffe quantified the 'degree of tempering' as a function of both tempering time, t, and tempering temperature, T, using the expression, T(log t + c). Here, c is thought to be a material constant and appears to decrease linearly with increasing carbon content. The Hollomon-Jaffe tempering parameter is frequently cited in the literature. This work reviews the original derivation of the tempering parameter concept, and presents the use of the characteristics diffusion distance as an alternative time-temperature relationship during martensite tempering. During the tempering of martensite, interstitial carbon atoms diffuse to form carbides. In addition, austenite decomposes, dislocations and grain boundaries rearrange, associated with iron self diffusion. Since these are all diffusional processes, it is reasonable to expect the degree of tempering to relate to the extent of diffusion.

  11. The Formation of Martensitic Austenite During Nitridation of Martensitic and Duplex Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangiabadi, Amirali; Dalton, John C.; Wang, Danqi; Ernst, Frank; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2017-01-01

    Isothermal martensite/ferrite-to-austenite phase transformations have been observed after low-temperature nitridation in the martensite and δ-ferrite phases in 15-5 PH (precipitation hardening), 17-7 PH, and 2205 (duplex) stainless steels. These transformations, in the region with nitrogen concentrations of 8 to 16 at. pct, are consistent with the notion that nitrogen is a strong austenite stabilizer and substitutional diffusion is effectively frozen at the paraequilibrium temperatures of our experiments. Our microstructural and diffraction analyses provide conclusive evidence for the martensitic nature of these phase transformations.

  12. General Aspects about the Martensitic Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar A. Torres-López

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available With the time, the number of studies associated to the martensitic transformation has been expanded; therefore, understand as this mechanism operates and as it confers different characteristics to diverse materials where it occurs, many studies has been conducted in different areas carrying out to discoveries at microstructural, kinetic and crystallographic level. This paper presents an overview of the martensitic transformation, beginning with a historical development, through a review on their morphology and kinetically characteristics, in addition to an analysis of the prospects of the studies carried out in the area, with a special interest in the phenomena of thermo-elasticity and shape memory.

  13. Mechanical properties of martensitic alloy AISI 422

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, F.H.; Hu, W.L.; Hamilton, M.L.

    1992-09-01

    HT9 is a martensitic stainless steel that has been considered for structural applications in liquid metal reactors (LMRs) as well as in fusion reactors. AISI 422 is a commercially available martensitic stainless steel that closely resembles HT9, and was studied briefly under the auspices of the US LMR program. Previously unpublished tensile, fracture toughness and charpy impact data on AISI 422 were reexamined for potential insights into the consequences of the compositional differences between the two alloys, particularly with respect to current questions concerning the origin of the radiation-induced embrittlement observed in HT9. 8 refs, 8 figs

  14. Tents and tunnels on martensitic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharya, K.; Hane, K.F.; James, R.D.; Palmstroem, C.J.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we outline a strategy for producing certain deformable structures - tents and tunnels - on epitaxially grown martensitic single crystal films. These structures are intended to be the basic building blocks of micropumps and microactuators. We give specific predictions for the systems Ni 2 MnGa, PbTiO 3 and Cu-Zn-Al. (orig.)

  15. Step-wise stimulated martensitic transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airoldi, G.; Riva, G.

    1991-01-01

    NiTi alloys, widely known both for their shape memory properties and for unusual pseudoelastic behaviour, are now on the forefront attention for step-wise induced memory processes, thermal or stress stimulated. Literature results related to step-wise stimulated martensite (direct transformation) are examined and contrasted with step-wise thermal stimulated parent phase (reverse transformation). Hypothesis are given to explain the key characters of both transformations, a thermodynamic model from first principles being till now lacking

  16. Radiation swelling of steels with lath martensite-austenic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagaradze, V.V.; Pavlov, V.A.; Alyab'ev, V.M.; Lapin, S.S.; Ermishkin, V.A.; Antonova, O.V.

    1987-01-01

    Influence of electron radiation in the column of the JEM-1000 electron microscope on radiation swelling of austenite as austenitic fields and thin plates surrounded by α-martensite crystals is investigated. Formation of lath structure of alternating dispersive plates of martensite and invert austenite formed as a result of partial inverse martensite transformation α→γ is shown to restrain radiation swelling and formation of vacancy voids in stainless steels

  17. Isothermal martensite formation at sub-zero temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojko, Allan; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Slycke, Jan

    2010-01-01

    austenitized and quenched in oil and thereafter investigated with vibrating sample agnetometry, which allows a quantitative assessment of the fraction of retained austenite as a function of the subzero temperature and time. Isothermal martensite formation was observed on interrupting the continuous cooling (5...... with a continuation of the martensitic transformation. On prolonged isothermal holding a volume reduction was observed for AISI 52100, but not for AISI 1070. A mechanism is proposed that explains the occurrence of isothermal martensite formation....

  18. Isothermal martensitic transformation as an internal-stress-increasing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Xie, Z.L.; Haenninen, H.; Humbeeck, J. van; Pietikaeinen, J.

    1995-01-01

    Based on the results that the magnitude of the stabilization of retained austenite increases with increasing the amount of martensite transformed, it has been assumed that the martensitic transformation is accompanied with an increase in internal resisting stress which subsequently results in the stabilization of retained austenite. By simplifying this internal resisting stress to be a type of hydrostatic compressive stress acting on retained austenite due to surrounding martensite plates, a thermodynamical analysis for an isothermal martensitic transformation under applied hydrostatic pressure has been performed. The calculated results, to some extent, show a good agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  19. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened 9Cr ferritic-martensitic steel clad tube for fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laha, K.; Saroja, S.; Mathew, M.D.; Jayakumar, T.; Vijay, R.; Venugopal Reddy, A.; Lakshminarayana, B.; Kapoor, Komal; Jha, S.K.; Tonpe, S.S.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key issues in the economical operation of FBR is to achieve high burn-up of fuel (200-250 GWd/t) which considerably reduces the fuel cycle cost. This imposes stringent requirements of void swelling resistance upto 200 dpa for the core structural materials. Presently used alloy 09 (a modified austenitic stainless steel, 15Cr-15Ni-Ti) for PFBR has void swelling limit less than 150 dpa. Because of the inherent void swelling resistance, 9-12Cr steels ferritic/martensitic steels are qualified for irradiation upto 200 dpa but their low creep strength at temperatures above 600 deg C restricts their application as a clad material. Oxide dispersion strengthening is found to be promising means of extending the creep resistance of ferritic/martensitic steels beyond 650 deg C without sacrificing the inherent advantages of high thermal conductivity and low swelling of ferritic steels

  20. Dose dependence of true stress parameters in irradiated bcc, fcc, and hcp metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, T. S.

    2007-04-01

    The dose dependence of true stress parameters has been investigated for nuclear structural materials: A533B pressure vessel steels, modified 9Cr-1Mo and 9Cr-2WVTa ferritic martensitic steels, 316 and 316LN stainless steels, and Zircaloy-4. After irradiation to significant doses, these alloys show radiation-induced strengthening and often experience prompt necking at yield followed by large necking deformation. In the present work, the critical true stresses for deformation and fracture events, such as yield stress (YS), plastic instability stress (PIS), and true fracture stress (FS), were obtained from uniaxial tensile tests or calculated using a linear strain-hardening model for necking deformation. At low dose levels where no significant embrittlement was detected, the true fracture stress was nearly independent of dose. The plastic instability stress was also independent of dose before the critical dose-to-prompt-necking at yield was reached. A few bcc alloys such as ferritic martensitic steels experienced significant embrittlement at doses above ∼1 dpa; and the true fracture stress decreased with dose. The materials fractured before yield at or above 10 dpa.

  1. Tribocorrosion wear of austenitic and martensitic steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Rozing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the impact of tribocorrosion wear caused by an aggressive acidic media. Tests were conducted on samples made of stainless steel AISI 316L, 304L and 440C. Austenitic steels were tested in their nitrided state and martensitic in quenched and tempered and then induction hardened state. Electrochemical corrosion resistance testing and analysis of the microstructure and hardness in the cross section was carried out on samples of selected steels. To test the possibility of applying surface modification of selected materials in conditions of use, tests were conducted on samples/parts in a worm press for final pressing.

  2. Martensitic textures: Multiscale consequences of elastic compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shenoy, S.R.; Lookman, T.; Saxena, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    2001-03-01

    We show that a free energy entirely in the order-parameter strain variable(s), rather than the displacement field, provides a unified understanding of martensitic textures. We use compatibility equations, linking the strain tensor components in the bulk and at interfaces, that induce anisotropic order-parameter strain interactions. These two long-range bulk/interface potentials, together with local compositional fluctuations, drive the formation of global elastic textures. Relaxational simulations show the spontaneous formation (and evolution under stress/temperature quenches) of equal width parallel twins, branched twins, and tweed, including characteristic scaling of twin width with twin length. (author)

  3. Anomalous kinetics of lath martensite formation in stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Pantleon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The kinetics of lath martensite formation in Fe-17.3 wt-%Cr-7.1 wt-%Ni-1.1 wt-%Al-0.08 wt-%C stainless steel was investigated with magnetometry and microscopy. Lath martensite forms during cooling, heating and isothermally. For the first time, it is shown by magnetometry during extremely slow...

  4. Modulated martensite: why it forms and why it deforms easily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, S; Niemann, R; Thersleff, T; Roessler, U K; Heczko, O; Buschbeck, J; Holzapfel, B; Schultz, L; Faehler, S

    2011-01-01

    Diffusionless phase transitions are at the core of the multifunctionality of (magnetic) shape memory alloys, ferroelectrics and multiferroics. Giant strain effects under external fields are obtained in low symmetric modulated martensitic phases. We outline the origin of modulated phases, their connection with tetragonal martensite and consequences owing to their functional properties by analysing the martensitic microstructure of epitaxial Ni-Mn-Ga films from the atomic to the macroscale. Geometrical constraints at an austenite-martensite phase boundary act down to the atomic scale. Hence, a martensitic microstructure of nanotwinned tetragonal martensite can form. Coarsening of twin variants can reduce twin boundary energy, a process we could observe from the atomic to the millimetre scale. Coarsening is a fractal process, proceeding in discrete steps by doubling twin periodicity. The collective defect energy results in a substantial hysteresis, which allows the retention of modulated martensite as a metastable phase at room temperature. In this metastable state, elastic energy is released by the formation of a 'twins within twins' microstructure that can be observed from the nanometre to the millimetre scale. This hierarchical twinning results in mesoscopic twin boundaries. Our analysis indicates that mesoscopic boundaries are broad and diffuse, in contrast to the common atomically sharp twin boundaries of tetragonal martensite. We suggest that the observed extraordinarily high mobility of such mesoscopic twin boundaries originates from their diffuse nature that renders pinning by atomistic point defects ineffective.

  5. Martensitic transformations in titanium nickelide subject to sock wave loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'dovich, V.I.; Shorokhov, E.V.; Gundyrev, V.M.; Khejfets, A.Eh.; Frolova, N.Yu.; Khomskaya, I.V.

    2000-01-01

    The plates of titanium nickelide (Ti-50.5 at. % Ni) rolled in an austenitic state and subjected to impact shock with pressure of 10 and 50 GPa are under study. Dilatometric and X-ray diffraction studied show that shock wave loading induces anisotropic martensitic transformations in the plates. The anisotropy of transformations is conditioned by directed motion of the substance of the plate in shock waves. Austenitic memory of specimens prior to loading is changed to martensitic one typical of deformation of martensite. Martensitic memory not preserve after the reserve martensitic transformation, the specimens recall the initial state with austenitic memory. The particles of Ti 3 N 4 precipitated phase and the dislocation structure formed in rolling are the carriers of memory [ru

  6. Resistance to small plastic strains during martensite tempering under tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabil' skij, V.V.; Sarrak, V.I. (AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Fiziki Metallov)

    1982-11-01

    The mechanism of plastic deformation of martensite of a series of hardened steels (N18, 20KhG, 50KhFA and others) during tempering under tension and the role of residual internal microstresses and phase transformations are studied. It is shown that martensite low resistance to small plastic deformations during tempering under tension which is usually associated with phase transformations depends as well on the level of residual internal microstresses in the martensite structure. The decrease of resistance to deformation in the course of the decomposition of a solid solution is due to weakening of martensitic matrix because of carbon departure from the solid solution and carbide coarsening. An assumption is made that martensite plastic deformation during tempering under tension is realized at the expense of the directed microplastic deformation in the regions of higher concentration of internal stresses.

  7. Martensite in steels: its significance, recent developments and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz-Beenken, A.S.

    1997-01-01

    Martensite is generally known as a hard but brittle microstructure. This is only true for high carbon plate martensite. Recently developed steels with a lath martensite microstructure offer an excellent toughness at yield strength of 1000 MPa yield strength. A transformation into lath martensite by glide as invariant shear mechanism is only possible at a carbon content below 0,03%. The source of both high strength and good toughness is the high dislocation density and the narrow lath width off less than 1 μm. By a thermomechanical treatment, that leads to a finer lath structure both strength and ductility can be improved to a yield strength of 1150 MPa and an elongation of 18%. As, unlike high carbon plate martensite, the hardness of lath martensite is not achieved by the distortion of the tetragonal cell by carbon atoms, the hardness of lath martensite remains stable up during an annealing treatment up to 600 C. This thermal stability of the lath martensit microstructure makes an additional increase of hardness by the precipitation of different types of intermetallic phases possible. The increase of the hardness from 300 HV to 600 HV by precipitation without volume changes and good cold deformability reveals many new application in manufacturing. In plate martensite too, comparatively high toughness values can be achieved, if carbon is replaced by nitrogen. The refining influence of nitrides on the austenite grain sizes and the precipitation of fine nitrides during the annealing process leads to impact values three times higher than those of comparable high carbon plate martensite. (orig.)

  8. Martensite transformation in antimony implanted stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Littmark, U.; Johansen, A.; Christodoulides, C.

    1981-01-01

    The authors have used Rutherford backscattering analysis (RBS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and diffraction to investigate austenitic stainless steel crystals implanted at room temperature with 80 keV Sb + ions to a fluence of 5 x 10 20 ions/m 2 , thus providing implantation with a heavy group V element. RBS channeling spectra from implanted crystals show a damage peak which approaches the height of the random level and therefore indicates a very high degree of disorder in the implanted layers. The distribution of the disorder extends to a depth 3-5 times the depth of the primary radiation damage. The Sb peaks under channeling as well as random conditions are indistinguishable, confirming that substitutionality during implantation is negligible. To establish the nature of the disorder which cannot be assessed from the RBS analysis alone, and in particular to assess whether an amorphous alloy is formed in the implanted layer as indicated from the RBS spectra, samples implanted under similar conditions were investigated in the TEM. Significant extra spots in the patterns can be ascribed to the presence of a radiation induced b.c.c. phase of martensitic origin. The result that a significant amount of martensite can be induced by antimony implantation seems to indicate that the main driving force for the transition is due to damage induced stress concentrations. (Auth.)

  9. Cold deformation of ADI castings: Martensitic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navea, Lilian R; Mannheim, Rodolfo M; Garin, Jorge L

    2004-01-01

    Research and applications in austempered ductile iron (ADI castings) have recently undergone noticeable progress in the industrialized world, becoming a highly competitive engineering material. The notable properties of these castings derive from their austenitic matrix stabilized by carbon, a thermally stable austenite during the austenizing process but possibly turning into martensite when undergoing plastic deformation. This work aims to study the changing structure of an ADI casting caused by one directional cold lamination. The samples that were studied were obtained from two nodular castings, one without alloying and the other alloyed with Cu, Ni and Mo. The samples were austenized in the first stage of the austempering process at 910 o C for 80 min. Then in the second stage the unalloyed samples were austempered at 410 o C for 10 min and the alloyed samples for 120 min. After the thermal treatment, the test pieces were deformed 0% to 25% by cold lamination. The quantification of the phases was performed using x-ray diffraction and the metallographic study using optic and Scanning Electronic Microscopy. The results show that the martensitic phase obtained by deformation is a very fine structure that evolves into a thicker one when the deformation of the samples increases (CW)

  10. Activation volume of martensitic ODS steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. W.; Noh, S.; Kim, T. K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Apparent activation volume as a function of temperature is 86b{sup 3}-42b{sup 3}. Activation volume decreases with increasing temperature. Activation volume changes scarcely with decreasing strain rate. Strain rate sensitivity increases with increasing temperature and decreasing strain rate. Nano-sized oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) martensitic steel has a high strength, low thermal expansion coefficient, high thermal conductivity, and a good swelling resistance. Martensitic ODS steel is a candidate material for fuel cladding of sodium cooled fast breeder reactor (SFR). The plastic flow stress is determined through the interaction of dislocations with the obstacles encountered inside lattice. Dislocation movement through the lattice or past an obstacle requires surmounting of the energy barrier by a combination of applied stress and thermal activation. The plastic deformation of materials is a thermally activated process dependent upon time, temperature, and strain rate. Characterization of the rate controlling mechanism for plastic deformation due to dislocation motion in crystalline materials is done by the assessment of activation volume based on thermal activation analysis.

  11. Analysis of the non-isothermal austenite-martensite transformation in 13% Cr-type martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-De-Andris, C.; Alvarez, L.F.

    1996-01-01

    In martensitic stainless steels, as in other alloyed containing carbide-forming elements, the carbide dissolution and precipitation processes that take place during heat treatment can cause modifications to the chemical composition of the austenite phase of these steels. The chemical composition of this phase is a fundamental factor for the evolution of the martensitic transformation. As a result of their influence on the dissolution and precipitation processes, the parameters of the quenching heat treatment exert a strong influence on the behavior of the martensitic transformation in these steels. In the present study, the effect of the heating temperature and the cooling rate on the martensitic transformation in two 13% Cr-type martensitic stainless steels with different carbon contents were properly evaluated. (author)

  12. Evaluation of temper embrittlement of martensitic and ferritic-martensitic steels by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yusho; Takahashi, Hideaki; Shoji, Tetsuo

    1987-01-01

    Martensitic (HT-9) and ferritic-martensitic steels (9Cr-2Mo) are considered as fusion first wall materials. In this investigation in order to understand the sensitivity of temper embrittlement in these steels under actual service condition, fracture toughness testing was made by use of acoustic emission technique. The temper embrittlement was characterized in terms of fracture toughness. The fracture toughness of these steels under 500 deg C, 100 hrs, and 1000 hrs heat treatment was decreased and their changes in micro-fracture process have been observed. The fracture toughness changes by temper embrittlement was discussed by the characteristic of AE, AE spectrum analysis and fractographic investigation. The relation between micro-fracture processes and AE has been clarified. (author)

  13. Computer simulation of martensitic transformations in idealized systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.H.R.

    1979-06-01

    Very little theoretical work on the development of the martensitic transformation and the characteristics of the resulting microstructure exists. This thesis advances the theory of the martensite transformation by constructing a computer model of a martensitic transformation in an idealized system. The model has its source in the general observation that the characteristics of martensitic transformations in solids are largely determined by accomodating the strain associated with the martensitic distortion of the crystal lattice. A review and adaptation of prior theoretical work leads to the development of a theory which allows the straightforward computation of the elastic energy associated with an arbitrary distribution of defects in an elastically anisotropic body under the assumption that the body has uniform elastic constants and that anharmonic effects may be neglected. Equations are cast in which the energy is written as a simple sum of binary interactions in which the defects influence one another according to an elastic potential whose form can be calculated. At the time that the energetic equations take a simple form the kinematics of the process involving the appearance of elastic inclusions are also known to be simple. The martiensitic transformation is modeled as a transformation which occurs through the sequential formation of individual martensitic elements, each carries the elementary transformation strain. Statistical equations developed govern the selection of the transformation path, or sequence that elementary martensite particles appear in the model, and specifies the kinetics of transformation.A useful representative path is defined as the minimum energy path. The model is used for the detailed simulation of a martensitic transformation in a pseudo two-dimensional system. Virtually all interesting qualitative aspects of the developing martensitic transformation are shown to be inherently present within it

  14. Crystallography of lath martensite and stabilization of retained austenite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarikaya. M.

    1982-10-01

    TEM was used to study the morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels in the as-quenched and 200/sup 0/C tempered conditions. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite and continuous thin films of retained austenite at the lath interfaces. Stacks of laths form the packets which are derived from different (111) variants of the same austenite grain. The residual parent austenite enables microdiffraction experiments with small electron beam spot sizes for the orientation relationships (OR) between austenite and martensite. All three most commonly observed ORs, namely Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, and Greninger-Troiano, operate within the same sample.

  15. Crystallography of lath martensite and stabilization of retained austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarikaya, M.

    1982-10-01

    TEM was used to study the morphology and crystallography of lath martensite in low and medium carbon steels in the as-quenched and 200 0 C tempered conditions. The steels have microduplex structures of dislocated lath martensite and continuous thin films of retained austenite at the lath interfaces. Stacks of laths form the packets which are derived from different [111] variants of the same austenite grain. The residual parent austenite enables microdiffraction experiments with small electron beam spot sizes for the orientation relationships (OR) between austenite and martensite. All three most commonly observed ORs, namely Kurdjumov-Sachs, Nishiyama-Wassermann, and Greninger-Troiano, operate within the same sample

  16. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2017-01-31

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, copper, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  17. Structure analysis of NiAl martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Y.; Shapiro, S.M.; Shirane, G.; Yamada, Y.; Fuchizaki, K.; Tanner, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    Neutron elastic scattering experiments were performed in order to investigate the structure of the low temperature martensitic phase of Ni 62.5 Al 37.5 alloy. The average structure analyzed from the integrated intensity was approximately described by the (5,-2) structure proposed by Martynov et al. Small deviation from the exact (5,-2) model in the positional parameters and the anomalously large Debye-Waller factor were obtained. The observed satellite profiles show asymmetrical broadening, and the peak positions shift from the regular reciprocal lattice points. These anomalous features of scattering profiles were tentatively interpreted by introducing spatial modulation of the strain and order parameters. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  18. Creep resistant high temperature martensitic steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Jablonski, Paul D.; Cowen, Christopher J.

    2015-11-13

    The disclosure provides a creep resistant alloy having an overall composition comprised of iron, chromium, molybdenum, carbon, manganese, silicon, nickel, vanadium, niobium, nitrogen, tungsten, cobalt, tantalum, boron, and potentially additional elements. In an embodiment, the creep resistant alloy has a molybdenum equivalent Mo(eq) from 1.475 to 1.700 wt. % and a quantity (C+N) from 0.145 to 0.205. The overall composition ameliorates sources of microstructural instability such as coarsening of M.sub.23C.sub.6 carbides and MX precipitates, and mitigates or eliminates Laves and Z-phase formation. A creep resistant martensitic steel may be fabricated by preparing a melt comprised of the overall composition followed by at least austenizing and tempering. The creep resistant alloy exhibits improved high-temperature creep strength in the temperature environment of around 650.degree. C.

  19. Literature Review: Impact Toughness of Bainite vs. Martensite

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Niccols, Edwin

    1976-01-01

    .... Tempered martensite is found to have generally superior mechanical properties for lower (less than .5%) carbon content steels, but two specific bainitic heat treatments are described which may yield optimum properties.

  20. Influence of plastic strain on deformation-induced martensitic transformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Groen, M.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of plastic strain on deformation-induced martensitic transformations have been investigated experimentally. Austenitic metastable stainless steel samples were heated to a temperature at which the transformation is suppressed and were plastically strained to different amounts. The

  1. Stress-Corrosion Cracking in Martensitic PH Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T.; Nelson, E.

    1984-01-01

    Precipitation-hardening alloys evaluated in marine environment tests. Report describes marine-environment stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) tests of three martensitic precipitation hardening (PH) stainless-steel alloys.

  2. Depth distribution of martensite in xenon implanted stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, A.; Johnson, E.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Steenstrup, S.; Hayashi, N.; Sakamoto, I.

    1989-01-01

    The amount of stress-induced martensite and its distribution in depth in xenon implanted austenitic stainless steel poly- and single crystals have been measured by Rutherford backscattering and channeling analysis, depth selective conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy, cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analysis. In low nickel 17/7, 304 and 316 commercial stainless steels and in 17:13 single crystals the martensitic transformation starts at the surface and develops towards greater depth with increasing xenon fluence. The implanted layer is nearly completely transformed, and the interface between martensite and austenite is rather sharp and well defined. In high nickel 310 commercial stainless steel and 15:19 and 20:19 single crystals, on the other hand, only insignificant amounts of martensite are observed. (orig.)

  3. Crystallography and Interphase Boundary of Martensite and Bainite in Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuhara, Tadashi; Chiba, Tadachika; Kaneshita, Takeshi; Wu, Huidong; Miyamoto, Goro

    2017-06-01

    Grain refinements in lath martensite and bainite structures are crucial for strengthening and toughening of high-strength structural steels. Clearly, crystallography of transformation plays an important role in determining the "grain" sizes in these structures. In the present study, crystallography and intrinsic boundary structure of martensite and bainite are described. Furthermore, various extrinsic factors affecting variant selection and growth kinetics, such as elastic/plastic strain and alloying effects on interphase boundary migration, are discussed.

  4. EBSD characterization of deformed lath martensite in if steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Z.A.; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2017-01-01

    Rolling deformation results in the transformation of a lath martensite structure to a lamellar structure characteristic to that of IF steel cold-rolled to medium and high strains. The structural transition takes place from low to medium strain, and electron backscatter diffraction analysis shows...... and the strength are characterized for lath martensite rolled to a thickness reduction of 30%, showing that large changes in the misorientation take place, while the strain hardening rate is low....

  5. Isothermal martensite formation at sub-zero temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stojko, Allan; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Slycke, Jan

    2012-01-01

    , quenched in oil, and thereafter investigated with vibrating sample magnetometry, which allows a quantitative assessment of the fraction of retained austenite as a function of the sub-zero temperature and time. Isothermal martensite formation was observed on interrupting the continuous cooling (5 K...... with a continuation of the martensitic transformation. On prolonged isothermal holding, a volume reduction was observed for AISI 52100, but not for AISI 1070. Copyright © 2011 by ASTM International....

  6. Energy Barriers and Hysteresis in Martensitic Phase Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    glacial acetic acid (CH3COOH) and 10-15% perchloric acid (HCLO4) by volume, the cathode was stainless steel , the anode was stainless steel or Ti, the...Submitted to Acta Materialia Energy barriers and hysteresis in martensitic phase transformations Zhiyong Zhang, Richard D. James and Stefan Müller...hysteresis based on the growth from a small scale of fully developed austenite martensite needles. In this theory the energy of the transition layer plays a

  7. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...... of the sample surface. The development of epsilon nitride, expanded austenite and expanded martensite resulted from the low temperature nitriding treatments. The microstructural features, hardness and phase composition are discussed with emphasis on the influence of nitriding duration and nitriding potential....

  8. Strength of zirconium--titanium martensites and deformation behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.; Vijayakar, S.J.; Krishnan, R.

    1978-01-01

    The deformation behavior of pure zirconium and of zirconium--titanium alloys containing 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt % titanium was studied in two heat treated conditions: furnace cooled and water quenched from the β phase field. By comparing the flow stresses of the furnace cooled α and the water quenched α' (martensite) structures it was possible to isolate the strengthening contributions of the martensitic structure (comprising the contributions due to the small size of the martensite units and to the distributions of defects like dislocations and internal twins) from those arising from the solid solution. The internally twinned plate martensite structure in the Zr--15% Ti and the Zr--20% Ti alloys was responsible for a significant increase in strength, while the strengthening due to the dislocated lath martensite structure in the more dilute alloys was only marginal. Stress relaxation experiments revealed that strengthening associated with the martensite structure was mainly due to an increase in the athermal component of the flow stress. The effectiveness of the lath boundaries and the (10 anti 11) twin boundaries in offering resistance to an approaching deformation front (either slip or twin) was examined. While the lath boundaries were found to be transparent with respect to the propagation of slip dislocations and deformation twins, a majority of plate as well as twin boundaries were effective barriers against their propagation. TEM observations showed an extensive accumulation of geometrically necessary dislocations in the plastically deformed twinned martensites. Enhanced work hardening was related to the geometric slip distances in these structures in accordance with Ashby's one parameter work hardening theory for plastically inhomogeneous materials. The effect of the martensite structure on different components of the flow stress (dependent on or independent of grain size and strain) was discussed

  9. Magnetic domains in martensite of Ni-Mg-Ga alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokorin, V.V.; Babij, O.M.; Dubinko, S.V.; Prokopov, A.R.

    2006-01-01

    The structural changes attendant on intermartensitic transformation in a Ni-Mg-Ga shape memory alloy are considered using magneto-optical visualization with the help of ferrite-garnet monocrystalline films. It is established that on the intermartensitic transformation the complete reorganization of martensite macrostructure fails. Martensite crystals resulted from the basic transformation change somewhat their sizes on intermartensitic transition. The existence of large-scale labyrinth magnetic domain structure is revealed [ru

  10. High temperature creep-fatigue design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavassoli, A. A. F.; Fournier, B.; Sauzay, M.

    2010-01-01

    Generation IV fission and future fusion reactors envisage development of more efficient high temperature concepts where materials performances are key to their success. This paper examines different types of high temperature creep-fatigue interactions and their implications on design rules for the structural materials retained in both programmes. More precisely, the paper examines current status of design rules for the stainless steel type 316L(N), the conventional Modified 9Cr-1Mo martensitic steel and the low activation Eurofer steel. Results obtained from extensive high temperature creep, fatigue and creep-fatigue tests performed on these materials and their welded joints are presented. These include sequential creep-fatigue and relaxation creep-fatigue tests with hold times in tension, in compression or in both. Effects of larger plastic deformations on fatigue properties are studied through cyclic creep tests or fatigue tests with extended hold time in creep. In most cases, mechanical test results are accompanied with microstructural and fractographic observations. In the case of martensitic steels, the effect of oxidation is examined by performing creep-fatigue tests on identical specimens in vacuum. Results obtained are analyzed and their implications on design allowable and creep-fatigue interaction diagrams are presented. While reasonable confidence is found in predicting creep-fatigue damage through existing code procedures for austenitic stainless steels, effects of cyclic softening and coarsening of microstructure of martensitic steels throughout the fatigue life on materials properties need to be taken into account for more precise damage calculations. In the long-term, development of ferritic/martensitic steels with stable microstructure, such as ODS steels, is proposed. (authors)

  11. High temperature creep-fatigue design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A. A. F.; Fournier, B.; Sauzay, M. [CEA Saclay, DEN DMN, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2010-07-01

    Generation IV fission and future fusion reactors envisage development of more efficient high temperature concepts where materials performances are key to their success. This paper examines different types of high temperature creep-fatigue interactions and their implications on design rules for the structural materials retained in both programmes. More precisely, the paper examines current status of design rules for the stainless steel type 316L(N), the conventional Modified 9Cr-1Mo martensitic steel and the low activation Eurofer steel. Results obtained from extensive high temperature creep, fatigue and creep-fatigue tests performed on these materials and their welded joints are presented. These include sequential creep-fatigue and relaxation creep-fatigue tests with hold times in tension, in compression or in both. Effects of larger plastic deformations on fatigue properties are studied through cyclic creep tests or fatigue tests with extended hold time in creep. In most cases, mechanical test results are accompanied with microstructural and fractographic observations. In the case of martensitic steels, the effect of oxidation is examined by performing creep-fatigue tests on identical specimens in vacuum. Results obtained are analyzed and their implications on design allowable and creep-fatigue interaction diagrams are presented. While reasonable confidence is found in predicting creep-fatigue damage through existing code procedures for austenitic stainless steels, effects of cyclic softening and coarsening of microstructure of martensitic steels throughout the fatigue life on materials properties need to be taken into account for more precise damage calculations. In the long-term, development of ferritic/martensitic steels with stable microstructure, such as ODS steels, is proposed. (authors)

  12. Alloying effect on martensite transformation in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulyaev, A.P.; Shlyamnev, A.P.; Sorokina, N.A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of cobalt, nickel, molybdenum on the martensite transformation kinetics in stainless steels containing 9 to 13% Cr has been studied. Cobalt in Fe-Cr base alloys decreases the temperature of the Msub(in) and Msub(fin) points without a considerable decrease of the martensite phase amount after the transformation. Nickel reduces the martensite transformation temperature range, the nickel effect being enhanced in the presence of cobalt, which is characterized by a change of the linear dependence Msub(in)=f(%Ni) for a quadratic one. Molybdenum decreases the temperature of the Msub(in) and Msub(fin) points intensively, thus, substantially increasing the residual austenite amount. In the steels investigated Ni and Co decrease, whereas Mo increases, to some extent, the temperature of the reverse a-γ-transformation. The reduction of chromium content from 13 to 9% stimulates the martensite transformation initiation, that is why, in alloys containing 9% Cr, the increase in the contents of Ni, Co., Mo with the martensite structure maintained is possible. A further alloying of steel containing 13% Cr with these elements is rather limited due to the inhibition of the martensite transformation

  13. Radiation induced microstructural evolution in ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Asakura, K.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    R and D of ferritic/martensitic steels as structural materials for fusion reactor is one of the most important issues of fusion technology. The efforts to characterize microstructural evolution under irradiation in the conventional Fe-Cr-Mo steels as well as newly developed Fe-Cr-Mn or Fe-Cr-W low activation ferritic/ martensitic steels have been continued. This paper provides some of the recent results of heavy irradiation effects on the microstructural evolution of ferritic/martensitic steels neutron irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA (Fast Flux Test Facility/Materials Open Test Assembly). Materials examined are Fe-10Cr-2Mo dual phase steel (JFMS: Japanese Ferritic/Martensitic Steel), Fe-12Cr-XMn-1Mo manganese stabilized martensitic steels and Fe-8Cr-2W Tungsten stabilized low activation martensitic steel (F82H). JFMS showed excellent void swelling resistance similar to 12Cr martensitic steel such as HT-9, while the manganese stabilized steels and F82H showed less void swelling resistance with small amount of void swelling at 640-700 K (F82H: 0.14% at 678 K). As for irradiation response of precipitate behavior, significant formation of intermetallic χ phase was observed in the manganese stabilized steels along grain boundaries which is though to cause mechanical property degradation. On the other hand, precipitates identified were the same type as those in unirradiated condition in F82H with no recognition of irradiation induced precipitates, which suggested satisfactory mechanical properties of F82H after the irradiation. (author)

  14. Creep and Creep Crack Growth Behaviors for SMAW Weldments of Gr. 91 Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Yin, Song Nan; Park, Ji Yeon; Hong, Sung Deok; Kim, Yong Wan; Park, Jae Young

    2010-01-01

    High Cr ferritic resistance steels with tempered martensite microstructures posses enhanced creep strength at the elevated temperatures. Those steels as represented by a modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (ASME Grade 91, hereafter Gr.91) are regarded as main structural materials of sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR) and reactor pressure vessel materials of very high temperature reactors (VHTR). The SFR and VHTR systems are designed during long-term duration reaching 60 years at elevated temperatures and often subjected to non-uniform stress and temperature distribution during service. These conditions may generate localized creep damage and propagate the cracks and ultimately may cause a fracture. A significant portion of its life is spent in crack propagation. Therefore, a creep crack growth rate (CCGR) due to creep damage should be assessed for both the base metal (BM) and welded metal (WM). Enough CCGR data for them should be provided for assessing their structural integrities. However, their CCGR data for the Gr. 91 steels is still insufficient. In this study, the CCGR for the BM and the WM of the Gr. 91 steel was comparatively investigated. A series of the CCG tests were conducted under different applied loads for the BM and the WM at 600 .deg. C. The CCGR was characterized in terms of the C parameter, and their CCG behavior were compared, respectively

  15. On the inter relationship between fatigue crack growth parameters in Paris regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasikala, G.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on fatigue crack growth behaviour of several steels and their welds for nuclear applications have been characterized in the author's laboratory in the past decade as a part of (i) creating the required database for integrity assessment of components, (ii) providing inputs for materials development, and (iii) understanding the crack growth behaviour in the light of basic mechanisms of cyclic deformation and damage. These include, effects of test variables (such as temperature, load ratio R) and material conditions (such as base and weld materials in as received, as welded or after subjecting to different ageing conditions). Different steels investigated include the ferritic grades modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (P91) and reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel, and austenitic grade SS 316L(N) and its weld. A common observation in the FCG literature is the inverse relationship between the Paris constant (log C) and exponent m, which has attracted considerable attention of the researchers in the field. The present paper attempts a fresh look at the inter relationship between Paris parameters obtained in the FCG studies on the above materials including the effect of crack closure and crack tip shielding. Further, some observed deviations from the inter relationship will be discussed in the light of changes in material properties and crack growth mechanisms. (author)

  16. Martensitic transformation, shape memory effects, and other curious mechanical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandermeer, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review tutorially the subject of martensitic transformations in uranium alloys emphasizing their role in the shape memory effect (SME). We examine first what a martensitic transformation is, illustrating some of its characteristics with specific examples. As well as being athermal in nature, as expected, data are presented indicating that martensitic transformations in some uranium alloys also have a strong isothermal component. In addition, a few alloys are known to exhibit thermoelastic martensitic reactions. The SME, which is associated with these, is defined and demonstrated graphically with data from a uranium-6 wt % niobium alloy. Some of the important variables influencing SME behavior are described. Specifically, these are reheat temperature, amount of deformation, crystal structure, and composition. A mechanism for SME is postulated and the association with martensitic transformation is detailed. A self-induced shape instability in the uranium-7.5 wt % niobium-2.5 wt % zirconium alloy with a rationalization of the behavior in terms of texture and lattice parameter change during aging is reviewed and discussed. 24 figures

  17. Deformation induced martensite in AISI 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, N.; Solomon, I.

    2010-01-01

    The forming process leads to a considerable differentiation of the strain field within the billet, and finally causes the non-uniform distribution of the total strain, microstructure and properties of the material over the product cross-section. This paper focus on the influence of stress states on the deformation-induced a martensitic transformation in AISI Type 316 austenitic stainless steel. The formation of deformation-induced martensite is related to the austenite (g) instability at temperatures close or below room temperature. The structural transformation susceptibility is correlated to the stacking fault energy (SFE), which is a function not only of the chemical composition, but also of the testing temperature. Austenitic stainless steels possess high plasticity and can be easily cold formed. However, during cold processing the hardening phenomena always occurs. Nevertheless, the deformation-induced martensite transformation may enhance the rate of work-hardening and it may or may not be in favour of further material processing. Due to their high corrosion resistance and versatile mechanical properties the austenitic stainless steels are used in pressing of heat exchanger plates. However, this corrosion resistance is influenced by the amount of martensite formed during processing. In order to establish the links between total plastic strain, and martensitic transformation, the experimental tests were followed by numerical simulation. (Author) 21 refs.

  18. Modeling mechanical effects on promotion and retardation of martensitic transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maalekian, Mehran, E-mail: mehran.maalekian@ubc.ca [Department of Materials Engineering, University of British Columbia, 309-6350 Stores Road, Vancouver, B.C. V61Z4 (Canada); Kozeschnik, Ernst [Christian Doppler Laboratory for ' Early Stages of Precipitation' , Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology (Austria)

    2011-01-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Compressive elastic stresses up to 250 MPa are applied in continuous cooling. {yields} Using the thermodynamic data and maximum value of the mechanical driving force the predicted increase in M{sub s} ({approx}0.1 K/MPa) is in agreement with experiment {yields} Austenite was deformed plastically at different temperatures (800 deg. C-1100 deg. C). {yields} High deformation temperature (i.e. 1100 deg. C) as well as low plastic strain (i.e. {epsilon}{sub ave} {approx} 30%) do not affect martensite transformation noticeably, whereas lower deformation temperature (e.g. 900 deg. C) and large plastic strain (i.e. {epsilon}{sub ave} {approx} 70%) retards martensite transformation. {yields} The theory of mechanical stabilization predicts the depression of M{sub s}. - Abstract: The influence of compressive stress and prior plastic deformation of austenite on the martensite transformation in a eutectoid steel is studied both experimentally and theoretically. It is demonstrated that martensite formation is assisted by stress but it is retarded when transformation occurs from deformed austenite. With the quantitative modeling of the problem based on the theory of displacive shear transformation, the explanation of the two opposite roles of mechanical treatment prior to or simultaneously to martensite transformation is presented.

  19. Crystallographic features of lath martensite in low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitahara, Hiromoto; Ueji, Rintaro; Tsuji, Nobuhiro; Minamino, Yoritoshi

    2006-01-01

    Electron backscattering diffraction with field-emission scanning electron microscopy was used to analyze crystallographically the lath martensite structure in a 0.20% carbon steel. The crystallographic features of the lath martensite structure, of the order of the prior austenite grain size or larger, were clarified. Although the orientations of the martensite crystals were scattered around the ideal variant orientations, the martensite in this steel maintained the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S) orientation relationship. The procedures of the crystallographic analysis of the martensite (ferrite) phase with the K-S orientation relationship were explained in detail. Variant analysis showed that all 24 possible variants did not necessarily appear within a single prior austenite grain and that all six variants did not necessarily appear within each packet. Specific combinations of two variants appeared within local regions (sub-blocks), indicating a strict rule for variant selection. Prior austenite grain boundaries and most of the packet boundaries were clearly recognized. However, it was difficult to determine the block boundaries within the sub-blocks

  20. Effect of hardness of martensite and ferrite on void formation in dual phase steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azuma, M.; Goutianos, Stergios; Hansen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    The influence of the hardness of martensite and ferrite phases in dual phase steel on void formation has been investigated by in situ tensile loading in a scanning electron microscope. Microstructural observations have shown that most voids form in martensite by evolving four steps: plastic...... deformation of martensite, crack initiation at the martensite/ferrite interface, crack propagation leading to fracture of martensite particles and void formation by separation of particle fragments. It has been identified that the hardness effect is associated with the following aspects: strain partitioning...... between martensite and ferrite, strain localisation and critical strain required for void formation. Reducing the hardness difference between martensite and ferrite phases by tempering has been shown to be an effective approach to retard the void formation in martensite and thereby is expected to improve...

  1. Influence of microscopic strain heterogeneity on the formability of martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettanini, Alvise Miotti; Delannay, Laurent; Jacques, Pascal J.; Pardoen, Thomas; Badinier, Guillaume; Mithieux, Jean-Denis

    2017-10-01

    Both finite element modeling and mean field (Mori-Tanaka) modeling are used to predict the strain partitioning in the martensite-ferrite microstructure of an AISI 410 martensitic stainless steel. Numerical predictions reproduce experimental trends according to which macroscopic strength is increased when the dissolution of carbides leads to carbon enrichment of martensite. However, the increased strength contrast of ferrite and martensite favours strain localization and high stress triaxiality in ferrite, which in turn promotes ductile damage development.

  2. Martensitic transformation in SUS304 steels with the same Ni equivalent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, T.; Okino, Y.; Takahashi, S.; Echigoya, J.; Kamada, Y.

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of martensitic transformation due to plastic deformation at room temperature was investigated in SUS304 austenitic stainless steels with the same nickel equivalent. The absolute volume of the martensitic phase was obtained by saturation magnetization. We discuss the shapes of the martensitic phase caused by different values of coercive force. Martensitic transformation depends on the applied stress but is independent of nickel content with same nickel equivalent. We investigated applications to nondestructive testing on the basis of the present study. (author)

  3. Friction Stir Welding of HT9 Ferritic-Martensitic Steel: An Assessment of Microstructure and Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    report of FSW on a ferritic- martensitic stainless steel is the work of Chung, which applied this approach to a dissimilar weld between F82H (ferritic... martensitic ) and SUS304 (austenitic stainless ) [43]. 7 D. CORROSION OF FERRITIC/ MARTENSITIC STEELS IN HIGH TEMPERATURE MOLTEN SALT COOLANTS In...Philadelphia, PA, 1992, pp. 1267–1286, March 1990. [15] S. Rosenwasser, ―The application of martensitic stainless steels in a lifelong fusion first wall

  4. Parent-martensite interface structure in ferrous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, X.; Pond, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, a Topological Model of martensitic transformations has been presented wherein the habit plane is a semi-coherent structure, and the transformation mechanism is shown explicitly to be diffusionless. This approach is used here to model martensitic transformations in ferrous alloys. The habit plane comprises coherent (1 1 1) γ parallel (0 1 1) α terraces where the coherency strains are accommodated by a network of dislocations, originating in the martensite phase, and disconnections (transformation dislocations). The disconnections can move conservatively across the interface, thereby effecting the transformation. Since the disconnections exhibit step character, the overall habit plane deviates from the terrace plane. A range of network geometries is predicted corresponding to orientation relationships varying from Nishiyama-Wasserman to Kurdjumov-Sachs. This range of solutions includes habit planes close to {2 9 5}, {5 7 5} and {1 2 1}, in good agreement with experimental observations in various ferrous alloys

  5. Ultrafine Structure and High Strength in Cold-Rolled Martensite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Xiaoxu; Morito, S.; Hansen, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Structural refinement by cold rolling (10 to 80 pct reductions) of interstitial free (IF) steel containing Mn and B has been investigated from samples with different initial structures: (a) lath martensite, (b) coarse ferrite (grain size 150 mu m), and (c) fine ferrite (22 mu m). Unalloyed IF steel....... At low to medium strains, lath martensite transforms into a cell block structure composed of cell block boundaries and cell boundaries with only a negligible change in strength. At medium to large strains, cell block structures in all samples refine with increasing strain and the hardening rate...... is constant (stage IV). A strong effect of the initial structure is observed on both the structural refinement and the strength increase. This effect is largest in lath martensite and smallest in unalloyed ferrite. No saturation in structural refinement and strength is observed. The discussion covers...

  6. Martensitic transformation induced by irradiation and deformation in stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksimkin, O.P.

    1997-01-01

    In the present work the peculiarities of martensite γ → α , (γ → ε → α , ) transformation in the steels with a low stacking fault energy (12Cr18Ni10T, Cr15AG14) irradiated by neutrons, α-particles and electrons (pulse and stationary) and then deformed with the various strain rates in the temperature range - 20 - 1000 C are considered. It is established by the electron-microscope research that the phase γ → α ' transition in irradiated and deformed steels is observed on the definite stage of evolution of the dislocation structure (after the cell formation) and the martensite formation preferentially occurs on a stacking fault aggregation. The regularities of the irradiation by high energy particles effect on the formation parameters and martensite α , -phase accumulation kinetics ones and also their role in forming of the strength and ductile properties in steels are analysed. (A.A.D.)

  7. Microstructure and martensitic transformation of Ni-Ti-Pr alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Chunwang [Inner Mongolia University of Technology, College of Science, Hohhot (China); Shanghai Maritime University, College of Arts and Sciences, Shanghai (China); Zhao, Shilei; Jin, Yongjun; Hou, Qingyu [Inner Mongolia University of Technology, College of Science, Hohhot (China); Guo, Shaoqiang [Beihang University, Key Laboratory of Micro-nano Measurement, Manipulation and Physics (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics, Beijing (China)

    2017-09-15

    The effect of Pr addition on the microstructure and martensitic transformation behavior of Ni{sub 50}Ti{sub 50-x}Pr{sub x} (x = 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 0.9) alloys were investigated experimentally. Results show that the microstructures of Ni-Ti-Pr alloys consist of the NiTi matrix and the NiPr precipitate with the Ti solute. The martensitic transformation start temperature decreases gradually with the increase in Pr fraction. The stress around NiPr precipitates is responsible for the decrease in martensitic transformation temperature with the increase in Pr fraction in Ni-Ti-Pr alloys. (orig.)

  8. Future directions for ferritic/martensitic steels for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Swindeman, R.W.

    2000-01-01

    High-chromium (7-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels are being considered for nuclear applications for both fission and fusion reactors. Conventional 9-12Cr Cr-Mo steels were the first candidates for these applications. For fusion reactors, reduced-activation steels were developed that were patterned on the conventional steels but with molybdenum replaced by tungsten and niobium replaced by tantalum. Both the conventional and reduced-activation steels are considered to have an upper operating temperature limit of about 550degC. For improved reactor efficiency, higher operating temperatures are required. For ferritic/martensitic steels that could meet such requirements, oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are being considered. In this paper, the ferritic/martensitic steels that are candidate steels for nuclear applications will be reviewed, the prospect for ODS steel development and the development of steels produced by conventional processes will be discussed. (author)

  9. Martensitic transformation in helium implanted 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishimatsu, Manabu; Tsukuda, Noboru

    1997-01-01

    In order to simulate surface deterioration phenomenon due to particle loading of SUS-316 steel which is one of candidate materials for nuclear fusion reactor vacuum wall structure material, helium ion implanting was conducted at room temperature, 473 K and 573 K. To martensitic phase formed as a results, implantation dose dependence, implanting temperature dependence, and annealing under 1073 K were conducted. Formation of the martensitic phase was suppressed at high implanting temperature. At room temperature implantation, the martensitic phase disappeared at more than 873 K, but at high temperature implantation, it increased abnormally near at 973 K. This showed that deterioration of materials depended extremely upon using temperature and temperature history. (G.K.)

  10. Deformation-induced martensite and resistance to cavitation erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richman, R.H.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure to cavitating liquids can induce surface transformation in metastable alloys, notably the 18Cr-8Ni class of stainless steels. The question of whether such transformation contributes to erosion resistance has not been resolved. To address that issue, two metastable stainless steels (Types 301 and 304L) and a near-equiatomic NiTi alloy were subjected to cavitation. Magnetic measurements during and after cavitation erosion indicate that substantial reversion of deformation-induced martensite occurs in the highly deformed surface layers of the stainless steels. Thus, cyclic formation and reversion of martensite is deduced to be a non-trivial energy-adsorption mechanism in those steels. The extreme case of cyclic induction and essentially complete reversion of martensite is illustrated by superelastic NiTi, which is extraordinarily resistant to cavitation damage. (orig.)

  11. Nanotribological behavior of deep cryogenically treated martensitic stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Prieto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cryogenic treatments are increasingly used to improve the wear resistance of various steel alloys by means of transformation of retained austenite, deformation of virgin martensite and carbide refinement. In this work the nanotribological behavior and mechanical properties at the nano-scale of cryogenically and conventionally treated AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel were evaluated. Conventionally treated specimens were subjected to quenching and annealing, while the deep cryogenically treated samples were quenched, soaked in liquid nitrogen for 2 h and annealed. The elastic–plastic parameters of the materials were assessed by nanoindentation tests under displacement control, while the friction behavior and wear rate were evaluated by a nanoscratch testing methodology that it is used for the first time in steels. It was found that cryogenic treatments increased both hardness and elastic limit of a low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, while its tribological performance was enhanced marginally.

  12. Nanotribological behavior of deep cryogenically treated martensitic stainless steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Germán; Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D; Tuckart, Walter R; Broitman, Esteban

    2017-01-01

    Cryogenic treatments are increasingly used to improve the wear resistance of various steel alloys by means of transformation of retained austenite, deformation of virgin martensite and carbide refinement. In this work the nanotribological behavior and mechanical properties at the nano-scale of cryogenically and conventionally treated AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel were evaluated. Conventionally treated specimens were subjected to quenching and annealing, while the deep cryogenically treated samples were quenched, soaked in liquid nitrogen for 2 h and annealed. The elastic-plastic parameters of the materials were assessed by nanoindentation tests under displacement control, while the friction behavior and wear rate were evaluated by a nanoscratch testing methodology that it is used for the first time in steels. It was found that cryogenic treatments increased both hardness and elastic limit of a low-carbon martensitic stainless steel, while its tribological performance was enhanced marginally.

  13. Martensite decomposition in Cu–Al–Mn–Ag alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Camila Maria Andrade dos, E-mail: camilaandr@gmail.com [Departamento de Físico-Química, Instituto de Química, UNESP, Caixa Postal 355, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Adorno, Antonio Tallarico [Departamento de Físico-Química, Instituto de Química, UNESP, Caixa Postal 355, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Galdino da Silva, Ricardo Alexandre [Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra, UNIFESP, 09972-270 Diadema, SP (Brazil); Carvalho, Thaisa Mary [Departamento de Físico-Química, Instituto de Química, UNESP, Caixa Postal 355, 14801-970 Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Martensite decomposition in Cu–Al–Mn–Ag alloys is mainly influenced by Mn. • Interaction between Cu–Mn atomic pairs increases activation energy. • Cu diffusion is disturbed by the interaction between Cu–Mn atomic pairs. - Abstract: The influence of Mn and Ag additions on the isothermal kinetics of martensite decomposition in the Cu–9wt.%Al alloy was studied using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDXS) and microhardness changes measurements with temperature and time. The results indicated that the reaction is disturbed by the increase of Mn, an effect associated with the increase in the Al–Mn and Cu–Mn atomic pairs, which disturbs Cu diffusion and increases the activation energy for the martensite decomposition reaction.

  14. A study on fatigue crack growth in dual phase martensitic steel in air

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dual phase (DP) steel was intercritically annealed at different temperatures from fully martensitic state to achieve martensite plus ferrite, microstructures with martensite contents in the range of 32 to 76%. Fatigue crack growth (FCG) and fracture toughness tests were carried out as per ASTM standards E 647 and E 399, ...

  15. Electrochemical characterisation of a martensitic stainless steel in a neutral chloride solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcelin, Sabrina; Pébère, Nadine; Régnier, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A better knowledge of the electrochemical behaviour of a martensitic stainless steel in bulk electrolyte was obtained. ► Quantitative parameters were obtained from impedance measurements. ► The study will be used as reference to investigate crevice corrosion using a thin layer cell. - Abstract: This paper focuses on the characterisation of the electrochemical behaviour of a martensitic stainless steel in 0.1 M NaCl + 0.04 M Na 2 SO 4 solution and is a part of a study devoted to crevice corrosion resistance of stainless steels. Polarisation curves and electrochemical impedance measurements were obtained for different experimental conditions in bulk electrolyte. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyse the passive films. At the corrosion potential, the stainless steel was in the passive state and the corrosion process was controlled by the properties of the passive film formed during air exposure. During immersion in the deaerated solution, the passive film was only slightly modified, whereas it was altered both in composition and thickness during immersion in the aerated solution. After cathodic polarisation of the stainless steel electrode surface, the oxide film was almost totally removed and the surface appeared to be uniformly active for oxygen reduction. The new passive film, formed at the corrosion potential, was enriched with iron species and less protective. Impedance diagrams allowed the characterisation of both the oxide film (high-frequency range) and the charge transfer process (low-frequency range).

  16. Activation energy of time-dependent martensite formation in steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2018-01-01

    The kinetics of {557}γ lath martensite formation in (wt%) 17Cr-7Ni-1Al-0.09C and 15Cr-7Ni-2Mo-1Al-0.08C steels was assessed with magnetometry at sub-zero Celsius temperatures. Samples were cooled to 77 K by immersion in boiling nitrogen to suppress martensite formation. Thereafter, thermally...... applied to evaluate the data available in the literature. The overall analysis showed that EA varies in the range 2–27 kJ mol−1 and increases logarithmically with the total fraction of interstitials in the steel....

  17. AM363 martensitic stainless steel: A multiphase equation of state

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzi-Venneri, Giulia; Crockett, Scott D.

    2017-01-01

    A multiphase equation of state for stainless steel AM363 has been developed within the Opensesame approach and has been entered as material 4295 in the LANL-SESAME Library. Three phases were constructed separately: the low pressure martensitic phase, the austenitic phase and the liquid. Room temperature data and the explicit introduction of a magnetic contribution to the free energy determined the martensitic phase, while shock Hugoniot data was used to determine the austenitic phase and the phase boundaries. More experimental data or First Principles calculations would be useful to better characterize the liquid.

  18. Joining method for pressure tube and martensitic stainless steel tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimoto, Hiroshi; Koike, Hiromitsu.

    1993-01-01

    In a joining portion of zirconium alloy and a stainless steel, the surface of martensitic stainless steel being in contact with Zr and Zr alloy is applied with a laser quenching solidification treatment before expanding joining of them to improve the surface. This can provide the surface with refined coagulated cell tissues and make deposits and impurities homogeneous and solubilized. As a result, the surface of the martensitic stainless steel has highly corrosion resistance, to suppress contact corrosion with Zr and Zr alloy. Accordingly, even if it is exposed to high temperature water of 200 to 350degC, failures of Zr and Zr alloy can be suppressed. (T.M.)

  19. Influence of magnetic fields on structural martensitic transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lashley, J C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, J C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, J L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fisher, R A [NON LANL; Modic, K A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, X- D [TEMPLE UNIV; Riseborough, P S [TEMPLE UNIV.; Opeil, C P [BOSTON COLLEGE; Finlayson, T R [UNIV OF MELBOURNE; Goddard, P A [UNIV OF OXFORD; Silhanek, A V [INPAC

    2009-01-01

    We show evidence that a structural martensitic transition is related to significant changes in the electronic structure, as revealed in thermodynamic measurements made in high-magnetic fields. The magnetic field dependence is considered unusual as many influential investigations of martensitic transitions have emphasized that the structural transitions are primarily lattice dynamical and are driven by the entropy due to the phonons. We provide a theoretical framework which can be used to describe the effect of magnetic field on the lattice dynamics in which the field dependence originates from the dielectric constant.

  20. Magnetic anisotropy of nonmodulated Ni-Mn-Ga martensite revisited

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Straka, L.; Novák, Václav; Fähler, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 9 (2010), 09A914/1-09A914/3 ISSN 0021-8979 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100100913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic anisotropy of non-modulated martensite * temperature dependence of anisotropy * Ni-Mn-Ga * adaptive martensite Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.064, year: 2010 http://jap.aip.org/resource/1/japiau/v107/i9/p09A914_s1

  1. Kinetic of martensitic transformations induced by hydrogen in the austenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio P. de; Saavedra, A.; Miranda, P.E.V. de

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray diffractometry technique was used, with an automatic data acquisition system to determine the kinetics of hydrogen induced martensitic phase transformations in an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel type, used in nuclear power plants. Hydrogenation was performed cathodically in a 1N sulfuric acid solution, containing 100 mg/l of arsenic trioxide, at 50 0 C, during 2 hours and with a current density of 200 A/m 2 . It was found that the microstructure of the steel plays a role on the generation of hydrogen induced martensitic phases and surface micro cracks. Both kinetics were slower on a pre-cold rolled steel. (Author) [pt

  2. Acoustic emission on thermoelastic martensitic transformations in alloys in the course of mechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, V.A.; Kokhanenko, D.V.

    2004-01-01

    The connection of the emission process with the process of the deformation accumulation and relaxation in the cycle of the martensitic transformations is studied. The martensitic transformations cycling was investigated by cycling change in the temperature in the Ti 50 Ni 50 Cu 10 alloys. The deformation accumulation and recovery is observed in the alloys undergoing the thermoelastic martensitic transformations under the mechanical loading conditions. The acoustic emission, accompanying the martensitic transformations, reflects the peculiarities of the alloy deformation behavior by the martensitic transformations. The anomalous acoustic effect correlates with the reversible deformation accumulation and does not correlates with the irreversible deformation accumulation [ru

  3. The effect of deformation mode on the sensitisation of partially martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briant, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    The metallurgical process by which austenitic stainless steels become susceptible to corrosion is defined as sensitisation. It is now well established that if the austenite is partially transformed to martensite by deformation, the kinetics of sensitisation will be accelerated. In this paper the effects of martensite induced by various deformation modes on sensitisation are examined. It will be shown that in all cases the martensite accelerates sensitisation which in turn leads to rapid corrosion. This effect is independent of the way the martensite is induced. The results also show that this effect is observed over a wide range of martensite content. (author)

  4. Martensitic nature of δ → γ allotropic transformation in plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, P.C.; Cost, J.R.; Axler, K.M.

    1996-09-01

    Isothermal and isoplethal studies using differential scanning calorimetry have been conducted to characterize the allotropic transformations of plutonium. The δ-γ transformation (upon cooling) was observed to have a classic martensitic nature. The work described herein is the first quantitative study of this phenomena in plutonium

  5. A multi-scale model of martensitic transformation plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouznetsova, V.G.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2008-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical engineering properties of many advanced steels, e.g. TRIP steels and metastable austenitic stainless steels, are related to their complex microstructural behaviour, resulting from the interaction between plastic deformation of the phases and the austenite to martensite

  6. Modulated martensite: why it forms and why it deforms easily

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaufmann, S.; Niemann, R.; Thersleff, T.; Roßler, U.K.; Heczko, Oleg; Buschbeck, J.; Holzapfel, B.; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 5 (2011), 053029/1-053029/24 ISSN 1367-2630 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : modulated martensite * adaptive phase * Ni-Mn-Ga * magnetic shape memory effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 4.177, year: 2011

  7. Block and sub-block boundary strengthening in lath martensite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Du, C.; Hoefnagels, J.P.M.; Vaes, R.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2016-01-01

    Well-defined uniaxial micro-tensile tests were performed on lath martensite single block specimens and multi-block specimens with different number of block boundaries parallel to the loading direction. Detailed slip trace analyses consistently revealed that in the {110}<111> slip system with the

  8. Phase-field simulation of lenticular martensite and inheritance of the accommodation dislocations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundin Julia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A phase-field simulation is performed to study the substructure evolution of lenticular martensite in TRIP steels. The evolution of martensitic phase variants and dislocations is calculated by a coupled phase-field micro-elasticity model. The simulations at isothermal conditions show that during the phase transformation, the accommodation dislocations evolving in the austenite are inherited by the martensitic phase and cause the further evolution of a single martensitic variant in the direction of the dislocation slip. As a result of the interaction, a change of the growth mode from twining to slip can be observed in accordance to the substructure formation of lenticular martensite. This interaction between the dislocations and martensitic phase depends on dislocation slip systems and the orientation of the martensitic variants as well as on the energy barriers for the phase transformation and for the dislocation motion.

  9. Thermodynamic assessment of the stabilization effect in deformed shape memory alloy martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Yohei; Sasaki, Kazuaki

    2011-01-01

    When a martensitic shape memory alloy is deformed, the reverse transformation occurs at higher temperature than that of undeformed martensite. This is a typical case of the stabilization effect of martensite that is commonly observed in shape memory alloys. Regarding previous results measured by electric resistance and/or dilatometoric methods in NiTi and CuAlNi shape memory alloys, this study has performed calorimetric measurement in these alloys in order to re-examine the stabilization effect in terms of thermodynamics. Experimental evidence for appreciable changes in the reverse transformation temperature due to variant change of the martensite is presented. The elastic energy stored in the deformed martensite and the irreversible energy dissipated during the reverse transformation are estimated from the transformation temperatures, the stress-strain curves of the martensite and the latent heat of transformation. The temperatures of the reverse martensitic transformation have been related to these energies in explicit form.

  10. Plastic flow properties and fracture toughness characterization of unirradiated and irradiated tempered martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaetig, P.; Bonade, R.; Odette, G.R.; Rensman, J.W.; Campitelli, E.N.; Mueller, P.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the plastic flow properties at low and high temperature of the tempered martensitic steel Eurofer97. We show that below room temperature, where the Peierls friction on the screw dislocation is active, it is necessary to modify the usual Taylor's equation between the flow stress and the square root of the dislocation density and to include explicitly the Peierls friction stress in the equation. Then, we compare the fracture properties of the Eurofer97 with those of the F82H steel. A clear difference of the fracture toughness-temperature behavior was found in the low transition region. The results indicate a sharper transition for Eurofer97 than for the F82H. Finally, the shift of the median toughness-temperature curve of the F82H steel was determined after two neutron irradiations performed in the High Flux Reactor in Petten

  11. Water corrosion resistance of ODS ferritic-martensitic steel tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narita, Takeshi; Ukai, Shigeharu; Kaito, Takeji; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Matsuda, Yasuji

    2008-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels have superior radiation resistance; it is possible to achieve a service temperature of up to around 973 K because of their superior creep strength. These advantages of ODS steels facilities their application to long-life cladding tubes in advanced fast reactor fuel elements. In addition to neutron radiation resistance, sufficient general corrosion resistance to maintain the strength of the cladding, and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance for spent-fuel-pool cooling systems and high-temperature oxidation for the fuel-clad chemical interaction (FCCI) of ODS ferritic steel are required. Although the addition of Cr to ODS is effective in preventing water corrosion and high-temperature oxidation, an excessively high amount of Cr leads to embrittlement due to the formation of a Cr-rich α' precipitate. The Cr content in 9Cr-ODS martensite and 12Cr-ODS ferrite, the ODS steels developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), is controlled. In a previous paper, it has been demonstrated that the resistances of 9Cr- and 12Cr-ODS ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature oxidation are superior to those of conventional 12Cr ferritic steel. However, the water corrosion data of ODS ferritic-martensitic steels are very limited. In this study, a water corrosion test was conducted on ODS steels in consideration of the spent-fuel-pool cooling condition, and the results were compared with those of conventional austenitic stainless steel and ferritic-martensitic stainless steel. (author)

  12. Material science and manufacturing of heat-resistant reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ioltukhovskiy, A.G.; Blokhin, A.I.; Budylkin, N.I.; Chernov, V.M.; Leont'eva-Smirnova, M.V.; Mironova, E.G.; Medvedeva, E.A.; Solonin, M.I.; Porollo, S.I.; Zavyalsky, L.P.

    2000-01-01

    A number of issues regarding the development and use of 10-12% Cr reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels (RAFMS) for fusion are considered. These include: (1) problems of manufacturing and modifying their composition and metallurgical condition; (2) the influence on properties of their composition, purity, δ-ferrite concentration and cooling rates in the final stages of manufacturing; and (3) the effects of neutron irradiation at 320-650 deg. C up to 108 dpa on their mechanical properties. In addition, neutron activation and nuclear accumulation of elements in RAFMS with different initial concentrations of alloying and impurity elements for typical fusion reactor (DEMO) irradiation regimes have been calculated

  13. Martensitic transformation and residual stresses after thermomechanical treatment of heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 (SAE 4140)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weise, A. [Technische Univ. Chemnitz-Zwickau, Chemnitz (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Maschinenbau und Verfahrenstechnik; Fritsche, G. [Technische Univ. Chemnitz-Zwickau, Chemnitz (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Maschinenbau und Verfahrenstechnik

    1996-01-01

    The influence of thermomechanical deformation on the residual stresses caused by quenching in bar shaped specimens of heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 has been investigated using a mechanical method for determining the distribution of residual stresses of the first kind. The results obtained show that the residual stress distribution after quenching is affected by the strengthening and softening of the austenite as a result of deformation and recrystallization and the modified transformation behaviour in martensite stage. An attempt is made to discuss qualitatively the influence of these changes on the generation of residual stresses as compared to results obtained after conventional hardening. (orig.).

  14. Martensitic transformation and residual stresses after thermomechanical treatment of heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 (SAE 4140)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weise, A.; Fritsche, G.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of thermomechanical deformation on the residual stresses caused by quenching in bar shaped specimens of heat treatable steel 42CrMo4 has been investigated using a mechanical method for determining the distribution of residual stresses of the first kind. The results obtained show that the residual stress distribution after quenching is affected by the strengthening and softening of the austenite as a result of deformation and recrystallization and the modified transformation behaviour in martensite stage. An attempt is made to discuss qualitatively the influence of these changes on the generation of residual stresses as compared to results obtained after conventional hardening. (orig.)

  15. Estimation of improved productivity based on materials substitution in high temperature applications. Use of alloy ASTM A-335 P91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna, J A; Afanador, W

    2001-01-01

    In ECOPETROL-ICP was carried out an evaluation of the mechanical and micro structural properties of modified 9 Cr-1 Mo alloy, ASTM A-335 Gr. P91, finding higher strength mechanical properties, allowable stresses and creep rupture strength, than the conventional 9 Cr-1 Mo alloy, ASTM A-335 Gr. P9, recommending the alloy P91 as substitute tube material in the radiation zone of the Visbreaking heater of Cartagena's refinery (furnace in revamping process). The results obtained permit a thickness reduction of radiation tubes of material P91 close to 25% and increase the internal volume tube over up 8%, which is a parameter to consider in improving productivity and efficiency process. Also would be obtained a significant savings cost in the material among 5 and 10%. Additionally, expectations of both design and remaining useful life would be seen extensively favored with this change of alloy

  16. Magnetic interactions in martensitic Ni-Mn based Heusler systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksoy, Seda

    2010-04-22

    In this work, magnetic, magnetocaloric and structural properties are investigated in Ni-Mn-based martensitic Heusler alloys with the aim to tailor these properties as well as to understand in detail the magnetic interactions in the various crystallographic states of these alloys. We choose Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 34}In{sub 16} as a prototype which undergoes a martensitic transformation and exhibits field-induced strain and the inverse magnetocaloric effect. Using the structural phase diagram of martensitic Ni-Mn-based Heusler alloys, we substitute gallium and tin for indium to carry these effects systematically closer to room temperature by shifting the martensitic transformation. A magneto-calorimeter is designed and built to measure adiabatically the magnetocaloric effect in these alloys. The temperature dependence of strain under an external magnetic field is studied in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 50-x}Z{sub x} (Z: Ga, Sn, In and Sb) and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 34}In{sub 16-x}Z{sub x} (Z: Ga and Sn). An argument based on the effect of the applied magnetic field on martensite nucleation is adopted to extract information on the direction of the magnetization easy axis in the martensitic unit cell in Heusler alloys. Parallel to these studies, the structure in the presence of an external field is also studied by powder neutron diffraction. It is demonstrated that martensite nucleation is influenced by cooling the sample under a magnetic field such that the austenite phase is arrested within the martensitic state. The magnetic interactions in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37}Sn{sub 13} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 40}Sb{sub 10} are characterized by using neutron polarization analysis. Below the martensitic transformation temperature, M{sub s}, an antiferromagnetically correlated state is found. Ferromagnetic resonance experiments are carried out on Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 37}Sn{sub 13} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 34}In{sub 16} to gain more detailed information on the nature of the magnetic interactions. The experimental

  17. The effect of nitrogen on martensite formation in a Cr-Mn-Ni stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggs, T.; Knutsen, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The influence of nitrogen (0 to 0.27 wt%) on martensite formation in an experimental low-nickel stainless-steel alloy (Fe-17Cr-7Mn-4Ni) has been investigated. The alloys containing 0.1 wt% or more nitrogen are fully austenitic at room temperature; those containing less nitrogen consist of a mixture of austenite, martensite and δ-ferrite. The alloys containing less than 0.2 wt% nitrogen are metastable and undergo a transformation from austenite to martensite on deformation. Transmission electron microscopy investigations suggest that, within the nitrogen range considered in this investigation, the addition of nitrogen causes an increase in stacking fault energy which in turn inhibits the nucleation of martensite. As the low-nitrogen alloys (less than 0.2 wt% nitrogen) undergo deformation, ε-martensite (with the [ anti 110] γ and [ anti 12 anti 10] ε zone axes parallel) is observed at the intersection of stacking faults. With increasing strain, the presence of α'-martensite is observed in conjunction with the ε-martensite, and only α'-martensite is observed at very high strains. Both the Nishiyama-Wasserman and Kurdjumov-Sachs orientation relationships are observed between austenite and α'-martensite. The transformation to martensite during deformation causes a significant variation in room-temperature mechanical properties, despite the overall narrow range in composition considered. (orig.)

  18. R and D status of China low activation martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Qunying; Li Chunjing; Li Yanfen; Liu Shaojun; Wu Yican; Li Jiangang; Shan Yiyin; Yu Jinnan; Zhu Shengyun; Zhang Pinyuan; Yang Jianfeng; Han Fusheng; Kong Mingguang; Li Heqin; Muroga, T.; Nagasaka, T.

    2007-01-01

    The Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel is considered as the primary candidate structural material for DEMO and the first fusion plant, and widely studied in the world. China low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) is being developed in Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, under wide collaboration with many other domestic and foreign institutes and universities. This paper summarized the main R and D progress on CLAM, which covered composition optimization of the CLAM, smelting and processing techniques, physical and mechanical property test and evaluation before and after irradiation, compatibility with liquid LiPb, welding techniques etc. Finally, further research and development, and the prospects on its application were stated. (authors)

  19. Strength of 10CR-N martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahrami, F.; Hendry, A.

    1993-01-01

    10Cr stainless steel has been employed to examine the effect of nitrogen on microstructure and strength. Applying Solid state gaseous nitrogenising treatments a whole range of nitrogen martensite structures containing up to 0.45 wt% were obtained. It was found that a linear relationship exists between strength and nitrogen content in precipitate free martensitic structures. Yield strength increased from 705 to 1295 MPa for nitrogen free base material and alloys with 0.35 wt%N respectively. Pronounce secondary hardening was observed at a tempering temperature of 500 C. A linear relationship was also observed between the lattice parameter and nitrogen concentration in these alloys. A model for mechanical behaviour is presented. (orig.)

  20. Reversible martensitic ω-α transformation in Ti and Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al'shevskij, Yu.L.; Kul'nitskij, B.A.; Konyaev, Yu.S.; Rojtburt, A.L.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of phase transformation in pure Ti and Zr in samples with initial ω-structure, produced as a result of heating to 1400 K with subsequent increase in pressure up to 8 GPa and a sharp decrease in temperature and pressure to normal values, has been studies. As a result of α → β → ω transformation, occurring in the process of the above-mentioned treatment, grains of ω-phase with perfect rystal structure are formed. With ω-phase heating to 650 K formation of α-phase takes place, and it is accompanied by the appearance of characteristic martensitic relief on the sample surface. Subsequent application of high pressure results in the reverse α → ω transformation with the disappearance of surface relief.The data suggest that direct ω → α transformation while heating and reverse α → ω transformation under pressure are realized according to martensitic mechanism

  1. MARTENSITIC CREEP RESISTANT STEEL STRENGTHENED BY Z-PHASE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to steel alloys having a martensitic or martensitic- ferritic structure and comprising Z-phase (CrXN) particles, where X is one or more of the elements V, Nb, Ta, and where the Z-phase particles have an average size of less than 400 nm. The alloy comprises by wt...... % the following components: 9 to 15% Cr, 0.01-0.20% N, C in an amount less than 0.1%, one or more of: 0.01- 0.5%V,0.01-1%Nb, 0.01-2%Ta, and a balance being substantially iron and inevitable impurities. The invention further relates to a method of manufacturing such a steel alloy, a component comprising...... such a steel alloy, and to the use of such a steel alloy for high temperature components....

  2. Aging in PWR conditions of martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boursier, J.M.; Buisine, D.; Fronteau, M.; Michel, D.; Rouillon, Y.; Yrieix, B.; Meyzaud, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are largely used in Nuclear Power Plant (pump impeller, valve stem...) because of their high mechanical characteristics and their good resistance to corrosion. Nevertheless some of those components could operate at temperature higher than 250 deg.C, which could embrittle the material by the precipitation of a chromium-rich phase during aging. In collaboration with Framatome, Electricite de France has undertaken numerous studies in order to understand this process of embrittlement. This paper presents a review of the metallurgical investigations on martensitic stainless steels components which were performed in the EDF hot laboratory. In peculiar, it should be noted the good correlation between inservice experience and the modelling developed by EDF R and D division. Finally and in association with safety analysis, these results will allow to establish the maintenance strategy of the French Nuclear Power Plants. (authors)

  3. Characterization of long term aged martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, M.; Hattori, K.; Okada, T.

    1992-01-01

    Types CA6NM (13Cr), 431 and 630 (17Cr) were aged at 400 degrees C and 350 degrees C for up to 10000 hours, and their hardness change and SCC susceptibility in 288 degrees C water were investigated. Hardness of the alloys increased with aging. Hardness of type 431 aged at 400 degrees C for 10000 hours exceeded 340 in Hv, over which tempered martensitic stainless steels had become susceptible to SCC, and showed high SCC susceptibility. Type 630 had high SCC susceptibility in before and after aged condition, and the hardness in both conditions was more than Hv 340. Therefore, hardness was considered to be a parameter which could describe the SCC susceptibility of martensitic stainless steels. Using activation energy for hardness change 105-125kJ/mol and the critical hardness level Hv=340, the marginal life-time for martensitic stainless steels at 288 degrees C was estimated. Predicted life of type 431 and CA6NM were around 10 5 hours and more than 10 6 hours, respectively. Activation energies obtained for toughness change and hardness change were different. Consequently, it was concluded that at least two factors should be taken into consideration for determining the total life-limit for usage of martensitic stainless steels in the light water reactor environment. The meaning of the existence of critical hardness for SCC susceptibility has been also discussed. Higher than 340 in Hv, yield strength and strain for uniform deformation showed a tendency of saturation. Therefore, it was conjectured that some extreme internal strain level, which may change the plastic deformation manner, is the absolute factor for determining the SCC susceptibility of the alloys in high temperature water

  4. The role of adaptive martensite in magnetic shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Niemann, R.; Rößler, U.K.; Gruner, M.E.; Heczko, Oleg; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 8 (2012), s. 562-581 ISSN 1438-1656 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : Ni-Mn-Ga * magnetic shape memory alloy * ferromagnetic martensite * modulated structure * adaptive phase * mobility of twin boundary Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.608, year: 2012

  5. Diffuse scattering as an indicator for martensitic variant selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Lei; Ding, Xiangdong; Zong, Hongxiang; Lookman, Turab; Sun, Jun; Ren, Xiaobing; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse scattering is an important precursor phenomenon prior to the martensitic transformation (MT). It is related to the correlated atomic position fluctuations prior to the MT and can provide important hints of the transformation mechanism. However, the role of this precursor phenomenon in the MT is not clear so far. Here we study the evolution of diffraction patterns prior to temperature- and stress-induced MTs and consider the evolution of atomic configurations during the whole MT process, using molecular dynamics simulations on a generic body-centered cubic–hexagonal close-packed transformation as an example. Our results show that, although the diffuse scattering changes with external fields, there exists a general relationship between the transformation pathways, the diffuse scattering streaks and the martensitic products. Two preferred transformation pathways with opposite shuffle directions lead to a single specific diffuse scattering streak prior to the MT and form one pair of anti-variants after the MT. Thus the distribution of diffuse scattering acts as an indicator of the selection of martensitic variants. In addition, we find that the applied stress can change the shear order parameter of the phase transformation, and subsequently determines the preferred transformation pathways and the distribution of diffuse scattering streaks. This work establishes a relationship between the transformation mechanism, the precursor phenomenon and the products after the MT under the influence of external fields

  6. Reversed austenite for enhancing ductility of martensitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieck, S.; Rosemann, P.; Kromm, A.; Halle, T.

    2017-03-01

    The novel heat treatment concept, “quenching and partitioning” (Q&P) has been developed for high strength steels with enhanced formability. This heat treatment involves quenching of austenite to a temperature between martensite start and finish, to receive a several amount of retained austenite. During the subsequent annealing treatment, the so called partitioning, the retained austenite is stabilized due to carbon diffusion, which results in enhanced formability and strength regarding strain induced austenite to martensite transformation. In this study a Q&P heat treatment was applied to a Fe-0.45C-0.65Mn-0.34Si-13.95Cr stainless martensite. Thereby the initial quench end temperature and the partitioning time were varied to characterize their influence on microstructural evolution. The microstructural changes were analysed by dilatometer measurements, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, including electron back-scatter diffraction. Compression testing was made to examine the mechanical behaviour. It was found that an increasing partitioning time up to 30 min leads to an enhanced formability without loss in strength due to a higher amount of stabilized retained and reversed austenite as well as precipitation hardening.

  7. In-service thermal ageing of martensitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tampigny, R.; Molinie, E.; Foct, F.; Dignocourt, P.

    2011-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are largely used in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) mainly as valve stems, bolts or nuts due to their high mechanical properties and their good resistance to corrosion in primary water. At the end of the eighties, research studies have demonstrated a thermal ageing irreversible embrittlement due to the precipitation of a chromium-rich phase for X6 CrNiCu 17-04, X6 CrNiMo 16.04 and X12 Cr 13 martensitic stainless steels and a semi-empirical modeling has been proposed. Numerous metallurgical examinations have been performed in hot laboratories to consolidate the good correlation between in-service experience and the modeling developed by EDF RD. According to the feedback analysis, thermal ageing embrittlement can appear at different in-service temperatures or do not appear in relation with chemical composition of martensitic stainless steels and end of manufacturing heat treatments associated. A new campaign of metallurgical examinations has been proposed to consolidate previous studies and to contribute to maintenance policy for the next ten years after the third decennial outages for 900 MWe NPP. Influence of real in-service temperatures and end of manufacturing heat treatments have been examined to understand reasons why in some cases thermal ageing embrittlement does not occur or occur with a lowest intensity. These new results have contributed to reinforce EDF RD modeling validity and technical specifications defined in RCC-M for new valve stems, bolts or nuts. (authors)

  8. Correlation between microstructure and mechanical properties of stable mixtures formed by austenite and martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckstein, C.B.

    1982-03-01

    The influence of martensite in mechanical properties of stable mixtures formed by austenite and martensite was studied by varying the amount of martensite in the mixtures. Microstructural parameters were determined by Optical Quantitative Metallography and used to establish the correlation between the mechanical response of the mixtures in tension and their microstructures. The 'in situ' deformation of each phase in mixtures was determined experimentally in terms of the rule of mixtures. It is shown that the partitioning of the deformation depends on the amount of martensite in the mixture and that it tends to a condition of isostrain at higher martensite volume fractions. Optical observation of fractured specimens showed that the beginning of the fracture process may related to regions of the austenite grain boundaries where they meet martensite plates. (Author) [pt

  9. Thermally activated growth of lath martensite in Fe–Cr–Ni–Al stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt; Pantleon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    The austenite to martensite transformation in a semi-austenitic stainless steel containing 17 wt-%Cr, 7 wt-%Ni and 1 wt-%Al was investigated with vibrating sample magnetometry and electron backscatter diffraction. Magnetometry demonstrated that, within experimental accuracy, martensite formation...... can be suppressed on fast cooling to 77 K as well as on subsequent fast heating to 373 K. Surprisingly, martensite formation was observed during moderate heating from 77 K, instead. Electron backscatter diffraction demonstrated that the morphology of martensite is lath type. The kinetics...... of the transformation is interpreted in terms of athermal nucleation of lath martensite followed by thermally activated growth. It is anticipated that substantial autocatalytic martensite formation occurs during thermally activated growth. The observation of a retardation of the transformation followed by a new...

  10. A review on the martensitic transformation and shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Q.; Humbeeck, J. van; Delaey, L.

    1994-01-01

    The martensitic transformation and the shape memory effect in Fe-Mn-Si alloys received great attention recently due to its potential commercial value. In this paper, the mechanisms for the martensitic transformation and various parameters influencing the shape memory effect like alloy composition, applied stress, prestrain, crystal orientation, temperature, grain size, pre-existing martensite, thermal cycling and training etc. are reviewed and discussed. (orig.)

  11. Linear Friction Welding Process Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-11

    Carpenter Custom 465 precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel to develop a linear friction welding (LFW) process model for this material...Model for Carpenter Custom 465 Precipitation-Hardened Martensitic Stainless Steel The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are... Martensitic Stainless Steel Report Title An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian finite-element analysis is combined with thermo-mechanical material

  12. Influence of the Martensitic Transformation on the Microscale Plastic Strain Heterogeneities in a Duplex Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechartier, Audrey; Martin, Guilhem; Comby, Solène; Roussel-Dherbey, Francine; Deschamps, Alexis; Mantel, Marc; Meyer, Nicolas; Verdier, Marc; Veron, Muriel

    2017-01-01

    The influence of the martensitic transformation on microscale plastic strain heterogeneity of a duplex stainless steel has been investigated. Microscale strain heterogeneities were measured by digital image correlation during an in situ tensile test within the SEM. The martensitic transformation was monitored in situ during tensile testing by high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction. A clear correlation is shown between the plasticity-induced transformation of austenite to martensite and the development of plastic strain heterogeneities at the phase level.

  13. Diffusion Couple Alloying of Refractory Metals in Austenitic and Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    stainless steel and ferritic/ martensitic steel can vary from structural and support components in the reactor core to reactor fuel...of ferritic/ martensitic steels compared to type 316 stainless steel after irradiation in Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at 420 ºC to ~80dpa (From...ferritic martensitic steel at Sandia National Laboratories. The 316 stainless steel had a certified composition of:

  14. Investigation of Microstructure and Corrosion Propagation Behaviour of Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates

    OpenAIRE

    Abidin Kamal Ariff Zainal; Ismail Elya Atikah; Zainuddin Azman; Hussain Patthi

    2014-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels are commonly used for fabricating components. For many applications, an increase in surface hardness and wear resistance can be beneficial to improve performance and extend service life. However, the improvement in hardness of martensitic steels is usually accompanied by a reduction in corrosion strength. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of nitriding on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, in terms of microstructure and corrosion propagat...

  15. Martensite. gamma. -->. cap alpha. transformations in various purity Fe-Ni-Mo alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikitina, I.I.; Rozhkova, A.S. (Tsentral' nyj Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Chernoj Metallurgii, Moscow (USSR))

    1982-06-01

    Kinetics of isothermal and athermal ..gamma.. ..-->.. ..cap alpha.. martensitic transitions in the Fe-25.5% Ni-4.5% Mo alloys with different degree of purity is studied. The determinant role of dislocation blocking by interstitials in stabilization of isothermal martensitic transformation is displayed. Presented are the data permitting to consider that the character of martensitic transition kinetics is determined by the ratio of the process moving force and resistance to microplastic deformation.

  16. Preliminary evaluation of microstructure and mechanical properties on low activation ferritic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.Y.; Lechtenberg, T.A.

    1985-01-01

    Radioactive waste disposal has become a primary concern for the selection of materials for the structural components for fusion reactors. One way to minimize this potential environmental problem is to use structural materials in which the induced radioactivity decays quickly to levels that allow for near-surface disposal under 10CFR61 rules. The primary objective of this work is to develop low activation ferritic steels that exhibit mechanical and physical properties approximately equivalent to the HT-9 and 9Cr-1Mo steels, but which only contain elements that would permit near-surface disposal under 10CFR61 after exposure to fusion neutrons. A preliminary evaluation of the microstructure and mechanical properties of a 9Cr-2.5W-0.3V-0.15C (GA3X) low activation ferritic steel has been performed. An optimum heat treatment condition has been defined for GA3X steel. The properties and microstructure of the quenched and tempered specimens were characterized via hardness measurement and optical metallographic observation. The hot-microhardness and ductility parameter measurements were used to estimate the tensile properties at elevated temperatures. The estimated tensile strengths of GA3X steel at elevated temperatures are comparable to both 9Cr-1Mo and the modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. These preliminary results are encouraging in that they suggest that suitable low activation alloys can be successfully produced in this ferritic alloy class

  17. Anomalous acoustic effect during martensitic transformations in titanium nickelide base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plotnikov, V.A.; Kokhanenko, D.V.

    2002-01-01

    One carried out experiments to determine effect of external static stress on martensitic transformations and acoustic emission, Martensitic transformations in titanium nickelide base alloys under mechanical stress were determined to change nature of acoustic emission to anomalous one - cycling of transformations under gradual increase of mechanical stress during direct martensitic transformation was followed by increase of acoustic emission energy instead of reduction. The mentioned nature of acoustic emission is indicative of essential effect of external stress on martensitic transformations and energy dissipation during transformations [ru

  18. Martensitic phase transformations in Ni–Ti-based shape memory alloys: The Landau theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shchyglo, Oleg; Salman, Umut; Finel, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple Landau free energy functional for cubic-to-orthorhombic and cubic-to-monoclinic martensitic phase transformations. The functional is derived following group–subgroup relations between different martensitic phases – tetragonal, trigonal, orthorhombic and monoclinic – in order to fully capture the symmetry properties of the free energy of the austenite and martensite phases. The derived free energy functional is fitted to the elastic and thermodynamic properties of NiTi and NiTiCu shape memory alloys which exhibit cubic-to-monoclinic and cubic-to-orthorhombic martensitic phase transformations, respectively.

  19. Investigation of strain-induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenite using nanoindentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, T.-H.; Oh, C.-S.; Kim, D.H.; Oh, K.H.; Bei, H.; George, E.P.; Han, H.N.

    2010-01-01

    Strain-induced martensitic transformation of metastable austenite was investigated by nanoindentation of individual austenite grains in multi-phase steel. A cross-section prepared through one of these indented regions using focused ion beam milling was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of martensite underneath the indent indicates that the pop-ins observed on the load-displacement curve during nanoindentation correspond to the onset of strain-induced martensitic transformation. The pop-ins can be understood as resulting from the selection of a favorable martensite variant during nanoindentation.

  20. Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensitic Transformation in Metastable Austenite using Nanoindentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, T.-H. [Seoul National University; Oh, C.-S. [Korean Institute of Materials Science; Kim, D. H. [Seoul National University; Oh, K. H. [Seoul National University; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL; Han, H. N. [Seoul National University

    2010-01-01

    Strain-induced martensitic transformation of metastable austenite was investigated by nanoindentation of individual austenite grains in multi-phase steel. A cross-section prepared through one of these indented regions using focused ion beam milling was examined by transmission electron microscopy. The presence of martensite underneath the indent indicates that the pop-ins observed on the load-displacement curve during nanoindentation correspond to the onset of strain-induced martensitic transformation. The pop-ins can be understood as resulting from the selection of a favorable martensite variant during nanoindentation.

  1. Twinning and martensitic transformations in nickel-enriched 304 austenitic steel during tensile and indentation deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, M.N., E-mail: gussevmn@ornl.gov; Busby, J.T.; Byun, T.S.; Parish, C.M.

    2013-12-20

    Twinning and martensitic transformation have been investigated in nickel-enriched AISI 304 stainless steel subjected to tensile and indentation deformation. Using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), the morphology of α- and ε-martensite and the effect of grain orientation to load axis on phase and structure transformations were analyzed in detail. It was found that the twinning occurred less frequently under indentation than under tension; also, twinning was not observed in [001] and [101] grains. In tensile tests, the martensite particles preferably formed at the deformation twins, intersections between twins, or at the twin-grain boundary intersections. Conversely, martensite formation in the indentation tests was not closely associated with twinning; instead, the majority of martensite was concentrated in the dense colonies near grain boundaries. Martensitic transformation seemed to be obstructed in the [001] grains in both tensile and indentation test cases. Under a tensile stress of 800 MPa, both α- and ε-martensites were found in the microstructure, but at 1100 MPa only α-martensite presented in the specimen. Under indentation, α- and ε-martensite were observed in the material regardless of the stress level.

  2. Metallurgical characterization of the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel Eurofer'97 on as-received condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, P.; Lancha, A.M.; Lapena, J.; Hernandez-Mayoral, M.

    2001-01-01

    A new European reduced activation ferrous alloy (denominated Eurofer'97) developed as possible first wall and breeder blanket structural material for fusion applications is being characterized. In this paper, activities specially focussed to investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties of this material on the as-received state (normalized at 980 degree sign C/27' plus tempered at 760 degree sign C/90'/air cooled) are presented. Chemical analyses, a detailed microstructural study, hardness, tensile and Charpy tests have been carried out and are compared to the reduced activation material F-82H modified previously studied. The results show that the Eurofer'97 is a fully martensitic steel free of δ-ferrite with similar tensile and better impact properties than the F-82H modified steel. Two types of carbides have been observed in the Eurofer'97, namely, Cr rich precipitates and Ta/V rich precipitates, tentatively identified as M 23 C 6 type and (Ta,V)C type, respectively

  3. Ion-irradiation-induced microstructural modifications in ferritic/martensitic steel T91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiang; Miao, Yinbin; Li, Meimei; Kirk, Marquis A.; Maloy, Stuart A.; Stubbins, James F.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, in situ transmission electron microscopy investigations were carried out to study the microstructural evolution of ferritic/martensitic steel T91 under 1 MeV Krypton ion irradiation up to 4.2 x 10(15) ions/cm(2) at 573 K, 673 K, and 773 K. At 573 K, grown-in defects are strongly modified by black dot loops, and dislocation networks together with black-dot loops were observed after irradiation. At 673 K and 773 K, grown-in defects are only partially modified by dislocation loops; isolated loops and dislocation segments were commonly found after irradiation. Post irradiation examination indicates that at 4.2 x 1015 ions/cm(2), about 51% of the loops were a(0)/2 < 111 > type for the 673 K irradiation, and the dominant loop type was a(0)< 100 > for the 773 K irradiation. Finally, a dispersed barrier hardening model was employed to estimate the change in yield strength, and the calculated ion data were found to follow the similar trend as the existing neutron data with an offset of 100-150 MPa. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of Continuous Galvanization-compatible Martensitic Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Y. F.; Song, T. J.; Kim, Han S.; De Cooman [Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, J. H. [POSCO Gwangyang Works, Gwangyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The development of martensitic grades which can be processed in continuous galvanizing lines requires the reduction of the oxides formed on the steel during the hot dip process. This reduction mechanism was investigated in detail by means of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) of cross-sectional samples. Annealing of a martensitic steel in a 10% H{sub 2} + N{sub 2} atmosphere with the dew point of -35 .deg. C resulted in the formation of a thin c-xMno.SiO{sub 2} (x>1) oxide film and amorphous a-xMnO.SiO{sub 2} oxide particles on the surface. During the hot dip galvanizing in Zn-0.13%Al, the thin c-xMnO.SiO{sub 2} (x>1) oxide films was reduced by the Al. The a-xMnO.SiO{sub 2} (x<0.9) and a-SiO{sub 2} (x>1) oxide film was also reduced and the amorphous a-xMnO.SiO{sub 2} and a-SiO{sub 2} particles were embedded in the Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5-x}Zn{sub x} inhibition layer formed at the steel/coating interface during hot dipping. The results clearly show that Al in the liquid Zn bath can reduce the crystalline c-xMn.SiO{sub 2} (x>1) oxides but not the amorphous a-xMnO.SiO{sub 2} (x<0.9) and a-SiO{sub 2} oxides. These oxides remain embedded in the Zn layer or in the inhibition layer, making it possible to apply a Zn or Zn-alloy coating on martensitic steel by hot dipping. The hot dipping process was also found to deteriorate the mechanical properties, independently of the Zn bath composition.

  5. Model for the interaction between interface migration and carbon diffusion during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santofimia, M.J.; Zhao, L.; Sietsma, J.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between carbon partitioning from martensite to austenite and interface migration during annealing of martensite-austenite microstructures is modeled, assuming the same chemical potential of carbon in martensite and austenite at the interface and allowing the motion of the phase interface when a free-energy difference occurs. The simulations show that the motion of the martensite-austenite interface can be significant and can takes place in either direction

  6. Martensite and bainite in steels: transformation mechanism and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.

    1997-01-01

    Many essential properties of iron alloys depend on what actually happens when one allotropic form gives way to another, i.e. on the mechanism of phase change. The dependence of the mechanical properties on the atomic mechanism by which bainite and martensite grow is the focus of this paper. The discussion is illustrated in the context of some common engineering design parameters, and with a brief example of the inverse problem in which the mechanism may be a function of the mechanical properties. (orig.)

  7. The neutronic basis for elemental substitution in martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublet, J.-Ch.; Butterworth, G. J.

    1994-09-01

    A simple graphical approach has been developed to facilitate the design of low-activation steels by elemental tailoring. Noting that the iron base provides the best achievable target, the influence of candidate alloying elements becomes readily apparent when the contribution each makes to a particular activation parameter such as specific activity, dose rate or decay power, is expressed relative to the contribution from the iron base. This approach highlights the most critical activation parameters and times after shutdown with respect to safety and environmental objectives. Its application to the design of low activation martensitic stainless steels is discussed.

  8. Physical metallurgy of BATMAN II Ti-bearing martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilloni, L.; Attura, F.; Calza-Bini, A.; Santis, G. de; Filacchioni, G.

    1998-01-01

    Seven laboratory experimental casts of 7-9% Cr Ti-bearing martensitic steels were obtained via VIM process. Plates of 25 mm thickness were produced by hot rolling. On each cast CCT diagrams and critical temperatures were determined. Several austenitizing treatments were performed to study the grain size evolution. The effect of microstructure on impact properties were finally investigated. This paper discusses the role of chemical composition on microstructural and physical properties and shows the beneficial effect either of low-temperature austenitizing or double-austenitizing steps on impact properties. (orig.)

  9. Characterization of a Laser Surface-Treated Martensitic Stainless Steel

    OpenAIRE

    S.R. Al-Sayed; A.A. Hussein; A.A. Nofal; S.I. Hassab Elnaby; H. Elgazzar

    2017-01-01

    Laser surface treatment was carried out on AISI 416 machinable martensitic stainless steel containing 0.225 wt.% sulfur. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used. The aim was to compare the physical and chemical properties achieved by this type of selective surface treatment with those achieved by the conventional treatment. Laser power of different values (700 and 1000 W) with four corresponding different laser scanning speeds (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 m?min?1) was adopted to reach the op...

  10. Evolution of microstructure in stainless martensitic steel for seamless tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyshmintsev, I. Yu.; Bityukov, S. M.; Pastukhov, V. I.; Danilov, S. V.; Vedernikova, L. O.; Lobanov, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Scanning electron microscopy with orientation analysis by the electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) method is used to study microstructures and textures formed in the 0.08C-13Cr-3Ni-Mo-V-Nb steel through seamless tube production route: after hot deformation by extrusion; after quenching from various temperatures and subsequent high tempering. It is shown that the martensitic microstructure formed both after hot deformation and after quenching is characterized by the presence of deformation crystallographic texture, which is predetermined by the texture of austenite. The effect of heat treatment on texture, packet refinement, lath width, precipitation of carbides and Charpy impact energy is analyzed.

  11. The morphology of lath martensite: a new perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koumatos Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical framework is proposed to predict the features of the (5 5 7 lath transformation in low-carbon steels based on energy minimisation. This theory generates a one-parameter family of possible habit plane normals and a selection mechanism then identifies the (5 5 7 normals as those arising from a deformation with small atomic movement and maximal compatibility. While the calculations bear some resemblance to those of double shear theories, the assumptions and conclusions are different. Interestingly, the predicted microstructure morphology resembles that of plate martensite, in the sense that a type of twinning mechanism is involved.

  12. Comparative Study of Hardening Mechanisms During Aging of a 304 Stainless Steel Containing α'-Martensite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S. W.; Kang, U. G.; Choi, J. Y.; Nam, W. J.

    2012-09-01

    Strain aging and hardening behaviors of a 304 stainless steel containing deformation-induced martensite were investigated by examining mechanical properties and microstructural evolution for different aging temperature and time. Introduced age hardening mechanisms of a cold rolled 304 stainless steel were the additional formation of α'-martensite, hardening of α'-martensite, and hardening of deformed austenite. The increased amount of α'-martensite at an aging temperature of 450 °C confirmed the additional formation of α'-martensite as a hardening mechanism in a cold rolled 304 stainless steel. Additionally, the increased hardness in both α'-martensite and austenite phases with aging temperature proved that hardening of both α'-martensite and austenite phases would be effective as hardening mechanisms in cold rolled and aged 304 stainless steels. The results suggested that among hardening mechanisms, hardening of an α'-martensite phase, including the diffusion of interstitial solute carbon atoms to dislocations and the precipitation of fine carbide particles would become a major hardening mechanism during aging of cold rolled 304 stainless steels.

  13. Martensitic transformation and stress partitioning in a high-carbon steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg; Pantleon, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Martensitic transformation in a high-carbon steel was investigated with (synchrotron) X-ray diffraction at sub-zero Celsius temperature. In situ angular X-ray diffraction was applied to: (i) quantitatively determine the fractions of retained austenite and martensite; and (ii) measure the evolutio...

  14. Modelling the interaction between plasticity and the austenite-martensite transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouznetsova, V.G.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2007-01-01

    Many advanced steels, such as high strength steels and TRIP steels, owe their excellent combination of strength and ductility to the complex microstructural behaviour involving the austenite to martensite phase transformation. In this paper a physically-based model for martensitic transformation

  15. Effects of high magnetic field on martensitic transformation behavior and structure in Fe-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtsuka, H.; Wada, H.; Ghosh, G.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of magnetic field on lath-type martensitic transformation behavior and the reverse transformation behavior from lath math martensite to austenite have been investigated in 18Ni maraging steel. It was found that the reverse transformation temperature during heating is increased by magnetic field. Reverse transformation behavior during isothermal holding was also found to be retarded by magnetic field. (orig.)

  16. A study on martensitic structure in Fe-4Cr-0.4C steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Won, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    Morphology, dependence of prior austenite grain size and packet size upon austenitizing temperature, distribution of lath width, and habit plane of martensitic structure in Fe-4Cr-0.4C steel has been studied by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The results obtained are as follows. 1) Optical microstructures of martensitic Fe-4Cr-0.4C steel consist of lath martensite and lens martensite. Also the four types of morphology are observed by electron microscopy. The most common morphologies are a regular paralleled martensite and an irregular dovetailed lath martensite, while the remainder of microstructures consists mainly of groups of internally twinned martensite and autotempered laths. 2) Prior austenite grain size and packet size increased with austenizing temperature, and also the numbers of lath contained in a prior austenite grain or a packet are increased with austenizing temperature. 3) The mean width of lath in Fe-4Cr-0.4C steel is about 0.23μm and most of lath widths are below 0.5μm. 4) Martensite habit plane of Fe-4Cr-0.4C steel is nearly [110]α'. (author)

  17. On the Nature of Internal Interfaces in Tempered Martensite Ferritic Steels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dronhofer, A.; Pešička, J.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Eggeler, G.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 5 (2003), s. 511-520 ISSN 0044-3093 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/1172 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2041904 Keywords : Tempered martensite ferritic steels * martensite variants * orientation imaging Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 0.637, year: 2003

  18. The Investigation of Strain-Induced Martensite Reverse Transformation in AISI 304 Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cios, G.; Tokarski, T.; Żywczak, A.; Dziurka, R.; Stępień, M.; Gondek, Ł.; Marciszko, M.; Pawłowski, B.; Wieczerzak, K.; Bała, P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive study on the strain-induced martensitic transformation and reversion transformation of the strain-induced martensite in AISI 304 stainless steel using a number of complementary techniques such as dilatometry, calorimetry, magnetometry, and in-situ X-ray diffraction, coupled with high-resolution microstructural transmission Kikuchi diffraction analysis. Tensile deformation was applied at temperatures between room temperature and 213 K (-60 °C) in order to obtain a different volume fraction of strain-induced martensite (up to 70 pct). The volume fraction of the strain-induced martensite, measured by the magnetometric method, was correlated with the total elongation, hardness, and linear thermal expansion coefficient. The thermal expansion coefficient, as well as the hardness of the strain-induced martensitic phase was evaluated. The in-situ thermal treatment experiments showed unusual changes in the kinetics of the reverse transformation (α' → γ). The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the reverse transformation may be stress assisted—strains inherited from the martensitic transformation may increase its kinetics at the lower annealing temperature range. More importantly, the transmission Kikuchi diffraction measurements showed that the reverse transformation of the strain-induced martensite proceeds through a displacive, diffusionless mechanism, maintaining the Kurdjumov-Sachs crystallographic relationship between the martensite and the reverted austenite. This finding is in contradiction to the results reported by other researchers for a similar alloy composition.

  19. Microstructural development during laser cladding of low-C martensitic stainless steel.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat input plays an important role in the microstructural development of 12%Cr martensitic stainless steel. The microstructure of low-C 12%Cr martensitic stainless steel resulting from laser cladding was investigated. For 410L a ferritic...

  20. On the multiplication of dislocations during martensitic transformations in NiTi shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Simon, T.; Kröger, A.; Somsen, Ch.; Dlouhý, Antonín; Eggeler, G.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 5 (2010), s. 1850-1860 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/1913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : NiTi * Martensitic transformations * Dislocation multiplication mechanism * Martensite variants * Dislocations Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.781, year: 2010

  1. Kinetics of martensitic transformations in magnetic field or under hydrostatic pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Kakeshita, Jung-min Nam and Takashi Fukuda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have recently constructed a phenomenological theory that provides a unified explanation for athermal and isothermal martensitic transformation processes. On the basis of this theory, we predict some properties of martensitic transformation and confirm them experimentally using some Fe-based alloys and a Ni–Co–Mn–In magnetic shape memory alloy.

  2. Self-stabilization of untransformed austenite by hydrostatic pressure via martensitic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakada, Nobuo; Ishibashi, Yuji; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Takaki, Setsuo

    2016-01-01

    For improving the understanding of austenite stability in steel, hydrostatic pressure in untransformed austenite that is generated via martensitic transformation was evaluated from macro- and micro-viewpoints, and its effect on austenite stability was investigated in a Fe-27%Ni austenitic alloy. X-ray diffractometry revealed that the lattice parameter of untransformed austenite is continuously decreased via martensitic transformation only when martensite becomes the dominant phase in the microstructure. This suggests that the untransformed austenite is isotropically compressed by the surrounding martensite grains, i.e., hydrostatic pressure is generated in untransformed austenite dynamically at a later stage of martensitic transformation. On the other hand, microscopic strain mapping using the electron backscatter diffraction technique indicated that a finer untransformed austenite grain has a higher hydrostatic pressure, while a high density of dislocations is also introduced in untransformed austenite near the austenite/martensite interface because of lattice-invariant shear characterized by non-thermoelastic martensitic transformation. Furthermore, it was experimentally demonstrated that the hydrostatic pressure stabilizes the untransformed austenite; however, the austenite stabilization effect alone is not large enough to fully explain a large gap between martensite start and finish temperatures in steel.

  3. Effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformation and mechanical strengthening of stainless steels – A phase-field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Shaw, Brian A.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    A 3D elastoplastic phase-field model is used to study the effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformationas well as on mechanical strengthening of both austenite and martensite in stainless steel. The results show that with an increasing number of thermal cycles, martensite becomes more...

  4. In Situ Study of Phase Transformations during Non-Isothermal Tempering of Bainitic and Martensitic Microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Hesamodin Talebi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Phase transformations during non-isothermal tempering of bainitic or martensitic microstructures obtained after quenching of a medium-carbon low-alloy steel was studied. The microstructures correspond to different locations of an as-quenched large-sized forged ingot used as a die material in the automotive industry. High-resolution dilatometry experiments were conducted to simulate the heat treatment process, as well as to investigate different phenomena occurring during non-isothermal tempering. The microstructures were characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopy. Dilatometry analyses demonstrated that tempering behavior varied significantly from bainitic to martensitic microstructures. Retained austenite, which exists between bainitic ferrite sheaves, decomposes to lower bainite causing a remarkable volume increase. It was found that this decomposition finishes below 386 °C. By contrast, martensite tempering was accompanied with a volume decrease due to the decomposition of medium-carbon martensite to low carbon martensite and carbides.

  5. Influence of stress on martensitic transformation and mechanical properties of hot stamped AHSS parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.; Li, X.D.; Zhao, K.M.; Wang, C.Y.; Zheng, G.J.; Hu, P.; Dong, H.

    2015-01-01

    Non-isothermal tension and compression tests of 22MnB5 boron steel were carried out in this study. How different stress state influences the martensitic transformation of advanced high strength steel (AHSS) parts was analyzed. The analysis reveals that the martensitic transformation starting temperature (M s ) changes with different stress states. Specifically, the M s temperature rises with increasing tensile stress, however, it rises first and then drops with increasing compressive stress. Moreover, a higher initial forming temperature leads to a higher M s temperature under the same stress. Simulation of an actual hot-formed AHSS B-pillar together with the microscopic metallography, hardness and martensitic content shows that in higher tensile stress dominated area, the martensitic content and hardness are usually higher than in other areas. Although the stress can promote the M s temperature, a lower cooling rate may lead to less martensite fraction

  6. Numerical simulation of transformation-induced microscopic residual stress in ferrite-martensite lamellar steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikami, Y; Inao, A; Mochizuki, M; Toyoda, M

    2009-01-01

    The effect of transformation-induced microscopic residual stress on fatigue crack propagation behavior of ferrite-martensite lamellar steel was discussed. Fatigue tests of prestrained and non-prestrained specimens were performed. Inflections and branches at ferrite-martensite boundaries were observed in the non-prestrained specimens. On the other hand, less inflections and branches were found in the prestrained specimens. The experimental results showed that the transformation induced microscopic residual stress has influence on the fatigue crack propagation behavior. To estimate the microscopic residual, a numerical simulation method for the calculation of microscopic residual stress stress induced by martensitic transformation was performed. The simulation showed that compressive residual stress was generated in martensite layer, and the result agree with the experimental result that inflections and branches were observed at ferrite-martensite boundaries.

  7. Morphology and substructure of lath martensites in dilute Zr--Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Mukhopadhyay, P.; Banerjee, S.

    2000-01-01

    The morphology and substructure of lath martensites formed in β quenched dilute Zr--Nb alloys are described. The laths are arranged in a nearly parallel manner within any given colony or packet. Packets of alternately twin related laths and clusters of three mutually twin related lath martensite variants have been observed and the twinning plane is of {1 anti 101} H type. With increasing niobium content a continuous transition from large colonies of lath martensites, through smaller lath colonies, to individual plates of the acicular martensites occurs. The lath-lath interface consists of regularly spaced parallel arrays of dislocations of type. The habit plane traces of lath martensite lie close to {334} type poles and the operating lattice invariant shear mode is { anti 1101} H H shear system. This result is consistent with results predicted by the phenomenological theory. The preferred two and three habit plane variant grouping clustering is explained on the basis of self-accommodation effects. (orig.)

  8. Kinetics of anomalous multi-step formation of lath martensite in steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villa, Matteo; Pantleon, Karen; Reich, Michael; Kessler, Olaf; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2014-01-01

    A steel containing 16 wt.% Cr, 5 wt.% Ni and 3 wt.% Cu was transformed into martensite by applying isochronal, i.e. constant rate, cooling followed by isothermal holding. The formation of martensite was monitored with dilatometry. A series of retardations and accelerations of the transformation was observed during isochronal cooling for cooling rates ranging from 1.5 to 50 K min −1 . The cooling rate in the isochronal stage was observed to influence the transformation rate in the isothermal stage. Electron backscatter diffraction was applied to determine the morphology of the martensite, which was of lath type, and to investigate the microstructure of the material. No influence of the cooling rate on the scale of the microstructure was observed. The series of retardations and accelerations of the transformation is interpreted in terms of the combined effect of the strain and interfacial energy introduced in the system during martensite formation, which stabilizes austenite, and autocatalytic nucleation of martensite

  9. Structural analysis and martensitic transformation in equiatomic HfPd alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisada, S.; Matsuda, M.; Takashima, K.; Yamabe-Mitarai, Y.

    2018-02-01

    We investigated the crystal structure and the martensitic transformation in equiatomic HfPd alloy. The analysis of the crystal structure by electron diffraction and Rietveld refinement using X-ray diffraction data indicates that the space group of the martensitic phase is Cmcm, and the lattice parameters are a = 0.329 nm, b = 1.021 nm, and c = 0.438 nm. Martensitic variants are composed of the plate-like morphology of several hundred nm, and the boundaries between the variants have (021)Cmcm twin relations. This (021)Cmcm twin boundary seems to be sharp without ledge and steps. Differential scanning calorimetry measurement indicates that each martensitic transformation temperature is determined to be Ms = 819 K, Mf = 794 K, As = 928 K, and Af = 954 K. Based on the dimension change using a thermo-mechanical analyzer, the expansion and shrinkage of the sample occurred with the forward and reverse martensitic transformation, respectively.

  10. Role of magnetism on the martensitic transformation in Ni–Mn-based magnetic shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez-Alarcos, V.; Recarte, V.; Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Gómez-Polo, C.; Rodríguez-Velamazán, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of magnetism on the martensitic structural transformation has been analyzed through the evolution of the transformation temperatures of several Ni–Mn–Ga and Ni–Mn–In alloys subjected to high-temperature quenching and post-quench annealing thermal treatments. It is found that the atomic order variations associated with the thermal treatments affect the structural transformation in different ways depending on the character of the magnetic ordering in the austenitic and the martensitic phases. In particular, regardless of composition, the variation in the atomic order affects the martensitic transformation temperature only in those alloys in which at least one of the structural phases show magnetic order at the transformation temperature, whereas those transformations taking place between paramagnetic phases remain unaffected. The observed behaviors are explained in terms of the effect of the magnetic exchange coupling variations on the free energy difference between austenite and martensite. The results confirm the key role of magnetism in the martensitic transformation.

  11. Effect of solute Cu on ductile-to-brittle behavior of martensitic Fe-8% Ni alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junaidi Syarif; Tsuchiyama, Toshihiro; Takaki, Setsuo

    2007-01-01

    Effect of solute Cu on the ductile-to-brittle (DBT) behaviour of martensitic Fe-8mass%Ni alloy is investigated to understand the effect of solute Cu on mechanical properties of martensitic steel. The DBT behaviours of the Fe-8mass%Ni and the Fe-8mass%Ni-1mass%Cu alloys are almost the same. It is thought to be due to disappearance of the solid solution softening in the martensitic Fe-8mass%Ni-Cu alloys. The solute Cu gives small influence on temperature and strain rate dependences of yield stress and suppressing the twin deformation at lower temperature in the martensitic Fe-8mass%Ni alloy. Therefore, the DBT temperature of the martensitic Fe-8mass%Ni-Cu alloy was not shifted to lower side. (author)

  12. Role of stress-assisted martensite in the design of strong ultrafine-grained duplex steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yen, Hung-Wei; Ooi, Steve Woei; Eizadjou, Mehdi; Breen, Andrew; Huang, Ching-Yuan; Bhadeshia, H.K.D.H.; Ringer, Simon P.

    2015-01-01

    This work explains the occurrence of transformation-induced plasticity via stress-assisted martensite, when designing ultrafine-grained duplex steels. It is found that, when the austenite is reduced to a fine scale of about 300 nm, the initial deformation-induced microstructure can be dominated by parallel lamellae of ε martensite or mechanical twinning, which cannot efficiently provide nucleation sites for strain-induced martensite. Hence, α′ martensite nucleation occurs independently by a stress-assisted process that enhances transformation-induced plasticity in ultrafine-grained austenite. This metallurgical principle was validated experimentally by using a combination of transmission Kikuchi diffraction mapping, transmission electron microscopy and atom probe microscopy, and demonstrated theoretically by the thermodynamics model of stress-assisted martensite

  13. Tempering response to different morphologies of martensite in tensile deformation of dual-phase steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, E.; Manzoor, T.; Sarwar, M.; Arif, M.; Hussain, N.

    2011-01-01

    A low alloy steel containing 0.2% C was heat treated with three cycles of heat treatments with the aim to acquire different morphologies of martensite in dual phase microstructure. Microscopic examination revealed that the morphologies consisting of grain boundary growth, scattered laths and bulk form of martensite were obtained. These morphologies have their distinct patterns of distribution in the matrix (ferrite). In tensile properties observations the dual phase steel with bulk morphology of martensite showed minimum of ductility but high tensile strength as compared to other two morphologies. This may be due to poor alignments of bulk martensite particles along tensile axes during deformation. Tempering was employed with various holding times at 550 deg. C to induce ductility in the heat treated material. The tempering progressively increased the ductility by increasing holding time. However, tempering response to strengths and ductilities was different to all three morphologies of martensite. (author)

  14. Influence of stress on martensitic transformation and mechanical properties of hot stamped AHSS parts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.; Li, X.D. [School of Automotive Engineering, National Key Laboratory of Industrial Equipment Structural Analysis, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, K.M., E-mail: kmzhao@dlut.edu.cn [School of Automotive Engineering, National Key Laboratory of Industrial Equipment Structural Analysis, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang, C.Y. [Institute for Special Steels, Central Iron & Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Zheng, G.J.; Hu, P. [School of Automotive Engineering, National Key Laboratory of Industrial Equipment Structural Analysis, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Dong, H. [Institute for Special Steels, Central Iron & Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-04-01

    Non-isothermal tension and compression tests of 22MnB5 boron steel were carried out in this study. How different stress state influences the martensitic transformation of advanced high strength steel (AHSS) parts was analyzed. The analysis reveals that the martensitic transformation starting temperature (M{sub s}) changes with different stress states. Specifically, the M{sub s} temperature rises with increasing tensile stress, however, it rises first and then drops with increasing compressive stress. Moreover, a higher initial forming temperature leads to a higher M{sub s} temperature under the same stress. Simulation of an actual hot-formed AHSS B-pillar together with the microscopic metallography, hardness and martensitic content shows that in higher tensile stress dominated area, the martensitic content and hardness are usually higher than in other areas. Although the stress can promote the M{sub s} temperature, a lower cooling rate may lead to less martensite fraction.

  15. Plastic Strain Induced Damage Evolution and Martensitic Transformation in Ductile Materials at Cryogenic Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2002-01-01

    The Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steels are well known for their ductile behaviour at cryogenic temperatures. This implies development and evolution of plastic strain fields in the stainless steel components subjected to thermo-mechanical loads at low temperatures. The evolution of plastic strain fields is usually associated with two phenomena: ductile damage and strain induced martensitic transformation. Ductile damage is described by the kinetic law of damage evolution. Here, the assumption of isotropic distribution of damage (microcracks and microvoids) in the Representative Volume Element (RVE) is made. Formation of the plastic strain induced martensite (irreversible process) leads to the presence of quasi-rigid inclusions of martensite in the austenitic matrix. The amount of martensite platelets in the RVE depends on the intensity of the plastic strain fields and on the temperature. The evolution of the volume fraction of martensite is governed by a kinetic law based on the accumulated plastic strain. Both of thes...

  16. Relationship between thermomechanical treatment, microstructure and α' martensite in stainless Fe-based shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otubo, J.; Mei, P.R.; Shinohara, A.H.; Suzuki, C.K.

    1999-01-01

    This work presents some preliminary results relating training treatment, training temperature and the formation of α' martensite to the shape recovery effect of stainless shape memory alloys. For the composition tested, the sample shows some mechanical memory (constant tensile stress at 4% strain and constant yield stress throughout the training cycles) with a very good shape recovery (95% after 4% tensile strain) at a training temperature of 873 K. Its residual strain is related to the generation of perfect dislocations only. For the sample trained at 723 K, the residual strain could be attributed to incomplete reversion of stress-induced ε martensite, in part due to the blocking effect of α' martensite and also to the generation of perfect dislocations. The influence of α' martensite on shape recovery is relative and is dependent on training temperature, and the preferential growth of α' martensite is shown to occur for large grain size. (orig.)

  17. Development of next generation tempered and ODS reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, S. J.; Boutard, J. L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Kimura, A.; Lindau, R.; Odette, G. R.; Rieth, M.; Tan, L.; Tanigawa, H.

    2017-09-01

    Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels are currently the most technologically mature option for the structural material of proposed fusion energy reactors. Advanced next-generation higher performance steels offer the opportunity for improvements in fusion reactor operational lifetime and reliability, superior neutron radiation damage resistance, higher thermodynamic efficiency, and reduced construction costs. The two main strategies for developing improved steels for fusion energy applications are based on (1) an evolutionary pathway using computational thermodynamics modelling and modified thermomechanical treatments (TMT) to produce higher performance reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels and (2) a higher risk, potentially higher payoff approach based on powder metallurgy techniques to produce very high strength oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels capable of operation to very high temperatures and with potentially very high resistance to fusion neutron-induced property degradation. The current development status of these next-generation high performance steels is summarized, and research and development challenges for the successful development of these materials are outlined. Material properties including temperature-dependent uniaxial yield strengths, tensile elongations, high-temperature thermal creep, Charpy impact ductile to brittle transient temperature (DBTT) and fracture toughness behaviour, and neutron irradiation-induced low-temperature hardening and embrittlement and intermediate-temperature volumetric void swelling (including effects associated with fusion-relevant helium and hydrogen generation) are described for research heats of the new steels.

  18. Deformation twinning in irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K.; Dai, Y.; Spätig, P.

    2018-04-01

    Two different ferritic/martensitic steels were tensile tested to gain insight into the mechanisms of embrittlement induced by the combined effects of displacement damage and helium after proton/neutron irradiation in SINQ, the Swiss spallation neutron source. The irradiation conditions were in the range: 15.8-19.8 dpa (displacement per atom) with 1370-1750 appm He at 245-300 °C. All the samples fractured in brittle mode with intergranular or cleavage fracture surfaces when tested at room temperature (RT) or 300 °C. After tensile test, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was employed to investigate the deformation microstructures. TEM-lamella samples were extracted directly below the intergranular fracture surfaces or cleavage surfaces by using the focused ion beam technique. Deformation twinning was observed in irradiated specimens at high irradiation dose. Only twins with {112} plane were observed in all of the samples. The average thickness of twins is about 40 nm. Twins initiated at the fracture surface, became gradually thinner with distance away from the fracture surface and finally stopped in the matrix. Novel features such as twin-precipitate interactions, twin-grain boundary and/or twin-lath boundary interactions were observed. Twinning bands were seen to be arrested by grain boundaries or large precipitates, but could penetrate martensitic lath boundaries. Unlike the case of defect free channels, small defect-clusters, dislocation loops and dense small helium bubbles were observed inside twins.

  19. Development of martensitic steels for high neutron damage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1998-01-01

    Martensitic stainless steels have been developed for both in-core applications in advanced liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) and for first wall and structural materials applications for commercial fusion reactors. It can now be shown that these steels can be expected to maintain properties to levels as high as 175 or 200 dpa, respectively. The 12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.2C alloy HT-9 has been extensively tested for LMFBR applications and shown to resist radiation damage, providing a creep and swelling resistant alternative to austenitic steels. Degradation of fracture toughness and Charpy impact properties have been observed, but properties are sufficient to provide reliable service. In comparison, alloys with lower chromium contents are found to decarburize in contact with liquid sodium and are therefore not recommended. Tungsten stabilized martensitic stainless steels have appropriate properties for fusion applications. Radioactivity levels are being less than 500 years after service, radiation damage resistance is excellent, including impact properties, and swelling is modest. This report describes the history of the development effort. (author)

  20. Postirradiation thermocyclic loading of ferritic-martensitic structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaeva, L.; Orychtchenko, A.; Petersen, C.; Rybin, V.

    Thermonuclear fusion reactors of the Tokamak-type will be unique power engineering plants to operate in thermocyclic mode only. Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels are prime candidate structural materials for test blankets of the ITER fusion reactor. Beyond the radiation damage, thermomechanical cyclic loading is considered as the most detrimental lifetime limiting phenomenon for the above structure. With a Russian and a German facility for thermal fatigue testing of neutron irradiated materials a cooperation has been undertaken. Ampule devices to irradiate specimens for postirradiation thermal fatigue tests have been developed by the Russian partner. The irradiation of these ampule devices loaded with specimens of ferritic-martensitic steels, like the European MANET-II, the Russian 05K12N2M and the Japanese Low Activation Material F82H-mod, in a WWR-M-type reactor just started. A description of the irradiation facility, the qualification of the ampule device and the modification of the German thermal fatigue facility will be presented.

  1. Development of martensitic steels for high neutron damage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1996-12-01

    Martensitic stainless steels have been developed for both in-core applications in advanced liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) and for first wall and structural materials applications for commercial fusion reactors. It can now be shown that these steels can be expected to maintain properties to levels as high as 175 or 200 dpa, respectively. The 12Cr1Mo0.5W0.2C alloy HT-9 has been extensively tested for LMFBR applications and shown to resist radiation damage, providing a creep and swelling resistant alternative to austenitic steels. Degradation of fracture toughness and Charpy impact properties have been observed, but properties are sufficient to provide reliable service. In comparison, alloys with lower chromium contents are found to decarburize in contact with liquid sodium and are therefore not recommended. Tungsten stabilized martensitic stainless steels have appropriate properties for fusion applications. Radioactivity levels are benign less than 500 years after service, radiation damage resistance is excellent, including impact properties, and swelling is modest. This report describes the history of the development effort.

  2. Mesoscale martensitic transformation in single crystals of topological defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiao; Martínez-González, José A.; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.; Ramírez-Hernández, Abelardo; Zhou, Ye; Sadati, Monirosadat; Zhang, Rui; Nealey, Paul F.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2017-09-05

    Liquid crystal blue phases (BPs) are highly ordered at two levels. Molecules exhibit orientational order at nanometer length scales, while chirality leads to ordered arrays of doubletwisted cylinders over micrometer scales. Past studies of polycrystalline BPs were challenged by grain boundaries between randomly oriented crystalline nanodomains. Here, the nucleation of BPs is controlled with considerable precision by relying on chemically nano-patterned surfaces, leading to macroscopic single-crystal BP specimens where the dynamics of meso-crystal formation can be directly observed. Theory and experiments show that transitions between two BPs having a different network structure proceed through local re-organization of the crystalline array, without diffusion of the double twisted cylinders. In solid crystals, martensitic transformations between crystal structures involve the concerted motion of a few atoms, without diffusion. The transformation between BPs, where crystal features arise in the sub-micron regime, is found to be martensitic in nature, with the diffusion-less feature associated to the collective behavior of the double twist cylinders. Single-crystal BPs are shown to offer fertile grounds for the study of directed crystal-nucleation and the controlled growth of soft matter.

  3. Why does the martensitic transformation temperature strongly depend on composition?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, X.; Otsuka, K.

    2000-01-01

    The reason for the strong composition and heat-treatment dependence of the martensitic transformation temperature was investigated by a simple Landau-type model. Assuming the anharmonic and coupling coefficients are insensitive to composition, we obtained an important result martensitic transformation occurs at a critical elastic constant c' and a critical TA 2 phonon energy ω η 2 , which are independent of alloy composition. This result gained support from a large body of experimental data of Cu-based alloys. Since c' and phonon energy are strongly dependent on composition, the constancy of c' at Ms demands that the (transformation) temperature must exhibit an opposite effect to compensate the composition effect. Therefore, the lower the c', the higher the Ms is. Because the temperature dependence of c' is weak (due to the 1 st order nature of the transformation), the big c' change by a slight composition change must be compensated by a large change in temperature. Thus Ms has strong composition dependence. The effect of quench is to increase point defects, being equivalent to a composition change, thus has a strong effect on Ms. From the present study, we can conclude that the strong composition dependence of Ms is mainly a harmonic effect. (orig.)

  4. High carbon microalloyed martensitic steel with ultrahigh strength-ductility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Wang, Ying [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai 200245 (China); Chen, Nailu, E-mail: nlchen@sjtu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-04-29

    Based on the idea of rising the mechanical stability of retained austenite by the addition of Si in Fe-Mn based steels, an Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb was designed, then its hot rolled plate was successively tread by normalization process as pretreatment of novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process. Product of tensile and elongation (PSE) of 53.94 GPa% were obtained for this high carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel, and the PSE (40.18 GPa%) obtained by the conversion of tensile sample size using Oliver formula still is more excellent PSE than those of other microalloyed advanced high strength steels reported. The microstructural characterization reveals origin of ultrahigh PSE resulting from both the increase of considerable and dispersed carbon enriched retained austenite with relative high mechanical stability in volume fraction and the decrease of brittle twin-type martensite with the sensitivity of notch.

  5. Significance of rate of work hardening in tempered martensite embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietikainen, J.

    1995-01-01

    The main explanations for tempered martensite embrittlement are based on the effects of impurities and cementite precipitation on the prior austenite grain boundaries. There are some studies where the rate of work hardening is proposed as a potential reason for the brittleness. One steel was studied by means of a specially developed precision torsional testing device. The test steel had a high Si and Ni content so ε carbide and Fe 3 C appear in quite different tempering temperature ranges. The M S temperature is low enough so that self tempering does not occur. With the testing device it was possible to obtain the true stress - true strain curves to very high deformations. The minimum toughness was always associated with the minimum of rate of work hardening. The change of deformed steel volume before the loss of mechanical stability is proposed as at least one reason for tempered martensite embrittlement. The reasons for the minimum of the rate of work hardening are considered. (orig.)

  6. Creep characteristics of precipitation hardened carbon free martensitic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muneki, S.; Igarashi, M.; Abe, F.

    2000-01-01

    A new attempt has been demonstrated using carbon free Fe-Ni-Co martensitic alloys strengthened by Laves phase such as Fe 2 W or Fe 2 Mo to achieve homogeneous creep deformation at high temperatures under low stress levels. Creep behavior of the alloys is found to be completely different from that of the conventional high-Cr ferritic steels. The alloys exhibit gradual change in the creep rate with strain both in the transient and acceleration creep regions, and give a larger strain for the minimum creep rate. In these alloys the creep deformation takes place very homogeneously and no heterogeneous creep deformation is enhanced even at low stress levels. The minimum creep rates of the Fe-Ni-Co alloys at 700 C are found to be much lower than that of the conventional steel, which is due to fine dispersion strengthening useful even at 700 C in these alloys. It is thus concluded that the Fe-Ni-Co martensite strengthened by Laves phase is very useful to increase the creep resistance at elevated temperatures over 650 C. (orig.)

  7. Martensitic phase transitions in Co-0.85 at % Fe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prem, M.

    1997-12-01

    Co-0.85at%Fe shows the two martensitic phase transitions hcp-dhcp and dhcp-fcc. The lattice dynamics of Co-0.85at%Fe was investigated by the means of inelastic neutron scattering at a series of temperatures up to 750K in order to understand the two martensitic phase transitions of this system. In all of the measured phonon branches anomalies were neither found near the hcp-dhcp phase transition nor going through the dhcp-fcc transition. Lattice-parameter scans were performed through the whole temperature range. Diffuse neutron scattering revealed a lattice parameter shift between the dhcp and fcc phase of ∼0.4 % measured at the same temperature. This was possible because the system shows a wide temperature hysteresis at the two phase transitions. In the temperature region of coexistence of dhcp and fcc phase diffuse satellites arose near the (111)fcc Bragg peak (which is equivalent to the (00.2)dhcp peak). Their intensity varied in accordance to the volume fraction of the phases but vanished on changing wavelength. The elastic measurements were performed at the Austrian triple axis spectrometer VALSE located at the Laboratoire Leon Brillouin (LLB) in Saclay (F); the inelastic measurements were performed at the spectrometers IN3 and INS of the Institute Laue Langevin (ILL) in Grenoble (F). (author)

  8. Surface martensitization of Carbon steel using Arc Plasma Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyudi, Haris; Dimyati, Arbi; Sebayang, Darwin

    2018-03-01

    In this paper new technology of surface structure modification of steel by short plasma exposure in Arc Plasma Sintering (APS) device is presented. APS is an apparatus working based on plasma generated by DC pulsed current originally used for synthesizing materials via sintering and melting. Plasma exposure in APS was applied into the specimens for 1 and 3 seconds which generate temperature approximately about 1300-1500°C. The SUP9, pearlitic carbon steel samples were used. The hardness, hardening depth and microstructure of the specimens have been investigated by Vickers micro hardness test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) supported by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDX). The results have showed that the mechanical property was significantly improved due to the formation of single martensitic structures as identified by SEM. The hardness of treated surface evaluated by Vickers hardness test showed significant improvement nearly three time from 190 VHN before to 524 VHN after treatment. Furthermore, EDX confirmed that the formation of martensite layer occurred without altering its composition. The APS also produced uniform hardened layer up to 250 μm. The experiment has demonstrated that arc plasma process was successfully improved the mechanical properties of steel in relatively very short time.

  9. Deformation induced martensite in AISI 316 stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon, N.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The forming process leads to a considerable differentiation of the strain field within the billet, and finally causes the non-uniform distribution of the total strain, microstrusture and properties of the material over the product cross-section. This paper focus on the influence of stress states on the deformation-induced a’ martensitic transformation in AISI Type 316 austenitic stainless steel. The formation of deformation-induced martensite is related to the austenite (g instability at temperatures close or below room temperature. The structural transformation susceptibility is correlated to the stacking fault energy (SFE, which is a function not only of the chemical composition, but also of the testing temperature. Austenitic stainless steels possess high plasticity and can be easily cold formed. However, during cold processing the hardening phenomena always occurs. Nevertheless, the deformation-induced martensite transformation may enhance the rate of work-hardening and it may or may not be in favour of further material processing. Due to their high corrosion resistance and versatile mechanical properties the austenitic stainless steels are used in pressing of heat exchanger plates. However, this corrosion resistance is influenced by the amount of martensite formed during processing. In order to establish the links between total plastic strain, and martensitic transformation, the experimental tests were followed by numerical simulation.

    El proceso de conformación da a lugar a una considerable diferenciación del campo de tensiones dentro de una barra de extrusión y, finalmente, causa una distribución no uniforme de la tensión total, la microestructura y propiedades del material sobre el corte transversal. En este trabajo se estudia la influencia de los estados de tensión sobre la transformación martensítica inducida por deformación en un acero inoxidable austenítico tipo AISI 316. La formación de martensita inducida por

  10. Reliability/unreliability of mixture rule in a low alloy ferrite–martensite dual phase steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fereiduni, E.; Ghasemi Banadkouki, S.S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The ferrite hardening response is quite variable in DP microstructures. •Martensite microhardness has not shown a specific manner in DP microstructures. •There is a major difference between experimental and calculated hardness values. •Mixture rule can be applied to predict the hardness if using some assumptions. -- Abstract: The aim of this paper is to investigate in details the relationship between the volume fractions of ferrite and martensite with the variation of hardness in a low alloy ferrite–martensite dual phase (DP) steel. For this purpose, a wide variety of ferrite–martensite DP samples consisting different volume fractions of ferrite and martensite have been developed using step quenching heat treatment cycle involving reheating at 860 °C for 60 min, soaking at 600 °C salt bath for various holding times followed by 70 °C hot oil quenching. Optical microscopy has been supplemented by electron microscopy and hardness measurements to follow microstructural changes and their relation to the variation in hardness. The results showed that there is a non-linear relationship between the hardness of DP samples with the volume fraction of phase constituents indicating that the mixture rule is not reliable in the ferrite–martensite DP microstructures. The unreliability of mixture rule is related to the variation of ferrite and martensite hardening responses developed in the DP samples. The DP microstructure consisting 6–7% volume fraction of continuous grain boundary ferrite in the vicinity of martensite has been associated with a remarkable higher hardness for both ferrite and martensite in comparison with the other DP microstructures. The higher martensite hardness is due to the higher carbon content of the remaining metastable austenite developed in the ferrite–austenite two phase field area, leading to the harder martensite formation on the subsequent 70 °C hot oil quenching. The harder ferrite grains have been developed as a

  11. Stress induced martensitic transformation from bcc to fcc in Ag-Zn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takezawa, K.; Akamatsu, R.; Marukawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    The martensitic transformation in Ag-Zn alloys of low-Zn content has been studied by optical and electron microscopic observations and by tensile tests. The β 1 phase of B2 structure transforms to the thermo-elastic martensite having 9R structure similar to Cu-based alloys upon cooling to temperature below Ms. When the β 1 phase is stretched at room temperature, the slip deformation occurs at first and then the stress-induced martensite(SIM) of wedge-like morphology forms. The SIM has the ordered fcc structure containing micro-twins. This direct transformation from bcc to fcc is a unique feature in Ag-Zn alloys. In Cu alloys, martensites of fcc structure appear only after the second transformation from the first transformation product of 9R structure. The critical stress for the martensitic transformation and a degree of order of SIM decrease as the deformation temperature rises. In Ag-Zn alloys, the martensite of disordered fcc is thermally produced also by up-quenching to a higher temperature. In the present study, the relation between martensites of ordered and disordered fcc is discussed through thermodynamical calculations. The condition for the direct transformation from bcc to fcc is also examined. (orig.)

  12. Variant selection of martensites in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaru; Yasuda, Hiroyuki Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examined the variant selection of martensites in the weld metals. ► We also measured the residual stress developed in the butt and box welded joints. ► 24 martensite variants were randomly selected in the butt welded joint. ► High tensile residual stress in the box welded joint led to the strong variant selection. ► We discussed the rule of the variant selection focusing on the residual stress. -- Abstract: Martensitic transformation behavior in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld (LTTW) metal was examined focusing on the variant selection of martensites. The butt and box welded joints were prepared with LTTW metals and 980 MPa grade high strength steels. The residual stress of the welded joints, which was measured by a neutron diffraction technique, was effectively reduced by the expansion of the LTTW metals by the martensitic transformation during cooling after the welding process. In the LTTW metals, the retained austenite and martensite phases have the Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship. The variant selection of the martensites in the LTTW metals depended strongly on the type of welded joints. In the butt welded joint, 24 K–S variants were almost randomly selected while a few variants were preferentially chosen in the box welded joint. This suggests that the high residual stress developed in the box welded joint accelerated the formation of specific variants during the cooling process, in contrast to the butt welded joint with low residual stress

  13. Effect of microstructure on the fracture toughness of ferrite-martensite-bainite steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Kim, In Sup

    1988-01-01

    The effect of microstructure on the fracture toughness of ferrite-martensite -bainite steels was investigated with Fe-0.11C-1.64Mn-0.78Si composition. One inch compact tension specimens (1T-CTSs) were machined from hot rolled plates. The microstructure of ferrite-martensite-bainite was introduced to the specimens by the heat treatment of intercritical annealing at 800deg C and isothermal holding at 350deg C. Holding at 350deg C increased volume fraction of bainite, while decreased that of martensite, and refined martensite particles. Single specimen unloading compliance method was used in fracture test to obtain J-resistance (J-R) curve and to determine the fracture toughness(J IC ). Introduction of bainite to the ferrite-martensite steel improved the fracture toughness due to the deformation of bainite which relaxed the stress concentration on the interface of ferrite and martensite. Observation of fracto-graphs through the scanning electron microscope(SEM) identified the fracture mechanism of ferrite-martensite-bainite steels as dimple nucleation and crack growth by decohesion of ferrite matrix and second phase particles and by microvoid coales cence. (Author)

  14. A phase-field study of the physical concepts of martensitic transformations in steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Borgenstam, Annika; Hedström, Peter; Ågren, John

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Critical driving forces associated with martensitic transformation are estimated. ► Plastic relaxation rate affects the transformation and microstructure evolution. ► Low relaxation rate promotes multi-domained martensitic microstructure. ► High relaxation rate promotes growth of a single martensite domain. ► The model predicts the final habit plane of martensite to be (−2 1 1) γ . - Abstract: A 3D elastoplastic phase-field model is employed to study various driving forces associated with martensitic transformations, plastic deformation behavior as well as the habit plane concept. Usage of thermodynamic parameters corresponding to Fe–0.3%C alloy in conjunction with anisotropic physical parameters of steels as the simulation parameters have yielded the results in reasonable agreement with experimental observations. From the simulation results, it is concluded that there exist three critical driving forces that control the transformation and also that the plastic deformation behavior of the material greatly affects the transformation. The model predicts the initial habit plane of the first infinitesimal unit of martensite as (−1 1 1). The model also predicts that, as the transformation progresses, the above mentioned martensite domain rotates and finally orients along the new habit plane of (−2 1 1).

  15. Theory and experimental evidence of phonon domains and their roles in pre-martensitic phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongmei M.; Wang, Yu U.; Ren, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Pre-martensitic phenomena, also called martensite precursor effects, have been known for decades while yet remain outstanding issues. This paper addresses pre-martensitic phenomena from new theoretical and experimental perspectives. A statistical mechanics-based Grüneisen-type phonon theory is developed. On the basis of deformation-dependent incompletely softened low-energy phonons, the theory predicts a lattice instability and pre-martensitic transition into elastic-phonon domains via 'phonon spinodal decomposition.' The phase transition lifts phonon degeneracy in cubic crystal and has a nature of phonon pseudo-Jahn-Teller lattice instability. The theory and notion of phonon domains consistently explain the ubiquitous pre-martensitic anomalies as natural consequences of incomplete phonon softening. The phonon domains are characterised by broken dynamic symmetry of lattice vibrations and deform through internal phonon relaxation in response to stress (a particular case of Le Chatelier's principle), leading to previously unexplored new domain phenomenon. Experimental evidence of phonon domains is obtained by in situ three-dimensional phonon diffuse scattering and Bragg reflection using high-energy synchrotron X-ray single-crystal diffraction, which observes exotic domain phenomenon fundamentally different from usual ferroelastic domain switching phenomenon. In light of the theory and experimental evidence of phonon domains and their roles in pre-martensitic phenomena, currently existing alternative opinions on martensitic precursor phenomena are revisited.

  16. Martensitic transformation behavior and shape memory properties of Ti-Ni-Pt melt-spun ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inamura, Tomonari; Takahashi, Yohei; Hosoda, Hideki; Wakashima, Kenji; Nagase, Takeshi; Nakano, Takayoshi; Umakoshi, Yukichi; Miyazaki, Shuichi

    2006-01-01

    Martensitic transformation behavior and shape memory properties of a Ti 50 Ni 40 Pt 10 (TiNiPt) melt-spun ribbon fabricated by a single roll melt-spinning technique were characterized. The constituent phases of the as-spun ribbon were B2 (parent phase) and B19 (martensite phase) at room temperature. The B2-B19 martensitic transformation temperatures of the as-spun ribbon were 100K higher than those of the bulk-material with the same chemical composition. The martensitic transformation temperatures of the as-spun ribbon were decreased with increasing the temperature of the heat-treatment made after the melt-spinning. The as-spun ribbon and the heat-treated ribbons exhibited shape recovery by heating and/or pseudoelasticity. The martensitic transformation temperatures determined from the temperature dependence of the 0.2% flow stress of the pseudoelastic deformation were in good agreement with those of B2-B19 martensitic transformation determined by DSC. It was confirmed that the observed shape recovery and pseudoelasticity are shape memory effect and superelasticity due to the B2-B19 martensitic transformation. Shape memory effect and superelasticity of melt-spun TiNiPt alloy were found to appear at higher temperatures compared to those of Bulk-material with the same composition. (author)

  17. Direct evidence for stress-induced transformation between coexisting multiple martensites in a Ni–Mn–Ga multifunctional alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, L; Cong, D Y; Dong, Y H; Zhang, Y; Wang, Y D; Wang, Z L; Nie, Z H; Ren, Y

    2015-01-01

    The structural response of coexisting multiple martensites to stress field in a Ni–Mn–Ga multifunctional alloy was investigated by the in situ high-energy x-ray diffraction technique. Stress-induced transformation between coexisting multiple martensites was observed at 110 K, at which five-layered modulated (5M), seven-layered modulated (7M) and non-modulated (NM) martensites coexist. We found that a tiny stress of as low as 0.5 MPa could trigger the transformation from 5M and 7M martensites to NM martensite and this transformation is partly reversible. Besides the transformation between coexisting multiple martensites, rearrangement of martensite variants also occurs during loading, at least at high stress levels. The present study is instructive for designing advanced multifunctional alloys with easy actuation. (paper)

  18. Microstructural characterisation of a P91 steel normalised and tempered at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurtado-Norena, C.; Danon, C.A.; Luppo, M.I.; Bruzzoni, P.

    2015-01-01

    9%Cr-1%Mo martensitic-ferritic steels are used in power plant components with operating temperatures of around 600 deg. C because of their good mechanical properties at high temperature as well as good oxidation resistance. These steels are generally used in the normalised and tempered condition. This treatment results in a structure of tempered lath martensite where the precipitates are distributed along the lath interfaces and within the martensite laths. The characterisation of these precipitates is of fundamental importance because of their relationship with the creep behaviour of these steels in service. In the present work, the different types of precipitates found in these steels have been studied on specimens in different metallurgical conditions. The techniques used in this investigation were X-ray diffraction with synchrotron light, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive microanalysis and transmission electron microscopy. (authors)

  19. Interdiffusion behavior of Al-rich oxidation resistant coatings on ferritic-martensitic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velraj, S.; Zhang, Y.; Hawkins, E.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505-0001 (United States); Pint, B.A. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6156 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Interdiffusion of thin Al-rich coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation on 9Cr ferritic-martensitic alloys was investigated in the temperature range of 650-700 C. The compositional changes after long-term exposures in laboratory air and air + 10 vol% H{sub 2}O were examined experimentally. Interdiffusion was modeled by a modified coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model (COSIM) program. The modification enabled the program to directly input the concentration profiles of the as-deposited coating determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Reasonable agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental Al profiles after exposures. The model was also applied to predict coating lifetime at 650-700 C based on a minimum Al content (C{sub b}) required at the coating surface to re-form protective oxide scale. In addition to a C{sub b} value established from the failure of a thin CVD coating at 700 C, values reported for slurry aluminide coatings were also included in lifetime predictions. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Optimizing Heat Treatment Process of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni Martensitic Stainless of Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M. S.; Prifiharni, S.; Mabruri, E.

    2017-05-01

    The Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni stainless steels are modified into martensitic stainless steels for steam turbine blades application. The working temperature of steam turbine was around 600 - 700 °C. The improvement properties of turbine blade material is necessary to maintain steam turbine work. The previous research revealed that it has corrosion resistance of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni which is better than 13Cr stainless steels in the chloride environment. In this work, the effect of heat treatment on microstructure and hardness of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni stainless steels has been studied. The steel was prepared by induction melting followed by hot forging. The steels were austenitized at 1000, 1050, and 1100 °C for 1 hour and were tempered at 600, 650, and 700 °C for 1 hour. The steels were then subjected to metallographic observation and hardness test of Rockwell C. The optimal heat treatment of Fe-13Cr-3Mo-3Ni was carried out austenitized in 1050 °C and tempered in 600 - 700 °C.

  1. An investigation of the γ → α martensitic transformation in uranium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speer, J.G.; Edmonds, D.V.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed study of the γ → chi martensite transformation in uranium alloys is presented. Five binary uranium-base alloys containing 0.77 Ti, 1.2 Mo, 2.2 Mo, 4.3 Mo and 5.0 Mo, respectively, were examined. As quenched, the U-0.77 Ti and U-1.2 Mo alloys consisted of an orthorhombic α'/sub a/ martensite phase with an acicular morphology. The acicular martensite plates contain deformation twins which result from transformation stresses. The U-2.2 Mo and U-4.3 Mo alloys transformed during quenching to orthorhomic chi'/sub b/ and monoclinic chi'/sub b/ martensite phases, respectively. The banded morphology observed in these two alloys consists of long, parallel martensite plates containing fine arrays of transformation twins. The type I transformation twinning modes were identified as /021/, /130/ and /131/. There was also evidence for a type II /111/ mode. It was found that adjacent bands could contain different kinds of transformation twins. In the U-5.0 Mo alloy, some of the cubic parent phase was retained during water quenching, and chi/γ orientation relationship was determined. The γ phase was completely retained in this alloy by slow cooling from the solution treatment temperature of 800 0 C, and it was found that a martensitic reaction could be induced by deformation. The strain-induced martensite plates contained /021/ transformation twins. The chi/γ orientation relationship was found to be different than the one determined in the quenched condition, and both orientation relationships are irrational. The invariant plane strain theory of martensite crystallography was applied to the twinned martensites, and a number of different parent/product lattice correspondences were considered for the γ → chi transformations. It was concluded that more than one correspondence may be operative during these transformations

  2. Effect of post weld heat treatments on the resistance to the hydrogen embrittlement of soft martensitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazarabedian, Alfredo; Ovejero Garcia, Jose; Bilmes, P.; Llorente, C.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of external hydrogen on the tensile properties of an all weld sample of a soft martensitic stainless steel was studied. The material was tested in the as weld condition and after tempered conditions modifying the austenite content, and changing the quantity, type and distribution of precipitates. Hydrogen was introduced by cathodic charge or by immersion in an acid brine saturated whit 1 atm hydrogen sulphide, during the mechanical test. The as weld condition showed a good resistance in the hydrogen sulphide, were the tempered samples were embrittled. Under cathodic charge, all samples were susceptible to hydrogen damage. The embritting mechanisms were the same in both environments. When the austenite content, was below 10% the crack path is on the primary austenite grain boundary. At higher austenite content, the crack is transgranular. (author)

  3. Computer simulation of the martensite transformation in a model two-dimensional body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Khachaturyan, A.G.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1979-05-01

    An analytical model of a martensitic transformation in an idealized body is constructed and used to carry out a computer simulation of the transformation in a pseudo-two-dimensional crystal. The reaction is assumed to proceed through the sequential transformation of elementary volumes (elementary martensitic particles, EMP) via the Bain strain. The elastic interaction between these volumes is computed and the transformation path chosen so as to minimize the total free energy. The model transformation shows interesting qualitative correspondencies with the known features of martensitic transformations in typical solids

  4. Computer simulation of the martensite transformation in a model two-dimensional body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Khachaturyan, A.G.; Morris, J.W. Jr.

    1979-06-01

    An analytical model of a martensitic transformation in an idealized body is constructed and used to carry out a computer simulation of the transformation in a pseudo-two-dimensional crystal. The reaction is assumed to proceed through the sequential transformation of elementary volumes (elementary martensitic particles, EMP) via the Bain strain. The elastic interaction between these volumes is computed and the transformation path chosen so as to minimize the total free energy. The model transformation shows interesting qualitative correspondencies with the known features of martensitic transformations in typical solids

  5. Accurate measurement of the orientation relationship of lath martensite and bainite by electron backscatter diffraction analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyamoto, G.; Takayama, N.; Furuhara, T.

    2009-01-01

    A new method to determine the orientation relationship between martensite and bainite with the parent austenite is developed based on electron backscatter diffraction analysis. This method can determine the orientation relationship accurately without the presence of retained austenite, and is applicable to lath martensite and bainite in low-alloyed carbon steels. The angles between close-packed directions are about 3 o for lath martensite regardless of the carbon content, while the angles between close-packed planes become smaller with increasing carbon content.

  6. Some aspects of thermally induced martensite in Fe-30% Ni-5% Cu alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guener, M.; Gueler, E.; Yasar, E.; Aktas, H.

    2007-01-01

    Kinetical, morphological, crystallographical and several thermal properties of thermally induced martensite in the austenite phase of Fe-30% Ni-5% Cu alloy were investigated. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques were used during study. Kinetics of the transformation was found to be as athermal type. SEM and TEM observations revealed α' (BCC) martensite formation in the austenite phase of alloy by thermal effect. These thermally induced α' martensites exhibited a thin plate-like morphology with twinnings

  7. Deformation Induced Martensitic Transformation and Its Initial Microstructure Dependence in a High Alloyed Duplex Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Lin; Huang, Tian Lin; Wang, Yu Hui

    2017-01-01

    Deformation induced martensitic transformation (DIMT) usually occurs in metastable austenitic stainless steels. Recent studies have shown that DIMT may occur in the austenite phase of low alloyed duplex stainless steels. The present study demonstrates that DIMT can also take place in a high alloyed...... Fe–23Cr–8.5Ni duplex stainless steel, which exhibits an unexpectedly rapid transformation from γ-austenite into α′-martensite. However, an inhibited martensitic transformation has been observed by varying the initial microstructure from a coarse alternating austenite and ferrite band structure...

  8. The effects of strain induced martensite on stress corrosion cracking in AISI 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W. S.; Kwon, S. I.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of strain induced martensite on stress corrosion cracking behavior in AISI 304 stainless steel in boiling 42 wt% MgCl 2 solution were investigated using monotonic SSRT and cyclic SSRT with R=0.1 stress ratio. As the amount of pre-strain increased, the failure time of the specimens in monotonic SSRT test decreased independent of the existence of strain induced martensite. The strain induced martensite seems to promote the crack initiation but to retard the crack propagation during stress corrosion cracking

  9. Stepwise transformation behavior of the strain-induced martensitic transformation in a metastable stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedstroem, Peter; Lienert, Ulrich; Almer, Jon; Oden, Magnus

    2007-01-01

    In situ high-energy X-ray diffraction during tensile loading has been used to investigate the evolution of lattice strains and the accompanying strain-induced martensitic transformation in cold-rolled sheets of a metastable stainless steel. At high applied strains the transformation to α-martensite occurs in stepwise bursts. These stepwise transformation events are correlated with stepwise increased lattice strains and peak broadening in the austenite phase. The stepwise transformation arises from growth of α-martensite embryos by autocatalytic transformation

  10. Investigation of Microstructure and Corrosion Propagation Behaviour of Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abidin Kamal Ariff Zainal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Martensitic stainless steels are commonly used for fabricating components. For many applications, an increase in surface hardness and wear resistance can be beneficial to improve performance and extend service life. However, the improvement in hardness of martensitic steels is usually accompanied by a reduction in corrosion strength. The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of nitriding on AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel, in terms of microstructure and corrosion propagation behavior. The results indicate that the microstructure and phase composition as well as corrosion resistance were influenced by nitriding temperatures.

  11. Influence of the welding process on martensitic high strength steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hanus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the study is martensitic 22MnB5 steels, which are used in the automotive industry. The main purpose of the performed analyses is a study of strength differences in heat affected zones of the spot welding. For the needs of the strength decrease assessment, the critical layer of the heat affected area was experimentally simulated. The aim of the work is to determine the most suitable methodology for evaluating the local changes of the elastic-plastic material response. The aim of this work is to determine the optimal methods for the determination of the yield strength and to find a firming trend in these zones.

  12. Magnetic domains in Ni-Mn-Ga martensitic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernenko, V A; Anton, R Lopez; Kohl, M; Ohtsuka, M; Orue, I; Barandiaran, J M

    2005-01-01

    A series of martensitic Ni 52 Mn 24 Ga 24 thin films deposited on alumina ceramic substrates has been prepared by using RF(radio-frequency) magnetron sputtering. The film thickness, d, varies from 0.1 to 5.0m. Magnetic domain patterns have been imaged by the MFM (magnetic force microscopy) technique. A maze domain structure is found for all studied films. MFM shows a large out-of-plane magnetization component and a rather uniform domain width for each film thickness. The domain width, δ, depends on the film thickness as δ∝√d in the whole studied range of film thickness. This dependence is the expected one for magnetic anisotropy and magnetostatic contributions in a perpendicular magnetic domain configuration. The proportionality coefficient is also consistent with the values of saturation magnetization and magnetic anisotropy determined in the samples

  13. Thermal expansion of martensitic A15 superconductors: V3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finlayson, T.R.; Liu, M.; Smith, T.F.

    1995-01-01

    The martensite phase morphology of V 3 Si has been controlled by the application of appropriate stress fields to a single crystal. With this procedure, it is possible to transform the crystal to a single, tetragonal domain, enabling the thermal expansion coefficients for the tetragonal a and c axes to be measured, using high-resolution, capacitance dilatometry. Expansion anomalies were found at low temperatures, well below the superconducting critical temperature, for both the a and c axes. The tetragonality continues increasing on cooling at low temperatures, which, predicted by theory, should have been inhibited by the onset of superconductivity. In addition, anisotropy in thermal expansion is found up to 50 K, which is well above the conventional M s temperature of 21 K. (orig.)

  14. Effects of irradiation on tungsten stabilized martensitic steels*1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.; Hsu, C. Y.; Lechtenberg, T. A.

    1988-07-01

    Tungsten stabilized martensitic stainless steels are being developed for fusion reactor first wall applications in order to lower retained radioactivity so as to permit shallow land burial after reactor decommissioning. Two such alloys have been designed, fabricated, fast neutron irradiated in FFTF and examined by transmission electron microscopy. The two compositions were Fe-7.5Cr-2.0W-0.17 C and Fe-10.2Cr-1.7W-0.3V-0.02C. Conditions examined included irradiation temperatures of 365, 426, 520 and 600°C to doses as high as 34 dpa. Small amounts of void swelling are found at the two lowest temperatures. It is demonstrated that levels of tungsten on the order of 2 wt% do not result in excessive intermetallic precipitation under these irradiation conditions.

  15. Laser milling of martensitic stainless steels using spiral trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romoli, L.; Tantussi, F.; Fuso, F.

    2017-04-01

    A laser beam with sub-picosecond pulse duration was driven in spiral trajectories to perform micro-milling of martensitic stainless steel. The geometry of the machined micro-grooves channels was investigated by a specifically conceived Scanning Probe Microscopy instrument and linked to laser parameters by using an experimental approach combining the beam energy distribution profile and the absorption phenomena in the material. Preliminary analysis shows that, despite the numerous parameters involved in the process, layer removal obtained by spiral trajectories, varying the radial overlap, allows for a controllable depth of cut combined to a flattening effect of surface roughness. Combining the developed machining strategy to a feed motion of the work stage, could represent a method to obtain three-dimensional structures with a resolution of few microns, with an areal roughness Sa below 100 nm.

  16. Charpy impact behavior of manganese-stabilized martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1986-05-01

    Tests were conducted to evaluate the irradiation-induced shift in ductile-to-brittle transition behavior of two manganese stabilized martensitic steels. Miniature Charpy specimens were fabricated from two heats of steel similar in composition to HT-9 but with 0.1% C and Mn contents ranging from 3.3 to 6.6.%. The 3.3% Mn steel showed a transition temperature similar to that of HT-9 in both the unirradiated condition and in specimens irradiated to 11.3 dpa. The steel containing 6.6% Mn exhibited a higher transition temperature after irradiation than the steel containing 3.3% Mn. The upper shelf energy (USE) after irradiation for the manganese stabilized alloys was much higher than for HT-9. 6 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Self accommodation morphology of martensite variants in Zr-2.5wt%Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivastava, D.; Madangopal, K.; Banerjee, S.; Ranganathan, S.

    1993-01-01

    The role of self accommodation of the different martensite variants in controlling the morphologies of the Zr-2.5wt%Nb alloy martensite has been examined. Three distinct types of grouping of martensite variants have been found to be predominantly present. Crystallographic descriptions of these groups have been provided and the degrees of self accommodation for these have been estimated and compared with those corresponding to other possible variant groupings around the symmetry axes of the parent phase. The frequently observed 3-variant group, which shows an indentation mark morphology when viewed along β directions in the transmission electron microscope, has been seen to have the highest degree of self accommodation amongst the cases considered. Based on the observations made, a growth sequence leading to the formation of the final martensitic structure has been proposed

  18. Hardness of AISI type 410 martensitic steels after high temperature irradiation via nanoindentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waseem, Owais Ahmed; Jeong, Jong-Ryul; Park, Byong-Guk; Maeng, Cheol-Soo; Lee, Myoung-Goo; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2017-11-01

    The hardness of irradiated AISI type 410 martensitic steel, which is utilized in structural and magnetic components of nuclear power plants, is investigated in this study. Proton irradiation of AISI type 410 martensitic steel samples was carried out by exposing the samples to 3 MeV protons up to a 1.0 × 1017 p/cm2 fluence level at a representative nuclear reactor coolant temperature of 350 °C. The assessment of deleterious effects of irradiation on the micro-structure and mechanical behavior of the AISI type 410 martensitic steel samples via transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy and cross-sectional nano-indentation showed no significant variation in the microscopic or mechanical characteristics. These results ensure the integrity of the structural and magnetic components of nuclear reactors made of AISI type 410 martensitic steel under high-temperature irradiation damage levels up to approximately 5.2 × 10-3 dpa.

  19. Surface morphological study of the transformation strain of martensites and bainites in copper alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marukawa, K.; Kumagai, I.; Takezawa, K.

    2000-01-01

    Transformation strain associated with martensites and bainites has been determined by surface relief measurements with an atomic force microscope. To this end, morphological data of transformation products have been combined with data on their crystallographic orientations, which have been determined by the electron back-scatter diffraction technique. The results have shown that the transformation strain of bainites has a comparable value to that of martensites in the same alloy. The orientation relationship between the transformation products and the parent crystal has also been determined. The relationship for bainites as well as martensites was consistent with the prediction of the phenomenological theory for the transformation. It was concluded that the transformation mechanism of bainites involves lattice shearing in a manner similar to that of the martensitic transformation. (orig.)

  20. Effect of heat treatment on martensitic transformation in Fe–12⋅5 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    12⋅5%Mn– ... et al 2003). The microstructure of ε martensite formed by cooling in thermomechanically-treated Fe–Mn–Si–Cr–Ni shape memory alloys has also been investigated (Inagaki ... mechanical polishing followed by etching with acetic.

  1. Nanoindentation study of ferrite–martensite dual phase steels developed by a new thermomechanical processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazaheri, Yousef, E-mail: y.mazaheri@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Engineering, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan 65178-38695 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, Ahmad; Najafizadeh, Abbas [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Dual phase (DP) steels consisting different volume fractions of ferrite and martensite and different ferrite grain size were produced by a new route utilizing cold-rolling and subsequent intercritical annealing of ferrite/martensite duplex starting structure at 770 °C for different times. Scanning electron microscopy has been supplemented by nanoindentation and tensile test to follow microstructural changes and their correlations to the variation in phase's hardness and mechanical properties. The results showed that longer holding times resulted in coarser and softer ferrite grains in DP microstructures. Martensite nanohardness variation with holding time is related to change in its carbon content. Mechanical properties such as strength, elongation and toughness are well correlated with the martensite/ferrite hardness ratio.

  2. Unique properties associated with normal martensitic transition and strain glass transition – A simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dong; Ni, Yan; Gao, Jinghui; Zhang, Zhen; Ren, Xiaobing; Wang, Yunzhi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We model the unique properties of strain glass which is different from that of normal martensite. ► We describe the importance of point defects in the formation of strain glass and related properties. ► The role of point defect can be attributed to global transition temperature effect (GTTE) and local field effect (LFE). -- Abstract: The transition behavior and unique properties associated with normal martensitic transition and strain glass transition are investigated by computer simulations using the phase field method. The simulations are based on a physical model that assumes that point defects alter the thermodynamic stability of martensite and create local lattice distortion. The simulation results show that strain glass transition exhibits different properties from those found in normal martensitic transformations. These unique properties include diffuse scattering pattern, “smear” elastic modulus peak, disappearance of heat flow peak and non-ergodicity. These simulation predictions agree well with the experimental observations

  3. Investigation of the self tempering effect of martensite by means of atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sackl, Stephanie; Clemens, Helmut; Primig, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Self-tempering effects can be observed in steels with relatively high martensite start temperatures. After the formation of the first martensitic laths, carbon is able to diffuse in these laths during cooling, which can be attributed to sufficiently high temperatures. This effect cannot be observed in laths formed at lower temperatures. In steels containing up to 0.2 m.-% carbon, up to 90 % of the carbon atoms in the martensite segregate to dislocations during quenching. Due to its atomic resolution and sensitivity with respect to light elements, atom probe tomography is very well suited for the investigation of this phenomenon. In this study, the self-tempering effect in a quenched and tempered steel 42CrMo4 with a martensite start temperature of 310 C is investigated by means of atom probe tomography.

  4. Surface crack formation on rails at grinding induced martensite white etching layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Carsten Jørn; Fæster, Søren; Dhar, Somrita

    2017-01-01

    The connection between profile grinding of rails, martensite surface layers and crack initiation has been investigated using visual inspection, optical microscopy and 3D X-ray computerized tomography. Newly grinded rails were extracted and found to be covered by a continuous surface layer...... of martensite with varying thickness formed by the grinding process. Worn R350HT and R200 rails were extracted from the Danish rail network as they had transverse bands resembling grinding marks on the running surface. The transverse bands were shown to consist of martensite which had extensive crack formation...... at the martensite/pearlite interface. The cracks in R350HT propagated down into the rail while those in the soft R200 returned to the surface causing only very small shallow spallation. The transverse bands had the same shape, size, orientation, location and periodicity which would be expected from grinding marks...

  5. Electronic structure and phase stability during martensitic transformation in Al-doped ZrCu intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Feng; Shen Ping; Liu Tao; Lin Qiaoli; Jiang Qichuan

    2010-01-01

    Martensitic transformation, phase stability and electronic structure of Al-doped ZrCu intermetallics were investigated by experiments and first-principles calculations using the pseudopotentials plane wave method. The formation energy calculations indicate that the stability of the ZrCu phase increases with the increasing Al content. Al plays a decisive role in controlling the formation and microstructures of the martensite phases in Zr-Cu-Al alloys. The total energy difference between ZrCu (B2) austenite and ZrCu martensite plays an important role in the martensitic transformation. The phase stability is dependent on its electronic structure. The densities of states (DOS) of the intermetallics were discussed in detail.

  6. A multi-scale model for structure-property relations of materials exhibiting martensite transformation plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouznetsova, V.; Balmachnov, A.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2009-01-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of many advanced steels, e.g. metastable austenitic stainless steels, are related to their complex microstructural behaviour, resulting from the interaction between plastic deformation of the phases and the austenite to martensite phase transformation during

  7. A Shear Strain Route Dependency of Martensite Formation in 316L Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Suk Hoon; Kim, Tae Kyu; Jang, Jinsung; Oh, Kyu Hwan

    2015-06-01

    In this study, the effect of simple shearing on microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of 316L austenitic stainless steel were investigated. Two different shear strain routes were obtained by twisting cylindrical specimens in the forward and backward directions. The strain-induced martensite phase was effectively obtained by alteration of the routes. Formation of the martensite phase clearly resulted in significant hardening of the steel. Grain-size reduction and strain-induced martensitic transformation within the deformed structures of the strained specimens were characterized by scanning electron microscopy - electron back-scattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction, and the TEM-ASTAR (transmission electron microscopy - analytical scanning transmission atomic resolution, automatic crystal orientation/phase mapping for TEM) system. Significant numbers of twin networks were formed by alteration of the shear strain routes, and the martensite phases were nucleated at the twin interfaces.

  8. Austenite reversion in low-carbon martensitic stainless steels – a CALPHAD-assisted review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niessen, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Low-carbon martensitic stainless steels with 11.5–16 wt-% Cr and martensite upon inter-critical annealing. The review treats...... the mechanisms governing the formation and stabilisation of reverted austenite and is assisted by the computation of phase equilibria. Literature data on Cr and Ni concentrations of the reverted austenite/martensite dual-phase microstructure are assessed with respect to predicted concentrations. Reasonable...... agreement was found for concentrations in martensite. Systematic excess of Cr in austenite of approx. 2 wt-% relative to calculations was suspected to originate from the growth of M23C6 with a coherent interface to austenite. Within large scatter, measured values of Ni in austenite were on average 2 wt...

  9. A macroscopic model to simulate the mechanically induced martensitic transformation in metastable austenitic stainless steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanically induced martensitic transformation and the associated transformation plasticity phenomena in austenitic stainless steels are studied. The mechanisms responsible for the transformation are investigated and put into perspective based on experimental evidence. The stress and strain

  10. Characterization of the martensite phase formed during hydrogen ion irradiation in austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Lim, Sangyeob; Kwon, Junhyun

    2017-10-01

    Microstructural changes in austenitic stainless steel caused by hydrogen ion irradiation were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It has been confirmed that the irradiation induced the formation of martensite along the grain boundary; the martensite phase exhibited a crystal orientation relationship with the adjacent austenite phase. The results of this study also indicate that the concentration of Cr in the martensite phase is lower compared to that in the austenite matrix. The TEM results showed the development of asymmetric radiation-induced segregation (RIS) near the grain boundary, which leads to local changes in the chemical composition such as reduction of Cr near the grain boundary. The asymmetric RIS serves as a prerequisite for the formation of the martensite under hydrogen irradiation.

  11. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened steels for FBR core application. 2. Morphology improvement by martensite transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Shigeharu; Nishida, Toshio; Yoshitake, Tunemitsu; Okuda, Takanari

    1998-01-01

    Previously manufactured oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel cladding tubes had inferior internal creep rupture strength in the circumferential hoop direction. This unexpected feature of ODS cladding tubes was substantially ascribed to the needle-like grain structure aligned with the forming direction. In this study, the grain morphology was controlled by using the martensite transformation in ODS martensitic steels to produce an equi-axial grain structure. A major improvement in the strength anisotropy was successfully achieved. The most effective yttria addition was about 1 mass% in improving the strength of the ODS martensitic steels. A simple addition of titanium was particularly effective in increasing the strength level of the ODS martensitic steels to that of ODS ferritic steels. (author)

  12. High Temperature Uniaxial Compression and Stress-Relaxation Behavior of India-Specific RAFM Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Naimish S.; Sunil, Saurav; Sarkar, Apu

    2018-05-01

    India-specific reduced activity ferritic martensitic steel (INRAFM), a modified 9Cr-1Mo grade, has been developed by India as its own structural material for fabrication of the Indian Test Blanket Module (TBM) to be installed in the International Thermonuclear Energy Reactor (ITER). The extensive study on mechanical and physical properties of this material has been currently going on for appraisal of this material before being put to use in the ITER. High temperature compression, stress-relaxation, and strain-rate change behavior of the INRAFM steel have been investigated. The optical microscopic and scanning electron microscopic characterizations were carried out to observe the microstructural changes that occur during uniaxial compressive deformation test. Comparable true plastic stress values at 300 °C and 500 °C and a high drop in true plastic stress at 600 °C were observed during the compression test. Stress-relaxation behaviors were investigated at 500 °C, 550 °C, and 600 °C at a strain rate of 10-3 s-1. The creep properties of the steel at different temperatures were predicted from the stress-relaxation test. The Norton's stress exponent (n) was found to decrease with the increasing temperature. Using Bird-Mukherjee-Dorn relationship, the temperature-compensated normalized strain rate vs stress was plotted. The stress exponent (n) value of 10.05 was obtained from the normalized plot. The increasing nature of the strain rate sensitivity (m) with the test temperature was found from strain-rate change test. The low plastic stability with m 0.06 was observed at 600 °C. The activation volume (V *) values were obtained in the range of 100 to 300 b3. By comparing the experimental values with the literature, the rate-controlling mechanisms at the thermally activated region of high temperature were found to be the nonconservative movement of jogged screw dislocations and thermal breaking of attractive junctions.

  13. The influence of deformation-induced martensite on the cryogenic behavior of 300-series stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Chan, J.W.; Mei, Z.

    1992-06-01

    The 300-series stainless steels that are commonly specified for the structures of high field superconducting magnets are metastable austenitic alloys that undergo martensitic transformations when deformed at low temperature. The martensitic tranformation is promoted by plastic deformation and by exposure to high magnetic fields. The transformation significantly influences the mechanical properties of the alloy. The mechanisms of this influence are reviewed, with emphasis on fatigue crack growth effects and magnetomechanical phenomena that have only recently been recognized

  14. OKMC study of the effect of grain boundaries in martensitic Fe-Cr-C alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiapetto, M.; Becquart, C.S.; Malerba, L.

    2015-01-01

    Fe-Cr-C alloys with chromium concentrations in the range from about 2 wt % to 12 wt % form ferritic-martensitic structures by rapid cooling from the austenite state already in the presence of relatively low carbon concentrations. In this process it is possible to obtain different ratios of ferrite and martensite, as well as formation of carbides, by varying the thermal treatment. The presence of ferrite or martensite might have an influence on the nano-structural evolution under irradiation of these alloys. Here, considering a tempered martensite reference alloy with 9% Cr, we make use of an already validated object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) model in order to study the possible effect of the formation of martensite laths on the material nano-structural evolution under neutron irradiation, assuming that the relevant boundaries act as sinks for radiation defects. The results show that the reduction of the grain size (including in this definition the average size of prior austenite grains, blocks and laths) does not play any relevant role until sizes of the order of about 0.5 μm are reached: for smaller grains the number of defects being absorbed by the boundaries becomes dominant. However, this threshold is lower than the experimentally observed martensite lath dimensions, thereby suggesting that what makes the difference in martensitic Fe-Cr-C alloys with respect to ferrite concerning events and mechanisms taking place during irradiation are not the lath boundaries as sinks. Differences between the nano-structural evolution in ferrite and martensite should therefore be ascribed to other factors. This document is composed of an article and the presentation slides. (authors)

  15. On the Prediction of α-Martensite Temperatures in Medium Manganese Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Daniel M.; Baker, Daniel S.; Van Aken, David C.

    2017-05-01

    A new composition-based method for calculating the α-martensite start temperature in medium manganese steel is presented and uses a regular solution model to accurately calculate the chemical driving force for α-martensite formation, Δ G_{{Chem}}^{γ \\to α } . In addition, a compositional relationship for the strain energy contribution during martensitic transformation was developed using measured Young's moduli ( E) reported in literature and measured values for steels produced during this investigation. An empirical relationship was developed to calculate Young's modulus using alloy composition and was used where dilatometry literature did not report Young's moduli. A comparison of the Δ G_{{Chem}}^{γ \\to α } normalized by dividing by the product of Young's modulus, unconstrained lattice misfit squared ( δ 2), and molar volume ( Ω) with respect to the measured α-martensite start temperatures, M_{{S}}^{α } , produced a single linear relationship for 42 alloys exhibiting either lath or plate martensite. A temperature-dependent strain energy term was then formulated as Δ G_{{str}}^{γ \\to α } ( {{{J}}/{{mol}}} ) = EΩ δ2 (14.8 - 0.013T) , which opposed the chemical driving force for α-martensite formation. M_{{S}}^{α } was determined at a temperature where Δ G_{{Chem}}^{γ \\to α } + Δ G_{{str}}^{γ \\to α } = 0 . The proposed M_{{S}}^{α } model shows an extended temperature range of prediction from 170 K to 820 K (-103 °C to 547 °C). The model is then shown to corroborate alloy chemistries that exhibit two-stage athermal martensitic transformations and two-stage TRIP behavior in three previously reported medium manganese steels. In addition, the model can be used to predict the retained γ-austenite in twelve alloys, containing ɛ-martensite, using the difference between the calculated M_{{S}}^{ɛ} and M_{{S}}^{α }.

  16. Martensitic Transformation in Ultrafine-Grained Stainless Steel AISI 304L Under Monotonic and Cyclic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Werner Höppel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The monotonic and cyclic deformation behavior of ultrafine-grained metastable austenitic steel AISI 304L, produced by severe plastic deformation, was investigated. Under monotonic loading, the martensitic phase transformation in the ultrafine-grained state is strongly favored. Under cyclic loading, the martensitic transformation behavior is similar to the coarse-grained condition, but the cyclic stress response is three times larger for the ultrafine-grained condition.

  17. Study of martensitic transformation in stainless steel by CEMS and RBS channeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.; Sakamoto, I.; Tanoue, H.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of Xe ion irradiation in a single crystal of 17/13 stainless steel has been studied, using RBS channeling techniques and conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). 300 keV Xe ions were used to induce martensitic transformation in the austentic steel. A dynamic behavior of the transformation was observed as functions of the fluence and depth dependence. The martensite appears abruptly at a critical fluence, in contrast with polycrystalline 17/7 stainless steel. (orig.)

  18. Dilatometry Analysis of Dissolution of Cr-Rich Carbides in Martensitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuliang; Volkova, Olena; Biermann, Horst; Mola, Javad

    2017-12-01

    The dissolution of Cr-rich carbides formed in the martensitic constituent of a 13 pct Cr stainless steel was studied by dilatometry and correlative electron channeling contrast examinations. The dissolution of carbides subsequent to the martensite reversion to austenite was associated with a net volume expansion which in turn increased the dilatometry-based apparent coefficient of thermal expansion (CTEa) during continuous heating. The effects of carbides fraction and size on the CTEa variations during carbides dissolution are discussed.

  19. Nanoscale characterization of martensite structures in copper based shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adiguzel, O, E-mail: oadiguzel@firat.edu.t [Firat University Department of Physics, 23169 Elazig (Turkey)

    2010-11-01

    Martensitic transformations are first order displacive transitions and occur in the materials on cooling from high temperature. Shape memory effect is an unusual property exhibited by certain alloy systems, and leads to martensitic transition. Copper-based alloys exhibit this property in beta phase field which possess simple bcc- structures, austenite structure at high-temperatures. As temperature is lowered the austenite undergoes martensitic transition following two ordering reactions, and structural changes in nanoscale govern this transition. Atomic movements are also confined to interatomic lengths in sub-{mu}m or angstrom scale in martensitic transformation. The formation of the layered structures in copper based alloys consists of shears and shear mechanism. Martensitic transformations occur in a few steps with the cooperative movement of atoms less than interatomic distances by means of lattice invariant shears on a {l_brace}110{r_brace} - type plane of austenite matrix which is basal plane or stacking plane of martensite. The lattice invariant shears occurs, in two opposite directions, <110> -type directions on the {l_brace}110{r_brace}-type plane. These shears gives rise to the formation of layered structure.

  20. On the role of interlath retained austenite in the deformation of lath martensite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maresca, F; Kouznetsova, V G; Geers, M G D

    2014-01-01

    Literature presents extensive experimental evidence of large deformation and ductile fracture behaviour of lath martensite in martensitic and multi-phase high strength steels under quasi-static, uniaxial loading conditions. The physical origin of this apparent ductile behaviour of martensite is not clear, since martensite generally provides a high material strength. The presence of thin films of interlath retained austenite may trigger the observed apparent martensite ductility. The present contribution investigates the role played by interlath retained austenite on the mechanics of lath martensite by means of crystal plasticity simulations. It is shown that independently from the interlath retained austenite volume fraction and the exact lath morphology, localized shearing along the lath habit plane occurs as long as there are enough carriers for plasticity. The austenite film acts like a ‘greasy’ plane on which the stiffer laths can slide. The shearing mechanism is not a mere consequence of the lower flow stress in the austenitic phase, but it is largely due to the orientation relationship between the retained austenite face centred cubic lattice and the body centred cubic lath crystals. (paper)

  1. Martensitic transformations in Ni-Mn-Ga system affected by external fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernenko, V.; Babii, O.; L'vov, V.; McCormick, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of hydrostatic pressure, uniaxial stress and magnetic field on the martensitic transformation temperatures for the ferromagnetic single crystalline Ni-Mn-Ga alloys is studied. It is shown that the experimental results are satisfactorily described by the Landau theory. Ni-Mn-Ga L2 1 -type ordered alloys exhibit a number of the first order and weak first order structural transformations in a ferromagnetic or paramagnetic parent phase depending on the alloy composition and being either thermally or stress activated. Most of these phase transformations are of the martensitic type, i.e., they are accompanied by the spontaneous elastic strains forming a multicomponent order parameter in the Landau expansion for the Gibbs potential. In this work we analyze the influence of the external fields (mechanical and magnetic) on the martensitic transformation (MT) from cubic parent phase (P) to five-layered martensitic one (5M-martensite) usually exhibited by the ferromagnetic ordered Ni-Mn-Ga alloys. In accordance with, we treat the 5M-martensite as a twinned tetragonal phase and, so, describe the experimental results in the framework of the theory of cubic-tetragonal MT. The original experimental data of high magnetic field influence on MT in near stoichiometric Ni 2 MnGa compound are presented to compare with the theoretical estimations. (orig.)

  2. Effect of laser welding parameters on the austenite and martensite phase fractions of NiTi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, J.P., E-mail: jp.oliveira@campus.fct.unl.pt [CENIMAT/i3N, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal); Braz Fernandes, F.M. [CENIMAT/i3N, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal); Miranda, R.M. [UNIDEMI, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa (Portugal); Schell, N. [Institute of Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Max-Planck-Str. 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Ocaña, J.L. [Centro Láser UPM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Edificio “La Arboleda”, Ctra. Valencia, km 7,300, Campus Sur UPM, 28031 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-09-15

    Although laser welding is probably the most used joining technique for NiTi shape memory alloys there is still a lack of understanding about the effects of laser welding parameters on the microstructural induced changes: in both the heat affected and fusion zones martensite may be present, while the base material is fully austenitic. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used for fine probing laser welded NiTi joints. Through Rietveld refinement the martensite and austenite phase fractions were determined and it was observed that the martensite content increases towards the weld centreline. This is related to a change of the local transformation temperatures on these regions, which occurs due to compositional variation in those regions. The martensite phase fraction in the thermally affected regions may have significant implications on functional properties on these joints. - Highlights: •Synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used for fine probing of the microstructure in laser welded NiTi joints. •Rietveld refinement allowed to determine the content of martensite along the heat affected and fusion zones. •The martensite content increases from the base material towards the weld centreline.

  3. Estimation of the kinetics of martensitic transformation in austenitic stainless steels by conventional and novel approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirdel, M., E-mail: mshirdel1989@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mirzadeh, H., E-mail: hmirzadeh@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Parsa, M.H., E-mail: mhparsa@ut.ac.ir [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Center of Excellence for High Performance Materials, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Advanced Metalforming and Thermomechanical Processing Laboratory, School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-29

    A comparative study was carried out on the kinetics of the martensitic transformation in a 304L stainless steel during cold rolling by conventional and novel approaches. The phase analysis based on X-ray diffraction patterns and metallography and also magnetic measurements based on ferritescope readings were utilized to elucidate the kinetics of the martensitic transformation. A straightforward magnetic measurement approach for evaluating the amount of strain-induced martensite in metastable austenitic stainless steels has been introduced in this study. This technique collects the data throughout the bulk of the material to give a realistic estimate of the amount of ferromagnetic martensite. This is an advantage over the surface collecting methods such as ferritescope readings, which overestimates the amount of martensite due to its inhomogeneous distribution through the thickness based on the frictional effects between the rolls and the specimen surface. The proposed approach can be applied in various designs for static/continuous magnetic measurement of bulk materials that is advantageous compared with the conventional vibrating sample magnetometer technique which is useful for static measurement of bulk materials with specific shapes. Moreover, in analogy to ferritescope, the output data of the developed device is directly related to the amount of martensite.

  4. Estimation of the kinetics of martensitic transformation in austenitic stainless steels by conventional and novel approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirdel, M.; Mirzadeh, H.; Parsa, M.H.

    2015-01-01

    A comparative study was carried out on the kinetics of the martensitic transformation in a 304L stainless steel during cold rolling by conventional and novel approaches. The phase analysis based on X-ray diffraction patterns and metallography and also magnetic measurements based on ferritescope readings were utilized to elucidate the kinetics of the martensitic transformation. A straightforward magnetic measurement approach for evaluating the amount of strain-induced martensite in metastable austenitic stainless steels has been introduced in this study. This technique collects the data throughout the bulk of the material to give a realistic estimate of the amount of ferromagnetic martensite. This is an advantage over the surface collecting methods such as ferritescope readings, which overestimates the amount of martensite due to its inhomogeneous distribution through the thickness based on the frictional effects between the rolls and the specimen surface. The proposed approach can be applied in various designs for static/continuous magnetic measurement of bulk materials that is advantageous compared with the conventional vibrating sample magnetometer technique which is useful for static measurement of bulk materials with specific shapes. Moreover, in analogy to ferritescope, the output data of the developed device is directly related to the amount of martensite

  5. Martensitic transformation behaviour in sensitized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel during isothermal holding at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-hwa; Fukuda, Takashi; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki

    2009-01-01

    We investigated martensitic transformation behaviour in sensitized SUS304 austenitic stainless steel to determine the stability of the austenitic phase at low temperatures. We found that a specimen that was sensitized at 973 K for 100 h exhibits an isothermal martensitic transformation when the specimen is held in the temperature range between 60 and 260 K. We constructed a time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram corresponding to the formation of 0.5 vol. % α'-martensite. A magnetization measurement was used to evaluate the volume fraction of a'-martensite. The TTT diagram shows a double-C curve with two noses located at about 100 and 200 K. In-situ optical microscope observations reveal that the double C-curve is due to two different transformation sequences. That is, the upper part of the C-curve is due to a direct γ → α' martensitic transformation and the lower part of the C-curve is due to a successive γ → ψ → α' martensitic transformation. The direct γ → α' transformation occurs in the vicinity of grain boundaries while the successive γ → ψ' → α' transformation occurs near the centre of grains. A scanning electron microscope observation reveals that carbide particles of M 23 C 6 are formed in the grain boundaries. The concentration difference between the centre of the grains and regions near grain boundaries is the reason for the difference in the isothermal transformation sequence for the sensitized SUS304 stainless steel.

  6. Effect of martensitic transformation on springback behavior of 304L austenitic stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, H.; Mohammadian Semnani, H. R.; Emadoddin, E.; Sadeghi, B. Mohammad

    2017-09-01

    The present paper studies the effect of martensitic transformation on the springback behavior of 304L austenitic stainless steel. Martensite volume fraction was determined at the bent portion under various strain rates after bending test. Martensitic transformation has a significant effect on the springback behavior of this material. The findings of this study indicated that the amount of springback was reduced under a situation of low strain rate, while a higher amount of springback was obtained with a higher strain rate. The reason for this phenomenon is that higher work hardening occurs during the forming process with the low strain rate due to the higher martensite volume fraction, therefore the formability of the sheet is enhanced and it leads to a decreased amount of springback after the bending test. Dependency of the springback on the martensite volume fraction and strain rate was expressed as formulas from the results of the experimental tests and simulation method. Bending tests were simulated using LS-DYNA software and utilizing MAT_TRIP to determine the martensite volume fraction and strain under various strain rates. Experimental result reveals good agreement with the simulation method.

  7. Effect of martensitic phase transformation on the behavior of 304 austenitic stainless steel under tension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, H., E-mail: wanghm@lanl.gov [Materials Science and Technology, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jeong, Y. [Materials Science and Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Clausen, B.; Liu, Y.; McCabe, R.J. [Materials Science and Technology, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Barlat, F. [Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology, POSTECH (Korea, Republic of); Tomé, C.N. [Materials Science and Technology, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The present work integrates in-situ neutron diffraction, electron backscatter diffraction and crystal plasticity modeling to investigate the effect of martensitic phase transformation on the behavior of 304 stainless steel under uniaxial tension. The macroscopic stress strain response, evolution of the martensitic phase fraction, texture evolution of each individual phase, and internal elastic strains were measured at room temperature and at 75 °C. Because no martensitic transformation was observed at 75 °C, the experimental results at 75 °C were used as a reference to quantify the effect of formed martensitic phase on the behavior of 304 stainless steel at room temperature. A crystallographic phase transformation model was implemented into an elastic–viscoplastic self-consistent framework. The phase transformation model captured the macroscopic stress strain response, plus the texture and volume fraction evolution of austenite and martensite. The model also predicts the internal elastic strain evolution with loading in the austenite, but not in the martensite. The results of this work highlight the mechanisms that control phase transformation and the sensitivity of modeling results to them, and point out to critical elements that still need to be incorporated into crystallographic phase transformation models to accurately describe the internal strain evolution during phase transformation.

  8. Monitoring of martensite formation during welding by means of acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohemen, S.M.C. van; Hermans, M.J.M.; Ouden, G. den

    2001-01-01

    The martensitic transformation during gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding of steel 42CrMo4 has been studied using the acoustic emission (AE) monitoring technique. Welds were produced under static conditions (spot welding) and under stationary conditions (travelling arc welding). After spot welding, the root mean square (RMS) value of the continuous acoustic emission was measured, revealing a peak that reflects the evolution of martensite formation during cooling of the spot weld. The RMS value was also measured during travelling arc welding at different heat inputs and corrected for the noise of the welding process to obtain the RMS value due to martensite formation. After welding, optical metallography was carried out to quantify the amount of martensite formed during cooling of the weld. An analysis of the results shows that the squared RMS value is proportional to the volume rate of martensite formation during welding, which is consistent with theory and in good agreement with the results obtained in the case of spot welding. The obtained results suggest that AE can be applied as a real time monitoring technique for the detection of martensite formation during steel welding. (author)

  9. Deformation induced martensite in an AISI 301LN stainless steel: characterization and influence on pitting corrosion resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu,Hamilton Ferreira Gomes de; Carvalho,Sheyla Santana de; Lima Neto,Pedro de; Santos,Ricardo Pires dos; Freire,Válder Nogueira; Silva,Paulo Maria de Oliveira; Tavares,Sérgio Souto Maior

    2007-01-01

    In austenitic stainless steels, plastic deformation can induce martensite formation. The induced martensite is related to the austenite (gamma) instability at temperatures close or below room temperature. The metastability of austenite stainless steels increases with the decreasing of stacking fault energy (SFE). In this work, the deformation induced martensite was analyzed by X ray diffraction, electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD), magnetic methods and atomic force microscope (AFM) in sa...

  10. Influence of cycle number, temperature and manufacturing process on deformation-induced martensite in meta-stable austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalkhof, D.; Niffenegger, M.; Grosse, M.; Bart, G.

    2002-01-01

    During cyclic loading of austenitic stainless steel, microstructural changes occur, which affect both the mechanical and the physical properties. Typical features are the rearrangement of dislocations and, in some cases, a deformation-induced martensitic phase transformation. In our investigation martensite formation was used as an indication for material degradation due to fatigue. Knowledge about mechanisms and influencing parameters of the martensitic transformation process is essential for the application in a lifetime monitoring system. The investigations showed that for a given meta-stable austenitic stainless steel the deformation-induced martensite depends on the applied strain amplitude, the cycle number (accumulated plastic strain) and the temperature. It was demonstrated that the volume fraction of martensite continuously increases with the cycle number. Therefore, martensite content could be used for indication of the fatigue usage. According to the Coffin-Manson relation the dependence of the martensite content on the cycle number could be described with a power law. The exponent was determined to be equal to 0.5 for the applied loading and temperature conditions. The influence of temperature on deformation-induced martensite was considered by means of a thermodynamic relation. Furthermore, the initial material state (initial defect density) played an important role for the martensite formation rate. Material properties and microstructures were characterised by metallography, neutron diffraction, and advanced magnetic non-destructive techniques. In order to investigate the correlation between the martensite content in the austenitic matrix and magnetic properties, the magnetic susceptibility was determined. Furthermore, a high sensitive Giant Magneto Resistant sensor was used to visualize the martensite distribution at the surface of the fatigue specimens. All applied techniques, neutron diffraction and advanced magnetic methods allowed the detection

  11. Characteristics of martensite as a function of the Ms temperature in low-carbon armour steel plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maweja, Kasonde; Stumpf, Waldo; Berg, Nic van der

    2009-01-01

    The microstructure, morphology, crystal structure and surface relief of martensite in a number of experimental armour steel plates with different M s temperatures were analysed. Atomic force microscopy, thin foil transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy allowed the identification of three groups of low-carbon martensitic armour steels. The investigation showed that the size of individual martensite products (plates or packets, laths or blocks) increases as the M s temperature increases. Comparison of ballistic performances suggests that the morphology (plate or lath) and size of the individual martensite products dictate the effective 'grain size' in resisting fracture or perforation due to ballistic impact.

  12. On the texture and crystal structure of the B19' martensite in single-crystal titanium nickelide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundyrev, V.M.; Zel'dovich, V.I.

    2003-01-01

    The texture of the B19' martensite formed by cooling the Ti-51 at. % Ni alloy in the B2-phase monocrystal is studied. The positions of the (002), (111-bar), (020) and (111) planes of B19' martensite proceeding from the plane (110) of B2-phase relative to this plane are determined for this purpose. It is established that the obtained results may be described on the basis of the accepted monoclinic structure of the B19' martensite and earlier determined orientation ratios. However small deviation from the parallelism of the (020) B19' and (110)B2 planes is observed. Not less that 12 crystallographically equivalent orientations of the martensite crystals are realized by transforming the B2 phase monocrystal into the B19' martensite in the process of cooling in the irradiated volume of 1.5 x 0.01 mm. Realization of various martensite orientations is practically equally probable. Large self-accommodation crystal groups having limited number of orientations do not appear. It is shown that the martensite phases R and B19' are formed by the martensite transformations in the process of cooling. The B19' martensite has the set of the monoclinic angles from 90 p to 96.8 deg [ru

  13. On a phase field approach for martensitic transformations in a crystal plastic material at a loaded surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Regina; Kuhn, Charlotte; Müller, Ralf

    2017-07-01

    A continuum phase field model for martensitic transformations is introduced, including crystal plasticity with different slip systems for the different phases. In a 2D setting, the transformation-induced eigenstrain is taken into account for two martensitic orientation variants. With aid of the model, the phase transition and its dependence on the volume change, crystal plastic material behavior, and the inheritance of plastic deformations from austenite to martensite are studied in detail. The numerical setup is motivated by the process of cryogenic turning. The resulting microstructure qualitatively coincides with an experimentally obtained martensite structure. For the numerical calculations, finite elements together with global and local implicit time integration scheme are employed.

  14. In-situ analysis of redistribution of carbon and nitrogen during tempering of low interstitial martensitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niessen, F.; Villa, M.; Danoix, F.

    2018-01-01

    The redistribution of C and N during tempering of X4CrNiMo16-5-1 martensitic stainless steel containing 0.034 wt% C and 0.032 wt% N was studied using in-situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atom probe tomography (APT). The unit cell volume of martensite decreased continuously during...... tempering. APT showed that this volume decrease is accounted entirely for by segregation of the interstitial atoms, implying that in low interstitial martensitic stainless steel stress relaxation only contributes negligibly to changes in the martensite unit cell volume....

  15. Martensitic phase transition in Cu–14%Al–4%Ni shape memory alloys studied by Brillouin light scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graczykowski, B; Mielcarek, S; Mroz, B; Breczewski, T; No, M L; San-Juan, J

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the influence of the martensitic phase transition on hypersonic thermally excited surface acoustic waves propagating in Cu–14%Al–4%Ni (wt%) shape memory alloy. Non-destructive and non-contact testing using Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy permitted determination of the elastic constants of austenite versus temperature. Experimental results obtained for martensite were interpreted using the proposed model of the cubic to orthorhombic martensitic phase transition based on the Landau model of a first-order phase transition. Additionally we adopted the approximation of the domain structure of martensite by a polycrystalline sample using the Voigt–Reuss–Hill procedure of averaging the elastic constants. (paper)

  16. The stability of the martensitic phases in Cu-Zn-Al at an electron concentration of 1534

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelegrina, J.L.; Ahlers, Manfred.

    1989-01-01

    The β phase to martensite and the martensite to martensite transformations in Cu-Zn-Al single crystals of a high electron concentration have been studied as a function of the temperature. A stress temperature diagram, similar to that proposed in the Cu-Al-Ni system, is constructed and the stability of the different martensites is analyzed from thermodynamic considerations. The results for the 18R, the 6R and the 2H phase are compared with those obtained from other alloy compositions. (Author) [es

  17. Characteristics of martensite as a function of the M{sub s} temperature in low-carbon armour steel plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maweja, Kasonde, E-mail: mawejak@yahoo.fr [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, CSIR, Materials Science and Manufacturing, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Stumpf, Waldo [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Berg, Nic van der [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2009-08-30

    The microstructure, morphology, crystal structure and surface relief of martensite in a number of experimental armour steel plates with different M{sub s} temperatures were analysed. Atomic force microscopy, thin foil transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy allowed the identification of three groups of low-carbon martensitic armour steels. The investigation showed that the size of individual martensite products (plates or packets, laths or blocks) increases as the M{sub s} temperature increases. Comparison of ballistic performances suggests that the morphology (plate or lath) and size of the individual martensite products dictate the effective 'grain size' in resisting fracture or perforation due to ballistic impact.

  18. Development of New Heats of Advanced Ferritic/Martensitic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maloy, Stuart Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pestovich, Kimberly Shay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Anderoglu, Osman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Aydogan, Eda [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-23

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of transmuting minor actinides in various fuel cycle options. To achieve this goal, new fuels and cladding materials must be developed and tested to high burnup levels (e.g. >20%) requiring cladding to withstand very high doses (greater than 200 dpa) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Recent results from testing numerous ferritic/martensitic steels at low temperatures suggest that improvements in low temperature radiation tolerance can be achieved through carefully controlling the nitrogen content in these alloys. Thus, four new heats of HT-9 were produced with controlled nitrogen content: two by Metalwerks and two by Sophisticated Alloys. Initial results on these new alloys are presented including microstructural analysis and hardness testing. Future testing will include irradiation testing with ions and in reactor.

  19. Martensitic phase transformation in shape-memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golestaneh, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    Isothermal studies are described of the shape-recovery phenomenon, stress-strain behavior, electrical resistivity and thermo-electric power associated with the martensite-parent phase reaction in the Ni-Ti shape-memory alloys. The energy-balance equation that links the reaction kinetics with the strain energy change during the cooling-deforming and heating cycle is analyzed. The strain range in which the Clausius-Clapeyron equation satisfactorily describes this reaction is determined. A large change in the Young's modulus of the specimen is found to be associated with the M → P reaction. A hysteresis loop in the resistivity-temperature plot is found and related to the anomaly in the athermal resistivity changes during cyclic M → P → M transformation. An explanation for the resistivity anomaly is offered. The M structure is found to be electrically negative relative to the P structure. A thermal emf of greater than or equal to 0.12 mV is found at the M-P interface

  20. Sensitization of Laser-beam Welded Martensitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin; Rajendran, Kousika Dhasanur; Lindner, Stefan

    Ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are an attractive alternative in vehicle production due to their inherent corrosion resistance. By the opportunity of press hardening, their strength can be increased to up to 2000 MPa, making them competitors for unalloyed ultra-high strength steels. Welding, nevertheless, requires special care, especially when it comes to joining of high strength heat treated materials. With an adopted in-line heat treatment of the welds in as-rolled as well as press hardened condition, materials with sufficient fatigue strength and acceptable structural behavior can be produced. Because of microstructural transformations in the base material such as grain coarsening and forced carbide precipitation, the corrosion resistance of the weld zone may be locally impaired. Typically the material in the heat-affected zone becomes sensitive to intergranular cracking in the form of knife-edge corrosion besides the fusion line. The current study comprises of two text scenarios. By an alternating climate test, general response in a corroding environment is screened. In order to understand the corrosion mechanisms and to localize the sensitive zones, sensitisation tests were undertaken. Furthermore, the applicability of a standard test according to ASTM 763-83 was examined. It was found that the alternative climate test does not reveal any corrosion effects. Testing by the oxalic acid test revealed clearly the effect of welding, weld heat treatment and state of thermal processing. Also application of the standard which originally suited for testing ferritic stainless steels could have been justified.

  1. Impurities block the alpha to omega martensitic transformation in titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Richard G; Trinkle, Dallas R; Bouchet, Johann; Srinivasan, Srivilliputhur G; Albers, Robert C; Wilkins, John W

    2005-02-01

    Impurities control phase stability and phase transformations in natural and man-made materials, from shape-memory alloys to steel to planetary cores. Experiments and empirical databases are still central to tuning the impurity effects. What is missing is a broad theoretical underpinning. Consider, for example, the titanium martensitic transformations: diffusionless structural transformations proceeding near the speed of sound. Pure titanium transforms from ductile alpha to brittle omega at 9 GPa, creating serious technological problems for beta-stabilized titanium alloys. Impurities in the titanium alloys A-70 and Ti-6Al-4V (wt%) suppress the transformation up to at least 35 GPa, increasing their technological utility as lightweight materials in aerospace applications. These and other empirical discoveries in technological materials call for broad theoretical understanding. Impurities pose two theoretical challenges: the effect on the relative phase stability, and the energy barrier of the transformation. Ab initio methods calculate both changes due to impurities. We show that interstitial oxygen, nitrogen and carbon retard the transformation whereas substitutional aluminium and vanadium influence the transformation by changing the d-electron concentration. The resulting microscopic picture explains the suppression of the transformation in commercial A-70 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. In general, the effect of impurities on relative energies and energy barriers is central to understanding structural phase transformations.

  2. Characterization of a Laser Surface-Treated Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.R. Al-Sayed

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Laser surface treatment was carried out on AISI 416 machinable martensitic stainless steel containing 0.225 wt.% sulfur. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used. The aim was to compare the physical and chemical properties achieved by this type of selective surface treatment with those achieved by the conventional treatment. Laser power of different values (700 and 1000 W with four corresponding different laser scanning speeds (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 m•min−1 was adopted to reach the optimum conditions for impact toughness, wear, and corrosion resistance for laser heat treated (LHT samples. The 0 °C impact energy of LHT samples indicated higher values compared to the conventionally heat treated (CHT samples. This was accompanied by the formation of a hard surface layer and a soft interior base metal. Microhardness was studied to determine the variation of hardness values with respect to the depth under the treated surface. The wear resistance at the surface was enhanced considerably. Microstructure examination was characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopes. The corrosion behavior of the LHT samples was also studied and its correlation with the microstructures was determined. The corrosion data was obtained in 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature by means of a potentiodynamic polarization technique.

  3. Characterization of a Laser Surface-Treated Martensitic Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sayed, S R; Hussein, A A; Nofal, A A; Hassab Elnaby, S I; Elgazzar, H

    2017-05-29

    Laser surface treatment was carried out on AISI 416 machinable martensitic stainless steel containing 0.225 wt.% sulfur. Nd:YAG laser with a 2.2-KW continuous wave was used. The aim was to compare the physical and chemical properties achieved by this type of selective surface treatment with those achieved by the conventional treatment. Laser power of different values (700 and 1000 W) with four corresponding different laser scanning speeds (0.5, 1, 2, and 3 m•min-1) was adopted to reach the optimum conditions for impact toughness, wear, and corrosion resistance for laser heat treated (LHT) samples. The 0 °C impact energy of LHT samples indicated higher values compared to the conventionally heat treated (CHT) samples. This was accompanied by the formation of a hard surface layer and a soft interior base metal. Microhardness was studied to determine the variation of hardness values with respect to the depth under the treated surface. The wear resistance at the surface was enhanced considerably. Microstructure examination was characterized using optical and scanning electron microscopes. The corrosion behavior of the LHT samples was also studied and its correlation with the microstructures was determined. The corrosion data was obtained in 3.5% NaCl solution at room temperature by means of a potentiodynamic polarization technique.

  4. Stress corrosion cracking evaluation of martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1980-01-01

    The resistance of the martensitic precipitation hardening stainless steels PH13-8Mo, 15-5PH, and 17-4PH to stress corrosion cracking was investigated. Round tensile and c-ring type specimens taken from several heats of the three alloys were stressed up to 100 percent of their yield strengths and exposed to alternate immersion in salt water, to salt spray, and to a seacoast environment. The results indicate that 15-5PH is highly resistant to stress corrosion cracking in conditions H1000 and H1050 and is moderately resistant in condition H900. The stress corrosion cracking resistance of PH13-8Mo and 17-4PH stainless steels in conditions H1000 and H1050 was sensitive to mill heats and ranged from low to high among the several heats included in the tests. Based on a comparison with data from seacoast environmental tests, it is apparent that alternate immersion in 3.5 percent salt water is not a suitable medium for accelerated stress corrosion testing of these pH stainless steels.

  5. Ion implantation induced martensite nucleation in SUS301 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Heishichiro; Gustiono, Dwi; Sakaguchi, Norihito; Shibayama, Tamaki; Watanabe, Seiichi

    2007-01-01

    Phase transformation behaviors of the austenitic 301 stainless steel was studied under Fe + , Ti + and Ar + ions implantation at room temperature with 100, 200 and 300 keV up to fluence of 1x10 21 ions/m 2 and the microstructures were observed by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The plane and cross-sectional observations of the implanted specimen showed that the induced-phases due to implantation from the γ matrix phase were identified as α' martensite phases with the orientation relationship of (11-bar0) α parallel (111-bar) γ and [111] α parallel [011] γ close to the Kurdjumov-Sachs (K-S). The ion implantation induced phases nucleated near the surface region and the depth position of the nucleation changed depending on the ion accelerating energy and ion species. It was also found that the induced marten sites phases nucleate under the influence of the stress distribution, which is introduced due to the concentration of implanted ions, especially due to the stress gradient caused by the corresponding concentration gradient. (author)

  6. Materials design data for reduced activation martensitic steel type EUROFER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavassoli, A.-A.F. E-mail: tavassoli@cea.fr; Alamo, A.; Bedel, L.; Forest, L.; Gentzbittel, J.-M.; Rensman, J.-W.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Schirra, M.; Schmitt, R.; Schneider, H.C.; Petersen, C.; Lancha, A.-M.; Fernandez, P.; Filacchioni, G.; Maday, M.F.; Mergia, K.; Boukos, N.; Baluc,; Spaetig, P.; Alves, E.; Lucon, E

    2004-08-01

    Materials design limits derived so far from the data generated in Europe for the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel type Eurofer are presented. These data address the short-term needs of the ITER Test Blanket Modules and a DEMOnstration fusion reactor. Products tested include plates, bars, tubes, TIG and EB welds, as well as powder consolidated blocks and solid-solid HIP joints. Effects of thermal ageing and low dose neutron irradiation are also included. Results are sorted and screened according to design code requirements before being introduced in reference databases. From the physical properties databases, variations of magnetic properties, modulus of elasticity, density, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, mean and instantaneous linear coefficients of thermal expansion versus temperature are derived. From the tensile and creep properties databases design allowable stresses are derived. From the instrumented Charpy impact and fracture toughness databases, ductile to brittle transition temperature, toughness and behavior of materials in different fracture modes are evaluated. From the fatigue database, total strain range versus number of cycles to failure curves are plotted and used to derive fatigue design curves. Cyclic curves are also derived and compared with monotonic hardening curves. Finally, irradiated and aged materials data are compared to ensure that the safety margins incorporated in unirradiated design limits are not exceeded.

  7. Mechanical behavior and fracture characterization of the T91 martensitic steel in liquid sodium environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdane, Ouadie

    2012-01-01

    The T91 martensitic steel is designed to constitute structural material of future sodium fast reactors of fourth generation, where it will be subjected to stresses in presence of liquid sodium. This study presents a qualitative and quantitative estimate of the sensitivity of T91 steel towards the phenomenon of liquid metal embrittlement. The effect of liquid sodium on T91 steel was studied and quantified according to the temperature and the cross head rate displacement, by using a set-up of Small Punch Test, three and four bending test, developed in laboratory. Mechanical tests in sodium environment are carried out inside a Plexiglas cell, conceived and developed at the laboratory. The atmosphere inside this cell is severely purified and controlled, in order to avoid on the one hand an explosive reaction of sodium with moisture, or an ignition with oxygen, and on the other hand to minimize the presence of impurities in liquid sodium used. The presence of sodium accelerates T91 steel fracture at low temperature, without modifying its ductile character. The T91 pre-immersion in sodium makes it possible to dissolve the protective layer of chromium oxide, and to obtain an intimate contact with the molten metal. However, pre-immersion generates a surface defects which cause a partial embrittlement by sodium. The hardening of T91 steel by heat treatment with a tempering temperature of 550 C (T91-TR550) causes a total embrittlement of steel in presence of sodium, with and without pre-immersion. The rupture of the T91-TR550 steel takes then place by intergranular de-cohesion, corresponding to the crack initiation phase, followed by laths de-cohesion, corresponding to the phase of propagation of these cracks. The mechanism suggested in this study is based on the intergranular penetration of sodium, supported by the presence of segregated impurities such phosphorus, and by the plastic deformation [fr

  8. Martensite phase stress and the strengthening mechanism in TRIP steel by neutron diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harjo, Stefanus; Tsuchida, Noriyuki; Abe, Jun; Gong, Wu

    2017-11-09

    Two TRIP-aided multiphase steels with different carbon contents (0.2 and 0.4 mass%) were analyzed in situ during tensile deformation by time-of-flight neutron diffraction to clarify the deformation induced martensitic transformation behavior and its role on the strengthening mechanism. The difference in the carbon content affected mainly the difference in the phase fractions before deformation, where the higher carbon content increased the phase fraction of retained austenite (γ). However, the changes in the relative fraction of martensitic transformation with respect to the applied strain were found to be similar in both steels since the carbon concentrations in γ were similar regardless of different carbon contents. The phase stress of martensite was found much larger than that of γ or bainitic ferrite since the martensite was generated at the beginning of plastic deformation. Stress contributions to the flow stress were evaluated by multiplying the phase stresses and their phase fractions. The stress contribution from martensite was observed increasing during plastic deformation while that from bainitic ferrite hardly changing and that from γ decreasing.

  9. Hydrogen effect on the martensite habit planes of titanium alloy quenching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolachev, B.A.; Fedorova, N.V.; Mamonova, F.S.

    1981-01-01

    The structure of hexagonal α'-martensite in the alloys Ti-2.4% Mo, Ti-4%V and VT6, the structure of rhombic α'' martensite in the alloy Ti-7.5% Mo and hydrogen effect on the martensite structure in the alloys Ti-7.5% Mo and VT6 are studied. It is shown that in the alloy Ti-2.4% Mo martensitic crystals has habit planes (334)sub(β) and (344)sub(β), at that, the (334)sub(β) habit dominates. The increase of molybdenum content up to 7.5% results in the growth of the crystal part with the (344)sub(β) habit. The introduction of 0.05% H into the alloy Ti-7.5% Mo increases the crystal part with the (334)sub(β) habit plane. The habit plane of martensitic crystals in the alloy Ti-4% V is (334)sub(β). The introduction of 6% Al into the alloy results in the appearance in the structure of the alloy Ti-6Al-4 V of the crystals with the (344)sub(β) habit. Hydrogen in the amount of 0.05% does not change the ratio between crystals with the (344)sub(β) habit and (334)sub(β) one in the VT6 alloy [ru

  10. Twin relationships of 5M modulated martensite in Ni-Mn-Ga alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zongbin; Zhang Yudong; Esling, Claude; Zhao Xiang; Zuo Liang

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We determine orientation relationships of 5M modulated martensite in NiMnGa alloy. → Accurate EBSD mapping is performed using monoclinic superstructure. → Four distinct variants mutually twin-related to each other are revealed. → Three twinning types and full twinning elements are identified. → Twin interfaces do coincide with respective twinning planes. - Abstract: For Ni-Mn-Ga ferromagnetic shape memory alloys, the characteristic features of modulated martensite (including the number/shape of constituent variants, the inter-variant orientation relationship and the geometrical distribution of variant interfaces) determine the attainability of the shape memory effect. In the present work, a comprehensive microstructural and crystallographic investigation has been conducted on a bulk polycrystalline Ni 50 Mn 28 Ga 22 alloy. As a first attempt, the orientation measurements by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) - using the precise information on the commensurate 5M modulated monoclinic superstructure (instead of the conventionally simplified non-modulated tetragonal structure) - were successfully performed to identify the crystallographic orientations on an individual basis. Consequently, the morphology of modulated martensite, the orientation relationships between adjacent variants and the characters of twin interfaces were unambiguously determined. With the thus-obtained full-featured image on the configuration of martensitic variants, the possibility of microstructural modification by proper mechanical 'training' was further discussed. This new effort makes it feasible to explore the crystallographic/microstructural correlations in modulated martensite with high statistical reliability, which in turn provides useful guidance for optimizing the microstructure and shape memory performance.

  11. An assessment of magnetic effects in ferromagnetic martensitic steels for use in fusion machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lechtenberg, T.; Dahms, C.; Attaya, H.

    1984-01-01

    Interest in the 9-12%Cr class of martensitic stainless steels has accelerated since these materials were included in the U.S. Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance (ADIP) task funded by the Office of Fusion Energy in 1979. This program is focused on developing structural materials for fusion reactor first wall/breeding blanket components where the neutron damage is most severe. This area of a fusion reactor will be required to tolerate damage levels on the order of 110 dpa( 1 ). As a part of ADIP, study of the martensitic steels is focused on establishing the feasibility of using these materials. The interest in martensitic steels stems from their potential to tolerate high levels of radiation damage without significant degradation of material properties. Martensitic steels have a body-centered-cubic crystal structure that, unlike face-centered-cubic structure of austenitic steels, exhibits very little swelling under neutron irradiation( 2 ). One of the outstanding issues with martensitic steels is the possible parasitic stresses associated with ferromagnetic interaction with the magnetic fields. This paper is divided into two parts, the first reviews previous work on magnetic effects to the structure and plasma; the second presents new calculations of stresses on a coolant pipe in a Starfire model assumed to be made of 12Cr-1Mo steel(HT-9)

  12. Commensurate and incommensurate '5M' modulated crystal structures in Ni-Mn-Ga martensitic phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Righi, L.; Albertini, F.; Pareti, L.; Paoluzi, A.; Calestani, G.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that the composition of ferromagnetic shape memory Ni-Mn-Ga Heusler alloys determines both temperature of martensitic transformations and the structure type of the product phase. In the present work we focused our attention on the structural study of the so-called '5M' modulated structure. In particular, the structure of Ni 1.95 Mn 1.19 Ga 0.86 martensitic phase is analysed by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) and compared with that of the stoichiometric Ni 2 MnGa martensite. The study of the diffraction data reveals the occurrence of commensurate (C) structural modulation in Ni 1.95 Mn 1.19 Ga 0.86 ; this contrasts with Ni 2 MnGa, where an incommensurate (IC) structural modulation was evident. The two phases also differ in the symmetry of the fundamental martensitic lattice. In fact, the incommensurate modulation is related to an orthorhombic basic structure, while the commensurate variant presents a monoclinic symmetry. The commensurate modulated structure has been investigated by using the superspace approach already adopted to solve the structure of Ni 2 MnGa martensite. The structure has been determined by Rietveld refinement of PXRD data

  13. Stress-induced martensitic transformation and ferroelastic deformation adjacent microhardness indents in tetragonal zirconia single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chien, F.R.; Ubic, F.J.; Prakash, V.; Heuer, A.H.

    1998-01-01

    The stress-induced tetragonal to monoclinic (t → m) martensitic transformation, stress-induced ferroelastic domain switching, and dislocation slip were induced by Vickers microindentation at elevated temperatures in polydomain single crystals of 3 mol%-Y 2 O 3 -stabilized tetragonal ZrO 2 single crystals (3Y-TZS). Chemical etching revealed traces along t directions adjacent to indentations, and Raman spectroscopy and TEM have shown that these traces are caused by products of the martensitic transformation, i.e. the monoclinic product phase forms primarily as thin, long plates with a habit plane approximately on (bar 301) m . This habit plane and the associated shear strain arising from the transformation, visible in TEM micrographs at the intersection of crystallographically equivalent martensite plates, were successfully predicted using the observed lattice correspondence and the phenomenological invariant plane strain theory of martensitic transformations. The extent of the martensitic transformation increased with increasing temperature from room temperature up to 300 C, but then decreased at higher temperatures. Ferroelastic deformation of tetragonal ZrO 2 has been observed at all temperatures up to 1,000 C. At the highest temperature, only ferroelastic domain switching and dislocation slip occurred during indentation-induced deformation

  14. Possible martensitic transformation in Heusler alloy Mn{sub 2}PdSn from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, L., E-mail: author.fenglin@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System, Ministry of Education, Computational Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Feng, X. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System, Ministry of Education, Computational Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Liu, E.K.; Wang, W.H.; Wu, G.H. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Hu, J.F.; Zhang, W.X. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Transducers and Intelligent Control System, Ministry of Education, Computational Condensed Matter Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China)

    2016-12-01

    The tetragonal distortion, electronic structure and magnetic property of Mn{sub 2}PdSn have been systematically investigated by first-principles calculations. The results indicate that the total energy of tetragonal martensitic phase is lower than cubic austenitic phase for Mn{sub 2}PdSn. The corresponding c/a ratio and energy difference are 1.23 and 41.62 meV/f.u., respectively. This suggests that there is a great possibility for martensitic transformation to occur in Mn{sub 2}PdSn with temperature decreasing. The electronic structure shows that there are sharp DOS peaks originating from p–d hybridization in the vicinity of Fermi level in the cubic phase. And these peaks disappear or become more flat in the martensitic phase. - Highlights: • The martensitic transformation is prone to occur with temperature decreasing in Mn{sub 2}PdSn. • Electronic structure and magnetic property of Mn{sub 2}PdSn are investigated. • Both the austenitic and martensitic phases of Mn{sub 2}PdSn are ferrimagnetic.

  15. Microstructural change during creep deformation in a 10%Cr martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Ho; Song, B. J.; Ryu, Woo Seog

    2001-01-01

    The relationship between creep deformation and microstructural changes in martensitic 10Cr-MoW steel has been studied. Transmission electron microscopy and image analyser were used to determine the variation of precipitates and martensite lath width size during creep deformation and aging. As precipitates are coarsened during creep deformation, dislocations become easy to move and the recovery proceeds rapidly. This leads to the growth of lath width. The average size of precipitates was linearly increased with creep time. On the other hand the growth rate of lath width is constant until tertiary creep, but the growth of lath width is accelerated during tertiary creep. It has been concluded that the growth behavior of lath width are consistent with creep deformation. Because the growth of lath width is controlled by the coarsening of precipitates it is important to form more stable precipitates in creep condition for improvement of creep properties of martensitic steel. Microstructure of martensitic steel is thermally very stable, so the size of precipitates and martensite lath width are hardly changed during aging

  16. Plastic strain induced damage evolution and martensitic transformation in ductile materials at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garion, C.; Skoczen, B.T.

    2002-01-01

    The Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steels are well known for their ductile behavior at cryogenic temperatures. This implies development and evolution of plastic strain fields in the stainless steel components subjected to thermo-mechanical loads at low temperatures. The evolution of plastic strain fields is usually associated with two phenomena: ductile damage and strain induced martensitic transformation. Ductile damage is described by the kinetic law of damage evolution. Here, the assumption of isotropic distribution of damage (microcracks and microvoids) in the Representative Volume Element (RVE) is made. Formation of the plastic strain induced martensite (irreversible process) leads to the presence of quasi-rigid inclusions of martensite in the austenitic matrix. The amount of martensite platelets in the RVE depends on the intensity of the plastic strain fields and on the temperature. The evolution of the volume fraction of martensite is governed by a kinetic law based on the accumulated plastic strain. Both of these irreversible phenomena, associated with the dissipation of plastic power, are included into the constitutive model of stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures. The model is tested on the thin-walled corrugated shells (known as bellows expansion joints) used in the interconnections of the Large Hadron Collider, the new proton storage ring being constructed at present at CERN

  17. Martensitic microstructural transformations from the hot stamping, quenching and partitioning process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Heping; Jin Xuejun; Dong Han; Shi Jie

    2011-01-01

    Hot stamping, which combines forming and quenching in one process, produces high strength steels with limited ductility because the quenching is uncontrolled. A new processing technique has been proposed in which the hot stamping step is followed by a controlled quenching and partitioning process, producing a microstructure containing retained austenite and martensite. To investigate this microstructure, specimens were heated at a rate of 10 deg. C/s to the austenitizing temperature of 900 deg. C, held for 5 min to eliminate thermal gradients, and cooled at a rate of 50 deg. C/s to a quenching temperature of 300 deg. C, which is between the martensite start temperature and the martensite finish temperatures. The resulting microstructure was examined using optical microscope, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The material produced contains irregular, fragmented martensite plates, a result of the improved strength of the austenite phase and the constraints imposed by a high dislocation density. - Research Highlights: → A novel heat treatment of advanced high strength steels is proposed. → The processing technique is hot stamping plus quenching and partitioning process. → The material produced contains irregular, fragmented martensite plates. → The reason is strength of austenite phase and constraint of dislocation density.

  18. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Y.

    1996-01-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature (≤380 degrees C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300 degrees C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300 degrees C to 500 degrees C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180 degrees C to 330 degrees C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited

  19. Influence of Plastic Deformation on Martensitic Transformation During Hot Stamping of Complex Structure Auto Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuhan; Song, Yanli; Hua, Lin; Lu, Jue

    2017-04-01

    The ultra-high strength steel auto parts manufactured by hot stamping are widely applied for weight reduction and safety improvement. During the hot stamping process, hot forming and quenching are performed in one step wherein plastic deformation and phase transformation simultaneously take place and affect each other. Thereinto, the influence of deformation on martensitic transformation is of great importance. In the present paper, the influence of plastic deformation on martensitic transformation during hot stamping of complex structure auto parts was investigated. For this purpose, a B-pillar reinforced panel in B1500HS steel was manufactured by hot stamping, and the process was simulated by finite element software based on a thermo-mechanical-metallurgical coupled model. Considering various deformation degrees, the microstructures and mechanical properties at four typical locations of the hot stamped B-pillar reinforced panel were detected. The results show that the martensitic content and the microhardness increase with the increase in the deformation amount. There are two reasons causing this phenomenon: (1) the increase in mechanical driving force and (2) the increased probability of the martensitic nucleation at crystal defects. The x-ray diffraction analysis indicates the carbon enrichment in retained austenite which results from the carbon diffusion during the low-carbon martensite formation. Furthermore, the carbon content decreases with the increase in the deformation amount, because the deformation of austenite suppresses the carbon diffusion.

  20. First-principles screening of structural properties of intermetallic compounds on martensitic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joohwi; Ikeda, Yuji; Tanaka, Isao

    2017-11-01

    Martensitic transformation with good structural compatibility between parent and martensitic phases are required for shape memory alloys (SMAs) in terms of functional stability. In this study, first-principles-based materials screening is systematically performed to investigate the intermetallic compounds with the martensitic phases by focusing on energetic and dynamical stabilities as well as structural compatibility with the parent phase. The B2, D03, and L21 crystal structures are considered as the parent phases, and the 2H and 6M structures are considered as the martensitic phases. In total, 3384 binary and 3243 ternary alloys with stoichiometric composition ratios are investigated. It is found that 187 alloys survive after the screening. Some of the surviving alloys are constituted by the chemical elements already widely used in SMAs, but other various metallic elements are also found in the surviving alloys. The energetic stability of the surviving alloys is further analyzed by comparison with the data in Materials Project Database (MPD) to examine the alloys whose martensitic structures may cause further phase separation or transition to the other structures.

  1. Modified cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaas, Willem F J.

    2014-06-17

    Disclosed is a modified photoautotrophic bacterium comprising genes of interest that are modified in terms of their expression and/or coding region sequence, wherein modification of the genes of interest increases production of a desired product in the bacterium relative to the amount of the desired product production in a photoautotrophic bacterium that is not modified with respect to the genes of interest.

  2. Influence of tempering on mechanical properties of ferritic martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Y. B.; Han, C. H.; Choi, B. K.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, T. K.; Jeong, Y. H.; Cho, S.

    2012-01-01

    In the mid-1980s research programs for development of low activation materials began. This is based on the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Guidelines (10CFR part 61) that were developed to reduce long-lived radioactive isotopes, which allows nuclear reactor waste to be disposed of by shallow land burial when removed from service. Development of low activation materials is also key issue in nuclear fusion systems, as the structural components can became radioactive due to nuclear transmutation caused by exposure to high dose neutron irradiation. Reduced-activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steels have been developed in the leading countries in nuclear fusion technology, and are now being considered as primary candidate material for the test blanket module (TBM) in the international thermonuclear experiment reactor (ITER). RAFM steels developed so far (e.g., EUROFER 97 and F82H) meet the requirement for structural application in the ITER. However, if such alloys are used in the DEMO or commercial fusion reactor is still unclear, as the reactors are designed to operate under much severe conditions (i.e., higher outlet coolant temperature and neutron fluences). Such harsh operating conditions lead to development of RAFM steels with better creep and irradiation resistances. Mechanical properties of RAFM steels are strongly affected by microstructural features including the distribution, size and type of precipitates, dislocation density and grain size. For a given composition, such microstructural characteristics are determined mainly by thermo-mechanical process employed to fabricate the final product, and accordingly a final heat treatment, i.e., tempering is the key step to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. In the present work, we investigated mechanical properties of the RAFM steels with a particular attention being paid to effects of tempering on impact and creep properties

  3. Formation and properties of chromium nitride coatings on martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendala, B.; Swadzba, L.; Hetmanczyk, M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the results of investigation of coatings obtained by ARC-PVD method on martensitic E1961 (13H12NWMFA) steel, which is used on compressor blades in the aircraft engines, were presented. The chemical composition of E1961 was given. The PVT-550 device was used for coating. The protective chromium nitride coatings were tested. The influence of ARC-PVD method parameters for example: bias, pressure and flow rate of reactive gases on the structure and properties of the CrN coatings in corrosion tests were investigated. Technical parameters of obtained CrN coatings were given. The phase analysis of chromium nitride coatings obtained with different technical parameters were tested. The results of phase analysis are given. The pitting corrosion resistance tests in 10% FeCl 3 solution was conducted. The corrosion rate for CrN coated samples were defined. It was found that 50 V and 100 V bias, about 0.5 and 0.7 Pa pressure and 140 sccm (standard cubic centimeter) flow rate of nitride during coating favour the CrN monophase structure while increasing bias to 150 V, decreasing the pressure to about 0.5 Pa and 0.3 Pa and increasing the flow rate of nitride to 160 - 180 sccm favour the CrN+Cr 2 N diphase structure. On the basis of corrosion investigations for CrN coatings obtained with different ARC-PVD parameters the best corrosion resistance in 10% FeCl 3 solution for CrN+Cr 2 N diphase structure was found. (author)

  4. Effect of Prior Athermal Martensite on the Isothermal Transformation Kinetics Below M s in a Low-C High-Si Steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarro-Lopez, A.; Sietsma, J.; Santofimia, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Thermomechanical processing of Advanced Multiphase High Strength Steels often includes isothermal treatments around the martensite start temperature (M s). It has been reported that the presence of martensite formed prior to these isothermal treatments accelerates the kinetics of the subsequent

  5. Investigation of route to martensitic transition in Ni-Mn-In shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevgi, R.; Priolkar, K. R.; Righi, L.

    2018-04-01

    The temperature dependent x-ray diffraction and magnetization measurements on the off stoichiometric Ni2Mn1+xIn1-x alloys have confirmed the appearance of martensite at critical Mn concentration of x=0.35. The high temperature phase of all the alloys have cubic L21 structure with the lattice constant steadily decreasing with increase in Mn concentration. Martensitic transition begins to appear in Ni2Mn1.35In0.65 at about 197K and the structure seems to adopt two phases including the major cubic along with the modulated monoclinic phase. This has been explained on the basis of number of Mn-Ni-Mn hybridized pairs that are responsible for inducing martensitic transition.

  6. A new quantitative approach to the thermoelastic martensitic transformation: The density of elastic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Aseguinolaza, J.; Ruiz-Larrea, I.; No, M.L.; Lopez-Echarri, A.; Juan, J. San

    2008-01-01

    A thermodynamic study, based on high-sensitivity adiabatic calorimetry, of the martensitic transformation undergone by Cu-Al-Ni shape memory alloys is presented. From the specific heat data, the thermodynamic function values, and in particular the crystal free energy, as functions of temperature, have been obtained. These results have permitted a careful estimation of the phase transformation temperatures of each β 3 ' martensite plate as a function of its stored elastic energy. Within this frame, the distribution density of the elastic energy states in the martensitic phase is directly derived from the specific heat data. It also permits a simple analysis of the nucleation processes and gives a convincing explanation of the temperature memory effects

  7. Structural properties, deformation behavior and thermal stability of martensitic Ti-Nb alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boenisch, Matthias

    2016-06-10

    Ti-Nb alloys are characterized by a diverse metallurgy which allows obtaining a wide palette of microstructural configurations and physical properties via careful selection of chemical composition, heat treatment and mechanical processing routes. The present work aims to expand the current state of knowledge about martensite forming Ti-Nb alloys by studying 15 binary Ti-c{sub Nb}Nb (9 wt.% ≤ c{sub Nb} ≤ 44.5 wt.%) alloy formulations in terms of their structural and mechanical properties, as well as their thermal stability. The crystal structures of the martensitic phases, α{sup '} and α'', and the influence of the Nb content on the lattice (Bain) strain and on the volume change related to the β → α{sup '}/α'' martensitic transformations are analyzed on the basis of Rietveld-refinements. The magnitude of the shuffle component of the β → α{sup '}/α'' martensitic transformations is quantified in relation to the chemical composition. The largest transformation lattice strains are operative in Nb-lean alloys. Depending on the composition, both a volume dilatation and contraction are encountered and the volume change may influence whether hexagonal martensite α{sup '} or orthorhombic martensite α'' forms from β upon quenching. The mechanical properties and the deformation behavior of martensitic Ti-Nb alloys are studied by complementary methods including monotonic and cyclic uniaxial compression, nanoindentation, microhardness and impulse excitation technique. The results show that the Nb content strongly influences the mechanical properties of martensitic Ti-Nb alloys. The elastic moduli, hardness and strength are minimal in the vicinity of the limiting compositions bounding the interval in which orthorhombic martensite α'' forms by quenching. Uniaxial cyclic compressive testing demonstrates that the elastic properties of strained samples are different than those of unstrained ones

  8. The distribution of intervariant crystallographic planes in a lath martensite using five macroscopic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beladi, Hossein; Rohrer, Gregory S.; Rollett, Anthony D.; Tari, Vahid; Hodgson, Peter D.

    2014-01-01

    Electron backscatter diffraction analysis was employed to compute the closest orientation relationship and the distribution of intervariant boundary character in a lath martensitic microstructure. The misorientations were close to the Kurdjumov–Sachs orientation relationship. The intervariant crystallographic plane distribution exhibited a relatively high anisotropy with a tendency for the lath interfaces to terminate on (1 1 0) planes. This results from the crystallographic constraints associated with the shear transformation rather than a low energy interface configuration. The lath martensite habit plane was determined to be mostly (1 1 0) or near (1 1 0). The relative populations of boundaries with [1 1 1] and [1 1 0] misorientations were greater than other high index misorientations, mostly characterized as (1 1 0) symmetric tilt and (1 1 0) twist boundary types, respectively. Analysis with homology metrics of the connectivity in the lath martensitic microstructure revealed the connectivity dominated by population of misorientation angle and boundary plane type

  9. Hysteresis and Power-Law Statistics during temperature induced martensitic transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Arya; Sengupta, Surajit; Rao, Madan

    2011-01-01

    We study hysteresis in temperature induced martensitic transformation using a 2D model solid exhibiting a square to rhombic structural transition. We find that upon quenching, the high temperature square phase, martensites are nucleated at sites having large non-affineness and ultimately invades the whole of the high temperature square phase. On heating the martensite, the high temperature square phase is restored. The transformation proceeds through avalanches. The amplitude and the time-duration of these avalanches exhibit power-law statistics both during heating and cooling of the system. The exponents corresponding to heating and cooling are different thereby indicating that the nucleation and dissolution of the product phase follows different transformation mechanism.

  10. The martensitic transformation of Ti–Ni shape memory thin films under proton irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Z.Y.; Wang, H.Z.; Zhu, Y.Y.; Meng, X.L.; Cai, W.

    2015-01-01

    The martensitic transformation behavior of a Ti–Ni alloy irradiated by proton with different doses has been investigated. It is found that the samples irradiated by 150 keV protons have a two-step phase transformation during heating and only one-step transformation during cooling. The exothermic peak at higher temperature disappears during the following thermal cycling. A model based on the stress-assisted martensitic transformation was established by the Transport of Ions in Matter (TRIM) calculations in order to explain the transformation behavior. - Highlights: • Martensitic transformation behavior of TiNi alloy under proton irradiation • Two-step transformation appears upon heating for a sample irradiated at 150 keV. • One-step transformation appears upon cooling for a sample irradiated at 150 keV. • In the following thermal cycling, the higher temperature exothermic peak vanishes

  11. Kinetics of anomalous multi-step formation of lath martensite in steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villa, Matteo; Pantleon, Karen; Reich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    A steel containing 16wt.% Cr, 5wt.% Ni and 3wt.% Cu was transformed into martensite by applying isochronal, i.e. constant rate, cooling followed by isothermal holding. The formation of martensite was monitored with dilatometry. A series of retardations and accelerations of the transformation...... was observed during isochronal cooling for cooling rates ranging from 1.5 to 50Kmin−1. The cooling rate in the isochronal stage was observed to influence the transformation rate in the isothermal stage. Electron backscatter diffraction was applied to determine the morphology of the martensite, which...... was of lath type, and to investigate the microstructure of the material. No influence of the cooling rate on the scale of the microstructure was observed. The series of retardations and accelerations of the transformation is interpreted in terms of the combined effect of the strain and interfacial energy...

  12. Driving higher magnetic field sensitivity of the martensitic transformation in MnCoGe ferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, S. C.; Ge, Q.; Hu, Y. F.; Wang, L.; Liu, K.; Jiang, Q. Z.; Wang, D. H.; Hu, C. C.; Huang, H. B.; Cao, G. P.; Zhong, Z. C.; Du, Y. W.

    2017-11-01

    The sharp metamagnetic martensitic transformation (MMT) triggered by a low critical field plays a pivotal role in magnetoresponsive effects for ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs). Here, a sharper magnetic-field-induced metamagnetic martensitic transformation (MFIMMT) is realized in Mn1-xCo1+xGe systems with a giant magnetocaloric effect around room temperature, which represents the lowest magnetic driving and completion fields as well as the largest magnetization difference around MFIMMT reported heretofore in MnCoGe-based FSMAs. More interestingly, a reversible MFIMMT with field cycling is observed in the Mn0.965Co0.035Ge compound. These results indicate that the consensus would be broken that the magnetic field is difficult to trigger the MMT for MnCoGe-based systems. The origin of a higher degree of sensitivity of martensitic transformation to the magnetic field is discussed based on the X-ray absorption spectroscopic results.

  13. Interaction of stress with the martensitic phase transition in A15 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.O.

    1981-01-01

    Recently there has been a resurgence of interest in the effect of the martensitic phase transition which occurs in many A15 compounds on superconductivity and on elastic and anelastic behavior. Since in many practical applications, A15 compounds are subject to considerable stress and strain, it is of interest to examine the interaction of stress with the martensitic transition; this paper is an examination of the effects of stress predicted by a simple Landau model which successfully describes many features of the transition and the related temperature dependence of the elastic modulus (c 11 -c 12 )/2. The effect of stress on the temperature ranges of stability and metastability of various types of martensitic domain is discussed. The non-linearity of the stress-strain relation in a polycrystalline A15 is studied

  14. Observation of the two-way shape memory effect in an atomistic model of martensitic transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Jagla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We study a system of classical particles in two dimensions interacting through an isotropic pair potential that displays a martensitic phase transition between a triangular and a rhomboidal structure upon the change of a single parameter. Previously it was shown that this potential is able to reproduce the shape memory effect and super-elasticity, among other well known features of the phenomenology of martensites. Here we extend those previous studies and describe the development of the more subtle two-way shape memory effect. We show that in a poly-crystalline sample, the effect is mostly due to the existence of retained martensite within the austenite phase. We also study the case of a single crystal sample where the effect is associated to particular orientations of the dislocations, either induced by training or by an ad hoc construction of a starting sample.

  15. Depth distribution analysis of Martensitic transformations in Xe implanted austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, E.; Gerritsen, E.; Chechenin, N.G.

    1989-01-01

    In recent years the implantation of noble gases in metals has been found to induce some exciting phenomena such as formation of inclusions containing solid gas at extremely high pressures. In stainless steels these inclusions are the origin of a stress-induced martensitic fcc → bcc phase...... transformation in the implanted layer. In this work we present results from a depth distribution analysis of the martensitic phase change occurring in Xe implanted single crystals of austenitic stainless steel. Analysis was done by in situ RBS/channeling analysis, X-ray diffraction and cross-section transmission...... electron microscopy (XTEM) of the implanted surface. It is found that the martensitic transformation of the surface layer occurs for fluences above 1 × 1020 m−2. The thickness of the transformed layer increases with fluence to ≈ 150 nm at 1 × 10 21 m−2, which far exceeds the range plus straggling...

  16. Constitutive modelling of stainless steels for cryogenic applications. Strain induced martensitic transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2001-01-01

    The 300-series stainless steels are metastable austenitic alloys: martensitic transformation occurs at low temperatures and/or when plastic strain fields develop in the structures. The transformation influences the mechanical properties of the material. The present note aims at proposing a set of constitutive equations describing the plastic strain induced martensitic transformation in the stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures. The constitutive modelling shall create a bridge between the material sciences and the structural analysis. For the structures developing and accumulating plastic deformations at sub-zero temperatures, it is of primary importance to be able to predict the intensity of martensitic transformation and its effect on the material properties. In particular, the constitutive model has been applied to predict the behaviour of the components of the LHC interconnections, the so-called bellows expansion joints (the LHC mechanical compensation system).

  17. Martensitic phase transformations in the nanostructured surface layers induced by mechanical attrition treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Zhichun; Wang Xiaowei; Wu Erdong; Liu Gang

    2005-01-01

    Conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis have been used to investigate the relationship between characteristics of phase transformation and the treatment time in surface nanocrystallized 316L stainless steel induced by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT). A similar trend of development of the martensitic phase upon the treatment time has been observed from both CEMS and XRD measurements. However, in the CEMS measurement, two types of martensite phase with different magnetic hyperfine fields are revealed. Based on a random distribution of the non-iron coordinating atoms, a three-element theoretical model is developed to illustrate the difference of two types of martensite phase. The calculated results indicate the segregation of the non-iron atoms associated with SMAT treatment

  18. Soft-martensitic stainless Cr-Ni-Mo steel for turbine rotors in geothermic power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schonfeld, K.; Potthast, E.

    1986-01-01

    Steel Grade X5 Cr-Ni-Mo 12 6 containing 0.05% carbon, 12% chromium, 6% nickel, and 1.50% molybdenum is an advantageous material for turbine rotors in geothermic power stations because of its excellent strength and toughness properties in combination with good erosion and corrosion resistance. In terms of the phase diagram, this soft-martensitic steel has its place at the martensite/austenite/ferrite interface. Therefore, its chemical composition must be chosen so as to have a completely martensitic structure after hardening. The manufacture of and the mechanical properties of a turbine rotor 1200 mm in diameter by 5600 mm in length with a finished weight of approximately 21.5 tons are described in detail

  19. Assessment of martensitic steels as structural materials in magnetic fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, J.M.; Chen, W.Y.K.; Cheng, E.T.; Dalessandro, J.A.; Miller, P.H.; Rosenwasser, S.N.; Thompson, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    This manuscript documents the results of preliminary experiments and analyses to assess the feasibility of incorporating ferromagnetic martensitic steels in fusion reactor designs and to evaluate the possible advantages of this class of material with respect to first wall/blanket lifetime. The general class of alloys under consideration are ferritic steels containing from about 9 to 13 percent Cr with some small additions of various strengthening elements such as Mo. These steels are conventionally used in the normalized and tempered condition for high temperature applications and can compete favorably with austenitic alloys up to about 600 0 C. Although the heat treatment can result in either a tempered martensite or bainite structure, depending on the alloy and thermal treatment parameters, this general class of materials will be referred to as martensitic stainless steels for simplicity

  20. Japanese great pioneer and leader, Zenji Nishiyama, on studies of martensitic transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K.

    2003-10-01

    Professor Zenji Nishiyama passed away on March 12, 1991, at the age of 89. He was born on October 14, 1901, and so the last year was the centennial birthday anniversary. In such a occasion, his personality and academic achievements will be introduced, because he had been one of great leaders of the world-wide martensite community for a long time, as is well known. The introduction consists of his personal history and academic activities and achievements on martensitic transformations. In addition, some hidden stories will be introduced as to publication of the well-known Nishiyama's orientation relationship and of the crystal structure of a Cu-Al alloy martensite, and as to several works which were carried out during the 2nd world-war and so not published in English.

  1. The Microstructure and Properties of Super Martensitic Stainless Steel Microalloyed with Tungsten and Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Dong; Li, Jun; Liu, Yu-Rong; Yong, Qi-Long; Su, Jie; Cao, Jian-Chun; Tao, Jing-Mei; Zhao, Kun-Yu

    2011-06-01

    The microstructure and properties of super martensitic stainless steel (SMSS) microalloyed with tungsten and copper were studied by means of optical microscopy, dilatometer, X-ray diffraction, and tensile tests. The results showed that the microstructure of SMSS, after quenching and tempering, was a typical biphase structure with tempered martensite and reversed austenite dispersedly distributed in the martensite matrix. W and Cu were added into the SMSS to reduce the transformation temperature (Ms) and improve the strength and hardness of the matrix by grain refining and solid solution strengthening. Thermocalc calculations confirmed that M23C6 compound and Laves phase were precipitated during tempering in the investigated steel. Compared with the traditional SMSS, the steel microalloyed with W and Cu performed better mechanical properties.

  2. Martensitic Transformation and Superelasticity in Fe-Mn-Al-Based Shape Memory Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Toshihiro; Kainuma, Ryosuke

    2017-12-01

    Ferrous shape memory alloys showing superelasticity have recently been obtained in two alloy systems in the 2010s. One is Fe-Mn-Al-Ni, which undergoes martensitic transformation (MT) between the α (bcc) parent and γ' (fcc) martensite phases. This MT can be thermodynamically understood by considering the magnetic contribution to the Gibbs energy, and the β-NiAl (B2) nanoprecipitates play an important role in the thermoelastic MT. The temperature dependence of critical stress for the MT is very small (about 0.5 MPa/°C) due to the small entropy difference between the parent and martensite phases in the Fe-Mn-Al-Ni alloy, and consequently, superelasticity can be obtained in a wide temperature range from cryogenic temperature to about 200 °C. Microstructural control is of great importance for obtaining superelasticity, and the relative grain size is among the most crucial factors.

  3. Structure of tetragonal martensite in the In95.42Cd4.58 cast alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlebnikova, Yu. V.; Egorova, L. Yu.; Rodionov, D. P.; Kazantsev, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    The structure of martensite in the In95.42Cd4.58 alloy has been studied by metallography, X-ray diffraction, dilatometry, and transmission electron microscopy. It has been shown that a massive structure built of colonies of tetragonal lamellar plates divided by a twin boundary {101}FCT is formed in the alloy under cooling below the martensite FCC → FCT transition temperature. The alloy recrystallizes after a cycle of FCT → FCC → FCT transitions with a decrease in the grain size by several times compared with the initial structure such fashion that the size of massifs and individual martensite lamella in the massif correlates with the change in the size of the alloy grain. Using thermal cycling, it has been revealed that the alloy tends to stabilize the high-temperature phase.

  4. Electron microscope study of the genesis of strain-induced martensite embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudhammer, K.P.; Hecker, S.S.; Murr, L.E.

    1984-01-01

    Previous work of Olson and Cohen and Murr, et al., is used to describe the genesis of martensite embryos which form at the intersection of microscopic shear bands in deformed type 304 stainless steel. It is shown that the intersection volume included within intersecting shear bands contains irregular and smaller dispersed volume segments forming α' martensite (bcc). These correspond to the satisfaction of specific intersections of stacking faults or partial dislocations on approximately every second (111)/sub fcc/ plane in one direction, and every third (111)/sub fcc/ plane in the other (conjugate) direction. The requisite stacking fault or partial dislocation arrangements are produced in an irregular fashion resulting in α' martensite embryos nucleating in an incomplete and irregular fashion within the intersection volume. 9 references, 2 figures

  5. Position-dependent shear-induced austenite– martensite transformation in double-notched TRIP and dual-phase steel samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blondé, R.J.P.; Jimenez-Melero, E.; Anusuya Ponnusami, S.; Zhao, L.; Schell, N.; Brück, E.H.; Van der Zwaag, S.; Van Dijk, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    While earlier studies on transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) steels focused on the determination of the austenite-to-martensite decomposition in uniform deformation or thermal fields, the current research focuses on the determination of the local retained austenite-to-martensite transformation

  6. In-situ investigation of strain-induced martensitic transformation kinetics in an austenitic stainless steel by inductive measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alonso de Celada Casero, C.; Kooiker, Harm; Groen, Manso; Post, J; San Martin, D

    2017-01-01

    An inductive sensor developed by Philips ATC has been used to study in-situ the austenite (γ) to martensite (α′) phase transformation kinetics during tensile testing in an AISI 301 austenitic stainless steel. A correlation between the sensor output signal and the volume fraction of α′-martensite

  7. Martensitic transformation in Heusler alloys Mn2YIn (Y=Ni, Pd and Pt): Theoretical and experimental investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Hongzhi; Liu, Bohua; Xin, Yuepeng; Jia, Pengzhong; Meng, Fanbin; Liu, Enke; Wang, Wenhong; Wu, Guangheng

    2015-01-01

    The martensitic transformation and electronic structure of Heusler alloys Mn 2 YIn (Y=Ni, Pd, Pt) have been investigated by both first-principles calculation and experimental investigation. Theoretical calculation reveals that, the energy difference ΔE between the tetragonal martensitic phase and cubic austenitic phase increases with Y varying from Ni to Pt in Mn 2 YIn. Thus a structural transition from cubic to tetragonal is most likely to happen in Heusler alloy Mn 2 PtIn. A single Heusler phase can be obtained in both Mn 2 PtIn and Mn 2 PdIn. A martensitic transformation temperature of 615 K has been identified in Mn 2 PtIn. And in Mn 2 PdIn, the austenitic phase is stable and no martensitic transformation is observed till 5 K. This indicates there may exist a positive relation between ΔE and martensitic transformation temperature. Calculated results show that Mn 2 YIn are all ferrimagnets in both austenitic and martensitic phases. The magnetic properties are mainly determined by the antiparallel aligned Mn spin moments. These findings can help to develop new FSMAs with novel properties. - Highlights: • Positive relation between ΔE and martensitic transformation temperature has been observed. • Heusler alloy Mn 2 PdIn has been synthesized successfully and investigated. • Martensitic transformation in Heusler alloys can be predicted by first -principles calculations

  8. Twinning processes in Cu-Al-Ni martensite single crystals investigated by neutron single crystal diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molnar, P.; Sittner, P.; Novak, V.; Lukas, P.

    2008-01-01

    A neutron single crystal diffraction method for inspecting the quality of martensite single crystals is introduced. True interface-free martensite single crystals are indispensable for, e.g. measurement of elastic constants of phases by ultrasonic techniques. The neutron diffraction method was used to detect and distinguish the presence of individual lattice correspondence variants of the 2H orthorhombic martensite phase in Cu-Al-Ni as well as to follow the activity of twinning processes during the deformation test on the martensite variant single crystals. When preparing the martensite single variant prism-shaped crystals by compression deformation method, typically a small fraction of second unwanted martensitic variant (compound twin) remains in the prism samples. Due to the very low stress (∼1 MPa) for the compound twinning in many shape memory alloys, it is quite difficult not only to deplete the martensite prisms of all internal interfaces but mainly to keep them in the martensite single variant state for a long time needed for further investigations

  9. Insight into the Effects of Reinforcement Shape on Achieving Continuous Martensite Transformation in Phase Transforming Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xudong; Ren, Junqiang; Wang, Xiaofei; Zong, Hongxiang; Cui, Lishan; Ding, Xiangdong

    2017-12-01

    A continuous martensite transformation is indispensable for achieving large linear superelasticity and low modulus in phase transforming metal-based composites. However, determining how to accurately condition the residual martensite in a shape memory alloy matrix though the reinforcement shape to achieve continuous martensite transformation has been a challenge. Here, we take the finite element method to perform a comparative study of the effects of nanoinclusion shape on the interaction and martensite phase transformation in this new composite. Two typical samples are compared: one reinforced by metallic nanowires and the other by nanoparticles. We find that the residual martensite within the shape memory alloy matrix after a pretreatment can be tailored by the reinforcement shape. In particular, our results show that the shape memory alloy matrix can retain enough residual martensite phases to achieve continuous martensite transformation in the subsequent loading when the aspect ratio of nanoreinforcement is larger than 20. In contrast, the composites reinforced with spherical or low aspect ratio reinforcement show a typical nonlinear superelasticity as a result of a low stress transfer-induced discontinuous martensite transformation within the shape memory alloy matrix.

  10. Kinetics of first order phase transformation in metals and alloys. Isothermal evolution in martensite transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Ken-ichi

    2011-01-01

    The 11th lecture about microstructures and fluctuation in solids reports on the martensitic phase transformation of alkali metals and alloys. The martensitic transformation is a diffusionless first order phase transformation. Martensitic transformations are classified into two with respect to kinetics, one is isothermal transformation and the other is athermal transformation. The former transformation depends upon both temperature and time, but the latter solely depends on temperature. The former does not have a definite transformation start temperature but occurs after some finite incubation time during isothermal holding. The isothermal martensitic transformation is changed to the athermal one under high magnetic field, and also the reverse transformation occurs under the application of hydrostatic pressure. The former phenomena were observed in Fe-Ni-Mn alloys, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys and also the reverse transformation in Fe-3.1at%Ni-0.5at%Mn alloys. The athermal transformation was observed in Li and Na metals at 73 and 36 K, respectively. A neutron diffraction study has been performed on single crystals of metallic Na. On cooling the virgin sample, the incubation time to transform from the bcc structure to the low-temperature structure (9R structure) is formed to be more than 2h at 38 K, 2 K higher than the transformation temperature of 36 K. The full width of half maximum of the Bragg reflection suddenly increased, due to some deformation introduced by the nucleation of the low-temperature structure. In relation to the deformation, strong extra-diffuse scattering (Huang scattering) was observed around the Bragg reflection in addition to thermal diffuse scattering. The kinetics of the martensitic transformation in In-Tl alloys has been studied by x-ray and neutron diffraction methods. A characteristic incubation time appeared at fixed temperature above Ms, the normal martensitic transformation start temperature. (author)

  11. Martensitic transformations, structure, and strengthness of processed high-nitrogen and high-carbon ferrous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaputkina, L. M.; Prokoshkina, V. G.

    2003-10-01

    Structures and properties of metastable austenitic alloys Fe-18Cr-16Ni-I2Mn-(0.17 to 0. 50)N, Fe-18Cr-12Mn-(0.48 to 1.12)N, Fe-18Cr-(0.1 to 1.18)N, and Fe-(12 to 20)Ni-(0.6 to 1.3)C, Fe-(6 to 8)Mn-(0.6 to 1.0)C, Fe-(5 to 6)Cr-(4 to 5)Mn-(0.6 to 0.8)C, Fe-6Cr-(1.0 to 1.3)C resulting from martensitic transformations under cooling and cold deformation (CD), as well as following tempering processes, were studied by magnetometry, X-ray and electron microscopy analyses, hardness measurements and mechanical properties tests. Martensite with a b.c.t. lattice was formed in all alloys with M_s{>}-196^circC during cooling. Under CD transformations of γ{to}α, γ{to}\\varepsilon{to}α, or γ{to}\\varepsilon types were realized depending on the alloy composition. Carbon increased but nitrogen decreased stacking fault energy. Thus carbon assists α-martensite formation but nitrogen promotese. As CD level and/or concentration of carbon and nitrogen increase residual stresses resulting from the CD also increase. The martensitic transformation during CD can decrease the residual stresses. Kinetic of tempering of b.c.t. thermal martensite differs from those of CD-induced martensite. In the second case, deformation aging, texture, and residual stresses are more visible. The maximal strengthening under CD takes place in (Mn+N)-steels. (Cr+N) and (Cr+Mn+N)-steels are high-strength, non-magnetic and corrosion resistant and are easily hardened by a low level of plastic deformation.

  12. Effect of Si on the reversibility of stress-induced martensite in Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanford, N. [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3217 (Australia); Dunne, D.P., E-mail: druce_dunne@uow.edu.au [Faculty of Engineering, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2010-12-15

    Fe-Mn-Si is a well-characterized ternary shape memory alloy. Research on this alloy has consistently shown that the addition of 5-6 wt.% Si is desirable to enhance the reversibility of stress-induced martensite vis-a-vis shape memory. This paper examines the effect of Si on the morphology and the crystallography of the martensite in the Fe-Mn-Si system. It is concluded that the addition of Si increases the c/a ratio of the martensite, reduces the transformation volume change and decreases the atomic spacing difference between the parallel close-packed directions in the austenite-martensite interface (habit) plane. It is proposed that, in addition to austenite strengthening, Si enhances reversibility by reducing the volume change and the interfacial atomic mismatch between the martensite and the austenite. Although shape memory is improved, transformation reversibility remains limited by the necessary misfit dislocations that accommodate the atomic spacing differences in the interface.

  13. Deformation-induced martensitic transformation in a 201 austenitic steel: The synergy of stacking fault energy and chemical driving force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moallemi, M., E-mail: m.moallemi@ma.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kermanpur, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafizadeh, A. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fould Institute of Technology, Fouladshahr, Isfahan, 8491663763 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezaee, A.; Baghbadorani, H. Samaei; Nezhadfar, P. Dastranjy [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-20

    The present study deals with the correlation of stacking fault energy's synergy and driving force in the formation of deformation-induced martensitic transformation in a 201 austenitic stainless steel. The fraction of deformation-induced martensite was characterized by means of X-ray diffraction and magnetic induction techniques. The kinetics of the martensite formation versus applied strain was evaluated through the sigmoidal model. It was shown that the volume fraction of ά-martensite is closely related to the driving force/SFE ratio of the alloy. The results also showed that the martensite content is similar in both XRD and magnetic methods and the applied sigmoidal model was consistent with the obtained experimental data.

  14. Influence of martensitic transformation on the low-cycle fatigue behaviour of 316LN stainless steel at 77 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botshekan, M.; Degallaix, S.; Desplanques, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Tensile and low-cycle fatigue tests were performed on a 316LN austenitic stainless steel at 300 and 77 K. The tensile and low-cycle fatigue properties were obtained and analysed in terms of influence of temperature on the plastic deformation process, and particularly on the strain-induced martensite formation. The martensite content was measured by a magnetic-at-saturation method. No martensite was detected at 300 K. On the contrary, strain-induced martensite transformation is responsible for the higher tensile elongation at 77 K and for the secondary hardening observed on softening-hardening curves in low-cycle fatigue at 77 K. The induced martensite content in tensile tests is a function of the strain according to Angel's model, and in low-cycle fatigue it is a function of the strain level and of the accumulated plastic strain. (orig.)

  15. Effect of Si on the reversibility of stress-induced martensite in Fe-Mn-Si shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, N.; Dunne, D.P.

    2010-01-01

    Fe-Mn-Si is a well-characterized ternary shape memory alloy. Research on this alloy has consistently shown that the addition of 5-6 wt.% Si is desirable to enhance the reversibility of stress-induced martensite vis-a-vis shape memory. This paper examines the effect of Si on the morphology and the crystallography of the martensite in the Fe-Mn-Si system. It is concluded that the addition of Si increases the c/a ratio of the martensite, reduces the transformation volume change and decreases the atomic spacing difference between the parallel close-packed directions in the austenite-martensite interface (habit) plane. It is proposed that, in addition to austenite strengthening, Si enhances reversibility by reducing the volume change and the interfacial atomic mismatch between the martensite and the austenite. Although shape memory is improved, transformation reversibility remains limited by the necessary misfit dislocations that accommodate the atomic spacing differences in the interface.

  16. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations

  17. Effect of plastic behaviour of steels during martensitic transformation on quenching stress initiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis-Judlin, Sabine

    1980-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of the effects of a steel martensitic transformation on the mechanisms producing internal stresses during quench. After having reported a bibliographical study on tests of qualitative and quantitative prediction (presentation of several models) of the genesis of internal stresses during quench, the author reports the study of the alloy behaviour during cooling and presents the basis of a model of prediction of internal stresses. The next part addresses the determination of the influence of martensitic transformation on the evolution of stresses during quench. The last part reports the taking into account of the effect of stress-phase transformation interaction in the calculation of internal stresses [fr

  18. Fatigue of DIN 1.4914 martensitic stainless steel in a hydrogen environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakib, J. I.; Ullmaier, H.; Little, E. A.; Faulkner, R. G.; Schmilz, W.; Chung, T. E.

    1994-09-01

    Fatigue tests at room temperature in vacuum, air and hydrogen have been carried out on specimens of DIN 1.4914 martensitic stainless steel in load-controlled, push-pull type experiments. Fatigue lifetimes in hydrogen are significantly lower than in both vacuum and air and the degradation is enhanced by lowering the test frequency or introducing hold times into the tension half-cycle. Fractographic examinations reveal hydrogen embrittlement effects in the form of internal cracking between fatigue striations together with surface modifications, particularly at low stress amplitudes. It is suggested that gaseous hydrogen can influence both fatigue crack initiation and propagation events in martensitic steels.

  19. Contributions from research on irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels to materials science and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1990-05-01

    Ferritic and martensitic steels are finding increased application for structural components in several reactor systems. Low-alloy steels have long been used for pressure vessels in light water fission reactors. Martensitic stainless steels are finding increasing usage in liquid metal fast breeder reactors and are being considered for fusion reactor applications when such systems become commercially viable. Recent efforts have evaluated the applicability of oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels. Experiments on the effect of irradiation on these steels provide several examples where contributions are being made to materials science and engineering. Examples are given demonstrating improvements in basic understanding, small specimen test procedure development, and alloy development.

  20. Moessbauer studies of a martensitic transformation and of cryogenic treatments of a D2 tool steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, B. F. O., E-mail: benilde@ci.uc.pt [University of Coimbra, CEMDRX, Department of Physics (Portugal); Blumers, M. [University Mainz, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry (Germany); Kortmann, A. [Ingpuls GmbH (Germany); Theisen, W. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Institute of Materials (Germany); Batista, A. C. [University of Coimbra, CEMDRX, Department of Physics (Portugal); Klingelhoefer, G. [University Mainz, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    A D2 tool steel X153CrVMo12 with composition C1.53 Cr12 V0.95 Mo0.80 Mn0.40(wt% Fe balanced) was studied by use of Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was observed that the study of carbides by X-ray diffraction was difficult while Moessbauer spectroscopy gives some light on the process occurring during cryogenic treatment. With the increase of the martensitic phase the carbides decrease and are dissolved in solid solution of martensite as well as the chromium element.

  1. Studies of martensitic transformation in Cu-Al alloys by positron annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, T.; Kuribayashi, K.; Doyama, M.

    1977-01-01

    The reverse martensitic transformations in Cu-23.5 at-%Al, and Cu-25.3 at-%Al have been studied by means of positron annihilation. The coincidence counting rates of angular correlation were measured as a function of the specimen temperature. The change of counting rates in heating run was rather different from that in cooling run due to the influence of tempering of martensitic structure. The results were interpreted by the change of the formation energy of a vacancy with phase transition. Influence of heating rate is also discussed. (orig.) [de

  2. Identification of some crystallographic features of martensite in steels by microdiffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarikaya, M.; Rao, B.V.N.; Thomas, G.

    1980-03-01

    Considerable attention should be paid to the interpretation of electron diffraction, such as the understanding of the extra reflections and other effects in an SAD pattern obtained from lath martensite by making allowances for spatial resolution limitations in the SAD patterns. These difficulties can be overcome by utilizing the convergent beam electron diffraction (CBED) method which permits the use of different probe sizes to obtain crystallographic information from very small regions. Some crystallographic features of lath martensite in low and medium C steels have been identified and some others verified by using CBED

  3. Martensitic transformation in an intergranular corrosion area of austenitic stainless steel during thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Yen, Hung-Wei; Trimby, Patrick; Moody, Steven; Miller, Sarah; Chensee, Martin; Ringer, Simon; Cairney, Julie

    2014-01-01

    An oxidation-assisted martensitic phase transformation was observed in an austenitic stainless steel after thermal cycling up to 970 °C in air in a solar thermal steam reformer. The intergranular corrosion areas were investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structural-and-chemical maps revealed that within intergranular corrosion areas this martensitic transformation primarily occurs in oxidation-induced chromium-depleted zones, rather than due to only sensitization. This displacive transformation may also play a significant role in the rate at which intergranular corrosion takes place

  4. Development of ODS (oxide dispersion strengthened) ferritic-martensitic steels for fast reactor fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukai, Shigeharu

    2000-01-01

    In order to attain higher burnup and higher coolant outlet temperature in fast reactor, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic-martensitic steels were developed as a long life fuel cladding. The improvement in formability and ductility, which are indispensable in the cold-rolling method for manufacturing cladding tube, were achieved by controlling the microstructure using techniques such as recrystallization heat-treatment and α to γ phase transformation. The ODS ferritic-martensitic cladding tubes manufactured using these techniques have the highest internal creep rupture strength in the world as ferritic stainless steels. Strength level approaches adequate value at 700degC, which meets the requirement for commercial fast reactors. (author)

  5. Finite Element Calculation of Local Variation in the Driving Force for Austenite to Martensite Transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, K.; Geijselaers, H. J. M.; Huetink, J.; Post, J.; Dinsdale, A.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanics and thermodynamics of strain induced martensitic transformation are coupled for a metastable alloy steel and implemented in FE models of forming processes. The basic formulations are based on a fifty year old treaty by Patel and Cohen. The variation in Gibbs energy due to local variation in strain, strain rate, temperature and state of stress of a forming part is calculated by FE codes. The local variation in Gibbs energy gives a probabilistic image of the potential sites for strain induced martensitic transformations

  6. Different microstructures of mobile twin boundaries in 10 M modulated Ni-Mn-Ga martensite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heczko, Oleg; Straka, L.; Seiner, Hanuš

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 2 (2013), 622-631 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP107/10/0824; GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388998 Keywords : martensitic twin microstructure * twinning interfaces * Ni-Mn-Ga martensite * mobility of twin boundary * magnetic shape memory Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.940, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S135964541200732X

  7. Effect of heat treatment on the crystal structure, martensitic transformation and magnetic properties of Mn{sub 53}Ni{sub 25}Ga{sub 22} ferromagnetic shape memory alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, G.F., E-mail: dgfu0451@sina.com [Department of mechanics Dalian University, Dalian 116622 (China); Gao, Z.Y. [National Key Laboratory Precision Hot Processing of Metals, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 405, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the effect of heat treatment on crystal structure, martensitic transformation, thermodynamic behavior and magnetic properties of polycrystalline Mn{sub 53}Ni{sub 25}Ga{sub 22} ferromagnetic shape memory alloy was systematically investigated. The results show that the heat treatment has obvious effect on martensitic transformation temperatures, crystal structure and hysteresis loops. Heat treatment greatly effects on transformation temperatures due to modified composition of the matrix. Martensitic transformation temperature, saturation magnetization decreased with the increase heat treatment temperature, reaching their minimum values at the heat treatment temperature of 1173 K for 12 h. Curie temperature of maximum values obtained at solution-treated of 1173 K for 12 h. In other word, increasing heat treatment temperature and time has an effect on Curie temperature. In addition, the annealed alloy Mn{sub 53}Ni{sub 25}Ga{sub 22} may completely dissolve in vacuum tubes at 1173 K for 12 h. It is found that the studied alloys have some (Mn,Ni){sub 4} Ga-type compound precipitates, which can be seen dispersing both in grain interiors and on grain boundaries at other heat treatment process. Lastly, Rietveld analysis shows the good agreement between experiment and calculated data of XRD patterns. - Highlights: • Heat treatment has obvious effect on transformation, structure and hysteresis. • Transformation temperature decreased with increase heat treatment temperature. • Magnetization decreased with increase heat treatment temperature. • Annealed alloy completely dissolve in vacuum tubes at 1123 K for 24 h.

  8. Defects and diffusion in semiconductors XIV

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, David J

    2012-01-01

    This 14th volume in the series covers the latest results in the field of Defects and Diffusion in Semiconductor. The issue also includes some original papers: An Experimental Study of the Thermal Properties of Modified 9Cr-1Mo Steel; Physico-Mechanical Properties of Sintered Iron-Silica Sand Nanoparticle Composites: A Preliminary Study; Defect and Dislocation Density Parameters of 5251 Al Alloy Using Positron Annihilation Lifetime Technique; A Novel Computational Strategy to Enhance the Ability of Elaborate Search by Entire Swarm to Find the Best Solution in Optimization of AMCs; Synthesis and

  9. Leaf-like dislocation substructures and the decrease of martensitic start temperatures: A new explanation for functional fatigue during thermally induced martensitic transformations in coarse-grained Ni-rich Ti–Ni shape memory alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jian; Somsen, Christoph; Simon, Tobias; Ding Xiangdong; Hou Sen; Ren Shuai; Ren Xiaobing; Eggeler, Gunther

    2012-01-01

    During repeatedly imposed thermally induced martensitic transformations in Ti–Ni shape memory alloys, the martensite start temperature M s decreases. This has been rationalized on the basis of a scenario where an increasing dislocation density makes it more and more difficult for martensite to form. However, it is not clear why dislocations which form because they accommodate the growth of martensite during the first cooling cycle should act as obstacles during subsequent transformation cycles. In the present work we use diffraction contrast transmission electron microscopy to monitor the formation of unique leaf-like dislocation substructures which form as the martensite start temperature decreases during thermal cycling. We interpret our microstructural results on the basis of a microstructural scenario where dislocations play different roles with respect to the propagation of a big martensite needle in one transformation cycle and the nucleation and growth of new martensite needles in the following cycles. As a consequence, chestnut-leaf-like dislocation arrays spread out in different crystallographic directions.

  10. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Recarte, V.; Gómez-Polo, C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 31 (2010), 316004/1-316004/7 ISSN 0953-8984 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : shape memory alloys * magnetic susceptibility * martensitic transition * magnetic domains Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.332, year: 2010

  11. Martensitic transformation in 304L and 316L types stainless steels cathodically hydrogen charged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minkovitz, E.; Eliezer, D.

    1984-01-01

    This paper reports a TEM study on the role of phase transitions at the crack tip in 304L and 316L types stainless steels cathodically hydrogen charged in the absence of any eternally applied forces. The possible role of α prime and epsilon martensite phases in the fracture mechanism is discussed

  12. Characterization of bainitic/martensitic structures formed in isothermal treatments below the M

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navarro Lopez, A.; Hidalgo Garcia, J.; Sietsma, J.; Santofimia Navarro, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    Advanced Multiphase High Strength Steels are generally obtained by applying isothermal treatments around the martensite start temperature (Ms). Previous investigations have shown that bainitic ferrite can form from austenite in isothermal treatments below Ms, where its

  13. Stress induced martensitic transformations in tension/torsion of CuAlNi single crystal tube

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šittner, Petr; Hashimoto, K.; Kato, M.; Tokuda, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 48, - (2003), s. 1153-1159 ISSN 1359-6462 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1048107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : shape memory alloys(SMAs) * martensitic phase transformation * single crystal tube * tension test * torsion Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.633, year: 2003

  14. Austenite-martensite interfaces in strained foils of CuAlNi alloy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ostapovets, Andrej; Paidar, Václav; Zárubová, Niva

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 3 (2009), 342-344 ISSN 1862-5282 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 149; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : martensitic transformation * CuAlNi * habit planes Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.862, year: 2009

  15. Thermal stability and phase transformations of martensitic Ti–Nb alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Bönisch, Mariana Calin, Thomas Waitz, Ajit Panigrahi, Michael Zehetbauer, Annett Gebert, Werner Skrotzki and Jürgen Eckert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at understanding the governing microstructural phenomena during heat treatments of Ni-free Ti-based shape memory materials for biomedical applications, a series of Ti–Nb alloys with Nb concentrations up to 29 wt% was produced by cold-crucible casting, followed by homogenization treatment and water quenching. Despite the large amount of literature available concerning the thermal stability and ageing behavior of Ti–Nb alloys, only few studies were performed dealing with the isochronal transformation behavior of initially martensitic Ti–Nb alloys. In this work, the formation of martensites (α' and α'' and their stability under different thermal processing conditions were investigated by a combination of x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, dilatometry and electron microscopy. The effect of Nb additions on the structural competition in correlation with stable and metastable phase diagrams was also studied. Alloys with 24 wt% Nb or less undergo a transformation sequence on heating from room temperature to 1155 K. In alloys containing >24 wt% Nb α'' martensitically reverts back to β0, which is highly unstable against chemical demixing by formation of isothermal ωiso. During slow cooling from the single phase β domain α precipitates and only very limited amounts of α'' martensite form.

  16. Tensile and impact behaviour of BATMAN II steels, Ti-bearing reduced activation martensitic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filacchioni, G.; Casagrande, E.; De Angelis, U.; De Santis, G.; Ferrara, D.; Pilloni, L.

    Two series of Reduced Activation Ferrous alloys (RAF) have been produced and studied by Casaccia's Laboratories. These martensitic alloys are named BATMAN steels. They are among the few presently developed RAF materials to exploit Ti as a carbide forming and grain size stabilizing element instead of Ta. In this work their mechanical properties are illustrated.

  17. The Relevant Role of Dislocations in the Martensitic Transformations in Cu-Al-Ni Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastien, R.; Sade, M.; Lovey, F. C.

    2018-03-01

    The interaction between dislocations and martensitic transformations in Cu-Al-Ni alloys is shortly reviewed. Results from many researchers are critically analyzed towards a clear interpretation of the relevant role played by dislocations on the properties of shape memory alloys in Cu-based alloys. Both thermally and stress-induced transformations are considered and focus is paid on two types of transitions, the β→β' and the formation of a mixture of martensites: β→β' + γ'. After cycling in the range where both martensites are formed, the twinned γ' phase is inhibited and cycling evolves into the formation of only β'. A model which considers the difference in energy of each γ' twin variant due to the introduced dislocations quantitatively explains the inhibition of γ' in both thermally and stress-induced cycling. The type of dislocations which are mainly introduced, mixed with Burgers vector belonging to the basal plane of the β' martensite, enables also to explain the unmodified mechanical behavior during β→β' cycling. The reported behavior shows interesting advantages of Cu-Al-Ni single crystals if mechanical properties are comparatively considered with those in other Cu-based alloys.

  18. Martensitic Transformation in a β-Type Mg-Sc Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yukiko; Ando, Daisuke; Sutou, Yuji; Somekawa, Hidetoshi; Koike, Junichi

    2018-03-01

    Recently, we found that a Mg-Sc alloy with a bcc (β) phase exhibits superelasticity and a shape memory effect at low temperature. In this work, we examined the stress-induced and thermally induced martensitic transformation of the β-type Mg-Sc alloy and investigated the crystal structure of the thermally induced martensite phase based on in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The lattice constants of the martensite phase were calculated to be a = 0.3285 nm, b = 0.5544 nm, and c = 0.5223 nm when we assumed that the martensite phase has an orthorhombic structure (Cmcm). Based on the lattice correspondence between a bcc and an orthorhombic structures such as that in the case of β-Ti shape memory alloys, we estimated the transformation strain of the β Mg-Sc alloy. As a result, the transformation strains along the 001, 011, and 111 directions in the β phase were calculated to be + 5.7, + 8.8, and + 3.3%, respectively.

  19. Martensitic transformation in Eurofer-97 and ODS-Eurofer steels: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zilnyk, K.D.; Oliveira, V.B.; Sandim, H.R.Z.; Möslang, A.; Raabe, D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Martensitic transformation of RAFM steels promotes significant grain fragmentation. • Austenite grain growth occurs in Eurofer-97 steel but not in ODS-Eurofer steel. • Boundary misorientation distribution of the as-quenched steels show two maxima peaks. • The amount of retained austenite varies from one steel to another. - Abstract: Reduced-activation ferritic–martensitic Eurofer-97 and ODS-Eurofer steels are potential candidates for structural applications in advanced nuclear reactors. Samples of both steel grades in the as-tempered condition were austenitized in vacuum for 1 h from 900 °C to 1300 °C followed by air cooling to room temperature. The microstructure was characterized by dilatometry, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermodynamic calculations provided by Thermo-Calc software were used to determine their transformation temperatures. Even having similar chemical composition, important changes were observed after martensitic transformation in these steels. Significant austenitic grain growth was observed in Eurofer-97 steel leading to the development of coarser martensitic packets. Contrastingly, austenitic grain growth was prevented in ODS-Eurofer steel due to fine and stable dispersion of Y-based particles

  20. Structure and tensile properties of ferro-martensitic alloys hardened by chi phase precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamo, A.; Aubert, H.; Laniesse, J.; Lelong, C.; Pigoury, M.; Foucher, C.

    1985-08-01

    Transformation of ferrite into austenite and of austenite into martensite, precipitation of intermetallic phases and tensile properties of the steel Cr13-Mo1.5 are studied in function of Ti additions (from 0 to 3%) and Ni additions (from 2 to 8%) for its mechanical resistance at 400-650 0 C. 12 references are given [fr

  1. Entropy change linked to the martensitic transformation inmetamagnetic shape memory alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Recarte, V.; Pérez-Landazábal, J.I.; Sánchez-Alarcos, V.; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Cesari, E.; Kustov, S.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 60, 6-7 (2012), s. 3168-3175 ISSN 1359-6454 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : metamagnetic shape memory alloys (MSMAs) * martensitic phase transformation * thermodynamics * transformation entropy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.941, year: 2012

  2. Corrosion-resistant coating technique for oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakasegawa, Hideo; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu; Ando, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels are attractive materials for application as fuel cladding in fast reactors and first-wall material of fusion blanket. Recent studies have focused more on high-chromium ferritic (12-18 wt% Cr) ODS steels with attractive corrosion resistance properties. However, they have poor material workability, require complicated heat treatments for recrystallization, and possess anisotropic microstructures and mechanical properties. On the other hand, low-chromium ferritic/martensitic (8-9 wt% Cr) ODS steels have no such limitations; nonetheless, they have poor corrosion resistance properties. In our work, we developed a corrosion-resistant coating technique for a low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steel. The ODS steel was coated with the 304 or 430 stainless steel, which has better corrosion resistances than the low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steels. The 304 or 430 stainless steel was coated by changing the canning material from mild steel to stainless steel in the conventional material processing procedure for ODS steels. Microstructural observations and micro-hardness tests proved that the stainless steels were successfully coated without causing a deterioration in the mechanical property of the low-chromium ferritic/martensitic ODS steel. (author)

  3. Predictive modeling of interfacial damage in substructured steels: application to martensitic microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maresca, F.; Kouznetsova, V.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic composite phases, like martensite present in conventional steels and new generation high strength steels exhibit microscale, locally lamellar microstructures characterized by alternating layers of phases or crystallographic variants. The layers can be sub-micron down to a few nanometers

  4. Moessbauer and TEM study of martensitic transformations in ion implanted 17/7 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Graabaek, L.

    1986-01-01

    It has earlier been shown that implantation of antimony into austenitic stainless steels induces martensitic phase transformations γ (fcc)→α (bcc). In the present work we have investigated which mechanisms are responsible for the transformation. Samples of 17/7 steels were implanted with noble gases (Kr, Ar) or the stainless steel constituent elements (Fe, Ni, Cr). The energies were selected to give ranges ∝40 nm. The phases present after implantation and the microstructures of the implanted samples were studied by CEMS and TEM respectively. A martensitic (α) phase was found to form after implantation both with Ni, Fe and Cr, in spite of the fact that these elements have opposite tendencies for stabilization of the austenite (γ) phase. The efficiency of martensite formation is therefore mainly related to stress relief associated with secondary radiation damage. This was substantiated from the noble gas implantations, where the highest degree of transformation was observed for fluences where bubble formation occurs. The CEMS analyses show that the transformation efficiency in such cases is nearly 100%. The hyperfine parameters of the implantation induced α phase are similar to those from conventionally induced martensites. (orig.)

  5. Modeling of the Austenite-Martensite Transformation in Stainless and TRIP Steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Hilkhuijsen, P.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Zhang, S.-H.; Liu, X.-H.; Gheng, M.; Li, J.

    2013-01-01

    The transformation of austenite to martensite is a dominant factor in the description of the constitutive behavior during forming of TRIP assisted steels. To predict this transformation different models are currently available. In this paper the transformation is regarded as a stress induced process

  6. Strain direction dependency of martensitic transformation in austenitic stainless steels: The effect of gamma-texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilkhuijsen, P.; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Perdahcioglu, Emin Semih; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Akkerman, Remko

    2013-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile tests on both a non-textured and a highly textured, fully austenitic stainless steel were performed in both the rolling and the transverse directions. Both materials show mechanically induced phase transformation from the austenitic FCC to the martensitic BCC phase. Differences in

  7. Martensitic transformations in 304 stainless steel after implantation with helium, hydrogen and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, E.; Grabaek, L.; Johansen, A.; Sarholt-Kristensen, L.; Hayashi, N.; Sakamoto, I.

    1988-01-01

    Using conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and glancing angle X-ray diffraction, martensitic transformations have been studied in type 304 austenitic stainless steels implanted with 8 keV helium, hydrogen and deuterium. Furthermore, using CEMS in the energy selective mode (DCEMS), the distribution of martensite in the implantation zone has been analysed as a function of depth. Transformation of the implanted layer occurs after implantation with 10 21 m -2 He + ions while 100 times higher fluence is required for the implanted layer to transform after hydrogen or deuterium implantations. This difference is due to the ability of helium to form high pressure gas bubbles, while implanted hydrogen is continuously lost by back diffusion to the surface. The helium bubbles, which are confined under pressures as high as 60 GPa, will induce extremely high stress levels in the implanted layer, by which the martensitic transformation is directly induced. The fact that a much higher fluence of hydrogen or deuterium is required to induce the transformation, shows that radiation damage plays only a minor role. In this case, the martensitic transformation first occurs when the implanted layer resembles the state of a cathodically charged surface. (orig.)

  8. Effect of alloying elements on martensitic transformation in the binary NiAl(β) phase alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kainuma, R.; Ohtani, H.; Ishida, K.

    1996-01-01

    The characteristics of the B2(β) to L1 0 (β') martensitic transformation in NiAl base alloys containing a small amount of third elements have been investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is found that in addition to the normal L1 0 (3R) martensite, the 7R martensite is also present in the ternary alloys containing Ti, Mo, Ag, Ta, or Zr. While the addition of third elements X (X: Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Zr, Nb, Mo, Ta, W, and Si) to the binary Ni 64 Al 36 alloy stabilizes the parent β phase, thereby lowering the M s temperature, addition of third elements such as Co, Cu, or Ag destabilizes the β phase, increasing the M s temperature. The occurrence of the 7R martensite structure is attributed to solid solution hardening arising from the difference in atomic size between Ni and Al and the third elements added. The variation in M s temperature with third element additions is primarily ascribed to the difference in lattice stabilities of the bcc and fcc phases of the alloying elements

  9. The Mechanism of High Ductility for Novel High-Carbon Quenching-Partitioning-Tempering Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Wang, Ying; Chen, Nailu; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua

    2015-09-01

    In this article, a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) process was applied to treat Fe-0.6C-1.5Mn-1.5Si-0.6Cr-0.05Nb hot-rolled high-carbon steel and the microstructures including retained austenite fraction and the average dislocation densities in both martensite and retained austenite were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The Q-P-T steel exhibits high strength (1950 MPa) and elongation (12.4 pct). Comparing with the steel treated by traditional quenching and tempering (Q&T) process, the mechanism of high ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T steel is revealed as follows. Much more retained austenite existing in Q-P-T steel than in Q&T one remarkably enhances the ductility by the following two effects: the dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect and the transformation-induced plasticity effect. Besides, lower dislocation density in martensite matrix produced by Q-P-T process plays an important role in the improvement of ductility. However, some thin plates of twin-type martensite embedded in dislocation-type martensite matrix in high-carbon Q-P-T steel affect the further improvement of ductility.

  10. Shape-memory materials as a working substance for martensitic rotary engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandzhavidze, A. G.; Barnov, V. A.; Sobolevskaya, S. V.; Margvelashvili, O. V.

    2006-05-01

    A martensitic rotary engine has been designed. The physical properties of its working substance are studied, and the power characteristics of the engine are determined. Temperature and stress cycling are shown to adversely affect the properties of the working element (a coil spring made of titanium nickelide) and, thus, to decrease the engine efficiency.

  11. Improved hardness of laser alloyed X12CrNiMo martensitic stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebiyi, DI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The improvement in hardness of X12CrNiMo martensitic stainless steel laser alloyed with 99.9% pure titanium carbide, stellite 6 and two cases of premixed ratio of titanium carbide and stellite 6 [TiC (30 wt.%)- stellite 6 (70 wt.%) and TiC (70 wt...

  12. Thermoelastic martensite and shape memory effect in ductile Cu-Al-Mn alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainuma, R.; Takahashi, S.; Ishida, K.

    1996-08-01

    Ductile shape memory (SM) alloys of the Cu-AI-Mn system have been developed by controlling the degree of order in the β phase. Additions of Mn to the binary Cu-Al alloy stabilize the β phase and widen the single-phase region to lower temperature and lower Al contents. It is shown that Cu-Al-Mn alloys with low Al contents have either the disordered A2 structure or the ordered L21 structure with a lower degree of order and that they exhibit excellent ductility. The disordered A2 phase martensitically transforms to the disordered Al phase with a high density of twins. The martensite phase formed from the ordered L21 phase has the 18R structure. The SM effect accompanies both the A2 → Al and L21 → 18R martensitic transformations. These alloys exhibit 15 pct strain to failure, 60 to 90 pct rolling reduction without cracking, and 80 to 90 pct recovery from bend test in the martensitic condition. Experimental results on the microstructure, crystal structure, mechanical properties, and shape memory behavior in the ductile Cu-AI-Mn alloys are presented and discussed.

  13. Propagation of an austenite-martensite interface in a thermal gradient

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Seiner, Hanuš; Landa, Michal; Sedlák, Petr

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 2 (2007), s. 218-225 ISSN 1406-0086 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200100627 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : shape memory alloy * martensitic transition * phase boundary Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  14. Martensitic Transformation in a β-Type Mg-Sc Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yukiko; Ando, Daisuke; Sutou, Yuji; Somekawa, Hidetoshi; Koike, Junichi

    2017-12-01

    Recently, we found that a Mg-Sc alloy with a bcc (β) phase exhibits superelasticity and a shape memory effect at low temperature. In this work, we examined the stress-induced and thermally induced martensitic transformation of the β-type Mg-Sc alloy and investigated the crystal structure of the thermally induced martensite phase based on in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. The lattice constants of the martensite phase were calculated to be a = 0.3285 nm, b = 0.5544 nm, and c = 0.5223 nm when we assumed that the martensite phase has an orthorhombic structure (Cmcm). Based on the lattice correspondence between a bcc and an orthorhombic structures such as that in the case of β-Ti shape memory alloys, we estimated the transformation strain of the β Mg-Sc alloy. As a result, the transformation strains along the 001, 011, and 111 directions in the β phase were calculated to be + 5.7, + 8.8, and + 3.3%, respectively.

  15. Temperature dependence of single twin boundary motion in Ni–Mn–Ga martensite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Straka, L.; Hänninen, H.; Heczko, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 14 (2011), 141902/1-141902/3 ISSN 0003-6951 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100913 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic shape memory effect * modulated martensite * Ni-Mn-Ga * mobility of twin boundary Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.844, year: 2011

  16. Shape memory effects, thermal expansion and B19' martensite texture in titanium nickelide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'dovich, V.I.; Sobyanina, G.A.; Rinkevich, O.S.; Gundyrev, V.M.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of plastic deformation by tension and cold rolling on shape memory effect, reverse shape memory effect, thermal expansion and texture state of martensite in titanium nickelide is under study. The relationship of thermal expansion coefficient to the value of strain during direct and reverse shape memory effect is established

  17. The effect of cooling and strain on martensitic transformation in Fe-Ni-Cr-Mn-Si alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Shin Hwa; Nam, Won Jong; Yoon, Man Son; Kang, Shin Wang; Lee, Dong Hyung

    1991-01-01

    In Fe-Ni-Cr-Mn-Si shape memory alloy, the effect of cooling methods and strain on the martensitic transformation was investigated. After the solution treatment at 900 deg C for 30 minutes, the specimens were air cooled, water cooled and quenched in liquid nitrogen. For air cooled specimens only austenite phase was detected, whereas austenite and ε-martensite phases were detected for specimens water cooled or quenched in liquid nitrogen. The amount of ε-martensite was increased with the cooling rate and strain. But the increasing rate of the amount of ε-martensite was decreased at 5% strain in air cooling and at 3% strain in water cooling, respectively. The occurrence of α-martensite was found at about 5% strain in air cooled specimens. For water cooled specimens it was found at about 3% strain. These strains almost coinceded with the strains at which the increasing rate of the amount of ε-martensite was changed. The occurrence of α-martensite in specimens quenched in liquid nitrogen was found less than 0.5% strain. (Author)

  18. Martensite transformation kinetics in 9Cr–1.7W–0.4Mo–Co ferritic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Qiuzhi, E-mail: neuqgao@163.com [School of Resources and Materials, Northeastern University at Qinhuangdao, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066000 (China); Wang, Cong; Qu, Fu; Wang, Yingling [School of Resources and Materials, Northeastern University at Qinhuangdao, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066000 (China); Qiao, Zhixia [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The obtained M{sub s} temperatures of samples austenitized at 1150 °C are higher than at 900 °C. • Martensite-start transformation is slower for austenitizing at 1150 °C than at 900 °C. • Martensite transformation was controlled by nucleation rate. • Growth of martensite plates was controlled by thermal activation of atoms. - Abstract: Martensite transformation features in the 9Cr–1.7W–0.4Mo–Co ferritic steel, was conducted on a Netzsch Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), after austenitized at 900 °C and 1150 °C followed by cooling at various rates to room temperature were studied. A martensite transformation kinetics model based on assumption of continuous nucleation and consideration of impingement was introduced to investigate the influence of austenitizing temperature and cooling rate on the martensite transformation behaviors. The obtained interface velocity and the activation energy for interface-controlling growth are lower than 10{sup −5} m/s and 40 kJ/mol, respectively, according to the fitted data. Both indicated that martensite transformation in the 9Cr–1.7W–0.4Mo–Co ferritic steel was controlled by nucleation rate, and that growth of plates was controlled by thermal activation of atoms.

  19. Martensite transformation kinetics in 9Cr–1.7W–0.4Mo–Co ferritic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Qiuzhi; Wang, Cong; Qu, Fu; Wang, Yingling; Qiao, Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The obtained M s temperatures of samples austenitized at 1150 °C are higher than at 900 °C. • Martensite-start transformation is slower for austenitizing at 1150 °C than at 900 °C. • Martensite transformation was controlled by nucleation rate. • Growth of martensite plates was controlled by thermal activation of atoms. - Abstract: Martensite transformation features in the 9Cr–1.7W–0.4Mo–Co ferritic steel, was conducted on a Netzsch Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), after austenitized at 900 °C and 1150 °C followed by cooling at various rates to room temperature were studied. A martensite transformation kinetics model based on assumption of continuous nucleation and consideration of impingement was introduced to investigate the influence of austenitizing temperature and cooling rate on the martensite transformation behaviors. The obtained interface velocity and the activation energy for interface-controlling growth are lower than 10 −5 m/s and 40 kJ/mol, respectively, according to the fitted data. Both indicated that martensite transformation in the 9Cr–1.7W–0.4Mo–Co ferritic steel was controlled by nucleation rate, and that growth of plates was controlled by thermal activation of atoms

  20. Analysis of the Mechanical Behavior, Creep Resistance and Uniaxial Fatigue Strength of Martensitic Steel X46Cr13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brnic, Josip; Krscanski, Sanjin; Lanc, Domagoj; Brcic, Marino; Turkalj, Goran; Canadija, Marko; Niu, Jitai

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with the analysis of the mechanical behavior at different temperatures, uniaxial creep and uniaxial fatigue of martensitic steel X46Cr13 (1.4034, AISI 420). For the purpose of considering the aforementioned mechanical behavior, as well as determining the appropriate resistance to creep and fatigue strength levels, numerous uniaxial tests were carried out. Tests related to mechanical properties performed at different temperatures are presented in the form of engineering stress-strain diagrams. Short-time creep tests performed at different temperatures and different stress levels are presented in the form of creep curves. Fatigue tests carried out at stress ratios R=0.25 and R=−1 are shown in the form of S–N (fatigue) diagrams. The finite fatigue regime for each of the mentioned stress ratios is modeled by an inclined log line, while the infinite fatigue regime is modeled by a horizontal line, which represents the fatigue limit of the material and previously was calculated by the modified staircase method. Finally, the fracture toughness has been calculated based on the Charpy V-notch impact energy. PMID:28772749