WorldWideScience

Sample records for modern scientific thinking

  1. Dilemmas over the theory and practice of the modern world pseudoconcreteness and scientific thinking

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    Aničić Radosav M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The reality of the modern world has become characteristic in many aspects even historically, due to a large number of almost insoluble contradictions of social-economic development most often accompanied by seriously warning retrograde processes, existential problems of a large part of the world population and other phenomena that are difficult to solve by using knowledge of contemporary science. Starting from this, as well as from a well known premise of the philosophy of science dating from the Plato age that "a thought arises from the opposite", it is possible to conclude that there have been few periods in recent human history so inspiring and at the same time so aggravating for the science as the period in which we are living. This paper deals with the following question: is the contemporary scientific thought and to what extent, capable of facing this challenge especially bearing in mind that it has been argued that, due to a general crisis of practice, science itself, as its reflective form, is also facing a crisis. The paper aims at critical reviewing of those attitudes and beliefs in which the essence of science and its interdependency upon the reality it studies are incomplete or inadequate.

  2. Promoting scientific thinking with robots

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    Carbajal, Juan Pablo; Benker, Emanuel

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an exemplary robot exercise which was conducted in a class for mechatronics students. The goal of this exercise was to engage students in scientific thinking and reasoning, activities which do not always play an important role in their curriculum. The robotic platform presented here is simple in its construction and is customizable to the needs of the teacher. Therefore, it can be used for exercises in many different fields of science, not necessarily related to robotics. Here we present a situation where the robot is used like an alien creature from which we want to understand its behavior, resembling an ethological research activity. This robot exercise is suited for a wide range of courses, from general introduction to science, to hardware oriented lectures.

  3. The forgotten half of scientific thinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Although thinking is the core business of scientists, we rarely ponder how it thrives best; this is ironic, as there is abundant scientific insight to draw upon. For example, it is now known that thinking has two complementary modes: roughly, association versus reasoning (1). We systematically

  4. Scientific Writing = Thinking in Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensuring that research results are reported accurately and effectively is an eternal challenge for scientists. The book Science Writing = Thinking in Words (David Lindsay, 2011. CSIRO Publishing) is a primer for researchers who seek to improve their impact through better written (and oral) presentat...

  5. Educational interventions to advance children's scientific thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klahr, David; Zimmerman, Corinne; Jirout, Jamie

    2011-08-19

    The goal of science education interventions is to nurture, enrich, and sustain children's natural and spontaneous interest in scientific knowledge and procedures. We present taxonomy for classifying different types of research on scientific thinking from the perspective of cognitive development and associated attempts to teach science. We summarize the literature on the early--unschooled--development of scientific thinking, and then focus on recent research on how best to teach science to children from preschool to middle school. We summarize some of the current disagreements in the field of science education and offer some suggestions on ways to continue to advance the science of science instruction.

  6. Gaming science: the "Gamification" of scientific thinking.

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    Morris, Bradley J; Croker, Steve; Zimmerman, Corinne; Gill, Devin; Romig, Connie

    2013-09-09

    Science is critically important for advancing economics, health, and social well-being in the twenty-first century. A scientifically literate workforce is one that is well-suited to meet the challenges of an information economy. However, scientific thinking skills do not routinely develop and must be scaffolded via educational and cultural tools. In this paper we outline a rationale for why we believe that video games have the potential to be exploited for gain in science education. The premise we entertain is that several classes of video games can be viewed as a type of cultural tool that is capable of supporting three key elements of scientific literacy: content knowledge, process skills, and understanding the nature of science. We argue that there are three classes of mechanisms through which video games can support scientific thinking. First, there are a number of motivational scaffolds, such as feedback, rewards, and flow states that engage students relative to traditional cultural learning tools. Second, there are a number of cognitive scaffolds, such as simulations and embedded reasoning skills that compensate for the limitations of the individual cognitive system. Third, fully developed scientific thinking requires metacognition, and video games provide metacognitive scaffolding in the form of constrained learning and identity adoption. We conclude by outlining a series of recommendations for integrating games and game elements in science education and provide suggestions for evaluating their effectiveness.

  7. Gaming Science: The Gamification of Scientific Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley eMorris

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Science is critically important for advancing economics, health, and social well being in the 21st century. A scientifically literate workforce is one that is well suited to meet the challenges of an information economy. However, scientific thinking skills do not routinely develop and must be scaffolded via educational and cultural tools. In this paper we outline a rationale for why we believe that video games have the potential to be exploited for gain in science education. The premise we entertain is that several classes of video games can be viewed as a type of cultural tool that is capable of supporting three key elements of scientific literacy: content knowledge, process skills, and understanding the nature of science. We argue that there are three classes of mechanisms through which video games can support scientific thinking. First, there are a number of motivational scaffolds, such as feedback, rewards, and flow states that engage students relative to traditional cultural learning tools. Second, there are a number of cognitive scaffolds, such as simulations and embedded reasoning skills that compensate for the limitations of the individual cognitive system. Third, fully developed scientific thinking requires metacognition, and video games provide metacognitive scaffolding in the form of constrained learning and identity adoption. We conclude by outlining a series of recommendations for integrating games and game elements in science education and provide suggestions for evaluating their effectiveness.

  8. The Scientific Method - Critical and Creative Thinking

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    Cotton, John; Scarlise, Randall

    2011-10-01

    The ``scientific method'' is not just for scientists! Combined with critical thinking, the scientific method can enable students to distinguish credible sources of information from nonsense and become intelligent consumers of information. Professors John Cotton and Randall Scalise illustrate these principles using a series of examples and demonstrations that is enlightening, educational, and entertaining. This lecture/demonstration features highlights from their course (whose unofficial title is ``debunking pseudoscience'' ) which enables students to detect pseudoscience in its many guises: paranormal phenomena, free-energy devices, alternative medicine, and many others.

  9. Mythical thinking, scientific discourses and research dissemination.

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    Hroar Klempe, Sven

    2011-06-01

    This article focuses on some principles for understanding. By taking Anna Mikulak's article "Mismatches between 'scientific' and 'non-scientific' ways of knowing and their contributions to public understanding of science" (IPBS 2011) as a point of departure, the idea of demarcation criteria for scientific and non-scientific discourses is addressed. Yet this is juxtaposed with mythical thinking, which is supposed to be the most salient trait of non-scientific discourses. The author demonstrates how the most widespread demarcation criterion, the criterion of verification, is self-contradictory, not only when it comes to logic, but also in the achievement of isolating natural sciences from other forms of knowledge. According to Aristotle induction is a rhetorical device and as far as scientific statements are based on inductive inferences, they are relying on humanities, which rhetoric is a part of. Yet induction also has an empirical component by being based on sense-impressions, which is not a part of the rhetoric, but the psychology. Also the myths are understood in a rhetorical (Lévi-Strauss) and a psychological (Cassirer) perspective. Thus it is argued that both scientific and non-scientific discourses can be mythical.

  10. [Paraphrenia: the modernity of Emil Kraepelin's thinking].

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    Pelizza, Lorenzo; Bonazzi, Federica

    2010-01-01

    Paraphrenia is a chronic psychotic disorder similar to paranoid schizophrenia, but with a better-preserved affect and rapport, and a much less personality deterioration. It was at first described by Kraepelin in 1913 as a group of patients who exhibited delusional symptoms typical of dementia praecox, but with minimal disturbances of emotion and volition. After the publication of Mayer-Gross's report in 1921, the view to differentiate paraphrenia from schizophrenia was considered to be unfounded and the term "paraphrenia" was not included in the current DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10 diagnostic criteria. Consequently, this disorder is now diagnosed relatively infrequently. However, several authors have recently suggested that the paraphrenia concept has not lost its usefulness. It seems to be that many psychiatrists recognize the illness, but labelled it as "atypical psychosis", "schizoaffective disorder" or "psychotic disorder not otherwise specified" for the lack of a better diagnostic category. Very few systematic studies on paraphrenia have been conducted in the past 70 years. Aim of this article is to underline the modernity of Kraepelin's thinking and his "paraphrenia" concept, suggesting that it could be possible to define and recognize the illness if practitioners would be induced to use a viable diagnostic entity.

  11. Developing Scientific Thinking Methods and Applications in Islamic Education

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    Al-Sharaf, Adel

    2013-01-01

    This article traces the early and medieval Islamic scholarship to the development of critical and scientific thinking and how they contributed to the development of an Islamic theory of epistemology and scientific thinking education. The article elucidates how the Qur'an and the Sunna of Prophet Muhammad have also contributed to the…

  12. Developing Scientific Thinking Methods and Applications in Islamic Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sharaf, Adel

    2013-01-01

    This article traces the early and medieval Islamic scholarship to the development of critical and scientific thinking and how they contributed to the development of an Islamic theory of epistemology and scientific thinking education. The article elucidates how the Qur'an and the Sunna of Prophet Muhammad have also contributed to the…

  13. Think Scientifically: Science Hidden in a Storybook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Norden, W. M.

    2012-12-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory's Think Scientifically (TS) program links literacy and science in the elementary classroom through an engaging storybook format and hands-on, inquiry based activities. TS consists of three illustrated storybooks, each addressing a different solar science concept. Accompanying each book is a hands-on science lesson plan that emphasizes the concepts addressed in the book, as well as math, reading, and language arts activities. Written by teachers, the books are designed to be extremely user-friendly and easy to implement in classroom instruction. The objectives of the program are: (1) to increase time spent on science in elementary school classrooms, (2) to assist educators in implementing hands-on science activities that reinforce concepts from the book, (3) to increase teacher capacity and comfort in teaching solar concepts, (4) to increase student awareness and interest in solar topics, especially students in under-served and under-represented communities. Our program meets these objectives through the National Science Standards-based content delivered in each story, the activities provided in the books, and the accompanying training that teachers are offered through the program.; ;

  14. Charles Lyell and scientific thinking in geology

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    Virgili, Carmina

    2007-07-01

    Charles Lyell (1797-1875) was born at Kinnordy, Scotland. His father, an amateur botanist, and his grandfather, a navigator, gave him very soon a taste for the observation of the Nature. He went to the Oxford University to study classical literature, but he also followed the geological course of William Buckland. After having been employed as jurist for some years, in 1827 he decided on a career of geologist and held the chair of geology of the King's College of London, from 1831 on. He was a contemporary of Cuvier, Darwin, von Humboldt, Hutton, Lavoisier, and was elected 'membre correspondant' of the 'Académie des sciences, France', in January 1862. Charles Lyell is one of the eminent geologists who initiated the scientific thinking in geology, in which his famous volumes of the Principles of Geology were taken as the authority. These reference volumes are based on multiple observations and field works collected during numerous fieldtrips in western Europe (principally Spain, France, and Italy) and North America. To his name are attached, among others: ( i) the concept of uniformitarism (or actualism), which was opposed to the famous catastrophism, in vogue at that time, and which may be summarized by the expression "The present is the key to the past"; ( ii) the division of the Tertiary in three series denominated Eocene, Miocene, and Pliocene, due to the study of the age of strata by fossil faunas; ( iii) the theory according to which the orogenesis of a mountain chain, as the Pyrenees, results from different pulsations on very long time scales and was not induced by a unique pulsation during a short and intense period. The uniformity of the laws of Nature is undeniably a principle Charles Lyell was the first to state clearly and to apply to the study of the whole Earth's crust, which opened a new era in geology.

  15. Post-modern thinking and African philosophy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    worldview of the modern period of Western (specifically European) history —a ... humans from nonhuman animals; (b) that there is an objective natural reality ... experiment in the combination of language games and as an objective “report.”.

  16. EASTERN SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS THROUGH THE LENS OF MODERN SCIENTIFIC WORLDVIEW

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    Tetiana V. Danylova

    2014-06-01

    that have been mastered over centuries. Meditation acts as a means of overcoming binary oppositions inherent to any given culture. It contributes to the experience of one absolute unity of all existence. Scientific novelty. Modern science reaffirmed one of the basic statements of Eastern mysticism: our concepts that we use to explain the world (such as past, present, future, physical space, personality, etc. are not fundamental characteristics of reality. They are products of thinking, that is, they are the map rather than the territory. Conclusion. In contrast to Western paradigm, the main characteristic of Eastern philosophy and science is the non-mathematical, non-technical approach to an understanding of the universe. Eastern sage has never separated himself from the Nature. He has experienced all phenomena in the world as manifestations of a basic Oneness, Wholeness, as the various aspects of spiritual unity.

  17. Eastern Spiritual Traditions Through the Lens of Modern Scientific Worldview

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    Tetiana V. Danylova

    2014-06-01

    that have been mastered over centuries. Meditation acts as a means of overcoming binary oppositions inherent to any given culture. It contributes to the experience of one absolute unity of all existence. Scientific novelty. Modern science reaffirmed one of the basic statements of Eastern mysticism: our concepts that we use to explain the world (such as past, present, future, physical space, personality, etc. are not fundamental characteristics of reality. They are products of thinking, that is, they are the map rather than the territory. Conclusion. In contrast to Western paradigm, the main characteristic of Eastern philosophy and science is the non-mathematical, non-technical approach to an understanding of the universe. Eastern sage has never separated himself from the Nature. He has experienced all phenomena in the world as manifestations of a basic Oneness, Wholeness, as the various aspects of spiritual unity.

  18. Thinking of modern wushu dissemination method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    martial arts in China for thousands of years culture heritage plays an important role, today has become a symbol of Chinese national culture. Martial arts in the long history of several thousand years, continuous development and fusion, formed a unique mode of transmission, and under the changing trend of the development of modern science and technology, not according to the traditional Chinese wushu dissemination, combined with the contemporary science and technology, network promotion, development of martial arts school, strengthen the cultural background, is the best way out for the spread of Chinese martial arts.

  19. Opportunities to learn scientific thinking in joint doctoral supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Grout, Brian William Wilson; Rump, Camilla Østerberg

    2015-01-01

    Research into doctoral supervision has increased rapidly over the last decades, yet our understanding of how doctoral students learn scientific thinking from supervision is limited. Most studies are based on interviews with little work being reported that is based on observation of actual supervi...

  20. Opportunities to Learn Scientific Thinking in Joint Doctoral Supervision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Grout, Brian W.; Rump, Camilla Østerberg

    2015-01-01

    Research into doctoral supervision has increased rapidly over the last decades, yet our understanding of how doctoral students learn scientific thinking from supervision is limited. Most studies are based on interviews with little work being reported that is based on observation of actual supervision. While joint supervision has become widely…

  1. Relevance of mathematics in development scientific and technological thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco Lay, Gonzalo; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos Facultad de Educación; Gutiérrez Sánchez, Hildebrando

    2014-01-01

    The article reviews three issues: Ethos of modern society, notion of time and training strategy through mathematics. The subjects apparently could explain the importance of mathematics in the development of scientific thought and technology in modern societies. From the descriptive empirical evidence, it is understandable strategy, and its results adopted by countries that qualify for better human development. El artículo revisa tres temas: Ethos de la sociedad moderna, noción de tiempo y ...

  2. MYTHOLOGIC AND DESTRUCTION OF THE SCIENTIFIC AND ARCHAIC CONSCIOUSNESS (TRAVELING TO SOURCES OF PRESOCRATIC THINKING

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    V. B. Okorokov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of research consists in that: having plunged into depths of primitive consciousness (using the recipe of many thinkers of non-classical philosophy, to reveal contradiction of the European thought (at its sources in Ancient Greek thought and show resources of mythological thinking on the way of overcoming of these contradictions. Methodology. All methodological installations, using possibilities, borderlines and effects of non-classical consciousness, have appeared insufficiently effective for adequate understanding of essence of the person. The generalised method, which is used by us, leans on deep resources of high-energy consciousness and on decoding of possibilities of anthropological time that it presumes to open new horizons of human existence. Originality. Addressing to modern representations about the changed conditions of consciousness, we have tried to see the historically generated discursive practices of understanding reality by the consciousness (including the historical one. Thus, using the consistently conducted destruction we are aimed at reaching the first sources of consciousness and revealing the deep historical mechanisms of temporal consciousnesses formation (as far as it possible in the modern conditions. Conclusions. It is shown that the use of the basic ideas of Ancient Greek thought leads scientific consciousness to deadlocks of contradictions, which were consistently revealed during subsequent history of philosophy and culture. The analysis of ancient mythological texts allows concluding, that the Greek thought is not a source of modern scientific thought. That is to understand the scientific thought one should address to the more ancient archaic thinking. Thus, to overcome the contradictions of modern scientific and philosophical thought it is necessary to search new alternative (more ancient sources of understanding of the historical reality, first of all, connected with deepening into ancient

  3. Evolutionary thinking: "A conversation with Carter Phipps about the role of evolutionary thinking in modern culture".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Tam

    2014-12-01

    Evolution as an idea has a lengthy history, even though the idea of evolution is generally associated with Darwin today. Rebecca Stott provides an engaging and thoughtful overview of this history of evolutionary thinking in her 2013 book, Darwin's Ghosts: The Secret History of Evolution. Since Darwin, the debate over evolution-both how it takes place and, in a long war of words with religiously-oriented thinkers, whether it takes place-has been sustained and heated. A growing share of this debate is now devoted to examining how evolutionary thinking affects areas outside of biology. How do our lives change when we recognize that all is in flux? What can we learn about life more generally if we study change instead of stasis? Carter Phipps' book, Evolutionaries: Unlocking the Spiritual and Cultural Potential of Science's Greatest Idea, delves deep into this relatively new development. Phipps generally takes as a given the validity of the Modern Synthesis of evolutionary biology. His story takes us into, as the subtitle suggests, the spiritual and cultural implications of evolutionary thinking. Can religion and evolution be reconciled? Can evolutionary thinking lead to a new type of spirituality? Is our culture already being changed in ways that we don't realize by evolutionary thinking? These are all important questions and Phipps book is a great introduction to this discussion. Phipps is an author, journalist, and contributor to the emerging "integral" or "evolutionary" cultural movement that combines the insights of Integral Philosophy, evolutionary science, developmental psychology, and the social sciences. He has served as the Executive Editor of EnlightenNext magazine (no longer published) and more recently is the co-founder of the Institute for Cultural Evolution, a public policy think tank addressing the cultural roots of America's political challenges. What follows is an email interview with Phipps.

  4. Modern Aspects of Schoolchildren’s Creative Thinking Development

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    Zhanar E. Sarsekeeva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article is about actual problems of schoolchildren’s creative thinking development. The changes happening in our society show absolutely different requirements to the younger generation than they were before which will become not only an active component of the state, but also the leading force in its further development in the closest future. Pedagogy of ideological dogmas, reproductive training, compounding and regulation of teacher and pupils’ activity corresponded to the society of totalitarian consciousness, priority of a political and ideological orientation in full measure. Nowadays pedagogical technologies differ in the rigid organization of school life, suppression of pupils’ initiative and independence, application of requirements and coercions. The personal focused technologies which gained new development at present moment are characterized by anthropocentricity, humanistic and psychotherapeutic orientation. They are aimed at versatile, free and creative development of the child. Only such active, creative personality is capable to realize in difficult social relationship of modern society. From the carried-out analysis of psychology and pedagogical literature it is possible to note that schoolchildren’s creative thinking development is becoming the priority direction.

  5. CREATE Cornerstone: Introduction to Scientific Thinking, a New Course for STEM-Interested Freshmen, Demystifies Scientific Thinking through Analysis of Scientific Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottesman, Alan J.; Hoskins, Sally G.

    2013-01-01

    The Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment (CREATE) strategy for teaching and learning uses intensive analysis of primary literature to improve students’ critical-thinking and content integration abilities, as well as their self-rated science attitudes, understanding, and confidence. CREATE also supports maturation of undergraduates’ epistemological beliefs about science. This approach, originally tested with upper-level students, has been adapted in Introduction to Scientific Thinking, a new course for freshmen. Results from this course's initial semesters indicate that freshmen in a one-semester introductory course that uses a narrowly focused set of readings to promote development of analytical skills made significant gains in critical-thinking and experimental design abilities. Students also reported significant gains in their ability to think scientifically and understand primary literature. Their perceptions and understanding of science improved, and multiple aspects of their epistemological beliefs about science gained sophistication. The course has no laboratory component, is relatively inexpensive to run, and could be adapted to any area of scientific study. PMID:23463229

  6. On multi-level thinking and scientific understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Michael Edgeworth

    2017-10-01

    Professor Duzheng YE's name has been familiar to me ever since my postdoctoral years at MIT with Professors Jule CHARNEY and Norman PHILLIPS, back in the late 1960s. I had the enormous pleasure of meeting Professor YE personally in 1992 in Beijing. His concern to promote the very best science and to use it well, and his thinking on multi-level orderly human activities, reminds me not only of the communication skills we need as scientists but also of the multi-level nature of science itself. Here I want to say something (a) about what science is; (b) about why multi-level thinking—and taking more than one viewpoint—is so important for scientific as well as for other forms of understanding; and (c) about what is meant, at a deep level, by "scientific understanding" and trying to communicate it, not only with lay persons but also across professional disciplines. I hope that Professor YE would approve.

  7. Scaffolding preservice teachers' noticing of elementary students' scientific thinking

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    Hawkins, Susan R.

    To effectively meet students' needs, educational reform in science calls for adaptive instruction based on students' thinking. To gain an understanding of what students know, a teacher needs to attend to, probe, and analyze student thinking to provide information to base curricular decisions, upon. These three components make up the skill of noticing. Learning to notice is not easy for any teacher, but is especially difficult for preservice teachers, who lack the experience these skills require. Additionally they lack the professional knowledge needed to inform responses. The purpose of this study was to discover how a combination of scaffolds: video-based reflection on practice, a professional learning community, and a content specific moderator as a guide can be embedded into a methods course to support preservice teachers' learning to professionally notice elementary students' scientific thinking in order to provide a responsive curriculum. The study was designed on the premise that the skill of professional noticing is critical for preservice teachers to acquire the knowledge and ability to develop their personal PCK and topic specific professional knowledge. It was situated in a methods course as this is the structure provided within teacher education programs to tie theory to practice. This qualitative case study, studied one section of an elementary science methods course during teaching of their science unit. In general participants' skills progressed from noticing the class as a whole to attending to specific students' thinking and from a focus on evaluation to interpretation. By the end they were connecting teaching strategies to student thinking. How participants' responded to what they had noticed progressed as well, moving from frontloading information to creating additional constructivist based learning experiences when encountering student confusion demonstrating growth in their professional knowledge as well as their noticing skills. They attributed

  8. Distinguishing science from pseudoscience in school psychology: science and scientific thinking as safeguards against human error.

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    Lilienfeld, Scott O; Ammirati, Rachel; David, Michal

    2012-02-01

    Like many domains of professional psychology, school psychology continues to struggle with the problem of distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific and otherwise questionable clinical practices. We review evidence for the scientist-practitioner gap in school psychology and provide a user-friendly primer on science and scientific thinking for school psychologists. Specifically, we (a) outline basic principles of scientific thinking, (b) delineate widespread cognitive errors that can contribute to belief in pseudoscientific practices within school psychology and allied professions, (c) provide a list of 10 key warning signs of pseudoscience, illustrated by contemporary examples from school psychology and allied disciplines, and (d) offer 10 user-friendly prescriptions designed to encourage scientific thinking among school psychology practitioners and researchers. We argue that scientific thinking, although fallible, is ultimately school psychologists' best safeguard against a host of errors in thinking.

  9. The organic principle of eurasianism and the prerequisite of change of the style of thinking dominating in modern science

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    Koptelova T. I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the organic principle of the Euroasian philosophy is studied. The organic principle acts as a basis of special style of thinking and a certain methodology of scientific knowledge here. The Euroasian methodology of studying of development of society allows establishing of the nature of communications between social processes and the phenomena of wildlife. In the article, the most important components of the Euroasian organic principle of thinking are shown: special terminology and possibilities of its application for the description and forecasting of the social phenomena. Prerequisites of change of the style of thinking dominating in modern science are also noted. The author considers advantages of the organic principle of the Euroasian methodology in solution of national political, social-economic and cultural problems and in possible prospects of its use for formation of scientific methodology. The organic principle of thinking creates complex idea of reality, which can appear before us new, party unknown earlier. Lack of division of sensual experience and “pure reason”, irrational and rational in organic thinking is unconditional advantage of organic approach. Organic principle presented by the Euroasian philosophical organization of the beginning of the twentieth century and continued by Lev Gumilev in the theory of ethnogenesis acts as alternative developed in the west of one-dimensional, mechanistic methodology. It can be told with confidence that owning all of variety of intellectual traditions is necessary for the modern humankind to become capable to realize global ecological threats and negative consequences of influence of culture in which ethics of individualism prevails.

  10. On Complexity of Social System and Modern Thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongsenWei

    2004-01-01

    This paper puts forward the idea that social system is an open complex macrosystem and summarized its eight characteristics. The research object of social system is also an open complex macro-system, thus the complex theory and systems thinking should be applied to research rather than the simplicity theory.

  11. Using Scientific Thinking and Intelligent Aggregation to Tame Big Data

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    Strelitz, R. A.; Yuen, D. A.

    2013-12-01

    Using Scientific Thinking and Intelligent Aggregation to Tame Big Data. Dave Yuen, Department of Minnesota Supercomputing Institute , University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0219 USA Richard Strelitz, CCS-3, MS B265, Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 We take the contrarian position that BIG DATA is at best a misnomer. The average human is confronted with Terabytes to Petabytes of sensor data daily, not to mention all of the internally generate throughts and conclusions. We start with the assumption that the coping mechanism is based on aggregation, suppression and prediction in a tight, Kalman filter based feedback system. Over the past year we have been developing tools and schemas that implement if not the mechanisms then the concepts we use every day, at work and in life. Current simulation science and its most faithful henchmen-visualization and statistics, are predicated on the idea that value at a point (on a grid) is the natural if not only was to consider data. It gives primacy to the geometry, itself an artifact of computational ease and also creates an entirely misleading sense that the value is precise and immutable. Yet when we view the same representation through our scientific lenses, we see patterns, structures, and familiar forms, and most often a large number of these in various sizes, orientations and stages of maturity. It is the pattern that matters. We have applied this concept to ocean eddy's that make up a significant part of the world wide ocean. Many ';see' the eddies, but few have attempted to compile demographics of size, age, depth, power that speak powerfully to the degree of mixing of various source waters. Fewer still have used this catalogue of self-similar features to develop scaling laws that relate to their formation and disappearance. Here we introduce the essential paradigm of the scientific method --observe, simulate, refine, repeat. A key feature of our approach is its adherence to first principles and

  12. The Role of Metaphorical Thinking in the Creativity of Scientific Discourse

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    Sanchez-Ruiz, Maria-Jose; Santos, Manuela Romo; Jiménez, Juan Jiménez

    2013-01-01

    This article critically reviews the extant literature on scientific creativity and metaphorical thinking. Metaphorical thinking is based on a conceptual transfer of relationships or mapping, from a well-known source domain to a poorly known target domain, which could result in creative outcomes in sciences. Creativity leads to products that are…

  13. Scientific Literacy: Resurrecting the Phoenix with Thinking Skills

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    Deming, John C.; O'Donnell, Jacqueline R.; Malone, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Prior research suggests that students' understanding of scientific concepts is pre-determined by their reasoning ability. Other efforts suggest that American students' scientific literacy is in decline. One difficulty Bybee (2009) acknowledges is that there are two divergent philosophical models of scientific literacy. The first describes the…

  14. Promoting Scientific Spirit to Cultivate Scientific Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Scientific culture is an advanced culture that is based on scientific knowledge and supported by the scientific method, with scientific thinking as its core and scientific spirit as its soul. During the process of modernization, it has profound impacts on human society in terms of values, ethics, mode of thinking, lifestyle and code of conduct, offering human civilization an important ideological source, physical foundation, technological tool and effective carrier.

  15. Thinking in early modernity and the separation process between philosophy and psychology.

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    Klempe, Sven Hroar

    2015-03-01

    One of the big questions in psychology is when and how psychology disentangled from philosophy. Usually it is referred to the laboratory Wundt established in Leipzig in 1879 as the birth for psychology as an independent science. However this separation process can also be traced in other ways, like by focusing on how the two sciences approach and understand thinking. Although thinking and language were not included in the research in this laboratory, Wundt (1897) regarded thinking as the core of psychology. As a commentary to Papanicolaou (Integr Psychol Behav Sci doi:10.1007/s12124-014-9273-3, 2014), this paper investigates the differences in how psychology and philosophy conceptualized thinking in early Western modernity. Thus one of the findings is that the separation process between the two was more or less initiated by Immanuel Kant. By defining thinking in terms of the pure reason he excluded the psychological understanding of thinking because psychology basically defined thinking in terms of ideas derived from qualia and sensation. Another finding is that psychology itself has not completely realized the differences between the philosophical and the psychological understanding of thinking by having been influenced by Kant's ideal of the pure reason. This may also explain some of the crises psychology went through during the twentieth century.

  16. Decoding the Disciplines: An Approach to Scientific Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinnow, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    The Decoding the Disciplines methodology aims to teach students to think like experts in discipline-specific tasks. The central aspect of the methodology is to identify a bottleneck in the course content: a particular topic that a substantial number of students struggle to master. The current study compared the efficacy of standard lecture and…

  17. Operation ARA: A Computerized Learning Game that Teaches Critical Thinking and Scientific Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Diane F.; Millis, Keith; Graesser, Arthur C.; Butler, Heather; Forsyth, Carol; Cai, Zhiqiang

    2012-01-01

    Operation ARA (Acquiring Research Acumen) is a computerized learning game that teaches critical thinking and scientific reasoning. It is a valuable learning tool that utilizes principles from the science of learning and serious computer games. Students learn the skills of scientific reasoning by engaging in interactive dialogs with avatars. They…

  18. Distinguishing Science from Pseudoscience in School Psychology: Science and Scientific Thinking as Safeguards against Human Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Ammirati, Rachel; David, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Like many domains of professional psychology, school psychology continues to struggle with the problem of distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific and otherwise questionable clinical practices. We review evidence for the scientist-practitioner gap in school psychology and provide a user-friendly primer on science and scientific thinking for…

  19. Distinguishing Science from Pseudoscience in School Psychology: Science and Scientific Thinking as Safeguards against Human Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Ammirati, Rachel; David, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Like many domains of professional psychology, school psychology continues to struggle with the problem of distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific and otherwise questionable clinical practices. We review evidence for the scientist-practitioner gap in school psychology and provide a user-friendly primer on science and scientific thinking for…

  20. Developing the critical thinking skills of astrobiology students through creative and scientific inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jamie S; Lemus, Judith D

    2015-01-01

    Scientific inquiry represents a multifaceted approach to explore and understand the natural world. Training students in the principles of scientific inquiry can help promote the scientific learning process as well as help students enhance their understanding of scientific research. Here, we report on the development and implementation of a learning module that introduces astrobiology students to the concepts of creative and scientific inquiry, as well as provide practical exercises to build critical thinking skills. The module contained three distinct components: (1) a creative inquiry activity designed to introduce concepts regarding the role of creativity in scientific inquiry; (2) guidelines to help astrobiology students formulate and self-assess questions regarding various scientific content and imagery; and (3) a practical exercise where students were allowed to watch a scientific presentation and practice their analytical skills. Pre- and post-course surveys were used to assess the students' perceptions regarding creative and scientific inquiry and whether this activity impacted their understanding of the scientific process. Survey results indicate that the exercise helped improve students' science skills by promoting awareness regarding the role of creativity in scientific inquiry and building their confidence in formulating and assessing scientific questions. Together, the module and survey results confirm the need to include such inquiry-based activities into the higher education classroom, thereby helping students hone their critical thinking and question asking skill set and facilitating their professional development in astrobiology.

  1. Becoming a successful scientist: strategic thinking for scientific discovery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loehle, Craig, Ph. D

    2010-01-01

    .... All types of scientific careers are discussed, from those in industry and academia to consulting, with emphasis on how scientists spend their time and the skills that are needed to be productive...

  2. Scientists and Scientific Thinking: Understanding Scientific Thinking through an Investigation of Scientists Views about Superstitions and Religious Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll, Richard K.; Lay, Mark C.; Taylor, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Scientific literacy is explored in this paper which describes two studies that seek to understand a particular feature of the nature of science; namely scientists' habits of mind. The research investigated scientists' views of scientific evidence and how scientists judge evidence claims. The first study is concerned with scientists' views of what…

  3. Hauntings, homeopathy, and the Hopkinsville Goblins: using pseudoscience to teach scientific thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaltz, Rodney; Lilienfeld, Scott O.

    2014-01-01

    With access to information ever increasing, it is essential that students acquire the skills to distinguish fact from fiction. By incorporating examples of pseudoscience into lectures, instructors can provide students with the tools needed to understand the difference between scientific and pseudoscientific or paranormal claims. We discuss examples involving psychics, ghosts, aliens, and other phenomena in relation to scientific thinking. In light of research literature demonstrating that presenting and dispelling scientific misconceptions in the classroom is an effective means of countering non-scientific or pseudoscientific beliefs, we provide examples of pseudoscience that can be used to help students acquire healthy skepticism while avoiding cynicism. PMID:24860520

  4. Hauntings, homeopathy, and the Hopkinsville Goblins: Using pseudoscience to teach scientific thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney Michael Schmaltz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available With access to information ever increasing, it is essential that students acquire the skills to distinguish fact from fiction. By incorporating examples of pseudoscience into lectures, instructors can provide students with the tools needed to understand the difference between scientific and pseudoscientific or paranormal claims. We discuss examples involving psychics, ghosts, aliens, and other phenomena in relation to scientific thinking. In light of research literature demonstrating that presenting and dispelling scientific misconceptions in the classroom is an effective means of countering non-scientific or pseudoscientific beliefs, we provide examples of pseudoscience that can be used to help students acquire healthy skepticism while avoiding cynicism.

  5. Hauntings, homeopathy, and the Hopkinsville Goblins: using pseudoscience to teach scientific thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmaltz, Rodney; Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2014-01-01

    With access to information ever increasing, it is essential that students acquire the skills to distinguish fact from fiction. By incorporating examples of pseudoscience into lectures, instructors can provide students with the tools needed to understand the difference between scientific and pseudoscientific or paranormal claims. We discuss examples involving psychics, ghosts, aliens, and other phenomena in relation to scientific thinking. In light of research literature demonstrating that presenting and dispelling scientific misconceptions in the classroom is an effective means of countering non-scientific or pseudoscientific beliefs, we provide examples of pseudoscience that can be used to help students acquire healthy skepticism while avoiding cynicism.

  6. Visual, Critical, and Scientific Thinking Dispositions in a 3rd Grade Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Stacy

    Many American students leave school without the required 21st century critical thinking skills. This qualitative case study, based on the theoretical concepts of Facione, Arheim, and Vygotsky, explored the development of thinking dispositions through the arts in science on the development of scientific thinking skills when used as a conceptual thinking routine in a rural 3rd grade classroom. Research questions examined the disposition to think critically through the arts in science and focused on the perceptions and experiences of 25 students with the Visual Thinking Strategy (VTS) process. Data were collected from classroom observations (n = 10), student interviews (n = 25), teacher interviews ( n = 1), a focus group discussion (n = 3), and artifacts of student work (n = 25); these data included perceptions of VTS, school culture, and classroom characteristics. An inductive analysis of qualitative data resulted in several emergent themes regarding disposition development and students generating questions while increasing affective motivation. The most prevalent dispositions were open-mindedness, the truth-seeking disposition, the analytical disposition, and the systematicity disposition. The findings about the teachers indicated that VTS questions in science supported "gradual release of responsibility", the internalization of process skills and vocabulary, and argumentation. This case study offers descriptive research that links visual arts inquiry and the development of critical thinking dispositions in science at the elementary level. A science curriculum could be developed, that emphasizes the development of thinking dispositions through the arts in science, which in turn, could impact the professional development of teachers and learning outcomes for students.

  7. Meta-Sticks: Having Children Consider the Source of Knowledge Promotes Scientific Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Mason

    2016-01-01

    Many elementary science teachers understand that the best way to enhance reasoning and thinking skills in their students is to have them engage in scientific negotiation. They know that teaching is not the simple transmission of information but a complex act that requires teachers to apply knowledge from multiple sources, including student…

  8. Training Scientific Thinking Skills: Evidence from an MCAT[superscript 2015]-Aligned Classroom Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Courtney; Witkow, Melissa R.

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports on the development and evaluation of a classroom module to train scientific thinking skills. The module was implemented in two of four parallel sections of introductory psychology. To assess learning, a passage-based question set from the medical college admissions test (MCAT[superscript 2015]) preview guide was included…

  9. Scientific Skills as Core Competences in Medical Education: What Do Medical Students Think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Laura; Severo, Milton; Pereira, Margarida; Ferreira, Maria Amélia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scientific excellence is one of the most fundamental underpinnings of medical education and its relevance is unquestionable. To be involved in research activities enhances students' critical thinking and problem-solving capacities, which are mandatory competences for new achievements in patient care and consequently to the improvement…

  10. Probing Student Understanding of Scientific Thinking in the Context of Introductory Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Richard N.; Cormier, Sebastien; Fernandez, Adiel

    2009-01-01

    Common forms of testing of student understanding of science content can be misleading about their understanding of the nature of scientific thinking. Observational astronomy integrated with related ideas of force and motion is a rich context to explore the correlation between student content knowledge and student understanding of the scientific…

  11. Science Learning with Information Technologies as a Tool for "Scientific Thinking" in Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Eugeny; Bogun, Vitali

    2011-01-01

    New methodologies in science (or mathematics) learning process and scientific thinking in the classroom activity of engineer students with ICT (information and communication technology), including graphic calculator are presented: visual modelling with ICT, action research with graphic calculator, insight in classroom and communications and…

  12. Modern Scientific Visualization is more than Just Pretty Pictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E Wes; Rubel, Oliver; Wu, Kesheng; Weber, Gunther; Pascucci, Valerio; Childs, Hank; Mascarenhas, Ajith; Meredith, Jeremy; Ahern, Sean

    2008-12-05

    While the primary product of scientific visualization is images and movies, its primary objective is really scientific insight. Too often, the focus of visualization research is on the product, not the mission. This paper presents two case studies, both that appear in previous publications, that focus on using visualization technology to produce insight. The first applies"Query-Driven Visualization" concepts to laser wakefield simulation data to help identify and analyze the process of beam formation. The second uses topological analysis to provide a quantitative basis for (i) understanding the mixing process in hydrodynamic simulations, and (ii) performing comparative analysis of data from two different types of simulations that model hydrodynamic instability.

  13. Modern Scientific Visualization is more than Just Pretty Pictures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E Wes; Rubel, Oliver; Wu, Kesheng; Weber, Gunther; Pascucci, Valerio; Childs, Hank; Mascarenhas, Ajith; Meredith, Jeremy; Ahern, Sean

    2008-12-05

    While the primary product of scientific visualization is images and movies, its primary objective is really scientific insight. Too often, the focus of visualization research is on the product, not the mission. This paper presents two case studies, both that appear in previous publications, that focus on using visualization technology to produce insight. The first applies"Query-Driven Visualization" concepts to laser wakefield simulation data to help identify and analyze the process of beam formation. The second uses topological analysis to provide a quantitative basis for (i) understanding the mixing process in hydrodynamic simulations, and (ii) performing comparative analysis of data from two different types of simulations that model hydrodynamic instability.

  14. A zoologia filosófica no Brasil: explorando as modernas correntes do pensamento científico no Collégio de Pedro II em meados do século XIX - The philosophical zoology in Brazil: exploring the modern approaches of the scientific thinking in the d. Pedro sc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl M. Lorenz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Resumo As Ciências Naturais foram ensinadas na escola secundária pública brasileira a partir de 1837 com a fundação do Imperial Collégio de Pedro II no Rio de Janeiro. Em 1841 foi introduzida no currículo a Zoologia Filosófica, uma matéria teórica, complementar aos estudos tradicionais da Zoologia, que permaneceu até ser suprimida em 1855. A Zoologia Filosófica era uma matéria intrínseca ao Colégio de Pedro II, uma vez que não existia nos colégios brasileiros da época outra semelhante, nem mesmo nos liceus franceses. Embora não haja informações sobre os conteúdos de que tratava, tem-se o programa de exames de 1850, em que quarenta pontos são listados. Mediante uma análise dos pontos, foi possível identificar os conteúdos ensinados. A análise demonstra que, em contraste com os conceitos tradicionais da Zoologia Descritiva, a Zoologia Filosófica abordou conceitos, grandes teorias e especulações sobre a origem, as transformações e o crescimento dos animais, que circulavam na Europa, e particularmente na França, na primeira metade do século XIX. No estudo, constata-se que foi uma matéria excepcional por ser a única no Brasil a tratar da Zoologia teórica nos moldes da Naturalfilosofie, prevalecente na Alemanha e explorada na França por Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire, Étienne Serres e outros cientistas de renome. Palavras-chave: ensino de ciências; história natural; ensino secundário; história das disciplinas; Collégio de Pedro II.   THE PHILOSOPHICAL ZOOLOGY IN BRAZIL: EXPLORING THE MODERN APPROACHES OF THE SCIENTIFIC THINKING IN THE “D. PEDRO” SCHOOL AT THE BEGINNING OF THE XIX CENTURY Abstract The natural sciences were taught in the public secondary schools in Brazil beginning in 1837 with the founding of the Imperial College Pedro II in Rio de Janeiro. In 1841, the course, Philosophical Zoology, was introduced as a theoretical discipline that complimented the standard content taught in the more

  15. Touching the Earth: the Role of Art in Scientific Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, K. V.; Stibbon, E.; Harris, R.

    2015-12-01

    Historically, geologists have used drawing as a tool not only to record observations but also to engage with the landscape and the materials from which it is constructed. Although geology students are still taught to keep field notebooks, the emphasis on drawing has given way to training in digital tools such as photography and GIS. Has this change altered our perception of our environment, and, thereby, affected the ways that we pursue scientific questions? We address this question through conversations - in the laboratory, studio and field - between artists and scientists that show that we (1) engage with the landscape both rationally and emotionally, (2) are attracted to earth materials because of their form, color, physical qualities and origin/history, (3) overcome technical challenges to realize an end result from an initial idea, (4) struggle to achieve a balance between critical faculties and creative insight, and (5) must communicate ideas, often before they are fully formed, to potential funders. Importantly, we find that the act of rendering (in 2D or 3D), and the ways in which the trace of the hand on paper (or manipulation of clay) engages a part of the brain that is not used in computer-based activities. At the same time, a geological understanding of earth materials enhances their metaphorical applications in the arts. Taken together, these conversations lead us to suggest that more cross-disciplinary training - training scientists in art and artists in science - would not only allow us to explore common themes from different perspectives, but could also create new ways of doing both art and science. Here we provide some examples, such as (1) the importance of drawing for moving from looking to seeing (observation to understanding), (2) ways of engaging perceptions through experimentation, (3) how to reveal the hidden by combining microscopic and macroscopic views of earth materials, and (4) using art as both a language and an interpretive tool

  16. Figures of Disengagement: Charles Taylor, Scientific Parenting, and the Paradox of Late Modernity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Berge, Luc; Ramaekers, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In this essay Luc Van den Berge and Stefan Ramaekers take the idea(l) of "scientific parenting" as an example of ambiguities that are typical of our late-modern condition. On the one hand, parenting seems like a natural thing to do, which makes "scientific parenting" sound like an oxymoron; on the other hand, a disengaged…

  17. Tacit Beginnings Towards a Model of Scientific Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Rory J.

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an examination of the role tacit knowledge plays in understanding, and to provide a model to make such knowledge identifiable. To do this I first consider the needs of society, the ubiquity of information in our world and the future demands of the science classroom. I propose the use of more implicit or tacit understandings as foundational elements for the development of student knowledge. To justify this proposition I consider a wide range of philosophical and psychological perspectives on knowledge. Then develop a Model of Scientific Knowledge, based in large part on a similar model created by Paul Ernest (Social constructivism as a philosophy of mathematics, SUNY Press, Albany, NY, 1998a; Situated cognition and the learning of mathematics, University of Oxford Department of Educational Studies, Oxford, 1998b). Finally, I consider the work that has been done by those in fields beyond education and the ways in which tacit knowledge can be used as a starting point for knowledge building.

  18. Probing student understanding of scientific thinking in the context of introductory astrophysics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard N. Steinberg

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Common forms of testing of student understanding of science content can be misleading about their understanding of the nature of scientific thinking. Observational astronomy integrated with related ideas of force and motion is a rich context to explore the correlation between student content knowledge and student understanding of the scientific thinking about that content. In this paper, we describe this correlation in detail with a focus on a question about the relative motion of the Sun and the Earth. We find that high achieving high school students throughout New York City struggle with what constitutes scientific justification and thought processes, but can improve these skills tremendously in an inquiry-oriented summer astronomy-physics program.

  19. ANALYZE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS AND SCIENTIFIC ATTITUDE IN PHYSICS LEARNING USED INQUIRY TRAINING AND DIRECT INSTRUCTION LEARNING MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dede Parsaoran Damanik

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to determine the differences: (1 the difference of critical thinking skills of students' that using Inquiry Training and Direct Instruction. (2 The difference of critical thinking skills among students who at high scientific attitude and students who at low scientific attitude. (3 To see if there is interaction between inquiry learning model of the scientific attitude students' to increase the ability to critical thinking. This is a quasi experimental research. Which students of private junior high school Two Raya Kahean District Simalungun. Population choose random sample of each class. Instrument used consisted of: (1 test the scientific attitude of students through a questionnaire with 25 statements questionnaire number (2 test the critical thinking skills in the form of descriptions by 9 questions. The data were analyzed according to ANAVA. It showed that: (1 There are differences in students' critical thinking of skills achievement Inquiry Training model and Direct Instruction model, (2 there was a difference of students' critical thinking in scientific attitude at high is better than who thought there is a difference of students' critical thinking in scientific attitude at low. (3 There was no interaction between Inquiry Training model and Direct Instruction with the scientific attitude students' to increase student’s critical thinking of skills.

  20. An Adaptable Seismic Data Format for Modern Scientific Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Bozdag, E.; Krischer, L.; Lefebvre, M.; Lei, W.; Podhorszki, N.; Tromp, J.

    2013-12-01

    Data storage, exchange, and access play a critical role in modern seismology. Current seismic data formats, such as SEED, SAC, and SEG-Y, were designed with specific applications in mind and are frequently a major bottleneck in implementing efficient workflows. We propose a new modern parallel format that can be adapted for a variety of seismic workflows. The Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF) features high-performance parallel read and write support and the ability to store an arbitrary number of traces of varying sizes. Provenance information is stored inside the file so that users know the origin of the data as well as the precise operations that have been applied to the waveforms. The design of the new format is based on several real-world use cases, including earthquake seismology and seismic interferometry. The metadata is based on the proven XML schemas StationXML and QuakeML. Existing time-series analysis tool-kits are easily interfaced with this new format so that seismologists can use robust, previously developed software packages, such as ObsPy and the SAC library. ADIOS, netCDF4, and HDF5 can be used as the underlying container format. At Princeton University, we have chosen to use ADIOS as the container format because it has shown superior scalability for certain applications, such as dealing with big data on HPC systems. In the context of high-performance computing, we have implemented ASDF into the global adjoint tomography workflow on Oak Ridge National Laboratory's supercomputer Titan.

  1. METHODOLOGICAL QUESTIONS OF SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATION PERFECTING WITH THE USE OF MODERN INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgii A. Ball

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors outline vital methodological questions which concern: (a value guidelines of scientific cognition and scientific communication; b theoretical bases (corresponding to task approach of building of scientific activity; c rational using of modern information and communication technologies in that activity. Among the most important steps towards the improvement of scientific communication the following were stressed: a awareness by scientists of their responsibility not only for adequate knowledge of the objects, but also for creating backgrounds so that the results of this knowledge might become the property of the consumers of scientific products, b development, to form such backgrounds, the ways based on adequate theoretical tools (in particular, on the task theory and on modern information and communication technologies, c coverage and discussion of the results of such development.

  2. Modernization of Chinese PE and Scientization of Thinking Mode%中国体育的现代化与思维方式的科学化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宓钟琪

    2011-01-01

    中国体育观念的争议及术语滥用现象引发对于中国体育现代化的思考.通过查阅大量文献资料表明,中国体育的现代化与中国体育工作者思维方式的科学化密不可分,改善中国体育工作者简单僵化的思维方式是亟需解决的问题.开放式、多维度的思维方式是完全可以借鉴的.%Idealistic controversy on Chinese PE and term abuse trigger the writer's thinking on the modernization of Chinese PE. It is found that the modernization of Chinese PE and the scientific thinking mode of Chinese PE workers are inseparable. It is urgent to change the simple rigid way of thinking mode. Open and multi-dimensional thinking mode may be learnt from.

  3. What type of person are you? Old-fashioned thinking even in modern science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Kenneth M; Lambert, Brian W

    2014-01-01

    People around the world have folk origin myths, stories that explain where they came from and account for their place in the world and their differences from other peoples. As scientists, however, we claim to be seeking literal historical truth. In Western culture, typological ideas about human variation are at least as ancient as written discussion of the subject, and have dominated both social and scientific thinking about race. From Herodotus to the Biblical lost tribes of Israel, and surprisingly even to today, it has been common to view our species as composed of distinct, or even discrete groups, types, or "races," with other individuals admixed from among those groups. Such rhetoric goes so much against the well-known evolutionary realities that it must reflect something deep about human thought, at least in Western culture. Typological approaches can be convenient for some pragmatic aspects of scientific analysis, but they can be seductively deceiving. We know how to think differently and should do so, given the historical abuses that have occurred as a result of typological thinking that seem always to lurk in the human heart.

  4. Using Scientific Visualizations to Enhance Scientific Thinking In K-12 Geoscience Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robeck, E.

    2016-12-01

    The same scientific visualizations, animations, and images that are powerful tools for geoscientists can serve an important role in K-12 geoscience education by encouraging students to communicate in ways that help them develop habits of thought that are similar to those used by scientists. Resources such as those created by NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio (SVS), which are intended to inform researchers and the public about NASA missions, can be used in classrooms to promote thoughtful, engaged learning. Instructional materials that make use of those visualizations have been developed and are being used in K-12 classrooms in ways that demonstrate the vitality of the geosciences. For example, the Center for Geoscience and Society at the American Geosciences Institute (AGI) helped to develop a publication that outlines an inquiry-based approach to introducing students to the interpretation of scientific visualizations, even when they have had little to no prior experience with such media. To facilitate these uses, the SVS team worked with Center staff and others to adapt the visualizations, primarily by removing most of the labels and annotations. Engaging with these visually compelling resources serves as an invitation for students to ask questions, interpret data, draw conclusions, and make use of other processes that are key components of scientific thought. This presentation will share specific resources for K-12 teaching (all of which are available online, from NASA, and/or from AGI), as well as the instructional principles that they incorporate.

  5. Scientific thinking in elementary school: Children's social cognition and their epistemological understanding promote experimentation skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterhaus, Christopher; Koerber, Susanne; Sodian, Beate

    2017-03-01

    Do social cognition and epistemological understanding promote elementary school children's experimentation skills? To investigate this question, 402 children (ages 8, 9, and 10) in 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grades were assessed for their experimentation skills, social cognition (advanced theory of mind [AToM]), epistemological understanding (understanding the nature of science), and general information-processing skills (inhibition, intelligence, and language abilities) in a whole-class testing procedure. A multiple indicators multiple causes model revealed a significant influence of social cognition (AToM) on epistemological understanding, and a McNemar test suggested that children's development of AToM is an important precursor for the emergence of an advanced, mature epistemological understanding. Children's epistemological understanding, in turn, predicted their experimentation skills. Importantly, this relation was independent of the common influences of general information processing. Significant relations between experimentation skills and inhibition, and between epistemological understanding, intelligence, and language abilities emerged, suggesting that general information processing contributes to the conceptual development that is involved in scientific thinking. The model of scientific thinking that was tested in this study (social cognition and epistemological understanding promote experimentation skills) fitted the data significantly better than 2 alternative models, which assumed nonspecific, equally strong relations between all constructs under investigation. Our results support the conclusion that social cognition plays a foundational role in the emergence of children's epistemological understanding, which in turn is closely related to the development of experimentation skills. Our findings have significant implications for the teaching of scientific thinking in elementary school and they stress the importance of children's epistemological understanding in

  6. INTEGRATED SCIENTIFIC-MANUFACTURING COMPLEXES AS A BASIS OF MODERN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Malyh

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The experience of FGUP PO "Uralvagonzavod" development is shown in the article, the analysis of mechanical engineering development in our country on modern stage is given. The authors’ approach upon the possibility, necessity and inevitability of a single right perspective decision of such economical problem in short period by the native financial, scientific-technical and people resources of Russia is proven. The position of seeing defensive enterprises as modern integrated scientific-manufacturing complexes, which are a real basis for creation of qualitatively new technique and technology of mechanical engineering and other country’s industry sectors.

  7. Biomedical Scientific and Professional Social Networks in the Service of the Development of Modern Scientific Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2016-01-01

    Information technologies have found their application in virtually every branch of health care. In recent years they have demonstrated their potential in the development of online library, where scientists and researchers can share their latest findings. Academia.edu, ResearchGate, Mendeley, Kudos, with the support of platform GoogleScholar, have indeed increased the visibility of scientific work of one author, and enable a much greater availability of the scientific work to the broader audience. Online libraries have allowed free access to the scientific content to the countries that could not follow the economic costs of getting access to certain scientific bases. Especially great benefit occurred in countries in transition and developing countries. Online libraries have great potential in terms of expanding knowledge, but they also present a major problem for many publishers, because their rights can be violated, which are signed by the author when publishing the paper. In the future it will lead to a major conflict of the author, the editorial board and online database, about the right to scientific content This question certainly represents one of the most pressing issues of publishing, whose future in printed form is already in the past, and the future of the online editions will be a problem of large-scale. PMID:28077905

  8. Biomedical Scientific and Professional Social Networks in the Service of the Development of Modern Scientific Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2016-12-01

    Information technologies have found their application in virtually every branch of health care. In recent years they have demonstrated their potential in the development of online library, where scientists and researchers can share their latest findings. Academia.edu, ResearchGate, Mendeley, Kudos, with the support of platform GoogleScholar, have indeed increased the visibility of scientific work of one author, and enable a much greater availability of the scientific work to the broader audience. Online libraries have allowed free access to the scientific content to the countries that could not follow the economic costs of getting access to certain scientific bases. Especially great benefit occurred in countries in transition and developing countries. Online libraries have great potential in terms of expanding knowledge, but they also present a major problem for many publishers, because their rights can be violated, which are signed by the author when publishing the paper. In the future it will lead to a major conflict of the author, the editorial board and online database, about the right to scientific content This question certainly represents one of the most pressing issues of publishing, whose future in printed form is already in the past, and the future of the online editions will be a problem of large-scale.

  9. Promoting Scientific Thinking and Conceptual Change about Alternative Explanations of Climate Change and Other Controversial Socio-scientific Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, D.; Sinatra, G. M.

    2013-12-01

    Critical evaluation and plausibility reappraisal of scientific explanations have been underemphasized in many science classrooms (NRC, 2012). Deep science learning demands that students increase their ability to critically evaluate the quality of scientific knowledge, weigh alternative explanations, and explicitly reappraise their plausibility judgments. Therefore, this lack of instruction about critical evaluation and plausibility reappraisal has, in part, contributed to diminished understanding about complex and controversial topics, such as global climate change. The Model-Evidence Link (MEL) diagram (originally developed by researchers at Rutgers University under an NSF-supported project; Chinn & Buckland, 2012) is an instructional scaffold that promotes students to critically evaluate alternative explanations. We recently developed a climate change MEL and found that the students who used the MEL experienced a significant shift in their plausibility judgments toward the scientifically accepted model of human-induced climate change. Using the MEL for instruction also resulted in conceptual change about the causes of global warming that reflected greater understanding of fundamental scientific principles. Furthermore, students sustained this conceptual change six months after MEL instruction (Lombardi, Sinatra, & Nussbaum, 2013). This presentation will discuss recent educational research that supports use of the MEL to promote critical evaluation, plausibility reappraisal, and conceptual change, and also, how the MEL may be particularly effective for learning about global climate change and other socio-scientific topics. Such instruction to develop these fundamental thinking skills (e.g., critical evaluation and plausibility reappraisal) is demanded by both the Next Generation Science Standards (Achieve, 2013) and the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Mathematics (CCSS Initiative-ELA, 2010; CCSS Initiative-Math, 2010), as well as a

  10. Schiller Revisited: "Beauty is Freedom in Appearance" - Aesthetics as a Challenge to the Modern Way of Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Welsch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay re-evaluates Schiller's idea of beauty as “freedom in appearance,” as brought forward in his Kallias or On Beauty (1793, against the backdrop of early modern and modern thinking that based itself on a fundamental split between nature and freedom, world and man. Schiller's claim that natural beauty results from freedom in nature bridges this gap. His suggestion is confirmed by modern science. Schiller's view is recommended and defended as a way of escaping modern bigotry.

  11. Fostering Students' Meta-understanding of Scientific Principles as Scientific Thinking : In the Case of a 6th Grade Unit about "Combustion"

    OpenAIRE

    坂本, 美紀; 村山, 功; 山口, 悦司; 稲垣, 成哲; 大島, 純; 大島, 律子; 中山, 迅; 竹中, 真希子; 山本, 智一; 藤本, 雅司; 竹下, 裕子; 橘, 早苗

    2007-01-01

    Students sometimes fail to give a theory-based explanation of phenomena after they learn scientific principles. The present study investigated the optimum method to train students in scientific thinking in elementary school science lessons. We conducted three experimental lessons to foster students' meta-understanding of scientific principles about combustion. Sixth graders collaboratively inquired into the difficult-to-understand phenomena of combustion for a theory-based explanation. Based ...

  12. Formal and Informal Learning and First-Year Psychology Students' Development of Scientific Thinking: A Two-Wave Panel Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyyılmaz, Demet; Griffin, Laura M; Martín, Miguel H; Kucharský, Šimon; Peycheva, Ekaterina D; Vaupotič, Nina; Edelsbrunner, Peter A

    2017-01-01

    Scientific thinking is a predicate for scientific inquiry, and thus important to develop early in psychology students as potential future researchers. The present research is aimed at fathoming the contributions of formal and informal learning experiences to psychology students' development of scientific thinking during their 1st-year of study. We hypothesize that informal experiences are relevant beyond formal experiences. First-year psychology student cohorts from various European countries will be assessed at the beginning and again at the end of the second semester. Assessments of scientific thinking will include scientific reasoning skills, the understanding of basic statistics concepts, and epistemic cognition. Formal learning experiences will include engagement in academic activities which are guided by university authorities. Informal learning experiences will include non-compulsory, self-guided learning experiences. Formal and informal experiences will be assessed with a newly developed survey. As dispositional predictors, students' need for cognition and self-efficacy in psychological science will be assessed. In a structural equation model, students' learning experiences and personal dispositions will be examined as predictors of their development of scientific thinking. Commonalities and differences in predictive weights across universities will be tested. The project is aimed at contributing information for designing university environments to optimize the development of students' scientific thinking.

  13. Formal and Informal Learning and First-Year Psychology Students’ Development of Scientific Thinking: A Two-Wave Panel Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyyılmaz, Demet; Griffin, Laura M.; Martín, Miguel H.; Kucharský, Šimon; Peycheva, Ekaterina D.; Vaupotič, Nina; Edelsbrunner, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Scientific thinking is a predicate for scientific inquiry, and thus important to develop early in psychology students as potential future researchers. The present research is aimed at fathoming the contributions of formal and informal learning experiences to psychology students’ development of scientific thinking during their 1st-year of study. We hypothesize that informal experiences are relevant beyond formal experiences. First-year psychology student cohorts from various European countries will be assessed at the beginning and again at the end of the second semester. Assessments of scientific thinking will include scientific reasoning skills, the understanding of basic statistics concepts, and epistemic cognition. Formal learning experiences will include engagement in academic activities which are guided by university authorities. Informal learning experiences will include non-compulsory, self-guided learning experiences. Formal and informal experiences will be assessed with a newly developed survey. As dispositional predictors, students’ need for cognition and self-efficacy in psychological science will be assessed. In a structural equation model, students’ learning experiences and personal dispositions will be examined as predictors of their development of scientific thinking. Commonalities and differences in predictive weights across universities will be tested. The project is aimed at contributing information for designing university environments to optimize the development of students’ scientific thinking. PMID:28239363

  14. Scientific Skills as Core Competences in Medical Education: What do medical students think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Laura; Severo, Milton; Pereira, Margarida; Amélia Ferreira, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Background: Scientific excellence is one of the most fundamental underpinnings of medical education and its relevance is unquestionable. To be involved in research activities enhances students' critical thinking and problem-solving capacities, which are mandatory competences for new achievements in patient care and consequently to the improvement of clinical practice. Purposes: This work aimed to study the relevance given by Portuguese medical students to a core of scientific skills, and their judgment about their own ability to execute those skills. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on students attending the first, fourth and sixth years of medical course in the same period. An assessment istrument, exploring the importance given by Portuguese medical students to scientific skills in high school, to clinical practice and to their own ability to execute them, was designed, adapted and applied specifically to this study. Results: Students' perceptions were associated with gender, academic year, previous participation in research activities, positive and negative attitudes toward science, research integration into the curriculum and motivation to undertake research. The viewpoint of medical students about the relevance of scientific skills overall, and the ability to execute them, was independently associated with motivation to be enrolled in research. Conclusions: These findings have meaningful implications in medical education regarding the inclusion of a structural research program in the medical curriculum. Students should be aware that clinical practice would greatly benefit from the enrollment in research activities. By developing a solid scientific literacy future physicians will be able to apply new knowledge in patient care.

  15. The origin of scientific neurology and its consequences for modern and future neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, David A

    2014-01-01

    John Hughlings Jackson (1835-1911) created a science of brain function that, in scope and profundity, is among the great scientific discoveries of the 19th century. It is interesting that the magnitude of his achievement is not completely recognized even among his ardent admirers. Although thousands of practitioners around the world use the clinical applications of his science every day, the principles from which bedside neurology is derived have broader consequences-for modern and future science-that remain unrecognized and unexploited. This paper summarizes the scientific formalism that created modern neurology, demonstrates how its direct implications affect a current area of neuroscientific research, and indicates how Hughlings Jackson's ideas form a path toward a novel solution to an important open problem of the brain and mind.

  16. CRITERIA OF TRUTHFULNESS AND THE SCIENTIFIC QUALITY IN POST-MODERN KNOWLEDGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mukha

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the criteria of truth in post-modern philosophy, taking into account the ways it is defined in both the classical and non-classical traditions. Specific to post-modern philosophy is the absence of a universal language of narration and the traditional methods in which knowledge is recognized as legitimate. Basing himself on these concepts, the author examines the problem of the ideal of scientific quality and the transformations this idea has undergone in contemporary philosophy. Truth is understood basically through two means which govern our relation to truth: the will to truth and the concern for truth. These also appear as defining factors of truth in various types of post-modern philosophy: social-operative, social-political, and aesthetic

  17. WHY SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH OF A LECTURER IS THE «LAME HORSE» OF MODERN SCIENCE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Belyaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to represent reflections on the crisis of science and logical thinking (within the framework of Social Science, Humanities and higher education that has its local and global manifestations; the author focused own attention on the manifestations in order to understand its depth and possible ways of overcoming them. Methods. A number of theoretical methods have been used in the article: analysis and synthesis, induction and deduction, comparison and classification, methods of extrapolation and modeling, as well as participant observation. Results. Local manifestations of the crisis of science and logical thinking associated with human factor in the national system of higher professional education in the era of virtualization and commercialization are expressed in reducing efforts and productivity of scientific research, due to the existing contradictions between changed requirements that enumerate professional duties of a lecturer and possibilities of combining and productive implementation of traditional and new professional roles. In particular, researches turn to promoters of themselves to solve financial and organizational issues of a scientific research and promotion of ratings. Changes in the sense of scientific activity in respect to educators and their personal attitude to new requirements will eventually face the eternal problem of attitude to knowledge and to the actual problem of change of knowledge subject in non-classical model and post-non-classical model of science. Expression of a researcher’s individuality encounters many obstacles (the author has identified 10 of them and is complicated by new facets of this subjectivity, induced by «logistics turn point» in science. Scientific novelty. The author proves that it is necessary to change nonclassical subject knowledge model (where the corporate subject leaning for the general ways and collective norms of scientific activity dominates for

  18. Making expert knowledge through the image: connections between antiquarian and early modern scientific illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Stephanie

    2014-03-01

    This essay examines drawings of antiquities in the context of the history of early modern scientific illustration. The role of illustrations in the establishment of archaeology as a discipline is assessed, and the emergence of a graphic style for representing artifacts is shown to be closely connected to the development of scientific illustration in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. The essay argues that the production of conventionalized drawings of antiquities during this period represents a fundamental shift in the approach to ancient material culture, signifying the recognition of objects as evidence. As has been demonstrated in other scientific fields, the creation of a visual system for recording objects was central to the acceptance of artifacts as "data" that could be organized into groups, classified as types, and analyzed to gain knowledge of the past.

  19. Using the First-Year English Class to Develop Scientific Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, B. J.; Burnham, C.; Green, S.; Ball, E.; Schryer, A.

    2002-12-01

    This poster presents the preliminary results from an experimental approach to teaching first-year writing using the scientific method as an organizing theme. The approach presumes a close connection between the classical scientific method: observing, hypothesis forming, hypothesis testing, and generalizing from the results of the testing, and the writing process: inventing and prewriting, drafting, and revising. The project has four goals: 1. To introduce students to the relations between scientific method, academic inquiry, and the writing process; 2. To help students see that academic inquiry, the work of generating, testing, and validating knowledge and then applying that knowledge in real contexts, is actually a hybrid form of the scientific method; 3. To encourage students to connect the work they are doing in the writing classroom with the work they are doing in other classes so they can transfer the skills learned in one context to the other; and 4. To cause students who have previously been alienated by science and science teaching to reconsider their attitudes, and to see the powerful influence of science and scientific thinking in our world. In short, we are teaching science literacy in a humanities classroom. The materials we use include science-based reading and the kinds of writing typically required in science classes. The poster presents the basic premises of the project, samples of class materials, and preliminary results of a controlled pre- and post-test of student attitudes toward science and writing, analyzed especially according to gender and minority status. We also present insights by participating instructors including a female graduate teaching assistant who had been trained as a scientist and a male who had not.

  20. Social science as a tool in developing scientific thinking skills in underserved, low-achieving urban students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewett, Elizabeth; Kuhn, Deanna

    2016-03-01

    Engagement in purposeful problem solving involving social science content was sufficient to develop a key set of inquiry skills in low-performing middle school students from an academically and economically disadvantaged urban public school population, with this skill transferring to a more traditional written scientific thinking assessment instrument 3weeks later. Students only observing their peers' activity or not participating at all failed to show these gains. Implications are addressed with regard to the mastery of scientific thinking skills among academically disadvantaged students. Also addressed are the efficacy of problem-based learning and the limits of observational learning.

  1. Mathematics, chemistry and science connection as a basis of scientific thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Matúš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific thinking is a basic skill that can support problemsolving of interdisciplinary tasks in science. Our research is leading us to creation of materials and resources that will support this interdisciplinary approach to education. The research includes interviews with high-school teachers of mathematics, chemistry and science, item analysis of extensive testing of knowledge and skills of high school students in chemistry in Czech Republic, follow-up survey of students’ problem-solving processes in tasks requiring the use of combined knowledge of mathematics and chemistry and the creation of educational materials. The article contains a few examples of proposed educational materials. The effectiveness of created materials is verified in high-schools. Students have got the most difficulties applying algebraic calculations in chemistry, using proportions, solving equations, expressing the unknown, the spatial imagination, geometry and stereometry and the resulting arrangement of atoms and shapes of molecules, chemical analytical tasks with logical thinking, interpretation of information from graphs and tables, plotting measured values into graphs and statistical evaluation.

  2. INSTITUTE OF SCIENTIFIC REVIEW TO A PLURALITY OF MODERN SCIENCE: NEED OR FICTION?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Mukha

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The current situation of plurality epistemological provokes distinct lack of clear criteria for scientific criticism humanities texts. This research raises the question of verification procedure for knowledge obtained humanities, its status and importance. Changes relate to the modern paradigm of scientific methodology in general, which involves switching from a focus on results orientation to the process of getting the truth (W.V.O. Quine, Thomas Kuhn, Paul Feyerabend, Imre Lakatos, etc.. To determine the relationships with the text as a carrier of the alleged truth reception is off ered three formats of relations: Text – Author, Text – Reader and Text – Reviewer. The article stresses questions of general and specific objectives for the scientifi c peer review, as well as the problem of plagiarism and its ethical and legal consequences. It is proposed to consider plan algorithm scientific review of the 26 criteria for it, which will help to streamline Institute of scientific criticism. Recent cover content requirements (which include: the incorporation of a scientific context, the definition of methodological systems, structured research, avoiding plagiarism, there is a real «increase of knowledge» and applied significance, etc. and technical design, the variable respectively specifi c edition. Compliance with a number of requirements set out will help improve the effi ciency and profitability of the humanities.

  3. The Transition and Adoption to Modern Programming Concepts for Scientific Computing in Fortran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles D. Norton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes our experiences in the early exploration of modern concepts introduced in Fortran90 for large-scale scientific programming. We review our early work in expressing object-oriented concepts based on the new Fortran90 constructs – foreign to most programmers at the time – our experimental work in applying them to various applications, the impact on the WG5/J3 standards committees to consider formalizing object-oriented constructs for later versions of Fortran, and work in exploring how other modern programming techniques such as Design Patterns can and have impacted our software development. Applications will be drawn from plasma particle simulation and finite element adaptive mesh refinement for solid earth crustal deformation modeling.

  4. Modern Scientific Research on the Development of Proactiveness of Preschool Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Agiliar Tukler

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces the results of analysis of modern scientific research in preschool education, which represents the problem of development of basic qualities of the identity. The research displays that the results of the study on the problem of development of basic qualities of preschool-age children influence the improvement of the content of program provision in the educational process in preschool educational institutions in Ukraine and are meant to be a reference point in choosing the strategy of its reorganization.

  5. Thinking on the Disaster Medicine by Modern Logistics Management%现代物流业对灾难医学的启发和思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘刚; 潘宁玲; 刘超

    2011-01-01

    本文探讨和分析了现代物流业的特点,以及对电子伤票、现代化单架平台的启示,并借鉴现代物流业信息化自动管理机制,实现灾难医学救援的科学化管理.灾难医学救治引入现代物流业信息化自动管理机制将促进灾害医学的发展.%The characteristics of modern logistics industry were explored and analyzed in this article,at same time the thinking on injury electronic ticket and platform were summarized too. Disaster medicine should learn scientific management from modern logistics to improve the rescue capability. If disaster medicine can lead modern logistics automated information management system into disaster rescue, the development of disaster medicine will be promoted in future.

  6. A Phenomenological Examination of Perceived Skills and Concepts Necessary for Teaching Scientific Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapetanis, Ana Cristina

    The use of high stakes testing to improve educational outcomes falls short in many settings. Proposals for improvement include providing more opportunities for students to extend their thinking, gaining experience in the social nature of science, and learning how to interpret, explain, and justify results. This phenomenological qualitative project study took place in a small independent school in the southeastern United States that lacked a cohesive elementary science program and was looking to create a vertically aligned science curriculum based on constructivism. The research question asked what skills and concepts teachers believed should be included in an elementary science program in order for students to learn scientific inquiry to be better prepared for middle and upper school science subjects. Using focus groups, observations, and interviews of a small sample of 4 teachers, data were collected, transcribed, and categorized through open coding. Inductive analysis was employed to look for patterns and emerging themes that painted a picture of how teachers viewed the current science program and what attributes they felt were important in the creation of a new curriculum. The findings revealed that teachers felt there was lack of a vertically aligned science curriculum, availability of resources throughout the school, and consistent support to provide an effective science program. The recommendations called for developing an elementary science program that includes all strands proposed by the National Science Education Standards and would provide students with opportunities to engage in scientific inquiry, conduct detailed observations, and learn to support conclusions using data. The implications for positive social change include development of programs that result in integrated science learning.

  7. Thinking in three's: Changing surgical patient safety practices in the complex modern operating room

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Verna C Gibbs

    2012-01-01

    The three surgical patient safety events,wrong site surgery,retained surgical items (RSI) and surgical fires are rare occurrences and thus their effects on the complex modern operating room (OR) are difficult to study.The likelihood of occurrence and the magnitude of risk for each of these surgical safety events are undefined.Many providers may never have a personal experience with one of these events and training and education on these topics are sparse.These circumstances lead to faulty thinking that a provider won't ever have an event or if one does occur the provider will intuitively know what to do.Surgeons are not preoccupied with failure and tend to usually consider good outcomes,which leads them to ignore or diminish the importance of implementing and following simple safety practices.These circumstances contribute to the persistent low level occurrence of these three events and to the difficulty in generating sufficient interest to resource solutions.Individual facilities rarely have the time or talent to understand these events and develop lasting solutions.More often than not,even the most well meaning internal review results in a new line to a policy and some rigorous enforcement mandate.This approach routinely fails and is another reason why these problems are so persistent.Vigilance actions alone have been unsuccessful so hospitals now have to take a systematic approach to implementing safer processes and providing the resources for surgeons and other stakeholders to optimize the OR environment.This article discusses standardized processes of care for mitigation of injury or outright prevention of wrong site surgery,RSI and surgical fires in an action-oriented framework illustrating the strategic elements important in each event and focusing on the responsibilities for each of the three major OR agents-anesthesiologists,surgeons and nurses.A Surgical Patient Safety Checklist is discussed that incorporates the necessary elements to bring these team

  8. THE EFFECT OF MODEL SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY USING MEDIA PhET TOWARD SKILLS PROCESS OF SCIENCE VIEWED FROM CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS

    OpenAIRE

    Nanda Safarati

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of research to analyse: the science process skills that are taught in a model of scientific inquiry using the media PhET better than students taught by learning direct instruction, science process skills of physics students who has the critical thinking skills using a model of scientific inquiry than average -rata better than students who have critical thinking skills using a direct model of instruction above average, the interaction of scientific inquiry learning model using PhET...

  9. The Present Conditions of the Advances in Modernizing Scientific and Technical Information Processing in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Written By Tongbao; Li, Translated By Guohua

    The trends of modernization (computerization) in information activities were outlined in focussing on the national computer-based information retrieval system, which was pushed by the State Science and Technology Commission in the 6th National Five-Year Plan. Secondary, the Plan to be promoted by the Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (ISTIC) as a central and integrated information center in China was also described for the 7th National Five-Year Plan on the occasion of the movement to the new ISTIC building. Finally, author's views on information programs to be further stressed were introduced, which include the production of reference and fact databases in Chinese and English, the consolidation of online network, standardization, etc.

  10. Exploring what stabilizes teachers' attention and responsiveness to the substance of students' scientific thinking in the classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Jennifer

    Teachers' attention and responsiveness to the substance of students' disciplinary thinking is critical for promoting students' disciplinary engagement and learning, yet such attention is rare and fleeting in American classrooms. In this dissertation, I aim to learn more from teachers who do attend and respond to students' scientific ideas while teaching. I explore the classroom practices of three focal teachers in a professional development program who consistently place students' ideas at the core of their instruction with an eye toward the following research question: What might stabilize teachers' attention and responsiveness to the substance of students' scientific thinking during sustained classroom episodes? Examining three episodes from each teacher, I identify aspects within these episodes that are salient to the teachers and plausibly interrelated with their attention and responsiveness to student thinking. My primary data chapters include analyses of specific pairs of episodes that speak to my broader research question as well as other relevant topics in the literature on attending and responding to student thinking. The first data chapter makes the case that professional development efforts aimed at supporting responsiveness to student thinking primarily help teachers within planned discussions or progressions, but struggle to help teachers adapt their ongoing instruction in response to unexpected directions from students. I examine two episodes in which the discussions that emerged were not preplanned but rather emergent from students' contributions, with an eye toward what initiated and sustained teachers' responsiveness. The second data chapter contributes to discussions on what constitutes favorable change in attending and responding to the substance of student thinking, emphasizing the importance of disciplinary-specific considerations. Finally, I draw on the entire data set in noting specific commonalities within and across teachers, suggesting two

  11. EVIDENCES OF SCIENTIFIC MIRACLE OF AL-QUR’AN IN THE MODERN ERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Sukmanila Sayska

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the miracles of al-Qur’an is i’jaz ilmi, it’s meant the information of al-Qur’an about science which is then able revealed and proven in accordance with the development of science. I’jaz ilmi does not present itself, but should be explored and researched, so that the evidence of i’jaz ilmi can be more and more and grow over time. Scientists gave the parable is like a spring that never runs dry. Every time always comes new discoveries and scientific provisions which already hinted at al-Qur’an for 14 centuries ago as evidence of i’jaz. I’jaz ilmi later became a effective propaganda media, especially among scientists. Many cases found confession of scientists when they were able to prove the truth of which is informed by al-Qur’an. In addition, evidence of ilmi i’jaz is able to ward off external oblique view of Islam that al-Qur’an is man work, because when they know that what is described by al- Qur’an has been proved by modern scientific discoveries, and eventually they acknowledges that al-Qur’an is really the word of God

  12. Beggars, Black Bears, and Butterflies: The Scientific Gaze and Ink Painting in Modern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Claypool

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The ink brushes of the painters Chen Shizeng (1876–1923, Liu Kuiling (1885–1967, and Gao Jianfu (1879–1951 were employed as tools of the nation in early twentieth-century China. Yet the expression of a radical idealism about the new republic in their ink paintings was tempered early on by a tentative and self-conscious exploration of new ways of seeing. By synthesizing a “universal” scientific gaze with their idiosyncratically trained vision as artists, they created pictures that encouraged their viewers to cross the boundaries and binaries that would come to define the discourse about guohua, or “national painting”: East versus West, oil versus ink, modernity versus tradition, painting versus graphic arts, and elite versus folk. This article explores that extended moment of synthesis and experimentation. It argues that it was through the scientific gaze of these brush-and-ink artists that idealism and learning came to cooperate, and through their paintings that possibilities for news ways of seeing the nation emerged.

  13. THE EFFECT OF MODEL SCIENTIFIC INQUIRY USING MEDIA PhET TOWARD SKILLS PROCESS OF SCIENCE VIEWED FROM CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanda Safarati

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of research to analyse: the science process skills that are taught in a model of scientific inquiry using the media PhET better than students taught by learning direct instruction, science process skills of physics students who has the critical thinking skills using a model of scientific inquiry than average -rata better than students who have critical thinking skills using a direct model of instruction above average, the interaction of scientific inquiry learning model using PhET media with critical thinking skills of students in improving students' science process skills. This research is quasi experimental. Technique that used to gain a sample is random cluster sampling. The instrument used is the science process skills test and test critical thinking skills. The results of this study concluded that: the science process skills of students who are taught by the model of scientific inquiry using the media PhET better than students taught by learning direct instruction, science process skills of physics students who have the critical thinking skills using a model of scientific inquiry over average better than students who have critical thinking skills using a direct model of instruction above average, there is interaction scientific inquiry model using the media PhET with critical thinking skills of students in improving students' science process skills.

  14. Developing the Critical Thinking Skills of Astrobiology Students through Creative and Scientific Inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Jamie S. Foster; Lemus, Judith D.

    2015-01-01

    Scientific inquiry represents a multifaceted approach to explore and understand the natural world. Training students in the principles of scientific inquiry can help promote the scientific learning process as well as help students enhance their understanding of scientific research. Here, we report on the development and implementation of a learning module that introduces astrobiology students to the concepts of creative and scientific inquiry, as well as provide practical exercises to build c...

  15. Critical Thinking and Modern Japan: Conflict in the Discourse of Government and Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REAR, David

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the public discourses of Japanese government and business interests on the subject of critical thinking within education. It begins by examining the dilemma critical thinking can pose to states and organisations with the emphasis it places on reasoned nonconformity. While nonconformity can be important in a post-industrial business context where fresh ideas and innovation provide the impetus for profit, it can also pose potential difficulties for organisational stability, as people choose to reject established ways of thinking or behaving. In twenty-first century Japan, this dilemma can clearly be seen in public policy statements made on education. On the one hand, the impact of globalised competition has led to a demand from government and business circles for a new kind of graduate, able to exercise independent judgement skills unbound by conventional thinking. On the other hand, they also express fears that the increasing individualism displayed by young people is threatening the social order and leading Japan towards an undesirable future. Their apparent solution to this dilemma is the re-introduction of patriotic and moral education, aimed at reaffirming the pre-war values of social duty and national solidarity.

  16. 论科学研究中非逻辑思维的作用%Study on the Role of Non-logical Thinking in Scientific Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈丽萍; 马义飞

    2011-01-01

    Compared with logical thinking, non-logical thinking has its own characteristics; non-logical thinking plays an important role in scientific research which is mainly reflected in generating new scientific ideas and scientific concepts, developping new areas of scientific research, screening scientific issues effectively and integrating the cause-and-effect relationship in scientific research.We should pay attention to the role that non-logical thinking plays in scientific research as well as combine it with logical thinking to achieve the target of impelling scientific research process jointly.%非逻辑思维与逻辑思维相比,有其自身特点;非逻辑思维在科学研究中具有重要的作用,主要表现在产生新的科学思想和科学概念、拓展新的研究领域、有效筛选科学问题和融合科学研究中的因果关系等方面.在科学研究中要注重发挥非逻辑思维的作用,并与逻辑思维相结合,共同推进科学研究进程.

  17. Thinking like Leonardo da Vinci and its implications for the modern doctor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Most people when asked to name the most creative, innovative, and multidimensional people in history would agree that Leonardo da Vinci is either at the top or very close to the number one position on that list. Wouldn't it be nice to think like da Vinci? This article shares the seven unique principles of thinking that da Vinci used that enabled him to be the greatest painter, sculptor, architect, musician, mathematician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, geologist, cartographer, botanist, and writer of his (if not of all) time. This article will take you deep into the notebooks and codices of da Vinci, and suggest ways his ideas can be used by anyone in the healthcare profession to make them a better healthcare provider.

  18. The Acquisition of Scientific Knowledge via Critical Thinking: A Philosophical Approach to Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talavera, Isidoro

    2016-01-01

    There is a gap between the facts learned in a science course and the higher-cognitive skills of analysis and evaluation necessary for students to secure scientific knowledge and scientific habits of mind. Teaching science is not just about how we do science (i.e., focusing on just "accumulating undigested facts and scientific definitions and…

  19. Thinking Globally, Acting Locally: Joel Wegmeister and Modern Hasidic Politics in Warsaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Guesnet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This contribution investigates how the emergence of the first modern Jewish metropolis in Warsaw in the second half of the 19th century challenged traditional visions of community cohesion. It argues that the acceleration of political and societal change within the Jewish community allowed observant elites to achieve political and cultural hegemony in Warsaw, and thus offers a sui generis pathway of Jewish metropolitan modernization. This claim is substantiated by following the communal and political involvement of a leading Hasidic civil leader, Joel Wegmeister (1837-1919, co-founder of the first outlets of the Agudat Israel in the Kingdom of Poland before World War One

  20. Scientific thinking in young children: theoretical advances, empirical research, and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopnik, Alison

    2012-09-28

    New theoretical ideas and empirical research show that very young children's learning and thinking are strikingly similar to much learning and thinking in science. Preschoolers test hypotheses against data and make causal inferences; they learn from statistics and informal experimentation, and from watching and listening to others. The mathematical framework of probabilistic models and Bayesian inference can describe this learning in precise ways. These discoveries have implications for early childhood education and policy. In particular, they suggest both that early childhood experience is extremely important and that the trend toward more structured and academic early childhood programs is misguided.

  1. Hauntings, homeopathy, and the Hopkinsville Goblins: using pseudoscience to teach scientific thinking

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schmaltz, Rodney; Lilienfeld, Scott O

    2014-01-01

    .... By incorporating examples of pseudoscience into lectures, instructors can provide students with the tools needed to understand the difference between scientific and pseudoscientific or paranormal claims...

  2. Epistemic Cognition when Students Read Multiple Documents Containing Conflicting Scientific Evidence: A Think-Aloud Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Leila E.; Braten, Ivar; Stromso, Helge I.

    2012-01-01

    This study used think-aloud methodology to investigate 51 Norwegian undergraduates' topic-specific epistemic cognition while working with six documents presenting conflicting views on the issue of cell phones and potential health risks. Results showed that students' epistemic cognition was represented by one dimension concerning the certainty and…

  3. Epistemic Cognition when Students Read Multiple Documents Containing Conflicting Scientific Evidence: A Think-Aloud Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Leila E.; Braten, Ivar; Stromso, Helge I.

    2012-01-01

    This study used think-aloud methodology to investigate 51 Norwegian undergraduates' topic-specific epistemic cognition while working with six documents presenting conflicting views on the issue of cell phones and potential health risks. Results showed that students' epistemic cognition was represented by one dimension concerning the certainty and…

  4. [Analysis of the transfer of the world medical scientific center until modern times].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Han-bin

    2010-03-01

    Since the 16th century, the world medical scientific center has transferred from Italy, Netherlands, the United Kingdom, France and Germany to the United States. The standards by which the above-mentioned countries became the medical scientific center during a certain historical period were not only the number of achievements of the scientific research and the talents, what was more important was their position and function in the leading disciplines. The background of the transfer of the medical scientific center was the economic, cultural and political rise of these countries, and the most important foundation was the innovation of personnel training systems.

  5. ABC-TRIZ introduction to creative design thinking with modern TRIZ modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Orloff, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    This textbook arms the reader with powerful techniques of Modern TRIZ self-training and real problem solving. It is designed as a simple and efficient, step-by-step crash course in primary TRIZ models based on the author's methods of extraction and reinvention, or retrieval of invention models from any real-life objects. Special content addresses the psychological support of the person during problem solving and promotion of the new idea to realization. The book introduces the so-called Theory of Developing the Creative Personality (TDCP), initiated but not completed by Genrikh Altshuller, father of TRIZ and TDCP. The textbook continues to develop a simple standard model presentation of the problem solving process with a four-step Meta-Algorithm of Invention (MAI) T-R-I-Z. .

  6. Sparking Thinking: Studying Modern Precision Medicine Will Accelerate the Progression of Traditional Chinese Medicine Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao-Cheng; Ji, Guang

    2017-07-01

    Incorporating "-omics" studies with environmental interactions could help elucidate the biological mechanisms responsible for Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) patterns. Based on the authors' own experiences, this review outlines a model of an ideal combination of "-omics" biomarkers, environmental factors, and TCM pattern classifications; provides a narrative review of the relevant genetic and TCM studies; and lists several successful integrative examples. Two integration tools are briefly introduced. The first is the integration of modern devices into objective diagnostic methods of TCM patterning, which would improve current clinical decision-making and practice. The second is the use of biobanks and data platforms, which could broadly support biological and medical research. Such efforts will transform current medical management and accelerate the progression of precision medicine.

  7. The Effects of Educational Multimedia for Scientific Signs in the Holy Quran in Improving the Creative Thinking Skills for Deaf Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusaleh, Sumaya; Abdelfattah, Eman; Alabadi, Zain; Sharieh, Ahmad

    This paper investigates the role of the scientific signs in the holy Quran in improving the creative thinking skills for the deaf children using multimedia. The paper investigates if the performance made by the experimental group's individuals is statistically significant compared with the performance made by the control group's individuals on Torrance Test for creative thinking (fluency, flexibility, originality and the total degree) in two cases:

  8. Scientific Visualization: The Modern Oscilloscope for "Seeing the Unseeable" (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bethel, E Wes

    2008-06-24

    Summer Lecture Series 2008: Scientific visualization transforms abstract data into readily comprehensible images, provide a vehicle for "seeing the unseeable," and play a central role in both experimental and computational sciences. Wes Bethel, who heads the Scientific Visualization Group in the Computational Research Division, presents an overview of visualization and computer graphics, current research challenges, and future directions for the field.

  9. Discussion on the Scientific Paradigm of Modern Athletic Training%试论运动训练科学范式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    诸葛伟民

    2009-01-01

    With the athletic lever becoming closer and closer between the players, one distinctive characteristic of the contemporary international sports competition is increasingly cruel and fierce. The only choice for contemporary athletic training wants to rapid raise training lever and wins the finally game is to obtain the maximum supports of the science and technology. Based on the basis of Isaac Newton's physics, the scientific paradigm of modern athletic training is belong to the simplify paradigm. It has been one of the most important powers that promote the international athletic training development. But, due to the weak points on itself which the athletic training scientific paradigm has and can not be overcome by itself, so it is very difficult to solve the problems of contemporary athletic training using the simplify scientific paradigm. With the prosperous of complexity science since 1980s, the scientific simplify paradigm has been strongly criticized and smashed. Th nain target of the essay is to comb the historical de-velopment locus of athletic training and describe the forming process of the modern athletic training scientific paradigm. Finally the essay puts forward the urgency to realize full conver-sion from simplify scientific paradigm of Modern Athletic Training to complexity scientific par-adigm.%当代国际体育竞技的特征是运动员水平越来越接近、比赛越来越激烈,而如何得到科学技术的最大"帮助"是当代运动训练的惟一选择.近代运动训练科学范式是建立在以牛顿力学为基础的简单性范式基础上的,它对加深人类对运动训练本质的认识产生了积极的作用.但是,20世纪80年代以来,随着复杂性科学的兴起,传统运动训练科学范式日益显示出其自身难以逾越的局限性.通过对近代运动训练科学范式形成的历史过程进行梳理,对其所面临的困境进行论述,提出实现运动训练科学范式从简单性向复杂性转化的迫切性.

  10. Ghost Hunting as a Means to Illustrate Scientific Methodology and Enhance Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Steven C.

    2012-01-01

    The increasing popularity of television shows featuring paranormal investigations has led to a renewed enthusiasm in ghost hunting activities, and belief in the paranormal in general. These shows typically feature a group of investigators who, while claiming to utilize proper scientifically correct methodologies, violate many core scientific…

  11. Farewell to reality how modern physics has betrayed the search for scientific truth

    CERN Document Server

    Baggott, Jim

    2013-01-01

    From acclaimed science author Jim Baggott, a pointed critique of modern theoretical physics. In this stunning new volume, Jim Baggott argues that there is no observational or experimental evidence for many of the ideas of modern theoretical physics: super-symmetric particles,super strings, the multiverse, the holographic principle,or the anthropic cosmological principle. These theories are not only untrue, it is not even science. It is fairy-tale physics: fantastical, bizarre and often outrageous, perhaps even confidence-trickery. This book provides a much-needed antidote. Informed,comprehensive, and balanced, it offers lay readers the latest ideas about the nature of physical reality while clearly distinguishing between fact and fantasy. With its engaging portraits of many central figures of modern physics, including Paul Davies, John Barrow, Brian Greene, Stephen Hawking, and Leonard Susskind, it promises to be essential reading for all readers interested in what we know and don’t know about the nature of...

  12. Corpo e vida: a crítica de Hannah Arendt à modernidade científica Body and life: Hannah Arendt's critique of scientific modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Heuer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo analisa as categorias de corpo e vida no pensamento de Hannah Arendt no contexto da crítica que a autora faz ao cientificismo moderno. Partindo da apresentação de alguns aspectos centrais da crítica arendtiana, passa-se a discutir em que medida essa crítica pode ser útil na discussão contemporânea acerca do biologismo e do mundo biotecnológico. Finalmente, tenta-se mostrar a radicalidade do pensamento da autora sobre o corpo e vida na sua relação com o conceito de corpo e vida da medicina tradicional chinesa.This paper analyzes the categories of body and life in Hannah Arendt's thought in the context of criticism that the author makes of modern scientific approach. From the presentation of some core aspects of Arendt's criticism, it discusses to what extent this criticism can be useful in contemporary discussion of biological and biotechnological world. Finally, it tries to show the radical thinking of the author about life in the body and its relationship to the concept of body and life of traditional Chinese medicine.

  13. Beggars, Black Bears, and Butterflies: The Scientific Gaze and Ink Painting in Modern China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lisa Claypool

    2015-01-01

    ...” scientific gaze with their idiosyncratically trained vision as artists, they created pictures that encouraged their viewers to cross the boundaries and binaries that would come to define the discourse about guohua, or “national painting...

  14. The Philosophy of Modern Scientific Knowledge: the Language of Synergy and the Synergy of Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Kiyashchenko

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The issue of the formation of present-day scientific knowledge is viewed in the paper through the prism of language. Language is seen here not merely as an external form vis-a-vis the content of scientific knowledge, but rather as the mode of emergence and existence of scientific knowledge as a certain reality (Shverev 2001: 509,  the one that evolves as a result of cognitive and communicative practices in transdisciplinary studies. The mutual influence of the language of synergy and the synergy of language leads to a new unity of scientific experience and gives rise to the philosophy of transdisciplinarity (Киященко 2006: 17. 

  15. Matter and spirit in the universe scientific and religious preludes to modern cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Kragh, Helge

    2004-01-01

    Cosmology is an unusual science with an unusual history. This bookexamines the formative years of modern cosmology from the perspectiveof its interaction with religious thought. As the first study of itskind, it reveals how closely associated the development of cosmologyhas been with considerations of a philosophical and religiousnature.

  16. The 3rd All-Russian Scientific Conference on “The Dynamics of Modern Ecosystems in the Holocene”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galimova Madina Sh.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available On March 12-15, 2013, Kazan hosted the Third All-Russian Scientific Conference with International Participation "The Dynamics of modern ecosystems in the Holocene". The scientific forum was organized by the Institute of Ecology and Mineral Wealth, Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Ecology and Evolution named after A.N. Severtsov, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS, and the Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology of the RAS Urals Branch, with support from the Russian Foundation for Fundamental Research. The conference was attended by over 200 researchers from different regions of Russia and ten foreign countries. The presented reports covered a wide range of problems, such as the dynamics of the natural environment in Northern Eurasia during the Holocene, the history of human interaction with the environment, etc. They contained the results of natural science studies in archeozoology, paleontology, paleobotany, paleoclimate reconstructions and paleolandscapes that are important for the archaeological science research.

  17. Critical Thinking through Writing: Expressing Scientific Thought and Process in a Deaf Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjarrez, Leslie

    Within Deaf classrooms there is often a disconnect between academic areas and writing curriculums that develop in both common and academic language, where often classrooms focus solely on writing as a skill rather than as a method for producing language through an academic area. This work focuses on the development of academic language in ASL and English print of science. The curriculum is written to be implemented as a bilingual academic curriculum to support Deaf and Hard of Hearing students in various self contained classroom settings. Lessons are conducted in three Units, A B and C. Unit A focuses on research, thought and writing of preparatory materials in small groups. Unit B is comprised of procedural lessons on conducting x experiments and the evaluation of those experiments through mathematics. Unit C is a group of lessons that ties together Units A and B through writing and peer teaching as a method of concluding the work and presenting information in an effective manner. The success of the project was evaluated on the basis of student work, rubrics, and final works from the students. The results showed promise in aspects of Critical Thinking, writing development, and expression of new concepts in both ASL and English.

  18. 1-jn agbo -ft 3 2 2014-the post-modern scientific thoughts of thomas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    “hall-of-fame”, what became known as “social sciences” wanted to ape the method of physical ... models from which spring particular coherent traditions of scientific research”. (10), but later in the book (174- ... It is in the emergence of a new paradigm after the revolution (let us call it Normal- ..... words or language. When it is ...

  19. Exploring corporate eco-modernism: Challenging corporate rhetoric and scientific discourses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Welford, Richard

    2000-01-01

    in shaping a new corporate environmentalism and, ten years on, we argue that it is time to step back and critically assess the nature and scope of corporate actions and scientific research within the field of corporate environmental management. This paper starts from the assertions that: (i) disturbing...

  20. The Effect of Using the Constructivist Learning Model in Teaching Science on the Achievement and Scientific Thinking of 8th Grade Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qarareh, Ahmed O.

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to investigate the effect of using constructivist learning model in teaching science, especially in the subject of light: its nature, mirrors, lens, and properties, on the achievement of eighth-grade students and their scientific thinking. The study sample consisted of (136) male and female 8th graders were chosen from two basic…

  1. Thinking Like a Scientist: The RITES Path for K-12 Students to Learn the Scientific Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, D. P.; Dooley, H., Jr.; Cardace, D.

    2015-12-01

    Bringing Research on Learning to the Geosciences (Manduca et al, 2002) stated that "An overaching goal for geoscience education is to help every student to 'think like a scientist'", and that continues to challenge geoscience education. The Rhode Island Technology Enhanced Science (RITES) project addresses that goal, and this presentation chronicles that successful effort. RITES strives to improve science education by providing professional development (PD) to the majority of science teachers at the 5th through 12th grade levels throughout Rhode Island. The PD is presented through ~forty 2.5 day workshops that emphasize the innovative use of technology and best teaching practices, consistent with the recommendations detailed in Manduca et al (2002). The presentation will focus on two of these workshops that provide middle and high school teachers with strategies and techniques for guiding student-run explorations of earthquakes as a result of tectonic plate movements. Teachers address these topics much as a scientist would by carrying out the following activities: 1) Identifying the relationships between faults, EQs and plate boundaries; 2) Using GPS data to quantify interseismic deformation; 3) Constructing an Earthquake machine; and 4) Scaling their observations from desktop to crustal scale, and (5) Using the results to forecast earthquakes along the SAF and to estimate the magnitude of earthquakes on ancient faults. As it is unrealistic to expect teachers to be able to incorporate all of this material into their syllabi, we have introduced the concept of Subtle Shifts (Exploratorium, 2006) as a means by which they can easily blend workshop material into their existing courses. Teacher surveys reflect a high level of satisfaction (81-100%), and pre- and post-evaluations show significant normalized gains (Hake, 1998), in about 90% of the courses. Moreover, students of RITES teachers demonstrate statistically significant gains in inquiry skills and content

  2. Re-envisioning scientific literacy as relational, participatory thinking and doing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trauth-Nare, Amy

    2016-06-01

    This review explores Michelle Hollingsworth Koomen's "Inclusive science education: Learning from Wizard," a case study of a middle school student with learning exceptionalities in a mainstream science classroom. The strength of Koomen's work lies in her elucidation of the ways in which normative science instruction fails to adequately support Wizard's learning. His classroom experiences position him, if unintentionally, as deficient and incapable, which in turn serves to undermine his ability to fully engage in science or to capitalize on his strengths as a learner in the service of developing disciplinary literacy. I extend this conversation by arguing for a broader view of scientific literacy and the need for a more relational pedagogy in classrooms that supports meaningful and productive engagement in science learning and fosters positive identification with science.

  3. The Learning of Science Basic Concept by Using Scientifiq Inquiry to Improve Student’s Thinking, Working, and Scientific Attitude Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wachidatul Linda Yuhanna

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research was a classroom action research which was conducted intwo cycles, each cycle consists of planning, implementing, observing, and reflecting. The data used was quantitative data on student observation sheet instruments. The Results of the study which were obtained from the first cycle showed about the students’ thinking skills and scientific works. They were categorized as excellent 18.18%, good 22.73%, enough 52.27%, and sufficiently less 6.82%. As for the scientific attitude with a very active category of 11.36%, 43.18% and less active 45.45%. It has not reached indicators of success, so it was necessary to cycle II. Cycle II demonstrated the excellent category 38.63%, 36.36% good, good enough18.18% and less 6.81%. While the scientific attitude in the cycle II was an active attitude 29.54%, active 54.54%, inactive 15.91%. These results show an increase from the cycle I to cycle II. The conclusion of this study were: 1 learning the basic concepts of science with scientific inquiry in students can be conducible applied.2 Learning the basic concepts of science with scientific inquiry can improve thinking ability and scientific work and students’ scientific attitude. 3 Learning the basic concepts of science with scientific inquiry be able to explore and develop student creativity in designing simple experiments which can be applied in primary schools.

  4. Modern Thinking of Weber Religious Ethics%韦伯宗教伦理观的现代性思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李雪君

    2015-01-01

    Max Weber,the famous German political economist and sociologist,is recognized as one of the most important mod-ern sociology and public administration.This paper includes,the rise of capitalism in the West,the development of the history of Marxism and materialism of Marx and Weber's views to attempt to show that the two great huge difference between thinking theo-rists,but we shall not be denied,the enormous contribution of the two ideas.%马克斯·韦伯,德国著名的政治经济学家和社会学家,被公认为是现代社会学和公共行政学最重要的创始人之一。韦伯曾自称他的宗教观点是在马克思设定的思想框架下进一步延伸和继承的理论,但笔者认为,这种继承很大程度上是一种否定性的继承。本文主要对韦伯关于西方资本主义的兴起、发展的原因,以及对马克思主义历史唯物、对马克思和韦伯关于资本主义兴起的观点进行比较分析,从而试图表明两个伟大的思想理论家的观点之间的差异,但我们不得否认两者的思想都对西方资本主义的兴起和发展,以及对从古至今关于宗教伦理观点的巨大贡献。

  5. Investigation of historical evolution stages of the term "pedagogical innovation" in modern scientific discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Світлана Миколаївна Ефендієва

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes the basic concepts of innovation. The formation of pedagogical innovations was analyzed and factors of effective management of innovative development were theoretically grounded. The essence of the concepts of scientific and pedagogical discourse was highlighted. The historical stages of the evolution of the term «pedagogical innovation» were investigated. The main draft laws about innovation activity in education were characterized

  6. Assessment of scientific thinking in basic science in the Iranian second national Olympiad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azarpira Negar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To evaluate the scientific reasoning in basic science among undergraduate medical students, we established the National Medical Science Olympiad in Iran. In this Olympiad, the drawing of a concept map was used to evaluate a student's knowledge framework; students' ability in hypothesis generation and testing were also evaluated in four different steps. All medical students were invited to participate in this program. Finally, 133 undergraduate medical students with average grades ≥ 16/20 from 45 different medical schools in Iran were selected. The program took the form of four exams: drawing a concept map (Exam I, hypothesis generation (Exam II, choosing variables based on the hypothesis (Exam III, measuring scientific thought (Exam IV. The examinees were asked to complete all examination items in their own time without using textbooks, websites, or personal consultations. Data were presented as mean ± SE of each parameter. The correlation coefficient between students' scores in each exam with the total final score and average grade was calculated using the Spearman test. Results Out of a possible score of 200, the mean ± SE of each exam were as follows: 183.88 ± 5.590 for Exam I; 78.68 ± 9.168 for Exam II; 92.04 ± 2.503 for exam III; 106.13 ± 2.345 for Exam IV. The correlation of each exam score with the total final score was calculated, and there was a significant correlation between them (p The average grade was significantly correlated with the total final score (R = 0.770, (p p R = 0.7708 and the average grade. This means students with higher average grades had better grades in each exam, especially in drawing the concept map. Conclusions We hope that this competition will encourage medical schools to integrate theory and practice, analyze data, and read research articles. Our findings relate to a selected population, and our data may not be applicable to all medical students. Therefore, further studies are

  7. 现代建筑设计中的感性思想与理性思维%Perceptual Thinking and Rational Thinking in Design of Modern Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王秀; 周茜

    2014-01-01

    The perceptual thinking and rational thinking is a unity of contradictory and mutual support in the architectural design. The author carried out an analysis and examples of pr- oof in this perceptual thinking and rational thinking in the architectural design and discussed that how an excelent arc- hitect to correctly handle the dialectical relationship between perceptual experience and rational thinking in the process of the creation of architectural works.%建筑设计中的感性思想与理性思维是一对互相矛盾而又互相依托的统一体。本文以建筑设计中的感性思想与理性思维的分析与实例举证,探讨了优秀的建筑师在创作建筑作品过程中,怎样正确处理感性体验与理性思想的辩证关系。

  8. Encyclopedia of cosmology historical, philosophical, and scientific foundations of modern cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Hetherington, Norriss S

    2014-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Cosmology, first published in 1993, recounts the history, philosophical assumptions, methodological ambiguities, and human struggles that have influenced the various responses to the basic questions of cosmology through the ages, as well as referencing important scientific theories.Just as the recognition of social conventions in other cultures can lead to a more productive perspective on our own behaviour, so too a study of the cosmologies of other times and places can enable us recognise elements of our own cosmology that might otherwise pass as inevitable developments.Ap

  9. Significance of Pirogov`s scientific ideas for modern organization of Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenova L.S.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is about Nikolay Ivanovich Pirogov, a surgeon and anatomist, prominent scientist and educator, founder of field surgery. He was the first to learn field surgery and military administration in practice. He was the first to use famous triage (the wounded were sorted according to the severity of injuries. N.I.Pirogov considered that well organized triage at dressing stations and temporary military hospitals is the main tool to provide proper care and to prevent harmful consequences. He organized training of medical nurses to help the wounded. He also published the work on the problems of pedagogy in which he proposed reforms of education system. The authors of the article have analyzed N.I.Pirogov`s works and showed their significance for modern social medicine and organization of Public Health.

  10. A set of vertically integrated inquiry-based practical curricula that develop scientific thinking skills for large cohorts of undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbardi, Kirsten; Bugarcic, Andrea; Colthorpe, Kay; Good, Jonathan P; Lluka, Lesley J

    2013-12-01

    Science graduates require critical thinking skills to deal with the complex problems they will face in their 21st century workplaces. Inquiry-based curricula can provide students with the opportunities to develop such critical thinking skills; however, evidence suggests that an inappropriate level of autonomy provided to underprepared students may not only be daunting to students but also detrimental to their learning. After a major review of the Bachelor of Science, we developed, implemented, and evaluated a series of three vertically integrated courses with inquiry-style laboratory practicals for early-stage undergraduate students in biomedical science. These practical curricula were designed so that students would work with increasing autonomy and ownership of their research projects to develop increasingly advanced scientific thinking and communication skills. Students undertaking the first iteration of these three vertically integrated courses reported learning gains in course content as well as skills in scientific writing, hypothesis construction, experimental design, data analysis, and interpreting results. Students also demonstrated increasing skills in both hypothesis formulation and communication of findings as a result of participating in the inquiry-based curricula and completing the associated practical assessment tasks. Here, we report the specific aspects of the curricula that students reported as having the greatest impact on their learning and the particular elements of hypothesis formulation and communication of findings that were more challenging for students to master. These findings provide important implications for science educators concerned with designing curricula to promote scientific thinking and communication skills alongside content acquisition.

  11. Using Tree-Ring Data to Develop Critical Scientific and Mathematical Thinking Skills in Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiondella, F.; Davi, N. K.; Wattenberg, F.; Pringle, P. T.; Greidanus, I.; Oelkers, R.

    2015-12-01

    histories of cliff dwellings and pueblos in the US Southwest. Our modules are designed to give undergraduate students a sense of the scientific process, from fieldwork and logistics, to data processing and data analysis.

  12. PEDAGOGICAL HERITAGE OF ANTONIO GRAMSCI AS A SUBJECT OF SCIENTIFIC DISCOURSE BY MODERN RESEARCHERS ABROAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Dmitrievna Fedotova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article the problems of research and evaluation of Antonio Gramsci’s theoretical heritage are considered. Empirical data were taken from electronic bibliographic abstract databases «ProQuest Dissertations & Theses» and «Scopus». The article presents the results of two series of research concerning researchers’ publications on Antonio Gramsci’s theoretical heritage issues. The first series aims at defining the state and dynamics of publications by the categories of «Gramsci’s heritage studies». The second series specifies the points of the first series, and contains the issues of using «Gramsci and Education» criterion for defining the authorship of the publications on his theoretical heritage. The article shows that publication activity of teachers can be considered within three clusters of time period. Empirical data analysis by «Gramsci and Education» criterion allows for some meaningful conclusions about chronological distribution and content of publications by modern teachers abroad.

  13. Scientific Integrity and Executive National Security Proclamations: A Conflict of the Modern Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.; Banerdt, B.; Bell, J. L.; Byrnes, D. V.; Carlisle, G. L.; D'Addario, L. R.; Weissman, P. R.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Foster, S. D.; Golombek, M. P.; Gorjian, V.; Gorjian, Z.; Hale, A. S.; Kulleck, J. G.; Laubach, S. L.; McElrath, T. P.; Penanen, K. I.; Satter, C.; Walker, W. J.

    2010-12-01

    In 2004, in response to the events of September, 11, 2001, President George W. Bush issued Homeland Security Presidential Directive #12, an executive order requiring a uniform means of identification (i.e. identification badge) for all employees and contractors at federal facilities. To comply with this directive NASA ordered that its contract employees at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory 'voluntarily' agree to an open ended, unrestricted, background investigation into the intimate details of their private lives. These employees do not have security clearances and do not work with classified material. Caltech, which employs the JPL personnel under a NASA management contract, informed the employees that if they did not ‘voluntarily’ consent to the background investigation, they would be assumed to have voluntarily resigned and therefore be denied access to JPL (i.e. they would be functionally terminated). In October 2007, twentyeight JPL employees filed suit in Federal District Court. After an initial dismissal by the lowest federal court, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals issued an injunction against Caltech and NASA, stopping the background investigations. The Appeals Court found that the investigations were not narrowly tailored to meet the specific needs of NASA and therefore violated the employee’s legitimate expectation of informational privacy. This injunction has been reviewed and upheld several times by various panels of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. In November 2009, the United States Department of Justice petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court requesting that it overturn this injunction. The Supreme Court accepted the case for oral arguments and scheduled them for October 5, 2010. A decision is imminent (if it has not been made already). The case has opened the following questions regarding all research workers under government contract: 1. What impact would such intrusive investigations have on open scientific inquiry and scientific integrity? 2

  14. From Kraepelin to a modern and integrative scientific discipline: the development of transcultural psychiatry in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machleidt, Wielant; Sieberer, Marcel

    2013-12-01

    The roots of transcultural psychiatry in Germany can be traced back to Emil Kraepelin, who made the first culturally comparative observations on mental disorders in Southeast Asia at the start of the 20th century. Since the beginning of the 1970s, contributors to the literature of transcultural psychiatry in Germany have been predominantly concerned with the mental health of migrant workers from Mediterranean countries, particularly the practical difficulties and therapeutic implications of inpatient psychiatric treatment of these migrant groups. The inauguration of the Section on Transcultural Psychiatry of the German Association for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy 20 years ago reflected an increasing scientific interest in this topic. In addition to the psychic impact of migration, research into transcultural care is currently focused on disparities in the utilization of health care and conjectured barriers to access to health and mental health care among migrants. Furthermore, studies based on epidemiological approaches have been carried out in order to resolve the question of whether migrants are as affected by mental disorders as the ethnic German population, and which issues contribute to the so-called "healthy migrant" effect. Other topics that have been explored in the last 10 years are the particular psychosocial situation of asylum seekers and refugees in Germany, and the effects of inadequate integration and discrimination on their mental health. In summary, after a short historical and theoretical overview, this article reviews the current major themes in transcultural research in German contemporary psychiatry, and concludes with an overview of future developments in this field.

  15. A high-enrollment course-based undergraduate research experience improves student conceptions of scientific thinking and ability to interpret data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownell, Sara E; Hekmat-Scafe, Daria S; Singla, Veena; Chandler Seawell, Patricia; Conklin Imam, Jamie F; Eddy, Sarah L; Stearns, Tim; Cyert, Martha S

    2015-01-01

    We present an innovative course-based undergraduate research experience curriculum focused on the characterization of single point mutations in p53, a tumor suppressor gene that is mutated in more than 50% of human cancers. This course is required of all introductory biology students, so all biology majors engage in a research project as part of their training. Using a set of open-ended written prompts, we found that the course shifts student conceptions of what it means to think like a scientist from novice to more expert-like. Students at the end of the course identified experimental repetition, data analysis, and collaboration as important elements of thinking like a scientist. Course exams revealed that students showed gains in their ability to analyze and interpret data. These data indicate that this course-embedded research experience has a positive impact on the development of students' conceptions and practice of scientific thinking.

  16. Mythological thinking in the person’s psychological integrity formation at the Modern period of social development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoriy Nina Ivanivna

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the process of consciousness mythologizing and the peculiarities of mythological thinking are researched. The peculiarities of mythological consciousness of mass psychology are distinguished relying on S. Freud’s theory.

  17. Assessment of scientific thinking in basic science questions in the Iranian Fourth National Olympiad for medical sciences students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ghojazadeh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Regarding to the importance of students Olympiads, and the need for evaluation of quality of questions, the aim of this study was to analyze questions (indices of difficulty coefficient and discrimination coefficient of Fourth Olympiad examination among Iranian medical sciences students in the area of scientific thinking in basic science. Methods: This study was descriptive-analytical study and was conducted in 2013 in the Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (Tabriz, Iran. The individual phase of this period, comprised from four phase and six parts included: designing conceptual map (CM (three part designing CM, summarizing CM, and designing three questions, hypothesis generating, selecting variables, and analyzing the findings. Data analyzed using descriptive statistics and statistical tests in SPSS for Windows. Results: According to difficulty coefficient of selecting variable (82% and making hypothesis was the easiest part (46%. And according to discriminate coefficient, analyzing the findings had the highest discriminate coefficient (83%, and selecting materials had the lowest discriminate coefficient (34%. Difficulty coefficient of the test was estimated about 63%, and discriminate coefficient was 66%. The results of Spearman correlation coefficient test showed that the correlation between scores related to designing CM with generating hypothesis equals to 85%, with selecting variable was 36% and with analyzing the results equals to 71%. Conclusion: Based on the result of this study, it is necessary for a designer of test to focus on selecting variable part of the test for improvement of quality and validity of the test. Furthermore, regarding to effectiveness of CM, it seems logical to pay more attention to their use.

  18. 以科研思维为依托的高校教师教学元思维构建%ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF SCIENTIFIC-THINKING-BASED META-THINKING IN TEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄辉辉

    2011-01-01

    教学投入与教学成效的严重失衡折射了当前高校教学研究的盲点,即忽略了对教师教学思维存在的问题的研究,也为新时期高校教师实现教学思维方式的转型提出了迫切要求。高校教师应构建一种以科研思维为依托的教学元思维。自组织系统理论为教学元思维构建的必要性与可行性提供了强有力的理论依据。教学元思维的自组织运行机制将真正推进素质教育往更深层次发展。%In Chinese colleges,teaching reforms have marched into an era of "methodology";however,classroom-based reforms haven't yielded satisfactory results and college students are characterised with an absence of analytical thinking capacity.This phenomenon not only mirrors the blind spot in current teaching research-the absense of study in the field of problems with teachers'thinking modes in teaching,but also makes the transformation of traditional teachers'thinking modes an urgent task in the new era.In view to the situation,college teachers should acquire a kind of scientific-thinking-based meta-thinking in teaching.The self-organizing theory offers theoretical foundation for the necessity and feasibility of constructing meta-thinking in foreign language teaching.

  19. On the Value of Thinking in the Scientific Writing%论思想在科研写作中的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张健

    2015-01-01

    与材料占有、语言技巧相比,思想见解、独到创意是科研写作的“重头戏”。思想的存在是科研写作的灵魂,思想的追寻是人类超越的境界,思想的创新是科研写作的旨归。思想创新的路径是善学、深思、能做、批判。%Compared with material possession and language skills,views,unique thoughts,and creative ideas,play an important role in scientific writing.The reasons are as follows:thoughts is the soul of scientific research and writing;the pursuit of thoughts is beyond the realm of human beings;the innovation of thoughts is the final purpose of scien-tific writing.The channels of scientific thoughts beginning:being good at study,thinking deeply,being equipped for thinking,and criticism.

  20. 刍议现代景观设计中创新思维的体现%Discuss the Embodiment of Creative Thinking in Modern Landscape Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨华; 刘金波

    2014-01-01

    Ful of innovative landscape design more atract people's atention and more consistent with the modern pe-ople's aesthetic view. Therefore, this article explore and di-scuss the content of promoting the innovation in landscape design thinking development, how to use the landscape design under the innovative thinking, anatomical analysis of how to present the innovative thinking in the contemporary landscape design.%充满创新性的景观设计更加吸引人们的眼球,更加吻合现代人们的审美观,所以,推进景观设计创新思维发展的缘由,在创新思维下景观设计怎样去运用,解剖分析当代景观设计中创新思维是怎样呈现的则是本文所探索讨论的内容。

  1. The Nishino Breathing Method and Ki-energy (Life-energy: A Challenge to Traditional Scientific Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Ohnishi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The breathing method, which was developed and is being taught by Kozo Nishino, a Japanese Ki-expert, is for raising the levels of Ki-energy (life-energy or the vitality of an individual. It is neither a therapy nor a healing technique. However, many of his students have experienced an improvement in their health, and in some cases, they were able to overcome health problems by themselves. Since this is an interesting subject from the standpoint of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM, we have been collaborating with Nishino to conduct a scientific investigation of his Ki-energy. We found that Nishino's Ki-energy can inhibit cell division of cancer cells, protect isolated mitochondria from heat deterioration and reduce lipid peroxidation in heat-treated mitochondria. Although Ki-energy may consist of several different energy forms, we found that at least one of them is near-infrared radiation between the wavelength range of 0.8 and 2.7 µm. Another interesting observation at his school is the Taiki-practice (paired Ki-practice. During this practice, Nishino can ‘move’ his students without any physical contact. Many of them run, jump or roll on the floor when they receive his Ki-energy. We studied this and propose that ‘information’ is conveyed through the air between two individuals by Ki-energy. This may be called a five sense-independent, life-to-life communication by Ki. All of our results suggest that we should re-evaluate the Cartesian dualism (separation of mind and body which has been a fundamental principle of modern science for the past three centuries.

  2. What Do Science Teachers Think about Developing Scientific Competences through Context-Based Teaching? A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupión-Cobos, Teresa; López-Castilla, Rafael; Blanco-López, Ángel

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we explore the views and opinions of four secondary education science teachers regarding the teaching of scientific competences. Their views were gathered in the context of a training programme in which they had to design, implement, and assess their own teaching unit for developing students' scientific competences by means of…

  3. COMPUTATIONAL THINKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy K. Khenner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the research is to draw attention of the educational community to the phenomenon of computational thinking which actively discussed in the last decade in the foreign scientific and educational literature, to substantiate of its importance, practical utility and the right on affirmation in Russian education.Methods. The research is based on the analysis of foreign studies of the phenomenon of computational thinking and the ways of its formation in the process of education; on comparing the notion of «computational thinking» with related concepts used in the Russian scientific and pedagogical literature.Results. The concept «computational thinking» is analyzed from the point of view of intuitive understanding and scientific and applied aspects. It is shown as computational thinking has evolved in the process of development of computers hardware and software. The practice-oriented interpretation of computational thinking which dominant among educators is described along with some ways of its formation. It is shown that computational thinking is a metasubject result of general education as well as its tool. From the point of view of the author, purposeful development of computational thinking should be one of the tasks of the Russian education.Scientific novelty. The author gives a theoretical justification of the role of computational thinking schemes as metasubject results of learning. The dynamics of the development of this concept is described. This process is connected with the evolution of computer and information technologies as well as increase of number of the tasks for effective solutions of which computational thinking is required. Author substantiated the affirmation that including «computational thinking » in the set of pedagogical concepts which are used in the national education system fills an existing gap.Practical significance. New metasubject result of education associated with

  4. [Institutional renovation and scientific modernization: the creation of the Instituto de Investigaciones Hematológicas during the mid-1950s].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschini, José

    2013-12-01

    Using documentary sources, this work analyzes the creation and initial functioning of the Instituto de Investigaciones Hematológicas (Institute of Hematological Research) of the National Academy of Medicine (Buenos Aires, Argentina) in the context of the scientific modernization initiated within the country during the mid-1950s. Particular attention is paid to the generation of material bases and institutional and cultural mechanisms for the development of scientific research and of clinical practices guided by procedures and techniques rooted in the basic sciences. The formation and development of a research school in the Experimental Leukemia Section of the institute is explored as a case illustrative of the effective consolidation of initiatives oriented towards the organization of a scientific center.

  5. Preschool Pathways to Science (PrePS[TM]): Facilitating Scientific Ways of Thinking, Talking, Doing, and Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelman, Rochel; Brenneman, Kimberly; Macdonald, Gay; Roman, Moises

    2009-01-01

    To ensure they're meeting state early learning guidelines for science, preschool educators need fun, age-appropriate, and research-based ways to teach young children about scientific concepts. The basis for the PBS KIDS show "Sid the Science Kid," this teaching resource helps children ages 3-5 investigate their everyday world and develop the…

  6. The Effects of Inquiry-Based Computer Simulation with Cooperative Learning on Scientific Thinking and Conceptual Understanding of Gas Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Sopiah; Shariff, Adilah

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of inquiry-based computer simulation with heterogeneous-ability cooperative learning (HACL) and inquiry-based computer simulation with friendship cooperative learning (FCL) on (a) scientific reasoning (SR) and (b) conceptual understanding (CU) among Form Four students in Malaysian Smart…

  7. Thinking with the saint: the miracle of Saint Januarius of Naples and science in early modern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ceglia, Francesco Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to reconstruct the way in which early modem science questioned and indirectly influenced (while being in its turn influenced by) the conceptualization of the liquefaction of the blood of Saint Januarius, a phenomenon that has been taking place at regular intervals in Naples since the late Middle Ages. In the seventeenth century, a debate arose that divided Europe between supporters of a theory of divine intervention and believers in the occult properties of the blood. These two theoretical options reflected two different perspectives on the relationship between the natural and the supernatural. While in the seventeenth century, the emphasis was placed on the predictable periodicity of the miraculous event of liquefaction as a manifestation of God in his role as a divine regulator, in the eighteenth century the event came to be described as capricious and unpredictable, in an attempt to differentiate miracles from the workings of nature, which were deemed to be normative. The miracle of the blood of Saint Januarius thus provides a window through which we can catch a glimpse of how the natural order was perceived in early modern Europe at a time when the Continent was culturally fragmented into north and south, Protestantism and Catholicism, learned and ignorant.

  8. Genetic Research Methodology Meets Early Childhood Science Education Research: A Cultural-Historical Study of Child’s Scientific Thinking Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fragkiadaki G.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study reported in this paper aims to structure a cultural-historical understanding on how early childhood children experience science and how they develop scientific thinking as they interact with the social, cultural and material world. Moving beyond the cognitive dimensions of learning by interrelating different aspects of the process of children’s scientific thinking development constitutes a research prior- ity for the study. From a wide range of collected data, in the present article one qualitative empirical case study is presented. The detailed single example that is analyzed refers to a kindergarten female student, aged 5.2 years old, from an urban area of Greece. A developmental research methodology as specified from the requirements of cultural-historical theory framework is used. Following four of the main principles of the experimental genetic method, this study creates a fecund ground for a cultural-historical exploration and interpretation of the very processes of the child’s development. The collection of the data was achieved through expanded, open-type conversations conducted at three concrete phases between the case study child, two of her peers and the educator. Drawing upon the system of theoretical concepts of cultural- historical theory the analysis is mainly based on the concept of perezhivanie as analytical tool as well as the concept of the developmental trajectories. The concept of the conceptualization of a precursor model as a theoretical tool that derives from the field of Science Education is also used. The analysis gives insights into how a certain social situation between children and educators in kindergarten settings becomes the unique social situation of a child’s development. Using as a base the dialectic perspective that Vygotsky posed in the analysis of human psyche, the study in this paper offers a creative insight in order to elaborate on a broad and dynamic understanding of the child

  9. COMPUTATIONAL THINKING

    OpenAIRE

    Evgeniy K. Khenner

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. The aim of the research is to draw attention of the educational community to the phenomenon of computational thinking which actively discussed in the last decade in the foreign scientific and educational literature, to substantiate of its importance, practical utility and the right on affirmation in Russian education.Methods. The research is based on the analysis of foreign studies of the phenomenon of computational thinking and the ways of its formation in the process of education;...

  10. Teaching Critical Thinking

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, N G; Bonn, D A

    2015-01-01

    The ability to make decisions based on data, with its inherent uncertainties and variability, is a complex and vital skill in the modern world. The need for such quantitative critical thinking occurs in many different contexts, and while it is an important goal of education, that goal is seldom being achieved. We argue that the key element for developing this ability is repeated practice in making decisions based on data, with feedback on those decisions. We demonstrate a structure for providing suitable practice that can be applied in any instructional setting that involves the acquisition of data and relating that data to scientific models. This study reports the results of applying that structure in an introductory physics lab course. Students in an experimental condition were repeatedly instructed to make and act on quantitative comparisons between datasets, and between data and models, an approach that is common to all science disciplines. These instructions were slowly faded across the course. After the...

  11. The Pioneering Work of Enrico Morselli (1852-1929) in Light of Modern Scientific Research on Hypnosis and Suggestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolucci, Chiara; Lombardo, Giovanni Pietro

    2017-01-01

    This article examines research on hypnosis and suggestion, starting with the nineteenth-century model proposed by Enrico Morselli (1852-1929), an illustrious Italian psychiatrist and psychologist. The authors conducted an original psychophysiological analysis of hypnosis, distancing the work from the neuropathological concept of the time and proposing a model based on a naturalistic approach to investigating mental processes. The issues investigated by Morselli, including the definition of hypnosis and analysis of specific mental processes such as attention and memory, are reviewed in light of modern research. From the view of modern neuroscientific concepts, some problems that originated in the nineteenth century still appear to be present and pose still-open questions.

  12. Defining Computational Thinking for Mathematics and Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintrop, David; Beheshti, Elham; Horn, Michael; Orton, Kai; Jona, Kemi; Trouille, Laura; Wilensky, Uri

    2016-02-01

    Science and mathematics are becoming computational endeavors. This fact is reflected in the recently released Next Generation Science Standards and the decision to include "computational thinking" as a core scientific practice. With this addition, and the increased presence of computation in mathematics and scientific contexts, a new urgency has come to the challenge of defining computational thinking and providing a theoretical grounding for what form it should take in school science and mathematics classrooms. This paper presents a response to this challenge by proposing a definition of computational thinking for mathematics and science in the form of a taxonomy consisting of four main categories: data practices, modeling and simulation practices, computational problem solving practices, and systems thinking practices. In formulating this taxonomy, we draw on the existing computational thinking literature, interviews with mathematicians and scientists, and exemplary computational thinking instructional materials. This work was undertaken as part of a larger effort to infuse computational thinking into high school science and mathematics curricular materials. In this paper, we argue for the approach of embedding computational thinking in mathematics and science contexts, present the taxonomy, and discuss how we envision the taxonomy being used to bring current educational efforts in line with the increasingly computational nature of modern science and mathematics.

  13. Computational thinking and thinking about computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Jeannette M

    2008-10-28

    Computational thinking will influence everyone in every field of endeavour. This vision poses a new educational challenge for our society, especially for our children. In thinking about computing, we need to be attuned to the three drivers of our field: science, technology and society. Accelerating technological advances and monumental societal demands force us to revisit the most basic scientific questions of computing.

  14. 近世代数课程教学与学生思维能力培养%The Course Teaching of Modern Algebra and the Training for Students' Thinking Capability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王旭琴

    2009-01-01

    Modern algebra, of which the logicality is very strict and the abstractness is relatively strong, has a u-nique advantage in training student's thinking. This paper illustrates the important functions of modern algebra in training student's creative thinking, and the practical applications in teaching course.%近世代数逻辑性严密,抽象性较强,在训练学生思维方面有独特优势.本文例说了近世代数课程培养学生创造性思维的重要作用,以及在教学过程中的具体应用.

  15. Method of Lecturing Science and Engineering Curriculums with Scientific Thinking%利用科研思维开展理工类课程的教学方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柯昌博; 刘大勇; 肖甫

    2015-01-01

    讨论科研思维在高教理工类教学中的作用. 首先,分析科研思维与理工类课程的特征;其次,讨论科研思维与理工类课程之间的关系,并定义利用科研思维教授理工类课程的两个维度;再次,以实例研究为例,说明实例教学在理工类课程教学中的重要性.%Discusses the role of scientific research thinking in science and engineering specialty lecturing in colleges and universities. Firstly, analyzes the characteristics of scientific research thinking and science and engineering curriculums. Secondly, discusses the relationship of scientific research thinking and science and engineering curriculums, and defines two dimensions of lecturing science and engineering curriculums with scientific research thinking. In the end, as case study for example, illustrates the importance of case lecturing for science and engineering curriculums.

  16. Case reports in medical education: a platform for training medical students, residents, and fellows in scientific writing and critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek, Aleksandra G; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-04-06

    A case report is a detailed narrative that usually illustrates a diagnostic or therapeutic problem experienced by one or several patients. Case reports commonly serve as the first line of evidence for new interventions or they function as alarms that an issue exists with an already established therapy. Case reports are of minor importance in evidence-based medicine; however, they make meaningful contributions to both the knowledge and education of medical students, residents, and fellows. Case reports are written with the goal of sharing information for medical, scientific, or educational purposes. They often serve as medical or even undergraduate students' first experience with medical writing and they provide a solid foundation for manuscript preparation and publication. In the last few decades, there has been an exponential increase in medical student research, specifically in the number of manuscripts published by medical students. It is important to foster this academic spirit among students by encouraging them to become involved in research. This editorial will focus on the value and educational benefits of writing case reports for medical students, university students, residents, and fellows.

  17. 院校实验室科学管理思考%Thinking about the College Laboratory Scientific Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍连利

    2011-01-01

    增强科学研究能力是当前实验室建设的主要任务.如何完成好这一任务、做好实验室的管理工作,是当前院校值得探讨的问题.从更新教育观念、健全规章制度、优化队伍结构、实行开放管理、营造和谐氛围5个方面,提出了提高院校实验室科学管理水平的对策.%Enhanced scientific research capacity is the main objective of the current laboratory construction; how to further achieve this goal is worth exploring. These aspects are updating concepts of education> consummating the regulations, optimizing team structure, the implementation of open management and creating a harmonious atmosphere, then the countermeasure is proposed.

  18. The Scientific Life of Modern Russia: Experience of Organizing and Publishing The Ancient Rus in Time, in Personalities, in Ideas Anthology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey V. Petrov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an overview of six printed books of a new ongoing scientific project, The Ancient Rus in Time, in Personalities, in Ideas anthology, on the basis of the current state of the features of the Russian history about the Russian Middle Ages. The authors try to show that in the modern history, which is characterized by multi-pronged approaches (based on both the traditions emerged more than one century and a half ago and those currently emerging, new forms of cooperation between research institutions and individual researchers are possible on the basis of independent publications underpinned by a private initiative. An example of the anthology, which is being published during the last three years and on which its publishers work in cooperation with individual researchers and scientific institutions (St. Petersburg Theological Academy, St. Petersburg State University and the Institute of Philosophy of the Russian Academy of Sciences, illustrates that coordination activity of the scientific community, at least in one discipline, may be based on a nonprofit private publishing project. The experience of the print edition and, more broadly, the experience of the comprehension of the national history are inseparable from national traditions and culture, understanding of which lies, perhaps, in a framework of historical knowledge. Translation of these experiences have the primary task of any science, primarily humanities, and the anthology is a new convenient platform for the dissemination of this experience, as exemplified by the content of the already published issues of the anthology.

  19. Rational Thinking and Reasonable Thinking in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaeva E. A.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The usual concept of space and time, based on Aristotle's principle of contemplation of the world and of the absoluteness of time, is a product of rational thinking. At the same time, in philosophy, rational thinking differs from reasonable thinking; the aim of logic is to distinguish finite forms from infinite forms. Agreeing that space and time are things of infinity in this work, we shall show that, with regard to these two things, it is necessary to apply reasonable thinking. Spaces with non-Euclidean geometry, for example Riemannian and Finslerian spaces, in particular, the space of the General Theory of the Relativity (four-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian geometry and also the concept of multi-dimensional space-time are products of reasonable thinking. Consequently, modern physical experiment not dealing with daily occurrences (greater speeds than a low speed to the velocity of light, strong fields, singularities, etc. can be covered only by reasonable thinking.

  20. Rational Thinking and Reasonable Thinking in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaeva E. A.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The usual concept of space and time, based on Aristotle’s principle of contemplation of the world and of the absoluteness of time, is a product of rational thinking. At the same time, in philosophy, rational thinking differs from reasonable thinking; the aim of logic is to distinguish finite forms from infinite forms. Agreeing that space and time are things of infinity in this work, we shall show that, with regard to these two things, it is necessary to apply reasonable thinking. Spaces with non-Euclidean geometry, for example Riemannian and Finslerian spaces, in particular, the space of the General Theory of the Relativity (four-dimensional pseudo-Riemannian geometry and also the concept of multi-dimensional space-time are products of reasonable thinking. Consequently, modern physical experiment not dealing with daily occurrences (greater speeds than a low speed to the velocity of light, strong fields, singularities, etc. can be covered only by reasonable thinking.

  1. Thinking inside the Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demski, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    When one thinks of 21st century schools, one thinks of geometric modern architecture, sustainable building materials, and high-tech modular classrooms. It's rare, though, that a district has the space or the money to build that school from the ground up. Instead, the challenge for most is the transformation of the 20th century architecture to…

  2. Thinking inside the Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demski, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    When one thinks of 21st century schools, one thinks of geometric modern architecture, sustainable building materials, and high-tech modular classrooms. It's rare, though, that a district has the space or the money to build that school from the ground up. Instead, the challenge for most is the transformation of the 20th century architecture to…

  3. Thinking on Internal audit of Agricultural Scientific Research Projects%对农业科研项目内部审计的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛凤琴

    2011-01-01

    With the development of market economy,operating scale of agricultural research institutes more and more complex,business diversification,administrative multilevel,project audit work has become a new topic engaged in internal audit work.Based on analysis of the function and problems on internal audit of agricultural scientific research projects,how to strengthen the internal audit have done some thinking.%随着市场经济的发展,农业科研单位经营业务规模日趋复杂、经营方式多样化、管理层次多级化。项目审计工作已成为从事内部审计工作的一项新课题。本文通过对经营业务规模日趋复杂的农业科研项目内部审计职能作用的分析,针对存在的问题,就如何强化科研项目内部审计做了一些思考。

  4. Traditional East Asian medicine: how to understand and approach diagnostic findings and patterns in a modern scientific framework?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Stephen; Alraek, Terje

    2014-05-01

    Research into the diagnostic methods and patterns of traditional East Asian medical (TEAM) systems of practice such as acupuncture and herbal medicine face certain challenges due to the nature of thinking in TEAM and the subjective basis of judgments made in practice. The TEAM-based diagnosis can take into account various findings and signs such as the appearance of the tongue, palpable qualities of the radial pulses, palpable qualities and findings on the abdomen, the complexion of the patient and so on. Both diagnostic findings and the patterns of diagnosis cannot be assumed to have objective bases or to be causally related to the complaints of the patient. However, the diagnoses of TEAM based acupuncture and herbal medicine have tended to look at pictures of the whole patient and rather than focus on a particular symptom, they have looked across a myriad of signs and symptoms to decide or identify the 'pattern' of diagnosis according to the theory in question. Although open for selective and subjective biases each diagnosis pattern always comes with a prescribed treatment tailored to the pattern. Further, the same research requirements needed for the validation of the diagnoses are needed also for these clinical observations and judgments. Hence, it is necessary, albeit challenging for research on TEAM diagnoses to first address these issues before proceeding to more complex investigations such as the development of instruments for making diagnostic observations, instruments for forming diagnostic conclusions or studies investigating the physiological bases of the diagnostic patterns. Preliminary work has started and instruments have been made, but we suggest that any instrumentation must necessarily be first validated by matching of the calibrated or scaled observations or judgments to observations made and agreed upon by relevant experts. Reliability of all observations and judgments are needed before any other tool, technology or more advanced approach can

  5. Experimental rage: the development of medical ethics and the genesis of scientific facts. Ludwik Fleck: an answer to the crisis of modern medicine in interwar Germany?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonah, Christian

    2002-08-01

    In 1930, the large-scale introduction of the BCG vaccination in the city of Lübeck in northern Germany led to a major scandal that focused public attention on medical experimentation with human beings as well as reviving criticism of the medical profession that had been voiced before. The trial following the catastrophe raised the first clearly identifiable public discussions on medical ethics in Europe, and led to the establishment of the first regulations for medical research on human beings in the western hemisphere; the German 'Richtlinien' of 1931. In 1935, Ludwik Fleck (1896-1961) published a now classic monograph entitled Genesis and Development of a Scientific Fact. The central hypothesis of this article is that, when Fleck published his book four years after the Lübeck trial, he was proposing answers to questions raised, at least partially, by the Lübeck case, although he never explicitly mentions it. Most interestingly, Fleck proposed a different approach to the fundamental dilemma of modern experimental medicine, the potential opposition between an individual's well-being, and the production and application of scientific knowledge in medicine. Where the standard answer to these questions has, since the 1930s, become moral reasoning and ethical regulation, known today as bioethics, Fleck portrays a different approach that could be characterized as the attempt to foster a deeper and more democratic understanding of science through an examination of its intimate functioning.

  6. A Set of Vertically Integrated Inquiry-Based Practical Curricula that Develop Scientific Thinking Skills for Large Cohorts of Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbardi, Kirsten; Bugarcic, Andrea; Colthorpe, Kay; Good, Jonathan P.; Lluka, Lesley J.

    2013-01-01

    Science graduates require critical thinking skills to deal with the complex problems they will face in their 21st century workplaces. Inquiry-based curricula can provide students with the opportunities to develop such critical thinking skills; however, evidence suggests that an inappropriate level of autonomy provided to under prepared students…

  7. Perspective and Spatiality in the Modern Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Fraisopi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available the domain of Art critique and becoming a philosophical argument. How can we think of Perspective as symbolic Form? Is Perspective really a symbolic form? Why is Perspective so important? Because at the beginning of the Modern Age, Perspective as spiritual figure grounds many symbolic or even many scientific constructions. We could we say that perspective open the foundation of modern science as such. The “Geometrization” of Vision, beginning with perspective, will be for us the interpretative key in order to understand the Modern Age as a whole.  This understanding will allow us to understand the anthropologic dimension arising from the Modern Age, called „Perspectivism“. Assuming that perspective was neither only an invention of painting nor of geometry nor of philosophy, taken as singular fields of human inquiry, we will try to sketch the genesis of “perspective” from an interdisciplinary point of view. By doing so, we will also try to fix its deep significance for the anthropology of the Modern Age. Living and feeling in a perspectival world is the real invention of the Modern Age, one that overcame the closed Cosmos of the Middle Ages in order to reveal to mankind its own potential. Our interdisciplinary approach will proceed from many points of view (history of art, science, theology, anthropology and converge on the idea of a new kind of human experience. Such an interdisciplinary approach will open new questions about our present time. Are we justified in thinking of our experience today as perspectival? What does it mean today to think from perspectives in the manifold dimensions of our living and to face to the complexity of our times?

  8. Different Ways of Thinking about Street Networks and Spatial Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Street networks, as one of the oldest infrastructures of transport in the world, play a significant role in modernization, sustainable development, and human daily activities in both ancient and modern times. Although street networks have been well studied in a variety of engineering and scientific disciplines, including for instance transport, geography, urban planning, economics, and even physics, our understanding of street networks in terms of their structure and dynamics remains limited, especially when dealing with such real-world problems as traffic jams, pollution, and human evacuations for disaster management. One goal of this special issue is to promote different ways of thinking about understanding street networks, and of conducting spatial analysis.

  9. Inspiration of pre - Qin Confucian archery thinking on modern competitivesports%先秦儒家视域下的射艺思想对现代竞技体育的启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛誉

    2014-01-01

    In the pre - Qin Dynasty,Confucian school used to elucidate their ideological theory by way of archery. Taking pre - Qin Confucian archery thinking for example,the paper has summed up 3 pieces of inspiration for modern competitive sports:unifications of body and skills, skills and rules, etiquettes and virtuousness. Archery thinking of pre - Qin Confucianism can be used to correct and overcome the bias and disadvantages in modern competitive sports and promote its sustainable development.%在先秦,先秦儒家经常言射箭来阐发自身的思想理论。以先秦儒学视域下的射艺思想为例,总结出3个对现代竞技体育的启示:一是身体与技能的统一,二是技能与规则的统一,三是礼仪与仁德的统一。借鉴先秦儒家视域中的射艺思想,以此来纠正和克服现代竞技体育中所存在的偏颇和弊端,使其可持续发展。

  10. Practice and Thinking about the Scientific Research Capacity of Orthopaedics Clinical Speciality Postgraduates%骨科专业型研究生科研能力培养的实践与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李甲振; 张鹏飞

    2014-01-01

    通过骨科专业型研究生的培养经验,总结认为专业型研究生科研能力的培养可通过掌握科研基础、培养科研思维、实践论文写作等方面培养专业型研究生的科研能力。%Through summarizing the training experience of orthopaedics clinical speciality postgradu-ates ,we can cultivate the scientific research capacity of clinical speciality postgraduates through these ways ,that is mastering the scientific research base ,training scientific thinking ,practicing essay writ-ing and so on .

  11. On the Pedagogy of Ideological and Politics Education in Institutions of Higher Education Based on Modern Ecological Thinking%基于现代生态思维理念的高校思政教学探究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姬君彩

    2012-01-01

    现代生态思维是一种互利型思维,是运用生态学的观点去思考问题、解决问题。从现代生态思维视角来研究高校思政教学。可以运用生态学的系统性、整体性、平衡性、协调性、可持续发展性等观点,探讨在宏观和微观生境中明确和把握思政教学的导向和内涵.以便协调好经济性、政治性、社会性生境与个性心理生境四者相互间关系.促进高校思政教学良性健康发展。%Modern Ecological Thinking approaches and solves problems with ecological perspectives and is a mutually beneficial thinking. In the pedagogic research of the ideological and politics education in institutions of higher education, we can utilize many concepts from modern ecological thinking, such as the view of system, holisrn, balance, coordination and sustainable development, to specify and ensure the guidance and content of ideological and political education in macroscopic and microscopic environments, so as to better coordinate the interrelation between economy, politics, social habitat and individual psychological habitat and promote the healthy development of the ideological and politics education in institutions of higher education.

  12. Scientific Thinking Construction of File Information Developers under Information Resources Management%浅谈信息资源管理背景下档案信息开发人员科学思维的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄吉春

    2011-01-01

    随着档案工作中心从“档案保管”转移到“档案利用”上,对档案信息开发人员的思维素养要求越来越高,本文就信息资源管理背景下,档案信息开发人员科学思维的培养问题提出一些解决之策。%With the archival work center from the"record keeping"to"file using"on the developer of file information literacy have become increasingly demanding of thinking,this article on the context of information resource management,file information developers to develop scientific thinking Some of the policy issues to resolve.

  13. SOLUTION OF TASKS AS CONDITION OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL THINKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kh. Kurashinova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The modern labor market waits for the expert trained not only theoretically, but also practically, and it means that knowledge in the respective area is obviously not enough. Effectively to work in this or that field, at a stage of high school training future specialists need to impart skills of the practical solution of professional tasks and by that to develop interest in future profession. At the same time, despite a sufficient theoretical and experienced and experimental readiness of a problem of forming of professional thinking, there is a contradiction between requirements of society imposed to professional training and the actual level of practical cogitative readiness of the modern graduate than and relevance of this scientific article and its problem is determined. The work purpose – theoretically to prove a possibility of development of professional thinking at a stage of high school training through special didactic model and at the same time to draw attention to the problems of modern education connected with insufficient practical readiness of university graduates. Object of a research is professional training of future specialist in system of high school education. A subject – problem (training tasks based form of educational process organization in higher education institution as a condition of forming of professional thinking. The scientific article contains selective data of the conducted experienced pilot study of a problem. 

  14. On the Application of Pedagogy of Group Cooperative Learning in the Course of Scientific Thinking Training%浅谈小组合作学习在《科学思维训练》课程的运用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙国红

    2013-01-01

      本文在结合《科学思维训练》课程中运用小组合作学习教学法的实际,阐述了小组合作学习教学法的内涵和模式,以及应用小组合作学习教学法应注意的问题。%By using pedagogy of group cooperative learning in the course of Scientific Thinking Training, this paper expounded its content and mode as well as the problems should pay attention to while using the pedagogy of group cooperative learning.

  15. Promoting agricultural modernization Practice and Thinking---Case in Taizhou%推进农业现代化的实践与思考--以泰州为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张中兰

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies designed to further strengthen the position of agriculture as the foundation of knowledge, through the development of modern agriculture in Taizhou analysis of the status quo and seek compliance Taizhou charac-teristics of agricultural modernization development path, scientific regulation deploy a variety of resources ,made to promote agricultural modernization in Taizhou main policy recommendations to promote better and faster development of modern a-griculture in Taizhou.%文章研究旨在进一步强化对农业基础地位的认识,通过对泰州现代农业发展现状的分析,寻求符合泰州特点的农业现代化发展路径,科学调控调配各类资源,提出推进泰州农业现代化建设的主要政策建议,以期推动泰州现代农业更好更快发展。

  16. Oersted Lecture 2013: How should we think about how our students think?

    CERN Document Server

    Redish, Edward F

    2013-01-01

    Physics Education Research (PER) applies a scientific approach to the question, "How do our students think about and learn physics?" PER allows us to explore such intellectually engaging questions as, "What does it mean to understand something in physics?" and, "What skills and competencies do we want our students to learn from our physics classes?" To address questions like these, we need to do more than observe student difficulties and build curricula. We need a theoretical framework -- a structure for talking about, making sense of, and modeling how one thinks about, learns, and understands physics. In this paper, I outline some aspects of the Resources Framework, a structure that some of us are using to create a phenomenology of physics learning that ties closely to modern developments in neuroscience, psychology, and linguistics. As an example of how this framework gives new insights, I discuss epistemological framing -- the role of students' perceptions of the nature of the knowledge they are learning a...

  17. 浅论现代篮球技术教学对大学男生的创造性思维引导%Discussion on modern basketball technology teaching on guide of college boys creative thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄承忠

    2012-01-01

      高校的现代篮球技术教学,可以充分发挥学生的能动性和创造性,因此有效的激发了学生的学习积极性和能动性,从而使高校体育教学由传统的被动的学习变为主动练习和探索,教学成果非常明显。创造力的培养是我国教育体制改革的关键,创造力的核心就是创新性思维能力,创新性思维能力是通过后天的学习和训练培养出来的。现代篮球技术作为一门先进的体育技术,它对临场发挥的技术性和创造性要求非常高,这对培养学生的创造性思维有着非常良好的引导作用。%  The modern basketball technology teaching achievement was very obvious,which can give full play to students' initiative and creativity in colleges and universities, were effectively stimulated the students' learning enthusiasm and initiative , was from the traditional passive learning into active practice and exploration in the universities sports teaching. The cultivation of creativity is the key in our country education system reform,the core of creativity is the innovative thinking ability, it is acquired through learning and training. Modern basketball technology as an advanced sports technology, it was very high for facing a play and creative requirements, so the training of the students' creative thinking has a very good guidance function.

  18. Modern health worries - the dark side of spirituality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köteles, Ferenc; Simor, Péter; Czető, Márton; Sárog, Noémi; Szemerszky, Renáta

    2016-08-01

    Modern health worries (MHWs) are widespread in modern societies. MHWs were connected to both negative and positive psychological characteristics in previous studies. The study aimed to investigate the relationships among intuitive-experiential information processing style, spirituality, MHWs, and psychological well-being. Members of the Hungarian Skeptic Society (N = 128), individuals committed to astrology (N = 601), and people from a non-representative community sample (N = 554) completed questionnaires assessing intuitive-experiential information processing style, spirituality, modern health worries (MHWs), and psychological well-being. Astrologers showed higher levels of spirituality, intuitive-experiential thinking, and modern health worries than individuals from the community sample; and skeptics scored even lower than the latter group with respect to all three constructs. Within the community sample, medium level connections between measures of spirituality and the experiential thinking style, and weak to medium level correlations between spirituality and MHWs were found. The connection between MHWs and experiential thinking style was completely mediated by spirituality. Individuals with higher levels of spirituality are particularly vulnerable to overgeneralized messages on health related risks. Official communication of potential risks based on rational scientific reasoning is not appropriate to persuade them as it has no impact on the intuitive-experiential system.

  19. Examination of the Computational Thinking Skills of Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korucu, Agah Tugrul; Gencturk, Abdullah Tarik; Gundogdu, Mustafa Mucahit

    2017-01-01

    Computational thinking is generally considered as a kind of analytical way of thinking. According to Wings (2008) it shares with mathematical thinking, engineering thinking and scientific thinking in the general ways in which we may use for solving a problem, designing and evaluating complex systems or understanding computability and intelligence…

  20. 浅谈现代居住区园林景观设计分析与思考%Modern Residential Landscape Design Analysis and Thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈娟

    2013-01-01

    随着我国经济快速发展,居住区周围环境也得到了改善,但是现代居住区的园林景观设计仍然存在着一些问题。本文介绍了现代居住区园林景观设计的作用和原则,分析了现代居住园林景区设计存在的问题,并提出相应措施。%With the rapid development of China’s economy, the surrounding residential environment has been improved, but there are stil some problems in the landscape design of modern residential areas. This paper introduces the function and principle of modern residential landscape design, analyzes the existing problems in the design of the modern residential garden scenic spot, and puts forward the corresponding me-asures.

  1. The Thinking of realizing information management of scientific research archives%对科研档案信息化管理的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈珍; 张红梅; 宋锦璘

    2016-01-01

    Scientific research archives management work is a basic work in the hospital work,establish hospital scientific research management information system,implementation of scientific research archives management informationization can not only realize the scientific research resources sharing,and can greatly improve the scientific quality of service and efficiency.This paper analyzes the necessity of scientific research archives information management,and the main plate and the function of information management system of scientific research archives has carried on the detailed introduction.%科研档案管理工作是医院工作中的一项基础性工作,建立医院科研管理信息系统,实现科研档案管理的信息化不仅能实现科研资源的共享,而且能大大提高科研服务质量和效率.本文分析了科研档案信息化管理的必要性,并就科研档案信息化管理的主要板块和功能进行了详细的介绍.

  2. 大数据时代中国大学生科技创新思维新内涵思考%The New Connotation about the Scientific Innovative Thinking of Chinese University Students in the Era of Big Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张阳

    2015-01-01

    This thesis discusses deep change of scientific innovative thinking in three aspects of knowledge structure, thought object and thought mode under the background of big data. Questionnaire and interview are employed to in-vestigate the status quo of university student's scientific innovative thinking. It shows that they have vague knowl-edge of big data and they still follow traditional thought habit and research method in scientific innovation activities. They don't realize big data's important purpose and meaning towards scientific innovation. It leads to insufficiency of their scientific innovation ability. So this thesis proposes new connotation for university student's scientific innova-tive thought, which is grasp of big data technology's basic knowledge, development of big data sense and possession of relevant thought mode demanded by this era.%论述了在大数据背景下,科技创新思维在知识结构、思维对象和思维方式三个方面发生的深刻变革。并通过问卷调查和访谈方法,调研了当前大学生的科技创新思维现状,发现大数据的认识很模糊,在科技创新活动中仍然沿用传统的思维习惯和研究方法,没有认识到大数据对于科技创新的重要作用和意义,导致其科技创新能力仍显不足。因此,对大学生科技创新思维提出了新的内涵,即掌握大数据技术的基本知识、养成大数据意识,具有这个时代所要求的相关性思维方式。

  3. Socrates, problem-based learning and critical thinking --- a philosophic point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shin-Yun; Tsai, Jer-Chia; Chiang, Horn-Che; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Lin, Hui-Ju

    2008-03-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a learner-centered educational method based on the principles of heuristics and collaboration. It has been considered an effective learning method in general and in professional education, especially in medical education. This article analyzes the thinking structure and philosophical background of PBL through the educational ideas of Socrates and the truth conception of Karl Popper. In the different phases of the PBL process, various truth conceptions will help to formulate the thinking framework of PBL --- from Socrates' truth of openness toward the truth of scientific accuracy of our modern age. Meanwhile, Popper's scientific theory of falsifiability further leads us to discuss the relationship between PBL and critical thinking.

  4. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulnix, Jennifer Wilson

    2012-01-01

    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting…

  5. Getting Healthy Scientifically

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Zhixin

    2010-01-01

    @@ Recently, Zhao Zhixin, a Beijing-based instructor on scientific bodybuiiding and public sport,was interviewed by China Youth Daily, sharing his views on how to get healthy scientifically.Edited excerpts follow: China Youth Daily: What do you think about food therapy as a regimen?

  6. Scientific Notation Watercolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linford, Kyle; Oltman, Kathleen; Daisey, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    (Purpose) The purpose of this paper is to describe visual literacy, an adapted version of Visual Thinking Strategy (VTS), and an art-integrated middle school mathematics lesson about scientific notation. The intent of this lesson was to provide students with a real life use of scientific notation and exponents, and to motivate them to apply their…

  7. 当代中国国家治理论域下的道德治理%On the Ethic Governance Thinking of Modern State Governance of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐化影

    2014-01-01

    道德作为人对人本身及人的世界的特殊“立法”在国家治理中不可缺席,尤其是当前社会失德现象的不断泛化对国家稳定和民生发展的负面影响迫切诉求道德的在场。这一诉求既不是中国传统道德的再现与新生,也并非资本主义道德的嫁接或移植,而是以“人”为价值本体、以理性为认识论基础、以现代政治文明之民主、平等、自由、和谐为核心的新道德的在场。在宏大的现代国家治理论题下,道德的新构需要行使国家治权者的德性示范、现代公民性的觉醒与理性的培育、法治的同构以及融合“形而下”与“形而上”完整性的道德的哲学诠释的共时建构。%Under the circumstances of modern political civilization, the value and significance of the morality in the country governance has in fact been marginalized.But the morality as one special "legislation"of the people for themselves and the people of the world should not be absent in the nation governance, especially in the current Chinese society, the negative relations between the generaliza-tion of the misconduct phenomenon and the development of national stability and people's livelihood situation directly reveal the urgent demands of the morality; But the appeal is neither the resurgence and rebirth of the Chinese traditional morality nor the grafting or transplant of the capitalism morality, rather than one new morality that the"people"is to be the value ontology, and the reason is the epistemology basis, and the democracy, equality, freedom, and harmony of the modern political civilization is the core of new morality;Under the grand modern state governance thesis, the restructure of the new morality needs the construction of the moral demonstration of the state governors, the awakening and rational cultivation of modern citizens, the homogeneous building of"the rule of law", and the philosophical interpretation of integrity morality

  8. The Practice and Think of Large-scale Modern Rice Mills%大型现代化精米厂的实践与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗秀川; 何为

    2001-01-01

    总结了大型现代化精米厂的建设和投产后技术管理的实践经验,介绍了大型现代化精米厂的特点和关键要素,对大型现代化精米厂生产工艺、关键设备、副产品整理和利用以及自动化等方面的发展趋势进行了预测。%The practical experiences for the construction and technicalmanagement of large-scale white rice mill were summarised, the characteristics and key factors of large-scale modern rice mill introduced, and the developing trend of the production technology, main equipment, finishing and by-products utilization as well as automatic control predicted.

  9. BIOETIKA DALAM PERSPEKTIF ISLAM SEBAGAI PENGAWAL PERKEMBANGAN BIOLOGI MODERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Budi Minarno

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern biology has been developing so rapidly that the field can amazingly provides great benefits for human beings’ prosperous life either at present or in the future.  It may, however, influence the ethical aspects negatively due to reductionism. Therefore, bioethics is highly required to control the devastating growth of modern biology and drive it toward persistent commitment upon human benefits (maslahah. This paper suggests that Bioethics–based learning be implemented in any educational level to develop the students’ critical thinking. Such learning might be put into practice by promoting the ethical decision-making method integrated with religious (Islamic perspective. The integration would result in the students’ considering the six principles of Islamic bioethics in any modern biology studies so that the students can precisely predict the beneficial or dangerous consequences of their scientific activities.

  10. The Scientific Attitude (The Scientific Temper in Eastern and Western societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SN Arseculeratne

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Scientific Attitude, different from the attitude to science, is discussed in relation to Eastern and Western modes of thinking; it is also differentiated from Scientism. The literature from western as well as Indian authors, and the comments of Joseph Needham on China, are included. The topics considered are the history of science, the importance of science, its methodologies, determinants of the growth of modern science, internal and external factors in the growth of science, education in science, documentation of science and technology, and determinants of the modes of thinking about science and its practice: these determinants include religion, tradition, utilitarianism, and administration in science. The major point of contrast between the attitudes of East versus West is argued to be religious versus secular. A relevant bibliography is provided.

  11. Text-based plagiarism in scientific writing: what Chinese supervisors think about copying and how to reduce it in students' writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongyan

    2013-06-01

    Text-based plagiarism, or textual copying, typically in the form of replicating or patchwriting sentences in a row from sources, seems to be an issue of growing concern among scientific journal editors. Editors have emphasized that senior authors (typically supervisors of science students) should take the responsibility for educating novices against text-based plagiarism. To address a research gap in the literature as to how scientist supervisors perceive the issue of textual copying and what they do in educating their students, this paper reports an interview study with 14 supervisors at a research-oriented Chinese university. The study throws light on the potentiality of senior authors mentoring novices in English as an Additional Language (EAL) contexts and has implications for the efforts that can be made in the wider scientific community to support scientists in writing against text-based plagiarism.

  12. LA RELACIÓN ENTRE LENGUAJE Y PENSAMIENTO DE VIGOTSKY EN EL DESARROLLO DE LA PSICOLINGÜÍSTICA MODERNA THINKING AND LANGUAGE IN VIGOTSKY AND THE PRESENCE OF HIS THEORY IN THE MODERN PSYCHOLINGUISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARLOS J ÁLVAREZ GONZÁLEZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Las teorías de Lev Vigotsky sobre las relaciones entre pensamiento y lenguaje han tenido una gran importancia dentro de la Psicología contemporánea, sobre todo en el campo de la Psicología Evolutiva. Sin embargo, resulta sorprendente la ausencia de su figura y sus planteamientos en los textos de Ciencia Cognitiva en general y de Psicolingüística en particular, quizás por el origen mayoritariamente anglosajón de las mismas. Este hecho es llamativo teniendo en cuenta que estas disciplinas son las encargadas de estudiar tanto la cognición como el lenguaje, siendo la relación entre ambas un tema clásico de investigación y debate, tal y como lo fue en el pensamiento vigotskyano. El presente artículo analiza la vigencia de la teoría de Vigotsky en los comienzos y desarrollo de la Psicolingüística Cognitiva moderna, atendiendo a las teorías e investigaciones relativas a los trabajos comparados, al estudio de primates no humanos, al campo de la evolución del lenguaje y a las disociaciones neuropsicológicas entre cognición y lenguaje.Lev Vigotsky’s theory about the relationship between cognition and language has been an important issue in the modern Psychology and in Developmental Psychology in particular. However, his ideas about the possible links between thinking and language has not been too considered in the modern Cognitive Science and Psycholinguistics, perhaps because the anglo-saxon origin of these disciplines. The present paper analyses the presence of the theory by Vigotksy in the Cognitive Psycholinguistics, focusing in the research about animal behavior and non-human primates, as well as the study of language evolution and the neuropsychological dissociations between cognition and language.

  13. Thinking of assessment of editing quality of scientific journals%关于科技期刊编辑质量考核的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄政; 郝希春

    2011-01-01

    The editing quality directly affects the overall quality of scientific journals. The quality of editors and the quality of papers in the journals are golden standards for the assessment. Therefore, publishing high quality journals requires scientists to become editors. In assessing the editing quality of scientific journals, the motivation of being indexed in SCI will easily make the originally objective and fair assessment indicators lose their practical functions. Because in many cases the contribution of the editors looks like some recessive achievements, so for the editing quality of scientific journals which is very particular and complicated, its assessment needs more theoretical studies and real practices.%科技期刊编辑质量直接影响刊物的整体质量。而在考核科技期刊的编辑质量时,SCI情结很易导致原本客观公正的评价指标失去其实际评价功能和意义。正因为科技期刊编辑的贡献更多地表现为隐性成绩,对特殊性和复杂性极为明显的科技期刊编辑质量考评在理论上和实践中都有待不断深化。

  14. Revisiting the Environmental and Socioeconomic Effects of Population Growth: a Fundamental but Fading Issue in Modern Scientific, Public, and Political Circles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo Mora

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Reversing ongoing declines in human welfare and biodiversity is at the core of human development. Although numerous institutions and avenues are in place to reverse such trends, there seems to be limited consideration of population growth as an ultimate driver. I review recent studies showing how the issue of population growth has been downplayed and trivialized among scientific fields, which may in part account for the reduced public interest in the issue and in turn the limited will for policy action. Different sources of evidence suggest that population growth could fundamentally affect society, nature, and the climate. Although tackling the issue of overpopulation will suffer from major impediments including scientific motivation, public scientific illiteracy, religion, and media attention, ongoing neglect of this issue will increase not only the extent of anthropogenic stressors but also the struggle associated with strategies to reverse biodiversity loss and improve human welfare.

  15. BASES OF CONSTRUCTIVITY OF MODERN PERSONALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya Petrovna Shatalova

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Formation of bases of constructibility is important process at this stage of de-velopment of our state. Personality of modern type must be capable to self-determination, competent adoption of constructive decisions and manifestation of a personal responsibility for the constructive election, personality of modern type must be capable for self-determination, competent adoption of constructive decisions and manifestation to a personal responsibility for the constructive choice. Formation of bases of constructibility in the course of education is caused by use of constructive tasks and the constructive educational environment which define innovative recep-tions and skills of influence as methods of pedagogical influence taking into account constantly changing circumstances. Extent of mastering each member of society bases of constructibility defines a spiritual condition of society, of the present and the future of our country, development of economy and culture in general.Purpose: consideration of question about development of constructive thinking and constructive skills of personality in modern constructive educational environ-ment.Methodology: formal pedagogical method, the theoretical modeling, the meth-od of participant observation.Results. In the article is give the short analysis of problem of development of personality in modern society, opened the concept of constructibility of the personali-ty and her basic components, classification constructive tasks investigated, specified preparatory steps for organization of the conditions of development of a constructibil-ity and gives a brief description of their. Article has the scientific value as contains au-thor's generalizations possessing scientific novelty and the conclusions directed on disclosure of problems of formation and development of the modern personality, considered from the point of view of the theory of democratic constructivism in edu-cation.Practical implications: pedagogical

  16. Thinking Is Literacy, Literacy Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Terry; Billings, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Recognizing the profound relationship between thinking and language, the authors have developed the traditional Paideia seminar into a literacy cycle of instruction that involves students in reading, speaking, listening, writing, and thinking. As staff members of the National Paideia Center, they have observed that learning to think requires…

  17. 解构思维的分解重构策略与西方现代景观设计%On decomposition and reconstruction strategies of deconstruction thinking and western modern landscape design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃斌

    2014-01-01

    The paper studies the decomposition and reconstruction strategies from the modernist landscape design, the ecologism landscape de-sign, and land art landscape design, points out decomposition and reconstruction strategies can provide the rich resource for the design inspira-tion for the development of western modern landscape design and some orientation for certain aesthetic interests, and supply innovation thinking and artistic language for the practice of the landscape design.%对现代主义景观设计、生态主义景观设计及大地艺术景观设计所体现的分解与重构策略作了研究,指出解构思维的分解与重构策略不仅为西方现代景观设计的发展提供了设计灵感的丰富来源和审美旨趣上的某种倾向,同时也为景观设计的实践提供了丰富而具有启发意义的创作思维和艺术形式语言。

  18. Thinking of the traditional cultural connotation in the construction of the modern landscape%建构现代景观中传统文化内涵的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张靖; 董雅

    2014-01-01

    In every historical stage of social development, due to the impact of specific political, economic, cultural and other factors at the time, the landscape environment wil have different forms of artistic expression and its characteristics, reflecting the traditional culture of the people to some extent, understanding and grasp. This article from the landscape and urban context inheritance perspective on how to build a modern landscape design thinking in traditional culture connotation.%在社会发展的每一历史阶段,由于当时特定的政治、经济、文化等因素的影响,景观环境都会有不同的艺术表现形式及其特征,反映人们对传统文化在一定程度上的认识与把握。本文从景观及城市文脉传承的角度出发,对如何构建现代景观设计中传统文化内涵进行思考。

  19. 谈创造性思维%Viewpoints on Creative Thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王桂凤

    2013-01-01

    Modern social practice has triggered transforma-tion of thinking mode, developed creative thinking ways with distinct characteristics of the times of systematic analysis and comprehensive combination, like multi-dimensional and unidi-rectional and multidirectional combinations, fuzzy with a combi-nation of clarity, combining qualitative and quantitative analysis, three-dimensional thinking, comprehensive thinking and back-ward thinking, strategic thinking and divergent thinking. The broad application of modern creative thinking makes the tradi-tional way of thinking get the best solution to the complex prob-lems in the past.

  20. IONIC LIQUIDS MATERIAL AS MODERN CONTEXT OF CHEMISTRY IN SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernani Hernani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One way to improve students’ chemistry literacy which is demanded in the modernization of modern technology-based chemistry learning is by studying ionic liquids. Low level of scientific literacy of students in Indonesia as revealed in the PISA in 2012 was the main reason of the research. Ionic liquids-based technology are necessary to be applied as a context for learning chemistry because: (1 the attention of the scientific an technology community in the use of ionic liquids as a new generation of green solvent, electrolyte material and fluidic engineering in recent years becomes larger, in line with the strong demands of the industry for the provision of new materials that are reliable, safe, and friendly for various purposes; (2 scientific explanations related to the context of the ionic liquid contains a lot of facts, concepts, principles, laws, models and theories can be used to reinforce the learning content as a media to develop thinking skill (process/competence as demanded by PISA; (3 The modern technology-based ionic liquid can also be used as a discourse to strengthen scientific attitude. The process of synthesis of ionic liquid involves fairly simple organic reagents, so it deserves to be included in the chemistry subject in school.

  1. IONIC LIQUIDS MATERIAL AS MODERN CONTEXT OF CHEMISTRY IN SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernani Hernani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One way to improve students’ chemistry literacy which is demanded in the modernization of modern technology-based chemistry learning is by studying ionic liquids. Low level of scientific literacy of students in Indonesia as revealed in the PISA in 2012 was the main reason of the research. Ionic liquids-based technology are necessary to be applied as a context for learning chemistry because: (1 the attention of the scientific an technology community in the use of ionic liquids as a new generation of green solvent, electrolyte material and fluidic engineering in recent years becomes larger, in line with the strong demands of the industry for the provision of new materials that are reliable, safe, and friendly for various purposes; (2 scientific explanations related to the context of the ionic liquid contains a lot of facts, concepts, principles, laws, models and theories can be used to reinforce the learning content as a media to develop thinking skill (process/competence as demanded by PISA; (3 The modern technology-based ionic liquid can also be used as a discourse to strengthen scientific attitude. The process of synthesis of ionic liquid involves fairly simple organic reagents, so it deserves to be included in the chemistry subject in school.

  2. Jacques Joseph: Father of modern aesthetic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Surajit

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available When we review the history of modern aesthetic surgery, a name that stands out as bright as a beacon and precious as gold is undoubtedly that of Jacques Joseph. A surgeon, par excellence, far ahead of his time, who chose to think out of the box, Joseph, despite all odds set out to give respectability to Aesthetic Surgery without depriving it of any scientific core values. By his words and deeds proved beyond doubt that only the very best in the field of reconstructive surgery, can visualize the hidden perfection in imperfection and formulate a treatment plan and a surgical strategy to achieve that elusive perfection. The rich surgical literature that he has left behind, the wealth of surgical instruments that he had designed and above all a way of thinking that he propagated, that aesthetic surgery is not frivolous but very serious endeavor, and treating the psychology of the patient is as important as treating his disease, undoubtedly makes him the revered ′Father of Modern Aesthetic Surgery′.

  3. On the Necessity of Aprioristic Thinking in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elmira A. Isaeva

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The thinking which encompasses both reasoning-in-itself and reasoning-for-itself, called "aprioristic thinking" by Hegel, is the freest form of thinking. This form of thinking is imparted to the physical sciences by philosophy. Only under this condition can physics obtain deeper scientific knowledge.

  4. Explicitly Teaching Critical Thinking Skills in a History Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Anne Collins; McGill, Alicia Ebbitt

    2017-01-01

    Critical thinking skills are often assessed via student beliefs in non-scientific ways of thinking, (e.g, pseudoscience). Courses aimed at reducing such beliefs have been studied in the STEM fields with the most successful focusing on skeptical thinking. However, critical thinking is not unique to the sciences; it is crucial in the humanities and…

  5. 试论运动训练科学研究的方法论问题%On scientific research methodology of modern athletic training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    仇乃民; 李少丹

    2014-01-01

    运动训练科学的方法论是运动训练科学理论研究的一个重要内容和手段。目前,在运动训练科学研究邻域存在着两种方法论模式,即整体论与还原论,这两种方法论模式有力地推动运动训练科学研究的发展。然而,运动训练是复杂性系统,这两种简单性方法模式在解决复杂的运动训练问题时都存在着各自的局限性。复杂性系统科学研究成果为运动训练科学研究方法论创新提供可能。复杂性方法论是未来运动训练科学研究的方法论发展方向。%The methodology of athletic training is an important content and means of scientific theory of sports training. Holism and reductionism are the two patterns of scientific research of sports train-ing,which have effectively promoted the development of sports training science. However,as sports training is a complex system,the two simple patterns have its own limitations in solving complex problems of sports training. The achievements of complex scientific research methodology make sports training innovation possible. The complexity methodology is the development direction of sports training methodology in the future.

  6. 临床营养科研发展的思考%Thinking on the daily works and scientific researches of clinical nutrition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺晓娟; 李百花; 张秋香; 闫少芳

    2011-01-01

    我国居民疾病谱的改变与近年来我国居民膳食模式的改变相关.在此背景下,为了更好地发挥临床营养科科研的作用,需要根据疾病谱变化及住院病人的营养特点,个体化地调整临床营养治疗方案,加强营养与疾病关系的健康教育与咨询,合理调整膳食模式,开展天然食物中的某些植物化学物对人体健康相关问题的科研,达到提高医院整体医疗水平的目的.%The change of Dietary pattern matched to a change in diseases spectrum of Chinese people in recent years. For improving the function of clinical nutrition branch in hospitals, in accordance with the change in the spectrum and patients' characters, we need to adjust the clinical nutrition treatments individually, to enhance the health education and consultation, to set new dietary pattern for people rationally, and to carry out the scientific research in the field of the relation between concerned chemical elements of organical foods and human health status in general, in order to reach the advanced hospital standards.

  7. Peculiarities of teaching students with mosaic thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Polevoy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the aim of the research, the author set the task of searching for new ways of conducting educational activity when teaching Project Management at the university taking into account the dominating mosaic thinking of modern students. There is a need to teach students of the given field logical thinking, the ability to work in the financial and humanitarian spheres of current business. In order to get a result, the analysis of the existing scientific views and approaches to teaching students with dominating mosaic thinking was conducted. The existing views by both Russian and foreign authors of mosaic thinking were considered, its different educational, psychological and philosophical aspects. As a result of the synthesis of the given approaches, taking into account the author’s inventions, proposals were developed on solving the problems of mosaic thinking in teaching students. Taking a constructive approach as a basis, the mosaic thinking is suggested to be considered as a phenomenon having both advantages and disadvantages. Changing the content of the educational process is done through updating standard methods and patterns of education, wide use of innovation approaches, intensifying cooperation and online collaboration of the teacher and the student in the process of study. The basis is formed by the emotional impact on the student in the course of studies, which will allow using logic and form the intention to learn the presented fact. Teaching Project Management to students is proposed taking into account their mosaic thinking, in four stages. During the lecture students receive a chain of images structured by the lecturer in the sequence embracing basic issues of the theme under consideration and presented in such a way as to inspire them to study the given questions independently. At the second stage, the students search for the solution of the assigned tasks in the course of independent work with the opportunities available for

  8. Dual thinking for scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marten Scheffer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies provide compelling evidence for the idea that creative thinking draws upon two kinds of processes linked to distinct physiological features, and stimulated under different conditions. In short, the fast system-I produces intuition whereas the slow and deliberate system-II produces reasoning. System-I can help see novel solutions and associations instantaneously, but is prone to error. System-II has other biases, but can help checking and modifying the system-I results. Although thinking is the core business of science, the accepted ways of doing our work focus almost entirely on facilitating system-II. We discuss the role of system-I thinking in past scientific breakthroughs, and argue that scientific progress may be catalyzed by creating conditions for such associative intuitive thinking in our academic lives and in education. Unstructured socializing time, education for daring exploration, and cooperation with the arts are among the potential elements. Because such activities may be looked upon as procrastination rather than work, deliberate effort is needed to counteract our systematic bias.

  9. 大力实施科技创新驱动现代渔业发展%To promote the development of modern fishery by implementing the scientific innovation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘常标; 游岚; 王晓伟

    2014-01-01

    科技创新是渔业产业发展的根本动力和核心,是促进渔业结构调整和渔业经济可持续发展的重要保障,发展现代渔业,必须紧紧依靠科技进步和创新驱动。本文论述了福建省渔业科技创新的成效,分析探讨了渔业科技创新面临的主要问题,并提出了推进福建省现代渔业发展需要完善渔业科技创新体制、加大渔业科技创新投入、构建渔业科技创新平台、加快渔业科技产业化发展等相关对策,以期对推动福建省渔业的发展具有一定的指导意义,促进福建省现代渔业发展再上新台阶。%Scientific innovation is the basic motivation and core of the fishery industry development. It is also the principle insurance of promoting fishery structure modification and fishery economy sustainable develop-ment. Modern fishery development must closely relys on progress and innovation in science and technology. In this paper, the scientific innovation effects of Fujian fishery were discussed, main problems were analyzed, and several countermeasures were proposed to promote the development of Fujian modern fishery, including improving fishery science and technology innovation system, increasing fishery science and technology innova-tion investments, constructing fishery science and technology innovation platform and accelerating industrial-ized development of fishery science and technology. It is hoped to guide the milestone-development of Fujian modern fishery and promote the modern fishery to a brand new level.

  10. Thinking Strategically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffress, Conway

    2000-01-01

    Asserts that community college leaders must think strategically and understand the difference between what is important and immediate, and what is strategic and essential to the long-term survival of a college. States that thinking strategically aligns decision-making and actions with the core purpose of the college; produces core competencies in…

  11. Performativity and the claims of scientificity of modern linguistics Performatividade e argumentos científicos da linguística moderna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanavillil Rajagopalan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the claim of the situatedness of research in both theoretical and applied linguistics and some of its implications and argues that it is linked to the performativity of all assertions, including scientific ones. More importantly, I argue that it is the regressive infinity of performativity that makes inevitable the passage from presumably 'dispassionate' research to militancy.Este trabalho discute a tese da 'situacionalidade' da pesquisa em linguística, quer teórica, quer aplicada, e algumas das suas implicações. E sustenta que ela está ligada à performatividade de todas as asserções, inclusive as asserções científicas. De forma mais importante, argumento que é a regressão infinita da performatividade que torna inevitável a passagem da pesquisa presumivelmente 'não influenciada por emoções' à militância.

  12. Early bases of modern embryology in Spain: microscopical anatomy and the introduction of cell theory and histology in their scientific and social European context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco-Cuellar, Roberto; Aréchaga, Juan

    2009-01-01

    We present a survey of the introduction and evolution of microscopy techniques in Spain, and the concepts and lines of research developed around this instrument, particularly in the field of Biomedical research. We cover in our article the long period from the XVII Century to the arrival of the great figure of Santiago Ramon y Cajal (1853-1934). We particularly want to mention many of the previously neglected pioneers who certainly paved the route for his discoveries and, we believe that without them, he would never have arrived to his important position in the annals of Biology and Medicine. The historical, scientific and social framework of that period also helped the approach to important biological concepts such as the cell and tissue, which are previous and essential ideas for a correct understanding of Development.

  13. Ecological thinking, education and complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Karol Herian

    2008-01-01

    The article reflects contemporary discussions on formation of ecological thinking and educational theory and praxis, all of which is related to the development of complex sciences - from two points of view: The first deals with ecological thinking with regard to meta-scientific implications of the disciplines dealing with organized complexity; the second concentrates on the relevance and impact of complexity science for transformation processes in the field of education (paradigms and institu...

  14. 从社会主义本质论到科学发展观——兼谈马克思主义时代化%The Theory of Socialism Essence and Scientific Outlook——Concurrently Discuss Marxism Modernization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建

    2012-01-01

    Deng Xiaoping proposed the theory of socialism essence through thinking about such significant issues,"what is socialism and how to construct socialism".The theory of socialism essence that pushes people forward to focus on economic construction and productivity development.Due to the significant achievements have been made on economic construction,the new central collective leaders with general secretary Hu Jintao as key leader proposed scientific outlook,which inherits,enriches and develops the thoughts about development of central collective leaders in three generations,and inherits and transcends the theory of socialism essence to promote the modernization of Marxism.%在深入思考"什么是社会主义、怎样建设社会主义"这一首要的基本理论问题过程中,邓小平提出了社会主义本质论。社会主义本质论的提出,促使人们更加自觉地以经济建设为中心,强调生产力的发展。面对我国经济建设取得的巨大成就,以胡锦涛总书记为核心的新一届中央领导集体提出了科学发展观。科学发展观是对党的三代中央领导集体关于发展思想的继承、丰富和发展,实现了对社会主义本质论的继承和超越,从而推进了马克思主义时代化。

  15. Modernity after Modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Dinu

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available A strategy for the second modernization raises, beyond objectives, a series of epistemicresponsibilities. It is known that modernization stemming from the Enlightment had, among other things,the pretense that it is a project which is self-legitimating. Its profound rationales are the only justification.Referential self-centering proved to be the one that made possible a practice of the new. Modernizationhaving the function of renouncing myth – meaning an eliminatory formula for the past – and thefixation in the opportunity and potentiality of the present, seemed to close an insoluble but extremelyengrossing problem: that of a propensity towards utopia, of the risky escape towards the future. Thetraditionalization of the new constitutes a support for the daring to break out of the captivity of themoment.Modernization becomes the experience of combining the new which, thus, creates a succession ofpresent times. The future is no longer the result of fantasy, but a system’s direct expression to combine thenew. Therefore the future is an option for one or another model of the present, often tested previouslysomewhere else. In a non-metaphysical way, the future can be seen, touched, tried, lived by simplegeographical movement. The sense of evolution has de-temporalized taking the form of the concomitant,parallel, enclosed, neighboring space. We just have to be in the trend, to evolve in the context.Globalization defines the context and its conception – as a project of the second modernity – showsus the trends. The problem is how to understand the context in order to find the sense of the trend. Are wethe load the sense with the values of the first modernity or will we have to turn to the values of anothermodernity? Why do we have to move away from the significance of the processes which made up the firstmodernity? How do we relate to the content of the new context in which the structural trends of today’sworld are taking place? What is the

  16. On Scientific process and alienation of modern%试论现代武术的科学化发展与异化现象

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦勇

    2012-01-01

    With the methods of literature material, comparison and review, this paper illustrates the inevitability of Chinese Wushu influenced by modern science and technology, as well as Wushu skill,training methods, system management, competition system, the industrialization process and transmission. Meanwhile, this paper discusses the double - edged - sword effect of modem science and technology and its negative impact and alienation on Wushu, such as deviation from the art of attack, the phenomenon of putting the cart before the horse in transmission and the excessive mystery in the film and television. It advocates that science and technology and humanities should develop harmoniously. On the basis of human - oriented concept, we should develop Wushu by using science and technology so that it can promote the development of modem Wushu.%运用文献资料、比较研究法,阐述科学技术影响武术现代化发展进程的时代必然性,进而从武术技术、训练方式、制度管理、竞赛体系、产业化进程,传播途径等方面阐释现代武术科学化发展的路径;同时指出科学技术是一把“双刃剑”。也对现代武术产生了诸如偏离技击、网络传播中的本末倒置以及武打影视带来的过度玄虚等异化现象。建议倡导科技与人文协调发展的和谐的科技兴武之路.

  17. THE PHYSICS OF MELTING IN EARLY MODERN LOVE POETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Brady

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Melting is a familiar trope in early modern erotic poetry, where it can signify the desire to transform the beloved from icy chastity through the warmth of the lover’s passion. However, this Petrarchan convention can be defamiliarised by thinking about the experiences of freezing and melting in this period. Examining melting in the discourses of early modern meteorology, medicine, proverb, scientific experiments, and preservative technologies, as well as weather of the Little Ice Age and the exploration of frozen hinterlands, this essay shows that our understanding of seeming constants – whether they be the physical properties of water or the passions of love – can be modulated through attention to the specific histories of cognition and of embodiment.

  18. Concerning technology: thinking with Heidegger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitzelsberger, Hilde M

    2004-10-01

    In human lives, technology holds sway in mundane and extraordinary ways, such as in the ways we work, entertain, transport, and feed ourselves, and importantly in the ways we encounter and manage health, disease, illness, and death. A significant area of Heidegger's later work is questioning technology. Unlike many current inquiries that centre on contemporary technology's function, utility, and positive transformations, Heidegger offers a radical way of thinking about technology through developing an inquiry that uncovers technology's essence of revealing. In this article, Heidegger's thinking about technological modes of revealing in regard to bodies, health, and illness is explored. In Heidegger's view, the ordered revealing of modern technology has overshadowed other modes of revealing. This article highlights how remembering concealment and unconcealment in its many modes can be relevant to nurses and others involved in health care. Through tracing Heidegger's thinking about technology, a more critical approach to the effects and outcomes of modern technologies within health care systems can be generated.

  19. The challenging issues of testing and standardization in education: modern references for restructuring the philosophy of thinking and integration of Ukraine into the system of international rating PISA-2018

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. B. Megega

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The European vector in the foreign policy of our state brought up a number of serious challenges for the system of domestic education. They include not only the reorganization of the philosophy of thinking, but also the conscious, objective study of the essence of our system’s entering into the so-called European standards. It would be a mistake to think that the transfer of principles, approaches, forms and methods of work from the educational systems of different countries of the world will immediately produce a positive effect. Each system has its pros and cons. Practical experience of the use of different testing and standardization methods in different countries has already revealed a number of negative trends. Despite the fact that the testing industry is on the rise, the problems of the education quality still remain unsolved. In addition, politicians and officials are constantly tempted to give education assessments based on the results of rating and monitoring studies. Consequently, the objective picture of the essence and depth of the transformations, so necessary for the modern school, has disappeared from the analysis. Moreover, the competent evaluation of the activity of the main figure of the educational process – i.e. the teacher – has not been done. Testing, in a number of cases, turns a school into a training ground for testing tools, and it makes socialization, creativity, artwork and the formation of competencies to be a secondary task. Therefore, the critical view of the experience, which has been presented in the study, will tell practitioners how to enter the system of international standards and how to evaluate without repeating other people’s mistakes. The expediency of such analysis becomes especially urgent on the eve of Ukraine’s participation in 2018 PISA testing. At the same time, one cannot help paying attention to the undeniable conclusions about the direct connection between the results of testing the

  20. Think Piece

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    being attuned to the reverberations of the earth, to its materials flows, ... to think transversely if we are to comprehend the interactions between the ... human and machine, there is a growing sense that previous philosophies are incapable of.

  1. think Piece

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research methodology is significantly political and in this think piece I try to ...... Critical inquiry in qualitative research: Feminist and poststructural perspectives: ... In: DeMarrais, K.B. & Lapan, S.D. (Eds), Foundations for research: Methods.

  2. New thinking

    OpenAIRE

    De Bono, Edward

    2003-01-01

    The traditional practice of medicine provides an excellent model of our thinking behavior. A child is brought into the clinic by his mother. The child has a rash. The doctor thinks of a range of possibilities from food allergy to measles. The doctor then makes a judgement or diagnosis based on signs, symptoms, history, tests (to exclude other possibilities), environmental factors, etc. If the doctor judges the condition to be measles then the probable course of the illness is known, as are th...

  3. Thinking Connections: Learning To Think and Thinking To Learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, David N.; And Others

    "Thinking Connections" is a thinking strategy program that teaches critical and creative thinking within the context of the regular curriculum. The main focus is helping students think to learn. Other results of this program are to develop positive attitudes, the ability to think an activity through to its conclusion, and to understand…

  4. Origins the scientific story of creation

    CERN Document Server

    Baggott, Jim

    2015-01-01

    What is the nature of the material world? How does it work? What is the universe and how was it formed? What is life? Where do we come from and how did we evolve? How and why do we think? What does it mean to be human? How do we know? There are many different versions of our creation story. This book tells the version according to modern science. It is a unique account, starting at the Big Bang and travelling right up to the emergence of humans as conscious intelligent beings, 13.8 billion years later. Chapter by chapter, it sets out the current state of scientific knowledge: the origins of space and time; energy, mass, and light; galaxies, stars, and our sun; the habitable earth, and complex life itself. Drawing together the physical and biological sciences, Baggott recounts what we currently know of our history, highlighting the questions science has yet to answer.

  5. Scientific Tourism Centres in Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.; Mikayelyan, G. A.; Mikayelyan, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Armenia is rich in scientific sites, among which archaeological sites of scientific nature, modern scientific institutions and science related museums can be mentioned. Examples of archaeological sites are ancient observatories, petroglyphs having astronomical nature, as well as intangible heritage, such as Armenian calendars. Modern institutions having tools or laboratories which can be represented in terms of tourism, are considered as scientific tourism sites. Science related museums are Museum of science and technology, Space museum, Geological museum and other museums. Despite the fact, that scientific tourism is a new direction, it has great perspectives, and Armenia has a great potential in this field. It is very important to introduce Armenia from this angle, including scientific archaeological sites as well as modern institutions and museums. This article presents major scientific tourism centers of Armenia.

  6. The paradox of scientific expertise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted; Noe, Egon

    2011-01-01

    Modern societies depend on a growing production of scientific knowledge, which is based on the functional differentiation of science into still more specialised scientific disciplines and subdisciplines. This is the basis for the paradox of scientific expertise: The growth of science leads to a f...... cross-disciplinary research and in the collective use of different kinds of scientific expertise, and thereby make society better able to solve complex, real-world problems.......Modern societies depend on a growing production of scientific knowledge, which is based on the functional differentiation of science into still more specialised scientific disciplines and subdisciplines. This is the basis for the paradox of scientific expertise: The growth of science leads...... to a fragmentation of scientific expertise. To resolve this paradox, the present paper investigates three hypotheses: 1) All scientific knowledge is perspectival. 2) The perspectival structure of science leads to specific forms of knowledge asymmetries. 3) Such perspectival knowledge asymmetries must be handled...

  7. Can Scientific Method Be Taught?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, D. C.

    1985-01-01

    Discussion of changes in science education and scientific literacy is presented in the form of a dialog between the author and his alter ego. Structure of science, myths, facts, methods, and critical rationality are considered. Suggests that scientific principles once considered basic and unchanging are giving way to critical thinking. (DH)

  8. CHALLENGES OF MODERN CONTROL THEORY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fundamental objective of the new scientific discipline called ’ control theory ’ is that of modifying the behavior of a system subject to various...possible contributions of modern control theory to the biomedical domain are briefly indicated.

  9. Beyond the Reductionist Thinking-Doing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodridis, Fotis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Drawing upon Castoriadis’ work, modernity is conceived to emerge as a conflict and mutual contamination between the two great projects of the West, the project of freedom, which has been pursued by different social movements as individual and social autonomy, and the project of the unlimited expansion of "rational mastery" over the world, which has been pursued by the institutions of capitalism as a ceaseless economic growth, associated to a ceaseless scientific and technological development. Both these projects have been emerged within a reductionist logic-ontology, which presupposes the determinacy and the identity-unity of being, and which thereby posits an imperative upon the Western thinking-doing: to provide a rational foundation of its projects – of freedom and of "rational mastery". As en epoch, postmodernity is defined by the retreat from the project of autonomy and by the increasing domination and globalization of the project of (pseudo-rational (pseudo-mastery. As an intellectual current, it has deconstructed the reductionism of modernity and thereby relativezed its political and socioeconomic projects, falling however into a political embarrassment and into the principle of "anything goes".

  10. Working Memory Capacity, Confidence and Scientific Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmadi, Fatheya; Oraif, Fatima

    2009-01-01

    Working memory capacity is now well established as a rate determining factor in much learning and assessment, especially in the sciences. Most of the research has focussed on performance in tests and examinations in subject areas. This paper outlines some exploratory work in which other outcomes are related to working memory capacity. Confidence…

  11. On Heidegger, medicine, and the modernity of modern medical technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassington, Iain

    2007-06-01

    This paper examines medicine's use of technology in a manner from a standpoint inspired by Heidegger's thinking on technology. In the first part of the paper, I shall suggest an interpretation of Heidegger's thinking on the topic, and attempt to show why he associates modern technology with danger. However, I shall also claim that there is little evidence that medicine's appropriation of modern technology is dangerous in Heidegger's sense, although there is no prima facie reason why it mightn't be. The explanation for this, I claim, is ethical. There is an initial attraction to the thought that Heidegger's thought echoes Kantian moral thinking, but I shall dismiss this. Instead, I shall suggest that the considerations that make modern technology dangerous for Heidegger are simply not in the character - the ethos - of medicine properly understood. This is because there is a distinction to be drawn between chronological and historical modernity, and that even up-to-date medicine, empowered by technology, retains in its ethos crucial aspects of a historically pre-modern understanding of technology. A large part of the latter half of the paper will be concerned with explaining the difference.

  12. Post-Modern Perspectives on Orthodox Positivism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venzke, I.

    2013-01-01

    This contribution explains the travails of international legal positivism (ILP) from post-modern perspectives. It identifies conventional precepts of orthodox ILP and shows how variants of post-modern thinking unravel them. The focus rests on three main such precepts and their critique: first, ortho

  13. On the Necessity of Aprioristic Thinking in Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaeva E. A.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The thinking which encompasses both reasoning-in-itself and reasoning-for-itself, called “aprioristic thinking” by Hegel, is the freest form of thinking. This form of thinking is imparted to the physical sciences by philosophy. Only under this condition can physics obtain deeper scientific knowledge.

  14. Understanding Probabilistic Thinking: The Legacy of Efraim Fischbein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Brian

    2001-01-01

    Honors the contribution of Efraim Fischbein to the study and analysis of probabilistic thinking. Summarizes Fischbein's early work, then focuses on the role of intuition in mathematical and scientific thinking; the development of probabilistic thinking; and the influence of instruction on that development. (Author/MM)

  15. Oersted Lecture 2013: How should we think about how our students think?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redish, Edward F.

    2014-06-01

    Physics Education Research (PER) applies a scientific approach to the question, "How do our students think about and learn physics?" PER allows us to explore such intellectually engaging questions as "What does it mean to understand something in physics?" and "What skills and competencies do we want our students to learn from our physics classes?" To address questions like these, we need to do more than observe student difficulties and build curricula. We need a theoretical framework—a structure for talking about, making sense of, and modeling how one thinks about, learns, and understands physics. In this paper, I outline some aspects of the Resources Framework, a structure that some of us are using to create a phenomenology of physics learning that ties closely to modern developments in neuroscience, psychology, and linguistics. As an example of how this framework gives new insights, I discuss epistemological framing—the role of students' perceptions of the nature of the knowledge they are learning and what knowledge is appropriate to bring to bear on a given task. I discuss how this foothold idea fits into our theoretical framework, show some classroom data on how it plays out in the classroom, and give some examples of how my awareness of the resources framework influences my approach to teaching.

  16. Modernity vs. modernism in Istanbul: The culture of rupture and the state of exception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, P.; Bedir, M.

    2014-01-01

    The modernity concept originated in western theoretical/philosophical thought. Characterised by secular, scientific, social and economic developments, it significantly affected arts and architecture. Modernism, its 20th century cultural outcome, was heterogeneous in nature and commonly related to lo

  17. Modernity vs. modernism in Istanbul: The culture of rupture and the state of exception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, P.; Bedir, M.

    2014-01-01

    The modernity concept originated in western theoretical/philosophical thought. Characterised by secular, scientific, social and economic developments, it significantly affected arts and architecture. Modernism, its 20th century cultural outcome, was heterogeneous in nature and commonly related to lo

  18. Modernity vs. modernism in Istanbul: The culture of rupture and the state of exception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, P.; Bedir, M.

    2014-01-01

    The modernity concept originated in western theoretical/philosophical thought. Characterised by secular, scientific, social and economic developments, it significantly affected arts and architecture. Modernism, its 20th century cultural outcome, was heterogeneous in nature and commonly related to

  19. Transdisciplinarity: a scientific essential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamberger, Erich

    2004-12-01

    Transdisciplinarity in science is necessary to counteract the rapid growth of scientific results and information, the elimination of logical inconsistencies, and the effect of specialization whereby uncomparable disciplines develop. A correspondence is drawn between the uncontrolled growth, immune system malfunction, repression/expansion, and isolation that are characteristic of cancer and of the scientific concept of modernity. Suggestions are presented regarding the promotion of healing in both of these realms.

  20. Mind, Thinking and Creativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janani Harish

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Global civilization is the product of diverse cultures, each contributing a unique perspective arising from the development of different mental faculties and powers of mind. The momentous achievements of modern science are the result of the cumulative development of mind’s capacity for analytic thinking, mathematical rendering and experimental validation. The near-exclusive preoccupation with analysis, universal laws, mechanism, materialism, and objective experience over the past two centuries has shaped the world we live in today, accounting both for its accomplishments and its insoluble problems. Today humanity confronts complex challenges that defy solution by piecemeal analysis, unidimensional theories, and fragmented strategies. Poverty, unemployment, economic crisis, fundamentalism, violence, climate change, war, refugees, reflect the limitations and blindspots that have resulted from a partial, one-sided application of the diverse capacities of the human mind. Human monocultures suffer from all the limitations as their biological counterparts. There is urgent need to revive the legitimacy of synthetic, organic and integrated modes of thinking, to restore the credibility of subjective self-experience in science, to reaffirm the place of symbol, analogy and metaphor as valid ways of knowing and communication in education, to recognize the unique role of the individual in social processes, to recognize the central role of insight and intuition in science as in art. This article examines themes presented at the WAAS-WUC course on Mind, Thinking and Creativity, conducted at Dubrovnik in April 2016.

  1. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  2. Thinking recursively

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Eric S

    1986-01-01

    Concentrating on the practical value of recursion, this text, the first of its kind, is essential to computer science students' education. In this text, students will learn the concept and programming applications of recursive thinking. This will ultimately prepare students for advanced topics in computer science such as compiler construction, formal language theory, and the mathematical foundations of computer science.

  3. Think Human

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Charlotte Marie Bisgaard

    2013-01-01

    years' campaigns suggests that the theory of communication underlying the campaign has its basis in mechanical action rather than in human communication. The practice of 'Communication design' is investigated in relation to this metaphorical 'machine thinking' model of communication and contrasted...... with the human-centered theory of communication advocated by integrationism....

  4. Visual Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnheim, Rudolf

    Based on the more general principle that all thinking (including reasoning) is basically perceptual in nature, the author proposes that visual perception is not a passive recording of stimulus material but an active concern of the mind. He delineates the task of visually distinguishing changes in size, shape, and position and points out the…

  5. Original Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Natarajan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available History that comes to us as a chronology of events is really a collective existence that is evolving through several stages to develop Individuality in all members of the society. The human community, nation states, linguistic groups, local castes and classes, and families are the intermediate stages in development of the Individual. The social process moves through phases of survival, growth, development and evolution. In the process it organizes the consciousness of its members at successive levels from social external manners, formed behavior, value-based character and personality to culminate in the development of Individuality. Through this process, society evolves from physicality to Mentality. The power of accomplishment in society and its members develops progressively through stages of skill, capacity, talent, and ability. Original thinking is made possible by the prior development of thinking that organizes facts into information. The immediate result of the last world war was a shift in reliance from physical force and action to mental conception and mental activity on a global scale. At such times no problem need defy solution, if only humanity recognizes the occasion for thinking and Original Thinking. The apparently insoluble problems we confront are an opportunity to formulate a comprehensive theory of social evolution. The immediate possibility is to devise complete solutions to all existing problems, if only we use the right method of thought development.

  6. Activating Children's Thinking Skills (ACTS): The Effects of an Infusion Approach to Teaching Thinking in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Jessica; Bento, Janet

    2009-01-01

    Background: Recent interest in the teaching of thinking skills within education has led to an increase in thinking skills packages available to schools. However many of these are not based on scientific evaluation (DfEE, 1999). This paper endeavours to examine the effectiveness of one approach, that of infusion, to teaching thinking. Aims: To…

  7. Late-modern hipsters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjørn Schiermer

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the cultural significance of a new figure in late-modern Western culture: the hipster. The current hipster culture, so I argue, can be used as a magnifying glass that makes impending changes to our conception of culture and of cultural development visible. It ushers in broa...... redemptive gesture toward the objects of the recent past and its predilection for irony. The article seeks to unfold hipster culture and sociality in an ongoing dialogue with sociological theory in general and conventional ways of thinking subculture in particular....

  8. The Leverage Effect in Chemistry Education——the Scientific Thinking Methods%化学教学的杠杆效应——科学的思维方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭瑞香; 蔡惠忠

    2009-01-01

    文章根据作者多年的化学从教经验,深入分析了化学的思维特点,并且提出了学生思维能力的培养方式.%In this paper, the author deeply analysed the thinking characteristics of chemistry and proposed the development method of student's thinking ability.

  9. Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking: Integrating Online Tools to Promote Critical Thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jean Mandernach

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The value and importance of critical thinking is clearly established; the challenge for instructors lies in successfully promoting students’ critical thinking skills within the confines of a traditional classroom experience. Since instructors are faced with limited student contact time to meet their instructional objectives and facilitate learning, they are often forced to make instructional decisions between content coverage, depth of understanding, and critical analysis of course material. To address this dilemma, it is essential to integrate instructional strategies and techniques that can efficiently and effectively maximize student learning and critical thinking. Modern advances in educational technology have produced a range of online tools to assist instructors in meeting this instructional goal. This review will examine the theoretical foundations of critical thinking in higher education, discuss empirically-based strategies for integrating online instructional supplements to enhance critical thinking, offer techniques for expanding instructional opportunities outside the limitations of traditional class time, and provide practical suggestions for the innovative use of critical thinking strategies via online resources.

  10. The Associative Basis of Scientific Creativity: A Model Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Kanli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is accepted as an important part of scientific skills. Scientific creativity proceeds from a need or urge to solve a problem, and in-volves the production of original and useful ideas or products. Existing scientific creativity theories and tests do not feature the very im-portant thinking processes, such as analogical and associative thinking, which can be consid-ered crucial in creative scientific problem solv-ing. Current study’s aim is to provide an alter-native model and explicate the associative basis of scientific creativity. Emerging from the re-viewed theoretical framework, Scientific Asso-ciations Model is proposed. This model claims that, similarity and mediation constitutes the basis of creativity and focuses on three compo-nents namely; associative thinking, analogical thinking (analogical reasoning & analogical problem solving and insight which are consid-ered to be main elements of scientific associa-tive thinking.

  11. 护理本科生科研能力与评判性思维态度倾向性的相关性研究%Study on correlation between scientific research ability and critical thinking attitude propensity of nursing under-graduate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻丹; 彭玉娇; 黄丽; 王燕; 杜春林; 但鑫

    2015-01-01

    [目的]调查护理本科生科研能力与评判性思维态度倾向性现状,探讨两者之间的相关性,为提高护理本科生科研能力提供理论依据。[方法]采用横断面调查研究,以配额抽样法抽取成都市某校护理学院全日制本科大学一年级~四年级277名学生为研究对象进行问卷调查,问卷由一般资料调查表、护理人员科研能力自评量表、中文版评判性思维态度倾向性问卷构成。[结果]护理本科生的评判性思维态度倾向性总分为(278.06±28.40)分,评判性思维的自信心得分最低,认知成熟度得分最高;护理科研能力总分为(52.96±17.72)分,论文写作能力得分最高,科研设计能力得分最低;护理科研能力与评判性思维态度倾向性总分(r =0.211)及评判性思维自信心(r=0.317)、系统化能力(r=0.294)、求知欲(r =0.238)、分析能力(r =0.187)呈正相关。[结论]护理本科生科研能力水平偏低,评判性思维态度倾向性为倾向不明,科研能力与评判性思维态度倾向性呈正相关,在学校教育中,可以通过加强学生自觉运用评判性思维的能力,即加强护理本科生的评判性思维态度倾向来提高其护理科研能力。%Objective:To investigate the status quo of scientific research ability and critical thinking attitude ori-entation of nursing undergraduates and to probe into the correlation between them,so as to provide the theoreti-cal basis to improve the scientific research ability of nursing undergraduates.Methods:A cross sectional survey study and quota sampling method was used.A total of 277 full time undergraduates from grade one to grade four in Chengdu University School of Nursing were selected as subjects for questionnaire by a cross sectional survey study and quota sampling method.The questionnaire consisted of general information questionnaire,the self assessment scale of nursing scientific research ability,the Chinese

  12. Visualization in modern cartography

    CERN Document Server

    MacEachren, AM

    1994-01-01

    Visualization in Modern Cartography explores links between the centuries-old discipline of cartography and today's revolutionary developments in scientific visualization. The book has three main goals: (1) to pass on design and symbolization expertise to the scientific visualization community - information that comes from centuries of pre-computer visualization by cartographers, and their more recent experiences with computerizing the discipline; (2) to help cartographers cope with the dramatic shift from print cartography to a dynamic virtual cartography for which their role is changing from

  13. Modernity: Are Modern Times Different?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Hunt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available “Modernity” has recently been the subject of considerable discussion among historians. This article reviews some of the debates and argues that modernity is a problematic concept because it implies a complete rupture with “traditional” ways of life. Studies of key terms are undertaken with the aid of Google Ngrams. These show that “modernity,” “modern times,” and “traditional” —in English and other languages— have a history of their own. A brief analysis of the shift from a self oriented toward equilibrium to a self oriented toward stimulation demonstrates that modernity is not necessary to historical analysis.

  14. Early modern sport

    OpenAIRE

    Huggins, Mike

    2017-01-01

    The "early modern" has always suffered problems of periodization. Its beginnings overlap with the Late Middle Ages when sport and athletic exercise were moving away from military training. It encompasses the Renaissance, Reformation, and Counter-Reformation and the scientific shifts of the Age of Enlightenment, movements that were diverse chronologically, geographically, culturally and intellectually. Some historians link its beginnings to block-printing, the beginning of the Tudor period, or...

  15. 当代科技革命与食品科学发展的哲学思考%Philosophic Think on Development of Food Science Under the Conditions of Contemporary Scientific and Technological Revolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田洪磊; 詹萍

    2012-01-01

      The theories and thought processes of food science coincide with those of modern science. The revolution of Science and technology can be seen as food source for their development,to enhance the cooperation among production, study and research, To achieve the innovation and development of food science and technology based on practice. The revolution of Science and technology have produced a huge impact on the traditional food processing industry, processing methods, testing standards, testing methods, early warning systems of quality control, as well as the theoretical framework of food science and technology, and provided a novel technology research platform. On the contrary, in order to meet the needs of scientific and technological development, food science and technology also promoted the revolution of science and technology at the same time of innovation.%  食品科学创新理论及研究开发的思维方法与现代科学理论及创新思维方法相吻合。科技革命可以看作食品科学技术发展的原动力,加强产学研合作,在实践的基础上实现食品科学技术的创新发展。现代科技革命对传统的食品加工产业的加工方法、检测标准、检测手段、质量控制预警体系乃至食品科学技术的理论框架都产生了巨大的冲击,并提供了新颖的技术研究平台,为适应科技发展的需要,食品科学技术在不断创新的同时,也促进科技革命的进程。

  16. Monitoring of Grid scientific workflows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balis, B.; Bubak, M.; Łabno, B.

    2008-01-01

    Scientific workflows are a means of conducting in silico experiments in modern computing infrastructures for e-Science, often built on top of Grids. Monitoring of Grid scientific workflows is essential not only for performance analysis but also to collect provenance data and gather feedback useful

  17. Monitoring of Grid scientific workflows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balis, B.; Bubak, M.; Łabno, B.

    2008-01-01

    Scientific workflows are a means of conducting in silico experiments in modern computing infrastructures for e-Science, often built on top of Grids. Monitoring of Grid scientific workflows is essential not only for performance analysis but also to collect provenance data and gather feedback useful i

  18. Grammatically Thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed; Bridges, Alan; Chase, Scott Curland

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a teaching experience conducted and carried out as part of the coursework of first year students of architecture at Strathclyde University. The workshop is the Third of three workshops planned to take place during the course of the first year studio, aimed at introducing new ...... ways of thinking and introducing students to a new pattern of architectural education. The experiment was planned under the theme of “Evaluation” during the Final stage. A grammatical approach was chosen to deliver the methodology in the design studio, based on shape grammars....

  19. Evolutionary thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Hunt, Tam

    2015-01-01

    Evolution as an idea has a lengthy history, even though the idea of evolution is generally associated with Darwin today. Rebecca Stott provides an engaging and thoughtful overview of this history of evolutionary thinking in her 2013 book, Darwin's Ghosts: The Secret History of Evolution. Since Darwin, the debate over evolution—both how it takes place and, in a long war of words with religiously-oriented thinkers, whether it takes place—has been sustained and heated. A growing share of this de...

  20. On three forms of thinking: magical thinking, dream thinking, and transformative thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Thomas H

    2010-04-01

    The author believes that contemporary psychoanalysis has shifted its emphasis from the understanding of the symbolic meaning of dreams, play, and associations to the exploration of the processes of thinking, dreaming, and playing. In this paper, he discusses his understanding of three forms of thinking-magical thinking, dream thinking, and transformative thinking-and provides clinical illustrations in which each of these forms of thinking figures prominently. The author views magical thinking as a form of thinking that subverts genuine thinking and psychological growth by substituting invented psychic reality for disturbing external reality. By contrast, dream thinking--our most profound form of thinking-involves viewing an emotional experience from multiple perspectives simultaneously: for example, the perspectives of primary process and secondary process thinking. In transformative thinking, one creates a new way of ordering experience that allows one to generate types of feeling, forms of object relatedness, and qualities of aliveness that had previously been unimaginable.

  1. Modern algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, Seth

    1990-01-01

    Standard text provides an exceptionally comprehensive treatment of every aspect of modern algebra. Explores algebraic structures, rings and fields, vector spaces, polynomials, linear operators, much more. Over 1,300 exercises. 1965 edition.

  2. Behavioural Modernity

    OpenAIRE

    McLean, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Behavioural Modernity explores the changing politics of representation and ethics of care in curatorial practice, necessitated by an increasing blurring of boundaries between the human, the technological, and the planetary.

  3. Modernity's Prometheus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Argues for reframing and reforging the relationship between text and context. Argues that the silences that modernity's tribute to text invites are grotesque, untenable, and fundamentally anti-intellectual. (SR)

  4. Modernity's Prometheus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Richard

    1993-01-01

    Argues for reframing and reforging the relationship between text and context. Argues that the silences that modernity's tribute to text invites are grotesque, untenable, and fundamentally anti-intellectual. (SR)

  5. Spinning the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Mindset: A Modern Physics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughani, Bahram

    2010-04-01

    Topics in Modern Physics course from relativity to quantum mechanics were examined in the context of innovation as part of the recent Kettering University program on ``Entrepreneurship Across Curriculum-EAC.'' The main goals were (a) to introduce innovation and entrepreneurship without eliminating any topics from this course, (b) to use EAC as a vehicle for intentional education that produces graduates with innovative mindsets, (c) to enrich the students learning experience aligned with the desired educational outcomes, and (d) to highlight the impact of scientific innovation in the society, while encouraging students to re-think how entrepreneurship mindset could maximize their impact in the society through innovation. Ideas such as principles behind innovation and innovative ideas, disciplines of innovations, formation of innovation teams, and effective methods for analyzing innovative value propositions were introduced in this course. Most of the implementation were achieved through out of class activities, and communicated through in class presentations, papers or weekly laboratory reports.

  6. Scientific publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getulio Teixeira Batista

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The necessary work for developing a scientific publication is sometimes underestimated and requires the effective participation of many players to obtain a result in good standard. Initially it depends upon the determination of the authors that decide to write the scientific article. Scientific writing is a very challenging and time consuming task, but at the same time essential for any scientist. A published scientific article is unquestionably one of the main indicators of scientific production, especially if published in a qualified scientific journal with highly qualified editorial committee and strict peer review procedure. By looking at evaluation criteria for scientific production of the several Thematic Scientific Committees of the Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq it becomes clear publications in scientific journals that has certified quality is the most important item in the evaluation of a scientist production.

  7. Modern strategies for effective teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Stojceska Gjorgioska, Mirjana; Serafimova, Mimoza

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Modern Teaching Strategies are introducing for students to achieve in their career. These teaching strategies are changing with the passage of time. Today’s students are into global world that will demand more understanding and abilities. Students need to understand the subject basics, but also to think decisively, to investigate, and to make conclusions. Helping students to advance these skills will require changes in teaching strategies at the school and classr...

  8. Modern strategies for effective teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Stojceska Gjorgioska, Mirjana; Serafimova, Mimoza

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Modern Teaching Strategies are introducing for students to achieve in their career. These teaching strategies are changing with the passage of time. Today’s students are into global world that will demand more understanding and abilities. Students need to understand the subject basics, but also to think decisively, to investigate, and to make conclusions. Helping students to advance these skills will require changes in teaching strategies at the school and classr...

  9. Scientifically artistic - artistically scientific

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2013-01-01

    From 5 to 7 June, two Austrian high-school classes met in Graz (Austria) for the Art&Science@School project. Launched by Michael Hoch from the CMS collaboration, the programme aims to show them another face of science through art.       On the first day, 62 teenagers from the BORG and GIBS schools attended a masterclass, where scientists from the CMS institute HEPHY (Vienna) provided information on colliders and detectors at CERN and explained the principles of high-energy physics. The students even had the chance to analyse real CERN data sets to “find” new particles. They also discovered the close link between science and art over the centuries and how contemporary artists visualise modern science and technology today. On the second day, under the supervision of art teachers, the students created an artwork from idea and concept to realisation and presentation. “I was completely amazed by the standard of the four artworks and by ...

  10. Invisible World and Modern Physics: Modern Science and Theology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodossiou, E.; Manimanis, V. N.; Danezis, E.

    2010-07-01

    A characteristic of the Western thought is the effort to counter Christian theology through arguments based on scientific discoveries (antirrhetic theology). Two objections can be raised against this trait: a) Modern science considers as a fact the future expansions, corrections, even total abolishment of scientific knowledge in the face of new discoveries. Therefore, dogmatic positions must not be based on temporary scientific views. b) Antirrhetic theology is mostly based on out-of-date scientific views of the period 1650-1900, which are not valid any more. The example of modern physics and cosmology is prime among them; in these sciences, the prevailing theories are based on the existence of an imperceptible reality, or on apparently “illogical” (in the sense of classical logic) fundamental properties of matter and its particles in quantum mechanics.

  11. English Secondary Students' Thinking about the Status of Scientific Theories: Consistent, Comprehensive, Coherent and Extensively Evidenced Explanations of Aspects of the Natural World--Or Just "An Idea Someone Has"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Keith S.; Billingsley, Berry; Riga, Fran; Newdick, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Teaching about the nature of science (NOS) is seen as a priority for science education in many national contexts. The present paper focuses on one central issue in learning about NOS: understanding the nature and status of scientific theories. A key challenge in teaching about NOS is to persuade students that scientific knowledge is generally…

  12. Three kinds of Thinking on Scientific Research and Practice of Landscape Architecture%风景园林科学研究与实践的三种思维

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘滨谊

    2016-01-01

    围绕风景园林学科研究与实践的思维特征,文章从风景园林学科范畴总结提出其科学、艺术、工程的三位一体属性;从风景园林的自然、人文、营造的时间进程,分析提出风景园林学科前瞻超越式的时间思维;从风景园林空间规划设计的特征,把诸多问题事件、甚至是貌似毫不相关的问题事件,置入同一空间予以“同时”思考,总结提出风景园林学科立体交叉式的空间思维;指出与大多数理工学科自成一体、回路闭合的逻辑思维的不同点,提出并分析了风景园林的非闭合发散式的逻辑思维及其成因。%Around the thinking characteristics of landscape architecture discipline research and practice, this paper summarizes the characteristics of science, art and engineering from the view of landscape architecture discipline; From the landscape time process of nature, humanities and construction, create the time course analysis of landscape architecture perspective beyond the time thinking; Based on the characteristics of landscape space planning and design, this paper puts forward a three-dimensional space thinking of landscape architecture subject: To put a lot of problems, and even seemingly unrelated issues, into the same space to be "at the same time" thinking; Different form logical thinking and most science self-contained, the logical thinking and its causes of non closure and divergent type of landscape architecture are put forward and analyzed.

  13. Think Before You Click

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Be aware of what attachments you open and what Internet programs you agree to download, the simple click of a mouse can be enough to introduce a virus at CERN and cause widespread damage. Modern viruses are a serious threat to our computers and networks. CERN limits the security risks that these programs pose through the use of its firewall, by constantly updating its anti-virus software, by detecting un-patched security holes, and by blocking many dangerous attachments as they pass through e-mail gateways, but these defenses do not guarantee 100% security. Our habits of clicking "ok" automatically on the Internet and opening attachments without thinking, are the behaviors that modern viruses are using to get past our security protections. Viruses can sit on the Internet waiting for us to activate them as we surf the web. Many of us simply click 'ok' when presented with dialogue boxes and this is exactly what the virus wants: clicking can be enough to download and infect our computers. Viruses can travel as...

  14. Are opinions based on science: Modelling social response to scientific facts

    CERN Document Server

    Iñiguez, Gerardo; Kaski, Kimmo K; Barrio, R A

    2011-01-01

    As scientists we like to think that modern societies and their members base their views, opinions and behaviour on scientific facts. However, this is not necessarily the case, even though we are all exposed to information flow through various channels of the media, i.e. newspapers, television, radio, internet, and web. Sociologists think this happens because individuals get conflicting information from the mass media and they hold different attitudes toward the information, i.e. external and personal factors affect the opinion of an individual. The attitudes are in turn variant because of their cultural, educational, and environmental differences. In this paper we shall investigate the dynamical development of opinion in a population of agents by using a computational model of opinion formation in a co-evolving or adaptive network of socially linked agents. The personal and external effects are taken into account by assigning an individual attitude parameter to each agent and by subjecting all to an external ...

  15. [John Snow, the cholera epidemic and the foundation of modern epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerda L, Jaime; Valdivia C, Gonzalo

    2007-08-01

    John Snow (1813-1858) was a brilliant British physician. Since young he stood out for his acute observation capacity, logical thinking and perseverance, first in anesthetics and later in epidemiology. The successive outbreaks of cholera that affected London, motivated him to study this disease from a populational point of view. He related the appearance of cases to the consumption of "morbid matter", responsible for the acute diarrhea with dehydration that characterizes this disease. Bravely, Snow opposed to certain theories present at his time, sacrificing his own prestige. He was a pioneer in the use of modern epidemiological investigation methodologies such as conducting surveys and spatial epidemiology. Fairly, he is considered nowadays as father of modern epidemiology by the scientific community.

  16. Montreal Modern

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Through analyses of the retro scenes in Montreal, Canada, the article discusses retro culture’s role as cultural memory. It is shown how Montreal’s cultural identity is formed by memories of modern culture such as the Red-light and Sin City reputation of the illicit nightlife of the 1940s and 1950s...

  17. Modern Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Gordon M.

    1970-01-01

    Presents the basic ideas of modern spectroscopy. Both the angular momenta and wave-nature approaches to the determination of energy level patterns for atomic and molecular systems are discussed. The interpretation of spectra, based on atomic and molecular models, is considered. (LC)

  18. Italian Modernities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn; Forlenza, Rosario

    assumptions that have substituted for thought and that have perpetuated prejudices both within and outside Italy’s borders. Grounded in meticulous historical and ethnological research, Italian Modernities deserves as wide an audience as its scholarship is deep.” (Michael Herzfeld, Ernest E. Monrad Professor...

  19. Conceptual Change:"Exploring Object, Changing Recognition", Guiding Theory, Teaching and Thinking Reform---Series of Studies on the Modern Basic Theory of Traditional Chinese Medicine (Part 2-Ⅲ)%概念转变:“探查对象,转变认识”引导理论与教学及思维变革--现代中医基础理论系列研究(中篇Ⅲ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔明琦; 魏盛; 张惠云; 韩秀珍

    2014-01-01

    The concept is "cell" of the theory. Starting from the concept, is the first and important step in building the modern basic theory of traditional Chinese medicine. Based on the early thought of "Changes from phenomenon description to entity elucidation", we firstly introduce "conceptual change" in this paper and point out its basic meaning and role. To accurately apply the new concept, we have analyzed and demonstrated the concept and its expression object, the concept words' expression forms, as well as the concept explanatory power in details, and pointed out the problems because of ignoring these recognition in researching the concept of chinese medicine and its solutions. We have summarized the laws of the international scientific community realizing the conceptual change "focus on the object, explore the unknown, propose new knowledge". and proposed the definition of "conceptual change" of the basic theory of traditional Chinese medicine. According to preliminary findings we have generalized the goal and standard to achieve the conceptual change of the basic theory of traditional Chinese medicine and gave examples of proof. As such we have draw an conclusion: the concepts of the basic theory of traditional Chinese medicine form the scientific concepts of the modern basic theory of traditional Chinese medicine through conceptual change, and thus guiding the theory, teaching and thinking reform of the Chinese medicine.%概念是理论的“细胞”。从概念着手,是构建现代中医基础理论首要且重要的一步。本文在前期“由现象描述向本质阐明的变革”思想下,首次引入“概念转变”,点明其基本含义和作用。为准确应用这一新概念,对概念与其表达对象,概念语词表达形式以及概念解释力等进行详尽分析论证,指出中医概念研究因忽略这些认识而导致的问题及解决途径。总结出国际科学界实现“概念转变”的规律为“聚焦对象,探

  20. Modernizing medical photography, part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Paul

    2005-03-01

    Part 1 of this paper explored the origins of process activity mapping, one of the major tools currently being used to modernize patient pathways in the National Health Service in Great Britain. Within medical photography the current notion of modernization is inextricably linked to the development of digital technology. Whilst the core principle of capturing light on a sensitive medium remains as clear and relevant as ever, the mechanisms by which the image is processed and presented to the client have changed profoundly. Part 2 shows how the principles of lean thinking and process activity mapping can be utilized to harness the advantages of digital technology to provide a modern and appropriate medical photography service in a large disparate teaching hospital.

  1. Teaching toward a More Scientifically Literate Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoGiudici, Raymond; Ende, Fred

    2010-01-01

    To teach scientific literacy to eighth graders, the authors created a yearlong project that emphasizes the various components and skills required to be a scientifically literate citizen. This project is broken into four separate components: skeptical thinking (pseudoscience), current-event article analysis, fiction and nonfiction literature, and…

  2. Thinking-in-Concert

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Aislinn

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, I examine the concept of thinking in Hannah Arendt's writings. Arendt's interest in the experience of thinking allowed her to develop a concept of thinking that is distinct from other forms of mental activity such as cognition and problem solving. For her, thinking is an unending, unpredictable and destructive activity without fixed…

  3. Developing a scientific culture through supervision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danie F.M. Strauss

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Through effective educational transmission cultural traditions are passed on to subsequent generations. The presence of alternative theoretical views of reality (paradigms in various academic disciplines uprooted the positivistic conviction that genuine science ought to be ‘objective’ and ‘neutral’. The background of this view is found in Renaissance and post-Renaissance philosophy, with its initial points of culmination in the thought of the 18th century philosopher, Immanuel Kant. He safe-guarded autonomous human freedom by restricting scholarship to phenomena (subject to the universal law of causality. The dialectic between nature and freedom gave direction to modern philosophy. Non-reductionist orientations eventually emerged recognising what is irreducible. Although a sound academic culture,operative within supervision to doctoral students, must pay attention to argumentative skills and informal logic, it must at the same time acknowledge the limitations of logic. The principle of sufficient reason refers human thinking beyond logic itself. The supervisor therefore should generate, amongst students, an awareness of the difference between reductionist and non-reductionist ontologies. Doctoral students must also realise that persistent themes and scientific revolutions go hand-in-hand. Some examples of seeing the aspects of reality as modes of explanation are given, before the seven aims of scientific endeavors identified by Stafleu are stipulated. This constitutes another important guideline that ought to be taken into account in supervising post-graduate work. Argumentative skills, scientific communication and the status of facts are discussed before a concluding formulation is given in which the overall argument of the article is summarised.

  4. Advances in modern cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    The twentieth century elevated our understanding of the Universe from its early stages to what it is today and what is to become of it. Cosmology is the weapon that utilizes all the scientific tools that we have created to feel less lost in the immensity of our Universe. The standard model is the theory that explains the best what we observe. Even with all the successes that this theory had, two main questions are still to be answered: What is the nature of dark matter and dark energy? This book attempts to understand these questions while giving some of the most promising advances in modern cosmology.

  5. Thinking of Western Classicism Clothing Design Styles in Modern Application Design%古典主义服装设计风格的现代设计应用思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄永利

    2011-01-01

    From the clothing design style of western classicism,it used the overall shape of clothing and the details to express retro thought and returning thought,used western classicism clothing elements as the new development path of modern fashion design though%从西方古典主义服装设计风格入手,利用其服装整体造型和细节表现复古和回归思潮,以西方古典主义服装设计风格作元素进行现代服装设计思维拓展的新途径。

  6. 建设环保型“两化”大庆市的几点思考%Some Thinking about building environmental friendly modern and international Daqing city

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赫丛喜; 李友俊; 邵强; 安亚娜; 孟宁

    2012-01-01

    作为典型的资源型城市,大庆市如何克服和解决多年来由于资源的开采造成的生态系统受损的问题,如何进行环境保护,如何向现代化城市进一步发展,是新时期大庆市理论和实践工作者需要深入研究的课题。针对大庆市的特点,从环境保护的角度,探讨了新时期对现代化国际化城市可持续发展的要求,提出了现代化国际化城市可持续发展在环境保护方面应注意的问题,深人分析了大庆市可持续发展的环境保护中面临的问题,提出了推进环保型“两化”大庆市的应对策略。%Daqing city has been regarded as a typical resource city,while how to overcome and solve problems from the broken ecosystem ,how to protect environment,and how to develop a modern city further are new topics for Daqing workers in theory and practice. According to the characteristics of Daqing city, requirements of modern and international cities have been discussed from the aspect of environmental protection. Moreover, some problems related to environmental protection have to be attention in order to assure the sustainable development of modern and international cities. Based on the above expression, some facing problems from Daqing sustainable development in environmental protection have been analyzed; simultaneously, solutions to improve environmental protection and "modern and international" Daqing city have been put forward.

  7. Relationship marketing as a modern marketing concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolotnaya Oksana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of scientific and practical justification of the relevance of using the concept of marketing of relations in modern market conditions and identifies the content and factors of customer loyalty.

  8. 洞庭湖区农业旅游带动现代农业发展的思路与支撑条件研究%Research on Supporting Factors and Thinking on Development of Modern Agriculture Driven by Agricultural Tourism in Dongting Lake Area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明贤; 叶慧敏

    2011-01-01

    农业旅游是农事活动与旅游相结合的农业发展形式,是传统农业现代化的一条新途径.本文简要概括了洞庭湖区农业旅游的发展情况,并阐述了农业旅游带动现代农业发展的作用机理.从湿地生态旅游资源、自然条件、农业资源、国家政策等方面,分析了洞庭湖区发展农业旅游的可行性.探讨了洞庭湖区发展农业旅游的具体项目:即农事体验、农家宾馆、农业高科技示范园和农史馆等.分析了农业旅游带动洞庭湖区现代农业发展的支撑条件.%Agricultural tourism is an agriculture development form which is the combination of agricultural activities and tourism;it is a new way of the modernization of traditional agriculture. This paper firstly summarized the situation of agricultural tourism in Dongting Lake area, and described the mechanism of the development of modern agriculture driven by agricultural tourism. Then it analyzed the feasibility to develop agricultural tourism in Dongting Lake area from the aspects of wetland ecological tourism resources, natural conditions, agricultural resources and national policy. This paper also discussed that concrete thinking of developing agricultural tourism in Dongting Lake area should be farming experience, farm hotels, high-tech agricultural demonstration garden and agricultural museum. Finally, the article analyzed supporting factors of development of modern agriculture driven by agricultural tourism in Dongting Lake area.

  9. Belief in the paranormal and modern health worries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utinans A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been found, that despite the improvement of the objective health indicators, people's subjective perception of health is that health indicators are getting worse (Barsky A.J., 1988, which is one of the reasons why a new term “modern health worries” is coming into use in medical literature (Petrie K.J., Wessely S., 2002. People are worried and scared of the effect of new high tech innovations (effect of cell phone radiation, environmental pollution, ozone layer depletion, etc., changes in manufacturing of food products (genetically modified food, food concentrates etc.. Nowadays, many people, being worried about their health, turn to new eating habits (veganism, defend themselves against various innovations in the health system (vaccination, etc. It could be defined as fear of consequences of scientific progress. The reason of fear is not only the misunderstanding of scientific innovations. Quite often, it is a belief in pseudoscientific theories (for example, “conspiracy” or belief in the paranormal phenomena (karma violations, disruption of the cosmic plan. In a part of cases protesters against vaccines and genetically modified food belong to new religious movements which are based on belief in the paranormal and magical thinking. Magical thinking predisposes to the negative attitude towards scientific assumptions and innovations, like a genetically modified food (Saher, 2006. Aim of study. To study the correlation between pseudoscientific assumptions, belief in the paranormal and modern health worries. This condition of modern health worries is becoming important for health care system. It causes the increase in the number of symptoms (Koteles et al., 2011, which, in its turn, increases the doctors' visit rate on one hand (Rief W et al., 2012, but, on the other hand, increases evasion to attend traditional medical care activities. Part of supporters of pseudoscientific beliefs experiences anxiety as to the bad food toxins

  10. Design thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Tim

    2008-06-01

    In the past, design has most often occurred fairly far downstream in the development process and has focused on making new products aesthetically attractive or enhancing brand perception through smart, evocative advertising. Today, as innovation's terrain expands to encompass human-centered processes and services as well as products, companies are asking designers to create ideas rather than to simply dress them up. Brown, the CEO and president of the innovation and design firm IDEO, is a leading proponent of design thinking--a method of meeting people's needs and desires in a technologically feasible and strategically viable way. In this article he offers several intriguing examples of the discipline at work. One involves a collaboration between frontline employees from health care provider Kaiser Permanente and Brown's firm to reengineer nursing-staff shift changes at four Kaiser hospitals. Close observation of actual shift changes, combined with brainstorming and rapid prototyping, produced new procedures and software that radically streamlined information exchange between shifts. The result was more time for nursing, better-informed patient care, and a happier nursing staff. Another involves the Japanese bicycle components manufacturer Shimano, which worked with IDEO to learn why 90% of American adults don't ride bikes. The interdisciplinary project team discovered that intimidating retail experiences, the complexity and cost of sophisticated bikes, and the danger of cycling on heavily trafficked roads had overshadowed people's happy memories of childhood biking. So the team created a brand concept--"Coasting"--to describe a whole new category of biking and developed new in-store retailing strategies, a public relations campaign to identify safe places to cycle, and a reference design to inspire designers at the companies that went on to manufacture Coasting bikes.

  11. Spirit Construction of Independent Thinking in Terms of Systematic Thinking%系统思维对于独立思考精神的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈凡; 刘国章

    2012-01-01

    独立思考在于能够超越感性生活的表象世界而对客观规律获得真知,并对于真正"好"生活进行合理构建。独立思考并非脱离客体而抽象存在,而是需要将主观观点通过语言进行"外化"获得客观肯定。运用系统的眼光看待自然界以及人类社会的发展是进行科学研究的必备条件,所以独立思考精神的塑造离不开现代性系统思维方式。%Independent thinking can obtain the gnosis of objective law beyond the idea world of per- ceptual life and reasonably establish real good life and it doesn't abstractly exist from the object but ex- ternalizes subjective perspective and obtains objective affirmation through language. The essential condi- tion of scientific research needs tem. So the spirit construction to take the nature and development of human society in the view of sys- of independent thinking is closely linked with modern thinking mode.

  12. SCIENTIFIC STATUS OF DIDACTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Osmolovskaya

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at scientific justification of didactics referred to the social and humanitarian field of knowledge. The author deals with the scientific character criteria (verity, inter-subjectivity, systemacity and validity taking into account different scientific rationality types (classical and nonclassical and identifying post-modernism influence on didactics. Objectives and results of research. Attempts are made to systematize the didactic knowledge and identify its components and structure. Didactic concepts are classified in accordance with its objects: teaching process by the whole, its individual components or educative process aspects that enable to form definite teaching views, studying it from the specific positions. The author singles out holistic-didactic, component and aspect concepts; and specifies the concept of didactic systems and models with its hierarchy. The author highlights the didactic knowledge increment. Apart from traditional empirical theoretical researches, the author’s attention is drawn to the academic pursuit such as a scientific project based on the didactic object specificity of the teaching process which is fully human controlled and realized and doesn’texist without human being. It is shown that basic theoretical ideas of scientific projects are itemized, concretized and enlarged during co-current educative practice, i.e. an adhesion of theory and practice occurs.It is stressed that there are two special directions of didactic development multidimensionality: 1. extension of its semantic field in the context of modern socio-cultural conditions; 2. increase of scientific status related to a conceptual framework improvement, empirically accumulated information arrangement, new hypotheses, theories and concepts’ development. Scientific novelty. The research findings demonstrate well-reasoned statement of the didactics’ scientific status, its particular components and structure

  13. SCIENTIFIC STATUS OF DIDACTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Osmolovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is aimed at scientific justification of didactics referred to the social and humanitarian field of knowledge. The author deals with the scientific character criteria (verity, inter-subjectivity, systemacity and validity taking into account different scientific rationality types (classical and nonclassical and identifying post-modernism influence on didactics. Objectives and results of research. Attempts are made to systematize the didactic knowledge and identify its components and structure. Didactic concepts are classified in accordance with its objects: teaching process by the whole, its individual components or educative process aspects that enable to form definite teaching views, studying it from the specific positions. The author singles out holistic-didactic, component and aspect concepts; and specifies the concept of didactic systems and models with its hierarchy. The author highlights the didactic knowledge increment. Apart from traditional empirical theoretical researches, the author’s attention is drawn to the academic pursuit such as a scientific project based on the didactic object specificity of the teaching process which is fully human controlled and realized and doesn’texist without human being. It is shown that basic theoretical ideas of scientific projects are itemized, concretized and enlarged during co-current educative practice, i.e. an adhesion of theory and practice occurs.It is stressed that there are two special directions of didactic development multidimensionality: 1. extension of its semantic field in the context of modern socio-cultural conditions; 2. increase of scientific status related to a conceptual framework improvement, empirically accumulated information arrangement, new hypotheses, theories and concepts’ development. Scientific novelty. The research findings demonstrate well-reasoned statement of the didactics’ scientific status, its particular components and structure

  14. On Thinking about Teaching of Modern Algebra——Take Yili Normal University as an Example%关于近世代数教学的思考——以伊犁师范学院为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈全国; 滕云玲

    2012-01-01

    近世代数是伊犁师范学院数学与应用数学和统计学专业的一门重要专业基础课,鉴于该课程的抽象性,导致学生在学习中存在一定的困难.结合自己的教学经历,谈谈近世代数教学中存在的一些问题及相应的对策,以便更好的提高教学效果.%Modern algebra is an important professional basic course of mathematics and applied mathematics and statistics in YIli Normal University.The Abstractness of this course leads to some difficulty which the students meet with in the study.Combining with my own teaching experience,this paper will talks about some problems in teaching of modern algebra and the corresponding countermeasures in order to improve the teaching effect.

  15. Popular Modernism:an analysis of Modern Architecture of village in city

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐娅; 司敏

    2009-01-01

    From many elements of Modern Architecture could be affect by houses of village in city,we call see the degree of acceptance of people to modernism.The analysis to this appearance has shown that this problem already has been the center ofpopuhr modernism research.In many countries,the Modern Architecture has never achieved so popular,and people think this would be the reason of modernism failure.However,In the end of 20th century,the modernism seems to be very popular in China,and it takes a very important role.The popular modernism became the prevalent style is a very interesting appearance which is worth of research,and which could contribute to the development of architecture in the 21st century.

  16. Modern maths

    CERN Document Server

    Thom,R

    1974-01-01

    Le Prof. R. Thom expose ses vues sur l'enseignement des mathématiques modernes et des mathémathiques de toujours. Il est un grand mathématicien et était professeur à Strasbourg; maintenant il est professeur de hautes études scientifiques et était invité par le Prof. Piaget à Genève

  17. Cyberspace modernization :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keliiaa, Curtis M.; McLane, Victor N.

    2014-07-01

    A common challenge across the communications and information technology (IT) sectors is Internet + modernization + complexity + risk + cost. Cyberspace modernization and cyber security risks, issues, and concerns impact service providers, their customers, and the industry at large. Public and private sectors are struggling to solve the problem. New service opportunities lie in mobile voice, video, and data, and machine-to-machine (M2M) information and communication technologies that are migrating not only to predominant Internet Protocol (IP) communications, but also concurrently integrating IP, version 4 (IPv4) and IP, version 6 (IPv6). With reference to the Second Internet and the Internet of Things, next generation information services portend business survivability in the changing global market. The planning, architecture, and design information herein is intended to increase infrastructure preparedness, security, interoperability, resilience, and trust in the midst of such unprecedented change and opportunity. This document is a product of Sandia National Laboratories Tribal Cyber and IPv6 project work. It is a Cyberspace Modernization objective advisory in support of bridging the digital divide through strategic partnership and an informed path forward.

  18. Learning in Public Management - Thinking Critically, Thinking Caringly, Thinking Creatively

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des)

    2001-01-01

    markdownabstractThe difference between learning to copy and learning to think For senior managers, the difference between learning by rote and learning to think independently is central. In rote learning we learn how to exactly reproduce something, we copy. This is fine for some purposes: we need to

  19. Study and Thinking of the Development of Chinese Modern City Maps%中国近代城市地图发展历程的分析与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏小琳; 叶妍君; 皮龙风

    2016-01-01

    . Therefore, city maps can provide great reference values for exploring the changesin city patterns from a historical view. This paper aims to study the modern city maps produced during the period from the Ming Dynasty to the Republican period. In terms of the inheritance of traditional ancient city maps and the developments encouraged by the western cartography, this paper intends to explore the characteristics, developing trends and values of Chinese modern city maps. On one hand, modern city maps had not completely got rid of the features of Chinese traditional city maps from the aspects of method and content; on the other hand, modern city maps had also been influenced and motivated by western knowledge. Therefore, Chinese modern city maps were gradually developing towards diversification, thematization and modernization during the process of inheritance and development, reflecting the trait of city development and regional features at that time. This paper also applied the case study method to explore the Chinese modern city maps with typical examples from various time and cities, and to further discuss and make comments on the representations, contents, techniques as well as significant values of these maps.

  20. Change and continuity in early modern cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Bonner, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Seen as a flash point of the Scientific Revolution, early modern astronomy witnessed an explosion of views about the function and structure of the world. This study explores these theories in a wide variety of settings, and challenges our view of modern science as the straightforward successor of Aristotelian natural philosophy.

  1. Explicitly Teaching Critical Thinking Skills in a History Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Anne Collins; McGill, Alicia Ebbitt

    2017-03-01

    Critical thinking skills are often assessed via student beliefs in non-scientific ways of thinking, (e.g, pseudoscience). Courses aimed at reducing such beliefs have been studied in the STEM fields with the most successful focusing on skeptical thinking. However, critical thinking is not unique to the sciences; it is crucial in the humanities and to historical thinking and analysis. We investigated the effects of a history course on epistemically unwarranted beliefs in two class sections. Beliefs were measured pre- and post-semester. Beliefs declined for history students compared to a control class and the effect was strongest for the honors section. This study provides evidence that a humanities education engenders critical thinking. Further, there may be individual differences in ability or preparedness in developing such skills, suggesting different foci for critical thinking coursework.

  2. 先秦道家思想对当代大学生价值取向的启示%The enlightenment provided by the hermit realm of Taoism for the profit -oriented thinking of modern college students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭会宁

    2012-01-01

    The hermit realm of Taoism can provide certain enizgntenment for, modem college students who are polluted by the profit - oriented thinking. This paper conducts a research on the hermit realm of Taoism and diversified value orientation of current college students. It points out that hermit realm can be conductive to the forming of college students" positive values. It looks forward to be helpful for the college students to establish correct values.%先秦道家思想中的隐士境界对当代大学生急功近利的言行有一定的启示。文章主要通过对隐士境界以及大学生价值取向多元化表现的研究,提炼出隐士境界对大学生价值取向的指导建议,期望能对大学生树立正确的价值观有积极的作用。

  3. 胜在战略决策,赢在战略思维——论《孙子兵法》战略思维与企业战略管理%Win in Strategic Decision-making, Victory in Strategic Thinking --On the Strategic Thinking of The Art of War and Business Strategic Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨新

    2011-01-01

    The Art of War is not only the oldest of war and strategic theory writings,but also an excellent work of military philosophy and strategic thinking.Its profound strategic culture,scientific strategic thinking,high level strategic planning and sophisticated art of strategic thinking are undoubtedly beneficial to the scientific strategic management of modern businesses.From the perspective of strategic values of strategic thinking,strategic thinking model and method,and the strategic thinking realms in The Art of War,the paper explores of the essence of "win in strategic thinking,victory in strategic decision-making"in business strategic management%《孙子兵法》既是现存最古老的战争与战略理论著作,也是优秀的军事哲学和战略思维著作。其深厚的战略文化底蕴、科学的战略思维方式、至高的战略谋划境界和精妙的战略思维艺术,无疑对现代企业战略管理具有科学的借鉴。从《孙子兵法》战略思维的战略价值观、战略思维模式与方法及战略思维境界等方面,探讨了企业战略管理"胜在战略决策、赢在战略思维"的真谛

  4. The Advance Experience of Foreign Top-level Think Tanks and its Enlightment to the Construction of Chinese University Think-Tank

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Yong; Li Qiushi; Zhao Gang; Zhao Wen

    2016-01-01

    This paper expounds the development course and current situation of foreign top-level Think Tank, and analyzes the important effects of foreign colleges and universities Think Tank in supporting national scientific decision-making and rapid development. It analyzes the development course and advanced experience of top-level Think Tank in America and other countries. The paper summaries the advance experiences, combines with the background and features of Think Tank construction of colleges an...

  5. Heidegger and Blumenberg on modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teodor Negru

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The debate surrounding the way in which Heidegger and Blumenberg understand the modern age is an opportunity to discuss two different approaches to history. On one hand, from Heidegger's perspective, history should be understood as starting from how Western thought related to Being, which, in metaphysical thinking, took the form of the forgetfulness of Being. Thus, the modern age represents the last stage in the process of forgetfulness of Being, which announces the moment of the rethinking of the relationship with Being by appealing to the authentic disclosure of Being. On the other hand, Blumenberg understands history as the result of the reoccupation process, which means replacing old theories with other new ones. Thus, to the historical approach it is not important to identify epochs as periods of time between two events, but to think about the discontinuities occurring throughout history. Starting from here, the modern age will be thought of not as an expression of the radicalization of the forgetfulness of Being, but as a response to the crises of medieval conceptions. For the same reason, the interpretation of history as a history of the forgetfulness of Being is considered by Blumenberg to subordinate history to an absolute principle, without taking into account its protagonists' needs and necessities.

  6. The paradox of scientific expertise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted; Noe, Egon

    2011-01-01

    to a fragmentation of scientific expertise. To resolve this paradox, the present paper investigates three hypotheses: 1) All scientific knowledge is perspectival. 2) The perspectival structure of science leads to specific forms of knowledge asymmetries. 3) Such perspectival knowledge asymmetries must be handled......Modern societies depend on a growing production of scientific knowledge, which is based on the functional differentiation of science into still more specialised scientific disciplines and subdisciplines. This is the basis for the paradox of scientific expertise: The growth of science leads...... through second order perspectives. We substantiate these hypotheses on the basis of a perspectivist philosophy of science grounded in Peircean semiotics and autopoietic systems theory. Perspectival knowledge asymmetries are an unavoidable and necessary part of the growth of scientific knowledge, and more...

  7. Reaching More Students through Thinking in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Vincent P.

    2017-01-01

    Thinking in Physics (TIP) is a new curriculum that is more effective than commonly used interactive engagement methods for students who have the greatest difficulty learning physics. Research has shown a correlation between learning in physics and other factors, including scientific reasoning ability. The TIP curriculum addresses those factors.…

  8. Thinking Tracks for Multidisciplinary System Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit Maarten Bonnema

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Systems engineering is, for a large part, a process description of how to bring new systems to existence. It is valuable as it directs the development effort. Tools exist that can be used in this process. System analysis investigates existing and/or desired situations. However, how to create a system that instantiates the desired situation depends significantly on human creativity and insight; the required human trait here is commonly called systems thinking. In literature, this trait is regularly used, but information on how to do systems thinking is scarce. Therefore, we have introduced earlier twelve thinking tracks that are concrete and help system designers to make an optimal fit between the system under design, the identified issue, the user, the environment and the rest of the world. The paper provides the scientific rationale for the thinking tracks based on literature. Secondly, the paper presents three cases of application, leading to the conclusion that the tracks are usable and effective.

  9. Modern plasmonics

    CERN Document Server

    Maradudin, Alexei A; Barnes, William L

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonics is entering the curriculum of many universities, either as a stand alone subject, or as part of some course or courses. Nanotechnology institutes have been, and are being, established in universities, in which plasmonics is a significant topic of research. Modern Plasmonics book offers a comprehensive presentation of the properties of surface plasmon polaritons, in systems of different structures and various natures, e.g. active, nonlinear, graded, theoretical/computational and experimental techniques for studying them, and their use in a variety of applications. Contains materia

  10. Scientific news

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1994-01-01

    The Rijksherbarium/Hortus Botanicus acquired funds through NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research) to participate in a 7-year interdisciplinary cooperative programme of Indonesian and Dutch scientific institutions aiming at research in Irian Jaya, Cenderawasih province (the Bird’s Hea

  11. From Disinformation to Wishful Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oreskes, N.; Conway, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    In our book, Merchants of Doubt, we documented how deliberate disinformation campaigns served to confuse the American people about the reality and significance of climate change over more than two decades. We showed how a variety of strategies were used to persuade the public that the scientific "jury was still out" on climate change, including deliberate mispresentation of facts, cherry-picking of evidence, and personal attacks on scientists. And we documented the links, both conceptual and actual, between doubt-mongering about climate change and the rejection of scientific evidence of the harms of tobacco, acid rain, the ozone hole, nuclear winter, and DDT. These tactics are still in use today, but they are now reinforced by a new problem, the problem of wishful thinking. Increasingly, we see commentators who accept the reality of climate change assuring us that the problem can be solved by natural gas, or even by some as yet unknown and uninvented technological innovations. In this paper we argue that these forms of wishful thinking, while not malicious in the same way that previous doubt-mongering campaigns have been, contribute substantially to scientific illiteracy and misunderstanding both of the character of the challenges that we face and of the history of technological innovation.

  12. Acupuncture in modern society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderploeg, Kristin; Yi, Xiaobin

    2009-03-01

    For at least 2,500 years, acupuncture has been an integral part of traditional Chinese medicine. However, recently as more people in western countries are diagnosed with chronic disease poorly treated with modern medical therapies, many are turning to acupuncture and other forms of alternative medical treatments. Based on the theory of harmonious flowing qi being the basis of good health, acupuncture focuses on restoring qi by manipulation of the complementary and opposing elements of yin and yang. However, in the modern medical community we struggle to with the concept of qi, given a lack of anatomic and histological evidence supporting its existence. However, with the surge in public interest in acupuncture, the scientific community begun heavy investigation of acupuncture's efficacy, as well as the physiologic basis behind it. Thus far, evidence supports the use of acupuncture in post-operative nausea and vomiting, postoperative dental pain, chronic pain conditions such as lower back pain, and possibly also such psychologic conditions as addiction. It is possible that by affecting afferent nerve signaling, acupuncture may influence the release of endogenous opioids to promote pain relief. This effect may be augmented by release of ACTH and cortisol, as well as through down-regulation of signaling through pain fibers. When treating patients who may utilize alternative forms of medicine, it is important that medical practitioners be educated in regards to the basic fundamental beliefs behind acupuncture, as well as the scientific evidence supporting its use and revealing its efficacy. The purpose of this review is to give western trained physicians exposure to history, basic knowledge and its clinical applications of acupuncture to accommodate accelerating interests in acupuncture in modern society.

  13. Crianças escolares do século XXI: para se pensar uma infância pós-moderna School children in the XXI century: thinking about a post-modern childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariangela Momo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O artigo apresenta um recorte de pesquisas realizadas sobre as conexões entre escola e cultura contemporânea. Nele procuramos mostrar, interpretar e problematizar modos de ser de crianças pobres que frequentam escolas públicas da periferia de uma capital brasileira. O estudo se inscreve em uma matriz de inteligibilidade que considera a infância como uma construção cultural, social e histórica, sujeita a mudanças, e vê a contemporaneidade marcada por condições imbricadas no que se conhece amplamente como cultura pós-moderna. Considera-se que esse estado da cultura, com implicações contundentes da mídia e do consumo, tem produzido tipos peculiares de sujeitos infantis, consoantes às configurações culturais do mundo contemporâneo, em que visibilidade, efemeridade, ambivalência, descartabilidade, superficialidade fazem parte da vida. São crianças que buscam infatigavelmente a fruição e o prazer; que procuram de modo incansável inscrever-se na cultura globalmente reconhecida. São crianças que se tornam o que são vivendo sob a condição pós-moderna.This article presents part of researches that we have carried out into the connections between school and contemporary culture. We have attempted to show, interpret, and problematize ways of being poor children in public schools located in the outskirts of a Brazilian capital. This study is inscribed in an intelligibility matrix that both considers childhood as a cultural, social, historical construction that is subject to changes, and regards contemporaneity as marked by conditions intertwined in what has been widely known as post-modern culture. We have considered that this culture state, with incisive implications of media and consumption, has produced peculiar kinds of child subjects, in accordance with cultural configurations of the contemporary world. Visibility, ephemerality, ambivalence, disposability, and superficiality are part of those children's lives. These

  14. What Are Think Tanks Thinking about?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Eleanor Lee

    2000-01-01

    Explores: "What type of people do think tanks attract?"; "How do think tanks operate and how are they funded?"; "Are they prone to compromise their research integrity?"; and "Are they focusing enough attention on the critical issue of minorities and higher education?" Discusses efforts of concern to African…

  15. Visual Thinking Strategies = Creative and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Mary; Cutler, Kay; Fiedler, Dave; Weier, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Implementation of Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) into the Camelot Intermediate School curriculum in Brookings, South Dakota, has fostered the development of creative and critical thinking skills in 4th- and 5th-grade students. Making meaning together by observing carefully, deciphering patterns, speculating, clarifying, supporting opinions, and…

  16. Climate Change and Innovation of Science and Technology:on the Modern Way of Thinking and View on Climate%气候变化与科技创新--论现代的思维方式和现代气候观

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国章

    2014-01-01

    对气候环境看法的不同,直接源自人们认识和改造自然和社会的思维方式存在差异。以马克思主义的唯物辩证法与系统科学为基础的科学、系统与整体意义上的现代气候观可以使人类从当前不利于社会发展的全球性气候与生态困境中走出来。尽管人们已经意识到科学技术是一把双刃剑,但是并未从根本上改变对自然资源“有来无回”的利用方式。因此,要实现人与人、人与社会、人与自然的和谐统一,就必须以系统思维方式下的系统化的社会价值意识逐步取代传统、片面、狭隘、自私的社会价值意识,从而指导、支配系统化的科技创新、发明和应用。%The different views on the climate environment directly derived from differences among ways of thinking on understanding and reforming the nature and society. Science based on the materialist dialectics of Marxism and systematic science, and the modern systematic concept on climate are able to make the human be-ings come out of the current dilemma of global climate and ecology which are not conducive to social develop-ment. Although people have realized science and technology is a double-edged sword, it did not change the way of using the natural resources“one time” fundamentally. Therefore, in order to achieve the harmonious unity of people, people and society, and people and nature, it is necessary to take the system under the mode of think-ing of the social value of systematic consciousness gradually replace the traditional, partial, narrow, selfish so-cial value consciousness so as to guide and control systematic innovation of science and technology, invention and application.

  17. 数字化科研学习环境对教师科研能力的影响和思考%The Influence of Digital Learning Environment on University Teachers'Scientific Research Ability and Thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧阳洁慧

    2012-01-01

    Along with the development of information technology, information resources digitization and networking tenden-cy in digital learning have become more and more obvious. Under such background, the role of university teachers in scien-tific research activities is undergoing a significant and important transformation. Digital learning environment is a double -edged sword for university teachers. Therefore, the paper defines clearly the connotation, target and advantages of digital learning environment in scientific research activities, identifies the influence of digital learning environment on university teachers'scientific research ability, and explores effective countermeasures to enhance university teachers'scientific research ability by using new technology under the new situation and new request.%随着信息技术的发展,信息资源数字化、网络化趋势日益明显,在数字化学习环境下,科研活动中的高校教师角色已发生显著而重要的转变.数字化科研学习环境对高校教师而言是一把双刃剑,因此,要明确科研活动中数字化学习环境的内涵、目标和优点,理清数字化科研学习环境对高校教师科研能力的影响,并探寻出新形势新要求下利用新技术提升高校教师科研能力的有效对策.

  18. Think tanks in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsten, Mark; Nørgaard Kristensen, Nete

    2016-01-01

    outside the media. The study shows that the two largest and oldest think tanks in Denmark, the liberal think tank CEPOS and the social democratic think tank ECLM, are very active and observable in the media; that the media’s distribution of attention to these think tanks, to some extent, confirms a re......Though think tanks have a long history internationally, they have especially in recent years come to play an increasingly important role in both policy-formulation and public debate. In this article, we analyse the growing presence of think tanks in a Danish context during the 2000s and the first...... half of the 2010s, because in this national setting think tanks are still a relatively new phenomenon. Based on theories of mediatization and de-corporatization, we present 1) an analysis of the visibility of selected Danish think tanks in the media and 2) an analysis of their political networks...

  19. Thinking of Front Sea Shenzhen & Hongkong modern service industry cooperation development route%关于前海深港现代服务业合作区发展路径的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田晓萍

    2011-01-01

    前海合作区深港合作,香港期盼的核心利益是,以前海为平台,优先进入中国大陆服务市场;深圳则可充分利用香港的优势,通过微观层面的企业合作促进产业结构升级,通过宏观层面的管理合作促进体制机制创新。政策拟定时应转变过去重点依赖税收优惠的思路,应重点从服务业市场准入、体制机制创新、人才环境等方面给予政策支持。%Through the Shenzhen-Hong Kong cooperation on modern service industries in Qianhai Area,the core interests Hong Kong expected is to enter the Chinese service market in priority.Shenzhen can also make full use of Hong Kong's advantages,through the micro-level enterprises cooperation to upgrade its industrial structure,through the macro-level cooperation of management for the innovation of its institutional mechanisms.Supporting policy should focus on service market access,institutional innovation,talent environment,in stead of relying on tax incentives in the past.

  20. 关于现代口腔医学本科生教学形式多样化的思考%Thinking of diverse modernized teaching technology for stomatological undergraduates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛丽娜; 焦凯; 沈丽娟; 陈吉华

    2014-01-01

    口腔医学是一门实践性及综合性很强的临床学科,在本科生教学中具有生理病理相关内容抽象、难于理解等特点,如果仅凭传统的教学模式势必会导致学生对课程缺乏兴趣,影响教学效果。探索新的教学手段,提高教学效果,为口腔医学教学提供了诸多新的教学参考方法。%Dentistry is a clinical discipline characterized with practicality and multi-subject complex.In dental education,especially in dental physiology and pathology,there are some content that is abstract and difficult for the students to understand.If we only lay on the tedious traditional teaching mode,it will be more possible for the student to lose interest in dentistry.Thus it is important for teachers to develop new and modernized teaching technology to improve teaching quality and bring up more innovative dentists.

  1. The Advance Experience of Foreign Top-level Think Tanks and its Enlightment to the Construction of Chinese University Think-Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Yong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper expounds the development course and current situation of foreign top-level Think Tank, and analyzes the important effects of foreign colleges and universities Think Tank in supporting national scientific decision-making and rapid development. It analyzes the development course and advanced experience of top-level Think Tank in America and other countries. The paper summaries the advance experiences, combines with the background and features of Think Tank construction of colleges and universities in China. It puts forward that Chinese colleges and universities Think Tank should aim at the national strategic needs, play the advantages of talents gathering and main innovation force, insist on opening, and set constructing professional colleges and universities Think Tank as the breakthrough point. The think tanks produce strategic consulting research results with high quality. The paper proposes the reference effect of foreign Think Tank on characteristic Think Tank construction of colleges and universities in China and the development strategy recommendations.

  2. Scientific communication and its relevance to research policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosendaal, H.E.; Geurts, P.A.Th.M.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the relation between developments in scientific communication and research. The developments in scientific communication are related to developments brought about by opportunities provided by the development and wide-scale introduction of modern information and communication tec

  3. Modern Tools for Modern Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumfert, G; Epperly, T

    2001-10-31

    This is a proposal for a new software configure/build tool for building, maintaining, deploying, and installing software. At its completion, this new tool will replace current standard tool suites such as ''autoconf'', ''automake'', ''libtool'', and the de facto standard build tool, ''make''. This ambitious project is born out of the realization that as scientific software has grown in size and complexity over the years, the difficulty of configuring and building software has increased as well. For high performance scientific software, additional complexities often arises from the need for portability to multiple platforms (including many one-of-a-kind platforms), multilanguage implementations, use of third party libraries, and a need to adapt algorithms to the specific features of the hardware. Development of scientific software is being hampered by the quality of configuration and build tools commonly available. Inordinate amounts of time and expertise are required to develop and maintain the configure and build system for a moderately complex project. Better build and configure tools will increase developer productivity. This proposal is a first step in a process of shoring up the foundation upon which DOE software is created and used.

  4. The madness of modern measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Sara

    2016-06-01

    In this column, Sara Wickham takes a sideways look at issues relevant to midwives, students, women and families, inviting us to sit down with a cup of tea and ponder what we think we know. In this article, Sara shares the story of a woman who discovered that the due date calculation made by a machine was considered inalienable, even when another date was known with certainty to be correct. Is this an inevitable consequence of our modern world, or can we act to challenge such situations?

  5. Foundations for Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Trudy; Chun, Marc; Daly, William T.; Harrington, Christine; Tobolowsky, Barbara F.

    2015-01-01

    "Foundations for Critical Thinking" explores the landscape of critical-thinking skill development and pedagogy through foundational chapters and institutional case studies involving a range of students in diverse settings. By establishing a link between active learning and improved critical thinking, this resource encourages all higher…

  6. On Developing Students Thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟兰

    2015-01-01

    With the development of English teaching, English teaching methods have been paid more and more attention to. Language learning is a complicated process, creative thinking is very important for students to learn language. According to analyzing several factors of affecting students' thinking, the author points out five areas of suggestions on developing students' thinking in this paper.

  7. Beyond Critical Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bono, Edward

    1986-01-01

    Suggests our society strongly needs thinking that is constructive, generative, and organizing; describes an educational program, CoRT (Cognitive Research Trust), which teaches creative thinking as a skill; and presents reasons for teaching thinking as a specific subject area. (MBR)

  8. Modern optics

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther, B D

    2015-01-01

    Modern Optics is a fundamental study of the principles of optics using a rigorous physical approach based on Maxwell's Equations. The treatment provides the mathematical foundations needed to understand a number of applications such as laser optics, fiber optics and medical imaging covered in an engineering curriculum as well as the traditional topics covered in a physics based course in optics. In addition to treating the fundamentals in optical science, the student is given an exposure to actual optics engineering problems such as paraxial matrix optics, aberrations with experimental examples, Fourier transform optics (Fresnel-Kirchhoff formulation), Gaussian waves, thin films, photonic crystals, surface plasmons, and fiber optics. Through its many pictures, figures, and diagrams, the text provides a good physical insight into the topics covered. The course content can be modified to reflect the interests of the instructor as well as the student, through the selection of optional material provided in append...

  9. Modern electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Zangwill, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    An engaging writing style and a strong focus on the physics make this comprehensive, graduate-level textbook unique among existing classical electromagnetism textbooks. Charged particles in vacuum and the electrodynamics of continuous media are given equal attention in discussions of electrostatics, magnetostatics, quasistatics, conservation laws, wave propagation, radiation, scattering, special relativity and field theory. Extensive use of qualitative arguments similar to those used by working physicists makes Modern Electrodynamics a must-have for every student of this subject. In 24 chapters, the textbook covers many more topics than can be presented in a typical two-semester course, making it easy for instructors to tailor courses to their specific needs. Close to 120 worked examples and 80 applications boxes help the reader build physical intuition and develop technical skill. Nearly 600 end-of-chapter homework problems encourage students to engage actively with the material. A solutions manual is availa...

  10. Modern thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2017-01-01

    This textbook introduces thermodynamics with a modern approach, starting from four fundamental physical facts (the atomic nature of matter, the indistinguishability of atoms and molecules of the same species, the uncertainty principle, and the existence of equilibrium states) and analyzing the behavior of complex systems with the tools of information theory, in particular with Shannon's measure of information (or SMI), which can be defined on any probability distribution. SMI is defined and its properties and time evolution are illustrated, and it is shown that the entropy is a particular type of SMI, i.e. the SMI related to the phase-space distribution for a macroscopic system at equilibrium. The connection to SMI allows the reader to understand what entropy is and why isolated systems follow the Second Law of Thermodynamics. The Second Llaw is also formulated for other systems, not thermally isolated and even open with respect to the transfer of particles. All the fundamental aspects of thermodynamics are d...

  11. GENDER ASYMMETRY IN A MODERN POLITICAL DISCOURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakytgul Khamenova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work (article, the author investigates gender asymmetry in modern Kazakhstan society which has social and psychological, is watered - economic scientific measurement. The scientific data base used in this research is wide and authentic enough and can be divided in three groups: first, the social stereotypes and gender aspects, second, the gender and sex theories, imageology, psychology, international politics, third, the scientific sources, devoted to the gender aspects of global and political processes.

  12. Critical Thinking as a Cognitive Educational Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brylina Irina V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with higher education issues related to the formation of students’ intellectual work skills. The research objective of the paper was to consider critical thinking as a cognitive technology in education. In this regard, the didactic and structural approaches to the study of critical thinking do not contradict one another: each approach is a logical complement of the other and reveals certain aspects of the complex concept of critical thinking, giving emphasis to the argument, which is a tool, used both in critical and dogmatic thinking. By the general competence we mean principles of thinking, the ability to produce a reasoned piece of oral and written language, understanding and analysis of philosophical issues, considering the essence and value of the information. Among the professional competencies, the following should be listed: the ability to reconsider the gathered experience critically, the ability to collect, process, and interpret the data of modern research, to form judgments about the value and impact of the professional activity. The logical competence draws focused attention to the critical argument, regarding it throughout the course Logic. It is concluded that critical thinking can be seen as a cognitive educational technology for the formation of logical competence.

  13. Affecting Critical Thinking through Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Virginia P.

    Intended for teachers, this booklet shows how spoken language can affect student thinking and presents strategies for teaching critical thinking skills. The first section discusses the theoretical and research bases for promoting critical thinking through speech, defines critical thinking, explores critical thinking as abstract thinking, and tells…

  14. Think Tanks in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelstrup, Jesper Dahl

    The emergence of more think tanks in recent decades has spawned some interest in how they function and impact policy-making in the European Union and its member states. So far however few empirical studies of think tanks have been carried out and think tanks have mainly been studied...... in their national contexts. Questions regarding patterns and differences in think tank organisations and functions across countries have largely been left unanswered. This paper advances a definition and research design that uses different expert roles to categorise think tanks. A sample of 34 think tanks from...... Brussels, Denmark and Germany are categorised according to different expert roles in a pilot analysis. As the analysis is sensitive to the interpretation and weight given to different indicators, besides from picturing the think tank landscape, the analysis is intended to trigger a discussion of how...

  15. “HONORABLE COMMISSIONS” AND THE EDUCATIVE ROLE OF THE MODERN MUSEUM: SCIENTIFIC COMMUNICATION, NATURE PROTECTION AND THE CAMPAIGN FOR WOMEN’S PROGRESS IN BERTHA LUTZ’S ACTIVITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Gomes Pinto de Sousa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to relate Bertha Lutz’s personal experience to the wider scenery of the scientific community to which she belonged, and to the new possibilities opened for women’s insertion in the public sphere. Within this wider objective, the work emphasizes her activities in the field of Education – a cause especially dear to her militancy, given its emancipative potential, as well as to her professional activities, for their civilizational ideal. The educational context in the 1920s and 1930s contemplates not only the aspirations of scientists of that period, but also the beginnings of women’s participation in this professional field – it can be considered a ‘link’ between the scientific and feminist dimensions. We may conclude that Bertha Lutz’s trajectory, where sciences and feminism are inseparable, contributed in a decisive manner to women’s intellectual, economic, and political emancipation.

  16. Critical reading and critical thinking Critical reading and critical thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loni Kreis Taglieber

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide, for L1 and L2 reading and writing teachers, a brief overview of the literature about critical reading and higher level thinking skills. The teaching of these skills is still neglected in some language classes in Brazil, be it in L1 or in L2 classes. Thus, this paper may also serve as a resource guide for L1 and/or L2 reading and writing teachers who want to incorporate critical reading and thinking into their classes. In modern society, even in everyday life people frequently need to deal with complicated public and political issues, make decisions, and solve problems. In order to do this efficiently and effectively, citizens must be able to evaluate critically what they see, hear, and read. Also, with the huge amount of printed material available in all areas in this age of “information explosion” it is easy to feel overwhelmed. But often the information piled up on people’s desks and in their minds is of no use due to the enormous amount of it. The purpose of this paper is to provide, for L1 and L2 reading and writing teachers, a brief overview of the literature about critical reading and higher level thinking skills. The teaching of these skills is still neglected in some language classes in Brazil, be it in L1 or in L2 classes. Thus, this paper may also serve as a resource guide for L1 and/or L2 reading and writing teachers who want to incorporate critical reading and thinking into their classes. In modern society, even in everyday life people frequently need to deal with complicated public and political issues, make decisions, and solve problems. In order to do this efficiently and effectively, citizens must be able to evaluate critically what they see, hear, and read. Also, with the huge amount of printed material available in all areas in this age of “information explosion” it is easy to feel overwhelmed. But often the information piled up on people’s desks and in their minds is of

  17. Defining Computational Thinking for Mathematics and Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintrop, David; Beheshti, Elham; Horn, Michael; Orton, Kai; Jona, Kemi; Trouille, Laura; Wilensky, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Science and mathematics are becoming computational endeavors. This fact is reflected in the recently released Next Generation Science Standards and the decision to include "computational thinking" as a core scientific practice. With this addition, and the increased presence of computation in mathematics and scientific contexts, a new…

  18. Inductive & Deductive Science Thinking: A Model for Lesson Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilica, Kim; Flores, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    Middle school students make great learning gains when they participate in lessons that invite them to practice their developing scientific reasoning skills; however, designing developmentally appropriate, clear, and structured lessons about scientific thinking and reasoning can be difficult. This challenge can be met through lessons that teach…

  19. Thinking and Exploration of Stress Scientific Experiment Transformations into Pathophysiological Teaching Experiment%将应激科学实验转化为病理生理学教学实验的探索与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘瑛; 周勇; 肖献忠; 涂自智; 张华莉; 王慷慨; 王念; 王浩; 邹江; 刘可; 管茶香

    2015-01-01

    应激是病理生理学的一个经典教学内容,但目前尚未开设应激相关内容的实验教学。因此,中南大学湘雅医学院病理生理学系结合最近科学研究进展,将应激科学实验转化为病理生理学教学实验,首次设计了“应激对小鼠行为及学习记忆能力的影响”实验。本实验采用足底电击法复制小鼠急性应激模型,采用旷场实验和 Morris 水迷宫实验来观察急性应激对小鼠情绪行为及学习记忆功能的影响并探讨其机制。通过本实验的探索,期望能够使应激的科研与教学有机结合,切实提高病理生理学课程的教学效果。%Stress is a classic teaching content of pathophysiology,but teaching experiment related to stress has not opened yet.In order to transfer stress scientific experiments into pathophysiological teaching experiment,we firstly designed an exper-iment named influence ofstress on behavior,learning and memory ability ofmice according to recent scientific research pro-gress.This experiment adopts the foot shock method to replicate mice acute stress model,performs open field test and Morris water maze test to observe the effects of acute stress on emotional behavior,learning and memory function of mice and to ex-plore its mechanism.Through the exploration of this experiment,stress teaching is expected to be combined with scientific re-search,and the teaching effect of pathophysiology may be effectively improved.

  20. English Teaching Under Guidance of Innovative Thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑾; ZHU; Yu

    2015-01-01

    Modern English teaching requires that English classes must face all students and focus on the quality-oriented education.This paper dwells on how to walk into English classroom and experience a new teaching mode that makes English"alive".This paper,discussing the two major deals-teachers and the classroom,teachers and students,amply demonstrates that the innovative thinking can make English class"alive"so as to better achieve the effectiveness of English teaching.

  1. The Role of the Spacecraft Operator in Scientific Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, S. G.

    2011-03-01

    Pilot and flight engineer crew members can improve scientific exploration missions and effectively support field work that they may not understand by contributing leadership, teamwork, communication, and operational thinking skills.

  2. One of the origins of modernity and naturalism of French literature in the 19th century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan-Kyu; Lee, Na-Mi

    2013-04-01

    Authors studied how Claude Bernard, the first founder of experimental medicine, contributed significantly to establishment of modernism and influenced European modern culture. Authors first studied his views on modernity, comparing with Descartes and Magendie, and on the similarity between "Experimental medicine" and the European literature in the 19th century. Bernard was not exclusively against vitalism, but the dogmatic misuse of vitalism. His objective thinking could be a useful model for the authors, who considered science to be an origin of modernity in literature of naturalism. Especially, Emile Zola was strongly influenced by Bernard's "An introduction to the study of Experimental medicine" and published "Experimental novel," a manifesto of naturalism. Although Bernard's experimental methodology and determinism deeply influenced modern European culture, the relationship between his Experimental medicine and modernism have not been fully investigated yet. His experimental medicine also needs to be discussed from the ecological viewpoints. His anthropo-centrism was unique since he emphasized any human theory could not surpass the principle of nature. Conventional anthropo-centrism claims that human beings are superior enough to own and govern the nature. And Bernard's the necessary determinism contains the ecological principle that all life forms and inanimate objects are organically related and intertwined to each other, irrespectively of their usefulness for the human beings. Although there were some ethical debates related to his medical experiments on living bodies of animal, his strict principle to perform experiments only after animal or human body died was worth considering as an effort to sustain ecological viewpoints. He was also unique in terms of being realistic and candid about his situation which was limited by the 19th century's scientific and medical development. In conclusion, the significance of convergence of literature and medical science

  3. Scientific communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Kobylarek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles the problem of models of communication in science. The formal division of communication processes into oral and written does not resolve the problem of attitude. The author defines successful communication as a win-win game, based on the respect and equality of the partners, regardless of their position in the world of science. The core characteristics of the process of scientific communication are indicated , such as openness, fairness, support, and creation. The task of creating the right atmosphere for science communication belongs to moderators, who should not allow privilege and differentiation of position to affect scientific communication processes.

  4. 密切"严"与"实"的有机融合 建设现代农业科研院所%Organically Melted"Strict"and"Earnest"to Construct Modern Agricultural Scientific Research Institutes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁伯琦; 仇秀丽; 黄颖; 张伟利

    2015-01-01

    农业科研院所要着力践行"三严三实",不断坚持创新驱动,深入贯彻科技为民,支撑服务"三农"事业发展.科技创新要从"严"从"实",做到始终如一的坚持,力求将科技为民作为目标,将科技创业与创新为民有机融为一体.科技人员应当"严"与"实"相融合,理论联系实际,甘于平静寂寞并热爱平凡工作,将履职担当与光荣坚守作为尽责使命.文章结合实际,提出了制订发展规划,奋力拼搏抓好落实;着力科技创新,服务"三农"事业发展;促进科技创业,加强成果集成推广;构建厚实平台,促进优势学科建设;完善激励机制,培养又红又专人才;强化有效保障,实现又好又快发展等在新常态下强化省级农业科研院所建设的主要对策.%Agricultural scientific research institutes should focus on the practice of "Three Strict and Three Earnest", insist on innovation drive, carry out the principle of science and technology for the people, and serve for the development of"countryside, agriculture and farmers". Scientific innovation should always stick to the "Strict" and "Earnest", set serving farmers with science and technology as the goal, and organically melt scientific enterprise with the goal. Scientific and technical personnel should merge "Strict" and "Earnest" together, apply theory to real-life situations, be willing to be serenity and lonely, love the ordinary work, and make bear and integrity as a responsible mission. In this paper, six key points and countermeasures with practice to deepen the construction of agricultural scientific research institutes in provincial-level under the condition of the new normal were put forward, i.e., making developing plan and carrying out it by hard working, laying stress on scientific innovation and serving the development of "countryside, agriculture and farmers", promoting technical industrialization and strengthening integration and extension of achievements, constructing steady

  5. The Relationship between Religion and Modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazdani, A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Modernity is the process of the thought, philosophical, scientific, industrialized, political, and social development, which occurred in the West after renascence. This phenomenon possesses special characteristics. The chief question is 'what the relationship between this western phenomenon and religion is'. Is Islam necessarily contradictory with modernity or consistent with it? Whether the challenges between religion and modernity are resolvable? In this paper, the various doctrines will be examined. Some religious studies scholars hold that they are consistent. They believe that in order to develop our country, we need to follow the enlightenment. In contrast, some maintain that religion and modernity are necessarily contradictory. Some other thinkers believe that they are inconsistent, but their inconsistency is resolvable. To resolve the inconsistency, these thinkers are divided into some groups. In this paper, the doctrine will be defended that not only modernity and religion are not necessarily antagonistic, but also today religion is alive, dynamic, and thriving in many modern metropolises.

  6. MODERN MODELS AND METHODS OF DIAGNOSIS OF METHODOLOGY COMPETENT TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loyko V. I.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is development of models and methods of diagnostics of methodical competence of a teacher. According to modern views, methodical thinking is the key competence of teachers. Modern experts consider the methodical competence of a teacher as a personal and professional quality, which is a fundamentally important factor in the success of the professional activity of teachers, as well as a subsystem of its professional competence. This is due to the fact that in today's world, a high level of knowledge of teachers of academic subjects and their possessing of learnt basics of teaching methods can not fully describe the level of professional competence of the teacher. The authors have characterized the functional components of methodical competence of the teacher, its relationship with other personalprofessional qualities (first - to the psychological and educational, research and informational competence, as well as its levels of formation. Forming a model of methodical competence of the teacher, the authors proceeded from the fact that a contemporary teacher high demands: it must be ready to conduct independent research, design-learning technologies, forecasting results of training and education of students. As a leading component of the methodical competence of the teacher is his personal experience in methodological activities and requirements of methodical competence determined goals and objectives of methodical activity, the process of the present study, the formation of patterns of methodical competence of the teacher preceded the refinement of existing models methodical activity of scientific and pedagogical staff of higher education institutions and secondary vocational education institutions. The proposed model of methodical competence of the teacher - the scientific basis of a system of monitoring of his personal and professional development, and evaluation criteria and levels of her diagnosis - targets system of

  7. 我国近代高等科学教育的历史回顾及启示%A Historical Review and Inspiration to Modern Higher Scientific Education of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琳; 王巍

    2012-01-01

    Through reviewing the development process of the China's higher education during the Opium War and the founding of new China, the paper analysis the characteristics of the development of China's modem higher scientific education, and gets inspiration from them.%通过对鸦片战争至新中国成立期间我国高等科学教育的发展历程的回顾,分析了我国近代高等科学教育发展的特点,并从中得到启示。

  8. Anthropology and Multiple Modernities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    , as the concept was pluralized into a variety of forms: multiple modernities, parallel modernities, manifold modernities, alternative modernities, competing modernities, reflexive modernities, early modernities, other modernities – the list still unfolding. By reviewing various attempts to conceptualise...... configurations. However, if the current pluralizing of modernity ultimately serves to describe the variety of cultural forms that co-exist in the World today, the analytical value of the concept risks being watered down, and little is gained in perspective. Arguably, other concepts would have served the purpose...

  9. Modernity, postmodernity and disability in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysack, C

    1997-06-01

    This paper examines the implications of two theoretical perspectives, modernity and postmodernity, for provision of community-based disability services in developing countries. The author argues that modernity's embrace of the 'wonders' of science and technology have significantly affected our understanding of what community is. Modernity, in fact, leads us to view communities in one of two major ways: as inferior, or as ideal. Both views are deeply flawed. Postmodernity's profound scepticism of truth claims and authority provides a useful critique of community conceived in modern terms. The critique is helpful to the extent that it reveals the power of language in constructing our ideas of community. It also highlights a new way of thinking about participation, individualism and choice in community disability initiatives.

  10. Professional scientific blog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Beke

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The professional blog is a weblog that on the whole meets the requirements of scientific publication. In my opinion it bear a resemblance to digital notice board, where the competent specialists of the given branch of science can place their ideas, questions, possible solutions and can raise problems. Its most important function can be collectivization of the knowledge. In this article I am going to examine the characteristics of the scientific blog as a genre. Conventional learning counts as a rather solitary activity. If the students have access to the materials of each other and of the teacher, their sense of solitude diminishes and this model is also closer to the constructivist approach that features the way most people think and learn. Learning does not mean passively collecting tiny pieces of knowledge; it much more esembles ‘spinning a conceptual net’ which is made up by the experiences and observations of the individual. With the spreading of the Internet more universities and colleges worldwide gave a try to on-line educational methods, but the most efficient one has not been found yet. The publication of the curriculum (the material of the lectures and the handling of the electronic mails are not sufficient; much more is needed for collaborative learning. Our scholastic scientific blog can be a sufficient field for the start of a knowledge-building process based on cooperation. In the Rocard-report can be read that for the future of Europe it is crucial to develop the education of the natural sciences, and for this it isnecessary to act on local, regional, national and EU-level. To the educational processes should be involved beyond the traditional actors (child, parent, teacher also others (scientists, professionals, universities, local institutions, the actors of the economic sphere, etc.. The scholastic scientific blog answer the purposes, as a collaborative knowledge-sharing forum.

  11. 关于提高企业培训计划科学化水平的实践与思考%The Practice and Thinking about Improving the Scientific Level of Corporate Training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

      企业年度培训计划是从组织的发展战略出发,在全面的培训需求分析的基础上对整体培训活动作出的系统安排。本文基于江苏井神盐化股份有限公司的管理实践,阐述了企业如何导入先进培训理念和管理方法,逐步建立制定与实施培训计划的工作体系,从而提升培训工作的科学化水平。%From the strategy of organization development, the company annual training plan is the schedule of the overall training activities, on the basis of the analysis of comprehensive training needs. In this paper, based on the management practices of Jiangsu Jingshen Salt & Chemical Industry Co., Ltd, the authors elaborate on how the corporate brings in the advanced training concept and management methods, gradually design the work system of establishing and implementing the annual training plan, and finally improve the training’s scientific level.

  12. The Scientific Research Position of TCM Hypothesis%中医学假说的科研地位

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶有青; 李振吉; 徐春波; 顾晓静; 白桦; 包文虎; 李文杰

    2014-01-01

    Scientific hypothesis is an important form of thinking in scientific research , and also it is an important part of scientific prac-tical activity .TCM hypothesis , which originated from TCM basic theory and clinical practice accepts the clinical examination , provides guiding function of innovating basic theory and promotes clinical researches .This paper analyses the hypothesis of TCM scientific research through the history of TCM and modern scientific research , in terms of its conception , institutional elements , as well as examples of sci-entific research hypothesis .%科学假说是科学研究中一种重要的思维形式,是科学实践活动的重要组成部分。中医学假说来源于中医理论基础和医疗实践,并接受临床检验,为理论创新和临床研究开展提供重要指导作用。本文从中医学假说的概念、构成要素以及科研假说范例等方面入手,从中医学发展历史与现代科研角度分析中医药科研中的假说。

  13. Visual thinking & digital imagery

    OpenAIRE

    Blevis, Eli; Churchill, Elizabeth; Odom, William; Pierre, James; Roedl, David; Wakkary, Ron

    2012-01-01

    This workshop focuses on exploring the centrality of visual literacy and visual thinking to HCI. Drawing on emerging critical perspectives, the workshop will address visual literacy and visual thinking from an interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary design-orientation [2, 8], foregrounding the notion that imagery is a primary form of visual thinking. Imagery—which subsumes digital imagery—goes well beyond sketching and beyond storyboards, screenshots and wireframes. We will address how a broa...

  14. Speech and scientific paper. A rhetorical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Carmona Sandoval

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This essay attempts to show that the ancient rhetorical theory has explanatory capabilities to understand and learn to write modern texts and to analyze them in order to understand their communication skills, as in the scientific article, one of the most prestigious forms on scientific communication. It starts with the notion of discourse in the field of scientific communication and then address the rhetorical dimension of the paper.

  15. The Question Concerning Thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Martin Heidegger's thought-provoking essay "The Question Concerning Technology" (1977a) placed technology at the heart of philosophy. Heidegger tried to show that the essence of technology provokes humans to think about the world in a very dangerous way. Yet if we follow Heidegger's analysis......, by doing so, we will in the end realize two important things. First, that Heidegger's declaration of the end of philosophy in fact also means the end of anything we can meaningfully call thinking. Second, that Heidegger's own thinking is completely different from his own ideal of thinking. Our question...

  16. Betting on better scientific literacy

    CERN Multimedia

    Daisy Yuhas

    Dmitry Zimin, founder of the Russian philanthropic foundation Dynasty, visited CERN on 23 October. Zimin, who is himself a scientist and businessman, founded Dynasty in order to support scientific education and a greater public understanding of scientific thinking. Zimin met the Bulletin to reflect on the experience and what had interested him about CERN. Zimin, who had read about and researched CERN before his visit, felt prepared for the physics at CERN but was greatly impressed by the collaborative “brainforce.” He observed that “The organization of all of these people is not less important as an achievement than all of the technical achievements, the collider, the experiments.” He was amazed at “how CERN has been able to organize such a grand collaboration of different people from different institutes of countries from all over the world.” At the core of the Dynasty Foundation’s ideals is the dissemination of scientific thought. Zimin ...

  17. Lateral Thinking of Prospective Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, A. S. Arul; Xavier, S. Amaladoss

    2013-01-01

    Edward de Bono who invented the term "lateral thinking" in 1967 is the pioneer of lateral thinking. Lateral thinking is concerned with the generation of new ideas. Liberation from old ideas and the stimulation of new ones are twin aspects of lateral thinking. Lateral thinking is a creative skills from which all people can benefit…

  18. Conceptual preconditions of overcoming of relativistic intentions in modern philosophy of science

    CERN Document Server

    Kulikov, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    The paper defends the thesis that it's possible to maintain some conceptual preconditions of overcoming of relativistic intentions in modern philosophy of science ("there are no any general foundations in philosophy of science"). We found two general foundations in philosophy of science as a minimum. From the first side it's realistic to reveal on the base of special understanding of time the value of time not only in natural thought (especially in theory of gravity) but also in humanitarian knowledge. That's why philosophy of science has independent position in epistemology and ontology corresponding to interpretation of time as a general category of scientific thinking. The nature of time has internally inconsistent (paradoxical) character. Time is phenomenon which existing and not existing at the same time. This phenomenon is identified with imaginary movement and also ideal (formal) process of formation of the nature. The general understanding of time is connected with its "mathematical" meaning as calcul...

  19. Alchemy as studies of life and matter: reconsidering the place of vitalism in early modern chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ku-ming

    2011-06-01

    Early modern alchemy studied both matter and life, much like today's life sciences. What material life is and how it comes about intrigued alchemists. Many found the answer by assuming a vital principle that served as the source and cause of life. Recent literature has presented important cases in which vitalist formulations incorporated corpuscular or mechanical elements that were characteristic of the New Science and other cases in which vitalist thinking influenced important figures of the Scientific Revolution. Not merely speculative, vitalist ideas also motivated chymical practice. The unity of life science and material science that is found in many formulations of Renaissance alchemy disintegrated in Georg Ernst Stahl's version of post-Cartesian vitalism.

  20. 国内现代科技工作者的道德修养研究综述%Research on Moral Cultivation of Domestic Modern Scientific and Technical Workers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄昊

    2012-01-01

    With the development of science and technology in human society, moral cultivation of science and technology worker research becomes increasingly important in recent years. This article made a summary of scholars in this domain' s research development in this field in recent years, emphasized that it is necessary to unify the moral cultivation of scien-tific and technical workers with the autonomy and the heteronomy, finally it pointed out the insufficiency in the research.%对近年来我国学者对科技工作者的道德修养研究领域的研究进展做一个综述,强调加强科技工作者的道德修养要自律与他律相结合,指出现有研究中的不足.

  1. Understanding the Limitation of Modern Medicine from the Scientific View of Space and Time%从科学的时空观看现代临床医学的局限性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何权瀛

    2014-01-01

    时空是世间万物存在的载体,也是万物运行的物质基础。在一定意义上讲空间和时间都是无限的。然而,我们所经历的时空又都是有限的。本文从时空的维度论证现代临床医学的局限性和有限性。从时间的维度上看,无论在门诊还是住院期间我们对疾病的认识仅仅看到疾病过程中的中段或极期,而没有观察到疾病的潜伏期或前驱期,更没有观察到疾病的康复期。从空间的维度上看,现代临床医学分科过细使我们无法从整体上完整地理解疾病的全貌和本质,以及各个脏器的结构和功能变化之间的内在联系。%The time and space is the carrier on which all things of creation on the earth exist ,and they are also material base of all things moving .Space and time are both immeasurable ,speaking in a certain sense ,however ,the time and space we have undergone is also limited .The limitation of modern clinical medicine was proved in the paper from the point of the view on time and space . Firstly , from the view of time , our understanding of various disease is only limited on the intermediate phase or extreme stage ,not on the observation the incubation period or prodromal stage of the disease ,even not on the observation of the recovery phase of the disease both in the out-patient department or the inpatient-department . Secondly ,from the view of space ,it has become impossible that we fully understand the complete picture and the essence of the disease as well as the internal relationship between the structure and function of various organs ,because the modern clinical medicine is separated excessively into deferent departments .

  2. Exploring multiliteracies, student voice, and scientific practices in two elementary classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Elizabeth Rowland

    This study explored the voices of children in a changing world with evolving needs and new opportunities. The workplaces of rapidly moving capitalist societies value creativity, collaboration, and critical thinking skills which are of growing importance and manifesting themselves in modern K-12 science classroom cultures (Gee, 2000; New London Group, 2000). This study explored issues of multiliteracies and student voice set within the context of teaching and learning in 4th and 5th grade science classrooms. The purpose of the study was to ascertain what and how multiliteracies and scientific practices (NGSS Lead States, 2013c) are implemented, explore how multiliteracies influence students' voices, and investigate teacher and student perceptions of multiliteracies, student voice, and scientific practices. Grounded in a constructivist framework, a multiple case study was employed in two elementary classrooms. Through observations, student focus groups and interviews, and teacher interviews, a detailed narrative was created to describe a range of multiliteracies, student voice, and scientific practices that occurred with the science classroom context. Using grounded theory analysis, data were coded and analyzed to reveal emergent themes. Data analysis revealed that these two classrooms were enriched with multiliteracies that serve metaphorically as breeding grounds for student voice. In the modern classroom, defined as a space where information is instantly accessible through the Internet, multiliteracies can be developed through inquiry-based, collaborative, and technology-rich experiences. Scientific literacy, cultivated through student communication and collaboration, is arguably a multiliteracy that has not been considered in the literature, and should be, as an integral component of overall individual literacy in the 21st century. Findings revealed four themes. Three themes suggest that teachers address several modes of multiliteracies in science, but identify

  3. REKONSTRUKSI PEMIKIRAN HUKUM ISLAM MELALUI INTEGRASI METODE KLASIK DENGAN METODE SAINTIFIK MODERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAHSUN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses methodological thinking about integration deals between classical methods with modern scientific methods in a project of reconstruction of Islamic legal thought. The idea of this paper is motivated by the need for the development of Islamic thought, especially in Islamic law. Philosophically, the real emergence manhaji-eclectic method as a result of integration between the classical methods and modern scientific methods is possible. Implementation of the integration must meet the main prerequisites: first, making al-maṣlaḥah al-'āmmah (public decency or maqāṣid alsharī’ah as a decisive consideration in seeking a legal aid in three main domains, namely ḍarūriyyah (urgent needs ḥājiyyah (normal needs, and taḥsīniyyah (complementary needs. The second prerequisite, is the emergence of human consciousness that the classical method will not capable to answer the challenges that change dynamically. While the third, is the willingness of people to change to something new and better, as the implementation of al-muḥāfaẓah ‘alā al-qadīm al-ṣāliḥ wa al-akhdh bi ‘l-jadīd l-aṣlaḥ

  4. Scientific Crossbreeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Rolf

    This thesis presents an alternative approach to the analysis of interdisciplinarity. One of the basic reasons for developing an alternative method for evaluation of interdisciplinary activities is that epistemic issues are insufficiently dealt with in the existing literature on the topic. To deve......This thesis presents an alternative approach to the analysis of interdisciplinarity. One of the basic reasons for developing an alternative method for evaluation of interdisciplinary activities is that epistemic issues are insufficiently dealt with in the existing literature on the topic....... To develop a more adequate way of capturing what is at stake in interdisciplinarity, I suggest drawing inspiration from the contemporary philosophical literature on scientific representation. The development of a representation based approach to the analysis of interdisciplinarity, and the discussion...... of the concept of “scientific discipline” and disciplinary difference. This chapter provides reasons to assume that conventional scientific taxonomies do not provide a good basis for analysing epistemic aspects of interdisciplinary science. On this background it is argued that the concept of “approaches...

  5. Scientific Realism and Primordial Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Azhar, Feraz

    2016-01-01

    We discuss scientific realism from the perspective of modern cosmology, especially primordial cosmology: i.e. the cosmological investigation of the very early universe. We first (Section 2) state our allegiance to scientific realism, and discuss what insights about it cosmology might yield, as against "just" supplying scientific claims that philosophers can then evaluate. In particular, we discuss: the idea of laws of cosmology, and limitations on ascertaining the global structure of spacetime. Then we review some of what is now known about the early universe (Section 3): meaning, roughly, from a thousandth of a second after the Big Bang onwards(!). The rest of the paper takes up two issues about primordial cosmology, i.e. the very early universe, where "very early" means, roughly, much earlier (logarithmically) than one second after the Big Bang: say, less than $10^{-11}$ seconds. Both issues illustrate that familiar philosophical threat to scientific realism, the under-determination of theory by data---on a...

  6. Modern universities in a digital environment

    OpenAIRE

    Lukovics, Miklós (ed.); Zuti, Bence

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays the digitalization of all aspects of our lives is becoming more and more general. This pattern is also true in case of modern institutions of higher education. In case of the operation of universities, we can identify a shift towards a growingly increasing approach, which is proactive strategic thinking done by university management. Many successful examples throughout the globe prove that universities may positively affect the level of economic development in given re...

  7. Illusions of causality: how they bias our everyday thinking and how they could be reduced.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Helena; Blanco, Fernando; Yarritu, Ion; Díaz-Lago, Marcos; Vadillo, Miguel A; Barberia, Itxaso

    2015-01-01

    Illusions of causality occur when people develop the belief that there is a causal connection between two events that are actually unrelated. Such illusions have been proposed to underlie pseudoscience and superstitious thinking, sometimes leading to disastrous consequences in relation to critical life areas, such as health, finances, and wellbeing. Like optical illusions, they can occur for anyone under well-known conditions. Scientific thinking is the best possible safeguard against them, but it does not come intuitively and needs to be taught. Teaching how to think scientifically should benefit from better understanding of the illusion of causality. In this article, we review experiments that our group has conducted on the illusion of causality during the last 20 years. We discuss how research on the illusion of causality can contribute to the teaching of scientific thinking and how scientific thinking can reduce illusion.

  8. Illusions of causality: how they bias our everyday thinking and how they could be reduced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matute, Helena; Blanco, Fernando; Yarritu, Ion; Díaz-Lago, Marcos; Vadillo, Miguel A.; Barberia, Itxaso

    2015-01-01

    Illusions of causality occur when people develop the belief that there is a causal connection between two events that are actually unrelated. Such illusions have been proposed to underlie pseudoscience and superstitious thinking, sometimes leading to disastrous consequences in relation to critical life areas, such as health, finances, and wellbeing. Like optical illusions, they can occur for anyone under well-known conditions. Scientific thinking is the best possible safeguard against them, but it does not come intuitively and needs to be taught. Teaching how to think scientifically should benefit from better understanding of the illusion of causality. In this article, we review experiments that our group has conducted on the illusion of causality during the last 20 years. We discuss how research on the illusion of causality can contribute to the teaching of scientific thinking and how scientific thinking can reduce illusion. PMID:26191014

  9. Illusions of causality: How they bias our everyday thinking and how they could be reduced

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena eMatute

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Illusions of causality occur when people develop the belief that there is a causal connection between two events that are actually unrelated. Such illusions have been proposed to underlie pseudoscience and superstitious thinking, sometimes leading to disastrous consequences in relation to critical life areas, such as health, finances, and wellbeing. Like optical illusions, they can occur for anyone under well-known conditions. Scientific thinking is the best possible safeguard against them, but it does not come intuitively and needs to be taught. Teaching how to think scientifically should benefit from better understanding of the illusion of causality. In this article, we review experiments that our group has conducted on the illusion of causality during the last 20 years. We discuss how research on the illusion of causality can contribute to the teaching of scientific thinking and how scientific thinking can reduce illusion.

  10. The Myth of Scientific Sufficiency in Librarianship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, H. Curtis

    Postwar librarians have sacrificed the humanistic basis of librarianship and regard the use of science in librarianship as a settled issue. American librarianship is currently dominated by the physical thinking of scientific systems theory, which includes Bertalanffy's general system theory, Wiener's cybernetics, and the Hartley-Shannon theory of…

  11. Critical reading and critical thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loni Kreis Taglieber

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to provide, for L1 and L2 reading and writing teachers, a brief overview of the literature about critical reading and higher level thinking skills. The teaching of these skills is still neglected in some language classes in Brazil, be it in L1 or in L2 classes. Thus, this paper may also serve as a resource guide for L1 and/or L2 reading and writing teachers who want to incorporate critical reading and thinking into their classes. In modern society, even in everyday life people frequently need to deal with complicated public and political issues, make decisions, and solve problems. In order to do this efficiently and effectively, citizens must be able to evaluate critically what they see, hear, and read. Also, with the huge amount of printed material available in all areas in this age of “information explosion” it is easy to feel overwhelmed. But often the information piled up on people’s desks and in their minds is of no use due to the enormous amount of it.

  12. Multiple modernities, modern subjectivities and social order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Dietrich; Sinclair, Kirstine

    2015-01-01

    to modern subjectivity formation. In combining conceptual tools from these strands of social theory, we argue that the emergence of multiple modernities should be understood as a historical result of idiosyncratic social constructions combining global social imaginaries with religious and other cultural......Taking its point of departure in the conceptual debate about modernities in the plural, this article presents a heuristic framework based on an interpretative approach to modernity. The article draws on theories of multiple modernities, successive modernities and poststructuralist approaches...... traditions. In the second part of the article we illustrate this argument with three short excursions into the history of Islamic reform in the 19th and 20th centuries. In this way we interpret the modern history of Muslim societies as based on cultural conflicts between different forms of social order...

  13. Thinking law: thinking law in motion

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Beth Nielsen

    2014-01-01

    This essay argues that one way to “think law” is to think “law in motion”. I will argue that a “law in motion” perspective embodies four core elements or ‘multiplicities’ which are: (1) multiple methodologies; (2) multiple perspectives; (3) multiple vocalities; and (4) multiple media including objects. As will become evident by the number of inspiring colleagues that have articulated rationales and perspectives for each of these multiplicities, these are not original ideas for which I can cla...

  14. Education in Medicine as a component of Modern Science; restoring the balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SN Arseculeratne

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Since 1871 when the Colombo Medical College was instituted, the education of undergraduates and postgraduates in medicine, over the succeeding decades, had the prime aim of producing doctors who could deliver health care. This was the continuation of British colonial policy. The establishment of the University of Ceylon in 1942 continued this orientation, while in later decades and in contemporary times, the place of medicine as a component of modern science has been ignored. If the major function of a modern university in the sciences is to establish a scientific culture, an overhaul of the system of medical education is essential. In instruction and evaluation, the inordinately heavy emphasis on factual content needs supplementation with the sponsoring of creative, integrated thinking and with discussions on the historical and philosophical aspects of medicine as a component of modern science, instead of considering it merely as a utilitarian task, that would produce only medical technicians, and not medical scientists, whom our country needs.

  15. Counterfactual thinking in physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elwenspoek, Miko; Birke, Dorothee; Butter, Michael; Köppe, Tilmann

    2011-01-01

    Counterfactual thinking plays a key role in research in physics and, I believe, in research in all natural sciences. In this contribution I will describe a few examples of counterfactual thinking, how it is used, the power of this method of inquiry, and the types of results that can be achieved. A b

  16. Against Critical Thinking Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, David

    2015-01-01

    Critical thinking pedagogy is misguided. Ostensibly a cure for narrowness of thought, by using the emotions appropriate to conflict, it names only one mode of relation to material among many others. Ostensibly a cure for fallacies, critical thinking tends to dishonesty in practice because it habitually leaps to premature ideas of what the object…

  17. Kaleidoscopic Thinking for Creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Catherine M., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    The most successful companies must be flexible and rapidly adaptable. This requires creative management and creative teamwork. Like a kaleidoscope, creative thinking is the ability to rearrange pieces to form a new reality, to see connections, and to think on a global scale. (SK)

  18. Blue Ocean Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orem, Donna

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a concept called the "blue ocean thinking strategy," developed by W. Chan Kim and Renée Mauborgne, professors at INSEAD, an international graduate school of business in France. The "blue ocean" thinking strategy considers opportunities to create new markets for services, rather than focusing solely on…

  19. Thinking in Orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Bjorn Tore

    1997-01-01

    A think-aloud technique, in which 20 orienteers verbalized their exact thoughts during orienteering, was used to examine the phenomenon of cognition during orienteering. Results indicate that orienteering is experienced as a task to be accomplished, a physical movement, and a dynamic process, and that thinking involves attuning perceptions to…

  20. Vitalistic thinking in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stuart

    2013-11-01

    Vitalistic thinking has traditionally been associated with reasoning about biological phenomena. The current research aimed to investigate a broader range of vitalistic thinking than previously studied. Esoteric notions of 'energy' are frequently used by individuals when making causal attributions for strange occurrences, and previous literature has linked such thinking with paranormal, magical, and superstitious beliefs. Two experiments are described that aim to investigate whether adults are vitalistic when asked to make causal judgments, and whether this can be predicted by thinking styles and prior paranormal belief. Experiment 1 asked participants to rate three causal options (one of which was vitalistic) for six vignettes. Scores on one dimension of paranormal belief (New Age Philosophy) and analytical thinking significantly predicted vitalism, but scores on intuitive thinking and Traditional Paranormal Beliefs did not. Experiment 2 extended the findings by asking participants to generate their own causal responses. Again, paranormal belief was found to be the best predictor of vitalism, but this time Traditional Paranormal Beliefs were associated with vitalistic responses whilst both intuitive and analytical thinking were unable to significantly predict classification. Results challenge previous findings, suggesting that vitalistic thinking may operate differently when applied to everyday causal reasoning.

  1. Rethinking Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    Critical thinking is of primary importance in higher education, yet the concept remains slippery and the skill elusive. The author argues that most current critical thinking textbooks are out of line with the seminal work of John Dewey. Rather than logical argument and justification, it is suggested that carefulness, open-mindedness and creativity…

  2. Modern Scientific Space-Time Conception in Modernist Arts%现代科学的时空概念在现代主义艺术中的体现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王静艳

    2013-01-01

    Modern science plays a crucial role in the development of human society and in the field of arts for almost all important trends of arts and the discoveries of natural science are closely related. It is safe to say that the modernist painting is promoted by the non-Euclidean geometry that overrides Newton’s classical space-time concept and that the most important time-space concept of modernist painting comes from the space-time concept of the theory of relativity. This article analyzes the influences the19th century new space-time concept makes on the paintings of several modernist artists.%  现代科学对于人类社会的发展起了至关重要的作用,而在艺术领域,几乎所有重要的艺术思潮都与自然科学的发现密切相关。特别是非欧几何以来对于牛顿经典时空的推翻更是推动了现代主义绘画的发展,可以说,绘画现代性中最为重要的对时空的阐释正是来自于对相对论时空观的理解。通过对现代主义几位代表人物作品的分析,19世纪新的时空概念对绘画的影响,主要体现在多维度空间概念、时间、弯曲空间等几个方面。

  3. Thinking is believing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturirangan, Rajesh

    2008-01-01

    Philosophers as well lay people often think of beliefs as psychological states with dubious epistemic properties. Beliefs are conceptualized as unregulated conceptual structures, for the most part hypothetical and often fanciful or deluded. Thinking and reasoning on the other hand are seen as rational activities regulated by rules and governed by norms. Computational modeling of the mind has focused on rule-governed behavior, ultimately trying to reduce them to rules of logic. What if thinking is less like reasoning and more like believing? I argue that the classical model of thought as rational is mistaken and that thinking is fundamentally constituted by believing. This new approach forces us to re-evaluate classical epistemic concepts like "truth", "justification" etc. Furthermore, if thinking is believing, then it is not clear how thoughts can be modeled computationally. We need new mathematical ideas to model thought, ideas that are quite different from traditional logic-based mathematical structures.

  4. Repetitive thinking and depressive symptoms in a normal population : responses to normal negative events

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Simen Mjøen

    2016-01-01

    Some theories view repetitive thinking as a maladaptive coping response that exacerbates depressive symptoms and explains the sex difference in depression. Other theories view repetitive thinking as the chief mechanism for solving complex social problems. A central theoretical assumption in evolutionary psychology is that psychological mechanisms are sensitive to modern cues to ancestral fitness-relevant contexts. The measures that are currently used to probe repetitive thinking does not refl...

  5. Integrating Direct and Inquiry-Based Instruction in the Teaching of Critical Thinking: An Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Kelly Y. L.; Ho, Irene T.; Hau, Kit-Tai; Lai, Eva C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking is a unifying goal of modern education. While past research has mostly examined the efficacy of a single instructional approach to teaching critical thinking, recent literature has begun discussing mixed teaching approaches. The present study examines three modes of instruction, featuring the direct instruction approach and the…

  6. New Ways of Life, Thinking, Cause Distress in Modern Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    THE social news that has appeared in the media comes in all forms. Some people regard an increase in the number of divorce cases brought by omen as a sign that society has advanced. Others look at the activity of selecting "model husbands" as a trend that women are prospering, while the age of male dominance is in decline. Some say that the "single child" is an expedient measure for the state population policy, while in reality, the state has reached its goal of "fewer births, but excellent child-rearing and

  7. Thinking About the Tactics of Modern War: The Salvadoran Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-06

    known as the Organizacion Democratica Nacionalist (ORDEN) apparently served to extort, suppress, repress, and intimidate the local populace more so...little of the manual is directed to civil military operations. Only an 18 page appendix entitled "Related Operations" directly addresses civil military...insurgency. Recognition of this fact by the doctrine writers would change the whole tone of the manual . Rather than stressing a war of insurgent attrition

  8. Tree thinking cannot taken for granted: challenges for teaching phylogenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvik, Hanno

    2008-03-01

    Tree thinking is an integral part of modern evolutionary biology, and a necessary precondition for phylogenetics and comparative analyses. Tree thinking has during the 20th century largely replaced group thinking, developmental thinking and anthropocentrism in biology. Unfortunately, however, this does not imply that tree thinking can be taken for granted. The findings reported here indicate that tree thinking is very much an acquired ability which needs extensive training. I tested a sample of undergraduate and graduate students of biology by means of questionnaires. Not a single student was able to correctly interpret a simple tree drawing. Several other findings demonstrate that tree thinking is virtually absent in students unless they are explicitly taught how to read evolutionary trees. Possible causes and implications of this mental bias are discussed. It seems that biological textbooks can be an important source of confusion for students. While group and developmental thinking have disappeared from most textual representations of evolution, they have survived in the evolutionary tree drawings of many textbooks. It is quite common for students to encounter anthropocentric trees and even trees containing stem groups and paraphyla. While these biases originate from the unconscious philosophical assumptions made by authors, the findings suggest that presenting unbiased evolutionary trees in biological publications is not merely a philosophical virtue but has also clear practical implications.

  9. Scientific Software Component Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohn, S.; Dykman, N.; Kumfert, G.; Smolinski, B.

    2000-02-16

    We are developing new software component technology for high-performance parallel scientific computing to address issues of complexity, re-use, and interoperability for laboratory software. Component technology enables cross-project code re-use, reduces software development costs, and provides additional simulation capabilities for massively parallel laboratory application codes. The success of our approach will be measured by its impact on DOE mathematical and scientific software efforts. Thus, we are collaborating closely with library developers and application scientists in the Common Component Architecture forum, the Equation Solver Interface forum, and other DOE mathematical software groups to gather requirements, write and adopt a variety of design specifications, and develop demonstration projects to validate our approach. Numerical simulation is essential to the science mission at the laboratory. However, it is becoming increasingly difficult to manage the complexity of modern simulation software. Computational scientists develop complex, three-dimensional, massively parallel, full-physics simulations that require the integration of diverse software packages written by outside development teams. Currently, the integration of a new software package, such as a new linear solver library, can require several months of effort. Current industry component technologies such as CORBA, JavaBeans, and COM have all been used successfully in the business domain to reduce software development costs and increase software quality. However, these existing industry component infrastructures will not scale to support massively parallel applications in science and engineering. In particular, they do not address issues related to high-performance parallel computing on ASCI-class machines, such as fast in-process connections between components, language interoperability for scientific languages such as Fortran, parallel data redistribution between components, and massively

  10. Scientific Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    As one of the world's largest grain consumers,food security has always been a major concern for the Chinese nation.China must confront the challenge of feeding a fifth of the world's population with less than 9 percent of the planet's arable land.In 2011,China's grain output recorded growth for the eighth successive year,and total production reached an all-time high of 571million tons.In terms of food security,China's goal is to maintain a self-sufficiency rate of above 95 percent.However,an annual net population growth of 7.39 million and the effective decline of the area of farmland in the country,as a result of urbanization,make achieving such selfsufficiency a serious challenge.Given the heavy burden placed on Chinese agriculture,constantly raising productivity by relying on scientific and technological progress has become a priority for China's agricultural sector.The Ministry of Agriculture,for example,has worked to raise China's annual grain yield per-unit area by 1 percent,on average,over the past decade.Last year,the contributory rate of scientific and technological development to China's agriculture reached 52 percent,surpassing the contribution made by land,labor and other production factors for the first time in history.

  11. Creative Cognition in Secondary Science: An exploration of divergent thinking in science among adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antink-Meyer, Allison; Lederman, Norman G.

    2015-07-01

    The divergent thinking skills in science of 282 US high school students were investigated across 16 weeks of instruction in order to determine whether typical academic time periods can significantly influence changes in thinking skills. Students' from 6 high school science classrooms completed the Scientific Structures Creativity Measure (SSCM) before and after a semester of instruction. Even the short time frame of a typical academic term was found to be sufficient to promote both improvements in divergent thinking skills as well as declining divergent thinking. Declining divergent thinking skills were more common in this time frame than were improvements. The nature of student performance on the SSCM and implications are discussed.

  12. The Time Value of Qu Qiubai’s Creative Thinking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Hui-jun

    2014-01-01

    Qu Qiubai is a Marxist, proletarian revolutionist, great thinker and theorist who was never afraid of conducting cre-ative thinking. It is creative thinking that have helped Qu Qiubai to accurately feel the pulse of the times, to timely respond to the requirement of the times and to scientifically answer the realist question raised by times in carrying out the China ’s revolu-tionary theory into practice. In a word, creative thinking gave full demonstration to Qu Qiu bai ’s time value by following the general trend and requirements of history and keeping up with the times.

  13. Integration of educational and scientific-technological areas during the process of education of aerospace engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayorova, Vera

    2011-09-01

    test-beds for quick and affordable trial-and-test of new technologies and design solutions in aerospace followed by implementation of selected efficiencies in the industry; development and improvement of ground control infrastructure based in the university, which includes the Mission Control Center and the Earth Remote Sensing Center; development of cooperative partnerships with international partners in the field of microsatellite technologies with the goal of sharing experience, uniting efforts in preparing and running scientific and educational experiments and creating next-generation spacecraft by multi-national student groups. Such approaches allow creating seamless environment that unites educational, scientific and innovative processes. This allows students to develop high professionalism, modern engineering thinking and stable engineering skills at an early stage of education at the university.

  14. Addressing big data challenges for scientific data infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demchenko, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Grosso, P.; Wibisono, A.; de Laat, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges that are imposed by Big Data Science on the modern and future Scientific Data Infrastructure (SDI). The paper refers to different scientific communities to define requirements on data management, access control and security. The paper introduces the Scientific

  15. Addressing big data challenges for scientific data infrastructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demchenko, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Grosso, P.; Wibisono, A.; de Laat, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges that are imposed by Big Data Science on the modern and future Scientific Data Infrastructure (SDI). The paper refers to different scientific communities to define requirements on data management, access control and security. The paper introduces the Scientific Dat

  16. Learning to think strategically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Strategic thinking focuses on issues that directly affect the ability of a family planning program to attract and retain clients. This issue of "The Family Planning Manager" outlines the five steps of strategic thinking in family planning administration: 1) define the organization's mission and strategic goals; 2) identify opportunities for improving quality, expanding access, and increasing demand; 3) evaluate each option in terms of its compatibility with the organization's goals; 4) select an option; and 5) transform strategies into action. Also included in this issue is a 20-question test designed to permit readers to assess their "strategic thinking quotient" and a list of sample questions to guide a strategic analysis.

  17. Proto-computational Thinking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tatar, Deborah Gail; Harrison, Steve; Stewart, Michael

    2017-01-01

    , the observation that computing is usually about some non-computational thing can lead to an approach that integrates computational thinking instruction with existing core curricular classes. A social justice argument can be made for this approach, because all students take courses in the core curriculum...... in plausible theories of change and a number of different educational projects suitable for classroom instruction. However, a major outcome of the study was to advance the importance of proto-computational thinking (PCT). We argue that, in the absence of preexisting use of representational tools for thinking...

  18. Logical Thinking Abilities among Form 4 Students in the Interior Division of Sabah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fah, Lay Yoon

    2009-01-01

    The science curriculum in Malaysia emphasizes the acquisition of scientific skills, thinking skills, and the inculcation of scientific attitudes and noble values. Besides that, the acquisition of scientific and technological knowledge and its application to the natural phenomena and students' daily experiences are also equally emphasized. The…

  19. [The sanitary question in the modernity-postmodernity debate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriart, C; Spinelli, H

    1994-12-01

    This work analyzes the sanitary question in the modernity-postmodernity debate. Such analyses are performed form a philosophical position that states the crisis of Modernity and questions the ideological twist that to itself propitiates postmodernity, shutting out questioning views or visions. It propitiates an alternative view of politics, thinking of it from the potency plane and giving a role to the subject in the decision of producing transformations.

  20. Esoteric discourse and esoteric world picture at modern stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokrovskaya Olga Sergeevna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of esotericism as a special type of discourse. The specificity of this phenomenon and its reflection in the text, esoteric understanding is noted by the author as a closed, secret knowledge (in dictionary definitions and other more extensive sources. This knowledge can be, in terms of cognitive science, a special world view shared by the respective individual or group of people. The article highlights a paradox at first glance, the trend: the modern esoteric, on the one hand, express their isolation, tightness of the uniqueness and closeness to comprehend knowledge, on the other - seek to spread their ideology and pursue quite pragmatic purpose: to seize as much as possible audience of potential adopters and to introduce them to the «enlightened» way of thinking and outlook. The author proves the syncretic nature of this particular esoteric forms of communication linking the language tools, techniques and genres of both religious (“preaching”, and “popular science” - more precisely, pseudo-scientific and pseudo-popular discourses.

  1. [Modernity in dreams and myths].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scopelliti, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    The very presence of myths in psychoanalysis raises questions about their scientific status: that leads to reconsider the whole issue of Freudian mythology in a non-medical manner, by envisaging it in the more general context of modern myths, both political and artistic. Special attention is then paid to Surrealism, as the only avant-garde movement at the same time focused on psychoanalysis and politics: the role played by dreams in foundering myths is examined in both Surrealism and psychoanalysis. Surrealistic myths, such as Dalí's Grand Paranoïaque Comestible, finally prove to be so non-oedipian as the Nazi Ubermensch myth; nevertheless, their comparison with Freudian mythology points out their common origin, as they all fulfilled the need of the mass society for a modern myth, able to express his deeply renewed self-awareness.

  2. Teaching Scientific Computing: A Model-Centered Approach to Pipeline and Parallel Programming with C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimiras Dolgopolovas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to present an approach to the introduction into pipeline and parallel computing, using a model of the multiphase queueing system. Pipeline computing, including software pipelines, is among the key concepts in modern computing and electronics engineering. The modern computer science and engineering education requires a comprehensive curriculum, so the introduction to pipeline and parallel computing is the essential topic to be included in the curriculum. At the same time, the topic is among the most motivating tasks due to the comprehensive multidisciplinary and technical requirements. To enhance the educational process, the paper proposes a novel model-centered framework and develops the relevant learning objects. It allows implementing an educational platform of constructivist learning process, thus enabling learners’ experimentation with the provided programming models, obtaining learners’ competences of the modern scientific research and computational thinking, and capturing the relevant technical knowledge. It also provides an integral platform that allows a simultaneous and comparative introduction to pipelining and parallel computing. The programming language C for developing programming models and message passing interface (MPI and OpenMP parallelization tools have been chosen for implementation.

  3. Modern project management theory and knowledge framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luo Zhongbao

    2014-01-01

    The scholars increasingly pay at ention to the internal rules in knowledge development and innovation of construction engineering management,as wel as the framework for engineering management body of knowledge. Considering the one-of-a-kind characteristic of construction project s and highly dependence from projects on management knowledge and its innovation,this paper analyzed the knowledge body of engineering management and its development dimension ,such as thinking and knowledge structure dimensions. The engineering management knowledge innovation model and structural model were put forward. The paper reviewed and proposed the engineering management knowledge system framework under engineering thinking mode,including the basic knowledge system framework which is used in engineering management research ,and a framework for body of knowledge which is applicable for engineering management practice. Based on a brief analysis of engineering management practice,this paper analyzed the development progres of engineering management from engineering thinking to ethical thinking and philosophical thinking. A dynamic model formed from the modern engineering management theory was put forward. The construction of projects are divided into two stages:an investment decision-making stage, and project implementation stage. According to the fact that project owners obtain the project products by transaction,the management during project implementation stage are divided into two aspects:project transaction management for the owner, and construction project management for the contractor. Thus, the three theoretical modules of modern engineering management were established:project investment decision-making management theory,engineering transaction management theory, and engineering project management theory. This paper further analyzed the content and basic theoretical issues of each theoretical module.

  4. Modern Analysis of Marx's Scientific Thoughts——Taking Machine. The Forces of Nature and Scientific Applications for Text%马克思科学思想的现代解析——以《机器。自然力和科学的应用》为文本

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘庆炬

    2012-01-01

    Machine.The Forces of Nature and Scientific Applications,contains rich scientific thoughts,which is the important preparation for Marx before writing Das Kaptial.In it,Marx points out the trend of the development of science and technology integration,reveals the interaction and the law of development between the science and economic activities,gains an insight into the alienation between the natural force and science based on the analysis of the capital motion rule.The words of wisdom of the late 19th century still has important significance in contemporary age.%《机器。自然力和科学的应用》是马克思为《资本论》的写作所做的重要准备,蕴含着丰富的科学思想。在书中,马克思指出了科学技术一体化的发展趋势;深刻揭示了科学与经济活动的互动关系和科学的发展规律;通过对资本运动规律的分析,洞见了自然力、科学的异化。这些在19世纪中后期的真知灼见仍然有着重要的当代意义。

  5. Stress Management: Positive Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management Positive thinking helps with stress management and can even improve your health. Practice overcoming negative self-talk ... with optimism is a key part of effective stress management. And effective stress management is associated with ...

  6. Sigtuna Think Piece 9

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    methods, longitudinal studies such as cohort and panel analysis, textual and content ... context encourages critical thinking and open-ended enquiry and recognises ... Case study: The international discourse on education and learning in ...

  7. Sigtuna Think Piece 4

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    environmental and sustainability issues and the same time, strives to avoid the risks of ... promoting students' critical thinking and their democratic action competence. .... to value-related issues the normative approach runs the risk of turning ...

  8. The Curiosity in Marketing Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Mark E.; McGinnis, John

    2007-01-01

    This article identifies the curiosity in marketing thinking and offers ways to teach for marketing thinking through an environment that fosters students' curiosity. The significance of curiosity in its relationship with thinking is that when curiosity is absent, so is thinking. Challenges are discussed in recognizing the fragility of curiosity…

  9. Cognitive aspects of a temporality concept in the comparative analysis of post-nonclassical scientificity and myth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tychkin Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers ‘time’, a fundamental category of human existence, in the context of cognitive processes research in modern culture. Main methodological approaches to determining temporality in myth have been outlined. The authors validate a thesis that methods of understanding time in science and myth at the current development stage of research of the specified worldview forms as cognitive practices correlate. Main features of a ‘time’ concept and its function in mythological thinking, such as unity, interpenetrability, verticality, have been formulated. Myth creates senses, forms a steady ontological picture of the world, makes a human an active source in “constructing the reality”. In this connection, myth mostly plays the role of one of the algorithms of cognitive activity in the context of modern cognitive science. A “temporality” concept realized in myth forms conditions to use it as one of ontological foundations in the modern research of cognitive processes. Main types of temporality in classical and nonclassical science have been described. The specificity of time concept transformation in non-classical science and actualization of relativity and probability of processes and their complementary nature have been revealed. D.Chou’s bootstrap theory of particles has been studied. There has been shown that temporary processes of the micro-world are discrete, diverse and do not exist within the framework of universal integrity which to a great extent correlates with the modern scientific worldview and principles of cognitive practices.

  10. Using motivation as a thinking experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunæs, Dorthe; Nissen, Morten

    Using motivation as thinking experiment, this presentation reconstructs critical post/psychologies in the light of the futures they envision. “Post” or “critical” does not imply not being concerned with psychology (the science of experience, thinking, acting, and feeling). Rather...... it may be formed. Yet, psychology mostly defines itself as a science that objectifies subjectivity while avoiding the reflection of these implications. Critical post/psychologies take up these implications, and face the choice of rejecting or reforming psychology. This utopia can be described as “we know...... by the idea that motivation practices can be articulated in promising ways. “Motivation” is psychology’s attempt to objectify a key aspect of subjectivity (the will) without addressing or performing self-critique. As modern science, motivation performed a critique of the disregarding of workers’ and students...

  11. Spirits of ecological thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Molderez, Ingrid

    2007-01-01

    The main focus of this article is to discern the ontological meaning of concepts related to sustainability. This fits within Linda Starke’s (1990) “hopeful signs” about the need for new ways of thinking about our common future instead of merely continuing with concrete policy changes within the accustomed mode of thinking. The article aims to prevent sustainability from being encapsulated within a prearranged framework. The popularization of sustainability within the corporate sector and educ...

  12. Modern acoustics in China related to Dah-You MAA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jialu

    2006-01-01

    The history of Acoustics is very long, but for modern Acoustics it was only started from the end of 19th century after Bell's and Sabine's works. Modern Acoustics in China was developed even later. The main contributions to the development of modern Acoustics in China of Dah-You MAA and his academic achievements were presented in this paper. It is shown that Dah-You MAA who is one of the founders of the normal mode theory and the modern Acoustics in China has played an important role in developing modern Acoustics. Some preliminary studies of MAA's scientific philosophy and his social activities were discussed in this paper also.

  13. IGISOL control system modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koponen, J., E-mail: jukka.ae.koponen@jyu.fi; Hakala, J.

    2016-06-01

    Since 2010, the IGISOL research facility at the Accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyväskylä has gone through major changes. Comparing the new IGISOL4 facility to the former IGISOL3 setup, the size of the facility has more than doubled, the length of the ion transport line has grown to about 50 m with several measurement setups and extension capabilities, and the accelerated ions can be fed to the facility from two different cyclotrons. The facility has evolved to a system comprising hundreds of manual, pneumatic and electronic devices. These changes have prompted the need to modernize also the facility control system taking care of monitoring and transporting the ion beams. In addition, the control system is also used for some scientific data acquisition tasks. Basic guidelines for the IGISOL control system update have been remote control, safety, usability, reliability and maintainability. Legacy components have had a major significance in the control system hardware and for the renewed control system software the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) has been chosen as the architectural backbone.

  14. Integrating modern business applications with objectified legacy systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Heuvel, W.J.A.M.

    2002-01-01

    'Integrating Modern Business Applications with Objectified Legacy Systems' investigates a methodology for designing configurable business applications in terms of wrapped legacy systems. The methodology blends scientifically validated research from various domains, such as distributed object

  15. Physical Education between the social project of solid modernity and the of liquid modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidinei Pithan da Silva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Grounded on Bauman’s thought, the present paper focuses on the constitution of social legitimacy and identity of Physical Education in the context of transition from solid to liquid modernity. This thought favors the understanding of the nature of the crisis that has crossed the identity discourse of Physical Education. The text signals the limits and possibilities of both the modern and the post-modern educational discourses. In this context, it describes a modern scenario that is marked by two distinct moments, the one of modernity at its solid stage, and that of modernity at its liquid stage. The first one, of solid modernity, social condition of surveillance, rationalization and control, performs the functional / adaptive role of putting everyone under the same rigid order (managed society. The second one, of liquid modernity, of the social condition of insignificance and irrationalism, plays the functional role of putting and keeping everyone under the same flexible Market disorder. From the scientific, mechanic focus of both the body and the physical education in solid modernity we have moved to the relativist and esthetic focus of body and physical education in liquid modernity.

  16. Masculinity and suicidal thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkis, Jane; Spittal, Matthew J; Keogh, Louise; Mousaferiadis, Tass; Currier, Dianne

    2017-03-01

    Males feature prominently in suicide statistics, but relatively little work has been done to date to explore whether endorsement of dominant masculinity norms heightens the risk of or is protective against suicidal thinking. This paper aimed to further knowledge in this area. We used baseline data from 13,884 men (aged 18-55) in the Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health (Ten to Men) cohort. These men filled in self-complete questionnaires in 2013/14 which covered a range of topics, including conformity to dominant masculinity norms and suicidal thinking. We conducted logistic regression analyses to estimate the strength of association between these two variables. After controlling for other key predictors of suicidal thinking, one characteristic of dominant masculinity-self-reliance-stood out as a risk factor for suicidal thinking (AOR 1.34; 95% CI 1.26-1.43). It suggests that one particular element of dominant masculinity-being self-reliant-may place men at increased risk of suicidal thinking. This finding resonates with current theories of how suicidal thinking develops and leads to action. It also has implications for the full gamut of suicide prevention approaches that target males in clinical settings and in the general population, and for our broader society. Further work is needed, however, to confirm the direction of the relationship between self-reliance and suicidality, and to unpack the means through which self-reliance may exert an influence.

  17. M. Lipman: Thinking in Education

    OpenAIRE

    BLÁHOVÁ, Klára

    2014-01-01

    The thesis presents the critical analysis of the work Thinking in Education by M. Lipman It deals with the problemc of fostering thinking through education. It explains the reasons of the relevance of the dialoque ability, critical thinking and also use of the creative and caring thinking. Also it explains that the thinking skills should be the effect of the education not only as a preparation for a life in the democratic society. The thesis summarize the views of it's critics.

  18. Thinking about Thinking: An Exploration of Preservice Teachers' Views about Higher Order Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Thinking skills have long been regarded as an essential outcome of the educational process. Yet, research shows that the teaching of thinking skills in K-12 education does not follow a coherent path. Several factors affect the teaching and use of thinking skills in the classroom, with teacher knowledge and beliefs about thinking skills among the…

  19. i negedu- ft 3 2 2014-scientific progress and postmodern culture the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JONATHAN

    phenomena make philosophical debates more relevant in our modern world. Keywords: Science, Scientific Progress, Post Modernity, Dialectic, Culture,. African Experience. ... knowledge with wide applications. One of the characteristics of ...

  20. Foreign experience of the social consequences of scientific and technological development: a place of education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. E. Khristolyubova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The social aspect (the restructuring of thinking, way of life and activity, quality of life, education is determined by the deficiency of fundamental scientific information on trends, issues, necessary conditions and possibilities of using foreign experience in managing the social consequences of scientific and technological development (progress at the present stage of Russian modernization.In this context, the changes, introduced by the scientific and technical progress (STP, which invade all aspects of human life, changing labor incentives, education and representation of human happiness, become an important object of study.Purpose of the study. The study of foreign experience of social consequences of scientific and technological development (progress at the present stage to assess the possibility of fragmented or integrated use of the new knowledge in the formation of long-term strategies for the development of science and technology, taking into account the social needs of society.R & D tasks. To effectively address the problems of modernization and restructuring of Russia it is necessary to explore and identify patterns and trends in the development of scientific and technological progress and social aspects of thinking changes, lifestyle and human activities for their subsequent use in the measurement and control of the social aspects of human life. To this should be investigated:1. Peculiarities of scientific and technological development in the next stage of the «long wave» of progress, which leads to the need for programming the development of the social aspect of the measure and the regulation of the quality of human life.2. Positive and negative social consequences of the development of scientific and technical progress.3. The impact of new challenges, factors and conditions, caused by the development of science and technology.4. Proposals for the analysis of the linkages and the risks of introduction of science and technology in

  1. Reclaiming the Body: Teaching Modern Poetry by Ignoring Meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Tom

    Many students think of poetry as a meaning to be figured out, a puzzle to be solved--as if poets were forever doomed to write only what they never quite mean and to mean what they never actually write. The struggle to discover meaning becomes acute with that distinctly modern poetry created by T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, and their…

  2. Retrospective and modern views on modernization and alternative modernization components of shinto and zen buddhism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Medviedieva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the ratio of modernization and counter modernizing key components of Japan and religions (partly introduced Christianity. The author concludes that the various components of the religious consciousness of the Japanese were kontratetycal on two main elements that form the basis of modern Western culture Japanese resistance and cause upgrade. First, science and technology, working on the basis of the laws of nature, which are opposed to the supernatural and the metaphysical world. Secondly, expressed individualism and atomism as hypertrophic respect for the human person, liberal nadzoseredzhenist to a person who undermines the consolidation of corporate social society. Japanese culture in the past was oriented toward modernization, but progress has been very slow. Moreover, in this process, Japan was much more conservative because in Japanese society regulatory institutions of the army, religion and industrial corporations can be considered a kind of constants which not only can be adapted to the modernization of Euro-American style, as suggested selection of authentic script compatible, especially with life values corporatism and solidarity. It is in this dimension of modernization projects related to Christian proselytism, as were «frustrated.» The reason for this breakdown can be considered inherence religion with social cohesion, its actual merging of social institutions, as well as hidden mahizm skepticism and religious outlook that combines Shinto, Confucian and Zen Buddhist elements. Since modernization in Christianity included the distinction darkened minds clerical era and «enlightened enlightenment» of consciousness era of modern times, it is this dichotomy allowed to oppose religious «ignorance» and scientific «enlightenment», the clergy and secular intellectuals, universities and intellectual clubs as a medium spreading the ideology of the bourgeoisie and monasteries as centers of religious clericalism

  3. Acquisition of Scientific Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noland, Lynn [Director, Sponsored Programs

    2014-05-16

    Whitworth University constructed a 63,00 sq. ft. biology and chemistry building which opened in the Fall of 2011. This project provided for new state-of-the-art science instrumentation enabling Whitworth students to develop skills and knowledge that are directly transferable to practical applications thus enhancing Whitworth student's ability to compete and perform in the scientific workforce. Additionally, STEM faculty undertake outreach programs in the area schools, bringing students to our campus to engage in activities with our science students. The ability to work with insturmentation that is current helps to make science exciting for middle school and high school students and gets them thinking about careers in science. 14 items were purchased following the university's purchasing policy, that benefit instruction and research in the departments of biology, chemistry, and health sciences. They are: Cadaver Dissection Tables with Exhaust Chamber and accessories, Research Microscope with DF DIC, Phase and Fluorescence illumination with DP72 Camera, Microscope with Fluorescence, Microcomputer controlled ultracentrifuge, Ultracentrifuge rotor, Variable Temperature steam pressure sterilizer, Alliance APLC System, DNA Speedvac, Gel Cocumentation System, BioPac MP150, Glovebox personal workstation,Lyophilizer, Nano Drop 2000/2000c Spectrophotometer, C02 Incubator.

  4. Critical thinking instruction and contextual interference to increase cognitive flexibility in complex judgment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helsdingen, Anne; Van Gog, Tamara; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Helsdingen, A. S., Van Gog, T., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2009). Critical thinking instruction and contextual interference to increase cognitive flexibility in complex judgment. Paper presented at the Joint meeting of the Scientific Network on "Developing critical and flexible thinking" and the E

  5. Learning to Think Spatially in an Undergraduate Interdisciplinary Computational Design Context: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Youssef, Belgacem; Berry, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Spatial thinking skills are vital for success in everyday living and work, not to mention the centrality of spatial reasoning in scientific discoveries, design-based disciplines, medicine, geosciences and mathematics to name a few. This case study describes a course in spatial thinking and communicating designed and delivered by an…

  6. Creative Cognition in Secondary Science: An Exploration of Divergent Thinking in Science among Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antink-Meyer, Allison; Lederman, Norman G.

    2015-01-01

    The divergent thinking skills in science of 282 US high school students were investigated across 16 weeks of instruction in order to determine whether typical academic time periods can significantly influence changes in thinking skills. Students' from 6 high school science classrooms completed the Scientific Structures Creativity Measure (SSCM)…

  7. Are opinions based on science: modelling social response to scientific facts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Iñiguez

    Full Text Available As scientists we like to think that modern societies and their members base their views, opinions and behaviour on scientific facts. This is not necessarily the case, even though we are all (over- exposed to information flow through various channels of media, i.e. newspapers, television, radio, internet, and web. It is thought that this is mainly due to the conflicting information on the mass media and to the individual attitude (formed by cultural, educational and environmental factors, that is, one external factor and another personal factor. In this paper we will investigate the dynamical development of opinion in a small population of agents by means of a computational model of opinion formation in a co-evolving network of socially linked agents. The personal and external factors are taken into account by assigning an individual attitude parameter to each agent, and by subjecting all to an external but homogeneous field to simulate the effect of the media. We then adjust the field strength in the model by using actual data on scientific perception surveys carried out in two different populations, which allow us to compare two different societies. We interpret the model findings with the aid of simple mean field calculations. Our results suggest that scientifically sound concepts are more difficult to acquire than concepts not validated by science, since opposing individuals organize themselves in close communities that prevent opinion consensus.

  8. Are opinions based on science: modelling social response to scientific facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iñiguez, Gerardo; Tagüeña-Martínez, Julia; Kaski, Kimmo K; Barrio, Rafael A

    2012-01-01

    As scientists we like to think that modern societies and their members base their views, opinions and behaviour on scientific facts. This is not necessarily the case, even though we are all (over-) exposed to information flow through various channels of media, i.e. newspapers, television, radio, internet, and web. It is thought that this is mainly due to the conflicting information on the mass media and to the individual attitude (formed by cultural, educational and environmental factors), that is, one external factor and another personal factor. In this paper we will investigate the dynamical development of opinion in a small population of agents by means of a computational model of opinion formation in a co-evolving network of socially linked agents. The personal and external factors are taken into account by assigning an individual attitude parameter to each agent, and by subjecting all to an external but homogeneous field to simulate the effect of the media. We then adjust the field strength in the model by using actual data on scientific perception surveys carried out in two different populations, which allow us to compare two different societies. We interpret the model findings with the aid of simple mean field calculations. Our results suggest that scientifically sound concepts are more difficult to acquire than concepts not validated by science, since opposing individuals organize themselves in close communities that prevent opinion consensus.

  9. Foundations of resilience thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtin, Charles G; Parker, Jessica P

    2014-08-01

    Through 3 broad and interconnected streams of thought, resilience thinking has influenced the science of ecology and natural resource management by generating new multidisciplinary approaches to environmental problem solving. Resilience science, adaptive management (AM), and ecological policy design (EPD) contributed to an internationally unified paradigm built around the realization that change is inevitable and that science and management must approach the world with this assumption, rather than one of stability. Resilience thinking treats actions as experiments to be learned from, rather than intellectual propositions to be defended or mistakes to be ignored. It asks what is novel and innovative and strives to capture the overall behavior of a system, rather than seeking static, precise outcomes from discrete action steps. Understanding the foundations of resilience thinking is an important building block for developing more holistic and adaptive approaches to conservation. We conducted a comprehensive review of the history of resilience thinking because resilience thinking provides a working context upon which more effective, synergistic, and systems-based conservation action can be taken in light of rapid and unpredictable change. Together, resilience science, AM, and EPD bridge the gaps between systems analysis, ecology, and resource management to provide an interdisciplinary approach to solving wicked problems.

  10. Reaching More Students Through Thinking in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Vincent P.

    2017-02-01

    Thinking in Physics (TIP) is a new curriculum that is more effective than commonly used interactive engagement methods for students who have the greatest difficulty learning physics. Research has shown a correlation between learning in physics and other factors, including scientific reasoning ability. The TIP curriculum addresses those factors. Features of the curriculum and evidence of its effectiveness are described. The most recent version of the TIP curriculum has greatly reduced a substantial gender gap that previously existed. More details and sample materials are provided in Thinking in Physics, a book intended for instructors of introductory physics, published in 2014 by Pearson as part of its Educational Innovation series. Additional materials, both for students and instructors, are provided on the website http://thinkinginphysics.com. Both the book and the website are free.

  11. Anthropology and Multiple Modernities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomassen, Bjørn

    as a discipline, and has important roots in Max Weber’s comparative sociology, elaborated for example by Shmul Eisenstadt. If anthropology, as Arjun Appadurai argues in Modernity at Large, wishes to contribute to a new social theory of modernity, it would need to tackle the theoretical luggage that the modernity......Anthropology never had an easy relationship with the concept of modernity. The “reflexive turn” which developed during the 1980s and 1990s tackled the concept of modernity as a culturally constructed narrative underlying Western self-assumptions of self and other– assumptions that needed...... to be unpacked and left behind. The debate was an essential part of a disciplininary reflexivity reconsidering anthropology’s epistemological and political roots in that very modernity. From the mid 1990s modernity was, somewhat surprisingly, reintroduced as a useful if not necessary conceptual tool...

  12. MODERN STATE LANGUAGE POLICY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga B. Akimova

    2015-01-01

    Russia; scientific studying and codification of the modern language, promoting of scientific knowledge of Russian and languages of the people of the Russian Federation; support expansion of the private initiatives connected with preservation and development of Russian in neighboring countries; creation of base for studying of Russian by foreign experts and labor migrants; cooperation with foreign specialists in the Russian philology, translators of the Russian literature and teachers of Russian.

  13. Topical Articles: A Course Designed to Improve Psychological Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penningroth, Suzanna L.; Despain, Laran H.; Gray, Matt J.

    2007-01-01

    The authors developed a one-credit freshman-level course designed to enhance psychological critical thinking. They based the new curriculum on Stanovich's (2004) text, with an emphasis on active learning and critically evaluating claims by applying scientific concepts. To assess the effectiveness of this course, they used a pretest-posttest design…

  14. Psychology Is a Science: At Least Some Students Think So

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Jeffrey D.; Beins, Bernard C.

    2009-01-01

    The American Psychological Association's (2007) curricular guidelines recommend that students develop both an understanding of how psychologists do research and an appreciation for why scientific thinking is necessary. We surveyed a large sample of psychology majors on specific interests, as well as individual difference variables relevant to…

  15. Blink the power of thinking without thinking

    CERN Document Server

    Gladwell, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    In his landmark bestseller The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us. Now, in Blink, he revolutionizes the way we understand the world within. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant-in the blink of an eye-that actually aren't as simple as they seem. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? How do our brains really work-in the office, in the classroom, in the kitchen, and in the bedroom? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others?In Blink we meet the psychologist who has learned to predict whether a marriage will last, based on a few minutes of observing a couple; the tennis coach who knows when a player will double-fault before the racket even makes contact with the ball; the antiquities experts who recognize a fake at a glance. Her...

  16. [Critical thinking skills in the nursing diagnosis process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, Greicy Kelly Gouveia Dias; Crossetti, Maria da Graça Oliveira

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the critical thinking skills utilized in the nursing diagnosis process. This was an exploratory descriptive study conducted with seven nursing students on the application of a clinical case to identify critical thinking skills, as well as their justifications in the nursing diagnosis process. Content analysis was performed to evaluate descriptive data. Six participants reported that analysis, scientific and technical knowledge and logical reasoning skills are important in identifying priority nursing diagnoses; clinical experience was cited by five participants, knowledge about the patient and application of standards were mentioned by three participants; Furthermore, discernment and contextual perspective were skills noted by two participants. Based on these results, the use of critical thinking skills related to the steps of the nursing diagnosis process was observed. Therefore, that the application of this process may constitute a strategy that enables the development of critical thinking skills.

  17. Systems Thinking : Ancient Maya's Evolution of Consciousness and Contemporary Systems Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jere Lazanski, Tadeja

    2010-11-01

    Systems thinking as a modern approach for problem solving was revived after WWII even though it had been an ancient philosophy. We can track systems thinking back to antiquity. Making a distinction from Western rationalist traditions of philosophy, C. West Churchman often identified with the I Ching as a systems approach sharing a frame of reference similar to pre-Socratic philosophy and Heraclitus. In this paper, we will compare the evolutionary system of consciousness, which was presented in the Tun calendar of Mayan Indians and contemporary systems theory and systems thinking, which is nothing else but highly evolved human consciousness in society. We will present Mayan calendar systems to contemporary systems thinking principles and explain the answer to the Ackoff's judgment on four hundred years of analytical thinking as the dominant mode of society. We will use the methods of historical comparison and a method of a systems approach. We will point out the big picture and Mayan divine plan as main systems principles. The Mayan numerical system and long count units has been proven as one of the most accurate systems for describing the present and future of the civilization in which we have all evolved. We will also explain the Mayan nine-level pyramids system that represents the evolutionary system, i.e. the consciousness, which in our time shows the actual level of human consciousness. Deriving from all described, we will show the main systems principles, discussed by contemporary systems authors and Mayan systems principles, which differ only in one expression—they named "the big picture" as "the divine plan". The final results can be perfectly applied to the society we live in. Seeing the world from the big picture point of view is reaching a level of awareness, in which linear thinking is replaced by systems thinking. The Mayans explained that the civilization would achieve the system of conscious co-creation. We can claim that linear thinking guides us

  18. Draft scientific concept of the research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazić Miljojko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Every scientific research is the systematic study of subjects, phenomena and processes that occur in nature and society, based on the use of scientific instruments for collecting, processing and analyzing data as well as the application of scientific methods for drawing conclusions about the properties of researching objects. precisely because each study needs to have systematic research character, it is necessary to design and plan in advance. The research project is a fundamental scientific and operational- planning document that represents a pre-designed model of acquiring scientific knowledge, structured as a target, rational purposeful system of mutually compatible and functionally related knowledge, attitudes, judgments and conclusions about the research subject. Because there are a number of different scientific disciplines and within them an even greater number of different types of research, general methodology of scientific research, as well as universal science, has defined certain standards and rules under which compiles every scientific project. Regardless of the scientific field, research project has a standard global structure consisting of: a draft scientific ideas; b research plans; c research instruments, including plans for processing data. Given the importance of the conceptualization of the research project, as a pre-designed model of acquisition of scientific knowledge and the numerous difficulties encountered by young researchers in establishing a draft of the scientific concept of their master and doctoral theses, the authors of this article have decided to offer an overall structure of the scientific draft of the research project, according to the requirements of modern general methodology and special sciences methodologies to the wider scientific community, in the next two editions of the Megatrend university journal. Due to the volume of subject matter, this paper refers only to the first three elements of the

  19. Thinking the unthinkable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard Nielsen, Anders; Dombernowsky, Per

    2004-01-01

    This paper adresses the theme of thinking construction in a changing world. In more specific terms it adresses two topics. The first being the necessary competences and skills in construction, that can be expected in the profile of the future architect after graduation. The second, being the acqu......This paper adresses the theme of thinking construction in a changing world. In more specific terms it adresses two topics. The first being the necessary competences and skills in construction, that can be expected in the profile of the future architect after graduation. The second, being...

  20. Experiential thinking in creationism--a textual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Petteri; Ryökäs, Esko; Mustonen, Anne-Mari

    2015-01-01

    Creationism is a religiously motivated worldview in denial of biological evolution that has been very resistant to change. We performed a textual analysis by examining creationist and pro-evolutionary texts for aspects of "experiential thinking", a cognitive process different from scientific thought. We observed characteristics of experiential thinking as follows: testimonials (present in 100% of sampled creationist texts), such as quotations, were a major form of proof. Confirmation bias (100% of sampled texts) was represented by ignoring or dismissing information that would contradict the creationist hypothesis. Scientifically irrelevant or flawed information was re-interpreted as relevant for the falsification of evolution (75-90% of sampled texts). Evolutionary theory was associated to moral issues by demonizing scientists and linking evolutionary theory to atrocities (63-93% of sampled texts). Pro-evolutionary rebuttals of creationist claims also contained testimonials (93% of sampled texts) and referred to moral implications (80% of sampled texts) but displayed lower prevalences of stereotypical thinking (47% of sampled texts), confirmation bias (27% of sampled texts) and pseudodiagnostics (7% of sampled texts). The aspects of experiential thinking could also be interpreted as argumentative fallacies. Testimonials lead, for instance, to ad hominem and appeals to authorities. Confirmation bias and simplification of data give rise to hasty generalizations and false dilemmas. Moral issues lead to guilt by association and appeals to consequences. Experiential thinking and fallacies can contribute to false beliefs and the persistence of the claims. We propose that science educators would benefit from the systematic analysis of experiential thinking patterns and fallacies in creationist texts and pro-evolutionary rebuttals in order to concentrate on scientific misconceptions instead of the scientifically irrelevant aspects of the creationist-evolutionist debate.

  1. Experiential thinking in creationism--a textual analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petteri Nieminen

    Full Text Available Creationism is a religiously motivated worldview in denial of biological evolution that has been very resistant to change. We performed a textual analysis by examining creationist and pro-evolutionary texts for aspects of "experiential thinking", a cognitive process different from scientific thought. We observed characteristics of experiential thinking as follows: testimonials (present in 100% of sampled creationist texts, such as quotations, were a major form of proof. Confirmation bias (100% of sampled texts was represented by ignoring or dismissing information that would contradict the creationist hypothesis. Scientifically irrelevant or flawed information was re-interpreted as relevant for the falsification of evolution (75-90% of sampled texts. Evolutionary theory was associated to moral issues by demonizing scientists and linking evolutionary theory to atrocities (63-93% of sampled texts. Pro-evolutionary rebuttals of creationist claims also contained testimonials (93% of sampled texts and referred to moral implications (80% of sampled texts but displayed lower prevalences of stereotypical thinking (47% of sampled texts, confirmation bias (27% of sampled texts and pseudodiagnostics (7% of sampled texts. The aspects of experiential thinking could also be interpreted as argumentative fallacies. Testimonials lead, for instance, to ad hominem and appeals to authorities. Confirmation bias and simplification of data give rise to hasty generalizations and false dilemmas. Moral issues lead to guilt by association and appeals to consequences. Experiential thinking and fallacies can contribute to false beliefs and the persistence of the claims. We propose that science educators would benefit from the systematic analysis of experiential thinking patterns and fallacies in creationist texts and pro-evolutionary rebuttals in order to concentrate on scientific misconceptions instead of the scientifically irrelevant aspects of the creationist

  2. The critical thinking curriculum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, William Haviland

    The Critical Thinking Curriculum Model (CTCM) utilizes a multidisciplinary approach that integrates effective learning and teaching practices with computer technology. The model is designed to be flexible within a curriculum, an example for teachers to follow, where they can plug in their own critical issue. This process engages students in collaborative research that can be shared in the classroom, across the country or around the globe. The CTCM features open-ended and collaborative activities that deal with current, real world issues which leaders are attempting to solve. As implemented in the Critical Issues Forum (CIF), an educational program administered by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the CTCM encompasses the political, social/cultural, economic, and scientific realms in the context of a current global issue. In this way, students realize the importance of their schooling by applying their efforts to an endeavor that ultimately will affect their future. This study measures student attitudes toward science and technology and the changes that result from immersion in the CTCM. It also assesses the differences in student learning in science content and problem solving for students involved in the CTCM. A sample of 24 students participated in classrooms at two separate high schools in New Mexico. The evaluation results were analyzed using SPSS in a MANOVA format in order to determine the significance of the between and within-subjects effects. A comparison ANOVA was done for each two-way MANOVA to see if the comparison groups were equal. Significant findings were validated using the Scheffe test in a Post Hoc analysis. Demographic information for the sample population was recorded and tracked, including self-assessments of computer use and availability. Overall, the results indicated that the CTCM did help to increase science content understanding and problem-solving skills for students, thereby positively effecting critical thinking. No matter if the

  3. Developing the Innovative Personality Type as the Priority Direction of Political Modernization in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernykh Natalya Sergeevna

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article attempts to explain the necessity to modernize the Russian political system and to implement the national innovative strategy. The need to strengthen and to develop the fundamentals of innovative-typed society – human potential and social capital – is analyzed on the basis of national empirical research. Today, humanity has entered the innovative information stage of development, where creative and active potential of a nation signifies one of the primary resources for achieving the status of a competitive state. The following characteristics become of the utmost value in such a society: independent and critical thinking, responsibility for the decisions, leadership and mobility. Unfortunately, the conditions for transitioning to the innovative type of society are not so favorable in Russia. Low birth rate, high mortality rate, underdeveloped state institutions, bureaucratization of goverment apparatus, brain drain from the periphery to the centre and abroad, weak legal culture and other social problems hinder the development of the innovative characteristics among Russian citizens. Russia needs to strengthen the fundamentals of the innovative-typed society, as there are positive impulses for its development (energy and raw material resources, high scientific potential, recognition by the most active part of society that the systemic transformations are necessary. The article presents the statistical data, which points to the need to invest in the development of the innovative personality characteristics, and the necessity to implement structural modernization of the specific areas of human capital.

  4. KONSEP DASAR ILMU (Kajian dalam Filsafat Yunani, Filsafat Islam, dan Filsafat Modern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moch. Khafidz Fuad Raya

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Speaking of science, the science is endless to be discussed, because it is the principal basis of the times. A civilization is formed in a contribution that science continues to evolve. Theoretical and empirical studies in the science of generating scientific method. Provides basic theoretical study and / or kerangak think that generate hypotheses, while empirical studies are testing hiptesis digging through the facts on the ground as a basis for conclusions. The paradigm then generate knowledge, and the emergence of a disciplines such as science, social sciences and humanities, resulting from the expansion of the perspective and discussion of the highly evolved of the meaning of science itself. The basic concept of the science of obtaining a special discussion, so that in the realm of philosophy into a discourse in shaping the basic concepts of the disciplines of birth. The development of the basic concepts of science has expanded in several studies of philosophy, both in philosophy western world (Greece, medieval philosophy (Islamic philosophy, and modern philosophy. So great was the role of science in the development of the age and the progress of civilization. So in this paper will discuss how the basic concepts of science in terms of philosophy, both in terms of Greek philosophy, medieval philosophy (Islamic philosophy, and modern philosophy, so it will obtain a comprehensive discussion related to the basic concepts of science.   Keywords: science, basic concepts, philosophy

  5. A protocol for a randomised active-controlled trial to evaluate the effects of an online mindfulness intervention on executive control, critical thinking and key thinking dispositions in a university student sample

    OpenAIRE

    Noone, Chris; Hogan, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background While most modern research focuses on the clinical benefits of mindfulness, an emerging body of work suggests that mindfulness can facilitate self-regulation of everyday thinking in typically developing individuals. This behaviour is best captured using critical thinking assessments. The aim of this paper is to describe a rigorous, pre-registered study which will investigate the effect of an online mindfulness intervention on Executive Functioning, critical thinking skills and asso...

  6. Uncovering Students' Thinking about Thinking Using Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchhart, Ron; Turner, Terri; Hadar, Linor

    2009-01-01

    A method for uncovering students' thinking about thinking, specifically their meta-strategic knowledge, is explored within the context of an ongoing, multi-year intervention designed to promote the development of students' thinking dispositions. The development of a concept-map instrument that classroom teachers can use and an analytic framework…

  7. Re/Thinking Critical Thinking: The Seductions of Everyday Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Kal

    2001-01-01

    Suggests that both critical thinking and obstacles to successful critical thinking are most commonly found in the activities of everyday life. Argues for a connective criticism approach that does not assume critical means adversarial and acknowledges that critical thinking can be used as a means of opening worlds of meaning. (KS)

  8. The contribution of William James to the origins of "scientific" psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreri, Antonio M

    2006-01-01

    This paper illustrates the specific nature of the contribution made by the psychology of William James to the construction of modern scientific psychology. Universally recognized as the father of American scientific psychology, William James still remains a much-debated scientist, mainly for two reasons. First, he was interested in subjects that were often very far from the narrow and traditional approaches taken by the greater part of his contemporary colleagues. Secondly, in order to enlighten psychological issues, he continued to adopt multidisciplinary contributions, rather than selecting only those that stemmed from experimental and specifically laboratory contexts. James has been recently inserted in the more complex international consortium of psychologists, psychiatrists, physicians, psychotherapists, and philosophers that has been called "the French-Swiss-English-and-American psychotherapeutic alliance." This does in reality seem a more appropriate framework for understanding the specificity of James's psychology. In order to illustrate the peculiar Jamesian way of thinking about psychological issues, this paper undertakes an examination of his classical concept of the "stream of thought." Here, in fact, many different contributions converge in defining and outlining "the primary fact of consciousness"--personal, subjective, and introspective observation; philosophical arguments; "mental experiments," and psychopathological experiences; but, most of all, neurological data derived specifically from brain physiology. This last contribution has been too often underestimated, as has also the background of James's training in the development of experimental psychology, neurology, and physiology at Harvard before 1890. The paper concludes with the assertion that James represents the prototype of a new way of defining the scientific quality of modern psychology, far from the narrow definition given by the laboratory experimentalists fresh from the German

  9. Creativity, Scientific Practice, and Knowledge Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    In this interesting article, Hisham Ghassib (2010) describes the transformation of science from its craft status in a pre-modern era to the major knowledge industry it is today. He then compares the production of scientific knowledge with industrial production, but makes the important distinction between the process of developing scientific…

  10. The Galileo Legend as Scientific Folklore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessl, Thomas M.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the various ways in which the legend of Galileo's persecution by the Roman Catholic Church diverges from scholarly readings of the Galileo affair. Finds five distinct themes of scientific ideology in the 40 accounts examined. Assesses the part that folklore plays in building and sustaining a professional ideology for the modern scientific…

  11. Software Defects, Scientific Computation and the Scientific Method

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Computation has rapidly grown in the last 50 years so that in many scientific areas it is the dominant partner in the practice of science. Unfortunately, unlike the experimental sciences, it does not adhere well to the principles of the scientific method as espoused by, for example, the philosopher Karl Popper. Such principles are built around the notions of deniability and reproducibility. Although much research effort has been spent on measuring the density of software defects, much less has been spent on the more difficult problem of measuring their effect on the output of a program. This talk explores these issues with numerous examples suggesting how this situation might be improved to match the demands of modern science. Finally it develops a theoretical model based on an amalgam of statistical mechanics and Hartley/Shannon information theory which suggests that software systems have strong implementation independent behaviour and supports the widely observed phenomenon that defects clust...

  12. Thinking Aloud Influences Perceived Time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Holmegaard, Kristin Due

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We investigate whether thinking aloud influences perceived time. Background: Thinking aloud is widely used in usability evaluation, yet it is debated whether thinking aloud influences thought and behavior. If thinking aloud is restricted to the verbalization of information to which...... a person is already attending, there is evidence that thinking aloud does not influence thought and behavior. Method: In an experiment, 16 thinking-aloud participants and 16 control participants solved a code-breaking task 24 times each. Participants estimated task duration. The 24 trials involved two...... levels of time constraint (timed, untimed) and resulted in two levels of success (solved, unsolved). Results: The ratio of perceived time to clock time was lower for thinking-aloud than control participants. Participants overestimated time by an average of 47% (thinking aloud) and 94% (control...

  13. Empowering academia through modern fabrication practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Padfield, Nicolas; Haldrup, Michael; Hobye, Mads

    We posit that modern fabrication and rapid prototyping practices can empower non-technical academic environments. For this to resonate with academic learning and research environments in a university context we must view FabLabs not only as machine parks but as creative environments, producing...... knowledge contributions in the form of processes, designs, artifacts and products. We must embrace thinking through the material, and embrace physical products as valid, accessible and assessable on an equal footing with traditional textual media. We describe two cases: workshops focused on exploration...... through the physical and digital media itself, without a traditional textual component....

  14. Belief in public efficacy, trust, and attitudes toward modern genetic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J; Cooper, H; Senior, V

    2007-08-01

    Government and policymakers want to engage the public in a dialogue about the conduct and consequences of science and increasingly seek to actively involve citizens in decision-making processes. Implicit in this thinking is that greater transparency and public inclusion will help dispel fears associated with new scientific advancements, foster greater public trust in those accountable, and ultimately increase the acceptability of new technologies. Less understood, however, are public perceptions about such high-level involvement in science and how these map onto public trust and attitudes within a diverse population. This article uses the concept of public efficacy -- the extent to which people believe that the public might be able to affect the course of decision making -- to explore differences in trust, attentiveness, and attitudes toward modern genetic science. Using nationally representative data from the 2003 British Social Attitudes Survey, we begin by examining the characteristics of those who have a positive belief about public involvement in this area of scientific inquiry. We then focus on how this belief maps on to indicators of public trust in key stakeholder groups, including the government and genetic scientists. Finally, we consider the relationship between public efficacy and trust and attitudes toward different applications of genetic technology. Our findings run contrary to assumptions that public involvement in science will foster greater trust and lead to a climate of greater acceptance for genetic technology. A belief in public efficacy does not uniformly equate with more trusting attitudes toward stakeholders but is associated with less trust in government rules. Whereas trust is positively correlated with more permissive attitudes about technologies such as cloning and gene therapy, people who believe in high-level public involvement are less likely to think that these technologies should be allowed than those who do not.

  15. Design Thinking for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    According to Vande Zande (2007), understanding the Design Process can help students become stronger critical thinkers. With this in mind, Andrew Watson decided to undertake an observational case study in which he focused directly on Design Thinking and addressed it more intentionally in his teaching. The hope was to understand how students saw…

  16. Engineering Design Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammi, Matthew; Becker, Kurt

    2013-01-01

    Engineering design thinking is "a complex cognitive process" including divergence-convergence, a systems perspective, ambiguity, and collaboration (Dym, Agogino, Eris, Frey, & Leifer, 2005, p. 104). Design is often complex, involving multiple levels of interacting components within a system that may be nested within or connected to other systems.…

  17. Thinking the unthinkable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard Nielsen, Anders; Dombernowsky, Per

    2004-01-01

    This paper adresses the theme of thinking construction in a changing world. In more specific terms it adresses two topics. The first being the necessary competences and skills in construction, that can be expected in the profile of the future architect after graduation. The second, being...

  18. Embedding GroupThink

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seabrooke, Leonard; Ban, Cornel; Helgadóttir, Oddný

    This memo outlines key concepts and the methodological approach involved in a recently funded Institute for New Economic Thinking project. Our aim is to pinpoint the relationship between the reception of academic ideas, traced by citation networks with qualitative coding, and positions of institu...

  19. A "thinking roadsurface"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, D. de; Brookhuis, K.A.; Noordmans, M.C.; Hogema, J.H.; Visscher, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Comprehensibility of an assistance system that should facilitate merging at places where a motorway lane ends was evaluated in the advanced driving simulator of the University of Groningen. Main components of the system called 'Denkdek' ('Thinking road surface') are electronic speed limit signs, arr

  20. Design Thinking for Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    According to Vande Zande (2007), understanding the Design Process can help students become stronger critical thinkers. With this in mind, Andrew Watson decided to undertake an observational case study in which he focused directly on Design Thinking and addressed it more intentionally in his teaching. The hope was to understand how students saw…

  1. Computational Thinking Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Andri; Bennett, Vicki; Repenning, Alexander; Koh, Kyu Han; Basawapatna, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    The iDREAMS project aims to reinvent Computer Science education in K-12 schools, by using game design and computational science for motivating and educating students through an approach we call Scalable Game Design, starting at the middle school level. In this paper we discuss the use of Computational Thinking Patterns as the basis for our…

  2. Thinking and Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Alan

    2006-01-01

    The importance of thinking for language learning has been recognized for some time. ELT activities which encourage active mental processing have become increasingly common. However, there is evidence that the use of such activities has still not become widespread in a number of ELT situations. One reason for this may be lack of awareness about how…

  3. Wishful thinking in preschoolers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Stéphane; Clément, Fabrice; Mercier, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The current experiment sought to demonstrate the presence of wishful thinking--when wishes influence beliefs--in young children. A sample of 77 preschoolers needed to predict, eight times in a row, which of two plastic eggs, one containing one toy and the other containing three toys, would be drawn by a blinded experimenter. On the four trials in which the children could not keep the content of the egg drawn, they were equally likely to predict that either egg would be drawn. By contrast, on the four trials in which the children got to keep the content of the egg, they were more likely to predict that the egg with three toys would be drawn. Any effort the children exerted would be the same across conditions, so that this demonstration of wishful thinking cannot be accounted for by an effort heuristic. One group of children--a subgroup of the 5-year-olds--did not engage in wishful thinking. Children from this subgroup instead used the representativeness heuristic to guide their answers. This result suggests that having an explicit representation of the outcome inhibits children from engaging in wishful thinking in the same way as explicit representations constrain the operation of motivated reasoning in adults.

  4. A "thinking roadsurface"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waard, D. de; Brookhuis, K.A.; Noordmans, M.C.; Hogema, J.H.; Visscher, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Comprehensibility of an assistance system that should facilitate merging at places where a motorway lane ends was evaluated in the advanced driving simulator of the University of Groningen. Main components of the system called 'Denkdek' ('Thinking road surface') are electronic speed limit signs,

  5. Remember to Just Think

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harney, John O.

    2014-01-01

    This article picks up on columnist Mike Barnicle's lazy style and "I was just thinking" format in his column for the "Boston Globe." Using that model, John Harney shares a few of his thoughts on various education topics such as co ops, "competency-based education," and making civics part of the curriculum at…

  6. The Celebration of Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, Elliot W.

    1988-01-01

    Without opportunities to acquire multiple forms of literacy, children will be handicapped in their ability to participate in the legacies of their culture. The forms in which thinking occurs should not be subjected to the status differences and inequities of society. (MLW)

  7. [A seminar for thinking?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touzet, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The sociopolitical context in which we carry out our caregiving profession influences our methods of working. In our world marked by rationalism, thinking about care, in the framework of a seminar, is a way of engaging ourselves and of not simply becoming a functionary of care.

  8. Nurturing Creative, Thinking Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes some ideas and experiences with training student engineers in creativity and critical thinking. In our survey, a large majority (82%) of respondents felt that as compared to all other kind of academic engagements, their projects had contributed most to develop their creativity. About 50% had also felt that their projects were…

  9. Dual thinking for scientists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Bascompte, J.; Bjordam, T.K.; Carpenter, S.R.; Clarke, L.; Folke, C.; Marquet, P.A.; Mazzeo, N.; Meerhoff, M.; Sala, O.; Westley, F.R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies provide compelling evidence for the idea that creative thinking draws upon two kinds of processes linked to distinct physiological features, and stimulated under different conditions. In short, the fast system-I produces intuition whereas the slow and deliberate system-II produces rea

  10. Thinking Data "with" Deleuze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzei, Lisa A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper the author is thinking with Deleuze's philosophical concept of the "image" of the speech-act in cinema and the implications for methodology and ethics in qualitative research. Drawing on research in the USA with white teachers, this paper will specifically engage with Deleuzian concepts presented in his two books on cinema and his…

  11. Can Animals Think?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    For centuries, philosophers argued that thinking and language sepa-rate humans from other species. The lesser creatures, Rene Descartes con-tended in I637, are little more than automatons, sleepwalking through lifewithout a mote of self-awareness. Later, scientists had reason to be skep-tical of claims concerning animal intelligence. At the turn of the century,

  12. What is This Thing Called Science?——A Consideration on Education from the Perspective of Scientific Thinking%论科学究竟是什么——从科学的思维和视角思考教育

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张俊洪; 陈铿; 杨文萍

    2012-01-01

      As the questions raised by the British philosopher A. F Chalmers in the book “What is This Thing Called Science”, everyone is curious about the same question. This is a question often asked by the people who are studying science and scientific education. Chalmers made a brief introduction about the contemporary Western philosopher’s answers to this question, such as Popper, Lakatos, Feyerabend. Chalmers stated his own opinion while giving critical comments on the other philosopher’s thinking. His aim is to give educators an initial understanding about the question“What is science?”and how to apply science to education.%  正如英国科学家A. F.查尔默斯(Alan F. Chalmers)所著的书《科学究竟是什么》书名所提出的疑问“科学究竟是什么”一样,我们每个有着好奇心的人都有这样的疑问.这个问题也是所有研究科学以及研究科学教育的人首先需要回答的问题.查尔默斯就当代西方一些主要的科学哲学家如波普尔、拉卡托斯、费耶阿本德等对科学究竟是什么这个问题的回答作了简明扼要的介绍,并在介绍其他科学哲学家的观点的同时也提出了理性的批判,同时阐明了查尔默斯他自己的观点.通过对科学究竟是什么的各种论述进行阐述,力图使教育工作者能够对究竟什么是科学这个问题以及如何把科学运用到教育教学当中有一个初步了解.

  13. The Effectiveness of Science Laboratory Course Regarding the Scientific Process Skills and Scientific Creativity of Prospective Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esin ŞAHİN-PEKMEZ

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research, primary science and mathematics prospective teachers’ scientific process skills and scientific creativity levels have been determined in science laboratory course. The research sample covers 84 primary science and mathematics prospective teachers. The content of the course includes some science scenarios which require the use of samples’ scientific creativity and critical thinking. In the light of these scenarios, the teacher candidates were required to design an experiment and then using their scientific process skills carry out the experiment. According to their written accounts student teachers abilities of scientific creativity and using scientific process skills were measured. As a result it was found out that, prospective teachers’ scientific process skills in both departments are at a good level and there is a significant difference in favor of mathematics prospective teachers. However, there is not a significant difference in terms of scientific creativity of the mathematics and science prospective teachers.

  14. Motivation of Professional Creative Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Mergalуаs M. Kashapov; Anna V. Leybina

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal correlation between motivation and creative professional thinking. Four hundred and seventy-one Russians of diff erent trades participated in the study. It was supposed that motivational structure and level of creative professional thinking were interrelated. The connection between motivational components and professional thinking was revealed. Tendencies of transition form situational level of thinking to oversituational one were determined. It was found o...

  15. The thinking: A interbehavioral definition

    OpenAIRE

    Melgar Segovia, Alberto; Facultad de Psicología, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    The thinking has been defined as it happens in a different dimension from the objective dimension. The thinking would be formal for internal processes unable to be observed. This methodological block was over for the theories of Skinner and Vigotsky. The first one proposed the introduction of objective stimuli in the responses chains of the Thinking process. Vigotsky remarked the slow intervention of tools in the structuration of the thinking behavior, meanly the language. However, these defi...

  16. Profile of middle school students on scientific literacy achievements by using scientific literacy assessments (SLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmatullah, Arif; Diana, Sariwulan; Rustaman, Nuryani Y.

    2016-02-01

    Along with the development of science and technology, the basic ability to read, write and count is not enough just to be able to survive in the modern era that surrounded by the products of science and technology. Scientific literacy is an ability that might be added as basic ability for human in the modern era. Recently, Fives et al. developed a new scientific literacy assessment for students, named as SLA (Scientific Literacy Assessment). A pilot study on the achievements of scientific literacy of middle school students in Sumedang using SLA was conducted to investigate the profile scientific literacy achievement of 223 middle school students in Sumedang, and compare the outcomes between genders (159 girls and 64 boys) and school accreditation (A and B) using a quantitative method with descriptive research-school survey. Based on the results, the average achievement of scientific literacy Sumedang middle school students is 45.21 and classified as the low category. The five components of scientific literacy, which is only one component in the medium category, namely science motivation and beliefs, and the four other components are in the low and very low category. Boys have higher scientific literacy, but the differences not statistically significant. Student's scientific literacy in an accredited school is higher than B, and the differences are statistically significant. Recommendation for further are: involve more research subjects, add more number of questions for each indicator, and conduct an independent research for each component.

  17. Er Rousseau moderne?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Søren

    1985-01-01

    Artiklen analyserer på hvilken måde Rousseau kan siges at være moderne, og den diskuterer på hvilken måde Rouseau har været medvirkende til at opbygge den moderne civilisation, og på hvilken måde han var kritisk i forhold til den gryende og moderne kapitalisme.......Artiklen analyserer på hvilken måde Rousseau kan siges at være moderne, og den diskuterer på hvilken måde Rouseau har været medvirkende til at opbygge den moderne civilisation, og på hvilken måde han var kritisk i forhold til den gryende og moderne kapitalisme....

  18. Late-Modern Symbolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjørn Schiermer

    2015-01-01

    Through analysis of key texts, I seek to demonstrate the explanative potential of Durkheim’s sociology of religion in the present context. I critically readdress the idea, found in his early work, that modernity is characterized by a rupture with pre-modern forms of solidarity. First, I investigate...... the ways in which Durkheim sets up a stark distinction between the pre-modern and the modern in his early work, and how this distinction is further cemented by his orthodox critique of the modern economy and its negative effects on social life. Second, I show how another timeless and positive understanding...... of “mechanical” solidarity is to be found behind the “symbolist” template crystalizing in Durkheim’s late work. Third, I develop this template for a modern context by critically addressing and removing other obstacles and prejudices on Durkheim’s part....

  19. Questions of Modern Cosmology Galileo's Legacy

    CERN Document Server

    D'Onofrio, Mauro

    2009-01-01

    Are we living in the "golden age" of cosmology? Are we close to understanding the nature of the unknown ingredients of the currently most accepted cosmological model and the physics of the early Universe? Or are we instead approaching a paradigm shift? What is dark matter and does it exist? How is it distributed around galaxies and clusters? Is the scientific community open to alternative ideas that may prompt a new scientific revolution - as the Copernican revolution did in Galileo's time? Do other types of supernovae exist that can be of interest for cosmology? Why have quasars never been effectively used as standard candles? Can you tell us about the scientific adventure of COBE? How does the extraction of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy depend on the subtraction of the various astrophysical foregrounds? These, among many others, are the astrophysical, philosophical and sociological questions surrounding modern cosmology and the scientific community that Mauro D'Onofrio and Carlo Burigana pose t...

  20. Functional System of Creative Thinking

    OpenAIRE

    Kotsan, Ihor Ya.; Kozachuk, Nataliia O.; Kachynska, Tetiana V.; Shvarts, Liudmyla O.; Poruchynskyi, Andrii I.; Dmytrotsa, Olena R.; Abramchuk, Olha M.; Zhuravlov, Oleksandr A.; Poruchynska, Tetiana F.; Коцан, Ігор Ярославович; Козачук, Наталія Олександрівна; Качинська, Тетяна Володимирівна; Шварц, Людмила Олексіївна; Поручинський, Андрій Іванович; Дмитроца, Олена Романівна

    2016-01-01

    In the article on the basis of electroencephalographic and psychological indicators the concept the mechanism of creative thinking was formulated. Creative thinking as a process involves operating images and searching similar tasks in memory (mental representations). High result in creative thinking is possible under the condition of high decision-making and low level of critical-controlling program.

  1. How Critical Is Critical Thinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Ryan D.

    2014-01-01

    Recent educational discourse is full of references to the value of critical thinking as a 21st-century skill. In music education, critical thinking has been discussed in relation to problem solving and music listening, and some researchers suggest that training in critical thinking can improve students' responses to music. But what exactly is…

  2. Lateral Thinking and Technology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waks, Shlomo

    1997-01-01

    Presents an analysis of technology education and its relevance to lateral thinking. Discusses prospects for utilizing technology education as a platform and a contextual domain for nurturing lateral thinking. Argues that technology education is an appropriate environment for developing complementary incorporation of vertical and lateral thinking.…

  3. Traditional Literacy and Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Priscille

    2016-01-01

    How school librarians focus on activating critical thinking through traditional literacy development can proactively set the stage for the deep thinking that occurs in all literacy development. The critical-thinking skills students build while becoming accomplished readers and writers provide the foundation for learning in a variety of…

  4. Developing Historical Thinking through Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viator, Martha Graham

    2012-01-01

    The social studies classroom can and should be a place where students learn critical thinking skills, but too often, especially in the middle grades, students are asked to focus on discrete facts on which they can be tested. The purpose of this article is to suggest that sixth graders can learn the critical thinking skills of "historical thinking"…

  5. Bases for conceptualisation of the notion of expert thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjaić Zora

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Institute of Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade This paper presents the bases for conceptualisation of the notion of expert thinking: the key concepts from the L.S. Vygotsky's theory and modern theories of giftedness, as well as empirical findings about the differences in achievement of gifted students from different academic study groups. We first present the conceptual core of the notion of expert thinking, i.e. the concept of artificial development from the sociocultural-historical theory of Vygotsky. Then we proceed to the bases which refer to relevant theoretical discussions and empirical findings about the development of giftedness and expertise, indicating that the phenomena of giftedness and expert thinking can be considered as general developmental psychological problems and in the context of general cognitive development and thinking. Special part refers to empirical data about differences in achievement in psychological tests by the most successful intellectually gifted students from various academic study groups. The paper also includes the working definition of expert thinking, which is defined as thinking of higher order, developed under the influence of culture and systematic education, in the course of which deep knowledge structures are acquired, enabling performance of specific patterns of intellectual operations which depend on particular epistemological nature of individual knowledge domains.

  6. Designers' Cognitive Thinking Based on Evolutionary Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Shutao; Jianning Su; Chibing Hu; Peng Wang

    2013-01-01

    The research on cognitive thinking is important to construct the efficient intelligent design systems. But it is difficult to describe the model of cognitive thinking with reasonable mathematical theory. Based on the analysis of design strategy and innovative thinking, we investigated the design cognitive thinking model that included the external guide thinking of "width priority - depth priority" and the internal dominated thinking of "divergent thinking - convergent thinking", built a reaso...

  7. The Emergence of a Modern City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steiner, Henriette

    , literature, and visual culture - to do so. The book argues that Copenhagen emerged as a modern city at this time, despite the fact that the Golden Age never witnessed the appearance of the main characteristics of the modernisation of cities associated with industrialisation, such as street lighting, sewer...... systems, and railroads. The book outlines the historical and topographical context of Copenhagen in the Golden Age with a special focus on the works of the most prominent architect of the period, C.F. Hansen. The characterisation of the city is complemented by investigations into writings of three...... when the city began to take on characteristics of ambiguity and alienation in European thinking, while at the same time the city itself retained some pre-modern motifs of a symbolic order. This transformation is set in a larger process of cultural re-orientation, from traditional Baroque culture...

  8. Homosexuality in ancient and modern Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Gwan; Hahn, Sook-Ja

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines Korean views on the subject of male homosexuality. Using historical and contemporary sources, it seeks to explain elements of new cultural openness towards homosexuality in modern Korea. Korean people's understanding and knowledge of male homosexuality is ambiguous and limited. In the absence of knowledge and open communication, most Korean people imagine that male homosexuality is an abnormal and impure modern phenomenon. Prejudice and confusion lead most Korean male homosexuals to be estranged from their families, religious communities and non-homosexual peers. Moreover, they are often viewed as the 'carriers' of AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs). The purpose of this paper is to examine current Korean perspectives on male homosexuality by exploring both the ancient history of the practice of male homosexuality and current thinking about homosexual life among Koreans, which has played an important part in the formation of contemporary attitudes toward homosexuality.

  9. Redesigning a General Education Science Course to Promote Critical Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Matthew P; Gillespie, B Marcus; Harris, Kevin R; Koether, Steven D; Shannon, Li-Jen Y; Rose, Lori A

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies question the effectiveness of a traditional university curriculum in helping students improve their critical thinking and scientific literacy. We developed an introductory, general education (gen ed) science course to overcome both deficiencies. The course, titled Foundations of Science, differs from most gen ed science offerings in that it is interdisciplinary; emphasizes the nature of science along with, rather than primarily, the findings of science; incorporates case studies, such as the vaccine-autism controversy; teaches the basics of argumentation and logical fallacies; contrasts science with pseudoscience; and addresses psychological factors that might otherwise lead students to reject scientific ideas they find uncomfortable. Using a pretest versus posttest design, we show that students who completed the experimental course significantly improved their critical-thinking skills and were more willing to engage scientific theories the general public finds controversial (e.g., evolution), while students who completed a traditional gen ed science course did not. Our results demonstrate that a gen ed science course emphasizing the process and application of science rather than just scientific facts can lead to improved critical thinking and scientific literacy.

  10. Productions, modern (Scandinavia)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lech, Marcel Lysgaard

    2017-01-01

    Greek comedy has never been as popular on the modern Scandinavian scene as Greek tragedy, but one play stands out among them all as a modern classic, Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, which has inspired many adaptations not only on the stage, but also in radio and cinema.......Greek comedy has never been as popular on the modern Scandinavian scene as Greek tragedy, but one play stands out among them all as a modern classic, Aristophanes’ Lysistrata, which has inspired many adaptations not only on the stage, but also in radio and cinema....

  11. Nuclear weapons modernizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristensen, Hans M. [Federation of American Scientists, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-05-09

    This article reviews the nuclear weapons modernization programs underway in the world's nine nuclear weapons states. It concludes that despite significant reductions in overall weapons inventories since the end of the Cold War, the pace of reductions is slowing - four of the nuclear weapons states are even increasing their arsenals, and all the nuclear weapons states are busy modernizing their remaining arsenals in what appears to be a dynamic and counterproductive nuclear competition. The author questions whether perpetual modernization combined with no specific plan for the elimination of nuclear weapons is consistent with the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and concludes that new limits on nuclear modernizations are needed.

  12. Indonesia - Procurement Modernization Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The evaluation seeks to establish evidence on the possible effects of an intervention designed to modernize public procurement: effects on cost savings, performance...

  13. Xi Jinping’s Governance Thinking Is the Theoretical Basis of the New Think Tanks in China%习近平治国理政思想是新型智库建设的指针

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李刚; 丁炫凯

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/signiifcance]The realization of strengthening the construction of new think tanks with Chinese characteristics, the establishment and improvement of the decision-consultation system desiderate the guidance of solid theory and methodology.[Method/process] The construction of new think tanks with Chinese characteristics is a national strategy made by the Party Central Committee, and Xi Jinping’s governing thinking is the guideline of this movement. We should stick to the leadership of the party to make space for the standardized and orderly discussion over the public policy and attach great importance to the construction of professional think tanks while keeping in mind that “constant dripping wears away a stone”. We should improve the strategic thinking, creative thinking, dialectical thinking and the ability of bottom-line thinking. We are supposed to adhere to the good tradition--doing the research and make full use of the theory and method that are scientific in the modern society to form a research paradigm of the public policy with Chinese characteristics.[Result/conclusion] Only guided by Xi Jinping’s ideas of governing the country together with building theoretical discourses, thoughts and the working method system, can the construction of new think tanks with Chinese characteristics be completed as a new think tank system that can be trusted and depended on.%[目的/意义]加强中国特色新型智库建设,建立健全决策咨询制度,亟需坚实的理论和方法论作为指导。[方法/过程]建设中国特色新型智库是党中央的一项战略部署,其理论基础来源于习近平总书记的治国理政思想:坚持党的领导,形成规范有序的公共政策讨论空间;重视专业化智库建设,发扬滴水穿石精神;提高智库战略思维、创新思维、辩证思维、底线思维能力;坚持调查研究的优良传统,充分运用现代社会科学的理论与方法,形成中国特色的

  14. Scientific papers: A new paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, George C.

    The problem of how to organize and write a scientific paper is a very basic one for most of us. A scientific paper is, after all, the only tangible product of a research scientist and, like all products, will be a failure if not marketed properly to reach its potential buyers. I think that a lack of attention to this “marketing and sales” aspect of research is a serious fault in our community, by which I mean those of us who publish in AGU journals.The potential audience for a scientific paper can be divided roughly into three distinct categories. The first group is usually rather small in number, consisting of fellow scientists working in a very closely related field, and to whom the details of the work are of major importance. The second group is also fellow scientists, but their interest is less sharply focused, and they are concerned with the broad outlines of the work and essential results. The third group is the sponsors and the people who actually pay for the work, whose interest in the details is minimal and they, sadly enough, are often concerned only with the fact that a paper has been published rather than its content.

  15. Teaching Critical Thinking through a course on Science and Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, H. L.; Jordan, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    The relationship between science and religion is, according to the public debate, rather stormy. It doesn't have to be this way. Since 1998, an astronomer (Shipman) and a philosopher (Jordan) have team-taught a course with a more constructive approach. This course has a recognized role in the University's General Education program and in the philosophy major. As overall course goals, we hope that our students will be able to: - exhibit critical thinking skills in being able to tell the difference between good arguments and bad arguments in this area - recognize that the relationship between science and religion is not necessarily an antagonistic one. We accomplish these goals by focusing the course on four major issues, namely: - Does Big Bang Cosmology leave room for a Creator? - Can a rational person believe in miracle reports? - In the light of modern science, what does it mean to be human? - Can a theist, someone who believes in God, rationally accept the scientific theory of biological evolution? We have evidence in the course to evaluate student progress towards our goals. Student responses to a pre- and post-testing methodology, where they responded to the same assignment at the beginning and at the end of the course, were classified as seeing the relationship between science and religion as confrontational, distinct, convergent, or transitional between distinct and convergent. Preliminary analysis of the student responses shows a significant shift away from a confrontational position and towards a more convergent position. The development of this course was supported by the John Templeton Foundation's Science and Religion course program. H.L.S.'s scholarly work integrating science research and science education research is supported by the National Science Foundation's Distinguished Teaching Scholars Program. DUE-0306557),

  16. 论中国传统道德智慧对现代生命伦理的积极价值∗%Discussion on the Modern Significance of Moral Wisdom of Chinese Traditional Philosophy to Carry Forward the Lofty Life Ethics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张周志

    2016-01-01

    医学认知和实践,面对人的生命存在的特殊客体,不仅需要主客关系的科学理性思维,更需要主体际性的伦理思维,尤其需要道德意识的自觉,重视德性伦理对于规范伦理的滋润。中国传统道德智慧,擅长于用你我关系的德性伦理进行换位思维,这一思想智慧,对于丰富完善规范伦理、构建现代生命伦理价值体系等,均具有十分重要的价值。%Faced with the special object of the existence of human life, medical cognition and practice not only need the scientific and rational thinking of the relation between subject and object, but also need the ethical think-ing of inter subjectivity, especially moral self-consciousness. It should pay attention to the effect of virtue ethics on the normative ethics. Chinese traditional moral wisdom is good at trans-positional thinking using virtue ethics of the relationship between "you" and "me". This thinking wisdom is value to enriching, perfecting the normative ethics, constructing modern life ethics value system, and so on.

  17. Load Balancing Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearce, Olga Tkachyshyn [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The largest supercomputers have millions of independent processors, and concurrency levels are rapidly increasing. For ideal efficiency, developers of the simulations that run on these machines must ensure that computational work is evenly balanced among processors. Assigning work evenly is challenging because many large modern parallel codes simulate behavior of physical systems that evolve over time, and their workloads change over time. Furthermore, the cost of imbalanced load increases with scale because most large-scale scientific simulations today use a Single Program Multiple Data (SPMD) parallel programming model, and an increasing number of processors will wait for the slowest one at the synchronization points. To address load imbalance, many large-scale parallel applications use dynamic load balance algorithms to redistribute work evenly. The research objective of this dissertation is to develop methods to decide when and how to load balance the application, and to balance it effectively and affordably. We measure and evaluate the computational load of the application, and develop strategies to decide when and how to correct the imbalance. Depending on the simulation, a fast, local load balance algorithm may be suitable, or a more sophisticated and expensive algorithm may be required. We developed a model for comparison of load balance algorithms for a specific state of the simulation that enables the selection of a balancing algorithm that will minimize overall runtime.

  18. Do We Need a Scientific Revolution?

    CERN Document Server

    Maxwell, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    Many see modern science as having serious defects, intellectual, social, moral. Few see this as having anything to do with the philosophy of science. I argue that many diverse ills of modern science are a consequence of the fact that the scientific community has long accepted, and sought to implement, a bad philosophy of science, which I call standard empiricism. This holds that the basic intellectual aim is truth, the basic method being impartial assessment of claims to knowledge with respect to evidence. Standard empiricism is, however, untenable. Furthermore, the attempt to put it into scientific practice has many damaging consequences for science. The scientific community urgently needs to bring about a revolution in both the conception of science, and science itself. It needs to be acknowledged that the actual aims of science make metaphysical, value and political assumptions and are, as a result, deeply problematic. Science needs to try to improve its aims and methods as it proceeds. Standard empiricism...

  19. Methods of Scientific Research: Teaching Scientific Creativity at Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Dennis; Ford, K. E. Saavik

    2016-01-01

    We present a scaling-up plan for AstroComNYC's Methods of Scientific Research (MSR), a course designed to improve undergraduate students' understanding of science practices. The course format and goals, notably the open-ended, hands-on, investigative nature of the curriculum are reviewed. We discuss how the course's interactive pedagogical techniques empower students to learn creativity within the context of experimental design and control of variables thinking. To date the course has been offered to a limited numbers of students in specific programs. The goals of broadly implementing MSR is to reach more students and early in their education—with the specific purpose of supporting and improving retention of students pursuing STEM careers. However, we also discuss challenges in preserving the effectiveness of the teaching and learning experience at scale.

  20. Development as modernity, modernity as development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lushaba, L.S.

    2006-01-01

    Albeit the divergences on the debate about development in Africa, it is indubitable that the continent remains underdeveloped after five decades of development efforts. To understand this impasse, it is necessary to trace Africa's encounter with Europe to the period of early modernity. This paper