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Sample records for moderate brain hypoxia

  1. Selective vulnerability in brain hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervos-Navarro, J.; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    1991-01-01

    Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis......Neuropathology, selective vulnerability, brain hypoxia, vascular factors, excitotoxicity, ion homeostasis...

  2. Gray matter blood flow change is unevenly distributed during moderate isocapnic hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binks, Andrew P; Cunningham, Vincent J; Adams, Lewis; Banzett, Robert B

    2008-01-01

    Hypoxia increases cerebral blood flow (CBF), but it is unknown whether this increase is uniform across all brain regions. We used H(2)(15)O positron emission tomography imaging to measure absolute blood flow in 50 regions of interest across the human brain (n = 5) during normoxia and moderate hypoxia. Pco(2) was kept constant ( approximately 44 Torr) throughout the study to avoid decreases in CBF associated with the hypocapnia that normally occurs with hypoxia. Breathing was controlled by mechanical ventilation. During hypoxia (inspired Po(2) = 70 Torr), mean end-tidal Po(2) fell to 45 +/- 6.3 Torr (means +/- SD). Mean global CBF increased from normoxic levels of 0.39 +/- 0.13 to 0.45 +/- 0.13 ml/g during hypoxia. Increases in regional CBF were not uniform and ranged from 9.9 +/- 8.6% in the occipital lobe to 28.9 +/- 10.3% in the nucleus accumbens. Regions of interest that were better perfused during normoxia generally showed a greater regional CBF response. Phylogenetically older regions of the brain tended to show larger vascular responses to hypoxia than evolutionary younger regions, e.g., the putamen, brain stem, thalamus, caudate nucleus, nucleus accumbens, and pallidum received greater than average increases in blood flow, while cortical regions generally received below average increases. The heterogeneous blood flow distribution during hypoxia may serve to protect regions of the brain with essential homeostatic roles. This may be relevant to conditions such as altitude, breath-hold diving, and obstructive sleep apnea, and may have implications for functional brain imaging studies that involve hypoxia.

  3. Cognitive Deterioration in Moderate and Severe Hypobaric Hypoxia Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Jeremy M A; Shender, Barry S; Chauvin, Daren; Dart, Todd S; Fischer, Joseph

    2017-07-01

    Hypoxia continues to present risks in military aviation. Hypoxia symptoms include sensory and cognitive effects; of these, it is important to identify which components of operator performance are most vulnerable to hypoxia-induced decline in order to determine which sensory modality is most effective for alerting an impaired aviator of an imminent hypoxic episode. A study was performed in a hypobaric chamber to characterize deterioration of cognitive performance under moderate (MH) and severe (SH) hypoxia conditions, culminating in subjects' inability to perform tasks. Subjects operated a synthetic workstation, performing multiple simultaneous tasks during hypobaric exposures equivalent to 5486 m (18,000 ft) MH and 7620 m (25,000 ft) SH ascents. Performance was compared across baseline, altitude exposure, and recovery periods within MH vs. SH altitude profiles. Ascents lasted until at least one of a list of termination criteria was met, at which point the chamber was returned to ground level pressure and the subject resumed workstation performance during recovery. SH conditions generated greater deficits than MH conditions, and these more severe effects hastened the termination of exposures (5 vs. 18 min mean duration, respectively). Workstation performance collapsed rapidly on SH exposure, with Mathematics and Auditory Monitoring tasks proving vulnerable to breakdown. In MH exposures, these tasks exhibited impaired accuracy (declining 11% and 9%, respectively) and speed, with declines in Auditory Monitoring lingering into recovery. The relative robustness of memory and visual monitoring vs. the vulnerability of mathematical and auditory processing suggest that care should be taken designing purely auditory cockpit hypoxia warning alerts.Beer JMA, Shender BS, Chauvin D, Dart TS, Fischer J. Cognitive deterioration in moderate and severe hypobaric hypoxia conditions. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(7):617-626.

  4. Postconditioning with repeated mild hypoxia protects neonatal hypoxia-ischemic rats against brain damage and promotes rehabilitation of brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qingqing; Chang, Yanqun; Cheng, Xiaomao; Luo, Xingang; Zhang, Jing; Tang, Xiaoyuan

    2018-02-06

    Mild hypoxia conditioning induced by repeated episodes of transient ischemia is a clinically applicable method for protecting the brain against injury after hypoxia-ischemic brain damage. To assess the effect of repeated mild hypoxia postconditioning on brain damage and long-term neural functional recovery after hypoxia-ischemic brain damage. Rats received different protocols of repeated mild hypoxia postconditioning. Seven-day-old rats with hypoxia ischemic brain damage (HIBD) from the left carotid ligation procedure plus 2 h hypoxic stress (8% O 2 at 37 °C) were further receiving repeated mild hypoxia intermittently. The gross anatomy, functional analyses, hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1a) expression, and neuronal apoptosis of the rat brains were subsequently examined. Compared to the HIBD group, rats postconditioned with mild hypoxia had elevated HIF-1a expression, more Nissl-stain positive cells in their brain tissue and their brains functioned better in behavioral analyses. The recovery of the brain function may be directly linked to the inhibitory effect of HIF-1α on neuronal apoptosis. Furthermore, there were significantly less neuronal apoptosis in the hippocampal CA1 region of the rats postconditioned with mild hypoxia, which might also be related to the higher HIF-1a expression and better brain performance. Overall, these results suggested that postconditioning of neonatal rats after HIBD with mild hypoxia increased HIF-1a expression, exerted a neuroprotective effect and promoted neural functional recovery. Repeated mild hypoxia postconditioning protects neonatal rats with HIBD against brain damage and improves neural functional recovery. Our results may have clinical implications for treating infants with HIBD. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of Acute Exposure to Moderate Altitude on Muscle Power: Hypobaric Hypoxia vs. Normobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch- Góngora, Juan G.; Galilea, Pedro A.; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest Pmean obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to Pmax (∼3%) and maximal strength (1RM) (∼6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (Pbarbell displacement velocity (P<0.001). No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press. PMID:25474104

  6. Effect of acute exposure to moderate altitude on muscle power: hypobaric hypoxia vs. normobaric hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Feriche

    Full Text Available When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17 in conditions of normoxia (N1 and hypobaric hypoxia (HH and G2 (n = 11 in conditions of normoxia (N2 and normobaric hypoxia (NH. Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax was recorded as the highest P(mean obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to P(max (∼ 3% and maximal strength (1 RM (∼ 6% in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (P<0.05. We also observed a stimulating effect of natural hypoxia on P(mean and P(peak in the middle-high part of the curve (≥ 60 kg; P<0.01 and a 7.8% mean increase in barbell displacement velocity (P<0.001. No changes in any of the variables examined were observed in G2. According to these data, we can state that acute exposure to natural moderate altitude as opposed to simulated normobaric hypoxia leads to gains in 1 RM, movement velocity and power during the execution of a force-velocity curve in bench press.

  7. The Consequences of Subsequent Exposures of Mild and Moderate Hypoxia on the Flight Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-15

    Although the deficits associated with mild hypoxia are relatively minor, even subtle impairments in vision, procedural execution, reasoning, or memory ...Raman, A., Schlader, Z., & Mundel, T. (2014). Effect of Mild Hypoxia on Working Memory , Complex Logical Reasoning, and Risk Judgment. The...Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton THE CONSEQUENCES OF SUBSEQUENT EXPOSURES OF MILD AND MODERATE HYPOXIA ON THE FLIGHT PROFILE

  8. Effects of Acute Systemic Hypoxia and Hypercapnia on Brain Damage in a Rat Model of Hypoxia-Ischemia.

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    Wanchao Yang

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypercapnia has the potential for neuroprotection after global cerebral ischemia. Here we further investigated the effects of different degrees of acute systemic hypoxia in combination with hypercapnia on brain damage in a rat model of hypoxia and ischemia. Adult wistar rats underwent unilateral common carotid artery (CCA ligation for 60 min followed by ventilation with normoxic or systemic hypoxic gas containing 11%O2,13%O2,15%O2 and 18%O2 (targeted to PaO2 30-39 mmHg, 40-49 mmHg, 50-59 mmHg, and 60-69 mmHg, respectively or systemic hypoxic gas containing 8% carbon dioxide (targeted to PaCO2 60-80 mmHg for 180 min. The mean artery pressure (MAP, blood gas, and cerebral blood flow (CBF were evaluated. The cortical vascular permeability and brain edema were examined. The ipsilateral cortex damage and the percentage of hippocampal apoptotic neurons were evaluated by Nissl staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL assay as well as flow cytometry, respectively. Immunofluorescence and western blotting were performed to determine aquaporin-4 (AQP4 expression. In rats treated with severe hypoxia (PaO2 50 mmHg, hypercapnia protected against these pathophysiological changes. Moreover, hypercapnia treatment significantly reduced brain damage in the ischemic ipsilateral cortex and decreased the percentage of apoptotic neurons in the hippocampus after the CCA ligated rats were exposed to mild or moderate hypoxemia (PaO2 > 50 mmHg; especially under mild hypoxemia (PaO2 > 60 mmHg, hypercapnia significantly attenuated the expression of AQP4 protein with brain edema (p < 0.05. Hypercapnia exerts beneficial effects under mild to moderate hypoxemia and augments detrimental effects under severe hypoxemia on brain damage in a rat model of hypoxia-ischemia.

  9. Extreme hypoxia tolerance of naked mole-rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, John; Park, Thomas J

    2009-12-09

    Mammalian brains have extremely high levels of aerobic metabolism and typically suffer irreversible damage after brief periods of oxygen deprivation such as occur during stroke or cardiac arrest. Here we report that brain tissue from naked mole-rats, rodents that live in a chronically low-oxygen environment, is remarkably resistant to hypoxia: naked mole-rat neurons maintain synaptic transmission much longer than mouse neurons and can recover from periods of anoxia exceeding 30 min. We suggest that brain tolerance to hypoxia may result from slowed or arrested brain development in these extremely long-lived animals.

  10. Brain adaptation to hypoxia and hyperoxia in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Terraneo, L.; Paroni, R.; Bianciardi, P.; Giallongo, T.; Carelli, S.; Gorio, A.; Samaja, M.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: Hyperoxic breathing might lead to redox imbalance and signaling changes that affect cerebral function. Paradoxically, hypoxic breathing is also believed to cause oxidative stress. Our aim is to dissect the cerebral tissue responses to altered O2 fractions in breathed air by assessing the redox imbalance and the recruitment of the hypoxia signaling pathways. Results: Mice were exposed to mild hypoxia (10%O2), normoxia (21%O2) or mild hyperoxia (30%O2) for 28 days, sacrificed and brain...

  11. Does moderate hypoxia alter working memory and executive function during prolonged exercise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Takaaki; Sudo, Mizuki; Higaki, Yasuki; Kiyonaga, Akira; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Ando, Soichi

    2015-02-01

    It has been suggested that acute exercise improves cognitive function. However, little is known about how exercise under hypoxia affects cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to determine if hypoxia alters working memory and executive function during prolonged exercise. Sixteen participants performed cognitive tasks at rest and during exercise under normoxia and hypoxia [fraction of inspired oxygen (FIO2)=0.15, corresponding to an altitude of approximately 2600 m]. The level of hypoxia was moderate. We used a combination of Spatial Delayed Response (Spatial DR) task and Go/No-Go (GNG) task, where spatial working memory and executive function are required. Working memory was assessed by the accuracy of the Spatial DR task, and executive function was assessed by the accuracy and reaction time in the GNG task. The participants cycled an ergometer for 30 min under normoxia and moderate hypoxia while keeping their heart rate (HR) at 140 beats/min. They performed the cognitive tasks 5 min and 23 min after their HR reached 140 beats/min. Moderate hypoxia did not alter the accuracy of the Spatial DR (P=0.38) and GNG tasks (P=0.14). In contrast, reaction time in the GNG task significantly decreased during exercise relative to rest under normoxia and moderate hypoxia (P=0.02). These results suggest that moderate hypoxia and resultant biological processes did not provide sufficient stress to impair working memory and executive function during prolonged exercise. The beneficial effects on speed of response appear to persist during prolonged exercise under moderate hypoxia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The Impact of Combined Prehospital Hypotension and Hypoxia on Mortality in Major Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Spaite, Daniel W.; Hu, Chengcheng; Bobrow, Bentley J.; Chikani, Vatsal; Barnhart, Bruce; Gaither, Joshua B.; Denninghoff, Kurt R.; Adelson, P. David; Keim, Samuel M.; Viscusi, Chad; Mullins, Terry; Sherrill, Duane

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Survival is significantly reduced by either hypotension or hypoxia during the prehospital management of major traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, only a handful of small studies have investigated the influence of the combination of both hypotension and hypoxia occurring together. Objective: In patients with major TBI, we evaluated the associations between mortality and prehospital hypotension and hypoxia, both separately and in combination. METHODS All moderate/severe TBI cases in the pre-implementation cohort of the Excellence in Prehospital Injury Care (EPIC) Study (a statewide, before/after, controlled study of the impact of implementing the prehospital TBI treatment guidelines) from 1/1/07–3/31/14 were evaluated [exclusions: age200mmHg]. The relationship between mortality and hypotension (SBP controlling for Injury Severity Score, head region severity, injury type (blunt versus penetrating), age, sex, race, ethnicity, payer, inter-hospital transfer, and trauma center. RESULTS Among the 13,151 cases that met inclusion criteria [Median age: 45; Male: 68.6%], 11,545 (87.8%) had neither hypotension nor hypoxia, 604 (4.6%) had hypotension only, 790 (6.0%) had hypoxia only, and 212 (1.6%) had both hypotension and hypoxia. Mortality for the four study cohorts was 5.6%, 20.7%, 28.1%, and 43.9%, respectively. The crude and adjusted odds ratios (cOR/aOR) for death within the cohorts, utilizing the patients with neither hypotension nor hypoxia as the reference, were 4.4/2.5, 6.6/3.0, and 13.2/6.1, respectively. Evaluation for an interaction between hypotension and hypoxia revealed that the effects are additive on the log odds of death. CONCLUSION In this statewide analysis of major TBI, combined prehospital hypotension/hypoxia were associated with dramatically increased mortality. This effect on survival persisted even after controlling for multiple potential confounders. In fact, the adjusted odds of death in patients with both hypotension and hypoxia was

  13. Increased susceptibility of dystrophin-deficient brain to mild hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallis, T.; Rae, C.; Bubb, W.A.; Head, S.I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked disorder resulting from total absence of the 427 kDa protein dystrophin. Dystrophin is normally expressed in the brain mainly in a neuronal subpopulation: cortical pyramidal cells, hippocampal CA1 neurons and cerebellar Purkinje cells. One suggested role for dystrophin is in colocalising mitochondrial creatine kinase with ADP translocase and ATP synthase in mitochondria. Brain tissue slices in the murine model of Duchenne dystrophy, the mdx mouse, have been shown to be more sensitive to hypoxia than control. In this work, we used 13 C NMR to monitor the metabolic response of mdx cortical brain tissue slices to normoxia (95%O 2 /5% CO 2 ) and mild hypoxia (95%air/5% CO 2 ). Under normoxic conditions, mdx cortical slices displayed increased net flux through the Krebs cycle and glutamate/glutamine cycle, consistent with the proposed GABA A lesion which results in decreased inhibitory input. By contrast, mild hypoxia resulted in a significant increase in the total pool size of lactate and decreased net flux of 13 C from [3- 13 C]pyruvate into glutamate C4, GABA C2 and Ala C2, as well as decreased anaplerotic activity as measured by the ratio of Asp C2: Asp C3 label. Mild hypoxia has a significantly greater effect on brain oxidative metabolism in mdx mice, than in control

  14. Brain adaptation to hypoxia and hyperoxia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terraneo, Laura; Paroni, Rita; Bianciardi, Paola; Giallongo, Toniella; Carelli, Stephana; Gorio, Alfredo; Samaja, Michele

    2017-04-01

    Hyperoxic breathing might lead to redox imbalance and signaling changes that affect cerebral function. Paradoxically, hypoxic breathing is also believed to cause oxidative stress. Our aim is to dissect the cerebral tissue responses to altered O 2 fractions in breathed air by assessing the redox imbalance and the recruitment of the hypoxia signaling pathways. Mice were exposed to mild hypoxia (10%O 2 ), normoxia (21%O 2 ) or mild hyperoxia (30%O 2 ) for 28 days, sacrificed and brain tissue excised and analyzed. Although one might expect linear responses to %O 2 , only few of the examined variables exhibited this pattern, including neuroprotective phospho- protein kinase B and the erythropoietin receptor. The major reactive oxygen species (ROS) source in brain, NADPH oxidase subunit 4 increased in hypoxia but not in hyperoxia, whereas neither affected nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of antioxidant proteins. As a result of the delicate equilibrium between ROS generation and antioxidant defense, neuron apoptosis and cerebral tissue hydroperoxides increased in both 10%O 2 and 30%O 2 , as compared with 21%O 2 . Remarkably, the expression level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α (but not HIF-1α) was higher in both 10%O 2 and 30%O 2 with respect to 21%O 2 INNOVATION: Comparing the in vivo effects driven by mild hypoxia with those driven by mild hyperoxia helps addressing whether clinically relevant situations of O 2 excess and scarcity are toxic for the organism. Prolonged mild hyperoxia leads to persistent cerebral damage, comparable to that inferred by prolonged mild hypoxia. The underlying mechanism appears related to a model whereby the imbalance between ROS generation and anti-ROS defense is similar, but occurs at higher levels in hypoxia than in hyperoxia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Regulation of human skeletal muscle perfusion and its heterogeneity during exercise in moderate hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinonen, Ilkka H; Kemppainen, Jukka; Kaskinoro, Kimmo

    2010-01-01

    Although many effects of both acute and chronic hypoxia on the circulation are well characterized, the distribution and regulation of blood flow (BF) heterogeneity in skeletal muscle during systemic hypoxia is not well understood in humans. We measured muscle BF within the thigh muscles of nine......, the results show that increased BF during one-leg exercise in moderate hypoxia is confined only to the contracting muscles, and the working muscle hyperemia appears not to be directly mediated by adenosine. Increased flow heterogeneity in noncontracting muscles likely reflects sympathetic nervous constraints...... of aminophylline. Systemic hypoxia reduced oxygen extraction of the limb but increased muscle BF, and this flow increment was confined solely to the exercising quadriceps femoris muscle. Exercising muscle BF heterogeneity was reduced from rest (P = 0.055) but was not affected by hypoxia. Adenosine receptor...

  16. Intermittent but not sustained moderate hypoxia elicits long-term facilitation of hypoglossal motor output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkerson, Julia E R; Devinney, Michael; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2017-10-23

    Phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) is a form of serotonin-dependent respiratory motor plasticity induced by moderate acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH), but not by moderate acute sustained hypoxia (ASH) of similar cumulative duration. Thus, moderate AIH-induced pLTF is sensitive to the pattern of hypoxia. On the other hand, pLTF induced by severe AIH protocols is neither pattern sensitive nor serotonin dependent (it converts to an adenosine-dependent mechanism). Although moderate AIH also induces hypoglossal LTF (hLTF), no data are available concerning its sensitivity/insensitivity to the pattern of hypoxia. Since hLTF following moderate hypoxia is serotonin-dependent, we hypothesized that hLTF is pattern-sensitive, similar to serotonin-dependent pLTF. Integrated hypoglossal nerve activity was recorded in urethane-anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed, and ventilated rats exposed to isocapnic AIH (3, 5min episodes of 11% O 2 ) or ASH (a single 25min episode of 11% O 2 ). Similar to previous studies of pLTF, hypoglossal motor output was elevated for more than 1h following AIH (50±20%, p0.05). Frequency LTF was not observed following either hypoxic exposure. Thus, in agreement with our hypothesis, hypoglossal LTF following moderate AIH is pattern-sensitive, similar to phrenic LTF. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Hypoxic Hypoxia at Moderate Altitudes: State of the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    arrhythmias resulting in cardiac arrest . Respiratory compensation in acute hypoxia Ascent to altitude occurs with a non-linear decrease in ambient...generation of respiratory rhythm are able to maintain cardiorespiratory functions during hypoxic episodes (Peña, Parkis, Tryba, & Ramirez, 2004). In

  18. The Effect of Combined Out-of-Hospital Hypotension and Hypoxia on Mortality in Major Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaite, Daniel W; Hu, Chengcheng; Bobrow, Bentley J; Chikani, Vatsal; Barnhart, Bruce; Gaither, Joshua B; Denninghoff, Kurt R; Adelson, P David; Keim, Samuel M; Viscusi, Chad; Mullins, Terry; Sherrill, Duane

    2017-01-01

    Survival is significantly reduced by either hypotension or hypoxia during the out-of-hospital management of major traumatic brain injury. However, only a handful of small studies have investigated the influence of the combination of both hypotension and hypoxia occurring together. In patients with major traumatic brain injury, we evaluate the associations between mortality and out-of-hospital hypotension and hypoxia separately and in combination. All moderate or severe traumatic brain injury cases in the preimplementation cohort of the Excellence in Prehospital Injury Care study (a statewide, before/after, controlled study of the effect of implementing the out-of-hospital traumatic brain injury treatment guidelines) from January 1, 2007, to March 31, 2014, were evaluated (exclusions: 200 mm Hg). The relationship between mortality and hypotension (systolic blood pressure controlling for Injury Severity Score, head region severity, injury type (blunt versus penetrating), age, sex, race, ethnicity, payer, interhospital transfer, and trauma center. Among the 13,151 patients who met inclusion criteria (median age 45 years; 68.6% men), 11,545 (87.8%) had neither hypotension nor hypoxia, 604 (4.6%) had hypotension only, 790 (6.0%) had hypoxia only, and 212 (1.6%) had both hypotension and hypoxia. Mortality for the 4 study cohorts was 5.6%, 20.7%, 28.1%, and 43.9%, respectively. The crude and adjusted odds ratios for death within the cohorts, using the patients with neither hypotension nor hypoxia as the reference, were 4.4 and 2.5, 6.6 and 3.0, and 13.2 and 6.1, respectively. Evaluation for an interaction between hypotension and hypoxia revealed that the effects were additive on the log odds of death. In this statewide analysis of major traumatic brain injury, combined out-of-hospital hypotension and hypoxia were associated with significantly increased mortality. This effect on survival persisted even after controlling for multiple potential confounders. In fact, the

  19. Moderate hypoxia induces β-cell dysfunction with HIF-1-independent gene expression changes.

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    Yoshifumi Sato

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β-cell failure is central to the development and progression of type 2 diabetes. We recently demonstrated that β-cells become hypoxic under high glucose conditions due to increased oxygen consumption and that the pancreatic islets of diabetic mice but not those of control mice are moderately hypoxic. However, the impact of moderate hypoxia on β-cell number and function is unknown. In the present study, moderate hypoxia induced a hypoxic response in MIN6 cells, as evidenced by increased levels of HIF-1α protein and target genes. Under these conditions, a selective downregulation of Mafa, Pdx1, Slc2a2, Ndufa5, Kcnj11, Ins1, Wfs1, Foxa2, and Neurod1, which play important roles in β-cells, was also observed in both MIN6 cells and isolated pancreatic islets. Consistent with the altered expression of these genes, abnormal insulin secretion was detected in hypoxic MIN6 cells. Most of the hypoxia-induced gene downregulation in MIN6 cells was not affected by the suppression of HIF-1α, suggesting a HIF-1-independent mechanism. Moderate hypoxia also induced apoptosis in MIN6 cells. These results suggest that hypoxia is a novel stressor of β-cells and that hypoxic stress may play a role in the deterioration of β-cell function.

  20. NO INFLUENCE OF HYPOXIA ON COORDINATION BETWEEN RESPIRATORY AND LOCOMOTOR RHYTHMS DURING ROWING AT MODERATE INTENSITY

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    Nicolas Fabre

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Besides neuro-mechanical constraints, chemical or metabolic stimuli have also been proposed to interfere with the coordination between respiratory and locomotor rhythms. In the light of the conflicting data observed in the literature, this study aimed to assess whether acute hypoxia modifies the degree of coordination between respiratory and locomotor rhythms during rowing exercises in order to investigate competitive interactions between neuro-mechanical (movement and chemical (hypoxia respiratory drives. Nine male healthy subjects performed one submaximal 6-min rowing exercise on a rowing ergometer in both normoxia (altitude: 304 m and acute hypoxia (altitude: 2877 m. The exercise intensity was about 40 % and 35 % (for normoxia and hypoxia conditions, respectively of the individual maximal power output measured during an incremental rowing test to volitional exhaustion carried out in normoxia. Metabolic rate and minute ventilation were continuously collected throughout exercise. Locomotor movement and breathing rhythms were continuously recorded and synchronized cycle-by-cycle. The degree of coordination was expressed as a percentage of breaths starting during the same phase of the locomotor cycle. For a same and a constant metabolic rate, acute hypoxia did not influence significantly the degree of coordination (mean ± SEM, normoxia: 20.0 ± 6.2 %, hypoxia: 21.3 ± 11.1 %, p > 0.05 while ventilation and breathing frequency were significantly greater in hypoxia. Our results may suggest that during rowing exercise at a moderate metabolic load, neuro-mechanical locomotion-linked respiratory stimuli appear "stronger" than peripheral chemoreceptors- linked respiratory stimuli induced by hypoxia, in the context of our study

  1. ASYMMETRY OF THE BRAIN AT ADAPTATION TO HYPOXIA

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    V. I. Portnichenko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Association between cerebral blood flow and higher nervous activity in people at different stages of adaptation to the midlands was studied. Investigation were performed before, during and after a three-week stay in the mountains at an altitude of 2100 m, as well as during short-term ups without the physical load on the height of 3900 m. In the initial period of adaptation to hypoxia desynchronization between the nerve processes in the cerebral cortex and brain blood flow was observed. There was an inversion and an increase in the asymmetry of cerebral blood flow in the direction of the dominance of the left hemisphere of the brain. After the three-week stay in the mountains asymmetry of cerebral blood flow was disappeared, blood flow to the brain was reduced, hemispheric symmetry was formed, and blood flow synchronized with the nerve processes in the cerebral cortex again was restored.

  2. Moderate hypoxia influences potassium outward currents in adipose-derived stem cells.

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    Mayuri Prasad

    Full Text Available Moderate hypoxic preconditioning of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs enhances properties such as proliferation and secretion of growth factors, representing a valuable strategy to increase the efficiency of cell-based therapies. In a wide variety of cells potassium (K+ channels are key elements involved in the cellular responses to hypoxia, suggesting that ASCs cultured under low oxygen conditions may display altered electrophysiological properties. Here, the effects of moderate hypoxic culture on proliferation, whole-cell currents, and ion channel expression were investigated using human ASCs cultured at 5% and 20% oxygen. Although cell proliferation was greatly enhanced, the dose-dependent growth inhibition by the K+ channel blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA was not significantly affected by hypoxia. Under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions, ASCs displayed outward K+ currents composed by Ca2+-activated, delayed rectifier, and transient components. Hypoxic culture reduced the slope of the current-voltage curves and caused a negative shift in the voltage activation threshold of the whole-cell currents. However, the TEA-mediated shift of voltage activation threshold was not affected by hypoxia. Semiquantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that expression of genes encoding for various ion channels subunits related to oxygen sensing and proliferation remained unchanged after hypoxic culture. In conclusion, outward currents are influenced by moderate hypoxia in ASCs through a mechanism that is not likely the result of modulation of TEA-sensitive K+ channels.

  3. Hypobaric Hypoxia Imbalances Mitochondrial Dynamics in Rat Brain Hippocampus

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    Khushbu Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain is predominantly susceptible to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction during hypobaric hypoxia, and therefore undergoes neurodegeneration due to energy crisis. Evidences illustrate a high degree of association for mitochondrial fusion/fission imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial fusion/fission is a recently reported dynamic mechanism which frequently occurs among cellular mitochondrial network. Hence, the study investigated the temporal alteration and involvement of abnormal mitochondrial dynamics (fusion/fission along with disturbed mitochondrial functionality during chronic exposure to hypobaric hypoxia (HH. The Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to simulated high altitude equivalent to 25000 ft for 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Mitochondrial morphology, distribution within neurons, enzyme activity of respiratory complexes, Δψm, ADP: ATP, and expression of fission/fusion key proteins were determined. Results demonstrated HH induced alteration in mitochondrial morphology by damaged, small mitochondria observed in neurons with disturbance of mitochondrial functionality and reduced mitochondrial density in neuronal processes manifested by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation (fission and decreased mitochondrial fusion as compared to unexposed rat brain hippocampus. The study suggested that imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics is one of the noteworthy mechanisms occurring in hippocampal neurons during HH insult.

  4. Minocycline-Suppression of Early Peripheral Inflammation Reduces Hypoxia-Induced Neonatal Brain Injury

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    Yingjun Min

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available While extensive studies report that neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI induces long-term cognitive impairment via inflammatory responses in the brain, little is known about the role of early peripheral inflammation response in HI injury. Here we used a neonatal hypoxia rodent model by subjecting postnatal day 0 (P0d rat pups to systemic hypoxia (3.5 h, a condition that is commonly seen in clinic neonates, Then, an initial dose of minocycline (45 mg/kg was injected intraperitoneally (i.p. 2 h after the hypoxia exposure ended, followed by half dosage (22.5 mg/kg minocycline treatment for next 6 consecutive days daily. Saline was injected as vehicle control. To examine how early peripheral inflammation responded to hypoxia and whether this peripheral inflammation response was associated to cognitive deficits. We found that neonatal hypoxia significantly increased leukocytes not only in blood, but also increased the monocytes in central nervous system (CNS, indicated by presence of C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2+/CD11b+CD45+ positive cells and CCR2 protein expression level. The early onset of peripheral inflammation response was followed by a late onset of brain inflammation that was demonstrated by level of cytokine IL-1β and ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1(Iba-1; activated microglial cell marker. Interrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB, hypomyelination and learning and memory deficits were seen after hypoxia. Interestingly, the cognitive function was highly correlated with hypoxia-induced leukocyte response. Notably, administration of minocycline even after the onset of hypoxia significantly suppressed leukocyte-mediated inflammation as well as brain inflammation, demonstrating neuroprotection in systemic hypoxia-induced brain damage. Our data provided new insights that systemic hypoxia induces cognitive dysfunction, which involves the leukocyte-mediated peripheral inflammation response.

  5. Minocycline-Suppression of Early Peripheral Inflammation Reduces Hypoxia-Induced Neonatal Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yingjun; Li, Hongchun; Xu, Kaiyu; Huang, Yilong; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Weizhou; Li, Longjun; Yang, Ting; Huang, Lixuan; Yang, Ling; Jiang, Hong; Wang, Qian; Zhao, Min; Hua, HaiRong; Mei, Rong; Li, Fan

    2017-01-01

    While extensive studies report that neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) induces long-term cognitive impairment via inflammatory responses in the brain, little is known about the role of early peripheral inflammation response in HI injury. Here we used a neonatal hypoxia rodent model by subjecting postnatal day 0 (P0d) rat pups to systemic hypoxia (3.5 h), a condition that is commonly seen in clinic neonates, Then, an initial dose of minocycline (45 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) 2 h after the hypoxia exposure ended, followed by half dosage (22.5 mg/kg) minocycline treatment for next 6 consecutive days daily. Saline was injected as vehicle control. To examine how early peripheral inflammation responded to hypoxia and whether this peripheral inflammation response was associated to cognitive deficits. We found that neonatal hypoxia significantly increased leukocytes not only in blood, but also increased the monocytes in central nervous system (CNS), indicated by presence of C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2+)/CD11b+CD45+ positive cells and CCR2 protein expression level. The early onset of peripheral inflammation response was followed by a late onset of brain inflammation that was demonstrated by level of cytokine IL-1β and ionized calcium binding adapter molecule 1(Iba-1; activated microglial cell marker). Interrupted blood-brain barrier (BBB), hypomyelination and learning and memory deficits were seen after hypoxia. Interestingly, the cognitive function was highly correlated with hypoxia-induced leukocyte response. Notably, administration of minocycline even after the onset of hypoxia significantly suppressed leukocyte-mediated inflammation as well as brain inflammation, demonstrating neuroprotection in systemic hypoxia-induced brain damage. Our data provided new insights that systemic hypoxia induces cognitive dysfunction, which involves the leukocyte-mediated peripheral inflammation response. PMID:28955196

  6. Comparative and Experimental Studies on the Genes Altered by Chronic Hypoxia in Human Brain Microendothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Mata-Greenwood

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background : Hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1A is a master regulator of acute hypoxia; however, with chronic hypoxia, HIF1A levels return to the normoxic levels. Importantly, the genes that are involved in the cell survival and viability under chronic hypoxia are not known. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that chronic hypoxia leads to the upregulation of a core group of genes with associated changes in the promoter DNA methylation that mediates the cell survival under hypoxia.Results : We examined the effect of chronic hypoxia (3 days; 0.5% oxygen on human brain micro endothelial cells (HBMEC viability and apoptosis. Hypoxia caused a significant reduction in cell viability and an increase in apoptosis. Next, we examined chronic hypoxia associated changes in transcriptome and genome-wide promoter methylation. The data obtained was compared with 16 other microarray studies on chronic hypoxia. Nine genes were altered in response to chronic hypoxia in all 17 studies. Interestingly, HIF1A was not altered with chronic hypoxia in any of the studies. Furthermore, we compared our data to three other studies that identified HIF-responsive genes by various approaches. Only two genes were found to be HIF dependent. We silenced each of these 9 genes using CRISPR/Cas9 system. Downregulation of EGLN3 significantly increased the cell death under chronic hypoxia, whereas downregulation of ERO1L, ENO2, adrenomedullin, and spag4 reduced the cell death under hypoxia.Conclusions : We provide a core group of genes that regulates cellular acclimatization under chronic hypoxic stress, and most of them are HIF independent.

  7. Protective effects of intermittent hypoxia on brain and memory in a mouse model of apnea of prematurity

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    Myriam eBouslama

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Apnea of prematurity (AOP is considered a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders in children based on epidemiological studies. This idea is supported by studies in newborn rodents in which exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH as a model of AOP significantly impairs development. However, the severe IH used in these studies may not fully reflect the broad spectrum of AOP severity. Considering that hypoxia appears neuroprotective under various conditions, we hypothesized that moderate IH would protect the neonatal mouse brain against behavioral stressors and brain damage. On P6, each pup in each litter was randomly assigned to one of three groups: a group exposed to IH while separated from the mother (IH group, a control group exposed to normoxia while separated from the mother (AIR group, and a group of untreated unmanipulated pups left continuously with their mother until weaning (UNT group. Exposure to moderate IH consisted of 20 hypoxic events/hour, 6 hours per day from postnatal day 6 (P6 to P10. The stress generated by maternal separation in newborn rodents is known to impair brain development, and we expected this effect to be smaller in the IH group compared to the AIR group. In a separate experiment, we combined maternal separation with excitotoxic brain lesions mimicking those seen in preterm infants. We analyzed memory, angiogenesis, neurogenesis and brain lesion size. In non-lesioned mice, IH stimulated hippocampal angiogenesis and neurogenesis and improved short-term memory indices. In brain-lesioned mice, IH decreased lesion size and prevented memory impairments. Contrary to common perception, IH mimicking moderate apnea may offer neuroprotection, at least in part, against brain lesions and cognitive dysfunctions related to prematurity. AOP may therefore have beneficial effects in some preterm infants. These results support the need for stratification based on AOP severity in clinical trials of treatments for AOP, to determine

  8. Protective effects of intermittent hypoxia on brain and memory in a mouse model of apnea of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouslama, Myriam; Adla-Biassette, Homa; Ramanantsoa, Nelina; Bourgeois, Thomas; Bollen, Bieke; Brissaud, Olivier; Matrot, Boris; Gressens, Pierre; Gallego, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Apnea of prematurity (AOP) is considered a risk factor for neurodevelopmental disorders in children based on epidemiological studies. This idea is supported by studies in newborn rodents in which exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH) as a model of AOP significantly impairs development. However, the severe IH used in these studies may not fully reflect the broad spectrum of AOP severity. Considering that hypoxia appears neuroprotective under various conditions, we hypothesized that moderate IH would protect the neonatal mouse brain against behavioral stressors and brain damage. On P6, each pup in each litter was randomly assigned to one of three groups: a group exposed to IH while separated from the mother (IH group), a control group exposed to normoxia while separated from the mother (AIR group), and a group of untreated unmanipulated pups left continuously with their mother until weaning (UNT group). Exposure to moderate IH (8% O2) consisted of 20 hypoxic events/hour, 6 h per day from postnatal day 6 (P6) to P10. The stress generated by maternal separation in newborn rodents is known to impair brain development, and we expected this effect to be smaller in the IH group compared to the AIR group. In a separate experiment, we combined maternal separation with excitotoxic brain lesions mimicking those seen in preterm infants. We analyzed memory, angiogenesis, neurogenesis and brain lesion size. In non-lesioned mice, IH stimulated hippocampal angiogenesis and neurogenesis and improved short-term memory indices. In brain-lesioned mice, IH decreased lesion size and prevented memory impairments. Contrary to common perception, IH mimicking moderate apnea may offer neuroprotection, at least in part, against brain lesions and cognitive dysfunctions related to prematurity. AOP may therefore have beneficial effects in some preterm infants. These results support the need for stratification based on AOP severity in clinical trials of treatments for AOP, to determine whether in

  9. Neurogenesis Recovery Induced by Granulocyte-colony Stimulating Factor in Neonatal Rat Brain After Perinatal Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Ning Yang

    2013-12-01

    Conclusion: This study suggests that G-CSF may be a potentially beneficial therapy, at least in part, through universal recovery of neurogenesis effects in the neonatal brain after perinatal hypoxia insult.

  10. Hypoxia in deep waters of moderately eutrophic marine lakes, Island of Mljet, eastern Adriatic Sea

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    Enis Hrustić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we explored the impact of eutrophication and stratification on hypoxia in deep waters of moderately warm Croatian marine lakes. Although the Mljet Lakes (MLs are predominantly oligotrophic, mesotrophic conditions are present at depths below 20 m in the Small Lake (SL and below 30 m in the Big Lake (BL, along with higher apparent oxygen utilization (AOU. Hypoxia at depths ≥ 25 m in SL and and ≥ 40 m in BL was observed between October 2009 and January 2010, and in SL in summer (July and September 2010. Significant differences (p 0.05 between the lakes. An intense and persistent pycnocline throughout the year, comparatively high water temperature, extended water renewal time and summer phytoplankton bloom were identified as physical and biological parameters which might have significantly contributed to increased frequency of hypoxic events in a shallow SL. Significantly (p < 0.05 higher ammonium concentration in SL, especially in its deep water, seems to be a long-term chemical feature related to the poor ventilation and higher sediment oxygen demand. At the current level of eutrophication and the present climate change trends, the MLs and similar systems may experience more persistent and intense stratification, which could further prevent mixing between upper and deep waters, likely leading to increasing duration of hypoxia and its negative impacts on the biodiversity of benthic communities.

  11. Effect of intermittent hypoxic training on hypoxia tolerance based on brain functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Zhang, Tinglin; Chen, Xiaojian; Shang, Chungang; Wang, You

    2016-12-01

    The difference of brain functional connectivity between hypoxic and normal states was studied. The impact of intermittent hypoxic training on the hypoxia tolerance of the brain was explored. Multivariable empirical mode decomposition was applied to extract common inherent modes of multichannel EEG adaptively instead of a priori selection of filter bandwidth, and the first two scales of intrinsic mode functions expressed the differences in brain connectivity. To quantify synchronization and search for consistent performance, coherence, phase locking value and synchronization likelihood were all utilized. Brain networks extracted from these synchronization measures all displayed that both local and global functional connectivity declined with increasing time in a hypoxic state. Furthermore, early hypoxia of the brain was represented on brain connectivity before mental fatigue was detected by conventional neurobehavioral evaluation. The decrease of connectivity tended to slow down in hypoxic conditions after training, which indicated that hypoxia tolerance strengthened because of the hypoxic training.

  12. Effect of hypoxia on cerebrovascular and cognitive function during moderate intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefferts, Wesley K; Babcock, Matthew C; Tiss, Matthew J; Ives, Stephen J; White, Corey N; Brutsaert, Tom D; Heffernan, Kevin S

    2016-10-15

    Exercise in hypoxia places added demands on the brain and cerebrovasculature that can impact cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of acute hypoxia on cerebrovascular hemodynamics, markers of neuro-steroidal modulation and brain-blood barrier (BBB) integrity, and cognition during exercise. Thirty healthy participants (21±4yrs., BMI 24.0±2.6kg∙m(-2); 15 men) were randomized to both a≈2.5h normoxic (FiO2 20.0%) and hypoxic (FiO2 12.5%) condition on two separate days. After 1.25h, participants underwent 10min of exercise-alone (cycling at 55% HRmax) and 15min of exercise+cognitive testing. Prefrontal cortex (PFC) tissue oxygenation and middle cerebral artery (MCA) mean blood velocity (MnV) were measured using near-infrared spectroscopy and transcranial Doppler respectively at rest, during exercise-alone, and during exercise+cognitive testing. Salivary levels of dehydroepiandosterone [DHEA], DHEA-sulfate [DHEAS]) and neuron specific enolase (NSE) were measured pre and post exercise. Cognition was assessed using standard metrics of accuracy and reaction time (RT), and advanced metrics from drift-diffusion modeling across memory recognition, N-Back and Flanker tasks. MCA MnV increased from rest to exercise (phypoxia. PFC oxygenation increased during exercise (phypoxia (phypoxia (phypoxia, while RT was slower in hypoxia vs normoxia across memory recognition (pmemory RT were due to increases in caution (phypoxia concomitant with slower RT in select cognitive tasks and reduced oxygenation in the PFC. These changes were accompanied by slight increases in neuro-steroidal modulation but appear independent of changes in NSE, a biomarker of BBB integrity. Maintained accuracy and select increases in RT during hypoxic exercise may be related behavioral changes in caution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Brain adaptation to hypoxia and hyperoxia in mice

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    Laura Terraneo

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Prolonged mild hyperoxia leads to persistent cerebral damage, comparable to that inferred by prolonged mild hypoxia. The underlying mechanism appears related to a model whereby the imbalance between ROS generation and anti-ROS defense is similar, but occurs at higher levels in hypoxia than in hyperoxia.

  14. The Effect of Inspiratory Resistance on Exercise Performance and Perception in Moderate Normobaric Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongsuk; Vaughan, Jeremiah; Quinn, Tyler D; Followay, Brittany; Roberge, Raymond; Glickman, Ellen L; Kim, Jung-Hyun

    2017-12-01

    Seo, Yongsuk, Jeremiah Vaughan, Tyler D. Quinn, Brittany Followay, Raymond Roberge, Ellen L. Glickman, and Jung-Hyun Kim. The effect of inspiratory resistance on exercise performance and perception in moderate normobaric hypoxia. High Alt Med Biol. 18:417-424, 2017. Respirators are simple and efficient in protecting workers against toxic airborne substances; however, their use may limit the physical performance of workers. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of inspiratory resistance on physical performance and breathing perception in normobaric hypoxia. Nine healthy men wore a tight-fitting respiratory mask outfitted with one of four different inspiratory resistors (R) (0, 1.5, 4.5, 7.5 cm H 2 O/L/Sec) while exercising at normobaric hypoxia (17% O 2 ) at submaximal exercise workloads of 50, 100, and 150 W on a cycle ergometer for 10 minutes each, followed by a maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2 max) test to exhaustion. Maximal power output at R7.5 was significantly lower than R0 (p = 0.016) and R1.5 (p = 0.035). Respiration rate was significantly reduced at R4.5 (p = 0.011) and R7.5 (p ≤ 0.001) compared with R0. Minute ventilation was significantly decreased in R7.5 compared with R0 (p = 0.003), R1.5 (p = 0.010), and R4.5 (p = 0.016), whereas VO 2 was not significantly changed. Breathing comfort (BC) and breathing effort (BE) were significantly impaired in R7.5 (BC: p = 0.025, BE: p = 0.001) and R4.5 (BC: p = 0.007, BE: p = 0.001) compared with R0, but rating of perceived exertion (RPE) remained unchanged. Added inspiratory resistance limited maximal power output and increased perceptions of BC and BE in normobaric hypoxia. However, low-to-moderate inspiratory resistance did not have a deleterious effect on VO 2 or RPE at submaximal or maximal exercise. Perceptual and physiological characteristics of respirators of varying inspiratory resistances should be considered by manufacturers and end users during

  15. Expression of manganese superoxide dismutase in rat blood, heart and brain during induced systemic hypoxia

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    Septelia I. Wanandi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia results in an increased generation of ROS. Until now, little is known about the role of MnSOD - a major endogenous antioxidant enzyme - on the cell adaptation response against hypoxia. The aim of this study was to  determine the MnSOD mRNA expression and levels of specific activity in blood, heart and brain of rats during induced systemic hypoxia.Methods: Twenty-five male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to systemic hypoxia in an hypoxic chamber (at 8-10% O2 for 0, 1, 7, 14 and 21 days, respectively. The mRNA relative expression of MnSOD was analyzed using Real Time RT-PCR. MnSOD specific activity was determined using xanthine oxidase inhibition assay.Results: The MnSOD mRNA relative expression in rat blood and heart was decreased during early induced systemic hypoxia (day 1 and increased as hypoxia continued, whereas the mRNA expression in brain was increased since day 1 and reached its maximum level at day 7. The result of MnSOD specific activity during early systemic hypoxia was similar to the mRNA expression. Under very late hypoxic condition (day 21, MnSOD specific activity in blood, heart and brain was significantly decreased. We demonstrate a positive correlation between MnSOD mRNA expression and specific activity in these 3 tissues during day 0-14 of induced systemic hypoxia. Furthermore, mRNA expression and specific activity levels in heart strongly correlate with those in blood.Conclusion: The MnSOD expression at early and late phases of induced systemic hypoxia is distinctly regulated. The MnSOD expression in brain differs from that in blood and heart revealing that brain tissue can  possibly survive better from induced systemic hypoxia than heart and blood. The determination of MnSOD expression in blood can be used to describe its expression in heart under systemic hypoxic condition. (Med J Indones 2011; 20:27-33Keywords: MnSOD, mRNA expression, ROS, specific activity, systemic hypoxia

  16. Phosphorylation of eIF2α is required for mRNA translation inhibition and survival during moderate hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne; Rouschop, Kasper M.A.; Beucken, Twan van den; Magagnin, Michael G.; Savelkouls, Kim; Lambin, Philippe; Wouters, Bradly G.

    2007-01-01

    Abstracts: Background and purpose: Human tumors are characterized by temporal fluctuations in oxygen tension. The biological pathways that respond to the dynamic tumor microenvironment represent potential molecular targets for cancer therapy. Anoxic conditions result in eIF2α dependent inhibition of overall mRNA translation, differential gene expression, hypoxia tolerance and tumor growth. The signaling pathway which governs eIF2α phosphorylation has therefore emerged as a potential molecular target. In this study, we investigated the role of eIF2α in regulating mRNA translation and hypoxia tolerance during moderate hypoxia. Since other molecular pathways that regulate protein synthesis are frequently mutated in cancer, we also assessed mRNA translation in a panel of cell lines from different origins. Materials and methods: Immortalized human fibroblast, transformed mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) and cells from six cancer cell lines were exposed to 0.2% or 0.0% oxygen. We assayed global mRNA translation efficiency by polysome analysis, as well as proliferation and clonogenic survival. The role of eIF2α was assessed in MEFs harboring a homozygous inactivating mutation (S51A) as well as in U373-MG cells overexpressing GADD34 (C-term) under a tetracycline-dependent promoter. The involvement of eIF4E regulation was investigated in HeLa cells stably expressing a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting 4E-BP1. Results: All cells investigated inhibited mRNA translation severely in response to anoxia and modestly in response to hypoxia. Two independent genetic cell models demonstrated that inhibition of mRNA translation in response to moderate hypoxia was dependent on eIF2α phosphorylation. Disruption of eIF2α phosphorylation caused sensitivity to hypoxia and anoxia. Conclusions: Disruption of eIF2α phosphorylation is a potential target for hypoxia-directed molecular cancer therapy

  17. Hypoxia and exercise provoke both lactate release and lactate oxidation by the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Morten; Rasmussen, Peter; Bohm, Aske M

    2012-01-01

    Lactate is shuttled between organs, as demonstrated in the Cori cycle. Although the brain releases lactate at rest, during physical exercise there is a cerebral uptake of lactate. Here, we evaluated the cerebral lactate uptake and release in hypoxia, during exercise and when the two interventions...... were combined. We measured cerebral lactate turnover via a tracer dilution method ([1-(13)C]lactate), using arterial to right internal jugular venous differences in 9 healthy individuals (5 males and 4 females), at rest and during 30 min of submaximal exercise in normoxia and hypoxia (F(i)o(2) 10......%, arterial oxygen saturation 72±10%, mean±SD). Whole-body lactate turnover increased 3.5-fold and 9-fold at two workloads in normoxia and 18-fold during exercise in hypoxia. Although middle cerebral artery mean flow velocity increased during exercise in hypoxia, calculated cerebral mitochondrial oxygen...

  18. Effects of caffeine on neuromuscular fatigue and performance during high-intensity cycling exercise in moderate hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirmaul, Bruno P C; de Moraes, Antonio Carlos; Angius, Luca; Marcora, Samuele M

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the effects of caffeine on performance, neuromuscular fatigue and perception of effort during high-intensity cycling exercise in moderate hypoxia. Seven adult male participants firstly underwent an incremental exercise test on a cycle ergometer in conditions of acute normobaric hypoxia (fraction inspired oxygen = 0.15) to establish peak power output (PPO). In the following two visits, they performed a time to exhaustion test (78 ± 3% PPO) in the same hypoxic conditions after caffeine ingestion (4 mg kg -1 ) and one after placebo ingestion in a double-blind, randomized, counterbalanced cross-over design. Caffeine significantly improved time to exhaustion by 12%. A significant decrease in subjective fatigue was found after caffeine consumption. Perception of effort and surface electromyographic signal amplitude of the vastus lateralis were lower and heart rate was higher in the caffeine condition when compared to placebo. However, caffeine did not reduce the peripheral and central fatigue induced by high-intensity cycling exercise in moderate hypoxia. The caffeine-induced improvement in time to exhaustion during high-intensity cycling exercise in moderate hypoxia seems to be mediated by a reduction in perception of effort, which occurs despite no reduction in neuromuscular fatigue.

  19. Non-injurious neonatal hypoxia confers resistance to brain senescence in aged male rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Martin

    Full Text Available Whereas brief acute or intermittent episodes of hypoxia have been shown to exert a protective role in the central nervous system and to stimulate neurogenesis, other studies suggest that early hypoxia may constitute a risk factor that influences the future development of mental disorders. We therefore investigated the effects of a neonatal "conditioning-like" hypoxia (100% N₂, 5 min on the brain and the cognitive outcomes of rats until 720 days of age (physiologic senescence. We confirmed that such a short hypoxia led to brain neurogenesis within the ensuing weeks, along with reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus involving activation of Erk1/2 and repression of p38 and death-associated protein (DAP kinase. At 21 days of age, increased thicknesses and cell densities were recorded in various subregions, with strong synapsin activation. During aging, previous exposure to neonatal hypoxia was associated with enhanced memory retrieval scores specifically in males, better preservation of their brain integrity than controls, reduced age-related apoptosis, larger hippocampal cell layers, and higher expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. These changes were accompanied with a marked expression of synapsin proteins, mainly of their phosphorylated active forms which constitute major players of synapse function and plasticity, and with increases of their key regulators, i.e. Erk1/2, the transcription factor EGR-1/Zif-268 and Src kinase. Moreover, the significantly higher interactions between PSD-95 scaffolding protein and NMDA receptors measured in the hippocampus of 720-day-old male animals strengthen the conclusion of increased synaptic functional activity and plasticity associated with neonatal hypoxia. Thus, early non-injurious hypoxia may trigger beneficial long term effects conferring higher resistance to senescence in aged male rats, with a better preservation of cognitive functions.

  20. Non-injurious neonatal hypoxia confers resistance to brain senescence in aged male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicolas; Bossenmeyer-Pourié, Carine; Koziel, Violette; Jazi, Rozat; Audonnet, Sandra; Vert, Paul; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Daval, Jean-Luc; Pourié, Grégory

    2012-01-01

    Whereas brief acute or intermittent episodes of hypoxia have been shown to exert a protective role in the central nervous system and to stimulate neurogenesis, other studies suggest that early hypoxia may constitute a risk factor that influences the future development of mental disorders. We therefore investigated the effects of a neonatal "conditioning-like" hypoxia (100% N₂, 5 min) on the brain and the cognitive outcomes of rats until 720 days of age (physiologic senescence). We confirmed that such a short hypoxia led to brain neurogenesis within the ensuing weeks, along with reduced apoptosis in the hippocampus involving activation of Erk1/2 and repression of p38 and death-associated protein (DAP) kinase. At 21 days of age, increased thicknesses and cell densities were recorded in various subregions, with strong synapsin activation. During aging, previous exposure to neonatal hypoxia was associated with enhanced memory retrieval scores specifically in males, better preservation of their brain integrity than controls, reduced age-related apoptosis, larger hippocampal cell layers, and higher expression of glutamatergic and GABAergic markers. These changes were accompanied with a marked expression of synapsin proteins, mainly of their phosphorylated active forms which constitute major players of synapse function and plasticity, and with increases of their key regulators, i.e. Erk1/2, the transcription factor EGR-1/Zif-268 and Src kinase. Moreover, the significantly higher interactions between PSD-95 scaffolding protein and NMDA receptors measured in the hippocampus of 720-day-old male animals strengthen the conclusion of increased synaptic functional activity and plasticity associated with neonatal hypoxia. Thus, early non-injurious hypoxia may trigger beneficial long term effects conferring higher resistance to senescence in aged male rats, with a better preservation of cognitive functions.

  1. Cerebral Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... off. When hypoxia lasts for longer periods of time, it can cause coma, seizures, and even brain death. In brain death, there is no measurable activity in the brain, although cardiovascular function is preserved. Life support is required for respiration. × Definition Cerebral hypoxia ...

  2. Marked anemic hypoxia deteriorates cerebral hemodynamics and brain metabolism during massive intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E J; Hung, Y C

    2001-09-15

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the influence of imposed anemic hypoxia on cerebral hemodynamics and metabolism in a condition of massive ICH. Two groups of eight dogs, with a target hemoglobin concentration of 12 g/dl in nonanemic and 6 g/dl in anemic group, were included. Before the onset of the insult, anemic group had a significant reduction (pglycolysis in biphasic periods. These results point to a complex interaction between cerebral hemodynamics, oxygen supply and glycolysis homeostasis upon the addition of anemic hypoxia in severe stress conditions of the brain.

  3. The effect of hypoxia on the functional and structural development of the chick brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodricks, Candice L; Gibbs, Marie E; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Miller, Suzanne L

    2010-06-01

    Decreased oxygen availability during gestation is linked with altered structural development of the brain and cognitive deficits after birth. Prehatch hypoxia can induce gross neuropathology such as brain lesions or more subtle injury including selective neuronal cell loss, white matter injury and gliosis. In the current study we used the developing chick embryo to determine whether 24h of hypoxia at different prehatch ages, embryonic day 10, 12 or 14 (E10, E12 or E14), resulted in an alteration in neuronal cell number or astrocyte density in brain areas associated with learning and memory. Twenty-four hours of hypoxia (14% oxygen) commencing at E10 resulted in an increase in the density of GFAP-positive astrocytes in the medial striatum (MSt) (PHypoxia at E14 resulted in an increase in GFAP immunoreactivity in the hippocampus (P Memory was tested soon after hatch using a bead discrimination learning task and results showed that E10 hypoxia significantly reduced short-term memory, which subsequently affected all stages of memory formation (Phypoxia at E14 did not alter short-term memory, but impaired consolidation into long-term memory (Phypoxia at E12 did not alter GFAP immunoreactivity or NeuN-positive cells, nor did it result in memory deficits. We find that an alteration in the number or a disruption in the normal development of astrocytes and neurons significantly affects memory formation and consolidation in the young chick. Crown Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. No oxygen? No problem! Intrinsic brain tolerance to hypoxia in vertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, John; Drew, Kelly L.; Folkow, Lars P.; Milton, Sarah L.; Park, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    Many vertebrates are challenged by either chronic or acute episodes of low oxygen availability in their natural environments. Brain function is especially vulnerable to the effects of hypoxia and can be irreversibly impaired by even brief periods of low oxygen supply. This review describes recent research on physiological mechanisms that have evolved in certain vertebrate species to cope with brain hypoxia. Four model systems are considered: freshwater turtles that can survive for months trapped in frozen-over lakes, arctic ground squirrels that respire at extremely low rates during winter hibernation, seals and whales that undertake breath-hold dives lasting minutes to hours, and naked mole-rats that live in crowded burrows completely underground for their entire lives. These species exhibit remarkable specializations of brain physiology that adapt them for acute or chronic episodes of hypoxia. These specializations may be reactive in nature, involving modifications to the catastrophic sequelae of oxygen deprivation that occur in non-tolerant species, or preparatory in nature, preventing the activation of those sequelae altogether. Better understanding of the mechanisms used by these hypoxia-tolerant vertebrates will increase appreciation of how nervous systems are adapted for life in specific ecological niches as well as inform advances in therapy for neurological conditions such as stroke and epilepsy. PMID:24671961

  5. Potential Moderators of Physical Activity on Brain Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina L. Leckie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Age-related cognitive decline is linked to numerous molecular, structural, and functional changes in the brain. However, physical activity is a promising method of reducing unfavorable age-related changes. Physical activity exerts its effects on the brain through many molecular pathways, some of which are regulated by genetic variants in humans. In this paper, we highlight genes including apolipoprotein E (APOE, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT along with dietary omega-3 fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, as potential moderators of the effect of physical activity on brain health. There are a growing number of studies indicating that physical activity might mitigate the genetic risks for disease and brain dysfunction and that the combination of greater amounts of DHA intake with physical activity might promote better brain function than either treatment alone. Understanding whether genes or other lifestyles moderate the effects of physical activity on neurocognitive health is necessary for delineating the pathways by which brain health can be enhanced and for grasping the individual variation in the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on the brain and cognition. There is a need for future research to continue to assess the factors that moderate the effects of physical activity on neurocognitive function.

  6. Isoflurane preserves spatial working memory in adult mice after moderate hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Alex; Shah, Romin; Quartermain, David; Li, Yong-Sheng; Blanck, Thomas

    2006-04-01

    Perioperative hypoxia may contribute to postoperative cognitive impairment. It is unknown, however, whether anesthetics exacerbate or protect against hypoxia-related central nervous system impairment. We sought to determine whether hypoxia alone or in combination with isoflurane disrupts working memory in mice. To this extent, we assigned adult mice to one of four treatments for 1 h: oxygen 21%, oxygen 21% + isoflurane 1.2%, oxygen 8%, or oxygen 8% + isoflurane 1.2%. Mice breathed spontaneously throughout the experiment. Body temperature was maintained at 37 degrees C + 0.5 degrees C. Mice were allowed to recover for 24 h to avoid the confounding influence of residual anesthetics on neurobehavioral performance. Working memory was assessed by use of a Y maze modified for mice. For the training trial, entry to one arm was blocked and mice were permitted to run between the two open arms for 15 min and inspect the objects outside. For the test trial, carried out 1 h later, all arms were open. Time spent in each arm was automatically recorded by a camera and associated software. Mice were tested 1, 4, and 7 days after anesthesia. A different arm was used as the novel arm for each test. Performance was analyzed with repeated-measurements analysis of variance, followed by analysis of simple main effects and by post hoc comparison using Newman-Keuls test when appropriate. P values hypoxia (8% oxygen for 1 h) spent significantly less time in the novel arm 1 day after the insult. The impairment, however, was transient. Hypoxic mice performance improved to the level of the control animals on the fourth post-treatment day. Mice subjected to hypoxia plus isoflurane exhibited no impairment and were comparable to the control group at all time points. Hypoxia transiently impairs performance in a spatial memory task. It appears that isoflurane protects against this deleterious effect of hypoxia.

  7. Spectroscopy study of the dynamics of the transencephalic electrical impedance in the perinatal brain during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Fernando; Lindecrantz, Kaj; Olsson, Torsten; Kjellmer, Ingemar; Flisberg, Anders; Bågenholm, Ralph

    2005-10-01

    Hypoxia/ischaemia is the most common cause of brain damage in neonates. Thousands of newborn children suffer from perinatal asphyxia every year. The cells go through a response mechanism during hypoxia/ischaemia, to maintain the cellular viability and, as a response to the hypoxic/ischaemic insult, the composition and the structure of the cellular environment are altered. The alterations in the ionic concentration of the intra- and extracellular and the consequent cytotoxic oedema, cell swelling, modify the electrical properties of the constituted tissue. The changes produced can be easily measured using electrical impedance instrumentation. In this paper, we report the results from an impedance spectroscopy study on the effects of the hypoxia on the perinatal brain. The transencephalic impedance, both resistance and reactance, was measured in newborn piglets using the four-electrode method in the frequency range from 20 kHz to 750 kHz and the experimental results were compared with numerical results from a simulation of a suspension of cells during cell swelling. The experimental results make clear the frequency dependence of the bioelectrical impedance, confirm that the variation of resistance is more sensitive at low than at high frequencies and show that the reactance changes substantially during hypoxia. The resemblance between the experimental and numerical results proves the validity of modelling tissue as a suspension of cells and confirms the importance of the cellular oedema process in the alterations of the electrical properties of biological tissue. The study of the effects of hypoxia/ischaemia in the bioelectrical properties of tissue may lead to the development of useful clinical tools based on the application of bioelectrical impedance technology.

  8. Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy induces hypoxia in intracerebral gliosarcoma but not in the normal brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouchet, Audrey; Lemasson, Benjamin; Christen, Thomas; Potez, Marine; Rome, Claire; Coquery, Nicolas; Le Clec’h, Céline; Moisan, Anaick; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Leduc, Géraldine; Rémy, Chantal; Laissue, Jean A.; Barbier, Emmanuel L.; Brun, Emmanuel; Serduc, Raphaël

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is an innovative irradiation modality based on spatial fractionation of a high-dose X-ray beam into lattices of microbeams. The increase in lifespan of brain tumor-bearing rats is associated with vascular damage but the physiological consequences of MRT on blood vessels have not been described. In this manuscript, we evaluate the oxygenation changes induced by MRT in an intracerebral 9L gliosarcoma model. Methods: Tissue responses to MRT (two orthogonal arrays (2 × 400 Gy)) were studied using magnetic resonance-based measurements of local blood oxygen saturation (MR S O 2 ) and quantitative immunohistology of RECA-1, Type-IV collagen and GLUT-1, marker of hypoxia. Results: In tumors, MR S O 2 decreased by a factor of 2 in tumor between day 8 and day 45 after MRT. This correlated with tumor vascular remodeling, i.e. decrease in vessel density, increases in half-vessel distances (×5) and GLUT-1 immunoreactivity. Conversely, MRT did not change normal brain MR S O 2 , although vessel inter-distances increased slightly. Conclusion: We provide new evidence for the differential effect of MRT on tumor vasculature, an effect that leads to tumor hypoxia. As hypothesized formerly, the vasculature of the normal brain exposed to MRT remains sufficiently perfused to prevent any hypoxia

  9. Sumoylation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α ameliorates failure of brain stem cardiovascular regulation in experimental brain death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Y H Chan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available One aspect of brain death is cardiovascular deregulation because asystole invariably occurs shortly after its diagnosis. A suitable neural substrate for mechanistic delineation of this aspect of brain death resides in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM. RVLM is the origin of a life-and-death signal that our laboratory detected from blood pressure of comatose patients that disappears before brain death ensues. At the same time, transcriptional upregulation of heme oxygenase-1 in RVLM by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α plays a pro-life role in experimental brain death, and HIF-1α is subject to sumoylation activated by transient cerebral ischemia. It follows that sumoylation of HIF-1α in RVLM in response to hypoxia may play a modulatory role on brain stem cardiovascular regulation during experimental brain death.A clinically relevant animal model that employed mevinphos as the experimental insult in Sprague-Dawley rat was used. Biochemical changes in RVLM during distinct phenotypes in systemic arterial pressure spectrum that reflect maintained or defunct brain stem cardiovascular regulation were studied. Western blot analysis, EMSA, ELISA, confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation demonstrated that drastic tissue hypoxia, elevated levels of proteins conjugated by small ubiquitin-related modifier-1 (SUMO-1, Ubc9 (the only known conjugating enzyme for the sumoylation pathway or HIF-1α, augmented sumoylation of HIF-1α, nucleus-bound translocation and enhanced transcriptional activity of HIF-1α in RVLM neurons took place preferentially during the pro-life phase of experimental brain death. Furthermore, loss-of-function manipulations by immunoneutralization of SUMO-1, Ubc9 or HIF-1α in RVLM blunted the upregulated nitric oxide synthase I/protein kinase G signaling cascade, which sustains the brain stem cardiovascular regulatory machinery during the pro-life phase.We conclude that sumoylation of HIF-1α in RVLM ameliorates brain stem

  10. Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Protect the Fetal Brain After Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ophelders, Daan R M G; Wolfs, Tim G A M; Jellema, Reint K; Zwanenburg, Alex; Andriessen, Peter; Delhaas, Tammo; Ludwig, Anna-Kristin; Radtke, Stefan; Peters, Vera; Janssen, Leon; Giebel, Bernd; Kramer, Boris W

    2016-06-01

    Preterm neonates are susceptible to perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, for which no treatment is available. In a preclinical animal model of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in ovine fetuses, we have demonstrated the neuroprotective potential of systemically administered mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). The mechanism of MSC treatment is unclear but suggested to be paracrine, through secretion of extracellular vesicles (EVs). Therefore, we investigated in this study the protective effects of mesenchymal stromal cell-derived extracellular vesicles (MSC-EVs) in a preclinical model of preterm hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Ovine fetuses were subjected to global hypoxia-ischemia by transient umbilical cord occlusion, followed by in utero intravenous administration of MSC-EVs. The therapeutic effects of MSC-EV administration were assessed by analysis of electrophysiological parameters and histology of the brain. Systemic administration of MSC-EVs improved brain function by reducing the total number and duration of seizures, and by preserving baroreceptor reflex sensitivity. These functional protections were accompanied by a tendency to prevent hypomyelination. Cerebral inflammation remained unaffected by the MSC-EV treatment. Our data demonstrate that MSC-EV treatment might provide a novel strategy to reduce the neurological sequelae following hypoxic-ischemic injury of the preterm brain. Our study results suggest that a cell-free preparation comprising neuroprotective MSC-EVs could substitute MSCs in the treatment of preterm neonates with hypoxic-ischemic brain injury, thereby circumventing the potential risks of systemic administration of living cells. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) show promise in treating hypoxic-ischemic injury of the preterm brain. Study results suggest administration of extracellular vesicles, rather than intact MSCs, is sufficient to exert therapeutic effects and avoids potential concerns associated with administration

  11. Sestrin2 induced by hypoxia inducible factor1 alpha protects the blood-brain barrier via inhibiting VEGF after severe hypoxic-ischemic injury in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xudan; Doycheva, Desislava Met; Xu, Liang; Tang, Jiping; Yan, Min; Zhang, John H

    2016-11-01

    Hypoxic ischemic (HI) encephalopathy remains the leading cause of perinatal brain injury resulting in long term disabilities. Stabilization of blood brain barrier (BBB) after HI is an important target, therefore, in this study we aim to determine the role of sestrin2, a stress inducible protein which is elevated after various insults, on BBB stabilization after moderate and severe HI injuries. Rat pups underwent common carotid artery ligation followed by either 150min (severe model) or 100min (moderate model) of hypoxia. 1h post HI, rats were intranasally administered with recombinant human sestrin2 (rh-sestrin2) and sacrificed for infarct area, brain water content, righting reflex and geotaxis reflex. Sestrin2 was silenced using siRNA and an activator/inhibitor of hypoxia inducible factor1α (HIF1α) was used to examine their roles on BBB permeability. Rats subjected to severe HI exhibited larger infarct area and higher sestrin2 expression compared to rats in the moderate HI group. rh-sestrin2 attenuated brain infarct and edema, while silencing sestrin2 reversed these protective effects after severe HI. HIF1α induced sestrin2 activation in severe HI but not in moderate HI groups. A HIF1a agonist was shown to increase permeability of the BBB via vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) after moderate HI. However, after severe HI, HIF1α activated both VEGF and sestrin2. But HIF1α dependent sestrin2 activation was the predominant pathway after severe HI which inhibited VEGF and attenuated BBB permeability. rh-sestrin2 attenuated BBB permeability via upregulation of endogenous sestrin2 which was induced by HIF1α after severe HI. However, HIF1α's effects as a prodeath or prosurvival signal were influenced by the severity of HI injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Overexpression of Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Protects against Brain Injury Induced by Chronic Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Nahla; Patel, Hardik; Codipilly, Champa; Marambaud, Philippe; Dewey, Stephen; Frattini, Stephen; Huerta, Patricio T.; Nasim, Mansoor; Miller, Edmund J.; Ahmed, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an isoform of SOD normally found both intra- and extra-cellularly and accounting for most SOD activity in blood vessels. Here we explored the role of EC-SOD in protecting against brain damage induced by chronic hypoxia. EC-SOD Transgenic mice, were exposed to hypoxia (FiO2.1%) for 10 days (H-KI) and compared to transgenic animals housed in room air (RA-KI), wild type animals exposed to hypoxia (H-WT or wild type mice housed in room air (RA-WT). Overall brain metabolism evaluated by positron emission tomography (PET) showed that H-WT mice had significantly higher uptake of 18FDG in the brain particularly the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and cerebellum. H-KI mice had comparable uptake to the RA-KI and RA-WT groups. To investigate the functional state of the hippocampus, electrophysiological techniques in ex vivo hippocampal slices were performed and showed that H-KI had normal synaptic plasticity, whereas H-WT were severely affected. Markers of oxidative stress, GFAP, IBA1, MIF, and pAMPK showed similar values in the H-KI and RA-WT groups, but were significantly increased in the H-WT group. Caspase-3 assay and histopathological studies showed significant apoptosis/cell damage in the H-WT group, but no significant difference in the H-KI group compared to the RA groups. The data suggest that EC-SOD has potential prophylactic and therapeutic roles in diseases with compromised brain oxygenation. PMID:25268361

  13. Cognitive performance in transient global hypoxic brain injury due to moderate drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucci, Mariana Penteado; Lukasova, Katerina; Vieira, Gilson; Sato, João Ricardo; Amaro Júnior, Edson

    2017-09-19

    Drowning is a serious and frequently neglected public health threat. Primary respiratory impairment after submersion often leads to brain dysfunction. Depending on the period of global hypoxia (respiratory failure), clinical aspects of neurological dysfunction are evident on the first evaluation after the water rescue. Nowadays, many neuropsychological assessments after drowning are inconclusive, with some studies reporting only minor neurological or cognitive impairments. The aim of this study is to identify measures in neuropsychological tests that most contribute to classify volunteers as moderate drowning subjects or healthy controls. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first neuropsychological prospective case-control study of moderate drowning in a country with large coastal cities. Fifteen moderate drowning patients (DP), who met the inclusion criteria, were compared with 18 healthy controls (HC). All subjects were assessed on memory, learning, visual spatial ability, executive function, attention, and general intellectual functioning and underwent structural magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain at 3.0 T, in order to exclude subjects with anatomic abnormalities. Neuropsychological tests assessing learning, execution function, and verbal fluency-Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) general learning ability, Digit Span total, Phonological Verbal Fluency (total FAS correct), and Brief Visuospatial Memory Test Revised (BVMT) correct recognition-have the strongest discriminating ability, using predictive models via the partial least squares (PLS) approach for data classification, while the other tests have shown similar predictive values between groups. Learning, execution function, and verbal fluency domains were the most critically affected domains. Serious impairments in the same domains have already been reported in severe drowning cases, and we hypothesize that subtle alterations found in moderate drowning cases, although not

  14. Whole brain radiation-induced impairments in learning and memory are time-sensitive and reversible by systemic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Junie P; Csiszar, Anna; Mitschelen, Matthew; Lee, Yong Woo; Sonntag, William E

    2012-01-01

    Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) is commonly used for treatment of primary and metastatic brain tumors; however, cognitive impairment occurs in 40-50% of brain tumor survivors. The etiology of the cognitive impairment following WBRT remains elusive. We recently reported that radiation-induced cerebrovascular rarefaction within hippocampal subregions could be completely reversed by systemic hypoxia. However, the effects of this intervention on learning and memory have not been reported. In this study, we assessed the time-course for WBRT-induced impairments in contextual and spatial learning and the capacity of systemic hypoxia to reverse WBRT-induced deficits in spatial memory. A clinical fractionated series of 4.5Gy WBRT was administered to mice twice weekly for 4 weeks, and after various periods of recovery, behavioral analyses were performed. To study the effects of systemic hypoxia, mice were subjected to 11% (hypoxia) or 21% oxygen (normoxia) for 28 days, initiated 1 month after the completion of WBRT. Our results indicate that WBRT induces a transient deficit in contextual learning, disruption of working memory, and progressive impairment of spatial learning. Additionally, systemic hypoxia completely reversed WBRT-induced impairments in learning and these behavioral effects as well as increased vessel density persisted for at least 2 months following hypoxia treatment. Our results provide critical support for the hypothesis that cerebrovascular rarefaction is a key component of cognitive impairment post-WBRT and indicate that processes of learning and memory, once thought to be permanently impaired after WBRT, can be restored.

  15. Gray Matter Hypoxia in the Brain of the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Thomas W.; Wu, Ying; Nathoo, Nabeela; Rogers, James A.; Wee Yong, V.; Dunn, Jeff F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) has a significant inflammatory component and may have significant gray matter (GM) pathophysiology. Brain oxygenation is a sensitive measurement of the balance between metabolic need and oxygen delivery. There is evidence that inflammation and hypoxia are interdependent. In this paper, we applied novel, implanted PO2 sensors to measure hypoxia in cortical and cerebellar GM, in an inflammation-induced mouse model of MS. Objective Quantify oxygenation in cortical and cerebellar GM in the awake, unrestrained experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model and to relate the results to symptom level and disease time-course. Methods C57BL/6 mice were implanted with a fiber-optic sensor in the cerebellum (n = 13) and cortex (n = 24). Animals were induced with stimulation of the immune response and sensitization to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG). Controls did not have MOG. We measured PO2 in awake, unrestrained animals from pre-induction (baseline) up to 36 days post-induction for EAE and controls. Results There were more days with hypoxia than hyperoxia (cerebellum: 34/67 vs. 18/67 days; cortex: 85/112 vs. 22/112) compared to time-matched controls. The average decline in PO2 on days that were significantly lower than time-matched controls was -8.8±6.0 mmHg (mean ± SD) for the cerebellum and -8.0±4.6 for the cortex. Conversely, the average increase in PO2 on days that were significantly hyperoxic was +3.2±2.8 mmHg (mean ± SD) for the cerebellum and +0.8±2.1 for the cortex. Cortical hypoxia related to increased behavioral deficits. Evidence for hypoxia occurred before measurable behavioral deficits. Conclusions A highly inflammatory condition primed to a white matter (WM) autoimmune response correlates with significant hypoxia and increased variation in oxygenation in GM of both cerebellum and cortex in the mouse EAE model of MS. PMID:27907119

  16. Contribution of maternal oxygenic state to the effects of chronic postnatal hypoxia on mouse body and brain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaso, Natalina; Dominguez, Moises; Kravitz, Jacob; Komitova, Mila; Vaccarino, Flora M; Schwartz, Michael L

    2015-09-14

    1-2% of live births are to very low birth weight, premature infants that often show a developmental trajectory plagued with neurological sequelae including ventriculomegaly and significant decreases in cortical volume. We are able to recapitulate these sequelae using a mouse model of hypoxia where early postnatal pups are exposed to chronic hypoxia for one week. However, because the timing of hypoxic exposure occurs so early in development, dams and pups are housed together in the hypoxic chamber, and therefore, dams are also subjected to the same hypoxic conditions as the pups. To understand the relative contribution of hypoxia directly on the pups as opposed to the indirect contribution mediated by the effects of hypoxia and potential alterations in the dam's care of the pups, we examined whether reducing the dams exposure to hypoxia may significantly increase pup outcomes on measures that we have found consistently changed immediately following chronic hypoxia exposure. To achieve this, we rotated dams between normoxic and hypoxic conditions, leaving the litters untouched in their respective conditions and compared gross anatomical measures of normoxic and hypoxic pups with non-rotating or rotating mothers. As we expected, hypoxic-rearing decreased pup body weight, brain weight and cortical volume. Reducing the dam's exposure to hypoxic conditions actually amplified the effects of hypoxia on body weight, such that hypoxic pups with rotating mothers showed significantly less growth. Interestingly, rotation of hypoxic mothers did not have the same deleterious effect on brain weight, suggesting the presence of compensatory mechanisms conserving brain weight and development even under extremely low body weight conditions. The factors that potentially contribute to these compensatory changes remain to be determined, however, nutrition, pup feeding/metabolism, or changes in maternal care are important candidates, acting either together or independently to change pup

  17. [Effect of hypobaric hypoxia exposure on memory and tau phosphorylation in brain of mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan; Yu, Li-Xia; Hong, Yan; Niu, Chao; Gao, Jing-Wei; Jin, Hong; Wang, Xue-Lan; Wang, Hai

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the effect of hypobaric hypoxia (HH)on the cognitive function of mice and the phosphorylation of tau protein in mice brain. Forty male mice were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 10): static control (control) group, 8 hours (8 h) group, 7 days(7 d) group and 28 days(28 d) group, which were exposed to simulated HH equivalent to 5 500 m in an animal decompression chamber for 0 hour, 8 hours, 7 days and 28 days, respectively. Cognitive performances were examined by open field and passive avoidance test, tan phosphorylation was assayed by Western blot. In open field test,the group exposed in hypobaric hypoxia for 28 d showed lower mean velocity (P < 0.05), time in central zone (P < 0.05) was longer than control group. In passive avoidance test 28 d group presented worse performance in both latency time and number of mistakes (P < 0.05) compared with control group. Western blot showed that phosphorylated tau was increased significantly following exposure to HH for 7 d in cortex and 28 d in hippocampus (P < 0.05). Tau hyperphosphorylation in brain of mice may play a role in chronic HH-induced cognitive function impairment.

  18. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha stabilization for regenerative therapy in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushfiquddin Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI, also called concussion, initiates sequelae leading to motor deficits, cognitive impairments and subtly compromised neurobehaviors. While the acute phase of TBI is associated with neuroinflammation and nitroxidative burst, the chronic phase shows a lack of stimulation of the neurorepair process and regeneration. The deficiency of nitric oxide (NO, the consequent disturbed NO metabolome, and imbalanced mechanisms of S-nitrosylation are implicated in blocking the mechanisms of neurorepair processes and functional recovery in the both phases. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α, a master regulator of hypoxia/ischemia, stimulates the process of neurorepair and thus aids in functional recovery after brain trauma. The activity of HIF-1α is regulated by NO via the mechanism of S-nitrosylation of HIF-1α. S-nitrosylation is dynamically regulated by NO metabolites such as S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO and peroxynitrite. GSNO stabilizes, and peroxynitrite destabilizes HIF-1α. Exogenously administered GSNO was found not only to stabilize HIF-1α and to induce HIF-1α-dependent genes but also to stimulate the regeneration process and to aid in functional recovery in TBI animals.

  19. Social support moderates caregiver life satisfaction following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergh, Tanya C; Hanks, Robin A; Rapport, Lisa J; Coleman, Renee D

    2003-12-01

    Social support is an important determinant of adjustment following traumatic brain injury (TBI) sustained by a family member. The present study examined the extent to which social support moderates the influence of characteristics of the person with injury on caregiver subjective well-being. Sixty pairs of individuals who had sustained a moderate to severe TBI and their caregivers (N=120) participated. Years postinjury ranged from 0.3 to 9.9 ( M=4.8, SD=2.6). Cognitive, functional, and neurobehavioral functioning of participants with TBI were assessed using neuropsychological tests and rating scales. Caregiver life satisfaction and perceived social support were assessed using self-report questionnaires. Results indicated that time since injury was unrelated to life satisfaction. Neurobehavioral disturbances showed an inverse relation with life satisfaction. Social support emerged as an important moderator of life satisfaction. Only among caregivers with low social support was cognitive dysfunction adversely related to life satisfaction. Similarly, a trend suggested that patient unawareness of deficit was associated with caregiver life dissatisfaction only among caregivers with low social support. In contrast, these characteristics were unrelated to life satisfaction among caregivers with adequate social support.

  20. Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP)-derived peptide (NAP) ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced oxidative stress in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Narendra K; Sethy, Niroj K; Meena, Ram Niwas; Ilavazhagan, Govindsamy; Das, Mainak; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2011-06-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia is a socio-economic problem affecting cognitive, memory and behavior functions. Severe oxidative stress caused by hypobaric hypoxia adversely affects brain areas like cortex, hippocampus, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. In the present study, we have investigated the antioxidant and memory protection efficacy of the synthetic NAP peptide (NAPVSIPQ) during long-term chronic hypobaric hypoxia (7, 14, 21 and 28 days, 25,000ft) in rats. Intranasal supplementation of NAP peptide (2μg/Kg body weight) improved antioxidant status of brain evaluated by biochemical assays for free radical estimation, lipid peroxidation, GSH and GSSG level. Analysis of expression levels of SOD revealed that NAP significantly activated antioxidant genes as compared to hypoxia exposed rats. We have also observed a significant increased expression of Nrf2, the master regulator of antioxidant defense system and its downstream targets such as HO-1, GST and SOD1 by NAP supplementation, suggesting activation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant defense response. In corroboration, our results also demonstrate that NAP supplementation improved the memory function assessed with radial arm maze. These cumulative results suggest the therapeutic potential of NAP peptide for ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia-induced oxidative stress. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prenatal exposure to nicotine with associated in utero hypoxia decreased fetal brain muscarinic mRNA in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Caiping; Yuan, Xin; Cui, Yugui; Li, Hong; Lv, Juanxiu; Feng, Xing; Liu, Yujuan; Chen, Linqi; Xu, Zhice

    2008-01-16

    Prenatal exposure to nicotine can be associated with fetal abnormal development and brain damage. This study determined the effect of administration of nicotine with associated in utero hypoxia in maternal rats from early, middle, and late gestation on fetal blood hemoglobin, and expression of cholinergic receptor subtypes in the fetal brain. Our results demonstrated that maternal subcutaneous nicotine from the early gestation increased fetal hemoglobin and hematocrit, associated with reduction of PO(2). Although exposure to nicotine during late gestation had no effects on fetal brain weight, nicotine administration from the early gestation significantly decreased fetal brain muscarinic receptor (M1, M2, M3, and M4) mRNA expression, associated with restricted brain growth. Nicotine-altered muscarinic receptor subtype expression in the fetal forebrain and hindbrain showed regional differences. In addition, there were gestational differences for fetal brain muscarinic suppression by prenatal nicotine. Together, the results demonstrate that nicotine-induced in utero hypoxia is associated with poor development of muscarinic receptors in the fetal brain and restricted brain growth, and that either prolonged prenatal exposure to nicotine or critical "window" period for the brain development during pregnancy may play a role in prenatal nicotine-induced fetal muscarinic-receptor deficiency in the fetal brain.

  2. Cyclosporine treatment reduces oxygen free radical generation and oxidative stress in the brain of hypoxia-reoxygenated newborn piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richdeep S Gill

    Full Text Available Oxygen free radicals have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. It has previously been shown in traumatic brain injury animal models that treatment with cyclosporine reduces brain injury. However, the potential neuroprotective effect of cyclosporine in asphyxiated neonates has yet to be fully studied. Using an acute newborn swine model of hypoxia-reoxygenation, we evaluated the effects of cyclosporine on the brain, focusing on hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 production and markers of oxidative stress. Piglets (1-4 d, 1.4-2.5 kg were block-randomized into three hypoxia-reoxygenation experimental groups (2 h hypoxia followed by 4 h reoxygenation (n = 8/group. At 5 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. saline (placebo, controls or cyclosporine (2.5 or 10 mg/kg i.v. bolus in a blinded-randomized fashion. An additional sham-operated group (n = 4 underwent no hypoxia-reoxygenation. Systemic hemodynamics, carotid arterial blood flow (transit-time ultrasonic probe, cerebral cortical H(2O(2 production (electrochemical sensor, cerebral tissue glutathione (ELISA and cytosolic cytochrome-c (western blot levels were examined. Hypoxic piglets had cardiogenic shock (cardiac output 40-48% of baseline, hypotension (mean arterial pressure 27-31 mmHg and acidosis (pH 7.04 at the end of 2 h of hypoxia. Post-resuscitation cyclosporine treatment, particularly the higher dose (10 mg/kg, significantly attenuated the increase in cortical H(2O(2 concentration during reoxygenation, and was associated with lower cerebral oxidized glutathione levels. Furthermore, cyclosporine treatment significantly attenuated the increase in cortical cytochrome-c and lactate levels. Carotid blood arterial flow was similar among groups during reoxygenation. Conclusively, post-resuscitation administration of cyclosporine significantly attenuates H(2O(2 production and minimizes oxidative stress in newborn piglets following hypoxia-reoxygenation.

  3. Whole brain radiation-induced impairments in learning and memory are time-sensitive and reversible by systemic hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junie P Warrington

    Full Text Available Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT is commonly used for treatment of primary and metastatic brain tumors; however, cognitive impairment occurs in 40-50% of brain tumor survivors. The etiology of the cognitive impairment following WBRT remains elusive. We recently reported that radiation-induced cerebrovascular rarefaction within hippocampal subregions could be completely reversed by systemic hypoxia. However, the effects of this intervention on learning and memory have not been reported. In this study, we assessed the time-course for WBRT-induced impairments in contextual and spatial learning and the capacity of systemic hypoxia to reverse WBRT-induced deficits in spatial memory. A clinical fractionated series of 4.5Gy WBRT was administered to mice twice weekly for 4 weeks, and after various periods of recovery, behavioral analyses were performed. To study the effects of systemic hypoxia, mice were subjected to 11% (hypoxia or 21% oxygen (normoxia for 28 days, initiated 1 month after the completion of WBRT. Our results indicate that WBRT induces a transient deficit in contextual learning, disruption of working memory, and progressive impairment of spatial learning. Additionally, systemic hypoxia completely reversed WBRT-induced impairments in learning and these behavioral effects as well as increased vessel density persisted for at least 2 months following hypoxia treatment. Our results provide critical support for the hypothesis that cerebrovascular rarefaction is a key component of cognitive impairment post-WBRT and indicate that processes of learning and memory, once thought to be permanently impaired after WBRT, can be restored.

  4. Spatial patterns of progressive brain volume loss after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Amy; de Simoni, Sara; Bourke, Niall; Patel, Maneesh C; Scott, Gregory; Sharp, David J

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury leads to significant loss of brain volume, which continues into the chronic stage. This can be sensitively measured using volumetric analysis of MRI. Here we: (i) investigated longitudinal patterns of brain atrophy; (ii) tested whether atrophy is greatest in sulcal cortical regions; and (iii) showed how atrophy could be used to power intervention trials aimed at slowing neurodegeneration. In 61 patients with moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (mean age = 41.55 years ± 12.77) and 32 healthy controls (mean age = 34.22 years ± 10.29), cross-sectional and longitudinal (1-year follow-up) brain structure was assessed using voxel-based morphometry on T1-weighted scans. Longitudinal brain volume changes were characterized using a novel neuroimaging analysis pipeline that generates a Jacobian determinant metric, reflecting spatial warping between baseline and follow-up scans. Jacobian determinant values were summarized regionally and compared with clinical and neuropsychological measures. Patients with traumatic brain injury showed lower grey and white matter volume in multiple brain regions compared to controls at baseline. Atrophy over 1 year was pronounced following traumatic brain injury. Patients with traumatic brain injury lost a mean (± standard deviation) of 1.55% ± 2.19 of grey matter volume per year, 1.49% ± 2.20 of white matter volume or 1.51% ± 1.60 of whole brain volume. Healthy controls lost 0.55% ± 1.13 of grey matter volume and gained 0.26% ± 1.11 of white matter volume; equating to a 0.22% ± 0.83 reduction in whole brain volume. Atrophy was greatest in white matter, where the majority (84%) of regions were affected. This effect was independent of and substantially greater than that of ageing. Increased atrophy was also seen in cortical sulci compared to gyri. There was no relationship between atrophy and time since injury or age at baseline. Atrophy rates were related to memory performance at the end of the

  5. KCC2 expression changes in Diazepam-treated neonatal rats with hypoxia-ischaemia brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun-Yuan; Zhang, Su-Pei; Guo, Liu-Bin; Li, Yong-Mei; Li, Qiang; Wang, Sai-Qi; Liu, Hong-Min; Wang, Cong

    2014-05-14

    Hypoxia-ischaemia brain damage (HIBD) is a major type of perinatal brain injury in newborns. In this study, we investigate the short- and long-term neuroprotective effects of Diazepam on neonatal rats with HIBD and the potential mechanisms underlying its protective effects. Seven-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to left carotid artery ligation followed by a 2-h exposure to 8% oxygen and 92% nitrogen. Diazepam was administered immediately via intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection after inducing HIBD at a dose of 10 mg kg(-1)8h(-1) for three consecutive days. Three days after HIBD, rats were decapitated, and the extent of brain injury was evaluated using 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. Additionally, the expression of Potassium-chloride cotransporter-2 (KCC2) was analysed using real-time PCR, Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Three weeks after HIBD, rats were subjected to the Morris water maze (MWM) test and the locomotor activity test to determine the long-term therapeutic effects of Diazepam. We observed that the volume of infarction in the Diazepam group was significantly less (PDiazepam rats improved significantly compared with the untreated rats (PDiazepam appears to attenuate HIBD and can efficiently improve the long-term learning and memory capabilities of the animal. A potential mechanism underlying these effects may involve preventing the decrease in KCC2 expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain Tissue PO2 Measurement During Normoxia and Hypoxia Using Two-Photon Phosphorescence Lifetime Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kui; Boas, David A; Sakadžić, Sava; LaManna, Joseph C

    2017-01-01

    Key to the understanding of the principles of physiological and structural acclimatization to changes in the balance between energy supply (represented by substrate and oxygen delivery, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation) and energy demand (initiated by neuronal activity) is to determine the controlling variables, how they are sensed and the mechanisms initiated to maintain the balance. The mammalian brain depends completely on continuous delivery of oxygen to maintain its function. We hypothesized that tissue oxygen is the primary sensed variable. In this study two-photon phosphorescence lifetime microscopy (2PLM) was used to determine and define the tissue oxygen tension field within the cerebral cortex of mice to a cortical depth of between 200-250 μm under normoxia and acute hypoxia (FiO 2  = 0.10). High-resolution images can provide quantitative distributions of oxygen and intercapillary oxygen gradients. The data are best appreciated by quantifying the distribution histogram that can then be used for analysis. For example, in the brain cortex of a mouse, at a depth of 200 μm, tissue oxygen tension was mapped and the distribution histogram was compared under normoxic and mild hypoxic conditions. This powerful method can provide for the first time a description of the delivery and availability of brain oxygen in vivo.

  7. Quantitative analysis of brain metabolites concentrations using MR spectroscopy in acute hypoxia ischemic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Yeyu; Wang HaiYu; Shen Zhiwei; Lin Yan; Chen Yaowen; Xiao Gang; Wu Renhua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the absolute quantification of brain metabolites concentrations using external standard MRS in acute hypoxia ischemia encephalopathy (HIE) piglet model. Method: Eight 7-day-old healthy piglets were subjected to insult of hypoxia ischemia (HI). The animals and an external standard phantom containing detectable metabolites of known concentrations were studied on a 1.5 T GE Signa scanner. The single-voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H-MRS) data were processed using LCModel software, and the quantification of N-acetylaspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr) and lactate (Lac) were accomplished. Multivariate analysis of variance was performed to compare the NAA, Cr, Lac concentration differences in the brains of piglets pre- and post-HI (0h). In addition, the dynamic changes of brain metabolites concentrations of 2 HIE piglets were observed at the time points of 0 h and 2 h. Results: One piglet was excluded because it was over anesthetized to death. Seven piglets' data were analyzed. The concentrations of NAA pre- and post-HI were (6.86±0.49) mmol/kg and (5.73±0.88) mmol/kg respectively, they were (4.65±0.73) mmol/kg and (4.40±0.80) mmol/kg for Cr; and were 0.00 mmol/kg and (0.43±0.39) mmol/kg for Lac. After HI, decreased NAA concentration immediately was observed, and it was of statistical significance (F=8.608, P=0.013). The concentration of Cr was insignificantly decreased (F=0.379, P=0.550). The concentration of Lac was increased, and the difference was of statistical significance (F=8.600, P=0.013). Dynamic observation showed a Lac peak immediately after HI and it decreased after 2 h post-HI. Conclusions: External standard MRS using LCModel has great value in the quantitative analysis of brain metabolites. The changes of NAA and Lac concentrations are sensitive to reflect the early metabolic change of acute HIE. (authors)

  8. Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Key Metabolic Changes in the Hooded Seal (Cystophora cristata Brain in Response to Hypoxia and Reoxygenation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Leivas Müller Hoff

    Full Text Available The brain of diving mammals tolerates low oxygen conditions better than the brain of most terrestrial mammals. Previously, it has been demonstrated that the neurons in brain slices of the hooded seal (Cystophora cristata withstand hypoxia longer than those of mouse, and also tolerate reduced glucose supply and high lactate concentrations. This tolerance appears to be accompanied by a shift in the oxidative energy metabolism to the astrocytes in the seal while in terrestrial mammals the aerobic energy production mainly takes place in neurons. Here, we used RNA-Seq to compare the effect of hypoxia and reoxygenation in vitro on brain slices from the visual cortex of hooded seals. We saw no general reduction of gene expression, suggesting that the response to hypoxia and reoxygenation is an actively regulated process. The treatments caused the preferential upregulation of genes related to inflammation, as found before e.g. in stroke studies using mammalian models. Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses showed a downregulation of genes involved in ion transport and other neuronal processes, indicative for a neuronal shutdown in response to a shortage of O2 supply. These differences may be interpreted in terms of an energy saving strategy in the seal's brain. We specifically analyzed the regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism. Hypoxia and reoxygenation caused a similar response, with upregulation of genes involved in glucose metabolism and downregulation of the components of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. We also observed upregulation of the monocarboxylate transporter Mct4, suggesting increased lactate efflux. Together, these data indicate that the seal brain responds to the hypoxic challenge by a relative increase in the anaerobic energy metabolism.

  9. Intermittent hypoxia hypobaric exposure minimized oxidative stress and antioxidants in brain cells of Sprague Dawleymice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wardaya Wardaya

    2013-05-01

    antioxidants in Sprague Dawley male mice.Methods: The experimental study was in February-April 2010 consisted of one control group and four exposed groups of male mice Sprague Dawley. Each groups consisted of 5 mice. The control group did not have IHH. The exposed groups (with an interval of one week had once, twice, three, or four times IHH using a chamber flight. All exposed groups were treated hypobaric equivalent to: 35,000 ft altitude (1 minutes, 25,000 ft (5 minutes, and 18,000 ft (25 minutes. All of their brains had 8-OHdG and SOD measured.Results: The 8-OHdG level among three time IHH exposures had already returned to the control value (P = 0.843. The SOD level increased progressively among two, three, and four times IHH. However after the second exposure, it was found that the SOD level was similar to the control value, 0.231 ± 0.042 (P = 0.191.Conclusion: In conclusion, three times of IHH may improve the effect of hypoxia hypobaric on oxidative stress and specific activity of antioxidants in Sprague Dawley male mice. The SOD level was increased at an earlier exposure, which was after one IHH exposure.Keywords: intermittent hypoxia hypobaric, oxidative stress, antioxidants

  10. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 in cultured brain slices after oxygen-glucose deprivation☆

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Hong; Han, Weijuan; Yang, Lijun; Chang, Yanzhong

    2013-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1 expressed in oligodendrocytes may trigger the repair of neuronal myelin impairment, and play a crucial role in myelin repair. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α, a transcription factor, is of great significance in premature infants with hypoxic-ischemic brain damage. There is little evidence of direct regulatory effects of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α on oligodendrocyte lineage gene-1. In this study, brain slices of Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured and subjected to oxy...

  11. Cognitive correlates of narrative impairment in moderate traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Andrea; Zettin, Marina; Galetto, Valentina

    2014-11-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are often associated with communicative deficits. The incoherent and impoverished language observed in non-aphasic individuals with severe TBI has been linked to a problem in the global organization of information at the text level. The present study aimed to analyze the features of narrative discourse impairment in a group of adults with moderate TBI (modTBI). 10 non-aphasic speakers with modTBI and 20 neurologically intact participants were recruited for the experiment. Their cognitive, linguistic and narrative skills were thoroughly assessed. The persons with modTBI exhibited normal phonological, lexical and grammatical skills. However, their narratives were characterized by lower levels of Lexical Informativeness and more errors of both Local and Global Coherence that, at times, made their narratives vague and ambiguous. Significant correlations were found between these narrative difficulties and the production of both perseverative and non-perseverative errors on the WCST. These disturbances confirm previous findings which suggest a deficit at the interface between cognitive and linguistic processing rather than a specific linguistic disturbance in these patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Preferred temperature of juvenile Atlantic cod Gadus morhua with different haemoglobin genotypes at normoxia and moderate hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, M.F.; Steffensen, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    .2+/-1.5 degrees C while HbI-1 cod preferred 15.4+/-1.1 degrees C, and this preference was significant. The effect of hypoxia (35% oxygen saturation) on the preferred temperature was also measured. Previous studies showed that the preferred temperature of fish decreases during hypoxia, and this was the case for Hb......I-1 cod, which preferred 9.8+/-1.8 degrees C during hypoxia, whereas HbI-2 cod did not show this effect. The results indicate that environmental temperature changes will lead to a distributional change in the different haemoglobin types of Atlantic cod, global warming providing an advantage for HbI-1...... cod. However, since HbI-1 cod prefer a low temperature under hypoxic conditions, a combination of increased water temperature and hypoxia could be unfavourable for Atlantic cod stocks....

  13. Long-Term Intermittent Hypoxia Elevates Cobalt Levels in the Brain and Injures White Matter in Adult Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veasey, Sigrid C.; Lear, Jessica; Zhu, Yan; Grinspan, Judith B.; Hare, Dominic J.; Wang, SiHe; Bunch, Dustin; Doble, Philip A.; Robinson, Stephen R.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Exposure to the variable oxygenation patterns in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes oxidative stress within the brain. We hypothesized that this stress is associated with increased levels of redox-active metals and white matter injury. Design: Participants were randomly allocated to a control or experimental group (single independent variable). Setting: University animal house. Participants: Adult male C57BL/6J mice. Interventions: To model OSA, mice were exposed to long-term intermittent hypoxia (LTIH) for 10 hours/day for 8 weeks or sham intermittent hypoxia (SIH). Measurements and Results: Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used to quantitatively map the distribution of the trace elements cobalt, copper, iron, and zinc in forebrain sections. Control mice contained 62 ± 7 ng cobalt/g wet weight, whereas LTIH mice contained 5600 ± 600 ng cobalt/g wet weight (P Cobalt was concentrated within white matter regions of the brain, including the corpus callosum. Compared to that of control mice, the corpus callosum of LTIH mice had significantly more endoplasmic reticulum stress, fewer myelin-associated proteins, disorganized myelin sheaths, and more degenerated axon profiles. Because cobalt is an essential component of vitamin B12, serum methylmalonic acid (MMA) levels were measured. LTIH mice had low MMA levels (P cobalt, predominantly in the white matter. The increased cobalt is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, myelin loss, and axonal injury. Low plasma methylmalonic acid levels are associated with white matter injury in long-term intermittent hypoxia and possibly in obstructive sleep apnea. Citation: Veasey SC; Lear J; Zhu Y; Grinspan JB; Hare DJ; Wang S; Bunch D; Doble PA; Robinson SR. Long-term intermittent hypoxia elevates cobalt levels in the brain and injures white matter in adult mice. SLEEP 2013;36(10):1471-1481. PMID:24082306

  14. Vitexin reduces hypoxia-ischemia neonatal brain injury by the inhibition of HIF-1alpha in a rat pup model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Jia-Wei; Hu, Jiang-Jian; He, Miao; Sanchez, Russell M; Huang, Wen-Xian; Liu, Yu-Qiang; Bsoul, Najeeb Bassam; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Liu, Wan-Hong; He, Xiao-Hua; Peng, Bi-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the early suppression of HIF-1α after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) injury provides neuroprotection. Vitexin (5, 7, 4-trihydroxyflavone-8-glucoside), an HIF-1α inhibitor, is a c-glycosylated flavone that has been identified in medicinal plants. Therefore, we hypothesized that treatment with vitexin would protect against HI brain injury. Newborn rat pups were subjected to unilateral carotid artery ligation followed by 2.5 h of hypoxia (8% O2 at 37 °C). Vitexin (30, 45 or 60 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally at 5 min or 3 h after HI. Vitexin, administered 5 min after HI, was neuroprotective as seen by decreased infarct volume evaluated at 48 h post-HI. This neuroprotection was removed when vitexin was administered 3 h after HI. Neuronal cell death, blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, brain edema, HIF-1α and VEGF protein levels were evaluated using a combination of Nissl staining, IgG staining, brain water content, immunohistochemistry and Western blot at 24 and 48 h after HI. The long-term effects of vitexin were evaluated by brain atrophy measurement, Nissl staining and neurobehavioral tests. Vitexin (45 mg/kg) ameliorated brain edema, BBB disruption and neuronal cell death; Upregulation of HIF-1α by dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) increased the BBB permeability and brain edema compared to HI alone. Vitexin attenuated the increase in HIF-1α and VEGF. Vitexin also had long-term effects of protecting against the loss of ipsilateral brain and improveing neurobehavioral outcomes. In conclusion, our data indicate early HIF-1α inhibition with vitexin provides both acute and long-term neuroprotection in the developing brain after neonatal HI injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hypoxia Stress Modifies Na/K-ATPase, H/K-ATPase, , and Isoform Expression in the Brain of Immune-Challenged Air-Breathing Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MC Subhash Peter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fishes are equipped to sense stressful stimuli and are able to respond to environmental stressor such as hypoxia with varying pattern of stress response. The functional attributes of brain to hypoxia stress in relation to ion transport and its interaction during immune challenge have not yet delineated in fish. We, therefore, explored the pattern of ion transporter functions and messenger RNA (mRNA expression of α1-subunit isoforms of Na + /K + -ATPase (NKA in the brain segments, namely, prosencephalon (PC, mesencephalon (MC, and metencephalon (MeC in an obligate air-breathing fish exposed either to hypoxia stress (30 minutes forced immersion in water or challenged with zymosan treatment (25-200 ng g −1 for 24 hours or both. Zymosan that produced nonspecific immune responses evoked differential regulation of NKA, H + /K + -ATPase (HKA, and Na + / NH 4 + - ATPase (NNA in the varied brain segments. On the contrary, hypoxia stress that demanded activation of NKA in PC and MeC showed a reversed NKA activity pattern in MeC of immune-challenged fish. A compromised HKA and NNA regulation during hypoxia stress was found in immune-challenged fish, indicating the role of these brain ion transporters to hypoxia stress and immune challenges. The differential mRNA expression of α1-subunit isoforms of NKA, nkaα1a , nkaα1b , and nkaα1c , in hypoxia-stressed brain showed a shift in its expression pattern during hypoxia stress-immune interaction in PC and MC. Evidence is thus presented for the first time that ion transporters such as HKA and NNA along with NKA act as functional brain markers which respond differentially to both hypoxia stress and immune challenges. Taken together, the data further provide evidence for a differential Na + , K + , H + , and NH 4 + ion signaling that exists in brain neuronal clusters during hypoxia stress-immune interaction as a result of modified regulations of NKA, HKA, and NNA transporter functions and nkaα1 isoform

  16. [Mechanism of potassium channel in hypoxia-ischemic brain edema: experiment with neonatal rat astrocyte].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xue-mei; Xiang, Long; Liao, Da-qing; Feng, Zhi-chun; Mu, De-zhi

    2008-11-04

    To investigate the mechanism of potassium channel in brain edema caused by hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Astrocytes were obtained from 3-day-old SD rats, cultured, and randomly divided into 2 groups: normoxia group, cultured under normoxic condition, and hypoxic-ischemic group, cultured under hypoxic-ischemic condition. The cell volume was measured by radiologic method. Patch-clamp technique was used to observe the electric physiological properties of the voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) in a whole cell configuration, and the change of voltage-gated potassium channel current (IKv) was recorded in cultured neonatal rat astrocyte during HI. Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression vector was constructed from pSUPER vector and transfected into the astrocytes (AQP4 RNAi) to construct AQP4 knockdown (AQP4-/-) cells. cellular volume was determined using [3H]-3-O-methyl-D-glucose uptake in both AQP4-/- and AQP4+/+ cells under the condition of HI. Real time PCR and Western blotting were used to detect the mRNA and protein expression of AQP4. The percentages of the AQP4+/+ and AQP4-/- astrocyte volumes in the condition of HI for 0.5, 1, 2, and 4 h were 104+/-7, 109+/-6, 126+/-12, and 152+/-9 times, and 97+/-7, 105+/-9, 109+/-7, and 132+/-6 times as those of their corresponding control groups (all Pastrocytes significantly increased during HI and the degrees of edema mediated by AQP4 knockdown at different time points were all significantly milder (all Pastrocytes via aquaporin-4 and then cell swelling.

  17. SPECT brain perfusion abnormalities in mild or moderate traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Dayem, H M; Abu-Judeh, H; Kumar, M; Atay, S; Naddaf, S; El-Zeftawy, H; Luo, J Q

    1998-05-01

    The purpose of this atlas is to present a review of the literature showing the advantages of SPECT brain perfusion imaging (BPI) in mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) over other morphologic imaging modalities such as x-ray CT or MRI. The authors also present the technical recommendations for SPECT brain perfusion currently practiced at their center. For the radiopharmaceutical of choice, a comparison between early and delayed images using Tc-99m HMPAO and Tc-99m ECD showed that Tc-99m HMPAO is more stable in the brain with no washout over time. Therefore, the authors feel that Tc-99m HMPAO is preferable to Tc-99m ECD. Recommendations regarding standardizing intravenous injection, the acquisition, processing parameters, and interpretation of scans using a ten grade color scale, and use of the cerebellum as the reference organ are presented. SPECT images of 228 patients (age range, 11 to 88; mean, 40.8 years) with mild or moderate TBI and no significant medical history that interfered with the results of the SPECT BP were reviewed. The etiology of the trauma was in the following order of frequency: motor vehicle accidents (45%) followed by blow to the head (36%) and a fall (19%). Frequency of the symptoms was headache (60.9%), memory problems (27.6%), dizziness (26.7%), and sleep disorders (8.7%). Comparison between patients imaged early (3 months) from the time of the accident, showed that early imaging detected more lesions (4.2 abnormal lesions per study compared to 2.7 in those imaged more than 3 months after the accident). Of 41 patients who had mild traumatic injury without loss of consciousness and had normal CT, 28 studies were abnormal. Focal areas of hypoperfusion were seen in 77% (176 patients, 612 lesions) of the group of 228 patients. The sites of abnormalities were in the following order: basal ganglia and thalami, 55.2%, frontal lobes, 23.8%, temporal lobes, 13%, parietal, 3.7%, insular and occipital lobes together, 4.6%.

  18. Outcome Prediction in Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Focus on Computed Tomography Variables

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, Bram; Beems, Tjemme; van der Vliet, Ton M.; van Vugt, Arie B.; Hoedemaekers, Cornelia; Horn, Janneke; Franschman, Gaby; Haitsma, Ian; van der Naalt, Joukje; Andriessen, Teuntje M. J. C.; Borm, George F.; Vos, Pieter E.

    2013-01-01

    With this study we aimed to design validated outcome prediction models in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) using demographic, clinical, and radiological parameters. Seven hundred consecutive moderate or severe TBI patients were included in this observational prospective cohort study.

  19. Early-Onset Convulsive Seizures Induced by Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia in Aging Mice: Effects of Anticonvulsive Treatments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Wang

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with an increased risk of seizures/epilepsy. Stroke (ischemic or hemorrhagic and cardiac arrest related brain injury are two major causative factors for seizure development in this patient population. With either etiology, seizures are a poor prognostic factor. In spite of this, the underlying pathophysiology of seizure development is not well understood. In addition, a standardized treatment regimen with anticonvulsants and outcome assessments following treatment has yet to be established for these post-ischemic seizures. Previous studies have modeled post-ischemic seizures in adult rodents, but similar studies in aging/aged animals, a group that mirrors a higher risk elderly population, remain sparse. Our study therefore aimed to investigate early-onset seizures in aging animals using a hypoxia-ischemia (HI model. Male C57 black mice 18-20-month-old underwent a unilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery followed by a systemic hypoxic episode (8% O2 for 30 min. Early-onset seizures were detected using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic (EEG monitoring. Brain injury was assessed histologically at different times post HI. Convulsive seizures were observed in 65% of aging mice post-HI but not in control aging mice following either sham surgery or hypoxia alone. These seizures typically occurred within hours of HI and behaviorally consisted of jumping, fast running, barrel-rolling, and/or falling (loss of the righting reflex with limb spasms. No evident discharges during any convulsive seizures were seen on cortical-hippocampal EEG recordings. Seizure development was closely associated with acute mortality and severe brain injury on brain histological analysis. Intra-peritoneal injections of lorazepam and fosphenytoin suppressed seizures and improved survival but only when applied prior to seizure onset and not after. These findings together suggest that seizures are a major contributing factor to acute

  20. Effect of moderate hypoxia at three acclimation temperatures on stress responses in Atlantic cod with different haemoglobin types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Methling, Caroline; Aluru, Neelakanteswar; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2010-01-01

    in a difference in stress response to hypoxia exposure. Two hsp70-isoforms (labelled a and b) were detected and they differed in expression in the gills but not in the liver of Atlantic cod. Acclimation temperature significantly affected the expression of hsp70 in the liver, and in an isoform-specific manner...... in the gills. Hypoxia exposure increased the expression of hsp70 in the liver, but not the gills, of cod and this response was not influenced by the acclimation temperature. The expression of hsp70 in both tissues did not differ between fish with different haemoglobin types. Acclimation temperature...... hypoxic exposure influence the organismal and cellular stress responses in Atlantic cod. We hypothesise that HbI-2 fish are more tolerant to short-term hypoxic episodes than HbI-1 fish, and this adaptation may be independent of tissue hsp70 expression....

  1. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates microglial activation and production of inflammatory mediators in neonatal rat brain following hypoxia: role of TLR4 in hypoxic microglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypoxia induces microglial activation which causes damage to the developing brain. Microglia derived inflammatory mediators may contribute to this process. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) has been reported to induce microglial activation and cytokines production in brain injuries; however, its role in hypoxic injury remains uncertain. We investigate here TLR4 expression and its roles in neuroinflammation in neonatal rats following hypoxic injury. Methods One day old Wistar rats were subjected to hypoxia for 2 h. Primary cultured microglia and BV-2 cells were subjected to hypoxia for different durations. TLR4 expression in microglia was determined by RT-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection and antibody neutralization were employed to downregulate TLR4 in BV-2 and primary culture. mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was assessed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) and NF-κB levels were determined by flow cytometry, colorimetric and ELISA assays respectively. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) mRNA and protein expression was quantified and where necessary, the protein expression was depleted by antibody neutralization. In vivo inhibition of TLR4 with CLI-095 injection was carried out followed by investigation of inflammatory mediators expression via double immunofluorescence staining. Results TLR4 immunofluorescence and protein expression in the corpus callosum and cerebellum in neonatal microglia were markedly enhanced post-hypoxia. In vitro, TLR4 protein expression was significantly increased in both primary microglia and BV-2 cells post-hypoxia. TLR4 neutralization in primary cultured microglia attenuated the hypoxia-induced expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and iNOS. siRNA knockdown of TLR4 reduced hypoxia-induced upregulation of TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS, ROS and NO in BV-2 cells. TLR4

  2. Toll-like receptor 4 mediates microglial activation and production of inflammatory mediators in neonatal rat brain following hypoxia: role of TLR4 in hypoxic microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Linli

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoxia induces microglial activation which causes damage to the developing brain. Microglia derived inflammatory mediators may contribute to this process. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 has been reported to induce microglial activation and cytokines production in brain injuries; however, its role in hypoxic injury remains uncertain. We investigate here TLR4 expression and its roles in neuroinflammation in neonatal rats following hypoxic injury. Methods One day old Wistar rats were subjected to hypoxia for 2 h. Primary cultured microglia and BV-2 cells were subjected to hypoxia for different durations. TLR4 expression in microglia was determined by RT-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Small interfering RNA (siRNA transfection and antibody neutralization were employed to downregulate TLR4 in BV-2 and primary culture. mRNA and protein expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS was assessed. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, nitric oxide (NO and NF-κB levels were determined by flow cytometry, colorimetric and ELISA assays respectively. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α mRNA and protein expression was quantified and where necessary, the protein expression was depleted by antibody neutralization. In vivo inhibition of TLR4 with CLI-095 injection was carried out followed by investigation of inflammatory mediators expression via double immunofluorescence staining. Results TLR4 immunofluorescence and protein expression in the corpus callosum and cerebellum in neonatal microglia were markedly enhanced post-hypoxia. In vitro, TLR4 protein expression was significantly increased in both primary microglia and BV-2 cells post-hypoxia. TLR4 neutralization in primary cultured microglia attenuated the hypoxia-induced expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and iNOS. siRNA knockdown of TLR4 reduced hypoxia-induced upregulation of TNF-α, IL-1β, iNOS, ROS and

  3. Acute effects of walking at moderate normobaric hypoxia on gait and balance performance in healthy community-dwelling seniors: A randomized controlled crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, Scott N; Faude, Oliver; de Fay du Lavallaz, Emilie; Allemann, Remo; Nève, Gilles; Donath, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Hiking at moderate altitude is a popular outdoor activity in seniors. Acute exercise or altitude can diminish balance performance. Thus, the present study examined the combined effects of altitude and walking on static and dynamic balance. Thirty-six healthy seniors (age: 62 (SD: 4) y; BMI: 25 (5) kg/m(2)) were examined on three days. Firstly, walking velocity was determined at 85% of the first ventilatory threshold (VT1). Therefore, a ramp walking test on a treadmill was completed. On day two or three, a 40-minute treadmill walk under sea level or normobaric hypoxia (2600m) was performed using a random, double-blind study design. Balance performance was assessed on a force-plate during single leg stance with eyes open (SLEO, 10s on a force-plate) immediately before and after walking. Spatio-temporal gait characteristics were collected during walking at 5 and 35min. Condition×time interaction effects were not found for either parameter (0.13moderate time×condition effect was observed for postural sway during SLEO (p=0.04, ηp(2)=0.11). Subseqent post hoc testing revealed difference between hypoxia and normoxia at 35min (p=0.01) and between 5 and 35min testing during hypoxia and normoxia (both p<0.001). Alterations of cadence, stride time, and temporal gait variability might be attributed to fatigue-induced changes of temporal gait adjustments. Normobaric hypoxia did not acutely impair gait patterns. We assume that demanding postural standing tasks that require more central control may be affected to a greater extent by altitude exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. High-Field MRI Reveals a Drastic Increase of Hypoxia-Induced Microhemorrhages upon Tissue Reoxygenation in the Mouse Brain with Strong Predominance in the Olfactory Bulb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helluy, Xavier; Milford, David; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Human pathophysiology of high altitude hypoxic brain injury is not well understood and research on the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the lack of well-characterized animal models. In this study, we explored the evolution of brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological methods in mice exposed to normobaric hypoxia at 8% oxygen for 48 hours followed by rapid reoxygenation and incubation for further 24 h under normoxic conditions. T2*-, diffusion-weighted and T2-relaxometry MRI was performed before exposure, immediately after 48 hours of hypoxia and 24 hours after reoxygenation. Cerebral microhemorrhages, previously described in humans suffering from severe high altitude cerebral edema, were also detected in mice upon hypoxia-reoxygenation with a strong region-specific clustering in the olfactory bulb, and to a lesser extent, in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. The number of microhemorrhages determined immediately after hypoxia was low, but strongly increased 24 hours upon onset of reoxygenation. Histologically verified microhemorrhages were exclusively located around cerebral microvessels with disrupted interendothelial tight junction protein ZO-1. In contrast, quantitative T2 and apparent-diffusion-coefficient values immediately after hypoxia and after 24 hours of reoxygenation did not show any region-specific alteration, consistent with subtle multifocal but not with regional or global brain edema. PMID:26863147

  5. Effects of maternal separation on behavior and brain damage in adult rats exposed to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Despina A; Markostamou, Ioanna; Ioannidis, Anestis; Gkioka, Mara; Simeonidou, Constantina; Anogianakis, Georgios; Spandou, Evangelia

    2015-03-01

    Animal studies suggest that maternal separation, a widely used paradigm to study the effects of early life adversity, exerts a profound and life-long impact on both brain and behavior. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether adverse early life experiences interact with neonatal hypoxia-ischemia, affecting the outcome of this neurological insult at both functional and structural levels during adulthood. Rat pups were separated from their mothers during postnatal days 1-6, for either a short (15 min) or prolonged (180 min) period, while another group was left undisturbed. On postnatal day 7, a subgroup from each of the three postnatal manipulations was exposed to a hypoxic-ischemic episode. Behavioral examination took place approximately at three months of age and included tests of learning and memory (Morris water maze, novel object and novel place recognition), as well as motor coordination (rota-rod). We found that both prolonged maternal separation and neonatal hypoxia-ischemia impaired the animals' spatial learning and reference memory. Deficits in spatial but not visual recognition memory were detected only in hypoxic-ischemic rats. Interestingly, prolonged maternal separation prior to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia augmented the reference memory impairments. Histological analysis of infarct size, hippocampal area and thickness of corpus callosum did not reveal any exacerbation of damage in hypoxic-ischemic rats that were maternally separated for a prolonged period. These are the first data suggesting that an adverse postnatal environmental manipulation of just 6 days causes long-term effects on spatial learning and memory and may render the organism more vulnerable to a subsequent insult. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Adult naked mole-rat brain retains the NMDA receptor subunit GluN2D associated with hypoxia tolerance in neonatal mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Bethany L; Park, Thomas J; Larson, John

    2012-01-11

    Adult naked mole-rats show a number of systemic adaptations to a crowded underground habitat that is low in oxygen and high in carbon dioxide. Remarkably, brain slice tissue from adult naked mole-rats also is extremely tolerant to oxygen deprivation as indicated by maintenance of synaptic transmission under hypoxic conditions as well as by a delayed neuronal depolarization during anoxia. These characteristics resemble hypoxia tolerance in brain slices from neonates in a variety of mammal species. An important component of neonatal tolerance to hypoxia involves the subunit composition of NMDA receptors. Neonates have a high proportion of NMDA receptors with GluN2D subunits which are protective because they retard calcium entry into neurons during hypoxic episodes. Therefore, we hypothesized that adult naked mole-rats retain a protective, neonatal-like, NMDA receptor subunit profile. We used immunoblotting to assess age-related changes in NMDA receptor subunits in naked mole-rats and mice. The results show that adult naked mole-rat brain retains a much greater proportion of the hypoxia-protective GluN2D subunit compared to adult mice. However, age-related changes in other subunits (GluN2A and GluN2B) from the neonatal period to adulthood were comparable in mice and naked mole-rats. Hence, adult naked mole-rat brain only retains the neonatal NMDA receptor subunit that is associated with hypoxia tolerance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Evolving changes in fetal heart rate variability and brain injury after hypoxia-ischaemia in preterm fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kyohei; Lear, Christopher A; Beacom, Michael J; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Gunn, Alistair J; Bennet, Laura

    2018-01-08

    Fetal heart rate variability is a critical index of fetal wellbeing. Suppression of heart rate variability may provide prognostic information on the risk of hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury after birth. In the present study, we report the evolution of fetal heart rate variability after both mild and severe hypoxia-ischaemia. Both mild and severe hypoxia-ischaemia were associated with an initial, brief suppression of multiple measures of heart rate variability. This was followed by normal or increased levels of heart rate variability during the latent phase of injury. Severe hypoxia-ischaemia was subsequently associated with the prolonged suppression of measures of heart rate variability during the secondary phase of injury, which is the period of time when brain injury is no longer treatable. These findings suggest that a biphasic pattern of heart rate variability may be an early marker of brain injury when treatment or intervention is probably most effective. Hypoxia-ischaemia (HI) is a major contributor to preterm brain injury, although there are currently no reliable biomarkers for identifying infants who are at risk. We tested the hypothesis that fetal heart rate (FHR) and FHR variability (FHRV) would identify evolving brain injury after HI. Fetal sheep at 0.7 of gestation were subjected to either 15 (n = 10) or 25 min (n = 17) of complete umbilical cord occlusion or sham occlusion (n = 12). FHR and four measures of FHRV [short-term variation, long-term variation, standard deviation of normal to normal R-R intervals (SDNN), root mean square of successive differences) were assessed until 72 h after HI. All measures of FHRV were suppressed for the first 3-4 h in the 15 min group and 1-2 h in the 25 min group. Measures of FHRV recovered to control levels by 4 h in the 15 min group, whereas the 25 min group showed tachycardia and an increase in short-term variation and SDNN from 4 to 6 h after occlusion. The measures of FHRV then progressively

  8. Hypoxia-induced lipid peroxidation in the brain during postnatal ontogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rauchová, Hana; Vokurková, Martina; Koudelová, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, Suppl.1 (2012), S89-S101 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510; GA ČR(CZ) GAP304/12/0259 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : hypobaric hypoxia * reactive oxygen species (ROS) * polyunsaturated fatty acids * Na * K- ATPase * catalase * L-carnitine Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  9. Hypoxia-Mediated Epigenetic Regulation of Stemness in Brain Tumor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Pankaj; Mittal, Shivani Arora; Chongtham, Jonita; Mohanty, Sujata; Srivastava, Tapasya

    2017-06-01

    Activation of pluripotency regulatory circuit is an important event in solid tumor progression and the hypoxic microenvironment is known to enhance the stemness feature of some cells. The distinct population of cancer stem cells (CSCs)/tumor initiating cells exist in a niche and augment invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance. Previously, studies have reported global hypomethylation and site-specific aberrant methylation in gliomas along with other epigenetic modifications as important contributors to genomic instability during glioma progression. Here, we have demonstrated the role of hypoxia-mediated epigenetic modifications in regulating expression of core pluripotency factors, OCT4 and NANOG, in glioma cells. We observe hypoxia-mediated induction of demethylases, ten-eleven-translocation (TET) 1 and 3, but not TET2 in our cell-line model. Immunoprecipitation studies reveal active demethylation and direct binding of TET1 and 3 at the Oct4 and Nanog regulatory regions. Tet1 and 3 silencing assays further confirmed induction of the pluripotency pathway involving Oct4, Nanog, and Stat3, by these paralogues, although with varying degrees. Knockdown of Tet1 and Tet3 inhibited the formation of neurospheres in hypoxic conditions. We observed independent roles of TET1 and TET3 in differentially regulating pluripotency and differentiation associated genes in hypoxia. Overall, this study demonstrates an active demethylation in hypoxia by TET1 and 3 as a mechanism of Oct4 and Nanog overexpression thus contributing to the formation of CSCs in gliomas. Stem Cells 2017;35:1468-1478. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  10. Ageing and chronic intermittent hypoxia mimicking sleep apnea do not modify local brain tissue stiffness in healthy mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorba, Ignasi; Menal, Maria José; Torres, Marta; Gozal, David; Piñol-Ripoll, Gerard; Colell, Anna; Montserrat, Josep M; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon; Almendros, Isaac

    2017-07-01

    Recent evidence suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase the risk of Alzheimer´s disease (AD), with the latter promoting alterations in brain tissue stiffness, a feature of ageing. Here, we assessed the effects of age and intermittent hypoxia (IH) on brain tissue stiffness in a mouse model of OSA. Two-month-old and 18-month-old mice (N=10 each) were subjected to IH (20% O 2 40s - 6% O 2 20s) for 8 weeks (6h/day). Corresponding control groups for each age were kept under normoxic conditions in room air (RA). After sacrifice, the brain was excised and 200-micron coronal slices were cut with a vibratome. Local stiffness of the cortex and hippocampus were assessed in brain slices placed in an Atomic Force Microscope. For both brain regions, the Young's modulus (E) in each animal was computed as the average values from 9 force-indentation curves. Cortex E mean (±SE) values were 442±122Pa (RA) and 455±120 (IH) for young mice and 433±44 (RA) and 405±101 (IH) for old mice. Hippocampal E values were 376±62 (RA) and 474±94 (IH) for young mice and 486±93 (RA) and 521±210 (IH) for old mice. For both cortex and hippocampus, 2-way ANOVA indicated no statistically significant effects of age or challenge (IH vs. RA) on E values. Thus, neither chronic IH mimicking OSA nor ageing up to late middle age appear to modify local brain tissue stiffness in otherwise healthy mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Statistical analysis plan for the Erythropoietin in Traumatic Brain Injury trial: a randomised controlled trial of erythropoietin versus placebo in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Presneill, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The Erythropoietin in Traumatic Brain Injury (EPO-TBI) trial aims to determine whether the administration of erythropoietin to patients with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury improves patient-centred outcomes.

  12. Feasibility of online self-administered cognitive training in moderate-severe brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhanu; Tomaszczyk, Jennifer C; Dawson, Deirdre; Turner, Gary R; Colella, Brenda; Green, Robin E A

    2017-07-01

    Cognitive environmental enrichment (C-EE) offers promise for offsetting neural decline that is observed in chronic moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Brain games are a delivery modality for C-EE that can be self-administered over the Internet without therapist oversight. To date, only one study has examined the feasibility of self-administered brain games in TBI, and the study focused predominantly on mild TBI. Therefore, the primary purpose of the current study was to examine the feasibility of self-administered brain games in moderate-severe TBI. A secondary and related purpose was to examine the feasibility of remote monitoring of any C-EE-induced adverse symptoms with a self-administered evaluation tool. Ten patients with moderate-severe TBI were asked to complete 12 weeks (60 min/day, five days/week) of online brain games with bi-weekly self-evaluation, intended to measure any adverse consequences of cognitive training (e.g., fatigue, eye strain). There was modest weekly adherence (42.6% ± 4.4%, averaged across patients and weeks) and 70% patient retention; of the seven retained patients, six completed the self-evaluation questionnaire at least once/week for each week of the study. Even patients with moderate-severe TBI can complete a demanding, online C-EE intervention and a self-administered symptom evaluation tool with limited therapist oversight, though at daily rate closer to 30 than 60 min per day. Further self-administered C-EE research is underway in our lab, with more extensive environmental support. Implications for Rehabilitation Online brain games (which may serve as a rehabilitation paradigm that can help offset the neurodegeneration observed in chronic TBI) can be feasibly self-administered by moderate-to-severe TBI patients. Brain games are a promising therapy modality, as they can be accessed by all moderate-to-severe TBI patients irrespective of geographic location, clinic and/or therapist availability, or impairments that

  13. Early environmental enrichment affects neurobehavioral development and prevents brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, Clarissa Pedrini; Diaz, Ramiro; Deckmann, Iohanna; Rojas, Joseane Jiménez; Deniz, Bruna Ferrary; Pereira, Lenir Orlandi

    2016-03-23

    Our previous results demonstrated improved cognition in adolescent rats housed in environmental enrichment (EE) that underwent neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of early EE on neurobehavioral development and brain damage in rats submitted to neonatal HI. Wistar rats were submitted to the HI procedure on the 7th postnatal day (PND) and housed in an enriched environment (8th-20th PND). The maturation of physical characteristics and the neurological reflexes were evaluated and the volume of striatum, corpus callosum and neocortex was measured. Data analysis demonstrated a clear effect of EE on neurobehavioral development; also, daily performance was improved in enriched rats on righting, negative geotaxis and cliff aversion reflex. HI caused a transient motor deficit on gait latency. Brain atrophy was found in HI animals and this damage was partially prevented by the EE. In conclusion, early EE stimulated neurobehavioral development in neonate rats and also protects the neocortex and the corpus callosum from atrophy following HI. These findings reinforce the potential of EE as a strategy for rehabilitation following neonatal HI and provide scientific support to the use of this therapeutic strategy in the treatment of neonatal brain injuries in humans. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Effect of transplants of retinal pigment epithelial cells from adult human eye on degenerative processes in the brain of rats with experimental acute hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova, M A; Kuznetsova, A V; Verdiev, B I; Milyushina-Rzhanova, L A; Sukhinich, K K

    2014-05-01

    Stimulation of cell regeneration in the brain and eye retina in various degenerative processes is a pressing problem in neurobiology. A promising approach is transplantation of somatic cells reprogrammed towards neural lineage. We studied the effect of transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells from adult human eye transdifferentiated in culture on degenerative processes in the brain of rats subjected to acute hypoxia. Immunohistochemical and molecular genetic analysis suggests that retinal pigment epithelial cells transdifferentiate in vitro and express markers of low-differentiated neural cells. The cells transplanted into rat brain survive for at least 20 days. During this period, they stimulate compensatory and reparative processes that protected cortical neurons in the recipients from hypoxia-induced degeneration.

  15. A History of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury affects Peripheral Pulse Oximetry during Normobaric Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard Temme

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Physiological and emotional stressors increase symptoms of concussion in recently injured individuals and both forms of stress induce symptoms in people recovering from mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI but who are asymptomatic when not stressed or are at rest. Methods: Healthy asymptomatic adults (25.0 ± 5.1 years with a history of mTBI (n = 36 and matched healthy controls (n = 36 with no mTBI history were exposed to three levels of normobaric hypoxic stress generated with the Reduced Oxygen Breathing Device (ROBD (Environics, Inc., Tollande, CT, which reduced the percent oxygen by mixing sea level air with nitrogen. The ROBD reduced the percent oxygen in the breathable air from the normal 21% to 15.5% O2, 14% O2, and 13% O2. Under these conditions: (a a standard pulse oximeter recorded peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2 and pulse rate (beats per minute, and (b the FIT (PMI, Inc., Rockville, MD recorded saccadic velocity and pupillary response dynamics to a brief light flash. Results: For all three hypoxic stress conditions the mTBI group had significantly higher SpO2 during the final minute of exposure than did the controls F(2.17,151.8 = 5.29, p < .001, η2 = .852 and the rate of SpO2 change over time was significantly shallower for the mTBI than for the controls F(2.3,161.3 = 2.863, p < .001, η2 = .569, Greenhouse-Geisser corrected. Overall, mTBI had lower pulse rate but the difference was only significant for the 14% O2 condition. FIT oculomotor measures were not sensitive to group differences. When exposed to mild or moderate normobaric hypoxic stress (15% O2: (1 SpO2 differences emerged between the mTBI and matched healthy controls, (2 heart rate trended lower in the mTBI group, and (3 FIT measures were not sensitive to group differences. Conclusion: A relatively minor hypoxic challenge can reveal measurable differences in SpO2 and heart rate in otherwise asymptomatic individuals with a history of mTBI.

  16. Brain tissue hypoxia and oxidative stress induced by obstructive apneas is different in young and aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmases, Mireia; Torres, Marta; Márquez-Kisinousky, Leonardo; Almendros, Isaac; Planas, Anna M; Embid, Cristina; Martínez-Garcia, Miguel Ángel; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon; Montserrat, Josep Maria

    2014-07-01

    To test the hypotheses that brain oxygen partial pressure (PtO2) in response to obstructive apneas changes with age and that it might lead to different levels of cerebral tissue oxidative stress. Prospective controlled animal study. University laboratory. Sixty-four male Wistar rats: 32 young (3 mo old) and 32 aged (18 mo). Protocol 1: Twenty-four animals were subjected to obstructive apneas (50 apneas/h, lasting 15 sec each) or to sham procedure for 50 min. Protocol 2: Forty rats were subjected to obstructive apneas or sham procedure for 4 h. Protocol 1: Real-time PtO2 measurements were performed using a fast-response oxygen microelectrode. During successive apneas cerebral cortex PtO2 presented a different pattern in the two age groups; there was a fast increase in young rats, whereas it remained without significant changes between the beginning and the end of the protocol in the aged group. Protocol 2: Brain oxidative stress assessed by lipid peroxidation increased after apneas in young rats (1.34 ± 0.17 nmol/mg of protein) compared to old ones (0.63 ± 0.03 nmol/mg), where a higher expression of antioxidant enzymes was observed. The results suggest that brain oxidative stress in aged rats is lower than in young rats in response to recurrent apneas, mimicking obstructive sleep apnea. This could be due to the different PtO2 response observed between age groups and the increased antioxidant expression in aged rats. Dalmases M, Torres M, Márquez-Kisinousky L, Almendros I, Planas AM, Embid C, Martínez-Garcia MA, Navajas D, Farré R, Montserrat JM. Brain tissue hypoxia and oxidative stress induced by obstructive apneas is different in young and aged rats.

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells induce T-cell tolerance and protect the preterm brain after global hypoxia-ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reint K Jellema

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE in preterm infants is a severe disease for which no curative treatment is available. Cerebral inflammation and invasion of activated peripheral immune cells have been shown to play a pivotal role in the etiology of white matter injury, which is the clinical hallmark of HIE in preterm infants. The objective of this study was to assess the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory effects of intravenously delivered mesenchymal stem cells (MSC in an ovine model of HIE. In this translational animal model, global hypoxia-ischemia (HI was induced in instrumented preterm sheep by transient umbilical cord occlusion, which closely mimics the clinical insult. Intravenous administration of 2 x 10(6 MSC/kg reduced microglial proliferation, diminished loss of oligodendrocytes and reduced demyelination, as determined by histology and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI, in the preterm brain after global HI. These anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of MSC were paralleled by reduced electrographic seizure activity in the ischemic preterm brain. Furthermore, we showed that MSC induced persistent peripheral T-cell tolerance in vivo and reduced invasion of T-cells into the preterm brain following global HI. These findings show in a preclinical animal model that intravenously administered MSC reduced cerebral inflammation, protected against white matter injury and established functional improvement in the preterm brain following global HI. Moreover, we provide evidence that induction of T-cell tolerance by MSC might play an important role in the neuroprotective effects of MSC in HIE. This is the first study to describe a marked neuroprotective effect of MSC in a translational animal model of HIE.

  18. Cannabidiol administration after hypoxia-ischemia to newborn rats reduces long-term brain injury and restores neurobehavioral function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, M R; Cinquina, V; Gómez, A; Layunta, R; Santos, M; Fernández-Ruiz, J; Martínez-Orgado, José

    2012-10-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) demonstrated short-term neuroprotective effects in the immature brain following hypoxia-ischemia (HI). We examined whether CBD neuroprotection is sustained over a prolonged period. Newborn Wistar rats underwent HI injury (10% oxygen for 120 min after left carotid artery electrocoagulation) and then received vehicle (HV, n = 22) or 1 mg/kg CBD (HC, n = 23). Sham animals were similarly treated (SV, n = 16 and SC, n = 16). The extent of brain damage was determined by magnetic resonance imaging, histological evaluation (neuropathological score, 0-5), magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Western blotting. Several neurobehavioral tests (RotaRod, cylinder rear test[CRT],and novel object recognition[NOR]) were carried out 30 days after HI (P37). CBD modulated brain excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammation seven days after HI. We observed that HI led to long-lasting functional impairment, as observed in all neurobehavioral tests at P37, whereas the results of HC animals were similar to those of sham animals (all p < 0.05 vs. HV). CBD reduced brain infarct volume by 17% (p < 0.05) and lessened the extent of histological damage. No differences were observed between the SV and SC groups in any of the experiments. In conclusion, CBD administration after HI injury to newborn rats led to long-lasting neuroprotection, with the overall effect of promoting greater functional rather than histological recovery. These effects of CBD were not associated with any side effects. These results emphasize the interest in CBD as a neuroprotective agent for neonatal HI. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Changes in phospholipids of the brain grey and white matter during in vitro autolysis in rats subjected to acute hypobaric hypoxic hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribanov, G A; Leshchenko, D V; Golovko, M Iu

    2004-01-01

    The development of autolysis in grey brain matter of albino rats was accompanied by desintegration of aminophospholipids with parallel increase of glycerophosphates (GLP) and phosphatidic acids (PA) on early stages of incubation and lysophospholipids (LPL) on later stages. Acute hypobaric hypoxic hypoxia decreased the level of phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) with simultaneous accumulation of PA. Previous hypoxia altered the character of autolytic reorganizations of phospholipids. Oscillatory reciprocal reorganizations in the system PE > PS (phosphatidylserine) were observed at early stage (1 h) and at late stages of autolysis (24 h). At the same time increased transformation of phosphatidylcholines (PC) into sphingomyelins (SM) with simultaneous accumulation GLP was registered. During autolysis of brain white matter of control rats opposite oscillatory reorganizations of PE, PC, SM, PA with reduction of PE and simultaneous increase of LPL and PA level after 1 hour of incubation were observed. Reciprocal reactions of biotransformation in system PS > PE were revealed at 4th hour. Previous hypobaric hypoxic hypoxia reduced the level of total phospholipids as well as PS at simultaneous increase of LPL. Acute hypobaric hypoxic hypoxia increased autolytic transformations in system PC > SM and induced hydrolysis of PE, PC into LPL at late stages of autolysis.

  20. Region-specific effects on brain metabolites of hypoxia and hyperoxia overlaid on cerebral ischemia in young and old rats: a quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliani Patricia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both hypoxia and hyperoxia, deregulating the oxidative balance, may play a role in the pathology of neurodegenerative disorders underlain by cerebral ischemia. In the present study, quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to evaluate regional metabolic alterations, following a 24-hour hypoxic or hyperoxic exposure on the background of ischemic brain insult, in two contrasting age-groups of rats: young - 3 months old and aged - 24 months old. Methods Cerebral ischemia was induced by ligation of the right common carotid artery. Concentrations of eight metabolites (alanine, choline-containing compounds, total creatine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate, lactate, myo-inositol and N-acetylaspartate were quantified from extracts in three different brain regions (fronto-parietal and occipital cortices and the hippocampus from both hemispheres. Results In the control normoxic condition, there were significant increases in lactate and myo-inositol concentrations in the hippocampus of the aged rats, compared with the respective values in the young ones. In the ischemia-hypoxia condition, the most prevalent changes in the brain metabolites were found in the hippocampal regions of both young and aged rats; but the effects were more evident in the aged animals. The ischemia-hyperoxia procedure caused less dedicated changes in the brain metabolites, which may reflect more limited tissue damage. Conclusions We conclude that the hippocampus turns out to be particularly susceptible to hypoxia overlaid on cerebral ischemia and that old age further increases this susceptibility.

  1. Assessing the relationship between neurocognitive performance and brain volume in chronic moderate-severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos eKonstantinou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Characterize the scale and pattern of long-term atrophy in grey matter (GM, white matter (WM and cerebrospinal (CSF in chronic moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI and its relationship to neurocognitive outcomes.Participants. The TBI group consisted of 17 males with primary diagnosis of moderate-severe closed head injury. Participants had not received any systematic, post-acute rehabilitation and were recruited on average 8.36 years post-injury. The control group consisted of 15 males matched on age and education.Main measures. Neurocognitive battery included widely used tests of verbal memory, visual memory, executive functioning, and attention/organization. GM,WM, and CSF volumes were calculated from segmented T1-weighted anatomical MR images. Voxel-based morphometry was employed to identify brain regions with differences in GM and WM between TBI and control groups.Results. Chronic TBI results in significant neurocognitive impairments, and significant loss of GM and WM volume, and significant increase in CSF volume. Brain atrophy is not widespread, but it is rather distributed in a fronto-thalamic network. The extent of volume loss is predictive of performance on the neurocognitive tests.Conclusion. Significant brain atrophy and associated neurocognitive impairments during the chronic stages of TBI support the notion that TBI results in a chronic condition with lifelong implications.

  2. Genetic variation in Aquaporin-4 moderates the relationship between sleep and brain Aβ-amyloid burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R; Mazzucchelli, Gavin N; Villemagne, Victor L; Brown, Belinda M; Porter, Tenielle; Weinborn, Michael; Bucks, Romola S; Milicic, Lidija; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Taddei, Kevin; Ames, David; Maruff, Paul; Masters, Colin L; Rowe, Christopher C; Salvado, Olivier; Martins, Ralph N; Laws, Simon M

    2018-02-26

    The glymphatic system is postulated to be a mechanism of brain Aβ-amyloid clearance and to be most effective during sleep. Ablation of the astrocytic end-feet expressed water-channel protein, Aquaporin-4, in mice, results in impairment of this clearance mechanism and increased brain Aβ-amyloid deposition, suggesting that Aquaporin-4 plays a pivotal role in glymphatic function. Currently there is a paucity of literature regarding the impact of AQP4 genetic variation on sleep, brain Aβ-amyloid burden and their relationship to each other in humans. To address this a cross-sectional observational study was undertaken in cognitively normal older adults from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers and Lifestyle (AIBL) study. Genetic variants in AQP4 were investigated with respect to self-reported Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index sleep parameters, positron emission tomography derived brain Aβ-amyloid burden and whether these genetic variants moderated the sleep-Aβ-amyloid burden relationship. One AQP4 variant, rs72878776, was associated with poorer overall sleep quality, while several SNPs moderated the effect of sleep latency (rs491148, rs9951307, rs7135406, rs3875089, rs151246) and duration (rs72878776, rs491148 and rs2339214) on brain Aβ-amyloid burden. This study suggests that AQP4 genetic variation moderates the relationship between sleep and brain Aβ-amyloid burden, which adds weight to the proposed glymphatic system being a potential Aβ-amyloid clearance mechanism and suggests that AQP4 genetic variation may impair this function. Further, AQP4 genetic variation should be considered when interpreting sleep-Aβ relationships.

  3. Hypoxia Stress Modifies Na+/K+-ATPase, H+/K+-ATPase, Na + / NH 4 + - ATPase , and nkaα1 Isoform Expression in the Brain of Immune-Challenged Air-Breathing Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Peter, MC Subhash; Simi, Satheesan

    2017-01-01

    Fishes are equipped to sense stressful stimuli and are able to respond to environmental stressor such as hypoxia with varying pattern of stress response. The functional attributes of brain to hypoxia stress in relation to ion transport and its interaction during immune challenge have not yet delineated in fish. We, therefore, explored the pattern of ion transporter functions and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of α1-subunit isoforms of Na + /K + -ATPase (NKA) in the brain segments, namely, pr...

  4. Tissue Oxygenation in Brain, Muscle, and Fat in a Rat Model of Sleep Apnea: Differential Effect of Obstructive Apneas and Intermittent Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendros, Isaac; Farré, Ramon; Planas, Anna M.; Torres, Marta; Bonsignore, Maria R.; Navajas, Daniel; Montserrat, Josep M.

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: To test the hypotheses that the dynamic changes in brain oxygen partial pressure (PtO2) in response to obstructive apneas or to intermittent hypoxia differ from those in other organs and that the changes in brain PtO2 in response to obstructive apneas is a source of oxidative stress. Design: Prospective controlled animal study. Setting: University laboratory. Participants: 98 Sprague-Dawley rats. Interventions: Cerebral cortex, skeletal muscle, or visceral fat tissues were exposed in anesthetized animals subjected to either obstructive apneas or intermittent hypoxia (apneic and hypoxic events of 15 s each and 60 events/h) for 1 h. Measurements and Results: Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) presented a stable pattern, with similar desaturations during both stimuli. The PtO2 was measured by a microelectrode. During obstructive apneas, a fast increase in cerebral PtO2 was observed (38.2 ± 3.4 vs. 54.8 ± 5.9 mm Hg) but not in the rest of tissues. This particular cerebral response was not found during intermittent hypoxia. The cerebral content of reduced glutathione was decreased after obstructive apneas (46.2% ± 15.2%) compared to controls (100.0% ± 14.7%), but not after intermittent hypoxia. This antioxidant consumption after obstructive apneas was accompanied by increased cerebral lipid peroxidation under this condition. No changes were observed for these markers in the other tissues. Conclusions: These results suggest that cerebral cortex could be protected in some way from hypoxic periods caused by obstructive apneas. The increased cerebral PtO2 during obstructive apneas may, however, cause harmful effects (oxidative stress). The obstructive apnea model appears to be more adequate than the intermittent hypoxia model for studying brain changes associated with OSA. Citation: Almendros I; Farre R; Planas AM; Torres M; Bonsignore MR; Navajas D; Montserrat JM. Tissue oxygenation in brain, muscle, and fat in a rat model of sleep apnea: differential

  5. Lesion size is exacerbated in hypoxic rats whereas hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha and vascular endothelial growth factor increase in injured normoxic rats: a prospective cohort study of secondary hypoxia in focal traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Peter Thelin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia following traumatic brain injury (TBI is a severe insult shown to exacerbate the pathophysiology, resulting in worse outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a hypoxic insult in a focal TBI model by monitoring brain edema, lesion volume, serum biomarker levels, immune cell infiltration, as well as the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF.Material and methods: Female Sprague-Dawley rats (n=73, including sham and naïve were used. The rats were intubated and mechanically ventilated. A controlled cortical impact device created a 3 millimeter deep lesion in the right parietal hemisphere. Post injury, rats inhaled either normoxic (22% O2 or hypoxic (11% O2 mixtures for 30 minutes. The rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 28 days post-injury. Serum was collected for S100B measurements using ELISA. Ex-vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was performed to determine lesion size and edema volume. Immunofluorescence was employed to analyze neuronal death, changes in cerebral macrophage- and neutrophil infiltration, microglia proliferation, apoptosis, complement activation (C5b9, IgG extravasation, HIF-1α and VEGF.Results: The hypoxic group had significantly increased blood levels of lactate and decreased pO2 (p<0.0001, respectively. On MRI post-traumatic hypoxia resulted in larger lesion areas (p=0.0173 and NeuN staining revealed greater neuronal loss (p=0.0253. HIF-1α and VEGF expression was significantly increased in normoxic but not in hypoxic animals (p<0.05, respectively. A trend was seen for serum levels of S100B to be higher in the hypoxic group at 1 day after trauma (p=0.0868. No differences were observed between the groups in cytotoxic and vascular edema, IgG extravasation, neutrophils and macrophage aggregation, microglia proliferation or C5b9 expression.Conclusion: Hypoxia following focal TBI exacerbated the lesion size and neuronal

  6. Gender differences in self reported long term outcomes following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratcliff Graham

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of research on health outcomes after a traumatic brain injury is focused on male participants. Information examining gender differences in health outcomes post traumatic brain injury is limited. The purpose of this study was to investigate gender differences in symptoms reported after a traumatic brain injury and to examine the degree to which these symptoms are problematic in daily functioning. Methods This is a secondary data analysis of a retrospective cohort study of 306 individuals who sustained a moderate to severe traumatic brain injury 8 to 24 years ago. Data were collected using the Problem Checklist (PCL from the Head Injury Family Interview (HIFI. Using Bonferroni correction, group differences between women and men were explored using Chi-square and Wilcoxon analysis. Results Chi-square analysis by gender revealed that significantly more men reported difficulty setting realistic goals and restlessness whereas significantly more women reported headaches, dizziness and loss of confidence. Wilcoxon analysis by gender revealed that men reported sensitivity to noise and sleep disturbances as significantly more problematic than women, whereas for women, lack of initiative and needing supervision were significantly more problematic in daily functioning. Conclusion This study provides insight into gender differences on outcomes after traumatic brain injury. There are significant differences between problems reported by men compared to women. This insight may facilitate health service planners and clinicians when developing programs for individuals with brain injury.

  7. Effect of hypoxia on the incorporation of [2-3H] glycerol and [1-14C[-palmitate into lipids of various brain regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberghina, M.; Giuffrida, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The lipid metabolism in guinea pig brain after intermittent hypoxia, prolonged for 80 hrs, was markedly impaired. The in vivo incorporation of [2-3H] glycerol and [1-14C] palmitate into lipids of microsomes, mitochondria, myelin, and synaptosomes, purified form cerebral hemispheres, was significantly lower in the hypoxic animals than in the controls. The same effect was observed on the incorporation of labeled precursors into lipids of mitochondria purified from cerebellum and brainstem. In particular, the labeling of th major phospholipids present - ie, phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) - in the mitochondria of the three brain regions examined decreased after hypoxic treatment

  8. Brain responses to emotional stimuli during breath holding and hypoxia: an approach based on the independent component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menicucci, Danilo; Artoni, Fiorenzo; Bedini, Remo; Pingitore, Alessandro; Passera, Mirko; Landi, Alberto; L'Abbate, Antonio; Sebastiani, Laura; Gemignani, Angelo

    2014-11-01

    Voluntary breath holding represents a physiological model of hypoxia. It consists of two phases of oxygen saturation dynamics: an initial slow decrease (normoxic phase) followed by a rapid drop (hypoxic phase) during which transitory neurological symptoms as well as slight impairment of integrated cerebral functions, such as emotional processing, can occur. This study investigated how breath holding affects emotional processing. To this aim we characterized the modulation of event-related potentials (ERPs) evoked by emotional-laden pictures as a function of breath holding time course. We recorded ERPs during free breathing and breath holding performed in air by elite apnea divers. We modeled brain responses during free breathing with four independent components distributed over different brain areas derived by an approach based on the independent component analysis (ICASSO). We described ERP changes during breath holding by estimating amplitude scaling and time shifting of the same components (component adaptation analysis). Component 1 included the main EEG features of emotional processing, had a posterior localization and did not change during breath holding; component 2, localized over temporo-frontal regions, was present only in unpleasant stimuli responses and decreased during breath holding, with no differences between breath holding phases; component 3, localized on the fronto-central midline regions, showed phase-independent breath holding decreases; component 4, quite widespread but with frontal prevalence, decreased in parallel with the hypoxic trend. The spatial localization of these components was compatible with a set of processing modules that affects the automatic and intentional controls of attention. The reduction of unpleasant-related ERP components suggests that the evaluation of aversive and/or possibly dangerous situations might be altered during breath holding.

  9. Altered astrocyte-neuronal interactions after hypoxia-ischemia in the neonatal brain in female and male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morken, Tora Sund; Brekke, Eva; Håberg, Asta; Widerøe, Marius; Brubakk, Ann-Mari; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2014-09-01

    Increased susceptibility to excitotoxicity of the neonatal brain after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) may be caused by limited capacity of astrocytes for glutamate uptake, and mitochondrial failure probably plays a key role in the delayed injury cascade. Male infants have poorer outcome than females after HI, possibly linked to differential intermediary metabolism. [1-(13)C]glucose and [1,2-(13)C]acetate were injected at zero, 6, and 48 hours after unilateral HI in 7-day-old rats. Intermediary metabolism was analyzed with magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Mitochondrial metabolism was generally reduced in the ipsilateral hemisphere for ≤6 hours after HI, whereas contralaterally, it was reduced in neurons but not in astrocytes. Transfer of glutamate from neurons to astrocytes was increased in the contralateral, but not in the ipsilateral hemisphere at 0 hour, and reduced bilaterally at 6 hours after HI. The transfer of glutamine from astrocytes to glutamatergic neurons was unaltered in both hemispheres, whereas the transfer of glutamine to GABAergic neurons was increased ipsilaterally at 0 hour. Anaplerosis (astrocytes) was decreased, whereas partial pyruvate recycling (astrocytes) was increased directly after HI. Male pups had lower astrocytic mitochondrial metabolism than females immediately after HI, whereas that of females was reduced longer and encompassed both neurons and astrocytes. The prolonged depression in mitochondrial metabolism indicates that mitochondria are vulnerable targets in the delayed injury after neonatal HI. The degree of astrocytic malfunction may be a valid indicator of outcome after hypoxic/HI brain injury and may be linked to the differential outcome in males and females. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. The Family Environment as a Moderator of Psychosocial Outcomes Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H. Gerry; Walz, Nicolay Chertkoff; Stancin, Terry; Wade, Shari L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study sought to determine whether the family environment moderates psychosocial outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in young children. Method Participants were recruited prospectively from consecutive hospital admissions of 3-6 year old children, and included 19 with severe TBI, 56 with complicated mild/moderate TBI, and 99 with orthopedic injuries (OI). They completed four assessments across the first 18 months post-injury. The initial assessment included measures of parenting style, family functioning, and the quality of the home. Children’s behavioral adjustment, adaptive functioning, and social competence were assessed at each occasion. Mixed model analyses examined the relationship of the family environment to psychosocial outcomes across time. Results The OI and TBI groups differed significantly in social competence, but the family environment did not moderate the group difference, which was of medium magnitude. In contrast, group differences in behavioral adjustment became more pronounced across time at high levels of authoritarian and permissive parenting; among children with severe TBI, however, even those with low levels of permissive parenting showed increases in behavioral problems. For adaptive functioning, better home environments provided some protection following TBI, but not over time for the severe TBI group. These three-way interactions of group, family environment, and time post injury were all of medium magnitude. Conclusions The findings indicate that the family environment moderates the psychosocial outcomes of TBI in young children, but the moderating influence may wane with time among children with severe TBI. PMID:20438212

  11. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Emily L; Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C; Thompson, Paul M; Asarnow, Robert F

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1-6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI.

  12. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M.; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Asarnow, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1–6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI. PMID:26393494

  13. Moderate alcohol exposure during early brain development increases stimulus-response habits in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Matthew O; Evans, Alexandra M-D; Brock, Alistair J; Combe, Fraser J; Teh, Muy-Teck; Brennan, Caroline H

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to alcohol during early central nervous system development has been shown variously to affect aspects of physiological and behavioural development. In extreme cases, this can extend to craniofacial defects, severe developmental delay and mental retardation. At more moderate levels, subtle differences in brain morphology and behaviour have been observed. One clear effect of developmental alcohol exposure is an increase in the propensity to develop alcoholism and other addictions. The mechanisms by which this occurs, however, are not currently understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that adult zebrafish chronically exposed to moderate levels of ethanol during early brain ontogenesis would show an increase in conditioned place preference for alcohol and an increased propensity towards habit formation, a key component of drug addiction in humans. We found support for both of these hypotheses and found that the exposed fish had changes in mRNA expression patterns for dopamine receptor, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and μ-opioid receptor encoding genes. Collectively, these data show an explicit link between the increased proclivity for addiction and addiction-related behaviour following exposure to ethanol during early brain development and alterations in the neural circuits underlying habit learning. © 2014 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. A Prospective Randomized Study of Brain Tissue Oxygen Pressure-Guided Management in Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Min Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of PbtO2-guided therapy with traditional intracranial pressure- (ICP- guided treatment on the management of cerebral variables, therapeutic interventions, survival rates, and neurological outcomes of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI patients. From 2009 to 2010, TBI patients with a Glasgow coma scale 20 mmHg, and 27 patients were treated with ICP-guided therapy (ICP 60 mmHg in the neurosurgical intensive care unit (NICU; demographic characteristics were similar across groups. The survival rate in the PbtO2-guided group was also significantly increased at 3 and 6 months after injury. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the PbtO2 signal and Glasgow outcome scale-extended in patients from 1 to 6 months after injury. This finding demonstrates that therapy directed by PbtO2 monitoring is valuable for the treatment of patients with moderate and severe TBI and that increasing PaO2 to 150 mmHg may be efficacious for preventing cerebral hypoxic events after brain trauma.

  15. A Prospective Randomized Study of Brain Tissue Oxygen Pressure-Guided Management in Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Min; Lin, Ming-Chin; Huang, Sheng-Jean; Lui, Tai-Ngar; Ma, Hsin-I; Liu, Ming-Ying; Chung, Wen-Yuh; Shih, Yang-Hsin; Tsai, Shin-Han; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Lin, Mau-Roung; Wei, Li; Wu, Chung-Che; Lin, En-Yuan; Liao, Kuo-Hsing; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of PbtO2-guided therapy with traditional intracranial pressure- (ICP-) guided treatment on the management of cerebral variables, therapeutic interventions, survival rates, and neurological outcomes of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. From 2009 to 2010, TBI patients with a Glasgow coma scale 20 mmHg), and 27 patients were treated with ICP-guided therapy (ICP 60 mmHg) in the neurosurgical intensive care unit (NICU); demographic characteristics were similar across groups. The survival rate in the PbtO2-guided group was also significantly increased at 3 and 6 months after injury. Moreover, there was a significant correlation between the PbtO2 signal and Glasgow outcome scale-extended in patients from 1 to 6 months after injury. This finding demonstrates that therapy directed by PbtO2 monitoring is valuable for the treatment of patients with moderate and severe TBI and that increasing PaO2 to 150 mmHg may be efficacious for preventing cerebral hypoxic events after brain trauma. PMID:26413530

  16. Potent and Selective Triazole-Based Inhibitors of the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl-Hydroxylases with Activity in the Murine Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mun Chiang Chan

    Full Text Available As part of the cellular adaptation to limiting oxygen availability in animals, the expression of a large set of genes is activated by the upregulation of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs. Therapeutic activation of the natural human hypoxic response can be achieved by the inhibition of the hypoxia sensors for the HIF system, i.e. the HIF prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs. Here, we report studies on tricyclic triazole-containing compounds as potent and selective PHD inhibitors which compete with the 2-oxoglutarate co-substrate. One compound (IOX4 induces HIFα in cells and in wildtype mice with marked induction in the brain tissue, revealing that it is useful for studies aimed at validating the upregulation of HIF for treatment of cerebral diseases including stroke.

  17. Chronic intermittent hypoxia induces changes on the expression and activity of neprilysin (EC 3.4.24.16) in the brain of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Renato W; Julian, Guilherme S; Perry, Juliana C; Tufik, Sergio; Chagas, Jair R

    2018-04-24

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a frequent sleeping breathing disorder associated with cognitive impairments. Neprilysin (NEP) is responsible for degrading several substrates related to cognition; however, the effect of chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) on NEP is still unknown. This study aimed to evaluate the expression and activity of NEP under CIH in cognitive-related brain structures. Western blot, qRT-PCR and enzyme activity assay, demonstrated that a six-week intermittent hypoxia increased NEP expression and activity, selectively in temporal cortex, but not in the hippocampus and frontal cortex. The increase in NEP activity and expression was reverted followed by two weeks recovery in normoxia. These data show that CIH protocol increases the expression and activity of NEP selectively in the temporal cortex. Additional mechanisms must be investigated to elucidate the effects of CIH in cognition. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Lesion Size Is Exacerbated in Hypoxic Rats Whereas Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1 Alpha and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Increase in Injured Normoxic Rats: A Prospective Cohort Study of Secondary Hypoxia in Focal Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin, Eric Peter; Frostell, Arvid; Mulder, Jan; Mitsios, Nicholas; Damberg, Peter; Aski, Sahar Nikkhou; Risling, Mårten; Svensson, Mikael; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina; Bellander, Bo-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia following traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a severe insult shown to exacerbate the pathophysiology, resulting in worse outcome. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a hypoxic insult in a focal TBI model by monitoring brain edema, lesion volume, serum biomarker levels, immune cell infiltration, as well as the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Female Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 73, including sham and naive) were used. The rats were intubated and mechanically ventilated. A controlled cortical impact device created a 3-mm deep lesion in the right parietal hemisphere. Post-injury, rats inhaled either normoxic (22% O2) or hypoxic (11% O2) mixtures for 30 min. The rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days post-injury. Serum was collected for S100B measurements using ELISA. Ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to determine lesion size and edema volume. Immunofluorescence was employed to analyze neuronal death, changes in cerebral macrophage- and neutrophil infiltration, microglia proliferation, apoptosis, complement activation (C5b9), IgG extravasation, HIF-1α, and VEGF. The hypoxic group had significantly increased blood levels of lactate and decreased pO2 (p hypoxic animals (p hypoxic group at 1 day after trauma (p = 0.0868). No differences were observed between the groups in cytotoxic and vascular edema, IgG extravasation, neutrophils and macrophage aggregation, microglia proliferation, or C5b-9 expression. Hypoxia following focal TBI exacerbated the lesion size and neuronal loss. Moreover, there was a tendency to higher levels of S100B in the hypoxic group early after injury, indicating a potential validity as a biomarker of injury severity. In the normoxic group, the expression of HIF-1α and VEGF was found elevated, possibly indicative of neuro-protective responses occurring in this less severely injured group. Further studies are

  19. Prodigiosin inhibits gp91{sup phox} and iNOS expression to protect mice against the oxidative/nitrosative brain injury induced by hypoxia-ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Chia-Che [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Basic Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Center, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Center of Infectious Disease and Signaling Research, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Wang, Yea-Hwey [Department of Nursing, College of Medicine and Nursing, Hungkuang University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Chern, Chang-Ming [Division of Neurovascular Disease, Neurological Institute, Taipei Veterans General Hospital and School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Liou, Kuo-Tong [Department of Chinese Martial Arts, Chinese Culture University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Hou, Yu-Chang [Department of Chinese Medicine, Taoyuan General Hospital, Department of Health, Taiwan (China); Department of Nursing, Yuanpei University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Bioscience Technology, Chuan-Yuan Christian University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Peng, Yu-Ta [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Shen, Yuh-Chiang, E-mail: yuhcs@nricm.edu.tw [National Research Institute of Chinese Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Institute of Biomedical Sciences, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2011-11-15

    This study aimed to explore the mechanisms by which prodigiosin protects against hypoxia-induced oxidative/nitrosative brain injury induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion/reperfusion (MCAo/r) injury in mice. Hypoxia in vitro was modeled using oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) followed by reoxygenation of BV-2 microglial cells. Our results showed that treatment of mice that have undergone MCAo/r injury with prodigiosin (10 and 100 {mu}g/kg, i.v.) at 1 h after hypoxia ameliorated MCAo/r-induced oxidative/nitrosative stress, brain infarction, and neurological deficits in the mice, and enhanced their survival rate. MCAo/r induced a remarkable production in the mouse brains of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and a significant increase in protein nitrosylation; this primarily resulted from enhanced expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (gp91{sup phox}), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and the infiltration of CD11b leukocytes due to breakdown of blood-brain barrier (BBB) by activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B). All these changes were significantly diminished by prodigiosin. In BV-2 cells, OGD induced ROS and nitric oxide production by up-regulating gp91{sup phox} and iNOS via activation of the NF-{kappa}B pathway, and these changes were suppressed by prodigiosin. In conclusion, our results indicate that prodigiosin reduces gp91{sup phox} and iNOS expression possibly by impairing NF-{kappa}B activation. This compromises the activation of microglial and/or inflammatory cells, which then, in turn, mediates prodigiosin's protective effect in the MCAo/r mice. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin ameliorated brain infarction and deficits. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin protected against hypoxia/reperfusion-induced brain injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin diminished oxidative/nitrosativestress and leukocytes infiltration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Prodigiosin reduced BBB breakdown. Black

  20. Executive functioning in relation to coping in mild versus moderate-severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakers, Sandra E; Scheenen, Myrthe E; Westerhof-Evers, Herma J; de Koning, Myrthe E; van der Horn, Harm J; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M

    2018-02-01

    To examine associations between executive functioning (EF) and coping styles, separately for mild and moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the chronic phase postinjury. Patients with mild (n = 47) and moderate-severe TBI (n = 59) were included, in addition to healthy controls (HCs; n = 51). Assessment consisted of EF tests (Trail Making Test, Zoo Map Test, Controlled Oral Word Association Test) and questionnaires examining EF (Dysexecutive Questionnaire) and coping styles (Utrecht Coping List). Moderate-severe TBI patients showed significant more EF deficits, lower active coping and higher passive coping than mild TBI patients and HCs, whereas mild TBI patients did not differ from HCs. In the moderate-severe TBI group, a higher number of self-reported EF problems was related to lower levels of active coping, r = -.43, p < .01 and higher levels of passive coping, r = .58, p < .001, with proxy-reports relating to lower levels of active coping, r = -.33, p < .05. For mild TBI, a higher amount of self-reported EF problems was related to lower levels of active coping, r = -.38, p < .05 and higher levels of passive coping, r = .55, p < .001, with proxy-reports relating to higher levels of passive coping, r = .39, p < .05. Except for mental flexibility, EF performances were not associated with coping. This study shows strong associations between reported EF problems in daily life and coping styles. For moderate-severe TBI, proxy-reports may reflect EF impairments that complicate active problem-solving. However, reported EF problems by mild and moderate-severe TBI patients are also likely to reflect a psychological distress related to the way patients are inclined to deal with stressing situations that put a demand on their executive abilities. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Parents' experiences following children's moderate to severe traumatic brain injury: a clash of cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscigno, Cecelia I; Swanson, Kristen M

    2011-10-01

    Little is understood about parents' experiences following children's moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Using descriptive phenomenology, we explored common experiences of parents whose children were diagnosed with moderate to severe TBI. Parents from across the United States (N = 42, from 37 families) participated in two semistructured interviews (~ 90 minutes in length and 12 to 15 months apart) in the first 5 years following children's TBI. First interviews were in person. Second interviews, done in person or by phone, facilitated updating parents' experiences and garnering their critique of the descriptive model. Parent themes were (a) grateful to still have my child, (b) grieving for the child I knew, (c) running on nerves, and (d) grappling to get what my child and family need. Parents reported cultural barriers because of others' misunderstandings. More qualitative inquiry is needed to understand how the knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and culture-based expectations of others influence parents' interactions and the family's adjustment and well-being.

  2. DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT OF MILD AND MODERATE BRAIN INJURY IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Shadrin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors present modern approach to the diagnostics and treatment of children with acute period of mild and moderate brain injury. It is necessary to provide timely diagnostics in children with craniocerebral trauma via neurovisualization: ultrasonic scan and computer tomography of brain (for a diagnostics of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, duplex ultrasonic scan and magnetic resonance imaging (for a detection of traumatic dissections of main arteries of head. The article considers main aspects of treatment of children with craniocerebral injury, describes indications to pathogenetical therapy aimed to compensation of disorders in dynamics of cerebrospinal liquor, microcirculation and antioxidant status.Key words: children, cerebrospinal injury, diagnostics, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(2:90-93

  3. Teleosts in hypoxia : Aspects of anaerobic metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Thillart, G.; van Waarde, Aren

    1985-01-01

    Moderate hypoxia can be tolerated by many fish species, while only some species survive severe hypoxia or anoxia. Hypoxia usually activates anaerobic glycolysis, which may be temporary when the animals are able to improve their oxygen extraction capacity. Switching over to aerobic metabolism allows

  4. Trauma center designation correlates with functional independence after severe but not moderate traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Joshua B; Stassen, Nicole A; Cheng, Julius D; Sangosanya, Ayodele T; Bankey, Paul E; Gestring, Mark L

    2010-08-01

    The mortality of traumatic brain injury (TBI) continues to decline, emphasizing functional outcomes. Trauma center designation has been linked to survival after TBI, but the impact on functional outcomes is unclear. The objective was to determine whether trauma center designation influenced functional outcomes after moderate and severe TBI. Trauma subjects presenting to an American College of Surgeons (ACS) Level I or II trauma center with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) independence (FI) defined as a modified functional independence measure (FIM) of 12, and independent expression (IE) defined as a FIM component of 4. These were compared between Level I and Level II centers in subjects with both moderate (GCS 9-12) and severe (GCS moderate TBI. ACS trauma center designation is significantly associated with FI and IE after severe, but not moderate TBI. Prospective study is warranted to verify and explore factors contributing to this discrepancy.

  5. Hypoxia Room

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hypoxia Room is a 8x8x8 ft. clear vinyl plastic and aluminum frame construction enclosure located within USAREIM laboratory 028. The Hypoxia Room (manufactured...

  6. Tobacco smoke chemicals attenuate brain-to-blood potassium transport mediated by the Na,K,2Cl-cotransporter during hypoxia-reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Jennifer R; Roder, Karen E; McAfee, Ghia; Allen, David D; Van der Schyf, Cornelis J; Abbruscato, Thomas J

    2006-01-01

    Smoking tobacco, including cigarettes, has been associated with an increased incidence and relative risk for cerebral infarction in both men and women. Recently, we have shown that nicotine and cotinine attenuate abluminal (brain facing) K(+) uptake mediated by the Na,K,2Cl-cotransporter (NKCC) in bovine brain microvessel endothelial cells (BBMECs) after hypoxic/aglycemic exposure (stroke conditions). The purpose of the current study was to explore the effects of nicotine and tobacco smoke chemicals on K(+) movement through the blood-brain barrier during both hypoxia/aglycemia and reoxygenation. BBMECs were exposed to nicotine/cotinine, nicotine-containing cigarette smoke extract (N-CSE), or nicotine-free cigarette smoke extract (NF-CSE) in quantities designed to mimic plasma concentrations of smokers. Stroke conditions were mimicked in vitro in BBMECs through 6 h of hypoxia/aglycemia with or without 12 h of reoxygenation, after which NKCC-mediated K(+) uptake and paracellular integrity were measured with (86)Rb and [(14)C]sucrose, respectively. In addition, K(+) concentrations in brain extracellular fluid were estimated in (86)Rb-injected rats that were administered nicotine, N-CSE, or NF-CSE and on whom global ischemia/reperfusion by in vivo four-vessel occlusion was performed. Both in vitro and in vivo paradigms showed nicotine, the major alkaloid present in tobacco smoke, to be the determining factor of an inhibited response of abluminal NKCC in BBMECs during and after stroke conditions. This was measured as a decrease in abluminal brain endothelial cell NKCC activity and as an increase in brain extracellular K(+) concentration measured as the brain extracellular fluid (86)Rb/plasma ratio after in vivo four-vessel occlusion with reperfusion.

  7. Hypoxia Stress Modifies Na+/K+-ATPase, H+/K+-ATPase, [Formula: see text], and nkaα1 Isoform Expression in the Brain of Immune-Challenged Air-Breathing Fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Mc Subhash; Simi, Satheesan

    2017-01-01

    Fishes are equipped to sense stressful stimuli and are able to respond to environmental stressor such as hypoxia with varying pattern of stress response. The functional attributes of brain to hypoxia stress in relation to ion transport and its interaction during immune challenge have not yet delineated in fish. We, therefore, explored the pattern of ion transporter functions and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of α1-subunit isoforms of Na + /K + -ATPase (NKA) in the brain segments, namely, prosencephalon (PC), mesencephalon (MC), and metencephalon (MeC) in an obligate air-breathing fish exposed either to hypoxia stress (30 minutes forced immersion in water) or challenged with zymosan treatment (25-200 ng g -1 for 24 hours) or both. Zymosan that produced nonspecific immune responses evoked differential regulation of NKA, H + /K + -ATPase (HKA), and [Formula: see text] (NNA) in the varied brain segments. On the contrary, hypoxia stress that demanded activation of NKA in PC and MeC showed a reversed NKA activity pattern in MeC of immune-challenged fish. A compromised HKA and NNA regulation during hypoxia stress was found in immune-challenged fish, indicating the role of these brain ion transporters to hypoxia stress and immune challenges. The differential mRNA expression of α1-subunit isoforms of NKA, nkaα1a , nkaα1b , and nkaα1c , in hypoxia-stressed brain showed a shift in its expression pattern during hypoxia stress-immune interaction in PC and MC. Evidence is thus presented for the first time that ion transporters such as HKA and NNA along with NKA act as functional brain markers which respond differentially to both hypoxia stress and immune challenges. Taken together, the data further provide evidence for a differential Na + , K + , H + , and [Formula: see text] ion signaling that exists in brain neuronal clusters during hypoxia stress-immune interaction as a result of modified regulations of NKA, HKA, and NNA transporter functions and nkaα1 isoform

  8. Uncovering latent deficits due to mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI by using normobaric hypoxia stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard eTemme

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Memory deficits and other cognitive symptoms frequently associated with mTBI are commonly thought to resolve within 7 to 10 days. This generalization is based principally on observations made in individuals who are in the unstressed environmental conditions typical to a clinic and so does not consider the impact of physiologic, environmental or psychological stress. Normobaric Hypoxia (NH stress can be generated by mixing normal mean sea level air (MSL containing 21% oxygen (O2 with nitrogen, which is biologically inert, so that the resultant mixed gas has a partial pressure of O2 approximating that of specified altitudes. This technique was used to generate NH equivalents of 8,000, 12,000 and 14,000 feet above MSL in a group of 36 volunteers with an mTBI history and an equal number of controls matched on the basis of age, gender, weight, etc. Short term visual memory was tested using Matching to Sample (M2S subtest of the BrainCheckers analogue of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM. Although there were no significant differences in M2S performance between the two groups of subjects at MSL, with increased altitude, performance deteriorated in the mTBI group as predicted to be significantly worse than that of the controls. When the subjects were returned to MSL, the difference disappeared. This finding suggests that the hypoxic challenge paradigm developed here has potential clinical utility for assessing the effects of mTBI in individuals who appear asymptomatic under normal conditions.

  9. Xenon and sevoflurane provide analgesia during labor and fetal brain protection in a perinatal rat model of hypoxia-ischemia.

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    Ting Yang

    Full Text Available It is not possible to identify all pregnancies at risk of neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE. Many women use some form of analgesia during childbirth and some anesthetic agents have been shown to be neuroprotective when used as analgesics at subanesthetic concentrations. In this study we sought to understand the effects of two anesthetic agents with presumptive analgesic activity and known preconditioning-neuroprotective properties (sevoflurane or xenon, in reducing hypoxia-induced brain damage in a model of intrauterine perinatal asphyxia. The analgesic and neuroprotective effects at subanesthetic levels of sevoflurane (0.35% or xenon (35% were tested in a rat model of intrauterine perinatal asphyxia. Analgesic effects were measured by assessing maternal behavior and spinal cord dorsal horn neuronal activation using c-Fos. In separate experiments, intrauterine fetal asphyxia was induced four hours after gas exposure; on post-insult day 3 apoptotic cell death was measured by caspase-3 immunostaining in hippocampal neurons and correlated with the number of viable neurons on postnatal day (PND 7. A separate cohort of pups was nurtured by a surrogate mother for 50 days when cognitive testing with Morris water maze was performed. Both anesthetic agents provided analgesia as reflected by a reduction in the number of stretching movements and decreased c-Fos expression in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Both agents also reduced the number of caspase-3 positive (apoptotic neurons and increased cell viability in the hippocampus at PND7. These acute histological changes were mirrored by improved cognitive function measured remotely after birth on PND 50 compared to control group. Subanesthetic doses of sevoflurane or xenon provided both analgesia and neuroprotection in this model of intrauterine perinatal asphyxia. These data suggest that anesthetic agents with neuroprotective properties may be effective in preventing HIE and should be

  10. Progesterone treatment shows benefit in a pediatric model of moderate to severe bilateral brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastafa I Geddes

    Full Text Available Controlled cortical impact (CCI models in adult and aged Sprague-Dawley (SD rats have been used extensively to study medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC injury and the effects of post-injury progesterone treatment, but the hormone's effects after traumatic brain injury (TBI in juvenile animals have not been determined. In the present proof-of-concept study we investigated whether progesterone had neuroprotective effects in a pediatric model of moderate to severe bilateral brain injury.Twenty-eight-day old (PND 28 male Sprague Dawley rats received sham (n = 24 or CCI (n = 47 injury and were given progesterone (4, 8, or 16 mg/kg per 100 g body weight or vehicle injections on post-injury days (PID 1-7, subjected to behavioral testing from PID 9-27, and analyzed for lesion size at PID 28.The 8 and 16 mg/kg doses of progesterone were observed to be most beneficial in reducing the effect of CCI on lesion size and behavior in PND 28 male SD rats.Our findings suggest that a midline CCI injury to the frontal cortex will reliably produce a moderate TBI comparable to what is seen in the adult male rat and that progesterone can ameliorate the injury-induced deficits.

  11. Functional Status Examination in Patients with Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machamer, Joan; Temkin, Nancy; Manley, Geoffrey; Dikmen, Sureyya

    2018-02-07

    The assessment of functional status after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is important. The Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) and its revised version Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOSE) have been used most frequently in TBI research but there are concerns about the sensitivity of these measures. The current study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Functional Status Examination (FSE) using a sample of 448 moderately to severely injured subjects with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The FSE is significantly related to other measures of functional status including the GOSE, Short Form Health Survey and EuroQol Checklist(p < .001), is sensitive to TBI severity (p < .001), and is responsive to recovery from 3 to 6 months post-injury (p < .001). In addition, there was a significant agreement (r = .817, p < .001) between the patient and significant other's assessment of functional status on the FSE at 6-months post-injury. The FSE may be a valuable measure of functional status after TBI given its strong psychometric properties including validity, sensitivity to brain injury severity, and recovery over time.

  12. The big sell: Managing stigma and workplace discrimination following moderate to severe brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Grigorovich, Alisa; Damianakis, Thecla; Le Dorze, Guylaine; David, Christine; Lemsky, Carolyn; Hebert, Debbie

    2017-01-01

    Misperceptions regarding persons with brain injuries (PWBI) can lead to stigmatization, workplace discrimination and, in turn, influence PWBIs full vocational integration. In this study we explored how stigma may influence return-to-work processes, experiences of stigma and discrimination at the workplace for persons with (moderate to severe) brain injuries, and strategies that can be employed to manage disclosure. Exploratory qualitative study; used in-depth interviews and an inductive thematic analytical approach in data analysis. Ten PWBI and five employment service providers participated. PWBI discussed their work experiences, relationships with supervisors and co-workers and experiences of stigma and/or discrimination at work. Employment service providers discussed their perceptions regarding PWBI's rights and abilities to work, reported incidents of workplace discrimination, and how issues related to stigma, discrimination and disclosure are managed. Three themes were identified: i) public, employer and provider knowledge about brain injury and beliefs about PWBI; ii) incidents of workplace discrimination; iii) disclosure. Misperceptions regarding PWBI persist amongst the public and employers. Incidents of workplace discrimination included social exclusion at the workplace, hiring discrimination, denial of promotion/demotion, harassment, and failure to provide reasonable accommodations. Disclosure decisions required careful consideration of PWBI needs, the type of information that should be shared, and the context in which that information is shared. Public understanding about PWBI remains limited. PWBI require further assistance to manage disclosure and incidents of workplace discrimination.

  13. Rejection Sensitivity as a Moderator of Psychosocial Outcomes Following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Emily A; Owen Yeates, Keith; Rubin, Kenneth H; Taylor, H Gerry; Bigler, Erin D; Dennis, Maureen; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Vannatta, Kathryn; Stancin, Terry; Hoskinson, Kristen R

    2017-07-01

    The current study examines whether psychosocial outcomes following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) vary as a function of children's rejection sensitivity (RS), defined as their disposition to be hypersensitive to cues of rejection from peers. Children ages 8-13 with a history of severe TBI (STBI, n=16), complicated mild/moderate TBI (n=35), or orthopedic injury (OI, n=49) completed measures assessing self-esteem and RS on average 3.28 years post-injury (SD=1.33, range=1.25-6.34). Parents reported on their child's emotional and behavioral functioning and social participation. Regression analyses found moderation of group differences by RS for three outcomes: social participation, self-perceptions of social acceptance, and externalizing behavior problems. Conditional effects at varying levels of RS indicated that externalizing problems and social participation were significantly worse for children with STBI at high levels of RS, compared to children with OI. Social participation for the STBI group remained significantly lower than the OI group at mean levels of RS, but not at low levels of RS. At high levels of RS, self-perceptions of social acceptance were lower for children with moderate TBI compared to OI, but group differences were not significant at mean or low levels of RS. No evidence of moderation was found for global self-worth, self-perceptions of physical appearance or athletic ability, or internalizing problems. The findings highlight the salient nature of social outcomes in the context of varying levels of RS. These findings may have implications for the design of interventions to improve social outcomes following TBI. (JINS, 2017, 23, 451-459).

  14. The frontal lobe and thalamus have different sensitivities to hypoxia-hypotension after traumatic brain injury: a microdialysis study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanié, Antonia; Vigué, Bernard; Benhamou, Dan; Duranteau, Jacques; Geeraerts, Thomas

    2012-12-10

    After traumatic brain injury (TBI), lesions are anatomically heterogeneous, but the spatial heterogeneity of the post-traumatic brain's vulnerability to hypoxia-hypotension (HH) has been poorly studied. Our objective was to compare the effect of HH after TBI on brain energy metabolism into two regions: the frontal lobe and the thalamus. Twenty-eight Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups: sham, TBI (brain trauma alone, impact acceleration, 450-g weight drop from 1.8 m), HH (blood depletion to mean arterial pressure 40 mm Hg, FiO(2) 10%, 15 min), and TBI-HH (TBI followed by HH, 45-min delay). Cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) was continuously measured. Brain microdialysis and brain tissue oxygen partial pressure (PtiO(2)) probes were both inserted stereotaxically into the right thalamus and frontal lobe. Except during the HH period, CPP was always above 60 mm Hg. During the hour following the HH period, significant increases in cerebral lactate-pyruvate ratio, glycerol, and glutamate were observed, and were always higher in the frontal lobe than in the thalamus (pfrontal lobe, increases in glutamate and glycerol were significantly higher than in the HH group (pfrontal lobe than in the thalamus. These findings demonstrate that in the early post-traumatic period, the metabolic cerebral response to HH is higher in the frontal lobe than in the thalamus, and is worsened by TBI, suggesting a higher vulnerability for the frontal lobes.

  15. Continuous monitoring of cerebral oxygen saturation in elderly patients undergoing major abdominal surgery minimizes brain exposure to potential hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Andrea; Fanelli, Guido; Pietropaoli, Paolo; Proietti, Rodolfo; Tufano, Rosalba; Danelli, Giorgio; Fierro, Giuseppe; Fierro, Giovanni; De Cosmo, Germano; Servillo, Giovanni

    2005-09-01

    undergoing major abdominal surgery reduces the potential exposure of the brain to hypoxia; this might be associated with decreased effects on cognitive function and shorter PACU and hospital stay.

  16. Predictors of quality of life after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Tavares Weber

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To verify correlations between age, injury severity, length of stay (LOS, cognition, functional capacity and quality of life (QOL six months after hospital discharge (HD of victims of traumatic brain injury (TBI. Method 50 patients consecutively treated in a Brazilian emergency hospital were assessed at admission, HD and six months after HD. The assessment protocol consisted in Abbreviated Injury Scale, Injury Severity Score, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS, Revised Trauma Score (RTS, Mini Mental Test, Barthel Index and World Health Organization QOL - Brief. Results Strong negative correlation was observed between LOS and GCS and LOS and RTS. An almost maximal correlation was found between RTS and GCS and functional capacity and GCS at HD. Age and LOS were considered independent predictors of QOL. Conclusion Age and LOS are independent predictors of QOL after moderate to severe TBI.

  17. Moderate traumatic brain injury causes acute dendritic and synaptic degeneration in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

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    Xiang Gao

    Full Text Available Hippocampal injury-associated learning and memory deficits are frequent hallmarks of brain trauma and are the most enduring and devastating consequences following traumatic brain injury (TBI. Several reports, including our recent paper, showed that TBI brought on by a moderate level of controlled cortical impact (CCI induces immature newborn neuron death in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In contrast, the majority of mature neurons are spared. Less research has been focused on these spared neurons, which may also be injured or compromised by TBI. Here we examined the dendrite morphologies, dendritic spines, and synaptic structures using a genetic approach in combination with immunohistochemistry and Golgi staining. We found that although most of the mature granular neurons were spared following TBI at a moderate level of impact, they exhibited dramatic dendritic beading and fragmentation, decreased number of dendritic branches, and a lower density of dendritic spines, particularly the mushroom-shaped mature spines. Further studies showed that the density of synapses in the molecular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus was significantly reduced. The electrophysiological activity of neurons was impaired as well. These results indicate that TBI not only induces cell death in immature granular neurons, it also causes significant dendritic and synaptic degeneration in pathohistology. TBI also impairs the function of the spared mature granular neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These observations point to a potential anatomic substrate to explain, in part, the development of posttraumatic memory deficits. They also indicate that dendritic damage in the hippocampal dentate gyrus may serve as a therapeutic target following TBI.

  18. Social Environmental Moderators of Long-term Functional Outcomes of Early Childhood Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Shari L; Zhang, Nanhua; Yeates, Keith Owen; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H Gerry

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes to impairments in behavior and academic performance. However, the long-term effects of early childhood TBI on functioning across settings remain poorly understood. To examine the long-term functional outcomes of early childhood TBI relative to early childhood orthopedic injuries (OIs). We also examine the moderating role of the social environment as defined by parent report and observational measures of family functioning, parenting practices, and home environment. A prospective, longitudinal, observational cohort study conducted at each child's home, school, and hospital, including 3 children's hospitals and 1 general hospital in the Midwest. Patients were enrolled in the initial study between January 2003 and October 2006. Follow-ups were completed between January 2010 and April 2015. Fifty-eight children who sustained a TBI (67% of original enrolled cohort) and 72 children who sustained an OI (61% of the original enrolled cohort) were prospectively followed up from shortly after injury (between the ages of 3 and 7 years at enrollment) to an average of 6.7 years after injury, with assessments occurring at multiple points. Long-term functional outcomes in everyday settings, as assessed through the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS). Of the 130 children included, the median age for those with OIs was 11.72 years and 11.97, 12.21, and 11.72 years for those with complicated mild, moderate, and severe TBIs, respectively. Children with moderate and severe TBI were rated as having more functional impairments in multiple domains than those with OIs (P authoritarian (mean CAFAS of 56.45, 41.80, 54.90, and 17.12 for severe TBI, moderate TBI, complicated mild TBI, and OI, respectively, with significant difference between severe TBI and OI [difference = 39.33; P parenting or with fewer home resources (mean CAFAS of 69.57, 47.45, 49.00, and 23.81 for severe TBI, moderate TBI, complicated mild TBI, and OI

  19. Tracheostomy is associated with decreased hospital mortality after moderate or severe isolated traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, David Marek; Hochrieser, Helene; Metnitz, Philipp G H; Mauritz, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Data regarding the impact and timing of tracheostomy in patients with isolated traumatic brain injury (TBI) are ambiguous. Our goal was to evaluate the impact of tracheostomy on hospital mortality in patients with moderate or severe isolated TBI. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of data prospectively collected at 87 Austrian intensive care units (ICUs). All patients continuously admitted between 1998 and 2010 were evaluated for the study. In total, 4,735 patients were admitted to ICUs with isolated TBI. Of these patients, 2,156 had a moderate or severe TBI (1,603 patients were endotracheally intubated only, 553 patients underwent tracheostomy). Epidemiological data (trauma severity, treatment, and outcome) of the two groups were compared. Patients with moderate or severe isolated TBI undergoing tracheostomy had a similar Glasgow Coma Scale score, median (interquartile range): 6 (3-8) vs 6 (3-8); p = 0.90, and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II, 45 (37-54) vs 45 (35-56); p = 0.86, compared with intubated patients not undergoing tracheostomy. Furthermore, patients undergoing tracheostomy exhibited higher Abbreviated Injury Scale Head scores and had a longer ICU stay for survivors, 30 (22-42) vs 9 (3-17) days; p tracheostomy compared with patients who remained intubated, observed-to-expected mortality ratio (95 % confidence interval): 0.62 (0.53-0.72) vs 1.00 (0.95-1.05) respectively. Despite the greater severity of head injury, patients with isolated TBI who underwent tracheostomy had a lower risk-adjusted mortality than patients who remained intubated. Reasons for this difference in outcome may be multifactorial and require further investigation.

  20. The Evolution of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder following Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alway, Yvette; Gould, Kate Rachel; McKay, Adam; Johnston, Lisa; Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-05-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may develop following traumatic brain injury (TBI), despite most patients having no conscious memory of their accident. This prospective study examined the frequency, timing of onset, symptom profile, and trajectory of PTSD and its psychiatric comorbidities during the first 4 years following moderate-to-severe TBI. Participants were 85 individuals (78.8% male) with moderate or severe TBI recruited following admission to acute rehabilitation between 2005 and 2010. Using the Structured Clinical Interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Disorders (SCID-I), participants were evaluated for pre- and post-injury PTSD soon after injury and reassessed at 6 months, 12 months, 2 years, 3 years, and 4 years post-injury. Over the first 4 years post-injury, 17.6% developed injury-related PTSD, none of whom had PTSD prior to injury. PTSD onset peaked between 6 and 12 months post-injury. The majority of PTSD cases (66.7%) had a delayed-onset, which for a third was preceded by subsyndromal symptoms in the first 6 months post-injury. PTSD frequency increased over the first year post-injury, remained stable during the second year, and gradually declined thereafter. The majority of subjects with PTSD experienced a chronic symptom course and all developed one or more than one comorbid psychiatric disorder, with mood, other anxiety, and substance-use disorders being the most common. Despite event-related amnesia, post-traumatic stress symptoms, including vivid re-experiencing phenomena, may develop following moderate-to-severe TBI. Onset is typically delayed and symptoms may persist for several years post-injury.

  1. Brain metabolism and extracellular space diffusion parameters during and after transient global hypoxia in the rat cortex

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zoremba, N.; Homola, Aleš; Rossaint, R.; Syková, Eva

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 203, - (2007), s. 34-41 ISSN 0014-4886 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA MŠk LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Hypoxia * Cortex * Recovery Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.982, year: 2007

  2. Social Environmental Moderators of Long-term Functional Outcomes of Early Childhood Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Shari L.; Zhang, Nanhua; Yeates, Keith Owen; Stancin, Terry; Taylor, H. Gerry

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) contributes to impairments in behavior and academic performance. However, the long-term effects of early childhood TBI on functioning across settings remain poorly understood. OBJECTIVE To examine the long-term functional outcomes of early childhood TBI relative to early childhood orthopedic injuries (OIs). We also examine the moderating role of the social environment as defined by parent report and observational measures of family functioning, parenting practices, and home environment. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS A prospective, longitudinal, observational cohort study conducted at each child’s home, school, and hospital, including 3 children’s hospitals and 1 general hospital in the Midwest. Patients were enrolled in the initial study between January 2003 and October 2006. Follow-ups were completed between January 2010 and April 2015. Fifty-eight children who sustained a TBI (67%of original enrolled cohort) and 72 children who sustained an OI (61% of the original enrolled cohort) were prospectively followed up from shortly after injury (between the ages of 3 and 7 years at enrollment) to an average of 6.7 years after injury, with assessments occurring at multiple points. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Long-term functional outcomes in everyday settings, as assessed through the Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS). RESULTS Of the 130 children included, the median age for those with OIs was 11.72 years and 11.97, 12.21, and 11.72 years for those with complicated mild, moderate, and severe TBIs, respectively. Children with moderate and severe TBI were rated as having more functional impairments in multiple domains than those with OIs (P authoritarian (mean CAFAS of 56.45, 41.80, 54.90, and 17.12 for severe TBI, moderate TBI, complicated mild TBI, and OI, respectively, with significant difference between severe TBI and OI [difference = 39.33; P < .001], moderate TBI and OI [difference = 24

  3. Sevoflurane postconditioning improves long-term learning and memory of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia brain damage rats via the PI3K/Akt-mPTP pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zhongmeng; Zhang, Liangcheng; Su, Jiansheng; Cai, Dongmiao; Xu, Qingxiu

    2016-01-01

    Volatile anesthetic postconditioning has been documented to provide neuroprotection in adult animals. Our aim was to investigate whether sevoflurane postconditioning improves long-term learning and memory of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia brain damage (HIBD) rats, and whether the PI3K/Akt pathway and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening participate in the effect. Seven-day-old Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to brain HI and randomly allocated to 10 groups (n=24 each group) and treated as follows: (1) Sham, without hypoxia-ischemia; (2) HI/Control, received cerebral hypoxia-ischemia; (3) HI+Atractyloside (Atr), (4) HI+Cyclosporin A (CsA), (5) HI+sevoflurane (Sev), (6) HI+Sev+ LY294002 (LY), (7) HI+Sev+ L-NAME (L-N), (8) HI+Sev+ SB216763 (SB), (9) HI+Sev+Atr, and (10) HI+Sev+CsA. Twelve rats in each group underwent behavioral testing and their brains were harvested for hippocampus neuron count and morphology study. Brains of the other 12 animals were harvested 24h after intervention to examine the expression of Akt, p-Akt, eNOS, p-eNOS, GSK-3β, p-GSK-3β by Western bolting and mPTP opening. Sevoflurane postconditioning significantly improved the long-term cognitive performance of the rats, increased the number of surviving neurons in CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions, and protected the histomorphology of the left hippocampus. These effects were abolished by inhibitors of PI3K/eNOS/GSK-3β. Although blocking mPTP opening simulated sevoflurane postconditioning-induced neuroprotection, it failed to enhance it. Sevoflurane postconditioning exerts a neuroprotective effect against HIBD in neonatal rats via PI3K/Akt/eNOS and PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathways, and blockage of mPTP opening may be involved in attenuation of histomorphological injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. HCdc14A is involved in cell cycle regulation of human brain vascular endothelial cells following injury induced by high glucose, free fatty acids and hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jingjing; Zhou, Houguang; Tao, Yinghong; Guo, Zhuangli; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Yanyan; Tang, Yuping; Hu, Renming; Dong, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell cycle processes play a vital role in vascular endothelial proliferation and dysfunction. Cell division cycle protein 14 (Cdc14) is an important cell cycle regulatory phosphatase. Previous studies in budding yeast demonstrated that Cdc14 could trigger the inactivation of mitotic cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks), which are required for mitotic exit and cytokinesis. However, the exact function of human Cdc14 (hCdc14) in cell cycle regulation during vascular diseases is yet to be elucidated. There are two HCdc14 homologs: hCdc14A and hCdc14B. In the current study, we investigated the potential role of hCdc14A in high glucose-, free fatty acids (FFAs)-, and hypoxia-induced injury in cultured human brain vascular endothelial cells (HBVECs). Data revealed that high glucose, FFA, and hypoxia down-regulated hCdc14A expression remarkably, and also affected the expression of other cell cycle-related proteins such as cyclin B, cyclin D, cyclin E, and p53. Furthermore, the combined addition of the three stimuli largely blocked cell cycle progression, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis. We also determined that hCdc14A was localized mainly to centrosomes during interphase and spindles during mitosis using confocal microscopy, and that it could affect the expression of other cycle-related proteins. More importantly, the overexpression of hCdc14A accelerated cell cycle progression, enhanced cell proliferation, and promoted neoplastic transformation, whereas the knockdown of hCdc14A using small interfering RNA produced the opposite effects. Therefore, these findings provide novel evidence that hCdc14A might be involved in cell cycle regulation in cultured HBVECs during high glucose-, FFA-, and hypoxia-induced injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Facilitated transport of glucose from blood to brain in man and the effect of moderate hypoglycaemia on cerebral glucose utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blomqvist, G.; Widen, L.; Hellstrand, E.; Gutniak, M.; Grill, V.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of steady-state moderate hypoglycaemia on human brain homeostasis has been studied with positron emission tomography using D-glucose 11 C(ul) as tracer. To rule out any effects of insulin, the plasma insulin concentration was maintained at the same level under normo- and hypoglycaemic conditions. Reduction of blood glucose by 55% increased the glucose clearance through the blood-brain barrier by 50% and reduced brain glucose consumption by 40%. Blood flow was not affected. The results are consistent with facilitated transport of glucose from blood to brain in humans. The maximal transport rate of glucose from blood to brain was found to be 62±19 (mean±SEM) μmol hg -1 min -1 , and the half-saturation constant was found to be 4.1±3.2 mM. (orig.)

  6. Ecological validity of executive function tests in moderate traumatic brain injury in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjorlolo, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    While executive functioning (EF) tests are frequently administered in several Sub-Saharan African countries, studies examining their predictive relationships with real-world behaviors (i.e. ecological validity) are nonexistent. The present study investigated the predictive relationship between the Stroop Test, Controlled Oral Word Association Test, and Trail Making Test (TMT), a general cognitive screening test, Revised Quick Cognitive Screening Test (RQCST), and measures of activities of daily living, quality of life, and cognitive failures in Ghana. A total of 50 literate urban dwellers who were diagnosed with moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) were administered the neuropsychological tests and the self-report measures stated above. The informant version of the Cognitive failure questionnaire (CFQ) was completed by 50 'significant other' who knew the patients very well. There was no statistically significant difference between the self and informant versions of the CFQ. Some EF test scores, specifically the Stroop Test, TMT and EF composite scores, correlated significantly with the outcome measures, with correlations ranging from .29 to .55. The RQCST explained 40-49% variance in the outcome measures, while the addition of the EF composite score not only resulted in 57-62% variance accounted for but also added incremental validity to the RQCST in predicting the behavioral measures, with the exception of cognitive failures. This study has shown that although EF test scores, specifically the Stroop Test, TMT and EF composite scores, can be used to predict real-world behavior after moderate TBI in Ghana, such predictions are likely to be limited. The general implication for cross-cultural neuropsychology is that the (limited) ecological validity of EF tests may not necessarily be affected by whether the tests were administered in settings where they have not been standardized. This argument is, however, tenable granted that the test taker's backgrounds are

  7. Mild and moderate pediatric traumatic brain injury: replace routine repeat head computed tomography with neurologic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Hassan; Rhee, Peter; Pandit, Viraj; Ibrahim-Zada, Irada; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Wynne, Julie; Zangbar, Bardiya; O'Keeffe, Terence; Tang, Andrew; Friese, Randall S; Joseph, Bellal

    2013-10-01

    Opinion is divided on the role of routine repeat head computed tomography (RHCT) for guiding clinical management in pediatric patients with blunt head trauma. We hypothesize that routine RHCT does not lead to change in management in mild and moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). This is a 3-year retrospective study of all patients of age 2 years to 18 years with blunt TBI admitted to our Level 1 trauma center with an abnormal head CT. Indications for RHCT (routine vs. neurologic deterioration) and their findings (progression or improvement) were recorded. Neurosurgical intervention was defined as extraventricular drain placement, craniectomy, or craniotomy. Primary outcome was a change in management after RHCT. A total of 291 pediatric patients were identified; of which 191 patients received an RHCT. Routine RHCT did not lead to neurosurgical intervention in the mild and moderate TBI group. In patients who received RHCT due to neurologic decline (n = 7), radiographic progression was seen on 85% of the patients (n = 6), with subsequent neurosurgical interventions in three patients. Two of these patients had a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of less than 8 at admission. Our study showed that the neurologic examination can be trusted and is reliable in pediatric blunt TBI patients in determining when an RHCT scan is necessary. We recommend that RHCT is required routinely in patients with intracranial hemorrhage with GCS score of 8 or less and in patients with GCS greater than 8 and that RHCT be performed only when there are clinical indications. Diagnostic/therapeutic study, level IV.

  8. FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER FOLLOWING MODERATE TO SEVERE TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: A PROSPECTIVE STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alway, Yvette; McKay, Adam; Gould, Kate Rachel; Johnston, Lisa; Ponsford, Jennie

    2016-01-01

    This study prospectively examined the relationship between preinjury, injury-related, and postinjury factors and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Two hundred and three participants were recruited during inpatient admission following moderate to severe TBI. Participants completed an initial assessment soon after injury and were reassessed at 3, 6, and 12 months, 2, 3, 4, and 5 years postinjury. The Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-fourth edition was used to diagnose pre- and postinjury PTSD and other psychiatric disorders. The Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) and the Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI) were used to evaluate functional and psychosocial outcome from 6 months postinjury. The frequency of PTSD ranged between 0.5 and 9.4% during the 5-year period, increasing throughout the first 12 months and declining thereafter. After controlling for other predictors, shorter posttraumatic amnesia duration (odds ratio = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.92-1.00), other concurrent psychiatric disorder (odds ratio = 14.22, 95% CI = 2.68-75.38), and lower GOSE (odds ratio = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.20-0.72) and QOLI scores (odds ratio = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.95-0.97) were associated with greater odds of having injury-related PTSD. The results of this study indicate that while shorter posttraumatic amnesia duration is associated with PTSD, greater TBI severity does not prevent PTSD from evolving. Patients with PTSD experienced high rates of psychiatric comorbidity and poorer functional and quality of life outcomes after TBI. There is a need to direct clinical attention to early identification and treatment of PTSD following TBI to improve outcomes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Alzheimer’s Disease Mutant Mice Exhibit Reduced Brain Tissue Stiffness Compared to Wild-type Mice in both Normoxia and following Intermittent Hypoxia Mimicking Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Menal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEvidence from patients and animal models suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA may increase the risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD and that AD is associated with reduced brain tissue stiffness.AimTo investigate whether intermittent hypoxia (IH alters brain cortex tissue stiffness in AD mutant mice exposed to IH mimicking OSA.MethodsSix-eight month old (B6C3-Tg(APPswe,PSEN1dE985Dbo/J AD mutant mice and wild-type (WT littermates were subjected to IH (21% O2 40 s to 5% O2 20 s; 6 h/day or normoxia for 8 weeks. After euthanasia, the stiffness (E of 200-μm brain cortex slices was measured by atomic force microscopy.ResultsTwo-way ANOVA indicated significant cortical softening and weight increase in AD mice compared to WT littermates, but no significant effects of IH on cortical stiffness and weight were detected. In addition, reduced myelin was apparent in AD (vs. WT, but no significant differences emerged in the cortex extracellular matrix components laminin and glycosaminoglycans when comparing baseline AD and WT mice.ConclusionAD mutant mice exhibit reduced brain tissue stiffness following both normoxia and IH mimicking sleep apnea, and such differences are commensurate with increased edema and demyelination in AD.

  10. Alzheimer's Disease Mutant Mice Exhibit Reduced Brain Tissue Stiffness Compared to Wild-type Mice in both Normoxia and following Intermittent Hypoxia Mimicking Sleep Apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menal, Maria José; Jorba, Ignasi; Torres, Marta; Montserrat, Josep M; Gozal, David; Colell, Anna; Piñol-Ripoll, Gerard; Navajas, Daniel; Almendros, Isaac; Farré, Ramon

    2018-01-01

    Evidence from patients and animal models suggests that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and that AD is associated with reduced brain tissue stiffness. To investigate whether intermittent hypoxia (IH) alters brain cortex tissue stiffness in AD mutant mice exposed to IH mimicking OSA. Six-eight month old (B6C3-Tg(APPswe,PSEN1dE9)85Dbo/J) AD mutant mice and wild-type (WT) littermates were subjected to IH (21% O 2 40 s to 5% O 2 20 s; 6 h/day) or normoxia for 8 weeks. After euthanasia, the stiffness (E) of 200-μm brain cortex slices was measured by atomic force microscopy. Two-way ANOVA indicated significant cortical softening and weight increase in AD mice compared to WT littermates, but no significant effects of IH on cortical stiffness and weight were detected. In addition, reduced myelin was apparent in AD (vs. WT), but no significant differences emerged in the cortex extracellular matrix components laminin and glycosaminoglycans when comparing baseline AD and WT mice. AD mutant mice exhibit reduced brain tissue stiffness following both normoxia and IH mimicking sleep apnea, and such differences are commensurate with increased edema and demyelination in AD.

  11. White matter disruption in moderate/severe pediatric traumatic brain injury: Advanced tract-based analyses

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    Emily L. Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is the leading cause of death and disability in children and can lead to a wide range of impairments. Brain imaging methods such as DTI (diffusion tensor imaging are uniquely sensitive to the white matter (WM damage that is common in TBI. However, higher-level analyses using tractography are complicated by the damage and decreased FA (fractional anisotropy characteristic of TBI, which can result in premature tract endings. We used the newly developed autoMATE (automated multi-atlas tract extraction method to identify differences in WM integrity. 63 pediatric patients aged 8–19 years with moderate/severe TBI were examined with cross sectional scanning at one or two time points after injury: a post-acute assessment 1–5 months post-injury and a chronic assessment 13–19 months post-injury. A battery of cognitive function tests was performed in the same time periods. 56 children were examined in the first phase, 28 TBI patients and 28 healthy controls. In the second phase 34 children were studied, 17 TBI patients and 17 controls (27 participants completed both post-acute and chronic phases. We did not find any significant group differences in the post-acute phase. Chronically, we found extensive group differences, mainly for mean and radial diffusivity (MD and RD. In the chronic phase, we found higher MD and RD across a wide range of WM. Additionally, we found correlations between these WM integrity measures and cognitive deficits. This suggests a distributed pattern of WM disruption that continues over the first year following a TBI in children.

  12. A functional brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene variant increases the risk of moderate-to-severe allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jin, Peng; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Quek, Jia Min; Lee, Bernett; Au, Bijin; Sio, Yang Yie; Irwanto, Astrid; Schurmann, Claudia; Grabe, Hans Joergen; Suri, Bani Kaur; Matta, Sri Anusha; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; Esko, Tonu; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Liu, Hong; Zhang, Furen; Larbi, Anis; Xu, Xin; Poidinger, Michael; Liu, Jianjun; Chew, Fook Tim; Rotzschke, Olaf; Shi, Li; Wang, De Yun

    Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a secretory protein that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic asthma, and eczema, but it is currently unknown whether BDNF polymorphisms influence susceptibility to moderate-to-severe AR. Objective: We

  13. Computed tomography and outcome in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury: hematoma volume and midline shift revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, B.; Beems, T.; Vliet, T.M. van der; Diaz-Arrastia, R.R.; Borm, G.F.; Vos, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Intracranial lesion volume and midline shift are powerful outcome predictors in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and therefore they are used in TBI and computed tomography (CT) classification schemes, like the Traumatic Coma Data Bank (TCDB) classification. In this study we aimed to

  14. WMS-III findings in litigants following moderate to extremely severe brain trauma.

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    Langeluddecke, Pauline M; Lucas, Sara K

    2005-07-01

    Published information pertaining to the clinical utility of the WMS-III in assessing memory impairment in traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains inadequate. WMS-III findings are reported for 180 litigants with post-acute moderate to extremely severe TBI, classified into three groups according to injury severity, and a healthy control group. A significant "dose-response" relationship was found between memory impairment and TBI severity for most of the WMS-III indexes and subtests. Effect sizes were large for the Immediate and General Memory Indexes and medium for the Working Memory Index. In general, TBI had a greater effect on the Visual than Auditory Indexes. Effect sizes were greatest for Family Pictures and least for the auditory recognition and working memory tasks. Group findings indicate the immediate memory tasks to be clinically useful in relation to a severe or extremely severe TBI, but not for less severe trauma. Delayed memory tasks do not provide information additional to that obtained from immediate memory measures. The revised Tulsky indexes are no more sensitive to the effects of TBI than the original ones. Differences between WMS-III memory indexes are unlikely to be of diagnostic utility although memory-intelligence discrepancies may be.

  15. A comparison of IQ and memory cluster solutions in moderate and severe pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Nicholas S; Terranova, Jennifer; Turner, Alisa; Mayfield, Joan; Allen, Daniel N

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have examined heterogeneous neuropsychological outcomes in childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI) using cluster analysis. These studies have identified homogeneous subgroups based on tests of IQ, memory, and other cognitive abilities that show some degree of association with specific cognitive, emotional, and behavioral outcomes, and have demonstrated that the clusters derived for children with TBI are different from those observed in normal populations. However, the extent to which these subgroups are stable across abilities has not been examined, and this has significant implications for the generalizability and clinical utility of TBI clusters. The current study addressed this by comparing IQ and memory profiles of 137 children who sustained moderate-to-severe TBI. Cluster analysis of IQ and memory scores indicated that a four-cluster solution was optimal for the IQ scores and a five-cluster solution was optimal for the memory scores. Three clusters on each battery differed primarily by level of performance, while the others had pattern variations. Cross-plotting the clusters across respective IQ and memory test scores indicated that clusters defined by level were generally stable, while clusters defined by pattern differed. Notably, children with slower processing speed exhibited low-average to below-average performance on memory indexes. These results provide some support for the stability of previously identified memory and IQ clusters and provide information about the relationship between IQ and memory in children with TBI.

  16. Intracavitary moderator balloon combined with (252)Cf brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy, improving dosimetry in brain tumour and infiltrations.

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    Brandão, S F; Campos, T P R

    2015-07-01

    This article proposes a combination of californium-252 ((252)Cf) brachytherapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and an intracavitary moderator balloon catheter applied to brain tumour and infiltrations. Dosimetric evaluations were performed on three protocol set-ups: (252)Cf brachytherapy combined with BNCT (Cf-BNCT); Cf-BNCT with a balloon catheter filled with light water (LWB) and the same set-up with heavy water (HWB). Cf-BNCT-HWB has presented dosimetric advantages to Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT in infiltrations at 2.0-5.0 cm from the balloon surface. However, Cf-BNCT-LWB has shown superior dosimetry up to 2.0 cm from the balloon surface. Cf-BNCT-HWB and Cf-BNCT-LWB protocols provide a selective dose distribution for brain tumour and infiltrations, mainly further from the (252)Cf source, sparing the normal brain tissue. Malignant brain tumours grow rapidly and often spread to adjacent brain tissues, leading to death. Improvements in brain radiation protocols have been continuously achieved; however, brain tumour recurrence is observed in most cases. Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT-HWB represent new modalities for selectively combating brain tumour infiltrations and metastasis.

  17. Intracavitary moderator balloon combined with 252Cf brachytherapy and boron neutron capture therapy, improving dosimetry in brain tumour and infiltrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, S F

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This article proposes a combination of californium-252 (252Cf) brachytherapy, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and an intracavitary moderator balloon catheter applied to brain tumour and infiltrations. Methods: Dosimetric evaluations were performed on three protocol set-ups: 252Cf brachytherapy combined with BNCT (Cf-BNCT); Cf-BNCT with a balloon catheter filled with light water (LWB) and the same set-up with heavy water (HWB). Results: Cf-BNCT-HWB has presented dosimetric advantages to Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT in infiltrations at 2.0–5.0 cm from the balloon surface. However, Cf-BNCT-LWB has shown superior dosimetry up to 2.0 cm from the balloon surface. Conclusion: Cf-BNCT-HWB and Cf-BNCT-LWB protocols provide a selective dose distribution for brain tumour and infiltrations, mainly further from the 252Cf source, sparing the normal brain tissue. Advances in knowledge: Malignant brain tumours grow rapidly and often spread to adjacent brain tissues, leading to death. Improvements in brain radiation protocols have been continuously achieved; however, brain tumour recurrence is observed in most cases. Cf-BNCT-LWB and Cf-BNCT-HWB represent new modalities for selectively combating brain tumour infiltrations and metastasis. PMID:25927876

  18. Job stability in skilled work and communication ability after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulenbroek, Peter; Turkstra, Lyn S

    2016-01-01

    Communication deficits may play a critical role in maintaining employment after traumatic brain injury (TBI), but links between specific communication deficits and employment outcomes have not been determined. This study identified communication measures that distinguished stably employed versus unstably employed adults with TBI. Participants were 31 adults with moderate-severe TBI who were employed full-time for at least 12 consecutive months before injury in skilled jobs and had attempted return to skilled jobs after injury. Sixteen had achieved stable employment (SE) post-injury, defined as full-time employment for ≥12 consecutive months; and 15 had unstable employment (UE). Participants completed a battery of communication tests identified in a prior qualitative study of communication skills required for skilled work. Measures of spoken language comprehension, verbal reasoning, social inference, reading and politeness in spoken discourse significantly discriminated between SE and UE groups. Two nested models were completed and compared. The first model excluded discourse data because of missing data for two UE and one SE participant. This model revealed that measures of verbal reasoning speed (β = -0.18, p = 0.05) and social inference (β = 0.19, p = 0.05) were predictive independent of the overall model. The second model included discourse politeness data and was a better overall predictor of group membership (Likelihood ratio test, Model 1: 3.824, Model 2: 2.865). Communication measures were positively associated with SE in skilled jobs after TBI. Clinicians should include assessment of communication for adults attempting return to work after TBI, paying specific attention to social inference and speed of verbal reasoning skills. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) often results in communication impairments associated with the cognitive skills underlying interpersonal skills. Communication impairment after TBI has been anecdotally associated with

  19. Does Apolipoprotein e4 Status Moderate the Association of Family Environment with Long-Term Child Functioning following Early Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury? A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treble-Barna, Amery; Zang, Huaiyu; Zhang, Nanhua; Martin, Lisa J; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H Gerry; Wade, Shari L; Kurowski, Brad G

    2016-09-01

    To examine whether apolipoprotein e4 (APOE) status moderates the association of family environment with child functioning following early traumatic brain injury (TBI). Sixty-five children with moderate to severe TBI and 70 children with orthopedic injury (OI) completed assessments 6, 12, 18 months, and 3.5 and 6.8 years post injury. DNA was extracted from saliva samples and genotyped for APOE e4 status. Linear mixed models examined moderating effects of APOE e4 status on associations between two family environment factors (parenting style, home environment) and three child outcomes (executive functioning, behavioral adjustment, adaptive functioning). Children with TBI who were carriers of the e4 allele showed poorer adaptive functioning relative to non-carriers with TBI and children with OI in the context of low authoritarianism. At high levels of authoritarianism, non-carriers with TBI showed the poorest adaptive functioning among groups. There were no main effects or interactions involving APOE and executive functioning or behavioral adjustment. The APOE e4 allele was detrimental for long-term adaptive functioning in the context of positive parenting, whereas in less optimal parenting contexts, being a non-carrier was detrimental. We provide preliminary evidence for an interaction of APOE e4 status and parenting style in predicting long-term outcomes following early TBI. (JINS, 2016, 22, 859-864).

  20. Predicting emotional well-being following traumatic brain injury: a test of mediated and moderated models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Elizabeth; Terry, Deborah

    2009-09-01

    This study examined two models for predicting emotional well-being following traumatic brain injury (TBI), namely the Lazarus and Folkman (1984) mediated model of stress and coping and the stress-buffer hypothesis (Cohen & Edwards, 1988). The mediated model suggests that antecedent variables (i.e., personal and environmental resources) will predict emotional well-being, but their effect will be mediated through cognitive variables, such as appraisal and coping. In contrast, the moderated (buffer) hypothesis suggests that resources will protect individuals from the effects of stress, so will have different relationships with outcome at different levels of perceived stress. Ninety individuals with TBI were recruited from a major hospital in Brisbane, Australia. They and their relatives completed questionnaires at three time intervals: discharge, one month and nine months post-discharge, discharge being in 1998. Hierarchical regression was used to examine the relationships among the proposed predictors, mediators and outcomes. Support was found for some aspects of both models in the short-term. In the long-term, stress-buffer effects were no longer apparent. However, with the exception of family support, the predictors all influenced long-term adjustment through their impact on short-term adjustment. The role of family support as a direct predictor of emotional well-being in the long-term is highlighted. The findings have the potential to enable the identification of "at risk" individuals prior to discharge and can highlight important foci for rehabilitation. Specifically, the study has identified the importance of early psychological intervention to address appraisal and the need to engage families in rehabilitation.

  1. Job stability in skilled work and communication ability after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meulenbroek, Peter; Turkstra, Lyn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Communication deficits may play a critical role in maintaining employment after traumatic brain injury (TBI), but links between specific communication deficits and employment outcomes have not been determined. This study identified communication measures that distinguished stably employed versus unstably employed adults with TBI. Methods Participants were 31 adults with moderate-severe TBI who were employed full-time for at least 12 consecutive months before injury in skilled jobs and had attempted return to skilled jobs after injury. Sixteen had achieved stable employment (SE) post-injury, defined as full-time employment for ≥12 consecutive months; and 15 had unstable (UE) employment. Participants completed a battery of communication tests identified in a prior qualitative study of communication skills required for skilled work. Results Measures of spoken language comprehension, verbal reasoning, social inference, reading, and politeness in spoken discourse significantly discriminated between SE and UE groups. Two nested models were completed and compared. The first model excluded discourse data because of missing data for two UE and one SE participant. This model revealed that measures of verbal reasoning speed (β = −0.18, p = 0.05) and social inference (β = 0.19, p = 0.05) were predictive independent of the overall model. The second model included discourse data and was a better overall predictor of group membership (Likelihood ratio test, Model 1: 3.824, Model 2: 2.865). Conclusion Communication measures were positively associated with stable employment in skilled jobs after TBI. Clinicians should include assessment of communication for adults attempting return to work after TBI, paying specific attention to social inference and speed of verbal reasoning skills. PMID:25958999

  2. Diagnostic Accuracy, Sensitivity, and Specificity of Executive Function Tests in Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjorlolo, Samuel

    2016-04-27

    The sociocultural differences between Western and sub-Saharan African countries make it imperative to standardize neuropsychological tests in the latter. However, Western-normed tests are frequently administered in sub-Saharan Africa because of challenges hampering standardization efforts. Yet a salient topical issue in the cross-cultural neuropsychology literature relates to the utility of Western-normed neuropsychological tests in minority groups, non-Caucasians, and by extension Ghanaians. Consequently, this study investigates the diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of executive function (EF) tests (The Stroop Test, Trail Making Test, and Controlled Oral Word Association Test), and a Revised Quick Cognitive Screening Test (RQCST) in a sample of 50 patients diagnosed with moderate traumatic brain injury and 50 healthy controls in Ghana. The EF test scores showed good diagnostic accuracy, with area under the curve (AUC) values of the Trail Making Test scores ranging from .746 to .902. With respect to the Stroop Test scores, the AUC values ranged from .793 to .898, while Controlled Oral Word Association Test had AUC value of .787. The RQCST scores discriminated between the groups, with AUC values ranging from .674 to .912. The AUC values of composite EF score and a neuropsychological score created from EF and RQCST scores were .936 and. 942, respectively. Additionally, the Stroop Test, Trail Making Test, EF composite score, and RQCST scores showed good to excellent sensitivities and specificities. In general, this study has shown that commonly used EF tests in Western countries have diagnostic accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity when administered in Ghanaian samples. The findings and implications of the study are discussed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. The dose-response effect of acute intravenous transplantation of human umbilical cord blood cells on brain damage and spatial memory deficits in neonatal hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, S; Greggio, S; Marinowic, D R; Machado, D C; DaCosta, J Costa

    2012-05-17

    Despite the beneficial effects of cell-based therapies on brain repair shown in most studies, there has not been a consensus regarding the optimal dose of human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBC) for neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI). In this study, we compared the long-term effects of intravenous administration of HUCBC at three different doses on spatial memory and brain morphological changes after HI in newborn Wistar rats. In addition, we tested whether the transplanted HUCBC migrate to the injured brain after transplantation. Seven-day-old animals underwent right carotid artery occlusion and were exposed to 8% O(2) inhalation for 2 h. After 24 h, randomly selected animals were assigned to four different experimental groups: HI rats administered with vehicle (HI+vehicle), HI rats treated with 1×10(6) (HI+low-dose), 1×10(7) (HI+medium-dose), and 1×10(8) (HI+high-dose) HUCBC into the jugular vein. A control group (sham-operated) was also included in this study. After 8 weeks of transplantation, spatial memory performance was assessed using the Morris water maze (MWM), and subsequently, the animals were euthanized for brain morphological analysis using stereological methods. In addition, we performed immunofluorescence and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analyses to identify HUCBC in the rat brain 7 days after transplantation. The MWM test showed a significant spatial memory recovery at the highest HUCBC dose compared with HI+vehicle rats (P<0.05). Furthermore, the brain atrophy was also significantly lower in the HI+medium- and high-dose groups compared with the HI+vehicle animals (P<0.01; 0.001, respectively). In addition, HUCBC were demonstrated to be localized in host brains by immunohistochemistry and PCR analyses 7 days after intravenous administration. These results revealed that HUCBC transplantation has the dose-dependent potential to promote robust tissue repair and stable cognitive improvement after HI brain injury. Copyright © 2012 IBRO. Published by

  4. Effect of equiosmolar solutions of hypertonic sodium lactate versus mannitol in craniectomy patients with moderate traumatic brain injury

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    Muhammad R. Ahmad

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brain relaxation and prevention from cerebral edema are essential in craniectomy. Osmotherapy with 20% mannitol are generally used to withdraw fluid from the brain parenchyma, however may cause hemodynamic fluctuation, due to increase diuresis. On the other hand 0.5 M hypertonic sodium lactate (HSL appeared as an alternative of osmotherapy. This study  aimed to observe the effect of hypertonic sodium lactate (HSL on brain relaxation, blood glucose level and hemodynamic variables in craniectomy due to moderate brain injury.Methods: A randomized controlled study of 42 cases with moderate brain injury, aged 18 - 65 years, ASA 1 - 3, between September-November 2012, was carried out. The patients were divided into group M (n = 21 that received 2.5 mL/kg 20% mannitol and group HSL that received 2.5 mL/kg 0.5M HSL. Mean arterial pressures (MAP, central venous pressures (CVP and urine output were measured after induction, and at 15, 30, 45, 60 min after infusion. Brain relaxation was assessed at a four-point scale after opening the duramater. Blood glucose levels were measured before induction and at 60 min after the infusion. Appropriate statistical tests were used for comparison. Unpaired t-test was used to compare hemodynamic and blood glucose level, and chi-square was used to compare brain relaxation.Results: MAP at 60 minute was significantly higher in HSL group than M group (81.66 ± 7.85 vs 74.33 ± 6.18 mmHg; p = 0.002. There was no difference in brain relaxation (p = 0.988. A significant increase in blood glucose level was observed in group HSL (17.95 ± 11.46 mg/dL; p = 0.001.Conclusion: Half-molar HSL was as effective as 20% mannitol in producing brain relaxation, with better hemodynamic stability and gave significant increase in blood glucose level.Keywords: brain relaxation, hemodynamic, hypertonic sodium lactate, mannitol, traumatic brain injury

  5. Mechanisms of Neuroprotection from Hypoxia-Ischemia (HI) Brain Injury by Up-regulation of Cytoglobin (CYGB) in a Neonatal Rat Model*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shu-Feng; Yang, Han-Hua; Xiao, Dan-Ping; Huang, Yue-Jun; He, Gu-Yu; Ma, Hai-Ran; Xia, Fang; Shi, Xue-Chuan

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the expression profile of CYGB, its potential neuroprotective function, and underlying molecular mechanisms using a model of neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) brain injury. Cygb mRNA and protein expression were evaluated within the first 36 h after the HI model was induced using RT-PCR and Western blotting. Cygb mRNA expression was increased at 18 h in a time-dependent manner, and its level of protein expression increased progressively in 24 h. To verify the neuroprotective effect of CYGB, a gene transfection technique was employed. Cygb cDNA and shRNA delivery adenovirus systems were established (Cygb-cDNA-ADV and Cygb-shRNA-ADV, respectively) and injected into the brains of 3-day-old rats 4 days before they were induced with HI treatment. Rats from different groups were euthanized 24 h post-HI, and brain samples were harvested. 2,3,5-Triphenyltetrazolium chloride, TUNEL, and Nissl staining indicated that an up-regulation of CYGB resulted in reduced acute brain injury. The superoxide dismutase level was found to be dependent on expression of CYGB. The Morris water maze test in 28-day-old rats demonstrated that CYGB expression was associated with improvement of long term cognitive impairment. Studies also demonstrated that CYGB can up-regulate mRNA and protein levels of VEGF and increase both the density and diameter of the microvessels but inhibits activation of caspase-2 and -3. Thus, this is the first in vivo study focusing on the neuroprotective role of CYGB. The reduction of neonatal HI injury by CYGB may be due in part to antioxidant and antiapoptotic mechanisms and by promoting angiogenesis. PMID:23585565

  6. Acute Effects of Moderate and Strenuous Running on Trace Element Distribution in the Brain, Liver, and Spleen of Trained Rats

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    Kıvanç Ergen

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Trace elements such as manganese (Mn, cobalt (Co and chromium (Cr play key roles in metabolic reactions and are important in many physiological enzymatic processes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the acute effects of moderate and strenuous running (treadmill exercise on the levels of Mn, Co and Cr in the brain, liver, and spleen of trained rats. Study Design: Animal experiment. Material and Methods: Twenty-one Wistar-Albino adult male rats were used in the study. Rats were grouped as control group (no mandated exercise; n=8, moderate exercise group (30 min exercise duration; n=7, and strenuous exercise group (60 min exercise duration; n=6. The levels of Mn, Co, and Cr in the frontal lobe, temporal lobe, brain stem, liver, and spleen were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Results: Cr levels in liver of rats increased in parallel to the time course of running supporting the exercise training effect on the action of insulin. Compared to the control group, the level of Co significantly decreased in the brain stem of rats in the moderate exercise group (p=0.009 and in the frontal lobe of rats in the strenuous exercise group (p=0.004. In the strenuous exercise group, an examination of the brain stem revealed that the level of Mn significantly decreased (p=0.001, and levels of Co and Cr were apparently depleted to the extent that these elements were no longer detectable. Conclusion: A notable finding is that during or after single bout strenuous exercise, levels of Co decreased in the spleen and particularly decreased in the brain stem of regularly trained rats. From this study, it can be inferred that sportsmen should aware trace element disturbances among the body parts or depletion of some trace elements after single bout of chronic strenuous running exercise.

  7. Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Correlates of Anxiety at 1 Year After Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Tessa; Fann, Jesse R; Chervoneva, Inna; Juengst, Shannon B; Rosenthal, Joseph A; Krellman, Jason W; Dreer, Laura E; Kroenke, Kurt

    2016-05-01

    To determine at 1 year after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury the (1) rate of clinically significant anxiety; (2) rates of specific symptoms of anxiety; (3) risk factors for anxiety; and (4) associations of anxiety with other 1-year outcomes, including participation and quality of life. Prospective longitudinal observational study. Inpatient rehabilitation centers, with data capture at injury and 1-year follow-up. Persons with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury who were enrolled in the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems database (N=1838). Not applicable. The 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, Patient Health Questionnaire (9-item screen for depression), FIM, Participation Assessment with Recombined Tools-Objective, and Satisfaction with Life Scale. Clinically significant anxiety was reported by 21% of the participants. Of these, >80% reported interference with daily activities, with the most common symptoms being excessive worry and irritability. A common pattern was comorbid anxiety and depression, with smaller proportions reporting either disorder alone. Anxiety had large effect sizes with respect to life satisfaction and cognitive disability and medium to small effect sizes relative to societal participation and self-care. Middle age, black race, lower socioeconomic status, preinjury mental health treatment, and at least 1 traumatic brain injury prior to the index injury were all risk factors for later anxiety. Anxiety should be screened, fully evaluated, and treated after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. Worry and irritability might be treated with pharmacologic agents or relatively simple behavioral interventions, which should be further researched in this population. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantification of compensatory processes of postnatal hypoxia in newborn piglets applying short-term nonlinear dynamics analysis

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    Walter Bernd

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Newborn mammals suffering from moderate hypoxia during or after birth are able to compensate a transitory lack of oxygen by adapting their vital functions. Exposure to hypoxia leads to an increase in the sympathetic tone causing cardio-respiratory response, peripheral vasoconstriction and vasodilatation in privileged organs like the heart and brain. However, there is only limited information available about the time and intensity changes of the underlying complex processes controlled by the autonomic nervous system. Methods In this study an animal model involving seven piglets was used to examine an induced state of circulatory redistribution caused by moderate oxygen deficit. In addition to the main focus on the complex dynamics occurring during sustained normocapnic hypoxia, the development of autonomic regulation after induced reoxygenation had been analysed. For this purpose, we first introduced a new algorithm to prove stationary conditions in short-term time series. Then we investigated a multitude of indices from heart rate and blood pressure variability and from bivariate interactions, also analysing respiration signals, to quantify the complexity of vegetative oscillations influenced by hypoxia. Results The results demonstrated that normocapnic hypoxia causes an initial increase in cardiovascular complexity and variability, which decreases during moderate hypoxia lasting one hour (p Conclusions In conclusion, indices from linear and nonlinear dynamics reflect considerable temporal changes of complexity in autonomous cardio-respiratory regulation due to normocapnic hypoxia shortly after birth. These findings might be suitable for non-invasive clinical monitoring of hypoxia-induced changes of autonomic regulation in newborn humans.

  9. Regional circulatory changes in the presence of acute hypoxic hypoxia

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    Kovalev, O.A; Larin, V.L.; Severovostokova, V.I.; Sheremetevskaya, S.K.; Korovin, K.F.; Nepochatov, O.N.

    Experiments were conducted on male white rats with catheters implanted in the external jugular vein. Hypoxic hypoxia was produced by placing the animals in a sealed chamber for 30 min, which was ventilated with a gas mixture of 10.5% O/sub 2/ + 89.5% N/sub 2/, or 3.5% O/sub 2/ + 96.5% N/sub 2/. To assess regional changes in resistive and capillary parts of the vascular system, the animals were given intravenous injections of /sup 86/Rb and 60 s after cardiac arrest, the organs and tissues were isolated and their radioactivity recorded. Changes in catecholamine, epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) content in blood plasma and tissues were studied using a spectrofluorimetric method. Moderate hypoxia was associated with substantial decrease in uptake of /sup 86/Rb in thoracic organs (myocardium, lungs), some organs of the abdominal cavity (stomach, pancreas, large intestine, kidneys, adrenals), as well as skin of the hind legs. Uptake of /sup 86/Rb increased in the brain, liver, small intestine, as well as extensive areas of muscular and bone tissues of the neck, chest, posterior extremities and, to a lesser extent, abdomen and pelvis, skin of the neck, chest, and forelegs. With a severe degree of hypoxia, uptake of /sup 86/Rb decreased in several abdominal organs (small and large intestine, stomach, pancreas, kidneys, spleen), as well as skin of virtually all parts of the body. However, an increase in /sup 86/Rb uptake was observed in the brain, myocardium, muscles and bones of the chest, abdomen and pelvis. E and NE concentrations decreased with moderate hypoxia in blood, and increased in the adrenals. An increase of NE was observed in hypothalamus, myocardium, and liver. Catecholamine levels did not differ from those of controls.

  10. Moderate Ethanol Preconditioning of Rat Brain Cultures Engenders Neuroprotection Against Dementia-Inducing Neuroinflammatory Proteins: Possible Signaling Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neafsey, Edward J.; Wang, Kewei; Achille, Nicholas J.; Mitchell, Robert M.; Sivaswamy, Sreevidya

    2010-01-01

    There is no question that chronic alcohol (ethanol) abuse, a leading worldwide problem, causes neuronal dysfunction and brain damage. However, various epidemiologic studies in recent years have indicated that in comparisons with abstainers or never-drinkers, light/moderate alcohol consumers have lower risks of age-dependent cognitive decline and/or dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Such reduced risks have been variously attributed to favorable circulatory and/or cerebrovascular effects of moderate ethanol intake, but they could also involve ethanol “preconditioning” phenomena in brain glia and neurons. Here we summarize our experimental studies showing that moderate ethanol preconditioning (MEP; 20–30 mM ethanol) of rat brain cultures prevents neurodegeneration due to β-amyloid, an important protein implicated in AD, and to other neuroinflammatory proteins such as gp120, the human immunodeficiency virus 1 envelope protein linked to AIDS dementia. The MEP neuroprotection is associated with suppression of neurotoxic protein-evoked initial increases in [Ca+2]i and proinflammatory mediators—e.g., superoxide anion, arachidonic acid, and glutamate. Applying a sensor → transducer → effector model to MEP, we find that onset of neuroprotection correlates temporally with elevations in “effector” heat shock proteins (HSP70, HSP27, and phospho-HSP27). The effector status of HSPs is supported by the fact that inhibiting HSP elevations due to MEP largely restores gp120-induced superoxide potentiation and subsequent neurotoxicity. As upstream mediators, synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors may be initial prosurvival sensors of ethanol, and protein kinase C epsilon and focal adhesion kinase are likely transducers during MEP that are essential for protective HSP elevations. Regarding human consumption, we speculate that moderate ethanol intake might counter incipient cognitive deterioration during advanced aging or AD by exerting preconditioning

  11. Measurement of physical performance and objective fatigability in people with mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritta, Catherine; Cherian, Binu; Macaden, Ashish S; John, Judy Ann

    2010-06-01

    The aims of this study were to objectively measure the physical performance and physical endurance of patients with traumatic brain injury with minimization of cognitive and psychological fatigue, and to compare the physical performance of brain injured patients with that of healthy controls. This was a nonrandomized partially blinded controlled study. The study setting was the Outpatient Multidisciplinary Brain Injury Clinic in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation of a tertiary care university teaching hospital. Participants included an experimental group that comprised independently ambulant men (age 18-55 years) with mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury (n = 24) who complained of greater fatigue than before their injury and an age-matched and sex-matched control group (n = 24). The intervention included the Six-Minute Walk Test. The primary outcome measures were the Six-Minute Walk Distance, the Fatigue Severity Scale, Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination, and the Fatigue Visual Numeric Scale; the secondary outcome measures were the Physiological Cost Index of Walking and the Borg Scale of Perceived Exertion. The Six-Minute Walk Distance of the experimental group (452.33+/-68.816) when compared with that of the control group (518.08+/-92.114) was reduced by 12.7 and 30.5%, respectively, when compared with the predicted Six-Minute Walking Distance (650.04+/-79.142) for the same age and sex. The mean Fatigue Severity Scale values were 2.51 and 1.62 for the experimental and control groups, respectively. The mean Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination Score for the patients was 85.5+/-7.265. In conclusion, the Six-Minute Walk Test is useful in segregating physical fatigue from cognitive and psychological aspects of fatigue when cognitive and psychological dimensions are known. The Six-Minute Walk Test can be used as a tool for exercise intensity prescription in men with mild-to-moderate brain injury, to avoid the deleterious effects of fatigue.

  12. Persistent dose-dependent changes in brain structure in young adults with low-to-moderate alcohol exposure in utero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstrand, Kristen L; Ding, Zhaohua; Dodge, Neil C; Cowan, Ronald L; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W; Avison, Malcolm J

    2012-11-01

    Many children with heavy exposure to alcohol in utero display characteristic alterations in brain size and structure. However, the long-term effects of low-to-moderate alcohol exposure on these outcomes are unknown. Using voxel-based morphometry and region-of-interest analyses, we examined the influence of lower doses of alcohol on gray and white matter composition in a prospectively recruited, homogeneous, well-characterized cohort of alcohol-exposed (n = 11, age 19.5 ± 0.3 years) and control (n = 9, age 19.6 ± 0.5 years) young adults. A large proportion of the exposed individuals were born to mothers whose alcohol consumption during pregnancy was in the low-to-moderate range. There were no differences in total brain volume or total gray or white matter volume between the exposed and control groups. However, gray matter volume was reduced in alcohol-exposed individuals in several areas previously reported to be affected by high levels of exposure, including the left cingulate gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyri, right middle temporal gyrus, and right caudate nucleus. Notably, this gray matter loss was dose dependent, with higher exposure producing more substantial losses. These results indicate that even at low doses, alcohol exposure during pregnancy impacts brain development and that these effects persist into young adulthood. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  13. Admission criteria to the Danish Brain Cancer Program are moderately associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hill, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Mie Kiszka; Nepper-Rasmussen, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the Danish Brain Cancer Program by examining the criteria for admission to the program and the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in 359 patients referred to the program at the Odense University Hospital during one year. The admiss......The objective of this study was to evaluate the Danish Brain Cancer Program by examining the criteria for admission to the program and the results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain in 359 patients referred to the program at the Odense University Hospital during one year....... The admission criteria given by the Danish Health and Medicines Authority are as follows: 1. Prior computed tomography or MRI indicating tumour. 2. Progressive focal neurological deficits. 3. Epileptic seizure in adults. 4. Change in behaviour or cognition showing progression. 5. Headache with progression over...

  14. Early Computed Tomography Frontal Abnormalities Predict Long-Term Neurobehavioral Problems But Not Affective Problems after Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spikman, Jacoba M.; Timmerman, Marieke E.; Coers, Annemieke; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral problems are serious consequences of moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and have a negative impact on outcome. There may be two types: neurobehavioral problems, manifesting as inadequate social behavior resulting from prefrontal system damage, and affective behavioral

  15. Effect of Concurrent Src Kinase Inhibition with Short-Duration Hypothermia on Ca2+/Calmodulin Kinase IV Activity and Neuropathology after Hypoxia-Ischemia in the Newborn Swine Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratimenos, Panagiotis; Koutroulis, Ioannis; Jain, Amit; Malaeb, Shadi; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) results in increased activation of Ca2+/calmodulin kinase IV (CaM kinase IV) mediated by Src kinase. Therapeutic hypothermia ameliorates neuronal injury in the newborn. Inhibition of Src kinase concurrently with hypothermia further attenuates the hypoxia-induced increased activation of CaM kinase IV compared with hypothermia alone. Ventilated piglets were exposed to HI, received saline or a selective Src kinase inhibitor (PP2), and were cooled to 33°C. Neuropathology, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine (PCr) concentrations, and CaM kinase IV activity were determined. The neuropathology mean score (mean ± SD) was 0.4 ± 0.43 in normoxia-normothermia (p Src kinase inhibitor were comparable in the levels of ATP and PCr, indicating that they were similar in their degree of energy failure prior to treatments. Hypothermia or Src kinase inhibitor (PP2) did not restore the ATP and PCr levels. Hypothermia and Src kinase inhibition attenuated apoptotic cell death and improved neuropathology after hypoxia. The combination of short-duration hypothermia with Src kinase inhibition following hypoxia further attenuates the increased activation of CaM kinase IV compared to hypothermia alone in the newborn swine brain. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Traumatic axonal injury and persistent emotional lability in an adolescent following moderate traumatic brain injury: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Luke C; Burkhart, Scott O; Elbin, R J; Agarwal, Vikus; Kontos, Anthony P

    2015-01-01

    A 15-year-old male was treated secondary to sustaining a moderate traumatic brain injury (moderate TBI). Symptom self-report, and computerized and paper-and-pencil-based neurocognitive, vestibular/ocular motor, and imaging data were used throughout to document impairment and recovery. The patient demonstrated persistent emotional lability concurrent with vestibular impairment. In addition to clinical evaluation and management, the patient also underwent susceptibility-weighted imaging, which revealed axonal shearing across the corpus callosum and areas innervating the prefrontal cortex. Paper-and-pencil neurocognitive measures revealed persisting deficits, despite normal-appearing computerized test results. Implications of this case underline the importance of an integrative evaluation process including clinical interview, neurocognitive and vestibular/ocular physical therapy, and advanced neuroimaging, especially in cases with atypical presentation.

  17. Brain and skin do not contribute to the systemic rise in erythropoietin during acute hypoxia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Nordsborg, Nikolai; Taudorf, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) preserves arterial oxygen content by controlling red blood cell and plasma volumes. Synthesis of EPO was long thought to relate inversely to renal oxygenation, but in knockout mice, brain and skin have been identified as essential for the acute hypoxic EPO response. Whether...

  18. Is Computerized Cognitive Testing Useful in Children and Adolescents with Moderate-to-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde, Vickie; Brooks, Brian L

    2017-04-01

    Children and adolescents with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) present with short and long-term neuropsychological deficits following their injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of a brief computerized test battery for evaluating cognitive functioning sub-acutely following a TBI. Participants (n=33) sustained a moderate-to-severe TBI, were between 8 and 18 years old, and were assessed using CNS Vital Signs (CNSVS) within 6 months post-injury (median=0.6 month). Participants with TBI were matched to 33 healthy controls based on age, sex, and handedness to compare their cognitive functioning on the CNSVS battery. Children and adolescents with moderate-to-severe TBI had significantly lower scores and large effect sizes on Reaction Time, Complex Attention, and Cognitive Flexibility domains, as well as medium effect sizes on two Visual Memory test scores and one Psychomotor Speed test score. A significantly higher percentage of participants with TBI had cognitive impairment on Reaction Time domain score compared to the control group. Finally, CNSVS domain scores correctly categorized 76% of participants as either group with TBI or control group. CNSVS may be a useful tool for screening cognitive abilities in children and adolescents who are early in their recovery from a moderate-to-severe TBI, particularly when a rapid screening evaluation can help guide management, interventions, and track recovery. (JINS, 2017, 23, 304-313).

  19. Social communication features in children following moderate to severe acquired brain injury: a cross-sectional pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breau, Lynn M; Clark, Brenda; Scott, Ori; Wilkes, Courtney; Reynolds, Shawn; Ricci, Florencia; Sonnenberg, Lyn; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Rashid, Marghalara; Goez, Helly R

    2015-04-01

    We compared the social communication deficits of children with moderate to severe acquired brain injury or autism spectrum disorder, while accounting for the role of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. Parents of 20 children aged 6 to 10 years (10 acquired brain injury; 10 autism spectrum disorder) completed the Social Communication Questionnaire, and Conners 3 Parent Short. A multivariate analysis of covariance revealed significant differences between groups in Social Communication Questionnaire restricted repetitive behavior scores, but not reciprocal social interaction or social communication. Multiple linear regressions indicated diagnosis did not predict reciprocal social interaction or social communication scores and that Conners 3 Parent Short Form hyperactivity scores were the strongest predictor of Social Communication Questionnaire reciprocal social interaction scores after accounting for age and Intelligence Quotient. The lack of difference in social communication deficits between groups may help in understanding the pathophysiology underlying the behavioral consequences of acquired brain injury. The link between hyperactivity and reciprocal interaction suggests that targeting hyperactivity may improve social outcomes in children following acquired brain injury. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Hypoxia-cultured human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells are non-oncogenic and have enhanced viability, motility, and tropism to brain cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y; Zhu, M; Dangelmajer, S; Lee, Y M; Wijesekera, O; Castellanos, C X; Denduluri, A; Chaichana, K L; Li, Q; Zhang, H; Levchenko, A; Guerrero-Cazares, H; Quiñones-Hinojosa, A

    2014-12-11

    Adult human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) are multipotent cells, which are abundant, easily collected, and bypass the ethical concerns that plague embryonic stem cells. Their utility and accessibility have led to the rapid development of clinical investigations to explore their autologous and allogeneic cellular-based regenerative potential, tissue preservation capabilities, anti-inflammatory properties, and anticancer properties, among others. hAMSCs are typically cultured under ambient conditions with 21% oxygen. However, physiologically, hAMSCs exist in an environment of much lower oxygen tension. Furthermore, hAMSCs cultured in standard conditions have shown limited proliferative and migratory capabilities, as well as limited viability. This study investigated the effects hypoxic culture conditions have on primary intraoperatively derived hAMSCs. hAMSCs cultured under hypoxia (hAMSCs-H) remained multipotent, capable of differentiation into osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic lineages. In addition, hAMSCs-H grew faster and exhibited less cell death. Furthermore, hAMSCs-H had greater motility than normoxia-cultured hAMSCs and exhibited greater homing ability to glioblastoma (GBM) derived from brain tumor-initiating cells from our patients in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, hAMSCs-H did not transform into tumor-associated fibroblasts in vitro and were not tumorigenic in vivo. Rather, hAMSCs-H promoted the differentiation of brain cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest an alternative culturing technique that can enhance the function of hAMSCs, which may be necessary for their use in the treatment of various pathologies including stroke, myocardial infarction, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and GBM.

  1. Oxytocin effects on complex brain networks are moderated by experiences of maternal love withdrawal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riem, M.M.E.; van IJzendoorn, M.H.; Tops, M.; Boksem, M.A.S.; Rombouts, S.A.R.B.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J.

    2013-01-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin has been implicated in a variety of social processes. However, recent studies indicate that oxytocin does not enhance prosocial behavior in all people in all circumstances. Here, we investigate effects of intranasal oxytocin administration on intrinsic functional brain

  2. EFFECTS OF CANNABIDIOL PLUS HYPOTHERMIA ON SHORT-TERM NEWBORN PIG BRAIN DAMAGE AFTER ACUTE HYPOXIA-ISCHEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Lafuente

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypothermia is standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but near 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms to hypothermia and would improve neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate.Objective: To test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets.Methods: Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomized to receive 30 min after the insult: 1 normothermia- and vehicle-treated group; 2 normothermia- and cannabidiol-treated group; 3 hypothermia- and vehicle-treated group; and 4 hypothermia- and cannabidiol-treated group. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to qualify the number of neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate. Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress and expression of caspase-3 (apoptosis and TNFα (inflammation.Results: Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on histological damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone.Conclusion: Cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.

  3. [Birth hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Větr, M

    2015-03-01

    Evaluation of the commonly used laboratory and clinical parameters of the newborn shortly after birth. Check thresholds acidemia, and in relation to the method of termination of pregnancy. Retrospective epidemiological study. Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University Hospital, Olomouc. Of the 26,869 children born in the years 2000 to 2013 Inclusion criteria (complete clinical and laboratory findings after birth) fulfill 23,471 (87.4%) neonates. Methods for evaluation of newborns included Apgar score calculation and arterial umbilical cord blood pH and lactate analysis. A total of 0.7% (157) of the neonates had severe acidosis pH below 7.00 arterial umbilical cord blood, its prevalence varies annually between 0.1 to 1.1%. Cutoff lactate in relation to pH reserves. Operating cesarean births in particular accounts for more than half of those with worse clinical findings Apgar and pH <7.00, but only 30% supratreshold lactate values. Also worse clinical evaluation after caesarean section is not in accordance with the laboratory findings. Vaginal surgery, especially forceps have a significant share of severe acidosis than cesarean, regardless of their frequency. Risk factor of forceps to pH less 7.00,OR = 9.28 (5.39 -15.77), P = 0.0000000, while caesarean to pH less 7,00 had OR = 1.52 (1.08 to 2.14), P = 0.01408156. The results obtained confirm that acidosis after birth is quite common, although they may not have response on the clinical condition of the newborn after birth. Evaluation of Apgar is little objective for the detection of hypoxia during birth and is influenced by the immaturity of newborn and method of delivery. Lactate levels may contribute to an objective assessment of hypoxia during birth. Values above 6.3 mmol/l can be considered an important indicator of newborn acidosis and birth hypoxia.

  4. Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor moderates associations between maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring behavioral disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Ardesheer; Odgerel, Zagaa; Wickramaratne, Priya J; Weissman, Myrna M

    2016-01-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy is associated with a number of adverse offspring outcomes. In the present study, based on 209 offspring from a 3-generation family study of depression, we show that the effects of prenatal exposure on offspring externalizing psychopathology (conduct, substance use disorder) is more pronounced in the presence of lower-expressing brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene variants. BDNF plays an important role in the development and survival of neural circuits. Individuals with low-expressing variants who are further exposed to prenatal tobacco smoke may be most vulnerable to a spectrum of behavioral disorders that depend on these circuits. PMID:27611068

  5. The moderating effects of sex and age on the association between traumatic brain injury and harmful psychological correlates among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Gabriela; Adlaf, Edward M; Mann, Robert E; Boak, Angela; Hamilton, Hayley; Asbridge, Mark; Colantonio, Angela; Turner, Nigel E; Rehm, Jürgen; Cusimano, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well established that sex is a risk factor in acquiring a traumatic brain injury (TBI) among adolescents, it has not been established whether it also moderates the influence of other TBI psychological health correlates. Data were derived from a 2011 population-based cross-sectional school survey, which included 9,288 Ontario 7th-12th graders who completed anonymous self-administered questionnaires in classrooms. Response rate was 62%. Preliminary analyses found no evidence of nonresponse bias in the reporting of TBI. TBI was defined as a hit or blow to the head that resulted in a 5 minutes loss of consciousness or at least one overnight hospitalization due to symptoms associated with it. Reports of lifetime TBI were more common among males than females (23.1%, 95% CI: 20.5, 25.8 vs. 17.1%, 95% CI: 14.7, 19.8). Thirteen correlates were examined and included cigarette smoking, elevated psychological distress, suicide ideation, bully victimization (at school, as well as cyber bullying), bullying others, cannabis use, cannabis dependence and drug use problems, physical injuries, daily smoking, drinking alcohol, binge drinking, use of cannabis, and poor academic performance. Among the outcomes examined, sex moderated the relationship between lifetime TBI and cigarette smoking. In addition, sex and age jointly moderated the relationship between lifetime TBI and daily smoking, alcohol use and physical injuries. Late adolescent males who reported lifetime TBI, relative to females, displayed elevated daily smoking and injuries, whereas their females counterparts displayed elevated past year drinking. Possible bias related to self-report procedures and the preclusion of causal inferences due to the cross-sectional nature of the data are limitations of this study. TBI differences in outcomes need to be assessed for potential moderating effects of sex and age. Results have important implications for more tailored injury prevention efforts.

  6. The moderating effects of sex and age on the association between traumatic brain injury and harmful psychological correlates among adolescents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Ilie

    Full Text Available Although it is well established that sex is a risk factor in acquiring a traumatic brain injury (TBI among adolescents, it has not been established whether it also moderates the influence of other TBI psychological health correlates.Data were derived from a 2011 population-based cross-sectional school survey, which included 9,288 Ontario 7th-12th graders who completed anonymous self-administered questionnaires in classrooms. Response rate was 62%. Preliminary analyses found no evidence of nonresponse bias in the reporting of TBI. TBI was defined as a hit or blow to the head that resulted in a 5 minutes loss of consciousness or at least one overnight hospitalization due to symptoms associated with it. Reports of lifetime TBI were more common among males than females (23.1%, 95% CI: 20.5, 25.8 vs. 17.1%, 95% CI: 14.7, 19.8. Thirteen correlates were examined and included cigarette smoking, elevated psychological distress, suicide ideation, bully victimization (at school, as well as cyber bullying, bullying others, cannabis use, cannabis dependence and drug use problems, physical injuries, daily smoking, drinking alcohol, binge drinking, use of cannabis, and poor academic performance. Among the outcomes examined, sex moderated the relationship between lifetime TBI and cigarette smoking. In addition, sex and age jointly moderated the relationship between lifetime TBI and daily smoking, alcohol use and physical injuries. Late adolescent males who reported lifetime TBI, relative to females, displayed elevated daily smoking and injuries, whereas their females counterparts displayed elevated past year drinking. Possible bias related to self-report procedures and the preclusion of causal inferences due to the cross-sectional nature of the data are limitations of this study.TBI differences in outcomes need to be assessed for potential moderating effects of sex and age. Results have important implications for more tailored injury prevention efforts.

  7. Utility of fractional anisotropy imaging analyzed by statistical parametric mapping for detecting minute brain lesions in chronic-stage patients who had mild or moderate traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Yoshitaka; Shinoda, Jun; Okumura, Ayumi; Aki, Tatsuki; Takenaka, Shunsuke; Miwa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Mikito; Ito, Takeshi; Yokohama, Kazutoshi

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has recently evolved as valuable technique to investigate diffuse axonal injury (DAI). This study examined whether fractional anisotropy (FA) images analyzed by statistical parametric mapping (FA-SPM images) are superior to T 2 *-weighted gradient recalled echo (T2*GRE) images or fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images for detecting minute lesions in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients. DTI was performed in 25 patients with cognitive impairments in the chronic stage after mild or moderate TBI. The FA maps obtained from the DTI were individually compared with those from age-matched healthy control subjects using voxel-based analysis and FA-SPM images (p<0.001). Abnormal low-intensity areas on T2*GRE images (T2* lesions) were found in 10 patients (40.0%), abnormal high-intensity areas on FLAIR images in 4 patients (16.0%), and areas with significantly decreased FA on FA-SPM image in 16 patients (64.0%). Nine of 10 patients with T2* lesions had FA-SPM lesions. FA-SPM lesions topographically included most T2* lesions in the white matter and the deep brain structures, but did not include T2* lesions in the cortex/near-cortex or lesions containing substantial hemosiderin regardless of location. All 4 patients with abnormal areas on FLAIR images had FA-SPM lesions. FA-SPM imaging is useful for detecting minute lesions because of DAI in the white matter and the deep brain structures, which may not be visualized on T2*GRE or FLAIR images, and may allow the detection of minute brain lesions in patients with post-traumatic cognitive impairment. (author)

  8. Oxytocin effects on complex brain networks are moderated by experiences of maternal love withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riem, Madelon M E; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H; Tops, Mattie; Boksem, Maarten A S; Rombouts, Serge A R B; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J

    2013-10-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin has been implicated in a variety of social processes. However, recent studies indicate that oxytocin does not enhance prosocial behavior in all people in all circumstances. Here, we investigate effects of intranasal oxytocin administration on intrinsic functional brain connectivity with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Participants were 42 women who received a nasal spray containing either 16 IU of oxytocin or a placebo and reported how often their mother used love withdrawal as a disciplinary strategy involving withholding love and affection after a failure or misbehavior. We found that oxytocin changes functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the brainstem. In the oxytocin group there was a positive connectivity between these regions, whereas the placebo group showed negative connectivity. In addition, oxytocin induced functional connectivity changes between the PCC, the cerebellum and the postcentral gyrus, but only for those participants who experienced low levels of maternal love withdrawal. We speculate that oxytocin enhances prosocial behavior by influencing complex brain networks involved in self-referential processing and affectionate touch, most prominently in individuals with supportive family backgrounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  9. Work-related mild-moderate traumatic brain injuries due to falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wenli; Liu, Margaret; Fergenbaum, Jennifer; Comper, Paul; Colantonio, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Workplace falls are a common cause of head injuries; however, detailed study of this is limited. The objective of the study was to examine the person, environment and occupation factors associated with work-related traumatic brain injuries (WrTBI) due to falls from elevation (FFE) and falls from the same level (FFSL). This study is a retrospective chart review. Data was extracted from consecutive medical records of workers who sustained a head injury at work and were referred to the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute for clinical assessment. FFE were more likely to occur in men and result in multiple traumas, compared to FFSL. FFSL occurred more equally among men and women. Slippery conditions and placement of objects were common for WrTBI due to FFSL. Change in elevation was common for WrTBI due to FFE. WrTBI due to FFE most often occurred in trades, transport occupations and the construction industry, whereas WrTBI due to FFSL most often occurred in professional, management, skilled positions and the manufacturing industry. Types of falls resulting in brain injury and their mechanisms of injury vary across industries and occupations. The study provides information for more tailored workplace safety strategies and primary prevention across industries.

  10. Unsupervised categorization with individuals diagnosed as having moderate traumatic brain injury: Over-selective responding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Darren J; Wood, Rodger

    2016-01-01

    This study explored over-selectivity (executive dysfunction) using a standard unsupervised categorization task. Over-selectivity has been demonstrated using supervised categorization procedures (where training is given); however, little has been done in the way of unsupervised categorization (without training). A standard unsupervised categorization task was used to assess levels of over-selectivity in a traumatic brain injury (TBI) population. Individuals with TBI were selected from the Tertiary Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic at Swansea University and were asked to categorize two-dimensional items (pictures on cards), into groups that they felt were most intuitive, and without any learning (feedback from experimenter). This was compared against categories made by a control group for the same task. The findings of this study demonstrate that individuals with TBI had deficits for both easy and difficult categorization sets, as indicated by a larger amount of one-dimensional sorting compared to control participants. Deficits were significantly greater for the easy condition. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of over-selectivity, and the processes that underlie this deficit. Also, the implications for using this procedure as a screening measure for over-selectivity in TBI are discussed.

  11. Autobiographical memory and episodic future thinking after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Katrine Willemoes; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that autobiographical memory and episodic future thinking share a common neurocognitive basis. Although previous research has shown that traumatic brain injury (TBI) can impair the ability to remember the personal past, episodic future thinking has not previously been...... asked to report a series of events that had happened to them in the past and a series of events that might happen to them in the future. Transcriptions were scored according to a reliable system for categorizing internal (episodic) and external (semantic) information. For each event described......, participants also completed two modified Autobiographical Memory Questionnaire items to assess self-reported phenomenal qualities associated with remembering and imagining. In addition, TBI patients underwent neuropsychological assessment. Results revealed that TBI patients recalled/imagined proportionally...

  12. Induced moderate hypothermia for the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury: West Virginia's first research case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, John H; Shelford, Daniel L; Reyes, Bernardo J

    2009-01-01

    The role of hypothermia in the improvement of outcomes among patients suffering severe head injury remains controversial. The "National Acute Brain Injury Study: Hypothermia (NABIS:H)" is a series of prospective trials trying to determine if this therapy provides a beneficial effect. This report describes the case of a patient ejected from a motor vehicle, who presented with a decreased level of consciousness (Glasgow Coma Scale of 5). This case illustrates our local experience with the current trial (NABIS:H IIR) being conducted in five other hospitals in the US and Canada. This was the first patient treated in West Virginia utilizing this technology. We discuss the clinical aspects of the case as well as the challenges establishing a system-wide educational program to ensure staff participation and compliance with the study protocol.

  13. Decreased EEG microstate duration and anteriorisation of the brain electrical fields in mild and moderate dementia of the Alzheimer type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strik, W K; Chiaramonti, R; Muscas, G C; Paganini, M; Mueller, T J; Fallgatter, A J; Versari, A; Zappoli, R

    1997-10-31

    Spatially oriented segmentation allows researchers to break down the continuous stream of the ongoing EEG into microstates with stable topography of the brain electrical landscapes. The resulting microstates were shown to be related to conscious mental experience as well as to psychiatric disorders typically associated with thought disorders. In the present study, the microstates of the resting EEG of patients presenting with mild or moderate probable dementia of the Alzheimer type (DAT) were investigated. A significant anteriorisation of the centers of gravity of the microstate fields, an increase of the microstates' optimal window size and a reduced duration of sustained microstates were found. These differences were statistically more robust than the typical changes in the frequency domain (diffuse slowing) and were significantly correlated with the cognitive decline. The adaptive spatial segmentation into microstates is discussed as a method to extract meaningful EEG parameters for the early diagnosis and staging of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Hypoxia: From Placental Development to Fetal Programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajersztajn, Lais; Veras, Mariana Matera

    2017-10-16

    Hypoxia may influence normal and different pathological processes. Low oxygenation activates a variety of responses, many of them regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 complex, which is mostly involved in cellular control of O 2 consumption and delivery, inhibition of growth and development, and promotion of anaerobic metabolism. Hypoxia plays a significant physiological role in fetal development; it is involved in different embryonic processes, for example, placentation, angiogenesis, and hematopoiesis. More recently, fetal hypoxia has been associated directly or indirectly with fetal programming of heart, brain, and kidney function and metabolism in adulthood. In this review, the role of hypoxia in fetal development, placentation, and fetal programming is summarized. Hypoxia is a basic mechanism involved in different pregnancy disorders and fetal health developmental complications. Although there are scientific data showing that hypoxia mediates changes in the growth trajectory of the fetus, modulates gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms, and determines the health status later in adulthood, more mechanistic studies are needed. Furthermore, if we consider that intrauterine hypoxia is not a rare event, and can be a consequence of unavoidable exposures to air pollution, nutritional deficiencies, obesity, and other very common conditions (drug addiction and stress), the health of future generations may be damaged and the incidence of some diseases will markedly increase as a consequence of disturbed fetal programming. Birth Defects Research 109:1377-1385, 2017.© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Parent management of the school reintegration needs of children and youth following moderate or severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscigno, Cecelia I; Fleig, Denise K; Knafl, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    School reintegration following children's traumatic brain injury (TBI) is still poorly understood from families' perspectives. We aimed to understand how both unique and common experiences during children's school reintegration were explained by parents to influence the family. Data came from an investigation using descriptive phenomenology (2005-2007) to understand parents' experiences in the first five years following children's moderate to severe TBI. Parents (N = 42 from 37 families in the United States) participated in two 90-min interviews (first M = 15 months; second M = 27 months). Two investigators independently coded parents' discussions of school reintegration using content analysis to understand the unique and common factors that parents perceived affected the family. Parents' school negotiation themes included the following: (1) legal versus moral basis for helping the child; (2) inappropriate state and local services that did not consider needs specific to TBI; and (3) involvement in planning, implementing and evaluating the child's education plan. Parents perceived that coordinated and collaboration leadership with school personnel lessened families' workload. Families who home-schooled had unique challenges. School reintegration can add to family workload by changing roles and relationships and by adding to parents' perceived stress in managing of the child's condition. Moderate to severe traumatic brain injury is assumed to be the primary cause of children's morbidities post-injury. Despite laws in the United States meant to facilitate children's school reintegration needs, parents often perceived that policies and practices differed from the intentions of laws and added to the family workload and stress. The school environment of the child (physical, cultural or psychological setting) plays an important long-term role in shaping family roles, relationships and management of the child's condition.

  16. [Comparison of different doses of escitalopram in the prevention of dementia in patients with depression and moderate cognitive dysfunction associated with chronic brain ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhitkova, J V

    2015-01-01

    to compare different doses of escitalopram (cipralex) in the prevention of dementia in patients with depression and moderate cognitive dysfunction associated with chronic brain ischemia. Two groups of patients, aged 65-78 years, with chronic brain ischemia and mild or moderate depression with moderate cognitive dysfunction were treated with different doses of escitalopram: 30 patients received 5 mg daily during all treatment period; 42 patients - 5 mg daily during the first week and 10 mg from the second week of treatment. The treatment lasted for 6 months; the period of observation was 8 months. The efficacy of escitalopram is demonstrated not only for the treatment of depression associated with cognitive dysfunction in patients with chronic brain ischemia but for decrease of the risk of dementia in long-term period.

  17. National Variability in Intracranial Pressure Monitoring and Craniotomy for Children With Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Cleve, William; Kernic, Mary A.; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Wang, Jin; Zatzick, Douglas F.; Bell, Michael J.; Wainwright, Mark S.; Groner, Jonathan I.; Mink, Richard B.; Giza, Christopher C.; Boyle, Linda Ng; Mitchell, Pamela H.; Rivara, Frederick P.; Vavilala, Monica S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of mortality and disability in children. Intracranial pressure monitoring (ICPM) and craniotomy/craniectomy (CRANI) may affect outcomes. Sources of variability in the use of these interventions remain incompletely understood. OBJECTIVE To analyze sources of variability in the use of ICPM and CRANI. METHODS Retrospective cross-sectional study of patients with moderate/severe pediatric TBI with the use of data submitted to the American College of Surgeons National Trauma Databank. RESULTS We analyzed data from 7140 children at 156 US hospitals during 7 continuous years. Of the children, 27.4% had ICPM, whereas 11.7% had a CRANI. Infants had lower rates of ICPM and CRANI than older children. A lower rate of ICPM was observed among children hospitalized at combined pediatric/adult trauma centers than among children treated at adult-only trauma centers (relative risk = 0.80; 95% confidence interval 0.66-0.97). For ICPM and CRANI, 18.5% and 11.6%, respectively, of residual model variance was explained by between-hospital variation in care delivery, but almost no correlation was observed between within-hospital tendency toward performing these procedures. CONCLUSION Infants received less ICPM than older children, and children hospitalized at pediatric trauma centers received less ICPM than children at adult-only trauma centers. In addition, significant between-hospital variability existed in the delivery of ICPM and CRANI to children with moderate-severe TBI. PMID:23863766

  18. Mild Concussion, but Not Moderate Traumatic Brain Injury, Is Associated with Long-Term Depression-Like Phenotype in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita M Bajwa

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injuries can lead to long-lasting cognitive and motor deficits, increasing the risk of future behavioral, neurological, and affective disorders. Our study focused on long-term behavioral deficits after repeated injury in which mice received either a single mild CHI (mCHI, a repeated mild CHI (rmCHI consisting of one impact to each hemisphere separated by 3 days, or a moderate controlled cortical impact injury (CCI. Shams received only anesthesia. Behavioral tests were administered at 1, 3, 5, 7, and 90 days post-injury (dpi. CCI animals showed significant motor and sensory deficits in the early (1-7 dpi and long-term (90 dpi stages of testing. Interestingly, sensory and subtle motor deficits in rmCHI animals were found at 90 dpi. Most importantly, depression-like behaviors and social passiveness were observed in rmCHI animals at 90 dpi. These data suggest that mild concussive injuries lead to motor and sensory deficits and affective disorders that are not observed after moderate TBI.

  19. A meta-analysis of working memory impairments in survivors of moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning, Darren L; Westgate, Briony; Adlam, Anna-Lynne R

    2016-10-01

    To establish the magnitude of deficits in working memory (WM) and short-term memory (STM) in those with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) relative to age-matched, healthy controls and to explore the moderating effects of time since injury and age at injury on these impairments. Twenty-one studies that compared the WM and/or STM abilities of individuals with at least a moderate TBI relative to healthy controls were included in a random effects meta-analysis. Measures used to examine memory performance were categorized by modality (visuospatial, verbal) and memory system (WM, STM). Individuals with TBI had significant deficits in verbal STM (Cohen's d = .41), visuospatial WM (Cohen's d = .69), and verbal WM (Cohen's d = .37) relative to controls. Greater decrements in verbal STM and verbal WM skills were associated with longer time postinjury. Larger deficits were observed in verbal WM abilities in individuals with older age at injury. Evidence for WM impairments following TBI is consistent with previous research. Larger verbal STM and verbal WM deficits were related to a longer time postinjury, suggesting that these aspects of memory do not "recover" over time and instead, individuals might show increased rates of cognitive decline. Age at injury was associated with the severity of verbal WM impairments, with larger deficits evident for injuries that occurred later in life. Further research needs to chart the long-term effects of TBI on WM and to compare the effects of injury on verbal relative to visuospatial memory. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Medical Symptom Validity Test Performance Following Moderate-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Expectations Based on Orientation Log Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macciocchi, Stephen N; Seel, Ronald T; Yi, Angela; Small, Sarah

    2017-05-01

    This study examined performance on the Medical Symptom Validity test (MSVT) during acute rehabilitation for moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) stratified by Orientation Log (O-Log) scores. Participants were 77 prospectively enrolled persons who sustained moderate-severe TBI and were acutely hospitalized secondary to the cognitive, medical and physical sequelae of their TBI. Participants were administered neuropsychological metrics, the O-Log and the MSVT a mean of 44 days post injury. Significantly lower neurocognitive test scores were observed among participants who remained in post-traumatic amnesia (O-Log scores ranging from 20 to 24) versus those who were oriented (O-Log scores ranging from 25 to 30). MSVT performance was lower among participants who remained in post-traumatic amnesia. When participants O-Log scores were unimpaired (30), performance on the MSVT was also unimpaired on immediate recognition (IR) and delayed recognition (DR). A small percentage of participants performed below MSVT interpretive expectations on CNS. As O-Log scores decreased, MSVT performance also declined on some, but not all MSVT metrics. The sample as a whole performed at or above expectations on MSVT criterion B2 (IR) = 96.6%; (DR) = 94.8%; consistency (CNS) = 92.9%; paired associate (PA) = 86.4% and delayed free recall (FR) = 46.8%. MSVT performance stratified by O-Log scores provides basal expectation levels for persons with acute, moderate-severe impairment in cognitive skills secondary to TBI. Our data demonstrate that persons with significant neurocognitive impairment who are oriented generally perform at or above MSVT interpretive guidelines. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Health-related quality of life 3 years after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauwmeijer, Erik; Heijenbrok-Kal, Majanka H; Ribbers, Gerard M

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the time course of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to identify its predictors. Prospective cohort study with follow-up measurements at 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 months after TBI. Patients with moderate to severe TBI discharged from 3 level-1 trauma centers. Patients (N=97, 72% men) with a mean age ± SD of 32.8±13.0 years (range, 18-65y), hospitalized with moderate (23%) or severe (77%) TBI. Not applicable. HRQoL was measured with the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), functional outcomes with the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS), Barthel Index, FIM, and Functional Assessment Measure, and mood with the Wimbledon Self-Report Scale. The SF-36 domains showed significant improvement over time for Physical Functioning (PPhysical (PPhysical Component Summary (PCS) score, whereas the Mental Component Summary (MCS) score remained stable. At 3-year follow-up, HRQoL of patients with TBI was the same as that in the Dutch normative population. Time after TBI, hospital length of stay (LOS), FIM, and GOS were independent predictors of the PCS, whereas LOS and mood were predictors of the MCS. After TBI, the physical component of HRQoL showed significant improvement over time, whereas the mental component remained stable. Problems of disease awareness seem to play a role in self-reported mental HRQoL. After TBI, mood status is a better predictor of the mental component of HRQoL than functional outcome, implying that mood should be closely monitored during and after rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Intranasal insulin treatment of an experimental model of moderate traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabazon, Fiona; Wilson, Colin M; Jaiswal, Shalini; Reed, John; Frey, William H; Byrnes, Kimberly R

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in learning and memory dysfunction. Cognitive deficits result from cellular and metabolic dysfunction after injury, including decreased cerebral glucose uptake and inflammation. This study assessed the ability of intranasal insulin to increase cerebral glucose uptake after injury, reduce lesion volume, improve memory and learning function and reduce inflammation. Adult male rats received a controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury followed by intranasal insulin or saline treatment daily for 14 days. PET imaging of [18F]-FDG uptake was performed at baseline and at 48 h and 10 days post-injury and MRI on days three and nine post injury. Motor function was tested with the beam walking test. Memory function was assessed with Morris water maze. Intranasal insulin after CCI significantly improved several outcomes compared to saline. Insulin-treated animals performed better on beam walk and demonstrated significantly improved memory. A significant increase in [18F]-FDG uptake was observed in the hippocampus. Intranasal insulin also resulted in a significant decrease in hippocampus lesion volume and significantly less microglial immunolabeling in the hippocampus. These data show that intranasal insulin improves memory, increases cerebral glucose uptake and decreases neuroinflammation and hippocampal lesion volume, and may therefore be a viable therapy for TBI.

  3. Hypoxic preconditioning induces neuroprotective stanniocalcin-1 in brain via IL-6 signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westberg, Johan A; Serlachius, Martina; Lankila, Petri

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Exposure of animals for a few hours to moderate hypoxia confers relative protection against subsequent ischemic brain damage. This phenomenon, known as hypoxic preconditioning, depends on new RNA and protein synthesis, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In...

  4. Sex differences in behavioral outcome following neonatal hypoxia ischemia: insights from a clinical meta-analysis and a rodent model of induced hypoxic ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amanda L; Alexander, Michelle; Rosenkrantz, Ted S; Sadek, Mona Lisa; Fitch, R Holly

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia ischemia (HI; reduced oxygen and/or blood flow to the brain) is one of the most common injuries among preterm infants and term infants with birth complications. Both populations show cognitive/behavioral deficits, including impairments in sensory, learning/memory, and attention domains. Clinical data suggests a sex difference in HI outcomes, with males exhibiting more severe cognitive/behavioral deficits relative to matched females. Our laboratory has also reported more severe behavioral deficits among male rats with induced HI relative to females with comparable injury (Hill et al., 2011a,b). The current study initially examined published clinical studies from the past 20years where long-term IQ outcome scores for matched groups of male and female premature infants were reported separately (IQ being the most common outcome measure). A meta-analysis revealed a female "advantage," as indicated by significantly better scores on performance and full scale IQ (but not verbal IQ) for premature females. We then utilized a rodent model of neonatal HI injury to assess sham and postnatal day 7 (P7) HI male and female rats on a battery of behavioral tasks. Results showed expected deficits in HI male rats, but also showed task-dependent sex differences, with HI males having significantly larger deficits than HI females on some tasks but equivalent deficits on other tasks. In contrast to behavioral results, post mortem neuropathology associated with HI was comparable across sex. These findings suggest: 1) neonatal female "protection" in some behavioral domains, as indexed by superior outcome following early injury relative to males; and 2) female protection may entail sex-specific plasticity or compensation, rather than a reduction in gross neuropathology. Further exploration of the mechanisms underlying this sex effect could aid in neuroprotection efforts for at-risk neonates in general, and males in particular. Moreover, our current report of comparable anatomical

  5. Hypoxia and hypoxia-regulated proteins in gastric cancer: prognostic significance for clinical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osinsky, S.; Gumenjuk, L.; Bubnovskaya, L.; Merentsev, S.; Kovelskaya, A.; Shalimov, S.; Osinsky, D.; Olijnichenko, G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: To examine the relationship between hypoxia level, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) expression, tumor vascularity, and clinicopathologic parameters in gastric cancer; to assess the impact of hypoxia-associated events on the prognosis of clinical outcome. High hypoxia levels were found in 29 % of pts., and low - in 71 % of pts. Strong nuclear expressions of HIF-1α were found in 7 % of pts., moderate - in 80 % of pts., and weak - in 13 % of pts. Strong microvessel densities were observed in 54 % of pts. and moderate - in 46 % of pts. It was revealed a close association between the hypoxia level in tumor assessed by 31 P NMR spectroscopy and expression of HIF-1α in tumor cells (P 0.05). Hypoxia level and microvessel density in tumor tissue correlated with clinical stage (P<0.05). High hypoxia levels positively correlated with decreased overall survival (P=0.044). For overall survival, hypoxia level and HIF-1α expression (hazard ratio, 2.10; 95 % CI, 0.67-4.67; P=0.035 and 3.45; 0.89-3.01, 0.047, respectively) were independently predictive in multivariate analysis for lymph-node negative patients; and hypoxia level (hazard ratio, 4.50; 95 % CI, 0.42-2.57; P=0.027) for lymph-node positive patients. Statistical analysis has indicated that PME/Pi ratio in tumor tissue may be used as an parameter of hypoxia level as well as independent prognostic factor of clinical outcome in patients with gastric cancer. Methodological approaches are started now to be used in the analysis of head and neck tumors treated with hyperthermia combined with radiation/chemotherapy. (author)

  6. The absence of protective effect of candesartan and angiotensin IV in the moderate brain injury in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasser, M.; Botelle, L.; Javellaud, J.; Oudart, N.; Achard, J-M

    2012-01-01

    Background: angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) are protective in various models of experimental ischemic stroke. This protective effect is mediated by the stimulation of non-AT1 receptors by angiotensin II and angiotensin IV. Since traumatic brain injury shares with ischemic cerebral injury several common mechanisms, we examined if a pretreatment with the ARB candesartan, or a post-treatment with angiotensin IV are also protective in a rat model of blunt traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods :adults Sprague Dawley rats were treated for five days with candesartan (0.5 mg/kg/day) or saline by gavage prior to the induction of diffuse moderate TBI using the impact-acceleration model. Two others groups of rats were treated by a daily intraperitoneal injection of angiotensin IV (1.5 mg/kg/day) or saline for five days following TBI. Overall neurological insult were assessed daily by measuring the neurological score. Sensitive deficits (scotch test) and sensorimotor deficits (beam-walking test) were evaluated daily from day 1 to 7 and at day 15; cognitive impairment (object recognition test) was evaluated at day 15. Results : TBI induced significant sensitive and sensorimotor deficits that were maximal at day 1 and spontaneously improved with time. At day 15, traumatised animals had a marked alteration of the working memory. Neither treatment with candesartan, angiotensin IV or with erythropoietin decreased the severity of the initial sensorimotor deficits, nor accelerate the recovery rate. Candesartan, angiotensin IV had likewise no protective effect on the cognitive deficit evaluated to day 15. Conclusion: pretreatment with candesartan and post-treatment with angiotensin IV are both ineffective to protect against sensorimotor and c ognitive impairment in a rat model of impact-acceleration TBI. (author)

  7. Hypoxia influences expression profile of Pleckstrin homology-like ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... levels in analysed tissues. Short- and long-term hypoxia exposure resulted in significant changes in the expression of CbPHLDA2 in liver, spleen, head kidney, brain and muscle in a time-dependent manner. The results suggested that CbPHLDA2 might play an important role for adaptive significance under hypoxia.

  8. Supra- and Sub-Baseline Phosphocreatine Recovery in Developing Brain after Transient Hypoxia-Ischaemia: Relation to Baseline Energetics, Insult Severity and Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Osuke; Iwata, Sachiko; Bainbridge, Alan; De Vita, Enrico; Matsuishi, Toyojiro; Cady, Ernest B.; Robertson, Nicola J.

    2008-01-01

    Following hypoxia-ischaemia (HI), an early biomarker of insult severity is desirable to target neuroprotective therapies to patients most likely to benefit; currently there are no biomarkers within the "latent phase" period before the establishment of secondary energy failure. Brief transient phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery overshoot (measured…

  9. Effects of early intervention and the moderating effects of brain activity on institutionalized children's social skills at age 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almas, Alisa N; Degnan, Kathryn A; Radulescu, Anca; Nelson, Charles A; Zeanah, Charles H; Fox, Nathan A

    2012-10-16

    The present study examined the social skills of previously institutionalized, 8-y-old Romanian children from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project and the influence of attachment security and brain electrical activity (alpha power) on these skills. Participants included children randomized to an intervention involving foster care [Foster Care Group (FCG)], children randomized to remain in institutions [Care As Usual Group (CAUG)], and never-institutionalized children living with their families in the Bucharest community [Never-Institutionalized Group (NIG)]. A continuous rating of children's attachment security to their primary caregiver was assessed at 42 mo of age. When children were 8 y old, teachers rated their social skills, and the children's resting electroencephalogram alpha power was recorded. Teachers rated social skills of FCG children who were placed into foster care before 20 mo of age as no different from NIG children, and both of these groups were higher than CAUG children and FCG children placed after 20 mo. Electroencephalogram alpha power at age 8 significantly moderated the relations between attachment security and social skills. These findings characterize institutionalized children's social skills in middle childhood within the context of a randomized intervention while highlighting the roles of both relational and biological factors in these developmental trajectories.

  10. Utility of the Croatian translation of the community integration questionnaire-revised in a sample of adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tršinski, Dubravko; Tadinac, Meri; Bakran, Žarko; Klepo, Ivana

    2018-02-23

    To examine the utility of the Community Integration Questionnaire-Revised, translated into Croatian, in a sample of adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury. The Community Integration Questionnaire-Revised was administered to a sample of 88 adults with traumatic brain injury and to a control sample matched by gender, age and education. Participants with traumatic brain injury were divided into four subgroups according to injury severity. The internal consistency of the Community Integration Questionnaire-Revised was satisfactory. The differences between the group with traumatic brain injury and the control group were statistically significant for the overall Community Integration Questionnaire-Revised score, as well as for all the subscales apart from the Home Integration subscale. The community Integration Questionnaire-Revised score varied significantly for subgroups with different severity of traumatic brain injury. The results show that the Croatian translation of the Community Integration Questionnaire-Revised is useful in assessing participation in adults with traumatic brain injury and confirm previous findings that severity of injury predicts community integration. Results of the new Electronic Social Networking scale indicate that persons who are more active on electronic social networks report better results for other domains of community integration, especially social activities. Implications for rehabilitation The Croatian translation of the Community Integration Questionnaire-Revised is a valid tool for long-term assessment of participation in various domains in persons with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury Persons with traumatic brain injury who are more active in the use of electronic social networking are also more integrated into social and productivity domains. Targeted training in the use of new technologies could enhance participation after traumatic brain injury.

  11. Migraine induced by hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine

    2016-01-01

    response to hypoxia. In a randomized double-blind crossover study design, 15 migraine with aura patients were exposed to 180 min of normobaric hypoxia (capillary oxygen saturation 70-75%) or sham on two separate days and 14 healthy controls were exposed to hypoxia. Glutamate and lactate concentrations...

  12. Hypoxia. 3. Hypoxia and neurotransmitter synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ganesh K

    2011-04-01

    Central and peripheral neurons as well as neuroendocrine cells express a variety of neurotransmitters/modulators that play critical roles in regulation of physiological systems. The synthesis of several neurotransmitters/modulators is regulated by O(2)-requiring rate-limiting enzymes. Consequently, hypoxia resulting from perturbations in O(2) homeostasis can affect neuronal functions by altering neurotransmitter synthesis. Two broad categories of hypoxia are frequently encountered: continuous hypoxia (CH) and intermittent hypoxia (IH). CH is often seen during high altitude sojourns, whereas IH is experienced in sleep-disordered breathing with recurrent apneas (i.e., brief, repetitive cessations of breathing). This article presents what is currently known on the effects of both forms of hypoxia on neurotransmitter levels and neurotransmitter synthesizing enzymes in the central and peripheral nervous systems.

  13. Acute, transient hemorrhagic hypotension does not aggravate structural damage or neurologic motor deficits but delays the long-term cognitive recovery following mild to moderate traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Christian; Stover, John F.; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Hoover, Rachel C.; Morales, Diego M.; Schouten, Joost W.; McMillan, Asenia; Soltesz, Kristie; Motta, Melissa; Spangler, Zachery; Neugebauer, Edmund; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Posttraumatic hypotension is believed to increase morbidity and mortality in traumatically brain-injured patients. Using a clinically relevant model of combined traumatic brain injury with superimposed hemorrhagic hypotension in rats, the present study evaluated whether a reduction in mean arterial blood pressure aggravates regional brain edema formation, regional cell death, and neurologic motor/cognitive deficits associated with traumatic brain injury. Design Experimental prospective, randomized study in rodents. Setting Experimental laboratory at a university hospital. Subjects One hundred nineteen male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 350-385 g. Interventions Experimental traumatic brain injury of mild to moderate severity was induced using the lateral fluid percussion brain injury model in anesthetized rats (n = 89). Following traumatic brain injury, in surviving animals one group of animals was subjected to pressure-controlled hemorrhagic hypotension, maintaining the mean arterial blood pressure at 50-60 mm Hg for 30 mins (n = 47). The animals were subsequently either resuscitated with lactated Ringer’s solution (three times shed blood volume, n = 18) or left uncompensated (n = 29). Other groups of animals included those with isolated traumatic brain injury (n = 34), those with isolated hemorrhagic hypotension (n = 8), and sham-injured control animals receiving anesthesia and surgery alone (n = 22). Measurements and Main Results The withdrawal of 6-7 mL of arterial blood significantly reduced mean arterial blood pressure by 50% without decreasing arterial oxygen saturation or Pao2. Brain injury induced significant cerebral edema (p hypotension. Brain injury-induced neurologic deficits persisted up to 20 wks after injury and were also not aggravated by the hemorrhagic hypotension. Cognitive dysfunction persisted for up to 16 wks postinjury. The superimposition of hemorrhagic hypotension significantly delayed the time course of cognitive recovery

  14. TNP-ATP is Beneficial for Treatment of Neonatal Hypoxia-Induced Hypomyelination and Cognitive Decline

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Jie; Huang, Yilong; Li, Xia; Li, Longjun; Yang, Ting; Huang, Lixuan; Yang, Ling; Jiang, Hong; Li, Hongchun; Li, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Our previous study together with other investigations have reported that neonatal hypoxia or ischemia induces long-term cognitive impairment, at least in part through brain inflammation and hypomyelination. However, the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we used a rodent model of neonatal hypoxia by subjecting postnatal day 0 (P0) rat pups to systemic hypoxia (3.5 h). We found that neonatal hypoxia increased the glutamate content and initiated inflammatory responses at 4 h an...

  15. White matter lesions characterise brain involvement in moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but cerebral atrophy does not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilling, Catherine A; Jones, Paul W; Dodd, James W; Barrick, Thomas R

    2017-06-19

    Brain pathology is relatively unexplored in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study is a comprehensive investigation of grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) changes and how these relate to disease severity and cognitive function. T1-weighted and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images were acquired for 31 stable COPD patients (FEV 1 52.1% pred., PaO 2 10.1 kPa) and 24 age, gender-matched controls. T1-weighted images were segmented into GM, WM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tissue classes using a semi-automated procedure optimised for use with this cohort. This procedure allows, cohort-specific anatomical features to be captured, white matter lesions (WMLs) to be identified and includes a tissue repair step to correct for misclassification caused by WMLs. Tissue volumes and cortical thickness were calculated from the resulting segmentations. Additionally, a fully-automated pipeline was used to calculate localised cortical surface and gyrification. WM and GM tissue volumes, the tissue volume ratio (indicator of atrophy), average cortical thickness, and the number, size, and volume of white matter lesions (WMLs) were analysed across the whole-brain and regionally - for each anatomical lobe and the deep-GM. The hippocampus was investigated as a region-of-interest. Localised (voxel-wise and vertex-wise) variations in cortical gyrification, GM density and cortical thickness, were also investigated. Statistical models controlling for age and gender were used to test for between-group differences and within-group correlations. Robust statistical approaches ensured the family-wise error rate was controlled in regional and local analyses. There were no significant differences in global, regional, or local measures of GM between patients and controls, however, patients had an increased volume (p = 0.02) and size (p = 0.04) of WMLs. In patients, greater normalised hippocampal volume positively correlated with exacerbation frequency (p = 0

  16. Anger Self-Management Training for Chronic Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Tessa; Brockway, Jo Ann; Maiuro, Roland D; Vaccaro, Monica; Fann, Jesse R; Mellick, David; Harrison-Felix, Cindy; Barber, Jason; Temkin, Nancy

    To test efficacy of 8-session, 1:1 treatment, anger self-management training (ASMT), for chronic moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Three US outpatient treatment facilities. Ninety people with TBI and elevated self-reported anger; 76 significant others (SOs) provided collateral data. Multicenter randomized controlled trial with 2:1 randomization to ASMT or structurally equivalent comparison treatment, personal readjustment and education (PRE). Primary outcome assessment 1 week posttreatment; 8-week follow-up. Response to treatment defined as 1 or more standard deviation change in self-reported anger. SO-rated anger, emotional and behavioral status, satisfaction with life, timing of treatment response, participant and SO-rated global change, and treatment satisfaction. State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-Revised Trait Anger (TA) and Anger Expression-Out (AX-O) subscales; Brief Anger-Aggression Questionnaire (BAAQ); Likert-type ratings of treatment satisfaction, global changes in anger and well-being. After treatment, ASMT response rate (68%) exceeded that of PRE (47%) on TA but not AX-O or BAAQ; this finding persisted at 8-week follow-up. No significant between-group differences in SO-reported response rates, emotional/behavioral status, or life satisfaction. ASMT participants were more satisfied with treatment and rated global change in anger as significantly better; SO ratings of global change in both anger and well-being were superior for ASMT. ASMT was efficacious and persistent for some aspects of problematic anger. More research is needed to determine optimal dose and essential ingredients of behavioral treatment for anger after TBI.

  17. Cannabis Use in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury or Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injury in Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Lenore; Ketchum, Jessica M; Morey, Clare; Pharm D, Kathleen Collins; Charlifue, Susan

    2018-03-07

    To describe the prevalence of cannabis use in an adult sample with spinal cord injury (SCI) or traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Colorado, and to describe the self-reported reasons and side effects of cannabis use in this sample. Mixed methods observational study, using focus group data and telephone survey SETTING: Community PARTICIPANTS: Colorado adults who have sustained SCI or moderate to severe TBI and have received services through the rehabilitation hospital conducting the study. None; Measures: Survey RESULTS: Focus group participants identified issues that were then included in the survey development. Seventy percent of the 116 surveyed reported cannabis use pre-injury (67% SCI, 74% TBI) with 48% reporting use after injury (53% SCI, 45% TBI). Overall, the most common reason for use was recreational (67%), followed by reducing stress/anxiety (62.5%), and improving sleep (59%). Among the respondents with SCI, the most common reasons for use were to reduce spasticity (70%), recreation (63%), and to improve sleep (63%). Among those with TBI, reasons endorsed were recreational (72%), reducing stress/anxiety (62%), and improving sleep (55%). Smoking was the most common method of use. A majority of this sample report using cannabis prior to injury, and approximately half report using cannabis post-injury. Both groups report recreational use, while the group with SCI also highly endorses using cannabis to address chronic medical conditions. Clinicians should be aware of the high prevalence of cannabis use in these populations and the impact such use may have on the individual's medical management. Further research in this area is needed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Chronic Treatment with a Water-Soluble Extract from the Culture Medium of Ganoderma lucidum Mycelia Prevents Apoptosis and Necroptosis in Hypoxia/Ischemia-Induced Injury of Type 2 Diabetic Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiyan Xuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been known to increase systemic oxidative stress by chronic hyperglycemia and visceral obesity and aggravate cerebral ischemic injury. On the basis of our previous study regarding a water-soluble extract from the culture medium of Ganoderma lucidum mycelia (designed as MAK, which exerts antioxidative and neuroprotective effects, the present study was conducted to evaluate the preventive effects of MAK on apoptosis and necroptosis (a programmed necrosis induced by hypoxia/ischemia (H/I in type 2 diabetic KKAy mice. H/I was induced by a combination of unilateral common carotid artery ligation with hypoxia (8% O2 for 20 min and subsequent reoxygenation. Pretreatment with MAK (1 g/kg, p.o. for a week significantly reduced H/I-induced neurological deficits and brain infarction volume assessed at 24 h of reoxygenation. Histochemical analysis showed that MAK significantly suppressed superoxide production, neuronal cell death, and vacuolation in the ischemic penumbra, which was accompanied by a decrease in the numbers of TUNEL- or cleaved caspase-3-positive cells. Furthermore, MAK decreased the expression of receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 mRNA and protein, a key molecule for necroptosis. These results suggest that MAK confers resistance to apoptotic and necroptotic cell death and relieves H/I-induced cerebral ischemic injury in type 2 diabetic mice.

  19. Moderate-severe traumatic brain injury causes delayed loss of white matter integrity: evidence of fornix deterioration in the chronic stage of injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adnan, Areeba; Crawley, Adrian; Mikulis, David; Moscovitch, Morris; Colella, Brenda; Green, Robin

    2013-01-01

    To examine structural integrity loss in the fornix from 5-30 months after moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) using diffusion tensor imaging. MRIs were prospectively undertaken in 29 adults with moderate and severe TBI at two time points. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was calculated for the fornix (column/body, right crux and left crux) at 5 and 30 months post-injury. Paired t-tests revealed significant FA reductions with large effect sizes across time in the column/body, p fornix plays a critical role in memory, this may be a contributing factor to the poor clinical outcomes observed in these patients.

  20. Hypoxia. 3. Hypoxia and neurotransmitter synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ganesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Central and peripheral neurons as well as neuroendocrine cells express a variety of neurotransmitters/modulators that play critical roles in regulation of physiological systems. The synthesis of several neurotransmitters/modulators is regulated by O2-requiring rate-limiting enzymes. Consequently, hypoxia resulting from perturbations in O2 homeostasis can affect neuronal functions by altering neurotransmitter synthesis. Two broad categories of hypoxia are frequently encountered: continuous hyp...

  1. Event-based prospective memory performance during subacute recovery following moderate to severe traumatic brain injury in children: Effects of monetary incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Stephen R; Pedroza, Claudia; Chapman, Sandra B; Cook, Lori G; Hotz, Gillian; Vásquez, Ana C; Levin, Harvey S

    2010-03-01

    There are very few studies investigating remediation of event-based prospective memory (EB-PM) impairments following traumatic brain injury (TBI). To address this, we used 2 levels of motivational enhancement (dollars vs. pennies) to improve EB-PM in children with moderate to severe TBI in the subacute recovery phase. Children with orthopedic injuries (OI; n = 61), moderate (n = 28), or severe (n = 30) TBI were compared. Significant effects included Group x Motivation Condition (F(2, 115) = 3.73, p children (p children with moderate, but not severe, TBI. Other strategies to improve EB-PM in these children at a similar point in recovery remain to be identified and evaluated.

  2. Acute fetal hypoxia: the modulating effect of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, G; Peebles, D

    2005-01-01

    The fetal brain is protected from the effects of acute hypoxia by a range of haemodynamic and metabolic compensations. Hypoxia alone is therefore an unusual cause of perinatal brain injury in either preterm or term infants. More recently, materno-fetal infection has been implicated as a causative factor in cases of cerebral palsy associated with preterm and term birth. This paper explores the concept that exposure to infection, and in particular pro-inflammatory cytokines, may reduce the threshold at which hypoxia becomes neurotoxic, so making the brain much more vulnerable to even mild hypoxic insults. The hypothesis is supported by an increasing body of evidence from animal studies that also demonstrate the importance of duration between exposure to infection and subsequent hypoxia. There are a number of clinical and research implications that centre around the role of antibiotics, mode and timing of delivery, maternal cooling during labour and the role of immune-modulating drugs.

  3. Tumor hypoxia and microscopic diffusion capacity in brain tumors: A comparison of {sup 62}Cu-Diacetyl-Bis (N4-Methylthiosemicarbazone) PET/CT and diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino-Shishikura, Ayako; Tateishi, Ukihide; Shibata, Hirofumi; Yoneyama, Tomohiro; Nishii, Toshiaki; Torii, Ikuo; Inoue, Tomio [Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Tateishi, Kensuke; Ohtake, Makoto; Kawahara, Nobutaka [Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama City University, Department of Neurosurgery, Yokohama (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between tumor hypoxia and microscopic diffusion capacity in primary brain tumors using {sup 62}Cu-Diacetyl-Bis (N4-Methylthiosemicarbazone) ({sup 62}Cu-ATSM) PET/CT and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). This study was approved by the institutional human research committee and was HIPAA compliant, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. {sup 62}Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DWI were performed in a total of 40 primary brain tumors of 34 patients with low grade glioma (LGG, n = 13), glioblastoma (GBM, n = 20), and primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL, n = 7). {sup 62}Cu-ATSM PET/CT parameters and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) obtained by DWI were compared. High intensity signals by {sup 62}Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DWI in patients with GBM and PCNSL, and low intensity signals in LGG patients were observed. An inverse correlation was found between maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}) and minimum ADC (ADC{sub min}) (r = -0.583, p < 0.0001), and between tumor/brain ratio (T/B{sub ratio}) and ADC{sub min} for all tumors (r = -0.532, p < 0.0001). Both SUV{sub max} and T/B{sub ratio} in GBM were higher than LGG (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.0001), and those in PCNSL were also higher than GBM (p = 0.033 and p = 0.044). The ADC{sub min} was lower in GBM (p = 0.011) and PCNSL (p = 0.01) than in LGG, while no significant difference was found between GBM and PCNSL (p = 0.90). Tumor hypoxia assessed by {sup 62}Cu-ATSM PET/CT correlated with microscopic diffusion capacity obtained by DWI in brain tumors. Both {sup 62}Cu-ATSM PET/CT and DWI were considered feasible imaging methods for grading glioma. However, {sup 62}Cu-ATSM PET/CT provided additional diagnostic information to differentiate between GBM and PCNSL. (orig.)

  4. Moderate O3/O2therapy enhances enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant in brain and cochlear that protects noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasezadeh, Parvaneh; Shahi, Farshad; Fridoni, Mohammadjavad; Seydi, Enayatollah; Izadi, Morteza; Salimi, Ahmad

    2017-10-01

    Mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). In this study, we examined the protective effect of O 2 /O 3 mixture (ozone/oxygen) therapy against mitochondrial induced damage and oxidative stress by noise exposure in rat brain and cochlear. For this purpose, rats were divided into four groups: 1 - control group; 2 - noise-exposed group (100 dB); 3 - noise + O 2 /O 3 , and 4 - O 2 /O 3 (30 µg/ml). After 14 d, animals were anesthetised. Rat brain and cochlear tissue were removed for evaluation of the histopathological damages, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction in both tissues. Our findings indicated that noise caused pathological damage, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction in rat brain and cochlear. Also, daily administration of an O 2 /O 3 therapy (30 µg/ml intravenous) efficiently increased enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant in brain and cochlear that this action led to inhibition of pathological damages, oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species formation, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) collapse, mitochondrial swelling, and cytochrome c release resulting from noise. These findings suggest that the moderate O 2 /O 3 therapy enhances the capacity of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant in brain and cochlear that protects against NIHL.

  5. Moderate and severe traumatic brain injury: effect of blood alcohol concentration on Glasgow Coma Scale score and relation to computed tomography findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundhaug, Nils Petter; Moen, Kent Gøran; Skandsen, Toril; Schirmer-Mikalsen, Kari; Lund, Stine B; Hara, Sozaburo; Vik, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The influence of alcohol is assumed to reduce consciousness in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), but research findings are divergent. The aim of this investigation was to study the effects of different levels of blood alcohol concentration (BAC) on the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores in patients with moderate and severe TBI and to relate the findings to brain injury severity based on the admission CT scan. In this cohort study, 265 patients (age range 16-70 years) who were admitted to St. Olavs University Hospital with moderate and severe TBI during a 7-year period were prospectively registered. Of these, 217 patients (82%) had measured BAC. Effects of 4 BAC groups on GCS score were examined with ordinal logistic regression analyses, and the GCS scores were inverted to give an OR > 1. The Rotterdam CT score based on admission CT scan was used to adjust for brain injury severity (best score 1 and worst score 6) by stratifying patients into 2 brain injury severity groups (Rotterdam CT scores of 1-3 and 4-6). Of all patients with measured BAC, 91% had intracranial CT findings and 43% had BAC > 0 mg/dl. The median GCS score was lower in the alcohol-positive patients (6.5, interquartile range [IQR] 4-10) than in the alcohol-negative patients (9, IQR 6-13; p brain injury itself seemed to overrun the depressing effect of the alcohol on the CNS. This finding is in agreement with the assumption of many clinicians in the emergency situation.

  6. Hypoxia and Mucosal Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Sean P.; Campbell, Eric L.; Kominsky, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Sites of inflammation are defined by significant changes in metabolic activity. Recent studies have suggested that O2 metabolism and hypoxia play a prominent role in inflammation so-called “inflammatory hypoxia,” which results from a combination of recruited inflammatory cells (e.g., neutrophils and monocytes), the local proliferation of multiple cell types, and the activation of multiple O2-consuming enzymes during inflammation. These shifts in energy supply and demand result in localized regions of hypoxia and have revealed the important function off the transcription factor HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor) in the regulation of key target genes that promote inflammatory resolution. Analysis of these pathways has provided multiple opportunities for understanding basic mechanisms of inflammation and has defined new targets for intervention. Here, we review recent work addressing tissue hypoxia and metabolic control of inflammation and immunity. PMID:27193451

  7. Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Genotypes and Parenting Influence on Long-Term Executive Functioning After Moderate to Severe Early Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, Brad G; Treble-Barna, Amery; Zang, Huaiyu; Zhang, Nanhua; Martin, Lisa J; Yeates, Keith Owen; Taylor, H Gerry; Wade, Shari L

    To examine catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) rs4680 genotypes as moderators of the effects of parenting style on postinjury changes in parent behavior ratings of executive dysfunction following moderate to severe early childhood traumatic brain injury. Research was conducted in an outpatient setting. Participants included children admitted to hospital with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (n = 55) or orthopedic injuries (n = 70) between ages 3 and 7 years. Prospective cohort followed over 7 years postinjury. Parenting Practices Questionnaire and the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning obtained at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months, and 3.5 and 6.8 years postinjury. DNA was collected from saliva samples, purified using the Oragene (DNA Genotek, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) OG-500 self-collection tubes, and analyzed using TaqMan (Applied Biosystems, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham, Massachusetts) assay protocols to identify the COMT rs4680 polymorphism. Linear mixed models revealed a significant genotype × parenting style × time interaction (F = 5.72, P = .02), which suggested that the adverse effects of authoritarian parenting on postinjury development of executive functioning were buffered by the presence of the COMT AA genotype (lower enzyme activity, higher dopamine levels). There were no significant associations of executive functioning with the interaction between genotype and authoritative or permissive parenting ratings. The lower activity COMT rs4680 genotype may buffer the negative effect of authoritarian parenting on long-term executive functioning following injury in early childhood. The findings provide preliminary evidence for associations of parenting style with executive dysfunction in children and for a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as contributors to decreases in these problems after traumatic injuries in children. Further investigation is warranted to understand the interplay among genetic and

  8. Exercise performed at hypoxia influences mood state and anxiety symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernando Tavares de Souza

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available During hypoxia conditions, psychological states can be worsened. However, little information is available regarding the effect of physical exercise performed in hypoxia conditions on mood state and anxiety symptoms. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the acute effect of moderate physical exercise performed at hypoxia on mood states and anxiety symptoms in healthy young subjects. Ten volunteers were subjected to the following conditions: a normoxic condition (NC and a hypoxic condition (HC. They performed 45 min of physical exercise. Their anxiety symptoms and mood states were evaluated at the initial time point as well as immediately following and 30 and 60 min after the exercise session. Our results showed a significant increase in post-exercise anxiety symptoms and a significant decrease in mood scores immediately after and 30 min after exercise performed in the HC. Moderate physical activity performed at hypoxia condition increased post-exercise anxiety and worsened mood state.

  9. Patterns of cortical thinning in relation to event-based prospective memory performance three months after moderate to severe traumatic brain injury in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Stephen R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Merkley, Tricia L; Schnelle, Kathleen P; Bigler, Erin D; Hunter, Jill V; Chu, Zili; Vásquez, Ana C; Levin, Harvey S

    2010-01-01

    While event-based prospective memory (EB-PM) tasks are a familiar part of daily life for children, currently no data exists concerning the relation between EB-PM performance and brain volumetrics after traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study investigated EB-PM in children (7 to 17 years) with moderate to severe TBI or orthopedic injuries. Participants performed an EB-PM task and concurrently underwent neuroimaging at three months postinjury. Surface reconstruction and cortical thickness analysis were performed using FreeSurfer software. Cortical thickness was significantly correlated with EB-PM (adjusting for age). Significant thinning in the left (dorsolateral and inferior prefrontal cortex, anterior and posterior cingulate, temporal lobe, fusiform, and parahippocampal gyri), and right hemispheres (dorsolateral, inferior, and medial prefrontal cortex, cingulate, and temporal lobe) correlated positively and significantly with EB-PM performance; findings are comparable to those of functional neuroimaging and lesion studies of EB-PM.

  10. Inverse relationship between brain glucose and ketone metabolism in adults during short-term moderate dietary ketosis: A dual tracer quantitative positron emission tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courchesne-Loyer, Alexandre; Croteau, Etienne; Castellano, Christian-Alexandre; St-Pierre, Valérie; Hennebelle, Marie; Cunnane, Stephen C

    2017-07-01

    Ketones (principally β-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate (AcAc)) are an important alternative fuel to glucose for the human brain, but their utilisation by the brain remains poorly understood. Our objective was to use positron emission tomography (PET) to assess the impact of diet-induced moderate ketosis on cerebral metabolic rate of acetoacetate (CMRa) and glucose (CMRglc) in healthy adults. Ten participants (35 ± 15 y) received a very high fat ketogenic diet (KD) (4.5:1; lipid:protein plus carbohydrates) for four days. CMRa and CMRglc were quantified by PET before and after the KD with the tracers, 11 C-AcAc and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG), respectively. During the KD, plasma ketones increased 8-fold ( p = 0.005) while plasma glucose decreased by 24% ( p = 0.005). CMRa increased 6-fold ( p = 0.005), whereas CMRglc decreased by 20% ( p = 0.014) on the KD. Plasma ketones were positively correlated with CMRa (r = 0.93; p < 0.0001). After four days on the KD, CMRa represented 17% of whole brain energy requirements in healthy adults with a 2-fold difference across brain regions (12-24%). The CMR of ketones (AcAc and β-hydroxybutyrate combined) while on the KD was estimated to represent about 33% of brain energy requirements or approximately double the CMRa. Whether increased ketone availability raises CMR of ketones to the same extent in older people as observed here or in conditions in which chronic brain glucose hypometabolism is present remains to be determined.

  11. Hypoxia induced cognitive impairment modulating activity of Cyperus rotundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandikattu, Hemanth Kumar; Deep, Satya Narayan; Razack, Sakina; Amruta, Narayanappa; Prasad, Dipti; Khanum, Farhath

    2017-06-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia leads to decrease in cellular oxygen content which subsequently damages the hippocampus with an increase in brain oxidative stress and impairs the memory of the individual. In the present study, we have evaluated the cognitive impairment modulating activity of total oligomeric flavonoids fraction of Cyperus rotundus (TOF) in Sprague Dawley rats. The rats were trained for memory activity for a period of 7days followed by 7days exposure to 25,000ft. altitude and the spatial reference memory was evaluated. Behavioral analysis of the rats by Morris water maze experiment showed that TOF supplementation enhanced the spatial reference memory activity of the rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia. The decrease in antioxidant status of the animals exposed to hypoxia was restored with TOF supplementation. The increase in ROS, lipid peroxidation products and protein carbonyls of the hippocampus was significantly decreased in animals with TOF administration. The histological assessment of the pyramidal cells of the hippocampus of hypoxia-exposed animals showed nuclear damage and TOF supplementation prevented nuclear damage. TOF administration suppressed hypoxia-induced increase in serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. GABA and Ach levels were decreased by hypoxia which was prevented by TOF supplementation. The increase in GFAP, HIF-1α and VEGF expression in CA3 region of the hippocampus in hypoxia-exposed rats was decreased in TOF administered rats. Taken together, TOF extract ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment and neurodegeneration in hippocampus through its anti-stress effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of early intervention and the moderating effects of brain activity on institutionalized children's social skills at age 8

    OpenAIRE

    Almas, Alisa N.; Degnan, Kathryn A.; Radulescu, Anca; Nelson, Charles A.; Zeanah, Charles H.; Fox, Nathan A.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined the social skills of previously institutionalized, 8-y-old Romanian children from the Bucharest Early Intervention Project and the influence of attachment security and brain electrical activity (alpha power) on these skills. Participants included children randomized to an intervention involving foster care [Foster Care Group (FCG)], children randomized to remain in institutions [Care As Usual Group (CAUG)], and never-institutionalized children living with their fami...

  13. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Mild-Moderate Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury PCS and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    DATE: October 2015 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland 21702-5012...AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) and 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command...hyperbaric oxygen therapy; TBI: traumatic brain injury; PPCS: persistent post- concussion syndrome 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF

  14. Neuropsychiatric diagnosis and management of chronic sequelae of war-related mild to moderate traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbauer, Joshua D; Ashford, J Wesson; Zeitzer, Jamie M; Adamson, Maheen M; Lew, Henry L; Yesavage, Jerome A

    2009-01-01

    Soldiers with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) present with an array of neuropsychiatric symptoms that can be grouped into nosological clusters: (1) cognitive dysfunctions: difficulties in memory, attention, language, visuospatial cognition, sensory-motor integration, affect recognition, and/or executive function typically associated with neocortical damage; (2) neurobehavioral disorders: mood, affect, anxiety, posttraumatic stress, and psychosis, as well as agitation, sleep problems, and libido loss, that may have been caused by damage to the cortex, limbic system, and/or brain stem monoaminergic projection systems; (3) somatosensory disruptions: impaired smell, vision, hearing, equilibrium, taste, and somatosensory perception frequently caused by trauma to the sensory organs or their projections through the brain stem to central processing systems; (4) somatic symptoms: headache and chronic pain; and (5) substance dependence. TBI-related cognitive impairment is common in veterans who have served in recent conflicts in the Middle East and is often related to blasts from improvised explosive devices. Although neurobehavioral disorders such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder commonly occur after combat, the presentation of such disorders in those with head injury may pass undetected with use of current diagnostic criteria and neuropsychological instruments. With a multidimensional approach (such as the biopsychosocial model) applied to each symptom cluster, psychological, occupational, and social dysfunction can be delineated and managed.

  15. Hypoxia-Induced Neuroinflammation and Learning-Memory Impairments in Adult Zebrafish Are Suppressed by Glucosamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunkyoung; Lee, Sujeong; Park, Ji-Won; Hwang, Ji-Sun; Kim, Sang-Min; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Lee, Chang-Joong; Han, Inn-Oc

    2018-03-27

    This study investigated changes in neuroinflammation and cognitive function in adult zebrafish exposed to acute hypoxia and protective effects of glucosamine (GlcN) against hypoxia-induced brain damage. The survival rate of zebrafish following exposure to hypoxia was improved by GlcN pretreatment. Moreover, hypoxia-induced upregulation of neuroglobin, NOS2α, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and S100β in zebrafish was suppressed by GlcN. Hypoxia stimulated cell proliferation in the telencephalic ventral domain and in cerebellum subregions. GlcN decreased the number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells in the telencephalon region, but not in cerebellum regions. Transient motor neuron defects, assessed by measuring the locomotor and exploratory activity of zebrafish exposed to hypoxia recovered quickly. GlcN did not affect hypoxia-induced motor activity changes. In passive avoidance tests, hypoxia impaired learning and memory ability, deficits that were rescued by GlcN. A learning stimulus increased the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (p-CREB), an effect that was greatly inhibited by hypoxia. GlcN restored nuclear p-CREB after a learning trial in hypoxia-exposed zebrafish. The neurotransmitters, γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate, were increased after hypoxia in the zebrafish brain, and GlcN further increased their levels. In contrast, acetylcholine levels were reduced by hypoxia and restored by GlcN. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine partially reversed the impaired learning and memory of hypoxic zebrafish. This study represents the first examination of the molecular mechanisms underlying hypoxia-induced memory and learning defects in a zebrafish model. Our results further suggest that GlcN-associated hexosamine metabolic pathway could be an important therapeutic target for hypoxic brain damage.

  16. Life after Adolescent and Adult Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Self-Reported Executive, Emotional, and Behavioural Function 2–5 Years after Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torun Gangaune Finnanger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Survivors of moderate-severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI are at risk for long-term cognitive, emotional, and behavioural problems. This prospective cohort study investigated self-reported executive, emotional, and behavioural problems in the late chronic phase of moderate and severe TBI, if demographic characteristics (i.e., age, years of education, injury characteristics (Glasgow Coma Scale score, MRI findings such as traumatic axonal injury (TAI, or duration of posttraumatic amnesia, symptoms of depression, or neuropsychological variables in the first year after injury predicted long-term self-reported function. Self-reported executive, emotional, and behavioural functioning were assessed among individuals with moderate and severe TBI (N=67, age range 15–65 years at time of injury 2–5 years after TBI, compared to a healthy matched control group (N=72. Results revealed significantly more attentional, emotional regulation, and psychological difficulties in the TBI group than controls. Demographic and early clinical variables were associated with poorer cognitive and emotional outcome. Fewer years of education and depressive symptoms predicted greater executive dysfunction. Younger age at injury predicted more aggressive and rule-breaking behaviour. TAI and depressive symptoms predicted Internalizing problems and greater executive dysfunction. In conclusion, age, education, TAI, and depression appear to elevate risk for poor long-term outcome, emphasising the need for long-term follow-up of patients presenting with risk factors.

  17. Life after Adolescent and Adult Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: Self-Reported Executive, Emotional, and Behavioural Function 2–5 Years after Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnanger, Torun Gangaune; Olsen, Alexander; Skandsen, Toril; Lydersen, Stian; Vik, Anne; Evensen, Kari Anne I.; Catroppa, Cathy; Håberg, Asta K.; Andersson, Stein; Indredavik, Marit S.

    2015-01-01

    Survivors of moderate-severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) are at risk for long-term cognitive, emotional, and behavioural problems. This prospective cohort study investigated self-reported executive, emotional, and behavioural problems in the late chronic phase of moderate and severe TBI, if demographic characteristics (i.e., age, years of education), injury characteristics (Glasgow Coma Scale score, MRI findings such as traumatic axonal injury (TAI), or duration of posttraumatic amnesia), symptoms of depression, or neuropsychological variables in the first year after injury predicted long-term self-reported function. Self-reported executive, emotional, and behavioural functioning were assessed among individuals with moderate and severe TBI (N = 67, age range 15–65 years at time of injury) 2–5 years after TBI, compared to a healthy matched control group (N = 72). Results revealed significantly more attentional, emotional regulation, and psychological difficulties in the TBI group than controls. Demographic and early clinical variables were associated with poorer cognitive and emotional outcome. Fewer years of education and depressive symptoms predicted greater executive dysfunction. Younger age at injury predicted more aggressive and rule-breaking behaviour. TAI and depressive symptoms predicted Internalizing problems and greater executive dysfunction. In conclusion, age, education, TAI, and depression appear to elevate risk for poor long-term outcome, emphasising the need for long-term follow-up of patients presenting with risk factors. PMID:26549936

  18. Recurrent Moderate Hypoglycemia Suppresses Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in the Prefrontal Cortex and Impairs Sensorimotor Gating in the Posthypoglycemic Period in Young Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Raghavendra; Ennis, Kathleen; Mitchell, Eugena P; Tran, Phu V; Gewirtz, Jonathan C

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent hypoglycemia is common in infants and children. In developing rat models, recurrent moderate hypoglycemia leads to neuronal injury in the medial prefrontal cortex. To understand the effects beyond neuronal injury, 3-week-old male rats were subjected to 5 episodes of moderate hypoglycemia (blood glucose concentration, approx. 30 mg/dl for 90 min) once daily from postnatal day 24 to 28. Neuronal injury was determined using Fluoro-Jade B histochemistry on postnatal day 29. The effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its cognate receptor, tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) expression, which is critical for prefrontal cortex development, were determined on postnatal day 29 and at adulthood. The effects on prefrontal cortex-mediated function were determined by assessing the prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex on postnatal day 29 and 2 weeks later, and by testing for fear-potentiated startle at adulthood. Recurrent hypoglycemia led to neuronal injury confined primarily to the medial prefrontal cortex. BDNF/TrkB expression in the prefrontal cortex was suppressed on postnatal day 29 and was accompanied by lower prepulse inhibition, suggesting impaired sensorimotor gating. Following the cessation of recurrent hypoglycemia, the prepulse inhibition had recovered at 2 weeks. BDNF/TrkB expression in the prefrontal cortex had normalized and fear-potentiated startle was intact at adulthood. Recurrent moderate hypoglycemia during development has significant adverse effects on the prefrontal cortex in the posthypoglycemic period. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Are self-reported symptoms of executive dysfunction associated with objective executive function performance following mild to moderate traumatic brain injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiehser, Dawn M.; Delis, Dean C.; Filoteo, J. Vincent; Delano-Wood, Lisa; Han, S. Duke; Jak, Amy J.; Drake, Angela I.; Bondi, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objective We examined the relationship between self-reported pre- and post-injury changes in executive dysfunction, apathy, disinhibition, and depression, and performance on neuropsychological tests of executive function, attention/processing speed, and memory in relation to mood levels and effort test performance in individuals in the early stages of recovery from mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). Method Participants were 71 noncombat military personnel who were in a semiacute stage of recovery (<3 months post injury) from mild to moderate TBI. Pre- and post-TBI behaviors were assessed with the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale (FrSBe; Grace & Malloy, 2001) and correlated with levels of depressive symptoms, effort test performance, and performance on objective measures of attention, executive function, and memory. Results Self-reported symptoms of executive dysfunction generally failed to predict performance on objective measures of executive function and memory, although they predicted poorer performance on measures of attention/processing speed. Instead, higher levels of depressive symptomatology best predicted poorer performance on measures of executive function and memory. However, the relationship between memory performance and TBI symptoms was no longer significant when effort performance was controlled. Conclusions Our findings suggest that, among individuals in early recovery from mild to moderate TBI, self-reported depressive symptoms, rather than patients’ cognitive complaints, are associated with objective executive function. However, self-reported cognitive complaints may be associated with objectively measured inattention and slow processing speed. PMID:21958432

  20. The moderating effect of estimated pre-morbid IQ on the relationship between neuropsychological status and subjective well-being after brain tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ownsworth, Tamara; Dwan, Toni; Chambers, Suzanne; Walker, David G; Shum, David H K

    2014-03-01

    People with brain tumour experience complex and distressing symptoms. Neuropsychological impairment is proposed to have a negative impact on subjective well-being; however, research is yet to examine the influence of estimated premorbid IQ on this relationship. This preliminary study investigated the moderating effect of estimated premorbid IQ on the relationship between global neuropsychological status (GNF) and depression and quality of life. 73 adults (51% male) aged 21-65 years with primary brain tumour (52% benign) were administered a test battery assessing estimated premorbid IQ, GNF, depression (Depression Anxiety Stress Scales) and quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy, FACT). A series of two-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) controlling for education found a significant interaction between estimated premorbid IQ (low average to average vs high average) and GNF (low vs high) on levels of depression (p IQ and low GNF reported better well-being than those with low-average to average estimated premorbid IQ and low GNF. Higher GNF was related to greater functional well-being (p IQ. The finding that higher premorbid cognitive ability buffers the effect of neuropsychological impairment on emotional well-being after brain tumour advances understanding of the role of cognitive reserve in adjustment to neurological disorders. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Tissue-specific induction of oxidative stress in goldfish by 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid: mild in brain and moderate in liver and kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matviishyn, Tetiana M; Kubrak, Olga I; Husak, Viktor V; Storey, Kenneth B; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) on free radical-related processes in tissues of goldfish given 96 h exposures to 1, 10 or 100 mg/L of 2,4-D as well as 96 h recovery from the 100 mg/L treatment. In liver, 2,4-D exposure increased levels of protein carbonyls and lipid peroxides by 36-53% and 24-43%, respectively, but both parameters reverted during recovery, whereas in brain glutathione status improved in response to 2,4-D. Lipid peroxide content in kidney was enhanced by 40-43% after exposure to 2,4-D with a decrease during recovery. Exposure to 2,4-D also reduced liver acetylcholinesterase activity by 31-41%. The treatment increased catalase activity in brain, but returned it to initial levels after recovery. In kidney, exposure to 100 mg/L of 2,4-D caused a 33% decrease of superoxide dismutase activity. Thus, goldfish exposure to 2,4-D induced moderate oxidative stress in liver and kidney and mild oxidative stress in brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of changes in brain natriuretic peptide serum levels and its diagnostic value in patients with mild and moderate head trauma, in patients referred to emergency department of Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, 2013-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizkhani, Reza; Keshavarz, Es'haq

    2016-01-01

    Head trauma is one of the most common reasons for emergency department (ED) care. Over the past decade, initial management strategies in mild and moderate head trauma have become focused on selective computed tomography (CT) use based upon presence or absence of specific aspects of patient history and/or clinical examination which has received more attention following reports of increased cancer risk from CT scans. Recently changes in serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels following head trauma have been studied. We investigated the changes in serum levels of BNP in patients with mild and moderate head trauma, in whom the first brain CT scanning was normal. This study is a cross-sectional, descriptive research. It was performed in patients with mild and moderate head trauma. Forty-one patients with isolated mild and moderate traumatic brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale = 9-15) were included. First brain CT scans were obtained during 2 h after ED arrival and the second one after 24 h. Plasma BNP levels were determined using a specific immunoassay system. Twenty-three patients were in Group A (with normal first and second brain CT) and 18 patients in Group B (with normal first and abnormal second brain CT). With P = 0.001, serum BNP level = 9.04 was determined for differentiating two groups. We concluded that serum BNP level is higher in patients with mild and moderate head trauma with delayed pathologic changes in second brain CT relative to patients with mild and moderate head trauma and with normal delayed brain CT.

  3. Moderate social sensitivity in a risky context supports adaptive decision-making in adolescence: Evidence from brain and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoorn, Jorien; McCormick, Ethan M; Telzer, Eva H

    2018-02-24

    Adolescence is a time of increased social-affective sensitivity, which is often related to heightened health-risk behaviors. However, moderate levels of social sensitivity, relative to either low (social vacuum) or high levels (exceptionally attuned), may confer benefits as it facilitates effective navigation of the social world. The present fMRI study tested a curvilinear relationship between social sensitivity and adaptive decision-making. Participants (ages 12-16; N = 35) played the Social Analogue Risk Task (SART), which measures participants' willingness to knock on doors in order to earn points. With each knock, the facial expression of the house's resident shifted from happy to somewhat angrier. If the resident became too angry, the door slammed and participants lost points. Social sensitivity was defined as the extent to which adolescents adjusted their risky choices based on shifting facial expressions. Results confirmed a curvilinear relationship between social sensitivity and self-reported adaptive decision-making at the behavioral and neural level. Moderate adolescent social sensitivity was modulated via heightened tracking of social cues in the TPJ, insula and dlPFC and related to adaptive decision-making. These findings suggest that social-affective sensitivity may positively impact outcomes in adolescence and have implications for interventions to help adolescents reach mature social goals into adulthood.

  4. Intermittent hypoxia training: Powerful, non-invasive cerebroprotection against ethanol withdrawal excitotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Marianna E; Mallet, Robert T

    2017-08-12

    Ethanol intoxication and withdrawal exact a devastating toll on the central nervous system. Abrupt ethanol withdrawal provokes massive release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate, which over-activates its postsynaptic receptors, causing intense Ca 2+ loading, p38 mitogen activated protein kinase activation and oxidative stress, culminating in ATP depletion, mitochondrial injury, amyloid β deposition and neuronal death. Collectively, these mechanisms produce neurocognitive and sensorimotor dysfunction that discourages continued abstinence. Although the brain is heavily dependent on blood-borne O 2 to sustain its aerobic ATP production, brief, cyclic episodes of moderate hypoxia and reoxygenation, when judiciously applied over the course of days or weeks, evoke adaptations that protect the brain from ethanol withdrawal-induced glutamate excitotoxicity, mitochondrial damage, oxidative stress and amyloid β accumulation. This review summarizes evidence from ongoing preclinical research that demonstrates intermittent hypoxia training to be a potentially powerful yet non-invasive intervention capable of affording robust, sustained neuroprotection during ethanol withdrawal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Regional Brain Volumes Moderate, but Do Not Mediate, the Effects of Group-Based Exercise Training on Reductions in Loneliness in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane K. Ehlers

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the prevalence of and negative health consequences associated with perceived loneliness in older adults, few studies have examined interactions among behavioral, psychosocial, and neural mechanisms. Research suggests that physical activity and improvements in perceived social support and stress are related to reductions in loneliness. Yet, the influence of brain structure on these changes is unknown. The present study examined whether change in regional brain volume mediated the effects of changes in social support and stress on change in perceived loneliness after an exercise intervention. We also examined the extent to which baseline brain volumes moderated the relationship between changes in social support, stress, and loneliness.Methods: Participants were 247 older adults (65.4 ± 4.6 years-old enrolled in a 6-month randomized controlled trial comprised of four exercise conditions: Dance (n = 69, Strength/Stretching/Stability (n = 70, Walk (n = 54, and Walk Plus (n = 54. All groups met for 1 h, three times weekly. Participants completed questionnaires assessing perceived social support, stress, and loneliness at baseline and post-intervention. Regional brain volumes (amygdala, prefrontal cortex [PFC], hippocampus before and after intervention were measured with automatic segmentation of each participant's T1-weighted structural MRI. Data were analyzed in a latent modeling framework.Results: Perceived social support increased (p = 0.003, while stress (p < 0.001, and loneliness (p = 0.001 decreased over the intervention. Increased social support directly (−0.63, p < 0.01 and indirectly, through decreased stress (−0.10, p = 0.02, predicted decreased loneliness. Changes in amygdala, PFC, and hippocampus volumes were unrelated to change in psychosocial variables (all p ≥ 0.44. However, individuals with larger baseline amygdalae experienced greater decreases in loneliness due to greater reductions in stress (0.35, p = 0

  6. Regional Brain Volumes Moderate, but Do Not Mediate, the Effects of Group-Based Exercise Training on Reductions in Loneliness in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Diane K; Daugherty, Ana M; Burzynska, Agnieszka Z; Fanning, Jason; Awick, Elizabeth A; Chaddock-Heyman, Laura; Kramer, Arthur F; McAuley, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the prevalence of and negative health consequences associated with perceived loneliness in older adults, few studies have examined interactions among behavioral, psychosocial, and neural mechanisms. Research suggests that physical activity and improvements in perceived social support and stress are related to reductions in loneliness. Yet, the influence of brain structure on these changes is unknown. The present study examined whether change in regional brain volume mediated the effects of changes in social support and stress on change in perceived loneliness after an exercise intervention. We also examined the extent to which baseline brain volumes moderated the relationship between changes in social support, stress, and loneliness. Methods: Participants were 247 older adults (65.4 ± 4.6 years-old) enrolled in a 6-month randomized controlled trial comprised of four exercise conditions: Dance ( n = 69), Strength/Stretching/Stability ( n = 70), Walk ( n = 54), and Walk Plus ( n = 54). All groups met for 1 h, three times weekly. Participants completed questionnaires assessing perceived social support, stress, and loneliness at baseline and post-intervention. Regional brain volumes (amygdala, prefrontal cortex [PFC], hippocampus) before and after intervention were measured with automatic segmentation of each participant's T1-weighted structural MRI. Data were analyzed in a latent modeling framework. Results: Perceived social support increased ( p = 0.003), while stress ( p loneliness ( p = 0.001) decreased over the intervention. Increased social support directly (-0.63, p loneliness. Changes in amygdala, PFC, and hippocampus volumes were unrelated to change in psychosocial variables (all p ≥ 0.44). However, individuals with larger baseline amygdalae experienced greater decreases in loneliness due to greater reductions in stress (0.35, p = 0.02). Further, individuals with larger baseline PFC volumes experienced greater reductions in stress due

  7. Cell-line dependent effects of hypoxia prior to irradiation in squamous cell carcinoma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franziska Hauth

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: We herein report a key role of ATM in the cellular fitness of cells exposed to prolonged moderate hypoxia prior to irradiation. While DNA damage response post-irradiation seem to be mainly driven by non-homologous end joining repair pathway in these conditions, our data suggest an important role for ATM kinase in hypoxia-driven modification of radiation response.

  8. Unexpected reductions in regional cerebral perfusion during prolonged hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawley, Justin S; Macdonald, Jamie H; Oliver, Samuel J; Mullins, Paul G

    2017-02-01

    Cognitive performance is impaired by hypoxia despite global cerebral oxygen delivery and metabolism being maintained. Using arterial spin labelled (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, this is the first study to show regional reductions in cerebral blood flow (CBF) in response to decreased oxygen supply (hypoxia) at 2 h that increased in area and became more pronounced at 10 h. Reductions in CBF were seen in brain regions typically associated with the 'default mode' or 'task negative' network. Regional reductions in CBF, and associated vasoconstriction, within the default mode network in hypoxia is supported by increased vasodilatation in these regions to a subsequent hypercapnic (5% CO 2 ) challenge. These results suggest an anatomical mechanism through which hypoxia may cause previously reported deficits in cognitive performance. Hypoxia causes an increase in global cerebral blood flow, which maintains global cerebral oxygen delivery and metabolism. However, neurological deficits are abundant under hypoxic conditions. We investigated regional cerebral microvascular responses to acute (2 h) and prolonged (10 h) poikilocapnic normobaric hypoxia. We found that 2 h of hypoxia caused an expected increase in frontal cortical grey matter perfusion but unexpected perfusion decreases in regions of the brain normally associated with the 'default mode' or 'task negative' network. After 10 h in hypoxia, decreased blood flow to the major nodes of the default mode network became more pronounced and widespread. The use of a hypercapnic challenge (5% CO 2 ) confirmed that these reductions in cerebral blood flow from hypoxia were related to vasoconstriction. Our findings demonstrate steady-state deactivation of the default network under acute hypoxia, which become more pronounced over time. Moreover, these data provide a unique insight into the nuanced localized cerebrovascular response to hypoxia that is not attainable through traditional methods. The observation of reduced

  9. Effects of Cannabidiol and Hypothermia on Short-Term Brain Damage in New-Born Piglets after Acute Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, Hector; Pazos, Maria R; Alvarez, Antonia; Mohammed, Nagat; Santos, Martín; Arizti, Maialen; Alvarez, Francisco J; Martinez-Orgado, Jose A

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is a standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but nearly 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms with hypothermia improving neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate. Our aim was to test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets. Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomly divided into four groups receiving 30 min after the insult: (1) normothermia and vehicle administration; (2) normothermia and cannabidiol administration; (3) hypothermia and vehicle administration; and (4) hypothermia and cannabidiol administration. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to quantify the number of damaged neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate) and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate). Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress), content of caspase-3 (apoptosis) and TNFα (inflammation). Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels in newborn piglets subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on cell damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone. The present study demonstrated that cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage if applied shortly after the insult.

  10. Effects of Cannabidiol and Hypothermia on Short-Term Brain Damage in New-Born Piglets after Acute Hypoxia-Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, Hector; Pazos, Maria R.; Alvarez, Antonia; Mohammed, Nagat; Santos, Martín; Arizti, Maialen; Alvarez, Francisco J.; Martinez-Orgado, Jose A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is a standard treatment for neonatal encephalopathy, but nearly 50% of treated infants have adverse outcomes. Pharmacological therapies can act through complementary mechanisms with hypothermia improving neuroprotection. Cannabidiol could be a good candidate. Our aim was to test whether immediate treatment with cannabidiol and hypothermia act through complementary brain pathways in hypoxic-ischemic newborn piglets. Hypoxic-ischemic animals were randomly divided into four groups receiving 30 min after the insult: (1) normothermia and vehicle administration; (2) normothermia and cannabidiol administration; (3) hypothermia and vehicle administration; and (4) hypothermia and cannabidiol administration. Six hours after treatment, brains were processed to quantify the number of damaged neurons by Nissl staining. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were obtained and analyzed for lactate, N-acetyl-aspartate and glutamate. Metabolite ratios were calculated to assess neuronal damage (lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate) and excitotoxicity (glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate). Western blot studies were performed to quantify protein nitrosylation (oxidative stress), content of caspase-3 (apoptosis) and TNFα (inflammation). Individually, the hypothermia and the cannabidiol treatments reduced the glutamate/Nacetyl-aspartate ratio, as well as TNFα and oxidized protein levels in newborn piglets subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Also, both therapies reduced the number of necrotic neurons and prevented an increase in lactate/N-acetyl-aspartate ratio. The combined effect of hypothermia and cannabidiol on excitotoxicity, inflammation and oxidative stress, and on cell damage, was greater than either hypothermia or cannabidiol alone. The present study demonstrated that cannabidiol and hypothermia act complementarily and show additive effects on the main factors leading to hypoxic-ischemic brain damage if applied shortly after the insult. PMID:27462203

  11. Effects of hypoxia-ischemia and MK-801 treatment on the binding of a phencyclidine analogue in the developing rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverstein, F.S.; McDonald, J.W. III; Bommarito, M.; Johnston, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    The phencyclidine analogue [ 3 H](1-[2-thienyl]cyclohexyl)piperidine ( 3 H-TCP) binds to the ion channel associated with the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor channel complex. In vitro autoradiography indicates that the distribution of 3 H-TCP binding in brain closely parallels that of [ 3 H]glutamate binding to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor. In nine 7-day-old rats, an acute focal hypoxic-ischemic insult produced by unilateral carotid artery ligation and subsequent exposure to 8% oxygen acutely reduced 3 H-TCP binding ipsilateral to the ligation by 30% in the CA1, by 27% in the CA3, by 26% in the dentate gyrus, and by 17% in the striatum compared with values from the contralateral hemisphere. In 10 littermates that received 1 mg/kg of the neuroprotective noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate antagonist MK-801 immediately before hypoxic exposure, the regional distribution of 3 H-TCP binding in hypoxic-ischemic brain was relatively preserved and there were no interhemispheric asymmetries in 3 H-TCP binding densities. In addition, in three unoperated rats decapitated 24 hours after MK-801 treatment, 3 H-TCP binding was reduced by 15-35%; similar bilateral suppression of 3 H-TCP binding was detected in MK-801-treated ligates. Our data indicate that 3 H-TCP autoradiography can be used to assay the efficacy of neuroprotective agents in this experimental model of perinatal stroke

  12. How impulsivity relates to compulsive buying and the burden perceived by caregivers after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Lucien; Beni, Catia; Billieux, Joël; Annoni, Jean-Marie; Van der Linden, Martial

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity is a core feature in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of the study is to investigate how a specific dimension of impulsivity, namely urgency (the tendency to act rashly when distressed), might shed new light on the aetiology of compulsive buying proneness in patients with TBI and to explore how urgency and compulsive buying relate to the burden perceived by the caregivers. Caregivers of 74 patients with TBI were given 3 questionnaires in order to assess their subjective burden as well as patients' impulsivity and compulsive buying proneness. Both urgency and compulsive buying tendencies significantly increased after TBI. Furthermore, path analyses revealed that current urgency was both directly and indirectly related to the subjective burden perceived by the caregivers, and this indirect pathway was mediated by compulsive buying. Urgency plays a central role in understanding specific problematic behaviours after TBI and their impact on caregivers. These findings are discussed in light of the cognitive processes underlying the urgency component of impulsivity in relation to the occurrence of compulsive buying behaviours after TBI. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. CNS hypoxia is more pronounced in murine cerebral than noncerebral malaria and is reversed by erythropoietin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempel, Casper; Combes, Valery; Hunt, Nicholas Henry

    2011-01-01

    , and two models of malaria without neurologic signs, P. berghei K173 in CBA mice and P. berghei ANKA in BALB/c mice. Hypoxia was demonstrated in brain sections using intravenous pimonidazole and staining with hypoxia-inducible factor-1a-specific antibody. Cytopathic hypoxia was studied using poly (ADP......-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) gene knockout mice. The effect of erythropoietin, an oxygen-sensitive cytokine that mediates protection against CM, on cerebral hypoxia was studied in C57BL/6 mice. Numerous hypoxic foci of neurons and glial cells were observed in mice with CM. Substantially fewer and smaller foci were...

  14. The Role of Hypoxia in Glioblastoma Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Monteiro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, a grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and deadly type of primary malignant brain tumor, with a patient’s median survival rate ranging from 15 to 17 months. The current treatment for GBM involves tumor resection surgery based on MRI image analysis, followed by radiotherapy and treatment with temozolomide. However, the gradual development of tumor resistance to temozolomide is frequent in GBM patients leading to subsequent tumor regrowth/relapse. For this reason, the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for GBM is of critical importance. Low tumor oxygenation, also known as hypoxia, constitutes a major concern for GBM patients, since it promotes cancer cell spreading (invasion into the healthy brain tissue in order to evade this adverse microenvironment. Tumor invasion not only constitutes a major obstacle to surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, but it is also the main cause of death in GBM patients. Understanding how hypoxia triggers the GBM cells to become invasive is paramount to developing novel and more effective therapies against this devastating disease. In this review, we will present a comprehensive examination of the available literature focused on investigating how GBM hypoxia triggers an invasive cancer cell phenotype and the role of these invasive proteins in GBM progression.

  15. Psychomotor skills learning under chronic hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouquet, C A; Gardette, B; Gortan, C; Abraini, J H

    1999-09-29

    Psychomotor deficits are a prominent feature in subjects exposed to hypoxia. Eight subjects exposed to chronic hypoxia during a simulated climb to 8848 m (Everest-Comex 97) were investigated using both a simple psychomotor task (Purdue pegboard) and two complex psychomotor tasks including a recognition task of either a color stimulus (high semantic level) or an abstract sign (low semantic level). Exposure to hypoxic stress mainly produced psychomotor skills learning deficits compared to control study, with greater deficits in the complex psychomotor task. The pattern of results suggests disruptions of motor strategic process. Our data further suggest that the relative strength of implicit or automatic memory processes associated with semantic information processing may increase when disturbances occur in brain functions.

  16. Methionine sulfoxide reductase A protects neuronal cells against brief hypoxia/reoxygenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yermolaieva, Olena; Xu, Rong; Schinstock, Carrie; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2004-02-01

    Hypoxia/reoxygenation induces cellular injury by promoting oxidative stress. Reversible oxidation of methionine in proteins involving the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase type A (MSRA) is postulated to serve a general antioxidant role. Therefore, we examined whether overexpression of MSRA protected cells from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. Brief hypoxia increased the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in PC12 cells and promoted apoptotic cell death. Adenovirus-mediated overexpression of MSRA significantly diminished the hypoxia-induced increase in ROS and facilitated cell survival. Measurements of the membrane potentials of intact mitochondria in PC12 cells and of isolated rat liver mitochondria showed that hypoxia induced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. The results demonstrate that MSRA plays a protective role against hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced cell injury and suggest the therapeutic potential of MSRA in ischemic heart and brain disease.

  17. Carbohydrate management, anaerobic metabolism, and adenosine levels in the armoured catfish, Liposarcus pardalis (castelnau), during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccormack, Tyson James; Lewis, Johanne Mari; Almeida-Val, Vera Maria Fonseca; Val, Adalberto Luis; Driedzic, William Robert

    2006-04-01

    The armoured catfish, Liposarcus pardalis, tolerates severe hypoxia at high temperatures. Although this species can breathe air, it also has a strong anaerobic metabolism. We assessed tissue to plasma glucose ratios and glycogen and lactate in a number of tissues under "natural" pond hypoxia, and severe aquarium hypoxia without aerial respiration. Armour lactate content and adenosine in brain and heart were also investigated. During normoxia, tissue to plasma glucose ratios in gill, brain, and heart were close to one. Hypoxia increased plasma glucose and decreased tissue to plasma ratios to less than one, suggesting glucose phosphorylation is activated more than uptake. High normoxic white muscle glucose relative to plasma suggests gluconeogenesis or active glucose uptake. Excess muscle glucose may serve as a metabolic reserve since hypoxia decreased muscle to plasma glucose ratios. Mild pond hypoxia changed glucose management in the absence of lactate accumulation. Lactate was elevated in all tissues except armour following aquarium hypoxia; however, confinement in aquaria increased armour lactate, even under normoxia. A stress-associated acidosis may contribute to armour lactate sequestration. High plasma lactate levels were associated with brain adenosine accumulation. An increase in heart adenosine was triggered by confinement in aquaria, although not by hypoxia alone.

  18. Intermittent hypoxia training protects cerebrovascular function in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukhina, Eugenia B; Downey, H Fred; Shi, Xiangrong

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of death and disability among older adults. Modifiable vascular risk factors for AD (VRF) include obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, and metabolic syndrome. Here, interactions between cerebrovascular function and development of AD are reviewed, as are interventions to improve cerebral blood flow and reduce VRF. Atherosclerosis and small vessel cerebral disease impair metabolic regulation of cerebral blood flow and, along with microvascular rarefaction and altered trans-capillary exchange, create conditions favoring AD development. Although currently there are no definitive therapies for treatment or prevention of AD, reduction of VRFs lowers the risk for cognitive decline. There is increasing evidence that brief repeated exposures to moderate hypoxia, i.e. intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), improve cerebral vascular function and reduce VRFs including systemic hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and mental stress. In experimental AD, IHT nearly prevented endothelial dysfunction of both cerebral and extra-cerebral blood vessels, rarefaction of the brain vascular network, and the loss of neurons in the brain cortex. Associated with these vasoprotective effects, IHT improved memory and lessened AD pathology. IHT increases endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO), thereby increasing regional cerebral blood flow and augmenting the vaso- and neuroprotective effects of endothelial NO. On the other hand, in AD excessive production of NO in microglia, astrocytes, and cortical neurons generates neurotoxic peroxynitrite. IHT enhances storage of excessive NO in the form of S-nitrosothiols and dinitrosyl iron complexes. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD, and IHT reduces oxidative stress in a number of experimental pathologies. Beneficial effects of IHT in experimental neuropathologies other than AD, including dyscirculatory encephalopathy, ischemic stroke injury, audiogenic

  19. Intermittent hypoxia training protects cerebrovascular function in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukhina, Eugenia B; Downey, H Fred; Shi, Xiangrong; Mallet, Robert T

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a leading cause of death and disability among older adults. Modifiable vascular risk factors for AD (VRF) include obesity, hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, sleep apnea, and metabolic syndrome. Here, interactions between cerebrovascular function and development of AD are reviewed, as are interventions to improve cerebral blood flow and reduce VRF. Atherosclerosis and small vessel cerebral disease impair metabolic regulation of cerebral blood flow and, along with microvascular rarefaction and altered trans-capillary exchange, create conditions favoring AD development. Although currently there are no definitive therapies for treatment or prevention of AD, reduction of VRFs lowers the risk for cognitive decline. There is increasing evidence that brief repeated exposures to moderate hypoxia, i.e. intermittent hypoxic training (IHT), improve cerebral vascular function and reduce VRFs including systemic hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, and mental stress. In experimental AD, IHT nearly prevented endothelial dysfunction of both cerebral and extra-cerebral blood vessels, rarefaction of the brain vascular network, and the loss of neurons in the brain cortex. Associated with these vasoprotective effects, IHT improved memory and lessened AD pathology. IHT increases endothelial production of nitric oxide (NO), thereby increasing regional cerebral blood flow and augmenting the vaso- and neuroprotective effects of endothelial NO. On the other hand, in AD excessive production of NO in microglia, astrocytes, and cortical neurons generates neurotoxic peroxynitrite. IHT enhances storage of excessive NO in the form of S-nitrosothiols and dinitrosyl iron complexes. Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of AD, and IHT reduces oxidative stress in a number of experimental pathologies. Beneficial effects of IHT in experimental neuropathologies other than AD, including dyscirculatory encephalopathy, ischemic stroke injury, audiogenic

  20. Radiation-induced hypoxia may perpetuate late normal tissue injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Feng, Q.-F.; Rabbani, Zahid N.; Amin, Khalid; Samulski, Thaddeus S.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Haroon, Zishan A.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not hypoxia develops in rat lung tissue after radiation. Methods and Materials: Fisher-344 rats were irradiated to the right hemithorax using a single dose of 28 Gy. Pulmonary function was assessed by measuring the changes in respiratory rate every 2 weeks, for 6 months after irradiation. The hypoxia marker was administered 3 h before euthanasia. The tissues were harvested at 6 weeks and 6 months after irradiation and processed for immunohistochemistry. Results: A moderate hypoxia was detected in the rat lungs at 6 weeks after irradiation, before the onset of functional or histopathologic changes. The more severe hypoxia, that developed at the later time points (6 months) after irradiation, was associated with a significant increase in macrophage activity, collagen deposition, lung fibrosis, and elevation in the respiratory rate. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed an increase in TGF-β, VEGF, and CD-31 endothelial cell marker, suggesting a hypoxia-mediated activation of the profibrinogenic and proangiogenic pathways. Conclusion: A new paradigm of radiation-induced lung injury should consider postradiation hypoxia to be an important contributing factor mediating a continuous production of a number of inflammatory and fibrogenic cytokines

  1. Hypoxia tolerance in coral-reef triggerfishes (Balistidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Corrie C.; Drazen, Jeffrey C.; Callan, Chatham K.; Korsmeyer, Keith E.

    2018-03-01

    Despite high rates of photosynthetic oxygen production during the day, the warm waters of coral reefs are susceptible to hypoxia at night due to elevated respiration rates at higher temperatures that also reduce the solubility of oxygen. Hypoxia may be a challenge for coral-reef fish that hide in the reef to avoid predators at night. Triggerfishes (Balistidae) are found in a variety of reef habitats, but they also are known to find refuge in reef crevices and holes at night, which may expose them to hypoxic conditions. The critical oxygen tension ( P crit) was determined as the point below which oxygen uptake could not be maintained to support standard metabolic rate (SMR) for five species of triggerfish. The triggerfishes exhibited similar levels of hypoxia tolerance as other coral-reef and coastal marine fishes that encounter low oxygen levels in their environment. Two species, Rhinecanthus rectangulus and R. aculeatus, had the lowest P crit ( 3.0 kPa O2), comparable to the most hypoxia-tolerant obligate coral-dwelling gobies, while Odonus niger and Sufflamen bursa were moderately tolerant to hypoxia ( P crit 4.5 kPa), and Xanthichthys auromarginatus was intermediate ( P crit 3.7 kPa). These differences in P crit were not due to differences in oxygen demand, as all the species had a similar SMR once mass differences were taken into account. The results suggest that triggerfish species are adapted for different levels of hypoxia exposure during nocturnal sheltering within the reef.

  2. Process of implementing collaborative care and its impacts on the provision of care and rehabilitation services to patients with a moderate or severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talbot LR

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Lise R Talbot,1,2 Annie Lévesque,1 Josée Trottier1 1School of Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Sherbrooke, 2Étienne-Le Bel Clinical Research Centre and the Research Centre on Aging, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada Objective: The introduction of new services in a rehabilitation center is a unique opportunity to introduce a new model of care and services between two institutions. A hospital and a rehabilitation center experienced a clinical management model inspired by an American approach – collaborative care. The purpose of this study was to describe the implementation of this approach and to provide a perception of the quality of care and services provided to patients with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury and to their caregivers. Materials and methods: In this qualitative study, individual semistructured interviews were conducted with patients and their caregivers in the hospital and rehabilitation center where the patients were treated. Individual semistructured interviews were conducted with administrators, and two focus groups were held with clinicians before and after the implementation. Results and conclusion: Ten days’ waiting time were saved with the collaborative approach. Implementing the collaborative care approach has been found to have several benefits, including improved communication, coordination of services between institutions, and better preparation, awareness, and involvement of patients and their families. Administrators, clinicians, patients, and caregivers expressed their opinions on the organization of care and services, the needs and expectations of patients and their caregivers, their participation in terms of roles and responsibilities, their perception of continuity of care, their satisfaction with the care process, and their suggestions for improvements. Keywords: traumatic brain injury, collaborative care, rehabilitation, quality of care

  3. Delayed effects of thallium in the rat brain: regional changes in lipid peroxidation and behavioral markers, but moderate alterations in antioxidants, after a single administration.

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    Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Medina-Campos, Omar N; Maldonado, Perla D; Vázquez-Román, Beatriz; Ríos, Camilo; Santamaría, Abel

    2005-07-01

    Thallium (Tl+) toxicity has been related with the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress (OS) in the central nervous system. Since changes in endogenous antioxidant systems might contribute to acute Tl+-induced OS and neurotoxicity, in this study we measured the metal concentration and the levels of lipid peroxidation (LP) in different brain regions (hypothalamus (Ht); cerebellum (Ce); striatum (S); hippocampus (Hc) and frontal cortex (Cx)) in possible correlation with the content of reduced glutathione (GSH), the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and the animal performance in behavioral tests, all evaluated after a single administration of thallium acetate (8 or 16 mg/kg, i.p.) to rats. Seven days after Tl+ administration, the metal was homogeneously and dose-dependently accumulated in all regions evaluated. LP was increased in Ht, Ce and S, while GSH was depleted in S. Cu,Zn-SOD activity was also decreased in Ht and S. All these changes occurred with 16 mg/kg dose and at 7 days after treatment, but not at 1 or 3 days. In addition, Tl+-treated animals exhibited general hypokinesis, but no changes were observed in spatial learning. Our findings suggest that a delayed response of the brain to Tl+ may be the result of its residual levels. Also, despite the regional alterations produced by Tl+ in LP and the limited changes in endogenous antioxidants, there is a correlation between the Tl+-induced oxidative damage and the affected behavioral tasks, suggesting that, although still moderate, Tl+ evokes neurotoxic patterns under the experimental conditions tested.

  4. Pediatric nurses' perceived knowledge and beliefs of evidence-based practice in the care of children and adolescents with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyesanya, Tolu O; Snedden, Traci R

    2018-04-01

    Pediatric nurses play a significant role in all phases of traumatic brain injury (TBI) recovery, particularly during the hospital stay. Although evidence-based nursing practice is known to improve patient outcomes, limited research exists on nurses' evidence-based perceived knowledge and beliefs specific to TBI care. As nurses' perceived knowledge and beliefs are known to guide their practice behaviors, this assessment is important to overall TBI outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pediatric nurses' evidence-based perceived knowledge and beliefs in providing care for children and adolescents with moderate-to-severe TBI. Data for this study were obtained from a larger parent study on nurses' perceptions of caring for patients of all ages with moderate-to-severe TBI. The parent study was an exploratory, cross-sectional electronic survey of registered nurses across all hospital departments within a large Midwestern health system. Only data specific to pediatric nurses (n = 330) were analyzed for this study. Descriptive statistics and latent class analysis (LCA) were performed. Pediatric nurses, on average, were 38.79 years, female (90.37%), had over a decade of nursing experience (13.55 years), and practiced as a staff nurse (80.07%) on an inpatient unit (45.51%). Findings indicated pediatric nurses reported overall low levels of evidence-based perceived knowledge and had inaccurate beliefs about caring for patients with TBI. LCA indicated two distinct homogenous subgroups specific to evidence-based perceived knowledge: low (41%) and high (59%). Nurses in the low evidence-based perceived knowledge group were younger, had less nursing experience, worked primarily on an inpatient unit, and cared for patients with TBI at a higher frequency compared to high evidence-based perceived knowledge nurses. Additionally, there were significant differences in beliefs about sex-based patient differences after TBI and the role of nurses in caring for patients with

  5. Moderate Hyperbilirubinemia Alters Neonatal Cardiorespiratory Control and Induces Inflammation in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarius

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    Marie-Laure Specq

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperbilirubinemia (HB occurs in 90% of preterm newborns. Moderate HB can induce acute neurological disorders while severe HB has been linked to a higher incidence of apneas of prematurity. The present study aimed to test the hypothesis that even moderate HB disrupts cardiorespiratory control in preterm lambs. Two groups of preterm lambs (born 14 days prior to term, namely control (n = 6 and HB (n = 5, were studied. At day 5 of life, moderate HB (150-250 µmol/L was induced during 17h in the HB group after which cardiorespiratory control as well as laryngeal and pulmonary chemoreflexes were assessed during baseline recordings and during hypoxia. Recordings were repeated 72 hours after HB induction, just before euthanasia. In addition, neuropathological studies were performed to investigate for cerebral bilirubin deposition as well as for signs of glial reactivity in brainstem structures involved in cardiorespiratory control. Results revealed that sustained and moderate HB: i decreased baseline respiratory rate and increased the time spent in apnea; ii blunted the cardiorespiratory inhibition normally observed during both laryngeal and pulmonary chemoreflexes and iii increased heart rate in response to acute hypoxia. These acute physiological changes were concurrent with an activation of Alzheimer type II astrocytes throughout the brain, including the brainstem. Concomitantly, bilirubin deposits were observed in the leptomeninges, but not in brain parenchyma. While most cardiorespiratory alterations returned to normal 72 hours after HB normalization, the expression of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP and Ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba1 was still increased within the nucleus tractus solitarius. In conclusion, moderate and sustained HB in preterm lambs induced cardiorespiratory alterations, the latter of which were associated with neurohistopathological changes. These changes are indicative of an inflammatory response in the

  6. Loneliness in Relation to Depression: The Moderating Influence of a Polymorphism of the Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene on Self-efficacy and Coping Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard, Marc; Woods, Robbie; Crump, Carly; Anisman, Hymie

    2017-01-01

    Disturbances of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling, which may occur among those with a polymorphism of the Val66Met gene, comprising a Met substitution for the Val allele, may be associated with depressive cognitions. However, presumed elevated BDNF levels among individuals with the Val/Val genotype, might confer increased responsivity to contextual challenges, thus fostering vulnerability to depression. In Study 1, among undergraduate students (N = 252), increased loneliness perceptions were accompanied with depressive symptoms. This relationship was moderated by self-efficacy and BDNF genotype, such that when individuals appraised high self-efficacy, those with the Val/Val genotype, compared to Met carriers, reported greater depression scores when they perceived feeling lonely. Study 2 revealed that among undergraduate students (N = 178), lower depressive scores were associated with increased problem-focused coping among Val/Val individuals, but not Met carriers. Moreover, with increased perceived loneliness, Val/Val carriers endorsed lower problem-focused coping. Findings suggest that Val/Val individuals may have adverse neurocognitive vulnerability to loneliness experiences. PMID:28769852

  7. Intermittent hypoxia and neurorehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Lee, Kun-Ze; Dale, Erica A; Reier, Paul J; Mitchell, Gordon S; Fuller, David D

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, it has become clear that brief, repeated presentations of hypoxia [i.e., acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH)] can boost the efficacy of more traditional therapeutic strategies in certain cases of neurologic dysfunction. This hypothesis derives from a series of studies in animal models and human subjects performed over the past 35 yr. In 1980, Millhorn et al. (Millhorn DE, Eldridge FL, Waldrop TG. Respir Physiol 41: 87-103, 1980) showed that electrical stimulation of carotid chemoafferent neurons produced a persistent, serotonin-dependent increase in phrenic motor output that outlasts the stimulus for more than 90 min (i.e., a "respiratory memory"). AIH elicits similar phrenic "long-term facilitation" (LTF) by a mechanism that requires cervical spinal serotonin receptor activation and de novo protein synthesis. From 2003 to present, a series of studies demonstrated that AIH can induce neuroplasticity in the injured spinal cord, causing functional recovery of breathing capacity after cervical spinal injury. Subsequently, it was demonstrated that repeated AIH (rAIH) can induce recovery of limb function, and the functional benefits of rAIH are greatest when paired with task-specific training. Since uncontrolled and/or prolonged intermittent hypoxia can elicit pathophysiology, a challenge of intermittent hypoxia research is to ensure that therapeutic protocols are well below the threshold for pathogenesis. This is possible since many low dose rAIH protocols have induced functional benefits without evidence of pathology. We propose that carefully controlled rAIH is a safe and noninvasive modality that can be paired with other neurorehabilitative strategies including traditional activity-based physical therapy or cell-based therapies such as intraspinal transplantation of neural progenitors. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha has a key role in hypoxic preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taie, Satoshi; Ono, Junichiro; Iwanaga, Yasuyuki; Tomita, Shuhei; Asaga, Takehiko; Chujo, Kosuke; Ueki, Masaaki

    2009-08-01

    Sublethal hypoxia induces tolerance to subsequent hypoxic insults in a process known as hypoxic preconditioning (HP). Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1 alpha) is a key transcription protein involved in the mechanism of HP. In this study, we investigated the effects of HP on tissue oxygenation and expression of HIF-1 alpha gene targets in the brain using neural cell-specific HIF-1 alpha-deficient mice. The animals were exposed to 8% oxygen for 3 hours. Twenty-four hours later, the oxygen partial pressure (pO(2)) of brain tissue and gene expression were measured during hypoxia. HP improved the pO(2) of brain tissue during subsequent hypoxia with upregulated inducible nitric oxide synthase in wild-type mice, whereas HP had no detectable effect in the mutant mice. Our results indicate that the protective effects of HP may be partially mediated by improving tissue oxygenation via HIF-1 alpha and inducible nitric oxide synthase.

  9. Hypoxia and Fetal Heart Development

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, A.J.; Zhang, L

    2010-01-01

    Fetal hearts show a remarkable ability to develop under hypoxic conditions. The metabolic flexibility of fetal hearts allows sustained development under low oxygen conditions. In fact, hypoxia is critical for proper myocardial formation. Particularly, hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor play central roles in hypoxia-dependent signaling in fetal heart formation, impacting embryonic outflow track remodeling and coronary vessel growth. Although HIF is not th...

  10. Longer hypoxia-ischemia periods to neonatal rats causes motor impairments and muscular changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Carabali, L E; Sanches, E F; Marques, M R; Aristimunha, D; Pagnussat, A; Netto, C A

    2017-01-06

    Prematurity and hypoxia-ischemia (HI) can lead to movement disorders in infants. Considering that mild-moderate HI induced at postnatal day (PND) 3 has failed to produce motor disabilities similar to those seen in pre-term newborns, the main goal of the present study was to verify whether longer hypoxia periods would mimic motor function impairment, brain and muscle morphological alterations. Forty-nine Wistar rat pups of both sexes were randomly assigned to surgical control (CG) and HI groups. HI animals were submitted to the Levine-Rice model at PND 3, and exposed to 120 (HI-120'), 180 (HI-180') or 210 (HI-210') minutes of hypoxia (FiO 2 : 0.08). Sensorimotor function was assessed as from PND 35-45, by means of grasping strength, adhesive removal, cylinder and ladder walking tests. Histological staining was used to quantify the striatal volume and the cross-sectional area (CSA) of skeletal muscles. Cylinder and adhesive removal test evidenced that HI-180' and HI-210' groups had asymmetrical use of the forepaws when compared to controls. HI animals showed a decrease in the step placement quality and an increase in step errors when compared to CG (P⩽0.05). Reduction in striatal volume correlates with behavioral assessment, HI-180' and HI-210' groups presented lower biceps brachii and tibialis anterior CSA. These results show that rats exposed to longer hypoxic periods at PND3 have encephalic and sensorimotor impairments that mimic those observed in preterm infants. Morphological changes in muscle tissue evidence a new pathophysiological characteristic of the HI model that might be of relevance for the study of sensorimotor deficits. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of hypoxia and ocean acidification on the upper thermal niche boundaries of coral reef fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ern, Rasmus; Johansen, Jacob L; Rummer, Jodie L; Esbaugh, Andrew J

    2017-07-01

    Rising ocean temperatures are predicted to cause a poleward shift in the distribution of marine fishes occupying the extent of latitudes tolerable within their thermal range boundaries. A prevailing theory suggests that the upper thermal limits of fishes are constrained by hypoxia and ocean acidification. However, some eurythermal fish species do not conform to this theory, and maintain their upper thermal limits in hypoxia. Here we determine if the same is true for stenothermal species. In three coral reef fish species we tested the effect of hypoxia on upper thermal limits, measured as critical thermal maximum (CT max ). In one of these species we also quantified the effect of hypoxia on oxygen supply capacity, measured as aerobic scope (AS). In this species we also tested the effect of elevated CO 2 (simulated ocean acidification) on the hypoxia sensitivity of CT max We found that CT max was unaffected by progressive hypoxia down to approximately 35 mmHg, despite a substantial hypoxia-induced reduction in AS. Below approximately 35 mmHg, CT max declined sharply with water oxygen tension ( P w O 2 ). Furthermore, the hypoxia sensitivity of CT max was unaffected by elevated CO 2 Our findings show that moderate hypoxia and ocean acidification do not constrain the upper thermal limits of these tropical, stenothermal fishes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  12. Effect of Age on Glasgow Coma Scale in Patients with Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: An Approach with Propensity Score-Matched Population

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    Cheng-Shyuan Rau

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most widely used methods of describing traumatic brain injury (TBI are the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS. Recent evidence suggests that presenting GCS in older patients may be higher than that in younger patients for an equivalent anatomical severity of TBI. This study aimed to assess these observations with a propensity-score matching approach using the data from Trauma Registry System in a Level I trauma center. Methods: We included all adult patients (aged ≥20 years old with moderate to severe TBI from 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2016. Patients were categorized into elderly (aged ≥65 years and young adults (aged 20–64 years. The severity of TBI was defined by an AIS score in the head (AIS 3‒4 and 5 indicate moderate and severe TBI, respectively. We examined the differences in the GCS scores by age at each head AIS score. Unpaired Student’s t- and Mann–Whitney U-tests were used to analyze normally and non-normally distributed continuous data, respectively. Categorical data were compared using either the Pearson chi-square or two-sided Fisher’s exact tests. Matched patient populations were allocated in a 1:1 ratio according to the propensity scores calculated using NCSS software with the following covariates: sex, pre-existing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, sodium, glucose, and alcohol level. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the effects of age on the GCS score in each head AIS stratum. Results: The study population included 2081 adult patients with moderate to severe TBI. These patients were categorized into elderly (n = 847 and young adults (n = 1234: each was exclusively further divided into three groups of patients with head AIS of 3, 4, or 5. In the 162 well-balanced pairs of TBI patients with head AIS of 3, the elderly demonstrated a significantly higher GCS score than the young adults (14.1 ± 2.2 vs. 13.1 ± 3

  13. Therapeutic temperature modulation in severe or moderate traumatic brain injury: a propensity score analysis of data from the Nationwide Japan Neurotrauma Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Kei; Ohnishi, Hirofumi; Maekawa, Kunihiko; Mikami, Takeshi; Akiyama, Yukinori; Iihoshi, Satoshi; Wanibuchi, Masahiko; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Uemura, Shuji; Tanno, Katsutoshi; Narimatsu, Eichi; Asai, Yasufumi

    2016-02-01

    In patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), a randomized controlled trial revealed that outcomes did not significantly improve after therapeutic hypothermia (TH) or normothermia (TN). However, avoiding pyrexia, which is often associated with intracranial disorders, might improve clinical outcomes. The objective of this study was to compare neurological outcomes among patients with moderate and severe TBI after therapeutic temperature modulation (TTM) in the absence of other interventions. Data from 1091 patients were obtained from the Japan Neurotrauma Data Bank Project 2009, a cohort observational study. Patients with cardiac arrest, those with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 3 and dilated fixed pupils, and those whose cause of death was injury to another area of the body were excluded, leaving 687 patients aged 16 years or older in this study. The patients were divided into 2 groups: the TTM group underwent TN (213 patients) or TH (82 patients), and the control group (392 patients) did not receive TTM. The primary end point for this study was the rate of poor outcome at hospital discharge, and the secondary end point was in-hospital death. Out of the 208 total items in the database, 29 variables that could potentially affect outcome were matched using the propensity score (PS) method in order to reduce selection bias and balance the baseline characteristics. From each group, 141 patients were extracted using the PS-matching process. Among the patients in the TTM group, 29 had undergone TH and 112 had undergone TN. In a log-rank test using Kaplan-Meier survival curves, no significant differences in patient outcome or death were observed between the 2 groups (poor outcome, p = 0.83; death, p = 0.18). A Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis established the HR for poor outcome and mortality at 1.03 (95% CI 0.78-1.36, p = 0.83) and 1.34 (95% CI 0.87-2.07, p = 0.18), respectively. There was no clear improvement in neurological outcomes after TTM in

  14. Intermittent hypoxia training in prediabetes patients: Beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis, hypoxia tolerance and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serebrovska, Tetiana V; Portnychenko, Alla G; Drevytska, Tetiana I; Portnichenko, Vladimir I; Xi, Lei; Egorov, Egor; Gavalko, Anna V; Naskalova, Svitlana; Chizhova, Valentina; Shatylo, Valeriy B

    2017-09-01

    The present study aimed at examining beneficial effects of intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) under prediabetic conditions. We investigate the effects of three-week IHT on blood glucose level, tolerance to acute hypoxia, and leukocyte mRNA expression of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and its target genes, i.e. insulin receptor, facilitated glucose transporter-solute carrier family-2, and potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily J. Seven healthy and 11 prediabetic men and women (44-70 years of age) were examined before, next day and one month after three-week IHT (3 sessions per week, each session consisting 4 cycles of 5-min 12% O 2 and 5-min room air breathing). We found that IHT afforded beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis in patients with prediabetes reducing fasting glucose and during standard oral glucose tolerance test. The most pronounced positive effects were observed at one month after IHT termination. IHT also significantly increased the tolerance to acute hypoxia (i.e. SaO 2 level at 20th min of breathing with 12% O 2 ) and improved functional parameters of respiratory and cardiovascular systems. IHT stimulated HIF-1α mRNA expression in blood leukocytes in healthy and prediabetic subjects, but in prediabetes patients the maximum increase was lagged. The greatest changes in mRNA expression of HIF-1α target genes occurred a month after IHT and coincided with the largest decrease in blood glucose levels. The higher expression of HIF-1α was positively associated with higher tolerance to hypoxia and better glucose homeostasis. In conclusion, our results suggest that IHT may be useful for preventing the development of type 2 diabetes. Impact statement The present study investigated the beneficial effects of intermittent hypoxia training (IHT) in humans under prediabetic conditions. We found that three-week moderate IHT induced higher HIF-1α mRNA expressions as well as its target genes, which were positively correlated with higher tolerance

  15. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α upregulation in microglia following hypoxia protects against ischemia-induced cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tao; Huang, Weiyi; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Yu, Lei; Xie, Caijun; Zhu, Dongan; Peng, Zizhuang; Chen, Jiehan

    2014-10-01

    Activated microglia were considered to be the toxic inflammatory mediators that induce neuron degeneration after brain ischemia. Hypoxia can enhance the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in microglia and cause microglial activation. However, intermittent hypoxia has been reported recently to be capable of protecting the body from myocardial ischemia. We established a high-altitude environment as the hypoxic condition in this study. The hypoxic condition displayed a neuroprotective effect after brain ischemia, and mice exposed to this condition presented better neurological performance and smaller infarct size. At the same time, a high level of HIF-1α, low level of isoform of nitric oxide synthase, and a reduction in microglial activation were also seen in ischemic focus of hypoxic mice. However, this neuroprotective effect could be blocked by 2-methoxyestradiol, the HIF-1α inhibitor. Our finding suggested that HIF-1α expression was involved in microglial activation in vitro and was regulated by oxygen supply. The microglia were inactivated by re-exposure to hypoxia, which might be due to overexpression of HIF-1α. These results indicated that hypoxic conditions can be exploited to achieve maximum neuroprotection after brain ischemia. This mechanism possibly lies in microglial inactivation through regulation of the expression of HIF-1α.

  16. Neuroprotective effect of melatonin in experimentally induced hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vornicescu, Corina; Boşca, Bianca; Crişan, Doiniţa; Yacoob, Sumaya; Stan, Nora; Filip, Adriana; Şovrea, Alina

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin (MEL) is an endogenous neurohormone with many biological functions, including a powerful antioxidant effect. The aim of the present study was to determine whether MEL protects the brain tissue from the oxidative stress induced by hypobaric hypoxia (HH) in vivo. This study was performed on Wistar rats randomly assigned in four groups, according to the pressure conditions and treatment: Group 1: normoxia and placebo; Group 2: HH and placebo; Group 3: normoxia and MEL; and Group 4: HH and MEL. The following aspects were evaluated: cognitive function (space reference and memory), oxidative stress parameters - serum and brain malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels -, and brain tissue macroscopic and microscopic morphological changes. Exposure to oxidative stress results in cognitive dysfunctions and biochemical alterations: significant increase of MDA and reduction of GSH in both serum and brain tissue. The most important morphological changes were observed in Group 2: increased cellularity, loss of pericellular haloes, shrunken neurons with scanty cytoplasm and hyperchromatic, pyknotic or absent nuclei; reactive gliosis, edema and blood-brain barrier alterations could also be observed in some areas. MEL treatment significantly diminished all these effects. Our results suggest that melatonin is a neuroprotective antioxidant both in normoxia and hypobaric hypoxia that can prevent and counteract the deleterious effects of oxidative stress (neuronal death, reactive astrogliosis, memory impairment and cognitive dysfunctions). Dietary supplements containing melatonin might be useful neuroprotective agents for the therapy of hypoxia-induced consequences.

  17. Computed tomography-estimated specific gravity at hospital admission predicts 6-month outcome in mild-to-moderate traumatic brain injury patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degos, Vincent; Lescot, Thomas; Icke, Christian; Le Manach, Yannick; Fero, Katherin; Sanchez, Paola; Hadiji, Bassem; Zouaoui, Abederrezak; Boch, Anne-Laure; Abdennour, Lamine; Apfel, Christian C; Puybasset, Louis

    2012-05-01

    It is clear that patients with a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) develop secondary, potentially lethal neurological deterioration. However, it is difficult to predict which patients with mild-to-moderate TBI (MM-TBI), even after intensive care unit (ICU) admission, will experience poor outcome at 6 months. Standard computed tomography (CT) imaging scans provide information that can be used to estimate specific gravity (eSG). We have previously demonstrated that higher eSG measurements in the standard CT reading were associated with poor outcomes after severe TBI. The aim of this study was to determine whether eSG of the intracranial content predicts 6-month outcome in MM-TBI. We analyzed admission clinical and CT scan data (including eSG) of 66 patients with MM-TBI subsequently admitted to our neurosurgical ICU. Primary outcome was defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of 1 to 3 after 6 months. Discriminating power (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [ROC-AUC], 95% confidence interval) of eSG to predict 6-month poor outcome was calculated. The correlation of eSG with the main ICU characteristics was then compared. Univariate and stepwise multivariate analyses showed an independent association between eSG and 6-month poor outcome (P = 0.001). ROC-AUC of eSG for the prediction of 6-month outcomes was 0.87 (confidence interval: 0.77-0.96). Admission eSG values were correlated with the main ICU characteristics, specifically 14-day mortality (P = 0.004), length of mechanical ventilation (P = 0.01), length of ICU stay (P = 0.045), and ICU procedures such as intracranial pressure monitoring (P eSG of routine CT scans was correlated with mortality, ICU severity, and predicted 6-month poor outcome. An external validation with studies that include the spectrum of TBI severities is warranted to confirm our results.

  18. Nutrition and exercise can attenuate inflammatory and psychobiological changes in hypoxia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Venticinque Caris

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to hypoxia causes damage in several physiological systems, whose tissues are dependent on the O2 supply. Recently, there has been growing attention on the immunosuppressive and inflammatory potential of the hypoxia, including stimulation, nuclear factor kappa B pathway in macrophages and Th2 response from lymphocytes. These changes may result in transient immunosuppression and happen at the same time to worsening of cognition and other psychobiological aspects. Furthermore, exercise and nutrition, especially glutamine supplementation may provide important role, not pharmacological partially reversing the effects of hypoxia. In fact, recent studies show that moderate exercise can improve cognition in people exposed to hypoxia while the exercise associated with glutamine supplementation can reverse the increase in inflammatory markers and the Th1/Th2 balance. This review aims to bring the light of the discussion about nonpharmacological ways to prevent the effects of hypoxia on the connection between the immune system and the central nervous system.

  19. Hypoxia in atherosclerosis and inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsch, Elke; Sluimer, Judith C.; Daemen, Mat J. A. P.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia triggers various cellular processes, both in physiological and pathological conditions, and has recently also been implicated in atherosclerosis. This review summarizes the recent evidence for the presence and the role of hypoxia in atherosclerosis. Additionally, it will elucidate on hypoxic

  20. Melatonin modulates the fetal cardiovascular defense response to acute hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, Avnesh S; Allison, Beth J; Niu, Youguo; Botting, Kimberley J; Serón-Ferré, Maria; Herrera, Emilio A; Giussani, Dino A

    2015-08-01

    Experimental studies in animal models supporting protective effects on the fetus of melatonin in adverse pregnancy have prompted clinical trials in human pregnancy complicated by fetal growth restriction. However, the effects of melatonin on the fetal defense to acute hypoxia, such as that which may occur during labor, remain unknown. This translational study tested the hypothesis, in vivo, that melatonin modulates the fetal cardiometabolic defense responses to acute hypoxia in chronically instrumented late gestation fetal sheep via alterations in fetal nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Under anesthesia, 6 fetal sheep at 0.85 gestation were instrumented with vascular catheters and a Transonic flow probe around a femoral artery. Five days later, fetuses were exposed to acute hypoxia with or without melatonin treatment. Fetal blood was taken to determine blood gas and metabolic status and plasma catecholamine concentrations. Hypoxia during melatonin treatment was repeated during in vivo NO blockade with the NO clamp. This technique permits blockade of de novo synthesis of NO while compensating for the tonic production of the gas, thereby maintaining basal cardiovascular function. Melatonin suppressed the redistribution of blood flow away from peripheral circulations and the glycemic and plasma catecholamine responses to acute hypoxia. These are important components of the fetal brain sparing response to acute hypoxia. The effects of melatonin involved NO-dependent mechanisms as the responses were reverted by fetal treatment with the NO clamp. Melatonin modulates the in vivo fetal cardiometabolic responses to acute hypoxia by increasing NO bioavailability. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A genetically encoded biosensor for visualising hypoxia responses in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tvisha Misra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cells experience different oxygen concentrations depending on location, organismal developmental stage, and physiological or pathological conditions. Responses to reduced oxygen levels (hypoxia rely on the conserved hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1. Understanding the developmental and tissue-specific responses to changing oxygen levels has been limited by the lack of adequate tools for monitoring HIF-1 in vivo. To visualise and analyse HIF-1 dynamics in Drosophila, we used a hypoxia biosensor consisting of GFP fused to the oxygen-dependent degradation domain (ODD of the HIF-1 homologue Sima. GFP-ODD responds to changing oxygen levels and to genetic manipulations of the hypoxia pathway, reflecting oxygen-dependent regulation of HIF-1 at the single-cell level. Ratiometric imaging of GFP-ODD and a red-fluorescent reference protein reveals tissue-specific differences in the cellular hypoxic status at ambient normoxia. Strikingly, cells in the larval brain show distinct hypoxic states that correlate with the distribution and relative densities of respiratory tubes. We present a set of genetic and image analysis tools that enable new approaches to map hypoxic microenvironments, to probe effects of perturbations on hypoxic signalling, and to identify new regulators of the hypoxia response.

  2. Investigation of changes in brain natriuretic peptide serum levels and its diagnostic value in patients with mild and moderate head trauma, in patients referred to emergency department of Alzahra Hospital, Isfahan, 2013-2014

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Azizkhani; Es'haq Keshavarz

    2016-01-01

    Background: Head trauma is one of the most common reasons for emergency department (ED) care. Over the past decade, initial management strategies in mild and moderate head trauma have become focused on selective computed tomography (CT) use based upon presence or absence of specific aspects of patient history and/or clinical examination which has received more attention following reports of increased cancer risk from CT scans. Recently changes in serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels f...

  3. [Hypoxia and polytrauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottó, S; Janos, S G

    1976-01-01

    The importance of polytrauma and hypoxia, resp., is discussed by the authors with regard to the mortality and the common effect of these is analysed. It was found that in the mortality of the patients suffered polytraumatism the first place (59,4%) is taken by such lesions, in which simultaneous lesion of the skull and the thorax occurs. The values of the blood gas and the acid-base balance of the patients who had suffered polytraumatism, were examined in the 12th--24th hours proceding the death. It was found that whereas--using the possibilities of the intensive therapy--the values of pH, paCO2 and BE could be kept in a part of the cases between the physiological limits--the paO2 value was under the normal value in all cases--moreover 2/3 of the values fell into the domain between 40--60 mmHg--signifying severe hypoxia. On the basis of the analysis it may be presumed that in the process leading to death of the patients who had suffered polytraumatism the anoxic hypoxy plays considerable role. This is supported also by the earlier data published by the institute, according to which the mortality in itself high--33.8%--of polytraumatism increases to 71.4%, if it is associated hypoxy. Consequently the aim of the therapy must be to exert the greatest activity in order to prevent or to combat, resp., the anoxic hypoxy.

  4. Effects of exposure to moderate levels of ethanol during prenatal brain development on dendritic length, branching, and spine density in the nucleus accumbens and dorsal striatum of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, James P; Suggs, Lisa E; Lusk, Alexandra V; Parker, Matthew O; Candelaria-Cook, Felicha T; Akers, Katherine G; Savage, Daniel D; Hamilton, Derek A

    2012-09-01

    Reductions in measures of dendritic morphology in the agranular insular cortex have been identified as consequences of prenatal exposure to moderate levels of ethanol in the rat. Motivated by the strong connectivity between this region of frontal cortex and the striatum and a growing body of data linking specific components of the mesocortical/limbic system to effects of ethanol and ethanol self-administration, the current study investigated the effects of moderate fetal ethanol exposure on the dendritic morphology of medium spiny neurons (MSNs) in several regions of the striatum. Throughout gestation, pregnant rat dams either consumed a saccharin solution (control) or achieved average daily blood ethanol concentrations of 84 mg% via voluntary consumption of a 5% ethanol solution. The brains of adult male offspring were extracted and processed for Golgi-Cox staining. MSNs from the dorsomedial striatum, dorsolateral striatum and the nucleus accumbens core and shell were sampled for analysis. Relative to saccharin controls, robust reductions in dendritic length and branching, but not spine density, were observed in the shell of the nucleus accumbens in fetal-ethanol-exposed rats. No significant prenatal ethanol effects were found in the other regions of the striatum. These findings suggest that exposure to moderate levels of ethanol in utero can have profound effects on brain regions related to reward processing and provide possible clues relevant to understanding increased self-administration of drugs of abuse in animals exposed to ethanol during brain development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Nitrate intake promotes shift in muscle fiber type composition during sprint interval training in hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    De Smet, S; Van Thienen, R; Deldicque, L; James, R; Sale, C; Bishop, DJ; Hespel, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the effect of sprint interval training (SIT) in normoxia, vs. SIT in hypoxia alone or in conjunction with oral nitrate intake, on buffering capacity of homogenized muscle (βhm) and fiber type distribution, as well as on sprint and endurance performance. Methods: Twenty-seven moderately-trained participants were allocated to one of three experimental groups: SIT in normoxia (20.9% FiO2) + placebo (N), SIT in hypoxia (15% FiO2) + placebo (H), or SIT in hypoxia + nitr...

  6. Blunted neuronal calcium response to hypoxia in naked mole-rat hippocampus.

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    Bethany L Peterson

    Full Text Available Naked mole-rats are highly social and strictly subterranean rodents that live in large communal colonies in sealed and chronically oxygen-depleted burrows. Brain slices from naked mole-rats show extreme tolerance to hypoxia compared to slices from other mammals, as indicated by maintenance of synaptic transmission under more hypoxic conditions and three fold longer latency to anoxic depolarization. A key factor in determining whether or not the cellular response to hypoxia is reversible or leads to cell death may be the elevation of intracellular calcium concentration. In the present study, we used fluorescent imaging techniques to measure relative intracellular calcium changes in CA1 pyramidal cells of hippocampal slices during hypoxia. We found that calcium accumulation during hypoxia was significantly and substantially attenuated in slices from naked mole-rats compared to slices from laboratory mice. This was the case for both neonatal (postnatal day 6 and older (postnatal day 20 age groups. Furthermore, while both species demonstrated more calcium accumulation at older ages, the older naked mole-rats showed a smaller calcium accumulation response than even the younger mice. A blunted intracellular calcium response to hypoxia may contribute to the extreme hypoxia tolerance of naked mole-rat neurons. The results are discussed in terms of a general hypothesis that a very prolonged or arrested developmental process may allow adult naked mole-rat brain to retain the hypoxia tolerance normally only seen in neonatal mammals.

  7. Blunted neuronal calcium response to hypoxia in naked mole-rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Bethany L; Larson, John; Buffenstein, Rochelle; Park, Thomas J; Fall, Christopher P

    2012-01-01

    Naked mole-rats are highly social and strictly subterranean rodents that live in large communal colonies in sealed and chronically oxygen-depleted burrows. Brain slices from naked mole-rats show extreme tolerance to hypoxia compared to slices from other mammals, as indicated by maintenance of synaptic transmission under more hypoxic conditions and three fold longer latency to anoxic depolarization. A key factor in determining whether or not the cellular response to hypoxia is reversible or leads to cell death may be the elevation of intracellular calcium concentration. In the present study, we used fluorescent imaging techniques to measure relative intracellular calcium changes in CA1 pyramidal cells of hippocampal slices during hypoxia. We found that calcium accumulation during hypoxia was significantly and substantially attenuated in slices from naked mole-rats compared to slices from laboratory mice. This was the case for both neonatal (postnatal day 6) and older (postnatal day 20) age groups. Furthermore, while both species demonstrated more calcium accumulation at older ages, the older naked mole-rats showed a smaller calcium accumulation response than even the younger mice. A blunted intracellular calcium response to hypoxia may contribute to the extreme hypoxia tolerance of naked mole-rat neurons. The results are discussed in terms of a general hypothesis that a very prolonged or arrested developmental process may allow adult naked mole-rat brain to retain the hypoxia tolerance normally only seen in neonatal mammals.

  8. Comparing the effect of hypercapnia and hypoxia on the electroencephalogram during wakefulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David; Yee, Brendon J; Wong, Keith K; Kim, Jong Won; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Duffin, James; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia has been postulated as a key mechanism for neurocognitive impairment in sleep-disordered breathing. However, the effect of hypoxia on the electroencephalogram (EEG) is not clear. We examined quantitative EEG recordings from 20 normal volunteers under three 5-min ventilatory control protocols: progressive hypercapnia with iso-hyperoxia (pO2=150mmHg) (Protocol 1), progressive hypercapnia with iso-hypoxia (pO2=50mmHg) (Protocol 2), and progressive hypoxia with a CO2 scrubber in the circuit (Protocol 3). Each protocol started with a 5-min session of breathing room air as baseline. In Protocol 1, compared to its baseline, iso-hyperoxia hypercapnia led to a lower Alpha% and higher Delta/Alpha (D/A) ratio. Similarly, in Protocol 2, the iso-hypoxia hypercapnia induced a higher Delta%, a lower Alpha% and higher D/A ratio. No difference was found in any EEG spectral band including the D/A ratio when Protocols 1 & 2 were compared. In Protocol 3, the Delta%, Alpha% and D/A ratio recorded during hypoxia were not significantly different from baseline. We found that hypercapnia, but not hypoxia, may play a key role in slowing of the EEG in healthy humans. Hypercapnia may be a greater influence than hypoxia on brain neuroelectrical activities. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Alterations in Cortical Thickness and White Matter Integrity in Mild-to-Moderate Communicating Hydrocephalic School-Aged Children Measured by Whole-Brain Cortical Thickness Mapping and DTI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyu Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Follow-up observation is required for mild-to-moderate hydrocephalic patients because of the potential damage to brain. However, effects of mild-to-moderate hydrocephalus on gray and white matter remain unclear in vivo. Using structural MRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, current study compared the cortical thickness and white matter integrity between children with mild-to-moderate communicating hydrocephalus and healthy controls. The relationships between cortical changes and intelligence quota were also examined in patients. We found that cortical thickness in the left middle temporal and left rostral middle frontal gyrus was significantly lower in the hydrocephalus group compared with that of controls. Fractional anisotropy in the right corpus callosum body was significantly lower in the hydrocephalus group compared with that of controls. In addition, there was no association of cortical thinning or white matter fractional anisotropy with intelligence quota in either group. Thus, our findings provide clues to that mild-to-moderate hydrocephalus could lead to structural brain deficits especially in the middle temporal and middle frontal gyrus prior to the behavior changes.

  10. Coastal hypoxia and sediment biogeochemistry

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    J. J. Middelburg

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The intensity, duration and frequency of coastal hypoxia (oxygen concentration <63 μM are increasing due to human alteration of coastal ecosystems and changes in oceanographic conditions due to global warming. Here we provide a concise review of the consequences of coastal hypoxia for sediment biogeochemistry. Changes in bottom-water oxygen levels have consequences for early diagenetic pathways (more anaerobic at expense of aerobic pathways, the efficiency of re-oxidation of reduced metabolites and the nature, direction and magnitude of sediment-water exchange fluxes. Hypoxia may also lead to more organic matter accumulation and burial and the organic matter eventually buried is also of higher quality, i.e. less degraded. Bottom-water oxygen levels also affect the organisms involved in organic matter processing with the contribution of metazoans decreasing as oxygen levels drop. Hypoxia has a significant effect on benthic animals with the consequences that ecosystem functions related to macrofauna such as bio-irrigation and bioturbation are significantly affected by hypoxia as well. Since many microbes and microbial-mediated biogeochemical processes depend on animal-induced transport processes (e.g. re-oxidation of particulate reduced sulphur and denitrification, there are indirect hypoxia effects on biogeochemistry via the benthos. Severe long-lasting hypoxia and anoxia may result in the accumulation of reduced compounds in sediments and elimination of macrobenthic communities with the consequences that biogeochemical properties during trajectories of decreasing and increasing oxygen may be different (hysteresis with consequences for coastal ecosystem dynamics.

  11. Bcl-2 family members make different contributions to cell death in hypoxia and/or hyperoxia in rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoming; Qiu, Jingxin; Grafe, Marjorie R; Rea, Harriett C; Rassin, David K; Perez-Polo, J Regino

    2003-11-01

    Hypoxic brain injury during fetal or neonatal development leads to damaged immature neurons and can result in cognitive or behavioral dysfunction. Hyperoxia therapy (treatment with oxygen) is commonly applied to infants with signs of perinatal hypoxia-anoxia. Both hypoxia and hyperoxia have been shown to result in apoptosis in the brains of rats in several animal models. One determinant of cellular commitment to cell death is the differential expression of the Bcl-2 family of proteins in response to trauma. Here, we characterize cell death and the expression of Bcl-2 homologous proteins in 7-day-old neonatal rat cerebral cortex after hypoxia (5% O(2) for 40 min) and/or hyperoxia (>95% O(2) for 2 h after hypoxia). The expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L), two anti-apoptotic proteins, decreased at 24 h after hypoxia. Bcl-X(L) increased after either hyperoxia or hypoxia+hyperoxia. We did not detect significant changes in the cytoplasmic levels of pro-apoptotic protein Bax after any of these three treatments. Using cell death ELISA and DNA FragEL assays, we observed increased cell death at 24h after hypoxia, hyperoxia or hypoxia+hyperoxia treatments. At 24 h after either hypoxia, hyperoxia or hypoxia+hyperoxia, caspase 3 activity also increased significantly. Our results suggest that both hypoxia and hyperoxia alone can induce cell death. The Bcl-2 --> cytochrome c --> caspase 3 pathway played a role in hypoxia-induced cell death, while other pathways may be involved in hyperoxia-induced cell death.

  12. Mathematical Model of HIF-1 alpha Pathway, Oxygen Transport and Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    sensory organ for detecting arterial blood O2 levels and mediating systemic cardiac, vascular and respiratory responses to hypoxia. Carotid body (CB...tissue response. Blood O2 (Hypoxia) Carotid Body HIF1,2α Signaling Sensory Output Compensatory Physiological Response Brain HIF1,2α...potentiation (LTP) and memory formation (Lynch, 2010), potentially leading to the observed cognitive issues in U-2 pilots (McGuire et al., 2014) (see Figure 13

  13. Disruption of the Serotonergic System after Neonatal Hypoxia-Ischemia in a Rodent Model

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    Kathryn M. Buller

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying which specific neuronal phenotypes are vulnerable to neonatal hypoxia-ischemia, where in the brain they are damaged, and the mechanisms that produce neuronal losses are critical to determine the anatomical substrates responsible for neurological impairments in hypoxic-ischemic brain-injured neonates. Here we describe our current work investigating how the serotonergic network in the brain is disrupted in a rodent model of preterm hypoxia-ischemia. One week after postnatal day 3 hypoxia-ischemia, losses of serotonergic raphé neurons, reductions in serotonin levels in the brain, and reduced serotonin transporter expression are evident. These changes can be prevented using two anti-inflammatory interventions; the postinsult administration of minocycline or ibuprofen. However, each drug has its own limitations and benefits for use in neonates to stem damage to the serotonergic network after hypoxia-ischemia. By understanding the fundamental mechanisms underpinning hypoxia-ischemia-induced serotonergic damage we will hopefully move closer to developing a successful clinical intervention to treat neonatal brain injury.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of the spalax hypoxia survival response includes suppression of apoptosis and tight control of angiogenesis

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    Malik Assaf

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of complex responses to hypoxia has played a key role in the evolution of mammals, as inadequate response to this condition is frequently associated with cardiovascular diseases, developmental disorders, and cancers. Though numerous studies have used mice and rats in order to explore mechanisms that contribute to hypoxia tolerance, these studies are limited due to the high sensitivity of most rodents to severe hypoxia. The blind subterranean mole rat Spalax is a hypoxia tolerant rodent, which exhibits unique longevity and therefore has invaluable potential in hypoxia and cancer research. Results Using microarrays, transcript abundance was measured in brain and muscle tissues from Spalax and rat individuals exposed to acute and chronic hypoxia for varying durations. We found that Spalax global gene expression response to hypoxia differs from that of rat and is characterized by the activation of functional groups of genes that have not been strongly associated with the response to hypoxia in hypoxia sensitive mammals. Using functional enrichment analysis of Spalax hypoxia induced genes we found highly significant overrepresentation of groups of genes involved in anti apoptosis, cancer, embryonic/sexual development, epidermal growth factor receptor binding, coordinated suppression and activation of distinct groups of transcription factors and membrane receptors, in addition to angiogenic related processes. We also detected hypoxia induced increases of different critical Spalax hub gene transcripts, including antiangiogenic genes associated with cancer tolerance in Down syndrome human individuals. Conclusions This is the most comprehensive study of Spalax large scale gene expression response to hypoxia to date, and the first to use custom Spalax microarrays. Our work presents novel patterns that may underlie mechanisms with critical importance to the evolution of hypoxia tolerance, with special relevance to

  15. The effect of hypobaric hypoxia on multichannel EEG signal complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadelis, Christos; Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Bamidis, Panagiotis D; Maglaveras, Nikos; Pappas, Konstantinos

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was the development and evaluation of nonlinear electroencephalography parameters which assess hypoxia-induced EEG alterations, and describe the temporal characteristics of different hypoxic levels' residual effect upon the brain electrical activity. Multichannel EEG, pO2, pCO2, ECG, and respiration measurements were recorded from 10 subjects exposed to three experimental conditions (100% oxygen, hypoxia, recovery) at three-levels of reduced barometric pressure. The mean spectral power of EEG under each session and altitude were estimated for the standard bands. Approximate Entropy (ApEn) of EEG segments was calculated, and the ApEn's time-courses were smoothed by a moving average filter. On the smoothed diagrams, parameters were defined. A significant increase in total power and power of theta and alpha bands was observed during hypoxia. Visual interpretation of ApEn time-courses revealed a characteristic pattern (decreasing during hypoxia and recovering after oxygen re-administration). The introduced qEEG parameters S1 and K1 distinguished successfully the three hypoxic conditions. The introduced parameters based on ApEn time-courses are assessing reliably and effectively the different hypoxic levels. ApEn decrease may be explained by neurons' functional isolation due to hypoxia since decreased complexity corresponds to greater autonomy of components, although this interpretation should be further supported by electrocorticographic animal studies. The introduced qEEG parameters seem to be appropriate for assessing the hypoxia-related neurophysiological state of patients in the hyperbaric chambers in the treatment of decompression sickness, carbon dioxide poisoning, and mountaineering.

  16. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat

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    Nikolaus Netzer

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators.

  17. [Reduction in hypoxia-derived neuroinflammation and dysfunctional glutamate transporters by minocycline may restore hypoxia-injured cognition of neonatal rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong-Chun; Xiao, Jie; Huang, Yi-Long; Li, Long-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Huang, Li-Xuan; Yang, Ting; Yang, Ling; Li, Fan

    2016-04-25

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of minocycline on cognitive functions in neonatal rat after hypoxia exposure and the underlying mechanism. A model of hypoxic brain damage (HBD) was developed by exposing postnatal 1 day (P1) rats to systemic hypoxia. The rats were intraperitoneally injected with normal saline (Hy group) or minocycline (Hy + M group) 2 h after hypoxia exposure. Some other P1 rats that were not subjected to systemic hypoxia were used as normal control (NG group). The Y-maze test was used to evaluate learning and memory ability on postnatal day 30. Inflammatory mediators (Iba-1, IL-1β, TNF-α and TGF-β1), glutamate transporters (EAAT1 and EAAT2), total Tau and phosphorylated Tau (phosphorylation sites: Tyr18, Thr205, Thr231, Ser396 and Ser404) protein expressions in the hippocampus were detected by Western blot 7 d after hypoxic exposure. The results showed that hypoxia induced learning and memory impairments of the neonatal rats, and minocycline administration could reverse the effects of hypoxia. The protein expression levels of Iba-1, IL-1β, TNF-α, EAAT2 and Tau phosphorylated at T231 were increased, but the total Tau expression was decreased in the hippocampus of the rats from Hy group 7 d after hypoxia exposure. In the hypoxia-treated rats, minocycline down-regulated Iba-1, IL-1β, TNF-α and EAAT2 protein expressions significantly, but did not affect total Tau and phosphorylated Tau protein expressions. Our results suggest that minocycline can prevent cognitive deficits of rats with hypoxia exposure, and the underlying mechanism may involve the inhibition of neuroinflammation and dysfunctional glutamate transporters but not the regulation of the Tau hyperphosphorylation.

  18. Nitric oxide in the rat cerebellum after hypoxia/ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, José; Fernández, Ana Patricia; Alonso, David; Serrano, Julia; Fernández-Vizarra, Paula; Martínez-Murillo, Ricardo; Bentura, María Luisa; Martinez, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide is a regulatory biological substance and an important intracellular messenger that acts as a specific mediator of various neuropathological disorders. In mammals and invertebrates, nitric oxide is synthesized from L-arginine in the central and peripheral neural structures by the endothelial, neuronal and inducible enzymatic isoforms of nitric oxide synthase. Nitric oxide may affect the function of various neurotransmitter-specific systems, and is involved in neuromodulation, reproductive function, immune response, and regulation of the cerebral blood circulation. This makes nitric oxide the main candidate in brain responses to brain ischemia/hypoxia. The cerebellum has been reported to be the area of the brain that has the highest nitric oxide synthase activity and the highest concentration of glutamate and aspartate. By glutamate receptors and physiological action of nitric oxide, cyclic guanisine-5'-monophosphate may be rapidly increased. The cerebellum significantly differs with respect to ischemia and hypoxia, this response being directly related to the duration and intensity of the injury. The cerebellum could cover the eventual need for nitric oxide during the hypoxia, boosting the nitric oxide synthase activity, but overall ischemia would require de novo protein synthesis, activating the inducible nitric oxide synthase to cope with the new situation. The specific inhibitors of nitric oxide synthesis show neuroprotective effects.

  19. Moderators, Mediators, and Nonspecific Predictors of Treatment Outcome in an Intervention for Everyday Task Improvement in Persons With Executive Deficits After Brain Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertens, D.; Fasotti, L.; Boelen, D.H.E.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify moderators, mediators, and predictors of everyday task performance after an experimental combination of errorless learning and goal management training. DESIGN: Predictor analysis of a randomized controlled intervention trial. SETTING: Outpatient rehabilitation centers.

  20. Moderators, mediators, and nonspecific predictors of treatment outcome in an intervention for everyday task improvement in persons with executive deficits after brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertens, D.; Fasotti, L.; Boelen, D.H.E.; Kessels, R.P.C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify moderators, mediators, and predictors of everyday task performance after an experimental combination of errorless learning and goal management training. DESIGN: Predictor analysis of a randomized controlled intervention trial. SETTING: Outpatient rehabilitation

  1. Hypobaric intermittent hypoxia attenuates hypoxia-induced depressor response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Cui

    Full Text Available Hypobaric intermittent hypoxia (HIH produces many favorable effects in the cardiovascular system such as anti-hypertensive effect. In this study, we showed that HIH significantly attenuated a depressor response induced by acute hypoxia.Sprague-Dawley rats received HIH in a hypobaric chamber simulating an altitude of 5000 m. The artery blood pressure (ABP, heart rate (HR and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA were recorded in anesthetized control rats and rats received HIH. The baseline ABP, HR and RSNA were not different between HIH and control rats. Acute hypoxia-induced decrease in ABP was significantly attenuated in HIH rat compared with control rats. However, acute hypoxia-induced increases in HR and RSNA were greater in HIH rat than in control rats. After removal of bilateral ascending depressor nerves, acute hypoxia-induced depressor and sympathoexcitatory responses were comparable in control and HIH rats. Furthermore, acute hypoxia-induced depressor and sympathoexcitatory responses did not differ between control and HIH groups after blocking ATP-dependent K(+ channels by glibenclamide. The baroreflex function evaluated by intravenous injection of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside was markedly augmented in HIH rats compared with control rats. The pressor and sympathoexcitatory responses evoked by intravenous injection of cyanide potassium were also significantly greater in HIH rats than in control rats.Our findings suggest that HIH suppresses acute hypoxia-induced depressor response through enhancement of baroreflex and chemoreflex function, which involves activation of ATP-dependent K(+ channels. This study provides new information and underlying mechanism on the beneficiary effect of HIH on maintaining cardiovascular homeostasis.

  2. Molecular and biochemical responses of hypoxia exposure in Atlantic croaker collected from hypoxic regions in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Md Saydur; Thomas, Peter

    2017-01-01

    A major impact of global climate change has been the marked increase worldwide in the incidence of coastal hypoxia (dissolved oxygen, DOhypoxic waters as well as their molecular and physiological responses to environmental hypoxia exposure are largely unknown. A suite of potential hypoxia exposure biomarkers was evaluated in Atlantic croaker collected from hypoxic and normoxic regions in the northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM), and in croaker after laboratory exposure to hypoxia (DO: 1.7 mg l-1). Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-α, hif-α; neuronal nitric oxide synthase, nNOS; and insulin-like growth factor binding protein, igfbp mRNAs and protein carbonyl (PC, an oxidative stress indicator) content were elevated several-fold in brain and liver tissues of croaker collected from nGOM hypoxic sites. All of these molecular and biochemical biomarkers were also upregulated ~3-10-fold in croaker brain and liver tissues within 1-2 days of hypoxia exposure in controlled laboratory experiments. These results suggest that hif-αs, nNOS and igfbp-1 transcripts and PC contents are useful biomarkers of environmental hypoxia exposure and some of its physiological effects, making them important components for improved assessments of long-term impacts of environmental hypoxia on fish populations.

  3. Serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase distinguish mild traumatic brain injury from trauma controls and are elevated in mild and moderate traumatic brain injury patients with intracranial lesions and neurosurgical intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Linda; Lewis, Lawrence M; Silvestri, Salvatore; Falk, Jay L; Giordano, Philip; Brophy, Gretchen M; Demery, Jason A; Liu, Ming Cheng; Mo, Jixiang; Akinyi, Linnet; Mondello, Stefania; Schmid, Kara; Robertson, Claudia S; Tortella, Frank C; Hayes, Ronald L; Wang, Kevin K W

    2012-05-01

    This study compared early serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH-L1) from patients with mild and moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) with uninjured and injured controls and examined their association with traumatic intracranial lesions on computed tomography (CT) scan (CT positive) and the need for neurosurgical intervention (NSI). This prospective cohort study enrolled adult patients presenting to three tertiary care Level I trauma centers after blunt head trauma with loss of consciousness, amnesia, or disorientation and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score 9 to 15. Control groups included normal uninjured controls and nonhead injured trauma controls presenting to the emergency department with orthopedic injuries or motor vehicle crash without TBI. Blood samples were obtained in all trauma patients within 4 hours of injury and measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for UCH-L1 (ng/mL ± standard error of the mean). There were 295 patients enrolled, 96 TBI patients (86 with GCS score 13-15 and 10 with GCS score 9-12), and 199 controls (176 uninjured, 16 motor vehicle crash controls, and 7 orthopedic controls). The AUC for distinguishing TBI from uninjured controls was 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-0.92) and for distinguishing those TBIs with GCS score 15 from controls was AUC 0.87 (95% CI, 0.81-0.93). Mean UCH-L1 levels in patients with CT negative versus CT positive were 0.620 (± 0.254) and 1.618 (± 0.474), respectively (p < 0.001), and the AUC was 0.73 (95% CI, 0.62-0.84). For patients without and with NSI, levels were 0.627 (0.218) versus 2.568 (0.854; p < 0.001), and the AUC was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.76-0.94). UCH-L1 is detectable in serum within an hour of injury and is associated with measures of injury severity including the GCS score, CT lesions, and NSI. Further study is required to validate these findings before clinical application. II, prognostic study.

  4. Carvedilol abrogates hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in microglial BV2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiujuan; Wu, Bin; Fu, Zhijian; Zhang, Zongwang; Xu, Guangjun

    2017-11-05

    Microglia initially undergo rapid activation in response to injury and stressful stimuli, such as hypoxia. Oxidative stress and the inflammatory response play critical roles in hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Carvedilol is a β-blocker used to treat high blood pressure and heart failure. In this study, we investigated whether carvedilol had a protective effect against hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and inflammation in microglial BV2 cells. Our results indicate that hypoxic exposure significantly reduced mean cell viability of BV2 microglia, which was significantly restored by carvedilol (10 and 50μM). In addition, carvedilol treatment significantly inhibited the hypoxia-induced increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE). Administration of carvedilol significantly inhibited expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Mechanistically, we found that hypoxia significantly increased phosphorylation of IKK, IκBα, and NF-κB p65. However, treatment with carvedilol inhibited phosphorylation of these molecules. Notably, hypoxia resulted in a significant nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65, which was inhibited by administration of carvedilol. Luciferase reporter assay results demonstrate that treatment with carvedilol inhibited the hypoxia-induced increase in NF-κB binding activity. These data suggest that carvedilol may be of potential use as a novel therapy against hypoxia or ischemia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Apolipoprotein E-deficient mice exhibit increased vulnerability to intermittent hypoxia-induced spatial learning deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirandish, Leila; Row, Barry W; Li, Richard C; Brittian, Kenneth R; Gozal, David

    2005-11-01

    Exposure to intermittent hypoxia, such as occurs in sleep-disordered breathing, is associated with oxidative stress, cognitive impairments, and increased neuronal apoptosis in brain regions involved in learning and memory. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders, and in vitro studies suggest that one of the functions of ApoE may be to confer protection from oxidant stress-induced neuronal cell loss. Therefore, we hypothesized that ApoE-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice would display increased cognitive impairments following intermittent hypoxia. Twenty-four young adult male mice (ApoE-/-) and 24 wild-type littermates (ApoE +/+) were exposed to 14 days of normoxia (room air; n=12 per group) or intermittent hypoxia (5.7% O2 alternating with 21% O2 every 90 seconds, 12 daylight hours per day; n=12 per group). Behavioral testing consisting of a standard place-training reference memory task in the water maze revealed that ApoE+/+ and ApoE-/- mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia were found to require significantly longer times (latency) and distances (pathlength) to locate the hidden platform (P hypoxia-exposed ApoE-/- mice were impaired on the final two days of training (P E2 and malondiadehyde concentrations were present in hippocampal brain tissues following intermittent hypoxia but were significantly higher in ApoE-/- mice (P breathing and may underlie the increased prevalence of Apolipoprotein E4 in patients with sleep-disordered breathing.

  6. Hypoxic pretreatment protects against neuronal damage of the rat hippocampus induced by severe hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgias, N; Maidatsi, P; Tsolaki, M; Alvanou, A; Kiriazis, G; Kaidoglou, K; Giala, M

    1996-04-01

    The present study investigates whether under conditions of successive hypoxic exposures pretreatment with mild (15% O(2)) or moderate (10% O(2)) hypoxia, protects hippocampal neurones against damage induced by severe (3% O(2)) hypoxia. The ultrastructural findings were also correlated with regional superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity changes. In unpretreated rats severe hypoxia induced ultrastructural changes consistent with the aspects of delayed neuronal death (DND). However, in preexposed animals hippocampal damage was attenuated in an inversely proportional way with the severity of the hypoxic pretreatment. The ultrastructural hypoxic tolerance findings were also closely related to increased regional SOD activity levels. Thus the activation of the endogenous antioxidant defense by hypoxic preconditioning, protects against hippocampal damage induced by severe hypoxia. The eventual contribution of increased endogenous adenosine and/or reduced excitotoxicity to induce hypoxic tolerance is discussed.

  7. 12TH Biennial International Hypoxia Symposium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roach, Robert

    2001-01-01

    The International Hypoxia Symposia (IHS) meet every other year to bring together international experts from many fields to focus on and discuss the state of the art in normal and pathophysiological responses to hypoxia...

  8. Physiological determinants of human acute hypoxia tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    AbstractIntroduction. We investigated possible physiological determinants of variability in hypoxia tolerance in subjects given a 5-minute normobaric exposure to 25,000 ft equivalent. Physiological tolerance to hypoxia was defined as the magnitude of...

  9. Mitochondrial complex I deactivation is related to superoxide production in acute hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Hernansanz-Agustín

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria use oxygen as the final acceptor of the respiratory chain, but its incomplete reduction can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS, especially superoxide. Acute hypoxia produces a superoxide burst in different cell types, but the triggering mechanism is still unknown. Herein, we show that complex I is involved in this superoxide burst under acute hypoxia in endothelial cells. We have also studied the possible mechanisms by which complex I could be involved in this burst, discarding reverse electron transport in complex I and the implication of PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1. We show that complex I transition from the active to ‘deactive’ form is enhanced by acute hypoxia in endothelial cells and brain tissue, and we suggest that it can trigger ROS production through its Na+/H+ antiporter activity. These results highlight the role of complex I as a key actor in redox signalling in acute hypoxia.

  10. Moderate whisky consumption in combination with an evening meal reduces tryptophan availability to the brain but does not influence performance in healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markus, C.R.; Sierksma, A.; Verbeek, C.; Rooijen, J.J.M. van; Patel, H.J.; Brand, A.N.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2004-01-01

    Brain serotonin (5-HT) synthesis is controlled by nutrients that influence the availability of plasma tryptophan (Trp) as compared with the sum of the other large neutral amino acids (LNAA; Trp:LNAA). Alcohol consumption is found to change mood and performance and this might well be due to

  11. Hypoxia: Exposure Time Until Significant Performance Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-07

    1994). Acute hypoxia fails to influence two aspects of short-term memory : implications for the source of cognitive deficits. Aviation, Space...Naval Medical Research Unit Dayton HYPOXIA : EXPOSURE TIME UNTIL SIGNIFICANT PERFORMANCE EFFECTS PHILLIPS, J.P., DRUMMOND, L.A...Andrews, CAPT, MSC, USN Commanding Officer i 1 ARTICLE TYPE: Research Article TITLE: Hypoxia : Exposure Time Until Significant Performance

  12. [Effects of the prenatal hypoxia on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function and working memory in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiul'kova, E I; Vataeva, L A; Glushchenko, T S; Pivina, S G

    2013-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the effects of severe hypobaric hypoxia in different prenatal periods on expression profiles of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) in dorsal (CA1) and ventral (dental gyrus) hippocampus and neocortex of rats, their stress reactivity and working memory has been performed in the present study for the first time. According to the data obtained, severe hypoxia in the prenatal period induces remarkable disturbances of GR expression in the neurons of neocortex of adult males but not females, that correlates to the disruption of working memory in adult males exposed to hypoxia on the prenatal 14-16th days. Elevation of stress plasma corticosterone levels have been observed only in the females subjected to hypoxia on the prenatal 17-19th days. Hypoxia in the females and males results in the differential changes in functions of hippocampus, as well as of other brain areas involved in learning.

  13. Systemic Hypoxia Changes the Organ-Specific Distribution of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor and Its Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Hugo H.; Risau, Werner

    1998-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a key role in physiological blood vessel formation and pathological angiogenesis such as tumor growth and ischemic diseases. Hypoxia is a potent inducer of VEGF in vitro. Here we demonstrate that VEGF is induced in vivo by exposing mice to systemic hypoxia. VEGF induction was highest in brain, but also occurred in kidney, testis, lung, heart, and liver. In situ hybridization analysis revealed that a distinct subset of cells within a given organ, such as glial cells and neurons in brain, tubular cells in kidney, and Sertoli cells in testis, responded to the hypoxic stimulus with an increase in VEGF expression. Surprisingly, however, other cells at sites of constitutive VEGF expression in normal adult tissues, such as epithelial cells in the choroid plexus and kidney glomeruli, decreased VEGF expression in response to the hypoxic stimulus. Furthermore, in addition to VEGF itself, expression of VEGF receptor-1 (VEGFR-1), but not VEGFR-2, was induced by hypoxia in endothelial cells of lung, heart, brain, kidney, and liver. VEGF itself was never found to be up-regulated in endothelial cells under hypoxic conditions, consistent with its paracrine action during normoxia. Our results show that the response to hypoxia in vivo is differentially regulated at the level of specific cell types or layers in certain organs. In these tissues, up- or down-regulation of VEGF and VEGFR-1 during hypoxia may influence their oxygenation after angiogenesis or modulate vascular permeability.

  14. Coastal hypoxia responses to remediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, W. M.; Testa, J. M.; Conley, D. J.; Gilbert, D.; Hagy, J. D.

    2009-07-01

    The incidence and intensity of hypoxic waters in coastal aquatic ecosystems has been expanding in recent decades coincident with eutrophication of the coastal zone. Because of the negative effects hypoxia has on many organisms, extensive efforts have been made to reduce the size and duration of hypoxia in many coastal waters. Although it has been broadly assumed that reductions in nutrient loading rates would reverse eutrophication and consequently, hypoxia, recent analyses of historical data from European and North American coastal systems suggest little evidence for simple linear response trajectories. We review existing data, analyses, and models that relate variations in the extent and intensity of hypoxia to changes in loading rates for inorganic nutrients and labile organic matter. We also assess existing knowledge of physical and ecological factors regulating oxygen in coastal marine waters and examine a broad range of examples where hypoxia responses to reductions in nutrient (or organic matter) inputs have been documented. Of the 22 systems identified where concurrent time series of loading and O2 were available, half displayed relatively clear and direct recoveries following remediation. We explored in detail 5 well-studied systems that have exhibited complex, non-linear responses to loading, including apparent "regime shifts." A summary of these analyses suggests that O2 conditions improved rapidly and linearly in systems where remediation focused on organic inputs from sewage plants, which were the primary drivers of hypoxia. In larger more open systems where diffuse nutrient loads are more important in fueling O2 depletion and where climatic influences are pronounced, responses to remediation tend to follow non-linear trends that may include hysteresis and time-lags. Improved understanding of hypoxia remediation requires that future studies use comparative approaches and consider multiple regulating factors including: (1) the dominant temporal scales

  15. Functional and anatomical evidence of cerebral tissue hypoxia in young sickle cell anemia mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, Lindsay S; Gazdzinski, Lisa M; Tsui, Albert Ky; Zhou, Yu-Qing; Portnoy, Sharon; Liu, Elaine; Mazer, C David; Hare, Gregory Mt; Kassner, Andrea; Sled, John G

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia is a significant source of morbidity in children with sickle cell anemia; however, the mechanism of injury is poorly understood. Increased cerebral blood flow and low hemoglobin levels in children with sickle cell anemia are associated with increased stroke risk, suggesting that anemia-induced tissue hypoxia may be an important factor contributing to subsequent morbidity. To better understand the pathophysiology of brain injury, brain physiology and morphology were characterized in a transgenic mouse model, the Townes sickle cell model. Relative to age-matched controls, sickle cell anemia mice demonstrated: (1) decreased brain tissue pO 2 and increased expression of hypoxia signaling protein in the perivascular regions of the cerebral cortex; (2) elevated basal cerebral blood flow , consistent with adaptation to anemia-induced tissue hypoxia; (3) significant reduction in cerebrovascular blood flow reactivity to a hypercapnic challenge; (4) increased diameter of the carotid artery; and (5) significant volume changes in white and gray matter regions in the brain, as assessed by ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging. Collectively, these findings support the hypothesis that brain tissue hypoxia contributes to adaptive physiological and anatomic changes in Townes sickle cell mice. These findings may help define the pathophysiology for stroke in children with sickle cell anemia.

  16. Hypoxia Induces Internalization of κ-Opioid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Chunhua; Liang, Xuan; Chen, Chunhua; Babazada, Hasan; Li, Tianzuo; Liu, Renyu

    2017-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that κ-opioid receptor agonists can reduce hypoxia-ischemia brain injury in animal models. However, it is unclear how the κ-opioid receptor responds to hypoxia-ischemia. In the current study, the authors used an in vitro model of oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation to explore how κ-opioid receptors respond to hypoxia and reoxygenation. Mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2A cells were stably transfected with mouse κ-opioid receptor-tdTomato fusion protein or Flag-tagged mouse κ-opioid receptor, divided into several groups (n = 6 to 12), and used to investigate the κ-opioid receptor movement. Observations were performed under normal oxygen, at 30 min to 1 h after oxygen-glucose deprivation and at 1 h after reoxygenation using high-resolution imaging techniques including immunoelectronmicroscopy in the presence and absence of κ-opioid receptor antagonist, dynamin inhibitors, potassium channel blockers, and dopamine receptor inhibitor. Hypoxic conditions caused the κ-opioid receptor to be internalized into the cells. Inhibition of dynamin by Dyngo-4a prevented the receptor internalization. Interestingly, a specific κ-opioid receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine blocked internalization, suggesting the involvement of activation of a specific κ-opioid receptor. κ-Opioid receptor internalization appears to be reversed by reoxygenation. Quantities of intracellular κ-opioid receptor-associated gold particles as demonstrated by immunoelectron microscopy were increased from 37 to 85% (P internalization. Hypoxia induces reversible κ-opioid receptor internalization, which was inhibited by selective κ-opioid receptor antagonists or dynamin inhibitor, and can be reversed by reoxygenation in neuroblastoma cells, indicating the modulating effects between κ-opioid receptor and hypoxia via κ-opioid receptor activation and the dynamin-dependent mechanism.

  17. Moderately delayed post-insult treatment with normobaric hyperoxia reduces excitotoxin-induced neuronal degeneration but increases ischemia-induced brain damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haelewyn Benoit

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use and benefits of normobaric oxygen (NBO in patients suffering acute ischemic stroke is still controversial. Results Here we show for the first time to the best of our knowledge that NBO reduces both NMDA-induced calcium influxes in vitro and NMDA-induced neuronal degeneration in vivo, but increases oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury in vitro and ischemia-induced brain damage produced by middle cerebral artery occlusion in vivo. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicate that NBO reduces excitotoxin-induced calcium influx and subsequent neuronal degeneration but favors ischemia-induced brain damage and neuronal death. These findings highlight the complexity of the mechanisms involved by the use of NBO in patients suffering acute ischemic stroke.

  18. Multi-Vitamin B Supplementation Reverses Hypoxia-Induced Tau Hyperphosphorylation and Improves Memory Function in Adult Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lixia; Chen, Yuan; Wang, Weiguang; Xiao, Zhonghai; Hong, Yan

    2016-08-04

    Hypobaric hypoxia (HH) leads to reduced oxygen delivery to brain. It could trigger cognitive dysfunction and increase the risk of dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The present study was undertaken in order to examine whether B vitamins (B6, B12, folate, and choline) could exert protective effects on hypoxia-induced memory deficit and AD related molecular events in mice. Adult male Kunming mice were assigned to five groups: normoxic control, hypoxic model (HH), hypoxia+vitamin B6/B12/folate (HB), hypoxia+choline (HC), hypoxia+vitamin B6/B12/folate+choline (HBC). Mice in the hypoxia, HB, HC, and HBC groups were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia for 8 h/day for 28 days in a decompression chamber mimicking 5500 meters of high altitude. Spatial and passive memories were assessed by radial arm and step-through passive test, respectively. Levels of tau and glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β phosphorylation were detected by western blot. Homocysteine (Hcy) concentrations were determined using enzymatic cycling assay. Mice in the HH group exhibited significant spatial working and passive memory impairment, increased tau phosphorylation at Thr181, Ser262, Ser202/Thr205, and Ser396 in the cortex and hippocampus, and elevated Hcy levels compared with controls. Concomitantly, the levels of Ser9-phosphorylated GSK-3β were significantly decreased in brain after hypoxic treatment. Supplementations of vitamin B6/B12/folate+choline could significantly ameliorate the hypoxia-induced memory deficits, observably decreased Hcy concentrations in serum, and markedly attenuated tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD-related sites through upregulating inhibitory Ser9-phosphorylated GSK-3β. Our finding give further insight into combined neuroprotective effects of vitamin B6, B12, folate, and choline on brain against hypoxia.

  19. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Mild-Moderate Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury Post-Concussion Syndrome (PCS) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    and civilians using standard accepted instruments . • Primary outcomes: Working Memory and the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory. Insert a picture or...Post-Concussion Syndrome (PCS) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul G. Harch, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Traumatic Brain Injury Post-Concussion Syndrome (PCS) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  20. Effects of prenatal hypoxia on schizophrenia-related phenotypes in heterozygous reeler mice: a gene × environment interaction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Kristy R; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2014-08-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors play important roles in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Although prenatal hypoxia is a potential environmental factor implicated in schizophrenia, very little is known about the consequences of combining models of genetic risk factor with prenatal hypoxia. Heterozygous reeler (haploinsufficient for reelin; HRM) and wild-type (WT) mice were exposed to prenatal hypoxia (9% oxygen for two hour) or normoxia at embryonic day 17 (E17). Behavioral (Prepulse inhibition, Y-maze and Open field) and functional (regional volume in frontal cortex and hippocampus as well as hippocampal blood flow) tests were performed at 3 months of age. The levels of hypoxia and stress-related molecules such as hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α (HIF-1α), vascular endothelial factor (VEGF), VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2/Flk1) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were examined in frontal cortex and hippocampus at E18, 1 month and 3 months of age. In addition, serum VEGF and corticosterone levels were also examined. Prenatal hypoxia induced anxiety-like behavior in both HRM and WT mice. A significant reduction in hippocampal blood flow, but no change in brain regional volume was observed following prenatal hypoxia. Significant age and region-dependent changes in HIF-1α, VEGF, Flk1 and GR were found following prenatal hypoxia. Serum VEGF and corticosterone levels were found decreased following prenatal hypoxia. None of the above prenatal hypoxia-induced changes were either diminished or exacerbated due to reelin deficiency. These results argue against any gene-environment interaction between hypoxia and reelin deficiency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  1. Cerebral hypoxia and ischemia in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ravarino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Premature birth is a major public health issue internationally affecting 13 million babies worldwide. Hypoxia and ischemia is probably the commonest type of acquired brain damage in preterm infants. The clinical manifestations of hypoxic-ischemic injury in survivors of premature birth include a spectrum of cerebral palsy and intellectual disabilities. Until recently, the extensive brain abnormalities in preterm neonates appeared to be related mostly to destructive processes that lead to substantial deletion of neurons, axons, and glia from necrotic lesions in the developing brain. Advances in neonatal care coincide with a growing body of evidence that the preterm gray and white matter frequently sustain less severe insults, where tissue destruction is the minor component. Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL is the major form of white matter injury and consists classically of focal necrotic lesions, with subsequent cyst formation, and a less severe but more diffuse injury to cerebral white mater, with prominent astrogliosis and microgliosis but without overt necrosis. With PVL a concomitant injury occurs to subplate neurons, located in the subcortical white matter. Severe hypoxic-ischemic insults that trigger significant white matter necrosis are accompanied by neuronal degeneration in cerebral gray and white matter. This review aims to illustrate signs of cerebral embryology of the second half of fetal life and correlate hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the premature infant. This should help us better understand the symptoms early and late and facilitate new therapeutic strategies. Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  2. Free chelatable zinc modulates the cholinergic function during hypobaric hypoxia-induced neuronal damage: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udayabanu, M; Kumaran, D; Katyal, A

    2012-01-27

    The deregulation of cholinergic system and associated neuronal damage is thought to be a major contributor to the pathophysiologic sequelae of hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment. Uniquely, the muscarinic receptors also play a role in zinc uptake. Despite the potential role of muscarinic receptors in the development of post hypoxia cognitive deficits, no studies to date have evaluated the mechanistic relationship between memory dysfunction and zinc homeostasis in brain. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of Ca(2)EDTA, a specific zinc chelator in the spatial working and associative memory deficits following hypobaric hypoxia. Our results demonstrate that accumulation of intracellular free chelatable zinc in the hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons is accompanied with neuronal loss and memory impairment in hypobaric hypoxic condition. Chelation of this free zinc with Ca(2)EDTA (1.25 mM/kg) ameliorated the hippocampus-dependent spatial as well as associative memory dysfunction and neuronal damage observed on exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. The zinc chelator significantly alleviated the downregulation in expression of choline acetyltransferase, muscarinic receptor 1 and 4, and acetylcholinesterase activity due to hypobaric hypoxia. Our data suggest that the free chelatable zinc released during hypobaric hypoxia might play a critical role in the neuronal damage and the alteration in cholinergic function associated with hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment. We speculate that zinc chelation might be a potential therapy for hypobaric hypoxia-induced cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The protective effects of Cyperus rotundus on behavior and cognitive function in a rat model of hypoxia injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebasingh, Dhas; Devavaram Jackson, Dhas; Venkataraman, S; Adeghate, Ernest; Starling Emerald, Bright

    2014-12-01

    Hypoxia injury (HI) with its long-term neurological complications is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in the world. Currently, the treatment regimens for hypoxia are aimed only at ameliorating the damage without complete cure. The need, therefore, for novel therapeutic drugs to treat HI continues. This study investigates the protective effects of the ethanol extract of Cyperus rotundus L. (Cyperaceae) (EECR), a medicinal plant used in Ayurvedic traditional medicine against sodium nitrite-induced hypoxia in rats. We have evaluated the protective effect of 200 and 400 mg/kg of EECR against sodium nitrite-induced hypoxia injury in rats by assessing the cognitive functions, motor, and behavioral effects of EECR treatment along with the histological changes in the brain. By comparing the protective effects of standard drugs galantamine, a reversible cholinesterase inhibitor and pyritinol, an antioxidant nootropic drug against sodium nitrite-induced hypoxia in rats, we have tested the protective ability of EECR. EECR at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg was able to protect against the cognitive impairments, and the locomotor activity and muscular coordination defects, which are affected by sodium nitrite-induced hypoxia injury in rats. Based on our results, we suggest that the medicinal herb C. rotundus possesses a protective effect against sodium nitrite-induced hypoxia in rats. Further studies on these protective effects of EECR may help in designing better therapeutic regimes for hypoxia injury.

  4. Plasma volume in acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T D; Klausen, T; Richalet, J P

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to acute hypoxia is associated with changes in body fluid homeostasis and plasma volume (PV). This study compared a dye dilution technique using Evans' blue (PV[Evans']) with a carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method (PV[CO]) for measurements of PV in ten normal subjects at sea level...

  5. Hypoxia and development : Air conditional

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voesenek, L.A.C.J.; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    Hypoxia has long been studied in relation to anaerobic metabolism. It has now been shown to control development, acting as a cue to maintain the seedling’s protective apical hook and a trigger of developmental decisions both before and after the plantlet emerges from the soil into the light.

  6. Nitric oxide signaling in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J J David; Man, H S Jeffrey; Marsden, Philip A

    2012-03-01

    Endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) is classically viewed as a regulator of vasomotor tone. NO plays an important role in regulating O(2) delivery through paracrine control of vasomotor tone locally and cardiovascular and respiratory responses centrally. Very soon after the cloning and functional characterization of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), studies on the interaction between O(2) and NO made the paradoxical finding that hypoxia led to decreases in eNOS expression and function. Why would decreases in O(2) content in tissues elicit a loss of a potent endothelial-derived vasodilator? We now know that restricting our view of NO as a regulator of vasomotor tone or blood pressure limited deeper levels of mechanistic insight. Exciting new studies indicate that functional interactions between NO and O(2) exhibit profound complexity and are relevant to diseases states, especially those associated with hypoxia in tissues. NOS isoforms catalytically require O(2). Hypoxia regulates steady-state expression of the mRNA and protein abundance of the NOS enzymes. Animals genetically deficient in NOS isoforms have perturbations in their ability to adapt to changes in O(2) supply or demand. Most interestingly, the intracellular pathways for O(2) sensing that evolved to ensure an appropriate balance of O(2) delivery and utilization intersect with NO signaling networks. Recent studies demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilization and transcriptional activity is achieved through two parallel pathways: (1) a decrease in O(2)-dependent prolyl hydroxylation of HIF and (2) S-nitrosylation of HIF pathway components. Recent findings support a role for S-nitrosothiols as hypoxia-mimetics in certain biological and/or disease settings, such as living at high altitude, exposure to small molecules that can bind NO, or anemia.

  7. Moderate Bravery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to act in a purposeful and effective way amid institutional tensions and paradoxes is, right now, a highly prized quality in public leadership. The purpose of this chapter is to qualify moderately brave acts as a learning format that combines the analytical and performative...... skills implied in this kind of agency. Design/methodology/approach: The chapter explores the engagement with paradoxes as a narrative praxis. From existing literature, it sums up an understanding of agency as a social process of mediating paradoxes in order to make action possible. Drawing on Northrop...

  8. Intermittent hypoxia in childhood: the harmful consequences versus potential benefits of therapeutic uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana V. Serebrovskaya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxia often occurs in early infancy in both preterm and term infants and especially at 36 to 44 weeks postmenstrual age. These episodes of intermittent hypoxia could result from sleep-disordered breathing or may be temporally unrelated to apnea or bradycardia events. There are numerous reports indicating adverse effects of intermittent hypoxia on development, behavior, academic achievement and cognition in children with sleep apnea syndrome. It remains uncertain the exact causative relationship between the neurocognitive and behavioral morbidities and intermittent hypoxia and/or its associated sleep fragmentation. On the other hand, well-controlled and moderate intermittent hypoxia conditioning/training has been used in sick children for treating their various forms of bronchial asthma, allergic dermatoses, autoimmune thyroiditis, cerebral palsy, and obesity. This review article provides an updated and impartial analysis on the currently available evidence in supporting either side of the seemingly contradictory scenarios. We wish to stimulate a comprehensive understanding of such a complex physiological phenomenon as intermittent hypoxia, which may be accompanied by other confounding factors (e.g. hypercapnia, polycythemia, in order to prevent or reduce its harmful consequences, while maximize its potential utility as an effective therapeutic tool in pediatric patients.

  9. Physical Activity Attenuates Intermittent Hypoxia-induced Spatial Learning Deficits and Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Gozal, David; Nair, Deepti; Goldbart, Aviv D.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Exposure to intermittent hypoxia (IH), such as occurs in sleep-disordered breathing, is associated with substantial cognitive impairments, oxidative stress and inflammation, and increased neuronal cell losses in brain regions underlying learning and memory in rats. Physical activity (PA) is now recognized as neuroprotective in models of neuronal injury and degeneration.

  10. Up-regulation of erythropoietin receptor by nitric oxide mediates hypoxia preconditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Li; Asavaritkrai, Pundit; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2010-11-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo), known to stimulate erythroid progenitor cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation, has been shown to be neuroprotective against brain ischemia in animal models. Both Epo and Epo receptor (EpoR) are expressed in the brain and are up-regulated by hypoxia. Brain Epo signaling can stimulate neural cell survival and prevent neuron apoptosis. Neurons from EpoR null mice exhibit marked increased sensitivity to hypoxia. In endothelial cells, Epo has been shown to stimulate nitric oxide (NO) production, particularly at low pO(2). We found here that the EpoR expression on neural cells and Epo's neuroprotective effect were regulated by NO. Hypoxia increased NO production as well as EpoR expression, and inhibition of NOS activity reduced the proportion of EpoR-expressing neurons induced at low pO(2). Conversely, addition of NO donor to cultures grown under normoxia induced EpoR. Similarly, NO donor increased EpoR promoter activity in a reporter gene assay, suggesting that NO regulates EpoR at the transcription level. Preincubation of neurons with NO results in induction of EpoR, which gives rise to protection against hypoxia even in the absence of exogenous Epo, although at high concentration NO is toxic. These data provide evidence of a role for NO in Epo activity in brain and suggest links between NO production, EpoR expression, and Epo signaling in neuroprotection.

  11. Neurons have an active glycogen metabolism that contributes to tolerance to hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saez, Isabel; Duran, Jordi; Sinadinos, Christopher; Beltran, Antoni; Yanes, Oscar; Tevy, María F; Martínez-Pons, Carlos; Milán, Marco; Guinovart, Joan J

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen is present in the brain, where it has been found mainly in glial cells but not in neurons. Therefore, all physiologic roles of brain glycogen have been attributed exclusively to astrocytic glycogen. Working with primary cultured neurons, as well as with genetically modified mice and flies, here we report that—against general belief—neurons contain a low but measurable amount of glycogen. Moreover, we also show that these cells express the brain isoform of glycogen phosphorylase, allowing glycogen to be fully metabolized. Most importantly, we show an active neuronal glycogen metabolism that protects cultured neurons from hypoxia-induced death and flies from hypoxia-induced stupor. Our findings change the current view of the role of glycogen in the brain and reveal that endogenous neuronal glycogen metabolism participates in the neuronal tolerance to hypoxic stress. PMID:24569689

  12. Postoperative hypoxia and length of intensive care unit stay after cardiac surgery: the underweight paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranucci, Marco; Ballotta, Andrea; La Rovere, Maria Teresa; Castelvecchio, Serenella

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac operations with cardiopulmonary bypass can be associated with postoperative lung dysfunction. The present study investigates the incidence of postoperative hypoxia after cardiac surgery, its relationship with the length of intensive care unit stay, and the role of body mass index in determining postoperative hypoxia and intensive care unit length of stay. Single-center, retrospective study. University Hospital. Patients. Adult patients (N = 5,023) who underwent cardiac surgery with CPB. None. According to the body mass index, patients were attributed to six classes, and obesity was defined as a body mass index >30. POH was defined as a PaO2/FiO2 ratio intensive care unit. Postoperative hypoxia was detected in 1,536 patients (30.6%). Obesity was an independent risk factor for postoperative hypoxia (odds ratio 2.4, 95% confidence interval 2.05-2.78, P = 0.001) and postoperative hypoxia was a determinant of intensive care unit length of stay. There is a significant inverse correlation between body mass index and PaO2/FiO2 ratio, with the risk of postoperative hypoxia increasing by 1.7 folds per each incremental body mass index class. The relationship between body mass index and intensive care unit length of stay is U-shaped, with longer intensive care unit stay in underweight patients and moderate-morbid obese patients. Obese patients are at higher risk for postoperative hypoxia, but this leads to a prolonged intensive care unit stay only for moderate-morbid obese patients. Obese patients are partially protected against the deleterious effects of hemodilution and transfusions. Underweight patients present the "paradox" of a better lung gas exchange but a longer intensive care unit stay. This is probably due to a higher severity of their cardiac disease.

  13. Short and Long-Term Analysis and Comparison of Neurodegeneration and Inflammatory Cell Response in the Ipsilateral and Contralateral Hemisphere of the Neonatal Mouse Brain after Hypoxia/Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Shrivastava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolution of neonatal hypoxic/ischemic is essential for novel neuroprotective approaches. We describe the neuropathology and glial/inflammatory response, from 3 hours to 100 days, after carotid occlusion and hypoxia (8% O2, 55 minutes to the C57/BL6 P7 mouse. Massive tissue injury and atrophy in the ipsilateral (IL hippocampus, corpus callosum, and caudate-putamen are consistently shown. Astrogliosis peaks at 14 days, but glial scar is still evident at day 100. Microgliosis peaks at 3–7 days and decreases by day 14. Both glial responses start at 3 hours in the corpus callosum and hippocampal fissure, to progressively cover the degenerating CA field. Neutrophils increase in the ventricles and hippocampal vasculature, showing also parenchymal extravasation at 7 days. Remarkably, delayed milder atrophy is also seen in the contralateral (CL hippocampus and corpus callosum, areas showing astrogliosis and microgliosis during the first 72 hours. This detailed and long-term cellular response characterization of the ipsilateral and contralateral hemisphere after H/I may help in the design of better therapeutic strategies.

  14. Approximate Simulation of Acute Hypobaric Hypoxia with Normobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, J.; Wessel, J. H., III

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Some manufacturers of reduced oxygen (O2) breathing devices claim a comparable hypobaric hypoxia (HH) training experience by providing F(sub I) O2 pO2) of the target altitude. METHODS. Literature from investigators and manufacturers indicate that these devices may not properly account for the 47 mmHg of water vapor partial pressure that reduces the inspired partial pressure of O2 (P(sub I) O2). Nor do they account for the complex reality of alveolar gas composition as defined by the Alveolar Gas Equation. In essence, by providing iso-pO2 conditions for normobaric hypoxia (NH) as for HH exposures the devices ignore P(sub A)O2 and P(sub A)CO2 as more direct agents to induce signs and symptoms of hypoxia during acute training exposures. RESULTS. There is not a sufficient integrated physiological understanding of the determinants of P(sub A)O2 and P(sub A)CO2 under acute NH and HH given the same hypoxic pO2 to claim a device that provides isohypoxia. Isohypoxia is defined as the same distribution of hypoxia signs and symptoms under any circumstances of equivalent hypoxic dose, and hypoxic pO2 is an incomplete hypoxic dose. Some devices that claim an equivalent HH experience under NH conditions significantly overestimate the HH condition, especially when simulating altitudes above 10,000 feet (3,048 m). CONCLUSIONS. At best, the claim should be that the devices provide an approximate HH experience since they only duplicate the ambient pO2 at sea level as at altitude (iso-pO2 machines). An approach to reduce the overestimation is to at least provide machines that create the same P(sub I)O2 (iso-P(sub I)O2 machines) conditions at sea level as at the target altitude, a simple software upgrade.

  15. Bayesian Inference of Tumor Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, R.; Tenti, G.; Sivaloganathan, S.

    2009-12-01

    Tumor hypoxia is a state of oxygen deprivation in tumors. It has been associated with aggressive tumor phenotypes and with increased resistance to conventional cancer therapies. In this study, we report on the application of Bayesian sequential analysis in estimating the most probable value of tumor hypoxia quantification based on immunohistochemical assays of a biomarker. The `gold standard' of tumor hypoxia assessment is a direct measurement of pO2 in vivo by the Eppendorf polarographic electrode, which is an invasive technique restricted to accessible sites and living tissues. An attractive alternative is immunohistochemical staining to detect proteins expressed by cells during hypoxia. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is an enzyme expressed on the cell membrane during hypoxia to balance the immediate extracellular microenvironment. CAIX is widely regarded as a surrogate marker of chronic hypoxia in various cancers. The study was conducted with two different experimental procedures. The first data set was a group of three patients with invasive cervical carcinomas, from which five biopsies were obtained. Each of the biopsies was fully sectioned and from each section, the proportion of CAIX-positive cells was estimated. Measurements were made by image analysis of multiple deep sections cut through these biopsies, labeled for CAIX using both immunofluorescence and immunohistochemical techniques [1]. The second data set was a group of 24 patients, also with invasive cervical carcinomas, from which two biopsies were obtained. Bayesian parameter estimation was applied to obtain a reliable inference about the proportion of CAIX-positive cells within the carcinomas, based on the available biopsies. From the first data set, two to three biopsies were found to be sufficient to infer the overall CAIX percentage in the simple form: best estimate±uncertainty. The second data-set led to a similar result in 70% of the cases. In the remaining cases Bayes' theorem warned us

  16. The critical role of ERK in death resistance and invasiveness of hypoxia-selected glioblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jee-Youn; Kim, Yong-Jun; Lee, Sun; Park, Jae-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    The rapid growth of tumor parenchyma leads to chronic hypoxia that can result in the selection of cancer cells with a more aggressive behavior and death-resistant potential to survive and proliferate. Thus, identifying the key molecules and molecular mechanisms responsible for the phenotypic changes associated with chronic hypoxia has valuable implications for the development of a therapeutic modality. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular basis of the phenotypic changes triggered by chronic repeated hypoxia. Hypoxia-resistant T98G (HRT98G) cells were selected by repeated exposure to hypoxia and reoxygenation. Cell death rate was determined by the trypan blue exclusion method and protein expression levels were examined by western blot analysis. The invasive phenotype of the tumor cells was determined by the Matrigel invasion assay. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze the expression of proteins in the brain tumor samples. The Student T-test and Pearson Chi-Square test was used for statistical analyses. We demonstrate that chronic repeated hypoxic exposures cause T98G cells to survive low oxygen tension. As compared with parent cells, hypoxia-selected T98G cells not only express higher levels of anti-apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, Bcl-X L , and phosphorylated ERK, but they also have a more invasive potential in Matrigel invasion chambers. Activation or suppression of ERK pathways with a specific activator or inhibitor, respectively, indicates that ERK is a key molecule responsible for death resistance under hypoxic conditions and a more invasive phenotype. Finally, we show that the activation of ERK is more prominent in malignant glioblastomas exposed to hypoxia than in low grade astrocytic glial tumors. Our study suggests that activation of ERK plays a pivotal role in death resistance under chronic hypoxia and phenotypic changes related to the invasive phenotype of HRT98G cells compared to parent cells

  17. Emotion perception after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury: The valence effect and the role of working memory, processing speed, and nonverbal reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Hannah; Dethier, Marie; Kessels, Roy P C; Westbrook, R Frederick; McDonald, Skye

    2015-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) impairs emotion perception. Perception of negative emotions (sadness, disgust, fear, and anger) is reportedly affected more than positive (happiness and surprise) ones. It has been argued that this reflects a specialized neural network underpinning negative emotions that is vulnerable to brain injury. However, studies typically do not equate for differential difficulty between emotions. We aimed to examine whether emotion recognition deficits in people with TBI were specific to negative emotions, while equating task difficulty, and to determine whether perception deficits might be accounted for by other cognitive processes. Twenty-seven people with TBI and 28 matched control participants identified 6 basic emotions at 2 levels of intensity (a) the conventional 100% intensity and (b) "equated intensity"-that is, an intensity that yielded comparable accuracy rates across emotions in controls. (a) At 100% intensity, the TBI group was impaired in recognizing anger, fear, and disgust but not happiness, surprise, or sadness and performed worse on negative than positive emotions. (b) At equated intensity, the TBI group was poorer than controls overall but not differentially poorer in recognizing negative emotions. Although processing speed and nonverbal reasoning were associated with emotion accuracy, injury severity by itself was a unique predictor. When task difficulty is taken into account, individuals with TBI show impairment in recognizing all facial emotions. There was no evidence for a specific impairment for negative emotions or any particular emotion. Impairment was accounted for by injury severity rather than being a secondary effect of reduced neuropsychological functioning. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Zinc promotes the death of hypoxic astrocytes by upregulating hypoxia-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha expression via poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Rong; Chen, Chen; Liu, Wen-Lan; Liu, Ke-Jian

    2013-07-01

    Pathological release of excess zinc ions has been implicated in ischemic brain cell death. However, the underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In stroke, ischemia-induced zinc release and hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) accumulation concurrently occur in the ischemic tissue. The present study tests the hypothesis that the presence of high intracellular zinc concentration is a major cause of modifications to PARP-1 and HIF-1α during hypoxia, which significantly contributes to cell death during ischemia. Primary cortical astrocytes and C8-D1A cells were exposed to different concentrations of zinc chloride. Cell death rate and protein expression of HIF-1 and Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 were examined after 3-h hypoxic treatment. Although 3-h hypoxia or 100 μM of zinc alone did not induce noticeable cytotoxicity, their combination led to a dramatic increase in astrocytic cell death in a zinc-concentration-dependent manner. Exposure of astrocytes to hypoxia for 3 h remarkably increased the levels of intracellular zinc and HIF-1α protein, which was further augmented by added exogenous zinc. Notably, HIF-1α knockdown blocked zinc-induced astrocyte death. Moreover, knockdown of PARP-1, another important protein in the response of hypoxia, attenuated the overexpression of HIF-1α and reduced the cell death rate. Our studies show that zinc promotes hypoxic cell death through overexpression of the hypoxia response factor HIF-1α via the cell fate determine factor PARP-1 modification, which provides a novel mechanism for zinc-mediated ischemic brain injury. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. SECONDARY BRAIN INJURY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Ayu Basmatika

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Secondary brain injury is a condision that occurs at some times after the primary impact and can be largely prevented and treated. Most brain injury ends with deadly consequences which is caused by secondary damage to the brain. Traumatic brain injured still represents the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals under the age of 45 years in the world. The classification of secondary brain injured is divided into extracranial and intracranial causes. The cause of extracranial such as hipoxia, hypotensi, hyponatremia, hypertermia, hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. The cause of intracranial such as extradural, subdural, intraserebral, intraventrikular, dan subarachnoid hemorrhage. Beside that secondary injury can also be caused by edema and infection. Post-traumatic cerebral injured is characterized by direct tissue damage, impaired regulation of cerebral blood flow (cerebral blood flow / CBF, and disruption of metabolism. Manifestations of secondary brain injured include increased intracranial pressure, ischemic brain damage, cerebral hypoxia and hypercarbi, as well as disruption of cerebral autoregulation. The first priority is to stabilize the patient's cervical spine injury, relieve and maintain airway, ensure adequate ventilation (breathing, and making venous access for fluid resuscitation pathways (circulation and assessing the level of awareness and disability. This steps is crucial in patients with head injured to prevent hypoxia and hypotension, which is the main cause of secondary brain injury.

  20. Normobaric Hypoxia and Submaximal Exercise Effects on Running Memory and Mood State in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yongsuk; Gerhart, Hayden D; Stavres, Jon; Fennell, Curtis; Draper, Shane; Glickman, Ellen L

    2017-07-01

    An acute bout of exercise can improve cognitive function in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. However, limited research supports the improvement of cognitive function and mood state in women. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of hypoxia and exercise on working memory and mood state in women. There were 15 healthy women (age = 22 ± 2 yr) who completed the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics-4th Edition (ANAM), including the Running Memory Continuous Performance Task (RMCPT) and Total Mood Disturbance (TMD) in normoxia (21% O2), at rest in normoxia and hypoxia (12.5% O2), and during cycling exercise at 60% and 40% Vo2max in hypoxia. RMCPT was not significantly impaired at 30 (100.3 ± 17.2) and 60 (96.6 ± 17.3) min rest in hypoxia compared to baseline in normoxia (97.0 ± 17.0). However, RMCPT was significantly improved during exercise (106.7 ± 20.8) at 60% Vo2max compared to 60 min rest in hypoxia. Following 30 (-89.4 ± 48.3) and 60 min of exposure to hypoxia (-79.8 ± 55.9) at rest, TMD was impaired compared with baseline (-107.1 ± 46.2). TMD was significantly improved during exercise (-108.5 ± 42.7) at 40% Vo2max compared with 30 min rest in hypoxia. Also, RMCPT was significantly improved during exercise (104.0 ± 19.1) at 60% Vo2max compared to 60 min rest in hypoxia (96.6 ± 17.3). Hypoxia and an acute bout of exercise partially influence RMCPT and TMD. Furthermore, a moderate-intensity bout of exercise (60%) may be a more potent stimulant for improving cognitive function than low-intensity (40%) exercise. The present data should be considered by aeromedical personnel performing cognitive tasks in hypoxia.Seo Y, Gerhart HD, Stavres J, Fennell C, Draper S, Glickman EL. Normobaric hypoxia and submaximal exercise effects on running memory and mood state in women. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(7):627-632.

  1. Mouse Intermittent Hypoxia Mimicking Apnea of Prematurity: Effects on Myelinogenesis and Axonal Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAI, JUN; TUONG, CHI MINH; ZHANG, YIPING; SHIELDS, CHRISTOPHER B.; GUO, GANG; FU, HUI; GOZAL, DAVID

    2014-01-01

    Premature babies are at high risk for both infantile apnea and long-term neurobehavioral deficits. Recent studies suggest that diffuse structural changes in brain white matter are a positive predictor of poor cognitive outcomes. Since oligodendrocyte maturation, myelination, axon development and synapse formation mainly occur in the 3rd trimester of gestation and 1st postnatal year, infantile apnea could lead to and/or exaggerate white matter impairments in preterm neonates. Therefore, we investigated oligodendroglia and axon development in a neonatal mouse model of intermittent hypoxia between postnatal days 2 to 10. During critical phases of central nervous system development, intermittent hypoxia induced hypomyelination in the corpus callosum, striatum, fornix and cerebellum, but not the pons or spinal cord. Intermittent hypoxia-elicited alterations in myelin-forming processes were reflected by decreased expression of myelin proteins, including MBP, PLP, MAG and CNPase, possibly due to arrested maturation of oligodendrocytes. Ultra-structural abnormalities were apparent in the myelin sheath and axon. Immature oligodendrocytes were more vulnerable to neonatal intermittent hypoxia exposures than developing axons, suggesting that hypomyelination may contribute, at least partially, to axonal deficits. Insufficient neurofilament synthesis with anomalous components of neurofilament subunits, β-tubulin and MAP2 isoforms indicated immaturity of axons in intermittent hypoxia-exposed mouse brains. In addition, down-regulation of Synapsin I, Synaptophysin and Gap-43 phosphorylation suggested a potential stunt in axonogenesis and synaptogenesis. The region-selective and complex impairment in brain white matter induced by intermittent hypoxia was further associated with electrophysiological changes that may underlie long-term neurobehavioral sequelae. PMID:21953180

  2. Plasma volume in acute hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, T D; Klausen, T; Richalet, J P

    1998-01-01

    Exposure to acute hypoxia is associated with changes in body fluid homeostasis and plasma volume (PV). This study compared a dye dilution technique using Evans' blue (PV[Evans']) with a carbon monoxide (CO) rebreathing method (PV[CO]) for measurements of PV in ten normal subjects at sea level...... and again 24 h after rapid passive ascent to high altitude (4,350 m). Hypobaric hypoxia decreased arterial oxygen saturation to 79 (74-83)% (mean with 95% confidence intervals). The PV(Evans') remained unchanged from 3.49 (3.30-3.68) l at sea level to 3.46 (3.24-3.68) l at high altitude. In contrast PV......(Evans') and PV(CO) increased from 1.04 (0.99-1.09) at sea level to 1.15 (1.06-1.24) at high altitude (P hypoxia-induced changes in PV. The mechanism responsible for the bias remains unknown, but it is suggested that the results may...

  3. Neuroproteomic study of nitrated proteins in moderate traumatic brain injured rats treated with gamma glutamyl cysteine ethyl ester administration post injury: Insight into the role of glutathione elevation in nitrosative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Moses; Rice, Brittany; Sebastian, Andrea; Sullivan, Patrick G; King, Christina; Robinson, Renã A S; Reed, Tanea T

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this study are to establish a time point to determine the most beneficial time to administer GCEE post incident to reduce oxidative damage and second, by using redox proteomics, to determine if GCEE can readily suppress 3-NT modification in TBI animals. By using a moderate traumatic brain injury model with Wistar rats, it is hypothesized that the role of 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) formation as an intermediate will predict the involvement of protein nitration/nitrosation and oxidative damage in the brain. In this experiment, the levels of protein carbonyls, 4-hydroxynonenal, and 3-nitrotyrosine were significantly elevated in TBI injured, saline treated rats compared with those who sustained an injury and were treated with 150 mg/kg of the glutathione mimetic, GCEE. Determining the existence of elevated 3-NT levels provides insight into the relationship between the protein nitration/nitrosation and the oxidative damage, which can determine the pathogenesis and progression of specific neurological diseases. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Cognition Effects of Low-Grade Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Denison found a significant effect on rate of learning, suggesting that hypoxia affected learning and memory at lower altitudes such as 2438 m (8000 ft...studies, reported memory and learning were not affected by hypoxia at any altitude below 3658 m (12,000 ft).2,3,10,11 Fowler et al. also came to the...significant result, it seems likely that hypoxia affects working memory capacity by decreasing an individual’s ability to quickly encode and recall

  5. The regulation of transcriptional repression in hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Cavadas, Miguel A.S.; Cheong, Alex; Taylor, Cormac T.

    2017-01-01

    A sufficient supply molecular oxygen is essential for the maintenance of physiologic metabolism and bioenergetic homeostasis for most metazoans. For this reason, mechanisms have evolved for eukaryotic cells to adapt to conditions where oxygen demand exceeds supply (hypoxia). These mechanisms rely on the modification of pre-existing proteins, translational arrest and transcriptional changes. The hypoxia inducible factor (HIF; a master regulator of gene induction in response to hypoxia) is resp...

  6. The role of hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) in hypoxia induced apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greijer, A.E.; Wall, E. van der

    2004-01-01

    Apoptosis can be induced in response to hypoxia. The severity of hypoxia determines whether cells become apoptotic or adapt to hypoxia and survive. A hypoxic environment devoid of nutrients prevents the cell undergoing energy dependent apoptosis and cells become necrotic. Apoptosis regulatory

  7. Hypoxia-induced changes in neuronal network properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Fernando; Ramirez, Jan-Marino

    2005-12-01

    Because of their high energetic demand, neurons within the mammalian central nervous system are extremely sensitive to changes in partial pressure of oxygen. Faced with acute hypoxic conditions, an organism must follow a complex and highly dynamic emergency plan to secure survival. Behavioral functions that are not immediately essential for survival are turned off, and critical behaviors (such as breathing) undergo a biphasic response. An augmentation of breathing is initially adaptive, whereas prolonged hypoxic conditions are better served by an energy-saving mode. However, the hypoxic response of an organism depends on many additional factors. Environmental conditions, the animal's age and health, and the pattern (continuous vs intermittent) and duration (chronic vs acute) of hypoxia greatly determine the specific course of a hypoxic response. Different forms of hypoxia can cause pathology or be used as therapy. Therefore, it is not surprising that the hypoxic response of an organism results from widespread and highly diverse reconfigurations of neuronal network functions in different brain areas that are accomplished by diverse hypoxic changes at all levels of the nervous system (i.e., molecular, cellular, synaptic, neuronal, network). Hypoxia-induced changes in synaptic transmission are generally depressive and result primarily from presynaptic mechanisms, whereas changes in intrinsic properties involve excitatory and inhibitory alterations involving the majority of K+, Na+, and Ca2+ channels. This article reviews the response of the nervous system to hypoxia, accounting for all levels of integration from the cellular to the network level, and postulates that a better understanding of the diversity of cellular events is only possible if cellular and network events are considered in a functional and organismal context.

  8. Noninvasive molecular imaging of hypoxia in human xenografts: comparing hypoxia-induced gene expression with endogenous and exogenous hypoxia markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fuqiu; Deng, Xuelong; Wen, Bixiu; Liu, Yueping; Sun, Xiaorong; Xing, Ligang; Minami, Akiko; Huang, Yunhong; Chen, Qing; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ling, C Clifton; Li, Gloria C

    2008-10-15

    Tumor hypoxia is important in the development and treatment of human cancers. We have developed a novel xenograft model for studying and imaging of hypoxia-induced gene expression. A hypoxia-inducible dual reporter herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase and enhanced green fluorescence protein (HSV1-TKeGFP), under the control of hypoxia response element (9HRE), was stably transfected into human colorectal HT29 cancer cells. Selected clones were further enriched by repeated live cell sorting gated for hypoxia-induced eGFP expression. Fluorescent microscopy, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and radioactive substrate trapping assays showed strong hypoxia-induced expression of eGFP and HSV1-tk enzyme in the HT29-9HRE cells in vitro. Sequential micropositron emission tomography (PET) imaging of tumor-bearing animals, using the hypoxic cell tracer (18)F-FMISO and the reporter substrate (124)I-FIAU, yielded similar tumor hypoxia images for the HT29-9HRE xenograft but not in the parental HT29 tumor. Using autoradiography and IHC, detailed spatial distributions in tumor sections were obtained and compared for the following hypoxia-associated biomarkers in the HT29-9HRE xenograft: (124)I-FIAU, (18)F-FMISO, Hoechst (perfusion), lectin-TRITC (functional blood vessels), eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9. Intratumoral distributions of (124)I-FIAU and (18)F-FMISO were similar, and eGFP, pimonidazole, EF5, and CA9 colocalized in the same areas but not in well-perfused regions that were positive for Hoechst and lectin-TRITC. In enabling the detection of hypoxia-induced molecular events and mapping their distribution in vivo with serial noninvasive positron emission tomography imaging, and multiple variable analysis with immunohistochemistry and fluorescence microscopy, this human xenograft model provides a valuable tool for studying tumor hypoxia and in validating existing and future exogenous markers for tumor hypoxia.

  9. Amiloride but not memantine reduces neurodegeneration, seizures and myoclonic jerks in rats with cardiac arrest-induced global cerebral hypoxia and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Kwok Keung; Truong, Daniel D

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported that both activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and acid-sensing ion channels during cerebral ischemic insult contributed to brain injury. But which of these two molecular targets plays a more pivotal role in hypoxia-induced brain injury during ischemia is not known. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of an acid-sensing cation channel blocker and an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker were evaluated in a rat model of cardiac arrest-induced cerebral hypoxia. We found that intracisternal injection of amiloride, an acid-sensing ion channel blocker, dose-dependently reduced cerebral hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration, seizures, and audiogenic myoclonic jerks. In contrast, intracisternal injection of memantine, a selective uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker, had no significant effect on cerebral hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration, seizure and audiogenic myoclonic jerks. Intracisternal injection of zoniporide, a specific sodium-hydrogen exchanger inhibitor, before cardiac arrest-induced cerebral hypoxia, also did not reduce cerebral hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration, seizures and myoclonic jerks. These results suggest that acid-sensing ion channels play a more pivotal role than N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in mediating cerebral hypoxia-induced brain injury during ischemic insult.

  10. Amiloride but not memantine reduces neurodegeneration, seizures and myoclonic jerks in rats with cardiac arrest-induced global cerebral hypoxia and reperfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Keung Tai

    Full Text Available It has been reported that both activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and acid-sensing ion channels during cerebral ischemic insult contributed to brain injury. But which of these two molecular targets plays a more pivotal role in hypoxia-induced brain injury during ischemia is not known. In this study, the neuroprotective effects of an acid-sensing cation channel blocker and an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker were evaluated in a rat model of cardiac arrest-induced cerebral hypoxia. We found that intracisternal injection of amiloride, an acid-sensing ion channel blocker, dose-dependently reduced cerebral hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration, seizures, and audiogenic myoclonic jerks. In contrast, intracisternal injection of memantine, a selective uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker, had no significant effect on cerebral hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration, seizure and audiogenic myoclonic jerks. Intracisternal injection of zoniporide, a specific sodium-hydrogen exchanger inhibitor, before cardiac arrest-induced cerebral hypoxia, also did not reduce cerebral hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration, seizures and myoclonic jerks. These results suggest that acid-sensing ion channels play a more pivotal role than N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in mediating cerebral hypoxia-induced brain injury during ischemic insult.

  11. Ethanol extract of Portulaca oleracea L. protects against hypoxia-induced neuro damage through modulating endogenous erythropoietin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanyin, Wang; Liwei, Dong; Lin, Jia; Hailiang, Xin; Changquan, Ling; Min, Li

    2012-04-01

    In addition to its role in erythropoiesis, erythropoietin is also appreciated for its neuroprotective effects, and it has been suggested for treatment of some ischemic-hypoxic neurovascular diseases. The protective effects of endogenous erythropoietin in the brain give rise to the hypothesis that modulating erythropoietin expression might be a better way for treatment of ischemia-hypoxia neurovascular diseases. We have found that ethanol extract of Portulaca oleracea L. (EEPO) could increase erythropoietin expression in hypoxic mouse brain in our previous study. The present study is to investigate whether EEPO exerts its neuroprotective effects against hypoxia injury through regulating endogenous erythropoietin expression. The results demonstrated that EEPO decreased the serum neuron specific enolase level in hypoxia mice and the activity of caspase-3 in neuron, increased the neuron viability and attenuated the pathological damages caused by the hypoxia condition. Importantly, we also found that EEPO stimulated the endogenous erythropoietin expression at both mRNA and protein levels. Using the conditioned medium containing soluble erythropoietin receptor, we found that the neuroprotective effects of EEPO were dependent, at least partly, on erythropoietin expression. Although EEPO did not affect transcription of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), it did stabilize expression of HIF-1α. It is concluded that EEPO has neuroprotective effects against hypoxia injury, which is at least partly through stimulating endogenous erythropoietin expression by stabilizing HIF-1α. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inflames of confined space-hypoxia syndrome on riboflavin and its coenzymes content in white rat tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Леонідівна Федорко

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available During confined space-hypoxia syndrome it is observed a significant increase of riboflavin in all organs of rats, but more in the heart and brain. High level of flavin adenine dinucleotide is observed in rat liver and kidney, and significant increase of flavin mononucleotide is observed only in the brain. The data reflect the metabolism of riboflavin under conditions of confined space-hypoxia syndrome, and change of the flavin content in the bodies of animals indicates different compensatory processes

  13. Stem cells to regenerate the newborn brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Velthoven, C.T.J.

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is a frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality with limited therapeutic options. In this thesis we investigate whether mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) regenerate the neonatal brain after HI injury. We show that transplantation of MSC after neonatal brain injury

  14. Sources of amniotic fluid erythropoietin during normoxia and hypoxia in fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, Robert A; Cheung, Cecilia Y; Davis, Lowell E; Gagnon, Robert; Harding, Richard; Widness, John A

    2006-07-01

    Erythropoietin is present in human amniotic fluid and has been suggested as a marker of fetal hypoxia. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether erythropoietin is present in ovine amniotic fluid, fetal urine, and/or lung liquid and whether concentrations in these compartments change in parallel with endogenous fetal plasma erythropoietin concentration when the latter is increased experimentally. In late gestation chronically catheterized fetal sheep, samples of amniotic fluid and plasma, urine and plasma, lung liquid, amniotic fluid, and plasma were collected before and up to 7 days after induction of 4 types of fetal hypoxia: (1) acute anemic hypoxia that was induced by a single fetal hemorrhage, (2) progressive anemic hypoxia that was induced by daily exchange transfusion, (3) acute hypoxic hypoxia that was induced by the reduction of maternal inspired oxygen content, or (4) chronic placental insufficiency that was induced by daily umbilicoplacental embolization for 4 days. Erythropoietin concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. Statistical testing included analysis of variance and least squares regression. Under basal, nonhypoxic conditions, amniotic fluid erythropoietin concentration averaged 33.2% +/- 1.6% (SE) of fetal plasma erythropoietin concentration, and basal fetal urine and lung liquid erythropoietin concentrations ranged from low (humans, basal amniotic fluid and plasma erythropoietin concentrations were correlated only weakly (r = 0.259; r2 = 6.7%; P = .0027; n = 132). Amniotic fluid erythropoietin concentration approximately doubled after 12 hours of severe hypoxic hypoxia or after 24 hours of embolization-induced severe hypoxia but was unchanged after 12 hours of mild-moderate hypoxic hypoxia or 24 hours of anemic hypoxia. Concomitant fetal plasma erythropoietin concentrations increased to 28.1 +/- 5.3, 12.5 +/- 2.7, 10.8 +/- 4.6, and 10.0 +/- 1.3 times basal values, respectively. During progressive fetal anemia

  15. Hypoxia/reoxygenation impairs memory formation via adenosine-dependent activation of caspase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Gabriel S; Chatterjee, Diptaman; Darmody, Patrick T; Walsh, John P; Meling, Daryl D; Johnson, Rodney W; Freund, Gregory G

    2012-10-03

    After hypoxia, a critical adverse outcome is the inability to create new memories. How anterograde amnesia develops or resolves remains elusive, but a link to brain-based IL-1 is suggested due to the vital role of IL-1 in both learning and brain injury. We examined memory formation in mice exposed to acute hypoxia. After reoxygenation, memory recall recovered faster than memory formation, impacting novel object recognition and cued fear conditioning but not spatially cued Y-maze performance. The ability of mice to form new memories after hypoxia/reoxygenation was accelerated in IL-1 receptor 1 knockout (IL-1R1 KO) mice, in mice receiving IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), and in mice given the caspase 1 inhibitor Ac-YVAD-CMK. Mechanistically, hypoxia/reoxygenation more than doubled caspase 1 activity in the brain, which was localized to the amygdala compared to the hippocampus. This reoxygenation-dependent activation of caspase 1 was prevented by broad-spectrum adenosine receptor (AR) antagonism with caffeine and by targeted A1/A2A AR antagonism with 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine plus 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine. Additionally, perfusion of adenosine activated caspase 1 in the brain, while caffeine blocked this action by adenosine. Finally, resolution of anterograde amnesia was improved by both caffeine and by targeted A1/A2A AR antagonism. These findings indicate that amygdala-based anterograde amnesia after hypoxia/reoxygenation is sustained by IL-1β generated through adenosine-dependent activation of caspase 1 after reoxygenation.

  16. Reducing Secondary Insults in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 24 Jun 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Journal...transport, intracranial pressure, monitoring, hypoxia, hypotension 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF...of productivity8 Previous studies suggest that secondary insults such as hypoxia and hypotension may worsen a brain injury.9-’ 9 Recent recognition

  17. The regulation of transcriptional repression in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavadas, Miguel A S; Cheong, Alex; Taylor, Cormac T

    2017-07-15

    A sufficient supply molecular oxygen is essential for the maintenance of physiologic metabolism and bioenergetic homeostasis for most metazoans. For this reason, mechanisms have evolved for eukaryotic cells to adapt to conditions where oxygen demand exceeds supply (hypoxia). These mechanisms rely on the modification of pre-existing proteins, translational arrest and transcriptional changes. The hypoxia inducible factor (HIF; a master regulator of gene induction in response to hypoxia) is responsible for the majority of induced gene expression in hypoxia. However, much less is known about the mechanism(s) responsible for gene repression, an essential part of the adaptive transcriptional response. Hypoxia-induced gene repression leads to a reduction in energy demanding processes and the redirection of limited energetic resources to essential housekeeping functions. Recent developments have underscored the importance of transcriptional repressors in cellular adaptation to hypoxia. To date, at least ten distinct transcriptional repressors have been reported to demonstrate sensitivity to hypoxia. Central among these is the Repressor Element-1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST), which regulates over 200 genes. In this review, written to honor the memory and outstanding scientific legacy of Lorenz Poellinger, we provide an overview of our existing knowledge with respect to transcriptional repressors and their target genes in hypoxia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular imaging of hypoxia with radiolabelled agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mees, Gilles; Dierckx, Rudi; Vangestel, Christel; Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Tissue hypoxia results from an inadequate supply of oxygen (O(2)) that compromises biological functions. Structural and functional abnormalities of the tumour vasculature together with altered diffusion conditions inside the tumour seem to be the main causes of tumour hypoxia. Evidence from

  19. A novel adjustable automated system for inducing chronic intermittent hypoxia in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Polšek

    Full Text Available Sleep apnea is a chronic, widely underdiagnosed condition characterized by disruption of sleep architecture and intermittent hypoxia due to short cessations of breathing. It is a major independent risk factor for myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure and stroke as well as one of the rare modifiable risk factors for Alzheimer's Dementia. Reliable animal disease models are needed to understand the link between sleep apnea and the various clinically linked disorders.An automated system for inducing hypoxia was developed, in which the major improvement was the possibility to efficiently adjust the length and intensity of hypoxia in two different periods. The chamber used a small volume of gas allowing for fast exchanges of different oxygen levels. The mice were kept in their cages adapted with the system on the cage lid. As a proof of principle, they were exposed to a three week period of intermittent hypoxia for 8 hours a day, with 90 s intervals of 5, 7% and 21% oxygen to validate the model. Treated (n = 8 and control mice (no hypoxia, n = 7 were handled in the same manner and their hippocampal brain regions compared by histology.The chamber provided a fast, reliable and precise intermittent hypoxia, without inducing noticeable side effects to the animals. The validation experiment showed that apoptotic neurons in the hippocampus were more numerous in the mice exposed to intermittent hypoxia than in the control group, in all tested hippocampal regions (cornu ammonis 1 (CA1 P <0.001; cornu ammonis 3 (CA3 P <0.001; and dentate gyrus (DG P = 0.023. In both, control and hypoxic conditions, there was a significantly higher number of apoptotic neurons in the DG compared to the CA1 and CA3 subfields (P <0.001.The new design of a hypoxic chamber provides a fast, adjustable and reliable model of obstructive sleep apnea, which was validated by apoptosis of hippocampal neurons.

  20. Acute hypoxia stress induced abundant differential expression genes and alternative splicing events in heart of tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun Hong; Li, Hong Lian; Li, Bi Jun; Gu, Xiao Hui; Lin, Hao Ran

    2018-01-10

    Hypoxia is one of the critical environmental stressors for fish in aquatic environments. Although accumulating evidences indicate that gene expression is regulated by hypoxia stress in fish, how genes undergoing differential gene expression and/or alternative splicing (AS) in response to hypoxia stress in heart are not well understood. Using RNA-seq, we surveyed and detected 289 differential expressed genes (DEG) and 103 genes that undergo differential usage of exons and splice junctions events (DUES) in heart of a hypoxia tolerant fish, Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus following 12h hypoxic treatment. The spatio-temporal expression analysis validated the significant association of differential exon usages in two randomly selected DUES genes (fam162a and ndrg2) in 5 tissues (heart, liver, brain, gill and spleen) sampled at three time points (6h, 12h, and 24h) under acute hypoxia treatment. Functional analysis significantly associated the differential expressed genes with the categories related to energy conservation, protein synthesis and immune response. Different enrichment categories were found between the DEG and DUES dataset. The Isomerase activity, Oxidoreductase activity, Glycolysis and Oxidative stress process were significantly enriched for the DEG gene dataset, but the Structural constituent of ribosome and Structural molecule activity, Ribosomal protein and RNA binding protein were significantly enriched only for the DUES genes. Our comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals abundant stress responsive genes and their differential regulation function in the heart tissues of Nile tilapia under acute hypoxia stress. Our findings will facilitate future investigation on transcriptome complexity and AS regulation during hypoxia stress in fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Physiological and Cognitive Effects of Acute Normobaric Hypoxia and Modulations from Oxygen Breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malle, Carine; Bourrilhon, Cyprien; Quinette, Peggy; Laisney, Mickaël; Eustache, Francis; Piérard, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of normobaric devices for hypoxia awareness training makes crucial the study of physiological and cognitive effects induced by acute normobaric hypoxia (NH) exposure. Our study aimed to 1) investigate the effects of acute NH exposure on physiological variables and working memory; and 2) investigate the physiological and cognitive effects of oxygen breathing before and after acute NH exposure. There were 86 healthy men who were randomized into 4 groups: the Normoxia-Air group (N = 23), whose subjects were breathing air; the Hypoxia-Air group (N = 22), where NH exposure was preceded and followed by air breathing; the Normoxia-O₂group (N = 21), whose protocol was similar to the Normoxia-Air group, except with the addition of 100% O₂breathing periods; and the Hypoxia-O₂group (N = 20), whose participants were exposed to 100% O₂before and after NH exposure. Working memory was assessed with the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test. Peripheral oxygen saturation (Spo₂), heart rate (HR), and electroencephalogram (EEG) were recorded. Acute NH exposure induced a classical physiological response (i.e., decreased Spo₂and increased HR), but not identical to the well-described physiological response to acute hypobaric hypoxia. Acute NH also caused a strong impairment in working memory. Oxygen breathing following NH exposure induced a slowing in the EEG associated with a worsening of working memory performance. Acute NH exposure revealed a good surrogate for the classical hypobaric chamber for refresher hypoxia awareness training. Because the association between hypoxia and hyperoxia seems deleterious for the brain, we suggest that NH exposure should be surrounded by air breathing.

  2. CD36 Upregulation Mediated by Intranasal LV-NRF2 Treatment Mitigates Hypoxia-Induced Progression of Alzheimer's-Like Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yan; Xie, Jing-Wei; Cai, Jian-Hui; Wang, Tao; Xu, Ye; Wang, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aims: There is extensive evidence that oxidative stress induces cellular dysfunction in the brain and plays a critical role in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis. Hypoxia increases factors involved in oxidative stress injury and contributes to the onset and progression of AD. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), a major component regulating antioxidant response, is attenuated in the AD brain. Importantly, NRF2 directly regulates the alternative first exons of CD36, an important participant in oxidative and inflammatory processes. To explore the effects of hypoxia-induced deterioration of AD-like pathogenesis and investigate the correlation between hypoxia-induced NRF2 signal alterations and CD36 expression, we examined the NRF2 signaling, CD36, and oxidative stress events in hypoxia-treated APPswe/PSEN1dE9 (APP/PS1) mice brain. Results: We observed that hypoxia treatment increased oxidative stress, exacerbated inflammation, and aggravated learning defects in aged APP/PS1 mice. Microglia from hypoxia-treated mice brain exhibited marked reduction in CD36 expression and inhibition of β-amyloid (Aβ) degradation. Accordingly, hypoxia treatment caused a decrease in transactivation of NRF2 target genes in the aging mouse brain. Intranasal administration with a lentiviral vector encoding human NRF2 increased CD36 expression, ameliorated the weak antioxidant response triggered by hypoxia, diminished Aβ deposition, and improved spatial memory defects. Innovation: In this study, we demonstrated for the first time that NRF2 intranasal treatment-induced increases of CD36 could enhance Aβ clearance in AD transgenic mouse. Conclusion: These results suggest that targeting NRF2-mediated CD36 expression might provide a beneficial intervention for cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in AD progression. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2208–2230. PMID:24702189

  3. Inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α suppresses neuroprotective endogenous erythropoietin from astrocytes mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-2α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaya, Yoshiaki; Aoyama, Mineyoshi; Tamura, Tetsuya; Kakita, Hiroki; Kato, Shin; Hida, Hideki; Saitoh, Shinji; Asai, Kiyofumi

    2014-12-01

    Interest in erythropoietin (EPO) as a neuroprotective mediator has grown since it was found that systemically administered EPO is protective in several animal models of disease. However, given that the blood-brain barrier limits EPO entry into the brain, alternative approaches that induce endogenous EPO production in the brain may be more effective clinically and associated with fewer untoward side-effects. Astrocytes are the main source of EPO in the central nervous system. In the present study we investigated the effect of the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) on hypoxia-induced upregulation of EPO in rat brain. Hypoxia significantly increased EPO mRNA expression in the brain and kidney, and this increase was suppressed by TNFα in vivo. In cultured astrocytes exposed to hypoxic conditions for 6 and 12 h, TNFα suppressed the hypoxia-induced increase in EPO mRNA expression in a concentration-dependent manner. TNFα inhibition of hypoxia-induced EPO expression was mediated primarily by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2α rather than HIF-1α. The effects of TNFα in reducing hypoxia-induced upregulation of EPO mRNA expression probably involve destabilization of HIF-2α, which is regulated by the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathway. TNFα treatment attenuated the protective effects of astrocytes on neurons under hypoxic conditions via EPO signaling. The effective blockade of TNFα signaling may contribute to the maintenance of the neuroprotective effects of EPO even under hypoxic conditions with an inflammatory response. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Hypoxia Worsens Affective Responses and Feeling of Fatigue During Prolonged Bed Rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nektarios A. M. Stavrou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research, although limited, suggests that both hypoxia and bed rest influence psychological responses by exaggerating negative psychological responses and attenuating positive emotions. The present study investigated the effect of a 21-day prolonged exposure to normobaric hypoxia and bed rest on affective responses and fatigue. Eleven healthy participants underwent three 21-day interventions using a cross-over design: (1 normobaric hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAMB, (2 normobaric hypoxic bed rest (HBR and (3 normoxic bed rest (NBR. Affective and fatigue responses were investigated using the Activation Deactivation Adjective Check List, and the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, which were completed before (Pre, during (Day 7, Day 14, and Day 21 and after (Post the interventions. The most negative psychological profile appeared during the HBR intervention. Specifically, tiredness, tension, general and physical fatigue significantly increased on days 7, 14, and 21, as well as at Post. After the HBR intervention, general and physical fatigue remained higher compared to Pre values. Additionally, a deterioration of psychological responses was also noted following HAMB and NBR. In particular, both hypoxia and BR per se induced subjective fatigue and negative affective responses. BR seems to exert a moderate negative effect on the sensation of fatigue, whereas exercise attenuates the negative effects of hypoxia as noted during the HAMB condition. In conclusion, our data suggest that the addition of hypoxia to bed rest-induced inactivity significantly worsens affective responses and feeling of fatigue.

  5. [Hypoxia and memory. Specific features of nootropic agents effects and their use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronina, T A

    2000-01-01

    Hypoxia and hypoxic adaptation are powerful factors of controlling memory and behavior processes. Acute hypoxia exerts a differential impact on different deficits of mnestic and cognitive functions. Instrumental reflexes of active and passive avoidance, negative learning, behavior with a change in the stereotype of learning are more greatly damaged. Memory with spatial and visual differentiation and their rearrangement change to a lesser extent and conditional reflexes are not deranged. In this contract, altitude hypoxic adaptation enhances information fixation and increases the degree and duration of retention of temporary relations. Nootropic agents with an antihypoxic action exert a marked effect on hypoxia-induced cognitive and memory disorders and the magnitude of this effect depends on the ration of proper nootropic to antihypoxic components in the spectrum of the drugs' pharmacological activity. The agents that combine a prevailing antiamnestic effect and a marked and moderate antihypoxic action (mexidole, nooglutil, pyracetam, beglymin, etc.) are most effective in eliminating different hypoxia-induced cognitive and memory disorders, nootropic drugs that have a pronounced antiamnestic activity (centrophenoxine, etc.) and no antihypoxic component also restore the main types of mnestic disorders after hypoxia, but to a lesser extent.

  6. Cerium oxide nanoparticles promote neurogenesis and abrogate hypoxia-induced memory impairment through AMPK-PKC-CBP signaling cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Aditya; Gangwar, Anamika; Singh, Sushil Kumar; Roy, Manas; Das, Mainak; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2016-01-01

    Structural and functional integrity of the brain is adversely affected by reduced oxygen saturation, especially during chronic hypoxia exposure and often encountered by altitude travelers or dwellers. Hypoxia-induced generation of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species reportedly affects the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain, promoting memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs), also known as nanoceria, switch between +3 and +4 oxidation states and reportedly scavenge superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, and peroxynitrite in vivo. In the present study, we evaluated the neuroprotective as well as the cognition-enhancing activities of nanoceria during hypobaric hypoxia. Using polyethylene glycol-coated 3 nm nanoceria (PEG-CNPs), we have demonstrated efficient localization of PEG-CNPs in rodent brain. This resulted in significant reduction of oxidative stress and associated damage during hypoxia exposure. Morris water maze-based memory function tests revealed that PEG-CNPs ameliorated hypoxia-induced memory impairment. Using microscopic, flow cytometric, and histological studies, we also provide evidences that PEG-CNPs augmented hippocampus neuronal survival and promoted neurogenesis. Molecular studies revealed that PEG-CNPs promoted neurogenesis through the 5'-adenine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-protein kinase C-cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein binding (AMPK-PKC-CBP) protein pathway. Our present study results suggest that nanoceria can be translated as promising therapeutic molecules for neurodegenerative diseases.

  7. Cerium oxide nanoparticles promote neurogenesis and abrogate hypoxia-induced memory impairment through AMPK–PKC–CBP signaling cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Aditya; Gangwar, Anamika; Singh, Sushil Kumar; Roy, Manas; Das, Mainak; Sethy, Niroj Kumar; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2016-01-01

    Structural and functional integrity of the brain is adversely affected by reduced oxygen saturation, especially during chronic hypoxia exposure and often encountered by altitude travelers or dwellers. Hypoxia-induced generation of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species reportedly affects the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain, promoting memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs), also known as nanoceria, switch between +3 and +4 oxidation states and reportedly scavenge superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, and peroxynitrite in vivo. In the present study, we evaluated the neuroprotective as well as the cognition-enhancing activities of nanoceria during hypobaric hypoxia. Using polyethylene glycol-coated 3 nm nanoceria (PEG-CNPs), we have demonstrated efficient localization of PEG-CNPs in rodent brain. This resulted in significant reduction of oxidative stress and associated damage during hypoxia exposure. Morris water maze-based memory function tests revealed that PEG-CNPs ameliorated hypoxia-induced memory impairment. Using microscopic, flow cytometric, and histological studies, we also provide evidences that PEG-CNPs augmented hippocampus neuronal survival and promoted neurogenesis. Molecular studies revealed that PEG-CNPs promoted neurogenesis through the 5′-adenine monophosphate-activated protein kinase–protein kinase C–cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein binding (AMPK-PKC-CBP) protein pathway. Our present study results suggest that nanoceria can be translated as promising therapeutic molecules for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27069362

  8. Identification of Robust Hypoxia Biomarker Candidates from Fin of Medaka (Oryzias latipes)✰

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ziping; Wells, Melissa C.; Boswell, Mikki G.; Beldorth, Ion; Kirk, Lyndsey M.; Wang, Yilei; Wang, Shulong; Savage, Markita; Walter, Ronald B.; Booth, Rachell E.

    2011-01-01

    Aquatic hypoxia caused by organic pollution and eutrophication is a pressing worldwide water pollution problem. Better methods for monitoring oxygen levels are needed to assist efforts to maintain and protect the health of natural aquatic environments. In this project, we used a Japanese ricefish (medaka, Oryzias latipes) 8K oligonucleotide array as a platform to identify potential hypoxic biomarkers in different organs (fin, gill, liver and brain) upon exposure to hypoxia. The microarray results were validated by qRT-PCR employing a subset of candidate biomarkers. Interestingly, the largest number and most significant of hypoxia responding array features were detected in hypoxia exposed fin tissues. We identified 173 array features that exhibited a significant response (over 2 fold change in expression) upon exposure to hypoxic conditions and validated a subset of these by quantitative RT-PCR. These gene targets were subjected to annotation and gene ontology mining. Positively identifiable gene targets that may be useful for development of a rapid and accurate biomarker test using fin clips are discussed in relation to previous reports on hypoxia responsive genes. PMID:21664487

  9. Loss aversion and hypoxia: less loss aversion in oxygen-depleted environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pighin, Stefania; Bonini, Nicolao; Savadori, Lucia; Hadjichristidis, Constantinos; Schena, Federico

    2014-03-01

    Hypoxia, the deprivation of adequate oxygen supply, constitutes a direct threat to survival by disrupting cardiovascular or respiratory homeostasis and eliciting a respiratory distress. Although hypoxia has been shown to increase brain vulnerability and impair basic cognitive functions, only one study has examined its effect on decision-making. The present study examined the effect of mild hypoxia on individual's loss aversion, that is, the tendency to be more affected by losses than equal sized gains. A sample of 26 participants were asked to either accept or reject a series of mixed gambles once in an oxygen-depleted environment (14.1% oxygen concentration) and once in a normoxic environment (20.9% oxygen concentration). Each gamble involved a 50-50 chance of winning or losing specified amounts of money. Mild hypoxia decreased loss aversion: on average in the normoxic condition participants accepted gambles if the gain was at least 2.4 times as large as the loss, whereas in the oxygen-depleted condition participants accepted gambles if the gain was at least 1.7 times as large as the loss. Mild hypoxia may push individuals to be less cautious in daily decisions that involve a trade-off between a gain and a loss.

  10. Effect of Ca2EDTA on zinc mediated inflammation and neuronal apoptosis in hippocampus of an in vivo mouse model of hypobaric hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udayabanu Malairaman

    Full Text Available Calcium overload has been implicated as a critical event in glutamate excitotoxicity associated neurodegeneration. Recently, zinc accumulation and its neurotoxic role similar to calcium has been proposed. Earlier, we reported that free chelatable zinc released during hypobaric hypoxia mediates neuronal damage and memory impairment. The molecular mechanism behind hypobaric hypoxia mediated neuronal damage is obscure. The role of free zinc in such neuropathological condition has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the underlying role of free chelatable zinc in hypobaric hypoxia-induced neuronal inflammation and apoptosis resulting in hippocampal damage.Adult male Balb/c mice were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia and treated with saline or Ca2EDTA (1.25 mM/kg i.p daily for four days. The effects of Ca2EDTA on apoptosis (caspases activity and DNA fragmentation, pro-inflammatory markers (iNOS, TNF-α and COX-2, NADPH oxidase activity, poly(ADP ribose polymerase (PARP activity and expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, HIF-1α, metallothionein-3, ZnT-1 and ZIP-6 were examined in the hippocampal region of brain.Hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increased expression of metallothionein-3 and zinc transporters (ZnT-1 and ZIP-6. Hypobaric hypoxia elicited an oxidative stress and inflammatory response characterized by elevated NADPH oxidase activity and up-regulation of iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-α. Furthermore, hypobaric hypoxia induced HIF-1α protein expression, PARP activation and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Administration of Ca2EDTA significantly attenuated the hypobaric hypoxia induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the hippocampus.We propose that hypobaric hypoxia/reperfusion instigates free chelatable zinc imbalance in brain associated with neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis. Therefore, zinc chelating strategies which block zinc mediated neuronal damage linked with cerebral hypoxia and other neurodegenerative conditions can be

  11. Effect of Ca2EDTA on Zinc Mediated Inflammation and Neuronal Apoptosis in Hippocampus of an In Vivo Mouse Model of Hypobaric Hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malairaman, Udayabanu; Dandapani, Kumaran; Katyal, Anju

    2014-01-01

    Background Calcium overload has been implicated as a critical event in glutamate excitotoxicity associated neurodegeneration. Recently, zinc accumulation and its neurotoxic role similar to calcium has been proposed. Earlier, we reported that free chelatable zinc released during hypobaric hypoxia mediates neuronal damage and memory impairment. The molecular mechanism behind hypobaric hypoxia mediated neuronal damage is obscure. The role of free zinc in such neuropathological condition has not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the underlying role of free chelatable zinc in hypobaric hypoxia-induced neuronal inflammation and apoptosis resulting in hippocampal damage. Methods Adult male Balb/c mice were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia and treated with saline or Ca2EDTA (1.25 mM/kg i.p) daily for four days. The effects of Ca2EDTA on apoptosis (caspases activity and DNA fragmentation), pro-inflammatory markers (iNOS, TNF-α and COX-2), NADPH oxidase activity, poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity and expressions of Bax, Bcl-2, HIF-1α, metallothionein-3, ZnT-1 and ZIP-6 were examined in the hippocampal region of brain. Results Hypobaric hypoxia resulted in increased expression of metallothionein-3 and zinc transporters (ZnT-1 and ZIP-6). Hypobaric hypoxia elicited an oxidative stress and inflammatory response characterized by elevated NADPH oxidase activity and up-regulation of iNOS, COX-2 and TNF-α. Furthermore, hypobaric hypoxia induced HIF-1α protein expression, PARP activation and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Administration of Ca2EDTA significantly attenuated the hypobaric hypoxia induced oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Conclusion We propose that hypobaric hypoxia/reperfusion instigates free chelatable zinc imbalance in brain associated with neuroinflammation and neuronal apoptosis. Therefore, zinc chelating strategies which block zinc mediated neuronal damage linked with cerebral hypoxia and other

  12. Metabolomic analysis of anti-hypoxia and anti-anxiety effects of Fu Fang Jin Jing Oral Liquid.

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    Xia Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Herba Rhodiolae is a traditional Chinese medicine used by the Tibetan people for treating hypoxia related diseases such as anxiety. Based on the previous work, we developed and patented an anti-anxiety herbal formula Fu Fang Jin Jing Oral Liquid (FJJOL with Herba Rhodiolae as a chief ingredient. In this study, the anti-hypoxia and anti-anxiety effects of FJJOL in a high altitude forced-swimming mouse model with anxiety symptoms will be elucidated by NMR-based metabolomics. METHODS: In our experiments, the mice were divided randomly into four groups as flatland group, high altitude saline-treated group, high altitude FJJOL-treated group, and high altitude diazepam-treated group. To cause anxiety effects and hypoxic defects, a combination use of oxygen level decreasing (hypobaric cabin and oxygen consumption increasing (exhaustive swimming were applied to mice. After a three-day experimental handling, aqueous metabolites of mouse brain tissues were extracted and then subjected to NMR analysis. The therapeutic effects of FJJOL on the hypobaric hypoxia mice with anxiety symptoms were verified. RESULTS: Upon hypoxic exposure, both energy metabolism defects and disorders of functional metabolites in brain tissues of mice were observed. PCA, PLS-DA and OPLS-DA scatter plots revealed a clear group clustering for metabolic profiles in the hypoxia versus normoxia samples. After a three-day treatment with FJJOL, significant rescue effects on energy metabolism were detected, and levels of ATP, fumarate, malate and lactate in brain tissues of hypoxic mice recovered. Meanwhile, FJJOL also up-regulated the neurotransmitter GABA, and the improvement of anxiety symptoms was highly related to this effect. CONCLUSIONS: FJJOL ameliorated hypobaric hypoxia effects by regulating energy metabolism, choline metabolism, and improving the symptoms of anxiety. The anti-anxiety therapeutic effects of FJJOL were comparable to the conventional anti-anxiety drug

  13. The Clinical Importance of Assessing Tumor Hypoxia: Relationship of Tumor Hypoxia to Prognosis and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Joseph C.; Lebedev, Artem; Aten, Edward; Madsen, Kathleen; Marciano, Liane

    2014-01-01

    I. Introduction II. The Clinical Importance of Tumor Hypoxia A. Pathophysiology of hypoxia B. Hypoxia's negative impact on the effectiveness of curative treatment 1. Hypoxic tumors accumulate and propagate cancer stem cells 2. Hypoxia reduces the effectiveness of radiotherapy 3. Hypoxia increases metastasis risk and reduces the effectiveness of surgery 4. Hypoxic tumors are resistant to the effects of chemotherapy and chemoradiation C. Hypoxia is prognostic for poor patient outcomes III. Diagnosis of Tumor Hypoxia A. Direct methods 1. Oxygen electrode—direct pO2 measurement most used in cancer research 2. Phosphorescence quenching—alternative direct pO2 measurement 3. Electron paramagnetic resonance 4. 19F-magnetic resonance spectroscopy 5. Overhauser-enhanced MRI B. Endogenous markers of hypoxia 1. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α 2. Carbonic anhydrase IX 3. Glucose transporter 1 4. Osteopontin 5. A combined IHC panel of protein markers for hypoxia 6. Comet assay C. Physiologic methods 1. Near-infrared spectroscopy/tomography—widely used for pulse oximetry 2. Photoacoustic tomography 3. Contrast-enhanced color duplex sonography 4. MRI-based measurements 5. Blood oxygen level-dependent MRI 6. Pimonidazole 7. EF5 (pentafluorinated etanidazole) 8. Hypoxia PET imaging—physiologic hypoxia measurement providing tomographic information a. 18F-fluoromisonidazole b. 18F-fluoroazomycinarabinofuranoside c. 18F-EF5 (pentafluorinated etanidazole) d. 18F-flortanidazole e. Copper (II) (diacetyl-bis (N4-methylthiosemicarbazone)) f. 18F-FDG imaging of hypoxia IV. Modifying Hypoxia to Improve Therapeutic Outcomes A. Use of hypoxia information in radiation therapy planning B. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients responsive to nimorazole C. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients responsive to tirapazamine D. Use of hypoxia assessment for selection of patients

  14. Ecosystem impacts of hypoxia: thresholds of hypoxia and pathways to recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steckbauer, A; Duarte, C M; Vaquer-Sunyer, R [Department of Global Change Research, IMEDEA (CSIC-UIB), Institut Mediterrani d' Estudis Avancats, C/Miquel Marques 21, 07190 Esporles (Mallorca), Islas Baleares (Spain); Carstensen, J [Department of Marine Ecology, National Environmental Research Institute, Aarhus University, PO Box 358, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Conley, D J, E-mail: asteckbauer@imedea.uib-csic.es [Department of Earth and Ecosystem Sciences, Lund University, SE-223 62 Lund (Sweden)

    2011-04-15

    Coastal hypoxia is increasing in the global coastal zone, where it is recognized as a major threat to biota. Managerial efforts to prevent hypoxia and achieve recovery of ecosystems already affected by hypoxia are largely based on nutrient reduction plans. However, these managerial efforts need to be informed by predictions on the thresholds of hypoxia (i.e. the oxygen levels required to conserve biodiversity) as well as the timescales for the recovery of ecosystems already affected by hypoxia. The thresholds for hypoxia in coastal ecosystems are higher than previously thought and are not static, but regulated by local and global processes, being particularly sensitive to warming. The examination of recovery processes in a number of coastal areas managed for reducing nutrient inputs and, thus, hypoxia (Northern Adriatic; Black Sea; Baltic Sea; Delaware Bay; and Danish Coastal Areas) reveals that recovery timescales following the return to normal oxygen conditions are much longer than those of loss following the onset of hypoxia, and typically involve decadal timescales. The extended lag time for ecosystem recovery from hypoxia results in non-linear pathways of recovery due to hysteresis and the shift in baselines, affecting the oxygen thresholds for hypoxia through time.

  15. Sexually Dimorphic Outcomes after Neonatal Stroke and Hypoxia-Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Charriaut-Marlangue

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cohort studies have demonstrated a higher vulnerability in males towards ischemic and/or hypoxic-ischemic injury in infants born near- or full-term. Male sex was also associated with limited brain repair following neonatal stroke and hypoxia-ischemia, leading to increased incidence of long-term cognitive deficits compared to females with similar brain injury. As a result, the design of pre-clinical experiments considering sex as an important variable was supported and investigated because neuroprotective strategies to reduce brain injury demonstrated sexual dimorphism. While the mechanisms underlining these differences between boys and girls remain unclear, several biological processes are recognized to play a key role in long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes: gonadal hormones across developmental stages, vulnerability to oxidative stress, modulation of cell death, and regulation of microglial activation. This review summarizes the current evidence for sex differences in neonatal hypoxic-ischemic and/or ischemic brain injury, considering the major pathways known to be involved in cognitive and behavioral deficits associated with damages of the developing brain.

  16. Association between the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians Score and Mortality in Patients with Isolated Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Propensity Score-Matched Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Wu, Shao-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chun; Hsieh, Hsiao-Yun; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2016-12-03

    Background: The purpose of this study was to use a propensity score-matched analysis to investigate the association between the Osteoporosis Self-Assessment Tool for Asians (OSTA) scores and clinical outcomes of patients with isolated moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods: The study population comprised 7855 patients aged ≥40 years who were hospitalized for treatment of isolated moderate and severe TBI (an Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) ≥3 points only in the head and not in other regions of the body) between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2014. Patients were categorized as high-risk (OSTA score -1; n = 5359). Two-sided Pearson's chi-squared, or Fisher's exact tests were used to compare categorical data. Unpaired Student's t -test and Mann-Whitney U test were performed to analyze normally and non-normally distributed continuous data, respectively. Propensity score-matching in a 1:1 ratio was performed using NCSS software, with adjustment for covariates. Results: Compared to low-risk patients, high- and medium-risk patients were significantly older and injured more severely. The high- and medium-risk patients had significantly higher mortality rates, longer hospital length of stay, and a higher proportion of admission to the intensive care unit than low-risk patients. Analysis of propensity score-matched patients with adjusted covariates, including gender, co-morbidity, blood alcohol concentration level, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and Injury Severity Score revealed that high- and medium-risk patients still had a 2.4-fold (odds ratio (OR), 2.4; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.39-4.15; p = 0.001) and 1.8-fold (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.19-2.86; p = 0.005) higher mortality, respectively, than low-risk patients. However, further addition of age as a covariate for the propensity score-matching demonstrated that there was no significant difference between high-risk and low-risk patients or between medium-risk and low-risk patients, implying that older age

  17. The effect of sustained hypoxia on the cardio-respiratory response of bowfin Amia calva: implications for changes in the oxygen transport system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porteus, C S; Wright, P A; Milsom, W K

    2014-03-01

    This study examined mechanisms underlying cardio-respiratory acclimation to moderate sustained hypoxia (6.0 kPa for 7 days at 22° C) in the bowfin Amia calva, a facultative air-breathing fish. This level of hypoxia is slightly below the critical oxygen tension (pcrit ) of A. calva denied access to air (mean ± s.e. = 9.3 ± 1.0 kPa). Before exposure to sustained hypoxia, A. calva with access to air increased air-breathing frequency on exposure to acute progressive hypoxia while A. calva without access to air increased gill-breathing frequency. Exposure to sustained hypoxia increased the gill ventilation response to acute progressive hypoxia in A. calva without access to air, regardless of whether they had access to air or not during the sustained hypoxia. Additionally, there was a decrease in Hb-O2 binding affinity in these fish. This suggests that, in A. calva, acclimation to hypoxia elicits changes that increase oxygen delivery to the gas exchange surface for oxygen uptake and reduce haemoglobin affinity to enhance oxygen delivery to the tissues. © 2013 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  18. The role of GABA in the hypoxia tolerance of the epaulette shark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, G.; Mulvey, J.; Renshaw, G.M.C.; Dodd, P.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The epaulette shark responds to hypoxia with brain hypometabolism which is correlated with increased levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). We examined GABA-like immunoreactivity (GABA-IR) and the density and binding characteristics of GABA A receptors in the Epaulette shark brainstem. These studies were conducted to investigate changes in response to hypoxia. Experimental animals were exposed to eight cycles of an extreme hypoxic regimen (5% of normoxia). Animals were anaesthetised with 80mg/L of MS222 and the brain was dissected and processed either for immunohistochemistry or receptor ligand binding. Membranes were prepared at 4 deg C according to a previously reported protocol and the binding characteristics of [ 3 H]flunitrazeparn ([ 3 H]FNZ) were examined using an in vitro centrifugation assay. We report on the effect of hypoxia on specific [ 3 H]FNZ binding characteristics. GABA-IR was detected using a primary antibody dilution of 1:15 000 and the Vector ABC method. We report that an overall increase in the optical density of GABA-IR occurs with significant increases in three out of the four brainstem nuclei examined in experimental animals. The results of these studies are discussed in conjunction with the hypoxia-tolerance .of the epaulette shark. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

  19. The hypoxia model in human psychopharmacology: neurophysiological and psychometric studies with aniracetam i.v.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletu, B; Grünberger, J

    1984-01-01

    Changes in human brain function and mental performance under hypoxic hypoxidosis as well as after intravenous injection of aniracetam - a new potentially nootropic 2-pyrrolidinone derivative - were investigated in a double-blind placebo-controlled study utilizing computer-assisted spectral analysis of the EEG and psychometric tests. Hypoxic hypoxidosis was induced by a fixed gas combination of 11.2% O2 and 88.8% N2, which was inhaled under normobaric conditions by 10 male healthy volunteers. The following substances were injected intravenously at weekly intervals according to a latin square design: placebo, 10 mg and 100 mg aniracetam and the solvent under hypoxic conditions as well as placebo under normoxic conditions. Spectral analysis of the EEG recorded under hypoxia demonstrated neurophysiological alterations indicative of a deterioration in vigilance, which was also reflected by a deterioration in psychomotor activity and mnestic performance in the psychometric tests. Aniracetam i.v. attenuated the hypoxia-induced deterioration of brain function and mental performance, thus exhibiting protective properties against hypoxia in man. The usefulness of the hypoxia model in the screening of antihypoxidotic compounds is discussed.

  20. Hypoxia augments LPS-induced inflammation and triggers high altitude cerebral edema in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yanzhao; Huang, Xin; Zhao, Tong; Qiao, Meng; Zhao, Xingnan; Zhao, Ming; Xu, Lun; Zhao, Yongqi; Wu, Liying; Wu, Kuiwu; Chen, Ruoli; Fan, Ming; Zhu, Lingling

    2017-08-01

    High altitude cerebral edema (HACE) is a life-threatening illness that develops during the rapid ascent to high altitudes, but its underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Growing evidence has implicated inflammation in the susceptibility to and development of brain edema. In the present study, we investigated the inflammatory response and its roles in HACE in mice following high altitude hypoxic injury. We report that acute hypobaric hypoxia induced a slight inflammatory response or brain edema within 24h in mice. However, the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammatory response rapidly aggravated brain edema upon acute hypobaric hypoxia exposure by disrupting blood-brain barrier integrity and activating microglia, increasing water permeability via the accumulation of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), and eventually leading to impaired cognitive and motor function. These findings demonstrate that hypoxia augments LPS-induced inflammation and induces the occurrence and development of cerebral edema in mice at high altitude. Here, we provide new information on the impact of systemic inflammation on the susceptibility to and outcomes of HACE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR) prevents hypobaric hypoxia-induced spatial memory impairment through extracellular related kinase-mediated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhwal, K; Hota, S K; Jain, V; Prasad, D; Singh, S B; Ilavazhagan, G

    2009-06-30

    Exposure to hypobaric hypoxia, a condition involving decreased availability of oxygen is known to be associated with oxidative stress, neurodegeneration and memory impairment. The multifactorial response of the brain and the complex signaling pathways involved therewith limits the therapeutic efficacy of several antioxidants in ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia-induced memory impairment. The present study was therefore aimed at investigating the potential of acetyl-l-carnitine (ALCAR), a known antioxidant that has been reported to augment neurotrophin-mediated survival mechanisms, in ameliorating hypoxia-induced neurodegeneration and memory impairment. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a key transcription factor involved in the cellular defense mechanism against oxidative stress related to brain injury and neurological disorders. The study was designed to understand the mechanisms involving Nrf2 stabilization following exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. The results displayed reference memory impairment in Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (7620 m) for 14 consecutive days which however improved on administration of ALCAR during hypoxic exposure. The study also revealed Nrf2 regulated augmented antioxidant response on administration of ALCAR which was through a novel tyrosine kinase A (TrkA) receptor-mediated mechanism. A decrease in free radical generation, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation was also observed along with a concomitant increase in thioredoxin and reduced glutathione levels on administration of ALCAR during exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. The present study therefore reveals the therapeutic potential of ALCAR under conditions of hypobaric hypoxia and elucidates a novel mechanism of action of the drug.

  2. Diagnostic efficiency of demographically corrected Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III and Wechsler Memory Scale-III indices in moderate to severe traumatic brain injury and lower education levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Alexandra J; Batchelor, Jennifer; Shores, E Arthur; Jones, Mike

    2009-11-01

    Despite the sensitivity of neuropsychological tests to educational level, improved diagnostic accuracy for demographically corrected scores has yet to be established. Diagnostic efficiency statistics of Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III) indices that were corrected for education, sex, and age (demographically corrected) were compared with age corrected indices in individuals aged 16 to 75 years with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 12 years or less education. TBI participants (n = 100) were consecutive referrals to an outpatient rehabilitation service and met careful selection criteria. Controls (n = 100) were obtained from the WAIS-III/WMS-III standardization sample. Demographically corrected indices did not provide higher diagnostic efficiency than age corrected indices and this result was supported by reanalysis of the TBI group against a larger and unmatched control group. Processing Speed Index provided comparable diagnostic accuracy to that of combined indices. Demographically corrected indices were associated with higher cut-scores to maximize overall classification, reflecting the upward adjustment of those scores in a lower education sample. This suggests that, in clinical practice, the test results of individuals with limited education may be more accurately interpreted with the application of demographic corrections. Diagnostic efficiency statistics are presented, and future research directions are discussed.

  3. A 26-Gene Hypoxia Signature Predicts Benefit from Hypoxia-Modifying Therapy in Laryngeal Cancer but Not Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eustace, A.; Mani, N.; Span, P.N.; Irlam, J.J.; Taylor, J.; Betts, G.N.; Denley, H.; Miller, C.J.; Homer, J.J.; Rojas, A.M.; Hoskin, P.J.; Buffa, F.M.; Harris, A.L.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; West, C.M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tumor hypoxia is associated with a poor prognosis, hypoxia modification improves outcome, and hypoxic status predicts benefit from treatment. Yet, there is no universal measure of clinical hypoxia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether a 26-gene hypoxia signature predicted

  4. Mitochondrial respiratory function induces endogenous hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Sara; Kim, Ara; Yoshihara, Toshitada; Tobita, Seiji; Takeuchi, Toshiyuki; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia influences many key biological functions. In cancer, it is generally believed that hypoxic condition is generated deep inside the tumor because of the lack of oxygen supply. However, consumption of oxygen by cancer should be one of the key means of regulating oxygen concentration to induce hypoxia but has not been well studied. Here, we provide direct evidence of the mitochondrial role in the induction of intracellular hypoxia. We used Acetylacetonatobis [2-(2'-benzothienyl) pyridinato-kN, kC3'] iridium (III) (BTP), a novel oxygen sensor, to detect intracellular hypoxia in living cells via microscopy. The well-differentiated cancer cell lines, LNCaP and MCF-7, showed intracellular hypoxia without exogenous hypoxia in an open environment. This may be caused by high oxygen consumption, low oxygen diffusion in water, and low oxygen incorporation to the cells. In contrast, the poorly-differentiated cancer cell lines: PC-3 and MDAMB231 exhibited intracellular normoxia by low oxygen consumption. The specific complex I inhibitor, rotenone, and the reduction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content reduced intracellular hypoxia, indicating that intracellular oxygen concentration is regulated by the consumption of oxygen by mitochondria. HIF-1α was activated in endogenously hypoxic LNCaP and the activation was dependent on mitochondrial respiratory function. Intracellular hypoxic status is regulated by glucose by parabolic dose response. The low concentration of glucose (0.045 mg/ml) induced strongest intracellular hypoxia possibly because of the Crabtree effect. Addition of FCS to the media induced intracellular hypoxia in LNCaP, and this effect was partially mimicked by an androgen analog, R1881, and inhibited by the anti-androgen, flutamide. These results indicate that mitochondrial respiratory function determines intracellular hypoxic status and may regulate oxygen-dependent biological functions.

  5. Mitochondrial respiratory function induces endogenous hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Prior

    Full Text Available Hypoxia influences many key biological functions. In cancer, it is generally believed that hypoxic condition is generated deep inside the tumor because of the lack of oxygen supply. However, consumption of oxygen by cancer should be one of the key means of regulating oxygen concentration to induce hypoxia but has not been well studied. Here, we provide direct evidence of the mitochondrial role in the induction of intracellular hypoxia. We used Acetylacetonatobis [2-(2'-benzothienyl pyridinato-kN, kC3'] iridium (III (BTP, a novel oxygen sensor, to detect intracellular hypoxia in living cells via microscopy. The well-differentiated cancer cell lines, LNCaP and MCF-7, showed intracellular hypoxia without exogenous hypoxia in an open environment. This may be caused by high oxygen consumption, low oxygen diffusion in water, and low oxygen incorporation to the cells. In contrast, the poorly-differentiated cancer cell lines: PC-3 and MDAMB231 exhibited intracellular normoxia by low oxygen consumption. The specific complex I inhibitor, rotenone, and the reduction of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA content reduced intracellular hypoxia, indicating that intracellular oxygen concentration is regulated by the consumption of oxygen by mitochondria. HIF-1α was activated in endogenously hypoxic LNCaP and the activation was dependent on mitochondrial respiratory function. Intracellular hypoxic status is regulated by glucose by parabolic dose response. The low concentration of glucose (0.045 mg/ml induced strongest intracellular hypoxia possibly because of the Crabtree effect. Addition of FCS to the media induced intracellular hypoxia in LNCaP, and this effect was partially mimicked by an androgen analog, R1881, and inhibited by the anti-androgen, flutamide. These results indicate that mitochondrial respiratory function determines intracellular hypoxic status and may regulate oxygen-dependent biological functions.

  6. Effect of hypoxia on the activity and binding of glycolytic and associated enzymes in sea scorpion tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lushchak V.I.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of hypoxia on the levels of glycogen, glucose and lactate as well as the activities and binding of glycolytic and associated enzymes to subcellular structures was studied in brain, liver and white muscle of the teleost fish, Scorpaena porcus. Hypoxia exposure decreased glucose levels in liver from 2.53 to 1.70 µmol/g wet weight and in muscle led to its increase from 3.64 to 25.1 µmol/g wet weight. Maximal activities of several enzymes in brain were increased by hypoxia: hexokinase by 23%, phosphoglucoisomerase by 47% and phosphofructokinase (PFK by 56%. However, activities of other enzymes in brain as well as enzymes in liver and white muscle were largely unchanged or decreased during experimental hypoxia. Glycolytic enzymes in all three tissues were partitioned between soluble and particulate-bound forms. In several cases, the percentage of bound enzymes was reduced during hypoxia; bound aldolase in brain was reduced from 36.4 to 30.3% whereas glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase fell from 55.7 to 28.7% bound. In muscle PFK was reduced from 57.4 to 41.7% bound. Oppositely, the proportion of bound aldolase and triosephosphate isomerase increased in hypoxic muscle. Phosphoglucomutase did not appear to occur in a bound form in liver and bound phosphoglucomutase disappeared in muscle during hypoxia exposure. Anoxia exposure also led to the disappearance of bound fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in liver, whereas a bound fraction of this enzyme appeared in white muscle of anoxic animals. The possible function of reversible binding of glycolytic enzymes to subcellular structures as a regulatory mechanism of carbohydrate metabolism is discussed.

  7. Kinetic modeling in PET imaging of hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjær; Hansen, Anders E

    2014-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased therapeutic resistance leading to poor treatment outcome. Therefore the ability to detect and quantify intratumoral oxygenation could play an important role in future individual personalized treatment strategies. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) can...... be used for non-invasive mapping of tissue oxygenation in vivo and several hypoxia specific PET tracers have been developed. Evaluation of PET data in the clinic is commonly based on visual assessment together with semiquantitative measurements e.g. standard uptake value (SUV). However, dynamic PET...... analysis for PET imaging of hypoxia....

  8. Sustained Hypoxia Elicits Competing Spinal Mechanisms of Phrenic Motor Facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinney, Michael J; Nichols, Nicole L; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2016-07-27

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF), a form of spinal motor plasticity. Competing mechanisms give rise to phrenic motor facilitation (pMF; a general term including pLTF) depending on the severity of hypoxia within episodes. In contrast, moderate acute sustained hypoxia (mASH) does not elicit pMF. By varying the severity of ASH and targeting competing mechanisms of pMF, we sought to illustrate why moderate AIH (mAIH) elicits pMF but mASH does not. Although mAIH elicits serotonin-dependent pLTF, mASH does not; thus, mAIH-induced pLTF is pattern sensitive. In contrast, severe AIH (sAIH) elicits pLTF through adenosine-dependent mechanisms, likely from greater extracellular adenosine accumulation. Because serotonin- and adenosine-dependent pMF interact via cross talk inhibition, we hypothesized that pMF is obscured because the competing mechanisms of pMF are balanced and offsetting during mASH. Here, we demonstrate the following: (1) blocking spinal A2A receptors with MSX-3 reveals mASH-induced pMF; and (2) sASH elicits A2A-dependent pMF. In anesthetized rats pretreated with intrathecal A2A receptor antagonist injections before mASH (PaO2 = 40-54 mmHg) or sASH (PaO2 = 25-36 mmHg), (1) mASH induced a serotonin-dependent pMF and (2) sASH induced an adenosine-dependent pMF, which was enhanced by spinal serotonin receptor inhibition. Thus, competing adenosine- and serotonin-dependent mechanisms contribute differentially to pMF depending on the pattern/severity of hypoxia. Understanding interactions between these mechanisms has clinical relevance as we develop therapies to treat severe neuromuscular disorders that compromise somatic motor behaviors, including breathing. Moreover, these results demonstrate how competing mechanisms of plasticity can give rise to pattern sensitivity in pLTF. Intermittent hypoxia elicits pattern-sensitive spinal plasticity and improves motor function after spinal injury or during neuromuscular disease

  9. [Effect of obstructive sleep apnea hypoxia on learning memory capacity after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, X F; Zhao, Y N; Li, J M; Chen, C X; Li, S X

    2016-04-07

    To investigate the effect of obstructive sleep apnea hypoxia on learning memory capacity in rat after ischemia. Eighty healthy male wister rats were randomly divided into: sham operation group (SO group, n=20), merely ischemia group (I/R group, n=20), and obstructive sleep apnea hypoxia for 7 days ischemia group (IH7+ I/R group, n=20), obstructive sleep apnea hypoxia for 21 days ischemia group (IH21+ I/R group, n=20). Obstructive sleep apnea hypoxia ischemia groups were respectively given obstructive sleep apnea hypoxia for 7 days and 21 days. Ischemia animals were prepared cerebral ischemia-reperfusion model by improved pulsinelli four vessels block (4-VO), the morphological changes of hippocampus nerve cells of rat brain were detected with HE, neuron pathology in hippocampal regin was observed using electron microscope, and learning memory capacity of rats were assessed by the Morris water maze test. Compared with the SO group, the I/R group demonstrated shortened escaping latency, increased frequency of crossing the platform in the water maze test, decreased survival rate of neurons, and increased apoptotic cells and ultrastructure damages(Phypoxia ischemia groups showed shortened escaping latency, increased frequency of crossing the platform, decreased survival rate of neurons, and increased apoptotic cells and ultrastructure damages(Phypoxia can increase the damage of learning memory capacity. This damage is related to hippocampus nerve loss and ultrastructure injury from obstructive sleep apnea hypoxia.

  10. Brief ethanol exposure and stress-related factors disorganize neonatal breathing plasticity during the brain growth spurt period in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchione, A F; Anunziata, F; Haymal, B O; Abate, P; Molina, J C

    2018-04-01

    The effects of early ethanol exposure upon neonatal respiratory plasticity have received progressive attention given a multifactorial perspective related with sudden infant death syndrome or hypoxia-associated syndromes. The present preclinical study was performed in 3-9-day-old pups, a stage in development characterized by a brain growth spurt that partially overlaps with the 3rd human gestational trimester. Breathing frequencies and apneas were examined in pups receiving vehicle or a relatively moderate ethanol dose (2.0 g/kg) utilizing a whole body plethysmograph. The experimental design also considered possible associations between drug administration stress and exteroceptive cues (plethysmographic context or an artificial odor). Ethanol exposure progressively exerted a detrimental effect upon breathing frequencies. A test conducted at PD9 when pups were under the state of sobriety confirmed ethanol's detrimental effects upon respiratory plasticity (breathing depression). Pre-exposure to the drug also resulted in a highly disorganized respiratory response following a hypoxic event, i.e., heightened apneic episodes. Associative processes involving drug administration procedures and placement in the plethysmographic context also affected respiratory plasticity. Pups that experienced intragastric administrations in close temporal contiguity with such a context showed diminished hyperventilation during hypoxia. In a 2nd test conducted at PD9 while pups were intoxicated and undergoing hypoxia, an attenuated hyperventilatory response was observed. In this test, there were also indications that prior ethanol exposure depressed breathing frequencies during hypoxia and a recovery normoxia phase. As a whole, the results demonstrated that brief ethanol experience and stress-related factors significantly disorganize respiratory patterns as well as arousal responses linked to hypoxia in neonatal rats.

  11. Hypoxia, HIF-1 Regulation and Cancer Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Oxygen insufficiency (hypoxia) is a common feature of human cancer and associated with tumor aggressiveness and poor clinical outcome. Furthermore, hypoxic tumors are more resistant to ionizing radiation and chemotherapy contributing to their unfavorable prognosis. The oxygen sensing pathway is

  12. Maternal sickle cell trait and fetal hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzar, S

    2000-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell trait (SCT) usually run a benign course. But they may develop vaso-occlusive crisis, which may lead to hypoxia. During these episodes, pregnant women with SCT may effect the developing fetus. This report describes an interesting finding of subtle degree of fetal hypoxia associated with maternal SCT. Twenty mothers with SCT were compared with 20 controls for the amount of circulating nucleated red blood cells (NRBC) and marker of fetal hypoxia at birth. Elevated number of circulating NRBC were noted in the cord blood of neonates born to mother with SCT as compared with controls, suggesting evidence of intrauterine fetal hypoxia. A larger prospective study is needed to elaborate further on this association.

  13. Hypoxia and the heart of poikilotherms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ošťádal, Bohuslav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 1 (2014), s. 28-32 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : blood supply heart * poikilotherms * tolerance to hypoxia Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  14. 2007 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  15. 2004 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  16. 2005 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  17. 2002 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  18. 2003 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  19. 2001 Hypoxia Watch Bottom CTD Station Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Hypoxia Watch project provides near-real-time, web-based maps of dissolved oxygen near the sea floor over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during a...

  20. Design of optimized hypoxia-activated prodrugs using pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Bettina Foehrenbacher

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia contributes to resistance of tumors to some cytotoxic drugs and to radiotherapy, but can in principle be exploited with hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAP. HAP in clinical development fall into two broad groups. Class I HAP (like the benzotriazine N-oxides tirapazamine and SN30000, are activated under relatively mild hypoxia. In contrast, Class II HAP (such as the nitro compounds PR-104A or TH-302 are maximally activated only under extreme hypoxia, but their active metabolites (effectors diffuse to cells at intermediate O2 and thus also eliminate moderately hypoxic cells. Here, we use a spatially resolved pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (SR-PK/PD model to compare these two strategies and to identify the features required in an optimal Class II HAP. The model uses a Green’s function approach to calculate spatial and longitudinal gradients of O2, prodrug and effector concentrations, and resulting killing in a digitized 3D tumor microregion to estimate activity as monotherapy and in combination with radiotherapy. An analogous model for a normal tissue with mild hypoxia and short intervesssel distances (based on a cremaster muscle microvessel network was used to estimate tumor selectivity of cell killing. This showed that Class II HAP offer advantages over Class I including higher tumor selectivity and greater freedom to vary prodrug diffusibility and rate of metabolic activation. The model suggests that the largest gains in class II HAP antitumor activity could be realized by optimizing effector stability and prodrug activation rates. We also use the model to show that diffusion of effector into blood vessels is unlikely to materially increase systemic exposure for realistic tumor burdens and effector clearances. However, we show that the tumor selectivity achievable by hypoxia-dependent prodrug activation alone is limited if dose-limiting normal tissues are even mildly hypoxic

  1. Nitric oxide associated with iNOS expression inhibits acetylcholinesterase activity and induces memory impairment during acute hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udayabanu, M; Kumaran, D; Nair, R Unnikrishnan; Srinivas, P; Bhagat, Neeta; Aneja, R; Katyal, Anju

    2008-09-16

    The mechanisms responsible for cholinergic dysfunction associated learning and memory impairment during hypoxia are not well-understood. However it is known that inflammatory mediators like inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) hamper the functions of cholinergic neurons. In this present experiment we made an effort to study the iNOS expression mediated retrograde and anterograde memory impairment in Balb/c mice following acute hypobaric hypoxia (at an altitude of 23,000ft for 6h) using elevated plus maze and passive avoidance step-through tasks. Our results demonstrated that hypoxia transiently impairs the retrograde memory without affecting the anterograde memory functions, accompanied with a substantial rise in iNOS expression and nitric oxide levels in cerebral cortex on days 2 and 3 post hypoxia. Treatment with aminoguanidine (iNOS inhibitor ), resulted in down-regulation of the iNOS expression, attenuation of the surge of nitric oxide (NO) in cerebral cortex and reversal of retrograde memory impairment due to hypoxia. Moreover the reduced AChE activity and elevated lipid peroxidation in cerebral cortex were evident during post hypoxia re-oxygenation period, which was not observed in the hippocampus. Additionally, NO donor spermine NONOate could inhibit the AChE activity in brain homogenates in a concentration-dependent manner, which further substantiate that nitric oxide produced during post hypoxia re-oxygenation, primarily contributes to the observed inhibition of cortical AChE activity. Based on these experiments we hypothesize that the NO burst as a result of iNOS upregulation during hypoxia interrupts the memory consolidation by altering the cholinergic functions.

  2. Cardiovascular function in term fetal sheep conceived, gestated and studied in the hypobaric hypoxia of the Andean altiplano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Emilio A; Rojas, Rodrigo T; Krause, Bernardo J; Ebensperger, Germán; Reyes, Roberto V; Giussani, Dino A; Parer, Julian T; Llanos, Aníbal J

    2016-03-01

    High-altitude hypoxia causes intrauterine growth restriction and cardiovascular programming. However, adult humans and animals that have evolved at altitude show certain protection against the effects of chronic hypoxia. Whether the highland fetus shows similar protection against high altitude gestation is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that high-altitude fetal sheep have evolved cardiovascular compensatory mechanisms to withstand chronic hypoxia that are different from lowland sheep. We studied seven high-altitude (HA; 3600 m) and eight low-altitude (LA; 520 m) pregnant sheep at ∼90% gestation. Pregnant ewes and fetuses were instrumented for cardiovascular investigation. A three-period experimental protocol was performed in vivo: 30 min of basal, 1 h of acute superimposed hypoxia (∼10% O2) and 30 min of recovery. Further, we determined ex vivo fetal cerebral and femoral arterial function. HA pregnancy led to chronic fetal hypoxia, growth restriction and altered cardiovascular function. During acute superimposed hypoxia, LA fetuses redistributed blood flow favouring the brain, heart and adrenals, whereas HA fetuses showed a blunted cardiovascular response. Importantly, HA fetuses have a marked reduction in umbilical blood flow versus LA. Isolated cerebral arteries from HA fetuses showed a higher contractile capacity but a diminished response to catecholamines. In contrast, femoral arteries from HA fetuses showed decreased contractile capacity and increased adrenergic contractility. The blunting of the cardiovascular responses to hypoxia in fetuses raised in the Alto Andino may indicate a change in control strategy triggered by chronic hypoxia, switching towards compensatory mechanisms that are more cost-effective in terms of oxygen uptake. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2015 The Physiological Society.

  3. Initial brain aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kirsten; Yokota, Takashi; Hasan-Olive, Md Mahdi

    2018-01-01

    Brain aging is accompanied by declining mitochondrial respiration. We hypothesized that mitochondrial morphology and dynamics would reflect this decline. Using hippocampus and frontal cortex of a segmental progeroid mouse model lacking Cockayne syndrome protein B (CSBm/m) and C57Bl/6 (WT) controls...... and comparing young (2–5 months) to middle-aged mice (13–14 months), we found that complex I-linked state 3 respiration (CI) was reduced at middle age in CSBm/m hippocampus, but not in CSBm/m cortex or WT brain. In hippocampus of both genotypes, mitochondrial size heterogeneity increased with age. Notably...... content was lower, and hypoxia-induced factor 1α mRNA was greater at both ages in CSBm/m compared to WT brain. Our findings show that decreased CI and increased mitochondrial size heterogeneity are highly associated and point to declining mitochondrial quality control as an initial event in brain aging....

  4. Physiological cerebrovascular remodeling in response to chronic mild hypoxia: a role for activated protein C

    OpenAIRE

    Burnier, Laurent; Boroujerdi, Amin; Fernández, Jose A.; Welser-Alves, Jennifer V.; Griffin, John H.; Milner, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Activated protein C (APC) is a serine protease that promotes favorable changes in vascular barrier integrity and post-ischemic angiogenic remodeling in animal models of ischemic stroke, and its efficacy is currently being investigated in clinical ischemic stroke trials. Interestingly, application of sub-clinical chronic mild hypoxia (CMH) (8% O2) also promotes angiogenic remodeling and increased tight junction protein expression, suggestive of enhanced blood-brain barrier (BBB) integrity, tho...

  5. Hypoxia treatment reverses neurodegenerative disease in a mouse model of Leigh syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Michele; Jain, Isha H; Goldberger, Olga; Rezoagli, Emanuele; Thoonen, Robrecht; Cheng, Kai-Hung; Sosnovik, David E; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Mootha, Vamsi K; Zapol, Warren M

    2017-05-23

    The most common pediatric mitochondrial disease is Leigh syndrome, an episodic, subacute neurodegeneration that can lead to death within the first few years of life, for which there are no proven general therapies. Mice lacking the complex I subunit, Ndufs4, develop a fatal progressive encephalopathy resembling Leigh syndrome and die at ≈60 d of age. We previously reported that continuously breathing normobaric 11% O 2 from an early age prevents neurological disease and dramatically improves survival in these mice. Here, we report three advances. First, we report updated survival curves and organ pathology in Ndufs4 KO mice exposed to hypoxia or hyperoxia. Whereas normoxia-treated KO mice die from neurodegeneration at about 60 d, hypoxia-treated mice eventually die at about 270 d, likely from cardiac disease, and hyperoxia-treated mice die within days from acute pulmonary edema. Second, we report that more conservative hypoxia regimens, such as continuous normobaric 17% O 2 or intermittent hypoxia, are ineffective in preventing neuropathology. Finally, we show that breathing normobaric 11% O 2 in mice with late-stage encephalopathy reverses their established neurological disease, evidenced by improved behavior, circulating disease biomarkers, and survival rates. Importantly, the pathognomonic MRI brain lesions and neurohistopathologic findings are reversed after 4 wk of hypoxia. Upon return to normoxia, Ndufs4 KO mice die within days. Future work is required to determine if hypoxia can be used to prevent and reverse neurodegeneration in other animal models, and to determine if it can be provided in a safe and practical manner to allow in-hospital human therapeutic trials.

  6. Molecular evolution of globin genes in Gymnotiform electric fishes: relation to hypoxia tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ran; Losilla, Mauricio; Lu, Ying; Yang, Guang; Zakon, Harold

    2017-02-13

    Nocturnally active gymnotiform weakly electric fish generate electric signals for communication and navigation, which can be energetically taxing. These fish mainly inhabit the Amazon basin, where some species prefer well-oxygenated waters and others live in oxygen-poor, stagnant habitats. The latter species show morphological, physiological, and behavioral adaptations for hypoxia-tolerance. However, there have been no studies of hypoxia tolerance on the molecular level. Globins are classic respiratory proteins. They function principally in oxygen-binding and -delivery in various tissues and organs. Here, we investigate the molecular evolution of alpha and beta hemoglobins, myoglobin, and neuroglobin in 12 gymnotiforms compared with other teleost fish. The present study identified positively selected sites (PSS) on hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb) genes using different maximum likelihood (ML) methods; some PSS fall in structurally important protein regions. This evidence for the positive selection of globin genes suggests that the adaptive evolution of these genes has helped to enhance the capacity for oxygen storage and transport. Interestingly, a substitution of a Cys at a key site in the obligate air-breathing electric eel (Electrophorus electricus) is predicted to enhance oxygen storage of Mb and contribute to NO delivery during hypoxia. A parallel Cys substitution was also noted in an air-breathing African electric fish (Gymnarchus niloticus). Moreover, the expected pattern under normoxic conditions of high expression of myoglobin in heart and neuroglobin in the brain in two hypoxia-tolerant species suggests that the main effect of selection on these globin genes is on their sequence rather than their basal expression patterns. Results indicate a clear signature of positive selection in the globin genes of most hypoxia-tolerant gymnotiform fishes, which are obligate or facultative air breathers. These findings highlight the critical role of globin genes in

  7. The effect of aprotinin on hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced changes in neutrophil and endothelial function.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, D

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: An acute inflammatory response associated with cerebral ischaemia-reperfusion contributes to the development of brain injury. Aprotinin has potential, though unexplained, neuroprotective effects in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODS: Human neutrophil CD11 b\\/CD18, endothelial cell intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression and endothelial interleukin (IL)-1beta supernatant concentrations in response to in vitro hypoxia-reoxygenation was studied in the presence or absence of aprotinin (1600 KIU mL(-1)). Adhesion molecule expression was quantified using flow cytometry and IL-1beta concentrations by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Data were analysed using ANOVA and post hoc Student-Newman-Keuls test as appropriate. RESULTS: Exposure to 60-min hypoxia increased neutrophil CD11b expression compared to normoxia (170+\\/-46% vs. 91+\\/-27%, P = 0.001) (percent intensity of fluorescence compared to time 0) (n = 8). Hypoxia (60 min) produced greater upregulation of CD11b expression in controls compared to aprotinin-treated neutrophils [(170+\\/-46% vs. 129+\\/-40%) (P = 0.04)] (n = 8). Hypoxia-reoxygenation increased endothelial cell ICAM-1 expression (155+\\/-3.7 vs. 43+\\/-21 mean channel fluorescence, P = 0.0003) and IL-1beta supernatant concentrations compared to normoxia (3.4+\\/-0.4 vs. 2.6+\\/-0.2, P = 0.02) (n = 3). Hypoxia-reoxygenation produced greater upregulation of ICAM- 1 expression [(155+\\/-3.3 vs. 116+\\/-0.7) (P = 0.001)] and IL-1beta supernatant concentrations [(3.4+\\/-0.3 vs. 2.6+\\/-0.1) (P = 0.01)] in controls compared to aprotinin-treated endothelial cell preparation (n = 3). CONCLUSIONS: Hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced upregulation of neutrophil CD11b, endothelial cell ICAM-1 expression and IL-1beta concentrations is decreased by aprotinin at clinically relevant concentrations.

  8. Immunohistochemical Detection of Changes in Tumor Hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, James; Carlin, Sean; Burke, Sean A.; Wen Bixiu; Yang, Kwang Mo; Ling, C. Clifton

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although hypoxia is a known prognostic factor, its effect will be modified by the rate of reoxygenation and the extent to which the cells are acutely hypoxic. We tested the ability of exogenous and endogenous markers to detect reoxygenation in a xenograft model. Our technique might be applicable to stored patient samples. Methods and Materials: The human colorectal carcinoma line, HT29, was grown in nude mice. Changes in tumor hypoxia were examined by injection of pimonidazole, followed 24 hours later by EF5. Cryosections were stained for these markers and for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α). Tumor hypoxia was artificially manipulated by carbogen exposure. Results: In unstressed tumors, all four markers showed very similar spatial distributions. After carbogen treatment, pimonidazole and EF5 could detect decreased hypoxia. HIF1α staining was also decreased relative to CAIX, although the effect was less pronounced than for EF5. Control tumors displayed small regions that had undergone spontaneous changes in tumor hypoxia, as judged by pimonidazole relative to EF5; most of these changes were reflected by CAIX and HIF1α. Conclusion: HIF1α can be compared with either CAIX or a previously administered nitroimidazole to provide an estimate of reoxygenation

  9. Hypoxia-induced phrenic long-term facilitation: emergent properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devinney, Michael J; Huxtable, Adrianne G; Nichols, Nicole L; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2013-03-01

    As in other neural systems, plasticity is a hallmark of the neural system controlling breathing. One spinal mechanism of respiratory plasticity is phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) following acute intermittent hypoxia. Although cellular mechanisms giving rise to pLTF occur within the phrenic motor nucleus, different signaling cascades elicit pLTF under different conditions. These cascades, referred to as Q and S pathways to phrenic motor facilitation (pMF), interact via cross-talk inhibition. Whereas the Q pathway dominates pLTF after mild to moderate hypoxic episodes, the S pathway dominates after severe hypoxic episodes. The biological significance of multiple pathways to pMF is unknown. This review will discuss the possibility that interactions between pathways confer emergent properties to pLTF, including pattern sensitivity and metaplasticity. Understanding these mechanisms and their interactions may enable us to optimize intermittent hypoxia-induced plasticity as a treatment for patients that suffer from ventilatory impairment or other motor deficits. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  10. Thirty Minutes of Hypobaric Hypoxia Provokes Alterations of Immune Response, Haemostasis, and Metabolism Proteins in Human Serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Hinkelbein

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypobaric hypoxia (HH during airline travel induces several (patho- physiological reactions in the human body. Whereas severe hypoxia is investigated thoroughly, very little is known about effects of moderate or short-term hypoxia, e.g. during airline flights. The aim of the present study was to analyse changes in serum protein expression and activation of signalling cascades in human volunteers staying for 30 min in a simulated altitude equivalent to airline travel. After approval of the local ethics committee, 10 participants were exposed to moderate hypoxia (simulation of 2400 m or 8000 ft for 30 min in a hypobaric pressure chamber. Before and after hypobaric hypoxia, serum was drawn, centrifuged, and analysed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DIGE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization followed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF. Biological functions of regulated proteins were identified using functional network analysis (GeneMania®, STRING®, and Perseus® software. In participants, oxygen saturation decreased from 98.1 ± 1.3% to 89.2 ± 1.8% during HH. Expression of 14 spots (i.e., 10 proteins: ALB, PGK1, APOE, GAPDH, C1QA, C1QB, CAT, CA1, F2, and CLU was significantly altered. Bioinformatic analysis revealed an association of the altered proteins with the signalling cascades “regulation of haemostasis” (four proteins, “metabolism” (five proteins, and “leukocyte mediated immune response” (five proteins. Even though hypobaric hypoxia was short and moderate (comparable to an airliner flight, analysis of protein expression in human subjects revealed an association to immune response, protein metabolism, and haemostasis

  11. Hypoxic stress up-regulates Kir2.1 expression and facilitates cell proliferation in brain capillary endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamura, Hideto; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Asai, Kiyofumi [Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan); Imaizumi, Yuji, E-mail: yimaizum@phar.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular & Cellular Pharmacology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is mainly composed of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), astrocytes and pericytes. Brain ischemia causes hypoxic encephalopathy and damages BBB. However, it remains still unclear how hypoxia affects BCECs. In the present study, t-BBEC117 cells, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, were cultured under hypoxic conditions at 4–5% oxygen for 72 h. This hypoxic stress caused hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a marked increase in Ba{sup 2+}-sensitive inward rectifier K{sup +} current in t-BBEC117 cells after hypoxic culture. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses showed that Kir2.1 expression was significantly up-regulated at protein level but not at mRNA level after the hypoxic culture. Ca{sup 2+} imaging study revealed that the hypoxic stress enhanced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) entry, which was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 μM Ba{sup 2+}. On the other hand, the expression of SOC channels such as Orai1, Orai2, and transient receptor potential channels was not affected by hypoxic stress. MTT assay showed that the hypoxic stress significantly enhanced t-BBEC117 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by approximately 60% in the presence of 100 μM Ba{sup 2+}. We first show here that moderate cellular stress by cultivation under hypoxic conditions hyperpolarizes membrane potential via the up-regulation of functional Kir2.1 expression and presumably enhances Ca{sup 2+} entry, resulting in the facilitation of BCEC proliferation. These findings suggest potential roles of Kir2.1 expression in functional changes of BCECs in BBB following ischemia. -- Highlights: •Hypoxic culture of brain endothelial cells (BEC) caused membrane hyperpolarization. •This hyperpolarization was due to the increased expression of Kir2.1 channels. •Hypoxia enhanced store-operated Ca{sup 2+} (SOC) entry via Kir2.1 up-regulation. •Expression levels of putative SOC

  12. Hypoxic stress up-regulates Kir2.1 expression and facilitates cell proliferation in brain capillary endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Hideto; Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Yamamura, Hisao; Asai, Kiyofumi; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is mainly composed of brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs), astrocytes and pericytes. Brain ischemia causes hypoxic encephalopathy and damages BBB. However, it remains still unclear how hypoxia affects BCECs. In the present study, t-BBEC117 cells, an immortalized bovine brain endothelial cell line, were cultured under hypoxic conditions at 4–5% oxygen for 72 h. This hypoxic stress caused hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential. Patch-clamp recordings revealed a marked increase in Ba 2+ -sensitive inward rectifier K + current in t-BBEC117 cells after hypoxic culture. Western blot and real-time PCR analyses showed that Kir2.1 expression was significantly up-regulated at protein level but not at mRNA level after the hypoxic culture. Ca 2+ imaging study revealed that the hypoxic stress enhanced store-operated Ca 2+ (SOC) entry, which was significantly reduced in the presence of 100 μM Ba 2+ . On the other hand, the expression of SOC channels such as Orai1, Orai2, and transient receptor potential channels was not affected by hypoxic stress. MTT assay showed that the hypoxic stress significantly enhanced t-BBEC117 cell proliferation, which was inhibited by approximately 60% in the presence of 100 μM Ba 2+ . We first show here that moderate cellular stress by cultivation under hypoxic conditions hyperpolarizes membrane potential via the up-regulation of functional Kir2.1 expression and presumably enhances Ca 2+ entry, resulting in the facilitation of BCEC proliferation. These findings suggest potential roles of Kir2.1 expression in functional changes of BCECs in BBB following ischemia. -- Highlights: •Hypoxic culture of brain endothelial cells (BEC) caused membrane hyperpolarization. •This hyperpolarization was due to the increased expression of Kir2.1 channels. •Hypoxia enhanced store-operated Ca 2+ (SOC) entry via Kir2.1 up-regulation. •Expression levels of putative SOC channels were not affected by hypoxia.

  13. Cerium oxide nanoparticles promote neurogenesis and abrogate hypoxia-induced memory impairment through AMPK–PKC–CBP signaling cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya A

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aditya Arya,1 Anamika Gangwar,1 Sushil Kumar Singh,2 Manas Roy,3,4 Mainak Das,3 Niroj Kumar Sethy,1 Kalpana Bhargava1 1Peptide and Proteomics Division, Defense Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, 2Functional Materials Division, Solid State Physics Laboratory, Defense Research and Development Organization, Timarpur, Delhi, 3Biological Science and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, 4Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Howrah, India Abstract: Structural and functional integrity of the brain is adversely affected by reduced oxygen saturation, especially during chronic hypoxia exposure and often encountered by altitude travelers or dwellers. Hypoxia-induced generation of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species reportedly affects the cortex and hippocampus regions of the brain, promoting memory impairment and cognitive dysfunction. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, also known as nanoceria, switch between +3 and +4 oxidation states and reportedly scavenge superoxide anions, hydrogen peroxide, and peroxynitrite in vivo. In the present study, we evaluated the neuroprotective as well as the cognition-enhancing activities of nanoceria during hypobaric hypoxia. Using polyethylene glycol-coated 3 nm nanoceria (PEG-CNPs, we have demonstrated efficient localization of PEG-CNPs in rodent brain. This resulted in significant reduction of oxidative stress and associated damage during hypoxia exposure. Morris water maze-based memory function tests revealed that PEG-CNPs ameliorated hypoxia-induced memory impairment. Using microscopic, flow cytometric, and histological studies, we also provide evidences that PEG-CNPs augmented hippocampus neuronal survival and promoted neurogenesis. Molecular studies revealed that PEG-CNPs promoted neurogenesis through the 5'-adenine monophosphate-activated protein kinase–protein kinase C–cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein

  14. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M

    1996-01-01

    exposed to 2 h each of hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, hypocapnic normoxia, and normal breathing of room air (control experiment). During the control experiment, serum-EPO showed significant variations (ANOVA P = 0.047) with a 15% increase in mean values. The serum-EPO measured in the other...

  15. Tumor Hypoxia: Causative Mechanisms, Microregional Heterogeneities, and the Role of Tissue-Based Hypoxia Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaupel, Peter; Mayer, Arnulf

    Tumor hypoxia is a hallmark of solid malignant tumor growth, profoundly influences malignant progression and contributes to the development of therapeutic resistance. Pathogenesis of tumor hypoxia is multifactorial, with contributions from both acute and chronic factors. Spatial distribution of hypoxia within tumors is markedly heterogeneous and often changes over time, e.g., during a course of radiotherapy. Substantial changes in the oxygenation status can occur within the distance of a few cell layers, explaining the inability of currently used molecular imaging techniques to adequately assess this crucial trait. Due to the possible importance of tumor hypoxia for clinical decision-making, there is a great demand for molecular tools which may provide the necessary resolution down to the single cell level. Exogenous and endogenous markers of tumor hypoxia have been investigated for this purpose. Their potential use may be greatly enhanced by multiparametric in situ methods in experimental and human tumor tissue.

  16. Protective effect of astrocyte-conditioned medium on neurons following hypoxia and mechanical injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAN Ji-wen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To investigate the protec-tive effect of mouse astrocyte-conditioned medium (ACM on hypoxic and mechanically injured neurons by a cell model in vitro, and to explore the possible mechanism. Methods: The model of hypoxic neuronal injury was caused by 3% O 2 in three-gas incubator. Neurons were cul-tured with ordinary medium or 20% ACM respectively and randomly divided into hypoxic group (hypoxia for 4, 8, 24 h and marked as H4R0, H8R0, H24R0 and hypoxia reoxygenation group (H4R24, H8R24, H24R24. Mechanical injury model was developed by scratching neurons cultured in 20% ACM or ordinary medium to different degrees. Neu-rons in both medium were divided into normal control group, mild, moderate and severe injury groups. The 20% ACM was added 24 h before hypoxia/reoxygenation or mechanical injury. The morphology and survival of neurons were observed and counted by trypan blue staining. The concentration of NO, lactic dehydrogenase (LDH and membrane ATPase activity were detected by corresponding kits. Results: It was showed that 20% ACM can obviously promote the survival rate of hypoxia/reoxygenated neurons and scratched neurons as well. The morphology and num-ber of neurons exposed to hypoxia or scratch injury showed great difference between groups with or without ACM treatment. Compared with control group, the concentration of NO and LDH was much lower in hypoxic/reoxygenated neurons treated with 20% ACM, and the ATPase activity was higher. For the mechanical injury model, neurons with moderate injury also revealed a lower NO and LDH concen-tration than the control group. All the differences were sta-tistically significant (P<0.05. Conclusion: ACM can promote the survival and func-tional recovery of neurons following hypoxia or scratching to a certain degree. The mechanism may be associated with reducing the synthesis and release of NO and LDH as well as increasing the activity of membrane ATPase. Key words: Glial cell line

  17. Plasma kallikrein-bradykinin pathway promotes circulatory nitric oxide metabolite availability during hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padhy, Gayatri; Gangwar, Anamika; Sharma, Manish; Himashree, Gidugu; Singh, Krishan; Bhaumik, Gopinath; Bhargava, Kalpana; Sethy, Niroj Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an indispensible signalling molecule under hypoxic environment for both ethnic high altitude natives as well as lowland residents at high altitude. Several studies have reported higher levels of NO and bioactive NO products for both high altitude natives as well as healthy high altitude sojourners. But the metabolic pathways regulating the formation of NO and associated metabolites during hypoxia still remain elusive. In the present study, we profiled plasma proteomes of Ladakhi natives (3520 m) and lowland residents (post 1, 4 and 7 days stay) at the same altitude. This has resulted in the identification of 208 hypoxia responsive proteins (p hypoxia. In corroboration, we have also observed significant higher levels of plasma biomarkers for NO production (l-citrulline, nitrite, nitrate) for Ladakhi natives as compared to both lowland individuals healthy high altitude sojourners indicating higher NO availability. Since hypoxia-induced free radicals reduce NO availability, we also measured plasma levels of 8-isoprostanes, protein carbonyls and protein oxidation products in both Ladakhi natives and high altitude sojourners. Interestingly Ladakhi natives had significant lower levels of oxidative stress in comparison to high altitude sojourners but higher than lowland controls. These results suggest that plasma kallikrein-bradykinin-eNOS pathway along with moderate oxidative stress contributes to high altitude adaptation of Ladakhi natives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Normobaric, intermittent hypoxia conditioning is cardio- and vasoprotective in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukhina, Eugenia B; Belkina, Ludmila M; Terekhina, Olga L; Abramochkin, Denis V; Smirnova, Elena A; Budanova, Olga P; Mallet, Robert T; Downey, H Fred

    2013-12-01

    Favorable versus detrimental cardiovascular responses to intermittent hypoxia conditioning (IHC) are heavily dependent on experimental or pathological conditions, including the duration, frequency and intensity of the hypoxia exposures. Recently, we demonstrated that a program of moderate, normobaric IHC (FIO2 9.5-10% for 5-10 min/cycle, with intervening 4 min normoxia, 5-8 cycles/day for 20 days) in dogs afforded robust cardioprotection against infarction and arrhythmias induced by coronary artery occlusion-reperfusion, but this protection has not been verified in other species. Accordingly, in this investigation cardio- as well as vasoprotection were examined in male Wistar rats completing the normobaric IHC program or a sham program in which the rats continuously breathed atmospheric air. Myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (IR) was imposed by occlusion and reperfusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery in in situ experiments and by subjecting isolated, perfused hearts to global ischemia-reperfusion. Cardiac arrhythmias and myocardial infarct size were quantified in in situ experiments. Endothelial function was evaluated from the relaxation to acetylcholine of norepinephrine-precontracted aortic rings taken from in situ IR experiments, and from the increase in coronary flow produced by acetylcholine in isolated hearts. IHC sharply reduced cardiac arrhythmias during ischemia and decreased infarct size by 43% following IR. Endothelial dysfunction in aorta was marked after IR in sham rats, but not significant in IHC rats. Similar findings were found for the coronary circulations of isolated hearts. These findings support the hypothesis that moderate, normobaric IHC is cardio- and vasoprotective in a rat model of IR.

  19. Hypoxia training: symptom replication in experienced military aircrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Ben J; Iremonger, Gareth S; Hunt, Sheena; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2012-10-01

    Military aircrew are trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of hypoxia in a safe environment using a variety of methods to simulate altitude. In order to investigate the effectiveness of hypoxia training, this study compared the recall of hypoxia symptoms in military aircrew between two consecutive hypobaric chamber hypoxia training sessions conducted, on average, 4.5 yr apart. Previously trained subjects completed a questionnaire immediately before and after they underwent refresher hypoxia training and recorded the occurrence, order, and severity of symptoms experienced. Responses from refresher training were compared with their recall of symptoms experienced during previous training. There was no difference in the recall of most hypoxia symptoms between training sessions. Slurred speech was recalled more frequently from previous training compared to refresher training (14 vs. 4 subjects), whereas hot/cold flushes were recalled less frequently from previous training compared to refresher training (5 vs. 17 subjects). There was a statistically significant difference in overall hypoxia score (10.3 vs. 8.3), suggesting that from memory subjects may underestimate the level of hypoxia experienced in previous training. A high level of similarity between the recall of previously experienced hypoxia symptoms and recent experience supports the effectiveness of hypoxia training. These results replicate the finding of a 'hypoxia signature' reported by a previous study. Small differences in the recall of some symptoms and in overall hypoxia score highlight the importance of drawing attention to the more subtle symptoms of early hypoxia, and of using training techniques which optimize aircrew recall.

  20. Hypoxia-on-a-chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busek Mathias

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work a microfluidic cell cultivation device for perfused hypoxia assays as well as a suitable controlling unit are presented. The device features active components like pumps for fluid actuation and valves for fluid direction as well as an oxygenator element to ensure a sufficient oxygen transfer. It consists of several individually structured layers which can be tailored specifically to the intended purpose. Because of its clearness, its mechanical strength and chemical resistance as well as its well-known biocompatibility polycarbonate was chosen to form the fluidic layers by thermal diffusion bonding. Several oxygen sensing spots are integrated into the device and monitored with fluorescence lifetime detection. Furthermore an oxygen regulator module is implemented into the controlling unit which is able to mix different process gases to achieve a controlled oxygenation. First experiments show that oxygenation/deoxygenation of the system is completed within several minutes when pure nitrogen or air is applied to the oxygenator. Lastly the oxygen input by the pneumatically driven micro pump was quantified by measuring the oxygen content before and after the oxygenator.

  1. Bacopa monniera leaf extract ameliorates hypobaric hypoxia induced spatial memory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hota, Sunil Kumar; Barhwal, Kalpana; Baitharu, Iswar; Prasad, Dipti; Singh, Shashi Bala; Ilavazhagan, Govindasamy

    2009-04-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment has been attributed to several factors including increased oxidative stress, depleted mitochondrial bioenergetics, altered neurotransmission and apoptosis. This multifactorial response of the brain to hypobaric hypoxia limits the use of therapeutic agents that target individual pathways for ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia induced memory impairment. The present study aimed at exploring the therapeutic potential of a bacoside rich leaf extract of Bacopa monniera in improving the memory functions in hypobaric conditions. The learning ability was evaluated in male Sprague Dawley rats along with memory retrieval following exposure to hypobaric conditions simulating an altitude of 25,000 ft for different durations. The effect of bacoside administration on apoptosis, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP levels, and oxidative stress markers and on plasma corticosterone levels was investigated. Expression of NR1 subunit of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors, neuronal cell adhesion molecules and was also studied along with CREB phosphorylation to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of bacoside action. Bacoside administration was seen to enhance learning ability in rats along with augmentation in memory retrieval and prevention of dendritic atrophy following hypoxic exposure. In addition, it decreased oxidative stress, plasma corticosterone levels and neuronal degeneration. Bacoside administration also increased cytochrome c oxidase activity along with a concomitant increase in ATP levels. Hence, administration of bacosides could be a useful therapeutic strategy in ameliorating hypobaric hypoxia induced cognitive dysfunctions and other related neurological disorders.

  2. Neuronal death after perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia: Focus on autophagy-mediated cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descloux, C; Ginet, V; Clarke, P G H; Puyal, J; Truttmann, A C

    2015-10-01

    Neonatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy is a critical cerebral event occurring around birth with high mortality and neurological morbidity associated with long-term invalidating sequelae. In view of the great clinical importance of this condition and the lack of very efficacious neuroprotective strategies, it is urgent to better understand the different cell death mechanisms involved with the ultimate aim of developing new therapeutic approaches. The morphological features of three different cell death types can be observed in models of perinatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia: necrotic, apoptotic and autophagic cell death. They may be combined in the same dying neuron. In the present review, we discuss the different cell death mechanisms involved in neonatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia with a special focus on how autophagy may be involved in neuronal death, based: (1) on experimental models of perinatal hypoxia-ischemia and stroke, and (2) on the brains of human neonates who suffered from neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasma metabolite score correlates with Hypoxia time in a newly born piglet model for asphyxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Kuligowski

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE secondary to perinatal asphyxia is a leading cause of mortality and acquired long-term neurologic co-morbidities in the neonate. The most successful intervention for the treatment of moderate to severe HIE is moderate whole body hypothermia initiated within 6 h from birth. The objective and prompt identification of infants who are at risk of developing moderate to severe HIE in the critical first hours still remains a challenge. This work proposes a metabolite score calculated based on the relative intensities of three metabolites (choline, 6,8-dihydroxypurine and hypoxanthine that showed maximum correlation with hypoxia time in a consolidated piglet model for neonatal hypoxia-ischemia. The metabolite score's performance as a biomarker for perinatal hypoxia and its usefulness for clinical grading and decision making have been assessed and compared to the performance of lactate which is currently considered the gold standard. For plasma samples withdrawn before and directly after a hypoxic insult, the metabolite score performed similar to lactate. However, it provided an enhanced predictive capacity at 2 h after resuscitation. The present study evidences the usefulness of the metabolite score for improving the early assessment of the severity of the hypoxic insult based on serial determinations in a minimally invasive biofluid. The applicability of the metabolite score for clinical diagnosis and patient stratification for hypothermia treatment has to be confirmed in multicenter trials involving newborns suffering from HIE. Keywords: Hypoxia, Perinatal asphyxia, Newborn, Metabolic biomarker, Neonatal piglet model, Liquid Chromatography – Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS

  4. The impact of hypoxia and oxygenation modification on the radiation response of an intracranial rat glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bean, J.M.; Archer, G.E.; Munley, M.T.; Ong, E.; Snyder, S.A.; Haroon, Z.A.; McLendon, R.E.; Marks, L.B.; Stratford, M.R.L.; Chaplin, D.J.; Brizel, D.M.; Bigner, D.D.; Dewhirst, M.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The median survival for a patient treated for GBM is 1 year. Reasons for the poor long term benefit of conventional therapy, which includes radiation therapy, are poorly understood. Gliomas have areas of hypoxia which may predict for radioresistance. The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that hyperbaric oxygen was superior to nicotinamide plus carbogen in decreasing the extent of hypoxia and in increasing survival following fractionated irradiation in an intracranial glioma tumor model. Materials and Methods: RG-2 tumor cells were transplanted intracranially into female Fischer 344 rats. Hypoxia was studied using immunohistochemical staining of drug-protein adducts in tumor following removal of the brain after i.p. injection of pimonidazole hydrochloride under conditions of room air, 3 atmospheres oxygen (HBO), or nicotinamide (200 mg/kg i.p.) with carbogen. Serum nicotinamide and metabolites were measured by HPLC on samples taken 20 minutes after giving nicotinamide (200 mg/kg, i.p.). In a survival study animals were randomized on day 14 post-transplant to 1 of 4 treatment groups: 1) sham - anesthesia only; 2) XRT - 4 Gy x 5; 3) HBO - XRT after breathing for 5 minutes once 3 atmospheres of 100% oxygen was obtained; and 4) Carbogen/Nicotinamide - XRT with i.p. nicotinamide 20 minutes prior to irradiation and carbogen breathing for 5 minutes after saturation of the chamber. Following treatment, animals were followed until death. Results: Immunohistochemical evaluation of the tumors from animals breathing room air revealed pimonidazole adducts indicating the presence of hypoxia. Those tumors evaluated from animals treated with HBO did not show evidence of hypoxia marker binding. The median serum nicotinamide level obtained was 258.2 μg/ml. Median survivals post-transplant were: 1) Sham - 22 days; 2) XRT - 28 days; 3) HBO - 28 days; and 4) Carbogen/Nicotinamide - 26 days. Only XRT and HBO were statistically better than Sham (p = 0.002 and p

  5. Sensing hypoxia: physiology, genetics and epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakar, Nanduri R

    2013-05-01

    The carotid body is a sensory organ for detecting arterial blood O2 levels and reflexly mediates systemic cardiac, vascular and respiratory responses to hypoxia. This article presents a brief review of the roles of gaseous messengers in the sensory transduction at the carotid body, genetic and epigenetic influences on hypoxic sensing and the role of the carotid body chemoreflex in cardiorespiratory diseases. Type I (also called glomus) cells, the site of O2 sensing in the carotid body, express haem oxygenase-2 and cystathionine-γ-lyase, the enzymes which catalyse the generation of CO and H2S, respectively. Physiological studies have shown that CO is an inhibitory gas messenger, which contributes to the low sensory activity during normoxia, whereas H2S is excitatory and mediates sensory stimulation by hypoxia. Hypoxia-evoked H2S generation in the carotid body requires the interaction of cystathionine-γ-lyase with haem oxygenase-2, which generates CO. Hypoxia-inducible factors 1 and 2 constitute important components of the genetic make-up in the carotid body, which influence hypoxic sensing by regulating the intracellular redox state via transcriptional regulation of pro- and antioxidant enzymes. Recent studies suggest that developmental programming of the carotid body response to hypoxia involves epigenetic changes, e.g. DNA methylation of genes encoding redox-regulating enzymes. Emerging evidence implicates heightened carotid body chemoreflex in the progression of autonomic morbidities associated with cardiorespiratory diseases, such as sleep-disordered breathing with apnoea, congestive heart failure and essential hypertension.

  6. Erythrocytes induce proinflammatory endothelial activation in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas, Alice; Das, Shonit R; Emin, Memet; Sun, Li; Rifkind, Joseph M; Bhattacharya, Jahar; Bhattacharya, Sunita

    2013-01-01

    Although exposure to ambient hypoxia is known to cause proinflammatory vascular responses, the mechanisms initiating these responses are not understood. We tested the hypothesis that in systemic hypoxia, erythrocyte-derived H(2)O(2) induces proinflammatory gene transcription in vascular endothelium. We exposed mice or isolated, perfused murine lungs to 4 hours of hypoxia (8% O(2)). Leukocyte counts increased in the bronchoalveolar lavage. The expression of leukocyte adhesion receptors, reactive oxygen species, and protein tyrosine phosphorylation increased in freshly recovered lung endothelial cells (FLECs). These effects were inhibited by extracellular catalase and by the removal of erythrocytes, indicating that the responses were attributable to erythrocyte-derived H(2)O(2). Concomitant nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-κB and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α stabilization in FLECs occurred only in the presence of erythrocytes. Hemoglobin binding to the erythrocyte membrane protein, band 3, induced the release of H(2)O(2) from erythrocytes and the p65 translocation in FLECs. These data indicate for the first time, to our knowledge, that erythrocytes are responsible for endothelial transcriptional responses in hypoxia.

  7. Morphological evaluation of the cerebral blood vessels in the late gestation fetal sheep following hypoxia in utero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburamani, Ana A; Lo, Camden; Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Walker, David W

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia can significantly contribute to the development of permanent brain injury in the term neonate; however the response of cerebral blood vessels is not well understood. This study aimed to quantitatively measure vascular density and morphology using laminin immunohistochemistry as a marker of blood vessels, and determine the effects of a single, severe bout of hypoxia (umbilical cord occlusion, UCO) late in gestation on the developing cerebrovasculature in fetal sheep. At 124-126 days gestation singleton fetal sheep underwent surgery for implantation of catheters and placement of an inflatable cuff around the umbilical cord. A 10 min UCO or sham UCO (n=5) occurred at 132 days gestation. Fetal brains were collected at 24 h (n=5) or 48 h (n=4) after UCO for vascular density and morphology analysis of laminin immunohistochemistry. 48 h following a single, brief bout of severe hypoxia late in gestation decreased vascular density was seen in the caudate nucleus and no changes in vascular morphology occurred. However closer analysis revealed a significant shift in the frequency of smaller (≤10 μm) to larger (≤100 μm) perimeter blood vessels in periventricular and subcortical white matter. Close examination of the frequency distribution of vascular perimeter highlights that alterations in vascular morphology persist in the near term fetal brain for up to 48 h following a brief (10 min) hypoxia in white but not gray matter. These findings suggest that the near term brain may still be vulnerable to white matter injury following in utero hypoxia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Hypoxia in a neonate caused by intermittent positive pressure ventilation.

    OpenAIRE

    Beddis, I R; Silverman, M

    1980-01-01

    A newborn baby receiving mechanical ventilation was noted to have an extremely variable degree of hypoxia, despite the administration of 100% oxygen. The hypoxia was relieved rapidly when mechanical ventilation was withdrawn.

  9. Targeting tumour hypoxia to improve outcome of stereotactic radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittenborn, Thomas R; Horsman, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypoxia is a characteristic feature of solid tumours that significantly reduces the efficacy of conventional radiation therapy. In this study we investigated the role of hypoxia in a stereotactic radiation schedule by using a variety of hypoxic modifiers in a preclinical tumour model...... OXi4503 and heat with the final 15 Gy had a significantly larger effect (TCD50 = 2 Gy). CONCLUSIONS: Clinically relevant modifiers of hypoxia effectively enhanced an equivalent stereotactic radiation treatment confirming the importance of hypoxia in such schedules....

  10. Inflammation and hypoxia in the kidney: friends or foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, Volker H

    2015-08-01

    Hypoxic injury is commonly associated with inflammatory-cell infiltration, and inflammation frequently leads to the activation of cellular hypoxia response pathways. The molecular mechanisms underlying this cross-talk during kidney injury are incompletely understood. Yamaguchi and colleagues identify CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein δ as a cytokine- and hypoxia-regulated transcription factor that fine-tunes hypoxia-inducible factor-1 signaling in renal epithelial cells and thus provide a novel molecular link between hypoxia and inflammation in kidney injury.

  11. Overexpression of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor-1α Exacerbates Endothelial Barrier Dysfunction Induced by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The mechanisms involved in endothelial barrier dysfunction induced by hypoxia are incompletely understood. There is debate about the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α in endothelial barrier disruption. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of genetic overexpression of HIF-1α on barrier function and the underlying mechanisms in hypoxic endothelial cells. Methods: The plasmid pcDNA3.1/V5-His-HIF-1α was stably transfected into human endothelial cells. The cells were exposed to normoxia or hypoxia. The mRNA and protein expressions of HIF-1α were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot respectively. The barrier function was assessed by measuring the transendothelial electrical resistance (TER. The Western blot analysis was used to determine the protein expression of glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1, zonular occludens-1 (ZO-1, occludin, and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK in endothelial cells. The mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines was detected by qRT-PCR. Results: Genetic overexpression of HIF-1α significantly increased the mRNA and protein expression of HIF-1α in endothelial cells. The overexpression of HIF-1α enhanced the hypoxia-induced increase of HIF-1α and GLUT-1 protein expression. HIF-1α overexpression not only exacerbated hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction but also augmented hypoxia-induced up-regulation of MLCK protein expression. HIF-1α overexpression also enhanced IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression. Conclusion: We provide evidence that genetic overexpression of HIF-1α aggravates the hypoxia-induced endothelial barrier dysfunction via enhancing the up-regulation of MLCK protein expression caused by hypoxia, suggesting a potential role for HIF-1α in the pathogenesis of endothelial barrier dysfunction in hypoxia.

  12. Analysis of hypoxia and hypoxia-like states through metabolite profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie E Gleason

    Full Text Available In diverse organisms, adaptation to low oxygen (hypoxia is mediated through complex gene expression changes that can, in part, be mimicked by exposure to metals such as cobalt. Although much is known about the transcriptional response to hypoxia and cobalt, little is known about the all-important cell metabolism effects that trigger these responses.Herein we use a low molecular weight metabolome profiling approach to identify classes of metabolites in yeast cells that are altered as a consequence of hypoxia or cobalt exposures. Key findings on metabolites were followed-up by measuring expression of relevant proteins and enzyme activities. We find that both hypoxia and cobalt result in a loss of essential sterols and unsaturated fatty acids, but the basis for these changes are disparate. While hypoxia can affect a variety of enzymatic steps requiring oxygen and heme, cobalt specifically interferes with diiron-oxo enzymatic steps for sterol synthesis and fatty acid desaturation. In addition to diiron-oxo enzymes, cobalt but not hypoxia results in loss of labile 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the mitochondria, but has no effect on homologous 4Fe-4S dehydratases in the cytosol. Most striking, hypoxia but not cobalt affected cellular pools of amino acids. Amino acids such as aromatics were elevated whereas leucine and methionine, essential to the strain used here, dramatically decreased due to hypoxia induced down-regulation of amino acid permeases.These studies underscore the notion that cobalt targets a specific class of iron proteins and provide the first evidence for hypoxia effects on amino acid regulation. This research illustrates the power of metabolite profiling for uncovering new adaptations to environmental stress.

  13. Nitric oxide and hypoxia signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey Man, H S; Tsui, Albert K Y; Marsden, Philip A

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production is catalyzed by three distinct enzymes, namely, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS). The production of NO by vascular endothelium relies mainly on eNOS. Curiously, iNOS and nNOS also are relevant for vascular NO production in certain settings. By relaxing vascular smooth muscle, the classical view is that NO participates in O2 homeostasis by increasing local blood flow and O2 delivery. It is now appreciated that NO has an even more fundamental role in cellular oxygen sensing at the cellular and physiological level. A key component of cellular oxygen sensing is the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) that activates a transcriptional program to promote cellular survival under conditions of inadequate oxygen supply. Important new insights demonstrate that HIF protein is stabilized by two parallel pathways: (1) a decrease in the O2-dependent prolyl hydroxylation of HIF and (2) NO-dependent S-nitrosylation of HIF pathway components including HIF-α. The need for these two complementary pathways to HIF activation arises because decreased oxygen delivery can occur not only by decreased ambient oxygen but also by decreased blood oxygen-carrying capacity, as with anemia. In turn, NO production is tightly linked to O2 homeostasis. O2 is a key substrate for the generation of NO and impacts the enzymatic activity and expression of the enzymes that catalyze the production of NO, the nitric oxide synthases. These relationships manifest in a variety of clinical settings ranging from the unique situation of humans living in hypoxic environments at high altitudes to the common scenario of anemia and the use of therapeutics that can bind or release NO. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hypoxia as a therapy for mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Isha H; Zazzeron, Luca; Goli, Rahul; Alexa, Kristen; Schatzman-Bone, Stephanie; Dhillon, Harveen; Goldberger, Olga; Peng, Jun; Shalem, Ophir; Sanjana, Neville E; Zhang, Feng; Goessling, Wolfram; Zapol, Warren M; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-04-01

    Defects in the mitochondrial respiratory chain (RC) underlie a spectrum of human conditions, ranging from devastating inborn errors of metabolism to aging. We performed a genome-wide Cas9-mediated screen to identify factors that are protective during RC inhibition. Our results highlight the hypoxia response, an endogenous program evolved to adapt to limited oxygen availability. Genetic or small-molecule activation of the hypoxia response is protective against mitochondrial toxicity in cultured cells and zebrafish models. Chronic hypoxia leads to a marked improvement in survival, body weight, body temperature, behavior, neuropathology, and disease biomarkers in a genetic mouse model of Leigh syndrome, the most common pediatric manifestation of mitochondrial disease. Further preclinical studies are required to assess whether hypoxic exposure can be developed into a safe and effective treatment for human diseases associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Hypoxia: An Unusual Cause with Specific Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Berger

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is a well-recognized consequence of venous admixture resulting from right to left intracardiac shunting. Right to left shunting is usually associated with high pulmonary artery pressure or alteration in the direction of blood flow due to an anatomical abnormality of the thorax. Surgical or percutaneous closure remains controversial; however it is performed frequently for patients presenting with clinical sequela presumed to be resulting from paradoxical embolization secondary to right to left shunting. We report two patients with hypoxia and dyspnea due to right to left shunting through a patent foramen ovale (PFO and venous admixture in the absence of elevated pulmonary artery pressures or other predisposing conditions like pneumonectomy or diaphragmatic weakness. Percutaneous closures of the PFOs with the self-centering Amplatzer device resulted in resolution of hypoxia and symptoms related to it.

  16. Neuroprotection via RNA-binding protein RBM3 expression is regulated by hypothermia but not by hypoxia in human SK-N-SH neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenthal LM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lisa-Maria Rosenthal,1 Giang Tong,1 Christoph Walker,1 Sylvia J Wowro,1 Jana Krech,1 Constanze Pfitzer,1,2 Georgia Justus,1 Felix Berger,1,3 Katharina Rose Luise Schmitt1 1Department of Congenital Heart Disease/Pediatric Cardiology, German Heart Institute Berlin, 2Berlin Institute of Health (BIH, 3Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Charité – University Medical Center, Berlin, Germany Objective: Therapeutic hypothermia is an established treatment for perinatal asphyxia. Yet, many term infants continue to die or suffer from neurodevelopmental disability. Several experimental studies have demonstrated a beneficial effect of mild-to-moderate hypothermia after hypoxic injury, but the understanding of hypothermia-induced neuroprotection remains incomplete. In general, global protein synthesis is attenuated by hypothermia, but a small group of RNA-binding proteins including the RNA-binding motif 3 (RBM3 is upregulated in response to cooling. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro model to investigate the effects of hypoxia and hypothermia on neuronal cell survival, as well as to examine the kinetics of concurrent cold-shock protein RBM3 gene expression. Methods: Experiments were performed by using human SK-N-SH neurons exposed to different oxygen concentrations (21%, 8%, or 0.2% O2 for 24 hours followed by moderate hypothermia (33.5°C or normothermia for 24, 48, or 72 hours. Cell death was determined by quantification of lactate dehydrogenase and neuron-specific enolase releases into the cell cultured medium, and cell morphology was assessed by using immunofluorescence staining. The regulation of RBM3 gene expression was assessed by reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis.Results: Exposure to hypoxia (0.2% O2 for 24 hours resulted in significantly increased cell death in SK-N-SH neurons, whereas exposure to 8% O2 had no significant impact on cell viability. Post-hypoxia treatment with

  17. Astrocytic adaptation during cerebral angiogenesis follows the new vessel formation induced through chronic hypoxia in adult mouse cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masamoto, Kazuto; Kanno, Iwao

    2014-03-01

    We examined longitudinal changes of the neuro-glia-vascular unit during cerebral angiogenesis induced through chronic hypoxia in the adult mouse cortex. Tie2-GFP mice in which the vascular endothelial cells expressed green fluorescent proteins (GFP) were exposed to chronic hypoxia, while the spatiotemporal developments of the cortical capillary sprouts and the neighboring astrocytic remodeling were characterized with repeated two-photon microscopy. The capillary sprouts appeared at early phases of the hypoxia adaptation (1-2 weeks), while the morphological changes of the astrocytic soma and processes were not detected in this phase. In the later phases of the hypoxia adaptation (> 2 weeks), the capillary sprouts created a new connection with existing capillaries, and its neighboring astrocytes extended their processes to the newly-formed vessels. The findings show that morphological adaptation of the astrocytes follow the capillary development during the hypoxia adaptation, which indicate that the newly-formed vessels provoke cellular interactions with the neighboring astrocytes to strengthen the functional blood-brain barrier.

  18. Hypoxia mediated pulmonary edema: potential influence of oxidative stress, sympathetic activation and cerebral blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khademi, Shadi; Frye, Melinda A; Jeckel, Kimberly M; Schroeder, Thies; Monnet, Eric; Irwin, Dave C; Cole, Patricia A; Bell, Christopher; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2015-10-09

    Neurogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) is a non-cardiogenic form of pulmonary edema that can occur consequent to central neurologic insults including stroke, traumatic brain injury, and seizure. NPE is a public health concern due to high morbidity and mortality, yet the mechanism(s) are unknown. We hypothesized that NPE, evoked by cerebral hypoxia in the presence of systemic normoxia, would be accompanied by sympathetic activation, oxidative stress, and compensatory antioxidant mechanisms. Thirteen Walker hounds were assigned to cerebral hypoxia (SaO2 ~ 55 %) with systemic normoxia (SaO2 ~ 90 %) (CH; n = 6), cerebral and systemic (global) hypoxia (SaO2 ~ 60 %) (GH; n = 4), or cerebral and systemic normoxia (SaO2 ~ 90 %) (CON; n = 3). Femoral venous (CH and CON) perfusate was delivered via cardiopulmonary bypass to the brain and GH was induced by FiO2 = 10 % to maintain the SaO2 at ~60 %. Lung wet to lung dry weight ratios (LWW/LDW) were assessed as an index of pulmonary edema in addition to hemodynamic measurements. Plasma catecholamines were measured as markers of sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity. Total glutathione, protein carbonyls, and malondialdehyde were assessed as indicators of oxidative stress. Brain and lung compensatory antioxidants were measured with immunoblotting. Compared to CON, LWW/LDW and pulmonary artery pressure were greater in CH and GH. Expression of hemeoxygenase-1 in brain was higher in CH compared to GH and CON, despite no group differences in oxidative damage in any tissue. Catecholamines tended to be higher in CH and GH. Cerebral hypoxia, with systemic normoxia, is not systematically associated with an increase in oxidative stress and compensatory antioxidant enzymes in lung, suggesting oxidative stress did not contribute to NPE in lung. However, increased SNS activity may play a role in the induction of NPE during hypoxia.

  19. Up-regulation of gene expression by hypoxia is mediated predominantly by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greijer, A.E.; van der Groep, P.; Kemming, D.; Shvarts, A.; Semenza, G.L.; Meijer, G.J.; van de Wiel, M.A.; Belien, J.A.M.; Van Diest, P; van der Wall, E.E.

    2005-01-01

    The hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) plays a critical role in cellular responses to hypoxia. The aim of the present study was to evaluate which genes are induced by hypoxia, and whether this induction is mediated by HIF-1, by expression microarray analysis of wt and HIF-1α null mouse fibroblasts.

  20. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha DNA induced angiogenesis in a rat cerebral ischemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Takeshi; Abe, Tatsuya; Wu, Jian Liang; Fujiki, Minoru; Kobayashi, Hidenori

    2005-07-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a transcription factor that regulates the adaptive response to hypoxia in mammalian cells. It consists of a regulatory subunit HIF-1alpha, which accumulates under hypoxic conditions, and a constitutively expressed subunit, HIF-1beta. In this study, we investigated HIF-1alpha naked DNA-induced angiogenesis in a cerebral ischemic model in vivo. We utilized a rat encephalo-myo-synangiosis (EMS) model and inoculated HIF-1alpha DNA into the brain surface or the temporal muscle. We analysed whether HIF-1alpha induced angiogenic factors and collateral circulation. A histological section treated with HIF-1alpha DNA showed an increased expression of HIF1 a and VEGF with collateral circulation, in comparison with control DNA (p angiogenesis development. These results suggest the feasibility of a novel approach for therapeutic collateral circulation of cerebral ischemia in which neovascularization may be achieved indirectly using a transcriptional regulatory strategy.

  1. Role of hypoxia and hypoxia inducible factor in physiological and pathological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Jahani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Organisms are exposed to oxygen deprivation (Hypoxia in various physiological and pathological conditions. There are different conserve evolutionary responses to counterview with this stress that primary transcriptional response to stress related to hypoxia is interceded by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1 in mammals. This factor can regulate different genes that have essential roles in adaptation to this condition. In this review, the role of this factor in physiological and pathological conditions under hypoxic condition has been evaluated after examining structural features and regulation characteristics of HIF-1. Methods: First, articles related to the keywords of hypoxia and HIF-1 (from 1991-2016 were searched from valid databases such as Springer Link, Google Scholar, PubMed and Science direct. Then, the articles correlated with hypoxia, HIF-1 and their roles in physiological and pathological conditions (120 articles were searched and just 64 articles were selected for this study. Result: According to studies, there are different genes in cells and organs that can be regulated by HIF-1. Activation of genes expression by this protein occurs through its linkage to cis-acting of 50 base pair hypoxia response element (HRE region located in their promotor and enhancer. Depending on circumstances, activation of these genes can be beneficial or harmful. Conclusion: Activation of different genes in hypoxia by HIF-1 has different effects on physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, HIF-1, as a hypoxia-inducible factor in hypoxic conditions, plays an essential role in the adaptation of cells and organs to changes related to the presence of oxygen.

  2. Sevoflurane suppresses hypoxia-induced growth and metastasis of lung cancer cells via inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor-1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hua; Yang, Cheng Xiang; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Han Bing; Liu, Hong Zhen; Lai, Xiao Hong; Liao, Mei Juan; Zhang, Tao

    2015-12-01

    Hypoxia promotes the progression of lung cancer cells. Unfortunately, anesthetic technique might aggravate hypoxia of lung cancer cells. Sevoflurane is a commonly used anesthetic. Its effect on hypoxia-induced aggressiveness of lung cancer cells remains unknown. The aim of the study is to investigate the effects of sevoflurane on hypoxia-induced growth and metastasis of lung cancer cells. As hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) plays a pivotal role in mediating the adaptation and tolerance of cancer cells under hypoxic microenvironment, the role of HIF-1α in the effect of sevoflurane on hypoxia-induced growth and metastasis has also been elucidated. A549 cells were treated with normoxia, hypoxia, co-treatment of sevoflurane and hypoxia, and dimethyloxaloylglycine (DMOG, a HIF-1α agonist) for 4 h, respectively. MTT assay and colony formation assay were used to evaluate cell growth. Transwell assay was performed to detect invasion and migration ability. The protein level of HIF-1α, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), survivin, fascin, heparanase (HPA), and p38 MAPK were determined by Western blotting. Hypoxia enhanced proliferation and metastatic potential of cells. Sevoflurane could suppress hypoxia-induced growth and metastasis ability of cells. Furthermore, HIF-1α, XIAP, survivin, fascin and HPA were down-regulated significantly by the co-treatment of sevoflurane and hypoxia as compared to hypoxia treatment. DMOG abolished the inhibiting effects of sevoflurane on hypoxia-induced growth and metastasis ability of cells. In addition, sevoflurane partly reversed the increase of p38 MAPK activity that was induced by hypoxia. Sevoflurane could suppress hypoxia-induced growth and metastasis of lung cancer cells, which might be associated with modulating HIF-1α and its down-stream genes. Moreover, p38 MAPK signaling pathway was involved in the regulation of HIF-1α by sevoflurane.

  3. Working memory impairment in pilots exposed to acute hypobaric hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malle, Carine; Quinette, Peggy; Laisney, Mickaël; Bourrilhon, Cyprien; Boissin, Jacqueline; Desgranges, Beatrice; Eustache, Francis; Piérard, Christophe

    2013-08-01

    During an acute hypoxia exposure, impairment of memory is one of the most frequently reported symptoms, either during hypoxia awareness training of aircrews or after an in-flight hypoxic incident. However, the effects of acute hypoxia on memory have been little studied in laboratory-controlled conditions. Moreover, none of these studies were performed in hypobaric conditions. The main aim of our study was to investigate the effects of acute hypobaric hypoxia on working memory (WM). This study also aimed to find links between physiological measurements and cognitive performance during acute hypoxia exposure. During hypoxia awareness training, 28 subjects (experimental group) were exposed to a simulated altitude level of 10,000 m (31,000 ft) in a hypobaric chamber, while 29 subjects (control group) stayed at sea level. WM was assessed in both groups with the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT). Peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate were recorded. WM was strongly impaired in the hypoxic group. One major finding is that hypoxia highly increase