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Sample records for moderate altitude exposure

  1. Effects of Acute Exposure to Moderate Altitude on Vascular Function, Metabolism and Systemic Inflammation

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    Stöwhas, Anne-Christin; Latshang, Tsogyal D.; Lo Cascio, Christian M.; Lautwein, Sina; Stadelmann, Katrin; Tesler, Noemi; Ayers, Lisa; Berneis, Kaspar; Gerber, Philipp A.; Huber, Reto; Achermann, Peter; Bloch, Konrad E.; Kohler, Malcolm

    2013-01-01

    Background Travel to mountain areas is popular. However, the effects of acute exposure to moderate altitude on the cardiovascular system and metabolism are largely unknown. Objectives To investigate the effects of acute exposure to moderate altitude on vascular function, metabolism and systemic inflammation. Methods In 51 healthy male subjects with a mean (SD) age of 26.9 (9.3) years, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, heart rate, arterial stiffness, lipid profiles, low density lipoprotein (LDL) particle size, insulin resistance (HOMA-index), highly-sensitive C-reactive protein and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured at 490 m (Zurich) and during two days at 2590 m, (Davos Jakobshorn, Switzerland) in randomized order. The largest differences in outcomes between the two altitudes are reported. Results Mean (SD) oxygen saturation was significantly lower at 2590 m, 91.0 (2.0)%, compared to 490 m, 96.0 (1.0)%, p<0.001. Mean blood pressure (mean difference +4.8 mmHg, p<0.001) and heart rate (mean difference +3.3 bpm, p<0.001) were significantly higher at 2590 m, compared to 490 m, but this was not associated with increased arterial stiffness. At 2590 m, lipid profiles improved (median difference triglycerides −0.14 mmol/l, p = 0.012, HDL +0.08 mmol/l, p<0.001, total cholesterol/HDL-ratio −0.25, p = 0.001), LDL particle size increased (median difference +0.45 nm, p = 0.048) and hsCRP decreased (median difference −0.18 mg/l, p = 0.024) compared to 490 m. No significant change in pro-inflammatory cytokines or insulin resistance was observed upon ascent to 2590 m. Conclusions Short-term stay at moderate altitude is associated with increased blood pressure and heart rate likely due to augmented sympathetic activity. Exposure to moderate altitude improves the lipid profile and systemic inflammation, but seems to have no significant effect on glucose metabolism. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01130948 PMID:23936377

  2. Effects of acute exposure to moderate altitude on vascular function, metabolism and systemic inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Christin Stöwhas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Travel to mountain areas is popular. However, the effects of acute exposure to moderate altitude on the cardiovascular system and metabolism are largely unknown. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of acute exposure to moderate altitude on vascular function, metabolism and systemic inflammation. METHODS: In 51 healthy male subjects with a mean (SD age of 26.9 (9.3 years, oxygen saturation, blood pressure, heart rate, arterial stiffness, lipid profiles, low density lipoprotein (LDL particle size, insulin resistance (HOMA-index, highly-sensitive C-reactive protein and pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured at 490 m (Zurich and during two days at 2590 m, (Davos Jakobshorn, Switzerland in randomized order. The largest differences in outcomes between the two altitudes are reported. RESULTS: Mean (SD oxygen saturation was significantly lower at 2590 m, 91.0 (2.0%, compared to 490 m, 96.0 (1.0%, p<0.001. Mean blood pressure (mean difference +4.8 mmHg, p<0.001 and heart rate (mean difference +3.3 bpm, p<0.001 were significantly higher at 2590 m, compared to 490 m, but this was not associated with increased arterial stiffness. At 2590 m, lipid profiles improved (median difference triglycerides -0.14 mmol/l, p=0.012, HDL +0.08 mmol/l, p<0.001, total cholesterol/HDL-ratio -0.25, p=0.001, LDL particle size increased (median difference +0.45 nm, p=0.048 and hsCRP decreased (median difference -0.18 mg/l, p=0.024 compared to 490 m. No significant change in pro-inflammatory cytokines or insulin resistance was observed upon ascent to 2590 m. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term stay at moderate altitude is associated with increased blood pressure and heart rate likely due to augmented sympathetic activity. Exposure to moderate altitude improves the lipid profile and systemic inflammation, but seems to have no significant effect on glucose metabolism. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01130948.

  3. Effect of acute exposure to moderate altitude on muscle power: hypobaric hypoxia vs. normobaric hypoxia.

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    Feriche, Belén; García-Ramos, Amador; Calderón-Soto, Carmen; Drobnic, Franchek; Bonitch-Góngora, Juan G; Galilea, Pedro A; Riera, Joan; Padial, Paulino

    2014-01-01

    When ascending to a higher altitude, changes in air density and oxygen levels affect the way in which explosive actions are executed. This study was designed to compare the effects of acute exposure to real or simulated moderate hypoxia on the dynamics of the force-velocity relationship observed in bench press exercise. Twenty-eight combat sports athletes were assigned to two groups and assessed on two separate occasions: G1 (n = 17) in conditions of normoxia (N1) and hypobaric hypoxia (HH) and G2 (n = 11) in conditions of normoxia (N2) and normobaric hypoxia (NH). Individual and complete force-velocity relationships in bench press were determined on each assessment day. For each exercise repetition, we obtained the mean and peak velocity and power shown by the athletes. Maximum power (Pmax) was recorded as the highest P(mean) obtained across the complete force-velocity curve. Our findings indicate a significantly higher absolute load linked to P(max) (∼ 3%) and maximal strength (1 RM) (∼ 6%) in G1 attributable to the climb to altitude (Ppress.

  4. Improved running economy and increased hemoglobin mass in elite runners after extended moderate altitude exposure.

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    Saunders, P U; Telford, R D; Pyne, D B; Hahn, A G; Gore, C J

    2009-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence whether hypoxia improves running economy (RE), maximal O(2) uptake (V(O)(2max)), haemoglobin mass (Hb(mass)) and performance, and what total accumulated dose is necessary for effective adaptation. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of an extended hypoxic exposure on these physiological and performance measures. Nine elite middle distance runners were randomly assigned to a live high-train low simulated altitude group (ALT) and spent 46+/-8 nights (mean+/-S.D.) at 2860+/-41m. A matched control group (CON, n=9) lived and trained near sea level ( approximately 600m). ALT decreased submaximal V(O)(2) (Lmin(-1)) (-3.2%, 90% confidence intervals, -1.0% to -5.2%, p=0.02), increased Hb(mass) (4.9%, 2.3-7.6%, p=0.01), decreased submaximal heart rate (-3.1%, -1.8% to -4.4%, p=0.00) and had a trivial increase in V(O)(2max) (1.5%, -1.6 to 4.8; p=0.41) compared with CON. There was a trivial correlation between change in Hb(mass) and change in V(O)(2max) (r=0.04, p=0.93). Hypoxic exposure of approximately 400h was sufficient to improve Hb(mass), a response not observed with shorter exposures. Although total O(2) carrying capacity was improved, the mechanism(s) to explain the lack of proportionate increase in V(O)(2max) were not identified.

  5. Preparation for football competition at moderate to high altitude.

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    Gore, C J; McSharry, P E; Hewitt, A J; Saunders, P U

    2008-08-01

    Analysis of approximately 100 years of home-and-away South American World Cup matches illustrate that football competition at moderate/high altitude (>2000 m) favors the home team, although this is more than compensated by the likelihood of sea-level teams winning at home against the same opponents who have descended from altitude. Nevertheless, the home team advantage at altitudes above approximately 2000 m may reflect that traditionally, teams from sea level or low altitude have not spent 1-2 weeks acclimatizing at altitude. Despite large differences between individuals, in the first few days at high altitude (e.g. La Paz, 3600 m) some players experience symptoms of acute mountain sickness (AMS) such as headache and disrupted sleep, and their maximum aerobic power (VO2max) is approximately 25% reduced while their ventilation, heart rate and blood lactate during submaximal exercise are elevated. Simulated altitude for a few weeks before competition at altitude can be used to attain partial ventilatory acclimation and ameliorated symptoms of AMS. The variety of simulated altitude exposures usually created with enriched nitrogen mixtures of air include resting or exercising for a few hours per day or sleeping approximately 8 h/night in hypoxia. Preparation for competition at moderate/high altitude by training at altitude is probably superior to simulated exposure; however, the optimal duration at moderate/high altitude is unclear. Preparing for 1-2 weeks at moderate/high altitude is a reasonable compromise between the benefits associated with overcoming AMS and partial restoration of VO2max vs the likelihood of detraining.

  6. Pupillary light reaction during high altitude exposure.

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    Maximilian Schultheiss

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: This study aimed to quantify the pupillary light reaction during high altitude exposure using the state of the art Compact Integrated Pupillograph (CIP and to investigate a potential correlation of altered pupil reaction with severity of acute mountain sickness (AMS. This work is related to the Tübingen High Altitude Ophthalmology (THAO study. METHODS: Parameters of pupil dynamics (initial diameter, amplitude, relative amplitude, latency, constriction velocity were quantified in 14 healthy volunteers at baseline (341 m and high altitude (4559 m over several days using the CIP. Scores of AMS, peripheral oxygen saturation and heart rate were assessed for respective correlations with pupil dynamics. For statistical analysis JMP was used and data are shown in terms of intra-individual normalized values (value during exposure/value at baseline and the 95% confidence interval for each time point. RESULTS: During high altitude exposure the initial diameter size was significantly reduced (p<0.05. In contrast, the amplitude, the relative amplitude and the contraction velocity of the light reaction were significantly increased (p<0.05 on all days measured at high altitude. The latency did not show any significant differences at high altitude compared to baseline recordings. Changes in pupil parameters did not correlate with scores of AMS. CONCLUSIONS: Key parameters of the pupillary light reaction are significantly altered at high altitude. We hypothesize that high altitude hypoxia itself as well as known side effects of high altitude exposure such as fatigue or exhaustion after ascent may account for an altered pupillogram. Interestingly, none of these changes are related to AMS.

  7. Pupillary Light Reaction during High Altitude Exposure

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    Schatz, Andreas; Wilhelm, Barbara; Peters, Tobias; Fischer, M. Dominik; Zrenner, Eberhart; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U.; Gekeler, Florian; Willmann, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to quantify the pupillary light reaction during high altitude exposure using the state of the art Compact Integrated Pupillograph (CIP) and to investigate a potential correlation of altered pupil reaction with severity of acute mountain sickness (AMS). This work is related to the Tübingen High Altitude Ophthalmology (THAO) study. Methods Parameters of pupil dynamics (initial diameter, amplitude, relative amplitude, latency, constriction velocity) were quantified in 14 healthy volunteers at baseline (341 m) and high altitude (4559 m) over several days using the CIP. Scores of AMS, peripheral oxygen saturation and heart rate were assessed for respective correlations with pupil dynamics. For statistical analysis JMP was used and data are shown in terms of intra-individual normalized values (value during exposure/value at baseline) and the 95% confidence interval for each time point. Results During high altitude exposure the initial diameter size was significantly reduced (p<0.05). In contrast, the amplitude, the relative amplitude and the contraction velocity of the light reaction were significantly increased (p<0.05) on all days measured at high altitude. The latency did not show any significant differences at high altitude compared to baseline recordings. Changes in pupil parameters did not correlate with scores of AMS. Conclusions Key parameters of the pupillary light reaction are significantly altered at high altitude. We hypothesize that high altitude hypoxia itself as well as known side effects of high altitude exposure such as fatigue or exhaustion after ascent may account for an altered pupillogram. Interestingly, none of these changes are related to AMS. PMID:24503770

  8. Changes in maximal double poling performance during and after moderate altitude training in elite cross country skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höög, Martina; Jensen, Kurt; Willis, Sarah;

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2014, the Olympic cross-country ski competitions will be held in Sochi, Russia at approximately 1500m altitude. Even moderate altitude can have negative effects on performance in highly trained endurance athletes and individuals may adapt and react differently to altitude exposure...

  9. How can acute mountain sickness be quantified at moderate altitude?

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    Roeggla, G; Roeggla, M; Podolsky, A.; Wagner, A; Laggner, A N

    1996-01-01

    Reports of acute mountain sickness (AMS) at moderate altitude show a wide variability, possibly because of different investigation methods. The aim of our study was to investigate the impact of investigation methods on AMS incidence. Hackett's established AMS score (a structured interview and physical examination), the new Lake Louise AMS score (a self-reported questionnaire) and oxygen saturation were determined in 99 alpinists after ascent to 2.94 km altitude. AMS incidence was 8% in Hacket...

  10. Changes in physical performance parameters during and after moderate altitude training in elite cross country skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Höög, Martina; Willis, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Olympic cross country skiing competitions in 2014 will be held in Sochi, Russia at an altitude of approximately 1500m. Although moderate, this altitude is known to reduce performance in highly trained endurance athletes. It is also known that individuals react differently during...... moderate altitude training seems not to be related to any single parameter. One should not ignore individual differences in adaptation. REFERENCES 1. Ainegren, M. et al Engineering of Sport 7, Vol 2, 2008: p. 393-400. 2. Medbo, J.I.et al J.Appl.Physiol., 1988. 64: p. 50-60.......INTRODUCTION: The Olympic cross country skiing competitions in 2014 will be held in Sochi, Russia at an altitude of approximately 1500m. Although moderate, this altitude is known to reduce performance in highly trained endurance athletes. It is also known that individuals react differently during...... altitude exposure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate performance changes during and after three weeks of training in moderate altitude in elite skiers. METHOD: Four male and three female skiers were tested on a roller skiing treadmill using the classic technique at sea level (NORM1), after 3 and 20...

  11. Pre-Altitude Serum Ferritin Levels and Daily Oral Iron Supplement Dose Mediate Iron Parameter and Hemoglobin Mass Responses to Altitude Exposure

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    Govus, Andrew D.; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Chris R Abbiss; Peter Peeling; Gore, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the influence of daily oral iron supplementation on changes in hemoglobin mass (Hbmass) and iron parameters after 2–4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure. Methods Hematological data collected from 178 athletes (98 males, 80 females) exposed to moderate altitude (1,350–3,000 m) were analysed using linear regression to determine how altitude exposure combined with oral iron supplementation influenced Hbmass, total iron incorporation (TII) and blood iron parameters [ferrit...

  12. Sildenafil and Exercise Capacity in the Elderly at Moderate Altitude.

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    Rodway, George W; Lovelace, Anne J; Lanspa, Michael J; McIntosh, Scott E; Bell, James; Briggs, Ben; Weaver, Lindell K; Yanowitz, Frank; Grissom, Colin K

    2016-06-01

    Hypobaric hypoxia decreases exercise capacity and causes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and pulmonary hypertension. The phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil is a pulmonary vasodilator that may improve exercise capacity at altitude. We aimed to determine whether sildenafil improves exercise capacity, measured as maximal oxygen consumption (peak V̇o2), at moderate altitude in adults 60 years or older. The design was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study. After baseline cardiopulmonary exercise testing at 1400 m, 12 healthy participants (4 women) aged 60 years or older, who reside permanently at approximately 1400 m and are regularly active in self-propelled mountain recreation above 2000 m, performed maximal cardiopulmonary cycle exercise tests in a hypobaric chamber at a simulated altitude of 2750 m after ingesting sildenafil and after ingesting a placebo. After placebo, mean peak V̇o2 was significantly lower at 2750 m than 1400 m: 37.0 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1) (95% CI, 32.7 to 41.3) vs 39.1 mL · kg(-1) · min(-1) (95% CI, 33.5 to 44.7; P = .020). After placebo, there was no difference in heart rate (HR) or maximal workload at either altitude (z = 0.182; P = .668, respectively). There was no difference between sildenafil and placebo at 2750 m in peak V̇o2 (P = .668), O2 pulse (P = .476), cardiac index (P = .143), stroke volume index (z = 0.108), HR (z = 0.919), or maximal workload (P = .773). Transthoracic echocardiography immediately after peak exercise at 2750 m showed tricuspid annular plane systolic velocity was significantly higher after sildenafil than after placebo (P = .019), but showed no difference in tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (P = .720). Sildenafil (50 mg) did not improve exercise capacity in adults 60 years or older at moderate altitude in our study. This might be explained by a "dosing effect" or insufficiently high altitude. Copyright © 2016 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc

  13. Effectiveness of Preacclimatization Strategies for High-Altitude Exposure

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    2013-01-01

    hypobaric conditions. IAE 15, 15 d of intermittent altitude exposure; IAE 7, 7 d of intermittent altitude expo- sure; NH (Sleep), Ambient normobaric hypoxia ...than those using norm(!)baric hypoxia (breathing, ង.9% ox-ygen). Key Words: hypobaric hypoxia , normobaric hypoxia , staging, acute mountain sickness...large decrements in endurance exercise performance occur when unacclimatized individuals rapidly ascend to high altitudes. Six altitude and hypoxia

  14. The body weight loss during acute exposure to high-altitude hypoxia in sea level residents.

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    Ge, Ri-Li; Wood, Helen; Yang, Hui-Huang; Liu, Yi-Ning; Wang, Xiu-Juan; Babb, Tony

    2010-12-25

    Weight loss is frequently observed after acute exposure to high altitude. However, the magnitude and rate of weight loss during acute exposure to high altitude has not been clarified in a controlled prospective study. The present study was performed to evaluate weight loss at high altitude. A group of 120 male subjects [aged (32±6) years] who worked on the construction of the Golmud-Lhasa Railway at Kunlun Mountain (altitude of 4 678 m) served as volunteer subjects for this study. Eighty-five workers normally resided at sea level (sea level group) and 35 normally resided at an altitude of 2 200 m (moderate altitude group). Body weight, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference were measured in all subjects after a 7-day stay at Golmud (altitude of 2 800 m, baseline measurements). Measurements were repeated after 33-day working on Kunlun Mountain. In order to examine the daily rate of weight loss at high altitude, body weight was measured in 20 subjects from the sea level group (sea level subset group) each morning before breakfast for 33 d at Kunlun Mountain. According to guidelines established by the Lake Louise acute mountain sickness (AMS) consensus report, each subject completed an AMS self-report questionnaire two days after arriving at Kunlun Mountain. After 33-day stay at an altitude of 4 678 m, the average weight loss for the sea level group was 10.4% (range 6.5% to 29%), while the average for the moderate altitude group was 2.2% (-2% to 9.1%). The degree of weight loss (Δ weight loss) after a 33-day stay at an altitude of 4 678 m was significantly correlated with baseline body weight in the sea level group (r=0.677, P0.05). In the sea level subset group, a significant weight loss was observed within 20 d, but the weight remained stable thereafter. AMS-score at high altitude was significantly higher in the sea level group (4.69±2.48) than that in the moderate altitude group (2.97±1.38), and was significantly correlated with baseline body weight

  15. Increased oxidative stress following acute and chronic high altitude exposure.

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    Jefferson, J Ashley; Simoni, Jan; Escudero, Elizabeth; Hurtado, Maria-Elena; Swenson, Erik R; Wesson, Donald E; Schreiner, George F; Schoene, Robert B; Johnson, Richard J; Hurtado, Abdias

    2004-01-01

    The generation of reactive oxygen species is typically associated with hyperoxia and ischemia reperfusion. Recent evidence has suggested that increased oxidative stress may occur with hypoxia. We hypothesized that oxidative stress would be increased in subjects exposed to high altitude hypoxia. We studied 28 control subjects living in Lima, Peru (sea level), at baseline and following 48 h exposure to high altitude (4300 m). To assess the effects of chronic altitude exposure, we studied 25 adult males resident in Cerro de Pasco, Peru (altitude 4300 m). We also studied 27 subjects living in Cerro de Pasco who develop excessive erythrocytosis (hematocrit > 65%) and chronic mountain sickness. Acute high altitude exposure led to increased urinary F(2)-isoprostane, 8-iso PGF(2 alpha) (1.31 +/- 0.8 microg/g creatinine versus 2.15 +/- 1.1, p = 0.001) and plasma total glutathione (1.29 +/- 0.10 micromol versus 1.37 +/- 0.09, p = 0.002), with a trend to increased plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) (59.7 +/- 36 pmol/mg protein versus 63.8 +/- 27, p = NS). High altitude residents had significantly elevated levels of urinary 8-iso PGF(2 alpha) (1.3 +/- 0.8 microg/g creatinine versus 4.1 +/- 3.4, p = 0.007), plasma TBARS (59.7 +/- 36 pmol/mg protein versus 85 +/- 28, p = 0.008), and plasma total glutathione (1.29 +/- 0.10 micromol versus 1.55 +/- 0.19, p < 0.0001) compared to sea level. High altitude residents with excessive erythrocytosis had higher levels of oxidative stress compared to high altitude residents with normal hematological adaptation. In conclusion, oxidative stress is increased following both acute exposure to high altitude without exercise and with chronic residence at high altitude.

  16. Fluid distribution and tissue thickness changes in 29 men during 1 week at moderate altitude (2,315 m).

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    Gunga, H C; Kirsch, K; Baartz, F; Steiner, H J; Wittels, P; Röcker, L

    1995-01-01

    To quantify fluid distribution at a moderate altitude (2,315 m) 29 male subjects were studied with respect to tissue thickness changes [front (forehead), sternum, tibia], changes of total body water, changes of plasma volume, total protein concentrations (TPC), colloid osmotic pressure (COP), and electrolytes. Tissue thickness at the forehead showed a significant increase from 4.14 mm to 4.41 mm 48 h after ascent to the Rudolfshuette (2,315 m) (P Rudolf-shuette in Saalfelden (744 m) COP was back to the control values. The TPC also showed an initial drop from 7.75 g.dl-1 to 7.48 g.dl-1 after 48 h at altitude and remained below the control value during the whole week (P < 0.01). It seems from our study that even with exposure to moderate altitude measurable fluid shifts to the upper part of the body occurred which were detected by our ultrasound method.

  17. Pre-Altitude Serum Ferritin Levels and Daily Oral Iron Supplement Dose Mediate Iron Parameter and Hemoglobin Mass Responses to Altitude Exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Govus

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of daily oral iron supplementation on changes in hemoglobin mass (Hbmass and iron parameters after 2-4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure.Hematological data collected from 178 athletes (98 males, 80 females exposed to moderate altitude (1,350-3,000 m were analysed using linear regression to determine how altitude exposure combined with oral iron supplementation influenced Hbmass, total iron incorporation (TII and blood iron parameters [ferritin and transferrin saturation (TSAT].Altitude exposure (mean ± s: 21 ± 3 days increased Hbmass by 1.1% [-0.4, 2.6], 3.3% [1.7, 4.8], and 4.0% [2.0, 6.1] from pre-altitude levels in athletes who ingested nil, 105 mg and 210 mg respectively, of oral iron supplement daily. Serum ferritin levels decreased by -33.2% [-46.9, -15.9] and 13.8% [-32.2, 9.7] from pre-altitude levels in athletes who supplemented with nil and 105 mg of oral iron supplement daily, but increased by 36.8% [1.3, 84.8] in athletes supplemented with 210 mg of oral iron daily. Finally, athletes who ingested either 105 mg or 210 mg of oral iron supplement daily had a greater TII compared with non-supplemented athletes (0 versus 105 mg: effect size (d = -1.88 [-2.56, -1.17]; 0 versus 210 mg: effect size (d = -2.87 [-3.88, -1.66].Oral iron supplementation during 2-4 weeks of moderate altitude exposure may enhance Hbmass production and assist the maintenance of iron balance in some athletes with low pre-altitude iron stores.

  18. QT interval changes in term pregnant women living at moderately high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmaz, G; Aksoy, A N; Aydın, S; Ay, N K; Dane, B

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the QT interval changes in women with term pregnancy living at moderately high altitude (1890 m in Erzurum, Turkey) with those of women living at sea level (31 m in İstanbul, Turkey). One-hundred ten women (n = 55, for each group) with full-term and single child pregnancies. Two different locations in that state were selected: İstanbul, Turkey, which is at 31 m above sea level (Group 1) and Erzurum, Turkey, at 1890 m above sea level (Group 2). Physicians from the two locations participated in the study. We estimated QTc, QTc Max, QTc Min, QT, and QTcd intervals. Moderately high altitude group had significantly longer QT parameters (QTc, QTc Max, QTc Min, QT, and QTcd intervals) compared with sea level group (P anges occur in term pregnant women living moderately high altitude. These changes may be associated with pregnancy-related cardiovascular complications in moderately high altitude.

  19. Hypoxic Hypoxia at Moderate Altitudes: State of the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    indicating more O2 unloading, leading to more rapid desaturation of hemoglobin. 6 Conditions such as anemia or high altitude, cause an increase of 2,3...yielded 32 articles, 5 technical reports, 1 master’s thesis , 2 abstracts, and 2 manuals. Excluded from the Dialog search were 17 articles, 2...technical reports, and 2 manuals. Additionally, 52 articles, 1 master’s thesis , and 16 abstracts were obtained for review from references of original

  20. Reduced autonomic activity during stepwise exposure to high altitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevre, K; Bendz, B; Hanko, E; Nakstad, AR; Hauge, A; Kasin, JI; Lefrandt, JD; Smit, AJ; Eide, [No Value; Rostrup, M

    2001-01-01

    Several studies have shown increased sympathetic activity during acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. In a recent field study we found reduced plasma catecholamines during the first days after a stepwise ascent to high altitude. In the present study 14 subjects were exposed to a simulated ascent in

  1. Impaired postural control in healthy men at moderate altitude (1630 m and 2590 m: data from a randomized trial.

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    Katrin Stadelmann

    Full Text Available Intact postural control is essential for safe performance of mountain sports, operation of machinery at altitude, and for piloting airplanes. We tested whether exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at moderate altitude impairs the static postural control of healthy subjects.In 51 healthy men, median age 24 y (quartiles 20;28, static control was evaluated on a balance platform in Zurich, 490 m, and during a 4-day sojourn in Swiss mountain villages at 1630 m and 2590 m, 2 days each. The order of altitude exposure was randomized. Total center of pressure path length (COPL and sway amplitude measured in two directions by a balance platform, and pulse oximetry were recorded. Data were compared between altitudes.Median (quartiles COPL during standing on both legs with eyes open at 490 m and in the evenings on the first and second days at 1630 and 2590 m, respectively were: 50 (45;57, 55 (48;62, 56 (49;61, 53 (47;59, 54 (48;60 cm, P<0.001 ANOVA. Corresponding arterial oxygen saturation was 97% (96;97, 95% (94;96, 95%(94;96, 92%(90;93, 93%(91;93, P<0.001. Anterior-posterior sway amplitudes were larger at 1630 and 2590 m compared to 490 m, P<0.001. Multiple logistic regression analysis confirmed that higher altitudes (1630 and 2590m were independently associated with increased COPL when controlled for the order of altitude exposure and age (P=0.001.Exposure to 1630 and 2590m was associated with impaired static postural control even when visual references were available.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01130948.

  2. Impaired Postural Control in Healthy Men at Moderate Altitude (1630 M and 2590 M): Data from a Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Katrin; Latshang, Tsogyal D.; Lo Cascio, Christian M.; Clark, Ross A.; Huber, Reto; Kohler, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Intact postural control is essential for safe performance of mountain sports, operation of machinery at altitude, and for piloting airplanes. We tested whether exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at moderate altitude impairs the static postural control of healthy subjects. Methods In 51 healthy men, median age 24 y (quartiles 20;28), static control was evaluated on a balance platform in Zurich, 490 m, and during a 4-day sojourn in Swiss mountain villages at 1630 m and 2590 m, 2 days each. The order of altitude exposure was randomized. Total center of pressure path length (COPL) and sway amplitude measured in two directions by a balance platform, and pulse oximetry were recorded. Data were compared between altitudes. Results Median (quartiles) COPL during standing on both legs with eyes open at 490 m and in the evenings on the first and second days at 1630 and 2590 m, respectively were: 50 (45;57), 55 (48;62), 56 (49;61), 53 (47;59), 54 (48;60) cm, P<0.001 ANOVA. Corresponding arterial oxygen saturation was 97% (96;97), 95% (94;96), 95%(94;96), 92%(90;93), 93%(91;93), P<0.001. Anterior-posterior sway amplitudes were larger at 1630 and 2590 m compared to 490 m, P<0.001. Multiple logistic regression analysis confirmed that higher altitudes (1630 and 2590m) were independently associated with increased COPL when controlled for the order of altitude exposure and age (P=0.001). Conclusions Exposure to 1630 and 2590m was associated with impaired static postural control even when visual references were available. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01130948. PMID:25723529

  3. Quantitative changes in the sleep EEG at moderate altitude (1630 m and 2590 m.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Stadelmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have observed an altitude-dependent increase in central apneas and a shift towards lighter sleep at altitudes >4000 m. Whether altitude-dependent changes in the sleep EEG are also prevalent at moderate altitudes of 1600 m and 2600 m remains largely unknown. Furthermore, the relationship between sleep EEG variables and central apneas and oxygen saturation are of great interest to understand the impact of hypoxia at moderate altitude on sleep. METHODS: Fourty-four healthy men (mean age 25.0 ± 5.5 years underwent polysomnographic recordings during a baseline night at 490 m and four consecutive nights at 1630 m and 2590 m (two nights each in a randomized cross-over design. RESULTS: Comparison of sleep EEG power density spectra of frontal (F3A2 and central (C3A2 derivations at altitudes compared to baseline revealed that slow-wave activity (SWA, 0.8-4.6 Hz in non-REM sleep was reduced in an altitude-dependent manner (~4% at 1630 m and 15% at 2590 m, while theta activity (4.6-8 Hz was reduced only at the highest altitude (10% at 2590 m. In addition, spindle peak height and frequency showed a modest increase in the second night at 2590 m. SWA and theta activity were also reduced in REM sleep. Correlations between spectral power and central apnea/hypopnea index (AHI, oxygen desaturation index (ODI, and oxygen saturation revealed that distinct frequency bands were correlated with oxygen saturation (6.4-8 Hz and 13-14.4 Hz and breathing variables (AHI, ODI; 0.8-4.6 Hz. CONCLUSIONS: The correlation between SWA and AHI/ODI suggests that respiratory disturbances contribute to the reduction in SWA at altitude. Since SWA is a marker of sleep homeostasis, this might be indicative of an inability to efficiently dissipate sleep pressure.

  4. Quantitative Changes in the Sleep EEG at Moderate Altitude (1630 m and 2590 m)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Katrin; Latshang, Tsogyal D.; Lo Cascio, Christian M.; Tesler, Noemi; Stoewhas, Anne-Christin; Kohler, Malcolm; Bloch, Konrad E.; Huber, Reto; Achermann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous studies have observed an altitude-dependent increase in central apneas and a shift towards lighter sleep at altitudes >4000 m. Whether altitude-dependent changes in the sleep EEG are also prevalent at moderate altitudes of 1600 m and 2600 m remains largely unknown. Furthermore, the relationship between sleep EEG variables and central apneas and oxygen saturation are of great interest to understand the impact of hypoxia at moderate altitude on sleep. Methods Fourty-four healthy men (mean age 25.0±5.5 years) underwent polysomnographic recordings during a baseline night at 490 m and four consecutive nights at 1630 m and 2590 m (two nights each) in a randomized cross-over design. Results Comparison of sleep EEG power density spectra of frontal (F3A2) and central (C3A2) derivations at altitudes compared to baseline revealed that slow-wave activity (SWA, 0.8–4.6 Hz) in non-REM sleep was reduced in an altitude-dependent manner (∼4% at 1630 m and 15% at 2590 m), while theta activity (4.6–8 Hz) was reduced only at the highest altitude (10% at 2590 m). In addition, spindle peak height and frequency showed a modest increase in the second night at 2590 m. SWA and theta activity were also reduced in REM sleep. Correlations between spectral power and central apnea/hypopnea index (AHI), oxygen desaturation index (ODI), and oxygen saturation revealed that distinct frequency bands were correlated with oxygen saturation (6.4–8 Hz and 13–14.4 Hz) and breathing variables (AHI, ODI; 0.8–4.6 Hz). Conclusions The correlation between SWA and AHI/ODI suggests that respiratory disturbances contribute to the reduction in SWA at altitude. Since SWA is a marker of sleep homeostasis, this might be indicative of an inability to efficiently dissipate sleep pressure. PMID:24167552

  5. A Novel Approach to Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD Screening at Moderate Altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin Lueth

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP has endorsed Critical Congenital Heart Disease (CCHD screening using pulse oximetry nationwide, but, however, acknowledges that altitude may impact failure rates and alternative algorithms may be required at high altitudes. We therefore evaluated a modified screening protocol at an altitude of 6200 feet with the hypothesis that modifications could decrease failure rates. We evaluated 2001 well, newborn infants ≥35 weeks gestation using a modified protocol, which included a lower saturation cutoff for the first screen (85% instead of the AAP recommended 90% and an oxygen hood intervention between the first two screens. Using our modified screening algorithm, we found a 0.3% failure rate, which was similar to the 0.2% sea-level rate and statistically different from the 1.1% rate identified in a recent study at similar altitude. Had the AAP protocol been used, the failure rate would have increased to 0.8%, which is similar to prior reports near this altitude. Echocardiograms were performed on failing newborns with no CCHD identified. A Birth Defects Registry Database review demonstrated one newborn with CCHD was missed after meeting AAP passing criteria. Overall, this study demonstrates that an alternative algorithm can be implemented at moderate altitude with decreased failure rate and comparable false negative rate.

  6. Sleep respiratory disturbances and arousals at moderate altitude have overlapping electroencephalogram spectral signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadelmann, Katrin; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Tarokh, Leila; Lo Cascio, Christian M; Tesler, Noemi; Stoewhas, Anne-Christin; Kohler, Malcolm; Bloch, Konrad E; Huber, Reto; Achermann, Peter

    2014-08-01

    An ascent to altitude has been shown to result in more central apneas and a shift towards lighter sleep in healthy individuals. This study employs spectral analysis to investigate the impact of respiratory disturbances (central/obstructive apnea and hypopnea or periodic breathing) at moderate altitude on the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) and to compare EEG changes resulting from respiratory disturbances and arousals. Data were collected from 51 healthy male subjects who spent 1 night at moderate altitude (2590 m). Power density spectra of Stage 2 sleep were calculated in a subset (20) of these participants with sufficient artefact-free data for (a) epochs with respiratory events without an accompanying arousal, (b) epochs containing an arousal and (c) epochs of undisturbed Stage 2 sleep containing neither arousal nor respiratory events. Both arousals and respiratory disturbances resulted in reduced power in the delta, theta and spindle frequency range and increased beta power compared to undisturbed sleep. The similarity of the EEG changes resulting from altitude-induced respiratory disturbances and arousals indicates that central apneas are associated with micro-arousals, not apparent by visual inspection of the EEG. Our findings may have implications for sleep in patients and mountain tourists with central apneas and suggest that respiratory disturbances not accompanied by an arousal may, none the less, impact sleep quality and impair recuperative processes associated with sleep more than previously believed.

  7. Are Nocturnal Breathing, Sleep, and Cognitive Performance Impaired at Moderate Altitude (1,630-2,590 m)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latshang, Tsogyal D.; Lo Cascio, Christian M.; Stöwhas, Anne-Christin; Grimm, Mirjam; Stadelmann, Katrin; Tesler, Noemi; Achermann, Peter; Huber, Reto; Kohler, Malcolm; Bloch, Konrad E.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Newcomers at high altitude (> 3,000 m) experience periodic breathing, sleep disturbances, and impaired cognitive performance. Whether similar adverse effects occur at lower elevations is uncertain, although numerous lowlanders travel to moderate altitude for professional or recreational activities. We evaluated the hypothesis that nocturnal breathing, sleep, and cognitive performance of lowlanders are impaired at moderate altitude. Design: Randomized crossover trial. Setting: University hospital at 490 m, Swiss mountain villages at 1,630 m and 2,590 m. Participants: Fifty-one healthy men, median (quartiles) age 24 y (20-28 y), living below 800 m. Interventions: Studies at Zurich (490 m) and during 4 consecutive days at 1,630 m and 2,590 m, respectively, 2 days each. The order of altitude exposure was randomized. Polysomnography, psychomotor vigilance tests (PVT), the number back test, several other tests of cognitive performance, and questionnaires were evaluated. Measurements and Results: The median (quartiles) apnea-hypopnea index at 490 m was 4.6/h (2.3; 7.9), values at 1,630 and 2,590 m, day 1 and 2, respectively, were 7.0/h (4.1; 12.6), 5.4/h (3.5; 10.5), 13.1/h (6.7; 32.1), and 8.0/h (4.4; 23.1); corresponding values of mean nocturnal oxygen saturation were 96% (95; 96), 94% (93; 95), 94% (93; 95), 90% (89; 91), 91% (90; 92), P < 0.05 versus 490 m, all instances. Slow wave sleep on the first night at 2,590 m was 21% (18; 25) versus 24% (20; 27) at 490 m (P < 0.05). Psychomotor vigilance and various other measures of cognitive performance did not change significantly. Conclusions: Healthy men acutely exposed during 4 days to hypoxemia at 1,630 m and 2,590 m reveal a considerable amount of periodic breathing and sleep disturbances. However, no significant effects on psychomotor reaction speed or cognitive performance were observed. Clinical Trials Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01130948. Citation: Latshang TD; Lo Cascio CM; Stöwhas AC

  8. Ion density and temperature variations at altitude of 500 km during moderate seismic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Ananna; Khurana, M. S.; Bahal, B. M.; Aggarwal, Malini; Sharma, D. K.

    2017-02-01

    Ionospheric ions (O+ and H+) and temperature (Ti) as precursory parameters to seismic activity have been analysed from year 1995 till 1998, using SROSS-C2 (average altitude range of ∼500 km) satellite measurements for moderate magnitude earthquakes. The details of seismic events during this period are downloaded from United State Geological Survey (USGS) and National Earthquake Information Centre (NEIC) website. 13 seismic events of moderate magnitude (M = 4-5.5) from 1995 to 1998, using SROSS-C2 satellite measurements have been analysed. During seismic affected period, considerable decrease in the density of heavier ion - O+ and increase in the ion temperature (Ti) is observed during all the selected events. Lighter ion - H+ doesn't show any significant change. Electric field and electromagnetic emissions generated due to seismogenic activity could be the plausible initializing agents responsible for change in ion concentration and temperature values during these events.

  9. Hypoxic hypoxia at moderate altitudes: review of the state of the science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrassi, Frank A; Hodkinson, Peter D; Walters, P Lynne; Gaydos, Steven J

    2012-10-01

    Unpressurized aircraft routinely operate at altitudes where hypoxia may be of concern. A systematic literature review was conducted regarding hypoxic impairment, including mental functions, sensory deficits, and other pertinent research findings that may affect aviation-related duties at moderate altitude (8000 to 15,000 ft/2438 to 4572 m). The results of this review suggest that cognitive and psychomotor deficits may include learning, reaction time, decision-making, and certain types of memory. However, results are difficult to quantify and reliably reproduce. Inconsistency of results may be related to the subtlety of deficits compared to high altitude, differences among individual compensatory mechanisms, variation in methodology or sensitivity of metrics, presence or absence of exercise, heterogeneous neuronal central nervous system (CNS) response, and interindividual variation. Literature regarding hypoxic visual decrements is more consistent. Rod photoreceptors are more susceptible to hypoxia; visual degradation has been demonstrated at 4000 to 5000 ft (1219 to 1524 m) under scotopic and 10,000 ft (3048 m) under photopic conditions. Augmented night vision goggle resolution demonstrates more resilience to mild hypoxic effects than the unaided eye under starlight conditions. Hypocapnia enhances visual sensitivity and contrast discrimination. Hyperventilation with resulting respiratory alkalosis and cerebral vasoconstriction may confound both cognitive/ psychomotor and visual experimental results. Future research should include augmentation of validated neuropsychological metrics (surrogate investigational end points) with actual flight metrics, investigation of mixed gas formulations, contribution of hypocapnic vasoconstrictive effects on hypoxic performance, and further investigation into cellular- and systems-level approaches for heterogeneous CNS response. Research is also required into the contribution of mild-moderate hypoxia in human factors- and spatial

  10. Threshold altitude for bubble decay and stabilization in rat adipose tissue at hypobaric exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2013-01-01

    Bubble formation during altitude exposures, causing altitude decompression sickness (aDCS), has been referred to in theoretical models as venous gas embolisms (VGE). This has also been demonstrated by intravascular gas formation. Previous reports indicate that the formation of VGE and aDCS incide...

  11. Reconstructing Ion Spectra from Low-Altitude ENAs: Moderate to Large Storms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LLera, K.; Goldstein, J.; McComas, D. J.; Valek, P. W.

    2015-12-01

    Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) Energetic neutral atom (ENA) imagers regularly observe Low-altitude Emission (LAE) intensifications during geomagnetic storm intervals. Since LAEs are produced by the interaction between ions and the near-Earth exosphere (altitudes ~200-800 km), they are a global signature of how the ring current decays in response to solar wind conditions. In this "optically thick" region, an ENA readily becomes reionized, and an ion is readily neutralized. Therefore, emerging ENAs that contribute to the LAE signal (detectable several RE away) have undergone multiple charge exchange and electron stripping interactions. Accounting for the ~36 eV energy loss per interaction, we developed a model to quantify the total energy lost by emergent LAEs. The analytical tool is applied to an ensemble of moderate to large storms (including the recent 17 March and 23 June storms in 2015) to reconstruct the parent ion spectra from TWINS ENA images. We examine the ion spectra energy characteristics among the various storm events.

  12. Physical Growth, Biological Age, and Nutritional Transitions of Adolescents Living at Moderate Altitudes in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio-Bolaños, Marco; Gómez Campos, Rossana; Andruske, Cynthia Lee; Flores, Antonio Viveros; Luarte-Rocha, Cristian; Olivares, Pedro R.; Garcia-Rubio, Javier; de Arruda, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peru is experiencing a stage of nutritional transition where the principal characteristics are typical of countries undergoing development. Objectives: The objectives of this study were the following: (a) compare physical growth patterns with an international standard; (b) determine biological age; and (c) analyze the double nutritional burden of adolescents living at a moderate altitude in Peru. Design: Weight, standing height, and sitting height were measured in 551 adolescents of both sexes (12.0 to 17.9 years old) from an urban area of Arequipa, Peru (2328 m). Physical growth was compared with the international standard of the CDC-2000. Biological age was determined by using a non-invasive transversal technique based on years from age at peak height velocity (APHV). Nutritional state was determined by means of weight for age and height for age. Z scores were calculated using international standards from the CDC-2000. Results: Body weight for both sexes was similar to the CDC-2000 international standards. At all ages, the girls’ height (p < 0.05) was below the standards. However, the boys’ height (p < 0.05) was less at ages, 15, 16, and 17. Biological age showed up in girls at age 12.7 years and for boys at 15.2 years. Stunted growth (8.7% boys and 18.0% girls) and over weight (11.3% boys and 8.8% girls) occurred in both groups. A relationship existed in both sexes between the categories of weight for the age and stunted growth by sex. Conclusions: Adolescents living at a moderate altitude exhibited stunted linear growth and biological maturation. Furthermore, adolescents of both sexes showed the presence of the double nutritional burden (stunted growth and excessive weight). PMID:26404334

  13. Physical Growth, Biological Age, and Nutritional Transitions of Adolescents Living at Moderate Altitudes in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Cossio-Bolaños

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Peru is experiencing a stage of nutritional transition where the principal characteristics are typical of countries undergoing development. Objectives: The objectives of this study were the following: (a compare physical growth patterns with an international standard; (b determine biological age; and (c analyze the double nutritional burden of adolescents living at a moderate altitude in Peru. Design: Weight, standing height, and sitting height were measured in 551 adolescents of both sexes (12.0 to 17.9 years old from an urban area of Arequipa, Peru (2328 m. Physical growth was compared with the international standard of the CDC-2000. Biological age was determined by using a non-invasive transversal technique based on years from age at peak height velocity (APHV. Nutritional state was determined by means of weight for age and height for age. Z scores were calculated using international standards from the CDC-2000. Results: Body weight for both sexes was similar to the CDC-2000 international standards. At all ages, the girls’ height (p < 0.05 was below the standards. However, the boys’ height (p < 0.05 was less at ages, 15, 16, and 17. Biological age showed up in girls at age 12.7 years and for boys at 15.2 years. Stunted growth (8.7% boys and 18.0% girls and over weight (11.3% boys and 8.8% girls occurred in both groups. A relationship existed in both sexes between the categories of weight for the age and stunted growth by sex. Conclusions: Adolescents living at a moderate altitude exhibited stunted linear growth and biological maturation. Furthermore, adolescents of both sexes showed the presence of the double nutritional burden (stunted growth and excessive weight.

  14. Outdoor Activity and High Altitude Exposure During Pregnancy: A Survey of 459 Pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Linda E; Hackett, Peter H; Luks, Andrew M

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate whether women engage in outdoor activities and high altitude travel during pregnancy; the health care advice received regarding high altitude during pregnancy; and the association between high altitude exposure and self-reported pregnancy complications. An online survey of women with at least 1 pregnancy distributed on websites and e-mail lists targeting mothers and/or mountain activities. Outcome measures were outdoor activities during pregnancy, high altitude (>2440 m) exposure during pregnancy, and pregnancy and perinatal complications. Hiking, running, and swimming were the most common activities performed during pregnancy. Women traveled to high altitude in over half of the pregnancies (244/459), and most did not receive counseling regarding altitude (355, 77%), although a small proportion (14, 3%) were told not to go above 2440 m. Rates of miscarriage and most other complications were similar between pregnancies with and without travel above 2440 m. Pregnancies with high altitude exposure were more likely to have preterm labor (odds ratio [OR] 2.3; 95% CI 0.97-5.4; P = .05). Babies born to women who went to high altitude during pregnancy were more likely to need oxygen at birth (OR 2.34; 95% CI 1.04-5.26; P < .05) but had similar rates of neonatal intensive care unit admission (P = not significant). Our results suggest pregnant women who are active in outdoor sports and travel to high altitude have a low rate of complications. Given the limitations of our data, further research is necessary on the risks associated with high altitude travel and physical activity and how these apply to the general population. Copyright © 2016 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Circulatory adaptation to long-term high altitude exposure in Aymaras and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Thomas; Scherrer, Urs

    2010-01-01

    About 30 million people live above 2500 m in the Andean Mountains of South America. Among them are 5.5 million Aymaras, an ethnic group with its own language, living on the altiplano of Bolivia, Peru, and northern Chile at altitudes of up to 4400 m. In this high altitude region traces of human population go back for more than 2000 years with constant evolutionary pressure on its residents for genetic adaptation to high altitude. Aymaras as the assumed direct descendents of the ancient cultures living in this region were the focus of much research interest during the last decades and several distinctive adaptation patterns to life at high altitude have been described in this ethnic group. The aim of this article was to review the physiology and pathophysiology of circulatory adaptation and maladaptation to longtime altitude exposure in Aymaras and Caucasians.

  16. Mitochondrial function in human skeletal muscle following high-altitude exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, Robert A; Boushel, Robert; Wright-Paradis, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Studies regarding mitochondrial modifications in human skeletal muscle following acclimatization to high altitude are conflicting, and these inconsistencies may be due to the prevalence of representing mitochondrial function through static and isolated measurements of specific mitochondrial.......059) to limit mass-specific maximal oxidative phosphorylation capacity. These data suggest that 9-11 days of exposure to high altitude do not markedly modify integrated measures of mitochondrial functional capacity in skeletal muscle despite significant decrements in the concentrations of enzymes involved...

  17. Effect of high altitude exposure on spermatogenesis and epididymal sperm count in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasco, M; Rubio, J; Chung, A; Villegas, L; Gonzales, G F

    2003-12-01

    The present study was designed to determine the effect of exposure to high altitude on spermatogenesis using transillumination technique and sperm count in male rats. In addition, the effect of oral intubation for intragastric administration of vehicle on testicular parameters in adult male rats in a schedule of 42 days was assessed. Male rats were exposed to Cerro de Pasco (Peru) at 4340 m for 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 days resulting in a modification of the pattern of the seminiferous tubule stages. At day 3, stages I, IV-V, VI, VII and IX-XI were relatively shorter at high altitude than at sea level. At day 7, stages VIII, IX-XI, XII and XIII-XIV were reduced. At day 14, stages VII, VIII and IX-XI were reduced. At day 21 and 28, stages VIII, XII and XIII-XIV were significantly increased at high altitude. At day 35 an increase in stage XIII-XIV was observed. At day 42, stages II-III, IX-XI and XII were significantly increased at high altitude. Epididymal sperm count was significantly reduced at day 7 of exposure to high altitude and maintained low levels with respect to sea level up to 42 days. In conclusion, high altitude exposure affects spermatogenesis, particularly onset of mitosis and spermiation. This in turn affects epididymal sperm count.

  18. Ozone Exposure System Designed and Used to High-Altitude Airship Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sharon K.

    2005-01-01

    High-altitude airships can receive high doses of ozone over short mission durations. For example, in 1 year at an altitude of 70,000 ft, the ozone fluence (number arriving per unit area) can be as high as 1.2 1024 molecules/sq cm. Ozone exposure at these levels can embrittle materials or change the performance of solar cells. It is important to expose components and materials to the expected ozone dosage to determine if the ozone exposure could cause any mission-critical failures.

  19. Structural and functional changes of the human macula during acute exposure to high altitude.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Dominik Fischer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aimed to quantify structural and functional changes at the macula during acute exposure to high altitude and to assess their structure/function relationship. This work is related to the Tuebingen High Altitude Ophthalmology (THAO study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Spectral domain optical coherence tomography and microperimetry were used to quantify changes of central retinal structure and function in 14 healthy subjects during acute exposure to high altitude (4559 m. High-resolution volume scans and fundus-controlled microperimetry of the posterior pole were performed in addition to best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA measurements and assessment of acute mountain sickness. Analysis of measurements at altitude vs. baseline revealed increased total retinal thickness (TRT in all four outer ETDRS grid subfields during acute altitude exposure (TRT(outer = 2.80 ± 1.00 μm; mean change ± 95%CI. This change was inverted towards the inner four subfields (TRT(inner = -1.89 ± 0.97 μm with significant reduction of TRT in the fovea (TRT(foveal = -6.62 ± 0.90 μm at altitude. BCVA revealed no significant difference compared to baseline (0.06 ± 0.08 logMAR. Microperimetry showed stable mean sensitivity in all but the foveal subfield (MS(foveal = -1.12 ± 0.68 dB. At baseline recordings before and >2 weeks after high altitude exposure, all subjects showed equal levels with no sign of persisting structural or functional sequels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: During acute exposure to high altitude central retinal thickness is subject to minor, yet statistically significant changes. These alterations describe a function of eccentricity with an increase in regions with relatively higher retinal nerve fiber content and vascular arcades. However, these changes did not correlate with measures of central retinal function or acute mountain sickness. For the first time a quantitative approach has been used to assess these changes during acute

  20. Structural and Functional Changes of the Human Macula during Acute Exposure to High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M. Dominik; Willmann, Gabriel; Schatz, Andreas; Schommer, Kai; Zhour, Ahmad; Zrenner, Eberhart; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U.; Gekeler, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aimed to quantify structural and functional changes at the macula during acute exposure to high altitude and to assess their structure/function relationship. This work is related to the Tuebingen High Altitude Ophthalmology (THAO) study. Methodology/Principal Findings Spectral domain optical coherence tomography and microperimetry were used to quantify changes of central retinal structure and function in 14 healthy subjects during acute exposure to high altitude (4559 m). High-resolution volume scans and fundus-controlled microperimetry of the posterior pole were performed in addition to best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) measurements and assessment of acute mountain sickness. Analysis of measurements at altitude vs. baseline revealed increased total retinal thickness (TRT) in all four outer ETDRS grid subfields during acute altitude exposure (TRTouter = 2.80±1.00 μm; mean change±95%CI). This change was inverted towards the inner four subfields (TRTinner = −1.89±0.97 μm) with significant reduction of TRT in the fovea (TRTfoveal = −6.62±0.90 μm) at altitude. BCVA revealed no significant difference compared to baseline (0.06±0.08 logMAR). Microperimetry showed stable mean sensitivity in all but the foveal subfield (MSfoveal = −1.12±0.68 dB). At baseline recordings before and >2 weeks after high altitude exposure, all subjects showed equal levels with no sign of persisting structural or functional sequels. Conclusions/Significance During acute exposure to high altitude central retinal thickness is subject to minor, yet statistically significant changes. These alterations describe a function of eccentricity with an increase in regions with relatively higher retinal nerve fiber content and vascular arcades. However, these changes did not correlate with measures of central retinal function or acute mountain sickness. For the first time a quantitative approach has been used to assess these changes during acute, non

  1. [Effects of exposure to altitude on neuropsychology aspects: a literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, Valdir de Aquino; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli Dos; Prado, Juliana Martuscelli da Silva; Tufik, Sergio; Mello, Marco Túlio De

    2010-03-01

    Discuss the effects of altitude exposure on neuropsychological functions. We have conducted a literature review using as source indexed articles at Pubmed in the period from 1921 to 2008, using the following key words: 'cognition and hypoxia', 'hypoxia and neuropsychology', 'acute hypoxia', 'chronic hypoxia', and 'acclimatization and hypoxia', as well as specific books on the subject. Acute and chronic effects of Hypoxia can alter many of the neuropsychological functions in different altitudes due to physiological changes resulted by the oxygen (O2) partial decrease that can lead to neuropsychological alterations in individuals exposed to high altitudes. Individuals exposed to high altitudes must use an O2 supplementation and the practice of acclimatization, among other strategy ways that can be used in order to minimize the negative effects of hypoxia on neuropsychological aspects.

  2. The influence of intermittent altitude exposure to 4100 m on exercise capacity and blood variables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Nielsen, T K; Dela, F

    2005-01-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effects of intermittent hypoxic exposure on blood and exercise parameters. Eight sea level residents were exposed to 2 h daily stimulus to 4100 m altitude in a hypobaric chamber for a total of 14 days. Exercise performance was evaluated at sea level bef...

  3. Altitude Exposure at 1800 m Increases Haemoglobin Mass in Distance Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Garvican-Lewis, Iona Halliday, Chris R. Abbiss, Philo U. Saunders, Christopher J. Gore

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of low natural altitudes (< 2000 m on erythropoietic adaptation is currently unclear, with current recommendations indicating that such low altitudes may be insufficient to stimulate significant increases in haemoglobin mass (Hbmass. As such, the purpose of this study was to determine the influence of 3 weeks of live high, train high exposure (LHTH at low natural altitude (i.e. 1800 m on Hbmass, red blood cell count and iron profile. A total of 16 elite or well-trained runners were assigned into either a LHTH (n = 8 or CONTROL (n = 8 group. Venous blood samples were drawn prior to, at 2 weeks and at 3 weeks following exposure. Hbmass was measured in duplicate prior to exposure and at 2 weeks and at 3 weeks following exposure via carbon monoxide rebreathing. The percentage change in Hbmass from baseline was significantly greater in LHTH, when compared with the CONTROL group at 2 (3.1% vs 0.4%; p = 0.01; and 3 weeks (3.0% vs -1.1%; p < 0.02, respectively following exposure. Haematocrit was greater in LHTH than CONTROL at 2 (p = 0.01 and 3 weeks (p = 0.04 following exposure. No significant interaction effect was observed for haemoglobin concentration (p = 0.06, serum ferritin (p = 0.43, transferrin (p = 0.52 or reticulocyte percentage (p = 0.16. The results of this study indicate that three week of natural classic (i.e. LHTH low altitude exposure (1800 m results in a significant increase in Hbmass of elite distance runners, which is likely due to the continuous exposure to hypoxia.

  4. Does altitude moderate the impact of lithium on suicide? : The case of Austria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helbich, M.; Blüml, V.; Leitner, M.; Kapusta, N.

    2013-01-01

    Suicide, the tenth leading cause of death worldwide, is a complex phenomenon. Models aiming to explain the interaction of ambient variables such as socioeconomic factors, lithium content of drinking water and altitude are poorly developed. While controlling for several risk factors, this research

  5. Chronic intermittent high altitude exposure, occupation, and body mass index in workers of mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esenamanova, Marina K; Kochkorova, Firuza A; Tsivinskaya, Tatyana A; Vinnikov, Denis; Aikimbaev, Kairgeldy

    2014-09-01

    The obesity and overweight rates in population exposed to chronic intermittent exposure to high altitudes are not well studied. The aim of the retrospective study was to evaluate whether there are differences in body mass index in different occupation groups working in intermittent shifts at mining industry at high altitude: 3800-4500 meters above sea level. Our study demonstrated that obesity and overweight are common in workers of high altitude mining industry exposed to chronic intermittent hypoxia. The obesity rate was lowest among miners as compared to blue- and white-collar employees (9.5% vs. 15.6% and 14.7%, p=0.013). Obesity and overweight were associated with older age, higher rates of increased blood pressure (8.79% and 5.72% vs. 1.92%), cholesterol (45.8% and 45.6% vs. 32.8%) and glucose (4.3% and 1.26% vs. 0.57%) levels as compared to normal body mass index category (pmining industry exposed to intermittent high-altitude hypoxia. Therefore, assessment and monitoring of body mass index seems to be essential in those who live and work at high altitudes to supply the correct nutrition, modify risk factors, and prevent related disorders.

  6. Incidence of high altitude pulmonary edema in low-landers during re-exposure to high altitude after a sojourn in the plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, C.V.; Tomar, R.K.S.; Sharma, D.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is uncertainty whether acclimatized low-landers who return to high altitude after a sojourn at low altitude have a higher incidence of pulmonary edema than during the first exposure to high altitude. Methods This was a prospective cohort study consisting of men ascending to 3400 m by road (N = 1003) or by air (N = 4178). The study compared the incidence of high altitude pulmonary edema during first exposure vs the incidence during re-exposure in each of these cohorts. Results Pulmonary edema occurred in 13 of the 4178 entries by air (Incidence: 0.31%, 95% CI: 0.18%–0.53%). The incidence during first exposure was 0.18% (0.05%–0.66%) and 0.36% (0.2%–0.64%) during re-exposure (Fisher Exact Test for differences in the incidence (two-tailed) p = 0.534). The relative risk for the re-exposure cohort was 1.95 (95% CI, 0.43%–8.80%). Pulmonary edema occurred in 3 of the 1003 road entrants (Incidence: 0.30%, 95% CI: 0.08%–0.95%). All three cases occurred in the re-exposure cohort. Conclusion The large overlap of confidence intervals between incidence during first exposure and re-exposure; the nature of the confidence interval of the relative risk; and the result of the Fisher exact test, all suggest that this difference in incidence could have occurred purely by chance. We did not find evidence for a significantly higher incidence of HAPE during re-entry to HA after a sojourn in the plains. PMID:26288488

  7. Hemoglobin mass and peak oxygen uptake in untrained and trained residents of moderate altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böning, D; Rojas, J; Serrato, M; Ulloa, C; Coy, L; Mora, M; Gomez, J; Hütler, M

    2001-11-01

    Blood composition, hemoglobin mass (CO rebreathing method) and VO2peak were measured in 15 untrained (UT-Bogotá) and 14 trained males (TR-Bogotá) living at 2600 m of altitude, and in 14 untrained lowlanders (UT-Berlin). [Hb] amounted to 15.3 + 0.2(SE) g/dl in UT-Berlin, 17.4 + 0.2 g/dl in UT-Bogotá and 16.0 + 0.2 g/dl in TR-Bogotá. Hb mass was significantly higher in UT-Bogotá (13.2 + 0.4 g/kg, P < 0.01) and in TR-Bogotá (14.7 + 0.5 g/kg, P < 0.001) than in UT-Berlin (11.7 + 0.2 g/kg). In TR-Bogotá also plasma volume was expanded. Erythropoietin concentrations in UT-Bogotá and TR-Bogotá were not significantly increased. There was a positive correlation between blood volume and VO2peak for the pooled values of all subjects, if the oxygen uptake of UT-Berlin was corrected for an ascent to 2600 m. For the Hb mass - VO2peak relation two groups are indicated pointing to two types of altitude acclimatization with different Hb mass increases but similar distribution of aerobic performance capacity. We suggest that different genetic properties in a population of mixed ethnic origin might play a role.

  8. [Applicability of BMI in adolescent students living at moderate altitude of Perú].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio Bolaños, Marco Antonio; Viveros Flores, Antonio; Eduardo Hespanhol, Jefferson; Camargo, Cristiane; Gomez Campos, Rossana

    2014-11-01

    Introducción y objetivos: El uso del IMC es muy cuestionado, sobretodo, en poblaciones en fase de crecimiento que se caracterizan por presentar baja estatura para su edad. El objetivo es verificar si el IMC es aplicable a una muestra de escolares adolescentes que viven en una región de moderada altitud del Perú. Material y Métodos: Estudio descriptivo transversal realizado en 319 adolescentes escolares (181 hombres y 138 mujeres) de 12,0 a 17,9 años de edad. Se evaluó las variables antropométricas del peso y la estatura. Se calculó el Índice de Masa Corporal (IMC). Se utilizó la referencia del CDC-2000 para comparar el peso y estatura a partir del Z-score y el IMC por medio de diferencia de medias. Resultados: El Z-score para el peso corporal mostró pequeñas variaciones (entre -0,3 a 0,3 kg). En la estatura se observa valores negativos para ambos sexos (hombres entre -0,3 a -1,3 cm y mujeres entre -0,5 a 1,3 cm). Respecto al IMC, hubo diferencias significativas en todas la edades y en ambos sexos (p.

  9. Body fluid alterations during head-down bed rest in men at moderate altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeppky, J. A.; Roach, R. C.; Selland, M. A.; Scotto, P.; Luft, F. C.; Luft, U. C.

    1993-01-01

    To determine the effects of hypoxia on fluid balance responses to simulated zero-gravity, measurements were made in six subjects before and during -5 deg continuous head-down bed rest (HDBR) over 8 d at 10,678 ft. The same subjects were studied again at this altitude without HDBR as a control (CON) using a cross-over design. During this time, they maintained normal upright day-time activities, sleeping in the horizontal position at night. Fluid balance changes during HDBR in hypoxia were more pronounced than similar measurements previously reported from HDBR studies at sea level. Plasma volume loss was slightly greater and the diuresis and natriuresis were doubled in magnitude as compared to previous studies in normoxia and sustained for 4 d during hypoxia. These changes were associated with an immediate but transient rise in plasma atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to day 4 of 140 percent in HDBR and 41 percent in CON (p less than 0.005), followed by a decline towards baseline. Differences were less striking between HDBR and CON for plasma antidiuretic hormone and aldosterone, which were transiently reduced by HDBR. Plasma catecholamines showed a similar pattern to ANP in both HDBR and CON, suggesting that elevated ANP and catecholamines together accounted for the enhanced fluid shifts with HDBR during hypoxia.

  10. Influence of acute exposure to high altitude on basal and postprandial plasma levels of gastroenteropancreatic peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf L Riepl

    Full Text Available Acute mountain sickness (AMS is characterized by headache often accompanied by gastrointestinal complaints that vary from anorexia through nausea to vomiting. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of high altitude on plasma levels of gastroenteropancreatic (GEP peptides and their association to AMS symptoms. Plasma levels of 6 GEP peptides were measured by radioimmunoassay in 11 subjects at 490 m (Munich, Germany and, after rapid passive ascent to 3454 m (Jungfraujoch, Switzerland, over the course of three days. In a second study (n = 5, the same peptides and ghrelin were measured in subjects who consumed standardized liquid meals at these two elevations. AMS symptoms and oxygen saturation were monitored. In the first study, both fasting (morning 8 a.m. and stimulated (evening 8 p.m. plasma levels of pancreatic polypeptide (PP and cholecystokinin (CCK were significantly lower at high altitude as compared to baseline, whereas gastrin and motilin concentrations were significantly increased. Fasting plasma neurotensin was significantly enhanced whereas stimulated levels were reduced. Both fasting and stimulated plasma motilin levels correlated with gastrointestinal symptom severity (r = 0.294, p = 0.05, and r = 0.41, p = 0.006, respectively. Mean O(2-saturation dropped from 96% to 88% at high altitude. In the second study, meal-stimulated integrated (= area under curve plasma CCK, PP, and neurotensin values were significantly suppressed at high altitude, whereas integrated levels of gastrin were increased and integrated VIP and ghrelin levels were unchanged. In summary, our data show that acute exposure to a hypobaric hypoxic environment causes significant changes in fasting and stimulated plasma levels of GEP peptides over consecutive days and after a standardized meal. The changes of peptide levels were not uniform. Based on the inhibition of PP and neurotensin release a reduction of the cholinergic tone can be postulated.

  11. Urban ectopy in the mountains: Carbon monoxide exposure at high altitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leaf, D.A. [Univ. of California Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Kleinman, M.T. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Environmental exposure to inhaled carbon monoxide (CO) increases coronary artery disease risk. Sudden cardiac death, a frequent manifestation of coronary artery disease, is usually a result of ventricular dysrhythmia. The effect of exposure to CO at sea level (CO/SL) and simulated high (2.1 km) altitudes (CO/HA) on the incidence of cardiac ectopy in subjects with coronary artery disease was investigated. A double-blind crossover study was conducted, with random-order assignment, and each subject served as his own control. Seventeen men with documented coronary artery disease and stable angina pectoris performed cardiopulmonary exercise stress tests after random exposure to either CO or clean air (CA) at sea level (CA/SL) or at a simulated 2.1-km high altitude (CA/HA). The individual CO and HA exposure conditions were each selected to reduce the percentage of oxygen saturation of the subjects arterial blood by 4%. Subjects blood carboxyhemoglobin levels were increased form an average of 0.62% after clean-air exposure to 3.91% of saturation after CO exposure. The percentage of oxygen saturation in arterial blood was reduced from a baseline level of 98% to approximately 94% after CO/SL or CA/HA and to approximately 90% after CO/HA. Compared with the CA/SL the average incidence of exercise-induced ventricular ectopy was approximately doubled after all exposures and a significant trend (p {le} .05) of increased ectopy with decreased oxygen saturation in arterial blood was observed. Yet, among subjects who were free from ectopy (n=11) on CA/SL, only 2 subjects developed ectopy after CO/HA. No episodes of ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation occurred. The findings indicated that exposure to increased levels of hypoxemia, resulting from hypoxic and/or CO exposures, increased the susceptibility to ventricular ectopy during exercise in individuals with stable angina pectoris; however, this risk was nominal for those without ectopy. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. Characterization of the Cosmic Radiation Field at Flight Altitudes and Estimation of Aircrew Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jong Ho

    2004-02-15

    Cosmic radiation field at flight altitudes was simulated using the FLUKA Monte Carlo transport code and the spectra of secondary particles were obtained from the simulation. The obtained particle spectra were converted into effective dose rates by means of appropriate sets of conversion coefficients. The result shows that higher dose rates are observed at the higher altitude than the lower, at the higher latitude than the lower, and at the solar minimum than the maximum. Also it is confirmed that CARI-6 used in the estimation of aircrew exposure along specific flights provides approximately the same doses as the results of FLUKA calculations. Accordingly, the route doses to the personnels on board due to cosmic radiation were calculated for Korean-based commercial international airline routes using CARI-6. Annual individual doses to aircrew and the collective effective dose of passengers were estimated by applying the calculated route doses to the flight schedules of aircrew and the air travel statistics of Korea. The result shows that the annual doses to aircrew exceed the annual dose limit of public and are comparable to those of the group of workers occupationally exposed. Therefore it is necessary to consider the aircrew as the occupational exposure group. Also the annual collective dose to 11 million Korean passengers in 2001 appeared to be 136 man-Sv.

  13. Quantification of optic disc edema during exposure to high altitude shows no correlation to acute mountain sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Willmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The study aimed to quantify changes of the optic nerve head (ONH during exposure to high altitude and to assess a correlation with acute mountain sickness (AMS. This work is related to the Tuebingen High Altitude Ophthalmology (THAO study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO, Heidelberg Retina Tomograph, HRT3® was used to quantify changes at the ONH in 18 healthy participants before, during and after rapid ascent to high altitude (4559 m. Slitlamp biomicroscopy was used for clinical optic disc evaluation; AMS was assessed with Lake Louise (LL and AMS-cerebral (AMS-c scores; oxygen saturation (SpO₂ and heart rate (HR were monitored. These parameters were used to correlate with changes at the ONH. After the first night spent at high altitude, incidence of AMS was 55% and presence of clinical optic disc edema (ODE 79%. Key stereometric parameters of the HRT3® used to describe ODE (mean retinal nerve fiber layer [RNFL] thickness, RNFL cross sectional area, optic disc rim volume and maximum contour elevation changed significantly at high altitude compared to baseline (p<0.05 and were consistent with clinically described ODE. All changes were reversible in all participants after descent. There was no significant correlation between parameters of ODE and AMS, SpO₂ or HR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Exposure to high altitude leads to reversible ODE in the majority of healthy subjects. However, these changes did not correlate with AMS or basic physiologic parameters such as SpO₂ and HR. For the first time, a quantitative approach has been used to assess these changes during acute, non-acclimatized high altitude exposure. In conclusion, ODE presents a reaction of the body to high altitude exposure unrelated to AMS.

  14. Quantification of Optic Disc Edema during Exposure to High Altitude Shows No Correlation to Acute Mountain Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Gabriel; Fischer, M. Dominik; Schatz, Andreas; Schommer, Kai; Messias, Andre; Zrenner, Eberhart; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U.; Gekeler, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Background The study aimed to quantify changes of the optic nerve head (ONH) during exposure to high altitude and to assess a correlation with acute mountain sickness (AMS). This work is related to the Tuebingen High Altitude Ophthalmology (THAO) study. Methodology/Principal Findings A confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO, Heidelberg Retina Tomograph, HRT3®) was used to quantify changes at the ONH in 18 healthy participants before, during and after rapid ascent to high altitude (4559 m). Slitlamp biomicroscopy was used for clinical optic disc evaluation; AMS was assessed with Lake Louise (LL) and AMS-cerebral (AMS-c) scores; oxygen saturation (SpO2) and heart rate (HR) were monitored. These parameters were used to correlate with changes at the ONH. After the first night spent at high altitude, incidence of AMS was 55% and presence of clinical optic disc edema (ODE) 79%. Key stereometric parameters of the HRT3® used to describe ODE (mean retinal nerve fiber layer [RNFL] thickness, RNFL cross sectional area, optic disc rim volume and maximum contour elevation) changed significantly at high altitude compared to baseline (p<0.05) and were consistent with clinically described ODE. All changes were reversible in all participants after descent. There was no significant correlation between parameters of ODE and AMS, SpO2 or HR. Conclusions/Significance Exposure to high altitude leads to reversible ODE in the majority of healthy subjects. However, these changes did not correlate with AMS or basic physiologic parameters such as SpO2 and HR. For the first time, a quantitative approach has been used to assess these changes during acute, non-acclimatized high altitude exposure. In conclusion, ODE presents a reaction of the body to high altitude exposure unrelated to AMS. PMID:22069483

  15. Reduced oxygen due to high-altitude exposure relates to atrophy in motor-function brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paola, M; Paola, M D; Bozzali, M; Fadda, L; Musicco, M; Sabatini, U; Caltagirone, C

    2008-10-01

    At high altitudes barometric pressure is reduced and, thus, less oxygen is inhaled. Reduced oxygen concentration in brain tissue can lead to cerebral damage and neurological and cognitive deficits. The present study was designed to explore the effects of high-altitude exposure using a quantitative MRI technique, voxel-based morphometry. We studied nine world-class mountain climbers before (baseline) and after (follow-up) an extremely high-altitude ascent of Everest and K2. We investigated the effects of repeated extremely high-altitude exposures by comparing mountain climbers' scans at baseline with scans of 19 controls. In addition, we measured the effects of a single extremely high-altitude expedition by comparing mountain climbers' scans at baseline and follow-up. A region of reduced white matter density/volume was found in the left pyramidal tract near the primary (BA 4) and supplementary (BA 6) motor cortex when mountain climbers at baseline were compared with controls. Further, when mountain climbers' scans before and after the expedition were compared, a region of reduced grey matter density/volume was found in the left angular gyrus (BA 39). These findings suggest that extremely high-altitude exposures may cause subtle white and grey matter changes that mainly affect brain regions involved in motor activity.

  16. Effect of hypoxia by intermittent altitude exposure on semen characteristics and testicular morphology of male rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, D. K.

    1995-09-01

    Semen characteristics and testicular morphology of rhesus monkeys were studied on exposure to a simulated high altitude of 4411 m for 21 days. There was a partially reversible decrease in the semen volume, sperm count and sperm motility, as well as an elevation of pH and fructose concentration. These changes were associated with degeneration of the germinal epithelium and spermatogenic arrest at the end of third week of exposure which had not recovered even 3 weeks after the exposure.

  17. Deviations from uniform power-law scaling due to exposure to high altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posiewnik, A.

    2002-12-01

    A major challenge in biological physics is the analysis of time series that are typically highly nonstationary. Viswanathan et al. (Phys. Rev. E 55 (1) (1997) 845-899) using techniques based on the Fano factor and the Allan factor functions, as well as on detrended fluctuation analysis showed that the scaling properties of the dynamics of healthy physiological systems in normal conditions are more stable than those of pathological systems-there is underlying loss of uniform power-law scaling in disease. Here we test, using the same techniques as Viswanathan et al. (1997), the hypothesis that deviations from uniform power-law scaling, similar to those seen in heart failure and deep apnea syndrome occur also for healthy subjects under pathological conditions (hypoxaemic stress during exposure to high altitude, over 6000 m).

  18. Benefits of high altitude allergen avoidance in atopic adolescents with moderate to severe asthma, over and above treatment with high dose inhaled steroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootendorst, DC; Dahlen, SE; Van den Bos, JW; Duiverman, EJ; Veselic-Charvat, M; Vrijlandt, EJLE; O'Sullivan, S; Kumlin, M; Sterk, PJ; Roldaan, AC

    2001-01-01

    Background Some patients with severe asthma cannot be controlled with high doses of inhaled steroids (ICS), which may be related to ongoing environmental allergen exposure. Objective We investigated whether 10 weeks of high altitude allergen avoidance leads to sustained benefits regarding clinical a

  19. Prevalence and determinants of hyperlipidemia in moderate altitude areas of the Yunnan-Kweichow plateau in Southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bingjun; Luo, Tingguang; Huang, Yanfei; Shen, Tianhang; Ma, Jing

    2012-03-01

    The objective of the current study was to determine the prevalence and determinants of hyperlipidemia among the populations living at moderate altitude on the Yunnan-Kweichow Plateau in Southwestern China. We randomly recruited 1415 people for this study. These subjects underwent a physical examination and a comprehensive questionnaire regarding their daily habits and diets. Furthermore, blood samples from the participants were collected for assessing the lipid profile. We found that 49.3% of participants (95% CI: 46.7-51.9%) suffered from hyperlipidemia. The prevalence in men was significantly higher than that in women (53.6% vs. 44.7%, pdine out often and consume more animal-based foods and alcohol. In addition, the hyperlipidemic men in our cohort consumed more salted food then their normolipidemic counterparts (pdining out, and BMI were found to be the main determinants of hyperlipidemia in women, whereas a prevalence of salted food was observed to be related to hyperlipidemia in men from the Yunnan-Kweichow Plateau subpopulation under study (p<0.05). The average daily energy, and protein and fat intakes of the sampled subjects were also higher than the levels set by the Chinese Recommendation Nutrient Intakes (RNI), while hyperlipidemic subjects had an even higher average daily intake of total fat, cholesterol, and lower dietary fiber compared with the normolipidemic subjects in the study group (p<0.05). In conclusion, this study reveals a higher prevalence of hyperlipidemia, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, increased BMI and WHR values in men, as well as a slightly higher prevalence of low HDL-C and high LDL-C in women from Yunnan-Kweichow Plateau. The incidence of hyperlipidemia also increased with age, as did the prevalence of an abnormal TC, TG, LDL-C, and WHR in our study cohort. A high BMI, and less healthy living habits and dietary preferences thus play significant roles in the onset of hyperlipidemia.

  20. Metabolic adaptations may counteract ventilatory adaptations of intermittent hypoxic exposure during submaximal exercise at altitudes up to 4000 m.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Faulhaber

    Full Text Available Intermittent hypoxic exposure (IHE has been shown to induce aspects of altitude acclimatization which affect ventilatory, cardiovascular and metabolic responses during exercise in normoxia and hypoxia. However, knowledge on altitude-dependent effects and possible interactions remains scarce. Therefore, we determined the effects of IHE on cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses at different simulated altitudes in the same healthy subjects. Eight healthy male volunteers participated in the study and were tested before and 1 to 2 days after IHE (7 × 1 hour at 4500 m. The participants cycled at 2 submaximal workloads (corresponding to 40% and 60% of peak oxygen uptake at low altitude at simulated altitudes of 2000 m, 3000 m, and 4000 m in a randomized order. Gas analysis was performed and arterial oxygen saturation, blood lactate concentrations, and blood gases were determined during exercise. Additionally baroreflex sensitivity, hypoxic and hypercapnic ventilatory response were determined before and after IHE. Hypoxic ventilatory response was increased after IHE (p<0.05. There were no altitude-dependent changes by IHE in any of the determined parameters. However, blood lactate concentrations and carbon dioxide output were reduced; minute ventilation and arterial oxygen saturation were unchanged, and ventilatory equivalent for carbon dioxide was increased after IHE irrespective of altitude. Changes in hypoxic ventilatory response were associated with changes in blood lactate (r = -0.72, p<0.05. Changes in blood lactate correlated with changes in carbon dioxide output (r = 0.61, p<0.01 and minute ventilation (r = 0.54, p<0.01. Based on the present results it seems that the reductions in blood lactate and carbon dioxide output have counteracted the increased hypoxic ventilatory response. As a result minute ventilation and arterial oxygen saturation did not increase during submaximal exercise at simulated altitudes between 2000 m and 4000 m.

  1. Relationship between daily exposure to biomass fuel smoke and blood pressure in high-altitude Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs Peña, Melissa; Romero, Karina M; Velazquez, Eric J; Davila-Roman, Victor G; Gilman, Robert H; Wise, Robert A; Miranda, J Jaime; Checkley, William

    2015-05-01

    Household air pollution from biomass fuel use affects 3 billion people worldwide; however, few studies have examined the relationship between biomass fuel use and blood pressure. We sought to determine if daily biomass fuel use was associated with elevated blood pressure in high altitude Peru and if this relationship was affected by lung function. We analyzed baseline information from a population-based cohort study of adults aged ≥ 35 years in Puno, Peru. Daily biomass fuel use was self-reported. We used multivariable regression models to examine the relationship between daily exposure to biomass fuel smoke and blood pressure outcomes. Interactions with sex and quartiles of forced vital capacity were conducted to evaluate for effect modification. Data from 1004 individuals (mean age, 55.3 years; 51.7% women) were included. We found an association between biomass fuel use with both prehypertension (adjusted relative risk ratio, 5.0; 95% confidence interval, 2.6-9.9) and hypertension (adjusted relative risk ratio, 3.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.0). Biomass fuel users had a higher systolic blood pressure (7.0 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 4.4-9.6) and a higher diastolic blood pressure (5.9 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 4.2-7.6) when compared with nonusers. We did not find interaction effects between daily biomass fuel use and sex or percent predicted forced vital capacity for either systolic blood pressure or diastolic blood pressure. Biomass fuel use was associated with a higher likelihood of having hypertension and higher blood pressure in Peru. Reducing exposure to household air pollution from biomass fuel use represents an opportunity for cardiovascular prevention.

  2. COMPARISON OF LIVE HIGH: TRAIN LOW ALTITUDE AND INTERMITTENT HYPOXIC EXPOSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare E. Humberstone-Gough

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Live High:Train Low (LHTL altitude training is a popular ergogenic aid amongst athletes. An alternative hypoxia protocol, acute (60-90 min daily Intermittent Hypoxic Exposure (IHE, has shown potential for improving athletic performance. The aim of this study was to compare directly the effects of LHTL and IHE on the running and blood characteristics of elite triathletes. Changes in total haemoglobin mass (Hbmass, maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max, velocity at VO2max (vVO2max, time to exhaustion (TTE, running economy, maximal blood lactate concentration ([La] and 3 mM [La] running speed were compared following 17 days of LHTL (240 h of hypoxia, IHE (10.2 h of hypoxia or Placebo treatment in 24 Australian National Team triathletes (7 female, 17 male. There was a clear 3.2 ± 4.8% (mean ± 90% confidence limits increase in Hbmass following LHTL compared with Placebo, whereas the corresponding change of -1.4 ± 4.5% in IHE was unclear. Following LHTL, running economy was 2.8 ± 4.4% improved compared to IHE and 3mM [La] running speed was 4.4 ± 4.5% improved compared to Placebo. After IHE, there were no beneficial changes in running economy or 3mM [La] running speed compared to Placebo. There were no clear changes in VO2max, vVO2max and TTE following either method of hypoxia. The clear difference in Hbmass response between LHTL and IHE indicated that the dose of hypoxia in IHE was insufficient to induce accelerated erythropoiesis. Improved running economy and 3mM [La] running speed following LHTL suggested that this method of hypoxic exposure may enhance performance at submaximal running speeds. Overall, there was no evidence to support the use of IHE in elite triathletes

  3. Going High with Heart Disease: The Effect of High Altitude Exposure in Older Individuals and Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Benjamin D

    2015-06-01

    Levine, Benjamin D. Going high with heart disease: The effect of high altitude exposure in older individuals and patients with coronary artery disease. High Alt Med Biol 16:89-96, 2015.--Ischemic heart disease is the largest cause of death in older men and women in the western world (Lozano et al., 2012 ; Roth et al., 2015). Atherosclerosis progresses with age, and thus age is the dominant risk factor for coronary heart disease in any algorithm used to assess risk for cardiovascular events. Subclinical atherosclerosis also increases with age, providing the substrate for precipitation of acute coronary syndromes. Thus the risk of high altitude exposure in older individuals is linked closely with both subclinical and manifest coronary heart disease (CHD). There are several considerations associated with taking patients with CHD to high altitude: a) The reduced oxygen availability may cause or exacerbate symptoms; b) The hypoxia and other associated environmental conditions (exercise, dehydration, change in diet, thermal stress, emotional stress from personal danger or conflict) may precipitate acute coronary events; c) If an event occurs and the patient is far from advanced medical care, then the outcome of an acute coronary event may be poor; and d) Sudden death may occur. Physicians caring for older patients who want to sojourn to high altitude should keep in mind the following four key points: 1). Altitude may exacerbate ischemic heart disease because of both reduced O2 delivery and paradoxical vasoconstriction; 2). Adverse events, including acute coronary syndromes and sudden cardiac death, are most common in older unfit men, within the first few days of altitude exposure; 3). Ensuring optimal fitness, allowing for sufficient acclimatization (at least 5 days), and optimizing medical therapy (especially statins and aspirin) are prudent recommendations that may reduce the risk of adverse events; 4). A graded exercise test at sea level is probably sufficient for

  4. Sildenafil does not improve steady state cardiovascular hemodynamics, peak power, or 15-km time trial cycling performance at simulated moderate or high altitudes in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kressler, Jochen; Stoutenberg, Mark; Roos, Bernard A; Friedlander, Anne L; Perry, Arlette C; Signorile, Joseph F; Jacobs, Kevin A

    2011-12-01

    Sildenafil improves oxygen delivery and maximal exercise capacity at very high altitudes (≥ 4,350 m), but it is unknown whether sildenafil improves these variables and longer-duration exercise performance at moderate and high altitudes where competitions are more common. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of sildenafil on cardiovascular hemodynamics, arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)), peak exercise capacity (W (peak)), and 15-km time trial performance in endurance-trained subjects at simulated moderate (MA; ~2,100 m, 16.2% F(I)O(2)) and high (HA; ~3,900 m, 12.8% F(I)O(2)) altitudes. Eleven men and ten women completed two HA W (peak) trials after ingesting placebo or 50 mg sildenafil. Subjects then completed four exercise trials (30 min at 55% of altitude-specific W (peak) + 15-km time trial) at MA and HA after ingesting placebo or 50 mg sildenafil. All trials were performed in randomized, counterbalanced, and double-blind fashion. Sildenafil had little influence on cardiovascular hemodynamics at MA or HA, but did result in higher SaO(2) values (+3%, p < 0.05) compared to placebo during steady state and time trial exercise at HA. W (peak) at HA was 19% lower than SL (p < 0.001) and was not significantly affected by sildenafil. Similarly, the significantly slower time trial performance at MA (28.1 ± 0.5 min, p = 0.016) and HA (30.3 ± 0.6 min, p < 0.001) compared to SL (27.5 ± 0.6 min) was unaffected by sildenafil. We conclude that sildenafil is unlikely to exert beneficial effects at altitudes <4,000 m for a majority of the population.

  5. Gender and Family as Moderators of the Relationship between Music Video Exposure and Adolescent Sexual Permissiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouse, Jeremiah S.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examined family environment and gender as moderators of an hypothesized relationship between exposure to rock music videos and premarital sexual attitudes and behavior. Results of a survey of 214 adolescents revealed a stronger association between permissive sexual attitudes and behavior and reported exposure to music videos for females than for…

  6. Changes of autonomic nervous system function in healthy young men during initial phase at acute high-altitude exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Jun; Huang Lan; Tian Kaixin; Yu Shiyong; Yu Yang; Long Min

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of autonomic nervous system (ANS) function during the initial phase at acute high-altitude exposure. Methods: Ninety-nine healthy sea-level male residents were studied in Chengdu plain and then Tibet plateau. Heart rate variability (HRV), cold pressor test (CPT), resting heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were measured at baseline (560 m altitude) and in 2 to 4 d after arriving at Tibet plateau (3 675 m altitude) to assess the ANS function. Results: Compared with baseline, on day 2 in Tibet the standard deviation of normal to normal intervals (SDNN), high-frequency (HF) power, total power (TP), root mean square of delta RR (rMSSD), percentage of delta RR>50 ms (PNN50), normalized high-frequency (Hfnu) and fractal dimension (FD) decreased significantly (SDNN, HF,TP P<0.01, rMSSD, PNNs0, Hfnu, FD P<0.05), while the normalized low-frequency (Lfnu) and LF/HF increased significantly (P<0.01). During day 3-4 in Tibet, SDNN, rMSSD, HF, TP and Hfnu tended to rebound while Lfnu and LF/HF decreased towards baseline day by day. In addition, in Tibet the increase in systolic pressure (SP) and diastolic pressure (DP) during CPT decreased significantly (P<0.01, 0.05), but resting HR increased compared with baseline (P<0.01). Conclusion: ANS modulation is generally blunted, and the relatively predominant sympathetic control is enhanced originally, then it reverts to the sea level states gradually during the initial days of acute high-altitude exposure.

  7. [Hemo- and neurodynamics of the human brain during exposure to moderate hypoxic hypoxia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, D A; Zubarev, A F; Krupina, T N; Iarullin, Kh Kh; Kuznets, E I

    1984-01-01

    Synchronous electro- and rheoencephalography were used to study tolerance to moderate hypoxic hypoxia for 30 min at an altitude of 5000 m without additional oxygen supply. As test subject, men with autonomic-vascular dystonia (29-39 years old), 15 men over 40 (41-56 years old), and 16 essentially healthy controls (23-36 years old) were used. The aged volunteers (41-56 years old) did not differ from the controls with respect to their tolerance to hypoxic hypoxia. The men with early symptoms of hypertonic-type dystonia also showed high tolerance to hypoxic hypoxia. The subjects with hypotonic-type dystonia displayed lower tolerance.

  8. Moderating effects of media exposure on associations between socioeconomic position and cancer worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Minsoo; Chan, Carina Ka Yee; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula

    2014-01-01

    Reducing fear of cancer is significant in developing cancer screening interventions, but the levels of fear may vary depending on the degrees of media exposure as well as individuals' socioeconomic positions (SEP). However, few studies have examined how the SEP influences the fear of cancer under the moderating process of general and specific forms of media exposure. We investigated the moderating effect of media exposure on the relationship between SEP and the level of fear of cancer by assuming that cancer knowledge is a covariate between those two. In particular, this study examined how exposure to both general and specific media changes the series of processes from SEP to fear of cancer. We conducted path analyses with three types of media--television, radio and the Internet--using data from a health communication survey of 613 adults in Massachusetts in the United States. We found that SEP influences cancer knowledge directly and fear of cancer indirectly, as moderated by the level of media exposure. Health-specific exposure, however, had a more consistent effect than general media exposure in lowering the fear of cancer by increasing knowledge about cancer. A higher level of health-specific exposure and greater amount of cancer knowledge lessened the fear of cancer. In addition, the more people were exposed to health information on television and the Internet, the lower the level of fear of cancer as a result. These findings indicate a relationship between SEP and fear of cancer, as moderated by the level and type of media exposure. Furthermore, the findings suggest that for early detection or cancer prevention strategies, health communication approaches through mass media need to be considered.

  9. Chronic exposure to low frequency noise at moderate levels causes impaired balance in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Tamura

    Full Text Available We are routinely exposed to low frequency noise (LFN; below 0.5 kHz at moderate levels of 60-70 dB sound pressure level (SPL generated from various sources in occupational and daily environments. LFN has been reported to affect balance in humans. However, there is limited information about the influence of chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels for balance. In this study, we investigated whether chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level of 70 dB SPL affects the vestibule, which is one of the organs responsible for balance in mice. Wild-type ICR mice were exposed for 1 month to LFN (0.1 kHz and high frequency noise (HFN; 16 kHz at 70 dB SPL at a distance of approximately 10-20 cm. Behavior analyses including rotarod, beam-crossing and footprint analyses showed impairments of balance in LFN-exposed mice but not in non-exposed mice or HFN-exposed mice. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a decreased number of vestibular hair cells and increased levels of oxidative stress in LFN-exposed mice compared to those in non-exposed mice. Our results suggest that chronic exposure to LFN at moderate levels causes impaired balance involving morphological impairments of the vestibule with enhanced levels of oxidative stress. Thus, the results of this study indicate the importance of considering the risk of chronic exposure to LFN at a moderate level for imbalance.

  10. Normobaric Hypoxia Exposure during Low Altitude Stay and Performance of Elite-Level Race-Walkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Sikri, AB Srinivasa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We read with profound interest the article titled ‘Increased hypoxic dose after training at low altitude with 9h per night at 3000m normobaric hypoxia’ by Carr et al. (2015. Authors have concluded that low altitude (1380 m combined with normobaric hypoxia of 3000 m improves total haemoglobin mass (Hbmass and is an effective alternate method for training. Like other studies on elite athletes, the authors of present work have brought out that a major limitation was non-availability of a control group consisting of subjects undertaking same supervised training at normoxia. The total number of ‘possible’ subjects for control group which were taken from a previous study (Saunders et al., 2010 was 11 i.e placebo group (n = 6; 3 male and 3 female and Nocebo group (n = 5; 3 female and 2 male. It seems likely that authors of the present study have chosen only 10 subjects out of those 11. The criteria for exclusion of one subject and selection of 10 out of 11 subjects from the previous study to form the control group of the present study may require further elaboration.

  11. Correlation of vascular endothelial growth factor to permeability of blood-brain barrier and brain edema during high-altitude exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiquan Zhou; Chang'e Liu; Jing Wang; Yunli Wang; Bo Zhou

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Many studies have evaluated the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in traumatic brain edema and hemorrhagic brain edema.OBJECTIVE:To observe the effects of VEGF expression on permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during high-altitude and hypoxia exposure,and to investigate the correlation between VEGF expression and BBB permeability with regard to Evans blue staining and brain edema during high-altitude exposure.DESIGN,TIME AND SETTING:The randomized,controlled,animal study was performed at the Tanggula Etape,Central Laboratory of Chengdu Medical College,and Central Laboratory of General Hospital of Chengdu Military Area Command of Chinese PLA,China,from July 2003 to November 2004.MATERIALS:Quantitative RT-PCR kit (Sigma,USA),VEGF ELISA kit (Biosource,USA),and Evans blue (Jingchun,China) were acquired for this study.METHODS:A total of 180 Wistar rats were equally and randomly assigned to 15 groups:low-altitude (500 m),middle-altitude (2 880 m),high-altitude (4 200 m),super-high-altitude (5 000 m),1,3,5,7,9,11,13,15,17,19,and 21 days of super high-altitude exposure.Wistar rats were exposed to various altitude gradients to establish a hypoxia model.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:Brain water content was calculated according to the wet-to-dry weight ratio.BBB permeability to Evans blue was determined by colorimetric method.VEGF mRNA and protein levels in brain tissues were detected using RT-PCR and double-antibody sandwich ELISA.RESULTS:Brain water content,BBB permeability to Evans blue,and VEGF mRNA and protein levels in brain tissues increased with increasing altitude and prolonged exposure to altitude.The greatest increase was determined on day 9 upon ascending 5 000 m.Simultaneously,VEGF expression positively correlated to BBB permeability of Evans blue and brain water content (r=0.975,0.917,P<0.01).CONCLUSION:Increased VEGF protein and mRNA expression was responsible for increased BBB permeability,which may be an important mechanism

  12. A randomly-controlled study on the cardiac function at the early stage of return to the plains after short-term exposure to high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiquan; Yang, Shengyue; Luo, Yongjun; Qi, Yushu; Yan, Ziqiang; Shi, Zifu; Fan, Yong

    2012-01-01

    High altitude acclimatization and adaptation mechanisms have been well clarified, however, high altitude de-adaptation mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we conducted a controlled study on cardiac functions in 96 healthy young male who rapidly entered the high altitude (3700 m) and returned to the plains (1500 m) after 50 days. Ninety eight healthy male who remained at low altitude were recruited as control group. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS), cardiac function index (Tei index) were tested. Levels of serum creatine kinase isoform MB (CK-MB), lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme-1 (LDH-1), endothelin-1 (ET-1), nitrogen oxide (NO), serum hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2α) (8-iso PGF(2α)), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malonaldehyde (MDA) were measured at an altitude of 3700 m and 1500 m respectively. The results showed that after short-term exposure to high altitude mPAP and Tei index increased significantly, while LVEF and LVFS decreased significantly. These changes were positively correlated with altitude. On the 15(th) day after the subjects returned to low altitude, mPAP, LVEF and LVFS levels returned to the same level as those of the control subjects, but the Tei index in the returned subjects was still significantly higher than that in the control subjects (PLDH-1. These findings suggest that cardiac function de-adapts when returning to the plains after short-term exposure to high altitude and the function recovery takes a relatively long time.

  13. A randomly-controlled study on the cardiac function at the early stage of return to the plains after short-term exposure to high altitude.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiquan Zhou

    Full Text Available High altitude acclimatization and adaptation mechanisms have been well clarified, however, high altitude de-adaptation mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we conducted a controlled study on cardiac functions in 96 healthy young male who rapidly entered the high altitude (3700 m and returned to the plains (1500 m after 50 days. Ninety eight healthy male who remained at low altitude were recruited as control group. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS, cardiac function index (Tei index were tested. Levels of serum creatine kinase isoform MB (CK-MB, lactate dehydrogenase isoenzyme-1 (LDH-1, endothelin-1 (ET-1, nitrogen oxide (NO, serum hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2α (8-iso PGF(2α, superoxide dismutase (SOD and malonaldehyde (MDA were measured at an altitude of 3700 m and 1500 m respectively. The results showed that after short-term exposure to high altitude mPAP and Tei index increased significantly, while LVEF and LVFS decreased significantly. These changes were positively correlated with altitude. On the 15(th day after the subjects returned to low altitude, mPAP, LVEF and LVFS levels returned to the same level as those of the control subjects, but the Tei index in the returned subjects was still significantly higher than that in the control subjects (P<0.01. We also found that changes in Tei index was positively correlated with mPAP, ET-1, HIF-1α and 8-iso PGF(2α levels, and negatively correlated with the level of NO, LVEF, LVFS, CK-MB and LDH-1. These findings suggest that cardiac function de-adapts when returning to the plains after short-term exposure to high altitude and the function recovery takes a relatively long time.

  14. EFFECTS OF MODERATE NOISE EXPOSURE ON HEARING FUNCTION IN C57BL/6J MICE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Chuang; SHI Lei; JIANG Xuejun; YANG Shiming; LIU Ke

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study characteristics of hearing loss after exposure to moderate noise exposure in C57BL/6J mice. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice with normal hearing at age of 5-6 weeks were chosen for this study. The mice were randomly selected to be studied immediately after exposure (Group P0), or 1 day (Group P1), 3 days (Group P3), 7 days (Group P7) or 14 days (P14) after exposure. Their before exposure condition served as the normal control. All mice were exposed to a broad-band white noise at 100 dB SPL for 2 hours, ABR thresholds were used to estimate hearing status at each time point. Results ABR threshold elevation was seen at every tested frequency at P0 (P0.05). Conclusion There is a frequency specific re-sponse to 100 dB SPL broad-band white noise in C57BL/6J mice, with the high-frequency being more susceptible. Hearing loss induced by moderate noise exposure appears reversible in C57BL/6J mice.

  15. Hematological indices, mountain sickness and MRI brain abnormalities in professional and amateur mountain climbers after altitude exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayed, Nicolás; Diaz, Lizeth; Dávila, Jorge; Medrano, Jaime

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this work was to correlate the presence of brain abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with changes in hematological variables and the presence of mountain sickness in 21 mountain climbers involved in two different expeditions to high mountains, Everest and Aconcagua, without supplementary oxygen and recommended acclimatization for this kind of activities. The climbers underwent medical examination, hematological studies, electrocardiogram and MRI of the cerebrum. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to evaluate the changes in hematocrit, hemoglobin, red blood cells, iron and ferritin. Mountain sickness was correlated with the age of the climbers and the altitude ascended, final hemoglobin and final mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration. There were no differences related to conditions of professional or amateur climbers and the changes of those hematological variables, as seen with the nominal regression. We found more brain damage on MRI in amateur than professional climbers. Amateur climbers are more susceptible to suffer acute mountain sickness and permanent cerebral damage than professional climbers after high altitude exposure.

  16. Media Exposure and Health in Europe: Mediators and Moderators of Media Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Niels; van der Zanden, Reneé; Buijzen, Moniek; Scheepers, Peer

    This study examined media exposure as an explanatory factor for individual and cross-national differences in self-assessed general health. In studying media exposure, traditional media (television, radio, and newspapers) and contemporary media (internet) were separately considered. Aside from hypotheses about the relation between media exposure and general health, we also tested hypotheses regarding the mediating role of social isolation and mean world syndrome as well as the moderating role of different media systems across countries. Therefore, we used European Social Survey 2010, covering 25 European countries (n = 36,692). The results of our multilevel regression analyses indicated that exposure to television was negatively related to general health, whereas exposure to radio and newspapers were positively related to health. For contemporary media, findings indicated consistent positive relations between internet exposure and health across. Furthermore, limited support was found for the mediating role of social isolation and the mean world syndrome in the link between media exposure and health. Across media systems, findings for the relations between exposure to the various types of media and health proved to be robust.

  17. Developmental functional adaptation to high altitude: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisancho, A Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Various approaches have been used to understand the origins of the functional traits that characterize the Andean high-altitude native. Based on the conceptual framework of developmental functional adaptation which postulates that environmental influences during the period of growth and development have long lasting effects that may be expressed during adulthood, we initiated a series of studies addressed at determining the pattern of physical growth and the contribution of growth and development to the attainment of full functional adaptation to high-altitude of low and high altitude natives living under rural and urban conditions. Current research indicate that: (a) the pattern of growth at high altitude due to limited nutritional resources, physical growth in body size is delayed but growth in lung volumes is accelerated because of hypoxic stress); (b) low-altitude male and female urban natives can attain a full functional adaptation to high altitude by exposure to high-altitude hypoxia during the period of growth and development; (c) both experimental studies on animals and comparative human studies indicate that exposure to high altitude during the period of growth and development results in the attainment of a large residual lung volume; (d) this developmentally acquired enlarged residual lung volume and its associated increase in alveolar area when combined with the increased tissue capillarization and moderate increase in red blood cells and hemoglobin concentration contributes to the successful functional adaptation of the Andean high-altitude native to hypoxia; and (e) any specific genetic traits that are related to the successful functional adaptation of Andean high-altitude natives have yet to be identified.

  18. Environmental hazards in Nepal: altitude illness, environmental exposures, injuries, and bites in travelers and expatriates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggild, Andrea K; Costiniuk, Cecilia; Kain, Kevin C; Pandey, Prativa

    2007-01-01

    Adventure travel necessarily places travelers at risk of environmental hazards. We assessed the burden of "environmental" hazards among a cohort of travelers and expatriates presenting to a large travel clinic in Nepal. Data on travelers and expatriates seen at the Canadian International Water and Energy Consultants (CIWEC) clinic in Kathmandu were prospectively collected and entered into the GeoSentinel Surveillance Network database. Data on individuals receiving predefined diagnoses related to environmental hazards were extracted and analyzed. Of 10,499 travelers and 4,854 expatriates in the database, 2,160 were diagnosed with 2,533 environment-related illnesses. Injuries were common among both travelers and expatriates [N= 788 (6.1%) and 328 (4.9%), respectively], while altitude illness was seen almost exclusively in travelers [N= 611 (4.7%) vs N= 8 (0.1%)]. Factors independently associated with environmental diagnoses include male gender (p tourism (p Environmental hazards are important causes of morbidity and potential mortality among adventure travelers and expatriates. Current pre-travel interventions are missing certain risk groups entirely and failing to have the desired educational impact in others.

  19. Media exposure and smoking intention in adolescents: a moderated mediation analysis from a cultivation perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Salmon, Charles T; Pang, Joyce S; Cheng, Wendy J Y

    2015-02-01

    The study tested a moderated mediation model to examine the mechanisms underlying the link between media exposure and adolescent smoking intention by utilizing a modification of cultivation theory. A total of 12,586 non-current smoker adolescents in California were included in the analysis. Results showed that media exposure was positively related to smoking intention via perceived prevalence of peer smoking when friend disapproval of cigarette use was low. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms regarding the media effects on smoking intention, but the findings should be interpreted with caution due to the small effect size.

  20. Effect of oxygen breathing on micro oxygen bubbles in nitrogen-depleted rat adipose tissue at sea level and 25 kPa altitude exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2012-01-01

    The standard treatment of altitude decompression sickness (aDCS) caused by nitrogen bubble formation is oxygen breathing and recompression. However, micro air bubbles (containing 79% nitrogen), injected into adipose tissue, grow and stabilize at 25 kPa regardless of continued oxygen breathing...... and the tissue nitrogen pressure. To quantify the contribution of oxygen to bubble growth at altitude, micro oxygen bubbles (containing 0% nitrogen) were injected into the adipose tissue of rats depleted from nitrogen by means of preoxygenation (fraction of inspired oxygen = 1.0; 100%) and the bubbles studied...... at 101.3 kPa (sea level) or at 25 kPa altitude exposures during continued oxygen breathing. In keeping with previous observations and bubble kinetic models, we hypothesize that oxygen breathing may contribute to oxygen bubble growth at altitude. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 3 h of oxygen...

  1. Effects of moderate-level sound exposure on behavioral thresholds in chinchillas

    OpenAIRE

    Carbajal de Nava, Maria Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Normal audiometric thresholds following noise exposure have generally been considered as an indication of a recovered cochlea and intact peripheral auditory system, yet recent animal work has challenged this classic assumption. Moderately noise-exposed animals have been shown to have permanent loss of synapses on inner hair cells (IHCs) and permanent damage to auditory nerve fibers (ANFs), specifically the low-spontaneous rate fibers (low-SR), despite normal electrophysiological thresholds. L...

  2. High altitude exposure alters gene expression levels of DNA repair enzymes, and modulates fatty acid metabolism by SIRT4 induction in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acs, Zoltan; Bori, Zoltan; Takeda, Masaki; Osvath, Peter; Berkes, Istvan; Taylor, Albert W; Yang, Hu; Radak, Zsolt

    2014-06-01

    We hypothesized that high altitude exposure and physical activity associated with the attack to Mt Everest could alter mRNA levels of DNA repair and metabolic enzymes and cause oxidative stress-related challenges in human skeletal muscle. Therefore, we have tested eight male mountaineers (25-40 years old) before and after five weeks of exposure to high altitude, which included attacks to peaks above 8000m. Data gained from biopsy samples from vastus lateralis revealed increased mRNA levels of both cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. On the other hand 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) mRNA levels tended to decrease while Ku70 mRNA levels and SIRT6 decreased with altitude exposure. The levels of SIRT1 and SIRT3 mRNA did not change significantly. However, SIRT4 mRNA level increased significantly, which could indicate decreases in fatty acid metabolism, since SIRT4 is one of the important regulators of this process. Within the limitations of this human study, data suggest that combined effects of high altitude exposure and physical activity climbing to Mt. Everest, could jeopardize the integrity of the particular chromosome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxidative stress in erythrocytes: a study on the effect of antioxidant mixtures during intermittent exposures to high altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vani, R.; Shiva Shankar Reddy, C. S.; Asha Devi, S.

    2010-09-01

    The aim of our study was to compare and assess the effectiveness of antioxidant mixtures on the erythrocytes (RBC) of adult male albino rats (Wister) subjected to simulated intermittent high altitudes—5,100 m (AL1) and 6,700 m (AL2)—to induce oxidative stress (OS). To achieve our objective, we pre-supplemented four sets of animals with different antioxidant mixtures [vitamin E (vit.E; 50 IU/kg BW), vitamin C (vit.C; 400 mg/kg) and l-carnitine (400 mg/kg)] in different combinations [M1 (vit.E+vit.C), M2 (vit.C+carnitine), M3 (vit.E+carnitine) and M4 (vit.C+vit.E+carnitine)] for 30 days prior to as well during exposure to intermittent hypobaric hypoxia (IHH). Membrane instability, in terms of osmotic fragility and hemolysis, decreased in RBCs of supplemented animals. There was a significant increase in the activity of glutathione peroxidase in the RBCs of supplemented animals. We confirmed OS imposed by IHH with assays relating to lipid [thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and lipofuscin (LF)] and protein (carbonyl, PrC) oxidation, and found a positive correlation between PrC and hemolysis, with a decrease in both upon supplementation with M3 and M4 mixtures. Fluorescence microscopic observation showed a maximum decrease in the LF content in rats administered M4 and M1 compared to those on M2 and M3 mixtures at both altitudes. We suggest that multiple antioxidant fortifications are effective in overcoming increased OS experienced by RBCs at high altitudes.

  4. Ghrelin, GLP-1, and leptin responses during exposure to moderate hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Takuma; Goto, Kazushige

    2016-04-01

    Severe hypoxia has been indicated to cause acute changes in appetite-related hormones, which attenuate perceived appetite. However, the effects of moderate hypoxia on appetite-related hormonal regulation and perceived appetite have not been elucidated. Therefore, we examined the effects of moderate hypoxia on appetite-related hormonal regulation and perceived appetite. Eight healthy males (21.0 ± 0.6 years; 173 ± 2.3 cm; 70.6 ± 5.0 kg; 23.4 ± 1.1 kg/m(2)) completed two experimental trials on separate days: a rest trial in normoxia (FiO2 = 20.9%) and a rest trial in hypoxia (FiO2 = 15.0%). The experimental trials were performed over 7 h in an environmental chamber. Blood samples and scores of subjective appetite were collected over 7 h. Standard meals were provided 1 h (745 kcal) and 4 h (731 kcal) after initiating exposure to hypoxia or normoxia within the chamber. Although each meal significantly reduced plasma active ghrelin concentrations (P ghrelin concentrations over 7 h were observed between the two trials. No significant differences were observed in glucagon-like peptide 1 or leptin concentrations over 7 h between the trials. The subjective feeling of hunger and fullness acutely changed in response to meal ingestions. However, these responses were not affected by exposure to moderate hypoxia. In conclusion, 7 h of exposure to moderate hypoxia did not change appetite-related hormonal responses or perceived appetite in healthy males.

  5. Efeitos da exposição à altitude sobre os aspectos neuropsicológicos: uma revisão da literatura Effects of exposure to altitude on neuropsychology aspects: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir de Aquino Lemos

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Discutir os efeitos da exposição à altitude sobre as funções neuropsicológicas. MÉTODO: Foi realizada uma revisão de literatura usando como fonte de pesquisa artigos indexados no Pubmed, no período de 1921 a 2008, utilizando as palavras-chave "cognition and hypoxia", "hypoxia and neuropsychology", "acute hypoxia", "chronic hypoxia" e "acclimatization and hypoxia", além de livros específicos do assunto. DISCUSSÃO: Os efeitos agudos e crônicos da hipóxia podem alterar inúmeras funções neuropsicológicas em diferentes altitudes, decorrentes de alterações fisiológicas que resultam da diminuição parcial de oxigênio (O2, que podem levar as alterações neuropsicológicas, como atenção, memória, tomada de decisão e demais funções executivas, em indivíduos expostos a grandes altitudes. CONCLUSÃO: Indivíduos que se expõem às grandes altitudes devem utilizar suplementação de O2 e prática de aclimatização, entre outras estratégias para minimizar os efeitos negativos da hipóxia nos aspectos neuropsicológicos.OBJECTIVE: Discuss the effects of altitude exposure on neuropsychological functions. METHOD: We have conducted a literature review using as source indexed articles at Pubmed in the period from 1921 to 2008, using the following key words: "cognition and hypoxia", "hypoxia and neuropsychology", "acute hypoxia", "chronic hypoxia", and "acclimatization and hypoxia", as well as specific books on the subject. DISCUSSION: Acute and chronic effects of Hypoxia can alter many of the neuropsychological functions in different altitudes due to physiological changes resulted by the oxygen (O2 partial decrease that can lead to neuropsychological alterations in individuals exposed to high altitudes. CONCLUSION: Individuals exposed to high altitudes must use an O2 supplementation and the practice of acclimatization, among other strategy ways that can be used in order to minimize the negative effects of hypoxia on

  6. Effect of low altitude at the Dead Sea on exercise capacity and cardiopulmonary response to exercise in cystic fibrosis patients with moderate to severe lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Bareket; Nini, Asaph; Zigel, Levana; Yahav, Yaacov; Aviram, Micha; Rivlin, Joseph; Bentur, Lea; Avital, Avraham; Dotan, Raffy; Blau, Hannah

    2006-03-01

    Oxygen supplementation may improve exercise tolerance and the physiological response to exercise in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Elevated barometric pressure at low altitude is a simple means of increasing the quantity of inspired oxygen. Our objectives were to examine the effect of natural oxygen enrichment (at the Dead Sea, 396 m below sea level) on exercise capacity, and the physiological responses to maximal and submaximal exercise in CF patients. Patients were tested twice: at sea level (barometric pressure, 754 +/- 6 mmHg, mean +/- SD), and at the Dead Sea (barometric pressure, 791 +/- 3 mmHg), in a randomized crossover design. We studied 14 CF patients (6 females, 8 males), aged 15-45 years, with moderate to severe lung disease (mean forced expired volume in 1 sec = 50.0 +/- 11.2% predicted). Tests at each site included resting spirometry, anthropometry, a graded submaximal exercise test, a maximal exercise test on a treadmill, and a 6-min walk test. Tests were performed in identical order at both sites. Tests at the Dead Sea were performed 72 hr after arrival. No differences between sites were observed in lung function at rest. Peak oxygen consumption was significantly improved at the Dead Sea compared with sea level (1.68 +/- 0.73 vs. 1.57 +/- 0.74 l/min, respectively, P = 0.05), along with an improvement in the ventilatory equivalent for oxygen (41.2 +/- 6.3 vs. 46.1 +/- 7.1, respectively, P Dead Sea compared with sea level at all exercise intensities (P Dead Sea area may have physiological benefits for CF patients with moderate to severe lung disease.

  7. Moderate alcohol exposure during early brain development increases stimulus-response habits in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Matthew O; Evans, Alexandra M-D; Brock, Alistair J; Combe, Fraser J; Teh, Muy-Teck; Brennan, Caroline H

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to alcohol during early central nervous system development has been shown variously to affect aspects of physiological and behavioural development. In extreme cases, this can extend to craniofacial defects, severe developmental delay and mental retardation. At more moderate levels, subtle differences in brain morphology and behaviour have been observed. One clear effect of developmental alcohol exposure is an increase in the propensity to develop alcoholism and other addictions. The mechanisms by which this occurs, however, are not currently understood. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that adult zebrafish chronically exposed to moderate levels of ethanol during early brain ontogenesis would show an increase in conditioned place preference for alcohol and an increased propensity towards habit formation, a key component of drug addiction in humans. We found support for both of these hypotheses and found that the exposed fish had changes in mRNA expression patterns for dopamine receptor, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor and μ-opioid receptor encoding genes. Collectively, these data show an explicit link between the increased proclivity for addiction and addiction-related behaviour following exposure to ethanol during early brain development and alterations in the neural circuits underlying habit learning.

  8. Aircraft Crew Radiation Exposure in Aviation Altitudes During Quiet and Solar Storm Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Peter

    The European Commission Directorate General Transport and Energy published in 2004 a summary report of research on aircrew dosimetry carried out by the EURADOS working group WG5 (European Radiation Dosimetry Group, http://www.eurados.org/). The aim of the EURADOS working group WG5 was to bring together, in particular from European research groups, the available, preferably published, experimental data and results of calculations, together with detailed descriptions of the methods of measurement and calculation. The purpose is to provide a dataset for all European Union Member States for the assessment of individual doses and/or to assess the validity of different approaches, and to provide an input to technical recommendations by the experts and the European Commission. Furthermore EURADOS (European Radiation Dosimetry Group, http://www.eurados.org/) started to coordinate research activities in model improvements for dose assessment of solar particle events. Preliminary results related to the European research project CONRAD (Coordinated Network for Radiation Dosimetry) on complex mixed radiation fields at workplaces are presented. The major aim of this work is the validation of models for dose assessment of solar particle events, using data from neutron ground level monitors, in-flight measurement results obtained during a solar particle event and proton satellite data. The radiation protection quantity of interest is effective dose, E (ISO), but the comparison of measurement results obtained by different methods or groups, and comparison of measurement results and the results of calculations, is done in terms of the operational quantity ambient dose equivalent, H* (10). This paper gives an overview of aircrew radiation exposure measurements during quiet and solar storm conditions and focuses on dose results using the EURADOS In-Flight Radiation Data Base and published data on solar particle events

  9. Association and moderation of self-reported hypotension with traffic noise exposure: A neglected relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Lercher

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a short-term experimental study about one-third of subjects exposed to noise shows both increases and decreases in blood pressure. While the association of noise with hypertension is established it is not yet known whether hypotension is associated with noise in field studies. In a cross-sectional study the association of self-reported hypotension and low blood pressure readings with traffic noise was examined in adults (age 25-65, N = 1989, participation = 62%. Noise exposure was based on both, short and long-term day/night recordings and standard noise mapping. Questionnaire data on socio-demographics, housing, life-style, noise and weather sensitivity, health status, mental and physical symptoms were available to adjust for potential confounding and testing for moderation. Non-linear multiple regression was applied to estimate the association between the two outcomes and overall noise exposure. We did not observe a stable relation between noise and low blood pressure readings since the number of subjects based on the recommended cut-off points (5 th percentile or 110 (100/60 mmHg was too small. However, self-reported hypotension was non-linearly associated with noise exposure ( P = 0.044 in the presence of a strong sex × age effect modification ( P < 0.0001. Another significant moderation by noise were observed with reported symptoms of exhaustion ( P = 0.03. Weather sensitivity showed a significant interaction with noise sensitivity ( P = 0.02 and also a non-linear interaction with age ( P = 0.02. The results remained stable after adjustment for variables known to be associated with constitutional hypotension. The exposure-effect curve ascends around sound levels of 55 dBA. The results suggest a novel moderated association of noise with self-reported hypotension, predominantly in weather sensitive women with symptoms of exhaustion. Further and larger studies are needed to replicate the potential moderating effect of noise on persons with

  10. Changes in brain iron concentration after exposure to high-altitude hypoxia measured by quantitative susceptibility mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Cai, Congbo; Yang, Tianhe; Lin, Jianzhong; Cai, Shuhui; Zhang, Jiaxing; Chen, Zhong

    2017-02-15

    Hypoxia can induce physiological changes. This study aims to explore effects of high-altitude (HA) hypoxia on cerebral iron concentration. Twenty-nine healthy sea-level participants were tested shortly before and after approximately 4-week adaptation to the HA environment at fQinghai-Tibet Plateau (4200m), and were re-investigated after re-adaptation to the sea-level environment one year later. Iron concentration was quantified with quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM), and the results were compared with transverse relaxation rate (R(*)2) measurements. The variations of magnetic susceptibility indicate that the iron concentration in gray matter regions, especially in basal ganglia, including caudate nucleus, putamen, globus pallidus and substantia nigra, increases significantly after HA exposure. This increase appears consistent with the conclusion from R(*)2 value variations. However, unlike QSM, the R(*)2 value fails to demonstrate the statistical difference of iron content in red nucleus. The re-investigation results show that most variations are recovered after sea-level re-adaptation for one year. Additionally, hemisphere- and gender-related differences in iron concentration changes were analyzed among cerebral regions. The results show greater possibilities in the right hemisphere and females. Further studies based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) suggest that the fractional anisotropy increases and the mean diffusivity decreases after HA exposure in six deep gray matter nuclei, with linear dependence on iron concentration only in putamen. In conclusion, the magnetic susceptibility value can serve as a quantitative marker of brain iron, and variations of regional susceptibility reported herein indicate that HA hypoxia can result in significant iron deposition in most deep gray matter regions. Additionally, the linear dependence of DTI metrics on iron concentration in putamen indicates a potential relationship between ferritin and water diffusion.

  11. Residential exposures to PM2.5 and CO in Cusco, a high-altitude city in the Peruvian Andes: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, John L; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Rathbun, Stephen L; Naeher, Luke P

    2009-01-01

    High-altitude populations using biofuels for household energy may be at health risk due to a combination of altitudinal stress and indoor exposures to biomass smoke. In this article, the authors measure indoor and outdoor breathing level concentrations of PM(2.5) and CO during periods of meal preparation in a convenience sample of homes above 3000 m in Cusco, Peru. From July 10 to 21, 2005, 237 measurements were taken during a pilot study at 41 residences. Results show the highest levels of PM(2.5) and CO occurred during the early morning in the kitchen when dung and wood were used. Additionally, findings suggest that residential biomass fuel combustion in Cusco results in elevated indoor PM(2.5) and CO exposure levels that are of potential human health concern, an issue that may be exacerbated by the physiological impact of living in a high-altitude environment.

  12. Effects on Pharmacokinetics of Propranolol and Other Factors in Rats After Acute Exposure to High Altitude at 4,010 m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenbin, Li; Rong, Wang; Hua, Xie; Juanhong, Zhang; Xiaoyu, Wu; Zhengping, Jia

    2015-05-01

    A series of pathological, physiological, and biochemical changes, even anatomical histological changes happen while humans arrive at the high plateau region from plain area. There is a certain relationship between the body's compensatory or decompensated adjustments to the environment and the changes of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs. The objective of the study is to observe the effects of acute exposure to high altitude at 4,010 m on pharmacokinetics of propranolol in rats, and to provide basis and new ideas to adjust drug dosage and administration, so as to promote rational drug use in high altitude. 28 healthy male wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups, group A and B which were in plain area; group C and D which were acutely exposed to high altitude by aviation; group A and C were used for pharmacokinetics determination of propranolol, while group B and D had no drug administration for physiological and pathological changes research at high altitude. The pharmacokinetics of propranolol significantly changed; area under curve, C max (the peak concentration), mean residence time, and t 1/2 (the biological half-life) increased significantly by 481.72, 398.94, 44.87, and 58.77 %, respectively; clearance and V (apparent volume of distribution) decreased by 81.50 and 70.56 %, respectively, after acute exposure to high altitude at 4,010 m; Analytic results show that pH, buffer base, base excess, ctCO2 (content of total carbon dioxide), sO2 (oxygen saturation of arterial blood), pO2 (oxygen tension of arterial blood), and cNa(+) severely decreased by 2.43, 630.00, 311.00, 11.48, 91.38, 76.22, and 2.82 %, respectively, while pCO2 (carbon dioxide tension of arterial blood) and cCl(-) significantly increased by 47.40 and 6.76 %. Lactate dehydrogenase and total protein significantly decreased by 58.44 and 26.82 %, while total bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase severely increased by 338 and 24.94 % after acute exposure to high

  13. Affective and behavioral changes following exposure to traumatic events: the moderating effect of religiosity on avoidance behavior among students studying under a high level of terror event exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Liat; Zukerman, Gil

    2011-12-01

    The goals of this study were to examine the development of affective and behavioral changes following exposure to traumatic events among Israeli students studying under a high level of terror event exposure and to assess the effects of religiosity on those changes development. A questionnaire was administered to 770 students in the Ariel University Center in Judea and Samaria. Higher levels of terror exposure were associated with higher levels of avoidance behavior, subjective feelings of insecurity, and emotional distress. Higher religiosity moderated avoidance behavior, even when controlling for the level of objective exposure to terror events exposure, but had no influence on subjective sense of insecurity, or the level of emotional distress. These findings suggest that religiosity moderates behavioral changes development after traumatic event exposure mainly by reducing avoidance behavior.

  14. Moderate lead exposure and elementary school end-of-grade examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magzamen, Sheryl; Imm, Pamela; Amato, Michael S; Havlena, Jeffrey A; Anderson, Henry A; Moore, Colleen F; Kanarek, Marty S

    2013-11-01

    This study investigated the association between moderate lead poisoning in early childhood with performance on a comprehensive set of end-of-grade examinations at the elementary school level in two urban school districts. Children born between 1996 and 2000 who resided in Milwaukee or Racine, WI, with a record of a blood lead test before the age of 3 years were considered for the analysis. Children were defined as exposed (blood lead level ≥10 and Parents of eligible children were mailed surveys to consent to participation and elicit information on potential confounders. On consent, children were matched to educational records for fourth grade Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examinations. Seemingly unrelated regression was used to evaluate the relation between scaled scores on all sections of the examination (math, reading, language arts, science, and social studies) with exposure status, controlling for demographics, social status indicators, health indicators, and district-based poverty indicators. A total of 1133 families responded to the survey and consented to have educational records released; 43% of children were considered exposed. After controlling for demographic and socioeconomic covariates, lead exposure was associated with significantly lower scores in all sections of the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examinations (range: science, β = -5.21, P = .01; reading, β = -8.91, P = .003). Children who were black, had a parent with less than a high-school education, and were classified by parents as having less than excellent health had significantly lower performance on all examination components. Children with moderate lead poisoning in early childhood performed significantly lower on all components of elementary school end-of-grade examinations compared with unexposed children. Household level social status and childhood health indicators partially explain decreased examination scores. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of oxygen and heliox breathing on air bubbles in adipose tissue during 25-kPa altitude exposures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randsoe, T.; Kvist, T.M.; Hyldegaard, O.

    2008-01-01

    changes of micro air bubbles injected into adipose tissue of anesthetized rats at 101.3 kPa (sea level) after which they were decompressed from 101.3 kPa to and held at 25 kPa (10,350 m), during breathing of oxygen or a heliox(34:66) mixture (34% helium and 66% oxygen). Furthermore, bubbles were studied...... and heliox breathing. Preoxygenation enhanced bubble disappearance compared with oxygen and heliox breathing but did not prevent bubble growth. The results indicate that oxygen breathing at 25 kPa promotes air bubble growth in adipose tissue regardless of the tissue nitrogen pressure Udgivelsesdato: 2008/11......At altitude, bubbles are known to form and grow in blood and tissues causing altitude decompression sickness. Previous reports indicate that treatment of decompression sickness by means of oxygen breathing at altitude may cause unwanted bubble growth. In this report we visually followed the in vivo...

  16. Moderate (2%, v/v Ethanol Feeding Alters Hepatic Wound Healing after Acute Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krutika T. Deshpande

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing consists of three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and matrix synthesis and remodeling. Prolonged alcohol abuse can cause liver fibrosis due to deregulated matrix remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that moderate ethanol feeding enhances liver fibrogenic markers and frank fibrosis independent of differences in CCl4-induced liver injury. Our objective was to determine whether or not other phases of the hepatic wound healing response were affected by moderate ethanol after CCl4 exposure. Mice were fed moderate ethanol (2% v/v for two days and then were exposed to CCl4 and euthanized 24–96 h later. Liver injury was not different between pair- and ethanol-fed mice; however, removal of necrotic tissue was delayed after CCl4-induced liver injury in ethanol-fed mice. Inflammation, measured by TNFα mRNA and protein and hepatic Ly6c transcript accumulation, was reduced and associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis after ethanol feeding. Hepatocytes entered the cell cycle equivalently in pair- and ethanol-fed mice after CCl4 exposure, but hepatocyte proliferation was prolonged in livers from ethanol-fed mice. CCl4-induced hepatic stellate cell activation was increased and matrix remodeling was prolonged in ethanol-fed mice compared to controls. Taken together, moderate ethanol affected each phase of the wound healing response to CCl4. These data highlight previously unknown effects of moderate ethanol exposure on hepatic wound healing after acute hepatotoxicant exposure.

  17. Moderate (2%, v/v) Ethanol Feeding Alters Hepatic Wound Healing after Acute Carbon Tetrachloride Exposure in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Krutika T; Liu, Shinlan; McCracken, Jennifer M; Jiang, Lu; Gaw, Ta Ehpaw; Kaydo, Lindsey N; Richard, Zachary C; O'Neil, Maura F; Pritchard, Michele T

    2016-01-06

    Wound healing consists of three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and matrix synthesis and remodeling. Prolonged alcohol abuse can cause liver fibrosis due to deregulated matrix remodeling. Previous studies demonstrated that moderate ethanol feeding enhances liver fibrogenic markers and frank fibrosis independent of differences in CCl₄-induced liver injury. Our objective was to determine whether or not other phases of the hepatic wound healing response were affected by moderate ethanol after CCl₄ exposure. Mice were fed moderate ethanol (2% v/v) for two days and then were exposed to CCl₄ and euthanized 24-96 h later. Liver injury was not different between pair- and ethanol-fed mice; however, removal of necrotic tissue was delayed after CCl₄-induced liver injury in ethanol-fed mice. Inflammation, measured by TNFα mRNA and protein and hepatic Ly6c transcript accumulation, was reduced and associated with enhanced hepatocyte apoptosis after ethanol feeding. Hepatocytes entered the cell cycle equivalently in pair- and ethanol-fed mice after CCl₄ exposure, but hepatocyte proliferation was prolonged in livers from ethanol-fed mice. CCl₄-induced hepatic stellate cell activation was increased and matrix remodeling was prolonged in ethanol-fed mice compared to controls. Taken together, moderate ethanol affected each phase of the wound healing response to CCl₄. These data highlight previously unknown effects of moderate ethanol exposure on hepatic wound healing after acute hepatotoxicant exposure.

  18. Indicator ability of biosubstances in monitoring the moderate occupational exposure to toxic metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabeklis, Andrei R; Skalny, Anatoly V; Nechiporenko, Sergei P; Lakarova, Elena V

    2011-01-01

    In order to improve the monitoring system, watching influence of toxic metals on human health in industrial plants, indicator properties of different biosubstances were compared. Four types of samples (whole blood, plasma, urine, and hair) from 263 workers of the "Khimprom" chemical plant (Novocheboksarsk, Russia) were subjected to multielement analysis by ICP-AES/ICP-MS. 19-25 chemical elements, including main toxic metals (Cd, Hg, Pb, etc.) were determined. The results were calculated with regard to workers' individual data on occupational exposure to chemical elements. Hair was found to be the most sensitive to toxic and conditionally toxic trace metals: Pb, Mn, Cr, Be, Ni, while occupational contact with macro elements (Na, P), trace metalloids (Si, B) and some other metals (Zn) was not reflected in hair. Whole blood relatively weakly indicated a moderate occupational level of metals except Pb and Mn, but effectively reflected deficiencies of essential elements: I, Cr, and shifts in K/Na ratio, which are likely to be secondary effects of harmful occupational factors. Blood plasma reflected only contact with Be, P; urine--only with Ni. In both whole blood and plasma the changes for the absolute majority of elements were similar. Thus, hair analysis is useful for monitoring the occupational exposure to toxic and conditionally toxic chemical elements, while a general estimation of occupational harmful influence on mineral metabolism requires simultaneous investigation of two biosubstances: hair and whole blood, or hair and blood plasma, with whole blood being more preferable. Analysis of urine is appropriate for monitoring particular chemical elements, e.g. nickel. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of enamel matrix genes on dental caries are moderated by fluoride exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, John R; Carlson, Jenna C; Stanley, Brooklyn O C; Feingold, Eleanor; Cooper, Margaret; Vanyukov, Michael M; Maher, Brion S; Slayton, Rebecca L; Willing, Marcia C; Reis, Steven E; McNeil, Daniel W; Crout, Richard J; Weyant, Robert J; Levy, Steven M; Vieira, Alexandre R; Marazita, Mary L

    2015-02-01

    Dental caries (tooth decay) is the most common chronic disease, worldwide, affecting most children and adults. Though dental caries is highly heritable, few caries-related genes have been discovered. We investigated whether 18 genetic variants in the group of non-amelogenin enamel matrix genes (AMBN, ENAM, TUFT1, and TFIP11) were associated with dental caries experience in 13 age- and race-stratified samples from six parent studies (N = 3,600). Linear regression was used to model genetic associations and test gene-by-fluoride interaction effects for two sources of fluoride: daily tooth brushing and home water fluoride concentration. Meta-analysis was used to combine results across five child and eight adult samples. We observed the statistically significant association of rs2337359 upstream of TUFT1 with dental caries experience via meta-analysis across adult samples (p caries experience only if they were not exposed to the source of fluoride. Altogether, these results confirm that variation in enamel matrix genes contributes to individual differences in dental caries liability, and demonstrate that the effects of these genes may be moderated by protective fluoride exposures. In short, genes may exert greater influence on dental caries in unprotected environments, or equivalently, the protective effects of fluoride may obviate the effects of genetic risk alleles.

  20. Community Violence Exposure and Adolescent Substance Use: Does Monitoring and Positive Parenting Moderate Risk in Urban Communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Rosalyn

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether monitoring and positive parenting moderate the relationship between community violence exposure (CVE) and youth substance use. Analyses utilized a subsample (N = 2197) of a cross-sectional, ethnically diverse, urban school district sample. Dependent variables were any past year alcohol or drug use (AOD) and binge…

  1. Concern and death anxiety during an ongoing terror wave: The moderating role of direct vs. indirect exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahat-Shamir, Michal; Hamama-Raz, Yaira; Ben-Ezra, Menachem; Pitcho-Prelorentzos, Shani; Zaken, Adi; David, Udi Y; Bergman, Yoav S

    2017-05-25

    The current study examined whether emotional concern over one's security situation is connected with death anxiety during an ongoing terror wave, and whether type of exposure (media exposure vs. contact with witnesses) moderates this connection. A total of 345 individuals, aged 18-70, were sampled during an ongoing wave of terror in Israel and filled out scales measuring death anxiety, concern over security situation, and type of exposure. Results indicated that increased concern was connected with enhanced death anxiety. Moreover, this connection was more pronounced among individuals exposed to the events through the media, in comparison with individuals who had first-hand contact with witnesses.

  2. Effect of oxygen and heliox breathing on air bubbles in adipose tissue during 25-kPa altitude exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randsøe, T; Kvist, T M; Hyldegaard, O

    2008-11-01

    At altitude, bubbles are known to form and grow in blood and tissues causing altitude decompression sickness. Previous reports indicate that treatment of decompression sickness by means of oxygen breathing at altitude may cause unwanted bubble growth. In this report we visually followed the in vivo changes of micro air bubbles injected into adipose tissue of anesthetized rats at 101.3 kPa (sea level) after which they were decompressed from 101.3 kPa to and held at 25 kPa (10,350 m), during breathing of oxygen or a heliox(34:66) mixture (34% helium and 66% oxygen). Furthermore, bubbles were studied during oxygen breathing preceded by a 3-h period of preoxygenation to eliminate tissue nitrogen before decompression. During oxygen breathing, bubbles grew from 11 to 198 min (mean: 121 min, +/-SD 53.4) after which they remained stable or began to shrink slowly. During heliox breathing bubbles grew from 30 to 130 min (mean: 67 min, +/-SD 31.0) from which point they stabilized or shrank slowly. No bubbles disappeared during either oxygen or heliox breathing. Preoxygenation followed by continuous oxygen breathing at altitude caused most bubbles to grow from 19 to 179 min (mean: 51 min, +/-SD 47.7) after which they started shrinking or remained stable throughout the observation period. Bubble growth time was significantly longer during oxygen breathing compared with heliox breathing and preoxygenated animals. Significantly more bubbles disappeared in preoxygenated animals compared with oxygen and heliox breathing. Preoxygenation enhanced bubble disappearance compared with oxygen and heliox breathing but did not prevent bubble growth. The results indicate that oxygen breathing at 25 kPa promotes air bubble growth in adipose tissue regardless of the tissue nitrogen pressure.

  3. Anxiety Sensitivity Among First-Time Fathers Moderates the Relationship Between Exposure to Stress During Birth and Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerach, Gadi; Magal, Ortal

    2016-05-01

    This longitudinal study examined posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and anxiety symptoms among men attending the birth of their first offspring. Furthermore, we examined the moderating role of anxiety sensitivity (AS) and intolerance of uncertainty in the association between exposure to stress during birth and PTSD and anxiety symptoms. Participants were Israeli men (n = 171) who were assessed with self-report questionnaires during the third trimester of pregnancy (T1) and approximately a month following birth (T2). Results show that the rates of postnatal PTSD and anxiety symptoms were relatively low. Subjective exposure to stress during birth and AS predicted PTSD in T2, above and beyond other negative life events and PTSD in T1. In addition, AS moderated the relations between subjective exposure to stress during birth and PTSD symptoms. Pregnancy and childbirth professionals may benefit from the insight that men with high levels of AS might experience childbirth as a highly stressful situation with possible posttraumatic stress symptoms.

  4. The effects of exposure to muscular male models among men: exploring the moderating role of gym use and exercise motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, Emma; Dittmar, Helga; Orsborn, Amber

    2007-09-01

    This study examines the effects of exposure to the muscular male body ideal on body-focused negative affect among male gym users and non-exercisers. As hypothesized, the impact of media exposure depended on men's exercise status. Non-exercisers (n = 58) reported greater body-focused negative affect after exposure to images of muscular male models than after neutral images (no model controls), whereas gym users (n = 58) showed a tendency for less body-focused negative affect after the model images than after the control images. Furthermore, the extent to which gym users were motivated to increase strength and muscularity moderated these exposure effects; men who reported stronger strength and muscularity exercise motivation reported a greater degree of self-enhancement after exposure to the muscular ideal. The findings are interpreted with respect to likely differences in motives for social comparisons.

  5. The moderating impact of interacting with distressed families of decedents on trauma exposure in medical examiner personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jennifer A; Delahanty, Douglas L; Schwartz, Joseph; Murani, Kristina; Brondolo, Elizabeth

    2016-11-01

    Prior research has examined the incidence of posttraumatic stress stemming from either direct or indirect trauma exposure in employees of high-risk occupations. However, few studies have examined the contribution of both direct and indirect trauma exposure in high-risk groups. One particularly salient indirect trauma often endorsed as the most stressful by many occupational groups is interacting with distressed family members of victims of crime, illness, or accidents. The present study examined the extent to which interacting with distressed families moderated the impact of cumulative potentially traumatic event (PTE) exposure on depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in 245 employees of medical examiner (ME) offices. Employees from 9 ME office sites in the United States participated in an online survey investigating the frequency of work place PTE exposures (direct and indirect) and mental health outcomes. Results revealed that cumulative PTE exposure was associated with higher PTSD symptoms (PTSS) for employees who had higher frequency of exposure to distressed family members. After controlling for cumulative and direct PTE exposure, gender, and office site, exposure to distressed families was significantly associated with depressive symptoms, but not PTSS. Findings of our research underscore the need for training employees in high-risk occupations to manage their reactions to exposure to distraught family members. Employee training may buffer risk for developing PTSD and depression. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Dissemination of go sun smart in outdoor recreation: effect of program exposure on sun protection of guests at high-altitude ski areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkosz, Barbara J; Buller, David B; Andersen, Peter A; Scott, Michael D; Dignan, Mark B; Cutter, Gary R; Liu, Xia; Maloy, Julie A

    2014-09-01

    Go Sun Smart is a theory-based health communication program designed to influence sun-protection behaviors of employees and guests at high-altitude ski areas to reduce skin cancer risk. The effects of Go Sun Smart, in a Phase IV dissemination randomized posttest-only trial, on sun-protection behaviors of ski area guests are reported. Program use was assessed by on-site observation and guest message exposure, and sun protection was measured in intercept surveys at ski areas. Dissemination strategy-enhanced versus basic-was not significantly related to sun safety practices. Additional analyses examined the relation between message exposure and guests' sun safety practices. Ski areas displaying at least 6 Go Sun Smart materials in guest-only areas and 9 Go Sun Smart materials throughout the area increased guests' message exposure. Higher message exposure within the high-use ski areas was associated with improved sun protection by guests but not within the low-use ski areas. The authors underscore the importance of program implementation and message exposure on the success of evidence-based health communication efforts applied industrywide.

  7. Extinction learning as a moderator of d-cycloserine efficacy for enhancing exposure therapy in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleine, Rianne A; Smits, Jasper A J; Hendriks, Gert-Jan; Becker, Eni S; van Minnen, Agnes

    2015-08-01

    Augmentation of exposure therapy with d-cycloserine (DCS) has proven efficacious across anxiety disorders, although results in PTSD have been mixed. Work in animals and anxiety-disordered patients suggest that the potentiating effects of DCS are dependent on the level of extinction learning during extinction training and exposure treatment, respectively. The aim of the current study was to replicate and extend previous work by examining the association between the degree of extinction learning and DCS efficacy in our randomized clinical trial on DCS (50 mg) versus placebo enhancement of exposure therapy in a chronic mixed-trauma PTSD sample (N=67; de Kleine, Hendriks, Kusters, Broekman, & van Minnen, 2012). The decline in subjective units of distress ratings collected during and across the exposure sessions were evaluated as indices of extinction learning. First, we examined whether extinction learning during an exposure session moderated DCS effects on self-reported PTSD symptoms at the next session. Second, we examined whether averaged extinction learning over the course of treatment interacted with group assignment to predict change over time and post treatment outcome. We did not find evidence that DCS effects were moderated by the degree of extinction learning, although, extinction learning was related to outcome regardless of group assignment. In PTSD, not one extinction-learning index has been consistently linked to DCS enhanced exposure treatment outcome. More (experimental) work needs to been done to unravel the complex interplay between extinction learning and DCS enhancement, especially in PTSD patients.

  8. Timing the arrival at 2340m altitude for aerobic performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schuler, B; Thomsen, JJ; Gassmann, M

    2007-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) and performance increase upon altitude acclimatization at moderate altitude. Eight elite cyclists were studied at sea level, and after 1 (Day 1), 7 (Day 7), 14 (Day 14) and 21 (Day 21) days of exposure to 2340 m. Capillary blood...... samples were taken on these days before performing two consecutive maximal exercise trials. Acclimatization reased hemoglobin concentration and arterial oxygen content. On Day 1, VO2max and time to exhaustion (at 80% of sea-level maximal power output) decreased by 12.8% (P

  9. Effect of Xiao-tan-jie-yu Prescription on sleep quality of soldiers acute exposure to high altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-xing YANG

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To observe the efficacy of Xiao-tan-jie-yu prescription (XTJYF on sleep quality of the soldiers who acutely exposed to western area of high altitude. Methods  In this prospective, completely randomized, parallel, placebo-controlled study, 550 soldiers acutely exposed to western area of high altitude were investigated by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, 100 soldiers with sleep disorder were selected and divided into two groups (50 each: treatment group received TCM XTJYF therapy and control group was treated with placebo. After 2 weeks' treatment, PSQI total score and respective factor scores before and after treatment were assessed, and clinical therapeutic efficacy and adverse reactions were observed. Results  The PSQI total score and respective factor scores of these soldiers were significantly higher than those of normal adults, but significantly lower than those of insomnia patients, while their sleep disorder factor score was significantly higher compared with insomnia patients. XTJYF reduced the total score and some factor scores (subjective sleep quality, time for initiating sleep, total sleep time, and sleep efficiency for PSQI in the soldiers with sleep disorder, and the overall response rate was 91.49% which is higher than those in the placebo control group (P<0.05 or 0.01, without toxic side effects. Conclusions  The sleep quality of soldiers who acutely exposed to western area of high altitude in China is not high, and XTJYF may safely and effectively improve the sleep quality. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.10.15

  10. Assessment of physical growth through body proportionality in Peruvian children living at moderately elevated altitudes. http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2012v14n6p690

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fargueta

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The strategy of our approach involves the use of an instrument for measuring body proportionality for the purpose of comparing growth of segments to body dimensions. The objective of this descriptive transversal study is to assess physical growth through body proportionality of school children, aged 6 to 12 years, living at moderately elevated altitudes. Study participants included 482 females and 473 males ranging in ages from 6 to 12 years and possessing middle socioeconomic status. The students were selected from a stratified probability segment of 6,659 students. In all, we evaluated: anthropometric measurements of weight (kg, height (m, five skinfolds (mm, four body perimeters and four body-bone diameters. Proportionality analyses were performed using the Phantom theoretical model proposed by Ross and Wilson (1974. The results of the Phantom Z-scores for both genders show generally negative values for body weight (-3.7 to -1.7, skinfold thickness (0.5 to -1.5, and body circumference (-0.9 to -1.3. In turn, bone diameters show positive values in all ages as well as in both genders (1.0 to 3.2. The results suggest that school children living at moderately elevated altitudes are characterized by slow growth correlated to body weight; on the other hand, skinfold thicknesses and body circumferences in relation to bone diameters exhibit a tendency to robustness.

  11. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee; Suh, Dae Chul

    2016-01-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced...

  12. Effect of oxygen breathing on micro oxygen bubbles in nitrogen-depleted rat adipose tissue at sea level and 25 kPa altitude exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randsoe, Thomas; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2012-08-01

    The standard treatment of altitude decompression sickness (aDCS) caused by nitrogen bubble formation is oxygen breathing and recompression. However, micro air bubbles (containing 79% nitrogen), injected into adipose tissue, grow and stabilize at 25 kPa regardless of continued oxygen breathing and the tissue nitrogen pressure. To quantify the contribution of oxygen to bubble growth at altitude, micro oxygen bubbles (containing 0% nitrogen) were injected into the adipose tissue of rats depleted from nitrogen by means of preoxygenation (fraction of inspired oxygen = 1.0; 100%) and the bubbles studied at 101.3 kPa (sea level) or at 25 kPa altitude exposures during continued oxygen breathing. In keeping with previous observations and bubble kinetic models, we hypothesize that oxygen breathing may contribute to oxygen bubble growth at altitude. Anesthetized rats were exposed to 3 h of oxygen prebreathing at 101.3 kPa (sea level). Micro oxygen bubbles of 500-800 nl were then injected into the exposed abdominal adipose tissue. The oxygen bubbles were studied for up to 3.5 h during continued oxygen breathing at either 101.3 or 25 kPa ambient pressures. At 101.3 kPa, all bubbles shrank consistently until they disappeared from view at a net disappearance rate (0.02 mm(2) × min(-1)) significantly faster than for similar bubbles at 25 kPa altitude (0.01 mm(2) × min(-1)). At 25 kPa, most bubbles initially grew for 2-40 min, after which they shrank and disappeared. Four bubbles did not disappear while at 25 kPa. The results support bubble kinetic models based on Fick's first law of diffusion, Boyles law, and the oxygen window effect, predicting that oxygen contributes more to bubble volume and growth during hypobaric conditions. As the effect of oxygen increases, the lower the ambient pressure. The results indicate that recompression is instrumental in the treatment of aDCS.

  13. Persistent dose-dependent changes in brain structure in young adults with low-to-moderate alcohol exposure in utero.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstrand, Kristen L; Ding, Zhaohua; Dodge, Neil C; Cowan, Ronald L; Jacobson, Joseph L; Jacobson, Sandra W; Avison, Malcolm J

    2012-11-01

    Many children with heavy exposure to alcohol in utero display characteristic alterations in brain size and structure. However, the long-term effects of low-to-moderate alcohol exposure on these outcomes are unknown. Using voxel-based morphometry and region-of-interest analyses, we examined the influence of lower doses of alcohol on gray and white matter composition in a prospectively recruited, homogeneous, well-characterized cohort of alcohol-exposed (n = 11, age 19.5 ± 0.3 years) and control (n = 9, age 19.6 ± 0.5 years) young adults. A large proportion of the exposed individuals were born to mothers whose alcohol consumption during pregnancy was in the low-to-moderate range. There were no differences in total brain volume or total gray or white matter volume between the exposed and control groups. However, gray matter volume was reduced in alcohol-exposed individuals in several areas previously reported to be affected by high levels of exposure, including the left cingulate gyrus, bilateral middle frontal gyri, right middle temporal gyrus, and right caudate nucleus. Notably, this gray matter loss was dose dependent, with higher exposure producing more substantial losses. These results indicate that even at low doses, alcohol exposure during pregnancy impacts brain development and that these effects persist into young adulthood. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  14. Effects of moderate prenatal ethanol exposure and age on social behavior, spatial response perseveration errors and motor behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Derek A; Barto, Daniel; Rodriguez, Carlos I; Magcalas, Christy M; Fink, Brandi C; Rice, James P; Bird, Clark W; Davies, Suzy; Savage, Daniel D

    2014-08-01

    Persistent deficits in social behavior are among the major negative consequences associated with exposure to ethanol during prenatal development. Prior work from our laboratory has linked deficits in social behavior following moderate prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) in the rat to functional alterations in the ventrolateral frontal cortex [21]. In addition to social behaviors, the regions comprising the ventrolateral frontal cortex are critical for diverse processes ranging from orofacial motor movements to flexible alteration of behavior in the face of changing consequences. The broader behavioral implications of altered ventrolateral frontal cortex function following moderate PAE have, however, not been examined. In the present study we evaluated the consequences of moderate PAE on social behavior, tongue protrusion, and flexibility in a variant of the Morris water task that required modification of a well-established spatial response. PAE rats displayed deficits in tongue protrusion, reduced flexibility in the spatial domain, increased wrestling, and decreased investigation, indicating that several behaviors associated with ventrolateral frontal cortex function are impaired following moderate PAE. A linear discriminant analysis revealed that measures of wrestling and tongue protrusion provided the best discrimination of PAE rats from saccharin-exposed control rats. We also evaluated all behaviors in young adult (4-5 months) or older (10-11 months) rats to address the persistence of behavioral deficits in adulthood and possible interactions between early ethanol exposure and advancing age. Behavioral deficits in each domain persisted well into adulthood (10-11 months), however, there was no evidence that aging enhances the effects of moderate PAE within the age ranges that were studied.

  15. Comparing high altitude treatment with current best care in Dutch children with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (and asthma): study protocol for a pragmatic randomized controlled trial (DAVOS trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fieten, Karin B; Zijlstra, Wieneke T; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke; Meijer, Yolanda; Venema, Monica Uniken; Rijssenbeek-Nouwens, Lous; l'Hoir, Monique P; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A; Pasmans, Suzanne G M A

    2014-03-26

    About 10 to 20% of children in West European countries have atopic dermatitis (AD), often as part of the atopic syndrome. The full atopic syndrome also consists of allergic asthma, allergic rhinitis and food allergy. Treatment approaches for atopic dermatitis and asthma include intermittent anti-inflammatory therapy with corticosteroids, health education and self-management training. However, symptoms persist in a subgroup of patients. Several observational studies have shown significant improvement in clinical symptoms in children and adults with atopic dermatitis or asthma after treatment at high altitude, but evidence on the efficacy when compared to treatment at sea level is still lacking. This study is a pragmatic randomized controlled trial for children with moderate to severe AD within the atopic syndrome. Patients are eligible for enrolment in the study if they are: diagnosed with moderate to severe AD within the atopic syndrome, aged between 8 and 18 years, fluent in the Dutch language, have internet access at home, able to use the digital patient system Digital Eczema Center Utrecht (DECU), willing and able to stay in Davos for a six week treatment period. All data are collected at the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital and DECU. Patients are randomized over two groups. The first group receives multidisciplinary inpatient treatment during six weeks at the Dutch Asthma Center in Davos, Switzerland. The second group receives multidisciplinary treatment during six weeks at the outpatient clinic of the Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, Utrecht, the Netherlands. The trial is not conducted as a blind trial. The trial is designed with three components: psychosocial, clinical and translational. Primary outcomes are coping with itch, quality of life and disease activity. Secondary outcomes include asthma control, medication use, parental quality of life, social and emotional wellbeing of the child and translational parameters. The results of this trial will provide

  16. Dietary Recommendations for Cyclists during Altitude Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalczyk, Małgorzata; Czuba, Miłosz; Zydek, Grzegorz; Zając, Adam; Langfort, Józef

    2016-06-18

    The concept of altitude or hypoxic training is a common practice in cycling. However, several strategies for training regimens have been proposed, like "live high, train high" (LH-TH), "live high, train low" (LH-TL) or "intermittent hypoxic training" (IHT). Each of them combines the effect of acclimatization and different training protocols that require specific nutrition. An appropriate nutrition strategy and adequate hydration can help athletes achieve their fitness and performance goals in this unfriendly environment. In this review, the physiological stress of altitude exposure and training will be discussed, with specific nutrition recommendations for athletes training under such conditions. However, there is little research about the nutrition demands of athletes who train at moderate altitude. Our review considers energetic demands and body mass or body composition changes due to altitude training, including respiratory and urinary water loss under these conditions. Carbohydrate intake recommendations and hydration status are discussed in detail, while iron storage and metabolism is also considered. Last, but not least the risk of increased oxidative stress under hypoxic conditions and antioxidant supplementation suggestions are presented.

  17. Dietary Recommendations for Cyclists during Altitude Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Michalczyk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The concept of altitude or hypoxic training is a common practice in cycling. However, several strategies for training regimens have been proposed, like “live high, train high” (LH-TH, “live high, train low” (LH-TL or “intermittent hypoxic training” (IHT. Each of them combines the effect of acclimatization and different training protocols that require specific nutrition. An appropriate nutrition strategy and adequate hydration can help athletes achieve their fitness and performance goals in this unfriendly environment. In this review, the physiological stress of altitude exposure and training will be discussed, with specific nutrition recommendations for athletes training under such conditions. However, there is little research about the nutrition demands of athletes who train at moderate altitude. Our review considers energetic demands and body mass or body composition changes due to altitude training, including respiratory and urinary water loss under these conditions. Carbohydrate intake recommendations and hydration status are discussed in detail, while iron storage and metabolism is also considered. Last, but not least the risk of increased oxidative stress under hypoxic conditions and antioxidant supplementation suggestions are presented.

  18. Dietary restraint moderates the effects of food exposure on women's body and weight satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geschwind, Nicole; Roefs, Anne; Lattimore, Paul; Fett, Anne-Kathrin; Jansen, Anita

    2008-11-01

    The influence of dietary restraint and food exposure on body satisfaction was tested. Body and weight satisfaction were measured before and after exposure to either high- or low-caloric food, without actual eating. Independent of caloric condition, higher dietary restraint was associated with a decrease in body satisfaction after food exposure. With regard to weight satisfaction, however, the association between higher dietary restraint and decreased weight satisfaction was specific for the high-caloric condition. Thus, the actual eating of food is not necessary for decreased body and weight satisfaction to occur, suggesting an exposure-induced activation of dysfunctional cognitions in restrained eaters.

  19. Media exposure and health in Europe: Mediators and moderators of media systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, N.; Zanden, R. van der; Buijzen, M.A.; Scheepers, P.L.H.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined media exposure as an explanatory factor for individual and cross-national differences in self-assessed general health. In studying media exposure, traditional media (television, radio, and newspapers) and contemporary media (internet) were separately considered. Aside from hypoth

  20. Exposure to Sexist Humor and Rape Proclivity: The Moderator Effect of Aversiveness Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Sanchez, Monica; Duran, Mercedes; Carretero-Dios, Hugo; Megias, Jesus L.; Moya, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effect of exposure to sexist humor about women on men's self-reported rape proclivity. Earlier studies have shown that exposure to this type of humor increases rape proclivity and that funniness responses to jokes are a key element to consider. However, the role of aversiveness responses has not been…

  1. Vicarious exposure to trauma and growth in therapists: the moderating effects of sense of coherence, organizational support, and empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockhouse, Rebecca; Msetfi, Rachel M; Cohen, Keren; Joseph, Stephen

    2011-12-01

    Therapists who work with traumatized individuals can experience psychological growth following this vicarious exposure to trauma. The purpose of the present study is to examine the variables that may moderate such vicarious posttraumatic growth. Therapists (N = 118) completed measures of vicarious exposure to trauma and growth, as well as empathy, sense of coherence, and perceived organizational support. Results showed that having a strong sense of coherence negatively predicted growth (β = -.28, p = .001), whereas empathy was a positive predictor (β = .37, p exposure to growth relationship when growth involved relating to others (β = -.20; p = .018). Organizational support did not predict growth. The results have implications for the recruitment, training, and supervision of therapists working with individuals who have experienced trauma. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  2. Altitude headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, J Ivan; Holdridge, Ashley; Mendizabal, Jorge E

    2013-12-01

    High altitude headache (HAH) has been defined by the International Headache Society as a headache that appears within 24 hours after ascent to 2,500 m or higher [1••]. The headache can appear in isolation or as part of acute mountain sickness (AMS), which has more dramatic symptoms than the headache alone. If symptoms are ignored, more serious conditions such as high altitude cerebral edema (HACE), high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), or even death may ensue. While there is no definitive understanding of the underlying pathophysiologic mechanism, it is speculated that HAH occurs from the combination of hypoxemia-induced intracranial vasodilation and subsequent cerebral edema. There are a number of preventive measures that can be adopted prior to ascending, including acclimatization and various medications. A variety of pharmacological interventions are also available to clinicians to treat this extremely widespread condition.

  3. Thermal comfort, physiological responses and performance during exposure to a moderate temperature drift

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schellen, Lisje; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter; de Wit, Martin;

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this research was to study the effects of a moderate temperature drift on human thermal comfort, physiological responses, productivity and performance. A dynamic thermophysiological model was used to examine the possibility of simulating human thermal responses and thermal comfor...

  4. Gestational and early postnatal exposure to simulated high altitude does not modify postnatal body mass growth trajectory in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzini, Carlos E; Champin, Graciela M; Bozzini, Clarisa; Alippi, Rosa M

    2014-09-01

    Postnatal hypoxia blunts body mass growth. It is also known that the quality of the fetal environment can influence the subsequent adult phenotype. The main purpose of the study was to determine whether gestational hypoxia and early postnatal hypoxia are able to blunt growth when the offspring is raised under normoxia. Hypobaric hypoxia was induced in simulated high altitude (SHA) chambers in which air was maintained at 380 mmHg (5450 m). Mature Sprague-Dawley rats of both sexes were divided in normoxic (NX) and hypoxic (HX) groups and, in the case of the HX group, maintained for 1 month at 5450 m. Mating was then allowed under NX or HX conditions. Offspring were NX-NX, NX-HX, HX-HX, or HX-NX: the first term indicates NX or HX during both gestation and the first 30 days of life; the second term indicates NX or HX during postnatal life between days 30 and 133. Body mass (g) was measured periodically and body mass growth rate (BMGR, g/d) was estimated between days 33 and 65 of postnatal life. Results can be summarized as follows: 1) BM was significantly higher in NX than in HX rats at weaning; 2) BMGR was not significantly different between NX-NX and HX-NX rats, and between HX-HX and NX-HX animals; and 3) BMGR was significantly higher in rats living under NX conditions than in those living under HX conditions during postnatal life. Data suggest that that hypobaric hypoxia during gestational and early postnatal development of rats does not alter the regulation of body mass growth in rats when compared to that seen under sea-level conditions.

  5. Arsenic metabolism and one-carbon metabolism at low-moderate arsenic exposure: Evidence from the Strong Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratlen, Miranda Jones; Gamble, Mary V; Grau-Perez, Maria; Kuo, Chin-Chi; Best, Lyle G; Yracheta, Joseph; Francesconi, Kevin; Goessler, Walter; Mossavar-Rahmani, Yasmin; Hall, Meghan; Umans, Jason G; Fretts, Amanda; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2017-07-01

    B-vitamins involved in one-carbon metabolism (OCM) can affect arsenic metabolism efficiency in highly arsenic exposed, undernourished populations. We evaluated whether dietary intake of OCM nutrients (including vitamins B2, B6, folate (B9), and B12) was associated with arsenic metabolism in a more nourished population exposed to lower arsenic than previously studied. Dietary intake of OCM nutrients and urine arsenic was evaluated in 405 participants from the Strong Heart Study. Arsenic exposure was measured as the sum of iAs, monomethylarsonate (MMA) and dimethylarsenate (DMA) in urine. Arsenic metabolism was measured as the individual percentages of each metabolite over their sum (iAs%, MMA%, DMA%). In adjusted models, increasing intake of vitamins B2 and B6 was associated with modest but significant decreases in iAs% and MMA% and increases in DMA%. A significant interaction was found between high folate and B6 with enhanced arsenic metabolism efficiency. Our findings suggest OCM nutrients may influence arsenic metabolism in populations with moderate arsenic exposure. Stronger and independent associations were observed with B2 and B6, vitamins previously understudied in relation to arsenic. Research is needed to evaluate whether targeting B-vitamin intake can serve as a strategy for the prevention of arsenic-related health effects at low-moderate arsenic exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Altitude and endurance training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusko, Heikki K; Tikkanen, Heikki O; Peltonen, Juha E

    2004-10-01

    The benefits of living and training at altitude (HiHi) for an improved altitude performance of athletes are clear, but controlled studies for an improved sea-level performance are controversial. The reasons for not having a positive effect of HiHi include: (1) the acclimatization effect may have been insufficient for elite athletes to stimulate an increase in red cell mass/haemoglobin mass because of too low an altitude (stress with possible overtraining symptoms and an increased frequency of infections. Moreover, the effects of hypoxia in the brain may influence both training intensity and physiological responses during training at altitude. Thus, interrupting hypoxic exposure by training in normoxia may be a key factor in avoiding or minimizing the noxious effects that are known to occur in chronic hypoxia. When comparing HiHi and HiLo (living high and training low), it is obvious that both can induce a positive acclimatization effect and increase the oxygen transport capacity of blood, at least in 'responders', if certain prerequisites are met. The minimum dose to attain a haematological acclimatization effect is > 12 h a day for at least 3 weeks at an altitude or simulated altitude of 2100-2500 m. Exposure to hypoxia appears to have some positive transfer effects on subsequent training in normoxia during and after HiLo. The increased oxygen transport capacity of blood allows training at higher intensity during and after HiLo in subsequent normoxia, thereby increasing the potential to improve some neuromuscular and cardiovascular determinants of endurance performance. The effects of hypoxic training and intermittent short-term severe hypoxia at rest are not yet clear and they require further study.

  7. The effects of low to moderate alcohol exposure in early pregnancy on IQ in 5-year-old children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Hanne-Lise Falgreen; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Kilburn, Tina R.

    2012-01-01

    the effects of low to moderate maternal alcohol consumption during early pregnancy on children's intelligence (IQ) at age 5 years. Design Prospective follow-up study. Setting Neuropsychological testing in four Danish cities 2003-2008. Population A cohort of 1628 women and their children sampled from...... the Danish National Birth Cohort. Methods Participants were sampled based on maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy. At 5 years of age, children were tested with the Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence-Revised (WPPSI-R). Parental education, maternal IQ, maternal smoking in pregnancy......Please cite this paper as: Falgreen Eriksen H, Mortensen E, Kilburn T, Underbjerg M, Bertrand J, Støvring H, Wimberley T, Grove J, Kesmodel U. The effects of low to moderate prenatal alcohol exposure in early pregnancy on IQ in 5-year-old children. BJOG 2012;119:1191-1200. Objective To examine...

  8. The Consequences of Subsequent Exposures of Mild and Moderate Hypoxia on the Flight Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-15

    that ‘Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government.’ Title 17 U.S.C. §101 defines a U.S...Exposures 10 1 and 2 were within the limits listed in the Time of Useful Consciousness table (DeHart, 1985), and are reasonable estimates of how...multiple exposures do in fact have an additive effect, emergency procedures may need to be modified to minimize this impact. Finally, we noted an

  9. Severe and Moderate Asthma Exacerbations in Asthmatic Children and Exposure to Ambient Air Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tétreault, Louis-Francois; Doucet, Marieve; Gamache, Philippe; Fournier, Michel; Brand, Allan; Kosatsky, Tom; Smargiassi, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is well established that short-term exposure to ambient air pollutants can exacerbate asthma, the role of early life or long-term exposure is less clear. We assessed the association between severe asthma exacerbations with both birth and annual exposure to outdoor air pollutants with a population-based cohort of asthmatic children in the province of Quebec (Canada). Method: Exacerbations of asthma occurring between 1 April 1996 and 31 March 2011 were defined as one hospitalization or emergency room visit with a diagnosis of asthma for children (<13 years old) already diagnosed with asthma. Annual daily average concentrations of ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were estimated at the child’s residential postal code. Satellite based levels of fine particulate (PM2.5) estimated for a grid of 10 km by 10 km were also assigned to postal codes of residence for the whole province. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated from Cox models with a gap time approach for both birth and time-dependant exposure. Results: Of the 162,752 asthmatic children followed (1,020,280 person-years), 35,229 had at least one asthma exacerbation. The HRs stratified by age groups and adjusted for the year of birth, the ordinal number of exacerbations, sex, as well as material and social deprivation, showed an interquartile range increase in the time-dependant exposure to NO2 (4.95 ppb), O3 (3.85 ppb), and PM2.5 (1.82 μg/m3) of 1.095 (95% CI 1.058–1.131), 1.052 (95% CI 1.037–1.066) and 1.025 (95% CI 1.017–1.031), respectively. While a positive association was found to PM2.5, no associations were found between exposure at birth to NO2 or O3. Conclusions: Our results support the conclusion, within the limitation of this study, that asthma exacerbations in asthmatic children are mainly associated with time dependent residential exposures less with exposure at birth. PMID:27490556

  10. The effects of low to moderate prenatal alcohol exposure in early pregnancy on IQ in 5‐year‐old children

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Falgreen Eriksen, H‐L; Mortensen, EL; Kilburn, T; Underbjerg, M; Bertrand, J; Støvring, H; Wimberley, T; Grove, J; Kesmodel, US

    2012-01-01

    ..., Støvring H, Wimberley T, Grove J, Kesmodel U. The effects of low to moderate prenatal alcohol exposure in early pregnancy on IQ in 5‐year‐old children. BJOG 2012;119:1191–1200. Objective...

  11. Oxidative stress, telomere shortening, and DNA methylation in relation to low-to-moderate occupational exposure to welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huiqi; Hedmer, Maria; Wojdacz, Tomasz; Hossain, Mohammad Bakhtiar; Lindh, Christian H; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Albin, Maria; Broberg, Karin

    2015-10-01

    Evidence suggests that exposure to welding fumes is a risk factor for lung cancer. We examined relationships between low-to-moderate occupational exposure to particles from welding fumes and cancer-related biomarkers for oxidative stress, changes in telomere length, and alterations in DNA methylation. We enrolled 101 welders and 127 controls (all currently nonsmoking men) from southern Sweden. We performed personal sampling of respirable dust and measured 8-oxodG concentrations in urine using a simplified liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method. Telomere length in peripheral blood was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Methylation status of 10 tumor suppressor genes was determined by methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting analysis. All analyses were adjusted for age, body mass index, previous smoking, passive smoking, current residence, and wood burning stove/boiler at home. Welders were exposed to respirable dust at 1.2 mg/m(3) (standard deviation, 3.3 mg/m(3); range, 0.1-19.3), whereas control exposures did not exceed 0.1 mg/m(3) (P telomere length (β = -0.053, P = 0.083) in adjusted models. Welders showed higher probability of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) methylation in the unadjusted model (odds ratio = 14, P = 0.014), but this was not significant in the fully adjusted model (P = 0.052). Every working year as a welder was associated with 0.0066 units shorter telomeres (95% confidence interval -0.013 to -0.00053, P = 0.033). Although there were no clear associations between concentrations of respirable dust and the biomarkers, there were modest signs of associations between oxidative stress, telomere alterations, DNA methylation, and occupational exposure to low-to-moderate levels of particles.

  12. Coping styles moderate the relationships between exposure to community violence and work-related outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Cody B; Johnson, Jennie; Coyle, Tom

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify coping strategies used by employees exposed to community violence and their relationships to work-related outcomes. In study 1, Mexican Maquiladora employees who experienced community violence reported their coping strategies. Results identified 3 strategies: social, solitary, and maladaptive coping. In study 2, another sample completed measures of violence exposure, strain, coping, and turnover intention. Supervisors provided performance evaluations. Community violence predicted the use of all 3 strategies. Social coping lessened the effects of community violence on turnover while maladaptive strategies predicted increased psychological strain. Results indicate that workers use a variety of coping strategies in response to community violence that both lessen and magnify the effects of violence exposure and impact their psychological strain, turnover intention, and job performance. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Universal Prevention Exposure as a Moderator of the Community Context: Findings from the PROSPER Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilenski, Sarah M; Welsh, Janet A; Perkins, Daniel F; Feinberg, Mark E; Greenberg, Mark T

    2016-03-01

    This study examined how participation in a universal family skills-building program may interact with community risks and resources to produce youth outcomes. Prior research has noted community-level variability in risk and protective factors, but thus far no study has examined the role that participation on a community-wide intervention may play in moderating the effects of community risks or resources. The study included 14 communities (seven in Iowa, seven in Pennsylvania) that implemented a family focused evidence-based program as part of the PROSPER project. Community level variables included both risk factors (percent of low income families, the availability of alcohol and tobacco, norms regarding adolescent substance use, incidence of drug-related crimes) and community resources (proactive school leadership, availability of youth-serving organizations, and student involvement in youth activities). The proximal youth and family outcomes included youth perceptions of their parents' management skills, parent-child activities, and family cohesion. Results indicated that the Strengthening Families Program:10-14 may have moderated the impact of the community risks and resources on community-level youth outcomes; risk levels meaningfully associated with community-level change in program participants, though these results varied somewhat by outcome. Generally, higher levels of resources also meaningfully associated with more positive change after participating in the family-focused intervention. These results suggest that the effect of some evidence-based programs may be even stronger in some communities than others; more research in this area is needed.

  14. Status-Relevant Experiences and Conspicuous Consumption - the Moderating Role of Prenatal Androgen Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelissen, Gert; Palacios-Fenech, Javier

    2016-09-20

    In this paper we study consumers' interest in acquiring and displaying expensive luxury products. Based on recent insights in consumer psychology, which build on developments in evolutionary biology, we consider luxury products as "costly signals": wasteful and costly goods, whose purpose is to communicate one's biological fitness, and social status, to others. In line with previous research, we show that experiences that trigger mate attraction goals (Study 1: Exposure to others in bathing outfit) or status display goals (Study 2: Experiencing a vicarious victory of one's favorite sports team) can increase people's interest in luxury products. However, we demonstrate that some individuals are predictably more responsive to those experiences than others. We used a physiological measure (the proportion of the length of the index finger and ring finger of the right hand, 2D:4D) as a proxy for individual differences in exposure to prenatal androgens (i.e., testosterone). This measure has been related to dominant and competitive behavior later in life. We predict and find that individuals with a low 2D:4D (i.e., high exposure to prenatal androgens) were more responsive to the status-relevant experiences: they became more interested in luxury goods after these experiences. This was not the case for high 2D:4D individuals.

  15. Anxiety sensitivity moderates the relationship of changes in physiological arousal with flight anxiety during in vivo exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busscher, Bert; Spinhoven, Philip; van Gerwen, Lucas J; de Geus, Eco J C

    2013-02-01

    Physiological sensations and discomfort constitute the major symptoms reported by aviophobics. Anxiety sensitivity (AS) seems to moderate the relationship between self-reported somatic sensations and flight anxiety, and AS has been identified as a vulnerability factor for flight phobia. In this study we examined whether AS moderates the effects of somatic sensations and autonomic nervous system reactivity on flight anxiety induced by real flight. In fifty aviophobics participating in Cognitive Behaviour Group Therapy (CBGT), flight anxiety, somatic sensations and autonomic nervous system reactivity were assessed during a guided return flight. Results indicate that physiological reactivity interacted with AS. Changes in heart rate and parasympathetic activity were more strongly associated with changes in reported flight anxiety for high AS participants, and less for participants low on AS. Results did not indicate a moderating effect of AS on the relationship between self-reported somatic sensations and flight anxiety. Our results suggest that therapy for flight phobia might benefit from addressing the physical effect of anxiety, by means of cognitive restructuring and exposure to interoceptive stimuli, particularly in aviophobics high in AS.

  16. Negative emotionality and its facets moderate the effects of exposure to Hurricane Sandy on children's postdisaster depression and anxiety symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopala-Sibley, Daniel C; Danzig, Allison P; Kotov, Roman; Bromet, Evelyn J; Carlson, Gabrielle A; Olino, Thomas M; Bhatia, Vickie; Black, Sarah R; Klein, Daniel N

    2016-05-01

    According to diathesis-stress models, temperament traits such as negative emotionality (NE) may moderate the effects of stressors on the development of symptoms of psychopathology, although little research has tested such models in children. Moreover, there are few data on whether specific facets of NE (sadness, fear, or anger) may specifically moderate the effects of stress on depression versus anxiety. Finally, there is a paucity of research examining whether childhood temperament moderates the effect of disaster exposure on depressive or anxiety symptoms. Hurricane Sandy, which affected many thousands of people in New York State and the surrounding regions in October 2012, offers a unique opportunity to address these gaps. Seven to eight years prior to Hurricane Sandy, 332 children 3 years old completed lab-based measures of NE and its facets. Six years later, when they were 9 years old, each mother rated her child's depressive and anxiety symptoms. Approximately 8 weeks post-Sandy (an average of 1 year after the age 9 assessment), mothers again rated their child's depressive and anxiety symptoms, as well as a measure of exposure to stress from Hurricane Sandy. Adjusting for symptom levels at age 9, higher levels of stress from Hurricane Sandy predicted elevated levels of depressive symptoms only in participants with high levels of temperamental sadness and predicted elevated levels of anxiety symptoms only in participants high in temperamental fearfulness. These findings support the role of early childhood temperament as a diathesis for psychopathology and highlight the importance of considering facets of temperament when examining their relationship to psychopathology. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Exposure to and engagement with gambling marketing in social media: Reported impacts on moderate-risk and problem gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainsbury, Sally M; King, Daniel L; Russell, Alex M T; Delfabbro, Paul; Derevensky, Jeffrey; Hing, Nerilee

    2016-03-01

    Digital advertising for gambling and specifically marketing via social media have increased in recent years, and the impact on vulnerable consumers, including moderate-risk and problem gamblers, is unknown. Social media promotions often fall outside of advertising restrictions and codes of conduct and may have an inequitable effect on susceptible gamblers. This study aimed to investigate recall of exposure to, and reported impact on gamblers of, gambling promotions and marketing content on social media, with a focus on vulnerable users currently experiencing gambling problems. Gamblers who use social media (N = 964) completed an online survey assessing their exposure to and engagement with gambling operators on social media, their problem gambling severity, and the impact of social media promotions on their gambling. Gamblers at moderate risk and problem gamblers were significantly more likely to report having been exposed to social media gambling promotions and indicated actively engaging with gambling operators via these platforms. They were more likely to self-report that they had increased gambling as a result of these promotions, and over one third reported that the promotions had increased their problems. This research suggests that gamblers at moderate risk or those experiencing gambling problems are more likely to be impacted by social media promotions, and these may play a role in exacerbating disordered gambling. Future research should verify these self-reported results with behavioral data. However, the potential influence of advertisements via these new platforms should be considered by clinicians and policymakers, given their potential role in the formation of this behavioral addiction.

  18. Oxytocin-Motivated Ally Selection is Moderated by Fetal Testosterone Exposure and Empathic Concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariska Esther Kret

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In humans, the hypothalamic neuropeptide oxytocin shifts the individual’s focus on self-interest towards group-serving cognitions and decision making. Here we examine this general tendency in the context of group formation, where individuals included into their group (or not 18 targets morphed as having low or high-threat potential (with high-threat targets being beneficial to group-interests but potentially hurting the recruiter’s self-interest. Ninety healthy males self-administered oxytocin or placebo in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study design, had their hands scanned to derive fetal testosterone vs. estradiol exposure from their 2D:4D ratio, and self-reported on their chronic empathic concern. Multilevel regression models revealed that when given oxytocin rather than placebo, individuals with low fetal testosterone priming included low-threat targets more and high-threat targets (somewhat less. Individuals with high fetal testosterone (i.e., low estradiol exposure, however, included high-threat targets more, and low-threat targets less when given oxytocin rather than placebo. Second, when given oxytocin rather than placebo, individuals with low empathic concern included low-threat targets more and high-threat targets less. Individuals with high empathic concern, however, included high-threat targets more, and low-threat targets less when given oxytocin rather than placebo. We conclude that oxytocin shifts the individual’s focus from self to group-serving cognition and decision making, and that these tendencies are stronger for males with high rather than low fetal testosterone exposure, and high rather than low empathic concern. Implications and avenues for future research are discussed.

  19. Moderate alcohol exposure compromises neural tube midline development in prenatal brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng C; Sari, Youssef; Powrozek, Teresa; Goodlett, Charles R; Li, Ting-Kai

    2003-08-12

    We previously reported that fetal alcohol treatment compromised the development of the midline raphe and the serotonin neurons contained in it. In this study, we report that the timely development of midline neural tissue during neural tube formation is sensitive to alcohol exposure. Pregnant dams were treated from embryonic day 7 (E7, prior to neurulation) or E8.5 (at neurulation) with the following diets: (a) alcohol (ALC), given as either a 20% or 25% ethanol-derived calorie (EDC) liquid diet, or (b) isocaloric liquid diet pair-fed (PF), or (c) standard rat chow (Chow). Fetal brains from each group were examined on E13, E15, or E18. Neural tube development was compromised as a result of alcohol exposure in the following ways: (1) approximately 60% of embryos at E13 and 20% at E15 showed perforation of the floor plate in the diencephalic vesicle, (2) although completely closed at E13, 70-80% of embryos failed to complete the formation of neural tissue at the roof as the alcohol exposure continued to E15, and (3) 60-80% of embryos show delayed 'occlusion' of the ventral canal by newly formed nestin-positive neuroepithelial cells and S100beta-positive glia in the brainstem of E15. The compromised (incomplete) neural tube midline (cNTM) occurred near the ventricles at E13 and E15, but was later completed at E18. In all cases, the cNTM was accompanied by an enlarged ventricle, and dose-dependent brain weight reduction. The midline of the neural tube at the roof and floor plates is known to mediate timely trophic induction for neural differentiation. Prenatal midline deficits also have the potential to affect the development of midline neurons such as raphe, septal nuclei, and the timely crossing of commissural fibers. The results of the liquid diet alcohol exposure paradigm suggest it is more a model for Alcohol-Related Neurodevelopmental Disorder (ARND) featuring neuropsychiatric disorders than for full-blown fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) with noticeable facial

  20. HPA-Axis Activation as a Key Moderator of Childhood Trauma Exposure and Adolescent Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, Kate R; Geiss, Elisa G; Vargas, Ivan; Lopez-Duran, Nestor

    2017-02-18

    Individual differences in a child's sensitivity to stress may influence whether youth exposed to trauma develop symptoms of psychopathology. We examined the interaction between HPA-axis reactivity to an acute stressor and exposure to different types of childhood trauma as predictors of mental health symptoms in a sample of youth. Youth (n = 121, ages 9-16; 47% female) completed a standardized stress task, including 5 post-stress salivary cortisol samples. Parents also completed the Child Behavior Checklist as a measure of child internalizing and externalizing symptoms in the past month, and completed the Early Trauma Inventory (ETI) as a measure of their child's trauma exposure. More emotional abuse and non-intentional trauma were associated with greater internalizing symptoms. Youth exposed to physical abuse who demonstrated slower HPA-axis reactivity had elevated internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Youth exposed to emotional abuse or non-intentional traumatic events who demonstrated faster HPA-axis reactivity had elevated internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Profiles of exaggerated or attenuated HPA-axis reactivity to acute stress may be risk factors for psychopathology in children facing different stressful social environments.

  1. Reacting to Neighborhood Cues: Political Sophistication Moderates the Effect of Exposure to Immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danckert, Bolette; Dinesen, Peter Thisted; Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2016-01-01

    is founded on politically sophisticated individuals having a greater comprehension of news and other mass-mediated sources, which makes them less likely to rely on neighborhood cues as sources of information relevant for political attitudes. Based on a unique panel data set with fine-grained information......Drawing on insights from political psychology regarding political information processing, this paper argues that politically sophisticated individuals are less sensitive to the social cues manifested in the ethnic composition of their neighborhood when they form political opinions. This prediction...... about the ethnic composition of the immediate neighborhood, the paper finds consistent support for the hypothesis: While neighborhood exposure to non-Western immigrants reduces anti-immigration attitudes among individuals with low political sophistication, there is no effect among individuals with high...

  2. Culturally-Adapted versus Standard Exposure Treatment for Phobic Asian Americans: Treatment Efficacy, Moderators, and Predictors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, David; Huey, Stanley J.; Hernandez, Dominica

    2011-01-01

    This study is a 6-month follow-up of a randomized pilot evaluation of standard one-session treatment (OST-S) versus culturally-adapted OST (OST-CA) with phobic Asian Americans. OST-CA included seven cultural adaptations drawn from prior research with East Asians and Asian Americans. Results from 1-week and 6-month follow-up show that both OST-S and OST-CA were effective at reducing phobic symptoms compared to self-help control. Moreover, OST-CA was superior to OST-S for several outcomes. For catastrophic thinking and general fear, moderator analyses indicated that low-acculturation Asian Americans benefitted more from OST-CA than OST-S, whereas both treatments were equally effective for high-acculturation participants. Although cultural process factors (e.g., facilitating emotional control, exploiting the vertical therapist-client relationship) and working alliance were predictive of positive outcomes, they did not mediate treatment effects. This study offers a potential model for evaluating cultural adaptation effects, as well as the mechanisms that account for such effects. PMID:21341893

  3. High altitude headache occurs frequently among construction workers in Yushu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Tianyi; Li Shuzhi; Jin Xinhui; Zhang Jianqing

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to measure the incidence of high altitude headache (HAH) and to determine clinical features,as well as the relation between acute mountain sickness (AMS) and HAH through a prospective study.We conducted a questionnaire-based study among construction workers in Yushu after a serious earthquake; they were under reconstruction using a structured questionnaire incorporating International Headache Society (IHS) and AMS Lake Louise Scoring System.A total of 608 workers were enrolled after their first ascent to altitudes of 3 750~4528 m.The results showed that 96 % reported at least 1 HAH(median 3.8,range from 1 to 10) in workers at a mean altitude of 4250 m.The magnitude of headache was divided as mild (38 %),moderate (44 %) and severe (18 %).This study indicates that HAH is the most common symptom of acute altitude exposure and closely correlated with altitude (r=0.165,p<0.001).However,52 % of headache was one of the main symptoms of AMS,while the other 48 % was the sole symptom of HAH.On the contrary we found that 2 % of AMS without headache,thus the "painless AMS" actually existed.The clinical features of HAH are presented,and the relationship between AMS and HAH is discussed.

  4. Evaluation of the potential role of chelation therapy in treatment of low to moderate lead exposures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisolm, J.J. Jr. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-11-01

    In the overall long-term management of lead poisoning, chelation therapy can have short-term benefits; however, these benefits must be accompanied by drastic reduction in environmental exposure to lead if therapy is to have any long-term benefit. This discussion is limited to calcium disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate (CaNa{sub 2}EDTA), the chelating agent that has been the mainstay of treatment of lead poisoning for the past 38 years, and to meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), a new and promising oral chelating agent, which is an orphan drug and is currently classified as an investigational new drug by the US Food and Drug Administration. With both drugs, multiple courses of treatment will be needed if any substantial reduction in body lead burden is to be achieved. A major limitation of CaNa{sub 2}EDTA is the enormous diuresis of zinc that it produces. DMSA produces a comparable diuresis of lead, a greater decrease in blood lead, and has negligible influence on the urinary losses of zinc, copper, iron, and calcium. Limited experience to date in man has revealed no significant adverse side effects of DMSA. In animals, DMSA will promptly reduce the concentration of lead in brain and kidney, in particular. By contrast, similar 5-day courses of CaNa{sub 2}EDTA do not produce any net reduction in brain lead. This is important, as the brain is the critical organ of the adverse effects of lead in children. If the efficacy of DMSA is to be comprehensively evaluated ethically in children, new and more sensitive neurochemical, electrophysiologic, or other markers must be developed.

  5. O uso das curvas de crescimento da Organização Mundial da Saúde em crianças e adolescentes que vivem em regiões de altitude moderada El uso de curvas de crecimiento de la Organización Mundial de la Salud en niños y adolescentes que viven en regiones de altitud moderada The use of World Health Organization growth curves in children and adolescents that live in regions of moderate altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Cossio-Bolaños

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a aplicabilidade do uso das curvas de crescimento da Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS em escolares que vivem em regiões de altitude moderada. MÉTODOS: Estudo transversal cuja população foi constituída por uma amostra probabilística estratificada com 955 crianças e adolescentes de seis a 12 anos, sendo 473 meninos e 482 meninas que frequentavam escolas públicas da área urbana da Região de Arequipa (Peru. As variáveis avaliadas envolveram medidas de massa corpórea (kg e estatura (m e índice de massa corporal. Para as comparações, utilizou-se o escore Z e o teste t para medidas pareadas. RESULTADOS: Os meninos apresentaram valores similares de massa corpórea quando comparados com a referência. No entanto, as meninas mostraram valores superiores à referência nas idades de seis, sete e dez anos (pOBJETIVO: Determinar la aplicabilidad del uso de curvas de crecimiento de la Organización Mundial de la Salud en escolares que viven en regiones de altitud moderada. MÉTODOS: Estudio transversal, cuya población fue constituida por una muestra probabilística estratificada con 955 niños y adolescentes de seis a 12 años de edad, siendo 473 muchachos y 482 muchachas, que frecuentaban escuelas públicas de área urbana de la Región de Arequipa (Perú. Las variables evaluadas implicaron medidas de masa corporal (kg y estatura (m y el índice de masa corporal. Para las comparaciones, se utilizó el escore Z y la prueba t para medidas pareadas. RESULTADOS: Los muchachos presentaron valores similares de masa corporal cuando comparados con la referencia. Sin embargo, las muchachas mostraron valores superiores a la referencia en las edades de seis, siete y diez años (pOBJECTIVE: To determine the applicability of the World Health Organization growth curves in school children that live in areas of moderate altitude. METHODS: A cross-sectional study, using a stratified random sample of 955 children and adolescents aged 6

  6. Do Gender and Exposure to Interparental Violence Moderate the Stability of Teen Dating Violence?: Latent Transition Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Jeong; Temple, Jeff R

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the development, change, and stability of teen dating violence (TDV) victimization over time. Specifically, we identify distinct subgroups of adolescents based on past-year TDV victimization, whether adolescents change victimization statuses over time (e.g., from psychological victimization to physical victimization), and how exposure to interparental violence and gender influence the prevalence and stability of TDV statuses. Adolescents (N=1,042) from 7 public high schools in Texas participated in this longitudinal study. The Conflict in Adolescent Dating Relationships Inventory (CADRI) (Wolfe et al., Psychological Assessment, 13(2), 277-293, 2001) was used to identify victimization statuses. Latent Transition Analysis (LTA) with measurement invariance was used to examine transition probability of an individual's latent status at Wave3 or Wave4 given his or her latent status at Wave2 or Wave3. Gender and exposure to interparental violence was included as moderators in the LTA. Three statuses of TDV victimization were identified: (1) non-victims; (2) emotional/verbal victims; and (3) physical/psychological victims. LTA showed that the majority of adolescents stayed in the same status over time; however, female youth exposed to interparental violence were more likely to move from a less to more severe status over time compared to non-exposed youth. This is among the first study to identify subgroups of TDV victimization and to examine the stability of group membership over time. Female youth exposed to interparental violence were more likely to remain in or move into a violent relationship compared to unexposed youth.

  7. Stromelysin-2 (MMP-10) facilitates clearance and moderates inflammation and cell death following lung exposure to long multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandivort, Tyler C; Birkland, Timothy P; Domiciano, Talita P; Mitra, Somenath; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Parks, William C

    2017-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are nanomaterials composed of multiple layers of graphene cylinders with unique properties that make them valuable for a number of industries. However, rising global production has led to concerns regarding potential occupational exposures to them as raw materials during handling. This is especially true for long MWCNT fibers, whose aspect ratio has been posited to initiate pathology similar to that of asbestos. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of extracellular endopeptidases that control various processes related to tissue repair, inflammation, and more. Stromelysin-2 (MMP-10) has roles in modulating macrophage activation and function, and hence, we used an MMP-10 null (Mmp10−/−) mouse model to assess its role in controlling lung responses to inhaled long MWCNTs. Oropharyngeal aspiration of long MWCNTs (80 µg/mouse) by wild-type mice induced expression of Mmp10 mRNA, which was accompanied by a robust inflammatory response characterized by elevated expression of Tnfa, Il6, and Il1b. In Mmp10−/− mice, we found that absence of MMP-10 led to impaired pulmonary clearance of MWCNTs and reduced macrophage cell survival. Exposure of wild-type bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) and alveolar macrophages to MWCNTs caused a rapid, dose-dependent upregulation of Mmp10 mRNA expression, which was accompanied by expression of pro-inflammatory products (Il6 and Il1b). These products were further enhanced in Mmp10−/− macrophages, resulting in increased caspase-3-dependent cell death compared with wild-type cells. These findings indicate that MMP-10 facilitates the clearance of MWCNTs and moderates the pro-inflammatory response of exposed alveolar and infiltrated macrophages. PMID:28223796

  8. Response of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal System to Repeated Moderate Psychoemotional Stress Exposure Is Associated with Behavioral Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goncharova, N D; Chigarova, O A; Oganyan, T E

    2017-05-01

    Individual features of the response of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) to repeated moderate stress exposure (daily 2-h restraint stress for 10 days) was studied in young female rhesus monkeys with healthy normal behavior and combined group of female rhesus monkeys with abnormal depression-like and anxious behavior. No between-group differences in the response of ACTH and cortisol were found on day 1. On day 10, a rapid and less pronounced increase in ACTH secretion was observed in all animals in comparison with day 1. Analysis of between-group differences in HPAA response showed higher increase in ACTH level and lower increase in cortisol concentration in animals with depression-like and anxious behavior. These changes were similar to the previously described differences in the response of the adenohypophysis and adrenal cortex to acute restraint stress in old monkeys with similar behavior. Thus, individuals with depression-like and anxious behavior demonstrate impaired stress-induced reactivity of HPAA as early as in young age.

  9. Stromelysin-2 (MMP-10 facilitates clearance and moderates inflammation and cell death following lung exposure to long multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandivort TC

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Tyler C Vandivort,1,2 Timothy P Birkland,1 Talita P Domiciano,3 Somenath Mitra,4 Terrance J Kavanagh,2 William C Parks1 1Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Women’s Guild Lung Institute, Los Angeles, CA, 2Department of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 3Department of Pediatrics, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, 4Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, USA Abstract: Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs are nanomaterials composed of multiple layers of graphene cylinders with unique properties that make them valuable for a number of industries. However, rising global production has led to concerns regarding potential occupational exposures to them as raw materials during handling. This is especially true for long MWCNT fibers, whose aspect ratio has been posited to initiate pathology similar to that of asbestos. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are a class of extracellular endopeptidases that control various processes related to tissue repair, inflammation, and more. Stromelysin-2 (MMP-10 has roles in modulating macrophage activation and function, and hence, we used an MMP-10 null (Mmp10-/- mouse model to assess its role in controlling lung responses to inhaled long MWCNTs. Oropharyngeal aspiration of long MWCNTs (80 µg/mouse by wild-type mice induced expression of Mmp10 mRNA, which was accompanied by a robust inflammatory response characterized by elevated expression of Tnfa, Il6, and Il1b. In Mmp10-/- mice, we found that absence of MMP-10 led to impaired pulmonary clearance of MWCNTs and reduced macrophage cell survival. Exposure of wild-type bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs and alveolar macrophages to MWCNTs caused a rapid, dose-dependent upregulation of Mmp10 mRNA expression, which was accompanied by expression of pro-inflammatory products (Il6 and Il1b. These products were further enhanced in Mmp10-/- macrophages

  10. Does high altitude increase risks of the elderly patients with coronary artery disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian-Yi Wu; Zhong-Yan Zhan; Qin-Li Wu; Suo-Lung Baomu; Yu-Ling Jie; Min Sun

    2009-01-01

    Objective To assess the effect of altitude hypoxia on the elderly patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods Three subject groups were surveyed during their train trip on the highest railroad--the Qinghai-Tibet Railway: 22 elderly individuals with documented CAD, 20 healthy elderly controls, and 20 healthy young controls, all of whom from Beijing near the sea level (76 m). Survey questions addressed clinical features of their healthy conditions and aspects of their coronary disease. The baseline study was performed at Xining at an altitude of 2261 m, and then during acute exposure to altitudes of 2808 m, 4768m, 5072 m and 4257 m by train for 24 hours. Resting pulse rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, electrocardiograph (ECG), and cardiac work estimated by the heart rate-blood pressure double product were obtained five times in each subject at different altitudes. Results On arrival to altitudes between 4768 m and 5072 m, the older passengers, especially those with preexisting coronary disease, had higher HR, higher BP, and lower SaO2, as well as more frequent abnormalities on ECG, as compared to the younger healthy subjects. As compared with the healthy elderly controls, incomplete right bundle branch block, left ventricular hypertrophy, and ST segment depression were more frequently seen in the elderly coronary patients (P<0.01). Cardiac work in group 1 was increased by 13% 12 hours after arrival to altitudes between 2808 m and 5072 m. Oxygen saturation decreased significantly with the altitude increasing by train ascent but improved after inhalation of oxygen. Most of the older subjects tolerated their sojourn at high altitude well except one who developed angina repeatedly with a significant ST segment depression. Conclusions Coronary events and ECG signs of myocardial ischemia are rare in elderly individuals with CAD who travel from sea level to moderate altitudes of 1500m to 2800 m. Patients with CAD who are well compensated at sea level

  11. Altitude Stress During Participation of Medical Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soon Bae; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Sang Jun; Cho, Su Hee; Suh, Dae Chul

    2016-09-01

    Medical congresses often held in highlands. We reviewed several medical issues associated with altitude stress especially while physicians have participated medical congress held in high altitude. Altitude stress, also known as an acute mountain sickness (AMS), is caused by acute exposure to low oxygen level at high altitude which is defined as elevations at or above 1,200 m and AMS commonly occurs above 2,500 m. Altitude stress with various symptoms including insomnia can also be experienced in airplane. AMS and drunken state share many common features in symptoms, neurologic manifestations and even show multiple microbleeds in corpus callosum and white matter on MRI. Children are more susceptible to altitude stress than adults. Gradual ascent is the best method for the prevention of altitude stress. Adequate nutrition (mainly carbohydrates) and hydration are recommended. Consumption of alcohol can exacerbate the altitude-induced impairments in judgment and the visual senses and promote psychomotor dysfunction. For prevention or treatment of altitude stress, acetazolamide, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, dexamethasone and erythropoietin are helpful. Altitude stress can be experienced relatively often during participation of medical congress. It is necessary to remind the harmful effect of AMS because it can cause serious permanent organ damage even though the symptoms are negligible in most cases.

  12. Recovery of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) with high time-resolution from a moderate monaural-exposure to 2-kHz in human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Toro, Miguel Angel Aranda; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Reuter, Karen

    2008-01-01

    The amplitude of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) decreases temporarily after exposure to a sound of moderate level. These changes show similarities to the changes observed in absolute hearing thresholds after similar sound exposures. This paper presents the experimental protocol...... to study how DPOAEs in human subjects are affected after a monaural exposure of ten minutes to a pure tone of 2 kHz. The experimental protocol allows to measure fine structures of the DPOAE with high time-resolution in a limited frequency range. Thus, the results give a detailed description of the DPOAE...... recovery process and can be used to develop a mathematical model of the recovery. This is the first approximation to study the recovery of more complex exposures. [Work supported by the Danish Research Council for Technology and Production.]...

  13. Effects of passive, moderate-level sound exposure on the mature auditory cortex: spectral edges, spectrotemporal density, and real-world noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pienkowski, Martin; Munguia, Raymundo; Eggermont, Jos J

    2013-02-01

    Persistent, passive exposure of adult cats to bandlimited tone pip ensembles or sharply-filtered white noise at moderate levels (∼70 dB SPL) leads to a long-term suppression of spontaneous and sound-evoked activity in the region(s) of primary auditory cortex (AI) normally tuned to the exposure spectrum, and to an enhancement of activity in one or more neighboring regions of AI, all in the apparent absence of hearing loss. Here, we first examined the effects of passive exposure to a more structured, real-world noise, consisting of a mix of power tool and construction sounds. This "factory noise" had less pronounced effects on adult cat AI than our previous random tone pip ensembles and white noise, and these effects appeared limited to the region of AI tuned to frequencies near the sharp factory noise cutoff at 16 kHz. To further investigate the role of sharp spectral edges in passive exposure-induced cortical plasticity, a second group of adult cats was exposed to a tone pip ensemble with a flat spectrum between 2 and 4 kHz and shallow cutoff slopes (12 dB/oct) on either side. Compared to our previous ensemble with the same power in the 2-4 kHz band but very steep slopes, exposure to the overall more intense, sloped stimulus had much weaker effects on AI. Finally, we explored the issue of exposure stimulus spectrotemporal density and found that low aggregate tone pip presentation rates of about one per second sufficed to induce changes in the adult AI similar to those characteristic of our previous, much denser exposures. These results are discussed in light of the putative mechanisms underlying exposure-induced auditory cortical plasticity, and the potential adverse consequences of working or living in moderately noisy environments.

  14. Acute massive splenic infarction with splenic vein thrombosis following altitude exposure of a Sri Lankan male with undetected sickle cell trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekera, Walimuni Yohan Mendis; de Silva, Warusha Dhammika Dulantha; Pinnaduwa, Sharika Shashindrani; Banagala, Anura Sarath Kumara

    2012-12-01

    Even though sickle cell disease is not common in Sri Lanka, we report an acute splenic infarction at high altitude of a Sri Lankan male with previously undetected sickle cell trait (SCT). This is the first time such a case is reported from the South Asian region. Early recognition of this hematological condition would simplify the management of acute splenic infarction in these patients, avoiding irreversible surgery.

  15. The effect of altitude hypoxia on glucose homeostasis in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J J; Hansen, J M; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    1997-01-01

    1. Exposure to altitude hypoxia elicits changes in glucose homeostasis with increases in glucose and insulin concentrations within the first few days at altitude. Both increased and unchanged hepatic glucose production (HGP) have previously been reported in response to acute altitude hypoxia...

  16. Pre- and postnatal exposure to moderate levels of ethanol can have long-lasting effects on hippocampal glutamate uptake in adolescent offspring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Brolese

    Full Text Available The developing brain is vulnerable to the effects of ethanol. Glutamate is the main mediator of excitatory signals in the brain and is probably involved in most aspects of normal brain function during development. The aim of this study was to investigate vulnerability to and the impact of ethanol toxicity on glutamate uptake signaling in adolescent rats after moderate pre and postnatal ethanol exposure. Pregnant female rats were divided into three groups and treated only with water (control, non-alcoholic beer (vehicle or 10% (v/v beer solution (moderate prenatal alcohol exposure-MPAE. Thirty days after birth, adolescent male offspring were submitted to hippocampal acute slice procedure. We assayed glutamate uptake and measured glutathione content and also quantified glial glutamate transporters (EAAT 1 and EAAT 2. The glutamate system vulnerability was tested with different acute ethanol doses in naïve rats and compared with the MPAE group. We also performed a (lipopolysaccharide-challenge (LPS-challenge with all groups to test the glutamate uptake response after an insult. The MPAE group presented a decrease in glutamate uptake corroborating a decrease in glutathione (GSH content. The reduction in GSH content suggests oxidative damage after acute ethanol exposure. The glial glutamate transporters were also altered after prenatal ethanol treatment, suggesting a disturbance in glutamate signaling. This study indicates that impairment of glutamate uptake can be dose-dependent and the glutamate system has a higher vulnerability to ethanol toxicity after moderate ethanol exposure In utero. The effects of pre- and postnatal ethanol exposure can have long-lasting impacts on the glutamate system in adolescence and potentially into adulthood.

  17. Adaptation to High Altitude

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Hypoxia is inconsequential for physiologically fit persons below an effective altitude of 2640 metres. At higher altitudes, the adaptation is brought about by four main factors, viz., hyperventilation, increased diffusion of oxygen across alveolar membrane, erythrocythemia and maintenance of body hydration. Carbon dioxide sensitivity is markedly elevated at high altitude, both in sojourners and acclimatized low-landers. The greater pulmonary diffusing capacity observed in high altitude native...

  18. Effects of Moderate Strength Cold Air Exposure on Blood Pressure and Biochemical Indicators among Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiakun Zhang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of cold air on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases were investigated in an experimental study examining blood pressure and biochemical indicators. Zhangye, a city in Gansu Province, China, was selected as the experimental site. Health screening and blood tests were conducted, and finally, 30 cardiovascular disease patients and 40 healthy subjects were recruited. The experiment was performed during a cold event during 27–28 April 2013. Blood pressure, catecholamine, angiotensin II (ANG-II, cardiac troponin I (cTnI, muscle myoglobin (Mb and endothefin-1 (ET-1 levels of the subjects were evaluated 1 day before, during the 2nd day of the cold exposure and 1 day after the cold air exposure. Our results suggest that cold air exposure increases blood pressure in cardiovascular disease patients and healthy subjects via the sympathetic nervous system (SNS that is activated first and which augments ANG-II levels accelerating the release of the norepinephrine and stimulates the renin-angiotensin system (RAS. The combined effect of these factors leads to a rise in blood pressure. In addition, cold air exposure can cause significant metabolism and secretion of Mb, cTnI and ET-1 in subjects; taking the patient group as an example, ET-1 was 202.7 ng/L during the cold air exposure, increased 58 ng/L compared with before the cold air exposure, Mb and cTnI levels remained relatively high (2,219.5 ng/L and 613.2 ng/L, increased 642.1 ng/L and 306.5 ng/L compared with before the cold air exposure, respectively 1-day after the cold exposure. This showed that cold air can cause damage to patients’ heart cells, and the damage cannot be rapidly repaired. Some of the responses related to the biochemical markers indicated that cold exposure increased cardiovascular strain and possible myocardial injury.

  19. Study protocol: psychological and physiological consequences of exposure to mass media in young women - an experimental cross-sectional and longitudinal study and the role of moderators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munsch, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Repeated exposure to thin beauty ideals is part of the daily routine. Exposure to thin ideals via mass media plays an important role in the development and maintenance of eating disorders (EDs), low self-esteem, depressive or anxious feelings in young females. It is important to elucidate the circumstances under which exposure to thin ideals develops its detrimental impact and to investigate whether these features are more pronounced in EDs than in other mental disorders also related to negative body image. We investigate the following key questions: (1) Does laboratory induced exposure to thin ideals (waiting room design) relate to impairments in terms of body image, affect and eating behavior and biological stress response (salivary alpha-amylase, salivary cortisol, heart rate and heart rate variability) in 18 to 35 year old female suffering from anorexia and bulimia nervosa (AN, BN) compared to female healthy controls and to a sample of females suffering from mixed mental disorders (depression, anxiety and somatic symptom disorder (SSD) disorders)? (2) How do moderators such as cognitive distortions ("Thought-Shape Fusion, TSF"), and correlates of emotion regulation (ER) moderate the influence of the exposure? (3) Are these characteristics amenable to change after treatment? Altogether 250 female participants including patients with AN, BN, depressive, anxiety and SSD disorders, and healthy women will be recruited in Switzerland and Germany. The findings will provide knowledge about the role of moderators influencing the effects of exposure to thin ideals promoted by mass media in eating disorder (ED) patients, patients suffering from mixed mental disorders and healthy controls. Evaluating their differential susceptibility will contribute to a better understanding of the role of negative body image in the maintenance of not only symptoms of ED, but also of depression, anxiety and SSD. Additionally our results will shed light on the stability of effects in

  20. Aggression in US soldiers post-deployment: Associations with combat exposure and PTSD and the moderating role of trait anger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Joshua E; Quartana, Phillip J; Clarke-Walper, Kristina; Kok, Brian C; Riviere, Lyndon A

    2015-01-01

    Anger and aggression are among the most common issues reported by returning service members from combat deployments. However, the pathways between combat exposure and anger and aggression have not been comprehensively characterized. The present study aimed to characterize the relationship between trait anger, combat exposure, post-deployment PTSD, and aggression. U.S. Army soldiers (N = 2,420) were administered anonymous surveys assessing combat exposure, current PTSD symptoms and aggression, as well as trait anger items 3 months after returning from deployment to Afghanistan. PTSD symptom levels were related to aggression at higher levels of trait anger, but not evident among soldiers who had lower levels of trait anger. The pathway from combat exposure to PTSD, and then to aggression, was conditional upon levels of trait anger, such that the pathway was most evident at high levels of trait anger. This was the first study to our knowledge that concurrently modeled unconditional and conditional direct and indirect associations between combat exposure, PTSD, trait anger, and aggression. The findings can be helpful clinically and for developing screening protocols for combat exposed Soldiers. The results of this study suggest the importance of assessing and managing anger and aggression in soldiers returning from combat deployment. Anger is one of the most common complaints of returning soldiers and can have debilitating effects across all domains of functioning. It is imperative that future research efforts are directed toward understanding this phenomenon and developing and validating effective treatments for it.

  1. The protective effect of moderate noisy backgrounds for certain period on hearing after exposure to a traumatic noise in guinea pig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-hua WANG

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the protective effect of moderate noisy backgrounds on guinea pig's hearing after an exposure to a traumatic noise. Methods  Thirty guinea pigs were randomly divided into five groups (6 each. Animals in group A, B, C and D were subjected to noise of 84 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL for 4, 8, 24 and 0 hour respectively after a traumatic exposure of 110 dB SPL, and those in group E were kept in quiet environment. Distortion product oto-acoustic emission (DPOAE amplitudes were determined on 1 day prior, and 1 and 7 days after noise exposure. Blood plasma was obtained to determine the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA and the activities of hemocuprein (SOD and nitricoxide synthase (NOS at the end of the experiment. Results  Noise-induced hearing loss was caused in group D after a traumatic exposure. At the 1st and 7th day after exposure, DPOAE amplitudes were higher in group A and B than in group D, especially at high frequencies, while no significant difference was observed between group C and D. At the 7th day after exposure, the activity of SOD lowered, while the content of MDA increased in group A and B as compared with group E (P<0.05. The content of MDA in group A increased as compared with group D (P<0.05. Conclusion  After the traumatic noise-exposure, the recovery of noise-induced hearing loss, especially the high-frequency hearing loss could be motivated when exposed to noise at 84 dB SPL for 4 or 8 hours.

  2. Sleep at high altitude: guesses and facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, Konrad E; Buenzli, Jana C; Latshang, Tsogyal D; Ulrich, Silvia

    2015-12-15

    Lowlanders commonly report a poor sleep quality during the first few nights after arriving at high altitude. Polysomnographic studies reveal that reductions in slow wave sleep are the most consistent altitude-induced changes in sleep structure identified by visual scoring. Quantitative spectral analyses of the sleep electroencephalogram have confirmed an altitude-related reduction in the low-frequency power (0.8-4.6 Hz). Although some studies suggest an increase in arousals from sleep at high altitude, this is not a consistent finding. Whether sleep instability at high altitude is triggered by periodic breathing or vice versa is still uncertain. Overnight changes in slow wave-derived encephalographic measures of neuronal synchronization in healthy subjects were less pronounced at moderately high (2,590 m) compared with low altitude (490 m), and this was associated with a decline in sleep-related memory consolidation. Correspondingly, exacerbation of breathing and sleep disturbances experienced by lowlanders with obstructive sleep apnea during a stay at 2,590 m was associated with poor performance in driving simulator tests. These findings suggest that altitude-related alterations in sleep may adversely affect daytime performance. Despite recent advances in our understanding of sleep at altitude, further research is required to better establish the role of gender and age in alterations of sleep at different altitudes, to determine the influence of acclimatization and of altitude-related illness, and to uncover the characteristics of sleep in highlanders that may serve as a study paradigm of sleep in patients exposed to chronic hypoxia due to cardiorespiratory disease.

  3. Adaptation to High Altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Nayar

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia is inconsequential for physiologically fit persons below an effective altitude of 2640 metres. At higher altitudes, the adaptation is brought about by four main factors, viz., hyperventilation, increased diffusion of oxygen across alveolar membrane, erythrocythemia and maintenance of body hydration. Carbon dioxide sensitivity is markedly elevated at high altitude, both in sojourners and acclimatized low-landers. The greater pulmonary diffusing capacity observed in high altitude natives is well documented. RBC count, haemoglobin and haematocrit increase whereas arterial oxyhaemoglobin saturation percentage decreases at high altitude. Diuretics (Furosemide have no role in adaptation to high altitude and adequate body hydration must be maintained.The ultimate adaptive mechanisms occur at tissue level which facilitate the diffusion of oxygen from blood to tissue and its utilization. The work capacity decreases at high altitude and a relationship between load carried and speed of marching has been determined at various altitudes. Although altitude has an adverse effect on process of cold acclimatization, yet it is possible to induce cold acclimatization by exposing subjects to a temperature of 0° to -5°C for a period of three hours daily for three weeks. The caloric requirements increase at high altitudes and are 4,286 K Cal and 4,380 K Cal at 13000 feet (3950 m and 17000 feet (5170 m, respectively.

  4. Relation between aggression exposure in adolescence and adult posttraumatic stress symptoms: Moderating role of the parasympathetic nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Samantha A; Rabkin, Ari N; Olezeski, Christy L; Rivers, Alison J; Gordis, Elana B

    2015-03-15

    The present study examines the impact of the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS), as measured by respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA), on the link between family aggression experienced during adolescence and posttraumatic stress symptoms during young adulthood. Participants completed retrospective self-report measures of interparental aggression and harsh parenting exposure during adolescence and measures of current posttraumatic stress symptoms. RSA indexed PNS activity. Among females, the three-way interaction between harsh parenting, interparental aggression, and resting RSA was significant in accounting for young adulthood PTSD symptoms. At higher values of resting RSA and higher levels of interparental aggression exposure, harsh parenting experienced during adolescence was positively associated with adulthood PTSD symptoms. Among males, adolescent aggression exposure and resting RSA did not significantly account for variation in adulthood PTSD symptoms. Thus, this study suggests that resting PNS activity may play an important role in the relationship between stressors during adolescence and later PTSD in females.

  5. Extinction learning as a moderator of d-cycloserine efficacy for enhancing exposure therapy in posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleine, R.A. de; Smits, J.A.J.; Hendriks, G.J.; Becker, E.S.; Rinck, M.

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation of exposure therapy with d-cycloserine (DCS) has proven efficacious across anxiety disorders, although results in PTSD have been mixed. Work in animals and anxiety-disordered patients suggest that the potentiating effects of DCS are dependent on the level of extinction learning during

  6. Extinction learning as a moderator of d-cycloserine efficacy for enhancing exposure therapy in posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleine, R.A. de; Smits, J.A.; Hendriks, G.J.; Becker, E.S.; Minnen, A. van

    2015-01-01

    Augmentation of exposure therapy with d-cycloserine (DCS) has proven efficacious across anxiety disorders, although results in PTSD have been mixed. Work in animals and anxiety-disordered patients suggest that the potentiating effects of DCS are dependent on the level of extinction learning during e

  7. Threat and Selective Exposure: The Moderating Role of Threat and Decision Context on Confirmatory Information Search after Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Peter; Kastenmuller, Andreas; Greitemeyer, Tobias; Fischer, Julia; Frey, Dieter; Crelley, David

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies on the impact of perceived threat on confirmatory information search (selective exposure) in the context of decision making have yielded mixed results. Some studies have suggested that confirmatory information search is reduced, yet others have found contradictory effects. The present series of 5 studies consistently found that…

  8. Energy at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, N E; Stacey, M J; Woods, D R

    2011-03-01

    For the military doctor, an understanding of the metabolic effects of high altitude (HA) exposure is highly relevant. This review examines the acute metabolic challenge and subsequent changes in nutritional homeostasis that occur when troops deploy rapidly to HA. Key factors that impact on metabolism include the hypoxic-hypobaric environment, physical exercise and diet. Expected metabolic changes include augmentation of basal metabolic rate (BMR), decreased availability of oxygen in peripheral metabolic tissues, reduction in VO2 max, increased glucose dependency and lactate accumulation during exercise. The metabolic demands of exercise at HA are crucial. Equivalent activity requires greater effort and more energy than it does at sea level. Soldiers working at HA show high energy expenditure and this may exceed energy intake significantly. Energy intake at HA is affected adversely by reduced availability, reduced appetite and changes in endocrine parameters. Energy imbalance and loss of body water result in weight loss, which is extremely common at HA. Loss of fat predominates over loss of fat-free mass. This state resembles starvation and the preferential primary fuel source shifts from carbohydrate towards fat, reducing performance efficiency. However, these adverse effects can be mitigated by increasing energy intake in association with a high carbohydrate ration. Commanders must ensure that individuals are motivated, educated, strongly encouraged and empowered to meet their energy needs in order to maximise mission-effectiveness.

  9. High Altitude Dermatology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Lt. Col. G K

    2017-01-01

    Approximately, 140 million people worldwide live permanently at high altitudes (HAs) and approximately another 40 million people travel to HA area (HAA) every year for reasons of occupation, sports or recreation. In India, whole of Ladakh region, part of Northwest Kashmir, Northern part of Sikkim and Tenga valley of Arunachal are considered inhabited areas of HAA. The low quantity of oxygen, high exposure of ultraviolet (UV) light, very low humidity, extreme subzero temperature in winter, high wind velocity, make this region difficult for lowlanders as well as for tourists. Acute mountain sickness, HA pulmonary edema, HA cerebral edema, and thromboembolic conditions are known to occur in HA. However, enough knowledge has not been shared on dermatoses peculiar to this region. Xerosis, UV-related skin disorders (tanning, photomelanosis, acute and chronic sunburn, polymorphic light eruption, chronic actinic dermatitis, actinic cheilitis, etc.), cold injuries (frostbite, chilblains, acrocyanosis, erythrocyanosis, etc.) nail changes (koilonychias), airborne contact dermatitis, insect bite reaction, and skin carcinoma (basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and also rarely malignant melanoma) are the dermatoses seen in HAAs. Early diagnosis and knowledge of HA dermatoses may prevent serious consequences of disease and improve the quality of life for the visitors as well as for native of the place. PMID:28216727

  10. High altitude dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G K Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately, 140 million people worldwide live permanently at high altitudes (HAs and approximately another 40 million people travel to HA area (HAA every year for reasons of occupation, sports or recreation. In India, whole of Ladakh region, part of Northwest Kashmir, Northern part of Sikkim and Tenga valley of Arunachal are considered inhabited areas of HAA. The low quantity of oxygen, high exposure of ultraviolet (UV light, very low humidity, extreme subzero temperature in winter, high wind velocity, make this region difficult for lowlanders as well as for tourists. Acute mountain sickness, HA pulmonary edema, HA cerebral edema, and thromboembolic conditions are known to occur in HA. However, enough knowledge has not been shared on dermatoses peculiar to this region. Xerosis, UV-related skin disorders (tanning, photomelanosis, acute and chronic sunburn, polymorphic light eruption, chronic actinic dermatitis, actinic cheilitis, etc., cold injuries (frostbite, chilblains, acrocyanosis, erythrocyanosis, etc. nail changes (koilonychias, airborne contact dermatitis, insect bite reaction, and skin carcinoma (basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and also rarely malignant melanoma are the dermatoses seen in HAAs. Early diagnosis and knowledge of HA dermatoses may prevent serious consequences of disease and improve the quality of life for the visitors as well as for native of the place.

  11. Experimental effects of exposure to pornography: the moderating effect of personality and mediating effect of sexual arousal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hald, Gert Martin; Malamuth, Neil N

    2015-01-01

    Using a randomly selected community sample of 200 Danish young adult men and women in a randomized experimental design, the study investigated the effects of a personality trait (agreeableness), past pornography consumption, and experimental exposure to non-violent pornography on attitudes supporting violence against women (ASV). We found that lower levels of agreeableness and higher levels of past pornography consumption significantly predicted ASV. In addition, experimental exposure to pornography increased ASV but only among men low in agreeableness. This relationship was found to be significantly mediated by sexual arousal with sexual arousal referring to the subjective assessment of feeling sexually excited, ready for sexual activities, and/or bodily sensations associated with being sexually aroused. In underscoring the importance of individual differences, the results supported the hierarchical confluence model of sexual aggression and the media literature on affective engagement and priming effects.

  12. Timing of moderate level prenatal alcohol exposure influences gene expression of sensory processing behavior in rhesus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary L Schneider

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Sensory processing disorder (SPD, characterized by over- or under-responsivity to non-noxious environmental stimuli, is a common but poorly understood disorder. We examined the role of prenatal alcohol exposure, serotonin transporter gene polymorphic region variation (rh5-HTTLPR, and striatal dopamine (DA function on behavioral measures of sensory responsivity to repeated non-noxious sensory stimuli in macaque monkeys. Results indicated that early gestation alcohol exposure induced behavioral under-responsivity to environmental stimuli in monkeys carrying the short (s rh5-HTTLPR allele compared to both early-exposed monkeys homozygous for the long (l allele and monkeys from middle-to-late exposed pregnancies and controls, regardless of genotype. Moreover, prenatal timing of alcohol exposure altered the relationship between sensory scores and DA D2R availability. In early-exposed monkeys, a positive relationship was shown between sensory scores and DA D2R availability, with low or blunted DA function associated with under-responsive sensory function. The opposite pattern was found for the middle-to-late gestation alcohol-exposed group. These findings raise questions about how the timing of prenatal perturbation and genotype contributes to effects on neural processing and possibly alters neural connections.

  13. Latino and European American early adolescents' exposure to music with substance-use references: examining parent-child communication as a moderator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Jennifer A; Wang, Ningxin; Harvey, Jessica

    2014-02-01

    This study hypothesized that frequent exposure to and attention to music with substance-use references would be indirectly related to alcohol, cigarette, or marijuana use through pro-substance-use beliefs (e.g., norms, outcome expectancies, and refusal efficacy). Parent-child communication, however, would attenuate such associations, which would differ by ethnicity. Multigroup mediation and moderation analyses were conducted, using cross-sectional survey data from 253 Latino and 308 European American 6th-8th grades students. For Latino and European American early adolescents, best-friend-injunctive norms and weak refusal efficacy were significant mediators, but not positive outcome expectancies. Descriptive norms were a significant mediator, but only for European American early adolescents. Although targeted parent-child communication and parental mediation did not moderate the associations between the music-exposure variables and the pro-substance-use beliefs variables, targeted parent-child communication attenuated the association between listening to favorite songs and alcohol consumption. Parental mediation attenuated the association between attention to music and alcohol consumption.

  14. Moderate alcohol exposure during the rat equivalent to the third trimester of human pregnancy alters dopamine regulation of GABAA receptor-mediated transmission in the basolateral amygdala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marvin Rafael Diaz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Fetal ethanol (EtOH exposure leads to a range of neurobehavioral alterations, including deficits in emotional processing. The basolateral amygdala (BLA plays a critical role in modulating emotional processing, in part, via dopamine (DA regulation of GABA transmission. This BLA modulatory system is acquired during the first two weeks of postnatal life in rodents (equivalent to the 3rd trimester of human pregnancy and we hypothesized that it could be altered by EtOH exposure during this period. We found that exposure of rats to moderate levels of EtOH vapor during the 3rd trimester-equivalent (postnatal days (P 2-12 alters DA modulation of GABAergic transmission in BLA pyramidal neurons during periadolescence. Specifically, D1R-mediated potentiation of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs was significantly attenuated in EtOH-exposed animals. However, this was associated with a compensatory decrease in D3R-mediated suppression of miniature IPSCs. Western blot analysis revealed that these effects were not a result of altered D1R or D3R levels. BLA samples from EtOH-exposed animals also had significantly lower levels of the DA precursor (L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine but DA levels were not affected. This is likely a consequence of reduced catabolism of DA, as indicated by reduced levels of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid in the BLA samples. Anxiety-like behavior was not altered in EtOH-exposed animals. This is the first study to demonstrate that the modulatory actions of DA in the BLA are altered by developmental EtOH exposure. Although compensatory adaptations were engaged in our moderate EtOH exposure paradigm, it is possible that these are not able to restore homeostasis and correct anxiety-like behaviors under conditions of heavier EtOH exposure. Therefore, future studies should investigate the potential role of alterations in the modulatory actions of DA in the pathophysiology of fetal alcohol spectrum

  15. Interaction of moderate UV-B exposure and temperature on the formation of structurally different flavonol glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives in kale (Brassica oleracea var. sabellica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugart, Susanne; Fiol, Michaela; Schreiner, Monika; Rohn, Sascha; Zrenner, Rita; Kroh, Lothar W; Krumbein, Angelika

    2014-05-07

    Kale has a high number of structurally different flavonol glycosides and hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives. In this study we investigated the interaction of moderate UV-B radiation and temperature on these compounds. Kale plants were grown at daily mean temperatures of 5 or 15 °C and were exposed to five subsequent daily doses (each 0.25 kJ m(-2) d(-1)) of moderate UV-B radiation at 1 d intervals. Of 20 phenolic compounds, 11 were influenced by an interaction of UV-B radiation and temperature, e.g., monoacylated quercetin glycosides. Concomitantly, enhanced mRNA expression of flavonol 3'- hydroxylase showed an interaction of UV-B and temperature, highest at 0.75 kJ m(-2) and 15 °C. Kaempferol glycosides responded diversely and dependent on, e.g., the hydroxycinnamic acid residue. Compounds containing a catechol structure seem to be favored in the response to UV-B. Taken together, subsequent exposure to moderate UV-B radiation is a successful tool for enhancing the flavonoid profile of plants, and temperature should be considered.

  16. Effect of baicalin capsules on acute mountain sickness in healthy young males at acute high altitude exposure%黄芩苷与红景天胶囊对急性高原病预防作用比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段炜; 孙书红; 惠增骞; 高钊; 胡建库; 金峰; 陈虹

    2015-01-01

    ), systolic blood pressure(SBP), diastolic blood pressure ( DBP) , pulmonary artery systolic pressure ( PASP) and mean pulmonary arterial pressure ( MPAP) were assessed both at 397 m and 3658 m.Results After high-altitude exposure, significantly fewer participants in the baicalin capsules group (n=8, 25.0%) and rhodiola capsules group(n=7, 29.2%) developed acute mountain sickness compared with participants receiving placebo (n=14, 58.3%) (P<0.05) .HR, SBP, DBP, PASP and MPAP increased with altitude exposure (P<0.05), and SpO2 decreased with alti-tude exposure (P<0.05).AMS, HR, SBP and DBP with baicalin capsules was lower than those with placebo (P<0.05); AMS, PASP, MPAP with rhodiola capsules were lower than those with placebo (P<0.05) and SpO2 was higher than that with placebo (P<0.05).Conclusions Baicalin capsules for AMS prevention also reduce HR , SBP and DBP with rapid airlift ascent to high altitude and rhodiola capsules for AMS prevention also reduce PASP , MPAP, increase SpO2 with rapid airlift ascent to high altitude .

  17. Exposure to the Lebanon War of 2006 and effects on alcohol use disorders: The moderating role of childhood maltreatment☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Katherine M.; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Greenstein, Eliana; McLaughlin, Kate; Wall, Melanie; Aharonovich, Efrat; Weizman, Abraham; Frisch, Amos; Spivak, Baruch; Grant, Bridget F.; Hasin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Background Civilian populations now comprise the majority of casualties in modern warfare, but effects of war exposure on alcohol disorders in the general population are largely unexplored. Accumulating literature indicates that adverse experiences early in life sensitize individuals to increased alcohol problems after adult stressful experiences. However, child and adult stressful experiences can be correlated, limiting interpretation. We examine risk for alcohol disorders among Israelis after the 2006 Lebanon War, a fateful event outside the control of civilian individuals and uncorrelated with childhood experiences. Further, we test whether those with a history of maltreatment are at greater risk for an alcohol use disorder after war exposure compared to those without such a history. Methods Adult household residents selected from the Israeli population register were assessed with a psychiatric structured interview; the analyzed sample included 1306 respondents. War measures included self-reported days in an exposed region. Results Among those with a history of maltreatment, those in a war-exposed region for 30+ days had 5.3 times the odds of subsequent alcohol disorders compared to those exposed 0 days (95%C.I. 1.01–27.76), controlled for relevant confounders; the odds ratio for those without this history was 0.5 (95%C.I. 0.25–1.01); test for interaction: X2 = 5.28, df = 1, P = 0.02. Conclusions Experiencing a fateful stressor outside the control of study participants, civilian exposure to the 2006 Lebanon War, is associated with a heightened the risk of alcohol disorders among those with early adverse childhood experiences. Results suggest that early life experiences may sensitize individuals to adverse health responses later in life. PMID:24262650

  18. HIGH-ALTITUDE ILLNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwitya Elvira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakHigh-altitude illness (HAI merupakan sekumpulan gejala paru dan otak yang terjadi pada orang yang baru pertama kali mendaki ke ketinggian. HAI terdiri dari acute mountain sickness (AMS, high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE dan high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE. Tujuan tinjauan pustaka ini adalah agar dokter dan wisatawan memahami risiko, tanda, gejala, dan pengobatan high-altitude illness. Perhatian banyak diberikan terhadap penyakit ini seiring dengan meningkatnya popularitas olahraga ekstrim (mendaki gunung tinggi, ski dan snowboarding dan adanya kemudahan serta ketersediaan perjalanan sehingga jutaan orang dapat terpapar bahaya HAI. Di Pherice, Nepal (ketinggian 4343 m, 43% pendaki mengalami gejala AMS. Pada studi yang dilakukan pada tempat wisata di resort ski Colorado, Honigman menggambarkan kejadian AMS 22% pada ketinggian 1850 m sampai 2750 m, sementara Dean menunjukkan 42% memiliki gejala pada ketinggian 3000 m. Aklimatisasi merupakan salah satu tindakan pencegahan yang dapat dilakukan sebelum pendakian, selain beberapa pengobatan seperti asetazolamid, dexamethasone, phosopodiestrase inhibitor, dan ginko biloba.Kata kunci: high-altitude illness, acute mountain sickness, edema cerebral, pulmonary edema AbstractHigh-altitude illness (HAI is symptoms of lung and brain that occurs in people who first climb to altitude. HAI includes acute mountain sickness (AMS, high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE and high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE. The objective of this review was to understand the risks, signs, symptoms, and treatment of high-altitude illness. The attention was given to this disease due to the rising popularity of extreme sports (high mountain climbing, skiing and snowboarding and the ease and availability of the current travelling, almost each year, millions of people could be exposed to the danger of HAI. In Pherice, Nepal (altitude 4343 m, 43% of climbers have symptoms of AMS. Furthermore, in a study conducted at sites in

  19. Tibetans at extreme altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tianyi; Li, Shupin; Ward, Michal P

    2005-01-01

    Between 1960 and 2003, 13 Chinese expeditions successfully reached the summit of Chomolungma (Mt Everest or Sagarmatha). Forty-five of the 80 summiteers were Tibetan highlanders. During these and other high-altitude expeditions in Tibet, a series of medical and physiological investigations were carried out on the Tibetan mountaineers. The results suggest that these individuals are better adapted to high altitude and that, at altitude, they have a greater physical capacity than Han (ethnic Chinese) lowland newcomers. They have higher maximal oxygen uptake, greater ventilation, more brisk hypoxic ventilatory responses, larger lung volumes, greater diffusing capacities, and a better quality of sleep. Tibetans also have a lower incidence of acute mountain sickness and less body weight loss. These differences appear to represent genetic adaptations and are obviously significant for humans at extreme altitude. This paper reviews what is known about the physiologic responses of Tibetans at extreme altitudes.

  20. Effect of moderate cold exposure on 24-h energy expenditure: similar response in postobese and nonobese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buemann, B; Astrup, A; Christensen, N J; Madsen, J

    1992-12-01

    Twenty-four-hour energy expenditure (EE) and substrate oxidation rates were measured two times in eight postobese women and eight matched controls. On one occasion the subjects were exposed to a room temperature of 16 degrees C, on the other to 24 degrees C. Cold exposure elicited a 2% increment in 24-h EE (P Sleeping EE was found to be 5% lower in the postobese women than in the controls (P = 0.04). The postobese group also had higher 24-h nonprotein respiratory quotient than the control group (P = 0.04), which was due to a 26% lower lipid-to-carbohydrate oxidation ratio. The study demonstrates that the thermogenic response to cold is normal in women susceptible to obesity, but it supports previous reports of a slightly lower basal EE and lower lipid-to-carbohydrate oxidation ratio in postobese subjects.

  1. Limbic system activation is affected by prenatal predator exposure and postnatal environmental enrichment and further moderated by dam and sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korgan, Austin C; Green, Amanda D; Perrot, Tara S; Esser, Michael J

    2014-02-01

    Epilepsy is a relatively common and chronic neurological condition, affecting 1-2% of the population. However, understanding of the underlying pathophysiology remains incomplete. To identify potential factors in the early environment that may increase the risk for experiencing seizures, maternal stress and environmental enrichment (EE) were utilized. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were exposed to an ethologically relevant predator stress (PS) and maternal glucocorticoid (GC) response was assessed across the exposure period. At birth, litters were divided into standard care (SC) and EE groups until postnatal day 14 (PD14) when a model of febrile convulsions was used to determine seizure susceptibility of the various groups. Pup brains were then processed for immunohistochemical detection of FosB from several structures in the limbic system as a measure of neuronal activation. Maternal PS-induced GC levels were elevated early in the exposure period, and pup birth weights, in both sexes, were lower in litters from dams exposed to PS. Seizure scores at PD14 were highly individualized and litter dependent, suggesting a dam-dependent and variable effect of controlled pre- and postnatal environmental factors. Further, analysis of FosB-immunoreactive (-ir) patterns revealed an activity dependent distribution, reflecting individual seizure susceptibility. EE had a varying effect on FosB-ir that was dependent on region. In the hippocampus FosB-ir levels were greater in the EE groups while extra-hippocampal regions showed lower levels of FosB-ir. Our results support the concept that pre- and postnatal environmental influences affect fetal programming and neurodevelopment of processes that could underlie seizure susceptibility, but that the magnitude of these effects appears to be dam- or litter-dependent.

  2. Do beliefs about gender roles moderate the relationship between exposure to misogynistic song lyrics and men's female-directed aggression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Courtland S; Berke, Danielle S; Miller, Joshua D; Zeichner, Amos

    2017-04-01

    Although independent lines of research have identified misogynistic lyrical content and traditional gender role beliefs as reliable predictors of men's female-directed aggression, more research is needed to understand the extent to which these variables may function in synthesis to potentiate aggression. In the current study, men (N = 193), who completed questionnaires relevant to their conformity to masculine norms and level of hostile and benevolent sexism, were exposed to either misogynistic or neutral lyrics before having the opportunity to shock an ostensible female confederate in a bogus reaction time task that, in effect, measured aggression. Results indicated that misogynistic lyrics and hostile sexism significantly predicted both unprovoked and provoked aggression against a female target. Contrary to expectations, moderating effects of gender role beliefs on the relationship between misogynistic lyrics and men's aggression were not found. Implications are discussed in terms of the costs of misogyny in media for women's lives. Aggr. Behav. 43:123-132, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Predictive Models of Acute Mountain Sickness after Rapid Ascent to Various Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    severity but not prevalence of AMS. Key Words: HYPOXIA , HYPOBARIC HYPOXIA , MIXED MODELS, ALTITUDE, ALTITUDE SICKNESS, UNACCLIMATIZED LOWLANDERS W hen...Beidleman BA, Muza SR, Fulco CS, et al. Intermittent altitude exposures reduce acute mountain sickness at 4300 m. Clin Sci. 2004;106(3):321–8. 4. Beidleman...Wood H, Yang HH, et al. The body weight loss during acute exposure to high-altitude hypoxia in sea level residents. Acta Physiologica Sinica

  4. Altitude Preexposure Recommendations for Inducing Acclimatization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    acetazolamide ( Kronenberg and Cain, 1968). Acute exposure to high altitude increases heart rate and cardiac output to maintain systemic oxygen delivery...emphasizing the regulation of breathing. Physiologist. 11:37–57. Kronenberg R.S., and Cain S.M. (1968). Hastening respiratory acclimatization to

  5. Effects of Acute Exposure to Mild or Moderate Hypoxia on Human Psychomotor Performance and Visual-reaction Time%急性轻、中度缺氧暴露对心理运动及反应时的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李学义; 吴兴裕; 付川; 沈小凤; 杨长斌; 吴燕红

    2000-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine whether psychomotor performance and visual reaction time were affected by acute exposure to mild or moderate hypoxia. Method Eighteen healthy male volunteers performed finger tapping, simple reaction time(SRT) and 4-choice reaction time(CRT) tests at simulated altitude of 300 m (control),2800 m, 3600 m and 4400 m for 1 h in a hypobaric chamber. Result SaO2 decreased from 98%(control) to 90%,82% and 74% respectively at the various altitudes. All the performance parameters showed no significant change after exposure to 2800 m for 1 h relative to ground level(P>0.05). However the mean reaction time of 4-CRT under 3600 m prolonged and performance decreased as compared with baseline value(P0.05). Conclusion The results from this study demonstrated that there were no measurable impairment of visual reaction time and psychomotor performance under exposure to an altitude of 2800 m for 1 h. However, adverse effects on psychomotor performance were observed under 3600 m and over.%目的研究急性轻、中度缺氧暴露对人的心理运动及视觉反应时的影响. 方法利用低压舱模拟300 m (对照高度)、2800 m、3600 m、4400 m高度缺氧暴露1 h,考察了18 名健康男性青年被试者指叩测验、简单反应时和选择反应时的变化. 结果血氧饱和度(SaO2)由地面对照值98%分别降至90%、82%和74%.2800 m 缺氧暴露1 h心理运动绩效的各个参数并无显著改变(P>0.05).3600 m缺氧暴露时选择反应时的平均反应时明显延长,运动绩效下降(P0.05). 结论本研究的结果提示,急性缺氧暴露于2800 m高度1 h并未对心理运动产生严重影响,而暴露于3600 m以上高度时会对选择反应时等复杂反应产生负面影响,且随着高度的增加而加重.

  6. Effect of Fasting on Tolerance to Moderate Hypoxia,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blood pressure response to moderate hypoxia was compared in a fasting and a control (non- fasting ) state in 10 seated subjects. End-tidal gas tensions...exposure to a simulated altitude of 17,000 ft. When exposed to the same stress after fasting for 18 hours, the MAP fell to 87% (P less than 0.01) of...its resting value. The mean end-tidal Po2 was significantly lower in the fasting state and the end-tidal Pco2 was unchanged. It is concluded that

  7. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    such enzyme inhibition would favor the creation of a metabolic acidosis to offset the hypoxic respiratory alkalosis of high altitude hyperventilation...that some of their symptoms might be due to the early respiratory alkalosis seen upon arrival at high altitude. Unfortunately 23 out of the 30 subjects...i I Hamilton-16 was negative in all cases and normal respiratory excursions were seen. CSF chemistries and cell counts were normal. Houston and

  8. Hepatocellular carcinoma and liver cirrhosis TP53 mutation analysis reflects a moderate dietary exposure to aflatoxins in Espírito Santo State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Fernanda Magri; de Almeida Pereira, Thiago; Gonçalves, Patrícia Lofego; Jarske, Robson Dettmann; Pereira, Fausto Edmundo Lima; Louro, Iuri Drumond

    2013-08-01

    The close relationship between aflatoxins and 249ser TP53 gene mutation (AGG to AGT, Arg to Ser) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) makes this mutation an indirect indicator of dietary contamination with this toxin. We have examined the prevalence of codon 249 TP53 mutation in 41 HCC and 74 liver cirrhosis (without HCC) cases diagnosed at the HUCAM University Hospital in Vitoria, Espírito Santo State, Brazil. DNA was extracted from paraffin sections and from plasma. The mutation was detected by DNA amplification, followed by restriction endonuclease digestion and confirmed by direct sequencing. DNA restriction showed 249ser mutation in 16 HCC and 13 liver cirrhosis, but sequencing confirmed mutations in only 6 HCC and 1 liver cirrhosis. In addition, sequencing revealed 4 patients with mutations at codon 250 (250ser and 250leu) in HCC cases. The prevalence of TP53 mutation was 10/41 (24.3%) in HCC and 1/74 (1.4%) in liver cirrhosis. No relationship between the presence of mutations and the etiology of HCC was observed. TP53 exon 7 mutations, which are related to aflatoxins exposure, were found at 14.6% (249ser), 7.3% (250leu) and 2.4% (250ser) in 41 cases of HCC and 1.4% in 74 liver cirrhosis (without HCC) cases, suggesting a moderate dietary exposure to aflatoxins in the Espírito Santo State, Brazil.

  9. High Altitude and Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yalcin

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, situations associated with high altitude such as mountaineering, aviation increasingly draw the attention of people. Gas pressure decreases and hypoxia is encountered when climbing higher. Physiological and pathological responses of human body to different heights are different. Therefore, physiological and pathological changes that may occur together with height and to know the clinical outcomes of these are important . Acute mountain sickness caused by high altitude and high altitude cerebral edema are preventable diseases with appropriate precautions. Atmospheric oxygen decreasing with height, initiates many adaptive mechanisms. These adaptation mechanisms and acclimatization vary widely among individuals because of reasons such as environmental factors, exercise and cold. High altitude causes different changes in the cardiovascular system with various mechanisms. Although normal individuals easily adapt to these changes, this situation can lead to undesirable results in people with heart disease. For this reason, it should be known the effective evaluation of the people with known heart disease before traveling to high altitude and the complications due to the changes with height and the recommendations can be made to these patients. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(2.000: 211-222

  10. Aging, High Altitude, and Blood Pressure: A Complex Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parati, Gianfranco; Ochoa, Juan Eugenio; Torlasco, Camilla; Salvi, Paolo; Lombardi, Carolina; Bilo, Grzegorz

    2015-06-01

    Parati, Gianfranco, Juan Eugenio Ochoa, Camilla Torlasco, Paolo Salvi, Carolina Lombardi, and Grzegorz Bilo. Aging, high altitude, and blood pressure: A complex relationship. High Alt Biol Med 16:97-109, 2015.--Both aging and high altitude exposure may induce important changes in BP regulation, leading to significant increases in BP levels. By inducing atherosclerotic changes, stiffening of large arteries, renal dysfunction, and arterial baroreflex impairment, advancing age may induce progressive increases in systolic BP levels, promoting development and progression of arterial hypertension. It is also known, although mainly from studies in young or middle-aged subjects, that exposure to high altitude may influence different mechanisms involved in BP regulation (i.e., neural central and reflex control of sympathetic activity), leading to important increases in BP levels. The evidence is less clear, however, on whether and to what extent advancing age may influence the BP response to acute or chronic high altitude exposure. This is a question not only of scientific interest but also of practical relevance given the consistent number of elderly individuals who are exposed for short time periods (either for leisure or work) or live permanently at high altitude, in whom arterial hypertension is frequently observed. This article will review the evidence available on the relationship between aging and blood pressure levels at high altitude, the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this complex association, as well as some questions of practical interest regarding antihypertensive treatment in elderly subjects, and the effects of antihypertensive drugs on blood pressure response during high altitude exposure.

  11. Can High Altitude Influence Cytokines and Sleep?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdir de Aquino Lemos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of persons who relocate to regions of high altitude for work, pleasure, sport, or residence increases every year. It is known that the reduced supply of oxygen (O2 induced by acute or chronic increases in altitude stimulates the body to adapt to new metabolic challenges imposed by hypoxia. Sleep can suffer partial fragmentation because of the exposure to high altitudes, and these changes have been described as one of the responsible factors for the many consequences at high altitudes. We conducted a review of the literature during the period from 1987 to 2012. This work explored the relationships among inflammation, hypoxia and sleep in the period of adaptation and examined a novel mechanism that might explain the harmful effects of altitude on sleep, involving increased Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β, Interleukin-6 (IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α production from several tissues and cells, such as leukocytes and cells from skeletal muscle and brain.

  12. Can High Altitude Influence Cytokines and Sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Aquino Lemos, Valdir; dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomatieli; Lira, Fabio Santos; Rodrigues, Bruno; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2013-01-01

    The number of persons who relocate to regions of high altitude for work, pleasure, sport, or residence increases every year. It is known that the reduced supply of oxygen (O2) induced by acute or chronic increases in altitude stimulates the body to adapt to new metabolic challenges imposed by hypoxia. Sleep can suffer partial fragmentation because of the exposure to high altitudes, and these changes have been described as one of the responsible factors for the many consequences at high altitudes. We conducted a review of the literature during the period from 1987 to 2012. This work explored the relationships among inflammation, hypoxia and sleep in the period of adaptation and examined a novel mechanism that might explain the harmful effects of altitude on sleep, involving increased Interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), Interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) production from several tissues and cells, such as leukocytes and cells from skeletal muscle and brain. PMID:23690660

  13. Low altitude remote sensing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pérez Calero, D.; Peyaud, A.; Van der Wal, D.; van 't Hof, J.; Hakkesteegt, H.; Vink, R.; Bovenkamp, E.G.P.; van Antwerpen, G.; Meynart, R.; Neeck, S.P.; Shimoda, H.; Habib, S.

    2008-01-01

    In 2007 TNO started to fly some sensors on an unmanned helicopter platform. These sensors included RGB, B/W and thermal infrared cameras. In 2008 a spectrometer was added. The goal for 2010 is to be able to offer a low altitude flying platform including several sensors. Development of these sensors

  14. Breathing and sleep at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, Philip N; Lucas, Samuel J E; Burgess, Keith R

    2013-09-15

    We provide an updated review on the current understanding of breathing and sleep at high altitude in humans. We conclude that: (1) progressive changes in pH initiated by the respiratory alkalosis do not underlie early (48 h), complex cellular and neurochemical re-organization occurs both in the peripheral chemoreceptors as well as within the central nervous system. The latter is likely influenced by central acid-base changes secondary to the extent of the initial respiratory responses to initial exposure to high altitude; (3) sleep at high altitude is disturbed by various factors, but principally by periodic breathing; (4) the extent of periodic breathing during sleep at altitude intensifies with duration and severity of exposure; (5) complex interactions between hypoxic-induced enhancement in peripheral and central chemoreflexes and cerebral blood flow--leading to higher loop gain and breathing instability--underpin this development of periodic breathing during sleep; (6) because periodic breathing may elevate rather than reduce mean SaO2 during sleep, this may represent an adaptive rather than maladaptive response; (7) although oral acetazolamide is an effective means to reduce periodic breathing by 50-80%, recent studies using positive airway pressure devices to increase dead space, hyponotics and theophylline are emerging but appear less practical and effective compared to acetazolamide. Finally, we suggest avenues for future research, and discuss implications for understanding sleep pathology.

  15. Impact of Altitude on Power Output during Cycling Stage Racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Clark, Bradley; Martin, David T; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; McDonald, Warren; Stephens, Brian; Ma, Fuhai; Thompson, Kevin G; Gore, Christopher J; Menaspà, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of moderate-high altitude on power output, cadence, speed and heart rate during a multi-day cycling tour. Power output, heart rate, speed and cadence were collected from elite male road cyclists during maximal efforts of 5, 15, 30, 60, 240 and 600 s. The efforts were completed in a laboratory power-profile assessment, and spontaneously during a cycling race simulation near sea-level and an international cycling race at moderate-high altitude. Matched data from the laboratory power-profile and the highest maximal mean power output (MMP) and corresponding speed and heart rate recorded during the cycling race simulation and cycling race at moderate-high altitude were compared using paired t-tests. Additionally, all MMP and corresponding speeds and heart rates were binned per 1000 m (3000 m) according to the average altitude of each ride. Mixed linear modelling was used to compare cycling performance data from each altitude bin. Power output was similar between the laboratory power-profile and the race simulation, however MMPs for 5-600 s and 15, 60, 240 and 600 s were lower (p ≤ 0.005) during the race at altitude compared with the laboratory power-profile and race simulation, respectively. Furthermore, peak power output and all MMPs were lower (≥ 11.7%, p ≤ 0.001) while racing >3000 m compared with rides completed near sea-level. However, speed associated with MMP 60 and 240 s was greater (p sea-level. A reduction in oxygen availability as altitude increases leads to attenuation of cycling power output during competition. Decrement in cycling power output at altitude does not seem to affect speed which tended to be greater at higher altitudes.

  16. Exercise and Training at Altitudes: Physiological Effects and Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Cecilia Vargas Pinilla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An increase in altitude leads to a proportional fall in the barometric pressure, and a decrease in atmospheric oxygen pressure, producing hypobaric hypoxia that affects, in different degrees, all body organs, systems and functions. The chronically reduced partial pressure of oxygen causes that individuals adapt and adjust to physiological stress. These adaptations are modulated by many factors, including the degree of hypoxia related to altitude, time of exposure, exercise intensity and individual conditions. It has been established that exposure to high altitude is an environmental stressor that elicits a response that contributes to many adjustments and adaptations that influence exercise capacity and endurance performance. These adaptations include in crease in hemoglobin concentration, ventilation, capillary density and tissue myoglobin concentration. However, a negative effect in strength and power is related to a decrease in muscle fiber size and body mass due to the decrease in the training intensity. Many researches aim at establishing how training or living at high altitudes affects performance in athletes. Training methods, such as living in high altitudes training low, and training high-living in low altitudes have been used to research the changes in the physical condition in athletes and how the physiological adaptations to hypoxia can enhanceperformance at sea level. This review analyzes the literature related to altitude training focused on how physiological adaptations to hypoxic environments influence performance, and which protocols are most frequently used to train in high altitudes.

  17. Ear - blocked at high altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    High altitudes and blocked ears; Flying and blocked ears; Eustachian tube dysfunction - high altitude ... eustachian tube is a connection between the middle ear (the space deep to the eardrum) and the ...

  18. Coronary calcium score in 12-year breast cancer survivors after adjuvant radiotherapy with low to moderate heart exposure - Relationship to cardiac radiation dose and cardiovascular risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjessem, Kristin Holm; Bosse, Gerhard; Fosså, Kristian; Reinertsen, Kristin V; Fosså, Sophie D; Johansen, Safora; Fosså, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    We explored the relation between coronary artery calcium (CAC) and cardiac radiation doses in breast cancer survivors (BCS) treated with radiotherapy (RT). Additionally, we examined the impact of other risk factors and biomarkers of coronary artery disease (CAD). 236 BCS (median age 51years [range 30-70], median observation time 12years [9.2-15.7]), treated with 4-field RT of 50GY, were included and examined in 2004 (T1), 2007 (T2) and 2011 (T3) with clinical examination, blood tests and questionnaires. At T3, cardiac computed tomography was performed with quantification of CAC using Agatston score (AS). For 106 patients cardiac dose volume histograms were available. The cohort-based median of the mean cardiac dose was 2.5 (range 0.5-7.0) Gy. There was no correlation between measures of cardiac dose and AS. AS was correlated with high cholesterol at T1/T2 (p=0.022), high proBNP at T1/T2 (p<0.022) and T3 (p<0.022) and high HbA1c at T3 (p=0.022). In addition, a high AS was significantly associated with hypertension (p=0.022). Age (p<0.001) and cholesterol at T1/T2 (p=0.001) retained significant associations in multivariate analysis. Traditional, modifiable risk factors of CAD correlate with CAC and may be important for the long term risk of CAD after RT. With low to moderate cardiac radiation exposure, a contribution of radiation dose to CAC could not be demonstrated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons aboard an ER-2 high-altitude airplane

    CERN Document Server

    Goldhagen, P E; Kniss, T; Reginatto, M; Singleterry, R C; Van Steveninck, W; Wilson, J W

    2002-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (t...

  20. [Studies on markers of exposure and early effect in areas with arsenic pollution: methods and results of the project SEpiAs. Epidemiological studies on population exposed to low-to-moderate arsenic concentration in drinking water].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustaffa, Elisa; Bianchi, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic and its inorganic compounds are classified as human carcinogens. Several epidemiological studies conducted in areas of the world characterized by high arsenic concentration in drinking water, even up to 3,000 μg/l, report associations between arsenic exposure and skin, bladder, lung, liver and kidney cancer as well as cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and reproductive and developmental effects. Since general population is not exposed to these high arsenic concentrations in the last years attention focused on adverse health effects that low-to-moderate arsenic concentrations (0-150 μg/l) in drinking water could induce. The World Health Organization recommends a maximum limit of 10 μg/l for arsenic in drinking water. Almost all epidemiological studies conducted on populations exposed to low-to-moderate arsenic concentrations in drinking water are limited due to problems arising from both individual exposure assessment and low subjects number. The aim of the present review is to collect literature-based evidences regarding adverse health effects associated with exposure to low-to-moderate arsenic concentrations in drinking water (10-150 μg/l) in order to obtain a comprehensive picture of the health outcomes that such exposure can have on general population.

  1. RaD-X: Complementary measurements of dose rates at aviation altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Matthias M.; Matthiä, Daniel; Forkert, Tomas; Wirtz, Michael; Scheibinger, Markus; Hübel, Robert; Mertens, Christopher J.

    2016-09-01

    The RaD-X stratospheric balloon flight organized by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration was launched from Fort Sumner on 25 September 2015 and carried several instruments to measure the radiation field in the upper atmosphere at the average vertical cutoff rigidity Rc of 4.1 GV. The German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) in cooperation with Lufthansa German Airlines supported this campaign with an independent measuring flight at the altitudes of civil aviation on a round trip from Germany to Japan. The goal was to measure dose rates under similar space weather conditions over an area on the Northern Hemisphere opposite to the RaD-X flight. Dose rates were measured in the target areas, i.e., around vertical cutoff rigidity Rc of 4.1 GV, at two flight altitudes for about 1 h at each position with acceptable counting statistics. The analysis of the space weather situation during the flights shows that measuring data were acquired under stable and moderate space weather conditions with a virtually undisturbed magnetosphere. The measured rates of absorbed dose in silicon and ambient dose equivalent complement the data recorded during the balloon flight. The combined measurements provide a set of experimental data suitable for validating and improving numerical models for the calculation of radiation exposure at aviation altitudes.

  2. The Effect on Moderate Altitude UPON Human Gastric Emptying Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-03-01

    physiological aliment . The emptying time, therefore, of a mixture of barium and food may perhaps differ somewhat from that of food alone. Determination of the... psychological stresses a vigorous program of preven- tive psychology had been undertaken as described above. The day prior to his first run each subject was

  3. Brain Food at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Scenic view at high altitude is a pleasure to the eyes, but it has some shortcoming effects as well. High altitude can be divided into different categories, i.e., high altitude (3000-5000 ft), very high altitude (5000-8000 ft), and extreme altitude (above 8000 ft). Much of the population resides at high altitude, and others go there for tourism. Military personnel are also posted there to defend boundaries. As we ascent to high altitude, partial pressure of oxygen reduces, whereas concentration remains the same; this reduces the availability of oxygen to different body parts. This pathophysiological condition is known as hypobaric hypoxia (HH) which leads to oxidative stress and further causes cognitive dysfunction in some cases. Hypoxia causes neurodegeneration in different brain regions; however, the hippocampus is found to be more prone in comparison to other brain regions. As the hippocampus is affected most, therefore, spatial memory is impaired most during such condition. This chapter will give a brief review of the damaging effect of high altitude on cognition and also throw light on possible herbal interventions at high altitude, which can improve cognitive performance as well as provide protection against the deteriorating effect of hypobaric hypoxia at high altitude.

  4. The Impact of Moderate-Altitude Staging on Pulmonary Arterial Hemodynamics after Ascent to High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    pressure ( Pao2 ) and arterial oxygenation saturation (Sao2) were measured at each time point. Compared to mean PAP at SL (mean SD, 14 3 mmHg), mean PAP...increased after DA to 37 8 mmHg (D¼ 24 10 mmHg, p< 0.001) and was negatively correlated with both Pao2 (r 2¼ 0.57, p¼ 0.011) and Sao2 (r2¼ 0.64, p...subcostal view. Assessment of oxygenation The primary indexes of oxygenation in this study were alveolar oxygen pressure ( Pao2 ) and arterial oxygen

  5. Nutritional Strategies for the Preservation of Fat Free Mass at High Altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacie L. Wing-Gaia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to extreme altitude presents many physiological challenges. In addition to impaired physical and cognitive function, energy imbalance invariably occurs resulting in weight loss and body composition changes. Weight loss, and in particular, loss of fat free mass, combined with the inherent risks associated with extreme environments presents potential performance, safety, and health risks for those working, recreating, or conducting military operations at extreme altitude. In this review, contributors to muscle wasting at altitude are highlighted with special emphasis on protein turnover. The article will conclude with nutritional strategies that may potentially attenuate loss of fat free mass during high altitude exposure.

  6. Ascent schedules, acute altitude illness, and altitude acclimatization: Observations on the Yushu Earthquake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Tianyi; Hou Shike; Li Shuzhi; Li Wenxiang; Gen Deng

    2013-01-01

    During the Yushu Earthquake on April 14,2010,a large number of rescuers from sea level or lowlands ascended to the quake areas very rapidly or rapidly less than 24 h.However,Yushu Earthquake is the highest quake in the world at altitudes between 3750 m and 4878 m where is a serious hypoxic environment.A high incidence of acute altitude illness was found in the unacclimatized rescuers; the mountain rescue operation changed as "rescue the rescuers".Lesson from the Yushu Earthquake is that the occurrence of acute altitude illness may be closely related to the ascent schedules.This prompted us to study the relationship between ascent rate and the incidence and severity of acute altitude illness; five different groups were compared.The first group was 42 sea level male young soldiers who ascended to quake area very rapidly within 8 h at 4000 m; the second group was 48 sea level male young soldiers who ascended to 4000 m rapidly less than 18 h; the third group was 66 acclimatized medical workers from 2261 m who ascended to 4000 m rapidly within 12 h; the fourth group was 56 Tibetan medical workers from 2800 m who ascended to 4000 m rapidly within 8 h; the fifth group was 50 male sea level workers who ascended to 4000 m gradually over a period of 4 d.The results showed that the sea level rescuers ascended to 4000 m very rapidly or rapidly had the highest incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS) with the greatest AMS scores and the lowest arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) ; the sea level workers ascended to 4000 m gradually had moderate incidence of AMS with moderate AMS scores and SaO2 values; whereas the acclimatized and adapted rescuers had the lowest incidence of AMS,lowest AMS scores and higher SaO2; especially none AMS occurred in Tibetan rescuers.AMS score is inversely related to the ascent rate (r=-0.24,p<0.001).Additionally,acute altitude illness is significantly influenced by altitude acclimatization.The ascent rate is inversely related to

  7. Travel to High Altitude Following Solid Organ Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luks, Andrew M

    2016-09-01

    Luks, Andrew M. Clinician's corner: travel to high altitude following solid organ transplantation. High Alt Med Biol. 17:147-156, 2016.-As they regain active lifestyles following successful organ transplantation, transplant recipients may travel to high altitude for a variety of activities, including skiing, climbing, and trekking. This review is intended to provide information for medical providers who may encounter transplant patients seeking advice before planned high altitude travel or care for medical issues that develop during the actual sojourn. There is currently limited information in the literature about outcomes during high-altitude travel following solid organ transplantation, but the available evidence suggests that the physiologic responses to hypobaric hypoxia are comparable to those seen in nontransplanted individuals and well-selected transplant recipients with no evidence of organ rejection can tolerate ascents as high as 6200 m. All transplant recipients planning high-altitude travel should undergo pretravel assessment and counseling with an emphasis on the recognition, prevention, and treatment of altitude illness, as well as the importance of preventing infection and limiting sun exposure. Transplant recipients can use the standard medications for altitude illness prophylaxis and treatment, but the choice and dose of medication should take into account the patient's preexisting medication regimen and current renal function. With careful attention to these and other details, the healthy transplant recipient can safely experience the rewards of traveling in the mountains.

  8. Cardiovascular physiology at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, T; Mellor, A

    2011-03-01

    The role of the cardiovascular system is to deliver oxygenated blood to the tissues and remove metabolic effluent. It is clear that this complex system will have to adapt to maintain oxygen deliver in the profound hypoxia of high altitude. The literature on the adaptation of both the systemic and pulmonary circulations to high altitude is reviewed.

  9. Regression of altitude-produced cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, D. A.; Mcintyre, T. W.; Van Liere, E. J.; Wilson , M. F.

    1973-01-01

    The rate of regression of cardiac hypertrophy with time has been determined in adult male albino rats. The hypertrophy was induced by intermittent exposure to simulated high altitude. The percentage hypertrophy was much greater (46%) in the right ventricle than in the left (16%). The regression could be adequately fitted to a single exponential function with a half-time of 6.73 plus or minus 0.71 days (90% CI). There was no significant difference in the rates of regression for the two ventricles.

  10. Regression of altitude-produced cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizemore, D. A.; Mcintyre, T. W.; Van Liere, E. J.; Wilson , M. F.

    1973-01-01

    The rate of regression of cardiac hypertrophy with time has been determined in adult male albino rats. The hypertrophy was induced by intermittent exposure to simulated high altitude. The percentage hypertrophy was much greater (46%) in the right ventricle than in the left (16%). The regression could be adequately fitted to a single exponential function with a half-time of 6.73 plus or minus 0.71 days (90% CI). There was no significant difference in the rates of regression for the two ventricles.

  11. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons aboard an ER-2 high-altitude airplane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhagen, P; Reginatto, M; Kniss, T; Wilson, J W; Singleterry, R C; Jones, I W; Van Steveninck, W

    2002-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to >10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron effective dose and dose equivalent rates and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cutoff. The measured cosmic-ray neutron spectra have almost no thermal neutrons, a large "evaporation" peak near 1 MeV and a second broad peak near 100 MeV which contributes about 69% of the neutron effective dose. At high altitude, geomagnetic latitude has very little effect on the shape of the spectrum, but it is the dominant variable affecting neutron fluence rate, which was eight times higher at the northernmost measurement location than it was at the southernmost. The shape of the spectrum varied only slightly with altitude from 21 km down to 12 km (56-201 g cm-2 atmospheric depth), but was significantly different on the ground. In all cases, ambient dose equivalent was greater than effective dose for cosmic-ray neutrons.

  12. Oral exposure to the anti-pyridoxine compound 1-amino D-proline further perturbs homocysteine metabolism through the transsulfuration pathway in moderately vitamin B₆ deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayengbam, Shyamchand; Raposo, Sara; Aliani, Michel; House, James D

    2015-03-01

    Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP; a B₆ vitamer) serves as an important cofactor in a myriad of metabolic reactions, including the transsulfuration (TS) pathway, which converts homocysteine (Hcy) to cysteine. While overt vitamin B₆ deficiency is rare, moderate deficiency is common and may be exacerbated by anti-pyridoxine factors in the food supply. To this end, we developed a model of moderate B₆ deficiency and a study was conducted to examine the in vivo effect of 1-amino D-proline (1ADP), an anti-pyridoxine factor found in flaxseed, on indices of Hcy metabolism through the TS pathway in moderately B₆ deficient rats. Male weaning rats received a semi-purified diet containing either 7 mg/kg (control; CD) or 0.7 mg/kg (moderately deficient; MD) diet of pyridoxine·hydrochloride (PN∙HCl), each with 1 of 4 levels of 1ADP, viz. 0, 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/kg diet for 5 weeks. Perturbations in vitamin B₆ biomarkers were more pronounced in the MD group. Plasma PLP was significantly reduced, while plasma Hcy (8-fold) and cystathionine (11-fold) were increased in rats consuming the highest amount of 1ADP in the MD group. The activities of hepatic cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase enzymes were significantly reduced in rats consuming the highest 1ADP compared to the lowest, for both levels of PN∙HCl. Dilation of hepatic central veins and sinusoids, mild steatosis and increased liver triglycerides were present in MD rats consuming the highest 1ADP level. The current data provide evidence that the consumption of an anti-pyridoxine factor linked to flaxseed may pose a risk for subjects who are moderate/severe vitamin B₆ deficient.

  13. Not so close but still extremely loud: recollection of the World Trade Center terror attack and previous hurricanes moderates the association between exposure to hurricane Sandy and posttraumatic stress symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palgi, Yuval; Shrira, Amit; Hamama-Raz, Yaira; Palgi, Sharon; Goodwin, Robin; Ben-Ezra, Menachem

    2014-05-01

    The present study examined whether recollections of the World Trade Center (WTC) terror attack and previous hurricanes moderated the relationship between exposure to Hurricane Sandy and related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. An online sample of 1000 participants from affected areas completed self-report questionnaires a month after Hurricane Sandy hit the East Coast of the United States. Participants reported their exposure to Hurricane Sandy, their PTSD symptoms, and recollections of the WTC terror attack and previous hurricanes elicited due to Hurricane Sandy. Exposure to Hurricane Sandy was related to PTSD symptoms among those with high level of recollections of the WTC terror attack and past hurricanes, but not among those with low level of recollections. The aftermath of exposure to Hurricane Sandy is related not only to exposure, but also to its interaction with recollections of past traumas. These findings have theoretical and practical implications for practitioners and health policy makers in evaluating and interpreting the impact of past memories on future natural disasters. This may help in intervention plans of social and psychological services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Enhancing team-sport athlete performance: is altitude training relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billaut, François; Gore, Christopher J; Aughey, Robert J

    2012-09-01

    Field-based team sport matches are composed of short, high-intensity efforts, interspersed with intervals of rest or submaximal exercise, repeated over a period of 60-120 minutes. Matches may also be played at moderate altitude where the lower oxygen partial pressure exerts a detrimental effect on performance. To enhance run-based performance, team-sport athletes use varied training strategies focusing on different aspects of team-sport physiology, including aerobic, sprint, repeated-sprint and resistance training. Interestingly, 'altitude' training (i.e. living and/or training in O(2)-reduced environments) has only been empirically employed by athletes and coaches to improve the basic characteristics of speed and endurance necessary to excel in team sports. Hypoxia, as an additional stimulus to training, is typically used by endurance athletes to enhance performance at sea level and to prepare for competition at altitude. Several approaches have evolved in the last few decades, which are known to enhance aerobic power and, thus, endurance performance. Altitude training can also promote an increased anaerobic fitness, and may enhance sprint capacity. Therefore, altitude training may confer potentially-beneficial adaptations to team-sport athletes, which have been overlooked in contemporary sport physiology research. Here, we review the current knowledge on the established benefits of altitude training on physiological systems relevant to team-sport performance, and conclude that current evidence supports implementation of altitude training modalities to enhance match physical performances at both sea level and altitude. We hope that this will guide the practice of many athletes and stimulate future research to better refine training programmes.

  15. The sleep of elite athletes at sea level and high altitude: a comparison of sea-level natives and high-altitude natives (ISA3600)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Gregory D; Schmidt, Walter F; Aughey, Robert J; Bourdon, Pitre C; Soria, Rudy; Claros, Jesus C Jimenez; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Buchheit, Martin; Simpson, Ben M; Hammond, Kristal; Kley, Marlen; Wachsmuth, Nadine; Gore, Christopher J; Sargent, Charli

    2013-01-01

    Background Altitude exposure causes acute sleep disruption in non-athletes, but little is known about its effects in elite athletes. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of altitude on two groups of elite athletes, that is, sea-level natives and high-altitude natives. Methods Sea-level natives were members of the Australian under-17 soccer team (n=14). High-altitude natives were members of a Bolivian under-20 club team (n=12). Teams participated in an 18-day (19 nights) training camp in Bolivia, with 6 nights at near sea level in Santa Cruz (430 m) and 13 nights at high altitude in La Paz (3600 m). Sleep was assessed on every day/night using activity monitors. Results The Australians’ sleep was shorter, and of poorer quality, on the first night at altitude compared with sea level. Sleep quality returned to normal by the end of the first week at altitude, but sleep quantity had still not stabilised at its normal level after 2 weeks. The quantity and quality of sleep obtained by the Bolivians was similar, or greater, on all nights at altitude compared with sea level. The Australians tended to obtain more sleep than the Bolivians at sea level and altitude, but the quality of the Bolivians’ sleep tended to be better than that of the Australians at altitude. Conclusions Exposure to high altitude causes acute and chronic disruption to the sleep of elite athletes who are sea-level natives, but it does not affect the sleep of elite athletes who are high-altitude natives. PMID:24282197

  16. Altitude transitions in energy climbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, A. R.; Cliff, E. M.; Kelley, H. J.

    1982-01-01

    The aircraft energy-climb trajectory for configurations with a sharp transonic drag rise is well known to possess two branches in the altitude/Mach-number plane. Transition in altitude between the two branches occurs instantaneously, a 'corner' in the minimum-time solution obtained with the energy-state model. If the initial and final values of altitude do not lie on the energy-climb trajectory, then additional jumps (crude approximations to dives and zooms) are required at the initial and terminal points. With a singular-perturbation approach, a 'boundary-layer' correction is obtained for each altitude jump, the transonic jump being a so-called 'internal' boundary layer, different in character from the initial and terminal layers. The determination of this internal boundary layer is examined and some computational results for an example presented.

  17. Venus Altitude Cycling Balloon Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ISTAR Group ( IG) and team mate Thin Red Line Aerospace (TRLA) propose a Venus altitude cycling balloon (Venus ACB), an innovative superpressure balloon...

  18. A3 Altitude Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulreix, Lionel J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation shows drawings, diagrams and photographs of the A3 Altitude Test Facility. It includes a review of the A3 Facility requirements, and drawings of the various sections of the facility including Engine Deck and Superstructure, Test Cell and Thrust Takeout, Structure and Altitude Support Systems, Chemical Steam generators, and the subscale diffuser. There are also pictures of the construction site, and the facility under construction. A Diagram of the A3 Steam system schematic is also shown

  19. Nutrient digestibility and growth in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) are impaired by short term exposure to moderate supersaturation in total gas pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Peter Vilhelm; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2013-01-01

    moderate TGP supersaturation negatively affect aquaculture production by a dual effect on energy uptake and energy expenditure, possibly caused by a general stress response to dissolved gases. Continuing the experiment over 25days eliminated any significant differences on production variables, suggesting......Excess levels of dissolved nitrogen gas (N2) may occur in recirculating aquaculture systems, as a result of aeration efforts, localized occurrences of denitrification, or from insufficient degassing of makeup water. If levels of dissolved N2 are sufficiently high, or if oxygen (O2) is also...

  20. Antioxidant and oxidative stress responses of sojourners at high altitude in different climatic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sanchari; Singh, Som Nath; Saha, Mantu; Kain, T. C.; Tyagi, A. K.; Ray, Uday Sankar

    2010-01-01

    High altitude (HA) is a multi-stressor environment comprising hypobaric hypoxia and cold. Climatic temperature varies with seasonal variation at HA. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of ambient temperature on antioxidant profile among sojourners at HA. The study was conducted on sojourners exposed to an altitude of 4,560 m in two different seasons and categorized into two groups (SOJ 1, n = 63, ambient temp. at HA: -6º to +10ºC; SOJ 2, n = 81, ambient temp. at HA: 3º-22ºC). Blood was collected at sea level (SL) and after 4 weeks of HA exposure. Antioxidant enzymes showed significant upregulation in SOJ 2 at HA. In SOJ 1, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase showed significant upregulation but catalase and glutathione reductase showed significant decrease at HA. Non-enzymatic antioxidants showed significant reduction in SOJ 1 whereas a sustained antioxidant profile was observed in SOJ 2 at HA. Oxidative stress markers showed higher levels in SOJ 1 than SOJ 2 at HA. Differences observed between SOJ 1 and SOJ 2 at HA may be the consequence of different environmental temperatures. Cold stress was higher in SOJ 1 as evidenced from the significantly lower oral temperature in SOJ 1 as compared to SOJ 2. Cold- and hypoxia-induced increase in energy expenditure was significantly high in SOJ 1 than SOJ 2. To conclude, chronic exposure to hypoxia in moderate climatic temperature has a potential preconditioning effect on antioxidant system, but exposure to both cold and hypoxia causes greater oxidative stress due to altered metabolic rate.

  1. Antioxidant and oxidative stress responses of sojourners at high altitude in different climatic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sanchari; Singh, Som Nath; Saha, Mantu; Kain, T C; Tyagi, A K

    2010-01-01

    High altitude (HA) is a multi-stressor environment comprising hypobaric hypoxia and cold. Climatic temperature varies with seasonal variation at HA. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of ambient temperature on antioxidant profile among sojourners at HA. The study was conducted on sojourners exposed to an altitude of 4,560 m in two different seasons and categorized into two groups (SOJ 1, n=63, ambient temp. at HA: -6 degree to +10degreeC; SOJ 2, n=81, ambient temp. at HA: 3degree-22degreeC). Blood was collected at sea level (SL) and after 4 weeks of HA exposure. Antioxidant enzymes showed significant upregulation in SOJ 2 at HA. In SOJ 1, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase showed significant upregulation but catalase and glutathione reductase showed significant decrease at HA. Non-enzymatic antioxidants showed significant reduction in SOJ 1 whereas a sustained antioxidant profile was observed in SOJ 2 at HA. Oxidative stress markers showed higher levels in SOJ 1 than SOJ 2 at HA. Differences observed between SOJ 1 and SOJ 2 at HA may be the consequence of different environmental temperatures. Cold stress was higher in SOJ 1 as evidenced from the significantly lower oral temperature in SOJ 1 as compared to SOJ 2. Cold- and hypoxia-induced increase in energy expenditure was significantly high in SOJ 1 than SOJ 2. To conclude, chronic exposure to hypoxia in moderate climatic temperature has a potential preconditioning effect on antioxidant system, but exposure to both cold and hypoxia causes greater oxidative stress due to altered metabolic rate.

  2. Early caregiving stress exposure moderates the relation between respiratory sinus arrhythmia reactivity at 1 month and biobehavioral outcomes at age 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradt, Elisabeth; Beauchaine, Theodore; Abar, Beau; Lagasse, Linda; Shankaran, Seetha; Bada, Henrietta; Bauer, Charles; Whitaker, Toni; Hammond, Jane; Lester, Barry

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing scientific interest in the psychophysiological functioning of children living in low-socioeconomic status (SES) contexts, though this research is complicated by knowledge that physiology-behavior relations often operate differently in these environments among adults. Importantly, such research is made more difficult because SES may be a proxy for a wide range of risk factors including poor caregiving and exposure to parental substance use. We used factor analysis to organize risk-exposure data collected from 827 children-many of whom were raised in low-SES contexts and exposed to substances prenatally-into dissociable components including economic stress, caregiving stress (e.g., stress the caregiver may experience, including parental psychopathology), and postnatal substance exposure. These factors, along with respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) reactivity at age 1 month, were used to predict behavior dysregulation and resting RSA at age 3 years. A significant RSA Reactivity × Caregiving Stress interaction indicated that infants who exhibited high RSA reactivity at 1 month experienced the greatest behavior dysregulation at 3 years, but only when they were exposed to high levels of caregiving stress. Among African Americans, the highest resting RSA at 3 years was found in infants with less RSA reactivity, but only if they also experienced less caregiving stress. Our work is consistent with biological sensitivity to context, adaptive calibration, and allostatic load models, and highlights the importance of studying Physiology × Environment interactions in low-SES contexts for predicting behavior and resting RSA.

  3. Moderate Bravery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majgaard, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The ability to act in a purposeful and effective way amid institutional tensions and paradoxes is, right now, a highly prized quality in public leadership. The purpose of this chapter is to qualify moderately brave acts as a learning format that combines the analytical and performative...... skills implied in this kind of agency. Design/methodology/approach: The chapter explores the engagement with paradoxes as a narrative praxis. From existing literature, it sums up an understanding of agency as a social process of mediating paradoxes in order to make action possible. Drawing on Northrop...

  4. Application of altitude control techniques for low altitude earth satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, K. G.; Herder, R. W.; Glass, A. B.; Cooley, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The applications sensors of many low altitude earth satellites designed for recording surface or atmospheric data require near zero orbital eccentricities for maximum usefulness. Coverage patterns and altitude profiles require specified values of orbit semimajor axis. Certain initial combinations of semimajor axis, eccentricity, and argument of perigee can produce a so called 'frozen orbit' and minimum altitude variation which enhances sensor coverage. This paper develops information on frozen orbits and minimum altitude variation for all inclinations, generalizing previous results. In the altitude regions where most of these satellites function (between 200 and 1000 kilometers) strong atmospheric drag effects influence the evolution of the initial orbits. Active orbital maneuver control techniques to correct evolution of orbit parameters while minimizing the frequency of maneuvers are presented. The paper presents the application of theoretical techniques for control of near frozen orbits and expands upon the methods useful for simultaneously targeting several inplane orbital parameters. The applications of these techniques are illustrated by performance results from the Atmosphere Explorer (AE-3 and -5) missions and in preflight maneuver analysis and plans for the Seasat Oceanographic Satellite.

  5. Missing correlation of retinal vessel diameter with high-altitude headache

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Gabriel; Fischer, M Dominik; Schommer, Kai; Bärtsch, Peter; Gekeler, Florian; Schatz, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The most common altitude-related symptom, high-altitude headache (HAH), has recently been suggested to originate from restricted cerebral venous drainage in the presence of increased inflow caused by hypoxia. In support of this novel hypothesis, retinal venous distension was shown to correlate with the degree of HAH. We quantified for the first time retinal vessel diameter changes at 4559 m using infrared fundus images obtained from a state of the art Spectralis™ HRA+OCT with a semiautomatic VesselMap 1® software. High-altitude exposure resulted in altered arterial and venous diameter changes at high altitude, however, independent of headache burden. PMID:25356382

  6. Cognitive Changes during Prolonged Stay at High Altitude and Its Correlation with C-Reactive Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Li Hu

    Full Text Available Hypersensitive C-reaction protein (hsCRP may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer's disease (AD, stroke, and vascular dementia. This study explored the correlation of peripheral blood hsCRP level with cognitive decline due to high altitude exposure. The study was conducted on 100 male military participants who had never been to high altitude. Cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring, event related potentials (P300, N200 detection, and neurocognitive assessment was performed and total hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and homocysteine was estimated at 500 m altitude, 3650 m altitude, 3 day, 1, and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m, and 1 month after coming back to the 500 m altitude. High altitude increased brain oxygen saturation, prolonged P300 and N200 latencies, injured cognitive functions, and raised plasma hsCRP levels. But they all recovered in varying degrees at 1 and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400 m. P300 latencies and hsCRP levels were strongly correlated to cognitive performances. These results suggested that cognitive deterioration occurred during the acute period of exposure to high altitude and may recover probably owning to acclimatization after extended stay at high altitude. Plasma hsCRP is inversely correlated to neurological cognition and it may be a potential biomarker for the prediction of high altitude induced cognitive dysfunction.

  7. Cognitive Changes during Prolonged Stay at High Altitude and Its Correlation with C-Reactive Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Sheng Li; Xiong, Wei; Dai, Zhi Qiang; Zhao, Heng Li; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitive C-reaction protein (hsCRP) may be a risk factor for cognitive impairment resulting from Alzheimer’s disease (AD), stroke, and vascular dementia. This study explored the correlation of peripheral blood hsCRP level with cognitive decline due to high altitude exposure. The study was conducted on 100 male military participants who had never been to high altitude. Cerebral oxygen saturation monitoring, event related potentials (P300, N200) detection, and neurocognitive assessment was performed and total hsCRP, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and homocysteine was estimated at 500m altitude, 3650m altitude, 3day, 1, and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400m), and 1 month after coming back to the 500m altitude. High altitude increased brain oxygen saturation, prolonged P300 and N200 latencies, injured cognitive functions, and raised plasma hsCRP levels. But they all recovered in varying degrees at 1 and 3 month post arriving at the base camp (4400m). P300 latencies and hsCRP levels were strongly correlated to cognitive performances. These results suggested that cognitive deterioration occurred during the acute period of exposure to high altitude and may recover probably owning to acclimatization after extended stay at high altitude. Plasma hsCRP is inversely correlated to neurological cognition and it may be a potential biomarker for the prediction of high altitude induced cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26731740

  8. Change of plasma hormone levels at acute exposure to 4500 meters altitude and its significance%模拟急进4500米高原血浆去甲肾上腺素等激素水平变化及意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隆敏; 田开新; 喻杨; 于世勇; 覃军

    2011-01-01

    Objective To explore changes of plasma noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (ADR), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) levels, and plasma renin activity (PRA) at acute exposure to 4500m altitude and their significances. Methods A set of hypobaric chamber was applied to simulate 4500 m altitude. Venous blood samples of 43 healthy young males were obtained before and at 22 hours after acute exposure to simulate 4500 m altitude. High-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemical method was used to detect plasma NA and ADR concentrations, while plasma ANP concentration and PRA were detected by radioimmunoassay. Subjects whose scores were higher than 10 were allocated into acute mountain sickness (AMS) group, and those less than 10 into non-AMS Group. Results After acute exposure to high altitude, concentrations of plasma NA and PRA significantly decreased[NA: (3.7 ± 0.8) vs (2.9 ±0.5) μg/L; PRA: (2.9 ±1.8) vs (1.3 ±1.1) μg/(L·h); P<0.01], however plasma ADR, ANP concentrations significantly increased [ADR: (2.0 ± 0.6) vs (2.5 ± 0.5) μg/L, P < 0.01; ANP: (79 ± 31) vs (100 ± 42) μg/L, P < 0.05]. Plasma NA concentration was significantly higher in AMS group than in non-AMS group after exposure to 4500 m altitude[(3.1 ±0.4) vs (2.8 ±0.5) μg/L, P<0.05], although it was not different at plain. AMS score was positively correlated with plasma NA concentrations either at plain or at 4500 m altitude ( r = 0.435, 0.391, P < 0.05 ) . Conclusion Apparent nerve-endocrine changes occur at acute exposure to high altitude, and these changes may be related to AMS.%目的 探讨急进4500m高原血浆去甲肾上腺素(NA)、肾上腺素(ADR)、心钠素(ANP)浓度、肾素活性(PRA)变化及意义.方法采用低压氧舱模拟急进4500m高原,43名健康青年男性分别在进舱前和模拟高原22h后接受静脉采血.高效液相色谱-电化学法检测NA及ADR浓度,放射免疫方法检测ANP浓度及PRA.急性高原反应(AMS)评分大于10分受试者

  9. Asteroid airburst altitude vs. strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Darrel; Wheeler, Lorien; Mathias, Donovan

    2016-10-01

    Small NEO asteroids (<Ø140m) may not be a threat on a national or global level but can still cause a significant amount of local damage as demonstrated by the Chelyabinsk event where there was over $33 million worth of damage (1 billion roubles) and 1500 were injured, mostly due to broken glass. The ground damage from a small asteroid depends strongly on the altitude at which they "burst" where most of the energy is deposited in the atmosphere. The ability to accurately predict ground damage is useful in determining appropriate evacuation or shelter plans and emergency management.Strong asteroids, such as a monolithic boulder, fail and create peak energy deposition close to the altitude at which ram dynamic pressure exceeds the material cohesive strength. Weaker asteroids, such as a rubble pile, structurally fail at higher altitude, but it requires the increased aerodynamic pressure at lower altitude to disrupt and disperse the rubble. Consequently the resulting airbursts have a peak energy deposition at similar altitudes.In this study hydrocode simulations of the entry and break-up of small asteroids were performed to examine the effect of strength, size, composition, entry angle, and speed on the resulting airburst. This presentation will show movies of the simulations, the results of peak burst height, and the comparison to semi-analytical models.

  10. High altitude, a natural research laboratory for the study of cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherrer, Urs; Allemann, Yves; Jayet, Pierre-Yves; Rexhaj, Emrush; Sartori, Claudio

    2010-01-01

    High altitude constitutes an exciting natural laboratory for medical research. Although initially, the aim of high-altitude research was to understand the adaption of the organism to hypoxia and find treatments for altitude-related diseases, during the past decade or so, the scope of this research has broadened considerably. Two important observations led the foundation for the broadening of the scientific scope of high-altitude research. First, high-altitude pulmonary edema represents a unique model that allows studying fundamental mechanisms of pulmonary hypertension and lung edema in humans. Second, the ambient hypoxia associated with high-altitude exposure facilitates the detection of pulmonary and systemic vascular dysfunction at an early stage. Here, we will review studies that, by capitalizing on these observations, have led to the description of novel mechanisms underpinning lung edema and pulmonary hypertension and to the first direct demonstration of fetal programming of vascular dysfunction in humans.

  11. Hyperuricemia, hypertension, and proteinuria associated with high-altitude polycythemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, J Ashley; Escudero, Elizabeth; Hurtado, Maria-Elena; Kelly, Jackeline Pando; Swenson, Erik R; Wener, Mark H; Burnier, Michel; Maillard, Marc; Schreiner, George F; Schoene, Robert B; Hurtado, Abdias; Johnson, Richard J

    2002-06-01

    Chronic exposure to high altitude is associated with the development of erythrocytosis, proteinuria, and, in some cases, hyperuricemia. We examined the relationship between high-altitude polycythemia and proteinuria and hyperuricemia in Cerro de Pasco, Peru (altitude, 4,300 m). We studied 25 adult men with hematocrits less than 65% and 27 subjects with excessive erythrocytosis (EE; hematocrit > 65%) living in Cerro de Pasco, Peru and compared them with 28 control subjects living in Lima, Peru (at sea level) and after 48 hours of exposure to high altitude. Serum urate levels were significantly elevated in patients with EE at altitude, and gout occurred in 4 of 27 of these subjects. Urate level strongly correlated with hematocrit (r = 0.71; P < 0.0001). Urate production (24-hour urine urate excretion and urine urate-creatinine ratio) was increased in this group compared with those at sea level. Fractional urate excretion was not increased, and fractional lithium excretion was reduced, in keeping with increased proximal reabsorption of filtrate. Significantly higher blood pressures and decreased renin levels in the EE group were in keeping with increased proximal sodium reabsorption. Serum urate levels correlated with mean blood pressure (r = 0.50; P < 0.0001). Significant proteinuria was more prevalent in the EE group despite normal renal function. Hyperuricemia is common in subjects living at high altitude and associated with EE, hypertension, and proteinuria. The increase in uric acid levels appears to be caused by increased urate generation secondary to systemic hypoxia, although a relative impairment in renal excretion also may contribute.

  12. 影响急进4010m高原大鼠药代动力学参数的诸因素变化%Changes in factors affecting pharmacokinetics in Wistar rats after acute exposure to high altitude of 4010 meters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文斌; 王荣; 谢华; 谢希晖; 张娟红; 武晓玉; 贾正平

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe changes in factors affecting pharmacokinetics in rats after acute exposure to high altitude and their reacclimation to low altitude. Methods: Twenty-one male Wistar rats were randomly assigned into 3 groups: Group A (plain area, at Shanghai, 55 m above sea level), Group B (acute exposure to high altitude, Maqu, Gansu, 4010 m above sea level), and Group C (acute exposure to high altitude and then back to the plain area). Blood was collected from orbit to analyze the main biochemical indicators; blood was collected from the abdominal aorta for blood gas analysis; and tissues— brain, lung, and kidney — were totally removed to observe pathological changes. Results: Compared with Group A, in Group B the pH, buffer base, base excess, total carbon dioxide level, oxgyen saturation of arterial blood, oxygen tension of arterial blood, serum sodium, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and total serum protein were all significantly reduced, while carbon dioxide tension of arterial blood, serum chlorine, and serum alkaline phosphatase were all significantly increased (P<0.05). In Group C, the pH, buffer base, base excess, oxgyen saturation of arterial blood, oxygen tension of arterial blood, hemoglobin, serum sodium, serum lactate dehydrogenase, and total serum protein were significantly reduced, while carbon dioxide tension of arterial blood, serum chlorine, serum alanine transarninase, total bilirubin and urea were significantly increased (P<0.05). The hemoglobin and alkaline phosphatase levels in Group C were significantly lower than those of Group B (P<0.05); and total protein, total bilirubin and urea in Group C were significantly higher than those of Group B (P<0.05). Pathological observation showed that the alveolar wall was hyperemic, edematous and incrassate; the alveolar epithelium became hyperplastic with neutrophilic; granulocyte infiltrates, the alveolar septum were widened; brain neurons were edematous with perivascular voids; neurons of

  13. Iron Supplementation and Altitude: Decision Making Using a Regression Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Garvican-Lewis, Andrew D. Govus, Peter Peeling, Chris R. Abbiss, Christopher J. Gore

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Altitude exposure increases the body’s need for iron (Gassmann and Muckenthaler, 2015, primarily to support accelerated erythropoiesis, yet clear supplementation guidelines do not exist. Athletes are typically recommended to ingest a daily oral iron supplement to facilitate altitude adaptations, and to help maintain iron balance. However, there is some debate as to whether athletes with otherwise healthy iron stores should be supplemented, due in part to concerns of iron overload. Excess iron in vital organs is associated with an increased risk of a number of conditions including cancer, liver disease and heart failure. Therefore clear guidelines are warranted and athletes should be discouraged from ‘self-prescribing” supplementation without medical advice. In the absence of prospective-controlled studies, decision tree analysis can be used to describe a data set, with the resultant regression tree serving as guide for clinical decision making. Here, we present a regression tree in the context of iron supplementation during altitude exposure, to examine the association between pre-altitude ferritin (Ferritin-Pre and the haemoglobin mass (Hbmass response, based on daily iron supplement dose. De-identified ferritin and Hbmass data from 178 athletes engaged in altitude training were extracted from the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS database. Altitude exposure was predominantly achieved via normobaric Live high: Train low (n = 147 at a simulated altitude of 3000 m for 2 to 4 weeks. The remaining athletes engaged in natural altitude training at venues ranging from 1350 to 2800 m for 3-4 weeks. Thus, the “hypoxic dose” ranged from ~890 km.h to ~1400 km.h. Ethical approval was granted by the AIS Human Ethics Committee, and athletes provided written informed consent. An in depth description and traditional analysis of the complete data set is presented elsewhere (Govus et al., 2015. Iron supplementation was prescribed by a sports physician

  14. Development of Aptitude at Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Alexandra M.; Virues-Ortega, Javier; Botti, Ana Baya; Bucks, Romola; Holloway, John W.; Rose-Zerilli, Matthew J.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Webster, Rebecca J.; Baldeweg, Torsten; Kirkham, Fenella J.

    2010-01-01

    Millions of people currently live at altitudes in excess of 2500 metres, where oxygen supply is limited, but very little is known about the development of brain and behavioural function under such hypoxic conditions. We describe the physiological, cognitive and behavioural profile of a large cohort of infants (6-12 months), children (6-10 years)…

  15. Metabolic and osmoregulatory function at low and high (3800 m) altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, H M; Cogger, E A; Miltenberger, T L; Koch, A K; Bray, R E; Wickler, S J

    2002-09-01

    Altitude evokes physiological adjustments that include not only respiratory and cardiovascular properties, but also metabolic function, renal and endocrine responses. The purpose of the present study was designed to expand our understanding of the physiological process involved with acclimatisation to high altitude in equids. The study examined temporal effects on metabolic and osmoregulatory function in horses (n = 6) at rest and postexercise at 3800 m. Animals were studied at 225 m (Pb = 743 mmHg) and during a 10 day stay at altitude (Pb = 487 mmHg). Rest samples were taken 90 min postprandial at 0830 h and immediately after the gallop phase of a standard exercise test. Changes in glucose, insulin, cortisol, thyroxine, sodium, potassium, chloride and total protein were assessed at both altitudes. Exercise stimulated increases in cortisol, thyroxine, potassium, and chloride; while the concentrations of glucose, insulin, sodium and total protein (regardless of altitude) decreased. Acute (Day 2) altitude exposure (following transport stress) produced significant increases in glucose, cortisol, thyroxine, chloride and protein at rest and exercise. All variables (except cortisol) appeared to stabilise by Day 4 of altitude exposure. Observations from these data (coupled with haematological and blood gases data) indicate that equids acutely acclimate within 2-3 days to this altitude.

  16. Why Are High Altitude Natives So Strong at High Altitude? Nature vs. Nurture: Genetic Factors vs. Growth and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutsaert, Tom

    Among high-altitude natives there is evidence of a general hypoxia tolerance leading to enhanced performance and/or increased capacity in several important domains. These domains likely include an enhanced physical work capacity, an enhanced reproductive capacity, and an ability to resist several common pathologies of chronic high-altitude exposure. The "strength" of the high-altitude native in this regard may have both a developmental and a genetic basis, although there is better evidence for the former (developmental effects) than for the latter. For example, early-life hypoxia exposure clearly results in lung growth and remodeling leading to an increased O2 diffusing capacity in adulthood. Genetic research has yet to reveal a population genetic basis for enhanced capacity in high-altitude natives, but several traits are clearly under genetic control in Andean and Tibetan populations e.g., resting and exercise arterial O2 saturation (SaO2). This chapter reviews the effects of nature and nurture on traits that are relevant to the process of gas exchange, including pulmonary volumes and diffusion capacity, the maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max), the SaO2, and the alveolar-arterial oxygen partial pressure difference (A-aDO2) during exercise.

  17. High Altitude Cooking and Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Standard Forms FSIS United States Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service About FSIS District Offices Careers ... 286) Actions ${title} Loading... High Altitude Cooking and Food Safety What is considered a high altitude? How is ...

  18. Lens autofluorescence is not increased at high altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Kofoed, Peter Kristian; Zubieta-Calleja, Gustavo

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study the relation between ambient environmental ultraviolet radiation exposure and lens fluorescence. METHODS: Non-invasive lens fluorometry measurements were compared in healthy Bolivian and Danish subjects. Background ultraviolet radiation was 4.5 times higher in Bolivia than...... in Denmark. RESULTS: No significant differences in lens fluorescence or transmittance were found between Bolivian and Danish volunteers. CONCLUSION: Age-corrected lens fluorescence and transmittance were comparable for healthy participants living at high altitude near the equator and healthy volunteers...

  19. 参芪花粉片对高原慢性间歇性缺氧暴露期间脱习服的疗效观察%Curative effect observation of Shenqipollen tablet on deacclimatization during exposure period of the chronic intermittent hypoxia in high altitude regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    娄晓敏; 张雪峰; 周其全; 王胜玉

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the intervention effects of Shenqi pollen tablets on deacclimatization during exposure period of chronic plateau intermittent hypoxic hypoxia. METHODS Selected 380 young healthy workers from the plains and low lying areas into the work area altitude 4 300m, with weekly indoor at an altitude of 4 300m for 5 working days, then returned to the elevation of 2 800m fixed base rest mode, continuously observed the intervention effect of Shenqi pollen tablets on symptom occurrence rate of plateau deacclimatization during rest period exposure period of 3 years in the highlands at an altitude of 2 800m. RESULTS The total detectable rate of altitude deacclimatization was 82.37% (313/380); the top 10 symptoms and the order were: lethargy (66.31%) , fatigue (42.37%) , dizziness (35.78%) , insomnia (30.79%) , decreased appetite (29.73%), upset (29.21%), general malaise (28.95%), depression (27.89%), palpitation (27.10%), and chest tightness (24.47%). The crowd in need of treatment with altitude deacclimatization were detected in the total de-acclimation of those 34.18% (107/313). The intervention effect of Shenqi pollen tablets made the symptoms completely disappear in 92.52% (99/ 107) after medication of 15 days, recurrence rate (cured) was 78.79% (78/99) in who without continue medication in half of one year, even?there were some symptoms and self-medication to ease (CR) 21.21% (21/99) , free remission or partial remission, but often needed medication (inactive) had 7.48% (8/107). There were no adverse drug reactions during observation period. CONCLUSION The high altitude deacclimatization during exposure period of chronic plateau intermittent hypoxic hypoxia has a higher prevalence. Shenqi pollen tablets have better short-term effect and long-term prevention, and is an effective disease prevention and treatment.%目的 探讨参芪花粉片对高原慢性间歇性缺氧暴露期间脱习服的干预效果.方法 选择由平原

  20. Cold Stress at High Altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Majumdar

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of cold at high altitudes has been analysed from a purely physical standpoint. It has been shown that Siple's Wind-Chill Index is not reliable because (i it does not make use of the well established principles governing the physical processes of heat transfer by convection and radiation, and (ii it assumes that the mean radiant temperature of the surroundings is the same as the ambient dry bulb temperature. A Cold Stress Index has been proposed which is likely to be a more reliable guide for assessing the climatic hazards of high altitude environments. The Index can be quickly estimated with the help of two nomograms devised for the purpose.

  1. Space Operations Center orbit altitude selection strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrikis, J.; Myers, H. L.

    1982-01-01

    The strategy for the operational altitude selection has to respond to the Space Operation Center's (SOC) maintenance requirements and the logistics demands of the missions to be supported by the SOC. Three orbit strategies are developed: two are constant altitude, and one variable altitude. In order to minimize the effect of atmospheric uncertainty the dynamic altitude method is recommended. In this approach the SOC will operate at the optimum altitude for the prevailing atmospheric conditions and logistics model, provided that mission safety constraints are not violated. Over a typical solar activity cycle this method produces significant savings in the overall logistics cost.

  2. De-adaptation change in cardiac function of laborers engaged in physical labor at high altitude after returning to lower altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En-zhi FENG

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To assess the effects of physical labor on cardiac function of laborers at high altitude and changes in cardiac function after returning to lower altitude. Methods According to symptomatic scores on Chinese acute high altitude reaction (AHAR, 96 male officers and soldiers, who rapidly entered high altitude areas (3700m altitude,and engaged in heavy physical work for 50 days, were be scored and graded. Levels of creatine kinase isoenzymes -MB (CK-MB and lactic dehydrogenase isoenzyme -1 (LDH-1 in the serum, Tei index, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, and left ventricular fractional shortening (LVFS were measured in the 96 servicemen at the 50th day of residing at high altitude, and the 2nd and 15th day after returning to lower altitude (1500m altitude, and the results were compared with that of 50 healthy controls residing at 1500m. Results  Among the 96 male servicemen, 71 developed AHAR, and 24 of them had severe AHAR, 47 mild to moderate AHAR, and the rest 25 had no AHAR. Levels of serum CK-MB, LDH-1 and Tei index were higher in the severe AHAR group than in the mild to moderate AHAR group, higher in the mild to moderate AHAR group than in the no AHAR group and higher in the no AHAR group than in the healthy group. As far as the values of LVEF and LVFS were concerned, the severe AHAR group < mild to moderate AHAR group < no AHAR group < control group. Significant difference was found in these levels between every two successive groups (P < 0.01. Linear correlation analysis showed that levels of CK-MB and LDH-1 of persons staying at 3700m altitude for 50 days were positively correlated with Tei index (r= 0.625, 0.598, respectively, P<0.01, and negatively correlated with LVEF(r=-0.716, -0.658, respectively, P<0.01, and also negatively correlated with LVFS (r=-0.639, -0.727, respectively, P<0.01. Level of serum CK-MB, LDH-1 and Tei index at 3700m altitude for 50 days were significantly higher than those 2

  3. Decompression to altitude: assumptions, experimental evidence, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Philip P; Butler, Bruce D

    2009-02-01

    Although differences exist, hypobaric and hyperbaric exposures share common physiological, biochemical, and clinical features, and their comparison may provide further insight into the mechanisms of decompression stress. Although altitude decompression illness (DCI) has been experienced by high-altitude Air Force pilots and is common in ground-based experiments simulating decompression profiles of extravehicular activities (EVAs) or astronauts' space walks, no case has been reported during actual EVAs in the non-weight-bearing microgravity environment of orbital space missions. We are uncertain whether gravity influences decompression outcomes via nitrogen tissue washout or via alterations related to skeletal muscle activity. However, robust experimental evidence demonstrated the role of skeletal muscle exercise, activities, and/or movement in bubble formation and DCI occurrence. Dualism of effects of exercise, positive or negative, on bubble formation and DCI is a striking feature in hypobaric exposure. Therefore, the discussion and the structure of this review are centered on those highlighted unresolved topics about the relationship between muscle activity, decompression, and microgravity. This article also provides, in the context of altitude decompression, an overview of the role of denitrogenation, metabolic gases, gas micronuclei, stabilization of bubbles, biochemical pathways activated by bubbles, nitric oxide, oxygen, anthropometric or physiological variables, Doppler-detectable bubbles, and potential arterialization of bubbles. These findings and uncertainties will produce further physiological challenges to solve in order to line up for the programmed human return to the Moon, the preparation for human exploration of Mars, and the EVAs implementation in a non-zero gravity environment.

  4. Radiation Safety Issues in High Altitude Commercial Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1995-01-01

    The development of a global economy makes the outlook for high speed commercial intercontinental flight feasible, and the development of various configurations operating from 20 to 30 km have been proposed. In addition to the still unresolved issues relating to current commercial operations (12-16 km), the higher dose rates associated with the higher operating altitudes makes il imperative that the uncertainties in the atmospheric radiation environment and the associated health risks be re-examined. Atmospheric radiation associated with the galactic cosmic rays forms a background level which may, under some circumstances, exceed newly recommended allowable exposure limits proposed on the basis of recent evaluations of the A -bomb survivor data (due to increased risk coefficients). These larger risk coefficients, within the context of the methodology for estimating exposure limits, are resulting in exceedingly low estimated allowable exposure limits which may impact even present day flight operations and was the reason for the CEC workshop in Luxembourg (1990). At higher operating altitudes, solar particles events can produce exposures many orders of magnitude above background levels and pose significant health risks to the most sensitive individuals (such as during pregnancy). In this case the appropriate quality factors are undefined, and some evidence exists which indicates that the quality factor for stochastic effects is a substantial underestimate.

  5. Water and Electrolyte Exchange during Exposure to Cold, Altitude and Combined Cold and Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-28

    adrenergic receptors may play a dominant role in acclimation to cold in the laboratory rat . Since an increase in the rate of secretion of thyroid hormones...stimulation that accompanies cold acclimation in the laboratory rat . Studies from this laboratory have shown that reduction in thyroid activity reduces

  6. 1962 Satellite High Altitude Radiation Belt Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    TR-14-18 1962 Satellite High Altitude Radiation Belt Database Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. March...the Status of the High Altitude Nuclear Explosion (HANE) Trapped Radiation Belt Database”, AFRL-VS-PS-TR- 2006-1079, Air Force Research Laboratory...Roth, B., “Blue Ribbon Panel and Support Work Assessing the Status of the High Altitude Nuclear Explosion (HANE) Trapped Radiation Belt Database

  7. Blood-Brain Barrier Changes in High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafuente, José V; Bermudez, Garazi; Camargo-Arce, Lorena; Bulnes, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral syndromes related to high-altitude exposure are becoming more frequent as the number of trips to high altitudes has increased in the last decade. The commonest symptom is headache, followed by acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE), which can be fatal. The pathophysiology of these syndromes is not fully understood. The classical "tight-fit hypothesis" posits that there are some anatomical variations that would obstruct the sinovenous outflow and worsen vasogenic edema and intracranial hypertension reactive to hypoxia. This could explain microhemorrhages seen in autopsies. However, recent magnetic resonance imaging studies have demonstrated some components of cytotoxic edema in HACE absent in AMS, suggesting a dysfunction in water balance at the cellular level. Currently, the "red-ox theory" supports trigemino-vascular system activation by free radicals formed after hypoxia and the consequent oxidative stress cascades. Apart from trigemino-vascular system activation, free radicals can also provoke membrane destabilisation mediated by lipid peroxidation, inflammation, and local hypoxia inducible factor-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor activation, resulting in gross blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction. Besides alterations in endothelial cells such as increased pinocytotic vesicles and disassembly of interendothelial tight junction proteins, capillary permeability may also increase with subsequent swelling of astrocyte end-feet. In conclusion, although the pathophysiology of AMS and HACE is not completely understood, recent evidence proposes a multifactorial entity, with brain swelling and compromise of the BBB considered to play an important role. A fuller comprehension of these processes is crucial to reduce and prevent BBB alterations during high-altitude exposure.

  8. Economy of Adaptation to High Altitude

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean-Paul Richalet

    2004-01-01

    @@ The international meeting that will be held in Xining and Lhasa in August 2004 will be a wonderful occasion to share facts and concepts dealing with adaptation to high altitude. Life at high altitude is a challenge for thousands of animal species and millions of humans residing or visiting high altitude regions of the world. To try to understand the physiological mechanisms involved in the adaptation processes to high altitude hypoxia, it is convenient to start by defining what is "extreme" from a biological point of view.

  9. Aspirated Compressors for High Altitude Engines Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aurora Flight Sciences proposes to incorporate aspirated compressor technology into a high altitude, long endurance (HALE) concept engine. Aspiration has been proven...

  10. High-altitude adaptations in vertebrate hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Vertebrates at high altitude are subjected to hypoxic conditions that challenge aerobic metabolism. O2 transport from the respiratory surfaces to tissues requires matching between the O2 loading and unloading tensions and theO2-affinity of blood, which is an integrated function of hemoglobin......, birds and ectothermic vertebrates at high altitude....

  11. High-altitude adaptations in vertebrate hemoglobins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Vertebrates at high altitude are subjected to hypoxic conditions that challenge aerobic metabolism. O2 transport from the respiratory surfaces to tissues requires matching between the O2 loading and unloading tensions and theO2-affinity of blood, which is an integrated function of hemoglobin......, birds and ectothermic vertebrates at high altitude....

  12. Effects of Altitude Exposure in Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK) Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    Corneal topography data was acquired with EyeSys Vista™ HANDHELD CORNEAL TOPOGRAPHER (Figure 5). The topography unit had the following features...0.10 Diopters (D) Reproducibility: +0.20 D Figure 5: EyeSys Vista™ HANDHELD CORNEAL TOPOGRAPHER Two corneal topography measures of...each eye were accomplished approximately within 30 seconds of each other at each data interval. The corneal topography data was captured and then

  13. Visual system effects of exercise on Mauna Kea at 2,200 and 4,200 meters altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeisser, E T; Gagliano, D L; Santiago-Marini, J

    1997-03-01

    Field exercise studies were performed at two altitudes (2,200 and 4,200 m) in 2 successive years using different sets of young male volunteers. Visual function indices were measured both at sea level and during a strenuous exercise regime at altitude. Volunteers were grouped in the first study by initial rest period (2 days vs. no rest) and in the second by diet (supplemental carbohydrates vs. Meals Ready to Eat rations only). Overall results showed no effect according to grouping, a decrease in average visual acuity at the higher altitude overall, and a decrease in electroretinographic (ERG) photopic flicker responses at moderate altitude. It is concluded that heavy exercise at these altitudes may not have operationally significant effects on ground troops in night vision or target recognition, although the change in ERG parameters does indicate a shift in retinal cone physiology that may have subtler effects.

  14. Diving at altitude: from definition to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egi, S Murat; Pieri, Massimo; Marroni, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Diving above sea level has different motivations for recreational, military, commercial and scientific activities. Despite the apparently wide practice of inland diving, there are three major discrepancies about diving at altitude: threshold elevation that requires changes in sea level procedures; upper altitude limit of the applicability of these modifications; and independent validation of altitude adaptation methods of decompression algorithms. The first problem is solved by converting the normal fluctuation in barometric pressure to an altitude equivalent. Based on the barometric variations recorded from a meteorological center, it is possible to suggest 600 meters as a threshold for classifying a dive as an "altitude" dive. The second problem is solved by proposing the threshold altitude of aviation (2,400 meters) to classify "high" altitude dives. The DAN (Divers Alert Network) Europe diving database (DB) is analyzed to solve the third problem. The database consists of 65,050 dives collected from different dive computers. A total of 1,467 dives were found to be classified as altitude dives. However, by checking the elevation according to the logged geographical coordinates, 1,284 dives were disqualified because the altitude setting had been used as a conservative setting by the dive computer despite the fact that the dive was made at sea level. Furthermore, according to the description put forward in this manuscript, 72 dives were disqualified because the surface level elevation is lower than 600 meters. The number of field data (111 dives) is still very low to use for the validation of any particular method of altitude adaptation concerning decompression algorithms.

  15. Observation of a rare cosmic ray event at mountain altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Basudhara; Raha, Sibaji; Saha, Swapan K.; Biswas, Sukumar; Dey, Sandhya; Maulik, Atanu; Mazumdar, Amal; Saha, Satyajit; Syam, Debapriyo

    2015-02-01

    Existence of strangelets in cosmic rays has been predicted even at mountain altitudes ∼ 3-4 km with extremely low abundance. We exposed an appropriate passive detector to cosmic rays at Darjeeling, India, at an atmospheric pressure of 765 hPa, as a pilot study to determine its suitability for the detection of strangelets in a large area detector array through long-term exposure. During the analysis we found a highly unusual event consisting of a cluster of six identical nuclear tracks. We argue that even the most mundane explanation of this event requires unusual physics, the first possible observation of multifragmentation involving cosmic rays.

  16. Iron supplementation at high altitudes induces inflammation and oxidative injury to lung tissues in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salama, Samir A., E-mail: salama.3@buckeyemail.osu.edu [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Al-Azhar University, Cairo 11751 (Egypt); Department of Pharmacology and GTMR Unit, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); Omar, Hany A. [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef 62514 (Egypt); Maghrabi, Ibrahim A. [Department of Clinical Pharmacy, College of Clinical Pharmacy, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); AlSaeed, Mohammed S. [Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia); EL-Tarras, Adel E. [High Altitude Research Center, Taif University, Al-Haweiah, Taif 21974 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to high altitudes is associated with hypoxia and increased vulnerability to oxidative stress. Polycythemia (increased number of circulating erythrocytes) develops to compensate the high altitude associated hypoxia. Iron supplementation is, thus, recommended to meet the demand for the physiological polycythemia. Iron is a major player in redox reactions and may exacerbate the high altitudes-associated oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to explore the potential iron-induced oxidative lung tissue injury in rats at high altitudes (6000 ft above the sea level). Iron supplementation (2 mg elemental iron/kg, once daily for 15 days) induced histopathological changes to lung tissues that include severe congestion, dilatation of the blood vessels, emphysema in the air alveoli, and peribronchial inflammatory cell infiltration. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α), lipid peroxidation product and protein carbonyl content in lung tissues were significantly elevated. Moreover, the levels of reduced glutathione and total antioxidant capacity were significantly reduced. Co-administration of trolox, a water soluble vitamin E analog (25 mg/kg, once daily for the last 7 days of iron supplementation), alleviated the lung histological impairments, significantly decreased the pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the oxidative stress markers. Together, our findings indicate that iron supplementation at high altitudes induces lung tissue injury in rats. This injury could be mediated through excessive production of reactive oxygen species and induction of inflammatory responses. The study highlights the tissue injury induced by iron supplementation at high altitudes and suggests the co-administration of antioxidants such as trolox as protective measures. - Highlights: • Iron supplementation at high altitudes induced lung histological changes in rats. • Iron induced oxidative stress in lung tissues of rats at high altitudes. • Iron

  17. Integration of radar altimeter, precision navigation, and digital terrain data for low-altitude flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenka, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    Avionic systems that depend on digitized terrain elevation data for guidance generation or navigational reference require accurate absolute and relative distance measurements to the terrain, especially as they approach lower altitudes. This is particularly exacting in low-altitude helicopter missions, where aggressive terrain hugging maneuvers create minimal horizontal and vertical clearances and demand precise terrain positioning. Sole reliance on airborne precision navigation and stored terrain elevation data for above-ground-level (AGL) positioning severely limits the operational altitude of such systems. A Kalman filter is presented which blends radar altimeter returns, precision navigation, and stored terrain elevation data for AGL positioning. The filter is evaluated using low-altitude helicopter flight test data acquired over moderately rugged terrain. The proposed Kalman filter is found to remove large disparities in predicted AGL altitude (i.e., from airborne navigation and terrain elevation data) in the presence of measurement anomalies and dropouts. Previous work suggested a minimum clearance altitude of 220 ft AGL for a near-terrain guidance system; integration of a radar altimeter allows for operation of that system below 50 ft, subject to obstacle-avoidance limitations.

  18. Effect of altitude on some blood factors and its stability after leaving the altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hematy, Yones; Setorki, Mahbubeh; Razavi, Akram; Doudi, Monir

    2014-09-01

    The underlying mechanisms of altitude training are still a matter of controversial discussion. The aim of this study was to compare the hemoglobin concentration, red blood cell count and volume between normal and high altitude situations and their persistence after returning back from higher altitudes. The study population included male students of Ardal Branch, Islamic Azad University. Twelve apparently healthy individual with high level of physical activity, mean age of 22.6 ± 1.50 years were selected through purposive and available sampling method. In this study, blood samples were collected at different time and altitudes in order to compare the changes of Red Blood Cell (RBC), Mean Cell Hemoglobin (MCH), Mean Corpuscular Hemoglobin Concentration (MCHC) and Mean Cell Volume (MCV). The first blood sampling was conducted at the altitude of 1830 m. The subsequent blood samplings were conducted 48 and 72 h after reaching the altitude of 4000 m and 24, 48 and 72 h after returning back to the altitude of 1830 m. The statistical method used in this study was repeated measurement ANOVA. Red Blood Cell (RBC) changes between onset of climbing to 1830 m and 24, 48 and 2 h after sojourn at 1830 m height (after returning from 4000 m altitude) was significant. Mean Cell Hemoglobin (MCH) showed no significant change in any of the altitudes. MCHC changes between onset of moving toward altitude 1830 meters and 24, 48 and 72 h after sojourn at 1830 m height (after returning from 4000 m altitude) was also significant in addition, MCHC showed a significant difference between 24 h staying at 1830 m altitude with 48 and 72 h staying at 4000 m altitude. Mean Cell Volume (MCV) showed no significant difference between 48 and 72 h staying at 4000 m altitude and also between 24, 48 and 72 h staying at 1830 m altitude; however, there was a significant difference between onset of moving toward 1830 m altitude with 24, 48 and 72 h staying at 1830 m altitude and also 48 and 72 h staying at

  19. The laryngeal mask airway at altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Grant D; Sittig, Steven E; Schears, Gregory J

    2008-02-01

    The Laryngeal Mask Airway (LMA) is an accepted adjunct for airway management in emergency patients. There are a number of case reports describing its use in transport medicine for infant to adult patients, including during flight. Although studies of the effect altitude has on air-filled tracheal tubes exists, we were unable to find documentation of the effect of altitude on laryngeal mask airways. Our objective was to assess the effect of altitude on the LMA in both fixed wing and rotary wing models. We performed an in vitro study of the effect of altitude on the LMA cuff. Infant and adult airway trainer mannequins with properly sized and inserted LMA-Classic laryngeal mask airways were monitored for cuff pressure changes while flown at altitudes commonly encountered during air medical transport. Both models demonstrated that LMA cuff pressures may exceed manufacturer recommended levels for safe use even at the relatively low altitudes experienced during rotor wing flight. Properly inserted and inflated laryngeal mask airways at ground level may result in overinflated LMA cuffs when flown to altitudes commonly used for rotor and fixed wing medical transport unless monitored and corrected.

  20. Renin and aldosterone at high altitude in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keynes, R J; Smith, G W; Slater, J D; Brown, M M; Brown, S E; Payne, N N; Jowett, T P; Monge, C C

    1982-01-01

    Measurements have been made of hormonal changes relevant to salt and water balance during prolonged exposure to hypoxia to improve our understanding of the syndrome of acute mountain sickness. We have attempted to delineate the detailed inter-relationships between the renin-aldosterone and the vasopressin systems by a metabolically controlled study, involving an orthostatic stress (45 degrees head-up tilt) and an injection of a standard dose of ACTH to test adrenal responsiveness. Three Caucasian medical students underwent a 7-day equilibration at 150 m (Lima, Peru), followed by a 6-day sojourn at 4350 m (Cerro de Pasco, Peru) and a final 7 days at 150 m. Measurements were made of sodium and potassium balance, body weight and the 24-h renal excretion of vasopressin, cortisol and aldosterone 18-glucuronide. These variables showed little change, except for that of aldosterone 18-glucuronide, which fell sharply at altitude and rebounded even more sharply on return to sea level. At altitude, basal plasma levels of renin activity and aldosterone fell, and the response to orthostasis was attenuated, but the fall of plasma renin activity, as compared to plasma aldosterone, was delayed; on return to sea level this dissociation was exacerbated with the return of normal renin responsiveness lagging behind that of aldosterone. We suggest that unknown factors which dissociate the orthodox renin-aldosterone relationship, other than the activity of the angiotensin I-converting enzyme, are operative on exposure to hypoxia.

  1. High Altitude Clear Air Turbulence Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Air Force Flight Dynamics Laboratory conducted the High Altitude Clear Air Turbulence Project in the mid 1960s with the intention of better understanding air...

  2. Python Engine Installed in Altitude Wind Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1949-01-01

    An engine mechanic checks instrumentation prior to an investigation of engine operating characteristics and thrust control of a large turboprop engine with counter-rotating propellers under high-altitude flight conditions in the 20-foot-dianieter test section of the Altitude Wind Tunnel at the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, Cleveland, Ohio, now known as the John H. Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.

  3. Effect of altitude relocations upon AaDo2 at rest and during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, J C; Hartley, L H; Vogel, J A

    1975-09-01

    The supine pulmonary venous admixture (shunt) has been measured at Cerro de Pasco, 4,350 m altitude in eight subjects native to high altitude (HAN) under resting condition. Alveolar-arterial O2 tension difference (AaDO2) was also determined at rest and during exercise. The same subjects were studied again after 10 days' sojourn at sea level in Lima at 150 m altitude. They were compared with four subjects from sea level (SLN) who were studied first at Lima and after 2 and 10 days at Cerro de Pasco. At altitude, AaDO2 was smaller in HAN than SLN both at rest and during exercise. Shunt was the same in both groups. It is concluded that HAN show more even ventilation/perfusion relationship (VA/Q) at altitude, probably due to their high pulmonary artery pressure. On the contrary, SLN show less even VA/Q on altitude exposure, since their shunt decreased 37%. At sea level, HAN increased their AaDO2 due partially to an increase of 110% in their shunt, and in part due to less even VA/Q as shown by augmented VD/VT ratios. Each group tended to have a more effective gas exchange in its own environment.

  4. Early history of high-altitude physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B

    2016-02-01

    High-altitude physiology can be said to have begun in 1644 when Torricelli described the first mercury barometer and wrote the immortal words "We live submerged at the bottom of an ocean of the element air." Interestingly, the notion of atmospheric pressure had eluded his teacher, the great Galileo. Blaise Pascal was responsible for describing the fall in pressure with increasing altitude, and Otto von Guericke gave a dramatic demonstration of the enormous force that could be developed by atmospheric pressure. Robert Boyle learned of Guericke's experiment and, with Robert Hooke, constructed the first air pump that allowed small animals to be exposed to a low pressure. Hooke also constructed a small low-pressure chamber and exposed himself to a simulated altitude of about 2400 meters. With the advent of ballooning, humans were rapidly exposed to very low pressures, sometimes with tragic results. For example, the French balloon, Zénith, rose to over 8000 m, and two of the three aeronauts succumbed to the hypoxia. Paul Bert was the first person to clearly state that the deleterious effects of high altitude were caused by the low partial pressure of oxygen (PO2), and later research was accelerated by high-altitude stations and expeditions to high altitude.

  5. Reducing body fat with altitude hypoxia training in swimmers: role of blood perfusion to skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Michael; Liao, Chin-An; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Wen-Chih; Hou, Chien-Wen; Yu, Szu-Hsien; Harris, M Brennan; Hsu, Tung-Shiung; Lee, Shin-Da; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2013-02-28

    Swimmers tend to have greater body fat than athletes from other sports. The purpose of the study was to examine changes in body composition after altitude hypoxia exposure and the role of blood distribution to the skeletal muscle in swimmers. With a constant training volume of 12.3 km/day, young male swimmers (N = 10, 14.8 ± 0.5 years) moved from sea-level to a higher altitude of 2,300 meters. Body composition was measured before and after translocation to altitude using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) along with 8 control male subjects who resided at sea level for the same period of time. To determine the effects of hypoxia on muscle blood perfusion, total hemoglobin concentration (THC) was traced by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in the triceps and quadriceps muscles under glucose-ingested and insulin-secreted conditions during hypoxia exposure (16% O2) after training. While no change in body composition was found in the control group, subjects who trained at altitude had unequivocally decreased fat mass (-1.7 ± 0.3 kg, -11.4%) with increased lean mass (+0.8 ± 0.2 kg, +1.5%). Arterial oxygen saturation significantly decreased with increased plasma lactate during hypoxia recovery mimicking 2,300 meters at altitude (~93% versus ~97%). Intriguingly, hypoxia resulted in elevated muscle THC, and sympathetic nervous activities occurred in parallel with greater-percent oxygen saturation in both muscle groups. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that increased blood distribution to the skeletal muscle under postprandial condition may contribute to the reciprocally increased muscle mass and decreased body mass after a 3-week altitude exposure in swimmers.

  6. REACTOR MODERATOR STRUCTURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenstreet, B.L.

    1963-12-31

    A system for maintaining the alignment of moderator block structures in reactors is presented. Integral restraining grids are placed between each layer of blocks in the moderator structure, at the top of the uppermost layer, and at the bottom of the lowermost layer. Slots are provided in the top and bottom surfaces of the moderator blocks so as to provide a keying action with the grids. The grids are maintained in alignment by vertical guiding members disposed about their peripheries. (AEC)

  7. Effect of altitude on solar UVR and spectral and spatial variations of UV irradiances measured inWagrain, Austria in winter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baczynska, Katarzyna A; Pearson, Andy J; O'Hagan, John B;

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation spectral irradiance was measured at different altitudes on horizontal and tilted planes in different azimuth directions on cloudless days in Austria, in March 2010, within the Impact of Climatic and Environmental factors on Personal Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure project...

  8. Nitric oxide in adaptation to altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Cynthia M; Laskowski, Daniel; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2012-04-01

    This review summarizes published information on the levels of nitric oxide gas (NO) in the lungs and NO-derived liquid-phase molecules in the acclimatization of visitors newly arrived at altitudes of 2500 m or more and adaptation of populations whose ancestors arrived thousands of years ago. Studies of acutely exposed visitors to high altitude focus on the first 24-48 h with just a few extending to days or weeks. Among healthy visitors, NO levels in the lung, plasma, and/or red blood cells fell within 2h, but then returned toward baseline or slightly higher by 48 h and increased above baseline by 5 days. Among visitors ill with high-altitude pulmonary edema at the time of the study or in the past, NO levels were lower than those of their healthy counterparts. As for highland populations, Tibetans had NO levels in the lung, plasma, and red blood cells that were at least double and in some cases orders of magnitude greater than other populations regardless of altitude. Red blood cell-associated nitrogen oxides were more than 200 times higher. Other highland populations had generally higher levels although not to the degree shown by Tibetans. Overall, responses of those acclimatized and those presumed to be adapted are in the same direction, although the Tibetans have much larger responses. Missing are long-term data on lowlanders at altitude showing how similar they become to the Tibetan phenotype. Also missing are data on Tibetans at low altitude to see the extent to which their phenotype is a response to the immediate environment or expressed constitutively. The mechanisms causing the visitors' and the Tibetans' high levels of NO and NO-derived molecules at altitude remain unknown. Limited data suggest processes including hypoxic upregulation of NO synthase gene expression, hemoglobin-NO reactions, and genetic variation. Gains in understanding will require integrating appropriate methods and measurement techniques with indicators of adaptive function under hypoxic

  9. Soccer activity profile of altitude versus sea-level natives during acclimatisation to 3600 m (ISA3600)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aughey, Robert J; Hammond, Kristal; Varley, Matthew C; Schmidt, Walter F; Bourdon, Pitre C; Buchheit, Martin; Simpson, Ben; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Kley, Marlen; Soria, Rudy; Sargent, Charli; Roach, Gregory D; Claros, Jesus C Jimenez; Wachsmuth, Nadine; Gore, Christopher J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We investigated the effect of high altitude on the match activity profile of elite youth high altitude and sea level residents. Methods Twenty Sea Level (Australian) and 19 Altitude-resident (Bolivian) soccer players played five games, two near sea level (430 m) and three in La Paz (3600 m). Match activity profile was quantified via global positioning system with the peak 5 min period for distance ((D5peak)) and high velocity running (>4.17 m/s, HIVR5peak); as well as the 5 min period immediately subsequent to the peak for both distance (D5sub) and high-velocity running (HIVR5sub) identified using a rolling 5 min epoch. The games at 3600 m were compared with the average of the two near sea-level games. Results The total distance per minute was reduced by a small magnitude in the first match at altitude in both teams, without any change in low-velocity running. There were variable changes in HiVR, D5peak and HiVR5peak from match to match for each team. There were within-team reductions in D5peak in each game at altitude compared with those at near sea level, and this reduction was greater by a small magnitude in Australians than Bolivians in game 4. The effect of altitude on HiVR5peak was moderately lower in Australians compared with Bolivians in game 3. There was no clear difference in the effect of altitude on maximal accelerations between teams. Conclusions High altitude reduces the distance covered by elite youth soccer players during matches. Neither 13 days of acclimatisation nor lifelong residence at high altitude protects against detrimental effects of altitude on match activity profile. PMID:24282196

  10. Biomarkers of genotoxicity of air pollution (the AULIS project): bulky DNA adducts in subjects with moderate to low exposures to airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and their relationship to environmental tobacco smoke and other parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgiadis, P.; Topinka, J.; Stoikidou, M.

    2001-01-01

    tobacco smoke (ETS), namely (i) declared times of exposure to ETS during the 24 h prior to blood donation, (ii) plasma cotinine levels and (iii) chrysene/benzo[g,h,i]perylene ratios in the profile of personal PAH exposure. Furthermore, among the Halkida campus area subjects (but not the remaining subjects......, exposure to ETS was a significant determinant of the observed DNA damage. Gender had a consistent and significant effect on adduct levels (males having higher levels), which remained significant even after multiple regression analysis. Habitual consumption of roasted meat was significantly associated...

  11. Responses of the autonomic nervous system in altitude adapted and high altitude pulmonary oedema subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Lazar; Purkayastha, S. S.; Jayashankar, A.; Radhakrishnan, U.; Sen Gupta, J.; Nayar, H. S.

    1985-06-01

    Studies were carried out to ascertain the role of sympatho-parasympathetic responses in the process of adaptation to altitude. The assessment of status of autonomic balance was carried out in a group of 20 young male subjects by recording their resting heart rate, blood pressure, oral temperature, mean skin temperature, extremity temperatures, pupillary diameter, cold pressor response, oxygen consumption, cardioacceleration during orthostasis and urinary excretion of catecholamines; in a thermoneutral laboratory. The same parameters were repeated on day 3 and at weekly intervals for a period of 3 weeks, after exposing them to 3,500 m; and also after return to sea level. At altitude, similar studies were carried out in a group of 10 acclimatized lowlanders, 10 high altitude natives and 6 patients who had recently recovered from high altitude pulmonary oedema. In another phase, similar studies were done in two groups of subjects, one representing 15 subjects who had stayed at altitude (3,500 4,000 m) without any ill effects and the other comprising of 10 subjects who had either suffered from high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) or acute mountain sickness (AMS). The results revealed sympathetic overactivity on acute induction to altitude which showed gradual recovery on prolonged stay, the high altitude natives had preponderance to parasympathetic system. Sympathetic preponderance may not be an essential etiological factor for the causation of maladaptation syndromes.

  12. Soldier at High Altitude: Problem & Preventive Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S Purkayastha

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to military and j trategic reasons, a large body of troops is being regularly dcployed in the snowbound areas through ut the Himalayan regions to guard Ihe Ironliers. Thc mountain environment at high 'allitude (HA consisls of several faclors alien lo plain dwellers, which evoke a series of physiological responses in human system. Some of the sea' level residents on induction to HA suffer from several unloward symploms of HA" ailmenls varying from mild-lo-severe degrees. Suddenexposure to HA is detrimental to physical and mental  performance of the low landers and  certain cases, may even lead to dreaded condition like high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO. These may make a man Jisturbed physically and mentally. So, there is a need lo prevent such hazards v(hich ispossible if the individual is aware of the problems and prevenlive measures ofHA ailments in advance, before going to HA for a safe and happy living there. Hence, a noble effort has been made to provide guidelines to create awareness about physical and physiological problems of life at HA and themethods of protection against its ill-effects for the soldiers, mountaineers and sojourners conducting scientific trials it HA. In th.:s revieJ, an attempt has been made to describe vital aspects of HA in a popular way, st~ing with its concept and various environmental factors which exert considerableettects on human body functions, heallh and performance on exposure to such environment, on the b¥is of a series of studies coitlucted at Ithe Defence Institute of Physiology & Allied Sciences, Delhi, oVer the years. The most important featurelof HA (3,000 m and above is hypoxia or deficiency ofoxygej1 in the body. Olher cnvironmental tactors are: scverc cold, high velocity wind, low rclalivc humidily, high solar radiatior, increased ultraviolet radialion and difficult terrain. These faclors are responsible for various HA cWtdc old syndromes, viz., acute mountain sickness, HAPO, dehydration,4

  13. Altitude Registration of Limb-Scattered Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Leslie; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen; Loughman, Robert; Kramarova, Natalya; Chen, Zhong; Taha, Ghassan; Chen, Grace; Xu, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest constraints to the retrieval of accurate ozone profiles from UV backscatter limb sounding sensors is altitude registration. Two methods, the Rayleigh scattering attitude sensing (RSAS) and absolute radiance residual method (ARRM), are able to determine altitude registration to the accuracy necessary for long-term ozone monitoring. The methods compare model calculations of radiances to measured radiances and are independent of onboard tracking devices. RSAS determines absolute altitude errors, but, because the method is susceptible to aerosol interference, it is limited to latitudes and time periods with minimal aerosol contamination. ARRM, a new technique introduced in this paper, can be applied across all seasons and altitudes. However, it is only appropriate for relative altitude error estimates. The application of RSAS to Limb Profiler (LP) measurements from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) on board the Suomi NPP (SNPP) satellite indicates tangent height (TH) errors greater than 1 km with an absolute accuracy of +/-200 m. Results using ARRM indicate a approx. 300 to 400m intra-orbital TH change varying seasonally +/-100 m, likely due to either errors in the spacecraft pointing or in the geopotential height (GPH) data that we use in our analysis. ARRM shows a change of approx. 200m over 5 years with a relative accuracy (a long-term accuracy) of 100m outside the polar regions.

  14. Oxygen ion energization observed at high altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Waara

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of significant heating (up to 8 keV perpendicular to the geomagnetic field of outflowing oxygen ions at high altitude (12 RE above the polar cap. The shape of the distribution functions indicates that most of the heating occurs locally (within 0.2–0.4 RE in altitude. This is a clear example of local ion energization at much higher altitude than usually reported. In contrast to many events at lower altitudes, it is not likely that the locally observed wave fields can cause the observed ion energization. Also, it is not likely that the ions have drifted from some nearby energization region to the point of observation. This suggests that additional fundamentally different ion energization mechanisms are present at high altitudes. One possibility is that the magnetic moment of the ions is not conserved, resulting in slower outflow velocities and longer time for ion energization.

  15. Altitude Registration of Limb-Scattered Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Leslie; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jaross, Glen; Loughman, Robert; Kramarova, Natalya; Chen, Zhong; Taha, Ghassan; Chen, Grace; Xu, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    One of the largest constraints to the retrieval of accurate ozone profiles from UV backscatter limb sounding sensors is altitude registration. Two methods, the Rayleigh scattering attitude sensing (RSAS) and absolute radiance residual method (ARRM), are able to determine altitude registration to the accuracy necessary for long-term ozone monitoring. The methods compare model calculations of radiances to measured radiances and are independent of onboard tracking devices. RSAS determines absolute altitude errors, but, because the method is susceptible to aerosol interference, it is limited to latitudes and time periods with minimal aerosol contamination. ARRM, a new technique introduced in this paper, can be applied across all seasons and altitudes. However, it is only appropriate for relative altitude error estimates. The application of RSAS to Limb Profiler (LP) measurements from the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) on board the Suomi NPP (SNPP) satellite indicates tangent height (TH) errors greater than 1 km with an absolute accuracy of +/-200 m. Results using ARRM indicate a approx. 300 to 400m intra-orbital TH change varying seasonally +/-100 m, likely due to either errors in the spacecraft pointing or in the geopotential height (GPH) data that we use in our analysis. ARRM shows a change of approx. 200m over 5 years with a relative accuracy (a long-term accuracy) of 100m outside the polar regions.

  16. High altitude syndromes at intermediate altitudes: a pilot study in the Australian Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaney, Graham; Cook, Angus; Weinstein, Philip

    2013-10-01

    Our hypothesis is that symptoms of high altitude syndromes are detectable even at intermediate altitudes, as commonly encountered under Australian conditions (flatus expulsion (HAFE). Symptoms of high altitude syndromes are of growing concern because of the global trend toward increasing numbers of tourists and workers exposed to both rapid ascent and sustained physical activity at high altitude. However, in Australia, high altitude medicine has almost no profile because of our relatively low altitudes by international standards. Three factors lead us to believe that altitude sickness in Australia deserves more serious consideration: Australia is subject to rapid growth in alpine recreational industries; altitude sickness is highly variable between individuals, and some people do experience symptoms already at 1500 m; and there is potential for an occupational health and safety issue amongst workers. To test this hypothesis we examined the relationship between any high altitude symptoms and a rapid ascent to an intermediate altitude (1800 m) by undertaking an intervention study in a cohort of eight medical clinic staff, conducted during July of the 2012 (Southern Hemisphere) ski season, using self-reporting questionnaires, at Mansfield (316 m above sea level) and at the Ski Resort of Mt Buller (1800 m), Victoria, Australia. The intervention consisted of ascent by car from Mansfield to Mt Buller (approx. 40 min drive). Participants completed a self-reporting questionnaire including demographic data and information on frequency of normal homeostatic processes (fluid intake and output, food intake and output, symptoms including thirst and headaches, and frequency of passing wind or urine). Data were recorded in hourly periods extending over 18 h before and 18 h after ascent. We found that the frequency of flatus production more than doubled following ascent, with a post-ascent frequency of approximately 14 expulsions per person over the 18 h recording period (Rate

  17. Pulmonary Embolism Masquerading as High Altitude Pulmonary Edema at High Altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Prativa; Lohani, Benu; Murphy, Holly

    2016-12-01

    Pandey, Prativa, Benu Lohani, and Holly Murphy. Pulmonary embolism masquerading as high altitude pulmonary edema at high altitude. High Alt Med Biol. 17:353-358, 2016.-Pulmonary embolism (PE) at high altitude is a rare entity that can masquerade as or occur in conjunction with high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and can complicate the diagnosis and management. When HAPE cases do not improve rapidly with descent, other diagnoses, including PE, ought to be considered. From 2013 to 2015, we identified eight cases of PE among 303 patients with initial diagnosis of HAPE. Upon further evaluation, five had deep vein thrombosis (DVT). One woman had a contraceptive ring and seven patients had no known thrombotic risks. PE can coexist with or mimic HAPE and should be considered in patients presenting with shortness of breath from high altitude regardless of thrombotic risk.

  18. Sleep of Andean high altitude natives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coote, J H; Stone, B M; Tsang, G

    1992-01-01

    The structure of sleep in lowland visitors to altitudes greater than 4000 m is grossly disturbed. There are no data on sleep in long-term residents of high altitudes. This paper describes an electroencephalographic study of sleep in high altitude dwellers who were born in and are permanent residents of Cerro de Pasco in the Peruvian Andes, situated at 4330 m. Eight healthy male volunteers aged between 18 and 69 years were studied. Sleep was measured on three consecutive nights for each subject. Electroencephalographs, submental electromyographs and electro-oculograms were recorded. Only data from the third night were used in the analysis. The sleep patterns of these subjects resembled the normal sleep patterns described by others in lowlanders at sea level. There were significant amounts of slow wave sleep in the younger subjects and rapid eye movement sleep seemed unimpaired.

  19. ARMAS and NAIRAS Comparisons of Radiation at Aviation Altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    Space Environment Technologies and the Space Weather Center (SWC) at Utah State University are deploying and obtaining effective dose rate radiation data from dosimeters flown on research aircraft. This project is called Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS). Through several dozen flights since 2013 the ARMAS project has successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro-dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from galactic cosmic rays (GCR's) and solar energetic particles (SEP's). Space weather effects upon the near Earth environment are to dynamic changes in the energy transfer process from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. The coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect human tissue and the aircrafts technology as a result of radiation exposure. We describe and compare the types of radiation we have been measuring with the NAIRAS global climatological model as it relates to human tissue susceptibility and as a source at different altitude regions.

  20. Variability in pulmonary function following rapid altitude ascent to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalande, S; Anderson, P J; Miller, A D; Ceridon, M L; Beck, K C; O'Malley, K A; Johnson, J B; Johnson, B D

    2011-09-01

    The impact of acute altitude exposure on pulmonary function is variable. A large inter-individual variability in the changes in forced expiratory flows (FEFs) is reported with acute exposure to altitude, which is suggested to represent an interaction between several factors influencing bronchial tone such as changes in gas density, catecholamine stimulation, and mild interstitial edema. This study examined the association between FEF variability, acute mountain sickness (AMS) and various blood markers affecting bronchial tone (endothelin-1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), catecholamines, angiotensin II) in 102 individuals rapidly transported to the South Pole (2835 m). The mean FEF between 25 and 75% (FEF(25-75)) and blood markers were recorded at sea level and after the second night at altitude. AMS was assessed using Lake Louise questionnaires. FEF(25-75) increased by an average of 12% with changes ranging from -26 to +59% from sea level to altitude. On the second day, AMS incidence was 36% and was higher in individuals with increases in FEF(25-75) (41 vs. 22%, P = 0.05). Ascent to altitude induced an increase in endothelin-1 levels, with greater levels observed in individuals with decreased FEF(25-75). Epinephrine levels increased with ascent to altitude and the response was six times larger in individuals with decreased FEF(25-75). Greater levels of endothelin-1 in individuals with decreased FEF(25-75) suggest a response consistent with pulmonary hypertension and/or mild interstitial edema, while epinephrine may be upregulated in these individuals to clear lung fluid through stimulation of β(2)-adrenergic receptors.

  1. Variability in low altitude astronomical refraction as a function of altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Russell D; Lozowski, Edward P; Fathi-Nejad, Arsha

    2008-12-01

    Low altitude astronomical refraction (LAAR) of the setting Sun was measured over a sea horizon from a coastal location in Barbados, West Indies. The altitude of the upper limb of the Sun and the apparent horizon were determined using a digital video camera (Canon XL2) and a digital SLR camera (Canon EOS 5D). A total of 14 sunsets were measured between 2005 and 2007. From these measurements LAAR variability was estimated at 14 standard altitudes of the refracted Sun between 0 degrees .01 and 4 degrees .5. The relative variability decreases with increasing altitude from +/- 0.0195 of mean refraction at an altitude of 0 degrees .01 to +/- 0.0142 at 4 degrees .5. If extrapolated to an altitude of 15 degrees , a linear fit to the data produces a relative variability of +/- 0.0038 and an absolute variability of +/- 0(").45. Statistical analysis of the relative variability in LAAR appears to support the decreasing trend. However, error propagation analysis further suggests that the observed values of refraction may exceed the accuracy of the measurement system at altitudes higher than 2 degrees .

  2. High-altitude physiology: lessons from Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Peter D.; Simonson, Tatum S.; Wei, Guan; Wagner, Harrieth; Wuren, Tanna; Yan, Ma; Qin, Ga; Ge, Rili

    2013-05-01

    Polycythemia is a universal lowlander response to altitude; healthy Andean high-altitude natives also have elevated [Hb]. While this may enhance O2 transport to tissues, studies have shown that acute isovolumic changes in [Hb] do not affect exercise capacity. Many high-altitude Tibetans have evolved sea-level values of [Hb], providing a natural opportunity to study this issue. In 21 young healthy male Tibetans with [Hb] between 15 and 23 g/dl, we measured VO2MAX and O2 transport capacity at 4200m. VO2MAX was higher when [Hb] was lower (Pcardiac output and muscle O2 diffusional conductance, but neither ventilation nor the alveolar-arterial PO2 difference (AaPO2) varied with [Hb]. In contrast, Andean high altitude natives remain polycythemic with larger lungs and higher lung diffusing capacity, a smaller exercising AaPO2, and lower ventilation. The challenges now are (1) to understand the different adaptive pathways used by Andeans and Tibetans, and (2) to determine in Tibetans whether, during evolution, reduced [Hb] appeared first, causing compensatory cardiac and muscle adaptations, or if enhanced cardiac function and muscle O2 transport capacity appeared first, permitting secondary reduction in [Hb]. For (2), further research is necessary to determine the basis of enhanced cardiac function and muscle O2 transport, and identify molecular targets of evolution in heart and muscle. Putative mutations can then be timed and compared to appearance of those affecting [Hb].

  3. Measurement of Aircraft Speed and Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-01

    Albert W. Hall, Thomas M. Moul, Virgil S. Ritchie, and Robert T. Taylor who, as members of a technical review covinittee, made many valuable...Terry J.; and Webb, Lainie D.: Calibrations and Comparisons of Pressuie-Type Airspeed-Altitude Systems of the X-15 Airplane From Subsonic to High

  4. Altitude, Orthocenter of a Triangle and Triangulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the altitudes of a triangle (the cevians perpendicular to the opposite sides. Using the generalized Ceva’s Theorem, we prove the existence and uniqueness of the orthocenter of a triangle [7]. Finally, we formalize in Mizar [1] some formulas [2] to calculate distance using triangulation.

  5. A space weather index for the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Matthias M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The additional dose contribution to the radiation exposure at aviation altitudes during Solar Particle Events (SPEs has been a matter of concern for many years. After the Halloween storms in 2003 several airlines began to implement mitigation measures such as rerouting and lowering flight altitudes in response to alerts on the NOAA S-scale regarding solar radiation storms. These alerts are based on the integral proton flux above 10 MeV measured aboard the corresponding GOES-satellite which is operated outside the Earth’s atmosphere in a geosynchronous orbit. This integral proton flux has, however, been proved to be an insufficient parameter to apply to the radiation field at aviation altitudes without an accompanying analysis of the shape of the energy spectrum. Consequently, false alarms and corresponding disproportionate reactions ensued. Since mitigating measures can be quite cost-intensive, there has been a demand for appropriate space weather information among responsible airline managers for about a decade. Against this background, we propose the introduction of a new Space Weather index D, based on dose rates at aviation altitudes produced by solar protons during solar radiation storms, as the relevant parameter for the assessment of corresponding radiation exposure. The Space Weather index D is a natural number given by a graduated table of ranges of dose rates in ascending order which is derived by an equation depending on the dose rate of solar protons.

  6. [Concept for a bioclimatic evaluation of an expedition and trekking area at moderate and high altitudes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Reinhold

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a concept which is built up on climate data with a long period of observation (temperature, wind conditions, precipitation, irradiation, and the frequency of low pressure weather situations with unfavorable biotropy stages). It therefore allows an evaluation of the bioclimate of a high mountain area. With the help of this relatively simple method, the risk of problems like AMS can be better estimated. Latest comparisons between different agencies of expeditions show that often the time schedule for climbing to the summit is too short and allows too little time for acclimatization; furthermore the number of days allowed for recreation is too small. A comparison of selected alpine regions shows better conditions in, for example, the Mount Kenia/Kilimandjaro region and parts of the western Andes in Chile, whereas the Himalaya and the Karakorum group can be problematic.

  7. Changes in physical performance parameters during and after moderate altitude training in elite cross country skiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kurt; Höög, Martina; Willis, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    and then grade every minute. Oxygen uptake (VO2) was measured continuously during submaximal and maximal exercise. Blood lactate concentrations were measured during the 1 min rest between submax stages and 2 min after the max test. Power at each submax and max stage were calculated from roller ski friction...... and body weight against gravity [1]. Each stage power was further used for calculations of power at VO2max, (WVO2max), work efficiency at submaximal loads (GE) and for the estimation of O2 cost at maximal work load (used to calculate accumulated O2 deficit (MOD)) [2]. RESULTS: At NORM1, the skiers’ body...... mass was 71.9±10.7kg and VO2max 214±12ml/min/kg0.73. The GE varied between 17.9-19.5% during the 3-5 submaximal loads, with no difference between conditions (P>0.05). Also, blood lactate accumulation after submaximal exercise loads showed no difference between conditions (PVO2max...

  8. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in healthy children and adolescents at moderately high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilarraza-Lomelí, Hermes; Castañeda-López, Javier; Myers, Jonathan; Miranda, Irma; Quiroga, Paula; Rius, María-Dolores; Lopez-de-la-Vega, César; Vallejo, Enrique; Calderón, Juan; Figueroa, Javier; Buendía, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise testing is a tool that helps clinicians to establish diagnosis and calculate risk stratification in adults. However, the utility of this test among children with congenital heart disease has not been fully explored. The goal of this study was to describe reference values for cardiopulmonary performance of healthy children. This study included 103 apparently healthy children (aged from 4 to 18 years; 61 boys), who underwent cardiopulmonary test using a treadmill protocol. All tests took place at 2240m above sea level (Mexico City). Exercise time was 11±4min. There were no complications. Peak oxygen uptake correlated closely with height in both genders (girls r=0.84; boys r=0.84, p<0.001). A multivariable linear regression model showed that body surface area, exercise time, gender and heart rate reserve were significant predictors of peak oxygen uptake (R(2)=0.815, p<0.001). Peak oxygen uptake was strongly associated with age even among children younger than thirteen years (r=0.74, p<0.001). This study provides physiological values for the major cardiopulmonary variables obtained from exercise testing using a treadmill among healthy children. Cardiopulmonary exercise test can be safely and effectively performed in young children even as young as 4 years old. Variables including age, gender and height are strongly associated with exercise time, peak heart rate and peak oxygen uptake. Regression equations for predicting peak heart rate and peak oxygen uptake are presented as reference values that allow researchers to compare children with heart disease versus those who are healthy. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Is High Altitude Pulmonary Edema Relevant to Hawai‘i?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    High altitude clinical syndromes have been described in the medical literature but may be under recognized in the state of Hawai‘i. As tourism increases, high altitude injuries may follow given the easy access to high altitude attractions. Visitors and clinicians should be aware of the dangers associated with the rapid ascent to high altitudes in the perceived comfort of a vehicle. This paper will review the basic pathophysiology, prevention, and treatment of the most serious of the high altitude clinical syndromes, high altitude pulmonary edema. PMID:25478294

  10. Estimation of high altitude Martian dust parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabari, Jayesh; Bhalodi, Pinali

    2016-07-01

    Dust devils are known to occur near the Martian surface mostly during the mid of Southern hemisphere summer and they play vital role in deciding background dust opacity in the atmosphere. The second source of high altitude Martian dust could be due to the secondary ejecta caused by impacts on Martian Moons, Phobos and Deimos. Also, the surfaces of the Moons are charged positively due to ultraviolet rays from the Sun and negatively due to space plasma currents. Such surface charging may cause fine grains to be levitated, which can easily escape the Moons. It is expected that the escaping dust form dust rings within the orbits of the Moons and therefore also around the Mars. One more possible source of high altitude Martian dust is interplanetary in nature. Due to continuous supply of the dust from various sources and also due to a kind of feedback mechanism existing between the ring or tori and the sources, the dust rings or tori can sustain over a period of time. Recently, very high altitude dust at about 1000 km has been found by MAVEN mission and it is expected that the dust may be concentrated at about 150 to 500 km. However, it is mystery how dust has reached to such high altitudes. Estimation of dust parameters before-hand is necessary to design an instrument for the detection of high altitude Martian dust from a future orbiter. In this work, we have studied the dust supply rate responsible primarily for the formation of dust ring or tori, the life time of dust particles around the Mars, the dust number density as well as the effect of solar radiation pressure and Martian oblateness on dust dynamics. The results presented in this paper may be useful to space scientists for understanding the scenario and designing an orbiter based instrument to measure the dust surrounding the Mars for solving the mystery. The further work is underway.

  11. Can aneroid sphygmomanometers be used at altitude?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kametas, N A; McAuliffe, F; Krampl, E; Nicolaides, K H; Shennan, A H

    2006-07-01

    Mercury-independent devices are increasingly being used in clinical practice as mercury will soon be removed from clinical use as a result of environmental, health and safety concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of a portable aneroid device in an adult population at high altitude by following the part of the protocol of the British Hypertension Society regarding comparison between device and observer. We examined 10 subjects in Cerro de Pasco, Peru, which is situated 4370 m above sea level. The aneroid device was initially calibrated at both high altitude and at sea level to ensure optimal function. Validation of the device was undertaken at high altitude by connecting it in parallel to two mercury sphygmomanometers. Eleven sequential same-arm measurements were taken from each subject by two trained observers, alternating between mercury sphygmomanometry and the aneroid device. Simultaneous mercury readings were also recorded for additional analysis. During calibration, all 60 comparisons between the aneroid and mercury sphygmomanometers were within 3 mm Hg both at sea level and at high altitude. At validation, the device achieved an A grade for both systolic and diastolic pressures and also fulfilled the requirements of the Association for the Advancement of Medical Instrumentation. The mean and standard deviation for systolic and diastolic pressures, respectively, were -1.32 (4.3) mm Hg and 3.7 (4.7) mm Hg in sequential analysis and -0.7 (2.6) mm Hg and -3.3 (2.7) mm Hg in simultaneous analysis. We conclude that the Riester-Exacta portable aneroid device can be recommended for use in an adult population at high altitude.

  12. High altitude pulmonary edema among "Amarnath Yatris"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaiz A Koul

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Annual pilgrimage (Yatra to the cave shrine of Shri Amarnath Ji′ is a holy ritual among the Hindu devotees of Lord Shiva. Located in the Himalayan Mountain Range (altitude 13,000 ft in south Kashmir, the shrine is visited by thousands of devotees and altitude sickness is reportedly common. Materials and Methods: More than 600,000 pilgrims visited the cave shrine in 2011 and 2012 with 239 recorded deaths. Thirty one patients with suspected altitude sickness were referred from medical centers en-route the cave to Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences, a tertiary-care center in capital Srinagar (5,000 ft. The clinical features and the response to treatment were recorded. Results: Thirty-one patients (all lowlanders, 19 male; age 18-60 years, median 41 had presented with acute onset breathlessness of 1-4 days (median 1.9 d starting within 12-24 h of a rapid ascent; accompanied by cough (68%, headache (8%, dizziness and nausea (65%. Sixteen patients had associated encephalopathy. Clinical features on admission included tachypnea ( n = 31, tachycardia ( n = 23, bilateral chest rales ( n = 29, cyanosis ( n = 22 and grade 2-4 encephalopathy. Hypoxemia was demonstrable in 24 cases and bilateral infiltrates on radiologic imaging in 29. Ten patients had evidence of high-altitude cerebral edema. All patients were managed with oxygen, steroids, nifedipine, sildenafil and other supportive measures including invasive ventilation ( n = 3. Three patients died due to multiorgan dysfunction. Conclusions: Altitude sickness is common among Amaranath Yatris from the plains and appropriate educational strategies should be invoked for prevention and prompt treatment.

  13. Nutrição para os praticantes de exercício em grandes altitudes Nutritional strategy for exercising in high altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Buss

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Quando o atleta ascende a uma grande altitude, ele é exposto a uma pressão barométrica reduzida, e os efeitos fisiológicos que acompanham estas mudanças da pressão atmosférica podem ter grande influência sobre o seu organismo e seu desempenho físico. Acredita-se que a hipóxia seja responsável pelo início de uma cascata de eventos sinalizadores que, ao final, levam à adaptação à altitude. A exposição aguda à hipóxia provoca sonolência, fadiga mental e muscular e prostração. Cefaléia, náusea e anorexia são sintomas provocados pela Doença Aguda das Montanhas, que pode ocorrer nos primeiros dias de permanência na altitude. Uma estratégia nutricional adequada é fundamental para que o organismo não sofra nenhum estresse adicional. O objetivo deste trabalho foi apresentar os principais efeitos da altitude sobre o organismo e sobre o desempenho físico, discutir e/ou sugerir recomendações nutricionais para esta situação e, se possível, apresentar uma orientação nutricional prática para o atleta na altitude. Algumas das principais conclusões encontradas foram: o consumo energético deve ser aumentado; é fundamental monitorar a quantidade de líquidos ingeridos e escolher alimentos agradáveis ao paladar, ricos em energia e nutrientes. Recomenda-se trabalhar com um nutricionista do esporte com antecedência, para que um plano alimentar individual seja elaborado e colocado em prática antes mesmo da viagem à altitude.When athletes are subject to high altitudes, they are exposed to a lower barometric pressure and the physiological effects that accompany these atmospheric pressure changes can have a strong influence on their bodies and performance. Hypoxia is thought to be responsible for triggering a cascade of signaling events that eventually leads to altitude acclimatization. Acute exposure to hypoxia causes sleepiness, mental and muscle fatigue and prostration. Headache, nausea and anorexia are some of the

  14. Role of the altitude level on cerebral autoregulation in residents at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Gerard F A; Krins, Anne; Basnyat, Buddha; Odoom, Joseph A; Ince, Can

    2007-08-01

    Cerebral autoregulation is impaired in Himalayan high-altitude residents who live above 4,200 m. This study was undertaken to determine the altitude at which this impairment of autoregulation occurs. A second aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that administration of oxygen can reverse this impairment in autoregulation at high altitudes. In four groups of 10 Himalayan high-altitude dwellers residing at 1,330, 2,650, 3,440, and 4,243 m, arterial oxygen saturation (Sa(O(2))), blood pressure, and middle cerebral artery blood velocity were monitored during infusion of phenylephrine to determine static cerebral autoregulation. On the basis of these measurements, the cerebral autoregulation index (AI) was calculated. Normally, AI is between zero and 1. AI of 0 implies absent autoregulation, and AI of 1 implies intact autoregulation. At 1,330 m (Sa(O(2)) = 97%), 2,650 m (Sa(O(2)) = 96%), and 3,440 m (Sa(O(2)) = 93%), AI values (mean +/- SD) were, respectively, 0.63 +/- 0.27, 0.57 +/- 0.22, and 0.57 +/- 0.15. At 4,243 m (Sa(O(2)) = 88%), AI was 0.22 +/- 0.18 (P < 0.0005, compared with AI at the lower altitudes) and increased to 0.49 +/- 0.23 (P = 0.008, paired t-test) when oxygen was administered (Sa(O(2)) = 98%). In conclusion, high-altitude residents living at 4,243 m have almost total loss of cerebral autoregulation, which improved during oxygen administration. Those people living at 3,440 m and lower have still functioning cerebral autoregulation. This study showed that the altitude region between 3,440 and 4,243 m, marked by Sa(O(2)) in the high-altitude dwellers of 93% and 88%, is a transitional zone, above which cerebral autoregulation becomes critically impaired.

  15. Endocrine and metabolic responses to extreme altitude and physical exercise in climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benso, Andrea; Broglio, Fabio; Aimaretti, Gianluca; Lucatello, Barbara; Lanfranco, Fabio; Ghigo, Ezio; Grottoli, Silvia

    2007-12-01

    Chronic hypoxia induces complex metabolic and endocrine adaptations. High-altitude (HA) exposure is a physiological model of hypoxia. To further investigate the endocrine and metabolic responses to extreme HA. We studied nine male elite climbers at sea level and at 5200 m after climbing Mt. Everest. After 7 weeks at HA, body weight was reduced (Pweight loss, leptin levels showed non-significant trend toward decrease, while ghrelin levels did not change at all. The results of the present study in a unique experimental human model of maximal exposure to altitude and physical exercise demonstrate that extreme HA and strenuous physical exercise are coupled with specific endocrine adaptations. These include increased activity of the GH/IGF-I axis and a low T(3) syndrome but no change in ghrelin and leptin that was expected taking into account body weight decrease. These findings would contribute to better understanding human endocrine and metabolic physiology in hypoxic conditions.

  16. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Meier Matthias M.; Trompier François; Ambrozova Iva; Kubancak Jan; Matthiä Daniel; Ploc Ondrej; Santen Nicole; Wirtz Michael

    2016-01-01

    Space weather can strongly affect the complex radiation field at aviation altitudes. The assessment of the corresponding radiation exposure of aircrew and passengers has been a challenging task as well as a legal obligation in the European Union for many years. The response of several radiation measuring instruments operated by different European research groups during joint measuring flights was investigated in the framework of the CONCORD (COmparisoN of COsmic Radiation Detectors) campaign ...

  17. Interviewing the moderator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Traulsen, Janine Morgall; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Björnsdóttir, Ingunn

    2004-01-01

    of a one-on-one interview with the FG moderator by another member of the research team. The authors argue, with reference to a specific study, that interviewing the moderator adds a new and valuable dimension to group interviews used in research. They describe how this method came about and provide...... a concrete example of its use in a recently completed research project. They discuss several advantages of the interview, among them that it provides information about group interaction and participant behavior, and furnishes additional data on what is discussed when the tape recorder is turned off....

  18. Pulmonary embolism in young natives of high altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Singhal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombotic events are relatively common in high altitude areas and known to occur in young soldiers working at high altitude without usual risk factors associated with thrombosis at sea-level. However, till now, cases with thrombotic events were reported only in lowlanders staying at high altitude. These two cases of pulmonary embolism demonstrate that thrombotic events can occur in highlanders after a prolonged stay at the extreme altitude.

  19. Altitude Performance of Modified J71 Afterburner with Revised Engine Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Useller, James W.; Russey, Robert E.

    1955-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in an altitude test chamber at the NACA Lewis laboratory to determine the effect of a revision of the rated engine operating conditions and modifications to the afterburner fue1 system, flameholder, and shell cooling on the augmented performance of the J71-A-2 (x-29) turbo jet engine operating at altitude . The afterburner modifications were made by the manufacturer to improve the endurance at sea-level, high-pressure conditions and to reduce the afterburner shell temperatures. The engine operating conditions of rated rotational speed and turbine-outlet gas temperature were increased. Data were obtained at conditions simulating flight at a Mach number of 0.9 and at altitudes from 40,000 to 60,000 feet. The afterburner modifications caused a reduction in afterburner combustion efficiency. The increase in rated engine speed and turbine-outlet temperature coupled with the afterburner modifications resulted in the over-all thrust of the engine and afterburner being unchanged at a given afterburner equivalence ratio, while the specific fuel consumption was increased slightly. A moderate shift in the range of equivalence ratios over which the afterburner would operate was encountered, but the maximum operable altitude remained unaltered. The afterburner-shell temperatures were also slightly reduced because of the modifications to the afterburner.

  20. [Effect of altitude on iron absorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, F; Zavaleta, N; Hertrampf, E; Berlanga, R; Camborda, L; Olivares, M

    1998-03-01

    Iron bioavailability was evaluated in people living in high altitudes. Absorption was estimated from a reference dose of ferrous ascorbate and from a standard diet of wheat flour, using extrinsic tag radioisotope technique of 55Fe and 59Fe. Twenty four volunteers, healthy women, with ages ranging from 28 to 45 years, participated. Of those, eleven lived at 3450 meters above sea level (m.a.s.l.) in Huancayo city-Peru (study group), and 13 lived in Santiago de Chile at 630 m.a.s.l. (control group). Iron absorption from reference dose of ferrous ascorbate was 32.0% and 31.1% in the study and control groups respectively. The geometric mean of iron absorption from the standard diet, corrected to 40% of absorption of reference dose, was 9.0% and 6.9% in the study and control groups respectively (NS). The results suggest that altitude does not produce a high iron absorption in highlander residents.

  1. HAWC - The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepe, Andreas; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    The high altitude water Cherenkov observatory (HAWC) is an instrument for the detection of high energy cosmic gamma-rays. Its predecessor Milagro has successfully proven that the water Cherenkov technology for gamma-ray astronomy is a useful technique. HAWC is currently under construction at Sierra Negra in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m and will include several improvements compared to Milagro. Two complementary DAQ systems of the HAWC detector allow for the observation of a large fraction of the sky with a very high duty cycle and independent of environmental conditions. HAWC will observe the gamma-ray sky from about 100 GeV up to 100 TeV. Also the cosmic ray flux anisotropy on different angular length scales is object of HAWC science. Because of HAWC's large effective area and field of view, we describe its prospects to observe gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) as an example for transient sources.

  2. Dust observations at orbital altitudes surrounding Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, L; Weber, T D; Malaspina, D; Crary, F; Ergun, R E; Delory, G T; Fowler, C M; Morooka, M W; McEnulty, T; Eriksson, A I; Andrews, D J; Horanyi, M; Collette, A; Yelle, R; Jakosky, B M

    2015-11-01

    Dust is common close to the martian surface, but no known process can lift appreciable concentrations of particles to altitudes above ~150 kilometers. We present observations of dust at altitudes ranging from 150 to above 1000 kilometers by the Langmuir Probe and Wave instrument on the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft. Based on its distribution, we interpret this dust to be interplanetary in origin. A comparison with laboratory measurements indicates that the dust grain size ranges from 1 to 12 micrometers, assuming a typical grain velocity of ~18 kilometers per second. These direct observations of dust entering the martian atmosphere improve our understanding of the sources, sinks, and transport of interplanetary dust throughout the inner solar system and the associated impacts on Mars's atmosphere.

  3. 14 CFR 135.93 - Autopilot: Minimum altitudes for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Autopilot: Minimum altitudes for use. 135... Operations § 135.93 Autopilot: Minimum altitudes for use. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), (d), and (e) of this section, no person may use an autopilot at an altitude above the terrain which is...

  4. Endotracheal Tube Cuff Management at Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-05

    model study of endotracheal intubation including mechanical ventilation and four methods of cuff pressure management during ascent and descent...AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2014-0007 Endotracheal Tube Cuff Management at Altitude SSgt Tyler J. Britton, RRT1; Richard D. Branson, RRT2...REPORT TYPE Special Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) June 2012 – December 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Endotracheal Tube Cuff Management

  5. Performance of portable ventilators at altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-20

    including suggestions for reducing this burden to Department of Defense, Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information Operations...D.R.J.). This study was presented as a poster at the Military Health System Research Symposium, August 12Y15, 2013, in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Address...BirdVSO2 and theLTV- 1000 at ranges of altitudes from sea level to 9,800 ft using lung models of adult respiratory distress syndrome and severe asthma

  6. Neutral Barium Cloud Evolution at Different Altitudes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李磊; 徐荣栏

    2002-01-01

    Considering the joint effects of diffusion, collision, oxidation and photoionization, we study the evolution of the barium cloud at different altitudes in the space plasma active experiment. The results present the variation of the loss rate, number density distribution and brightness of the barium cloud over the range from 120 to 260km.This can be divided into oxidation, oxidation plus photoionization and photoionization regions.

  7. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Miguel; HAWC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view experiment comprised of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs) to study transient and steady emission of TeV gamma and cosmic rays. Each 200000 l WCD is instrumented with 4 PMTs providing charge and timing information. The array covers ~22000 m2 at an altitude of 4100 m a.s.l. inside the Pico de Orizaba national park in Mexico. The high altitude, large active area, and optical isolation of the PMTs allows us to reliably estimate the energy and determine the arrival direction of gamma and cosmic rays with significant sensitivity over energies from several hundred GeV to a hundred TeV. Continuously observing 2 / 3 of the sky every 24 h, HAWC plays a significant role as a survey instrument for multi-wavelength studies. The performance of HAWC makes possible the detection of both transient and steady emissions, the study of diffuse emission and the measurement of the spectra of gamma-ray sources at TeV energies. HAWC is also sensitive to the emission from GRBs above 100 GeV. I will highlight the results from the first year of operation of the full HAWC array, and describe the ongoing site work to expand the array by a factor of 4 to explore the high energy range.

  8. Disturbances in Maternal Steroidogenesis and Appearance of Intrauterine Growth Retardation at High-Altitude Environments Are Established from Early Pregnancy. Effects of Treatment with Antioxidant Vitamins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parraguez, Victor H; Mamani, Sandra; Cofré, Eileen; Castellaro, Giorgio; Urquieta, Bessie; De Los Reyes, Mónica; Astiz, Susana; Gonzalez-Bulnes, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancies at high-altitudes are influenced by hypoxia and oxidative stress and frequently affected by IUGR. However, a common thought is that early pregnant women visiting altitude have no major complications for gestation development, since IUGR is developed during the second half of pregnancy. Thus, using a well-characterized sheep-model, we aimed to determine whether long- and/or short-term exposure to high-altitude may affect maternal steroidogenesis and therefore embryo-fetal growth from conception. The second aim was to differentiate the relative role of hypoxia and oxidative stress by assessing the effects of supplementation with antioxidant agents during this early-pregnancy stage, which were previously found to be useful to prevent IUGR. The results indicate that both long- and short-term exposure to high-altitude causes disturbances in maternal ovarian steroidogenesis and negatively affects embryo-fetal growth already during the very early stages of gestation, with the consequences being even worsened in newcomers to high-altitude. The supply of antioxidant during this period only showed discrete effects for preventing IUGR. In conclusion, the present study gives a warning for clinicians about the risks for early-pregnant women when visiting high-altitude regions and suggests the need for further studies on the effects of the length of exposure and on the interaction of the exposure with the pregnancy stage.

  9. Disturbances in Maternal Steroidogenesis and Appearance of Intrauterine Growth Retardation at High-Altitude Environments Are Established from Early Pregnancy. Effects of Treatment with Antioxidant Vitamins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor H Parraguez

    Full Text Available Pregnancies at high-altitudes are influenced by hypoxia and oxidative stress and frequently affected by IUGR. However, a common thought is that early pregnant women visiting altitude have no major complications for gestation development, since IUGR is developed during the second half of pregnancy. Thus, using a well-characterized sheep-model, we aimed to determine whether long- and/or short-term exposure to high-altitude may affect maternal steroidogenesis and therefore embryo-fetal growth from conception. The second aim was to differentiate the relative role of hypoxia and oxidative stress by assessing the effects of supplementation with antioxidant agents during this early-pregnancy stage, which were previously found to be useful to prevent IUGR. The results indicate that both long- and short-term exposure to high-altitude causes disturbances in maternal ovarian steroidogenesis and negatively affects embryo-fetal growth already during the very early stages of gestation, with the consequences being even worsened in newcomers to high-altitude. The supply of antioxidant during this period only showed discrete effects for preventing IUGR. In conclusion, the present study gives a warning for clinicians about the risks for early-pregnant women when visiting high-altitude regions and suggests the need for further studies on the effects of the length of exposure and on the interaction of the exposure with the pregnancy stage.

  10. Sleep quality alterations in healthy workers at high altitude in Yushu area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Tianyi; Li Wenxiang; Zhang Jianqing; Qi Shengui; Hao Lijuan; Wen Jialin

    2013-01-01

    During the period of reconstruction after Yushu Earthquake,a large number of sea-level or lowland workers ascended there and worked at altitudes between 3750 m and 4878 m which is a hypoxic environment.To investigate the sleep quality at that altitude,we performed two full polysomnographies (PSGs) in 10 volunteers,who were healthy male workers,aged 31±6.6,born and living at sea level,without experience of pre-altitude exposure.The assessment of subjective sleep quality was performed twice in each volunteer.The first investigations were carried out at sea level in Jinan city (pB=760 torr,1 torr=133.322 4 Pa).The second studies were performed at an altitude of 3750 m (pB=416 tonr) in Yushu Jiegu in the same 10 workers after they lived and worked at that altitude for 5 months.At sea level,workers presented a normal sleep structure and a higher oxygenation during sleep.However,as compared to sea-level sleep,at 3750 m,workers had a shorter total sleep time (TST) (p < 0.001),a longer stage 1 non-rapid eye movement (nREM) sleep (p < 0.05) and a shorter 3+4 nREM and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (p < 0.05) with a severe sleep hypoxemia (p < 0.01).Our data suggested that sea-level workers revealed a disturbed sleep and a bad sleep quality with a significant sleep hypoxemia at altitude of 3750 m.Strengthening the prevention and treatment are thereby sorely necessary.

  11. Response to cooling temperature in infants born at an altitude of 4,330 meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frappell, P B; León-Velarde, F; Aguero, L; Mortola, J P

    1998-12-01

    The metabolic response to reduction in ambient temperature was studied in healthy, full-term, 1-d-old infants in Lima (50 m altitude, n = 20) and Cerro de Pasco (4,330 m, barometric pressure approximately 450 mm Hg, n = 20), Peru. Oxygen consumption (V O2) and carbon dioxide production (V CO2) were measured with an open-flow system as each infant rested quietly in a cylindrical humicrib, at wall temperatures of 35 degrees C (warm) and 26 degrees C (cool). The infants were exposed for 20 min to both temperatures, with the higher temperature followed by the lower, and oxygen consumption (V O2) and carbon dioxide production (V CO2) were measured over the last 8 min of each exposure. Average birth weight in Cerro de Pasco (2,933 +/- 77 g [mean +/- SE]) was less than in Lima (3,457 +/- 73 g). In warm conditions, infants born at high altitude had slightly yet significantly lower body and skin temperatures than did those born at low altitude, with similar values of V O2 and heart rate (HR). Neither body nor skin temperature changed in either group during cooling. At low altitude, cooling increased V O2 ( approximately 34%), whereas no significant increase occurred in the high-altitude group. A similar response occurred for HR. Among several possibilities, the most likely interpretation of the results would be that of a decreased thermogenic capacity in the high-altitude infants because of the correspondingly lower oxygen availability during gestation.

  12. Moderator Chemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department`s moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  13. Moderator Chemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  14. Den moderate revolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bøje

    "normale" industrivirksomheder, men den er absolut set begrænset. Årsagerne til denne kun "moderate revolution" af organisationsformerne diskuteres: Er det fordi klassisk organisation og social nærkontakt er nødvendig i den nye økonomi, eller er det manglende fantasi og tryghedsbehov? Begge muligheder...

  15. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression in healthy adults rapidly transported to high altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herman NM

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nicole M Herman,1 Diane E Grill,2 Paul J Anderson,1 Andrew D Miller,1 Jacob B Johnson,1 Kathy A O’Malley,1 Maile L Ceridon Richert,1 Bruce D Johnson1 1Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, 2Department of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN, USA Abstract: Although mechanisms of high altitude illness have been studied extensively, the processes behind the development of these conditions are still unclear. Few genome-wide studies on rapid exposure to high altitude have been performed. Each year, scientists and support workers are transferred by plane from McMurdo Station in Antarctica (sea level to the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station at 2,835 meters. This uniform and rapid transfer to altitude provides a unique opportunity to study the effects of hypobaric hypoxia on gene expression that may help illustrate the body's adaptations to these conditions. We hypothesized that an extensive number of genes would change with rapid exposure to altitude and further expected that these genes would correspond to inflammatory pathways proposed as a mechanism in development of acute mountain sickness. Peripheral venous blood samples were drawn from 98 healthy subjects at sea level and again on day two at altitude. Microarray analysis was performed on these samples. In total, 1,118 probe sets with significant P-values and fold changes (90% upregulated were identified and entered into MetaCore™ software. Several pathways, including oxidative phosphorylation, cytoskeleton remodeling, and platelet aggregation, were significantly represented by the data set and all were upregulated. Many genes changed expression, and the vast majority of these increased. Increased metabolism in peripheral blood mononuclear cells suggests increased inflammatory activity. Keywords: peripheral blood mononuclear cells, microarray, gene expression, acute mountain sickness

  16. High altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) in an Indian pilgrim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthi, Sagar; Basnyat, Buddha

    2013-11-01

    Increasing number of Hindu pilgrims visit the Himalayas where some of them suffer from high altitude illness including the life threatening forms, high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral oedema. Compared to tourists and trekkers, pilgrims are usually ignorant about altitude illness. This is a case of a pilgrim who suffered from HAPE on his trip to Kailash-Mansarovar and is brought to a tertiary level hospital in Kathmandu. This report emphasises on how to treat a patient with HAPE, a disease which is increasingly being seen in the high altitude pilgrim population.

  17. Hypoxia: adapting to high altitude by mutating EPAS-1, the gene encoding HIF-2α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Patot, Martha C Tissot; Gassmann, Max

    2011-01-01

    Living at high altitude is demanding and thus drives adaptational mechanisms. The Tibetan population has had a longer evolutionary period to adapt to high altitude than other mountain populations such as Andeans. As a result, some Tibetans living at high altitudes do not show markedly elevated red blood cell production as compared to South American high altitude natives such as Quechuas or Aymaras, thereby avoiding high blood viscosity creating cardiovascular risk. Unexpectedly, the responsible mutation(s) reducing red blood cell production do not involve either the gene encoding the blood hormone erythropoietin (Epo), or the corresponding regulatory sequences flanking the Epo gene. Similarly, functional mutations in the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α) gene that represents the oxygen-dependent subunit of the HIF-1 heterodimer, the latter being the main regulator of over 100 hypoxia-inducible genes, have not been described so far. It was not until very recently that three independent groups showed that the gene encoding HIF-2α, EPAS-1 (Wenger et al. 1997), represents a key gene mutated in Tibetan populations adapted to living at high altitudes (Beall et al. 2010 , Yi et al. 2010 , Simonson et al. 2010). Hypoxia-inducible transcription factors were first identified by the description of HIF-1 (Semenza et al. 1991 , 1992), which was subsequently found to enhance transcription of multiple genes that encode proteins necessary for rescuing from hypoxic exposure, including erythropoietic, angiogenic and glycolytic proteins. Then HIF-2 was identified (Ema et al. 1997 ; Flamme et al. 1997 ; Hogenesch et al. 1997 ; and Tian et al. 1997) and although it is highly similar to HIF-1 and has the potential to bind (Camenisch et al. 2001) and mediate (Mole et al. 2009) many of the same genes as HIF-1, its biological actions in response to hypoxia are distinct from those of HIF-1 (reviewed by Loboda et al. 2010). By now, several of these HIF-2 mediated

  18. The role of oxygen-increased respirator in humans ascending to high altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Guanghao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute mountain sickness (AMS is common for people who live in low altitude areas ascending to the high altitude. Many instruments have been developed to treat mild cases of AMS. However, long-lasting and portable anti-hypoxia equipment for individual is not yet available. Methods Oxygen-increased respirator (OIR has been designed to reduce the risk of acute mountain sickness in acute exposure to low air pressure. It can increase the density of oxygen by increasing total atmospheric pressure in a mask. Male subjects were screened, and eighty-eight were qualified to perform the experiments. The subjects were divided into 5 groups and were involved in some of the tests at 4 different altitudes (Group 1, 2: 3700 m; Group 3,4,5: 4000 m, 4700 m, 5380 m with and without OIR. These tests include heart rate, saturation of peripheral oxygen (SpO2, malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, blood lactate (BLA and PWC (physical work capacity -170. Results The results showed that higher SpO2, lower heart rate (except during exercise and better recovery of heart rate were observed from all the subjects ’with OIR’ compared with ’without OIR’ (P Conclusions We suggested that OIR may play a useful role in protecting people ascending to high altitude before acclimatization.

  19. Global Trends in Glacial Cirque Floor Altitudes and Their Relationships with Climate, Equilibrium Line Altitudes, and Mountain Range Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, S. G.; Humphries, E.

    2013-12-01

    Glacial erosion at the base of cirque headwalls and the creation of threshold slopes above cirque floors may contribute to the 'glacial buzzsaw' effect in limiting the altitude of some mountain ranges. Since glacial extent and therefore glacial erosion rate depends on the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) of a region, the altitude of cirque formation should be a function of the ELA. Several regional studies have shown that cirque floors form at an altitude approximating average Quaternary ELAs in some mountain ranges, but a global correlation has not yet been demonstrated. We examined the correlation between cirque altitudes and global ELA trends by compiling existing and new cirque altitude and morphometry data from > 30 mountain ranges at a wide range of latitudes. Where available, we calculate or present the average cirque altitude, relief, and latitude. We compared these altitudes to both the global East Pacific ELA and local ELAs where available. For the locations analyzed, the majority of average cirque altitudes fall between the Eastern Pacific modern and LGM ELAs, and mountain range height is typically limited to cirque formation is dependent upon the ELA, and that cirques likely form as a result of average, rather than extreme, glacial conditions. Furthermore, the correlation between cirque altitude and ELA, along with the restricted window of relief, implies that cirque formation is a factor in limiting peak altitude in ranges that rise above the ELA.

  20. High altitude balloon experiments at IIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Akshata; Sreejith, A. G.; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    Recent advances in balloon experiments as well as in electronics have made it possible to fly scientific payloads at costs accessible to university departments. We have begun a program of high altitude ballooning at the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bengaluru. The primary purpose of this activity is to test low-cost ultraviolet (UV) payloads for eventual space flight, but we will also try scientific exploration of the phenomena occurring in the upper atmosphere, including sprites and meteorite impacts. We present the results of the initial experiments carried out at the CREST campus of IIA, Hosakote, and describe our plans for the future.

  1. Comparison of the space radiation environment at Foton M3 satellite altitudes and on aircraft altitudes for minimum of solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploc, Ondrej; Dachev, Tsvetan; Spurny, Frantisek; Tomov, Borislav; Dimitrov, Plamen; Matviichuk, Yury; Bankov, Nikolay

    The space radiation environments at Foton M3 and aircraft altitudes were measured by using of practically equal silicon detector based on a deposited energy spectrometers in the fall of 2007. The aircraft measurements were performed on commercial flights of CSA airlines, while the Foton M3 measurements were inside of the ESA Biopan 6 experiment. Foton M3 orbit was close to circular between 260 and 289 km altitude and about 63° inclination. The relatively high inclination and small shielding of the detector (0.81 g/cm2 ) allow us to observe doses by electrons in the outer radiation belt as high as 2.3 mGy/hour. The comparison of the total GCR deposited doses for the Foton M3 time interval, which coincides with the absolute cycle 23 minimum of the solar activity is about 15% higher than the measured during the Foton M2 satellite doses in 2005. Comparisons of the latitudinal profiles for ISS in 2001, Foton 2 and 3 satellites and aircrafts show that the ratio of doses is as 1:2:3. Aircraft measurements are characterised through average values of exposure during frequent, statistically well based measurements on the routes Prague - New York. Dose absorbed in Si-detector per flight on these routes was about 8% higher in 2007 than in 2005. Different comparisons with the existing models for the radiation environment on aircraft and spacecraft altitudes are presented in the paper also and discussed.

  2. Protective effect of ginkgolide B on high altitude cerebral edema of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botao, Yu; Ma, Jie; Xiao, Wenjing; Xiang, Qingyu; Fan, Kaihua; Hou, Jun; Wu, Juan; Jing, Weihua

    2013-03-01

    Ginkgolide B (GB) is one of the ginkgolides isolated from leaves of the Ginkgo biloba tree. The aim of this study was to investigate whether GB has a protective effect on high altitude cerebral edema (HACE) of rats. HACE was induced by hypobaric hypoxia exposure for 24 hours in an animal decompression chamber with the chamber pressure of 267 mmHg to simulate an altitude of 8000 m. Before the exposure, three doses (3, 6, and 12 mg·kg(-1)) of GB were given intraperitoneally (ip) daily for 3 days. Effects of GB on brain water content (BWC), activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), concentration of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA), expression of active caspase-3 and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were measured. In GB pretreatment groups (6 and 12 mg·kg(-1), but not 3 mg·kg(-1)), BWC, the concentration of MDA, the expression of active caspase-3 and PARP were reduced significantly, while the activity of SOD and concentration of GSH were significantly increased. In conclusion, these results indicate that GB has a protective effect on cerebral edema caused by high altitude in rats. The protective effect of GB might be attributed to its antioxidant properties and suppression of the caspase-dependent apoptosis pathway.

  3. Changes in body fluid compartments on re-induction to high altitude and effect of diuretics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M. V.; Rawal, S. B.; Tyagi, A. K.; Bhagat, Maj J. K.; Parshad, R.; Divekar, H. M.

    1988-03-01

    Studies were carried out in 29 healthy young adults in the Indian Army stationed in the plains and posted at an elevation of 3500 m for more than 6 months. After exposure to a low elevation in Delhi (260 m) for 3 weeks they were reinduced to a height of 3500 m. The subjects were divided into three groups, each of which was treated with either placebo or acetazolamide or spironolactone. The drug treatment was started immediately after their landing at high altitude and continued for 2 days only. Total body water, extracellular fluid, intracellular fluid, plasma volume, blood pH, PaO2, PaCO2 and blood viscosity were determined on exposure at Delhi and on re-induction to high altitude. Plasma volume was increased after the descent from high altitude and remained high for up to 21 day's study. This increased plasma volume may have some significance in the pathogenesis of pulmonary oedema. Total body water and intracellular fluid content were increased at 260 m elevation, while extracellular fluid decreased. On re-induction there was a decrease in total body water with no change in the extracellular fluid content.

  4. Effects of High Altitude on Sleep and Respiratory System and Theirs Adaptations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turhan San

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude (HA environments have adverse effects on the normal functioning body of people accustomed to living at low altitudes because of the change in barometric pressure which causes decrease in the amount of oxygen leading to hypobaric hypoxia. Sustained exposure to hypoxia has adverse effects on body weight, muscle structure and exercise capacity, mental functioning, and sleep quality. The most important step of acclimatization is the hyperventilation which is achieved by hypoxic ventilatory response of the peripheral chemoreceptors. Hyperventilation results in increase in arterial carbondioxide concentration. Altitude also affects sleep and cardiac output, which is the other determinant of oxygen delivery. Upon initial exposure to HA, the resting pulse rate increases rapidly, but with acclimatization, heart rate and cardiac output tend to fall. Another important component that leads to decrease in cardiac output is the reduction in the stroke volume with acclimatization. During sleep at HA, the levels of CO2 in the blood can drop very low and this can switch off the drive to breathe. Only after the body senses a further drop in O2 levels breathing is started again. Periodic breathing is thought to result from instability in the control system through the hypoxic drive or the response to CO2.

  5. Efficient Cryosolid Positron Moderators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Howell, and Mr. Roy Larsen for infrastructure and equipment support. Mrs. Karen Clayton for administrative support. Mr. Byron Allmon for critical...showing explicitly the long, bent slow positron transport tube scaled to fit onto a 4x4-foot optical table. The sharp 90° bend in this tube is intended...half-cycle RPA scan of an N2 moderator. The ≈ 0.15 cps CEM signal is clearly visible above the ≈ 0.03 cps background. The very sharp absorption lines

  6. THE HIGH ALTITUDE GAMMA RAY OBSERVATORY, HAWC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. González

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El volcán Sierra Negra en Puebla, México fue seleccionado para albergar a HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov, un observatorio de gran apertura (2Pi sr, único en el mundo, capaz de observar contínuamente el cielo a energías de 0.1 a 100 TeV. HAWC consiste en un arreglo a una altitud de 4100 m sobre el nivel del mar de 300 contenedores de 7.3 m de diámetro y 5 m de altura llenos de agua pura y sensores de luz que observan partículas sumamente energ´eticas provenientes de los eventos más violentos del universo y será 15 veces más sensible que su antecesor Milagro. Las aportaciones científicas de Milagro han demostrado las capacidades únicas de este tipo de observatorios. En este trabajo se presentará HAWC y se discutirá brevemente su caso científico y capacidades.

  7. A challenge to the highest balloon altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Y.; Akita, D.; Fuke, H.; Iijima, I.; Izutsu, N.; Kato, Y.; Kawada, J.; Matsuzaka, Y.; Mizuta, E.; Namiki, M.; Nonaka, N.; Ohta, S.; Sato, T.; Seo, M.; Takada, A.; Tamura, K.; Toriumi, M.; Yamagami, T.; Yamada, K.; Yoshida, T.; Matsushima, K.; Tanaka, S.

    2012-02-01

    Development of a balloon to fly at higher altitudes is one of the most attractive challenges for scientific balloon technologies. After reaching the highest balloon altitude of 53.0 km using the 3.4 μm film in 2002, a thinner balloon film with a thickness of 2.8 μm was developed. A 5000 m3 balloon made with this film was launched successfully in 2004. However, three 60,000 m3 balloons with the same film launched in 2005, 2006, and 2007, failed during ascent. The mechanical properties of the 2.8 μm film were investigated intensively to look for degradation of the ultimate strength and its elongation as compared to the other thicker balloon films. The requirement of the balloon film was also studied using an empirical and a physical model assuming an axis-symmetrical balloon shape and the static pressure. It was found that the film was strong enough. A stress due to the dynamic pressure by the wind shear is considered as the possible reason for the unsuccessful flights. A 80,000 m3 balloon with cap films covering 9 m from the balloon top will be launch in 2011 to test the appropriateness of this reinforcement.

  8. Development of the High Altitude Student Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzik, T. G.; Besse, S.; Calongne, A.; Dominique, A.; Ellison, S. B.; Gould, R.; Granger, D.; Olano, D.; Smith, D.; Stewart, M.; Wefel, J. P.

    2008-11-01

    The High Altitude Student Platform (HASP) was originally conceived to provide student groups with access to the near-space environment for flight durations and experiment capabilities intermediate between what is possible with small sounding balloons and low Earth orbit rocket launches. HASP is designed to carry up to twelve student payloads to an altitude of about 36 km with flight durations of 15 20 h using a small zero-pressure polyethylene film balloon. This provides a flight capability that can be used to flight-test compact satellites, prototypes and other small payloads designed and built by students. HASP includes a standard mechanical, power and communication interface for the student payload to simplify integration and allows the payloads to be fully exercised. Over the last two years a partnership between the NASA Balloon Program Office (BPO), Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility (CSBF), Louisiana State University (LSU), the Louisiana Board of Regents (BoR), and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSPACE) has led to the development, construction and, finally, the first flight of HASP with a complement of eight student payloads on September 4, 2006. Here we discuss the primary as-built HASP systems and features, the student payload interface, HASP performance during the first flight and plans for continuing HASP flights. The HASP project maintains a website at http://laspace.lsu.edu/hasp/ where flight application, interface documentation and status information can be obtained.

  9. Impact of high altitude on the hepatic fatty acid oxidation and synthesis in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Qian [Department of General Surgery, Hepatic-biliary-pancreatic Institute, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Department of Pediatrics, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Shao, Yuan; Wang, Ying Zhen [Department of General Surgery, Hepatic-biliary-pancreatic Institute, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou (China); Jing, Yu Hong [Institute of Anatomy, School of Basic Medicine, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou (China); Zhang, You Cheng, E-mail: zhangychmd@126.com [Department of General Surgery, Hepatic-biliary-pancreatic Institute, Lanzhou University Second Hospital, Lanzhou (China)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • Acute exposure to high altitude (HA) increased hepatic fatty acid (FA) β-oxidation. • Acute exposure of rats to HA increased hepatic FA synthesis. • PPARα and AMPK can regulate the FA metabolism. • FA may be a key energy fuel and a compensation for CHO during acute exposure to HA. • The acute changes of FA metabolism may be a mechanism of acclimatization. - Abstract: High altitude (HA) affects energy metabolism. The impact of acute and chronic HA acclimatization on the major metabolic pathways is still controversial. In this study, we aimed to unveil the impact of HA on the key enzymes involved in the fatty acid (FA) metabolism in liver. Rats were exposed to an altitude of 4300 m for 30 days and the expressions of two key proteins involved in FA β-oxidation (carnitine palmitoyl transferase I, CPT-I; and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha, PPARα), two proteins involved in FA synthesis (acetyl CoA carboxylase-1, ACC-1; and AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPK), as well as the total ketone body in the liver and the plasma FFAs were examined. Rats without HA exposure were used as controls. We observed that the acute exposure of rats to HA (3 days) led to a significant increase in the expressions of CPT-I and PPARα and in the total hepatic ketone body. Longer exposure (15 days) caused a marked decrease in the expression of CPT-I and PPARα. By 30 days after HA exposure, the expression levels of CPT-I and PPARα returned to the control level. The hepatic ACC-1 level showed a significant increase in rats exposed to HA for 1 and 3 days. In contrast, the hepatic level of AMPK showed a significant reduction throughout the experimental period. Plasma FFA concentrations did not show any significant changes following HA exposure. Thus, increased hepatic FA oxidation and synthesis in the early phase of HA exposure may be among the important mechanisms for the rats to respond to the hypoxic stress in order to acclimatize themselves to the

  10. [Protective effect of salidroside against high altitude hypoxia-induced brain injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaoru; Zhang, Xiangnan; Li, Dan; Li, Bin; Wang, Jiye; Meng, Shanshan; Luo, Wenjing; Zhang, Wenbin

    2015-10-01

    To observe the protective effect of salidroside against brain injury in rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia, and investigate the molecular mechanism of salidroside in the prevention of hypobaric hypoxia-induced brain injury. Rats were placed in experiment module simulating 6000 m altitude to establish acute hypobaric hypoxia-induced brain injury models. Their respiratory frequency was observed and recorded. Cell apoptosis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) was detected by TUNEL assay; the expressions of Ras homolog family member A (RhoA), phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) and phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) were detected by Western blotting. After acute exposure to 6000 m altitude, the respiratory frequency of the rats increased remarkably. The simulation of hypobaric hypoxia induced cell apoptosis in hippocampal DG region, and salidroside intervention inhibited the process of cell apoptosis. The expressions of RhoA, p-ERK, p-JNK decreased after hypobaric hypoxia exposure. Salidroside intervention reversed RhoA expression and raised the levels of p-ERK and p-JNK. Acute exposure to hypobaric hypoxia can induce cell apoptosis in rat hippocampal DG, and salidroside can protect the cells from the exposure-induced apoptosis.

  11. What Is 'Moderate' Exercise Anyway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/news/fullstory_166905.html What Is 'Moderate' Exercise Anyway? How to figure out the best intensity ... most adults to get 30 minutes of moderate exercise on most days to stay fit. But what ...

  12. Analysis of the hazardous low-altitude snowfall, 8th March 2010, in Catalonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran, M.; Rigo, T.; Bech, J.; Brucet, C.; Vilaclara, E.

    2010-09-01

    During winter season snow precipitation is quite frequent in the Pyrenees (north-east of the Iberian Peninsula). On average the total amount of fresh snow at 2200 metres is of 250 cm. However, important snow episodes at low latitudes are unlikely. From 1947 to 2009, 16 significant snow episodes took place in the Barcelona and 18 in Girona areas. On 8th March 2010, a severe wet snow event had a high social impact on these regions. One of the most remarkable features of this episode was the type of precipitation (wet snow) and the large amount of precipitation combined with strong wind gust that caused the collapse of electricity pylons and tree forests. The damage was very important in the north-eastern part and the regional government approved funds of 21.4 million € to reduce the impact caused by this event. Although diagnosis of other low altitude snowfall events in Catalonia has been done previously, the analysis of this event can contribute to characterise a little bit better these snow episodes. In this study, we will present the synoptic framework characterised by the presence of a deep low in the north-east of Catalonia and moving through Ebro valley to the Catalan coast. To do this we will use ECMWF reanalyses and Meteosat images. The main features to predict this snow event and the critical point were the total amount of precipitation and snow level forecasted by mesoscale models (MM5, WRF). The model outputs for precipitation, temperature and wind will be compared with automatic weather, radar and radiosounding data. The snow level and the type of precipitation are compared with the information received from spotters. The main storm was characterised by moderate vertical development with tops of 8 km (4 km were the average height during the initial and final phase of the event). Also, lightning activity was observed, 310 intra-cloud and 128 cloud-to-ground. The type of precipitation at a specific location in the eastern zone temporally changed because

  13. Exercise at simulated high altitude facilitates the increase in capillarity in skeletal muscle of rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To study the changes in capillarity of skeletal muscle during acclimation to high altitude, and explore the effects of a certain extent physical activity under hypoxia on capillary formation and the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in this process. METHODS: 48 Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups: Ⅰ normoxic control; Ⅱ hypoxia and Ⅲ hypoxia+exercise. Rats of Ⅱ and Ⅲ groups were subjected to hypobaric hypoxia for 5 weeks (23 h/d). They were first brought to simulated 4 000 m altitude, where rats of the Ⅲgroup were forced to swim for 1 h/d (6 d/week). Then the animals were ascent to 5 000 m. Biomicrosphere method was used to determine blood flow of skeletal muscle. The mean fiber cross-sectional area (FCSA), capillary density (CD) and capillary/fiber ratio (C/F) of red portion of the lateral head of the gastrocneminus were assayed by myofibrillar ATPase histochemistry. VEGF and its receptor KDR were assayed with immunohistochemistry method.RESULTS: By comparison with the normoxic control, 5-week hypoxic exposure resulted in a decrease in cross-sectional area of skeletal muscle fiber and an increase in CD, but the C/F remained unchanged. The blood supply to the gastrocnemius was not changed. After 5-week-exercise at high altitude, the muscle fibers did not undergo atrophy. CD, C/F, and the blood flow at rest increased significantly. VEGF protein was found primarily in the matrix between muscle fibers; KDR were shown mainly in endothelial cells of capillary. VEGF was more strongly stained in the skeletal muscle of hypoxia-exercise rats.CONCLUSION: Hypoxia itself can not induce neovascularization. While exercise during hypoxic exposure can lead to capillary formation. VEGF and KDR may play roles in it. New capillary formation benefits the blood supply, oxygen delivery and working performance at high altitude.

  14. Altitude variations of ionospheric currents at auroral latitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamide, Y. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan)); Brekke, A. (Univ. of Tromso (Netherlands))

    1993-02-19

    On the basis of updated EISCAT experiments, the first full derivation of the ionospheric current density of the auroral electrojets at six different altitudes are presented. It is found that current vectors at different altitudes are quite different, although the eastward and westward currents prevail in the evening and morning sectors, respectively, once the currents are integrated over altitude. The eastward electrojet becomes almost northward whilst the westward electrojet becomes almost southward, at the highest altitude, 125 km, in this study. The physical implications of these characteristics are discussed.

  15. The effect of high altitude on nasal nitric oxide levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundag, Aytug; Salihoglu, Murat; Cayonu, Melih; Cingi, Cemal; Tekeli, Hakan; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether nasal nitric oxide (nNO) levels change in relation to high altitude in a natural setting where the weather conditions were favorable. The present study included 41 healthy volunteers without a history of acute rhinosinusitis within 3 weeks and nasal polyposis. The study group consisted of 31 males (76 %) and 10 females (24 %) and the mean age of the study population was 38 ± 10 years. The volunteers encamped for 2 days in a mountain village at an altitude of 1,500 m above sea level (masl) and proceeded to highlands at an altitude of 2,200 masl throughout the day. The measurements of nNO were done randomly, either first at the mountain village or at sea level. Each participant had nNO values both at sea level and at high altitude at the end of the study. The nNO values of sea level and high altitude were compared to investigate the effect of high altitude on nNO levels. The mean of average nNO measurements at the high altitude was 74.2 ± 41 parts-per-billion (ppb) and the mean of the measurements at sea level was 93.4 ± 45 ppb. The change in nNO depending on the altitude level was statistically significant (p high altitude even if the weather conditions were favorable, such as temperature, humidity, and wind.

  16. Neurophysiological Problems in Snow Bound High Altitude Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Selvamurthy

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available A series of studies have been conducted to evaluate the neurophysiological responses in young healthy soldiers during acclimatization at 3,500m altitude in Western Himalayas. The responses of autonomic nervous system, electroencephalogram hypothalamic thermoregulatory efficiency, orthostatic tolerance, sleep profile and effects of sleep deprivation have been studied in fresh inductees during three to five weeks of acclimatization at high altitude and compared with those of one year acclimatized lowlanders and high altitude natives. Physiological significance of these neurophysiological responses in the process of altitude adaptation is discussed in the light of current knowledge in the field.

  17. Imaging Findings of a Survivor of Avalanche without Any Life Support at Very High Altitude and Extreme Low Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Dwivedi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Survival at high altitude is very challenging and in spite of adequate training and acclimatization, injuries are frequent. The fate of mountaineers and soldiers at such areas largely depends on the mercy of the climate. An avalanche causes physical trauma, cold injury and asphyxia to the victim. The patient in our report had diffuse cerebral edema, bilateral pulmonary consolidation and pneumothorax. In spite of the best efforts the victim succumbed to the injuries. There are many incidents of high altitude accidents in India. This case report is of a soldier deployed at the high altitude, is a lone ever reported survivor above 5000 meters, under 35 feet snow and below - 45°C for greater than 5 days of exposure to an avalanche

  18. Hemoglobin mass and peak oxygen uptake in untrained and trained female altitude residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böning, D; Cristancho, E; Serrato, M; Reyes, O; Mora, M; Coy, L; Rojas, J

    2004-11-01

    Total hemoglobin mass has not been systematically investigated in females at altitude. We measured this quantity (CO-rebreathing method) as well as peak oxygen uptake in 54 young women (age 22.5 +/- 0.6 SE years) with differing physical fitness living in Bogota (2600 m) and compared the results with those of 19 subjects from 964 m in Colombia and 75 subjects from 35 m in Germany. In spite of an increased hemoglobin concentration the hemoglobin mass was not changed in highlanders (means 9.0 to 9.5 g . kg (-1) in untrained subjects at all altitude levels). Endurance trained athletes, however, showed a rise in hemoglobin mass by 2 - 3 g . kg (-1) at all sites. Erythropoietin was little increased in Bogota; iron stores were within the normal range. Aerobic performance capacity was lower at high altitude than at sea level and remained so also after correction for the hypoxic deterioration in untrained and moderately trained subjects but not in athletes; possibly the cause was reduced daily physical activity in non-athletic Bogotanians compared to lowlanders. After exclusion of the factor V.O(2peak) by analysis of covariance a mean rise of 6.6 % in hemoglobin mass at 2600 m was calculated being smaller than in males (> 12 %). The attenuated increase of hemoglobin mass in female highlanders possibly results from stimulation of ventilation improving arterial oxygen saturation or from an increased hypoxia tolerance of cellular metabolism both caused by female sexual hormones.

  19. Aviation fuel property effects on altitude relight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataramani, K.

    1987-01-01

    The major objective of this experimental program was to investigate the effects of fuel property variation on altitude relight characteristics. Four fuels with widely varying volatility properties (JP-4, Jet A, a blend of Jet A and 2040 Solvent, and Diesel 2) were tested in a five-swirl-cup-sector combustor at inlet temperatures and flows representative of windmilling conditions of turbofan engines. The effects of fuel physical properties on atomization were eliminated by using four sets of pressure-atomizing nozzles designed to give the same spray Sauter mean diameter (50 + or - 10 micron) for each fuel at the same design fuel flow. A second series of tests was run with a set of air-blast nozzles. With comparable atomization levels, fuel volatility assumes only a secondary role for first-swirl-cup lightoff and complete blowout. Full propagation first-cup blowout were independent of fuel volatility and depended only on the combustor operating conditions.

  20. Effects of altitude to blood parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đelkapić Milosava

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reducing of partial pressure of oxygen in the air leads to a reduced arterial oxygen saturation and increases secretion of erythropoietin, wich stimulates erythropoiesis. Study included 63 healthy children aged 7 years, devided into 3 groups. I group consists of 21 children from suburb of altitude of 370 m, II group of 22 children from the village on 822 m, III group of 21 children from the town on 411 m. Complete blood count was determined on a Hematology analyzer HmX ( Beckman Coulter. Statistical analysis of data showed that children from II group have a higher average values of erythrocytes than children from the I (p0.05. Results show that stay in the village is useful for stimulation of erythropoiesis.

  1. Sleep apneas and high altitude newcomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, F; Richalet, J P; Onnen, I; Antezana, A M

    1992-10-01

    Sleep and respiration data from two French medical high altitude expeditions (Annapurna 4,800 m and Mt Sajama 6,542 m) are presented. Difficulties in maintaining sleep and a SWS decrease were found with periodic breathing (PB) during both non-REM and REM sleep. Extent of PB varied considerably among subjects and was not correlated to the number of arousals but to the intercurrent wakefulness duration. There was a positive correlation between the time spent in PB and the individual hypoxic ventilatory drive. The relation between PB, nocturnal desaturation, and mountain sickness intensity are discussed. Acclimatization decreased the latency toward PB and improved sleep. Hypnotic benzodiazepine intake (loprazolam 1 mg) did not worsen either SWS depression or apneas and allowed normal sleep reappearance after acclimatization.

  2. Changes in labial capillary density on ascent to and descent from high altitude [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Gilbert-Kawai

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Present knowledge of how the microcirculation is altered by prolonged exposure to hypoxia at high altitude is incomplete and modification of existing analytical techniques may improve our knowledge considerably. We set out to use a novel simplified method of measuring in vivo capillary density during an expedition to high altitude using a CytoCam incident dark field imaging video-microscope. The simplified method of data capture involved recording one-second images of the mucosal surface of the inner lip to reveal data about microvasculature density in ten individuals. This was done on ascent to, and descent from, high altitude. Analysis was conducted offline by two independent investigators blinded to the participant identity, testing conditions and the imaging site.  Additionally we monitored haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit data to see if we could support or refute mechanisms of altered density relating to vessel recruitment. Repeated sets of paired values were compared using Kruskall Wallis Analysis of Variance tests, whilst comparisons of values between sites was by related samples Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Correlation between different variables was performed using Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient, and concordance between analysing investigators using intra-class correlation coefficient. There was a significant increase in capillary density from London on ascent to high altitude; median capillaries per field of view area increased from 22.8 to 25.3 (p=0.021. There was a further increase in vessel density during the six weeks spent at altitude (25.3 to 32.5, p=0.017. Moreover, vessel density remained high on descent to Kathmandu (31.0 capillaries per field of view area, despite a significant decrease in haemoglobin concentration and haematocrit. Using a simplified technique, we have demonstrated an increase in capillary density on early and sustained exposure to hypobaric hypoxia at thigh altitude, and that this remains

  3. Effects of ascent to high altitude on human antimycobacterial immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Eisen

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis infection, disease and mortality are all less common at high than low altitude and ascent to high altitude was historically recommended for treatment. The immunological and mycobacterial mechanisms underlying the association between altitude and tuberculosis are unclear. We studied the effects of altitude on mycobacteria and antimycobacterial immunity.Antimycobacterial immunity was assayed in 15 healthy adults residing at low altitude before and after they ascended to 3400 meters; and in 47 long-term high-altitude residents. Antimycobacterial immunity was assessed as the extent to which participants' whole blood supported or restricted growth of genetically modified luminescent Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG mycobacteria during 96 hours incubation. We developed a simplified whole blood assay that could be used by a technician in a low-technology setting. We used this to compare mycobacterial growth in participants' whole blood versus positive-control culture broth and versus negative-control plasma.Measurements of mycobacterial luminescence predicted the number of mycobacterial colonies cultured six weeks later. At low altitude, mycobacteria grew in blood at similar rates to positive-control culture broth whereas ascent to high altitude was associated with restriction (p ≤ 0.002 of mycobacterial growth to be 4-times less than in culture broth. At low altitude, mycobacteria grew in blood 25-times more than negative-control plasma whereas ascent to high altitude was associated with restriction (p ≤ 0.01 of mycobacterial growth to be only 6-times more than in plasma. There was no evidence of differences in antimycobacterial immunity at high altitude between people who had recently ascended to high altitude versus long-term high-altitude residents.An assay of luminescent mycobacterial growth in whole blood was adapted and found to be feasible in low-resource settings. This demonstrated that ascent to or residence at high altitude was

  4. Effects of Ascent to High Altitude on Human Antimycobacterial Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Robert W.; Siedner, Mark J.; Necochea, Alejandro; Leybell, Inna; Valencia, Teresa; Herrera, Beatriz; Wiles, Siouxsie; Friedland, Jon S.; Gilman, Robert H.; Evans, Carlton A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis infection, disease and mortality are all less common at high than low altitude and ascent to high altitude was historically recommended for treatment. The immunological and mycobacterial mechanisms underlying the association between altitude and tuberculosis are unclear. We studied the effects of altitude on mycobacteria and antimycobacterial immunity. Methods Antimycobacterial immunity was assayed in 15 healthy adults residing at low altitude before and after they ascended to 3400 meters; and in 47 long-term high-altitude residents. Antimycobacterial immunity was assessed as the extent to which participants’ whole blood supported or restricted growth of genetically modified luminescent Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) mycobacteria during 96 hours incubation. We developed a simplified whole blood assay that could be used by a technician in a low-technology setting. We used this to compare mycobacterial growth in participants’ whole blood versus positive-control culture broth and versus negative-control plasma. Results Measurements of mycobacterial luminescence predicted the number of mycobacterial colonies cultured six weeks later. At low altitude, mycobacteria grew in blood at similar rates to positive-control culture broth whereas ascent to high altitude was associated with restriction (p≤0.002) of mycobacterial growth to be 4-times less than in culture broth. At low altitude, mycobacteria grew in blood 25-times more than negative-control plasma whereas ascent to high altitude was associated with restriction (p≤0.01) of mycobacterial growth to be only 6-times more than in plasma. There was no evidence of differences in antimycobacterial immunity at high altitude between people who had recently ascended to high altitude versus long-term high-altitude residents. Conclusions An assay of luminescent mycobacterial growth in whole blood was adapted and found to be feasible in low-resource settings. This demonstrated that ascent to or

  5. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation and Human Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Mertens, Christopher J.; Goldhagen, Paul; Friedberg, W.; DeAngelis, G.; Clem, J. M.; Copeland, K.; Bidasaria, H. B.

    2005-01-01

    Atmospheric ionizing radiation is of interest, apart from its main concern of aircraft exposures, because it is a principal source of human exposure to radiations with high linear energy transfer (LET). The ionizing radiations of the lower atmosphere near the Earth s surface tend to be dominated by the terrestrial radioisotopes. especially along the coastal plain and interior low lands, and have only minor contributions from neutrons (11 percent). The world average is substantially larger but the high altitude cities especially have substantial contributions from neutrons (25 to 45 percent). Understanding the world distribution of neutron exposures requires an improved understanding of the latitudinal, longitudinal, altitude and spectral distribution that depends on local terrain and time. These issues are being investigated in a combined experimental and theoretical program. This paper will give an overview of human exposures and describe the development of improved environmental models.

  6. AltitudeOmics: The Basic Biology of Human Acclimatization to High Altitude. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    After obtaining written consent, physical exams and the Army Physical Fitness Test (push-ups, sit-ups, and a 3.2-km run) were performed to verify health...imposed by the MFVL. Membrane Excitability and Contractile Function M-waves. As a measure of membrane excitability we exam - ined pre- vs. postexercise...Rose MS, Forte VA, Jr., Young PM, and Cymerman A. Effect of caffeine on submaximal exercise performance at altitude. Aviat Space Environ Med 65: 539

  7. AltitudeOmics: The Basic Biology of Human Acclimatization to High Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    met the limit imposed by the MFVL. Membrane Excitability and Contractile Function M-waves. As a measure of membrane excitability we exam - ined pre...least 3 h postprandial, and avoided strenuous exercise in the 48 h preceding each trial. They also refrained from caffeine for 12 h before each test...traveled to altitudes > 1,000 m in the past 3 months. After obtaining written consent, physical exams and the Army Physical Fitness Test (push ups

  8. 强噪声暴露后不同持续时间中等水平噪声暴露对豚鼠听力的保护作用研究%The protective effect of moderate noisy backgrounds for certain period on hearing after exposure to a traumatic noise in guinea pig

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓花; 章建程; 王艳军; 周宏元; 徐灵活; 胡家庆

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protective effect of moderate noisy backgrounds on guinea pig's hearing after an exposure to a traumatic noise. Methods Thirty guinea pigs were randomly divided into five groups (6 each). Animals in group A, B, C and D were subjected to noise of 84 decibels sound pressure level (dB SPL) for 4, 8, 24 and 0 hour respectively after a traumatic exposure of 110 dB SPL, and those in group E were kept in quiet environment. Distortion product oto-acoustic emission (DPOAE) amplitudes were determined on 1 day prior, and 1 and 7 days after noise exposure. Blood plasma was obtained to determine the contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activities of hemocuprein (SOD) and nitricoxide synthase (NOS) at the end of the experiment. Results Noise-induced hearing loss was caused in group D after a traumatic exposure. At the 1st and 7th day after exposure, DPOAE amplitudes were higher in group A and B than in group D, especially at high frequencies, while no significant difference was observed between group C and D. At the 7th day after exposure, the activity of SOD lowered, while the content of MDA increased in group A and B as compared with group E (P<0.05). The content of MDA in group A increased as compared with group D (P<0.05). Conclusion After the traumatic noise-exposure, the recovery of noise-induced hearing loss, especially the high-frequency hearing loss could be motivated when exposed to noise at 84 dB SPL for 4 or 8 hours.%目的 探讨强噪声暴露后中等水平噪声环境对豚鼠听力的保护作用.方法 30只雄性健康白化种红目豚鼠随机分为5组,每组6只.A、B、C和D组分别于110dB SPL白噪声暴露4h后继续84dB SPL噪声暴露4、8、24、0h;E组为空白对照,不施加噪声暴露.噪声暴露前1d、暴露后1d和7d进行3次畸变产物耳声发射(DPOAE)测定.测试完毕后,取血浆测试超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)、丙二醛(MDA)含量及一氧化氮合酶(NOS)活力.结果 强噪声暴露后,D组

  9. Determinants of team-sport performance: implications for altitude training by team-sport athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, David J; Girard, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Team sports are increasingly popular, with millions of participants worldwide. Athletes engaged in these sports are required to repeatedly produce skilful actions and maximal or near-maximal efforts (eg, accelerations, changes in pace and direction, sprints, jumps and kicks), interspersed with brief recovery intervals (consisting of rest or low-intensity to moderate-intensity activity), over an extended period of time (1–2 h). While performance in most team sports is dominated by technical and tactical proficiencies, successful team-sport athletes must also have highly-developed, specific, physical capacities. Much effort goes into designing training programmes to improve these physical capacities, with expected benefits for team-sport performance. Recently, some team sports have introduced altitude training in the belief that it can further enhance team-sport physical performance. Until now, however, there is little published evidence showing improved team-sport performance following altitude training, despite the often considerable expense involved. In the absence of such studies, this review will identify important determinants of team-sport physical performance that may be improved by altitude training, with potential benefits for team-sport performance. These determinants can be broadly described as factors that enhance either sprint performance or the ability to recover from maximal or near-maximal efforts. There is some evidence that some of these physical capacities may be enhanced by altitude training, but further research is required to verify that these adaptations occur, that they are greater than what could be achieved by appropriate sea-level training and that they translate to improved team-sport performance. PMID:24282200

  10. Determinants of team-sport performance: implications for altitude training by team-sport athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, David J; Girard, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    Team sports are increasingly popular, with millions of participants worldwide. Athletes engaged in these sports are required to repeatedly produce skilful actions and maximal or near-maximal efforts (eg, accelerations, changes in pace and direction, sprints, jumps and kicks), interspersed with brief recovery intervals (consisting of rest or low-intensity to moderate-intensity activity), over an extended period of time (1-2 h). While performance in most team sports is dominated by technical and tactical proficiencies, successful team-sport athletes must also have highly-developed, specific, physical capacities. Much effort goes into designing training programmes to improve these physical capacities, with expected benefits for team-sport performance. Recently, some team sports have introduced altitude training in the belief that it can further enhance team-sport physical performance. Until now, however, there is little published evidence showing improved team-sport performance following altitude training, despite the often considerable expense involved. In the absence of such studies, this review will identify important determinants of team-sport physical performance that may be improved by altitude training, with potential benefits for team-sport performance. These determinants can be broadly described as factors that enhance either sprint performance or the ability to recover from maximal or near-maximal efforts. There is some evidence that some of these physical capacities may be enhanced by altitude training, but further research is required to verify that these adaptations occur, that they are greater than what could be achieved by appropriate sea-level training and that they translate to improved team-sport performance.

  11. Accuracy of Handheld Blood Glucose Meters at High Altitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mol, Pieter; Krabbe, Hans G.; de Vries, Suzanna T.; Fokkert, Marion J.; Dikkeschei, Bert D.; Rienks, Rienk; Bilo, Karin M.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Due to increasing numbers of people with diabetes taking part in extreme sports (e. g., high-altitude trekking), reliable handheld blood glucose meters (BGMs) are necessary. Accurate blood glucose measurement under extreme conditions is paramount for safe recreation at altitude. Prior st

  12. Quadrant to Measure the Sun's Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, A Morgan, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The changing altitude of the Sun (either over the course of a day or longer periods) is a phenomenon that students do not normally appreciate. However, the altitude of the Sun affects many topics in disciplines as diverse as astronomy, meteorology, navigation, or horology, such as the basis for seasons, determination of latitude and longitude, or…

  13. Cold induced peripheral vasodilation at high altitudes- a field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ruiten, H.J.A. van

    2000-01-01

    A significant reduction in cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) is observed at high altitudes. No agreement is found in the literature about acclimatization effects on CIVD. Two studies were performed to investigate the effect of altitude acclimatization on CIVD. In the first study 13 male subjects imme

  14. 14 CFR 93.307 - Minimum flight altitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum flight altitudes. 93.307 Section 93...) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Special Flight Rules in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park, AZ § 93.307 Minimum flight altitudes. Except in an emergency, or...

  15. Introductory address: lessons to be learned from high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, C S

    1979-07-01

    A historical account of the important landmarks in man's experience with the high altitude environment is followed by comments on the important stages in the understanding of its physiological effects. The work of The Mount Logan High Altitude Physiology Study on acute mountain sickness is reviewed from its inception in 1967 until the present.

  16. Cold induced peripheral vasodilation at high altitudes- a field study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Ruiten, H.J.A. van

    2000-01-01

    A significant reduction in cold-induced vasodilation (CIVD) is observed at high altitudes. No agreement is found in the literature about acclimatization effects on CIVD. Two studies were performed to investigate the effect of altitude acclimatization on CIVD. In the first study 13 male subjects imme

  17. Toward a Moderate Autoethnography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Stahlke Wall

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Autoethnography is an avant-garde method of qualitative inquiry that has captured the attention of an ever-increasing number of scholars from a variety of disciplines. Personal experience methods can offer a new and unique vantage point from which to make a contribution to social science yet, autoethnography has been criticized for being self-indulgent, narcissistic, introspective, and individualized. Methodological discussions about this method are polarized. As an autoethnographer and qualitative methodologist with an interest in personal experience methods, I have had the opportunity to review several autoethnographic manuscripts over the years. As my reviews accumulated, I began to see themes in my responses and it became apparent that I was advocating for an approach to autoethnography that lies in contrast to the frequently offered methodological polemics from philosophically divergent scholars. In this article, I draw from the reviews I have done to address topics such as applications and purposes for autoethnography, the degree of theory and analysis used within the method, data sources and dissemination of findings, and ethical issues. I then connect the concerns I see in the reviewed manuscripts to examples in the autoethnographic literature. Ultimately, I propose a moderate and balanced treatment of autoethnography that allows for innovation, imagination, and the representation of a range of voices in qualitative inquiry while also sustaining confidence in the quality, rigor, and usefulness of academic research.

  18. Understanding controls on cirque floor altitudes: Insights from Kamchatka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Iestyn D.; Spagnolo, Matteo

    2015-11-01

    Glacial cirques reflect former regions of glacier initiation, and are therefore used as indicators of past climate. One specific way in which palaeoclimatic information is obtained from cirques is by analysing their elevations, on the assumption that cirque floor altitudes are a proxy for climatically controlled equilibrium-line altitudes (ELAs) during former periods of small scale (cirque-type) glaciation. However, specific controls on cirque altitudes are rarely assessed, and the validity of using cirque floor altitudes as a source of palaeoclimatic information remains open to question. In order to address this, here we analyse the distribution of 3520 ice-free cirques on the Kamchatka Peninsula (eastern Russia), and assess various controls on their floor altitudes. In addition, we analyse controls on the mid-altitudes of 503 modern glaciers, currently identifiable on the peninsula, and make comparisons with the cirque altitude data. The main study findings are that cirque floor altitudes increase steeply inland from the Pacific, suggesting that moisture availability (i.e., proximity to the coastline) played a key role in regulating the altitudes at which former (cirque-forming) glaciers were able to initiate. Other factors, such as latitude, aspect, topography, geology, and neo-tectonics seem to have played a limited (but not insignificant) role in regulating cirque floor altitudes, though south-facing cirques are typically higher than their north-facing equivalents, potentially reflecting the impact of prevailing wind directions (from the SSE) and/or variations in solar radiation on the altitudes at which former glaciers were able to initiate. Trends in glacier and cirque altitudes across the peninsula are typically comparable (i.e., values typically rise from both the north and south, inland from the Pacific coastline, and where glaciers/cirques are south-facing), yet the relationship with latitude is stronger for modern glaciers, and the relationship with

  19. Effects of the activity of superoxide dismutase in blood serum and gingival tissues of rabbit in periodontitis model after hypoxia exposure at high altitude%高原低氧环境对兔牙周炎模型血清和牙龈组织中超氧化物歧化酶活力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武曦; 黄镜静; 张纲; 谭颖徽; 高钰琪

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in rabbit periodontitis model in nor-moxia and hypoxia environment, and to research the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases at high altitude. Methods Fourty male rabbits were randomly divided into four groups: Normoxia control group, normoxia periodontitis group (periodontitis models), hypoxia control group, hypoxia periodontitis group (periodontitis models). The periodontitis models were established by ligating the two central incisors of mandible and raised by periodontitis diets. The weights of four groups were dynamically observed. After eight weeks, the clinical periodontal indexes and the activity of total-SOD (T-SOD) in blood serum and gingival tissues in all groups were detected. Results The activity of T-SOD of hypoxia periodontitis group was significantly lower than normoxia periodontitis group and hypoxia control group (/*<0.05). The weights and clinical periodontal indexes were also dramatically different (P<0.01). The activity of SOD in serum was positively correlated with the gingival tissues (r=0.846, P<0.01), and they both negatively correlated with AL (r=-0.980, -0.804, F<0.01). Conclusion The growth state of the body and the balance of bioconversion were affected in hypoxia environment when exposed at high altitude. The activity of SOD in total body and local tissues were decreased, thus the superoxide free radicals were accumulated in the body, especially in local periodontal tissues. Therefore it can accelerate and aggravate the destruction of periodontal tissues.%目的 观察高原低氧和平原常氧环境下兔牙周炎动物模型中超氧化物歧化酶(SOD)的活力情况,以探讨高原牙周病的发病机制.方法 选取40只雄性白兔随机分为4组,即常氧对照组、常氧实验组(牙周炎动物模型)、低氧对照组、低氧实验组(牙周炎动物模型).采用正畸结扎丝结扎下颌中切牙与牙周炎食谱的方法建立牙周炎动物模型.动

  20. Hemoglobin values for pregnant women residing at middle altitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Jatziri Gaitán-González

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine maternal hemoglobin behavior during pregnancy for middle altitude residents and to compare it with that reported in other populations with or without iron supplementation. Materials and methods. Hematological values from 227 pregnant women residing at 2 240 m altitude (Mexico City, with low obstetric and perinatal risk, and receiving supplementary iron, were compared with reference values obtained from other populations of pregnant women residing at different altitudes, after correcting for altitude. Results. While the hemoglobin values for the first and second trimester of pregnancy in our studied population were similar to those reported for iron-supplemented populations (p mayor que 0.05, the third trimester values were similar to those reported for a population without this supplement (p mayor que 0.05. Conclusions. Despite receiving supplementary iron, hemoglobin values during pregnancy from women residing at middle altitude show similar behavior to that reported for pregnant women without iron supplementation.

  1. Low altitude dose measurements from APEX, CRRES and DMSP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, E G; Gussenhoven, M S; Bell, J T; Madden, D; Holeman, E; Delorey, D

    1998-01-01

    Dosimeter data taken on the APEX (1994-1996), CRRES (1990-1991) and DMSP (1984-1987) satellites have been used to study the low altitude (down to 350 km) radiation environment. Of special concern has been the inner edge of the inner radiation belt due to its steep gradient. We have constructed dose models of the inner edge of the belt from all three spacecraft and put them into a personal computer utility, called APEXRAD, that calculates dose for user-selected orbits. The variation of dose for low altitude, circular orbits is given as a function of altitude, inclination and particle type. Dose-depth curves show that shielding greater than approximately 1/4 in Al is largely ineffectual for low altitude orbits. The contribution of outer zone electrons to low altitude dose is shown to be important only for thin shields and to have significant variation with magnetic activity and solar cycle.

  2. Water Metabolism and Fluid Compartment Volumes in Humans at Altitude. A Compendium of Research (1914 - 1996)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, J. L.; Stad, N. J.; Gay, E.; West, G. I.; Barnes, P. R.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    This compendium includes abstracts and synopses of clinical observations and of more basic studies involving physiological mechanisms concerning interaction of water metabolism and fluid compartment volumes in humans during altitude exposure. If the author's abstract or summary was appropriate, it was included. In other cases a more detailed synopsis of the paper was prepared under the subheadings Purpose, Methods, Results, and Conclusions. Author and subject indices are provided, plus an additional selected bibliography of related work of those papers received after the volume was being prepared for publication. This volume includes material published from 1914 through 1995.

  3. Chronic hypoxia, physical exercise and PSA: correlation during high-altitude trekking (2004 K2 expedition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verratti, Vittore; Di Giulio, Camillo; Di Francesco, Simona; Berardinelli, Francesco; Pellicciotta, Mario; Gidaro, Stefano; Zezza, Andrea; Tenaglia, Raffaele

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of physical exercise on PSA serum levels and the diagnostic validity of PSA in the screening of prostate cancer in subjects undergoing physical exercise during chronic hypoxia. The study was performed during trekking between 3,200 and 5,600 meters of altitude on K2 mountain for 26 days. Mean serum PSA values before and after exposure did not show significant difference due to physical exercise. These data indicate that physical exercise or mountain hypoxia do not affect the diagnostic validity of PSA.

  4. Incidence and possible causes of dental pain during simulated high altitude flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, W

    1993-03-01

    Of 11,617 personnel participating in simulated high altitude flights up to 43,000 feet, only 30 (0.26%) complained of toothache (barodontalgia). The cause of the barodontalgia in 28 episodes of pain in 25 of these subjects was investigated. Chronic pulpitis was suspected as the cause in 22 cases and maxillary sinusitis in 2. No pathosis was detected in the other four. In 10 cases in which the pulpitis was treated by root filling or replacing a deep filling, subsequent exposure to low pressure caused no pain.

  5. Training Diaries during Altitude Training Camp in Two Olympic Champions: An Observational Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Pugliese, Fabio R. Serpiello, Grégoire P. Millet, Antonio La Torre

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, Live High-Train High (LHTH interventions were adopted when athletes trained and lived at altitude to try maximising the benefits offered by hypoxic exposure and improving sea level performance. Nevertheless, scientific research has proposed that the possible benefits of hypoxia would be offset by the inability to maintain high training intensity at altitude. However, elite athletes have been rarely recruited as an experimental sample, and training intensity has almost never been monitored during altitude research. This case study is an attempt to provide a practical example of successful LHTH interventions in two Olympic gold medal athletes. Training diaries were collected and total training volumes, volumes at different intensities, and sea level performance recorded before, during and after a 3-week LHTH camp. Both athletes successfully completed the LHTH camp (2090 m maintaining similar absolute training intensity and training volume at high-intensity (> 91% of race pace compared to sea level. After the LHTH intervention both athletes obtained enhancements in performance and they won an Olympic gold medal. In our opinion, LHTH interventions can be used as a simple, yet effective, method to maintain absolute, and improve relative training intensity in elite endurance athletes.

  6. Prevalence of COPD in five Colombian cities situated at low, medium, and high altitude (PREPOCOL study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Andrés; Torres-Duque, Carlos A; Jaramillo, Claudia; Bolívar, Fabio; Sanabria, Fernando; Osorio, Patricia; Orduz, Carlos; Guevara, Diana P; Maldonado, Darío

    2008-02-01

    The prevalence of COPD in Colombia is unknown. This study aimed to investigate COPD prevalence in five Colombian cities and measure the association between COPD and altitude. A cross-sectional design and a random, multistage, cluster-sampling strategy were used to provide representative samples of adults aged >or= 40 years. Each participant was interviewed (validated Spanish version of the Ferris Respiratory Questionnaire) and performed spirometry before and after 200 microg of inhaled salbutamol, using a portable spirometer according to American Thoracic Society recommendations. COPD definitions were as follows: (1) spirometric: fixed ratio (primary definition): FEV1/FVC or= 3 months every year during >or= 2 consecutive years (chronic bronchitis). Analysis was performed using statistical software. A total of 5,539 orsubjects were included. The overall COPD prevalence using the primary definition (spirometric) was 8.9%, ranging from 6.2% in Barranquilla to 13.5% in Medellín. The prevalence measured by the spirometric definition was higher than medical (2.8%) and clinical (3.2%) definitions. After the logistic regression analysis, the factors related with COPD were age >or= 60 years, male gender, history of tuberculosis, smoking, wood smoke exposure >or= 10 years, and very low education level. There was a nonsignificant tendency toward larger prevalence with higher altitude. COPD is an important health burden in Colombia. Additional studies are needed to establish the real influence of altitude on COPD prevalence.

  7. High Altitude Pulmonary Edema Without Appropriate Action Progresses to Right Ventricular Strain: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Logan; Harper, Chris; Rozwadowski, Sophie; Imray, Chris

    2016-09-01

    Mills, Logan, Chris Harper, Sophie Rozwadowski, and Chris Imray. High altitude pulmonary edema without appropriate action progresses to right ventricular strain: A case study. High Alt Med Biol. 17:228-232, 2016.-A 24-year-old male developed high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) after three ascents to 4061 m over 3 days, sleeping each night at 2735 m. He complained of exertional dyspnea, dry cough, chest pain, fever, nausea, vertigo, and a severe frontal headache. Inappropriate continuation of ascent despite symptoms led to functional impairment and forced a return to the valley, but dyspnea persisted in addition to new orthopnea. Hospital admission showed hypoxemia, resting tachycardia, and systemic hypertension. ECG revealed right ventricular strain and a chest X-ray revealed right lower zone infiltrates. This case demonstrates that HAPE can develop in previously unaffected individuals given certain precipitating factors, and that in the presence of HAPE, prolonged exposure to altitude with exercise (or exertion) does not confer acclimatization with protective adaptations and that rest and descent are the appropriate actions. The case additionally demonstrates well-characterized right ventricular involvement.

  8. Solar electric energy supply at high altitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaupp, W.; Mundschau, E. [Zentrum fur Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW), Ulm (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    Solar-hydrogen systems were analyzed regarding their usability as energy supply system for high altitude platforms. In a first step for an assessment of solar and photovoltaic resources near-ground spectral transmittances of atmosphere were extended with simplified height correction functions to achieve spectral irradiance descriptions versus atmospheric height up to 25 km. The influence of atmospheric height to different solar cell technologies regarding electrical performance was quantified at some examples for the aspect of spectral distribution with the help of the introduced spectral height factor. The main attention during analysis of the whole solar-hydrogen energy system was directed to characteristics of current or near term available technology. Specific power weight of photovoltaic system, electrolyzer, fuel cell and gas tanks and their dependence on operation mode and power range were assessed. A pre-design of a solar-hydrogen energy system was carried out for an airship (volume 580,000 m3) withstanding continuous wind speeds up to {approx} 130 km/h. The calculated coverage ratio of photovoltaic and load share of energy system mark the frame of usability. Depending on the airship size, shape and other external boundary conditions the total electrical energy demand could be covered by a solar-hydrogen energy system of current or near term technology for full year operation. However further investigations are necessary regarding e.g. further mass reductions. (author)

  9. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafá, Miguel A.

    2014-10-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV γ-ray experiment under construction at 4,100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow us to detect both the transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV γ-ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from γ-ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first 30 WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer 2012, and 100 WCDs will be taking data by May, 2013. We present in this paper the motivation for constructing the HAWC observatory, the status of the deployment, and the first results from the constantly growing array.

  10. The high-altitude water Cherenkov Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mostafa, Miguel A., E-mail: miguel@psu.edu [Department of Physics, Colorado State University, Ft Collins, CO (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV γ -ray experiment under construction at 4,100ma.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow to detect both the transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV γ -ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from γ -ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first 30 WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer 2012, and 100 WCDs will be taking data by May, 2013. We present in this paper the motivation for constructing the HAWC observatory, the status of the deployment, and the first results from the constantly growing array. (author)

  11. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Wayne

    2014-06-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a continuously operated, wide field of view detector based upon a water Cherenkov technology developed by the Milagro experiment. HAWC observes, at an elevation of 4100 m on Sierra Negra Mountain in Mexico, extensive air showers initiated by gamma and cosmic rays. The completed detector will consist of 300 closely spaced water tanks each instrumented with four photomultiplier tubes that provide timing and charge information used to reconstruct energy and arrival direction. HAWC has been optimized to observe transient and steady emission from point as well as diffuse sources of gamma rays in the energy range from several hundred GeV to several hundred TeV. Studies in solar physics as well as the properties of cosmic rays will also be performed. HAWC has been making observations at various stages of deployment since completion of 10% of the array in summer 2012. A discussion of the detector design, science capabilities, current construction/commissioning status, and first results will be presented...

  12. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV gamma-ray experiment under construction at 4,100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow us to detect both transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV gamma-ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first thirty WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer...

  13. Spatial sensitivities of human health risk to intercontinental and high-altitude pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Jamin; Wang, Qiqi; Henze, Daven K.; Waitz, Ian A.; Barrett, Steven R. H.

    2013-06-01

    We perform the first long-term (>1 year) continuous adjoint simulations with a global atmospheric chemistry-transport model focusing on population exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and associated risk of early death. Sensitivities relevant to intercontinental and high-altitude PM pollution are calculated with particular application to aircraft emissions. Specifically, the sensitivities of premature mortality risk in different regions to NOx, SOx, CO, VOC and primary PM2.5 emissions as a function of location are computed. We apply the resultant sensitivity matrices to aircraft emissions, finding that NOx emissions are responsible for 93% of population exposure to aircraft-attributable PM2.5. Aircraft NOx accounts for all of aircraft-attributable nitrate exposure (as expected) and 53% of aircraft-attributable sulfate exposure due to the strong "oxidative coupling" between aircraft NOx emissions and non-aviation SO2 emissions in terms of sulfate formation. Of the health risk-weighted human PM2.5 exposure attributable to aviation, 73% occurs in Asia, followed by 18% in Europe. 95% of the air quality impacts of aircraft emissions in the US are incurred outside the US. We also assess the impact of uncertainty or changes in (non-aviation) ammonia emissions on aviation-attributable PM2.5 exposure by calculating second-order sensitivities. We note the potential application of the sensitivity matrices as a rapid policy analysis tool in aviation environmental policy contexts.

  14. Decompression Sickness Risk Versus Time and Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    M, Wiegman J, Pilmanis exposure at 22,500 ft (Fig. 1-2) should raise AA. Prebreathe enhancement with concern since that level of decompression is...Andrew A. P11manis in a research phyniologist 2. Fischer MO, Wiegman JF, McLean SA, Olson Andrew A. ihi ish resiarch poycioo SRM. Evaluation of four

  15. Exposure Forecaster

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Exposure Forecaster Database (ExpoCastDB) is EPA's database for aggregating chemical exposure information and can be used to help with chemical exposure...

  16. Training Diaries during Altitude Training Camp in Two Olympic Champions: An Observational Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Lorenzo; Serpiello, Fabio R; Millet, Grégoire P; La Torre, Antonio

    2014-09-01

    Traditionally, Live High-Train High (LHTH) interventions were adopted when athletes trained and lived at altitude to try maximising the benefits offered by hypoxic exposure and improving sea level performance. Nevertheless, scientific research has proposed that the possible benefits of hypoxia would be offset by the inability to maintain high training intensity at altitude. However, elite athletes have been rarely recruited as an experimental sample, and training intensity has almost never been monitored during altitude research. This case study is an attempt to provide a practical example of successful LHTH interventions in two Olympic gold medal athletes. Training diaries were collected and total training volumes, volumes at different intensities, and sea level performance recorded before, during and after a 3-week LHTH camp. Both athletes successfully completed the LHTH camp (2090 m) maintaining similar absolute training intensity and training volume at high-intensity (> 91% of race pace) compared to sea level. After the LHTH intervention both athletes obtained enhancements in performance and they won an Olympic gold medal. In our opinion, LHTH interventions can be used as a simple, yet effective, method to maintain absolute, and improve relative training intensity in elite endurance athletes. Key PointsElite endurance athletes, with extensive altitude training experience, can maintain similar absolute intensity during LHTH compared to sea level.LHTH may be considered as an effective method to increase relative training intensity while maintaining the same running/walking pace, with possible beneficial effects on sea level performance.Training intensity could be the key factor for successful high-level LHTH camp.

  17. DLR HABLEG- High Altitude Balloon Launched Experimental Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlach, S.; Schwarzbauch, M.; Laiacker, M.

    2015-09-01

    The group Flying Robots at the DLR Institute of Robotics and Mechatronics in Oberpfaffenhofen conducts research on solar powered high altitude aircrafts. Due to the high altitude and the almost infinite mission duration, these platforms are also denoted as High Altitude Pseudo-Satellites (HAPS). This paper highlights some aspects of the design, building, integration and testing of a flying experimental platform for high altitudes. This unmanned aircraft, with a wingspan of 3 m and a mass of less than 10 kg, is meant to be launched as a glider from a high altitude balloon in 20 km altitude and shall investigate technologies for future large HAPS platforms. The aerodynamic requirements for high altitude flight included the development of a launch method allowing for a safe transition to horizontal flight from free-fall with low control authority. Due to the harsh environmental conditions in the stratosphere, the integration of electronic components in the airframe is a major effort. For regulatory reasons a reliable and situation dependent flight termination system had to be implemented. In May 2015 a flight campaign was conducted. The mission was a full success demonstrating that stratospheric research flights are feasible with rather small aircrafts.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA response to high altitude: a new perspective on high-altitude adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongjun; Yang, Xiaohong; Gao, Yuqi

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondria are the energy metabolism centers of the cell. More than 95% of cellular energy is produced by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Hypoxia affects a wide range of energy generation and consumption processes in animals. The most important mechanisms limiting ATP consumption increase the efficiency of ATP production and accommodate the reduced production of ATP by the body. All of these mechanisms relate to changes in mitochondrial function. Mitochondrial function can be affected by variations in mitochondrial DNA, including polymorphisms, content changes, and deletions. These variations play an important role in acclimatization or adaptation to hypoxia. In this paper, the association between mitochondrial genome sequences and high-altitude adaptation is reviewed.

  19. Gravity Disturbances at Altitude and at the Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, T.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. National Geodetic Survey (NGS) is committed to redefining the nation's vertical datum by 2022. In support of the new vertical datum, NGS is collecting high-altitude airborne gravity data across the United States through the Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project. GRAV-D (as of August 2013) has publicly released full-field gravity products from these high-altitude flights for >15% of the country. The full-field gravity (FFG) at altitude product is versatile because it allows the user to calculate any disturbance or anomaly that is appropriate for their application- based on any datum and height above the datum desired. However, conventional geophysical methods for calculating gravity disturbances assume very low altitudes above the ellipsoid. This presentation addresses the differences between several conventional and non-conventional methods for calculating gravity disturbances, from the perspective of altitudes as high as 40,000 ft. The methods for calculating a disturbance at altitude apply different corrections to the FFG for: 1. Normal gravity at the surface of the ellipsoid and the free-air reduction (1st order, 2nd order, and higher order approximations); 2. Normal gravity at the surface of the ellipsoid, upward continued to flight height; 3. Normal gravity at flight altitude above the ellipsoid from Heiskanen and Moritz (1967)'s closed equations; 4. Normal gravity at flight altitude above the ellipsoid from spherical and ellipsoidal harmonic coefficients of the ellipsoid. Initial results indicate that these methods produce gravity disturbances that are 10s of mGals different at altitude. This presentation will also investigate disturbances calculated at the surface of the ellipsoid, by downward continuing the results of the above methods. Gravity disturbances continued from airborne flight heights down to the surface are desired for comparison to terrestrial and marine gravity data.

  20. Effects of moderate level of + Gz exposure on urinary microalbumin ,α1 microglobulin and items of urinary routine in pilots%中等水平+Gz暴露对飞行员尿微量白蛋白、尿α1微球蛋白及尿常规检测指标的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成刚; 李建标; 朱美财; 郑军

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of moderate level of+Gz exposure on urinary microalbumin(MA),α1 microglobulin(α1 M)and ten items of urinary routine in pilots. Methods The centrifuge testing of relaxed+Gz tolerance was performed in 33 fighter pilots,in which the maximum+Gz exposure was+4.25 G/10 s.The above-mentioned indices of urine were examined in 10 pilots 2 hours later and in 23 pilots 24 hours later. Results All urinary indices of 33 pilots were normal before centrifuge test.After centrifuge test,all pilots had n0 uncomfortable complaint.Two hours later,there were an increase of urinary MA in one pilot and an increase of urinary α1M in another pilot.The abnormality disappeared the next day.All the results of urinary routine test were normal,but after 2 hours of +Gz exposure the average data of urinary specific gravity decreased(t=4.129,P<0.01)while the average data of urinary pH value increased slightly(t=6.530,P<0.01).Twenty-four hours after +Gz exposure,there were an increase of urinary MA in one pilot and an increase of urinary a1 M in another pilot,furthermore,a few red blood cells were found in one pilot's urine routine exam.There was no significant difference in urinary MA and α1M before and after +Gz exposure for 2 h or 4 h(t=1.616,0.376,0.640,0.422,P>0.05). Conclusions There is a slight effect on renal function in some pilots after moderate level of +Gz exposure,the temporary change may occur individually.The monitoring and protection of renal function in pilots during+Gz exposure should be strengthened.%目的 观察中等水平+Gz暴露对飞行员尿微量白蛋白(MA)、尿α1微球蛋白(α1M)及尿常规10项检测指标的影响.方法 33名歼击机飞行员接受离心机基础+Gz耐力检查,最高加速度暴露水平为+4.25 G/10 s,观察10名飞行员+Gz暴露后2 h和23名飞行员+Gz暴露后24 h尿液指标中MA、α1M和尿常规10项指标的变化情况.结果 离心机检查前,33名飞行员尿液指标检测结果均

  1. Oxidative stress and the high altitude environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Krzeszowiak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years there has been considerable interest in mountain sports, including mountaineering, owing to the general availability of climbing clothing and equipment as well trainings and professional literature. This raised a new question for the environmental and mountain medicine: Is mountaineering harmful to health? Potential hazards include the conditions existing in the alpine environment, i.e. lower atmospheric pressure leading to the development of hypobaric hypoxia, extreme physical effort, increased UV radiation, lack of access to fresh food, and mental stress. A reasonable measure of harmfulness of these factors is to determine the increase in the level of oxidative stress. Alpine environment can stimulate the antioxidant enzyme system but under specific circumstances it may exceed its capabilities with simultaneous consumption of low-molecular antioxidants resulting in increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. This situation is referred to as oxidative stress. Rapid and uncontrolled proliferation of reactive oxygen species leads to a number of adverse changes, resulting in the above-average damage to the lipid structures of cell membranes (peroxidation, proteins (denaturation, and nucleic acids. Such situation within the human body cannot take place without resultant systemic consequences. This explains the malaise of people returning from high altitude and a marked decrease in their physical fitness. In addition, a theory is put forward that the increase in the level of oxidative stress is one of the factors responsible for the onset of acute mountain sickness (AMS. However, such statement requires further investigation because the currently available literature is inconclusive. This article presents the causes and effects of development of oxidative stress in the high mountains.

  2. Guide to Altitude Decompression Sickness Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Individual Assessment Report showing VO2Max score or submit to a submaximal ergometry test g. Schedule Physical Exam which is described in the...PREFACE vii ACKNOWLEDGMENTS viii SUMMARY 1 INTRODUCTION 2 SUBJECT-SPECIFIC PROCEDURES 2 TEST SUBJECT PHYSICAL EXAM 3 PHYSIOLOGICAL TRAINING 3 AIR...EXPOSURE PROCEDURES 5 CHAMBER DESCRIPTIONS, CAPABILITIES, AND PROCEDURES 7 BROOKS CHAMBERS 7 TEST PLAN AND NORMAL CHAMBER OPERATIONS 7 POSTFLIGHT

  3. Altitude-Limiting Airbrake System for Small to Medium Scale Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron, Robert F., III

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the overall internship opportunity this semester was to learn and practice the elements of engineering design through direct exposure to real engineering problems. The primary exposure was to design and manufacture an airbrake device for use with small-medium scale rocket applications. The idea was to take the presented concept of a solution and transform said concept into a reliable fully-functioning and reusable mechanism. The mechanism was to be designed as an insurance feature so that the overall altitude of a rocket with relatively undetermined engine capabilities does not unexpectedly exceed the imposed 10,000 foot ceiling, per range requirements. The airbrake concept was introduced to the Prototype Development Lab as a rotation-driven four tiered offset track pin mechanism, i.e. the airbrake was deployed by rotating a central shaft attached directly to the bottom plate. The individual airbrake fins were subsequently deployed using multiple plates with tracks of offset curvature. The fins were created with guide pins to follow the tracks in each of the offset plates, thus allowing the simultaneous rotational deployment of all fins by only rotating one plate. The concept of this solution was great; though it did not function in application. The rotating plates alone brought up problems like the entire back half of the rocket rotating according to the motion of the aforementioned base plate. Subsequently, the solution currently under development became a static linear actuator-driven spring-loaded fin release system. This solution is almost instantaneously triggered electronically when the avionics detect that the rocket has reached the calculated altitude of deceleration. This altitude will allow enough time remaining to the overall ceiling to adequately decelerate the rocket prior to reaching the ceiling.

  4. Altitude and latitude dependence of the equatorial electrojet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A.; Cole, K. D.

    1988-07-01

    A self-consistent and high-resolution dynamo model is used to investigate the effects of day-to-day or seasonal variation of altitude and latitude profiles of the E-plasma density in the equatorial ionosphere on equatorial electrojet (EEJ) structure. Variations in the E-layer peak altitude and amplitude are shown to significantly affect EEJ structure. The results indicate that, for any shape, the EEJ peak appears at or below the E-layer peak altitude. Distinct double peaks occur in the EEJ structure if the E-layer peak is above 105 km or if the gradient is large. The effect of the latitudinal variation of the integrated conductivities of ionospheric field lines upon the amplitude and altitude of the EEJ peak is discussed.

  5. Altitude Compensating Nozzle Transonic Performance Flight Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Altitude compensating nozzles continue to be of interest for use on future launch vehicle boosters and upper stages because of their higher mission average Isp and...

  6. Children's exercise capacity at high altitude in Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianba; Andersen, Lars Bo; Stigum, Hein; Ouzhuluobu; Bjertness, Espen

    2014-11-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (exercise capacity) is a vital parameter in the evaluation of adaptation to high altitude, providing an index of the integrated function of the oxygen transport system. Previous studies of maximal oxygen uptake in population at high altitude have mainly focused on adults and adolescents, though data on children are uncommon. Maximal oxygen uptake can be measured directly, using an oxygen analyser, or indirectly through the development of equations for estimation from the maximal power output (W(max)). Such estimations and studies of the physiological aspects of children's capacity to work and live at different altitudes in Tibet ancestry were not reported previously, although differences similar to those seen in adults may be expected to occur. The present paper summarized the findings of studies on exercise capacity among children living at high altitude in Tibet.

  7. Recognising and mitigating the risk of altitude-related illness

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Typically, above 3 500 m, an increase in sleep- ing altitude of ... Everest. Fig. 1. Relative heights of well-known African and international peaks in comparison to Kilimanjaro, ... recent times, however, the importance of providing high-quality,.

  8. Altitude training considerations for the winter sport athlete

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Robert F. Chapman; Jonathon L. Stickford; Benjamin D. Levine

    2010-01-01

    .... The reduction in air resistance at altitude can dramatically affect sports involving high velocities and technical skill components, such as ski jumping, speed skating, figure skating and ice hockey...

  9. General introduction to altitude adaptation and mountain sickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartsch, P.; Saltin, B.

    2008-01-01

    ascent (average ascent rate 300 m/day above 2000 m a.s.l.), primarily in order to sleep and feel well, and minimize the risk of mountain sickness. A new classification of altitude levels based on the effects on performance and well-being is proposed and an overview given over the various modalities using...... at altitudes between 2500 and 3000 m a.s.l. Pulmonary edema is rarely seen below 3000 m a.s.l. and brain edema is not seen below 4000 m a.s.l. It is possible to travel to altitudes of 2500-3000 m a.s.l., wait for 2 days, and then gradually start to train. At higher altitudes, one should consider a staged...

  10. NHAP = National High-Altitude Aerial Photography: 1980 - 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The National High Altitude Photography (NHAP) program, which was operated from 1980-1989, was coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey as an interagency project to...

  11. Ben Macdhui High Altitude Trace Gas and Aerosol Transport Experiment

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Piketh, SJ

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ben Macdhui High Altitude Aerosol and Trace Gas Transport Experiment (BHATTEX) was started to characterize the nature and magnitude of atmospheric, aerosol and trace gas transport paths recirculation over and exiting from southern Africa...

  12. NHAP = National High-Altitude Aerial Photography: 1980 - 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The National High Altitude Photography (NHAP) program, which was operated from 1980-1989, was coordinated by the U.S. Geological Survey as an interagency project to...

  13. The yak genome and adaptation to life at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Qiang; Zhang, Guojie; Ma, Tao; Qian, Wubin; Wang, Junyi; Ye, Zhiqiang; Cao, Changchang; Hu, Quanjun; Kim, Jaebum; Larkin, Denis M; Auvil, Loretta; Capitanu, Boris; Ma, Jian; Lewin, Harris A; Qian, Xiaoju; Lang, Yongshan; Zhou, Ran; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Kun; Xia, Jinquan; Liao, Shengguang; Pan, Shengkai; Lu, Xu; Hou, Haolong; Wang, Yan; Zang, Xuetao; Yin, Ye; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Zhaofeng; Zhang, Yingmei; Zhang, Dawei; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Hasegawa, Masami; Zhong, Yang; Liu, Wenbin; Zhang, Yan; Huang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Shengxiang; Long, Ruijun; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Lenstra, Johannes A; Cooper, David N; Wu, Yi; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Wang, Jian; Liu, Jianquan

    2012-07-01

    Domestic yaks (Bos grunniens) provide meat and other necessities for Tibetans living at high altitude on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and in adjacent regions. Comparison between yak and the closely related low-altitude cattle (Bos taurus) is informative in studying animal adaptation to high altitude. Here, we present the draft genome sequence of a female domestic yak generated using Illumina-based technology at 65-fold coverage. Genomic comparisons between yak and cattle identify an expansion in yak of gene families related to sensory perception and energy metabolism, as well as an enrichment of protein domains involved in sensing the extracellular environment and hypoxic stress. Positively selected and rapidly evolving genes in the yak lineage are also found to be significantly enriched in functional categories and pathways related to hypoxia and nutrition metabolism. These findings may have important implications for understanding adaptation to high altitude in other animal species and for hypoxia-related diseases in humans.

  14. Travelling to new heights: practical high altitude medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Tracie; Aref-Adib, Golnar

    2008-06-01

    Over 40 million people travel to high altitude for both work and pleasure each year, and all of them are at risk of the acute effects of hypoxia. This article reviews the prevention, diagnostic features and treatments of these illnesses.

  15. Investigation of Correction Method of the Spacecraft Low Altitude Ranging

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jing-Lei; Wu, Shi-Tong; Huang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    gamma ray altitude control system is an important equipment for deep space exploration and sample return mission, its main purpose is a low altitude measurement of the spacecraft based on Compton Effect at the moment when it lands on extraterrestrial celestial or sampling returns to the Earth land, and an ignition altitude correction of the spacecraft retrograde landing rocket at different landing speeds. This paper presents an ignition altitude correction method of the spacecraft at different landing speeds, based on the number of particles gamma ray reflected field gradient graded. Through the establishment of a theoretical model, its algorithm feasibility is proved by a mathematical derivation and verified by an experiment, and also the adaptability of the algorithm under different parameters is described. The method provides a certain value for landing control of the deep space exploration spacecraft landing the planet surface.

  16. Functions and Design Scheme of Tibet High Altitude Test Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Yongqing; Guo Jian; Yin Yu; Mao Yan; Li Guangfan; Fan Jianbin; Lu Jiayu; Su Zhiyi; Li Peng; Li Qingfeng; Liao Weiming; Zhou Jun

    2010-01-01

    @@ The functional orientation of the Tibet High Altitude Test Base, subordinated to the State Grid Corporation of China (SGCC), is to serve power transmission projects in high altitude areas, especially to provide technical support for southwestern hydropower delivery projects by UHVDC transmission and Qinghai-Tibet grid interconnection project. This paper presents the matters concerned during siting and planning, functions,design scheme, the main performances and parameters of the test facilities, as well as the tests and research tasks already carried out.

  17. Birth weight and altitude: a study in Peruvian communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortola, J P; Frappell, P B; Aguero, L; Armstrong, K

    2000-03-01

    We tested the hypothesis that at high altitude birth weight decreases once a critical barometric pressure (Pb) is reached. Birth weight data covering the 1-year period from November 1997 to October 1998 were collected in Peru from the data files of 15 community and mining centers between sea level and 4575 m altitude. These centers are scattered along the main road that joins Lima (on the Pacific shore) to Cerro de Pasco (4330 m) and surroundings. Above approximately 2000 m (ie, at Pb below approximately 590 mm Hg, inspired O(2) partial pressure of approximately 114 mm Hg) and up to approximately 4500 m altitude birth weight declined at an average of 65 g for every additional 500 m altitude (or 105 g for every additional 50 mm Hg drop in Pb). This pattern did not differ between sexes. Averages and modal distributions of the birth weight from 2 hospitals in Cerro de Pasco (4330 m) serving different social groups were similar. Body length at birth was similar at various altitudes, with the exception of the 2 highest locations above 4500 m, where it was slightly reduced. From these data, together with additional data collected in the North of Peru (Chacas, 3360 m) and with results from other ethnic groups previously published, we conclude that the drop in birth weight at altitude is (1) apparent once the critical Pb of approximately 590 mm Hg is reached, corresponding to an altitude of approximately 2000 m, (2) proportional to the increase in altitude between approximately 2000 m and 4500 m, and (3) independent from socioeconomic factors.

  18. Functions and Design Scheme of Tibet High Altitude Test Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The functional orientation of the Tibet High Altitude Test Base, subordinated to the State Grid Corporation of China (SGCC), is to serve power transmission projects in high altitude areas, especially to provide technical support for southwestern hydropower delivery projects by UHVDC transmission and Qinghai-Tibet grid interconnection project. This paper presents the matters concerned during siting and planning, functions, design scheme, the main performances and parameters of the test facilities, as well as...

  19. Effects of altitude on the climbing performance of Monarch butterflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang-Kwon; Sridhar, Madhu; Landrum, David; Aono, Hikaru

    2016-11-01

    Millions of Monarchs annually travel up to 4,000km, the longest migration distance among insects. They fly and overwinter at high altitudes. However, the aerodynamic mechanism enabling the long-range flight of Monarch butterflies is unknown. To study the effects of altitude on the aerodynamic performance of Monarch butterflies, a unique combination of a motion tracking system and a variable pressure chamber that allows controlling the density is used. The condition inside the chamber is systematically varied to simulate high altitude conditions up to 3,000 m. An optical tracking technique is used to characterize the climbing trajectories of freely flying Monarch butterflies. Customized reflective markers are designed to minimize the effects of marker addition. Flapping amplitude and frequency as well as climbing trajectories are measured. Lift acting on the butterfly is also determined by considering the force balance. Results show that the average flight speed and the Reynolds number, in general, decreased with the altitude, whereas, interestingly, the lift coefficient increased with the altitude. More detailed measurements and analyses will be performed in the future to explain the lift enhancement by flying at higher altitudes. This work is partly supported by NSF Grant CBET-1335572 and in part by CK's startup fund provided by UAH.

  20. Shilajit: A panacea for high-altitude problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Harsahay; Pandey, H K; Arya, M C; Ahmed, Zakwan

    2010-01-01

    High altitude problems like hypoxia, acute mountain sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, pulmonary edema, insomnia, tiredness, lethargy, lack of appetite, body pain, dementia, and depression may occur when a person or a soldier residing in a lower altitude ascends to high-altitude areas. These problems arise due to low atmospheric pressure, severe cold, high intensity of solar radiation, high wind velocity, and very high fluctuation of day and night temperatures in these regions. These problems may escalate rapidly and may sometimes become life-threatening. Shilajit is a herbomineral drug which is pale-brown to blackish-brown, is composed of a gummy exudate that oozes from the rocks of the Himalayas in the summer months. It contains humus, organic plant materials, and fulvic acid as the main carrier molecules. It actively takes part in the transportation of nutrients into deep tissues and helps to overcome tiredness, lethargy, and chronic fatigue. Shilajit improves the ability to handle high altitudinal stresses and stimulates the immune system. Thus, Shilajit can be given as a supplement to people ascending to high-altitude areas so that it can act as a "health rejuvenator" and help to overcome high-altitude related problems.

  1. Doing statistical mediation and moderation

    CERN Document Server

    Jose, Paul E

    2013-01-01

    Written in a friendly, conversational style, this book offers a hands-on approach to statistical mediation and moderation for both beginning researchers and those familiar with modeling. Starting with a gentle review of regression-based analysis, Paul Jose covers basic mediation and moderation techniques before moving on to advanced topics in multilevel modeling, structural equation modeling, and hybrid combinations, such as moderated mediation. User-friendly features include numerous graphs and carefully worked-through examples; ""Helpful Suggestions"" about procedures and pitfalls; ""Knowled

  2. A longitudinal study of cerebral blood flow under hypoxia at high altitude using 3D pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenjia; Liu, Jie; Lou, Xin; Zheng, Dandan; Wu, Bing; Wang, Danny J. J.; Ma, Lin

    2017-01-01

    Changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) may occur with acute exposure to high altitude; however, the CBF of the brain parenchyma has not been studied to date. In this study, identical magnetic resonance scans using arterial spin labeling (ASL) were performed to study the haemodynamic changes at both sea level and high altitude. We found that with acute exposure to high altitude, the CBF in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subjects was higher (P  0.05) compared with those at sea level. Moreover, magnetic resonance angiography in both AMS and non-AMS subjects showed a significant increase in the cross-sectional areas of the internal carotid, basilar, and middle cerebral arteries on the first day at high altitude. These findings support that AMS may be related to increased CBF rather than vasodilation; these results contradict most previous studies that reported no relationship between CBF changes and the occurrence of AMS. This discrepancy may be attributed to the use of ASL for CBF measurement at both sea level and high altitude in this study, which has substantial advantages over transcranial Doppler for the assessment of CBF. PMID:28240265

  3. Youth Exposed to Terrorism: the Moderating Role of Ideology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Michelle; Shur, Lia; Gilady, Ayelet

    2016-05-01

    The present review examines the moderating role of ideology on the effects of war, armed conflict, and terrorism on youth. Ideology is an important factor given the central role played by religio-political ideology and nationalism in present-day conflicts. Ideologies or worldviews represent cognitive frameworks that imbue the traumatic situation with meaning and order. Analysis of the pool of studies identified three categories of ideologically based moderating factors, each representing an aspect of social construction of traumatic events, namely, religion, political ideology, and self-concept. The two closely related categories of religion and politico-religious beliefs showed both positive and negative effects on psychological and psychiatric outcomes among youth. The third category of different aspects of self-concept yielded consistently positive moderating effects. The mechanisms by which each category of ideology moderates effects of exposure to war, armed conflict, and terrorism are discussed, and research and clinical implications are presented.

  4. Ascent to altitude as a weight loss method: the good and bad of hypoxia inducible factor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2014-02-01

    Given the epidemic of obesity worldwide there is a need for more novel and effective weight loss methods. Altitude is well known to be associated with weight loss and has actually been used as a method of weight reduction in obese subjects. This review demonstrates the critical role of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) in bringing about reductions in appetite and increases in energy expenditure characteristic of hypobaric hypoxia A MEDLINE search of English language articles through February 2013 identified publications associating altitude or hypobaric hypoxia with key words to include HIF, weight loss, appetite, basal metabolic rate, leptin, cellular energetics, and obesity. The data from these articles were synthesized to formulate a unique and novel mechanism by which HIF activation leads to alterations in appetite, basal metabolic rate, and reductions in body adiposity. A synthesis of previously published literature revealed mechanisms by which altitude induces activation of HIF, thereby suggesting this transcription factor regulates changes in cellular metabolism/energetics, activation of the central nervous system, as well as peripheral pathways leading to reductions in food intake and increases in energy expenditure. Here a unifying hypothesis is present suggesting that activation of HIF under conditions of altitude potentially leads to metabolic benefits that are dose dependent, gender and genetic specific, and results in adverse effects if the exposure is extreme. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  5. Lower obesity rate during residence at high altitude among a military population with frequent migration: a quasi experimental model for investigating spatial causation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jameson D Voss

    Full Text Available We sought to evaluate whether residence at high altitude is associated with the development of obesity among those at increased risk of becoming obese. Obesity, a leading global health priority, is often refractory to care. A potentially novel intervention is hypoxia, which has demonstrated positive long-term metabolic effects in rats. Whether or not high altitude residence confers benefit in humans, however, remains unknown. Using a quasi-experimental, retrospective study design, we observed all outpatient medical encounters for overweight active component enlisted service members in the U.S. Army or Air Force from January 2006 to December 2012 who were stationed in the United States. We compared high altitude (>1.96 kilometers above sea level duty assignment with low altitude (<0.98 kilometers. The outcome of interest was obesity related ICD-9 codes (278.00-01, V85.3x-V85.54 by Cox regression. We found service members had a lower hazard ratio (HR of incident obesity diagnosis if stationed at high altitude as compared to low altitude (HR 0.59, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54-0.65; p<0.001. Using geographic distribution of obesity prevalence among civilians throughout the U.S. as a covariate (as measured by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the REGARDS study also predicted obesity onset among service members. In conclusion, high altitude residence predicts lower rates of new obesity diagnoses among overweight service members in the U.S. Army and Air Force. Future studies should assign exposure using randomization, clarify the mechanism(s of this relationship, and assess the net balance of harms and benefits of high altitude on obesity prevention.

  6. Low-dose radiation exposure and carcinogenesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2012-01-01

    .... Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the dose-response relationships for cancer induction and quantitative evaluations of cancer risk following exposure to moderate to high doses of low-linear...

  7. Kajian Teknologi High Altitude Platform (HAP [Study of High Altitude Platform (HAP Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amry Daulat Gultom

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available High Altitude Platform (HAP merupakan solusi alternatif untuk mengatasi keterbatasan infrastruktur terestrial maupun satelit. HAP merupakan pesawat ataupun balon udara yang ditempatkan pada ketinggian 20-50 km di atas permukaan bumi. Kelebihan yang utama dari HAP adalah kemudahan dalam penempatan, fleksibilitas, biaya operasionalnya rendah, delay  propagasi rendah, sudut elevasi lebar, cakupan yang luas. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui potensi HAP untuk komunikasi pita lebar dan perkembangannya di Indonesia. Analisis dilakukan secara deskriptif dengan mengolah data literatur yang didapat. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa di Indonesia terdapat potensi teknologi HAP untuk komunikasi pita lebar dengan lebar pita 2x300 MHz di band 27,9-28,2 GHz dan 31-31,3 GHz. Namun, belum ada peraturan yang mengatur alokasi frekuensi untuk HAP secara khusus di Indonesia.*****High Altitude Platform (HAP has been developed as an alternative solution in order to overcome limitation of terrestrial and satellite communication system. HAP is an aircraft or balloon situated on 20-50 km above the earth. Main advantages of HAP are flexibility in deployment, low propagation delay, wide elevation angle and broad coverage. The research is conducted to gather HAP potential for broadband communication and its development in Indonesia. Analysis is conducted by descriptive analysis from literature study gather. The research result shows that in Indonesia, there is potential of HAP technology for broadband communication with 2x300 MHz bandwidth within 27,9-28,2 GHz and 31-31,3 GHz. Yet, there are no specific regulations managing frequency allocation for HAP in Indonesia.

  8. Reappraisal, Suppression and Reactions to Affect-Inducing Images: The Moderating Role of Gender in Different Emotion Categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Mai Bjørnskov; Mehlsen, Mimi Yung; OToole, Mia Skytte

    The present study explored the moderating effect of gender on the relationship between emotion regulation and affective states following exposure to emotion inducing images. Results revealed that gender moderated the association between reappraisal and affect. In addition, the moderating effect...... of gender varied according to category of emotion....

  9. The Role of Visual Occlusion in Altitude Maintenance during Simulated Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, R.; Geri, G. A.; Akhtar, S. C.; Covas, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    The use of visual occlusion as a cue to altitude maintenance in low-altitude flight (LAF) was investigated. The extent to which the ground surface is occluded by 3-D objects varies with altitude and depends on the height, radius, and density of the objects. Participants attempted to maintain a constant altitude during simulated flight over an…

  10. Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on to any children you have after the exposure. A lot of radiation over a short period, ... skin burns and reduced organ function. If the exposure is large enough, it can cause premature aging ...

  11. International Olympic Committee consensus statement on thermoregulatory and altitude challenges for high-level athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, M F; Bahr, R; Bärtsch, P; Bourdon, L; Calbet, J A L; Carlsen, K H; Castagna, O; González-Alonso, J; Lundby, C; Maughan, R J; Millet, G; Mountjoy, M; Racinais, S; Rasmussen, P; Singh, D G; Subudhi, A W; Young, A J; Soligard, T; Engebretsen, L

    2012-09-01

    Challenging environmental conditions, including heat and humidity, cold, and altitude, pose particular risks to the health of Olympic and other high-level athletes. As a further commitment to athlete safety, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) Medical Commission convened a panel of experts to review the scientific evidence base, reach consensus, and underscore practical safety guidelines and new research priorities regarding the unique environmental challenges Olympic and other international-level athletes face. For non-aquatic events, external thermal load is dependent on ambient temperature, humidity, wind speed and solar radiation, while clothing and protective gear can measurably increase thermal strain and prompt premature fatigue. In swimmers, body heat loss is the direct result of convection at a rate that is proportional to the effective water velocity around the swimmer and the temperature difference between the skin and the water. Other cold exposure and conditions, such as during Alpine skiing, biathlon and other sliding sports, facilitate body heat transfer to the environment, potentially leading to hypothermia and/or frostbite; although metabolic heat production during these activities usually increases well above the rate of body heat loss, and protective clothing and limited exposure time in certain events reduces these clinical risks as well. Most athletic events are held at altitudes that pose little to no health risks; and training exposures are typically brief and well-tolerated. While these and other environment-related threats to performance and safety can be lessened or averted by implementing a variety of individual and event preventative measures, more research and evidence-based guidelines and recommendations are needed. In the mean time, the IOC Medical Commission and International Sport Federations have implemented new guidelines and taken additional steps to mitigate risk even further.

  12. Transcriptome and network changes in climbers at extreme altitudes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Chen

    Full Text Available Extreme altitude can induce a range of cellular and systemic responses. Although it is known that hypoxia underlies the major changes and that the physiological responses include hemodynamic changes and erythropoiesis, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways mediating such changes are largely unknown. To obtain a more complete picture of the transcriptional regulatory landscape and networks involved in extreme altitude response, we followed four climbers on an expedition up Mount Xixiabangma (8,012 m, and collected blood samples at four stages during the climb for mRNA and miRNA expression assays. By analyzing dynamic changes of gene networks in response to extreme altitudes, we uncovered a highly modular network with 7 modules of various functions that changed in response to extreme altitudes. The erythrocyte differentiation module is the most prominently up-regulated, reflecting increased erythrocyte differentiation from hematopoietic stem cells, probably at the expense of differentiation into other cell lineages. These changes are accompanied by coordinated down-regulation of general translation. Network topology and flow analyses also uncovered regulators known to modulate hypoxia responses and erythrocyte development, as well as unknown regulators, such as the OCT4 gene, an important regulator in stem cells and assumed to only function in stem cells. We predicted computationally and validated experimentally that increased OCT4 expression at extreme altitude can directly elevate the expression of hemoglobin genes. Our approach established a new framework for analyzing the transcriptional regulatory network from a very limited number of samples.

  13. Altitude dependence of plasma density in the auroral zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    Full Text Available We study the altitude dependence of plasma depletions above the auroral region in the 5000–30 000 km altitude range using five years of Polar spacecraft potential data. We find that besides a general decrease of plasma density with altitude, there frequently exist additional density depletions at 2–4 RE radial distance, where RE is the Earth radius. The position of the depletions tends to move to higher altitude when the ionospheric footpoint is sunlit as compared to darkness. Apart from these cavities at 2–4 RE radial distance, separate cavities above 4 RE occur in the midnight sector for all Kp and also in the morning sector for high Kp. In the evening sector our data remain inconclusive in this respect. This holds for the ILAT range 68–74. These additional depletions may be substorm-related. Our study shows that auroral phenomena modify the plasma density in the auroral region in such a way that a nontrivial and interesting altitude variation results, which reflects the nature of the auroral acceleration processes.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetosphere–ionosphere interactions

  14. Physiological Changes at Altitude in Nonasthmatic and Asthmatic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianna Louie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercised-induced asthma is not due to exercise itself per se, but rather is due to cooling and/or drying of the airway because of the increased ventilation that accompanies exercise. Travel to high altitudes is accompanied by increased ventilation of cool, often dry, air, irrespective of the level of exertion, and by itself, this could represent an 'exercise' challenge for asthmatic subjects. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction was measured at sea level and at various altitudes during a two-week trek through the Himalayas in a group of nonasthmatic and asthmatic subjects. The results of this study showed that in mild asthmatics, there was a significant reduction in peak expiratory flow at very high altitudes. Contrary to the authors' hypothesis, there was not a significant additional decrease in peak expiratory flow after exercise in the asthmatic subjects at high altitude. However, there was a significant fall in arterial oxygen saturation postexercise in the asthmatic subjects, a change that was not seen in the nonasthmatic subjects. These data suggest that asthmatic subjects develop bronchoconstriction when they go to very high altitudes, possibly via the same mechanism that causes exercise-induced asthma.

  15. Joseph Barcroft's studies of high-altitude physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John B

    2013-10-15

    Joseph Barcroft (1872-1947) was an eminent British physiologist who made contributions to many areas. Some of his studies at high altitude and related topics are reviewed here. In a remarkable experiment he spent 6 days in a small sealed room while the oxygen concentration of the air gradually fell, simulating an ascent to an altitude of nearly 5,500 m. The study was prompted by earlier reports by J. S. Haldane that the lung secreted oxygen at high altitude. Barcroft tested this by having blood removed from an exposed radial artery during both rest and exercise. No evidence for oxygen secretion was found, and the combination of 6 days incarceration and the loss of an artery was heroic. To obtain more data, Barcroft organized an expedition to Cerro de Pasco, Peru, altitude 4,300 m, that included investigators from both Cambridge, UK and Harvard. Again oxygen secretion was ruled out. The protocol included neuropsychometric measurements, and Barcroft famously concluded that all dwellers at high altitude are persons of impaired physical and mental powers, an assertion that has been hotly debated. Another colorful experiment in a low-pressure chamber involved reducing the pressure below that at the summit of Mt. Everest but giving the subjects 100% oxygen to breathe while exercising as a climber would on Everest. The conclusion was that it would be possible to reach the summit while breathing 100% oxygen. Barcroft was exceptional for his self-experimentation under hazardous conditions.

  16. Mobile platform of altitude measurement based on a smartphone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowski, Paweł; Kowalczyk, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    The article presents a low cost, fully - functional meter of altitude and pressure changes in a form of mobile application controlled by Android OS (operating system). The measurements are possible due to pressure sensor inserted in majority of latest modern mobile phones, which are known as smartphones. Using their computing capabilities and other equipment components like GPS receiver in connection with data from the sensor enabled authors to create a sophisticated handheld measuring platform with many unique features. One of them is a drawing altitude maps mode in which user can create maps of altitude changes just by moving around examined area. Another one is a convenient mode for altitude measurement. It is also extended with analysis tools which provide a possibility to compare measured values by displaying the data in a form of plots. The platform consists of external backup server, where the user can secure all gathered data. Moreover, the results of measurement's accuracy examination process which was executed after building the solution were shown. At the end, the realized meter of altitude was compared to other popular altimeters, which are available on the market currently.

  17. Acute emesis: moderately emetogenic chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrstedt, Jørn; Rapoport, Bernardo; Warr, David

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a review of the recommendations for the prophylaxis of acute emesis induced by moderately emetogenic chemotherapy as concluded at the third Perugia Consensus Conference, which took place in June 2009. The review will focus on new studies appearing since the Second consensus conference...... receiving multiple cycles of moderately emetogenic chemotherapy will be reviewed. Consensus statements are given, including optimal dose and schedule of serotonin(3) receptor antagonists, dexamethasone, and neurokinin(1) receptor antagonists. The most significant recommendations (and changes since the 2004...... version of the guidelines) are as follows: the best prophylaxis in patients receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (not including a combination of an anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide) is the combination of palonosetron and dexamethasone on the day of chemotherapy, followed by dexamethasone...

  18. Latent Presentation of Decompression Sickness After Altitude Chamber Training in an Active Duty Flier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, James; Rango, Juan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Biedermann, Shane

    2017-04-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a potential danger and risk for both divers and aircrew alike. DCS is also a potential side effect of altitude (hypobaric) chamber training as well and can present long after training occurs. Literature review shows that altitude chamber induced DCS has approximately a 0.25% incidence. A 32-yr-old, active duty military member developed symptoms of DCS 3 h after his hypobaric chamber training. Unfortunately, he did not seek treatment for DCS until 48 h after the exposure. His initial treatment included ground level oxygen therapy for 30 min at 12 L of oxygen per minute using a nonrebreathing mask. He achieved complete symptom resolution and was returned to duty. However, 12 d after his initial Flight Medicine evaluation, the patient returned complaining of a right temporal headache, multijoint pains, and fatigue. He was treated in the hyperbaric chamber and had complete resolution of symptoms. He was returned to flying status and 5 mo later denied any return of symptoms. Hypobaric chamber familiarity training is a requirement for all military aircrew personnel to allow them assess their ability to identify symptoms of hypoxia. This training method is not only costly to maintain, but it also places aircrew and chamber technicians at risk for potential long-term side effects from failed recompression treatment of DCS. We are presenting a case of recurrent DCS symptoms 12 d after initial ground level oxygen therapy.Gentry J, Rango J, Zhang J, Biedermann S. Latent presentation of decompression sickness after altitude chamber training in an active duty flier. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(4):427-430.

  19. Modelling circumplanetary ejecta clouds at low altitudes: a probabilistic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Christou, Apostolos A

    2014-01-01

    A model is presented of a ballistic, collisionless, steady state population of ejecta launched at randomly distributed times and velocities and moving under constant gravity above the surface of an airless planetary body. Within a probabilistic framework, closed form solutions are derived for the probability density functions of the altitude distribution of particles, the distribution of their speeds in a rest frame both at the surface and at altitude and with respect to a moving platform such as an orbiting spacecraft. These expressions are validated against numerically-generated synthetic populations of ejecta under lunar surface gravity. The model is applied to the cases where the ejection speed distribution is (a) uniform (b) a power law. For the latter law, it is found that the effective scale height of the ejecta envelope directly depends on the exponent of the power law and increases with altitude. The same holds for the speed distribution of particles near the surface. Ejection model parameters can, t...

  20. Microcomputer-controlled high-altitude data aquisition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-05-01

    A new microcomputer controlled high altitude data acquisition system was developed. The system provides a new technique for data acquisition from China's astronomical, meteorological and other high altitude experiments and opens up new territory in microcomputer applications. This microcomputer controlled high altitude data acquisition system is made up of a Z80 single board computer, 10 K memory expansion board, and keyboard and display board which can collect 16 analog signals simultaneously, and through analog/digital conversion can convert external analog signals into digital signals then encode them in a certain form through program modulation and store them on audio cassette. The data is immediately retrieved from the tape and sent to the surface microcomputer system for data processing and analysis.

  1. Adding heat to the live-high train-low altitude model: a practical insight from professional football

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheit, M; Racinais, S; Bilsborough, J; Hocking, J; Mendez-Villanueva, A; Bourdon, P C; Voss, S; Livingston, S; Christian, R; Périard, J; Cordy, J; Coutts, A J

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine with a parallel group study design the performance and physiological responses to a 14-day off-season ‘live high-train low in the heat’ training camp in elite football players. Methods Seventeen professional Australian Rules Football players participated in outdoor football-specific skills (32±1°C, 11.5 h) and indoor strength (23±1°C, 9.3 h) sessions and slept (12 nights) and cycled indoors (4.3 h) in either normal air (NORM, n=8) or normobaric hypoxia (14±1 h/day, FiO2 15.2–14.3%, corresponding to a simulated altitude of 2500–3000 m, hypoxic (HYP), n=9). They completed the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery level 2 (Yo-YoIR2) in temperate conditions (23±1°C, normal air) precamp (Pre) and postcamp (Post). Plasma volume (PV) and haemoglobin mass (Hbmass) were measured at similar times and 4 weeks postcamp (4WPost). Sweat sodium concentration ((Na+)sweat) was measured Pre and Post during a heat-response test (44°C). Results Both groups showed very large improvements in Yo-YoIR2 at Post (+44%; 90% CL 38, 50), with no between-group differences in the changes (−1%; −9, 9). Postcamp, large changes in PV (+5.6%; −1.8, 5.6) and (Na+)sweat (−29%; −37, −19) were observed in both groups, while Hbmass only moderately increased in HYP (+2.6%; 0.5, 4.5). At 4WPost, there was a likely slightly greater increase in Hbmass (+4.6%; 0.0, 9.3) and PV (+6%; −5, 18, unclear) in HYP than in NORM. Conclusions The combination of heat and hypoxic exposure during sleep/training might offer a promising ‘conditioning cocktail’ in team sports. PMID:24282209

  2. Effect of Air Pollution, Contamination and High Altitude on Bronchial Asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesriene El margoushy*, Mohamad El Nashar**, Hatem Khairy*, Nihad El Nashar*, Hala Mohamad

    2013-01-01

    , associated with a high rate of rhinitis symptoms and hay fever. In addition to bronchial asthma, prevalence of allergic diseases in a sample of Taif citizens assessed by an original Arabic questionnaire (phase I evidenced a high prevalence of allergic diseases as Urticaria, allergic rhinitis with or without other co-morbidities, and atopic dermatitis. Effect of high altitude on bronchial asthma is controversial; at high altitudes, the concentrations of the allergens are reduced due to the reduced amounts of vegetation, animal populations and human influences, high UV light exposure and low humidity could be contributing factors to the benefits of high altitude other than allergen avoidance. On the contrary, Lower altitudes have significant beneficial effects for bronchial asthma patients but lessen with increasing altitudes; the mountain climate can modify respiratory function and bronchial responsiveness of asthmatic subjects. Hypoxia, hyperventilation of cold and dry air and physical exertion may worsen asthma or enhance bronchial hyper-responsiveness while a reduction in pollen and pollution may play an important role in reducing bronchial inflammation. Increasing attention has to be paid to the potential of urban air toxics to exacerbate asthma. Continued emphasis on the identification of strategies for reducing levels of urban air pollutants is warranted to reduce respiratory diseases and other diseases related to pollution. Efforts for reducing the asthma burden must focus on primary prevention to reduce the level of exposure of individuals and populations to common risk factors, particularly tobacco smoke, frequent lower respiratory infections during childhood, and environmental air pollution (indoor, outdoor, and occupational.

  3. High incidence of abnormal glucose metabolism in acute coronary syndrome patients at a moderate altitude: A sub-Himalayan study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitender Mokta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abnormal glucose metabolic status at admission is an important marker of future cardiovascular events and long-term mortality after acute coronary syndrome (ACS, whether or not they are known diabetics. Objective: The aims were to study the prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism in ACS patients and to compare the different methods of diagnosing diabetes in ACS patients. Methods: We did a prospective study. About 250 consecutive nondiabetic patients (200 men and 50 women with ACS admitted to a tertiary care institute of Himachal Pradesh in 1 year were enrolled. Admission plasma glucose, next morning fasting plasma glucose (FPG, A1C, and a standardized 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT 72 h after admission were done. Glucose metabolism was categorized as normal glucose metabolism, impaired glucose metabolism (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance [IGT], and diabetes. Diabetes was arbitrarily classified further as undiagnosed (HBA1c ≥6.5% or possibly stress diabetes (HBA1c <6.5%. A repeat OGTT after 3 months in objects with IGT and stress hyperglycemia at a time of admission was done. Results: The mean age was 54 ± 12.46 years. The mean plasma glucose at admission was 124 ± 53.96 mg/dL, and the mean FPG was 102 ± 27.07 mg/dL. The mean 2-h postglucose load concentration was 159.5 ± 56.58 mg/dL. At baseline, 95 (38% had normal glucose metabolism, 95 (38% had impaired glucose metabolism (IGT and or IGT and 60 (24% had diabetes; 48 (19.2% were undiagnosed diabetes and 12 (4.8% had stress hyperglycemia. At follow up 58.66% and 55.55% of patients with impaired glucose tolerance and stress hyperglycemia continued to have impaired glucose tolerance respectively. About 75 gm OGTT has highest sensitivity and specificity to diagnose diabetes, whereas A1C most specific to rule out stress hyperglycemia. Conclusions: In this small hilly state of India, abnormal glucose metabolism (previously undiagnosed diabetes and IGT is common in patients admitted with ACS. Abnormal glucometabolic status can be detected early in the postadmission period. Our results further suggest that 75-g OGTT remained the gold standard test to detect diabetes and could be used before discharge to diagnose diabetes.

  4. High incidence of abnormal glucose metabolism in acute coronary syndrome patients at a moderate altitude: A sub-Himalayan study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokta, Jitender; Kumar, Subash; Ganju, Neeraj; Mokta, Kiran; Panda, Prashant Kumar; Gupta, Swatantra

    2017-01-01

    Background: Abnormal glucose metabolic status at admission is an important marker of future cardiovascular events and long-term mortality after acute coronary syndrome (ACS), whether or not they are known diabetics. Objective: The aims were to study the prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism in ACS patients and to compare the different methods of diagnosing diabetes in ACS patients. Methods: We did a prospective study. About 250 consecutive nondiabetic patients (200 men and 50 women) with ACS admitted to a tertiary care institute of Himachal Pradesh in 1 year were enrolled. Admission plasma glucose, next morning fasting plasma glucose (FPG), A1C, and a standardized 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) 72 h after admission were done. Glucose metabolism was categorized as normal glucose metabolism, impaired glucose metabolism (impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance [IGT]), and diabetes. Diabetes was arbitrarily classified further as undiagnosed (HBA1c ≥6.5%) or possibly stress diabetes (HBA1c <6.5%). A repeat OGTT after 3 months in objects with IGT and stress hyperglycemia at a time of admission was done. Results: The mean age was 54 ± 12.46 years. The mean plasma glucose at admission was 124 ± 53.96 mg/dL, and the mean FPG was 102 ± 27.07 mg/dL. The mean 2-h postglucose load concentration was 159.5 ± 56.58 mg/dL. At baseline, 95 (38%) had normal glucose metabolism, 95 (38%) had impaired glucose metabolism (IGT and or IGT) and 60 (24%) had diabetes; 48 (19.2%) were undiagnosed diabetes and 12 (4.8%) had stress hyperglycemia. At follow up 58.66% and 55.55% of patients with impaired glucose tolerance and stress hyperglycemia continued to have impaired glucose tolerance respectively. About 75 gm OGTT has highest sensitivity and specificity to diagnose diabetes, whereas A1C most specific to rule out stress hyperglycemia. Conclusions: In this small hilly state of India, abnormal glucose metabolism (previously undiagnosed diabetes and IGT) is common in patients admitted with ACS. Abnormal glucometabolic status can be detected early in the postadmission period. Our results further suggest that 75-g OGTT remained the gold standard test to detect diabetes and could be used before discharge to diagnose diabetes. PMID:28217514

  5. Wilderness medicine at high altitude: recent developments in the field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah NM

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neeraj M Shah,1 Sidra Hussain,2 Mark Cooke,3 John P O’Hara,3 Adrian Mellor3,4 1Division of Asthma, Allergy and Lung Biology, King’s College London, UK; 2School of Medicine, University College London, London, UK; 3Research Institute for Sport, Physical Activity and Leisure, Leeds Beckett University, Leeds, UK; 4Academic Department of Military Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, Birmingham, UK Abstract: Travel to high altitude is increasingly popular. With this comes an increased incidence of high-altitude illness and therefore an increased need to improve our strategies to prevent and accurately diagnose these. In this review, we provide a summary of recent advances of relevance to practitioners who may be advising travelers to altitude. Although the Lake Louise Score is now widely used as a diagnostic tool for acute mountain sickness (AMS, increasing evidence questions the validity of doing so, and of considering AMS as a single condition. Biomarkers, such as brain natriuretic peptide, are likely correlating with pulmonary artery systolic pressure, thus potential markers of the development of altitude illness. Established drug treatments include acetazolamide, nifedipine, and dexamethasone. Drugs with a potential to reduce the risk of developing AMS include nitrate supplements, propagators of nitric oxide, and supplemental iron. The role of exercise in the development of altitude illness remains hotly debated, and it appears that the intensity of exercise is more important than the exercise itself. Finally, despite copious studies demonstrating the value of preacclimatization in reducing the risk of altitude illness and improving performance, an optimal protocol to preacclimatize an individual remains elusive. Keywords: hypoxia, acute mountain sickness, acclimatization, biomarkers, preacclimatization

  6. [Sperm count and seminal biochemistry of high altitude inhabitants and patients with chronic altitude sickness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hjarles, M A

    1989-04-01

    Semen analysis has been studied in 9 healthy adult males from sea level (150 m), age 19-32 years old and 15 healthy males from high altitude (NA), 9 from Cerro de Pasco (4,300 m) and 6 from Morococha (4,540 m), ages 19-45 years old. Five patients with chronic mountain sickness (MMC), whose ages ranged from 23 to 52 years old were also studied. The volume and motility were similar in NA and MMC, however both were below than in sea level subjects, but still in the normal range; the number of spermatozoa per 1 ml was lower at sea level than in NA and MMC, although the total number was higher at sea level due to the higher semen volume. Fructose at sea level was 356 +/- 53 mg/100 ml (mean +/- S.E.) which is similar to NA 237 +/- 45 whereas a MMC was significantly lower, 142 +/- 60. Citric acid was lower at sea level than in NA and MMC. Na, K and Cl, were similar among the three groups. The lower concentration of fructose in MMC parallels the decreased testicular function already found in these groups. However it is worthy to point out that the fertility is preserved in all the groups. The normal reproductive function in MMC is against the concept that this process occurs as a consequence of environmental disadaptation.

  7. Grappling the High Altitude for Safe Edible Bamboo Shoots with Rich Nutritional Attributes and Escaping Cyanogenic Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayanika Devi Waikhom

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of bamboo species with high level of total cyanogenic content (TCC in Asia by many ethnic groups is significantly associated with food poisoning and occasionally Konzo (a neurological disorder. Adequate characterization of edible bamboo species with low level of TCC and high nutritious attributes is required for consumer’s safety as well as for the conservation of the gene pool. Here, we employed morphological descriptors, atomic absorption spectrophotometer, RAPD, and trnL-F intergenic spacer to characterize 15 indigenous edible bamboo species of north-east India. The study indicates that morphologically and genetically evolved edible bamboo species having large and robust bamboo-shoot texture and growing at low altitude contain high level of TCC, low antioxidant properties, and low levels of beneficial macronutrients and micronutrients. Importantly, Dendrocalamus species are shown to be rich in TCC irrespective of the growing altitude while Bambusa species are found to have moderate level of TCC. The findings clearly demonstrated that Chimonobambusa callosa growing at high altitude represents safe edible bamboo species with nutritious attributes.

  8. Influence of Atmospheric Solar Radiation Absorption on Photodestruction of Ions at D-Region Altitudes of the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    The influence of atmospheric solar radiation absorption on the photodetachment, dissociative photodetachment, and photodissociation rate coefficients (photodestruction rate coefficients) of O-, Cl-, O2 -, O3 -, OH-, NO2 -, NO3 -, O4 -, OH-(H2O), CO3 -, CO4 -, ONOO-, HCO3 -, CO3 -(H2O), NO3 -(H2O), O2 +(H2O), O4 +, N4 +, NO+(H2O), NO+(H2O)2, H+(H2O) n for n = 2-4, NO+(N2), and NO+(CO2) at D-region altitudes of the ionosphere is studied. A numerical one-dimensional time-dependent neutral atmospheric composition model has been developed to estimate this influence. The model simulations are carried out for the geomagnetically quiet time period of 15 October 1998 at moderate solar activity over the Boulder ozonesonde. If the solar zenith angle is not more than 90° then the strongest influence of atmospheric solar radiation absorption on photodestruction of ions is found for photodissociation of CO4 - ions when CO3 - ions are formed. It follows from the calculations that decreases in the photodestruction rate coefficients of ions under consideration caused by this influence are less than 2 % at 70 km altitude and above this altitude if the solar zenith angle does not exceed 90°.

  9. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meier Matthias M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Space weather can strongly affect the complex radiation field at aviation altitudes. The assessment of the corresponding radiation exposure of aircrew and passengers has been a challenging task as well as a legal obligation in the European Union for many years. The response of several radiation measuring instruments operated by different European research groups during joint measuring flights was investigated in the framework of the CONCORD (COmparisoN of COsmic Radiation Detectors campaign in the radiation field at aviation altitudes. This cooperation offered the opportunity to measure under the same space weather conditions and contributed to an independent quality control among the participating groups. The CONCORD flight campaign was performed with the twin-jet research aircraft Dassault Falcon 20E operated by the flight facility Oberpfaffenhofen of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, DLR. Dose rates were measured at four positions in the atmosphere in European airspace for about one hour at each position in order to obtain acceptable counting statistics. The analysis of the space weather situation during the measuring flights demonstrates that short-term solar activity did not affect the results which show a very good agreement between the readings of the instruments of the different institutes.

  10. CONCORD: comparison of cosmic radiation detectors in the radiation field at aviation altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Matthias M.; Trompier, François; Ambrozova, Iva; Kubancak, Jan; Matthiä, Daniel; Ploc, Ondrej; Santen, Nicole; Wirtz, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Space weather can strongly affect the complex radiation field at aviation altitudes. The assessment of the corresponding radiation exposure of aircrew and passengers has been a challenging task as well as a legal obligation in the European Union for many years. The response of several radiation measuring instruments operated by different European research groups during joint measuring flights was investigated in the framework of the CONCORD (COmparisoN of COsmic Radiation Detectors) campaign in the radiation field at aviation altitudes. This cooperation offered the opportunity to measure under the same space weather conditions and contributed to an independent quality control among the participating groups. The CONCORD flight campaign was performed with the twin-jet research aircraft Dassault Falcon 20E operated by the flight facility Oberpfaffenhofen of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt, DLR). Dose rates were measured at four positions in the atmosphere in European airspace for about one hour at each position in order to obtain acceptable counting statistics. The analysis of the space weather situation during the measuring flights demonstrates that short-term solar activity did not affect the results which show a very good agreement between the readings of the instruments of the different institutes.

  11. MRI evidence: acute mountain sickness is not associated with cerebral edema formation during simulated high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairer, Klemens; Göbel, Markus; Defrancesco, Michaela; Wille, Maria; Messner, Hubert; Loizides, Alexander; Schocke, Michael; Burtscher, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a common condition among non-acclimatized individuals ascending to high altitude. However, the underlying mechanisms causing the symptoms of AMS are still unknown. It has been suggested that AMS is a mild form of high-altitude cerebral edema both sharing a common pathophysiological mechanism. We hypothesized that brain swelling and consequently AMS development is more pronounced when subjects exercise in hypoxia compared to resting conditions. Twenty males were studied before and after an eight hour passive (PHE) and active (plus exercise) hypoxic exposure (AHE) (F(i)O(2) = 11.0%, P(i)O(2)∼80 mmHg). Cerebral edema formation was investigated with a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance scanner and analyzed by voxel based morphometry (VBM), AMS was assessed using the Lake Louise Score. During PHE and AHE AMS was diagnosed in 50% and 70% of participants, respectively (p>0.05). While PHE slightly increased gray and white matter volume and the apparent diffusion coefficient, these changes were clearly more pronounced during AHE but were unrelated to AMS. In conclusion, our findings indicate that rest and especially exercise in normobaric hypoxia are associated with accumulation of water in the extracellular space, however independent of AMS development. Thus, it is suggested that AMS and HACE do not share a common pathophysiological mechanism.

  12. Performance on neurological development tests by riverine children with moderate mercury exposure in Amazonia, Brazil Desempenho de crianças ribeirinhas da Amazônia, Brasil, expostas moderadamente ao mercúrio em testes para avaliação de desenvolvimento neurológico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia Maria Bocayuva Tavares

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system can be damaged when the population is exposed to methyl mercury (MeHg by ingesting fish, and children deserve special attention due to their increased susceptibility as compared to adults. A comparative cross-sectional study was performed in order to investigate the use of a battery of neurological development tests in two groups of 209 riverine children from 3 to 7 years old: a group exposed to moderate levels of MeHg (n = 75 and a control group (n = 134. The study included a questionnaire, the collection of scalp hair samples for determination of total mercury concentration, and performance on a test for evaluating neurological function in children. Riverine children presented higher exposure to MeHg (mean hair Hg = 5.37 ± 3.35µg.g-1 in comparison to the control group (mean Hg = 2.08 ± 1.37µg.g-1. Both groups showed a high proportion of children with what was considered "non-normal" performance, suggesting that the results could not be related to mercury exposure and that this type of test presented limitations for use with river-dwelling Amazon communities.O sistema nervoso pode ser afetado quando as pessoas, notadamente crianças, estão expostas ao metilmercúrio pela ingestão de peixes. Foi desenvolvido um estudo seccional, comparativo, para avaliar o desempenho de dois grupos de crianças ribeirinhas de 3 a 7 anos de idade na realização de uma bateria de testes de desenvolvimento neurológico. Um grupo estudo composto de crianças expostas a moderados níveis de mercúrio (n = 75 e um grupo controle (n = 134 de crianças que diferiam do primeiro grupo por uma ingestão menor de peixe. O estudo incluiu questionário, coleta de amostras de cabelo para determinação de mercúrio total e avaliação do desempenho das crianças na realização dos testes. As crianças do grupo estudo apresentaram maior média de concentração de mercúrio no cabelo (5,37 ± 3,35µg.g-1 em comparação com o grupo controle (2,08 ± 1

  13. Moderate Secularism and Multicultural Equality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2008-01-01

    provides a response to a prominent argument against multicultural accommodation of religious minorities, what is really at stake in discussions of multiculturalism and secularism are political principles. Modood's case for accommodation of Muslims along the lines of moderate secularism presupposes...... a normative conception of equality, but his characterisation of multicultural equality is inadequate in several respects...

  14. An empirical approach to the measurement of the cosmic radiation field at jet aircraft altitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Green, A R; Lewis, B J; Kitching, F; McCall, M J; Desormeaux, M; Butler, A A

    2005-01-01

    Researchers at the Royal Military College of Canada have accumulated extensive dose measurements performed at jet altitudes on over 160 flights and with a wide variety of detectors including a tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC), a smart wide energy neutron detection instrument (SWENDI), bubble detectors, thermoluminescent detectors (TLD) and an ion chamber. The summation of the individual low and high LET results from the latter equipment compared successfully to those from the TEPC on each flight. The data from these numerous worldwide flights have been encapsulated into a program that calculates the radiation dose for any flight in the world at any period in the solar cycle. This experimentally based program, Predictive Code for AIRcrew Exposure (PCAIRE) has been designed to be used by the airline industry to meet national dosimetry requirements. In Canada, for example, such a code can be used, supported by periodic measurements. With this latter requirement in mind and a desire to decrease equip...

  15. Variation of environmental neutron flux with altitude and depth of both water and soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. KOMURA; N.K. AHMED; A.H. EL-KAMEL; A.M.M. YOUSEF

    2004-01-01

    Applying the extreme low-level γ-ray spectroscopic analysis the environmental neutron flux is measured using different moderator construction and environment through the reaction 197Au (n, γ) 198Au. The contribution of thermal and resonance neutrons is separated using the cadmium difference technique, while fast neutrons are measured by the paraffin moderator. The results of altitude dependence of the neutron flux are discussed. The thermal neutron flux near the surface of sea water is less than its value at 100 cm over ground near sea water, while the value over the surfaces of fresh water is higher than that near the surface of sea water. Also the thermal neutron flux at 5 cm soil depth increases, then decreases to its original value at 10 cm depth and still constant until 25 cm, then decreases rapidly to reach 27% of its original value at 60 cm depth. The soil compositions, corresponding neutron temperatures and effective absorption cross sections of earth are the most effective factors on the equilibrium region of thermal neutrons in the ground.

  16. The genetic architecture of adaptations to high altitude in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Beall, Cynthia M; Witonsky, David B; Gebremedhin, Amha; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Di Rienzo, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Although hypoxia is a major stress on physiological processes, several human populations have survived for millennia at high altitudes, suggesting that they have adapted to hypoxic conditions. This hypothesis was recently corroborated by studies of Tibetan highlanders, which showed that polymorphisms in candidate genes show signatures of natural selection as well as well-replicated association signals for variation in hemoglobin levels. We extended genomic analysis to two Ethiopian ethnic groups: Amhara and Oromo. For each ethnic group, we sampled low and high altitude residents, thus allowing genetic and phenotypic comparisons across altitudes and across ethnic groups. Genome-wide SNP genotype data were collected in these samples by using Illumina arrays. We find that variants associated with hemoglobin variation among Tibetans or other variants at the same loci do not influence the trait in Ethiopians. However, in the Amhara, SNP rs10803083 is associated with hemoglobin levels at genome-wide levels of significance. No significant genotype association was observed for oxygen saturation levels in either ethnic group. Approaches based on allele frequency divergence did not detect outliers in candidate hypoxia genes, but the most differentiated variants between high- and lowlanders have a clear role in pathogen defense. Interestingly, a significant excess of allele frequency divergence was consistently detected for genes involved in cell cycle control and DNA damage and repair, thus pointing to new pathways for high altitude adaptations. Finally, a comparison of CpG methylation levels between high- and lowlanders found several significant signals at individual genes in the Oromo.

  17. PHYSICAL ADAPTATION OF CHILDREN TO LIFE AT HIGH-ALTITUDE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEER, K; HEYMANS, HSA; ZIJLSTRA, WG

    1995-01-01

    Children permanently exposed to hypoxia at altitudes of > 3000 m above sea level show a phenotypical form of adaptation. Under these environmental conditions, oxygen uptake in the lungs is enhanced by increases in ventilation, lung compliance, and pulmonary diffusion. Lung and thorax volumes in chil

  18. Climate Change Impacts on High-Altitude Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Pauli

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reviewed: Climate Change Impacts on High-Altitude Ecosystems By Münir Öztürk, Khalid Rehman Hakeem, I. Faridah-Hanum and Efe. Recep, Cham, Switzerland: Springer International Publishing, 2015. xvii + 696 pp. US$ 239.00. ISBN 978-3-319-12858-0.

  19. Pathophysiology of acute mountain sickness and high altitude pulmonary oedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sutton, J R; Lassen, N

    1979-01-01

    We review the evidence that acute mountain sickness (AMS) and high altitude pulmonary oedema (HAPO) occur together more often than is realized. We hypothesize that AMS and HAPO have a common pathophysiological basis: both are due to increased pressure and flow in the microcirculation, causing...

  20. Chicxulub High-Altitude Ballistic Ejecta from Central Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, K. O.; Ocampo, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    Chicxulub ejecta are found in central Belize, 475 km southeast of the impact crater center. These deposits are ballistic ejecta launched along high-altitude trajectories above the atmosphere and deposited as a discontinuous sheet on the terminal Cretaceous land surface.

  1. Diurnal variations of serum erythropoietin at sea level and altitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Poulsen, T D; Fogh-Andersen, N

    1996-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that the diurnal variations of serum-erythropoietin concentration (serum-EPO) observed in normoxia also exist in hypoxia. The study also attempted to investigate the regulation of EPO production during sustained hypoxia. Nine subjects were investigated at sea level...... and during 4 days at an altitude of 4350 m. Median sea level serum-EPO concentration was 6 (range 6-13) U.l-1. Serum-EPO concentration increased after 18 and 42 h at altitude, [58 (range 39-240) and 54 (range 36-340) U.l-1, respectively], and then decreased after 64 and 88 h at altitude [34 (range 18...... in 2, 3 diphosphoglycerate. After 64 h at altitude, six of the nine subjects had down-regulated their serum-EPO concentrations so that median values were three times above those at sea level. These six subjects had significant diurnal variations of serum-EPO concentration at sea level; the nadir...

  2. Flight Control of the High Altitude Wind Power System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Podgaets, A.R.; Ockels, W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Closed loop Laddermill flight control problem is considered in this paper. Laddermill is a high altitude kites system for energy production. The kites have been simulated as rigid bodies and the cable as a thin elastic line. Euler angles and cable speed are controls. Flight control is written as a f

  3. Acetazolamide improves cerebral oxygenation during exercise at high altitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuyk, J.; Bos, J. van den; Terhell, K.; Bos, R. de; Vletter, A.; Valk, P.; Beuzekom, M. van; Kleef, J. van; Dahan, A.

    2006-01-01

    Acute mountain sickness is thought to be triggered by cerebral hypoxemia and be prevented by acetazolamide (Actz). The effect of Actz on cerebral oxygenation at altitude remains unknown. In 16 members of the 2005 Dutch Cho Oyu (8201 m, Tibet) expedition, the influence of Actz and exercise (750 mg PO

  4. HCN ice in Titan's high-altitude southern polar cloud

    CERN Document Server

    de Kok, Remco J; Maltagliati, Luca; Irwin, Patrick G J; Vinatier, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Titan's middle atmosphere is currently experiencing a rapid change of season after northern spring arrived in 2009. A large cloud was observed for the first time above Titan's southern pole in May 2012, at an altitude of 300 km. This altitude previously showed a temperature maximum and condensation was not expected for any of Titan's atmospheric gases. Here we show that this cloud is composed of micron-sized hydrogen cyanide (HCN) ice particles. The presence of HCN particles at this altitude, together with new temperature determinations from mid-infrared observations, indicate a very dramatic cooling of Titan's atmosphere inside the winter polar vortex in early 2012. Such a cooling is completely contrary to previously measured high-altitude warming in the polar vortex, and temperatures are a hundred degrees colder than predicted by circulation models. Besides elucidating the nature of Titan's mysterious polar cloud, these results thus show that post-equinox cooling at the winter pole is much more efficient th...

  5. Transcriptome and network changes in climbers at extreme altitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Liang, Yu;

    2012-01-01

    Extreme altitude can induce a range of cellular and systemic responses. Although it is known that hypoxia underlies the major changes and that the physiological responses include hemodynamic changes and erythropoiesis, the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways mediating such changes are lar...

  6. Abnormal blood flow in the sublingual microcirculation at high altitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, D.S.; Ince, C.; Goedhart, P.; Levett, D.Z.H.; Grocott, M.P.W.

    2009-01-01

    We report the first direct observations of deranged microcirculatory blood flow at high altitude, using sidestream dark-field imaging. Images of the sublingual microcirculation were obtained from a group of 12 volunteers during a climbing expedition to Cho Oyu (8,201 m) in the Himalayas.

  7. Altitude effects on combustion in residential furnaces with fan assist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, S.; Fleck, B.A.; Ackerman, M.Y.; Dale, J.D.; Wilson, D.J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2002-07-01

    Five residential furnaces were tested to determine if altitude has an effect on the performance of modern furnaces equipped with fan assisted flue venting systems. The tests were conducted at 3 altitudes, 50 m, 685 m and 2050 m above sea level at sites in Vancouver, Edmonton, and Fortress Mountain, Alberta. Current furnace derating practices require that furnaces at high altitude have small fuel openings or decreased fuel supply manifold pressures. However, it is possible that modern furnaces with fan driven combustion venting do not have to be derated to the same extent. Propane and natural gas were the fuel sources for the tests. It was confirmed that since most residential systems are designed to operate at 100 per cent excess air, the current derating standard practice is overly conservative. The effects of altitude on carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide levels were also examined, along with burner and igniter operating characteristics, heat exchanger operating temperatures, and blocked-vent shutoff combustion performance. 1 tab., 3 figs.

  8. [Soil microbial functional diversity of different altitude Pinus koraiensis forests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dong-xue; Wang, Ning; Wang, Nan-nan; Sun, Xue; Feng, Fu-juan

    2015-12-01

    In order to comprehensively understand the soil microbial carbon utilization characteristics of Pinus koraiensis forests, we took the topsoil (0-5 cm and 5-10 cm) along the 700-1100 m altitude in Changbai Mountains and analyzed the vertical distributed characteristics and variation of microbial functional diversity along the elevation gradient by Biolog microplate method. The results showed that there were significant differences in functional diversity of microbial communities at different elevations. AWCD increased with the extension of incubation time and AWCD at the same soil depth gradually decreased along with increasing altitude; Shannon, Simpson and McIntosh diversity index also showed the same trend with AWCD and three different diversity indices were significantly different along the elevation gradient; Species diversity and functional diversity showed the same variation. The utilization intensities of six categories carbon sources had differences while amino acids were constantly the most dominant carbon source. Principal component analysis (PCA) identified that soil microbial carbon utilization at different altitudes had obvious spatial differentiation, as reflected in the use of carbohydrates, amino acids and carboxylic acids. In addition, the cluster of the microbial diversity indexes and AWCD values of different altitudes showed that the composition of vegetation had a significant impact on soil microbial composition and functional activity.

  9. Altitude Chamber Testing of the Passenger Oxygen System (POS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    unlikely, rare manifestations of DCS could result in death or disability. Normally, DCS symptoms clear when the altitude chamber is returned to...Case File No. 09-411, 26 August 2009; approval given by 311th Public Affairs Office, Brooks City-Base, Texas procedures could affect an unborn

  10. Acute occlusive mesenteric ischemia in high altitude of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in our region. Keywords: Acute mesenteric ischemia, high altitude, Saudi Arabia. Résumé .... Saudi Arabia for many diseases such as stroke,[13] deep venous .... intestinal vascular failure: a collective review of 43 cases in Taiwan. Br J Clin ...

  11. Investigating the auroral electrojets with low altitude polar orbiting satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretto, T.; Olsen, Nils; Ritter, P.

    2002-01-01

    Three geomagnetic satellite missions currently provide high precision magnetic field measurements from low altitude polar orbiting spacecraft. We demonstrate how these data can be used to determine the intensity and location of the horizontal currents that flow in the ionosphere, predominantly...

  12. Are macroinvertebrates in high altitude streams affected by oxygen deficiency?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Dean; Rostgaard, S.; Vásconez, J. J.

    2003-01-01

    conditions. However, this fails to take into account that oxygen solubility declines with decreasing atmospheric pressure, which may be of importance at high altitudes. 2. Based on samples of macroinvertebrate benthos and in situ measurements of respiratory oxygen demand of macroinvertebrates in small...

  13. Wood anatomical variation in relation to latitude anf altitude

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, van der N.A.; Baas, P.

    1974-01-01

    The wood anatomical variation within 17 eurytherm hardwood genera in relation to altitude and latitude has been studied using wood samples from 52 species. With increasing latitude a miniaturization of secondary xylem elements (shorter vessel members, narrower vessels, shorter and sometimes narrower

  14. 77 FR 71735 - Minimum Altitudes for Use of Autopilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-04

    ... Autopilots AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM). SUMMARY: The FAA proposes to amend and harmonize minimum altitudes for use of autopilots for transport category airplanes. The proposed rule would enable the operational use of advanced autopilot and...

  15. Insect Vision: A Few Tricks to Regulate Flight Altitude

    OpenAIRE

    Floreano D.; Zufferey J.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A recent study sheds new light on the visual cues used by Drosophila to regulate flight altitude. The striking similarity with previously identified steering mechanisms provides a coherent basis for novel models of vision-based flight control in insects and robots.

  16. Insect vision: a few tricks to regulate flight altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floreano, Dario; Zufferey, Jean-Christophe

    2010-10-12

    A recent study sheds new light on the visual cues used by Drosophila to regulate flight altitude. The striking similarity with previously identified steering mechanisms provides a coherent basis for novel models of vision-based flight control in insects and robots.

  17. Do chronic workplace irritant exposures cause asthma?

    OpenAIRE

    Dumas, Orianne; Le Moual, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The present review summarizes the recent literature on the relation between chronic workplace irritant exposures and asthma, focusing on exposures of low to moderate levels. We discuss results from epidemiological surveys, potential biological mechanisms, and needs for further research. These aspects are largely illustrated by studies on exposure to cleaning products. Recent results from nine population-based and workplace-based epidemiological studies, mostly cross-se...

  18. Temporal variations of flux and altitude of sulfur dioxide emissions during volcanic eruptions: implications for long-range dispersal of volcanic clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Boichu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur-rich degassing, which is mostly composed of sulfur dioxide (SO2, plays a major role in the overall impact of volcanism on the atmosphere and climate. The accurate assessment of this impact is currently hampered by the poor knowledge of volcanic SO2 emissions. Here, using an inversion procedure, we show how assimilating snapshots of the volcanic SO2 load derived from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI allows for reconstructing both the flux and altitude of the SO2 emissions with an hourly resolution. For this purpose, the regional chemistry-transport model CHIMERE is used to describe the dispersion of SO2 when released in the atmosphere. As proof of concept, we study the 10 April 2011 eruption of the Etna volcano (Italy, which represents one of the few volcanoes instrumented on the ground for the continuous monitoring of SO2 degassing. We find that the SO2 flux time-series retrieved from satellite imagery using the inverse scheme is in agreement with ground observations during ash-poor phases of the eruption. However, large discrepancies are observed during the ash-rich paroxysmal phase as a result of enhanced plume opacity affecting ground-based ultraviolet (UV spectroscopic retrievals. As a consequence, the SO2 emission rate derived from the ground is underestimated by almost one order of magnitude. Altitudes of the SO2 emissions predicted by the inverse scheme are validated against an RGB image of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS capturing the near-source atmospheric pathways followed by Etna plumes, in combination with forward trajectories from the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model. At a large distance from the source, modelled SO2 altitudes are compared with independent information on the volcanic cloud height. We find that the altitude predicted by the inverse scheme is in agreement with snapshots of the SO2 height retrieved from recent algorithms

  19. The relation between actual exposure to political violence and preparatory intervention for exposure to media coverage of terrorism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Michelle; Shoshani, Anat; Baumgarten-Katz, Inbar

    2008-07-01

    This laboratory study examined differential effects of television broadcasts of terrorism on viewers' anxiety according to their actual exposure history, and differential efficacy of a preparatory intervention in moderating elevated anxiety for high or low actual exposure. Participants were 80 young Israeli adults, randomly allocated to a terrorism or non-terrorism media broadcast, and for each type of exposure, to a preparatory or control intervention. Actual political violence and terrorism exposure history was assessed, and anxiety measured explicitly and indirectly prior and subsequent to the intervention and media exposure manipulation. Results showed that in the terrorism media exposure, participants with high more than low actual political life events (PLE) exposure showed higher post-test levels of indirectly measured anxiety. Clinical intervention before the terrorism media exposure moderated indirectly measured anxiety among participants with high PLE exposure, but increased anxiety for low PLE. Findings outline preparatory measures that could maximize coping for the high PLE actual exposure at-risk sector.

  20. Causal Moderation Analysis Using Propensity Score Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Nianbo

    2012-01-01

    This paper is based on previous studies in applying propensity score methods to study multiple treatment variables to examine the causal moderator effect. The propensity score methods will be demonstrated in a case study to examine the causal moderator effect, where the moderators are categorical and continuous variables. Moderation analysis is an…

  1. China's Economy Registered Moderate Slowdown

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ The Chinese economy registered a moderate slowdown over the course of 2011, the World Bank said in its East Asia and Pacific Economic Update.During the first nine months of 2011, growth slowed from 10.6 percent in 2010 to 9.4 percent.The bank estimates that China's economic growth is expected at 9.1 percent in 2011, 8.4 percent in 2012 and roughly similar rates thereafter.

  2. Moderate Psoriasis: A Proposed Definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas-Velasco, M; de la Cueva, P; Notario, J; Martínez-Pilar, L; Martorell, A; Moreno-Ramírez, D

    2017-08-16

    The Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) is the most widely used scale for assessing the severity of psoriasis and for therapeutic decision making. On the basis of the PASI score, patients have been stratified into 2 groups: mild disease and moderate-to-severe disease. To draft a proposal for the definition and characterization of moderate psoriasis based on PASI and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scores. A group of 6 dermatologists with experience in the treatment of psoriasis undertook a critical review of the literature and a discussion of cases to draft a proposal. In order of priority, PASI, DLQI, and body surface area (BSA) are the parameters to be used in daily practice to classify psoriasis as mild, moderate, or severe. Severity should be assessed on the basis of a combined evaluation and interpretation of the PASI and DLQI. And 3, PASI and DLQI should carry equal weight in the determination of disease severity. On this basis, psoriasis severity was defined using the following criteria: mild, PASI15, independently of the DLQI score. A more precise classification of psoriasis according to disease severity will improve the risk-benefit assessment essential to therapeutic decision making in these patients. Copyright © 2017 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Moderate and extreme maternal obesity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdelmaboud, M O

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of moderate and extreme obesity among an Irish obstetric population over a 10-year period, and to evaluate the obstetric features of such pregnancies. Of 31,869 women delivered during the years 2000-2009, there were 306 women in the study group, including 173 in the moderate or Class 2 obese category (BMI 35-39.9) and 133 in the extreme or Class 3 obese category (BMI > or = 40).The prevalence of obese women with BMI > or = 35 was 9.6 per 1000 (0.96%), with an upward trend observed from 2.1 per 1000 in the year 2000, to 11.8 per 1000 in the year 2009 (P = 0.001). There was an increase in emergency caesarean section (EMCS) risk for primigravida versus multigravid women, within both obese categories (P < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in EMCS rates observed between Class 2 and Class 3 obese women, when matched for parity. The prevalence of moderate and extreme obesity reported in this population is high, and appears to be increasing. The increased rates of abdominal delivery, and the levels of associated morbidity observed, have serious implications for such women embarking on pregnancy.

  4. Effect of Hypohydration and Altitude Exposure on Aerobic Exercise Performance and Acute Mountain Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    diagnostic of AMS. At the completion of the PDA-based questionnaire, the volunteer’s resting arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) was measured ( Dolphin ...ventral forearm (opposite arm of the blood pressure cuff, forearm kept at heart level) using laser -Doppler flowmetry. The flow probe (sam- pling at 780 nm

  5. Effects of Early Altitude Exposure Following Traumatic Injury and Hemorrhagic Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-27

    bicarbonate among resuscitation strategies. ............................................ 6 Figure 4. Differences in pH with open and closed abdomen ...pentobarbital, and then sterile prepping of the abdomen was performed. A 2-cm midline laparotomy was created, and a sterile, occlusive dressing was...applied for the duration of the experiment. Laparotomies were closed either immediately (closed abdomen ) or in a delayed fashion (open abdomen ) with 3-0

  6. Soluble Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator Receptor Plasma Concentration May Predict Susceptibility to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zügel, Stefanie; Schoeb, Michele; Auinger, Katja; Dehnert, Christoph; Maggiorini, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Acute exposure to high altitude induces inflammation. However, the relationship between inflammation and high altitude related illness such as high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and acute mountain sickness (AMS) is poorly understood. We tested if soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration, a prognostic factor for cardiovascular disease and marker for low grade activation of leukocytes, will predict susceptibility to HAPE and AMS. Methods. 41 healthy mountaineers were examined at sea level (SL, 446 m) and 24 h after rapid ascent to 4559 m (HA). 24/41 subjects had a history of HAPE and were thus considered HAPE-susceptible (HAPE-s). Out of the latter, 10/24 HAPE-s subjects were randomly chosen to suppress the inflammatory cascade with dexamethasone 8 mg bid 24 h prior to ascent. Results. Acute hypoxic exposure led to an acute inflammatory reaction represented by an increase in suPAR (1.9 ± 0.4 at SL versus 2.3 ± 0.5 at HA, p < 0.01), CRP (0.7 ± 0.5 at SL versus 3.6 ± 4.6 at HA, p < 0.01), and IL-6 (0.8 ± 0.4 at SL versus 3.3 ± 4.9 at HA, p < 0.01) in all subjects except those receiving dexamethasone. The ascent associated decrease in PaO2 correlated with the increase in IL-6 (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), but not suPAR (r = 0.27, p = 0.08); the increase in IL-6 was not correlated with suPAR (r = 0.16, p = 0.24). Baseline suPAR plasma concentration was higher in the HAPE-s group (2.0 ± 0.4 versus 1.8 ± 0.4, p = 0.04); no difference was found for CRP and IL-6 and for subjects developing AMS. Conclusion. High altitude exposure leads to an increase in suPAR plasma concentration, with the missing correlation between suPAR and IL-6 suggesting a cytokine independent, leukocyte mediated mechanism of low grade inflammation. The correlation between IL-6 and PaO2 suggests a direct effect of hypoxia, which is not the case for suPAR. However, suPAR plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict

  7. 'Ome' on the range: update on high-altitude acclimatization/adaptation and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yongjun; Wang, Yuxiao; Lu, Hongxiang; Gao, Yuqi

    2014-11-01

    The main physiological challenge in high-altitude plateau environments is hypoxia. When people living in a plain environment migrate to the plateau, they face the threat of hypoxia. Most people can acclimatize to high altitudes; the acclimatization process mainly consists of short-term hyperventilation and long-term compensation by increased oxygen uptake, transport, and use due to increased red blood cell mass, myoglobin, and mitochondria. If individuals cannot acclimatize to high altitude, they may suffer from a high-altitude disease, such as acute mountain disease (AMS), high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or chronic mountain sickness (CMS). Because some individuals are more susceptible to high altitude diseases than others, the incidence of these high-altitude diseases is variable and cannot be predicted. Studying "omes" using genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, lipidomics, immunomics, glycomics and RNomics can help us understand the factors that mediate susceptibility to high altitude illnesses. Moreover, analysis of the "omes" using a systems biology approach may provide a greater understanding of high-altitude illness pathogenesis and improve the efficiency of the diagnosis and treatment of high-altitude illnesses in the future. Below, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of "omes" in high-altitude acclimatization/adaptation and disease and discuss key research gaps to better understand the contribution of "omes" to high-altitude illness susceptibility.

  8. Compositae Plants Differed in Leaf Cuticular Waxes between High and Low Altitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Na; Gao, Jianhua; He, Yuji; Guo, Yanjun

    2016-06-01

    We sampled eight Compositae species at high altitude (3482 m) and seven species at low altitude (220 m), analyzed the chemical compositions and contents of leaf cuticular wax, and calculated the values of average chain length (ACL), carbon preference index (CPI), dispersion (d), dispersion/weighted mean chain length (d/N), and C31 /(C31  + C29 ) (Norm31). The amounts of total wax and compositions were significantly higher at high altitude than at low altitude, except for primary alcohol, secondary alcohol, and ketone. The main n-alkanes in most samples were C31 , C29 , and C33 . Low altitude had more C31 and C33 , whereas more C29 occurred at high altitude. The ACL, CPI, d, d/N, and Norma 31 were higher at low altitude than at high altitude. The fatty acid and primary alcohol at low altitude contained more C26 homologous than at high altitude. More short-chain primary alcohols were observed at high altitude. At low altitude, the primary alcohol gave on average the largest amount, while it was n-alkane at high altitude. These results indicated that the variations of leaf cuticular waxes benefited Compositae plants to adapt to various environmental stresses and enlarge their distribution.

  9. Increased Hypoxic Dose After Training at Low Altitude with 9h Per Night at 3000m Normobaric Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia J. Carr, Philo U. Saunders, Brent S. Vallance, Laura A. Garvican-Lewis, Christopher J. Gore

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examined effects of low altitude training and a live-high: train-low protocol (combining both natural and simulated modalities on haemoglobin mass (Hbmass, maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max, time to exhaustion, and submaximal exercise measures. Eighteen elite-level race-walkers were assigned to one of two experimental groups; lowHH (low Hypobaric Hypoxia: continuous exposure to 1380 m for 21 consecutive days; n = 10 or a combined low altitude training and nightly Normobaric Hypoxia (lowHH+NHnight: living and training at 1380 m, plus 9 h.night-1 at a simulated altitude of 3000 m using hypoxic tents; n = 8. A control group (CON; n = 10 lived and trained at 600 m. Measurement of Hbmass, time to exhaustion and VO2max was performed before and after the training intervention. Paired samples t-tests were used to assess absolute and percentage change pre and post-test differences within groups, and differences between groups were assessed using a one-way ANOVA with least significant difference post-hoc testing. Statistical significance was tested at p < 0.05. There was a 3.7% increase in Hbmass in lowHH+NHnight compared with CON (p = 0.02. In comparison to baseline, Hbmass increased by 1.2% (±1.4% in the lowHH group, 2.6% (±1.8% in lowHH+NHnight, and there was a decrease of 0.9% (±4.9% in CON. VO2max increased by ~4% within both experimental conditions but was not significantly greater than the 1% increase in CON. There was a ~9% difference in pre and post-intervention values in time to exhaustion after lowHH+NH-night (p = 0.03 and a ~8% pre to post-intervention difference (p = 0.006 after lowHH only. We recommend low altitude (1380 m combined with sleeping in altitude tents (3000 m as one effective alternative to traditional altitude training methods, which can improve Hbmass.

  10. Thoraco-abdominal coordination and performance during uphill running at altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Eva; Pratali, Lorenza; Mandolesi, Gaia; Spiridonova, Maria; Roi, Giulio Sergio; Cogo, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Running races on mountain trails at moderate-high altitude with large elevation changes throughout has become increasingly popular. During exercise at altitude, ventilatory demands increase due to the combined effects of exercise and hypoxia. Aim To investigate the relationships between thoraco-abdominal coordination, ventilatory pattern, oxygen saturation (SpO2), and endurance performance in runners during high-intensity uphill exercise. Methods Fifteen participants (13 males, mean age 42±9 yrs) ran a “Vertical Kilometer,” i.e., an uphill run involving a climb of approximately 1000 m with a slope greater than 30%. The athletes were equipped with a portable respiratory inductive plethysmography system, a finger pulse oximeter and a global positioning unit (GPS). The ventilatory pattern (ventilation (VE), tidal volume (VT), respiratory rate (RR), and VE/VT ratio), thoraco-abdominal coordination, which is represented by the phase angle (PhA), and SpO2 were evaluated at rest and during the run. Before and after the run, we assessed respiratory function, respiratory muscle strength and the occurrence of interstitial pulmonary edema by thoracic ultrasound. Results Two subjects were excluded from the respiratory inductive plethysmography analysis due to motion artifacts. A quadratic relationship between the slope and the PhA was observed (r = 0.995, p = 0.036). When the slope increased above 30%, the PhA increased, indicating a reduction in thoraco-abdominal coordination. The reduced thoraco-abdominal coordination was significantly related to reduced breathing efficiency (i.e., an increased VE/VT ratio; r = 0.961, p = 0.038) and SpO2 (r = -0.697, pabdominal coordination and consequent reduction in SpO2 were associated with interstitial pulmonary edema. Conclusion Reductions in thoraco-abdominal coordination are associated with a less efficient ventilatory pattern and lower SpO2 during uphill running. This fact could have a negative effect on performance

  11. Surface altitude of hydrogeologic layers of the Atlantic Coastal Plain of North and South Carolina

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — PP1773_unit_alt_grid is a polygon shapefile of surface altitudes for 16 hydrogeologic units as described in report Professional Paper 1773. Surface altitudes were...

  12. Mitogenomic analyses propose positive selection in mitochondrial genes for high-altitude adaptation in galliform birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Taicheng; Shen, Xuejuan; Irwin, David M; Shen, Yongyi; Zhang, Yaping

    2014-09-01

    Galliform birds inhabit very diverse habitats, including plateaus that are above 3000 m in altitude. At high altitude, lower temperature and hypoxia are two important factors influencing survival. Mitochondria, as the ultimate oxygen transductor, play an important role in aerobic respiration through oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). We analyzed the mitochondrial genomes of six high-altitude phasianidae birds and sixteen low-altitude relatives in an attempt to determine the role of mitochondrial genes in high-altitude adaptation. We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships of these phasianidae birds and relatives and found at least four lineages that independently occupied this high-altitude habitat. Selective analyses revealed significant evidence for positive selection in the genes ND2, ND4, and ATP6 in three of the high-altitude lineages. This result strongly suggests that adaptive evolution of mitochondrial genes played a critical role during the independent acclimatization to high altitude by galliform birds.

  13. Sub-Scale Re-entry Capsule Drop via High Altitude Balloons Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High-altitude balloon flights are an inexpensive method used to lift payloads to high altitudes. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulations permit payloads...

  14. Science 101: Why Does It Take Longer to Boil Potatoes at High Altitudes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Why Does It Take Longer to Boil Potatoes at High Altitudes? This column provides background science information for elementary teachers. This month's issue looks at why water boils at different temperatures at different altitudes.

  15. Upper atomosphere and Thermal control of the Super Low Altitude Test Satellite

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The Super Low Altitude Test Satellite (SLATS) is an engineering test satellite currently under development in JAXA in an attempt to open a new frontier of space utilization on extremely low earth orbits. The altitude of SLATS orbit is around200km altitude. In this altitude, rarefied aerodynamics and high-density atomic oxygen effect on the thermal design of SLATS. The thermal control of SLATS was introduced in this paper. And, the equilibrium temperature on the bumper of SLATS was estimated w...

  16. Effect of Altitude Error on Position Precision of Double-Star Position System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xueyuan; LI Tingjun; QIU Libo; LIN Yu

    2006-01-01

    The effects of two kinds of methods for obtaining altitudes on the position precision are analyzed, and the error expressions are deduced. Many simulation results show that in the two cases, the effects of the same altitude errors on the positioning precision are identical, and the rules that the two altitude errors affect positioning precision can be expressed as that altitude error has little effect on the east-west position error, but has large effect on the south-north position error.

  17. Wissenschafts-Kriterien: Eine Moderation

    OpenAIRE

    Breuer, Franz; Reichertz, Jo

    2001-01-01

    Zur Moderation und Orientierung von Beiträgen zur FQS-Debatte über "Qualitätsstandards" qualitativer Sozialforschung wird an die Breite und Vielfalt von in Diskursen über Wissenschaft diskutierten Gütemaßstäben erinnert, und es werden einige Impressionen hinsichtlich ihres historischen Wandels in der jüngeren Vergangenheit präsentiert. Damit verbunden ist die Aufforderung an Debatten-Teilnehmer, sich des systematischen und historischen Stellenwerts postulierter Kriterien und Kriterien-Mixe ge...

  18. Initial Feasibility Assessment of a High Altitude Long Endurance Airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony; Dolce, James (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A high altitude solar powered airship provides the ability to carry large payloads to high altitudes and remain on station for extended periods of time. This study examines the feasibility of this concept. Factors such as time of year, latitude, wind speeds and payload are considered in establishing the capabilities of a given size airship. East and West coast operation were evaluated. The key aspect to success of this type of airship is the design and operation of the propulsion and power system. A preliminary propulsion/power system design was produced based on a regenerative fuel cell energy storage system and solar photovoltaic array for energy production. A modular system design was chosen with four independent power/propulsion units utilized by the airship. Results on payload capacity and flight envelope (latitude and time of year) were produced for a range of airship sizes.

  19. [Umbilical artery blood gases of term neonates at altitude].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamonte, Wilfredo; Escalante, Darío; Yabar, Janet; Jerí, María; Peralta, Paola; Ochoa, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the normal values of arterial blood gases in the umbilical artery of term infants at 3400 m altitude, a cross-sectional study was conducted. It was performed in the umbilical artery blood of 300 term infants, with an adequate gestational age and whose birth took place between January 2010 and December 2011 at the Essalud National Hospital Adolfo Guevara Velazco (Cusco, Peru). It was found that the average pH of healthy term infants was 7.33 ± 0.07; the values for percentiles 5 and 95 were 7.18 and 7.40 respectively. Tables with the 5th and 95th percentiles for pH, pO2, pCO2, SO2, p50, base excess and HCO3 of the umbilical artery of term infants at 3400 m altitude are provided.

  20. First year results of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Carramiñana, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) gamma-ray observatory is a wide field of view (1.8 Sr) and high duty cycle (>95% up-time) detector of unique capabilities for the study of TeV gamma-ray sources. Installed at an altitude of 4100m in the Northern slope of Volc\\'an Sierra Negra, Puebla, by a collaboration of about thirty institutions of Mexico and the United States, HAWC has been in full operations since March 2015, surveying 2/3 of the sky every sidereal day, monitoring active galaxies and mapping sources in the Galactic Plane to a detection level of 1 Crab per day. This contribution summarizes the main results of the first year of observations of the HAWC gamma-ray observatory.

  1. High altitude aerodynamic platform concept evaluation and prototype engine testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerman, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    A design concept has been developed for maintaining a 150-pound payload at 60,000 feet altitude for about 50 hours. A 600-pound liftoff weight aerodynamic vehicle is used which operates at sufficient speeds to withstand prevailing winds. It is powered by a turbocharged four-stoke cycle gasoline fueled engine. Endurance time of 100 hours or more appears to be feasible with hydrogen fuel and a lighter payload. A prototype engine has been tested to 40,000 feet simulated altitude. Mismatch of the engine and the turbocharger system flow and problems with fuel/air mixture ratio control characteristics prohibited operation beyond 40,000 feet. But there seems to be no reason why the concept cannot be developed to function as analytically predicted.

  2. Physical condition among middle altitude trekkers in an aging society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Shigeru; Tobe, Ken; Harada, Naomi; Aso, Chizu; Nishihara, Fumio; Shimada, Hitoshi

    2002-07-01

    The number of alpine accidents has markedly increased among elderly trekkers in an aging society, Japan. We evaluated the physical condition of 176 trekkers by interview and physical examination on a popular middle altitude mountain. Heart rate, noninvasive blood pressure and arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) were measured using a portable life monitor. It was revealed that more than 70% of the trekkers were over 50. Seventy-five percent of trekkers over 70 had some pre-existing medical problems. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure before the start of trekking, increased with age. However, such age-dependent differences were not apparent at the summit hut. SpO2 values decreased slightly but significantly with age. In conclusion, many elderly people enjoy nonchallenging middle altitude trekking in an aging society. Alpine accidents caused by health problems tend to arise more frequently in this population. Alpine rescue teams should be well-prepared for the alpine accidents of elderly trekkers.

  3. Cosmic microwave background science at commercial airline altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Stephen M.; Gudmundsson, Jon E.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Verde, Licia; Errard, Josquin

    2017-07-01

    Obtaining high-sensitivity measurements of degree-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization is the most direct path to detecting primordial gravitational waves. Robustly recovering any primordial signal from the dominant foreground emission will require high-fidelity observations at multiple frequencies, with excellent control of systematics. We explore the potential for a new platform for CMB observations, the Airlander 10 hybrid air vehicle, to perform this task. We show that the Airlander 10 platform, operating at commercial airline altitudes, is well suited to mapping frequencies above 220 GHz, which are critical for cleaning CMB maps of dust emission. Optimizing the distribution of detectors across frequencies, we forecast the ability of Airlander 10 to clean foregrounds of varying complexity as a function of altitude, demonstrating its complementarity with both existing (Planck) and ongoing (C-BASS) foreground observations. This novel platform could play a key role in defining our ultimate view of the polarized microwave sky.

  4. Cosmic Microwave Background Science at Commercial Airline Altitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Feeney, Stephen M; Peiris, Hiranya V; Verde, Licia; Errard, Josquin

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining high-sensitivity measurements of degree-scale cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization is the most direct path to detecting primordial gravitational waves. Robustly recovering any primordial signal from the dominant foreground emission will require high-fidelity observations at multiple frequencies, with excellent control of systematics. We explore the potential for a new platform for CMB observations, the Airlander 10 hybrid air vehicle, to perform this task. We show that the Airlander 10 platform, operating at commercial airline altitudes, is well-suited to mapping frequencies above 220 GHz, which are critical for cleaning CMB maps of dust emission. Optimizing the distribution of detectors across frequencies, we forecast the ability of Airlander 10 to clean foregrounds of varying complexity as a function of altitude, demonstrating its complementarity with both existing (Planck) and ongoing (C-BASS) foreground observations. This novel platform could play a key role in defining our ultimate vi...

  5. First year results of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carramiñana, Alberto

    2016-10-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) γ-ray observatory is a wide field of view (1.8 Sr) and high duty cycle (> 95% up-time) detector of unique capabilities for the study of TeV gamma-ray sources. Installed at an altitude of 4100m in the Northern slope of Volcan Sierra Negra, Puebla, by a collaboration of about thirty institutions of Mexico and the United States, HAWC has been in full operations since March 2015, surveying 2/3 of the sky every sidereal day, monitoring active galaxies and mapping sources in the Galactic Plane to a detection level of 1 Crab per day. This contribution summarizes the main results of the first year of observations of the HAWC γ-ray observatory.

  6. Increased insulin requirements during exercise at very high altitude in type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mol, Pieter; de Vries, Suzanna T.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Tack, Cees J.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Safe, very high altitude trekking in subjects with type 1 diabetes requires understanding of glucose regulation at high altitude. We investigated insulin requirements, energy expenditure, and glucose levels at very high altitude in relation to acute mountain sickness (AMS) symptoms in indi

  7. Increased insulin requirements during exercise at very high altitude in type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, P. De; Vries, S.T. de; Koning, E.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Tack, C.J.J.; Bilo, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Safe, very high altitude trekking in subjects with type 1 diabetes requires understanding of glucose regulation at high altitude. We investigated insulin requirements, energy expenditure, and glucose levels at very high altitude in relation to acute mountain sickness (AMS) symptoms in ind

  8. Elevated Suicide Rates at High Altitude: Sociodemographic and Health Issues May Be to Blame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Marian E.; Valley, Morgan A.; Lowenstein, Steven R.; Hedegaard, Holly; Thomas, Deborah; Stallones, Lorann; Honigman, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Suicide rates are higher at high altitudes; some hypothesize that hypoxia is the cause. We examined 8,871 suicides recorded in 2006 in 15 states by the National Violent Death Reporting System, with the victim's home county altitude determined from the National Elevation Dataset through FIPS code matching. We grouped cases by altitude (low less…

  9. Increased insulin requirements during exercise at very high altitude in type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, P. De; Vries, S.T. de; Koning, E.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Tack, C.J.J.; Bilo, H.J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Safe, very high altitude trekking in subjects with type 1 diabetes requires understanding of glucose regulation at high altitude. We investigated insulin requirements, energy expenditure, and glucose levels at very high altitude in relation to acute mountain sickness (AMS) symptoms in

  10. Increased insulin requirements during exercise at very high altitude in type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Mol, Pieter; de Vries, Suzanna T.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.; Gans, Rijk O. B.; Tack, Cees J.; Bilo, Henk J. G.

    OBJECTIVE-Safe, very high altitude trekking in subjects with type 1 diabetes requires understanding of glucose regulation at high altitude. We investigated insulin requirements, energy expenditure, and glucose levels at very high altitude in relation to acute mountain sickness (AMS) symptoms in

  11. 14 CFR 125.329 - Minimum altitudes for use of autopilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum altitudes for use of autopilot. 125... § 125.329 Minimum altitudes for use of autopilot. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b), (c), (d), and (e) of this section, no person may use an autopilot at an altitude above the terrain which is...

  12. Military Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Military Exposures Veterans may have been exposed to a range of chemical, physical, and environmental hazards during military service. Reports on Veterans’ Health Care Use What ...

  13. The genetic architecture of adaptations to high altitude in Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Alkorta-Aranburu

    Full Text Available Although hypoxia is a major stress on physiological processes, several human populations have survived for millennia at high altitudes, suggesting that they have adapted to hypoxic conditions. This hypothesis was recently corroborated by studies of Tibetan highlanders, which showed that polymorphisms in candidate genes show signatures of natural selection as well as well-replicated association signals for variation in hemoglobin levels. We extended genomic analysis to two Ethiopian ethnic groups: Amhara and Oromo. For each ethnic group, we sampled low and high altitude residents, thus allowing genetic and phenotypic comparisons across altitudes and across ethnic groups. Genome-wide SNP genotype data were collected in these samples by using Illumina arrays. We find that variants associated with hemoglobin variation among Tibetans or other variants at the same loci do not influence the trait in Ethiopians. However, in the Amhara, SNP rs10803083 is associated with hemoglobin levels at genome-wide levels of significance. No significant genotype association was observed for oxygen saturation levels in either ethnic group. Approaches based on allele frequency divergence did not detect outliers in candidate hypoxia genes, but the most differentiated variants between high- and lowlanders have a clear role in pathogen defense. Interestingly, a significant excess of allele frequency divergence was consistently detected for genes involved in cell cycle control and DNA damage and repair, thus pointing to new pathways for high altitude adaptations. Finally, a comparison of CpG methylation levels between high- and lowlanders found several significant signals at individual genes in the Oromo.

  14. Nike Black Brant V high altitude dynamic instability characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, W. H.; Walker, L. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Flight experience on the Nike Black Brant V has demonstrated the existence of plume induced flow separation over the fins and aft body of the Black Brant V motor. Modelling of the forces associated with this phenomenon as well as analysis of the resultant vehicle coning motion and its effect on the velocity vector heading are presented. A summary of Nike Black Brant V flight experience with high altitude dynamic instability is included.

  15. Body Structure and Respiratory Efficiency among High Altitude Himalayan Populations

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    To understand the morphological and physiological variations among the temporary and permanent residents of high altitude, this study was undertaken at Leh, Ladakh. It is situated at 3500 m (11500 feet) above sea level, the mean barometric pressure was 500 tors and air temperature varied from 2 °C to 20 °C. The highland Tibetans showed broadest chest and most developed musculature closely followed by Ladakhi Bods. These high altude natives also displayed significantly higher value of vital ca...

  16. Lifespan of a Ceratitis fruit fly increases with higher altitude

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Variation in lifespan may be linked to geographic factors. While latitudinal variation in lifespan has been studied for a number of species, altitude variation has received much less attention, particularly in insects. We measured the lifespan of different populations of the Natal fruit fly Ceratitis rosa along an altitudinal cline. For the different populations we first measured the residual longevity of wild flies by captive cohort approach and compared F1 generation from the same populatio...

  17. Nike Black Brant V high altitude dynamic instability characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montag, W. H.; Walker, L. L., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Flight experience on the Nike Black Brant V has demonstrated the existence of plume induced flow separation over the fins and aft body of the Black Brant V motor. Modelling of the forces associated with this phenomenon as well as analysis of the resultant vehicle coning motion and its effect on the velocity vector heading are presented. A summary of Nike Black Brant V flight experience with high altitude dynamic instability is included.

  18. Determination of Altitude Sickness Risk (DASR) User’s Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Information Sciences Directorate Battlefield Environment Division (ATTN: RDRL- CIE -D) White Sands Missile Range, NM 88002-5501 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...displayed accordingly as color -keyed indicators under the “RISK IMPACT” column on the right side of the view. The color coding key is displayed at the...impacts and the altitude illness risk. Again, color coding is the same as for the environmental factors. Note, that in this example, there is a

  19. Performance of the Volumetric Diffusive Respirator at Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-18

    altitude include changes in the movement of gas through fixed orifices altering accuracy in ventilator settings as well as the measurement of flow and...control system relies on the movement of gas through known restrictions and changes in pressure on opposing sides of a diaphragm. Airway pressure... orifice restrictor is placed in line to dampen the pressures in an attempt to display the estimated tracheal pressure. This requires the clinician to

  20. The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W.; Buttenschoen, A.; Farr, Q.; Hodgson, C.; Mann, I. R.; Mazzino, L.; Rae, J.; University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon Team

    2011-12-01

    The University of Alberta High Altitude Balloon (UA-HAB) program is a one and half year program sponsored by the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) that offers hands on experience for undergraduate and graduate students in the design, build, test and flight of an experimental payload on a high altitude balloon platform. Utilising low cost weather balloon platforms, and through utilisation of the CSA David Florida Laboratory for thermal-vacuum tests , in advance of the final flight of the payload on a NASA high altitude balloon platform. Collectively the program provided unique opportunities for students to experience mission phases which parallel those of a space satellite mission. The program has facilitated several weather balloon missions, which additionally provide educational opportunities for university students and staff, as well as outreach opportunities among junior and senior high school students. Weather balloon missions provide a cheap and quick alternative to suborbital missions; they can be used to test components for more expensive missions, as well as to host student based projects from different disciplines such as Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (EAS), Physics, and Engineering. In addition to extensive skills development, the program aims to promote recruitment of graduate and undergraduate students into careers in space science and engineering. Results from the UA-HAB program and the flight of the UA-HAB shielded Gieger counter payload for cosmic ray and space radiation studies will be presented. Lessons learned from developing and maintaining a weather balloon program will also be discussed. This project is undertaken in partnership with the High Altitude Student Platform, organized by Louisiana State University and the Louisiana Space Consortium (LaSpace), and sponsored by NASA, with the financial support of the Canadian Space Agency.