WorldWideScience

Sample records for models-3 community multi-scale

  1. Multi-scale structural community organisation of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Rasha E; Tremblay, Nicolas; Arneodo, Alain; Borgnat, Pierre; Audit, Benjamin

    2017-04-11

    Structural interaction frequency matrices between all genome loci are now experimentally achievable thanks to high-throughput chromosome conformation capture technologies. This ensues a new methodological challenge for computational biology which consists in objectively extracting from these data the structural motifs characteristic of genome organisation. We deployed the fast multi-scale community mining algorithm based on spectral graph wavelets to characterise the networks of intra-chromosomal interactions in human cell lines. We observed that there exist structural domains of all sizes up to chromosome length and demonstrated that the set of structural communities forms a hierarchy of chromosome segments. Hence, at all scales, chromosome folding predominantly involves interactions between neighbouring sites rather than the formation of links between distant loci. Multi-scale structural decomposition of human chromosomes provides an original framework to question structural organisation and its relationship to functional regulation across the scales. By construction the proposed methodology is independent of the precise assembly of the reference genome and is thus directly applicable to genomes whose assembly is not fully determined.

  2. Evaluation of the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is a state-of-the-science air quality model that simulates the emission, transport and fate of numerous air pollutants, including ozone and particulate matter. The Computational Exposure Division (CED) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency develops the CMAQ model and periodically releases new versions of the model that include bug fixes and various other improvements to the modeling system. In the fall of 2015, CMAQ version 5.1 was released. This new version of CMAQ will contain important bug fixes to several issues that were identified in CMAQv5.0.2 and additionally include updates to other portions of the code. Several annual, and numerous episodic, CMAQv5.1 simulations were performed to assess the impact of these improvements on the model results. These results will be presented, along with a base evaluation of the performance of the CMAQv5.1 modeling system against available surface and upper-air measurements available during the time period simulated. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Computational Exposure Division (CED) develops and evaluates data, decision-support tools, and models to be applied to media-specific or receptor-specific problem areas. CED uses modeling-based approaches to characterize exposures, evaluate fate and transport, and support environmental diagnostics/forensics with input from multiple data sources. It also develops media- and receptor-specific models, proces

  3. Diagnosing Disaster Resilience of Communities as Multi-scale Complex Socio-ecological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Mochizuki, Junko; Keating, Adriana; Mechler, Reinhard; Williges, Keith; Hochrainer, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Global environmental change, growing anthropogenic influence, and increasing globalisation of society have made it clear that disaster vulnerability and resilience of communities cannot be understood without knowledge on the broader social-ecological system in which they are embedded. We propose a framework for diagnosing community resilience to disasters, as a form of disturbance to social-ecological systems, with feedbacks from the local to the global scale. Inspired by iterative multi-scale analysis employed by Resilience Alliance, the related socio-ecological systems framework of Ostrom, and the sustainable livelihood framework, we developed a multi-tier framework for thinking of communities as multi-scale social-ecological systems and analyzing communities' disaster resilience and also general resilience. We highlight the cross-scale influences and feedbacks on communities that exist from lower (e.g., household) to higher (e.g., regional, national) scales. The conceptual framework is then applied to a real-world resilience assessment situation, to illustrate how key components of socio-ecological systems, including natural hazards, natural and man-made environment, and community capacities can be delineated and analyzed.

  4. Multi scale Disaster Risk Reduction Systems Space and Community based Experiences over HKH Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, D. R.; Shrestha, M.; Shrestha, N.; Debnath, B.; Jishi, G.; Bajracharya, R.; Dhonju, H. K.; Pradhan, S.

    2014-11-01

    An increasing trend in the recurrence of natural disasters and associated impacts due to Floods, Glacier Lake out bursts, landslides and forest fire is reported over Hindu Kush Himalyan (HKH) region. Climate change and anthropogenic coupled factors are identified as primary factors for such increased vulnerability. The large degree of poverty, lack of infrastructure, poor accessibility and uncertainties involved in understanding high altitude land surface and climate dynamics poses serious challenges in reducing disaster vulnerability and mitigating disaster impacts. In this context effective development of Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) protocols and mechanisms have been realized as an urgent need. The paper presents the adoption and experiences of multi scale DRR systems across different Himalayan member countries ranging from community based indigenous early warning to space based emergency response and decision support systems. The Establishment of a Regional Flood Information System (HKH-HYCOS) over Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) and Indus river basins promoted the timely exchange of flood data and information for the reduction of flood vulnerability within and among the participating countries. Satellite based forest fire alert systems evoked significant response among diverse stakeholders to optimize fire incidence and control. Satellite rainfall estimation products, satellite altimetry based flood early warning systems, flood inundation modelling and products, model derived hydrology flow products from different global data-sharing networks constitutes diverse information to support multi scale DRR systems. Community-based Flood Early Warning System (FEWS) enabled by wireless technology established over the Singara and Jiadhal rivers in Assam also stands as one of the promising examples of minimizing flood risk. Disaster database and information system and decision support tools in Nepal serves as potential tool to support diverse stakeholders.

  5. Beyond harvests in the commons: multi-scale governance and turbulence in indigenous/community conserved areas in Oaxaca, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Barton Bray

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Some important elements of common property theory include a focus on individual communities or user groups, local level adjudication of conflicts, local autonomy in rule making, physical harvests, and low levels of articulation with markets. We present a case study of multi-scale collective action around indigenous/community conserved areas (ICCAs in Oaxaca, Mexico that suggests a modification of these components of common property theory. A multi-community ICCA in Oaxaca demonstrates the importance of inter-community collective action as key link in multi-scale governance, that conflicts are often negotiated in multiple arenas, that rules emerge at multiple scales, and that management for conservation and environmental services implies no physical harvests. Realizing economic gains from ICCAs for strict conservation may require something very different than traditional natural resource management. It requires intense engagement with extensive networks of government and civil society actors and new forms of community and inter-community collection action, or multi-scale governance. Multi-scale governance is built on trust and social capital at multiple scales and also constitutes collective action at multiple scales. However, processes of multi-scale governance are also necessarily “turbulent” with actors frequently having conflicting values and goals to be negotiated. We present an analytic history of the process of emergence of community and inter-community collective action around strict conservation and examples of internal and external turbulence. We argue that this case study and other literature requires an extensions of the constitutive elements of common property theory.

  6. Crops in silico: A community wide multi-scale computational modeling framework of plant canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, V.; Christensen, A.; Borkiewic, K.; Yiwen, X.; Ellis, A.; Panneerselvam, B.; Kannan, K.; Shrivastava, S.; Cox, D.; Hart, J.; Marshall-Colon, A.; Long, S.

    2016-12-01

    Current crop models predict a looming gap between supply and demand for primary foodstuffs over the next 100 years. While significant yield increases were achieved in major food crops during the early years of the green revolution, the current rates of yield increases are insufficient to meet future projected food demand. Furthermore, with projected reduction in arable land, decrease in water availability, and increasing impacts of climate change on future food production, innovative technologies are required to sustainably improve crop yield. To meet these challenges, we are developing Crops in silico (Cis), a biologically informed, multi-scale, computational modeling framework that can facilitate whole plant simulations of crop systems. The Cis framework is capable of linking models of gene networks, protein synthesis, metabolic pathways, physiology, growth, and development in order to investigate crop response to different climate scenarios and resource constraints. This modeling framework will provide the mechanistic details to generate testable hypotheses toward accelerating directed breeding and engineering efforts to increase future food security. A primary objective for building such a framework is to create synergy among an inter-connected community of biologists and modelers to create a realistic virtual plant. This framework advantageously casts the detailed mechanistic understanding of individual plant processes across various scales in a common scalable framework that makes use of current advances in high performance and parallel computing. We are currently designing a user friendly interface that will make this tool equally accessible to biologists and computer scientists. Critically, this framework will provide the community with much needed tools for guiding future crop breeding and engineering, understanding the emergent implications of discoveries at the molecular level for whole plant behavior, and improved prediction of plant and ecosystem

  7. Multi-scale processes drive benthic community structure in upwelling-affected coral reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corvin eEidens

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Environmental processes acting at multiple spatial scales control benthic community structures in coral reefs. However, the contribution of local factors (e.g., substrate availability and water clarity vs. non-local oceanographic processes (e.g. upwelling events in these highly complex systems is poorly understood. We therefore investigated the relative contribution of local and non-local environmental factors on the structure of benthic groups and specifically on coral assemblages in the upwelling-affected Tayrona National Natural Park (TNNP, Colombian Caribbean. Coral-dominated communities were monitored along with key environmental parameters at water current-exposed and -sheltered sites in four consecutive bays. Regression tree analyses revealed that environmental parameters explained 59.1% of the variation within the major benthic groups and 36.1% within coral assemblages. Findings also showed recurring patterns in community structures at sites with similar exposure across bays. We suggest that benthic community composition in TNNP is primarily driven by 1 wave exposure, followed by 2 temporal changes in nutrient availability governing the structure of benthic groups, and 3 local bay-specific differences controlling the zonation of benthic groups and coral assemblages. This study highlights the existence of complex hierarchical levels of local and non-local environmental factors acting on reef communities and stresses the importance of considering processes operating at multiple spatial scales in future studies on coral reef community structure and resilience.

  8. Blending science and community voices for multi-scale disaster risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper documents the experience of CARE International in Ethiopia in facilitating bottom-up approaches to promote community-led disaster risk management and climate change adaptation planning through a participator scenario planning (PSP) methodology. PSP is a coordinated approach which leverages a variety ...

  9. Multi-scales analysis of the global change impact on the diversity of the aphid communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulle, M.

    2007-01-01

    The primary objective of this project is to investigate the effects of global change on the biodiversity of aphid communities in Western Europe. Biodiversity has been examined at 3 levels: total number of species, phenology and reproductive strategy. Data were provided by EXAMINE, the European suction traps network which has been now operating for 35 years. 392 different species have been identified. At each location, total number of species has been regularly increasing, one additional species being caught every 1 or 2 years depending on location. This is due to introduced species but also to warming which favours rare species. No general trend of increasing density has been detected, but phenological earliness of almost all species (annual date of first appearance in suction traps) is strongly correlated with temperature and especially with mean daily temperature (during more or less long periods of time lying principally in February and March) or number of days below 0 C. Strong relationships between aphid phenology and environmental variables have been found and there is strong discrimination between species with different life cycle strategies, and between species feeding on herbs and trees, suggesting the possible value of trait-based groupings in predicting responses to environmental changes. These preliminary results suggest that 1) biodiversity has increased during the last decades; 2) there is a pool of species among which some of them reach a detectable density only during years where temperatures are high enough; 3) a set of newly introduced species succeed in settling being favoured by warming and 4) phenology of aphids is expected to advance and their abundance to increase with temperature, and the possible role of natural enemies to regulate abundant species is discussed. (author)

  10. Using multi-scale distribution and movement effects along a montane highway to identify optimal crossing locations for a large-bodied mammal community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Schuster

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Roads are a major cause of habitat fragmentation that can negatively affect many mammal populations. Mitigation measures such as crossing structures are a proposed method to reduce the negative effects of roads on wildlife, but the best methods for determining where such structures should be implemented, and how their effects might differ between species in mammal communities is largely unknown. We investigated the effects of a major highway through south-eastern British Columbia, Canada on several mammal species to determine how the highway may act as a barrier to animal movement, and how species may differ in their crossing-area preferences. We collected track data of eight mammal species across two winters, along both the highway and pre-marked transects, and used a multi-scale modeling approach to determine the scale at which habitat characteristics best predicted preferred crossing sites for each species. We found evidence for a severe barrier effect on all investigated species. Freely-available remotely-sensed habitat landscape data were better than more costly, manually-digitized microhabitat maps in supporting models that identified preferred crossing sites; however, models using both types of data were better yet. Further, in 6 of 8 cases models which incorporated multiple spatial scales were better at predicting preferred crossing sites than models utilizing any single scale. While each species differed in terms of the landscape variables associated with preferred/avoided crossing sites, we used a multi-model inference approach to identify locations along the highway where crossing structures may benefit all of the species considered. By specifically incorporating both highway and off-highway data and predictions we were able to show that landscape context plays an important role for maximizing mitigation measurement efficiency. Our results further highlight the need for mitigation measures along major highways to improve connectivity

  11. Multi-scale variation in spatial heterogeneity for microbial community structure in an eastern Virginia agricultural field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Rima B.; Mills, Aaron L.

    2003-01-01

    To better understand the distribution of soil microbial communities at multiple spatial scales, a survey was conducted to examine the spatial organization of community structure in a wheat field in eastern Virginia (USA). Nearly 200 soil samples were collected at a variety of separation distances ranging from 2.5 cm to 11 m. Whole-community DNA was extracted from each sample, and community structure was compared using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) DNA fingerprinting. Relative similarity was calculated between each pair of samples and compared using geostatistical variogram analysis to study autocorrelation as a function of separation distance. Spatial autocorrelation was found at scales ranging from 30 cm to more than 6 m, depending on the sampling extent considered. In some locations, up to four different correlation length scales were detected. The presence of nested scales of variability suggests that the environmental factors regulating the development of the communities in this soil may operate at different scales. Kriging was used to generate maps of the spatial organization of communities across the plot, and the results demonstrated that bacterial distributions can be highly structured, even within a habitat that appears relatively homogeneous at the plot and field scale. Different subsets of the microbial community were distributed differently across the plot, and this is thought to be due to the variable response of individual populations to spatial heterogeneity associated with soil properties. c2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Engaging communities and climate change futures with Multi-Scale, Iterative Scenario Building (MISB) in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel Murphy; Carina Wyborn; Laurie Yung; Daniel R. Williams; Cory Cleveland; Lisa Eby; Solomon Dobrowski; Erin Towler

    2016-01-01

    Current projections of future climate change foretell potentially transformative ecological changes that threaten communities globally. Using two case studies from the United States Intermountain West, this article highlights the ways in which a better articulation between theory and methods in research design can generate proactive applied tools that enable...

  13. Multi-scale functional and taxonomic β-diversity of the macroinvertebrate communities in a Mediterranean coastal lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. CABANA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Benthic macroinvertebrate communities form the basis of the intricate lagoonal food web. Understanding their functional and taxonomic response, from a β-diversity perspective, is essential to disclose underlying patterns with potential applicability in conservation and management actions. Within the central lagoon of Messolonghi we studied the main environmental components structuring the macroinvertebrate community. We analyzed the β-taxonomic and β-functional diversity across the main habitats and seasons, over a year time frame. Our results outline habitat type and vegetation biomass as the major factors structuring the communities. We found environmental variability to have a positive correlation with functional β-diversity, however no correlation was found with taxonomic β-diversity. Across the seasons an asynchronous response of the functional and taxonomic β-diversity was identified. The taxonomic composition displayed significant heterogeneity during the driest period and the functional during the rainy season. Across the habitats the unvegetated presented higher taxonomic homogeneity and functionally heterogeneity, contrary the vegetated habitats present higher taxonomic variability and functional homogeneity. Across the seasons and habitats a pattern of functional redundancy and taxonomic replacement was identified. Besides high functional turnover versus low taxonomic turnover was documented in an anthropogenic organically enriched habitat We conclude that habitats display independent functional and taxonomic seasonal patterns, thus different processes may contribute to their variability. The framework presented here highlights the importance of studying both β-diversity components framed in a multiscale approach to better understand ecological processes and variability patterns. These results are important to understand macroinvertebrate community assembly processes and are valuable for conservation purposes.

  14. Modeling ozone and aerosol formation and transport in the pacific northwest with the community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Susan M; Lamb, Brian K; Chen, Jack; Claiborn, Candis; Finn, Dennis; Otterson, Sally; Figueroa, Cristiana; Bowman, Clint; Boyer, Mike; Wilson, Rob; Arnold, Jeff; Aalbers, Steven; Stocum, Jeffrey; Swab, Christopher; Stoll, Matt; Dubois, Mike; Anderson, Mary

    2006-02-15

    The Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system was used to investigate ozone and aerosol concentrations in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) during hot summertime conditions during July 1-15, 1996. Two emission inventories (El) were developed: emissions for the first El were based upon the National Emission Trend 1996 (NET96) database and the BEIS2 biogenic emission model, and emissions for the second El were developed through a "bottom up" approach that included biogenic emissions obtained from the GLOBEIS model. The two simulations showed that elevated PM2.5 concentrations occurred near and downwind of the Interstate-5 corridor along the foothills of the Cascade Mountains and in forested areas of central Idaho. The relative contributions of organic and inorganic aerosols varied by region, but generally organic aerosols constituted the largest fraction of PM2.5. In wilderness areas near the 1-5 corridor, organic carbon from anthropogenic sources contributed approximately 50% of the total organic carbon with the remainder from biogenic precursors, while in wilderness areas in Idaho, biogenic organic carbon accounted for 80% of the total organic aerosol. Regional analysis of the secondary organic aerosol formation in the Columbia River Gorge, Central Idaho, and the Olympics/Puget Sound showed that the production rate of secondary organic carbon depends on local terpene concentrations and the local oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere, which was strongly influenced by anthropogenic emissions. Comparison with observations from 12 IMPROVE sites and 21 ozone monitoring sites showed that results from the two El simulations generally bracketed the average observed PM parameters and that errors calculated for the model results were within acceptable bounds. Analysis across all statistical parameters indicated that the NW-AIRQUEST El solution performed better at predicting PM2.5, PM1, and beta(ext) even though organic carbon PM was over-predicted, and the NET96 El

  15. APPLICATION OF A NEW LAND-SURFACE, DRY DEPOSITION, AND PBL MODEL IN THE MODELS-3 COMMUNITY MULTI-SCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODEL SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like most air quality modeling systems, CMAQ divides the treatment of meteorological and chemical/transport processes into separate models run sequentially. A potential drawback to this approach is that it creates the illusion that these processes are minimally interdependent an...

  16. A case study of aerosol data assimilation with the Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model over the contiguous United States using 3D-Var and optimal interpolation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Youhua; Pagowski, Mariusz; Chai, Tianfeng; Pan, Li; Lee, Pius; Baker, Barry; Kumar, Rajesh; Delle Monache, Luca; Tong, Daniel; Kim, Hyun-Cheol

    2017-12-01

    This study applies the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) 3D-Var assimilation tool originally developed by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), to improve surface PM2.5 predictions over the contiguous United States (CONUS) by assimilating aerosol optical depth (AOD) and surface PM2.5 in version 5.1 of the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. An optimal interpolation (OI) method implemented earlier (Tang et al., 2015) for the CMAQ modeling system is also tested for the same period (July 2011) over the same CONUS. Both GSI and OI methods assimilate surface PM2.5 observations at 00:00, 06:00, 12:00 and 18:00 UTC, and MODIS AOD at 18:00 UTC. The assimilations of observations using both GSI and OI generally help reduce the prediction biases and improve correlation between model predictions and observations. In the GSI experiments, assimilation of surface PM2.5 (particle matter with diameter root mean squared error (RMSE). It should be noted that the 3D-Var and OI methods used here have several big differences besides the data assimilation schemes. For instance, the OI uses relatively big model uncertainties, which helps yield smaller mean biases, but sometimes causes the RMSE to increase. We also examine and discuss the sensitivity of the assimilation experiments' results to the AOD forward operators.

  17. Multi-scale Regions from Edge Fragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazmi, Wajahat; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    In this article we introduce a novel method for detecting multi-scale salient regions around edges using a graph based image compression algorithm. Images are recursively decomposed into triangles arranged into a binary tree using linear interpolation. The entropy of any local region of the image...... to estimate regions. Salient regions are thus formed as stable regions around edges. Tree hierarchy is then used to generate multi-scale regions. We evaluate our detector by performing image retrieval tests on our building database which shows that combined with Spin Images (Lazebnik et al., 2003...

  18. Integrated multi-scale modelling and simulation of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valot, C.; Bertolus, M.; Masson, R.; Malerba, L.; Rachid, J.; Besmann, T.; Phillpot, S.; Stan, M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter aims at discussing the objectives, implementation and integration of multi-scale modelling approaches applied to nuclear fuel materials. We will first show why the multi-scale modelling approach is required, due to the nature of the materials and by the phenomena involved under irradiation. We will then present the multiple facets of multi-scale modelling approach, while giving some recommendations with regard to its application. We will also show that multi-scale modelling must be coupled with appropriate multi-scale experiments and characterisation. Finally, we will demonstrate how multi-scale modelling can contribute to solving technology issues. (authors)

  19. Multi-scale biomedical systems: measurement challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, R

    2016-01-01

    Multi-scale biomedical systems are those that represent interactions in materials, sensors, and systems from a holistic perspective. It is possible to view such multi-scale activity using measurement of spatial scale or time scale, though in this paper only the former is considered. The biomedical application paradigm comprises interactions that range from quantum biological phenomena at scales of 10-12 for one individual to epidemiological studies of disease spread in populations that in a pandemic lead to measurement at a scale of 10+7. It is clear that there are measurement challenges at either end of this spatial scale, but those challenges that relate to the use of new technologies that deal with big data and health service delivery at the point of care are also considered. The measurement challenges lead to the use, in many cases, of model-based measurement and the adoption of virtual engineering. It is these measurement challenges that will be uncovered in this paper. (paper)

  20. Multi-Scale Validation of a Nanodiamond Drug Delivery System and Multi-Scale Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalbe, Michelle Kristin

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation has two primary concerns: (i) evaluating the uncertainty and prediction capabilities of a nanodiamond drug delivery model using Bayesian calibration and bias correction, and (ii) determining conceptual difficulties of multi-scale analysis from an engineering education perspective. A Bayesian uncertainty quantification scheme…

  1. Multi-scale simulation for plasma science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiguro, S; Usami, S; Horiuchi, R; Ohtani, H; Maluckov, A; Skoric, M M, E-mail: ishiguro.seiji@nifs.ac.jp

    2010-11-01

    In order to perform a computer simulation of a large time and spatial scale system, such as a fusion plasma device and solar-terrestrial plasma, macro simulation model, where micro physics is modeled analytically or empirically, is usually used. However, kinetic effects such as wave-particle interaction play important roles in most of nonlinear plasma phenomena and result in anomalous behavior. This limits the applicability of macro simulation models. In a past few years several attempts have been performed to overcome this difficulty. Two types of multi-scale simulation method for nonlinear plasma science are presented. First one is the Micro-Macro Interconnected Simulation Method (MMIS), where micro model and macro model are connected dynamically through an interface and macro time and space simulation is performed. Second one is the Equation Free Projective Integration Method (EFPI), where macro space and time scale simulation is performed by using only a micro simulator and a sophisticated numerical algorithm.

  2. Multi-scale modeling of composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azizi, Reza

    A general method to obtain the homogenized response of metal-matrix composites is developed. It is assumed that the microscopic scale is sufficiently small compared to the macroscopic scale such that the macro response does not affect the micromechanical model. Therefore, the microscopic scale...... is analyzed using a Representative Volume Element (RVE), while the homogenized data are saved and used as an input to the macro scale. The dependence of fiber size is analyzed using a higher order plasticity theory, where the free energy is stored due to plastic strain gradients at the micron scale. Hill...... to plastic deformation. The macroscopic operators found, can be used to model metal matrix composites on the macroscopic scale using a hierarchical multi-scale approach. Finally, decohesion under tension and shear loading is studied using a cohesive law for the interface between matrix and fiber....

  3. MUSIC: MUlti-Scale Initial Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Oliver; Abel, Tom

    2013-11-01

    MUSIC generates multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological ‘zoom-in’ simulations. The code uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). MUSIC achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10-4 for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier space-induced interference ringing.

  4. Multi-scale approximation of Vlasov equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouton, A.

    2009-09-01

    One of the most important difficulties of numerical simulation of magnetized plasmas is the existence of multiple time and space scales, which can be very different. In order to produce good simulations of these multi-scale phenomena, it is recommended to develop some models and numerical methods which are adapted to these problems. Nowadays, the two-scale convergence theory introduced by G. Nguetseng and G. Allaire is one of the tools which can be used to rigorously derive multi-scale limits and to obtain new limit models which can be discretized with a usual numerical method: this procedure is so-called a two-scale numerical method. The purpose of this thesis is to develop a two-scale semi-Lagrangian method and to apply it on a gyrokinetic Vlasov-like model in order to simulate a plasma submitted to a large external magnetic field. However, the physical phenomena we have to simulate are quite complex and there are many questions without answers about the behaviour of a two-scale numerical method, especially when such a method is applied on a nonlinear model. In a first part, we develop a two-scale finite volume method and we apply it on the weakly compressible 1D isentropic Euler equations. Even if this mathematical context is far from a Vlasov-like model, it is a relatively simple framework in order to study the behaviour of a two-scale numerical method in front of a nonlinear model. In a second part, we develop a two-scale semi-Lagrangian method for the two-scale model developed by E. Frenod, F. Salvarani et E. Sonnendrucker in order to simulate axisymmetric charged particle beams. Even if the studied physical phenomena are quite different from magnetic fusion experiments, the mathematical context of the one-dimensional paraxial Vlasov-Poisson model is very simple for establishing the basis of a two-scale semi-Lagrangian method. In a third part, we use the two-scale convergence theory in order to improve M. Bostan's weak-* convergence results about the finite

  5. Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) System Manager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiff, Conrad; Maher, Francis Alfred; Henely, Sean Philip; Rand, David

    2014-01-01

    The Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission is an ambitious NASA space science mission in which 4 spacecraft are flown in tight formation about a highly elliptical orbit. Each spacecraft has multiple instruments that measure particle and field compositions in the Earths magnetosphere. By controlling the members relative motion, MMS can distinguish temporal and spatial fluctuations in a way that a single spacecraft cannot.To achieve this control, 2 sets of four maneuvers, distributed evenly across the spacecraft must be performed approximately every 14 days. Performing a single maneuver on an individual spacecraft is usually labor intensive and the complexity becomes clearly increases with four. As a result, the MMS flight dynamics team turned to the System Manager to put the routine or error-prone under machine control freeing the analysts for activities that require human judgment.The System Manager is an expert system that is capable of handling operations activities associated with performing MMS maneuvers. As an expert system, it can work off a known schedule, launching jobs based on a one-time occurrence or on a set reoccurring schedule. It is also able to detect situational changes and use event-driven programming to change schedules, adapt activities, or call for help.

  6. Transitions of the Multi-Scale Singularity Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somchaipeng, Kerawit; Sporring, Jon; Kreiborg, Sven

    2005-01-01

    Multi-Scale Singularity Trees(MSSTs) [10] are multi-scale image descriptors aimed at representing the deep structures of images. Changes in images are directly translated to changes in the deep structures; therefore transitions in MSSTs. Because MSSTs can be used to represent the deep structure o...

  7. State-of-the-Art Report on Multi-scale Modelling of Nuclear Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartel, T.J.; Dingreville, R.; Littlewood, D.; Tikare, V.; Bertolus, M.; Blanc, V.; Bouineau, V.; Carlot, G.; Desgranges, C.; Dorado, B.; Dumas, J.C.; Freyss, M.; Garcia, P.; Gatt, J.M.; Gueneau, C.; Julien, J.; Maillard, S.; Martin, G.; Masson, R.; Michel, B.; Piron, J.P.; Sabathier, C.; Skorek, R.; Toffolon, C.; Valot, C.; Van Brutzel, L.; Besmann, Theodore M.; Chernatynskiy, A.; Clarno, K.; Gorti, S.B.; Radhakrishnan, B.; Devanathan, R.; Dumont, M.; Maugis, P.; El-Azab, A.; Iglesias, F.C.; Lewis, B.J.; Krack, M.; Yun, Y.; Kurata, M.; Kurosaki, K.; Largenton, R.; Lebensohn, R.A.; Malerba, L.; Oh, J.Y.; Phillpot, S.R.; Tulenko, J. S.; Rachid, J.; Stan, M.; Sundman, B.; Tonks, M.R.; Williamson, R.; Van Uffelen, P.; Welland, M.J.; Valot, Carole; Stan, Marius; Massara, Simone; Tarsi, Reka

    2015-10-01

    The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has undertaken an ambitious programme to document state-of-the-art of modelling for nuclear fuels and structural materials. The project is being performed under the Working Party on Multi-Scale Modelling of Fuels and Structural Material for Nuclear Systems (WPMM), which has been established to assess the scientific and engineering aspects of fuels and structural materials, describing multi-scale models and simulations as validated predictive tools for the design of nuclear systems, fuel fabrication and performance. The WPMM's objective is to promote the exchange of information on models and simulations of nuclear materials, theoretical and computational methods, experimental validation and related topics. It also provides member countries with up-to-date information, shared data, models, and expertise. The goal is also to assess needs for improvement and address them by initiating joint efforts. The WPMM reviews and evaluates multi-scale modelling and simulation techniques currently employed in the selection of materials used in nuclear systems. It serves to provide advice to the nuclear community on the developments needed to meet the requirements of modelling for the design of different nuclear systems. The original WPMM mandate had three components (Figure 1), with the first component currently completed, delivering a report on the state-of-the-art of modelling of structural materials. The work on modelling was performed by three expert groups, one each on Multi-Scale Modelling Methods (M3), Multi-Scale Modelling of Fuels (M2F) and Structural Materials Modelling (SMM). WPMM is now composed of three expert groups and two task forces providing contributions on multi-scale methods, modelling of fuels and modelling of structural materials. This structure will be retained, with the addition of task forces as new topics are developed. The mandate of the Expert Group on Multi-Scale Modelling of

  8. Multi-scale salient feature extraction on mesh models

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yongliang

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method of extracting multi-scale salient features on meshes. It is based on robust estimation of curvature on multiple scales. The coincidence between salient feature and the scale of interest can be established straightforwardly, where detailed feature appears on small scale and feature with more global shape information shows up on large scale. We demonstrate this multi-scale description of features accords with human perception and can be further used for several applications as feature classification and viewpoint selection. Experiments exhibit that our method as a multi-scale analysis tool is very helpful for studying 3D shapes. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  9. Multi-Scale Simulation of High Energy Density Ionic Liquids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Voth, Gregory A

    2007-01-01

    The focus of this AFOSR project was the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of ionic liquid structure, dynamics, and interfacial properties, as well as multi-scale descriptions of these novel liquids (e.g...

  10. Software Integration in Multi-scale Simulations: the PUPIL System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torras, J.; Deumens, E.; Trickey, S. B.

    2006-10-01

    The state of the art for computational tools in both computational chemistry and computational materials physics includes many algorithms and functionalities which are implemented again and again. Several projects aim to reduce, eliminate, or avoid this problem. Most such efforts seem to be focused within a particular specialty, either quantum chemistry or materials physics. Multi-scale simulations, by their very nature however, cannot respect that specialization. In simulation of fracture, for example, the energy gradients that drive the molecular dynamics (MD) come from a quantum mechanical treatment that most often derives from quantum chemistry. That “QM” region is linked to a surrounding “CM” region in which potentials yield the forces. The approach therefore requires the integration or at least inter-operation of quantum chemistry and materials physics algorithms. The same problem occurs in “QM/MM” simulations in computational biology. The challenge grows if pattern recognition or other analysis codes of some kind must be used as well. The most common mode of inter-operation is user intervention: codes are modified as needed and data files are managed “by hand” by the user (interactively and via shell scripts). User intervention is however inefficient by nature, difficult to transfer to the community, and prone to error. Some progress (e.g Sethna’s work at Cornell [C.R. Myers et al., Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc., 538(1999) 509, C.-S. Chen et al., Poster presented at the Material Research Society Meeting (2000)]) has been made on using Python scripts to achieve a more efficient level of interoperation. In this communication we present an alternative approach to merging current working packages without the necessity of major recoding and with only a relatively light wrapper interface. The scheme supports communication among the different components required for a given multi-scale calculation and access to the functionalities of those components

  11. Multi-scales analysis of the global change impact on the diversity of the aphid communities; Analyse multi-echelle de l'impact du changement global sur la diversite des communautes aphidiennes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulle, M

    2007-07-01

    The primary objective of this project is to investigate the effects of global change on the biodiversity of aphid communities in Western Europe. Biodiversity has been examined at 3 levels: total number of species, phenology and reproductive strategy. Data were provided by EXAMINE, the European suction traps network which has been now operating for 35 years. 392 different species have been identified. At each location, total number of species has been regularly increasing, one additional species being caught every 1 or 2 years depending on location. This is due to introduced species but also to warming which favours rare species. No general trend of increasing density has been detected, but phenological earliness of almost all species (annual date of first appearance in suction traps) is strongly correlated with temperature and especially with mean daily temperature (during more or less long periods of time lying principally in February and March) or number of days below 0 C. Strong relationships between aphid phenology and environmental variables have been found and there is strong discrimination between species with different life cycle strategies, and between species feeding on herbs and trees, suggesting the possible value of trait-based groupings in predicting responses to environmental changes. These preliminary results suggest that 1) biodiversity has increased during the last decades; 2) there is a pool of species among which some of them reach a detectable density only during years where temperatures are high enough; 3) a set of newly introduced species succeed in settling being favoured by warming and 4) phenology of aphids is expected to advance and their abundance to increase with temperature, and the possible role of natural enemies to regulate abundant species is discussed. (author)

  12. Crops In Silico: Generating Virtual Crops Using an Integrative and Multi-scale Modeling Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall-Colon, Amy; Long, Stephen P.; Allen, Douglas K.; Allen, Gabrielle; Beard, Daniel A.; Benes, Bedrich; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Christensen, A. J.; Cox, Donna J.; Hart, John C.; Hirst, Peter M.; Kannan, Kavya; Katz, Daniel S.; Lynch, Jonathan P.; Millar, Andrew J.; Panneerselvam, Balaji; Price, Nathan D.; Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw; Raila, David; Shekar, Rachel G.; Shrivastava, Stuti; Shukla, Diwakar; Srinivasan, Venkatraman; Stitt, Mark; Turk, Matthew J.; Voit, Eberhard O.; Wang, Yu; Yin, Xinyou; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2017-01-01

    Multi-scale models can facilitate whole plant simulations by linking gene networks, protein synthesis, metabolic pathways, physiology, and growth. Whole plant models can be further integrated with ecosystem, weather, and climate models to predict how various interactions respond to environmental perturbations. These models have the potential to fill in missing mechanistic details and generate new hypotheses to prioritize directed engineering efforts. Outcomes will potentially accelerate improvement of crop yield, sustainability, and increase future food security. It is time for a paradigm shift in plant modeling, from largely isolated efforts to a connected community that takes advantage of advances in high performance computing and mechanistic understanding of plant processes. Tools for guiding future crop breeding and engineering, understanding the implications of discoveries at the molecular level for whole plant behavior, and improved prediction of plant and ecosystem responses to the environment are urgently needed. The purpose of this perspective is to introduce Crops in silico (cropsinsilico.org), an integrative and multi-scale modeling platform, as one solution that combines isolated modeling efforts toward the generation of virtual crops, which is open and accessible to the entire plant biology community. The major challenges involved both in the development and deployment of a shared, multi-scale modeling platform, which are summarized in this prospectus, were recently identified during the first Crops in silico Symposium and Workshop. PMID:28555150

  13. Crops In Silico: Generating Virtual Crops Using an Integrative and Multi-scale Modeling Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Marshall-Colon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-scale models can facilitate whole plant simulations by linking gene networks, protein synthesis, metabolic pathways, physiology, and growth. Whole plant models can be further integrated with ecosystem, weather, and climate models to predict how various interactions respond to environmental perturbations. These models have the potential to fill in missing mechanistic details and generate new hypotheses to prioritize directed engineering efforts. Outcomes will potentially accelerate improvement of crop yield, sustainability, and increase future food security. It is time for a paradigm shift in plant modeling, from largely isolated efforts to a connected community that takes advantage of advances in high performance computing and mechanistic understanding of plant processes. Tools for guiding future crop breeding and engineering, understanding the implications of discoveries at the molecular level for whole plant behavior, and improved prediction of plant and ecosystem responses to the environment are urgently needed. The purpose of this perspective is to introduce Crops in silico (cropsinsilico.org, an integrative and multi-scale modeling platform, as one solution that combines isolated modeling efforts toward the generation of virtual crops, which is open and accessible to the entire plant biology community. The major challenges involved both in the development and deployment of a shared, multi-scale modeling platform, which are summarized in this prospectus, were recently identified during the first Crops in silico Symposium and Workshop.

  14. The Goddard multi-scale modeling system with unified physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-K. Tao

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1 a cloud-resolving model (CRM, (2 a regional-scale model, the NASA unified Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF, and (3 a coupled CRM-GCM (general circulation model, known as the Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework or MMF. The same cloud-microphysical processes, long- and short-wave radiative transfer and land-surface processes are applied in all of the models to study explicit cloud-radiation and cloud-surface interactive processes in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator for comparison and validation with NASA high-resolution satellite data.

    This paper reviews the development and presents some applications of the multi-scale modeling system, including results from using the multi-scale modeling system to study the interactions between clouds, precipitation, and aerosols. In addition, use of the multi-satellite simulator to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the model-simulated precipitation processes will be discussed as well as future model developments and applications.

  15. Microphysics in Multi-scale Modeling System with Unified Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, a review of developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the microphysics development and its performance for the multi-scale modeling system will be presented.

  16. Conformal-Based Surface Morphing and Multi-Scale Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka Chun Lam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents two algorithms, based on conformal geometry, for the multi-scale representations of geometric shapes and surface morphing. A multi-scale surface representation aims to describe a 3D shape at different levels of geometric detail, which allows analyzing or editing surfaces at the global or local scales effectively. Surface morphing refers to the process of interpolating between two geometric shapes, which has been widely applied to estimate or analyze deformations in computer graphics, computer vision and medical imaging. In this work, we propose two geometric models for surface morphing and multi-scale representation for 3D surfaces. The basic idea is to represent a 3D surface by its mean curvature function, H, and conformal factor function λ, which uniquely determine the geometry of the surface according to Riemann surface theory. Once we have the (λ, H parameterization of the surface, post-processing of the surface can be done directly on the conformal parameter domain. In particular, the problem of multi-scale representations of shapes can be reduced to the signal filtering on the λ and H parameters. On the other hand, the surface morphing problem can be transformed to an interpolation process of two sets of (λ, H parameters. We test the proposed algorithms on 3D human face data and MRI-derived brain surfaces. Experimental results show that our proposed methods can effectively obtain multi-scale surface representations and give natural surface morphing results.

  17. Algorithmic foundation of multi-scale spatial representation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhilin

    2006-01-01

    With the widespread use of GIS, multi-scale representation has become an important issue in the realm of spatial data handling. However, no book to date has systematically tackled the different aspects of this discipline. Emphasizing map generalization, Algorithmic Foundation of Multi-Scale Spatial Representation addresses the mathematical basis of multi-scale representation, specifically, the algorithmic foundation.Using easy-to-understand language, the author focuses on geometric transformations, with each chapter surveying a particular spatial feature. After an introduction to the essential operations required for geometric transformations as well as some mathematical and theoretical background, the book describes algorithms for a class of point features/clusters. It then examines algorithms for individual line features, such as the reduction of data points, smoothing (filtering), and scale-driven generalization, followed by a discussion of algorithms for a class of line features including contours, hydrog...

  18. Multi-scale magnetic field intermittence in the plasma sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vörös

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates that intermittent magnetic field fluctuations in the plasma sheet exhibit transitory, localized, and multi-scale features. We propose a multifractal-based algorithm, which quantifies intermittence on the basis of the statistical distribution of the "strength of burstiness", estimated within a sliding window. Interesting multi-scale phenomena observed by the Cluster spacecraft include large-scale motion of the current sheet and bursty bulk flow associated turbulence, interpreted as a cross-scale coupling (CSC process.Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetotail; plasma sheet – Space plasma physics (turbulence

  19. Multi-scale modeling strategies in materials science—The ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    will review the recently developed quasicontinuum method which is an attempt to bridge the length scales in a single seamless model with the aid of the finite element method. Attempts to generalize this method to finite temperatures will be outlined. Keywords. Multi-scale models; quasicontinuum method; finite elements. 1.

  20. Multi-Scale Pattern Recognition for Image Classification and Segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Scale is an important parameter of images. Different objects or image structures (e.g. edges and corners) can appear at different scales and each is meaningful only over a limited range of scales. Multi-scale analysis has been widely used in image processing and computer vision, serving as the basis

  1. Multi-scale atmospheric environment modelling for urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baklanov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Modern supercomputers allow realising multi-scale systems for assessment and forecasting of urban meteorology, air pollution and emergency preparedness and considering nesting with obstacle-resolved models. A multi-scale modelling system with downscaling from regional to city-scale with the Environment – HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model (Enviro-HIRLAM and to micro-scale with the obstacle-resolved Micro-scale Model for Urban Environment (M2UE is suggested and demonstrated. The M2UE validation results versus the Mock Urban Setting Trial (MUST experiment indicate satisfactory quality of the model. Necessary conditions for the choice of nested models, building descriptions, areas and resolutions of nested models are analysed. Two-way nesting (up- and down-scaling, when scale effects both directions (from the meso-scale on the micro-scale and from the micro-scale on the meso-scale, is also discussed.

  2. Multi-scale simulation for homogenization of cement media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abballe, T.

    2011-01-01

    To solve diffusion problems on cement media, two scales must be taken into account: a fine scale, which describes the micrometers wide microstructures present in the media, and a work scale, which is usually a few meters long. Direct numerical simulations are almost impossible because of the huge computational resources (memory, CPU time) required to assess both scales at the same time. To overcome this problem, we present in this thesis multi-scale resolution methods using both Finite Volumes and Finite Elements, along with their efficient implementations. More precisely, we developed a multi-scale simulation tool which uses the SALOME platform to mesh domains and post-process data, and the parallel calculation code MPCube to solve problems. This SALOME/MPCube tool can solve automatically and efficiently multi-scale simulations. Parallel structure of computer clusters can be use to dispatch the more time-consuming tasks. We optimized most functions to account for cement media specificities. We presents numerical experiments on various cement media samples, e.g. mortar and cement paste. From these results, we manage to compute a numerical effective diffusivity of our cement media and to reconstruct a fine scale solution. (author) [fr

  3. Multi-scale symbolic transfer entropy analysis of EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wenpo; Wang, Jun

    2017-10-01

    From both global and local perspectives, we symbolize two kinds of EEG and analyze their dynamic and asymmetrical information using multi-scale transfer entropy. Multi-scale process with scale factor from 1 to 199 and step size of 2 is applied to EEG of healthy people and epileptic patients, and then the permutation with embedding dimension of 3 and global approach are used to symbolize the sequences. The forward and reverse symbol sequences are taken as the inputs of transfer entropy. Scale factor intervals of permutation and global way are (37, 57) and (65, 85) where the two kinds of EEG have satisfied entropy distinctions. When scale factor is 67, transfer entropy of the healthy and epileptic subjects of permutation, 0.1137 and 0.1028, have biggest difference. And the corresponding values of the global symbolization is 0.0641 and 0.0601 which lies in the scale factor of 165. Research results show that permutation which takes contribution of local information has better distinction and is more effectively applied to our multi-scale transfer entropy analysis of EEG.

  4. Front-end vision and multi-scale image analysis multi-scale computer vision theory and applications, written in Mathematica

    CERN Document Server

    Romeny, Bart M Haar

    2008-01-01

    Front-End Vision and Multi-Scale Image Analysis is a tutorial in multi-scale methods for computer vision and image processing. It builds on the cross fertilization between human visual perception and multi-scale computer vision (`scale-space') theory and applications. The multi-scale strategies recognized in the first stages of the human visual system are carefully examined, and taken as inspiration for the many geometric methods discussed. All chapters are written in Mathematica, a spectacular high-level language for symbolic and numerical manipulations. The book presents a new and effective

  5. Gradient design for liquid chromatography using multi-scale optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Ureña, S; Torres-Lapasió, J R; Donat, R; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C

    2018-01-26

    In reversed phase-liquid chromatography, the usual solution to the "general elution problem" is the application of gradient elution with programmed changes of organic solvent (or other properties). A correct quantification of chromatographic peaks in liquid chromatography requires well resolved signals in a proper analysis time. When the complexity of the sample is high, the gradient program should be accommodated to the local resolution needs of each analyte. This makes the optimization of such situations rather troublesome, since enhancing the resolution for a given analyte may imply a collateral worsening of the resolution of other analytes. The aim of this work is to design multi-linear gradients that maximize the resolution, while fulfilling some restrictions: all peaks should be eluted before a given maximal time, the gradient should be flat or increasing, and sudden changes close to eluting peaks are penalized. Consequently, an equilibrated baseline resolution for all compounds is sought. This goal is achieved by splitting the optimization problem in a multi-scale framework. In each scale κ, an optimization problem is solved with N κ  ≈ 2 κ variables that are used to build the gradients. The N κ variables define cubic splines written in terms of a B-spline basis. This allows expressing gradients as polygonals of M points approximating the splines. The cubic splines are built using subdivision schemes, a technique of fast generation of smooth curves, compatible with the multi-scale framework. Owing to the nature of the problem and the presence of multiple local maxima, the algorithm used in the optimization problem of each scale κ should be "global", such as the pattern-search algorithm. The multi-scale optimization approach is successfully applied to find the best multi-linear gradient for resolving a mixture of amino acid derivatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Multi-scale structural similarity index for motion detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdel-Salam Nasr

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The most recent approach for measuring the image quality is the structural similarity index (SSI. This paper presents a novel algorithm based on the multi-scale structural similarity index for motion detection (MS-SSIM in videos. The MS-SSIM approach is based on modeling of image luminance, contrast and structure at multiple scales. The MS-SSIM has resulted in much better performance than the single scale SSI approach but at the cost of relatively lower processing speed. The major advantages of the presented algorithm are both: the higher detection accuracy and the quasi real-time processing speed.

  7. Multi-scale window specification over streaming trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Patroumpas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Enormous amounts of positional information are collected by monitoring applications in domains such as fleet management, cargo transport, wildlife protection, etc. With the advent of modern location-based services, processing such data mostly focuses on providing real-time response to a variety of user requests in continuous and scalable fashion. An important class of such queries concerns evolving trajectories that continuously trace the streaming locations of moving objects, like GPS-equipped vehicles, commodities with RFID's, people with smartphones etc. In this work, we propose an advanced windowing operator that enables online, incremental examination of recent motion paths at multiple resolutions for numerous point entities. When applied against incoming positions, this window can abstract trajectories at coarser representations towards the past, while retaining progressively finer features closer to the present. We explain the semantics of such multi-scale sliding windows through parameterized functions that reflect the sequential nature of trajectories and can effectively capture their spatiotemporal properties. Such window specification goes beyond its usual role for non-blocking processing of multiple concurrent queries. Actually, it can offer concrete subsequences from each trajectory, thus preserving continuity in time and contiguity in space along the respective segments. Further, we suggest language extensions in order to express characteristic spatiotemporal queries using windows. Finally, we discuss algorithms for nested maintenance of multi-scale windows and evaluate their efficiency against streaming positional data, offering empirical evidence of their benefits to online trajectory processing.

  8. Multi-scale modeling for sustainable chemical production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Kai; Bakshi, Bhavik R; Herrgård, Markus J

    2013-09-01

    With recent advances in metabolic engineering, it is now technically possible to produce a wide portfolio of existing petrochemical products from biomass feedstock. In recent years, a number of modeling approaches have been developed to support the engineering and decision-making processes associated with the development and implementation of a sustainable biochemical industry. The temporal and spatial scales of modeling approaches for sustainable chemical production vary greatly, ranging from metabolic models that aid the design of fermentative microbial strains to material and monetary flow models that explore the ecological impacts of all economic activities. Research efforts that attempt to connect the models at different scales have been limited. Here, we review a number of existing modeling approaches and their applications at the scales of metabolism, bioreactor, overall process, chemical industry, economy, and ecosystem. In addition, we propose a multi-scale approach for integrating the existing models into a cohesive framework. The major benefit of this proposed framework is that the design and decision-making at each scale can be informed, guided, and constrained by simulations and predictions at every other scale. In addition, the development of this multi-scale framework would promote cohesive collaborations across multiple traditionally disconnected modeling disciplines to achieve sustainable chemical production. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. OHMMS: a framework for multi-scale materials simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazzard, Kaden R. A.; Kim, Jeongnim

    2002-08-01

    To maintain the rapid growth of computational materials science requires both the development of algorithms implementing theoretical developments and their rapid deployment on evolving high-performance computers. OHMMS provides Object-oriented High-performance solutions for Multi-scale Materials Simulations to meet such challenges. OHMMS achieves i) high flexibility and re-usability by applying object-oriented programming practice, such as design patterns, and ii) performance by utilizing advanced abstractions, such as expression templates for low-level components. Examples include: (a) easy inclusion of both new potential types/parameters and new local minimization methods and (b) sophisticated data compression and infrequent event detection (starting with Fortran code and progressing easily to bit arithmetic C++ coding). OHMMS designs for classical and quantum atomistic simulations are overviewed together with performance of core routines for OHMMS applications on several architectures.

  10. A Multi-Scale Settlement Matching Algorithm Based on ARG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yue

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Homonymous entity matching is an important part of multi-source spatial data integration, automatic updating and change detection. Considering the low accuracy of existing matching methods in dealing with matching multi-scale settlement data, an algorithm based on Attributed Relational Graph (ARG is proposed. The algorithm firstly divides two settlement scenes at different scales into blocks by small-scale road network and constructs local ARGs in each block. Then, ascertains candidate sets by merging procedures and obtains the optimal matching pairs by comparing the similarity of ARGs iteratively. Finally, the corresponding relations between settlements at large and small scales are identified. At the end of this article, a demonstration is presented and the results indicate that the proposed algorithm is capable of handling sophisticated cases.

  11. Multi-scale evaluations of submarine groundwater discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Taniguchi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Multi-scale evaluations of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD have been made in Saijo, Ehime Prefecture, Shikoku Island, Japan, by using seepage meters for point scale, 222Rn tracer for point and coastal scales, and a numerical groundwater model (SEAWAT for coastal and basin scales. Daily basis temporal changes in SGD are evaluated by continuous seepage meter and 222Rn mooring measurements, and depend on sea level changes. Spatial evaluations of SGD were also made by 222Rn along the coast in July 2010 and November 2011. The area with larger 222Rn concentration during both seasons agreed well with the area with larger SGD calculated by 3D groundwater numerical simulations.

  12. Plant trait detection with multi-scale spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamon, J. A.; Wang, R.

    2017-12-01

    Proximal and remote sensing using imaging spectrometry offers new opportunities for detecting plant traits, with benefits for phenotyping, productivity estimation, stress detection, and biodiversity studies. Using proximal and airborne spectrometry, we evaluated variation in plant optical properties at various spatial and spectral scales with the goal of identifying optimal scales for distinguishing plant traits related to photosynthetic function. Using directed approaches based on physiological vegetation indices, and statistical approaches based on spectral information content, we explored alternate ways of distinguishing plant traits with imaging spectrometry. With both leaf traits and canopy structure contributing to the signals, results exhibit a strong scale dependence. Our results demonstrate the benefits of multi-scale experimental approaches within a clear conceptual framework when applying remote sensing methods to plant trait detection for phenotyping, productivity, and biodiversity studies.

  13. Multi-scale modeling for sustainable chemical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Kai; Bakshi, Bhavik R.; Herrgard, Markus

    2013-01-01

    associated with the development and implementation of a su stainable biochemical industry. The temporal and spatial scales of modeling approaches for sustainable chemical production vary greatly, ranging from metabolic models that aid the design of fermentative microbial strains to material and monetary flow...... and predictions at every other scale. In addition, the development of this multi-scale framework would promote cohesive collaborations across multiple traditionally disconnected modeling disciplines to achieve sustainable chemical production.......With recent advances in metabolic engineering, it is now technically possible to produce a wide portfolio of existing petrochemical products from biomass feedstock. In recent years, a number of modeling approaches have been developed to support the engineering and decision-making processes...

  14. Multi-Scale Dissemination of Time Series Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qingsong; Zhou, Yongluan; Su, Li

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of continuous dissemination of time series data, such as sensor measurements, to a large number of subscribers. These subscribers fall into multiple subscription levels, where each subscription level is specified by the bandwidth constraint of a subscriber......, which is an abstract indicator for both the physical limits and the amount of data that the subscriber would like to handle. To handle this problem, we propose a system framework for multi-scale time series data dissemination that employs a typical tree-based dissemination network and existing time...... to optimize the average accuracies of the data received by all subscribers within the dissemination network. Finally, we have conducted extensive experiments to study the performance of the algorithms....

  15. Multi-scale Dynamical Processes in Space and Astrophysical Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Vörös, Zoltán; IAFA 2011 - International Astrophysics Forum 2011 : Frontiers in Space Environment Research

    2012-01-01

    Magnetized plasmas in the universe exhibit complex dynamical behavior over a huge range of scales. The fundamental mechanisms of energy transport, redistribution and conversion occur at multiple scales. The driving mechanisms often include energy accumulation, free-energy-excited relaxation processes, dissipation and self-organization. The plasma processes associated with energy conversion, transport and self-organization, such as magnetic reconnection, instabilities, linear and nonlinear waves, wave-particle interactions, dynamo processes, turbulence, heating, diffusion and convection represent fundamental physical effects. They demonstrate similar dynamical behavior in near-Earth space, on the Sun, in the heliosphere and in astrophysical environments. 'Multi-scale Dynamical Processes in Space and Astrophysical Plasmas' presents the proceedings of the International Astrophysics Forum Alpbach 2011. The contributions discuss the latest advances in the exploration of dynamical behavior in space plasmas environm...

  16. An efficient multi-scale Green's function reaction dynamics scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbailò, Luigi; Noé, Frank

    2017-11-01

    Molecular Dynamics-Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (MD-GFRD) is a multiscale simulation method for particle dynamics or particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics that is suited for systems involving low particle densities. Particles in a low-density region are just diffusing and not interacting. In this case, one can avoid the costly integration of microscopic equations of motion, such as molecular dynamics (MD), and instead turn to an event-based scheme in which the times to the next particle interaction and the new particle positions at that time can be sampled. At high (local) concentrations, however, e.g., when particles are interacting in a nontrivial way, particle positions must still be updated with small time steps of the microscopic dynamical equations. The efficiency of a multi-scale simulation that uses these two schemes largely depends on the coupling between them and the decisions when to switch between the two scales. Here we present an efficient scheme for multi-scale MD-GFRD simulations. It has been shown that MD-GFRD schemes are more efficient than brute-force molecular dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 102 μM. In this paper, we show that the choice of the propagation domains has a relevant impact on the computational performance. Domains are constructed using a local optimization of their sizes and a minimal domain size is proposed. The algorithm is shown to be more efficient than brute-force Brownian dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 103 μM and is up to an order of magnitude more efficient compared with previous MD-GFRD schemes.

  17. A theoretical foundation for multi-scale regular vegetation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnita, Corina E; Bonachela, Juan A; Sheffer, Efrat; Guyton, Jennifer A; Coverdale, Tyler C; Long, Ryan A; Pringle, Robert M

    2017-01-18

    Self-organized regular vegetation patterns are widespread and thought to mediate ecosystem functions such as productivity and robustness, but the mechanisms underlying their origin and maintenance remain disputed. Particularly controversial are landscapes of overdispersed (evenly spaced) elements, such as North American Mima mounds, Brazilian murundus, South African heuweltjies, and, famously, Namibian fairy circles. Two competing hypotheses are currently debated. On the one hand, models of scale-dependent feedbacks, whereby plants facilitate neighbours while competing with distant individuals, can reproduce various regular patterns identified in satellite imagery. Owing to deep theoretical roots and apparent generality, scale-dependent feedbacks are widely viewed as a unifying and near-universal principle of regular-pattern formation despite scant empirical evidence. On the other hand, many overdispersed vegetation patterns worldwide have been attributed to subterranean ecosystem engineers such as termites, ants, and rodents. Although potentially consistent with territorial competition, this interpretation has been challenged theoretically and empirically and (unlike scale-dependent feedbacks) lacks a unifying dynamical theory, fuelling scepticism about its plausibility and generality. Here we provide a general theoretical foundation for self-organization of social-insect colonies, validated using data from four continents, which demonstrates that intraspecific competition between territorial animals can generate the large-scale hexagonal regularity of these patterns. However, this mechanism is not mutually exclusive with scale-dependent feedbacks. Using Namib Desert fairy circles as a case study, we present field data showing that these landscapes exhibit multi-scale patterning-previously undocumented in this system-that cannot be explained by either mechanism in isolation. These multi-scale patterns and other emergent properties, such as enhanced resistance to

  18. Toward a global multi-scale heliophysics observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeter, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    We live within the only known stellar-planetary system that supports life. What we learn about this system is not only relevant to human society and its expanding reach beyond Earth's surface, but also to our understanding of the origins and evolution of life in the universe. Heliophysics is focused on solar-terrestrial interactions mediated by the magnetic and plasma environment surrounding the planet. A defining feature of energy flow through this environment is interaction across physical scales. A solar disturbance aimed at Earth can excite geospace variability on scales ranging from thousands of kilometers (e.g., global convection, region 1 and 2 currents, electrojet intensifications) to 10's of meters (e.g., equatorial spread-F, dispersive Alfven waves, plasma instabilities). Most "geospace observatory" concepts are focused on a single modality (e.g., HF/UHF radar, magnetometer, optical) providing a limited parameter set over a particular spatiotemporal resolution. Data assimilation methods have been developed to couple heterogeneous and distributed observations, but resolution has typically been prescribed a-priori and according to physical assumptions. This paper develops a conceptual framework for the next generation multi-scale heliophysics observatory, capable of revealing and quantifying the complete spectrum of cross-scale interactions occurring globally within the geospace system. The envisioned concept leverages existing assets, enlists citizen scientists, and exploits low-cost access to the geospace environment. Examples are presented where distributed multi-scale observations have resulted in substantial new insight into the inner workings of our stellar-planetary system.

  19. Dissecting the multi-scale spatial relationship of earthworm assemblages with soil environmental variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Juan J; Decaëns, Thibaud; Lavelle, Patrick; Rossi, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-05

    Studying the drivers and determinants of species, population and community spatial patterns is central to ecology. The observed structure of community assemblages is the result of deterministic abiotic (environmental constraints) and biotic factors (positive and negative species interactions), as well as stochastic colonization events (historical contingency). We analyzed the role of multi-scale spatial component of soil environmental variability in structuring earthworm assemblages in a gallery forest from the Colombian "Llanos". We aimed to disentangle the spatial scales at which species assemblages are structured and determine whether these scales matched those expressed by soil environmental variables. We also tested the hypothesis of the "single tree effect" by exploring the spatial relationships between root-related variables and soil nutrient and physical variables in structuring earthworm assemblages. Multivariate ordination techniques and spatially explicit tools were used, namely cross-correlograms, Principal Coordinates of Neighbor Matrices (PCNM) and variation partitioning analyses. The relationship between the spatial organization of earthworm assemblages and soil environmental parameters revealed explicitly multi-scale responses. The soil environmental variables that explained nested population structures across the multi-spatial scale gradient differed for earthworms and assemblages at the very-fine- (30 m), fine (10-20 m) and very fine scales (<10 m). Variation partitioning analysis revealed that the soil environmental variability explained from less than 1% to as much as 48% of the observed earthworm spatial variation. A large proportion of the spatial variation did not depend on the soil environmental variability for certain species. This finding could indicate the influence of contagious biotic interactions, stochastic factors, or unmeasured relevant soil environmental variables.

  20. OBJECT-ORIENTED CHANGE DETECTION BASED ON MULTI-SCALE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The change detection of remote sensing images means analysing the change information quantitatively and recognizing the change types of the surface coverage data in different time phases. With the appearance of high resolution remote sensing image, object-oriented change detection method arises at this historic moment. In this paper, we research multi-scale approach for high resolution images, which includes multi-scale segmentation, multi-scale feature selection and multi-scale classification. Experimental results show that this method has a stronger advantage than the traditional single-scale method of high resolution remote sensing image change detection.

  1. Mixing in 3D Sparse Multi-Scale Grid Generated Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usama, Syed; Kopec, Jacek; Tellez, Jackson; Kwiatkowski, Kamil; Redondo, Jose; Malik, Nadeem

    2017-04-01

    Flat 2D fractal grids are known to alter turbulence characteristics downstream of the grid as compared to the regular grids with the same blockage ratio and the same mass inflow rates [1]. This has excited interest in the turbulence community for possible exploitation for enhanced mixing and related applications. Recently, a new 3D multi-scale grid design has been proposed [2] such that each generation of length scale of turbulence grid elements is held in its own frame, the overall effect is a 3D co-planar arrangement of grid elements. This produces a 'sparse' grid system whereby each generation of grid elements produces a turbulent wake pattern that interacts with the other wake patterns downstream. A critical motivation here is that the effective blockage ratio in the 3D Sparse Grid Turbulence (3DSGT) design is significantly lower than in the flat 2D counterpart - typically the blockage ratio could be reduced from say 20% in 2D down to 4% in the 3DSGT. If this idea can be realized in practice, it could potentially greatly enhance the efficiency of turbulent mixing and transfer processes clearly having many possible applications. Work has begun on the 3DSGT experimentally using Surface Flow Image Velocimetry (SFIV) [3] at the European facility in the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization located in Gottingen, Germany and also at the Technical University of Catalonia (UPC) in Spain, and numerically using Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) at King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals (KFUPM) in Saudi Arabia and in University of Warsaw in Poland. DNS is the most useful method to compare the experimental results with, and we are studying different types of codes such as Imcompact3d, and OpenFoam. Many variables will eventually be investigated for optimal mixing conditions. For example, the number of scale generations, the spacing between frames, the size ratio of grid elements, inflow conditions, etc. We will report upon the first set of findings

  2. Multi-scale nonlinear constitutive models using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hoan-Kee

    This study presents a new approach for nonlinear multi-scale constitutive models using artificial neural networks (ANNs). Three ANN classes are proposed to characterize the nonlinear multi-axial stress-strain behavior of metallic, polymeric, and fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) materials, respectively. Load-displacement responses from nanoindentation of metallic and polymeric materials are used to train new generation of dimensionless ANN models with different micro-structural properties as additional variables to the load-deflection. The proposed ANN models are effective in inverse-problems set to back-calculate in-situ material parameters from given overall nanoindentation test data with/without time-dependent material behavior. Towards that goal, nanoindentation tests have been performed for silicon (Si) substrate with/without a copper (Cu) film. Nanoindentation creep test data, available in the literature for Polycarbonate substrate, are used in these inverse problems. The predicted properties from the ANN models can also be used to calibrate classical constitutive parameters. The third class of ANN models is used to generate the effective multi-axial stress-strain behavior of FRP composites under plane-stress conditions. The training data are obtained from coupon tests performed in this study using off-axis tension/compression and pure shear tests for pultruded FRP E-glass/polyester composite systems. It is shown that the trained nonlinear ANN model can be directly coupled with finite-element (FE) formulation as a material model at the Gaussian integration points of each layered-shell element. This FE-ANN modeling approach is applied to simulate an FRP plate with an open-hole and compared with experimental results. Micromechanical nonlinear ANN models with damage formulation are also formulated and trained using simulated FE modeling of the periodic microstructure. These new multi-scale ANN constitutive models are effective and can be extended by including

  3. Multi-scale visual analysis of time-varying electrocorticography data via clustering of brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Sugeerth; Bouchard, Kristofer; Chang, Edward; Dougherty, Max; Hamann, Bernd; Weber, Gunther H

    2017-06-06

    There exists a need for effective and easy-to-use software tools supporting the analysis of complex Electrocorticography (ECoG) data. Understanding how epileptic seizures develop or identifying diagnostic indicators for neurological diseases require the in-depth analysis of neural activity data from ECoG. Such data is multi-scale and is of high spatio-temporal resolution. Comprehensive analysis of this data should be supported by interactive visual analysis methods that allow a scientist to understand functional patterns at varying levels of granularity and comprehend its time-varying behavior. We introduce a novel multi-scale visual analysis system, ECoG ClusterFlow, for the detailed exploration of ECoG data. Our system detects and visualizes dynamic high-level structures, such as communities, derived from the time-varying connectivity network. The system supports two major views: 1) an overview summarizing the evolution of clusters over time and 2) an electrode view using hierarchical glyph-based design to visualize the propagation of clusters in their spatial, anatomical context. We present case studies that were performed in collaboration with neuroscientists and neurosurgeons using simulated and recorded epileptic seizure data to demonstrate our system's effectiveness. ECoG ClusterFlow supports the comparison of spatio-temporal patterns for specific time intervals and allows a user to utilize various clustering algorithms. Neuroscientists can identify the site of seizure genesis and its spatial progression during various the stages of a seizure. Our system serves as a fast and powerful means for the generation of preliminary hypotheses that can be used as a basis for subsequent application of rigorous statistical methods, with the ultimate goal being the clinical treatment of epileptogenic zones.

  4. Proximity graphs based multi-scale image segmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skurikhin, Alexei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We present a novel multi-scale image segmentation approach based on irregular triangular and polygonal tessellations produced by proximity graphs. Our approach consists of two separate stages: polygonal seeds generation followed by an iterative bottom-up polygon agglomeration into larger chunks. We employ constrained Delaunay triangulation combined with the principles known from the visual perception to extract an initial ,irregular polygonal tessellation of the image. These initial polygons are built upon a triangular mesh composed of irregular sized triangles and their shapes are ad'apted to the image content. We then represent the image as a graph with vertices corresponding to the polygons and edges reflecting polygon relations. The segmentation problem is then formulated as Minimum Spanning Tree extraction. We build a successive fine-to-coarse hierarchy of irregular polygonal grids by an iterative graph contraction constructing Minimum Spanning Tree. The contraction uses local information and merges the polygons bottom-up based on local region-and edge-based characteristics.

  5. Multi-scale modeling of the CD8 immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarroux, Loic; Michel, Philippe; Adimy, Mostafa; Crauste, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    During the primary CD8 T-Cell immune response to an intracellular pathogen, CD8 T-Cells undergo exponential proliferation and continuous differentiation, acquiring cytotoxic capabilities to address the infection and memorize the corresponding antigen. After cleaning the organism, the only CD8 T-Cells left are antigen-specific memory cells whose role is to respond stronger and faster in case they are presented this very same antigen again. That is how vaccines work: a small quantity of a weakened pathogen is introduced in the organism to trigger the primary response, generating corresponding memory cells in the process, giving the organism a way to defend himself in case it encounters the same pathogen again. To investigate this process, we propose a non linear, multi-scale mathematical model of the CD8 T-Cells immune response due to vaccination using a maturity structured partial differential equation. At the intracellular scale, the level of expression of key proteins is modeled by a delay differential equation system, which gives the speeds of maturation for each cell. The population of cells is modeled by a maturity structured equation whose speeds are given by the intracellular model. We focus here on building the model, as well as its asymptotic study. Finally, we display numerical simulations showing the model can reproduce the biological dynamics of the cell population for both the primary response and the secondary responses.

  6. Multi-Scale Investigation of Sheared Flows In Magnetized Plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward, Jr., Thomas [Auburn Univ., Auburn, AL (United States)

    2014-09-19

    Flows parallel and perpendicular to magnetic fields in a plasma are important phenomena in many areas of plasma science research. The presence of these spatially inhomogeneous flows is often associated with the stability of the plasma. In fusion plasmas, these sheared flows can be stabilizing while in space plasmas, these sheared flows can be destabilizing. Because of this, there is broad interest in understanding the coupling between plasma stability and plasma flows. This research project has engaged in a study of the plasma response to spatially inhomogeneous plasma flows using three different experimental devices: the Auburn Linear Experiment for Instability Studies (ALEXIS) and the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH) stellarator devices at Auburn University, and the Space Plasma Simulation Chamber (SPSC) at the Naval Research Laboratory. This work has shown that there is a commonality of the plasma response to sheared flows across a wide range of plasma parameters and magnetic field geometries. The goal of this multi-device, multi-scale project is to understand how sheared flows established by the same underlying physical mechanisms lead to different plasma responses in fusion, laboratory, and space plasmas.

  7. Multi-scale Modeling of Chromosomal DNA in Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spakowitz, Andrew

    The organization and dynamics of chromosomal DNA play a pivotal role in a range of biological processes, including gene regulation, homologous recombination, replication, and segregation. Establishing a quantitative theoretical model of DNA organization and dynamics would be valuable in bridging the gap between the molecular-level packaging of DNA and genome-scale chromosomal processes. Our research group utilizes analytical theory and computational modeling to establish a predictive theoretical model of chromosomal organization and dynamics. In this talk, I will discuss our efforts to develop multi-scale polymer models of chromosomal DNA that are both sufficiently detailed to address specific protein-DNA interactions while capturing experimentally relevant time and length scales. I will demonstrate how these modeling efforts are capable of quantitatively capturing aspects of behavior of chromosomal DNA in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. This talk will illustrate that capturing dynamical behavior of chromosomal DNA at various length scales necessitates a range of theoretical treatments that accommodate the critical physical contributions that are relevant to in vivo behavior at these disparate length and time scales. National Science Foundation, Physics of Living Systems Program (PHY-1305516).

  8. Multi-scale modelling of uranyl chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Nghi; Duvail, Magali, E-mail: magali.duvail@icsm.fr; Villard, Arnaud; Dufrêche, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.dufreche@univ-montp2.fr [Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule (ICSM), UMR 5257, CEA-CNRS-Université Montpellier 2-ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, Bâtiment 426, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Molina, John Jairo [Fukui Institute for Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto University, Takano-Nishihiraki-cho 34-4, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8103 (Japan); Guilbaud, Philippe [CEA/DEN/DRCP/SMCS/LILA, Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France)

    2015-01-14

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations with explicit polarization have been successfully used to determine the structural and thermodynamic properties of binary aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride (UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}). Concentrated aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride have been studied to determine the hydration properties and the ion-ion interactions. The bond distances and the coordination number of the hydrated uranyl are in good agreement with available experimental data. Two stable positions of chloride in the second hydration shell of uranyl have been identified. The UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-Cl{sup −} association constants have also been calculated using a multi-scale approach. First, the ion-ion potential averaged over the solvent configurations at infinite dilution (McMillan-Mayer potential) was calculated to establish the dissociation/association processes of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-Cl{sup −} ion pairs in aqueous solution. Then, the association constant was calculated from this potential. The value we obtained for the association constant is in good agreement with the experimental result (K{sub UO{sub 2Cl{sup +}}} = 1.48 l mol{sup −1}), but the resulting activity coefficient appears to be too low at molar concentration.

  9. Probabilistic Simulation of Multi-Scale Composite Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamis, Christos C.

    2012-01-01

    A methodology is developed to computationally assess the non-deterministic composite response at all composite scales (from micro to structural) due to the uncertainties in the constituent (fiber and matrix) properties, in the fabrication process and in structural variables (primitive variables). The methodology is computationally efficient for simulating the probability distributions of composite behavior, such as material properties, laminate and structural responses. Bi-products of the methodology are probabilistic sensitivities of the composite primitive variables. The methodology has been implemented into the computer codes PICAN (Probabilistic Integrated Composite ANalyzer) and IPACS (Integrated Probabilistic Assessment of Composite Structures). The accuracy and efficiency of this methodology are demonstrated by simulating the uncertainties in composite typical laminates and comparing the results with the Monte Carlo simulation method. Available experimental data of composite laminate behavior at all scales fall within the scatters predicted by PICAN. Multi-scaling is extended to simulate probabilistic thermo-mechanical fatigue and to simulate the probabilistic design of a composite redome in order to illustrate its versatility. Results show that probabilistic fatigue can be simulated for different temperature amplitudes and for different cyclic stress magnitudes. Results also show that laminate configurations can be selected to increase the redome reliability by several orders of magnitude without increasing the laminate thickness--a unique feature of structural composites. The old reference denotes that nothing fundamental has been done since that time.

  10. Emergence of multi-scaling in fluid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzis, Diego; Yakhot, Victor

    2017-11-01

    We present new theoretical and numerical results on the transition to strong turbulence in an infinite fluid stirred by a Gaussian random force. The transition is defined as a first appearance of anomalous scaling of normalized moments of velocity derivatives (or dissipation rates) emerging from the low-Reynolds-number Gaussian background. It is shown that due to multi-scaling, strongly intermittent rare events can be quantitatively described in terms of an infinite number of different ``Reynolds numbers'' reflecting a multitude of anomalous scaling exponents. We found that anomalous scaling for high order moments emerges at very low Reynolds numbers implying that intense dissipative-range fluctuations are established at even lower Reynolds number than that required for an inertial range. Thus, our results suggest that information about inertial range dynamics can be obtained from dissipative scales even when the former does not exit. We discuss our further prediction that transition to fully anomalous turbulence disappears at Rλ < 3 . Support from NSF is acknowledged.

  11. Magnetic Multi-Scale Mapping to Characterize Anthropogenic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Maire, P.; Munschy, M.

    2017-12-01

    The discovery of buried anthropic objects on construction sites can cause delays and/or dangers for workers and for the public. Indeed, every year 500 tons of Unexploded-ordnance are discovered in France. Magnetic measurements are useful to localize magnetized objects. Moreover, it is the cheapest geophysical method which does not impact environment and which is relatively fast to perform. Fluxgate magnetometers (three components) are used to measure magnetic properties bellow the ground. These magnetic sensors are not absolute, so they need to be calibrated before the onset of the measurements. The advantage is that they allow magnetic compensation of the equipment attached to the sensor. So the choice of this kind sensor gives the opportunity to install the equipment aboard different magnetized supports: boat, quad bike, unmanned aerial vehicle, aircraft,... Indeed, this methodology permits to perform magnetic mapping with different scale and different elevation above ground level. An old French aerial military plant was chosen to perform this multi-scale approach. The advantage of the site is that it contains a lot of different targets with variable sizes and depth, e.g. buildings, unexploded-ordnances of the two world wars, trenches, pipes,… By comparison between the different magnetic anomaly maps at different elevations some of the geometric parameters of the magnetic sources can be characterized. The comparison between measured maps at different elevations and the prolonged map highlights the maximum distance for the target's detection (figure).

  12. Multi-scale elastic graph matching for face detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yasuomi D.; Kuriya, Yasutaka

    2013-12-01

    We propose a multi-scale elastic graph matching (MS-EGM) algorithm for face detection, in which the conventional EGM is improved with two simple image processing techniques of the Gabor wavelet-based pyramid and the weak Gabor feature elimination. It is expected to solve difficulties of the real-time process in the conventional EGM. The Gabor wavelet-based pyramid effectively reduces not only the computational cost of the Gabor filtering but also the computational complexity of feature representation of a model face, preserving the facial information. The elimination of the weak Gabor feature extracted from an input image facilitates an accuracy of the Gabor feature similarity computations as unexpected. We then test that the MS-EGM can be capable of rapid face detection processing while achieving a high correct detection rate, comparable to the AdaBoost Haar-like (HL) feature cascade. We also show that the MS-EGM has strong robustness to the image of a face occluded with sunglasses and scarfs because of topologically preserved feature representations.

  13. Multi-scale modeling of the CD8 immune response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbarroux, Loic, E-mail: loic.barbarroux@doctorant.ec-lyon.fr [Inria, Université de Lyon, UMR 5208, Institut Camille Jordan (France); Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Michel, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.michel@ec-lyon.fr [Inria, Université de Lyon, UMR 5208, Institut Camille Jordan (France); Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Adimy, Mostafa, E-mail: mostafa.adimy@inria.fr [Inria, Université de Lyon, UMR 5208, Université Lyon 1, Institut Camille Jordan, 43 Bd. du 11 novembre 1918, F-69200 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Crauste, Fabien, E-mail: crauste@math.univ-lyon1.fr [Inria, Université de Lyon, UMR 5208, Université Lyon 1, Institut Camille Jordan, 43 Bd. du 11 novembre 1918, F-69200 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2016-06-08

    During the primary CD8 T-Cell immune response to an intracellular pathogen, CD8 T-Cells undergo exponential proliferation and continuous differentiation, acquiring cytotoxic capabilities to address the infection and memorize the corresponding antigen. After cleaning the organism, the only CD8 T-Cells left are antigen-specific memory cells whose role is to respond stronger and faster in case they are presented this very same antigen again. That is how vaccines work: a small quantity of a weakened pathogen is introduced in the organism to trigger the primary response, generating corresponding memory cells in the process, giving the organism a way to defend himself in case it encounters the same pathogen again. To investigate this process, we propose a non linear, multi-scale mathematical model of the CD8 T-Cells immune response due to vaccination using a maturity structured partial differential equation. At the intracellular scale, the level of expression of key proteins is modeled by a delay differential equation system, which gives the speeds of maturation for each cell. The population of cells is modeled by a maturity structured equation whose speeds are given by the intracellular model. We focus here on building the model, as well as its asymptotic study. Finally, we display numerical simulations showing the model can reproduce the biological dynamics of the cell population for both the primary response and the secondary responses.

  14. Multi-scale analysis for random quantum systems with interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Chulaevsky, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The study of quantum disorder has generated considerable research activity in mathematics and physics over past 40 years. While single-particle models have been extensively studied at a rigorous mathematical level, little was known about systems of several interacting particles, let alone systems with positive spatial particle density. Creating a consistent theory of disorder in multi-particle quantum systems is an important and challenging problem that largely remains open. Multi-scale Analysis for Random Quantum Systems with Interaction  presents the progress that had been recently achieved in this area.   The main focus of the book is on a rigorous derivation of the multi-particle localization in a strong random external potential field. To make the presentation accessible to a wider audience, the authors restrict attention to a relatively simple tight-binding Anderson model on a cubic lattice Zd.   This book includes the following cutting-edge features: * an introduction to the state-of-the-art single-...

  15. Multi-scale Modelling of the Ocean Beneath Ice Shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, A. S.; Kimura, S.; Holland, P.; Kramer, S. C.; Piggott, M. D.; Jenkins, A.; Pain, C. C.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative prediction of future sea-level is currently limited because we lack an understanding of how the mass balance of the Earth's great ice sheets respond to and influence the climate. Understanding the behaviour of the ocean beneath an ice shelf and its interaction with the sheet above presents a great scientific challenge. A solid ice cover, in many places kilometres thick, bars access to the water column, so that observational data can only be obtained by drilling holes through, or launching autonomous vehicles beneath, the ice. In the absence of a comprehensive observational database, numerical modelling can be a key tool to advancing our understanding of the sub-ice-shelf regime. While we have a reasonable understanding of the overall ocean circulation and basic sensitivities, there remain critical processes that are difficult or impossible to represent in current operational models. Resolving these features adequately within a domain that includes the entire ice shelf and continental shelf to the north can be difficult with a structured horizontal resolution. It is currently impossible to adequately represent the key grounding line region, where the water column thickness reduces to zero, with a structured vertical grid. In addition, fronts and pycnoclines, the ice front geometry, shelf basal irregularities and modelling surface pressure all prove difficult in current approaches. The Fluidity-ICOM model (Piggott et al. 2008, doi:10.1002/fld.1663) simulates non-hydrostatic dynamics on meshes that can be unstructured in all three dimensions and uses anisotropic adaptive resolution which optimises the mesh and calculation in response to evolving solution dynamics. These features give it the flexibility required to tackle the challenges outlined above and the opportunity to develop a model that can improve understanding of the physical processes occurring under ice shelves. The approaches taken to develop a multi-scale model of ice shelf ocean cavity

  16. Multi-scale characterization of nanostructured sodium aluminum hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    NaraseGowda, Shathabish

    Complex metal hydrides are the most promising candidate materials for onboard hydrogen storage. The practicality of this class of materials is counter-poised on three critical attributes: reversible hydrogen storage capacity, high hydrogen uptake/release kinetics, and favorable hydrogen uptake/release thermodynamics. While a majority of modern metallic hydrides that are being considered are those that meet the criteria of high theoretical storage capacity, the challenges lie in addressing poor kinetics, thermodynamics, and reversibility. One emerging strategy to resolve these issues is via nanostructuring or nano-confinement of complex hydrides. By down-sizing and scaffolding them to retain their nano-dimensions, these materials are expected to improve in performance and reversibility. This area of research has garnered immense interest lately and there is active research being pursued to address various aspects of nanostructured complex hydrides. The research effort documented here is focused on a detailed investigation of the effects of nano-confinement on aspects such as the long range atomic hydrogen diffusivities, localized hydrogen dynamics, microstructure, and dehydrogenation mechanism of sodium alanate. A wide variety of microporous and mesoporous materials (metal organic frameworks, porous silica and alumina) were investigated as scaffolds and the synthesis routes to achieve maximum pore-loading are discussed. Wet solution infiltration technique was adopted using tetrahydrofuran as the medium and the precursor concentrations were found to have a major role in achieving maximum pore loading. These concentrations were optimized for each scaffold with varying pore sizes and confinement was quantitatively characterized by measuring the loss in specific surface area. This work is also aimed at utilizing neutron and synchrotron x-ray characterization techniques to study and correlate multi-scale material properties and phenomena. Some of the most advanced

  17. Bridging the PSI Knowledge Gap: A Multi-Scale Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2015-01-08

    Plasma-surface interactions (PSI) pose an immense scientific hurdle in magnetic confinement fusion and our present understanding of PSI in confinement environments is highly inadequate; indeed, a recent Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee report found that 4 out of the 5 top five fusion knowledge gaps were related to PSI. The time is appropriate to develop a concentrated and synergistic science effort that would expand, exploit and integrate the wealth of laboratory ion-beam and plasma research, as well as exciting new computational tools, towards the goal of bridging the PSI knowledge gap. This effort would broadly advance plasma and material sciences, while providing critical knowledge towards progress in fusion PSI. This project involves the development of a Science Center focused on a new approach to PSI science; an approach that both exploits access to state-of-the-art PSI experiments and modeling, as well as confinement devices. The organizing principle is to develop synergistic experimental and modeling tools that treat the truly coupled multi-scale aspect of the PSI issues in confinement devices. This is motivated by the simple observation that while typical lab experiments and models allow independent manipulation of controlling variables, the confinement PSI environment is essentially self-determined with few outside controls. This means that processes that may be treated independently in laboratory experiments, because they involve vastly different physical and time scales, will now affect one another in the confinement environment. Also, lab experiments cannot simultaneously match all exposure conditions found in confinement devices typically forcing a linear extrapolation of lab results. At the same time programmatic limitations prevent confinement experiments alone from answering many key PSI questions. The resolution to this problem is to usefully exploit access to PSI science in lab devices, while retooling our thinking from a linear and de

  18. Use of ARM Data to address the Climate Change Further Development and Applications of A Multi-scale Modeling Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Randall; Marat Khairoutdinov

    2007-12-14

    The Colorado State University (CSU) Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) is a new type of general circulation model (GCM) that replaces the conventional parameterizations of convection, clouds and boundary layer with a cloud-resolving model (CRM) embedded into each grid column. The MMF that we have been working with is a “super-parameterized” version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). As reported in the publications listed below, we have done extensive work with the model. We have explored the MMF’s performance in several studies, including an AMIP run and a CAPT test, and we have applied the MMF to an analysis of climate sensitivity.

  19. Multi-scale Modeling of Plasticity in Tantalum.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carroll, Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Buchheit, Thomas E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boyce, Brad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weinberger, Christopher [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we present a multi-scale computational model to simulate plastic deformation of tantalum and validating experiments. In atomistic/ dislocation level, dislocation kink- pair theory is used to formulate temperature and strain rate dependent constitutive equations. The kink-pair theory is calibrated to available data from single crystal experiments to produce accurate and convenient constitutive laws. The model is then implemented into a BCC crystal plasticity finite element method (CP-FEM) model to predict temperature and strain rate dependent yield stresses of single and polycrystalline tantalum and compared with existing experimental data from the literature. Furthermore, classical continuum constitutive models describing temperature and strain rate dependent flow behaviors are fit to the yield stresses obtained from the CP-FEM polycrystal predictions. The model is then used to conduct hydro- dynamic simulations of Taylor cylinder impact test and compared with experiments. In order to validate the proposed tantalum CP-FEM model with experiments, we introduce a method for quantitative comparison of CP-FEM models with various experimental techniques. To mitigate the effects of unknown subsurface microstructure, tantalum tensile specimens with a pseudo-two-dimensional grain structure and grain sizes on the order of millimeters are used. A technique combining an electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) and high resolution digital image correlation (HR-DIC) is used to measure the texture and sub-grain strain fields upon uniaxial tensile loading at various applied strains. Deformed specimens are also analyzed with optical profilometry measurements to obtain out-of- plane strain fields. These high resolution measurements are directly compared with large-scale CP-FEM predictions. This computational method directly links fundamental dislocation physics to plastic deformations in the grain-scale and to the engineering-scale applications. Furthermore, direct

  20. Multi-Scale Initial Conditions For Cosmological Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Oliver; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ZAH, Heidelberg /HITS, Heidelberg

    2011-11-04

    We discuss a new algorithm to generate multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological 'zoom-in' simulations. The method uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). The new algorithm achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10{sup -4} for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier-space-induced interference ringing. An optional hybrid multi-grid and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based scheme is introduced which has identical Fourier-space behaviour as traditional approaches. Using a suite of re-simulations of a galaxy cluster halo our real-space-based approach is found to reproduce correlation functions, density profiles, key halo properties and subhalo abundances with per cent level accuracy. Finally, we generalize our approach for two-component baryon and dark-matter simulations and demonstrate that the power spectrum evolution is in excellent agreement with linear perturbation theory. For initial baryon density fields, it is suggested to use the local Lagrangian approximation in order to generate a density field for mesh-based codes that is consistent with the Lagrangian perturbation theory instead of the current practice of using the Eulerian linearly scaled densities.

  1. Modeling of Multi-Scale Channeling Phenomena in Porous Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räss, Ludovic; Omlin, Samuel; Yarushina, Viktoriya; Simon, Nina; Podladchikov, Yuri

    2015-04-01

    Predictive modeling of fluid percolation through tight porous rocks is critical to evaluate environmental risks associated with waste storage and reservoir operations. To understand the evolution of two-phase mixtures of fluid and solid it is insufficient to only combine single-phase fluid flow methods and solid mechanics. A proper coupling of these two different multi-scales physical processes is required to describe the complex evolution of permeability and porosity in space and in time. We conduct numerical modeling experiments in geometrically simple but physically complex systems of stressed rocks containing self-focusing porous flow. Our model is physically and thermodynamically consistent and describes the formation and evolution of fluid pathways. The model consists of a system of coupled equations describing poro-elasto-viscous deformation and flow. Nonlinearity of the solid rheology is also taken into account. We have developed a numerical application based on an iterative finite difference scheme that runs on mutli-GPUs cluster in parallel. In order to validate these models, we consider the largest CO2 sequestration project in operation at the Sleipner field in the Norwegian North Sea. Attempts to match the observations at Sleipner using conventional reservoir simulations fail to capture first order observations, such as the seemingly effortless vertical flow of CO2 through low permeability shale layers and the formation of focused flow channels or chimneys. Conducted high-resolution three-dimensional numerical simulations predict the formation of dynamically evolving high porosity and permeability pathways as a natural outcome of porous flow nonlinearly coupled with rock deformation, which may trigger leakage through low permeability barriers.

  2. Multi-scale surface-groundwater interactions: Processes and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packman, A. I.; Harvey, J. W.; Worman, A.; Cardenas, M. B.; Schumer, R.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Tank, J. L.; Stonedahl, S. H.

    2009-05-01

    Site-based investigations of stream-subsurface interactions normally focus on a limited range of spatial scales - typically either very shallow subsurface flows in the hyporheic zone, or much larger scale surface- groundwater interactions - but subsurface flows are linked across this entire continuum. Broad, multi-scale surface-groundwater interactions produce complex patterns in porewater flows, and interfacial fluxes do not average in a simple fashion because of the competitive effects of flows induced at different scales. For example, reach-scale stream-groundwater interactions produce sequences of gaining and losing reaches that can either suppress or enhance local-scale hyporheic exchange. Many individual topographic features also produce long power-law tails in surface residence time distributions, and the duration of these tails is greatly extended by interactions over a wide range of spatial scales. Simultaneous sediment transport and landscape evolution further complicates the analysis of porewater flow dynamics in rivers. Finally, inhomogeneity in important biogeochemical processes, particularly microbial processes that are stimulated near the sediment- water interface, leads to a great degree of non-linearity in chemical transformation rates in stream channels. This high degree of complexity in fluvial systems requires that careful approaches be used to extend local observations of hyporheic exchange and associated nutrient, carbon, and contaminant transformations to larger spatial scales. It is important to recognize that conventional advection-dispersion models are not expected to apply, and instead anomalous transport models must be used. Unfortunately, no generally applicable model is available for stream-groundwater interactions at the present time. Alternative approaches for modeling conservative and reactive transport will be discussed, and a strategy articulated for coping with the complexity of coupled surface-subsurface dynamics in fluvial

  3. Multi-scale initial conditions for cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Oliver; Abel, Tom

    2011-08-01

    We discuss a new algorithm to generate multi-scale initial conditions with multiple levels of refinements for cosmological 'zoom-in' simulations. The method uses an adaptive convolution of Gaussian white noise with a real-space transfer function kernel together with an adaptive multi-grid Poisson solver to generate displacements and velocities following first- (1LPT) or second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory (2LPT). The new algorithm achieves rms relative errors of the order of 10-4 for displacements and velocities in the refinement region and thus improves in terms of errors by about two orders of magnitude over previous approaches. In addition, errors are localized at coarse-fine boundaries and do not suffer from Fourier-space-induced interference ringing. An optional hybrid multi-grid and Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) based scheme is introduced which has identical Fourier-space behaviour as traditional approaches. Using a suite of re-simulations of a galaxy cluster halo our real-space-based approach is found to reproduce correlation functions, density profiles, key halo properties and subhalo abundances with per cent level accuracy. Finally, we generalize our approach for two-component baryon and dark-matter simulations and demonstrate that the power spectrum evolution is in excellent agreement with linear perturbation theory. For initial baryon density fields, it is suggested to use the local Lagrangian approximation in order to generate a density field for mesh-based codes that is consistent with the Lagrangian perturbation theory instead of the current practice of using the Eulerian linearly scaled densities.

  4. Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

    2014-01-16

    -part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transfer—its rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long “tailing” behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to

  5. Multi-scale evolution of a derecho-producing MCS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardet, Ligia Ribeiro

    1997-12-01

    In this dissertation we address one type of severe weather: strong straight-line winds. In particular, we focus on derechos, a type of wind storm caused by a convective system and characterized by its long duration and by the large area it covers. One interesting characteristic of these storms is that they develop at night, on the cold side of a thermal boundary. This region is not characterized by large convective instability. In fact, surface parcels are generally stable with respect to vertical displacements. To gain understanding of the physical processes involved in these storms, we focused on the case of a MCS that developed in eastern Colorado on 12-13 May, 1985. The system formed in the afternoon, was active until early morning, and caused strong winds during the night. A multi-scale full physics simulation of this case was performed using a non-hydrostatic mesoscale model. Four telescopically nested grids covering from the synoptic scale down to cloud scale circulations were used. A Lagrangian model was used to follow trajectories of parcels that took part in the updraft and in the downdraft, and balance of forces were computed along the trajectories. Our results show that the synoptic and mesoscale environment of the storm largely influences convective organization and cloud-scale circulations. During the day, when the boundary layer is well mixed, the source of air for the clouds is located within the boundary layer. At night, when the boundary layer becomes stable, the source of air shifts to the top of the boundary layer. It is composed of warm, moist air that is brought by the nocturnal low-level jet. The downdraft structure also changes from day to night. During the day, parcels acquire negative buoyancy because of cooling due to evaporation and melting. As they sink, they remain colder than the environment, and end up at the surface constituting the cold pool. During the night, downdrafts are stronger, generating the strong surface winds. The most

  6. EPOS Multi-Scale Laboratory platform: a long-term reference tool for experimental Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippanera, Daniele; Tesei, Telemaco; Funiciello, Francesca; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Rosenau, Matthias; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Lange, Otto; Calignano, Elisa; Spiers, Chris; Drury, Martin; Willingshofer, Ernst; Winkler, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    With continuous progress on scientific research, a large amount of datasets has been and will be produced. The data access and sharing along with their storage and homogenization within a unique and coherent framework is a new challenge for the whole scientific community. This is particularly emphasized for geo-scientific laboratories, encompassing the most diverse Earth Science disciplines and typology of data. To this aim the "Multiscale Laboratories" Work Package (WP16), operating in the framework of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS), is developing a virtual platform of geo-scientific data and services for the worldwide community of laboratories. This long-term project aims at merging the top class multidisciplinary laboratories in Geoscience into a coherent and collaborative network, facilitating the standardization of virtual access to data, data products and software. This will help our community to evolve beyond the stage in which most of data produced by the different laboratories are available only within the related scholarly publications (often as print-version only) or they remain unpublished and inaccessible on local devices. The EPOS multi-scale laboratory platform will provide the possibility to easily share and discover data by means of open access, DOI-referenced, online data publication including long-term storage, managing and curation services and to set up a cohesive community of laboratories. The WP16 is starting with three pilot cases laboratories: (1) rock physics, (2) palaeomagnetic, and (3) analogue modelling. As a proof of concept, first analogue modelling datasets have been published via GFZ Data Services (http://doidb.wdc-terra.org/search/public/ui?&sort=updated+desc&q=epos). The datasets include rock analogue material properties (e.g. friction data, rheology data, SEM imagery), as well as supplementary figures, images and movies from experiments on tectonic processes. A metadata catalogue tailored to the specific communities

  7. Single Image Super-Resolution Based on Multi-Scale Competitive Convolutional Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiaofeng; Qu, Xiaobo; He, Yifan; Guo, Di

    2018-03-06

    Deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) are successful in single-image super-resolution. Traditional CNNs are limited to exploit multi-scale contextual information for image reconstruction due to the fixed convolutional kernel in their building modules. To restore various scales of image details, we enhance the multi-scale inference capability of CNNs by introducing competition among multi-scale convolutional filters, and build up a shallow network under limited computational resources. The proposed network has the following two advantages: (1) the multi-scale convolutional kernel provides the multi-context for image super-resolution, and (2) the maximum competitive strategy adaptively chooses the optimal scale of information for image reconstruction. Our experimental results on image super-resolution show that the performance of the proposed network outperforms the state-of-the-art methods.

  8. Heat and mass transfer intensification and shape optimization a multi-scale approach

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Is the heat and mass transfer intensification defined as a new paradigm of process engineering, or is it just a common and old idea, renamed and given the current taste? Where might intensification occur? How to achieve intensification? How the shape optimization of thermal and fluidic devices leads to intensified heat and mass transfers? To answer these questions, Heat & Mass Transfer Intensification and Shape Optimization: A Multi-scale Approach clarifies  the definition of the intensification by highlighting the potential role of the multi-scale structures, the specific interfacial area, the distribution of driving force, the modes of energy supply and the temporal aspects of processes.   A reflection on the methods of process intensification or heat and mass transfer enhancement in multi-scale structures is provided, including porous media, heat exchangers, fluid distributors, mixers and reactors. A multi-scale approach to achieve intensification and shape optimization is developed and clearly expla...

  9. New multi-scale perspectives on the stromatolites of Shark Bay, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suosaari, E. P.; Reid, R. P.; Playford, P. E.; Foster, J. S.; Stolz, J. F.; Casaburi, G.; Hagan, P. D.; Chirayath, V.; MacIntyre, I. G.; Planavsky, N. J.; Eberli, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    A recent field-intensive program in Shark Bay, Western Australia provides new multi-scale perspectives on the world’s most extensive modern stromatolite system. Mapping revealed a unique geographic distribution of morphologically distinct stromatolite structures, many of them previously undocumented. These distinctive structures combined with characteristic shelf physiography define eight ‘Stromatolite Provinces’. Morphological and molecular studies of microbial mat composition resulted in a revised growth model where coccoid cyanobacteria predominate in mat communities forming lithified discrete stromatolite buildups. This contradicts traditional views that stromatolites with the best lamination in Hamelin Pool are formed by filamentous cyanobacterial mats. Finally, analysis of internal fabrics of stromatolites revealed pervasive precipitation of microcrystalline carbonate (i.e. micrite) in microbial mats forming framework and cement that may be analogous to the micritic microstructures typical of Precambrian stromatolites. These discoveries represent fundamental advances in our knowledge of the Shark Bay microbial system, laying a foundation for detailed studies of stromatolite morphogenesis that will advance our understanding of benthic ecosystems on the early Earth.

  10. Multi-scale modelling of rubber-like materials and soft tissues: an appraisal

    OpenAIRE

    Puglisi, G.; Saccomandi, G.

    2016-01-01

    We survey, in a partial way, multi-scale approaches for the modelling of rubber-like and soft tissues and compare them with classical macroscopic phenomenological models. Our aim is to show how it is possible to obtain practical mathematical models for the mechanical behaviour of these materials incorporating mesoscopic (network scale) information. Multi-scale approaches are crucial for the theoretical comprehension and prediction of the complex mechanical response of these materials. Moreove...

  11. EPOS-WP16: A coherent and collaborative network of Solid Earth Multi-scale laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calignano, Elisa; Rosenau, Matthias; Lange, Otto; Spiers, Chris; Willingshofer, Ernst; Drury, Martyn; van Kan-Parker, Mirjam; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Funiciello, Francesca; Trippanera, Daniele; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Tesei, Telemaco; Winkler, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    Laboratory facilities are an integral part of Earth Science research. The diversity of methods employed in such infrastructures reflects the multi-scale nature of the Earth system and is essential for the understanding of its evolution, for the assessment of geo-hazards and for the sustainable exploitation of geo-resources. In the frame of EPOS (European Plate Observing System), the Working Package 16 represents a developing community of European Geoscience Multi-scale laboratories. The participant and collaborating institutions (Utrecht University, GFZ, RomaTre University, INGV, NERC, CSIC-ICTJA, CNRS, LMU, C4G-UBI, ETH, CNR*) embody several types of laboratory infrastructures, engaged in different fields of interest of Earth Science: from high temperature and pressure experimental facilities, to electron microscopy, micro-beam analysis, analogue tectonic and geodynamic modelling and paleomagnetic laboratories. The length scales encompassed by these infrastructures range from the nano- and micrometre levels (electron microscopy and micro-beam analysis) to the scale of experiments on centimetres-sized samples, and to analogue model experiments simulating the reservoir scale, the basin scale and the plate scale. The aim of WP16 is to provide two services by the year 2019: first, providing virtual access to data from laboratories (data service) and, second, providing physical access to laboratories (transnational access, TNA). Regarding the development of a data service, the current status is such that most data produced by the various laboratory centres and networks are available only in limited "final form" in publications, many data remain inaccessible and/or poorly preserved. Within EPOS the TCS Multi-scale laboratories is collecting and harmonizing available and emerging laboratory data on the properties and process controlling rock system behaviour at all relevant scales, in order to generate products accessible and interoperable through services for supporting

  12. Chinese Medical Question Answer Matching Using End-to-End Character-Level Multi-Scale CNNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Zhang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses mainly on the problem of Chinese medical question answer matching, which is arguably more challenging than open-domain question answer matching in English due to the combination of its domain-restricted nature and the language-specific features of Chinese. We present an end-to-end character-level multi-scale convolutional neural framework in which character embeddings instead of word embeddings are used to avoid Chinese word segmentation in text preprocessing, and multi-scale convolutional neural networks (CNNs are then introduced to extract contextual information from either question or answer sentences over different scales. The proposed framework can be trained with minimal human supervision and does not require any handcrafted features, rule-based patterns, or external resources. To validate our framework, we create a new text corpus, named cMedQA, by harvesting questions and answers from an online Chinese health and wellness community. The experimental results on the cMedQA dataset show that our framework significantly outperforms several strong baselines, and achieves an improvement of top-1 accuracy by up to 19%.

  13. A Multi-scale Approach to Urban Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluch, Renne; Quattrochi, Dale A.

    2005-01-01

    An environmental consequence of urbanization is the urban heat island effect, a situation where urban areas are warmer than surrounding rural areas. The urban heat island phenomenon results from the replacement of natural landscapes with impervious surfaces such as concrete and asphalt and is linked to adverse economic and environmental impacts. In order to better understand the urban microclimate, a greater understanding of the urban thermal pattern (UTP), including an analysis of the thermal properties of individual land covers, is needed. This study examines the UTP by means of thermal land cover response for the Salt Lake City, Utah, study area at two scales: 1) the community level, and 2) the regional or valleywide level. Airborne ATLAS (Advanced Thermal Land Applications Sensor) data, a high spatial resolution (10-meter) dataset appropriate for an environment containing a concentration of diverse land covers, are used for both land cover and thermal analysis at the community level. The ATLAS data consist of 15 channels covering the visible, near-IR, mid-IR and thermal-IR wavelengths. At the regional level Landsat TM data are used for land cover analysis while the ATLAS channel 13 data are used for the thermal analysis. Results show that a heat island is evident at both the community and the valleywide level where there is an abundance of impervious surfaces. ATLAS data perform well in community level studies in terms of land cover and thermal exchanges, but other, more coarse-resolution data sets are more appropriate for large-area thermal studies. Thermal response per land cover is consistent at both levels, which suggests potential for urban climate modeling at multiple scales.

  14. Implementation of Grid-computing Framework for Simulation in Multi-scale Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Data Iranata

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A new grid-computing framework for simulation in multi-scale structural analysis is presented. Two levels of parallel processing will be involved in this framework: multiple local distributed computing environments connected by local network to form a grid-based cluster-to-cluster distributed computing environment. To successfully perform the simulation, a large-scale structural system task is decomposed into the simulations of a simplified global model and several detailed component models using various scales. These correlated multi-scale structural system tasks are distributed among clusters and connected together in a multi-level hierarchy and then coordinated over the internet. The software framework for supporting the multi-scale structural simulation approach is also presented. The program architecture design allows the integration of several multi-scale models as clients and servers under a single platform. To check its feasibility, a prototype software system has been designed and implemented to perform the proposed concept. The simulation results show that the software framework can increase the speedup performance of the structural analysis. Based on this result, the proposed grid-computing framework is suitable to perform the simulation of the multi-scale structural analysis.

  15. Multi-scale surface topography to minimize adherence and viability of nosocomial drug-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Jafar; Jain, Shubham; Padmarajan, Rinsha; Purighalla, Swathi; Sambandamurthy, Vasan K; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2018-02-15

    Toward minimizing bacterial colonization of surfaces, we present a one-step etching technique that renders aluminum alloys with micro- and nano-scale roughness. Such a multi-scale surface topography exhibited enhanced antibacterial effect against a wide range of pathogens. Multi-scale topography of commercially grade pure aluminum killed 97% of Escherichia coli and 28% of Staphylococcus aureus cells in comparison to 7% and 3%, respectively, on the smooth surfaces. Multi-scale topography on Al 5052 surface was shown to kill 94% of adhered E . coli cells. The microscale features on the etched Al 1200 alloy were not found to be significantly bactericidal, but shown to decrease the adherence of S . aureus cells by one-third. The fabrication method is easily scalable for industrial applications. Analysis of roughness parameters determined by atomic force microscopy revealed a set of significant parameters that can yield a highly bactericidal surface; thereby providing the design to make any surface bactericidal irrespective of the method of fabrication. The multi-scale roughness of Al 5052 alloy was also highly bactericidal to nosocomial isolates of E . coli , K . pneumoniae and P . aeruginosa . We envisage the potential application of engineered surfaces with multi-scale topography to minimize the spread of nosocomial infections.

  16. A Multi-Scale Energy Food Systems Modeling Framework For Climate Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, S.; Bakker, C.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Hobbs, B. F.; Broaddus, E.; Neff, R.; Haskett, J.; Parker, C.

    2016-12-01

    Our goal is to understand coupled system dynamics across scales in a manner that allows us to quantify the sensitivity of critical human outcomes (nutritional satisfaction, household economic well-being) to development strategies and to climate or market induced shocks in sub-Saharan Africa. We adopt both bottom-up and top-down multi-scale modeling approaches focusing our efforts on food, energy, water (FEW) dynamics to define, parameterize, and evaluate modeled processes nationally as well as across climate zones and communities. Our framework comprises three complementary modeling techniques spanning local, sub-national and national scales to capture interdependencies between sectors, across time scales, and on multiple levels of geographic aggregation. At the center is a multi-player micro-economic (MME) partial equilibrium model for the production, consumption, storage, and transportation of food, energy, and fuels, which is the focus of this presentation. We show why such models can be very useful for linking and integrating across time and spatial scales, as well as a wide variety of models including an agent-based model applied to rural villages and larger population centers, an optimization-based electricity infrastructure model at a regional scale, and a computable general equilibrium model, which is applied to understand FEW resources and economic patterns at national scale. The MME is based on aggregating individual optimization problems for relevant players in an energy, electricity, or food market and captures important food supply chain components of trade and food distribution accounting for infrastructure and geography. Second, our model considers food access and utilization by modeling food waste and disaggregating consumption by income and age. Third, the model is set up to evaluate the effects of seasonality and system shocks on supply, demand, infrastructure, and transportation in both energy and food.

  17. Flows in polymers, reinforced polymers and composites a multi-scale approach

    CERN Document Server

    Binetruy, Christophe; Keunings, Roland

    2015-01-01

    This book gives a detailed and practical introduction to complex flows of polymers and reinforced polymers as well as the flow of simple fluids in complex microstructures. Over the last decades, an increasing number of functional and structural parts, made so far with metals, has been progressively reengineered by replacing metallic materials by polymers, reinforced polymers and composites. The motivation for this substitution may be the weight reduction, the simpler, cheaper or faster forming process, or the ability to exploit additional functionalities. The present Brief surveys modern developments related to the multi-scale modeling and simulation of polymers, reinforced polymers, that involve a flowing microstructure and continuous fiber-reinforced composites, wherein the fluid flows inside a nearly stationary multi-scale microstructure. These developments concern both multi-scale modeling, defining bridges between the micro and macro scales - with special emphasis on the mesoscopic scale at which kinetic...

  18. Correlations of stock price fluctuations under multi-scale and multi-threshold scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Guo; Li, Huajiao; Feng, Sida; Liu, Xueyong; Jiang, Meihui

    2018-01-01

    The multi-scale method is widely used in analyzing time series of financial markets and it can provide market information for different economic entities who focus on different periods. Through constructing multi-scale networks of price fluctuation correlation in the stock market, we can detect the topological relationship between each time series. Previous research has not addressed the problem that the original fluctuation correlation networks are fully connected networks and more information exists within these networks that is currently being utilized. Here we use listed coal companies as a case study. First, we decompose the original stock price fluctuation series into different time scales. Second, we construct the stock price fluctuation correlation networks at different time scales. Third, we delete the edges of the network based on thresholds and analyze the network indicators. Through combining the multi-scale method with the multi-threshold method, we bring to light the implicit information of fully connected networks.

  19. Multi-scale filling simulation of micro-injection molding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Joo; Kim, Sun Kyoung

    2011-01-01

    This work proposes a multi-scale simulation method that can simulate filling during the micro-injection molding process. The multiscale simulation is comprised of two steps. In the first step, the macro-scale flow is analyzed using the conventional method. In the second step, the micro-scale simulation is conducted taking the slip and surface tension into consideration to investigate the filling of microcavity. Moreover, a conservative level set method is employed to accurately track the flow front. First, numerical tests have been done for circular micro-channels. The results show that slip and surface tension play important roles in the micro-regime. Second, to verify the multi-scale method, filling of a thin plate with micro-channel patterns has been simulated. The results show that the proposed multi-scale method is promising for micro-injection molding simulations

  20. Multi-scale and multi-domain computational astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elteren, Arjen; Pelupessy, Inti; Zwart, Simon Portegies

    2014-08-06

    Astronomical phenomena are governed by processes on all spatial and temporal scales, ranging from days to the age of the Universe (13.8 Gyr) as well as from kilometre size up to the size of the Universe. This enormous range in scales is contrived, but as long as there is a physical connection between the smallest and largest scales it is important to be able to resolve them all, and for the study of many astronomical phenomena this governance is present. Although covering all these scales is a challenge for numerical modellers, the most challenging aspect is the equally broad and complex range in physics, and the way in which these processes propagate through all scales. In our recent effort to cover all scales and all relevant physical processes on these scales, we have designed the Astrophysics Multipurpose Software Environment (AMUSE). AMUSE is a Python-based framework with production quality community codes and provides a specialized environment to connect this plethora of solvers to a homogeneous problem-solving environment. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Multi-scale modelling of rubber-like materials and soft tissues: an appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puglisi, G.

    2016-01-01

    We survey, in a partial way, multi-scale approaches for the modelling of rubber-like and soft tissues and compare them with classical macroscopic phenomenological models. Our aim is to show how it is possible to obtain practical mathematical models for the mechanical behaviour of these materials incorporating mesoscopic (network scale) information. Multi-scale approaches are crucial for the theoretical comprehension and prediction of the complex mechanical response of these materials. Moreover, such models are fundamental in the perspective of the design, through manipulation at the micro- and nano-scales, of new polymeric and bioinspired materials with exceptional macroscopic properties. PMID:27118927

  2. Biomimic design of multi-scale fabric with efficient heat transfer property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wool fiber has a complex hierarchic structure. The multi-scale fibrils are assembled to form a tree-like channel net in wool fiber, providing an efficient heat transfer property. The optimal inner configuration of wool fiber can also be invited to biomimic design of textile fabrics to improve the thermal comfort of cloth. A heat transfer model of biomimic multi-scale fabric using the fractal derivative is established. Theoretical analysis indicates that the heat flux efficiency in the biomimic fabric can be 2 orders of magnitude comparing with that of the continuous medium.

  3. Patterns and multi-scale drivers of phytoplankton species richness in temperate peri-urban lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catherine, Arnaud, E-mail: arnocat@mnhn.fr [UMR7245 MCAM MNHN-CNRS, Muséum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CC 39, 12 rue Buffon, F-75231 Paris, Cedex 05 (France); Selma, Maloufi, E-mail: maloufi@mnhn.fr [UMR7245 MCAM MNHN-CNRS, Muséum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CC 39, 12 rue Buffon, F-75231 Paris, Cedex 05 (France); Mouillot, David, E-mail: david.mouillot@univ-montp2.fr [UMR 9190 MARBEC UM2-CNRS-IRD-UM1-IFREMER, CC 93, Place Eugène Bataillon, Université de Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Troussellier, Marc, E-mail: troussel@univ-montp2.fr [UMR 9190 MARBEC UM2-CNRS-IRD-UM1-IFREMER, CC 93, Place Eugène Bataillon, Université de Montpellier 2, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Bernard, Cécile, E-mail: cbernard@mnhn.fr [UMR7245 MCAM MNHN-CNRS, Muséum National d' Histoire Naturelle, CC 39, 12 rue Buffon, F-75231 Paris, Cedex 05 (France)

    2016-07-15

    species richness in temperate lakes. This approach may prove useful and cost-effective for the management and conservation of aquatic ecosystems. - Highlights: • We studied phytoplankton communities in 50 peri-urban lakes. • We assessed the impact of multi-scale drivers of phytoplankton richness. • Local- and catchment-scale predictive models performed similarly. • Seasonal temperature variation and resource availability strongly modulate species richness. • This approach may be used for the management and conservation of aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Advanced computational workflow for the multi-scale modeling of the bone metabolic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Tien Tuan

    2017-06-01

    Multi-scale modeling of the musculoskeletal system plays an essential role in the deep understanding of complex mechanisms underlying the biological phenomena and processes such as bone metabolic processes. Current multi-scale models suffer from the isolation of sub-models at each anatomical scale. The objective of this present work was to develop a new fully integrated computational workflow for simulating bone metabolic processes at multi-scale levels. Organ-level model employs multi-body dynamics to estimate body boundary and loading conditions from body kinematics. Tissue-level model uses finite element method to estimate the tissue deformation and mechanical loading under body loading conditions. Finally, cell-level model includes bone remodeling mechanism through an agent-based simulation under tissue loading. A case study on the bone remodeling process located on the human jaw was performed and presented. The developed multi-scale model of the human jaw was validated using the literature-based data at each anatomical level. Simulation outcomes fall within the literature-based ranges of values for estimated muscle force, tissue loading and cell dynamics during bone remodeling process. This study opens perspectives for accurately simulating bone metabolic processes using a fully integrated computational workflow leading to a better understanding of the musculoskeletal system function from multiple length scales as well as to provide new informative data for clinical decision support and industrial applications.

  5. A rate-dependent multi-scale crack model for concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karamnejad, A.; Nguyen, V.P.; Sluys, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-scale numerical approach for modeling cracking in heterogeneous quasi-brittle materials under dynamic loading is presented. In the model, a discontinuous crack model is used at macro-scale to simulate fracture and a gradient-enhanced damage model has been used at meso-scale to simulate

  6. A Multi-Scale Energy Demand Model suggests sharing Market Risks with Intelligent Energy Cooperatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Methenitis (Georgios); M. Kaisers (Michael); J.A. La Poutré (Han)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we propose a multi-scale model of energy demand that is consistent with observations at a macro scale, in our use-case standard load profiles for (residential) electric loads. We employ the model to study incentives to assume the risk of volatile market prices for

  7. Multi-scale habitat selection modeling: A review and outlook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin McGarigal; Ho Yi Wan; Kathy A. Zeller; Brad C. Timm; Samuel A. Cushman

    2016-01-01

    Scale is the lens that focuses ecological relationships. Organisms select habitat at multiple hierarchical levels and at different spatial and/or temporal scales within each level. Failure to properly address scale dependence can result in incorrect inferences in multi-scale habitat selection modeling studies.

  8. Sustainable Manufacturing via Multi-Scale, Physics-Based Process Modeling and Manufacturing-Informed Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-04-01

    This factsheet describes a project that developed and demonstrated a new manufacturing-informed design framework that utilizes advanced multi-scale, physics-based process modeling to dramatically improve manufacturing productivity and quality in machining operations while reducing the cost of machined components.

  9. Multi-scale scenarios of spatial-temporal dynamics in the European livestock sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neumann, K.; Verburg, P.H.; Elbersen, B.; Stehfest, E.; Woltjer, G.B

    2011-01-01

    The European livestock sector has changed rapidly in the recent past and further changes are expected in the near future due to reforms in the European Common Agricultural Policy (CAP), increasing environmental concerns and changing consumer awareness. We developed a multi-scale modeling approach

  10. Multi-scale calculation based on dual domain material point method combined with molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Tilak Raj [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-27

    This dissertation combines the dual domain material point method (DDMP) with molecular dynamics (MD) in an attempt to create a multi-scale numerical method to simulate materials undergoing large deformations with high strain rates. In these types of problems, the material is often in a thermodynamically non-equilibrium state, and conventional constitutive relations are often not available. In this method, the closure quantities, such as stress, at each material point are calculated from a MD simulation of a group of atoms surrounding the material point. Rather than restricting the multi-scale simulation in a small spatial region, such as phase interfaces, or crack tips, this multi-scale method can be used to consider non-equilibrium thermodynamic e ects in a macroscopic domain. This method takes advantage that the material points only communicate with mesh nodes, not among themselves; therefore MD simulations for material points can be performed independently in parallel. First, using a one-dimensional shock problem as an example, the numerical properties of the original material point method (MPM), the generalized interpolation material point (GIMP) method, the convected particle domain interpolation (CPDI) method, and the DDMP method are investigated. Among these methods, only the DDMP method converges as the number of particles increases, but the large number of particles needed for convergence makes the method very expensive especially in our multi-scale method where we calculate stress in each material point using MD simulation. To improve DDMP, the sub-point method is introduced in this dissertation, which provides high quality numerical solutions with a very small number of particles. The multi-scale method based on DDMP with sub-points is successfully implemented for a one dimensional problem of shock wave propagation in a cerium crystal. The MD simulation to calculate stress in each material point is performed in GPU using CUDA to accelerate the

  11. A Multi-scale Modeling System with Unified Physics to Study Precipitation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W. K.

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, exponentially increasing computer power has extended Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) integrations from hours to months, the number of computational grid points from less than a thousand to close to ten million. Three-dimensional models are now more prevalent. Much attention is devoted to precipitating cloud systems where the crucial 1-km scales are resolved in horizontal domains as large as 10,000 km in two-dimensions, and 1,000 x 1,000 km2 in three-dimensions. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that NWP and mesoscale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (1) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), and (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF). The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, a review of developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the results from using multi-scale modeling system to study the precipitation, processes and their sensitivity on model resolution and microphysics schemes will be presented. Also how to use of the multi-satellite simulator to improve precipitation processes will be discussed.

  12. Multi-Scale Aspects in the Management of Geologically Defined Geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, Martin; Cremers, Armin B.; Shumilov, Serge; Siebeck, Jörg

    The interactive geological modelling and the geometric-kinetic modelling of geological objects need an efficient database support. In this chapter we present multi-scale aspects in the management of geologically defined geometries. From the computer science side, object-oriented data modelling provides a framework for the embedding of multi-scale information by enabling geoscientists to model different "semantic scales" of the data. In particular, the concepts of inheritance and aggregation implicitly deal with multi-scale aspects. According to these concepts, the database-backed software system GeoStore has been developed. It handles geological data in two different scales: the large-scale data of the Lower Rhine Basin and the small-scale data of the Bergheim open pit mine.We describe the database models for both scales as well as the steps undertaken to combine these models into one view. Furthermore, there are interesting connections between interactive multi-scale modelling and geo-database query processing techniques. In this context, we have devel-oped the "multi-level R*-tree", an index structure allowing "perspective region queries." Multi-scale landform data modelling and management imposes manifold requirements. We discuss some of them and conclude that they can be met by a hierarchical data type: a directed acyclic graph structure which, if implemented in an object-oriented database system, is readily extensible. Another important aspect is the interoperability between modelling and data management tools. We describe the tasks to be carried through for accessing and recycling data in different scales contained in heterogeneous databases. In particular, we present the eXtensible Database Adapter (XDA) which performs network-transparent integration of client-side GIS tools and object-oriented spatial database systems.

  13. Addressing the multi-scale lapsus of landscape : multi-scale landscape process modelling to support sustainable land use : a case study for the Lower Guadalhorce valley South Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoorl, J.M.

    2002-01-01

    "Addressing the Multi-scale Lapsus of Landscape" with the sub-title "Multi-scale landscape process modelling to support sustainable land use: A case study for the Lower Guadalhorce valley South Spain" focuses on the role of

  14. Evaluating 20th Century precipitation characteristics between multi-scale atmospheric models with different land-atmosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M.; Denning, A. S.; Randall, D. A.; Branson, M.

    2016-12-01

    Multi-scale models of the atmosphere provide an opportunity to investigate processes that are unresolved by traditional Global Climate Models while at the same time remaining viable in terms of computational resources for climate-length time scales. The MMF represents a shift away from large horizontal grid spacing in traditional GCMs that leads to overabundant light precipitation and lack of heavy events, toward a model where precipitation intensity is allowed to vary over a much wider range of values. Resolving atmospheric motions on the scale of 4 km makes it possible to recover features of precipitation, such as intense downpours, that were previously only obtained by computationally expensive regional simulations. These heavy precipitation events may have little impact on large-scale moisture and energy budgets, but are outstanding in terms of interaction with the land surface and potential impact on human life. Three versions of the Community Earth System Model were used in this study; the standard CESM, the multi-scale `Super-Parameterized' CESM where large-scale parameterizations have been replaced with a 2D cloud-permitting model, and a multi-instance land version of the SP-CESM where each column of the 2D CRM is allowed to interact with an individual land unit. These simulations were carried out using prescribed Sea Surface Temperatures for the period from 1979-2006 with daily precipitation saved for all 28 years. Comparisons of the statistical properties of precipitation between model architectures and against observations from rain gauges were made, with specific focus on detection and evaluation of extreme precipitation events.

  15. REVIEW OF THE GOVERNING EQUATIONS, COMPUTATIONAL ALGORITHMS, AND OTHER COMPONENTS OF THE MODELS-3 COMMUNITY MULTISCALE AIR QUALITY (CMAQ) MODELING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article describes the governing equations, computational algorithms, and other components entering into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. This system has been designed to approach air quality as a whole by including state-of-the-science capabiliti...

  16. Differences between regional and biogeographic species pools highlight the need for multi-scale theories in macroecology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Buschke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ecologists are intrigued by the manner in which colonists from a regional pool of species establish and structure local ecological communities. This has initiated several approaches to identifying the relative roles of regional and local processes. Recently, large-scale data sets and novel statistical tools have sparked renewed interest in objectively defined homogeneous species pools. At continental and global scales, these homogenous units are known as biogeographic species pools. Here we argue that the biogeographic species pool is not just a scaled-up version of the regional species pool featured in many foundational ecological theories. Instead, the processes linking local communities and regional species pools differ from those in the biogeographic species pool. To illustrate this, we distinguish between regional and biogeographic species pools by overlaying species distribution data and differentiat- ing between the intersection and union of these distributions. Although patterns in the regional and biogeographic species pools may appear self-similar across scales, the underlying mechanisms differ from those between local communities and the regional species pool. As a consequence, conventional approaches of quantifying the relative role of local and regional process are inappropriate for studying the biogeographic species pool, thus highlighting the need for new multi-scale theories in macroecology.

  17. Edge Preserving and Multi-Scale Contextual Neural Network for Salient Object Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang; Ma, Huimin; Chen, Xiaozhi; You, Shaodi

    In this paper, we propose a novel edge preserving and multi-scale contextual neural network for salient object detection. The proposed framework is aiming to address two limits of the existing CNN based methods. First, region-based CNN methods lack sufficient context to accurately locate salient object since they deal with each region independently. Second, pixel-based CNN methods suffer from blurry boundaries due to the presence of convolutional and pooling layers. Motivated by these, we first propose an end-to-end edge-preserved neural network based on Fast R-CNN framework (named RegionNet ) to efficiently generate saliency map with sharp object boundaries. Later, to further improve it, multi-scale spatial context is attached to RegionNet to consider the relationship between regions and the global scenes. Furthermore, our method can be generally applied to RGB-D saliency detection by depth refinement. The proposed framework achieves both clear detection boundary and multi-scale contextual robustness simultaneously for the first time, and thus achieves an optimized performance. Experiments on six RGB and two RGB-D benchmark datasets demonstrate that the proposed method achieves state-of-the-art performance.In this paper, we propose a novel edge preserving and multi-scale contextual neural network for salient object detection. The proposed framework is aiming to address two limits of the existing CNN based methods. First, region-based CNN methods lack sufficient context to accurately locate salient object since they deal with each region independently. Second, pixel-based CNN methods suffer from blurry boundaries due to the presence of convolutional and pooling layers. Motivated by these, we first propose an end-to-end edge-preserved neural network based on Fast R-CNN framework (named RegionNet ) to efficiently generate saliency map with sharp object boundaries. Later, to further improve it, multi-scale spatial context is attached to RegionNet to consider the

  18. Multi-scale random sets: from morphology to effective properties and to fracture statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeulin, Dominique, E-mail: dominique.jeulin@mines-paristech.fr [Centre de Morphologie Mathematique, Mathematiques et Systemes, Mines ParisTech 35 rue Saint-Honore, F77300 Fontainebleau (France)

    2011-09-15

    Complex microstructures in materials often involve multi-scale heterogeneous textures, modelled by random sets derived from Mathematical Morphology. Starting from 2D or 3D images, a complete morphological characterization by image analysis is performed, and used for the identification of a model of random structure. From morphological models, simulations of realistic microstructures are introduced in a numerical solver to compute appropriate fields (electric, elastic stress or strain, ...) and to estimate the effective properties by numerical homogenization, accounting for scale dependent statistical fluctuations of the fields. Our approach is illustrated by various examples of multi-scale models: Boolean random sets based on Cox point processes and various random grains (spheres, cylinders), showing a very low percolation threshold, and therefore a high conductivity or high elastic moduli for a low volume fraction of a second phase. Multiscale Cox point processes are also a source of instructive models of fracture statistics, such as multiscale weakest link models.

  19. FEM × DEM: a new efficient multi-scale approach for geotechnical problems with strain localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Kien; Claramunt, Albert Argilaga; Caillerie, Denis; Combe, Gaël; Dal Pont, Stefano; Desrues, Jacques; Richefeu, Vincent

    2017-06-01

    The paper presents a multi-scale modeling of Boundary Value Problem (BVP) approach involving cohesive-frictional granular materials in the FEM × DEM multi-scale framework. On the DEM side, a 3D model is defined based on the interactions of spherical particles. This DEM model is built through a numerical homogenization process applied to a Volume Element (VE). It is then paired with a Finite Element code. Using this numerical tool that combines two scales within the same framework, we conducted simulations of biaxial and pressuremeter tests on a cohesive-frictional granular medium. In these cases, it is known that strain localization does occur at the macroscopic level, but since FEMs suffer from severe mesh dependency as soon as shear band starts to develop, the second gradient regularization technique has been used. As a consequence, the objectivity of the computation with respect to mesh dependency is restored.

  20. Multi-scale coding of genomic information: From DNA sequence to genome structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arneodo, Alain, E-mail: alain.arneodo@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Vaillant, Cedric, E-mail: cedric.vaillant@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Audit, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.audit@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Argoul, Francoise, E-mail: francoise.argoul@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); D' Aubenton-Carafa, Yves, E-mail: daubenton@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thermes, Claude, E-mail: claude.thermes@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-02-15

    Understanding how chromatin is spatially and dynamically organized in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and how this affects genome functions is one of the main challenges of cell biology. Since the different orders of packaging in the hierarchical organization of DNA condition the accessibility of DNA sequence elements to trans-acting factors that control the transcription and replication processes, there is actually a wealth of structural and dynamical information to learn in the primary DNA sequence. In this review, we show that when using concepts, methodologies, numerical and experimental techniques coming from statistical mechanics and nonlinear physics combined with wavelet-based multi-scale signal processing, we are able to decipher the multi-scale sequence encoding of chromatin condensation-decondensation mechanisms that play a fundamental role in regulating many molecular processes involved in nuclear functions.

  1. Multi-scale graphene patterns on arbitrary substrates via laser-assisted transfer-printing process

    KAUST Repository

    Park, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    A laser-assisted transfer-printing process is developed for multi-scale graphene patterns on arbitrary substrates using femtosecond laser scanning on a graphene/metal substrate and transfer techniques without using multi-step patterning processes. The short pulse nature of a femtosecond laser on a graphene/copper sheet enables fabrication of high-resolution graphene patterns. Thanks to the scale up, fast, direct writing, multi-scale with high resolution, and reliable process characteristics, it can be an alternative pathway to the multi-step photolithography methods for printing arbitrary graphene patterns on desired substrates. We also demonstrate transparent strain devices without expensive photomasks and multi-step patterning process. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Wavelet-Based Multi-Scale Entropy Analysis of Complex Rainfall Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ming Chou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel framework to determine the number of resolution levels in the application of a wavelet transformation to a rainfall time series. The rainfall time series are decomposed using the à trous wavelet transform. Then, multi-scale entropy (MSE analysis that helps to elucidate some hidden characteristics of the original rainfall time series is applied to the decomposed rainfall time series. The analysis shows that the Mann-Kendall (MK rank correlation test of MSE curves of residuals at various resolution levels could determine the number of resolution levels in the wavelet decomposition. The complexity of rainfall time series at four stations on a multi-scale is compared. The results reveal that the suggested number of resolution levels can be obtained using MSE analysis and MK test. The complexity of rainfall time series at various locations can also be analyzed to provide a reference for water resource planning and application.

  3. Biology meets Physics: Reductionism and Multi-scale Modeling of Morphogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Sara; Batterman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    from philosophers of biology. Specifically, scholars have pointed to the impossibility of deducing biological explanations from physical ones, and to the irreducible nature of distinctively biological processes such as gene regulation and evolution. This paper takes a step back in asking whether bottom......-up modeling is feasible even when modeling simple physical systems across scales. By comparing examples of multi-scale modeling in physics and biology, we argue that the “tyranny of scales” problem present a challenge to reductive explanations in both physics and biology. The problem refers to the scale......-dependency of physical and biological behaviors that forces researchers to combine different models relying on different scale-specific mathematical strategies and boundary conditions. Analyzing the ways in which different models are combined in multi-scale modeling also has implications for the relation between physics...

  4. An Investigation of Wavelet Bases for Grid-Based Multi-Scale Simulations Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baty, R.S.; Burns, S.P.; Christon, M.A.; Roach, D.W.; Trucano, T.G.; Voth, T.E.; Weatherby, J.R.; Womble, D.E.

    1998-11-01

    The research summarized in this report is the result of a two-year effort that has focused on evaluating the viability of wavelet bases for the solution of partial differential equations. The primary objective for this work has been to establish a foundation for hierarchical/wavelet simulation methods based upon numerical performance, computational efficiency, and the ability to exploit the hierarchical adaptive nature of wavelets. This work has demonstrated that hierarchical bases can be effective for problems with a dominant elliptic character. However, the strict enforcement of orthogonality was found to be less desirable than weaker semi-orthogonality or bi-orthogonality for solving partial differential equations. This conclusion has led to the development of a multi-scale linear finite element based on a hierarchical change of basis. The reproducing kernel particle method has been found to yield extremely accurate phase characteristics for hyperbolic problems while providing a convenient framework for multi-scale analyses.

  5. FEM × DEM: a new efficient multi-scale approach for geotechnical problems with strain localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Trung Kien

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a multi-scale modeling of Boundary Value Problem (BVP approach involving cohesive-frictional granular materials in the FEM × DEM multi-scale framework. On the DEM side, a 3D model is defined based on the interactions of spherical particles. This DEM model is built through a numerical homogenization process applied to a Volume Element (VE. It is then paired with a Finite Element code. Using this numerical tool that combines two scales within the same framework, we conducted simulations of biaxial and pressuremeter tests on a cohesive-frictional granular medium. In these cases, it is known that strain localization does occur at the macroscopic level, but since FEMs suffer from severe mesh dependency as soon as shear band starts to develop, the second gradient regularization technique has been used. As a consequence, the objectivity of the computation with respect to mesh dependency is restored.

  6. A Multi-Scale Computational Study on the Mechanism of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase (SpNic)

    OpenAIRE

    Ion, Bogdan; Kazim, Erum; Gauld, James

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinamidase (Nic) is a key zinc-dependent enzyme in NAD metabolism that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to give nicotinic acid. A multi-scale computational approach has been used to investigate the catalytic mechanism, substrate binding and roles of active site residues of Nic from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic). In particular, density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamics (MD) and ONIOM quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods have been employed. The o...

  7. Simulation of Left Atrial Function Using a Multi-Scale Model of the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pironet, Antoine; Dauby, Pierre C.; Paeme, Sabine; Kosta, Sarah; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Desaive, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    During a full cardiac cycle, the left atrium successively behaves as a reservoir, a conduit and a pump. This complex behavior makes it unrealistic to apply the time-varying elastance theory to characterize the left atrium, first, because this theory has known limitations, and second, because it is still uncertain whether the load independence hypothesis holds. In this study, we aim to bypass this uncertainty by relying on another kind of mathematical model of the cardiac chambers. In the present work, we describe both the left atrium and the left ventricle with a multi-scale model. The multi-scale property of this model comes from the fact that pressure inside a cardiac chamber is derived from a model of the sarcomere behavior. Macroscopic model parameters are identified from reference dog hemodynamic data. The multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including the left atrium is then simulated to show that the physiological roles of the left atrium are correctly reproduced. This include a biphasic pressure wave and an eight-shaped pressure-volume loop. We also test the validity of our model in non basal conditions by reproducing a preload reduction experiment by inferior vena cava occlusion with the model. We compute the variation of eight indices before and after this experiment and obtain the same variation as experimentally observed for seven out of the eight indices. In summary, the multi-scale mathematical model presented in this work is able to correctly account for the three roles of the left atrium and also exhibits a realistic left atrial pressure-volume loop. Furthermore, the model has been previously presented and validated for the left ventricle. This makes it a proper alternative to the time-varying elastance theory if the focus is set on precisely representing the left atrial and left ventricular behaviors. PMID:23755183

  8. Multi-scale learning based segmentation of glands in digital colonrectal pathology images

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yi; Liu, William; Arjun, Shipra; Zhu, Liangjia; Ratner, Vadim; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Joel; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    Digital histopathological images provide detailed spatial information of the tissue at micrometer resolution. Among the available contents in the pathology images, meso-scale information, such as the gland morphology, texture, and distribution, are useful diagnostic features. In this work, focusing on the colon-rectal cancer tissue samples, we propose a multi-scale learning based segmentation scheme for the glands in the colon-rectal digital pathology slides. The algorithm learns the gland an...

  9. Simulation of left atrial function using a multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Pironet

    Full Text Available During a full cardiac cycle, the left atrium successively behaves as a reservoir, a conduit and a pump. This complex behavior makes it unrealistic to apply the time-varying elastance theory to characterize the left atrium, first, because this theory has known limitations, and second, because it is still uncertain whether the load independence hypothesis holds. In this study, we aim to bypass this uncertainty by relying on another kind of mathematical model of the cardiac chambers. In the present work, we describe both the left atrium and the left ventricle with a multi-scale model. The multi-scale property of this model comes from the fact that pressure inside a cardiac chamber is derived from a model of the sarcomere behavior. Macroscopic model parameters are identified from reference dog hemodynamic data. The multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including the left atrium is then simulated to show that the physiological roles of the left atrium are correctly reproduced. This include a biphasic pressure wave and an eight-shaped pressure-volume loop. We also test the validity of our model in non basal conditions by reproducing a preload reduction experiment by inferior vena cava occlusion with the model. We compute the variation of eight indices before and after this experiment and obtain the same variation as experimentally observed for seven out of the eight indices. In summary, the multi-scale mathematical model presented in this work is able to correctly account for the three roles of the left atrium and also exhibits a realistic left atrial pressure-volume loop. Furthermore, the model has been previously presented and validated for the left ventricle. This makes it a proper alternative to the time-varying elastance theory if the focus is set on precisely representing the left atrial and left ventricular behaviors.

  10. Multi-Scale Process of Soil Freezing, Thawing, and Thaw-Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-18

    REPORT Multi-Scale Process of soil Freezing, Thawing, and Thaw-Settlement 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Freezing and thawing of soils...penetration resistance of sand after dynamic compaction, Second International Symposium on Computational Geomechanics (ComGeo II), Cavtat-Dubrovnik...2011) TOTAL: 4 Books Number of Manuscripts: Received Paper TOTAL: Patents Submitted Patents Awarded Awards MTS Visiting Professor of Geomechanics

  11. Low-carbon building assessment and multi-scale input-output analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, G. Q.; Chen, H.; Chen, Z. M.; Zhang, Bo; Shao, L.; Guo, S.; Zhou, S. Y.; Jiang, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Presented as a low-carbon building evaluation framework in this paper are detailed carbon emission account procedures for the life cycle of buildings in terms of nine stages as building construction, fitment, outdoor facility construction, transportation, operation, waste treatment, property management, demolition, and disposal for buildings, supported by integrated carbon intensity databases based on multi-scale input-output analysis, essential for low-carbon planning, procurement and supply chain design, and logistics management.

  12. Multi-scale Modeling and Analysis of Nano-RFID Systems on HPC Setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rohit; Joshi, Satyadhar

    In this paper we have worked out on some the complex modeling aspects such as Multi Scale modeling, MATLAB Sugar based modeling and have shown the complexities involved in the analysis of Nano RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) systems. We have shown the modeling and simulation and demonstrated some novel ideas and library development for Nano RFID. Multi scale modeling plays a very important role in nanotech enabled devices properties of which cannot be explained sometimes by abstraction level theories. Reliability and packaging still remains one the major hindrances in practical implementation of Nano RFID based devices. And to work on them modeling and simulation will play a very important role. CNTs is the future low power material that will replace CMOS and its integration with CMOS, MEMS circuitry will play an important role in realizing the true power in Nano RFID systems. RFID based on innovations in nanotechnology has been shown. MEMS modeling of Antenna, sensors and its integration in the circuitry has been shown. Thus incorporating this we can design a Nano-RFID which can be used in areas like human implantation and complex banking applications. We have proposed modeling of RFID using the concept of multi scale modeling to accurately predict its properties. Also we give the modeling of MEMS devices that are proposed recently that can see possible application in RFID. We have also covered the applications and the advantages of Nano RFID in various areas. RF MEMS has been matured and its devices are being successfully commercialized but taking it to limits of nano domains and integration with singly chip RFID needs a novel approach which is being proposed. We have modeled MEMS based transponder and shown the distribution for multi scale modeling for Nano RFID.

  13. Classification of high-resolution remote sensing images based on multi-scale superposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinliang; Gao, Wenjie; Liu, Guangjie

    2017-07-01

    Landscape structures and process on different scale show different characteristics. In the study of specific target landmarks, the most appropriate scale for images can be attained by scale conversion, which improves the accuracy and efficiency of feature identification and classification. In this paper, the authors carried out experiments on multi-scale classification by taking the Shangri-la area in the north-western Yunnan province as the research area and the images from SPOT5 HRG and GF-1 Satellite as date sources. Firstly, the authors upscaled the two images by cubic convolution, and calculated the optimal scale for different objects on the earth shown in images by variation functions. Then the authors conducted multi-scale superposition classification on it by Maximum Likelyhood, and evaluated the classification accuracy. The results indicates that: (1) for most of the object on the earth, the optimal scale appears in the bigger scale instead of the original one. To be specific, water has the biggest optimal scale, i.e. around 25-30m; farmland, grassland, brushwood, roads, settlement places and woodland follows with 20-24m. The optimal scale for shades and flood land is basically as the same as the original one, i.e. 8m and 10m respectively. (2) Regarding the classification of the multi-scale superposed images, the overall accuracy of the ones from SPOT5 HRG and GF-1 Satellite is 12.84% and 14.76% higher than that of the original multi-spectral images, respectively, and Kappa coefficient is 0.1306 and 0.1419 higher, respectively. Hence, the multi-scale superposition classification which was applied in the research area can enhance the classification accuracy of remote sensing images .

  14. Variational Multi-Scale method with spectral approximation of the sub-scales.

    KAUST Repository

    Dia, Ben Mansour

    2015-01-07

    A variational multi-scale method where the sub-grid scales are computed by spectral approximations is presented. It is based upon an extension of the spectral theorem to non necessarily self-adjoint elliptic operators that have an associated base of eigenfunctions which are orthonormal in weighted L2 spaces. We propose a feasible VMS-spectral method by truncation of this spectral expansion to a nite number of modes.

  15. Data fusion of multi-scale representations for structural damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tian; Xu, Zili

    2018-01-01

    Despite extensive researches into structural health monitoring (SHM) in the past decades, there are few methods that can detect multiple slight damage in noisy environments. Here, we introduce a new hybrid method that utilizes multi-scale space theory and data fusion approach for multiple damage detection in beams and plates. A cascade filtering approach provides multi-scale space for noisy mode shapes and filters the fluctuations caused by measurement noise. In multi-scale space, a series of amplification and data fusion algorithms are utilized to search the damage features across all possible scales. We verify the effectiveness of the method by numerical simulation using damaged beams and plates with various types of boundary conditions. Monte Carlo simulations are conducted to illustrate the effectiveness and noise immunity of the proposed method. The applicability is further validated via laboratory cases studies focusing on different damage scenarios. Both results demonstrate that the proposed method has a superior noise tolerant ability, as well as damage sensitivity, without knowing material properties or boundary conditions.

  16. Remote Sensing Images Super Resolution Reconstruction Based on Multi-scale Detail Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHU Hong

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The existing methods are hard to highlight the details after super resolution reconstruction, so it is proposed a super-resolution model frame to enhance the multi-scale details. Firstly, the sequence images are multi-scale deposed to keep the edge structure and the deposed multi-scale image information are differenced. Then, the smoothing information and detail information are interpolated, and a texture detail enhancement function is built to improve the scope of small details. Finally, the coarse-scale image information and small-medium-scale information are confused to get the premier super-resolution reconstruction result, and a local optimizing model is built to further promote the premier image quality. The experiments on the same period and different period remote sensing images show that the objective evaluation index are both largely improved comparing with the interpolation method, traditional total variation(TVmethod,and maximum a posterior(MAP method. The details of the reconstruction image are improved distinctly. The reconstruction image produced using the proposed method provides more high frequency details, and the method proves to be robust and universal for different kinds of satellite remote sensing images.

  17. Multi-Scale Modeling of an Integrated 3D Braided Composite with Applications to Helicopter Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Diantang; Chen, Li; Sun, Ying; Zhang, Yifan; Qian, Kun

    2017-10-01

    A study is conducted with the aim of developing multi-scale analytical method for designing the composite helicopter arm with three-dimensional (3D) five-directional braided structure. Based on the analysis of 3D braided microstructure, the multi-scale finite element modeling is developed. Finite element analysis on the load capacity of 3D five-directional braided composites helicopter arm is carried out using the software ABAQUS/Standard. The influences of the braiding angle and loading condition on the stress and strain distribution of the helicopter arm are simulated. The results show that the proposed multi-scale method is capable of accurately predicting the mechanical properties of 3D braided composites, validated by the comparison the stress-strain curves of meso-scale RVCs. Furthermore, it is found that the braiding angle is an important factor affecting the mechanical properties of 3D five-directional braided composite helicopter arm. Based on the optimized structure parameters, the nearly net-shaped composite helicopter arm is fabricated using a novel resin transfer mould (RTM) process.

  18. Multi-Scale Modeling the Mechanical Properties of Biaxial Weft Knitted Fabrics for Composite Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abghary, Mohammad Javad; Nedoushan, Reza Jafari; Hasani, Hossein

    2017-08-01

    In this paper a multi-scale numerical model for simulating the mechanical behavior of biaxial weft knitted fabrics produced based on 1×1 rib structure is presented. Fabrics were produced on a modern flat knitting machine using polyester as stitch yarns and nylon as straight yarns. A macro constitutive equation was presented to model the fabric mechanical behavior as a continuum material. User defined material subroutines were provided to implement the constitutive behavior in Abaqus software. The constitutive equation needs remarkable tensile tests on the fabric as the inputs. To solve this drawbacks meso scale modeling of the fabric was used to predict stress-strain curves of the fabric in three different directions (course, wale and 45°). In these simulations only the yarn properties are needed. To evaluate the accuracy of the proposed macro and meso models, fabric tensile behavior in 22.5 and 67.5° directions were simulated by the calibrated macro model and compared with experimental results. Spherical deformation was also simulated by the multi scale model and compared with experimental results. The results showed that the multi-scale modeling can successfully predict the tensile and spherical deformation of the biaxial weft knitted fabric with least required experiments. This model will be useful for composite applications.

  19. MULTI-SCALE SEGMENTATION OF HIGH RESOLUTION REMOTE SENSING IMAGES BY INTEGRATING MULTIPLE FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Di

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Most of multi-scale segmentation algorithms are not aiming at high resolution remote sensing images and have difficulty to communicate and use layers’ information. In view of them, we proposes a method of multi-scale segmentation of high resolution remote sensing images by integrating multiple features. First, Canny operator is used to extract edge information, and then band weighted distance function is built to obtain the edge weight. According to the criterion, the initial segmentation objects of color images can be gained by Kruskal minimum spanning tree algorithm. Finally segmentation images are got by the adaptive rule of Mumford–Shah region merging combination with spectral and texture information. The proposed method is evaluated precisely using analog images and ZY-3 satellite images through quantitative and qualitative analysis. The experimental results show that the multi-scale segmentation of high resolution remote sensing images by integrating multiple features outperformed the software eCognition fractal network evolution algorithm (highest-resolution network evolution that FNEA on the accuracy and slightly inferior to FNEA on the efficiency.

  20. Development of porous structure simulator for multi-scale simulation of irregular porous catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Michihisa; Suzuki, Ai; Sahnoun, Riadh; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Kubo, Momoji; Del Carpio, Carlos A.; Miyamoto, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Efficient development of highly functional porous materials, used as catalysts in the automobile industry, demands a meticulous knowledge of the nano-scale interface at the electronic and atomistic scale. However, it is often difficult to correlate the microscopic interfacial interactions with macroscopic characteristics of the materials; for instance, the interaction between a precious metal and its support oxide with long-term sintering properties of the catalyst. Multi-scale computational chemistry approaches can contribute to bridge the gap between micro- and macroscopic characteristics of these materials; however this type of multi-scale simulations has been difficult to apply especially to porous materials. To overcome this problem, we have developed a novel mesoscopic approach based on a porous structure simulator. This simulator can construct automatically irregular porous structures on a computer, enabling simulations with complex meso-scale structures. Moreover, in this work we have developed a new method to simulate long-term sintering properties of metal particles on porous catalysts. Finally, we have applied the method to the simulation of sintering properties of Pt on alumina support. This newly developed method has enabled us to propose a multi-scale simulation approach for porous catalysts

  1. Superhydrophobic multi-scale ZnO nanostructures fabricated by chemical vapor deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Feng, Chengheng; Wu, Chunxia; Ma, Weiwei; Cai, Lan

    2009-07-01

    The ZnO nanostructures were synthesized on Si(100) substrates by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. Different Morphologies of ZnO nanostructures, such as nanoparticle film, micro-pillar and micro-nano multi-structure, were obtained with different conditions. The results of XRD and TEM showed the good quality of ZnO crystal growth. Selected area electron diffraction analysis indicates the individual nano-wire is single crystal. The wettability of ZnO was studied by contact angle admeasuring apparatus. We found that the wettability can be changed from hydrophobic to super-hydrophobic when the structure changed from smooth particle film to single micro-pillar, nano-wire and micro-nano multi-scale structure. Compared with the particle film with contact angle (CA) of 90.7 degrees, the CA of single scale microstructure and sparse micro-nano multi-scale structure is 130-140 degrees, 140-150 degrees respectively. But when the surface is dense micro-nano multi-scale structure such as nano-lawn, the CA can reach to 168.2 degrees . The results indicate that microstructure of surface is very important to the surface wettability. The wettability on the micro-nano multi-structure is better than single-scale structure, and that of dense micro-nano multi-structure is better than sparse multi-structure.

  2. Assessing landscape hydroperiods across the Mekong Basin using multi-scale remote sensing to understand water-energy-food tradeoffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbick, N.; Salas, W.; Qi, J.; Huang, X.

    2017-12-01

    In the Lower Mekong River Basin (LMRB), population growth and transitioning economies, shifting climate, and intense pressures for resources are driving tradeoffs among the water-enegery-food (WEF) nexus. Rice production and irrigation, wetlands habitat, and damn constructions are intertwinned across the region. There are 11 major hydropower dams on the main stem of the Lower Mekong River and many smaller dams in the basin. At the same time increased pressure for food production has amplified cropping intensity and irrigation infrastructure projects. These human acitivies are impacting inundation patterns and phenology of wetland and lake ecosystems. We are mapping rice, wetlands, and lake inundation dynamics using multi-scale satellite remote sensing. New opportunities exist for moderate scale, near-daily mapping of rice, wetland, shrimp, and lake hydroperiod with multi-source imaging and BigData computational approaches on the NAS cloud. Primarily we rely on Sentinel-1 IW and PALSAR-2 ScanSAR to map inundation dynamics at 10m resolution including under canopy conditions using double bounce properties. As part of this effort we are assessing different damn impacts at case studies in Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam with high resolution commercial imagery, social surveys, and socioeconomic models. These dams are currently regulated individually without coordination. As a result, their operation has outsized impacts on lake and wetland ecologies, negatively affecting the associated ecosystem services that local communities have relied on. All new products are shared openly with the science community. Case study illustrations will be presented.

  3. Introduction of an agent-based multi-scale modular architecture for dynamic knowledge representation of acute inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An Gary

    2008-05-01

    in the intensive care setting. The ABMs all utilize cell-level agents that encapsulate specific mechanistic knowledge extracted from in vitro experiments. The execution of the ABMs results in a dynamic representation of the multi-scale conceptual models derived from those experiments. These models represent a qualitative means of integrating basic scientific information on acute inflammation in a multi-scale, modular architecture as a means of conceptual model verification that can potentially be used to concatenate, communicate and advance community-wide knowledge.

  4. Using Multi-Scale Modeling Systems and Satellite Data to Study the Precipitation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, J.; Lamg, S.; Matsui, T.; Shen, B.; Zeng, X.; Shi, R.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, exponentially increasing computer power has extended Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) integrations from hours to months, the number of computational grid points from less than a thousand to close to ten million. Three-dimensional models are now more prevalent. Much attention is devoted to precipitating cloud systems where the crucial 1-km scales are resolved in horizontal domains as large as 10,000 km in two-dimensions, and 1,000 x 1,000 km2 in three-dimensions. Cloud resolving models now provide statistical information useful for developing more realistic physically based parameterizations for climate models and numerical weather prediction models. It is also expected that NWP and mesoscale model can be run in grid size similar to cloud resolving model through nesting technique. Recently, a multi-scale modeling system with unified physics was developed at NASA Goddard. It consists of (l) a cloud-resolving model (Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model, GCE model), (2) a regional scale model (a NASA unified weather research and forecast, WRF), (3) a coupled CRM and global model (Goddard Multi-scale Modeling Framework, MMF), and (4) a land modeling system. The same microphysical processes, long and short wave radiative transfer and land processes and the explicit cloud-radiation, and cloud-land surface interactive processes are applied in this multi-scale modeling system. This modeling system has been coupled with a multi-satellite simulator to use NASA high-resolution satellite data to identify the strengths and weaknesses of cloud and precipitation processes simulated by the model. In this talk, the recent developments and applications of the multi-scale modeling system will be presented. In particular, the results from using multi-scale modeling system to study the precipitating systems and hurricanes/typhoons will be presented. The high-resolution spatial and temporal visualization will be utilized to show the evolution of precipitation processes. Also how to

  5. Assessing the role of urban developments on storm runoff response through multi-scale catchment experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Mark; Owen, Gareth; Geris, Josie; Soulsby, Chris; Quinn, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Many communities across the world face the increasing challenge of balancing water quantity and quality issues with accommodating new growth and urban development. Urbanisation is typically associated with detrimental changes in water quality, sediment delivery, and effects on water storage and flow pathways (e.g. increases in flooding). In particular for mixed rural and urban catchments where the spatio-temporal variability of hydrological responses is high, there remains a key research challenge in evaluating the timing and magnitude of storage and flow pathways at multiple scales. This is of crucial importance for appropriate catchment management, for example to aid the design of Green Infrastructure (GI) to mitigate the risk of flooding, among other multiple benefits. The aim of this work was to (i) explore spatio-temporal storm runoff generation characteristics in multi-scale catchment experiments that contain rural and urban land use zones, and (ii) assess the (preliminary) impact of Sustainable Drainage (SuDs) as GI on high flow and flood characteristics. Our key research catchment, the Ouseburn in Northern England (55km2), has rural headwaters (15%) and an urban zone (45%) concentrated in the lower catchment area. There is an intermediate and increasingly expanding peri-urban zone (currently 40%), which is defined here as areas where rural and urban features coexist, alongside GIs. Such a structure is typical for most catchments with urban developments. We monitored spatial precipitation and multiscale nested (five gauges) runoff response, in addition to the storage dynamics in GIs for a period of 6 years (2007-2013). For a range of events, we examined the multiscale nested runoff characteristics (lag time and magnitude) of the rural and urban flow components, assessed how these integrated with changing land use and increasing scale, and discussed the implications for flood management in the catchment. The analyses indicated three distinctly different

  6. Fast randomized Hough transformation track initiation algorithm based on multi-scale clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Minjie; Gu, Guohua; Chen, Qian; Qian, Weixian; Wang, Pengcheng

    2015-10-01

    A fast randomized Hough transformation track initiation algorithm based on multi-scale clustering is proposed to overcome existing problems in traditional infrared search and track system(IRST) which cannot provide movement information of the initial target and select the threshold value of correlation automatically by a two-dimensional track association algorithm based on bearing-only information . Movements of all the targets are presumed to be uniform rectilinear motion throughout this new algorithm. Concepts of space random sampling, parameter space dynamic linking table and convergent mapping of image to parameter space are developed on the basis of fast randomized Hough transformation. Considering the phenomenon of peak value clustering due to shortcomings of peak detection itself which is built on threshold value method, accuracy can only be ensured on condition that parameter space has an obvious peak value. A multi-scale idea is added to the above-mentioned algorithm. Firstly, a primary association is conducted to select several alternative tracks by a low-threshold .Then, alternative tracks are processed by multi-scale clustering methods , through which accurate numbers and parameters of tracks are figured out automatically by means of transforming scale parameters. The first three frames are processed by this algorithm in order to get the first three targets of the track , and then two slightly different gate radius are worked out , mean value of which is used to be the global threshold value of correlation. Moreover, a new model for curvilinear equation correction is applied to the above-mentioned track initiation algorithm for purpose of solving the problem of shape distortion when a space three-dimensional curve is mapped to a two-dimensional bearing-only space. Using sideways-flying, launch and landing as examples to build models and simulate, the application of the proposed approach in simulation proves its effectiveness , accuracy , and adaptivity

  7. IMPROVEMENT AND EXTENSION OF SHAPE EVALUATION CRITERIA IN MULTI-SCALE IMAGE SEGMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sakamoto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available From the last decade, the multi-scale image segmentation is getting a particular interest and practically being used for object-based image analysis. In this study, we have addressed the issues on multi-scale image segmentation, especially, in improving the performances for validity of merging and variety of derived region’s shape. Firstly, we have introduced constraints on the application of spectral criterion which could suppress excessive merging between dissimilar regions. Secondly, we have extended the evaluation for smoothness criterion by modifying the definition on the extent of the object, which was brought for controlling the shape’s diversity. Thirdly, we have developed new shape criterion called aspect ratio. This criterion helps to improve the reproducibility on the shape of object to be matched to the actual objectives of interest. This criterion provides constraint on the aspect ratio in the bounding box of object by keeping properties controlled with conventional shape criteria. These improvements and extensions lead to more accurate, flexible, and diverse segmentation results according to the shape characteristics of the target of interest. Furthermore, we also investigated a technique for quantitative and automatic parameterization in multi-scale image segmentation. This approach is achieved by comparing segmentation result with training area specified in advance by considering the maximization of the average area in derived objects or satisfying the evaluation index called F-measure. Thus, it has been possible to automate the parameterization that suited the objectives especially in the view point of shape’s reproducibility.

  8. Multi-scale path planning for reduced environmental impact of aviation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Scot Edward

    A future air traffic management system capable of rerouting aircraft trajectories in real-time in response to transient and evolving events would result in increased aircraft efficiency, better utilization of the airspace, and decreased environmental impact. Mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) is used within a receding horizon framework to form aircraft trajectories which mitigate persistent contrail formation, avoid areas of convective weather, and seek a minimum fuel solution. Areas conducive to persistent contrail formation and areas of convective weather occur at disparate temporal and spatial scales, and thereby require the receding horizon controller to be adaptable to multi-scale events. In response, a novel adaptable receding horizon controller was developed to account for multi-scale disturbances, as well as generate trajectories using both a penalty function approach for obstacle penetration and hard obstacle avoidance constraints. A realistic aircraft fuel burn model based on aircraft data and engine performance simulations is used to form the cost function in the MILP optimization. The performance of the receding horizon algorithm is tested through simulation. A scalability analysis of the algorithm is conducted to ensure the tractability of the path planner. The adaptable receding horizon algorithm is shown to successfully negotiate multi-scale environments with performance exceeding static receding horizon solutions. The path planner is applied to realistic scenarios involving real atmospheric data. A single flight example for persistent contrail mitigation shows that fuel burn increases 1.48% when approximately 50% of persistent contrails are avoided, but 6.19% when 100% of persistent contrails are avoided. Persistent contrail mitigating trajectories are generated for multiple days of data, and the research shows that 58% of persistent contrails are avoided with a 0.48% increase in fuel consumption when averaged over a year.

  9. Exploring Multi-Scale Spatiotemporal Twitter User Mobility Patterns with a Visual-Analytics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjun Yin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding human mobility patterns is of great importance for urban planning, traffic management, and even marketing campaign. However, the capability of capturing detailed human movements with fine-grained spatial and temporal granularity is still limited. In this study, we extracted high-resolution mobility data from a collection of over 1.3 billion geo-located Twitter messages. Regarding the concerns of infringement on individual privacy, such as the mobile phone call records with restricted access, the dataset is collected from publicly accessible Twitter data streams. In this paper, we employed a visual-analytics approach to studying multi-scale spatiotemporal Twitter user mobility patterns in the contiguous United States during the year 2014. Our approach included a scalable visual-analytics framework to deliver efficiency and scalability in filtering large volume of geo-located tweets, modeling and extracting Twitter user movements, generating space-time user trajectories, and summarizing multi-scale spatiotemporal user mobility patterns. We performed a set of statistical analysis to understand Twitter user mobility patterns across multi-level spatial scales and temporal ranges. In particular, Twitter user mobility patterns measured by the displacements and radius of gyrations of individuals revealed multi-scale or multi-modal Twitter user mobility patterns. By further studying such mobility patterns in different temporal ranges, we identified both consistency and seasonal fluctuations regarding the distance decay effects in the corresponding mobility patterns. At the same time, our approach provides a geo-visualization unit with an interactive 3D virtual globe web mapping interface for exploratory geo-visual analytics of the multi-level spatiotemporal Twitter user movements.

  10. Multi-scale learning based segmentation of glands in digital colonrectal pathology images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Liu, William; Arjun, Shipra; Zhu, Liangjia; Ratner, Vadim; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Joel; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-03-01

    Digital histopathological images provide detailed spatial information of the tissue at micrometer resolution. Among the available contents in the pathology images, meso-scale information, such as the gland morphology, texture, and distribution, are useful diagnostic features. In this work, focusing on the colon-rectal cancer tissue samples, we propose a multi-scale learning based segmentation scheme for the glands in the colon-rectal digital pathology slides. The algorithm learns the gland and non-gland textures from a set of training images in various scales through a sparse dictionary representation. After the learning step, the dictionaries are used collectively to perform the classification and segmentation for the new image.

  11. Multi-scale kinetic description of granular clusters: invariance, balance, and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capriz, Gianfranco; Mariano, Paolo Maria

    2017-12-01

    We discuss a multi-scale continuum representation of bodies made of several mass particles flowing independently each other. From an invariance procedure and a nonstandard balance of inertial actions, we derive the balance equations introduced in earlier work directly in pointwise form, essentially on the basis of physical plausibility. In this way, we analyze their foundations. Then, we propose a Boltzmann-type equation for the distribution of kinetic energies within control volumes in space and indicate how such a distribution allows us to propose a definition of (granular) temperature along processes far from equilibrium.

  12. Multi-scale learning based segmentation of glands in digital colonrectal pathology images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yi; Liu, William; Arjun, Shipra; Zhu, Liangjia; Ratner, Vadim; Kurc, Tahsin; Saltz, Joel; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-02-01

    Digital histopathological images provide detailed spatial information of the tissue at micrometer resolution. Among the available contents in the pathology images, meso-scale information, such as the gland morphology, texture, and distribution, are useful diagnostic features. In this work, focusing on the colon-rectal cancer tissue samples, we propose a multi-scale learning based segmentation scheme for the glands in the colon-rectal digital pathology slides. The algorithm learns the gland and non-gland textures from a set of training images in various scales through a sparse dictionary representation. After the learning step, the dictionaries are used collectively to perform the classification and segmentation for the new image.

  13. Multi-Physics and Multi-Scale Deterioration Modelling of Reinforced Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik; Lepech, M.

    2016-01-01

    Deterioration of reinforced concrete infrastructure such as bridges, tunnels, and buildings represents one of the major challenges currently facing developed countries. While engineering tools and methods for structural modelling and design of new reinforced concrete infrastructure are mature......, methods and tools for modelling decades-long deterioration and maintenance are much less developed. In this paper, a multi-physics and multi-scale modelling approach for structural deterioration of reinforced concrete components due to reinforcement corrosion is presented. The multi-disciplinary modelling...... approach includes physical, chemical, electrochemical, and fracture mechanical processes at the material and meso-scale, which are further coupled with mechanical deterioration processes at the structural scale....

  14. Replication of Non-Trivial Directional Motion in Multi-Scales Observed by the Runs Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yura, Yoshihiro; Ohnishi, Takaaki; Yamada, Kenta; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

    Non-trivial autocorrelation in up-down statistics in financial market price fluctuation is revealed by a multi-scale runs test(Wald-Wolfowitz test). We apply two models, a stochastic price model and dealer model to understand this property. In both approaches we successfully reproduce the non-stationary directional price motions consistent with the runs test by tuning parameters in the models. We find that two types of dealers exist in the markets, a short-time-scale trend-follower and an extended-time-scale contrarian who are active in different time periods.

  15. Multi-scale image segmentation method with visual saliency constraints and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Yu, Jie; Sun, Kaimin

    2018-03-01

    Object-based image analysis method has many advantages over pixel-based methods, so it is one of the current research hotspots. It is very important to get the image objects by multi-scale image segmentation in order to carry out object-based image analysis. The current popular image segmentation methods mainly share the bottom-up segmentation principle, which is simple to realize and the object boundaries obtained are accurate. However, the macro statistical characteristics of the image areas are difficult to be taken into account, and fragmented segmentation (or over-segmentation) results are difficult to avoid. In addition, when it comes to information extraction, target recognition and other applications, image targets are not equally important, i.e., some specific targets or target groups with particular features worth more attention than the others. To avoid the problem of over-segmentation and highlight the targets of interest, this paper proposes a multi-scale image segmentation method with visually saliency graph constraints. Visual saliency theory and the typical feature extraction method are adopted to obtain the visual saliency information, especially the macroscopic information to be analyzed. The visual saliency information is used as a distribution map of homogeneity weight, where each pixel is given a weight. This weight acts as one of the merging constraints in the multi- scale image segmentation. As a result, pixels that macroscopically belong to the same object but are locally different can be more likely assigned to one same object. In addition, due to the constraint of visual saliency model, the constraint ability over local-macroscopic characteristics can be well controlled during the segmentation process based on different objects. These controls will improve the completeness of visually saliency areas in the segmentation results while diluting the controlling effect for non- saliency background areas. Experiments show that this method works

  16. Systematic approximation of multi-scale Feynman integrals arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Borowka, Sophia; Hulme, Daniel

    An algorithm for the systematic analytical approximation of multi-scale Feynman integrals is presented. The algorithm produces algebraic expressions as functions of the kinematical parameters and mass scales appearing in the Feynman integrals, allowing for fast numerical evaluation. The results are valid in all kinematical regions, both above and below thresholds, up to in principle arbitrary orders in the dimensional regulator. The scope of the algorithm is demonstrated by presenting results for selected two-loop three-point and four-point integrals with an internal mass scale that appear in the two-loop amplitudes for Higgs+jet production.

  17. The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-31

    The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

  18. Structural health monitoring using DOG multi-scale space: an approach for analyzing damage characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tian; Xu, Zili

    2018-03-01

    Measurement noise is inevitable in practice; thus, it is difficult to identify defects, cracks or damage in a structure while suppressing noise simultaneously. In this work, a novel method is introduced to detect multiple damage in noisy environments. Based on multi-scale space analysis for discrete signals, a method for extracting damage characteristics from the measured displacement mode shape is illustrated. Moreover, the proposed method incorporates a data fusion algorithm to further eliminate measurement noise-based interference. The effectiveness of the method is verified by numerical and experimental methods applied to different structural types. The results demonstrate that there are two advantages to the proposed method. First, damage features are extracted by the difference of the multi-scale representation; this step is taken such that the interference of noise amplification can be avoided. Second, a data fusion technique applied to the proposed method provides a global decision, which retains the damage features while maximally eliminating the uncertainty. Monte Carlo simulations are utilized to validate that the proposed method has a higher accuracy in damage detection.

  19. A multi-scale framework to link remotely sensed metrics with socioeconomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watmough, Gary; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Palm, Cheryl; Sullivan, Clare; Danylo, Olha; McCallum, Ian

    2017-04-01

    There is increasing interest in the use of remotely sensed satellite data for estimating human poverty as it can bridge data gaps that prevent fine scale monitoring of development goals across large areas. The ways in which metrics derived from satellite imagery are linked with socioeconomic data are crucial for accurate estimation of poverty. Yet, to date, approaches in the literature linking satellite metrics with socioeconomic data are poorly characterized. Typically, approaches use a GIS approach such as circular buffer zones around a village or household or an administrative boundary such as a district or census enumeration area. These polygons are then used to extract environmental data from satellite imagery and related to the socioeconomic data in statistical analyses. The use of a single polygon to link environment and socioeconomic data is inappropriate in coupled human-natural systems as processes operate over multiple scales. Human interactions with the environment occur at multiple levels from individual (household) access to agricultural plots adjacent to homes, to communal access to common pool resources (CPR) such as forests at the village level. Here, we present a multi-scale framework that explicitly considers how people use the landscape. The framework is presented along with a case study example in Kenya. The multi-scale approach could enhance the modelling of human-environment interactions which will have important consequences for monitoring the sustainable development goals for human livelihoods and biodiversity conservation.

  20. Application of multi-scale (cross-) sample entropy for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Kang; Liang, Jui-Chang

    2015-08-01

    This study proposes an information-theoretic structural health monitoring (SHM) system based on multi-scale entropy (MSE) and multi-scale cross-sample entropy (MSCE). By measuring the ambient vibration signal from a structure, the damage condition can be rapidly evaluated via MSE analysis. The damage location can then be detected by analyzing the signals of different floors under the same damage condition via MSCE analysis. Moreover, a damage index is proposed to efficiently quantify the SHM process. Unlike some existing SHM methods, no experimental database or numerical model is required. Instead, a reference measurement of the current stage can initiate and launch the SHM system. A numerical simulation of a four-story steel structure is used to verify that the damage location and condition can be detected by the proposed SHM algorithm, and the location can be efficiently quantified by the damage index. A seven-story scaled-down benchmark structure is then employed for experimental verification. Based on the results, the damage condition can be correctly assessed, and average accuracy rates of 63.4 and 86.6% for the damage location can be achieved using the MSCE and damage index methods, respectively. As only the ambient vibration signal is required with a set of initial reference measurements, the proposed SHM system can be implemented practically with low cost.

  1. Simulating multi-scale oceanic processes around Taiwan on unstructured grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao-Cheng; Zhang, Yinglong J.; Yu, Jason C. S.; Terng, C.; Sun, Weiling; Ye, Fei; Wang, Harry V.; Wang, Zhengui; Huang, Hai

    2017-11-01

    We validate a 3D unstructured-grid (UG) model for simulating multi-scale processes as occurred in Northwestern Pacific around Taiwan using recently developed new techniques (Zhang et al., Ocean Modeling, 102, 64-81, 2016) that require no bathymetry smoothing even for this region with prevalent steep bottom slopes and many islands. The focus is on short-term forecast for several months instead of long-term variability. Compared with satellite products, the errors for the simulated Sea-surface Height (SSH) and Sea-surface Temperature (SST) are similar to a reference data-assimilated global model. In the nearshore region, comparison with 34 tide gauges located around Taiwan indicates an average RMSE of 13 cm for the tidal elevation. The average RMSE for SST at 6 coastal buoys is 1.2 °C. The mean transport and eddy kinetic energy compare reasonably with previously published values and the reference model used to provide boundary and initial conditions. The model suggests ∼2-day interruption of Kuroshio east of Taiwan during a typhoon period. The effect of tidal mixing is shown to be significant nearshore. The multi-scale model is easily extendable to target regions of interest due to its UG framework and a flexible vertical gridding system, which is shown to be superior to terrain-following coordinates.

  2. Multi-scale semi-ideal magnetohydrodynamics of a tokamak plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazdenkov, S.; Sato, Tetsuya; Watanabe, Kunihiko

    1995-09-01

    An analytical model of fast spatial flattening of the toroidal current density and q-profile at the nonlinear stage of (m = 1/n = 1) kink instability of a tokamak plasma is presented. The flattening is shown to be an essentially multi-scale phenomenon which is characterized by, at least, two magnetic Reynolds numbers. The ordinary one, R{sub m}, is related with a characteristic radial scale-length, while the other, R{sub m}{sup *}, corresponds to a characteristic scale-length of plasma inhomogeneity along the magnetic field line. In a highly conducting plasma inside the q = 1 magnetic surface, where q value does not much differ from unity, plasma evolution is governed by a multi-scale non-ideal dynamics characterized by two well-separated magnetic Reynolds numbers, R{sub m} and R{sub m}{sup *} {identical_to} (1 - q) R{sub m}, where R{sub m}{sup *} - O(1) and R{sub m} >> 1. This dynamics consistently explains two seemingly contradictory features recently observed in a numerical simulation [Watanabe et al., 1995]: (i) the current profile (q-profile) is flattened in the magnetohydrodynamic time scale within the q = 1 rational surface; (ii) the magnetic surface keeps its initial circular shape during this evolution. (author).

  3. Flexible feature-space-construction architecture and its VLSI implementation for multi-scale object detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Aiwen; An, Fengwei; Zhang, Xiangyu; Chen, Lei; Huang, Zunkai; Jürgen Mattausch, Hans

    2018-04-01

    Feature extraction techniques are a cornerstone of object detection in computer-vision-based applications. The detection performance of vison-based detection systems is often degraded by, e.g., changes in the illumination intensity of the light source, foreground-background contrast variations or automatic gain control from the camera. In order to avoid such degradation effects, we present a block-based L1-norm-circuit architecture which is configurable for different image-cell sizes, cell-based feature descriptors and image resolutions according to customization parameters from the circuit input. The incorporated flexibility in both the image resolution and the cell size for multi-scale image pyramids leads to lower computational complexity and power consumption. Additionally, an object-detection prototype for performance evaluation in 65 nm CMOS implements the proposed L1-norm circuit together with a histogram of oriented gradients (HOG) descriptor and a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. The proposed parallel architecture with high hardware efficiency enables real-time processing, high detection robustness, small chip-core area as well as low power consumption for multi-scale object detection.

  4. The role of zonal flows in the saturation of multi-scale gyrokinetic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staebler, G. M.; Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States); Howard, N. T. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Holland, C. [University of California San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    The 2D spectrum of the saturated electric potential from gyrokinetic turbulence simulations that include both ion and electron scales (multi-scale) in axisymmetric tokamak geometry is analyzed. The paradigm that the turbulence is saturated when the zonal (axisymmetic) ExB flow shearing rate competes with linear growth is shown to not apply to the electron scale turbulence. Instead, it is the mixing rate by the zonal ExB velocity spectrum with the turbulent distribution function that competes with linear growth. A model of this mechanism is shown to be able to capture the suppression of electron-scale turbulence by ion-scale turbulence and the threshold for the increase in electron scale turbulence when the ion-scale turbulence is reduced. The model computes the strength of the zonal flow velocity and the saturated potential spectrum from the linear growth rate spectrum. The model for the saturated electric potential spectrum is applied to a quasilinear transport model and shown to accurately reproduce the electron and ion energy fluxes of the non-linear gyrokinetic multi-scale simulations. The zonal flow mixing saturation model is also shown to reproduce the non-linear upshift in the critical temperature gradient caused by zonal flows in ion-scale gyrokinetic simulations.

  5. A multi-scale model for correlation in B cell VDJ usage of zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Keyao; Deem, Michael W.

    2011-10-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is one of the model animals used for the study of immunology because the dynamics in the adaptive immune system of zebrafish are similar to that in higher animals. In this work, we built a multi-scale model to simulate the dynamics of B cells in the primary and secondary immune responses of zebrafish. We use this model to explain the reported correlation between VDJ usage of B cell repertoires in individual zebrafish. We use a delay ordinary differential equation (ODE) system to model the immune responses in the 6-month lifespan of a zebrafish. This mean field theory gives the number of high-affinity B cells as a function of time during an infection. The sequences of those B cells are then taken from a distribution calculated by a 'microscopic' random energy model. This generalized NK model shows that mature B cells specific to one antigen largely possess a single VDJ recombination. The model allows first-principle calculation of the probability, p, that two zebrafish responding to the same antigen will select the same VDJ recombination. This probability p increases with the B cell population size and the B cell selection intensity. The probability p decreases with the B cell hypermutation rate. The multi-scale model predicts correlations in the immune system of the zebrafish that are highly similar to that from experiment.

  6. Multi-scale modeling of composites subjected to high speed impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minhyung; Cha, Myung S.; Kim, Nam H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, multi-scale modeling methodology has been applied to simulate the relatively thick composite panels subjected to high speed local impact loading. Instead of massive parallel processing, we propose to use surrogate modeling to bridge micro-scale and macro-scale. Multi-scale modeling of fracture phenomena of composite materials will consist of (1) micro-scale modeling of fiber-matrix structure using the unit-volume-element technique, which can incorporate the boundary effect, and the level set method for crack modeling, which can model the crack propagation independent of finite element mesh; (2) macro-scale simulation of composite panels under high strain-rate impact using material response calculated from micro-scale modeling; and (3) surrogate modeling to integrate the two scales. In order to validate the predictions, first we did the material level lab experiment such as tensile test. We also did the field test of bullet impact into composite panels made of 4 plies fiber. The impact velocity ranges from 300 ˜ 600 m/s.

  7. Robust Face Recognition via Multi-Scale Patch-Based Matrix Regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangwei Gao

    Full Text Available In many real-world applications such as smart card solutions, law enforcement, surveillance and access control, the limited training sample size is the most fundamental problem. By making use of the low-rank structural information of the reconstructed error image, the so-called nuclear norm-based matrix regression has been demonstrated to be effective for robust face recognition with continuous occlusions. However, the recognition performance of nuclear norm-based matrix regression degrades greatly in the face of the small sample size problem. An alternative solution to tackle this problem is performing matrix regression on each patch and then integrating the outputs from all patches. However, it is difficult to set an optimal patch size across different databases. To fully utilize the complementary information from different patch scales for the final decision, we propose a multi-scale patch-based matrix regression scheme based on which the ensemble of multi-scale outputs can be achieved optimally. Extensive experiments on benchmark face databases validate the effectiveness and robustness of our method, which outperforms several state-of-the-art patch-based face recognition algorithms.

  8. The turtle carapace as an optimized multi-scale biological composite armor - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achrai, Ben; Wagner, H Daniel

    2017-09-01

    The turtle carapace, the top dorsal part of the shell, is a remarkable multi-scale dermal armor that has evolved to withstand various types of high-stress events encountered in nature. This keratin-covered boney exoskeleton exhibits a number of structural motifs, including alternating rigid and flexible components, layering and functionally graded elements, designed to protect the reptile during predatory attacks, and smashing events. Here we review the multi-scale structural hierarchy of the turtle carapace and its corresponding mechanical properties. We show how the microscopic features of the carapace govern its various macroscopic mechanical responses relevant to protective functioning, including dynamic (impact and cyclic) compression and bending loading situations. In addition, the effect of hydration, a crucial factor for proper physiological-mechanical behavior of biological materials, is illustrated throughout. We also discuss carapace-inspired designs that could be advantageous over the traditional strategies adopted in impact-resistant materials, and could bring new mechanistic insights. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Learning Dual Multi-Scale Manifold Ranking for Semantic Segmentation of High-Resolution Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Semantic image segmentation has recently witnessed considerable progress by training deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs. The core issue of this technique is the limited capacity of CNNs to depict visual objects. Existing approaches tend to utilize approximate inference in a discrete domain or additional aides and do not have a global optimum guarantee. We propose the use of the multi-label manifold ranking (MR method in solving the linear objective energy function in a continuous domain to delineate visual objects and solve these problems. We present a novel embedded single stream optimization method based on the MR model to avoid approximations without sacrificing expressive power. In addition, we propose a novel network, which we refer to as dual multi-scale manifold ranking (DMSMR network, that combines the dilated, multi-scale strategies with the single stream MR optimization method in the deep learning architecture to further improve the performance. Experiments on high resolution images, including close-range and remote sensing datasets, demonstrate that the proposed approach can achieve competitive accuracy without additional aides in an end-to-end manner.

  10. Multi-scale modelling and numerical simulation of electronic kinetic transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duclous, R.

    2009-11-01

    This research thesis which is at the interface between numerical analysis, plasma physics and applied mathematics, deals with the kinetic modelling and numerical simulations of the electron energy transport and deposition in laser-produced plasmas, having in view the processes of fuel assembly to temperature and density conditions necessary to ignite fusion reactions. After a brief review of the processes at play in the collisional kinetic theory of plasmas, with a focus on basic models and methods to implement, couple and validate them, the author focuses on the collective aspect related to the free-streaming electron transport equation in the non-relativistic limit as well as in the relativistic regime. He discusses the numerical development and analysis of the scheme for the Vlasov-Maxwell system, and the selection of a validation procedure and numerical tests. Then, he investigates more specific aspects of the collective transport: the multi-specie transport, submitted to phase-space discontinuities. Dealing with the multi-scale physics of electron transport with collision source terms, he validates the accuracy of a fast Monte Carlo multi-grid solver for the Fokker-Planck-Landau electron-electron collision operator. He reports realistic simulations for the kinetic electron transport in the frame of the shock ignition scheme, the development and validation of a reduced electron transport angular model. He finally explores the relative importance of the processes involving electron-electron collisions at high energy by means a multi-scale reduced model with relativistic Boltzmann terms

  11. Multi-scale-nonlinear interactions among micro-turbulence, magnetic islands, and zonal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N.; Okamoto, M.; Ramos, J.J.

    2006-10-01

    We investigate multi-scale-nonlinear interactions among micro-instabilities, macro-scale tearing instabilities and zonal flows, by solving reduced two-fluid equations numerically. We find that the nonlinear interactions of these instabilities trigger macro-scale MHD activity after an equilibrium is formed by a balance between the micro-turbulence and zonal flow. This MHD activity breaks magnetic surfaces then this breaking spreads the micro-turbulence over the plasma. These multi-scale-nonlinear interactions can explain the evolution of fluctuation observed in torus plasma experiments because micro-turbulence and MHD instabilities usually appear in the plasma at the same time, in spite of the fact that effects of micro-turbulence and MHD instabilities on plasma confinement have been investigated separately. For instance, MHD activities are observed in reversed shear tokamak plasmas with a transport barrier related to zonal flows and micro-turbulence, and micro-turbulence is observed in Large Helical Device plasmas that usually exhibit MHD activities. (author)

  12. The Multi-Scale Model Approach to Thermohydrology at Yucca Mountain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glascoe, L; Buscheck, T A; Gansemer, J; Sun, Y

    2002-01-01

    The Multi-Scale Thermo-Hydrologic (MSTH) process model is a modeling abstraction of them1 hydrology (TH) of the potential Yucca Mountain repository at multiple spatial scales. The MSTH model as described herein was used for the Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses (BSC, 2001) and is documented in detail in CRWMS M and O (2000) and Glascoe et al. (2002). The model has been validated to a nested grid model in Buscheck et al. (In Review). The MSTH approach is necessary for modeling thermal hydrology at Yucca Mountain for two reasons: (1) varying levels of detail are necessary at different spatial scales to capture important TH processes and (2) a fully-coupled TH model of the repository which includes the necessary spatial detail is computationally prohibitive. The MSTH model consists of six ''submodels'' which are combined in a manner to reduce the complexity of modeling where appropriate. The coupling of these models allows for appropriate consideration of mountain-scale thermal hydrology along with the thermal hydrology of drift-scale discrete waste packages of varying heat load. Two stages are involved in the MSTH approach, first, the execution of submodels, and second, the assembly of submodels using the Multi-scale Thermohydrology Abstraction Code (MSTHAC). MSTHAC assembles the submodels in a five-step process culminating in the TH model output of discrete waste packages including a mountain-scale influence

  13. Multi-scale simulation of single crystal hollow turbine blade manufactured by liquid metal cooling process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Liquid metal cooling (LMC process as a powerful directional solidification (DS technique is prospectively used to manufacture single crystal (SC turbine blades. An understanding of the temperature distribution and microstructure evolution in LMC process is required in order to improve the properties of the blades. For this reason, a multi-scale model coupling with the temperature field, grain growth and solute diffusion was established. The temperature distribution and mushy zone evolution of the hollow blade was simulated and discussed. According to the simulation results, the mushy zone might be convex and ahead of the ceramic beads at a lower withdrawal rate, while it will be concave and laggard at a higher withdrawal rate, and a uniform and horizontal mushy zone will be formed at a medium withdrawal rate. Grain growth of the blade at different withdrawal rates was also investigated. Single crystal structures were all selected out at three different withdrawal rates. Moreover, mis-orientation of the grains at 8 mm/min reached ~30°, while it was ~5° and ~15° at 10 mm/min and 12 mm/min, respectively. The model for predicting dendritic morphology was verified by corresponding experiment. Large scale for 2D dendritic distribution in the whole sections was investigated by experiment and simulation, and they presented a well agreement with each other. Keywords: Hollow blade, Single crystal, Multi-scale simulation, Liquid metal cooling

  14. Multi-Scale Factor Analysis of High-Dimensional Brain Signals

    KAUST Repository

    Ting, Chee-Ming

    2017-05-18

    In this paper, we develop an approach to modeling high-dimensional networks with a large number of nodes arranged in a hierarchical and modular structure. We propose a novel multi-scale factor analysis (MSFA) model which partitions the massive spatio-temporal data defined over the complex networks into a finite set of regional clusters. To achieve further dimension reduction, we represent the signals in each cluster by a small number of latent factors. The correlation matrix for all nodes in the network are approximated by lower-dimensional sub-structures derived from the cluster-specific factors. To estimate regional connectivity between numerous nodes (within each cluster), we apply principal components analysis (PCA) to produce factors which are derived as the optimal reconstruction of the observed signals under the squared loss. Then, we estimate global connectivity (between clusters or sub-networks) based on the factors across regions using the RV-coefficient as the cross-dependence measure. This gives a reliable and computationally efficient multi-scale analysis of both regional and global dependencies of the large networks. The proposed novel approach is applied to estimate brain connectivity networks using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Results on resting-state fMRI reveal interesting modular and hierarchical organization of human brain networks during rest.

  15. Improved convergence of gradient-based reconstruction using multi-scale models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, G.S.; Hanson, K.M.; Koyfman, I.

    1996-01-01

    Geometric models have received increasing attention in medical imaging for tasks such as segmentation, reconstruction, restoration, and registration. In order to determine the best configuration of the geometric model in the context of any of these tasks, one needs to perform a difficult global optimization of an energy function that may have many local minima. Explicit models of geometry, also called deformable models, snakes, or active contours, have been used extensively to solve image segmentation problems in a non-Bayesian framework. Researchers have seen empirically that multi-scale analysis is useful for convergence to a configuration that is near the global minimum. In this type of analysis, the image data are convolved with blur functions of increasing resolution, and an optimal configuration of the snake is found for each blurred image. The configuration obtained using the highest resolution blur is used as the solution to the global optimization problem. In this article, the authors use explicit models of geometry for a variety of Bayesian estimation problems, including image segmentation, reconstruction and restoration. The authors introduce a multi-scale approach that blurs the geometric model, rather than the image data, and show that this approach turns a global, highly nonquadratic optimization into a sequence of local, approximately quadratic problems that converge to the global minimum. The result is a deterministic, robust, and efficient optimization strategy applicable to a wide variety of Bayesian estimation problems in which geometric models of images are an important component

  16. Collaborative Multi-Scale 3d City and Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunig, M.; Borrmann, A.; Rank, E.; Hinz, S.; Kolbe, T.; Schilcher, M.; Mundani, R.-P.; Jubierre, J. R.; Flurl, M.; Thomsen, A.; Donaubauer, A.; Ji, Y.; Urban, S.; Laun, S.; Vilgertshofer, S.; Willenborg, B.; Menninghaus, M.; Steuer, H.; Wursthorn, S.; Leitloff, J.; Al-Doori, M.; Mazroobsemnani, N.

    2017-09-01

    Computer-aided collaborative and multi-scale 3D planning are challenges for complex railway and subway track infrastructure projects in the built environment. Many legal, economic, environmental, and structural requirements have to be taken into account. The stringent use of 3D models in the different phases of the planning process facilitates communication and collaboration between the stake holders such as civil engineers, geological engineers, and decision makers. This paper presents concepts, developments, and experiences gained by an interdisciplinary research group coming from civil engineering informatics and geo-informatics banding together skills of both, the Building Information Modeling and the 3D GIS world. New approaches including the development of a collaborative platform and 3D multi-scale modelling are proposed for collaborative planning and simulation to improve the digital 3D planning of subway tracks and other infrastructures. Experiences during this research and lessons learned are presented as well as an outlook on future research focusing on Building Information Modeling and 3D GIS applications for cities of the future.

  17. The adaptive value of habitat preferences from a multi-scale spatial perspective: insights from marsh-nesting avian species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Jedlikowski

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Habitat selection and its adaptive outcomes are crucial features for animal life-history strategies. Nevertheless, congruence between habitat preferences and breeding success has been rarely demonstrated, which may result from the single-scale evaluation of animal choices. As habitat selection is a complex multi-scale process in many groups of animal species, investigating adaptiveness of habitat selection in a multi-scale framework is crucial. In this study, we explore whether habitat preferences acting at different spatial scales enhance the fitness of bird species, and check the appropriateness of single vs. multi-scale models. We expected that variables found to be more important for habitat selection at individual scale(s, would coherently play a major role in affecting nest survival at the same scale(s. Methods We considered habitat preferences of two Rallidae species, little crake (Zapornia parva and water rail (Rallus aquaticus, at three spatial scales (landscape, territory, and nest-site and related them to nest survival. Single-scale versus multi-scale models (GLS and glmmPQL were compared to check which model better described adaptiveness of habitat preferences. Consistency between the effect of variables on habitat selection and on nest survival was checked to investigate their adaptive value. Results In both species, multi-scale models for nest survival were more supported than single-scale ones. In little crake, the multi-scale model indicated vegetation density and water depth at the territory scale, as well as vegetation height at nest-site scale, as the most important variables. The first two variables were among the most important for nest survival and habitat selection, and the coherent effects suggested the adaptive value of habitat preferences. In water rail, the multi-scale model of nest survival showed vegetation density at territory scale and extent of emergent vegetation within landscape scale as the most

  18. Prediction of irradiation damage effects by multi-scale modelling: EURATOM 3 Framework integrated project perfect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massoud, J.P.; Bugat, St.; Marini, B.; Lidbury, D.; Van Dyck, St.; Debarberis, L.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. In nuclear PWRs, materials undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational life. Utilities operating these reactors must quantify the aging and the potential degradations of reactor pressure vessels and also of internal structures to ensure safe and reliable plant operation. The EURATOM 6. Framework Integrated Project PERFECT (Prediction of Irradiation Damage Effects in Reactor Components) addresses irradiation damage in RPV materials and components by multi-scale modelling. This state-of-the-art approach offers potential advantages over the conventional empirical methods used in current practice of nuclear plant lifetime management. Launched in January 2004, this 48-month project is focusing on two main components of nuclear power plants which are subject to irradiation damage: the ferritic steel reactor pressure vessel and the austenitic steel internals. This project is also an opportunity to integrate the fragmented research and experience that currently exists within Europe in the field of numerical simulation of radiation damage and creates the links with international organisations involved in similar projects throughout the world. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and continuous progress in computer sciences make possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the effects of irradiation on materials microstructure. The consequences of irradiation on mechanical and corrosion properties of materials are also tentatively modelled using such multi-scale modelling. But it requires to develop different mechanistic models at different levels of physics and engineering and to extend the state of knowledge in several scientific fields. And the links between these different kinds of models are particularly delicate to deal with and need specific works. Practically the main objective of PERFECT is to build

  19. Assessing the reliability of components with micro- and nano-structures when they are part a multi-scale system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimi, Nader; Shehadeh, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Products with macro- and meso-scales components have grown into multi-scale systems where some of their components have shrunk to a smaller scale such as micro- and nano-structures. In practice, engineers may be unable to accurately assess their designs to improve the reliability of components in multi-scale systems, because component parts with micro- and nano-structures cannot be realized directly in system design phase. Thus, all kinds of design processes such as engineering verifications for physics or functions become increasingly complex in a muti-scale system. For this shortcoming, we present a parametric Bayesian method that enables engineers to assess indirectly the reliability and the quality of a component with either a micro-structure or a nano-structure using experimental data on failure time of the multi-scale system. Our proposed Bayesian approach is flexible in allowing a general model for distributions of failure times of a multi-scale system and its components. Our method is applied to a simulated data set. - Highlights: • A framework for assessment of reliability of components from a multi-scale system lifetime is presented here. • A Bayesian model is used, allowing instantaneous propagation of knowledge. • A set of analytical and numerical methods is used to make statistical inference about unknown parameters in the model

  20. Vessel Segmentation in Retinal Images Using Multi-scale Line Operator and K-Means Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarzadeh, Vahid Mohammadi; Osareh, Alireza; Shadgar, Bita

    2014-04-01

    Detecting blood vessels is a vital task in retinal image analysis. The task is more challenging with the presence of bright and dark lesions in retinal images. Here, a method is proposed to detect vessels in both normal and abnormal retinal fundus images based on their linear features. First, the negative impact of bright lesions is reduced by using K-means segmentation in a perceptive space. Then, a multi-scale line operator is utilized to detect vessels while ignoring some of the dark lesions, which have intensity structures different from the line-shaped vessels in the retina. The proposed algorithm is tested on two publicly available STARE and DRIVE databases. The performance of the method is measured by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve and the segmentation accuracy. The proposed method achieves 0.9483 and 0.9387 localization accuracy against STARE and DRIVE respectively.

  1. Predicting the breakdown strength and lifetime of nanocomposites using a multi-scale modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yanhui; Zhao, He; Wang, Yixing; Ratcliff, Tyree; Breneman, Curt; Brinson, L. Catherine; Chen, Wei; Schadler, Linda S.

    2017-08-01

    It has been found that doping dielectric polymers with a small amount of nanofiller or molecular additive can stabilize the material under a high field and lead to increased breakdown strength and lifetime. Choosing appropriate fillers is critical to optimizing the material performance, but current research largely relies on experimental trial and error. The employment of computer simulations for nanodielectric design is rarely reported. In this work, we propose a multi-scale modeling approach that employs ab initio, Monte Carlo, and continuum scales to predict the breakdown strength and lifetime of polymer nanocomposites based on the charge trapping effect of the nanofillers. The charge transfer, charge energy relaxation, and space charge effects are modeled in respective hierarchical scales by distinctive simulation techniques, and these models are connected together for high fidelity and robustness. The preliminary results show good agreement with the experimental data, suggesting its promise for use in the computer aided material design of high performance dielectrics.

  2. A Framework for Parallel Numerical Simulations on Multi-Scale Geometries

    KAUST Repository

    Varduhn, Vasco

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, an approach on performing numerical multi-scale simulations on fine detailed geometries is presented. In particular, the focus lies on the generation of sufficient fine mesh representations, whereas a resolution of dozens of millions of voxels is inevitable in order to sufficiently represent the geometry. Furthermore, the propagation of boundary conditions is investigated by using simulation results on the coarser simulation scale as input boundary conditions on the next finer scale. Finally, the applicability of our approach is shown on a two-phase simulation for flooding scenarios in urban structures running from a city wide scale to a fine detailed in-door scale on feature rich building geometries. © 2012 IEEE.

  3. Multi-scale computation methods: Their applications in lithium-ion battery research and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqi, Shi; Jian, Gao; Yue, Liu; Yan, Zhao; Qu, Wu; Wangwei, Ju; Chuying, Ouyang; Ruijuan, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Based upon advances in theoretical algorithms, modeling and simulations, and computer technologies, the rational design of materials, cells, devices, and packs in the field of lithium-ion batteries is being realized incrementally and will at some point trigger a paradigm revolution by combining calculations and experiments linked by a big shared database, enabling accelerated development of the whole industrial chain. Theory and multi-scale modeling and simulation, as supplements to experimental efforts, can help greatly to close some of the current experimental and technological gaps, as well as predict path-independent properties and help to fundamentally understand path-independent performance in multiple spatial and temporal scales. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51372228 and 11234013), the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2015AA034201), and Shanghai Pujiang Program, China (Grant No. 14PJ1403900).

  4. Multi-scale modeling of soft fibrous tissues based on proteoglycan mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linka, Kevin; Khiêm, Vu Ngoc; Itskov, Mikhail

    2016-08-16

    Collagen in the form of fibers or fibrils is an essential source of strength and structural integrity in most organs of the human body. Recently, with the help of complex experimental setups, a paradigm change concerning the mechanical contribution of proteoglycans (PGs) took place. Accordingly, PG connections protect the surrounding collagen fibrils from over-stretching rather than transmitting load between them. In this paper, we describe the reported PG mechanics and incorporate it into a multi-scale model of soft fibrous tissues. To this end, a nano-to-micro model of a single collagen fiber is developed by taking the entropic-energetic transition on the collagen molecule level into account. The microscopic damage occurring inside the collagen fiber is elucidated by sliding of PGs as well as by over-stretched collagen molecules. Predictions of this two-constituent-damage model are compared to experimental data available in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Multi scale thermal hydraulic analysis of PWRs using the CUPID code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Han Young; Cho, Hyoung Kyu; Lee, Jae Ryong; Park, Ik Kyu [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Jun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    KAERI has developed a two-phase CFD code, CUPID, for a refined calculation of transient two-phase flows related to nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics, and its numerical models have been verified in previous studies. In this paper, the CUPID code is validated against experiments on the downcomer boiling and moderator flow in a Calandria vessel. Physical models relevant to the validation are discussed. Thereafter, multi-scale thermal hydraulic analyses using the CUPID code are introduced. At first, a component-scale calculation for the passive condensate cooling tank (PCCT) of the PASCAL experiment is linked to the CFD-scale calculation for LOCA boiling heat transfer outside the heat exchanger tube. Next, the Rossendorf coolant mixing (ROCOM) test is analyzed by using the CUPID code, which is implicitly coupled with a system scale code, MARS.

  6. Improved anomaly detection using multi-scale PLS and generalized likelihood ratio test

    KAUST Repository

    Madakyaru, Muddu

    2017-02-16

    Process monitoring has a central role in the process industry to enhance productivity, efficiency, and safety, and to avoid expensive maintenance. In this paper, a statistical approach that exploit the advantages of multiscale PLS models (MSPLS) and those of a generalized likelihood ratio (GLR) test to better detect anomalies is proposed. Specifically, to consider the multivariate and multi-scale nature of process dynamics, a MSPLS algorithm combining PLS and wavelet analysis is used as modeling framework. Then, GLR hypothesis testing is applied using the uncorrelated residuals obtained from MSPLS model to improve the anomaly detection abilities of these latent variable based fault detection methods even further. Applications to a simulated distillation column data are used to evaluate the proposed MSPLS-GLR algorithm.

  7. From seconds to months: an overview of multi-scale dynamics of mobile telephone calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saramäki, Jari; Moro, Esteban

    2015-06-01

    Big Data on electronic records of social interactions allow approaching human behaviour and sociality from a quantitative point of view with unforeseen statistical power. Mobile telephone Call Detail Records (CDRs), automatically collected by telecom operators for billing purposes, have proven especially fruitful for understanding one-to-one communication patterns as well as the dynamics of social networks that are reflected in such patterns. We present an overview of empirical results on the multi-scale dynamics of social dynamics and networks inferred from mobile telephone calls. We begin with the shortest timescales and fastest dynamics, such as burstiness of call sequences between individuals, and "zoom out" towards longer temporal and larger structural scales, from temporal motifs formed by correlated calls between multiple individuals to long-term dynamics of social groups. We conclude this overview with a future outlook.

  8. MEGAPOLI: concept of multi-scale modelling of megacity impact on air quality and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklanov, A.; Lawrence, M.; Pandis, S.; Mahura, A.; Finardi, S.; Moussiopoulos, N.; Beekmann, M.; Laj, P.; Gomes, L.; Jaffrezo, J.-L.; Borbon, A.; Coll, I.; Gros, V.; Sciare, J.; Kukkonen, J.; Galmarini, S.; Giorgi, F.; Grimmond, S.; Esau, I.; Stohl, A.; Denby, B.; Wagner, T.; Butler, T.; Baltensperger, U.; Builtjes, P.; van den Hout, D.; van der Gon, H. D.; Collins, B.; Schluenzen, H.; Kulmala, M.; Zilitinkevich, S.; Sokhi, R.; Friedrich, R.; Theloke, J.; Kummer, U.; Jalkinen, L.; Halenka, T.; Wiedensholer, A.; Pyle, J.; Rossow, W. B.

    2010-11-01

    The EU FP7 Project MEGAPOLI: "Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation" (http://megapoli.info) brings together leading European research groups, state-of-the-art scientific tools and key players from non-European countries to investigate the interactions among megacities, air quality and climate. MEGAPOLI bridges the spatial and temporal scales that connect local emissions, air quality and weather with global atmospheric chemistry and climate. The suggested concept of multi-scale integrated modelling of megacity impact on air quality and climate and vice versa is discussed in the paper. It requires considering different spatial and temporal dimensions: time scales from seconds and hours (to understand the interaction mechanisms) up to years and decades (to consider the climate effects); spatial resolutions: with model down- and up-scaling from street- to global-scale; and two-way interactions between meteorological and chemical processes.

  9. Results from Navigator GPS Flight Testing for the Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lulich, Tyler D.; Bamford, William A.; Wintermitz, Luke M. B.; Price, Samuel R.

    2012-01-01

    The recent delivery of the first Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Navigator Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers to the Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission spacecraft is a high water mark crowning a decade of research and development in high-altitude space-based GPS. Preceding MMS delivery, the engineering team had developed receivers to support multiple missions and mission studies, such as Low Earth Orbit (LEO) navigation for the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM), above the constellation navigation for the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) proof-of-concept studies, cis-Lunar navigation with rapid re-acquisition during re-entry for the Orion Project and an orbital demonstration on the Space Shuttle during the Hubble Servicing Mission (HSM-4).

  10. Automatic Matching of Multi-scale Road Networks under the Constraints of Smaller Scale Road Meshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEI Hongxing

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to achieve automatic matching for multi-scale roads under the constraints of the smaller scale data. Firstly, meshes should be extracted from the two different scales road data. Secondly, several basic meshes in the larger scale road network will be merged as a composite one, which will be matched with one mesh from the smaller scale road network, so that the meshes with many-to-one and one-to-one matching relationships will be matched. Thirdly, meshes from the two different scale road data with many-to-many matching relationships will be matched. Finally, road will be classified into two categories under the constraints of meshes: mesh border roads and mesh internal roads, and then matching will be done in their own categories according to the matching relationships between the two scales meshes. The results showed that roads from different scale will be more precisely matched.

  11. Multi-scale Food Energy and Water Dynamics in the Blue Nile Highlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitchik, B. F.; Simane, B.; Block, P. J.; Foltz, J.; Mueller-Mahn, D.; Gilioli, G.; Sciarretta, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Ethiopian highlands are often called the "water tower of Africa," giving rise to major transboundary rivers. Rapid hydropower development is quickly transforming these highlands into the "power plant of Africa" as well. For local people, however, they are first and foremost a land of small farms, devoted primarily to subsistence agriculture. Under changing climate, rapid national economic growth, and steadily increasing population and land pressures, these mountains and their inhabitants have become the focal point of a multi-scale food-energy-water nexus with significant implications across East Africa. Here we examine coupled natural-human system dynamics that emerge when basin and nation scale resource development strategies are superimposed on a local economy that is largely subsistence based. Sensitivity to local and remote climate shocks are considered, as is the role of Earth Observation in understanding and informing management of food-energy-water resources across scales.

  12. A Multi-Scale, Multi-Physics Optimization Framework for Additively Manufactured Structural Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Wardany, Tahany; Lynch, Mathew; Gu, Wenjiong; Hsu, Arthur; Klecka, Michael; Nardi, Aaron; Viens, Daniel

    This paper proposes an optimization framework enabling the integration of multi-scale / multi-physics simulation codes to perform structural optimization design for additively manufactured components. Cold spray was selected as the additive manufacturing (AM) process and its constraints were identified and included in the optimization scheme. The developed framework first utilizes topology optimization to maximize stiffness for conceptual design. The subsequent step applies shape optimization to refine the design for stress-life fatigue. The component weight was reduced by 20% while stresses were reduced by 75% and the rigidity was improved by 37%. The framework and analysis codes were implemented using Altair software as well as an in-house loading code. The optimized design was subsequently produced by the cold spray process.

  13. Multi-scale freeform surface texture filtering using a mesh relaxation scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Xiangqian; Abdul-Rahman, Hussein S; Scott, Paul J

    2013-01-01

    Surface filtering algorithms using Fourier, Gaussian, wavelets, etc, are well-established for simple Euclidean geometries. However, these filtration techniques cannot be applied to today's complex freeform surfaces, which have non-Euclidean geometries, without distortion of the results. This paper proposes a new multi-scale filtering algorithm for freeform surfaces that are represented by triangular meshes based on a mesh relaxation scheme. The proposed algorithm is capable of decomposing a freeform surface into different scales and separating surface roughness, waviness and form from each other, as will be demonstrated throughout the paper. Results of applying the proposed algorithm to computer-generated as well as real surfaces are represented and compared with a lifting wavelet filtering algorithm. (paper)

  14. Multi-scale process and supply chain modelling: from lignocellulosic feedstock to process and products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Shah, Nilay

    2011-04-06

    There is a large body of literature regarding the choice and optimization of different processes for converting feedstock to bioethanol and bio-commodities; moreover, there has been some reasonable technological development in bioconversion methods over the past decade. However, the eventual cost and other important metrics relating to sustainability of biofuel production will be determined not only by the performance of the conversion process, but also by the performance of the entire supply chain from feedstock production to consumption. Moreover, in order to ensure world-class biorefinery performance, both the network and the individual components must be designed appropriately, and allocation of resources over the resulting infrastructure must effectively be performed. The goal of this work is to describe the key challenges in bioenergy supply chain modelling and then to develop a framework and methodology to show how multi-scale modelling can pave the way to answer holistic supply chain questions, such as the prospects for second generation bioenergy crops.

  15. Cerebellum segmentation in MRI using atlas registration and local multi-scale image descriptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Lijn, F.; de Bruijne, M.; Hoogendam, Y.Y.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a novel cerebellum segmentation method for MRI, based on a combination of statistical models of the structure's expected location in the brain and its local appearance. The appearance model is obtained from a k-nearest-neighbor classifier, which uses a set of multi-scale local image...... descriptors as features. The spatial model is constructed by registering multiple manually annotated datasets to the unlabeled target image. The two components are then combined in a Bayesian framework. The method is quantitatively validated in a leave-one-out experiment using 18 MR images of elderly subjects....... The experiment showed that the method produces accurate segmentations. The mean Dice similarity index compared to the manual reference was 0.953 for left and right, and the mean surface distance was 0.49 mm for left and 0.50 mm for right. The combined atlas- and appearance-based method was found to be more...

  16. Multi-scale high-performance fluid flow: Simulations through porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Perović, Nevena

    2016-08-03

    Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations on geometrically complex domains such as porous media require high geometric discretisation for accurately capturing the tested physical phenomena. Moreover, when considering a large area and analysing local effects, it is necessary to deploy a multi-scale approach that is both memory-intensive and time-consuming. Hence, this type of analysis must be conducted on a high-performance parallel computing infrastructure. In this paper, the coupling of two different scales based on the Navier–Stokes equations and Darcy\\'s law is described followed by the generation of complex geometries, and their discretisation and numerical treatment. Subsequently, the necessary parallelisation techniques and a rather specific tool, which is capable of retrieving data from the supercomputing servers and visualising them during the computation runtime (i.e. in situ) are described. All advantages and possible drawbacks of this approach, together with the preliminary results and sensitivity analyses are discussed in detail.

  17. Numerical methods for simulating blood flow at macro, micro, and multi scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, Yohsuke; Omori, Toshihiro; Shimogonya, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-07-26

    In the past decade, numerical methods for the computational biomechanics of blood flow have progressed to overcome difficulties in diverse applications from cellular to organ scales. Such numerical methods may be classified by the type of computational mesh used for the fluid domain, into fixed mesh methods, moving mesh (boundary-fitted mesh) methods, and mesh-free methods. The type of computational mesh used is closely related to the characteristics of each method. We herein provide an overview of numerical methods recently used to simulate blood flow at macro and micro scales, with a focus on computational meshes. We also discuss recent progress in the multi-scale modeling of blood flow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Modelling an industrial anaerobic granular reactor using a multi-scale approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldman, Hannah; Flores Alsina, Xavier; Ramin, Pedram

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to show the results of an industrial project dealing with modelling of anaerobic digesters. A multi-scale mathematical approach is developed to describe reactor hydrodynamics, granule growth/distribution and microbial competition/inhibition for substrate/space within...... the biofilm. The main biochemical and physico-chemical processes in the model are based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No 1 (ADM1) extended with the fate of phosphorus (P), sulfur (S) and ethanol (Et-OH). Wastewater dynamic conditions are reproduced and data frequency increased using the Benchmark...... simulations show the effects on the overall process performance when operational (pH) and loading (S:COD) conditions are modified. Lastly, the effect of intra-granular precipitation on the overall organic/inorganic distribution is assessed at: 1) different times; and, 2) reactor heights. Finally...

  19. A multi-scale integrated analysis of the energy use in Romania, Bulgaria, Poland and Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorgulescu, Raluca I.; Polimeni, John M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses energy use in the case of four countries, Bulgaria, Poland, Hungary, and Romania, which changed the economic system from command economy to open-market. The analysis provided uses the multi-scale integrated analysis of societal metabolism (MSIASM) approach and contrasts it with the use of the traditional indicators approach (GDP growth rates and energy intensity). These traditional indicators have been widely criticized for being inadequate reflections of how energy policies work. Furthermore, the one-size-fits-all policies that result from analyzing these indicators are inaccurate, particularly for transitional economies. The alternative indicators, economic labor productivity, saturation index of human activity, and exosomatic metabolic rates are used to investigate the four case studies considering the complexity of the transition process

  20. High resolution multi-scale air quality modelling for all streets in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steen Solvang; Ketzel, Matthias; Becker, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The annual concentrations of NO2, PM2.5 and PM10 in 2012 have for the first time been modelled for all 2.4 million addresses in Denmark based on a multi-scale air quality modelling approach. All addresses include residential, industrial, institutional, shop, school, restaurant addresses etc...... concentrations of NO2 for the five available street monitoring stations are within −27% to +12%. The model results were also verified with comparisons with previous model results for NO2 at 98 selected streets in Copenhagen and 31 streets in Aalborg. The verification showed good correlation in Copenhagen (r2 = 0....... The approach is based on a suite of chemistry-transport models all developed at Aarhus University and includes regional modelling, urban background modelling and street modelling. Information about traffic volumes is based on a newly developed national Danish Transport Model, and national travel speed data...

  1. Enhanced inertia from lossy effective fluids using multi-scale sonic crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D. Guild

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a recent theoretically predicted phenomenon of enhanced permittivity with electromagnetic waves using lossy materials is investigated for the analogous case of mass density and acoustic waves, which represents inertial enhancement. Starting from fundamental relationships for the homogenized quasi-static effective density of a fluid host with fluid inclusions, theoretical expressions are developed for the conditions on the real and imaginary parts of the constitutive fluids to have inertial enhancement, which are verified with numerical simulations. Realizable structures are designed to demonstrate this phenomenon using multi-scale sonic crystals, which are fabricated using a 3D printer and tested in an acoustic impedance tube, yielding good agreement with the theoretical predictions and demonstrating enhanced inertia.

  2. Aerosol indirect effects in a multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Much of the large uncertainty in estimates of anthropogenic aerosol effects on climate arises from the multi-scale nature of the interactions between aerosols, clouds and dynamics, which are difficult to represent in conventional general circulation models (GCMs. In this study, we use a multi-scale aerosol-climate model that treats aerosols and clouds across multiple scales to study aerosol indirect effects. This multi-scale aerosol-climate model is an extension of a multi-scale modeling framework (MMF model that embeds a cloud-resolving model (CRM within each vertical column of a GCM grid. The extension allows a more physically-based treatment of aerosol-cloud interactions in both stratiform and convective clouds on the global scale in a computationally feasible way. Simulated model fields, including liquid water path (LWP, ice water path, cloud fraction, shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, precipitation, water vapor, and cloud droplet number concentration are in reasonable agreement with observations. The new model performs quantitatively similar to the previous version of the MMF model in terms of simulated cloud fraction and precipitation. The simulated change in shortwave cloud forcing from anthropogenic aerosols is −0.77 W m−2, which is less than half of that (−1.79 W m−2 calculated by the host GCM (NCAR CAM5 with traditional cloud parameterizations and is also at the low end of the estimates of other conventional global aerosol-climate models. The smaller forcing in the MMF model is attributed to a smaller (3.9 % increase in LWP from preindustrial conditions (PI to present day (PD compared with 15.6 % increase in LWP in stratiform clouds in CAM5. The difference is caused by a much smaller response in LWP to a given perturbation in cloud condensation nuclei (CCN concentrations from PI to PD in the MMF (about one-third of that in CAM5, and, to a lesser extent, by a smaller relative increase in CCN

  3. Train axle bearing fault detection using a feature selection scheme based multi-scale morphological filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifan; Liang, Xihui; Lin, Jianhui; Chen, Yuejian; Liu, Jianxin

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents a novel signal processing scheme, feature selection based multi-scale morphological filter (MMF), for train axle bearing fault detection. In this scheme, more than 30 feature indicators of vibration signals are calculated for axle bearings with different conditions and the features which can reflect fault characteristics more effectively and representatively are selected using the max-relevance and min-redundancy principle. Then, a filtering scale selection approach for MMF based on feature selection and grey relational analysis is proposed. The feature selection based MMF method is tested on diagnosis of artificially created damages of rolling bearings of railway trains. Experimental results show that the proposed method has a superior performance in extracting fault features of defective train axle bearings. In addition, comparisons are performed with the kurtosis criterion based MMF and the spectral kurtosis criterion based MMF. The proposed feature selection based MMF method outperforms these two methods in detection of train axle bearing faults.

  4. Nonsolvent-assisted fabrication of multi-scaled polylactide as superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yafang; Liu, Xuying; Yang, Huige; Zhang, Li; Cui, Zhe; Niu, Mingjun; Liu, Hongzhi; Chen, Jinzhou

    2016-03-14

    The solution-processing fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces is currently intriguing, owing to high-efficiency, low cost, and energy-consuming. Here, a facile nonsolvent-assisted process was proposed for the fabrication of the multi-scaled surface roughness in polylactide (PLA) films, thereby resulting in a significant transformation in the surface wettability from intrinsic hydrophilicity to superhydrophobicity. Moreover, it was found that the surface topographical structure of PLA films can be manipulated by varying the compositions of the PLA solutions. And the samples showed superhydrophobic surfaces as well as high melting enthalpy and crystallinity. In particular, a high contact angle of 155.8° together with a high adhesive force of 184 μN was yielded with the assistance of a multi-nonsolvent system, which contributed to the co-existence of micro-/nano-scale hierarchical structures.

  5. Geo-spatial Cognition on Human's Social Activity Space Based on Multi-scale Grids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAI Weixin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Widely applied location aware devices, including mobile phones and GPS receivers, have provided great convenience for collecting large volume individuals' geographical information. The researches on the human's society behavior space has attracts an increasingly number of researchers. In our research, based on location-based Flickr data From 2004 to May, 2014 in China, we choose five levels of spatial grids to form the multi-scale frame for investigate the correlation between the scale and the geo-spatial cognition on human's social activity space. The HT-index is selected as the fractal inspired by Alexander to estimate the maturity of the society activity on different scales. The results indicate that that the scale characteristics are related to the spatial cognition to a certain extent. It is favorable to use the spatial grid as a tool to control scales for geo-spatial cognition on human's social activity space.

  6. Multi-scale anomaly detection algorithm based on infrequent pattern of time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Yun; Zhan, Yan-Yan

    2008-04-01

    In this paper, we propose two anomaly detection algorithms PAV and MPAV on time series. The first basic idea of this paper defines that the anomaly pattern is the most infrequent time series pattern, which is the lowest support pattern. The second basic idea of this paper is that PAV detects directly anomalies in the original time series, and MPAV algorithm extraction anomaly in the wavelet approximation coefficient of the time series. For complexity analyses, as the wavelet transform have the functions to compress data, filter noise, and maintain the basic form of time series, the MPAV algorithm, while maintaining the accuracy of the algorithm improves the efficiency. As PAV and MPAV algorithms are simple and easy to realize without training, this proposed multi-scale anomaly detection algorithm based on infrequent pattern of time series can therefore be proved to be very useful for computer science applications.

  7. A mixed parallel strategy for the solution of coupled multi-scale problems at finite strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, I. A. Rodrigues; Pires, F. M. Andrade; Reis, F. J. P.

    2017-09-01

    A mixed parallel strategy for the solution of homogenization-based multi-scale constitutive problems undergoing finite strains is proposed. The approach aims to reduce the computational time and memory requirements of non-linear coupled simulations that use finite element discretization at both scales (FE^2 ). In the first level of the algorithm, a non-conforming domain decomposition technique, based on the FETI method combined with a mortar discretization at the interface of macroscopic subdomains, is employed. A master-slave scheme, which distributes tasks by macroscopic element and adopts dynamic scheduling, is then used for each macroscopic subdomain composing the second level of the algorithm. This strategy allows the parallelization of FE^2 simulations in computers with either shared memory or distributed memory architectures. The proposed strategy preserves the quadratic rates of asymptotic convergence that characterize the Newton-Raphson scheme. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed parallel strategy.

  8. Multi-Scale Modeling of Liquid Phase Sintering Affected by Gravity: Preliminary Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olevsky, Eugene; German, Randall M.

    2012-01-01

    A multi-scale simulation concept taking into account impact of gravity on liquid phase sintering is described. The gravity influence can be included at both the micro- and macro-scales. At the micro-scale, the diffusion mass-transport is directionally modified in the framework of kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations to include the impact of gravity. The micro-scale simulations can provide the values of the constitutive parameters for macroscopic sintering simulations. At the macro-scale, we are attempting to embed a continuum model of sintering into a finite-element framework that includes the gravity forces and substrate friction. If successful, the finite elements analysis will enable predictions relevant to space-based processing, including size and shape and property predictions. Model experiments are underway to support the models via extraction of viscosity moduli versus composition, particle size, heating rate, temperature and time.

  9. Multi-scale spatial modeling of human exposure from local sources to global intake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wannaz, Cedric; Fantke, Peter; Jolliet, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    Exposure studies, used in human health risk and impact assessments of chemicals are largely performed locally or regionally. It is usually not known how global impacts resulting from exposure to point source emissions compare to local impacts. To address this problem, we introduce Pangea......, an innovative multi-scale, spatial multimedia fate and exposure assessment model. We study local to global population exposure associated with emissions from 126 point sources matching locations of waste-to-energy plants across France. Results for three chemicals with distinct physicochemical properties...... are expressed as the evolution of the population intake fraction through inhalation and ingestion as a function of the distance from sources. For substances with atmospheric half-lives longer than a week, less than 20% of the global population intake through inhalation (median of 126 emission scenarios) can...

  10. Multi-scale Clustering of Points Synthetically Considering Lines and Polygons Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Considering the complexity and discontinuity of spatial data distribution, a clustering algorithm of points was proposed. To accurately identify and express the spatial correlation among points,lines and polygons, a Voronoi diagram that is generated by all spatial features is introduced. According to the distribution characteristics of point's position, an area threshold used to control clustering granularity was calculated. Meanwhile, judging scale convergence by constant area threshold, the algorithm classifies spatial features based on multi-scale, with an O(n log n running time.Results indicate that spatial scale converges self-adaptively according with distribution of points.Without the custom parameters, the algorithm capable to discover arbitrary shape clusters which be bound by lines and polygons, and is robust for outliers.

  11. A mixed parallel strategy for the solution of coupled multi-scale problems at finite strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, I. A. Rodrigues; Pires, F. M. Andrade; Reis, F. J. P.

    2018-02-01

    A mixed parallel strategy for the solution of homogenization-based multi-scale constitutive problems undergoing finite strains is proposed. The approach aims to reduce the computational time and memory requirements of non-linear coupled simulations that use finite element discretization at both scales (FE^2). In the first level of the algorithm, a non-conforming domain decomposition technique, based on the FETI method combined with a mortar discretization at the interface of macroscopic subdomains, is employed. A master-slave scheme, which distributes tasks by macroscopic element and adopts dynamic scheduling, is then used for each macroscopic subdomain composing the second level of the algorithm. This strategy allows the parallelization of FE^2 simulations in computers with either shared memory or distributed memory architectures. The proposed strategy preserves the quadratic rates of asymptotic convergence that characterize the Newton-Raphson scheme. Several examples are presented to demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed parallel strategy.

  12. Multi-scale modeling of inter-granular fracture in UO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Tonks, Michael R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Biner, S. Bulent [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    A hierarchical multi-scale approach is pursued in this work to investigate the influence of porosity, pore and grain size on the intergranular brittle fracture in UO2. In this approach, molecular dynamics simulations are performed to obtain the fracture properties for different grain boundary types. A phase-field model is then utilized to perform intergranular fracture simulations of representative microstructures with different porosities, pore and grain sizes. In these simulations the grain boundary fracture properties obtained from molecular dynamics simulations are used. The responses from the phase-field fracture simulations are then fitted with a stress-based brittle fracture model usable at the engineering scale. This approach encapsulates three different length and time scales, and allows the development of microstructurally informed engineering scale model from properties evaluated at the atomistic scale.

  13. MREG V1.1 : a multi-scale image registration algorithm for SAR applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichel, Paul H.

    2013-08-01

    MREG V1.1 is the sixth generation SAR image registration algorithm developed by the Signal Processing&Technology Department for Synthetic Aperture Radar applications. Like its predecessor algorithm REGI, it employs a powerful iterative multi-scale paradigm to achieve the competing goals of sub-pixel registration accuracy and the ability to handle large initial offsets. Since it is not model based, it allows for high fidelity tracking of spatially varying terrain-induced misregistration. Since it does not rely on image domain phase, it is equally adept at coherent and noncoherent image registration. This document provides a brief history of the registration processors developed by Dept. 5962 leading up to MREG V1.1, a full description of the signal processing steps involved in the algorithm, and a user's manual with application specific recommendations for CCD, TwoColor MultiView, and SAR stereoscopy.

  14. Segmentation of phase contrast microscopy images based on multi-scale local Basic Image Features histograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaccard, N; Szita, N; Griffin, L D

    2017-09-03

    Phase contrast microscopy (PCM) is routinely used for the inspection of adherent cell cultures in all fields of biology and biomedicine. Key decisions for experimental protocols are often taken by an operator based on typically qualitative observations. However, automated processing and analysis of PCM images remain challenging due to the low contrast between foreground objects (cells) and background as well as various imaging artefacts. We propose a trainable pixel-wise segmentation approach whereby image structures and symmetries are encoded in the form of multi-scale Basic Image Features local histograms, and classification of them is learned by random decision trees. This approach was validated for segmentation of cell versus background, and discrimination between two different cell types. Performance close to that of state-of-the-art specialised algorithms was achieved despite the general nature of the method. The low processing time ( images) is suitable for batch processing of experimental data as well as for interactive segmentation applications.

  15. A tool for multi-scale modelling of the renal nephron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickerson, David P.; Terkildsen, Jonna R.; Hamilton, Kirk L.; Hunter, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the development of a tool, which provides users with the ability to visualize and interact with a comprehensive description of a multi-scale model of the renal nephron. A one-dimensional anatomical model of the nephron has been created and is used for visualization and modelling of tubule transport in various nephron anatomical segments. Mathematical models of nephron segments are embedded in the one-dimensional model. At the cellular level, these segment models use models encoded in CellML to describe cellular and subcellular transport kinetics. A web-based presentation environment has been developed that allows the user to visualize and navigate through the multi-scale nephron model, including simulation results, at the different spatial scales encompassed by the model description. The Zinc extension to Firefox is used to provide an interactive three-dimensional view of the tubule model and the native Firefox rendering of scalable vector graphics is used to present schematic diagrams for cellular and subcellular scale models. The model viewer is embedded in a web page that dynamically presents content based on user input. For example, when viewing the whole nephron model, the user might be presented with information on the various embedded segment models as they select them in the three-dimensional model view. Alternatively, the user chooses to focus the model viewer on a cellular model located in a particular nephron segment in order to view the various membrane transport proteins. Selecting a specific protein may then present the user with a description of the mathematical model governing the behaviour of that protein—including the mathematical model itself and various simulation experiments used to validate the model against the literature. PMID:22670210

  16. A physiologically based, multi-scale model of skeletal muscle structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eRöhrle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Models of skeletal muscle can be classified as phenomenological or biophysical. Phenomenological models predict the muscle's response to a specified input based on experimental measurements. Prominent phenomenological models are the Hill-type muscle models, which have been incorporated into rigid-body modelling frameworks, and three-dimensional continuum-mechanical models. Biophysically based models attempt to predict the muscle's response as emerging from the underlying physiology of the system. In this contribution, the conventional biophysically based modelling methodology is extended to include several structural and functional characteristics of skeletal muscle. The result is a physiologically based, multi-scale skeletal muscle finite element model that is capable of representing detailed, geometrical descriptions of skeletal muscle fibres and their grouping. Together with a well-established model of motor unit recruitment, the electro-physiological behaviour of single muscle fibres within motor units is computed and linked to a continuum-mechanical constitutive law. The bridging between the cellular level and the organ level has been achieved via a multi-scale constitutive law and homogenisation. The effect of homogenisation has been investigated by varying the number of embedded skeletal muscle fibres and/or motor units and computing the resulting exerted muscle forces while applying the same excitatory input. All simulations were conducted using an anatomically realistic finite element model of the Tibialis Anterior muscle. Given the fact that the underlying electro-physiological cellular muscle model is capable of modelling metabolic fatigue effects such as potassium accumulation in the T-tubular space and inorganic phosphate build-up, the proposed framework provides a novel simulation-based way to investigate muscle behaviour ranging from motor unit recruitment to force generation and fatigue.

  17. Multi-scale clustering by building a robust and self correcting ultrametric topology on data points.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsieh Fushing

    Full Text Available The advent of high-throughput technologies and the concurrent advances in information sciences have led to an explosion in size and complexity of the data sets collected in biological sciences. The biggest challenge today is to assimilate this wealth of information into a conceptual framework that will help us decipher biological functions. A large and complex collection of data, usually called a data cloud, naturally embeds multi-scale characteristics and features, generically termed geometry. Understanding this geometry is the foundation for extracting knowledge from data. We have developed a new methodology, called data cloud geometry-tree (DCG-tree, to resolve this challenge. This new procedure has two main features that are keys to its success. Firstly, it derives from the empirical similarity measurements a hierarchy of clustering configurations that captures the geometric structure of the data. This hierarchy is then transformed into an ultrametric space, which is then represented via an ultrametric tree or a Parisi matrix. Secondly, it has a built-in mechanism for self-correcting clustering membership across different tree levels. We have compared the trees generated with this new algorithm to equivalent trees derived with the standard Hierarchical Clustering method on simulated as well as real data clouds from fMRI brain connectivity studies, cancer genomics, giraffe social networks, and Lewis Carroll's Doublets network. In each of these cases, we have shown that the DCG trees are more robust and less sensitive to measurement errors, and that they provide a better quantification of the multi-scale geometric structures of the data. As such, DCG-tree is an effective tool for analyzing complex biological data sets.

  18. Mapping transient hyperventilation induced alterations with estimates of the multi-scale dynamics of BOLD signal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesa J Kiviniemi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Temporal blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD contrast signals in functional MRI during rest may be characterized by power spectral distribution (PSD trends of the form 1/f α. Trends with 1/f characteristics comprise fractal properties with repeating oscillation patterns in multiple time scales. Estimates of the fractal properties enable the quantification of phenomena that may otherwise be difficult to measure, such as transient, non-linear changes. In this study it was hypothesized that the fractal metrics of 1/f BOLD signal trends can map changes related to dynamic, multi-scale alterations in cerebral blood flow (CBF after a transient hyperventilation challenge. Twenty-three normal adults were imaged in a resting-state before and after hyperventilation. Different variables (1/f trend constant α, fractal dimension Df, and, Hurst exponent H characterizing the trends were measured from BOLD signals. The results show that fractal metrics of the BOLD signal follow the fractional Gaussian noise model, even during the dynamic CBF change that follows hyperventilation. The most dominant effect on the fractal metrics was detected in grey matter, in line with previous hyperventilation vaso-reactivity studies. The α was able to differentiate also blood vessels from grey matter changes. Df was most sensitive to grey matter. H correlated with default mode network areas before hyperventilation but this pattern vanished after hyperventilation due to a global increase in H. In the future, resting-state fMRI combined with fractal metrics of the BOLD signal may be used for analyzing multi-scale alterations of cerebral blood flow.

  19. Optical characterization of multi-scale morphologically complex heterogeneous media - Application to snow with soot impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaoyu; Haussener, Sophia

    2018-02-01

    A multi-scale methodology for the radiative transfer analysis of heterogeneous media composed of morphologically-complex components on two distinct scales is presented. The methodology incorporates the exact morphology at the various scales and utilizes volume-averaging approaches with the corresponding effective properties to couple the scales. At the continuum level, the volume-averaged coupled radiative transfer equations are solved utilizing (i) effective radiative transport properties obtained by direct Monte Carlo simulations at the pore level, and (ii) averaged bulk material properties obtained at particle level by Lorenz-Mie theory or discrete dipole approximation calculations. This model is applied to a soot-contaminated snow layer, and is experimentally validated with reflectance measurements of such layers. A quantitative and decoupled understanding of the morphological effect on the radiative transport is achieved, and a significant influence of the dual-scale morphology on the macroscopic optical behavior is observed. Our results show that with a small amount of soot particles, of the order of 1ppb in volume fraction, the reduction in reflectance of a snow layer with large ice grains can reach up to 77% (at a wavelength of 0.3 μm). Soot impurities modeled as compact agglomerates yield 2-3% lower reduction of the reflectance in a thick show layer compared to snow with soot impurities modeled as chain-like agglomerates. Soot impurities modeled as equivalent spherical particles underestimate the reflectance reduction by 2-8%. This study implies that the morphology of the heterogeneities in a media significantly affects the macroscopic optical behavior and, specifically for the soot-contaminated snow, indicates the non-negligible role of soot on the absorption behavior of snow layers. It can be equally used in technical applications for the assessment and optimization of optical performance in multi-scale media.

  20. SOMAR-LES: A framework for multi-scale modeling of turbulent stratified oceanic flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalamalla, Vamsi K.; Santilli, Edward; Scotti, Alberto; Jalali, Masoud; Sarkar, Sutanu

    2017-12-01

    A new multi-scale modeling technique, SOMAR-LES, is presented in this paper. Localized grid refinement gives SOMAR (the Stratified Ocean Model with Adaptive Resolution) access to small scales of the flow which are normally inaccessible to general circulation models (GCMs). SOMAR-LES drives a LES (Large Eddy Simulation) on SOMAR's finest grids, forced with large scale forcing from the coarser grids. Three-dimensional simulations of internal tide generation, propagation and scattering are performed to demonstrate this multi-scale modeling technique. In the case of internal tide generation at a two-dimensional bathymetry, SOMAR-LES is able to balance the baroclinic energy budget and accurately model turbulence losses at only 10% of the computational cost required by a non-adaptive solver running at SOMAR-LES's fine grid resolution. This relative cost is significantly reduced in situations with intermittent turbulence or where the location of the turbulence is not known a priori because SOMAR-LES does not require persistent, global, high resolution. To illustrate this point, we consider a three-dimensional bathymetry with grids adaptively refined along the tidally generated internal waves to capture remote mixing in regions of wave focusing. The computational cost in this case is found to be nearly 25 times smaller than that of a non-adaptive solver at comparable resolution. In the final test case, we consider the scattering of a mode-1 internal wave at an isolated two-dimensional and three-dimensional topography, and we compare the results with Legg (2014) numerical experiments. We find good agreement with theoretical estimates. SOMAR-LES is less dissipative than the closure scheme employed by Legg (2014) near the bathymetry. Depending on the flow configuration and resolution employed, a reduction of more than an order of magnitude in computational costs is expected, relative to traditional existing solvers.

  1. Toward multi-scale simulation of reconnection phenomena in space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Den, M.; Horiuchi, R.; Usami, S.; Tanaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ohtani, H.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection is considered to play an important role in space phenomena such as substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. It is well known that magnetic reconnection is controlled by microscopic kinetic mechanism. Frozen-in condition is broken due to particle kinetic effects and collisionless reconnection is triggered when current sheet is compressed as thin as ion kinetic scales under the influence of external driving flow. On the other hand configuration of the magnetic field leading to formation of diffusion region is determined in macroscopic scale and topological change after reconnection is also expressed in macroscopic scale. Thus magnetic reconnection is typical multi-scale phenomenon and microscopic and macroscopic physics are strongly coupled. Recently Horiuchi et al. developed an effective resistivity model based on particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation results obtained in study of collisionless driven reconnection and applied to a global magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation of substorm in the Earth's magnetosphere. They showed reproduction of global behavior in substrom such as dipolarization and flux rope formation by global three dimensional MHD simulation. Usami et al. developed multi-hierarchy simulation model, in which macroscopic and microscopic physics are solved self-consistently and simultaneously. Based on the domain decomposition method, this model consists of three parts: a MHD algorithm for macroscopic global dynamics, a PIC algorithm for microscopic kinetic physics, and an interface algorithm to interlock macro and micro hierarchies. They verified the interface algorithm by simulation of plasma injection flow. In their latest work, this model was applied to collisionless reconnection in an open system and magnetic reconnection was successfully found. In this paper, we describe our approach to clarify multi-scale phenomena and report the current status. Our recent study about extension of the MHD domain to global system is presented. We

  2. Automatic Multi-Scale Calibration Procedure for Nested Hydrological-Hydrogeological Regional Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labarthe, B.; Abasq, L.; Flipo, N.; de Fouquet, C. D.

    2014-12-01

    Large hydrosystem modelling and understanding is a complex process depending on regional and local processes. A nested interface concept has been implemented in the hydrosystem modelling platform for a large alluvial plain model (300 km2) part of a 11000 km2 multi-layer aquifer system, included in the Seine basin (65000 km2, France). The platform couples hydrological and hydrogeological processes through four spatially distributed modules (Mass balance, Unsaturated Zone, River and Groundwater). An automatic multi-scale calibration procedure is proposed. Using different data sets from regional scale (117 gauging stations and 183 piezometers over the 65000 km2) to the intermediate scale(dense past piezometric snapshot), it permits the calibration and homogenization of model parameters over scales.The stepwise procedure starts with the optimisation of the water mass balance parameters at regional scale using a conceptual 7 parameters bucket model coupled with the inverse modelling tool PEST. The multi-objective function is derived from river discharges and their de-composition by hydrograph separation. The separation is performed at each gauging station using an automatic procedure based one Chapman filter. Then, the model is run at the regional scale to provide recharge estimate and regional fluxes to the groundwater local model. Another inversion method is then used to determine the local hydrodynamic parameters. This procedure used an initial kriged transmissivity field which is successively updated until the simulated hydraulic head distribution equals a reference one obtained by krigging. Then, the local parameters are upscaled to the regional model by renormalisation procedure.This multi-scale automatic calibration procedure enhances both the local and regional processes representation. Indeed, it permits a better description of local heterogeneities and of the associated processes which are transposed into the regional model, improving the overall performances

  3. Concussion As a Multi-Scale Complex System: An Interdisciplinary Synthesis of Current Knowledge

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    Erin S. Kenzie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI has been called “the most complicated disease of the most complex organ of the body” and is an increasingly high-profile public health issue. Many patients report long-term impairments following even “mild” injuries, but reliable criteria for diagnosis and prognosis are lacking. Every clinical trial for TBI treatment to date has failed to demonstrate reliable and safe improvement in outcomes, and the existing body of literature is insufficient to support the creation of a new classification system. Concussion, or mild TBI, is a highly heterogeneous phenomenon, and numerous factors interact dynamically to influence an individual’s recovery trajectory. Many of the obstacles faced in research and clinical practice related to TBI and concussion, including observed heterogeneity, arguably stem from the complexity of the condition itself. To improve understanding of this complexity, we review the current state of research through the lens provided by the interdisciplinary field of systems science, which has been increasingly applied to biomedical issues. The review was conducted iteratively, through multiple phases of literature review, expert interviews, and systems diagramming and represents the first phase in an effort to develop systems models of concussion. The primary focus of this work was to examine concepts and ways of thinking about concussion that currently impede research design and block advancements in care of TBI. Results are presented in the form of a multi-scale conceptual framework intended to synthesize knowledge across disciplines, improve research design, and provide a broader, multi-scale model for understanding concussion pathophysiology, classification, and treatment.

  4. Multi-scale curvature for automated identification of glaciated mountain landscapes☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasicek, Günther; Otto, Jan-Christoph; Montgomery, David R.; Schrott, Lothar

    2014-01-01

    Erosion by glacial and fluvial processes shapes mountain landscapes in a long-recognized and characteristic way. Upland valleys incised by fluvial processes typically have a V-shaped cross-section with uniform and moderately steep slopes, whereas glacial valleys tend to have a U-shaped profile with a changing slope gradient. We present a novel regional approach to automatically differentiate between fluvial and glacial mountain landscapes based on the relation of multi-scale curvature and drainage area. Sample catchments are delineated and multiple moving window sizes are used to calculate per-cell curvature over a variety of scales ranging from the vicinity of the flow path at the valley bottom to catchment sections fully including valley sides. Single-scale curvature can take similar values for glaciated and non-glaciated catchments but a comparison of multi-scale curvature leads to different results according to the typical cross-sectional shapes. To adapt these differences for automated classification of mountain landscapes into areas with V- and U-shaped valleys, curvature values are correlated with drainage area and a new and simple morphometric parameter, the Difference of Minimum Curvature (DMC), is developed. At three study sites in the western United States the DMC thresholds determined from catchment analysis are used to automatically identify 5 × 5 km quadrats of glaciated and non-glaciated landscapes and the distinctions are validated by field-based geological and geomorphological maps. Our results demonstrate that DMC is a good predictor of glacial imprint, allowing automated delineation of glacially and fluvially incised mountain landscapes. PMID:24748703

  5. Fatiguing Effects on the Multi-Scale Entropy of Surface Electromyography in Children with Cerebral Palsy

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    Tong Hong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of muscle fatigue on the multi-scale entropy of surface electromyography (EMG in children with cerebral palsy (CP and typical development (TD. Sixteen CP children and eighteen TD children participated in experiments where they performed upper limb cyclic lifting tasks following a muscle fatiguing process, while the surface EMG signals were recorded from their upper trapezius muscles. Multi-scale entropy (MSE analyses of the surface EMG were applied by calculating sample entropy (SampEn on individual intrinsic mode functions (IMFs adaptively generated by empirical mode decomposition (EMD of the original signal. The declining degree of the resultant MSE curve was found to reflect muscle fatigue level for all subjects, with its slope (purposely calculated over the first four scales increasing significantly as the fatigue level increased. Further, such a slope increase was less significant for CP children as compared with TD children. Our findings confirmed that the decrease of muscle fiber conduction velocity (MFCV and the increase of motor unit synchronization may be two possible factors induced by muscle fatigue, and further indicated that there appear to be some neuromuscular changes (such as MFCV decrease, motor unit synchronization increase, motor unit firing rates reduction, selective loss of larger motor units that occur as a result of cerebral palsy. These changes may account for experimentally observed difference in fatiguing effects between subject groups. Our study provides an investigative tool to assess muscle fatigue as well as to help reveal complex neuropathological changes underlying the motor impairments of CP children.

  6. Quantifying the multi-scale response of avifauna to prescribed fire experiments in the southwest United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Brett G; Noon, Barry R; Flather, Curtis H; Jentsch, Stephanie; Block, William M

    2009-04-01

    Landscape-scale disturbance events, including ecological restoration and fuel reduction activities, can modify habitat and affect relationships between species and their environment. To reduce the risk of uncharacteristic stand-replacing fires in the southwestern United States, land managers are implementing restoration and fuels treatments (e.g., mechanical thinning, prescribed fire) in progressively larger stands of dry, lower elevation ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest. We used a Before-After/Control-Impact experimental design to quantify the multi-scale response of avifauna to large (approximately 250-400 ha) prescribed fire treatments on four sites in Arizona and New Mexico dominated by ponderosa pine. Using distance sampling and an information-theoretic approach, we estimated changes in density for 14 bird species detected before (May-June 2002-2003) and after (May-June 2004-2005) prescribed fire treatments. We observed few site-level differences in pre- and posttreatment density, and no species responded strongly to treatment on all four sites. Point-level spatial models of individual species response to treatment, habitat variables, and fire severity revealed ecological relationships that were more easily interpreted. At this scale, pretreatment forest structure and patch characteristics were important predictors of posttreatment differences in bird species density. Five species (Pygmy Nuthatch [Sitta pygmaea], Western Bluebird [Sialia mexicana], Steller's Jay [Cyanocitta stelleri], American Robin [Turdus migratorius], and Hairy Woodpecker [Picoides villosus]) exhibited a strong treatment response, and two of these species (American Robin and Hairy Woodpecker) could be associated with meaningful fire severity response functions. The avifaunal response patterns that we observed were not always consistent with those reported by more common studies of wildland fire events. Our results suggest that, in the short-term, the distribution and abundance of

  7. Multi-scale ancient DNA analyses confirm the western origin of Michelsberg farmers and document probable practices of human sacrifice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Beau

    Full Text Available In Europe, the Middle Neolithic is characterized by an important diversification of cultures. In northeastern France, the appearance of the Michelsberg culture has been correlated with major cultural changes and interpreted as the result of the settlement of new groups originating from the Paris Basin. This cultural transition has been accompanied by the expansion of particular funerary practices involving inhumations within circular pits and individuals in "non-conventional" positions (deposited in the pits without any particular treatment. If the status of such individuals has been highly debated, the sacrifice hypothesis has been retained for the site of Gougenheim (Alsace. At the regional level, the analysis of the Gougenheim mitochondrial gene pool (SNPs and HVR-I sequence analyses permitted us to highlight a major genetic break associated with the emergence of the Michelsberg in the region. This genetic discontinuity appeared to be linked to new affinities with farmers from the Paris Basin, correlated to a noticeable hunter-gatherer legacy. All of the evidence gathered supports (i the occidental origin of the Michelsberg groups and (ii the potential implication of this migration in the progression of the hunter-gatherer legacy from the Paris Basin to Alsace / Western Germany at the beginning of the Late Neolithic. At the local level, we noted some differences in the maternal gene pool of individuals in "conventional" vs. "non-conventional" positions. The relative genetic isolation of these sub-groups nicely echoes both their social distinction and the hypothesis of sacrifices retained for the site. Our investigation demonstrates that a multi-scale aDNA study of ancient communities offers a unique opportunity to disentangle the complex relationships between cultural and biological evolution.

  8. The bacterial interlocked process ONtology (BiPON): a systemic multi-scale unified representation of biological processes in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Vincent J; Goelzer, Anne; Ferré, Arnaud; Fischer, Stephan; Dinh, Marc; Loux, Valentin; Froidevaux, Christine; Fromion, Vincent

    2017-11-23

    High-throughput technologies produce huge amounts of heterogeneous biological data at all cellular levels. Structuring these data together with biological knowledge is a critical issue in biology and requires integrative tools and methods such as bio-ontologies to extract and share valuable information. In parallel, the development of recent whole-cell models using a systemic cell description opened alternatives for data integration. Integrating a systemic cell description within a bio-ontology would help to progress in whole-cell data integration and modeling synergistically. We present BiPON, an ontology integrating a multi-scale systemic representation of bacterial cellular processes. BiPON consists in of two sub-ontologies, bioBiPON and modelBiPON. bioBiPON organizes the systemic description of biological information while modelBiPON describes the mathematical models (including parameters) associated with biological processes. bioBiPON and modelBiPON are related using bridge rules on classes during automatic reasoning. Biological processes are thus automatically related to mathematical models. 37% of BiPON classes stem from different well-established bio-ontologies, while the others have been manually defined and curated. Currently, BiPON integrates the main processes involved in bacterial gene expression processes. BiPON is a proof of concept of the way to combine formally systems biology and bio-ontology. The knowledge formalization is highly flexible and generic. Most of the known cellular processes, new participants or new mathematical models could be inserted in BiPON. Altogether, BiPON opens up promising perspectives for knowledge integration and sharing and can be used by biologists, systems and computational biologists, and the emerging community of whole-cell modeling.

  9. Multi-scale ancient DNA analyses confirm the western origin of Michelsberg farmers and document probable practices of human sacrifice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beau, Alice; Rivollat, Maïté; Réveillas, Hélène; Pemonge, Marie-Hélène; Mendisco, Fanny; Thomas, Yohann; Lefranc, Philippe; Deguilloux, Marie-France

    2017-01-01

    In Europe, the Middle Neolithic is characterized by an important diversification of cultures. In northeastern France, the appearance of the Michelsberg culture has been correlated with major cultural changes and interpreted as the result of the settlement of new groups originating from the Paris Basin. This cultural transition has been accompanied by the expansion of particular funerary practices involving inhumations within circular pits and individuals in "non-conventional" positions (deposited in the pits without any particular treatment). If the status of such individuals has been highly debated, the sacrifice hypothesis has been retained for the site of Gougenheim (Alsace). At the regional level, the analysis of the Gougenheim mitochondrial gene pool (SNPs and HVR-I sequence analyses) permitted us to highlight a major genetic break associated with the emergence of the Michelsberg in the region. This genetic discontinuity appeared to be linked to new affinities with farmers from the Paris Basin, correlated to a noticeable hunter-gatherer legacy. All of the evidence gathered supports (i) the occidental origin of the Michelsberg groups and (ii) the potential implication of this migration in the progression of the hunter-gatherer legacy from the Paris Basin to Alsace / Western Germany at the beginning of the Late Neolithic. At the local level, we noted some differences in the maternal gene pool of individuals in "conventional" vs. "non-conventional" positions. The relative genetic isolation of these sub-groups nicely echoes both their social distinction and the hypothesis of sacrifices retained for the site. Our investigation demonstrates that a multi-scale aDNA study of ancient communities offers a unique opportunity to disentangle the complex relationships between cultural and biological evolution.

  10. Object-Based Approach for Multi-Scale Mangrove Composition Mapping Using Multi-Resolution Image Datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Kamal

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Providing accurate maps of mangroves, where the spatial scales of the mapped features correspond to the ecological structures and processes, as opposed to pixel sizes and mapping approaches, is a major challenge for remote sensing. This study developed and evaluated an object-based approach to understand what types of mangrove information can be mapped using different image datasets (Landsat TM, ALOS AVNIR-2, WorldView-2, and LiDAR. We compared and contrasted the ability of these images to map five levels of mangrove features, including vegetation boundary, mangrove stands, mangrove zonations, individual tree crowns, and species communities. We used the Moreton Bay site in Australia as the primary site to develop the classification rule sets and Karimunjawa Island in Indonesia to test the applicability of the rule sets. The results demonstrated the effectiveness of a conceptual hierarchical model for mapping specific mangrove features at discrete spatial scales. However, the rule sets developed in this study require modification to map similar mangrove features at different locations or when using image data acquired by different sensors. Across the hierarchical levels, smaller object sizes (i.e., tree crowns required more complex classification rule sets. Incorporation of contextual information (e.g., distance and elevation increased the overall mapping accuracy at the mangrove stand level (from 85% to 94% and mangrove zonation level (from 53% to 59%. We found that higher image spatial resolution, larger object size, and fewer land-cover classes result in higher mapping accuracies. This study highlights the potential of selected images and mapping techniques to map mangrove features, and provides guidance for how to do this effectively through multi-scale mangrove composition mapping.

  11. Predicting multi-scale relationships between geomorphology and bedrock geology of the rocky intertidal in Central and Northern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, A.; Aiello, I. W.

    2014-12-01

    Substratum geology is fundamental in shaping rocky shore morphology. Specific lithologies have various responses to wave action, tectonic features (e.g. fractures, faults) and sedimentary structures (e.g. bedding), creating distinctive weathering profiles. Along with local oceanography and climate forcing, different rock substrata create coastal morphologies that can vary distinctly between scales, ranging from mm to km. Despite the complexity of the system, qualitative observations show coastal areas with similar rock types share similar geomorphologies. Thus, a statistic relationship between geomorphology (expressed for instance by surface parameter rugosity) and geology can be envisaged. There are multiple benefits of finding such a relationship, as rocky intertidal geomorphology can be an important determinant in which organisms can settle, grow, and survive in near shore communities: allowing the prediction of geomorphologic parameters determining coastal ecology solely based on substratum geology, a crucial aspect in guiding the selection of marine protected areas. This study presents preliminary results of multi-scale geospatial surveys (cm to tens of meters) of rocky intertidal outcrops from Central to Northern California using a Terrestrial Laser Scanner. The outcrops investigated are representative of the most common igneous and sedimentary rocks in California (granitoids, conglomerates, sandstones, mudstones) and metamorphic units. The statistical analysis of the survey data support the hypothesis that surface properties can change significantly with changing scale, each rock type having distinct surface characteristics which are similar to comparable lithologies exposed at different locations. These scale dependent variations are controlled by different lithologic and structural characteristics of the outcrop in question. Our data also suggests lithologic variability within a rock unit could be a very significant factor in controlling changes in

  12. Multi-scale lines and edges in V1 and beyond: brightness, object categorization and recognition, and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João; du Buf, J M Hans

    2009-03-01

    In this paper we present an improved model for line and edge detection in cortical area V1. This model is based on responses of simple and complex cells, and it is multi-scale with no free parameters. We illustrate the use of the multi-scale line/edge representation in different processes: visual reconstruction or brightness perception, automatic scale selection and object segregation. A two-level object categorization scenario is tested in which pre-categorization is based on coarse scales only and final categorization on coarse plus fine scales. We also present a multi-scale object and face recognition model. Processing schemes are discussed in the framework of a complete cortical architecture. The fact that brightness perception and object recognition may be based on the same symbolic image representation is an indication that the entire (visual) cortex is involved in consciousness.

  13. Determining the multi-scale hedge ratios of stock index futures using the lower partial moments method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Zhou, Haigang; Zhao, Shaoquan

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers a multi-scale future hedge strategy that minimizes lower partial moments (LPM). To do this, wavelet analysis is adopted to decompose time series data into different components. Next, different parametric estimation methods with known distributions are applied to calculate the LPM of hedged portfolios, which is the key to determining multi-scale hedge ratios over different time scales. Then these parametric methods are compared with the prevailing nonparametric kernel metric method. Empirical results indicate that in the China Securities Index 300 (CSI 300) index futures and spot markets, hedge ratios and hedge efficiency estimated by the nonparametric kernel metric method are inferior to those estimated by parametric hedging model based on the features of sequence distributions. In addition, if minimum-LPM is selected as a hedge target, the hedging periods, degree of risk aversion, and target returns can affect the multi-scale hedge ratios and hedge efficiency, respectively.

  14. Advancing a distributed multi-scale computing framework for large-scale high-throughput discovery in materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knap, J; Spear, C E; Borodin, O; Leiter, K W

    2015-10-30

    We describe the development of a large-scale high-throughput application for discovery in materials science. Our point of departure is a computational framework for distributed multi-scale computation. We augment the original framework with a specialized module whose role is to route evaluation requests needed by the high-throughput application to a collection of available computational resources. We evaluate the feasibility and performance of the resulting high-throughput computational framework by carrying out a high-throughput study of battery solvents. Our results indicate that distributed multi-scale computing, by virtue of its adaptive nature, is particularly well-suited for building high-throughput applications.

  15. Flexible fabrication of multi-scale integrated 3D periodic nanostructures with phase mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Liang Leon

    Top-down fabrication of artificial nanostructures, especially three-dimensional (3D) periodic nanostructures, that forms uniform and defect-free structures over large area with the advantages of high throughput and rapid processing and in a manner that can further monolithically integrate into multi-scale and multi-functional devices is long-desired but remains a considerable challenge. This thesis study advances diffractive optical element (DOE) based 3D laser holographic nanofabrication of 3D periodic nanostructures and develops new kinds of DOEs for advanced diffracted-beam control during the fabrication. Phase masks, as one particular kind of DOE, are a promising direction for simple and rapid fabrication of 3D periodic nanostructures by means of Fresnel diffraction interference lithography. When incident with a coherent beam of light, a suitable phase mask (e.g. with 2D nano-grating) can create multiple diffraction orders that are inherently phase-locked and overlap to form a 3D light interference pattern in the proximity of the DOE. This light pattern is typically recorded in photosensitive materials including photoresist to develop into 3D photonic crystal nanostructure templates. Two kinds of advanced phase masks were developed that enable delicate phase control of multiple diffraction beams. The first exploits femtosecond laser direct writing inside fused silica to assemble multiple (up to nine) orthogonally crossed (2D) grating layers, spaced on Talbot planes to overcome the inherent weak diffraction efficiency otherwise found in low-contrast volume gratings. A systematic offsetting of orthogonal grating layers to establish phase offsets over 0 to pi/2 range provided precise means for controlling the 3D photonic crystal structure symmetry between body centered tetragonal (BCT) and woodpile-like tetragonal (wTTR). The second phase mask consisted of two-layered nanogratings with small sub-wavelength grating periods and phase offset control. That was

  16. Multi-scale osteointegration and neovascularization of biphasic calcium phosphate bone scaffolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Sheeny K.

    micropores is an indication of scaffold osteoinductivity because a chemotactic factor must be present to induce cell migration into pores on the order of the cell diameter. It is likely that the scaffold undergoes in vivo modifications involving formation of a biological apatite layer within scaffold micropores and possibly co-precipitation of endogenous osteoinductive proteins. To further investigate the effects of scaffold osteoinductivity, BCP scaffolds were implanted in porcine mandibular defects with rhBMP-2, which was partially sequestered in the micropores. Cell migration into osteoinductive scaffold micropores can be enhanced through the delivery of exogenous rhBMP-2 further promoting multi-scale osteointegration. Finally, endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs) isolated from human umbilical cord blood (UCB) were evaluated in terms of their in vivo vasculogenic potential in the context of bone formation. This work was completed to determine if ECFCs could be utilized in a bone tissue engineering construct to promote neovascularization. ECFCs were combined with a BCP scaffold and rhBMP-2 and implanted subcutaneously on the abdominal wall of NOD/SCID mice. The result was formation of perfused human vessels within BCP scaffold macropores that were present at 4 weeks. The high density and persistence of human vessels at four weeks indicates that human UCB ECFCs exceed their reported in vivo vasculogenic potential when combined with rhBMP-2 and a BCP scaffold. This shows a dual role for BMP-2 in the context of bone regeneration. Collectively, the thesis demonstrates that (1) the design of synthetic bone scaffolds should include controlled multi-scale porosity to promote multi-scale osteointegration, which may significantly improve scaffold mechanical properties and (2) human umbilical cord blood-derived endothelial colony forming cells have potential for promoting neovascularization in a bone defect when combined with rhBMP-2.

  17. Simulating Multi-Scale Mercury Fate and Transport in a Coastal Plain Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knightes, C. D.; Davis, G. M.; Golden, H. E.; Conrads, P. A.; Bradley, P. M.; Journey, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury is the toxicant responsible for the largest number of fish advisories across the United States, with 1.1 million river miles under advisory. The processes governing fate, transport, and transformation of mercury in streams and rivers are not well understood, in large part, because these systems are intimately linked with their surrounding watersheds and are often highly spatially variable. In this study, we applied a linked watershed hydrology and biogeochemical cycling (N, C, and Hg) model (VELMA, Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Assessment) to simulate daily flow, fluxes, and soil and stream concentrations of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) at multiple spatial scales in McTier Creek, a Coastal Plain watershed within the Edisto River basin of South Carolina, USA. Our goals were to (1) calibrate and simulate Hg fate and transport processes at a focused reach scale (0.1 km2) and (2) assess how representative the reach-scale parameters and processes are when multi-scale watershed information is included in Hg cycling simulations. Thus, reach-scale parameterization was applied to multi-scaled watersheds, including two headwater sub-watersheds (28 km2 and 25 km2) nested within the McTier Creek watershed (79 km2), to evaluate model performance and how well reach-scale parameterization and processes characterize nested watersheds with increasing drainage areas. The current VELMA simulations suggest that stream water column THg concentration predictions perform reasonably well at different scales based on reach-scale calibrations, but the model simulations of MeHg reach, sub-watershed, and watershed stream concentrations are out-of-phase with observed MeHg concentrations. This result suggests that processes governing MeHg loading to the main channel may be under-represented in the current model structure and underscores the complexity of simulating MeHg dynamics in watershed models. This work supports the importance of hydrology in

  18. Multi-scale dynamic modeling of atmospheric pollution in urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thouron, Laetitia

    2017-01-01

    Urban air pollution has been identified as an important cause of health impacts, including premature deaths. In particular, ambient concentrations of gaseous pollutants such as nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) and particulate matter (PM10 and PM2.5) are regulated, which means that emission reduction strategies must be put in place to reduce these concentrations in places where the corresponding regulations are not respected. Besides, air pollution can contribute to the contamination of other media, for example through the contribution of atmospheric deposition to runoff contamination. The multifactorial and multi-scale aspects of urban make the pollution sources difficult to identify. Indeed, the urban environment is a heterogeneous space characterized by complex architectural structures (old buildings alongside a more modern building, residential, commercial, industrial zones, roads, etc.), non-uniform atmospheric pollutant emissions and therefore the population exposure to pollution is variable in space and time. The modeling of urban air pollution aims to understand the origin of pollutants, their spatial extent and their concentration/deposition levels. Some pollutants have long residence times and can stay several weeks in the atmosphere (PM2.5) and therefore be transported over long distances, while others are more local (NO x in the vicinity of traffic). The spatial distribution of a pollutant will therefore depend on several factors, and in particular on the surfaces encountered. Air quality depends strongly on weather, buildings (canyon-street) and emissions. The aim of this thesis is to address some of these aspects by modeling: (1) urban background pollution with a transport-chemical model (Polyphemus / POLAIR3D), which makes it possible to estimate atmospheric pollutants by type of urban surfaces (roofs, walls and roadways), (2) street-level pollution by explicitly integrating the effects of the building in a three-dimensional way with a multi-scale model of

  19. Predicting patient exposure to nickel released from cardiovascular devices using multi-scale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, David M; Craven, Brent A; Chandrasekar, Vaishnavi; Simon, David D; Brown, Ronald P; Sussman, Eric M

    2018-04-01

    Many cardiovascular device alloys contain nickel, which if released in sufficient quantities, can lead to adverse health effects. However, in-vivo nickel release from implanted devices and subsequent biodistribution of nickel ions to local tissues and systemic circulation are not well understood. To address this uncertainty, we have developed a multi-scale (material, tissue, and system) biokinetic model. The model links nickel release from an implanted cardiovascular device to concentrations in peri-implant tissue, as well as in serum and urine, which can be readily monitored. The model was parameterized for a specific cardiovascular implant, nitinol septal occluders, using in-vitro nickel release test results, studies of ex-vivo uptake into heart tissue, and in-vivo and clinical measurements from the literature. Our results show that the model accurately predicts nickel concentrations in peri-implant tissue in an animal model and in serum and urine of septal occluder patients. The congruity of the model with these data suggests it may provide useful insight to establish nickel exposure limits and interpret biomonitoring data. Finally, we use the model to predict local and systemic nickel exposure due to passive release from nitinol devices produced using a wide range of manufacturing processes, as well as general relationships between release rate and exposure. These relationships suggest that peri-implant tissue and serum levels of nickel will remain below 5 μg/g and 10 μg/l, respectively, in patients who have received implanted nitinol cardiovascular devices provided the rate of nickel release per device surface area does not exceed 0.074 μg/(cm 2  d) and is less than 32 μg/d in total. The uncertainty in whether in-vitro tests used to evaluate metal ion release from medical products are representative of clinical environments is one of the largest roadblocks to establishing the associated patient risk. We have developed and validated a multi-scale

  20. Land-Atmosphere Coupling in the Multi-Scale Modelling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, P. M.; Denning, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Multi-Scale Modeling Framework (MMF), in which cloud-resolving models (CRMs) are embedded within general circulation model (GCM) gridcells to serve as the model's cloud parameterization, has offered a number of benefits to GCM simulations. The coupling of these cloud-resolving models directly to land surface model instances, rather than passing averaged atmospheric variables to a single instance of a land surface model, the logical next step in model development, has recently been accomplished. This new configuration offers conspicuous improvements to estimates of precipitation and canopy through-fall, but overall the model exhibits warm surface temperature biases and low productivity.This work presents modifications to a land-surface model that take advantage of the new multi-scale modeling framework, and accommodate the change in spatial scale from a typical GCM range of ~200 km to the CRM grid-scale of 4 km.A parameterization is introduced to apportion modeled surface radiation into direct-beam and diffuse components. The diffuse component is then distributed among the land-surface model instances within each GCM cell domain. This substantially reduces the number excessively low light values provided to the land-surface model when cloudy conditions are modeled in the CRM, associated with its 1-D radiation scheme. The small spatial scale of the CRM, ~4 km, as compared with the typical ~200 km GCM scale, provides much more realistic estimates of precipitation intensity, this permits the elimination of a model parameterization of canopy through-fall. However, runoff at such scales can no longer be considered as an immediate flow to the ocean. Allowing sub-surface water flow between land-surface instances within the GCM domain affords better realism and also reduces temperature and productivity biases.The MMF affords a number of opportunities to land-surface modelers, providing both the advantages of direct simulation at the 4 km scale and a much reduced

  1. Scrubbing Up: Multi-Scale Investigation of Woody Encroachment in a Southern African Savannah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G. Marston

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the extent of woody vegetation represent a major conservation question in many savannah systems around the globe. To address the problem of the current lack of broad-scale cost-effective tools for land cover monitoring in complex savannah environments, we use a multi-scale approach to quantifying vegetation change in Kruger National Park (KNP, South Africa. We test whether medium spatial resolution satellite data (Landsat, existing back to the 1970s, which have pixel sizes larger than typical vegetation patches, can nevertheless capture the thematic detail required to detect woody encroachment in savannahs. We quantify vegetation change over a 13-year period in KNP, examine the changes that have occurred, assess the drivers of these changes, and compare appropriate remote sensing data sources for monitoring change. We generate land cover maps for three areas of southern KNP using very high resolution (VHR and medium resolution satellite sensor imagery from February 2001 to 2014. Considerable land cover change has occurred, with large increases in shrubs replacing both trees and grassland. Examination of exclosure areas and potential environmental driver data suggests two mechanisms: elephant herbivory removing trees and at least one separate mechanism responsible for conversion of grassland to shrubs, theorised to be increasing atmospheric CO2. Thus, the combination of these mechanisms causes the novel two-directional shrub encroachment that we observe (tree loss and grassland conversion. Multi-scale comparison of classifications indicates that although spatial detail is lost when using medium resolution rather than VHR imagery for land cover classification (e.g., Landsat imagery cannot readily distinguish between tree and shrub classes, while VHR imagery can, the thematic detail contained within both VHR and medium resolution classifications is remarkably congruent. This suggests that medium resolution imagery contains sufficient

  2. PSI-BOIL, a building block towards the multi-scale modeling of flow boiling phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niceno, Bojan; Andreani, Michele; Prasser, Horst-Michael

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In these work we report the current status of the Swiss project Multi-scale Modeling Analysis (MSMA), jointly financed by PSI and Swissnuclear. The project aims at addressing the multi-scale (down to nano-scale) modelling of convective boiling phenomena, and the development of physically-based closure laws for the physical scales appropriate to the problem considered, to be used within Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. The final goal is to construct a new computational tool, called Parallel Simulator of Boiling phenomena (PSI-BOIL) for the direct simulation of processes all the way down to the small-scales of interest and an improved CFD code for the mechanistic prediction of two-phase flow and heat transfer in the fuel rod bundle of a nuclear reactor. An improved understanding of the physics of boiling will be gained from the theoretical work as well as from novel small- and medium scale experiments targeted to assist the development of closure laws. PSI-BOIL is a computer program designed for efficient simulation of turbulent fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena in simple geometries. Turbulence is simulated directly (DNS) and its efficiency plays a vital role in a successful simulation. Having high performance as one of the main prerequisites, PSIBOIL is tailored in such a way to be as efficient a tool as possible, relying on well-established numerical techniques and sacrificing all the features which are not essential for the success of this project and which might slow down the solution procedure. The governing equations are discretized in space with orthogonal staggered finite volume method. Time discretization is performed with projection method, the most obvious a the most widely used choice for DNS. Systems of linearized equation, stemming from the discretization of governing equations, are solved with the Additive Correction Multigrid (ACM). methods. Two distinguished features of PSI-BOIL are the possibility to

  3. Optimal Multi-scale Demand-side Management for Continuous Power-Intensive Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumit

    With the advent of deregulation in electricity markets and an increasing share of intermittent power generation sources, the profitability of industrial consumers that operate power-intensive processes has become directly linked to the variability in energy prices. Thus, for industrial consumers that are able to adjust to the fluctuations, time-sensitive electricity prices (as part of so-called Demand-Side Management (DSM) in the smart grid) offer potential economical incentives. In this thesis, we introduce optimization models and decomposition strategies for the multi-scale Demand-Side Management of continuous power-intensive processes. On an operational level, we derive a mode formulation for scheduling under time-sensitive electricity prices. The formulation is applied to air separation plants and cement plants to minimize the operating cost. We also describe how a mode formulation can be used for industrial combined heat and power plants that are co-located at integrated chemical sites to increase operating profit by adjusting their steam and electricity production according to their inherent flexibility. Furthermore, a robust optimization formulation is developed to address the uncertainty in electricity prices by accounting for correlations and multiple ranges in the realization of the random variables. On a strategic level, we introduce a multi-scale model that provides an understanding of the value of flexibility of the current plant configuration and the value of additional flexibility in terms of retrofits for Demand-Side Management under product demand uncertainty. The integration of multiple time scales leads to large-scale two-stage stochastic programming problems, for which we need to apply decomposition strategies in order to obtain a good solution within a reasonable amount of time. Hence, we describe two decomposition schemes that can be applied to solve two-stage stochastic programming problems: First, a hybrid bi-level decomposition scheme with

  4. Solving the problem of imaging resolution: stochastic multi-scale image fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsanina, Marina; Mallants, Dirk; Gilyazetdinova, Dina; Gerke, Kiril

    2016-04-01

    Structural features of porous materials define the majority of its physical properties, including water infiltration and redistribution, multi-phase flow (e.g. simultaneous water/air flow, gas exchange between biologically active soil root zone and atmosphere, etc.) and solute transport. To characterize soil and rock microstructure X-ray microtomography is extremely useful. However, as any other imaging technique, this one also has a significant drawback - a trade-off between sample size and resolution. The latter is a significant problem for multi-scale complex structures, especially such as soils and carbonates. Other imaging techniques, for example, SEM/FIB-SEM or X-ray macrotomography can be helpful in obtaining higher resolution or wider field of view. The ultimate goal is to create a single dataset containing information from all scales or to characterize such multi-scale structure. In this contribution we demonstrate a general solution for merging multiscale categorical spatial data into a single dataset using stochastic reconstructions with rescaled correlation functions. The versatility of the method is demonstrated by merging three images representing macro, micro and nanoscale spatial information on porous media structure. Images obtained by X-ray microtomography and scanning electron microscopy were fused into a single image with predefined resolution. The methodology is sufficiently generic for implementation of other stochastic reconstruction techniques, any number of scales, any number of material phases, and any number of images for a given scale. The methodology can be further used to assess effective properties of fused porous media images or to compress voluminous spatial datasets for efficient data storage. Potential practical applications of this method are abundant in soil science, hydrology and petroleum engineering, as well as other geosciences. This work was partially supported by RSF grant 14-17-00658 (X-ray microtomography study of shale

  5. Subgrid-scale stresses and scalar fluxes constructed by the multi-scale turnover Lagrangian map

    Science.gov (United States)

    AL-Bairmani, Sukaina; Li, Yi; Rosales, Carlos; Xie, Zheng-tong

    2017-04-01

    The multi-scale turnover Lagrangian map (MTLM) [C. Rosales and C. Meneveau, "Anomalous scaling and intermittency in three-dimensional synthetic turbulence," Phys. Rev. E 78, 016313 (2008)] uses nested multi-scale Lagrangian advection of fluid particles to distort a Gaussian velocity field and, as a result, generate non-Gaussian synthetic velocity fields. Passive scalar fields can be generated with the procedure when the fluid particles carry a scalar property [C. Rosales, "Synthetic three-dimensional turbulent passive scalar fields via the minimal Lagrangian map," Phys. Fluids 23, 075106 (2011)]. The synthetic fields have been shown to possess highly realistic statistics characterizing small scale intermittency, geometrical structures, and vortex dynamics. In this paper, we present a study of the synthetic fields using the filtering approach. This approach, which has not been pursued so far, provides insights on the potential applications of the synthetic fields in large eddy simulations and subgrid-scale (SGS) modelling. The MTLM method is first generalized to model scalar fields produced by an imposed linear mean profile. We then calculate the subgrid-scale stress, SGS scalar flux, SGS scalar variance, as well as related quantities from the synthetic fields. Comparison with direct numerical simulations (DNSs) shows that the synthetic fields reproduce the probability distributions of the SGS energy and scalar dissipation rather well. Related geometrical statistics also display close agreement with DNS results. The synthetic fields slightly under-estimate the mean SGS energy dissipation and slightly over-predict the mean SGS scalar variance dissipation. In general, the synthetic fields tend to slightly under-estimate the probability of large fluctuations for most quantities we have examined. Small scale anisotropy in the scalar field originated from the imposed mean gradient is captured. The sensitivity of the synthetic fields on the input spectra is assessed by

  6. Progression to multi-scale models and the application to food system intervention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröhn, Yrjö T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this article is to discuss how the systems science approach can be used to optimize intervention strategies in food animal systems. It advocates the idea that the challenges of maintaining a safe food supply are best addressed by integrating modeling and mathematics with biological studies critical to formulation of public policy to address these challenges. Much information on the biology and epidemiology of food animal systems has been characterized through single-discipline methods, but until now this information has not been thoroughly utilized in a fully integrated manner. The examples are drawn from our current research. The first, explained in depth, uses clinical mastitis to introduce the concept of dynamic programming to optimize management decisions in dairy cows (also introducing the curse of dimensionality problem). In the second example, a compartmental epidemic model for Johne's disease with different intervention strategies is optimized. The goal of the optimization strategy depends on whether there is a relationship between Johne's and Crohn's disease. If so, optimization is based on eradication of infection; if not, it is based on the cow's performance only (i.e., economic optimization, similar to the mastitis example). The third example focuses on food safety to introduce risk assessment using Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella Typhimurium. The last example, practical interventions to effectively manage antibiotic resistance in beef and dairy cattle systems, introduces meta-population modeling that accounts for bacterial growth not only in the host (cow), but also in the cow's feed, drinking water and the housing environment. Each example stresses the need to progress toward multi-scale modeling. The article ends with examples of multi-scale systems, from food supply systems to Johne's disease. Reducing the consequences of foodborne illnesses (i.e., minimizing disease occurrence and associated costs) can only occur through an

  7. Symptoms of change in multi-scale observations of arctic ecosystem carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoy, P. C.; Williams, M. D.; Hartley, I. P.; Street, L.; Hill, T. C.; Prieto-Blanco, A.; Wayolle, A.; Disney, M.; Evans, J.; Fletcher, B.; Poyatos, R.; Wookey, P.; Merbold, L.; Wade, T. J.; Moncrieff, J.

    2009-12-01

    Arctic ecosystems are responding rapidly to observed climate change. Quantifying the magnitude of these changes, and their implications for the climate system, requires observations of their current structure and function, as well as extrapolation and modelling (i.e. ‘upscaling’) across time and space. Here, we describe the major results of the International Polar Year (IPY) ABACUS project, a multi-scale investigation across arctic Fennoscandia that couples plant and soil process studies, isotope analyses, flux and micrometeorological measurements, process modelling, and aircraft and satellite observations to improve predictions of the response of the arctic terrestrial biosphere to global change. We begin with a synthesis of eddy covariance observations from the global FLUXNET database. We demonstrate that a simple model parameterized using pan-arctic chamber measurements explains over 80% of the variance of half-hourly CO2 fluxes during the growing season across most arctic and montane tundra ecosystems given accurate measurements of leaf area index (LAI), which agrees with the recently proposed ‘functional convergence’ paradigm for tundra vegetation. The ability of MODIS to deliver accurate LAI estimates is briefly discussed and an adjusted algorithm is presented and validated using direct observations. We argue for an Information Theory-based framework for upscaling in Earth science by conceptualizing multi-scale research as a transfer of information across scales. We then demonstrate how error in upscaled arctic C flux estimates can be reduced to less than 4% from their high-resolution counterpart by formally preserving the information content of high spatial and spectral resolution aircraft and satellite imagery. Jaynes’ classic Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) principle is employed to incorporate logical, biological and physical constraints to reduce error in downscaled flux estimates. Errors are further reduced by assimilating flux, biological and remote

  8. Training Systems Modelers through the Development of a Multi-scale Chagas Disease Risk Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, J.; Stevens-Goodnight, S.; Kulkarni, S.; Bustamante, D.; Fytilis, N.; Goff, P.; Monroy, C.; Morrissey, L. A.; Orantes, L.; Stevens, L.; Dorn, P.; Lucero, D.; Rios, J.; Rizzo, D. M.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of our NSF-sponsored Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences grant is to create a multidisciplinary approach to develop spatially explicit models of vector-borne disease risk using Chagas disease as our model. Chagas disease is a parasitic disease endemic to Latin America that afflicts an estimated 10 million people. The causative agent (Trypanosoma cruzi) is most commonly transmitted to humans by blood feeding triatomine insect vectors. Our objectives are: (1) advance knowledge on the multiple interacting factors affecting the transmission of Chagas disease, and (2) provide next generation genomic and spatial analysis tools applicable to the study of other vector-borne diseases worldwide. This funding is a collaborative effort between the RSENR (UVM), the School of Engineering (UVM), the Department of Biology (UVM), the Department of Biological Sciences (Loyola (New Orleans)) and the Laboratory of Applied Entomology and Parasitology (Universidad de San Carlos). Throughout this five-year study, multi-educational groups (i.e., high school, undergraduate, graduate, and postdoctoral) will be trained in systems modeling. This systems approach challenges students to incorporate environmental, social, and economic as well as technical aspects and enables modelers to simulate and visualize topics that would either be too expensive, complex or difficult to study directly (Yasar and Landau 2003). We launch this research by developing a set of multi-scale, epidemiological models of Chagas disease risk using STELLA® software v.9.1.3 (isee systems, inc., Lebanon, NH). We use this particular system dynamics software as a starting point because of its simple graphical user interface (e.g., behavior-over-time graphs, stock/flow diagrams, and causal loops). To date, high school and undergraduate students have created a set of multi-scale (i.e., homestead, village, and regional) disease models. Modeling the system at multiple spatial scales forces recognition that

  9. Towards Characterization, Modeling, and Uncertainty Quantification in Multi-scale Mechanics of Oragnic-rich Shales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedi, S.; Mashhadian, M.; Noshadravan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Increasing the efficiency and sustainability in operation of hydrocarbon recovery from organic-rich shales requires a fundamental understanding of chemomechanical properties of organic-rich shales. This understanding is manifested in form of physics-bases predictive models capable of capturing highly heterogeneous and multi-scale structure of organic-rich shale materials. In this work we present a framework of experimental characterization, micromechanical modeling, and uncertainty quantification that spans from nanoscale to macroscale. Application of experiments such as coupled grid nano-indentation and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and micromechanical modeling attributing the role of organic maturity to the texture of the material, allow us to identify unique clay mechanical properties among different samples that are independent of maturity of shale formations and total organic content. The results can then be used to inform the physically-based multiscale model for organic rich shales consisting of three levels that spans from the scale of elementary building blocks (e.g. clay minerals in clay-dominated formations) of organic rich shales to the scale of the macroscopic inorganic/organic hard/soft inclusion composite. Although this approach is powerful in capturing the effective properties of organic-rich shale in an average sense, it does not account for the uncertainty in compositional and mechanical model parameters. Thus, we take this model one step forward by systematically incorporating the main sources of uncertainty in modeling multiscale behavior of organic-rich shales. In particular we account for the uncertainty in main model parameters at different scales such as porosity, elastic properties and mineralogy mass percent. To that end, we use Maximum Entropy Principle and random matrix theory to construct probabilistic descriptions of model inputs based on available information. The Monte Carlo simulation is then carried out to propagate the

  10. The Cea multi-scale and multi-physics simulation project for nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledermann, P.; Chauliac, C.; Thomas, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Today numerical modelling is everywhere recognized as an essential tool of capitalization, integration and share of knowledge. For this reason, it becomes the central tool of research. Until now, the Cea developed a set of scientific software allowing to model, in each situation, the operation of whole or part of a nuclear installation and these codes are largely used in nuclear industry. However, for the future, it is essential to aim for a better accuracy, a better control of uncertainties and better performance in computing times. The objective is to obtain validated models allowing accurate predictive calculations for actual complex nuclear problems such as fuel behaviour in accidental situation. This demands to master a large and interactive set of phenomena ranging from nuclear reaction to heat transfer. To this end, Cea, with industrial partners (EDF, Framatome-ANP, ANDRA) has designed an integrated platform of calculation, devoted to the study of nuclear systems, and intended at the same time for industries and scientists. The development of this platform is under way with the start in 2005 of the integrated project NURESIM, with 18 European partners. Improvement is coming not only through a multi-scale description of all phenomena but also through an innovative design approach requiring deep functional analysis which is upstream from the development of the simulation platform itself. In addition, the studies of future nuclear systems are increasingly multidisciplinary (simultaneous modelling of core physics, thermal-hydraulics and fuel behaviour). These multi-physics and multi-scale aspects make mandatory to pay very careful attention to software architecture issues. A global platform is thus developed integrating dedicated specialized platforms: DESCARTES for core physics, NEPTUNE for thermal-hydraulics, PLEIADES for fuel behaviour, SINERGY for materials behaviour under irradiation, ALLIANCES for the performance

  11. Landslide mapping with multi-scale object-based image analysis – a case study in the Baichi watershed, Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lahousse

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We developed a multi-scale OBIA (object-based image analysis landslide detection technique to map shallow landslides in the Baichi watershed, Taiwan, after the 2004 Typhoon Aere event. Our semi-automated detection method selected multiple scales through landslide size statistics analysis for successive classification rounds. The detection performance achieved a modified success rate (MSR of 86.5% with the training dataset and 86% with the validation dataset. This performance level was due to the multi-scale aspect of our methodology, as the MSR for single scale classification was substantially lower, even after spectral difference segmentation, with a maximum of 74%. Our multi-scale technique was capable of detecting landslides of varying sizes, including very small landslides, up to 95 m2. The method presented certain limitations: the thresholds we established for classification were specific to the study area, to the landslide type in the study area, and to the spectral characteristics of the satellite image. Because updating site-specific and image-specific classification thresholds is easy with OBIA software, our multi-scale technique is expected to be useful for mapping shallow landslides at watershed level.

  12. Shingle 2.0 : Generalising self-consistent and automated domain discretisation for multi-scale geophysical models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Candy, A.S.; Pietrzak, J.D.

    2018-01-01

    The approaches taken to describe and develop spatial discretisations of the domains required for geophysical simulation models are commonly ad hoc, model- or application-specific, and under-documented. This is particularly acute for simulation models that are flexible in their use of multi-scale,

  13. Strategies for efficient numerical implementation of hybrid multi-scale agent-based models to describe biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilfone, Nicholas A; Kirschner, Denise E; Linderman, Jennifer J

    2015-03-01

    Biologically related processes operate across multiple spatiotemporal scales. For computational modeling methodologies to mimic this biological complexity, individual scale models must be linked in ways that allow for dynamic exchange of information across scales. A powerful methodology is to combine a discrete modeling approach, agent-based models (ABMs), with continuum models to form hybrid models. Hybrid multi-scale ABMs have been used to simulate emergent responses of biological systems. Here, we review two aspects of hybrid multi-scale ABMs: linking individual scale models and efficiently solving the resulting model. We discuss the computational choices associated with aspects of linking individual scale models while simultaneously maintaining model tractability. We demonstrate implementations of existing numerical methods in the context of hybrid multi-scale ABMs. Using an example model describing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, we show relative computational speeds of various combinations of numerical methods. Efficient linking and solution of hybrid multi-scale ABMs is key to model portability, modularity, and their use in understanding biological phenomena at a systems level.

  14. Multi-scale spatial controls of understory vegetation in Douglas-fir–western hemlock forests of western Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia I. Burton; Lisa M. Ganio; Klaus J. Puettmann

    2014-01-01

    Forest understory vegetation is influenced by broad-scale variation in climate, intermediate scale variation in topography, disturbance and neighborhood interactions. However, little is known about how these multi-scale controls interact to influence observed spatial patterns. We examined relationships between the aggregated cover of understory plant species (%...

  15. Quantifying restoration effectiveness using multi-scale habitat models: Implications for sage-grouse in the Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert S. Arkle; David S. Pilliod; Steven E. Hanser; Matthew L. Brooks; Jeanne C. Chambers; James B. Grace; Kevin C. Knutson; David A. Pyke; Justin L. Welty; Troy A. Wirth

    2014-01-01

    A recurrent challenge in the conservation of wide-ranging, imperiled species is understanding which habitats to protect and whether we are capable of restoring degraded landscapes. For Greater Sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus), a species of conservation concern in the western United States, we approached this problem by developing multi-scale empirical models of...

  16. Multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations of an Alcator C-Mod, ELM-y H-mode plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, N. T.; Holland, C.; White, A. E.; Greenwald, M.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, P.; Candy, J.; Creely, A. J.

    2018-01-01

    High fidelity, multi-scale gyrokinetic simulations capable of capturing both ion ({k}θ {ρ }s∼ { O }(1.0)) and electron-scale ({k}θ {ρ }e∼ { O }(1.0)) turbulence were performed in the core of an Alcator C-Mod ELM-y H-mode discharge which exhibits reactor-relevant characteristics. These simulations, performed with all experimental inputs and realistic ion to electron mass ratio ({({m}i/{m}e)}1/2=60.0) provide insight into the physics fidelity that may be needed for accurate simulation of the core of fusion reactor discharges. Three multi-scale simulations and series of separate ion and electron-scale simulations performed using the GYRO code (Candy and Waltz 2003 J. Comput. Phys. 186 545) are presented. As with earlier multi-scale results in L-mode conditions (Howard et al 2016 Nucl. Fusion 56 014004), both ion and multi-scale simulations results are compared with experimentally inferred ion and electron heat fluxes, as well as the measured values of electron incremental thermal diffusivities—indicative of the experimental electron temperature profile stiffness. Consistent with the L-mode results, cross-scale coupling is found to play an important role in the simulation of these H-mode conditions. Extremely stiff ion-scale transport is observed in these high-performance conditions which is shown to likely play and important role in the reproduction of measurements of perturbative transport. These results provide important insight into the role of multi-scale plasma turbulence in the core of reactor-relevant plasmas and establish important constraints on the the fidelity of models needed for predictive simulations.

  17. Multi-scale earthquake hazard and risk in the Chinese mainland and countermeasures for the preparedness, mitigation, and management: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z.; Jiang, C.; Ma, T.

    2012-12-01

    Earthquake hazard and risk in the Chinese mainland exhibit multi-scale characteristics. Temporal scales from centuries to months, spatial scales from the whole mainland to specific engineering structures, and energy scales from great disastrous earthquakes to small earthquakes causing social disturbance and economic loss, feature the complexity of earthquake disasters. Coping with such complex challenge, several research and application projects have been undertaken since recent years. Lessons and experiences of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake contributed much to the launching and conducting of these projects. Understandings of the scientific problems and technical approaches taken in the mainstream studies in the Chinese mainland have no significant difference from those in the international scientific communities, albeit using of some of the terminologies have "cultural differences" - for instance, in the China Earthquake Administration (CEA), the terminology "earthquake forecast/prediction (study)" is generally used in a much broader sense, mainly indicating time-dependent seismic hazard at different spatio-temporal scales. Several scientific products have been produced serving the society in different forms. These scientific products have unique academic merits due to the long-term persistence feature and the forward forecast nature, which are all essential for the evaluation of the technical performance and the falsification of the scientific ideas. On the other hand, using the language of the "actor network theory (ANT)" in science studies (or the sociology of science), at present, the hierarchical "actors' network", making the science transformed to the actions of the public and government for the preparedness, mitigation, and management of multi-scale earthquake disasters, is still in need of careful construction and improvement.

  18. A Multi-Scale Computational Study on the Mechanism of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase (SpNic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan F. Ion

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinamidase (Nic is a key zinc-dependent enzyme in NAD metabolism that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to give nicotinic acid. A multi-scale computational approach has been used to investigate the catalytic mechanism, substrate binding and roles of active site residues of Nic from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic. In particular, density functional theory (DFT, molecular dynamics (MD and ONIOM quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM methods have been employed. The overall mechanism occurs in two stages: (i formation of a thioester enzyme-intermediate (IC2 and (ii hydrolysis of the thioester bond to give the products. The polar protein environment has a significant effect in stabilizing reaction intermediates and in particular transition states. As a result, both stages effectively occur in one step with Stage 1, formation of IC2, being rate limiting barrier with a cost of 53.5 kJ•mol−1 with respect to the reactant complex, RC. The effects of dispersion interactions on the overall mechanism were also considered but were generally calculated to have less significant effects with the overall mechanism being unchanged. In addition, the active site lysyl (Lys103 is concluded to likely play a role in stabilizing the thiolate of Cys136 during the reaction.

  19. A multi-scale computational study on the mechanism of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase (SpNic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ion, Bogdan F; Kazim, Erum; Gauld, James W

    2014-09-29

    Nicotinamidase (Nic) is a key zinc-dependent enzyme in NAD metabolism that catalyzes the hydrolysis of nicotinamide to give nicotinic acid. A multi-scale computational approach has been used to investigate the catalytic mechanism, substrate binding and roles of active site residues of Nic from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic). In particular, density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamics (MD) and ONIOM quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods have been employed. The overall mechanism occurs in two stages: (i) formation of a thioester enzyme-intermediate (IC2) and (ii) hydrolysis of the thioester bond to give the products. The polar protein environment has a significant effect in stabilizing reaction intermediates and in particular transition states. As a result, both stages effectively occur in one step with Stage 1, formation of IC2, being rate limiting barrier with a cost of 53.5 kJ·mol-1 with respect to the reactant complex, RC. The effects of dispersion interactions on the overall mechanism were also considered but were generally calculated to have less significant effects with the overall mechanism being unchanged. In addition, the active site lysyl (Lys103) is concluded to likely play a role in stabilizing the thiolate of Cys136 during the reaction.

  20. A multi-scale network method for two-phase flow in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayrat, Karim; Jenny, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Pore-network models of porous media are useful in the study of pore-scale flow in porous media. In order to extract macroscopic properties from flow simulations in pore-networks, it is crucial the networks are large enough to be considered representative elementary volumes. However, existing two-phase network flow solvers are limited to relatively small domains. For this purpose, a multi-scale pore-network (MSPN) method, which takes into account flow-rate effects and can simulate larger domains compared to existing methods, was developed. In our solution algorithm, a large pore network is partitioned into several smaller sub-networks. The algorithm to advance the fluid interfaces within each subnetwork consists of three steps. First, a global pressure problem on the network is solved approximately using the multiscale finite volume (MSFV) method. Next, the fluxes across the subnetworks are computed. Lastly, using fluxes as boundary conditions, a dynamic two-phase flow solver is used to advance the solution in time. Simulation results of drainage scenarios at different capillary numbers and unfavourable viscosity ratios are presented and used to validate the MSPN method against solutions obtained by an existing dynamic network flow solver.

  1. Face Verification with Multi-Task and Multi-Scale Feature Fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Lu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Face verification for unrestricted faces in the wild is a challenging task. This paper proposes a method based on two deep convolutional neural networks (CNN for face verification. In this work, we explore using identification signals to supervise one CNN and the combination of semi-verification and identification to train the other one. In order to estimate semi-verification loss at a low computation cost, a circle, which is composed of all faces, is used for selecting face pairs from pairwise samples. In the process of face normalization, we propose using different landmarks of faces to solve the problems caused by poses. In addition, the final face representation is formed by the concatenating feature of each deep CNN after principal component analysis (PCA reduction. Furthermore, each feature is a combination of multi-scale representations through making use of auxiliary classifiers. For the final verification, we only adopt the face representation of one region and one resolution of a face jointing Joint Bayesian classifier. Experiments show that our method can extract effective face representation with a small training dataset and our algorithm achieves 99.71% verification accuracy on Labeled Faces in the Wild (LFW dataset.

  2. Dynamics of Multi-Scale Intra-Provincial Regional Inequality in Zhejiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenze Yue

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates regional inequality in a multi-scale framework, using Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis, based on the per capita Gross Domestic Product (GDP of counties and municipalities within the Zhejiang province in China between the years of 1990 and 2010. A Spatial Markov Chain is used to identify the dynamics of regional wealth disparity in Zhejiang. The results show that the regional inequality of Zhejiang is sensitive to the geographic scale of the analysis. In addition, the inter-county inequality shows an inverted-U shape pattern. At the same time, the inter-municipality inequality displays a more consistently upward trend, and the evolution of the interregional inequality is relatively stable over time. The regional inequality is more significant at finer (larger spatial scales. The decomposition of the Theil Index shows that the contribution of the inequalities between Northeast Zhejiang and Southwest Zhejiang increased. The increasingly larger values of the Global Moran’s I show that there is an intensifying spatial aggregation of economic development. The comparison of the traditional Markov transition matrix and the Spatial Markov transition matrix illustrates how the relative wealth or poverty of neighboring counties make a significance difference in wealth in a given county as measured using domestic GDP per capita in Zhejiang province. This space-time analysis is valuable for policy making towards sustainable economic development in China given the soaring spatial inequality.

  3. Time-Varying, Multi-Scale Adaptive System Reliability Analysis of Lifeline Infrastructure Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gearhart, Jared Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kurtz, Nolan Scot [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The majority of current societal and economic needs world-wide are met by the existing networked, civil infrastructure. Because the cost of managing such infrastructure is high and increases with time, risk-informed decision making is essential for those with management responsibilities for these systems. To address such concerns, a methodology that accounts for new information, deterioration, component models, component importance, group importance, network reliability, hierarchical structure organization, and efficiency concerns has been developed. This methodology analyzes the use of new information through the lens of adaptive Importance Sampling for structural reliability problems. Deterioration, multi-scale bridge models, and time-variant component importance are investigated for a specific network. Furthermore, both bridge and pipeline networks are studied for group and component importance, as well as for hierarchical structures in the context of specific networks. Efficiency is the primary driver throughout this study. With this risk-informed approach, those responsible for management can address deteriorating infrastructure networks in an organized manner.

  4. Bearing Fault Detection Using Multi-Scale Fractal Dimensions Based on Morphological Covers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Lin Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration signals acquired from bearing have been found to demonstrate complicated nonlinear characteristics in literature. Fractal geometry theory has provided effective tools such as fractal dimension for characterizing the vibration signals in bearing faults detection. However, most of the natural signals are not critical self-similar fractals; the assumption of a constant fractal dimension at all scales may not be true. Motivated by this fact, this work explores the application of the multi-scale fractal dimensions (MFDs based on morphological cover (MC technique for bearing fault diagnosis. Vibration signals from bearing with seven different states under four operations conditions are collected to validate the presented MFDs based on MC technique. Experimental results reveal that the vibration signals acquired from bearing are not critical self-similar fractals. The MFDs can provide more discriminative information about the signals than the single global fractal dimension. Furthermore, three classifiers are employed to evaluate and compare the classification performance of the MFDs with other feature extraction methods. Experimental results demonstrate the MFDs to be a desirable approach to improve the performance of bearing fault diagnosis.

  5. Multi-scale connectivity and graph theory highlight critical areas for conservation under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilts, Thomas E.; Weisberg, Peter J.; Leitner, Phillip; Matocq, Marjorie D.; Inman, Richard D.; Nussear, Ken E.; Esque, Todd C.

    2016-01-01

    Conservation planning and biodiversity management require information on landscape connectivity across a range of spatial scales from individual home ranges to large regions. Reduction in landscape connectivity due changes in land-use or development is expected to act synergistically with alterations to habitat mosaic configuration arising from climate change. We illustrate a multi-scale connectivity framework to aid habitat conservation prioritization in the context of changing land use and climate. Our approach, which builds upon the strengths of multiple landscape connectivity methods including graph theory, circuit theory and least-cost path analysis, is here applied to the conservation planning requirements of the Mohave ground squirrel. The distribution of this California threatened species, as for numerous other desert species, overlaps with the proposed placement of several utility-scale renewable energy developments in the American Southwest. Our approach uses information derived at three spatial scales to forecast potential changes in habitat connectivity under various scenarios of energy development and climate change. By disentangling the potential effects of habitat loss and fragmentation across multiple scales, we identify priority conservation areas for both core habitat and critical corridor or stepping stone habitats. This approach is a first step toward applying graph theory to analyze habitat connectivity for species with continuously-distributed habitat, and should be applicable across a broad range of taxa.

  6. Multi-scale Fully Convolutional Network for Face Detection in the Wild

    KAUST Repository

    Bai, Yancheng

    2017-08-24

    Face detection is a classical problem in computer vision. It is still a difficult task due to many nuisances that naturally occur in the wild. In this paper, we propose a multi-scale fully convolutional network for face detection. To reduce computation, the intermediate convolutional feature maps (conv) are shared by every scale model. We up-sample and down-sample the final conv map to approximate K levels of a feature pyramid, leading to a wide range of face scales that can be detected. At each feature pyramid level, a FCN is trained end-to-end to deal with faces in a small range of scale change. Because of the up-sampling, our method can detect very small faces (10×10 pixels). We test our MS-FCN detector on four public face detection datasets, including FDDB, WIDER FACE, AFW and PASCAL FACE. Extensive experiments show that it outperforms state-of-the-art methods. Also, MS-FCN runs at 23 FPS on a GPU for images of size 640×480 with no assumption on the minimum detectable face size.

  7. Depth estimation from multi-scale SLIC superpixels using non-parametric learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yifeng; Zhu, Yuesheng; Qing, Yin; Yang, Fan

    2017-07-01

    This study introduces a novel depth estimation method that can automatically generate plausible depth map from a single image with unstructured environment. Our goal is to extrapolate depth map with more correct, rich, and distinct depth order, which is both quantitatively accurate as well as visually pleasing. Based on the preexisting DepthTransfer algorithm, our approach primarily transfers depth information at the level of superpixels from the most photometrically similar retrieval images under the framework of non-parametric learning. Posteriorly, we propose to concurrently warp the corresponding superpixels in multi-scale levels, where we employ an improved SLIC technique to segment the RGBD images from coarse to fine. Then, modified Cross Bilateral Filter is leveraged to refine the final depth field. With respect to training and evaluation, we perform our experiment on the popular Make3D dataset and demonstrate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art in both efficacy and computational efficiency. Especially, the final results show that in qualitatively evaluation, our results are visually superior in realism and simultaneously more immersive.

  8. Automatic facial pore analysis system using multi-scale pore detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J Y; Kim, S W; Lee, S H; Choi, J E; Ko, S J

    2017-08-01

    As facial pore widening and its treatments have become common concerns in the beauty care field, the necessity for an objective pore-analyzing system has been increased. Conventional apparatuses lack in usability requiring strong light sources and a cumbersome photographing process, and they often yield unsatisfactory analysis results. This study was conducted to develop an image processing technique for automatic facial pore analysis. The proposed method detects facial pores using multi-scale detection and optimal scale selection scheme and then extracts pore-related features such as total area, average size, depth, and the number of pores. Facial photographs of 50 subjects were graded by two expert dermatologists, and correlation analyses between the features and clinical grading were conducted. We also compared our analysis result with those of conventional pore-analyzing devices. The number of large pores and the average pore size were highly correlated with the severity of pore enlargement. In comparison with the conventional devices, the proposed analysis system achieved better performance showing stronger correlation with the clinical grading. The proposed system is highly accurate and reliable for measuring the severity of skin pore enlargement. It can be suitably used for objective assessment of the pore tightening treatments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A multi-scale network method for two-phase flow in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khayrat, Karim, E-mail: khayratk@ifd.mavt.ethz.ch; Jenny, Patrick

    2017-08-01

    Pore-network models of porous media are useful in the study of pore-scale flow in porous media. In order to extract macroscopic properties from flow simulations in pore-networks, it is crucial the networks are large enough to be considered representative elementary volumes. However, existing two-phase network flow solvers are limited to relatively small domains. For this purpose, a multi-scale pore-network (MSPN) method, which takes into account flow-rate effects and can simulate larger domains compared to existing methods, was developed. In our solution algorithm, a large pore network is partitioned into several smaller sub-networks. The algorithm to advance the fluid interfaces within each subnetwork consists of three steps. First, a global pressure problem on the network is solved approximately using the multiscale finite volume (MSFV) method. Next, the fluxes across the subnetworks are computed. Lastly, using fluxes as boundary conditions, a dynamic two-phase flow solver is used to advance the solution in time. Simulation results of drainage scenarios at different capillary numbers and unfavourable viscosity ratios are presented and used to validate the MSPN method against solutions obtained by an existing dynamic network flow solver.

  10. Equivalent Electromagnetic Constants for Microwave Application to Composite Materials for the Multi-Scale Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Fujisaki

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available To connect different scale models in the multi-scale problem of microwave use, equivalent material constants were researched numerically by a three-dimensional electromagnetic field, taking into account eddy current and displacement current. A volume averaged method and a standing wave method were used to introduce the equivalent material constants; water particles and aluminum particles are used as composite materials. Consumed electrical power is used for the evaluation. Water particles have the same equivalent material constants for both methods; the same electrical power is obtained for both the precise model (micro-model and the homogeneous model (macro-model. However, aluminum particles have dissimilar equivalent material constants for both methods; different electric power is obtained for both models. The varying electromagnetic phenomena are derived from the expression of eddy current. For small electrical conductivity such as water, the macro-current which flows in the macro-model and the micro-current which flows in the micro-model express the same electromagnetic phenomena. However, for large electrical conductivity such as aluminum, the macro-current and micro-current express different electromagnetic phenomena. The eddy current which is observed in the micro-model is not expressed by the macro-model. Therefore, the equivalent material constant derived from the volume averaged method and the standing wave method is applicable to water with a small electrical conductivity, although not applicable to aluminum with a large electrical conductivity.

  11. Multi-scale simulation for terahertz wave emission from the intrinsic Josephson junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, T; Matsumoto, H [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Machida, M; Ota, Y [CREST (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    A numerical method applicable to the analysis of the multi-scale electromagnetic (EM) excitations in intrinsic Josephson junctions (IJJs) is presented. Using this method, we investigate the EM wave emission from the IJJs observed in Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} mesas. The IJJs have three length scales that are greatly different in magnitude, i.e. the distance between superconducting layers (d {approx} 10{sup -3} {mu}m), the Josephson length ({lambda}{sub J} {approx} 1 {mu}m) and the c-axis penetration depth ({lambda}{sub c} {approx} 10{sup 2} {mu}m). The EM field excited in the IJJs generally shows spatial variation of these three length scales at the same time. In our numerical method the coupled dynamical equations for the phase differences and the EM field can be solved simultaneously in all the scales in the whole space composed of the IJJs and the surrounding vacuum. We clarify that the spatial symmetry of the EM field excited at the resonance with the {pi}-cavity-mode is different from that with the 2{pi}-cavity-mode. The strong EM wave emission originating from the {pi}-cavity-mode resonance takes place in the region where the uniform branch becomes unstable in the I-V characteristics.

  12. Insights into the multi-scale structure and digestibility of heat-moisture treated rice starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongwei; Liu, Yufan; Chen, Ling; Li, Xiaoxi; Wang, Jun; Xie, Fengwei

    2018-03-01

    The digestibility and structural changes of rice starch induced by heat-moisture treatment (HMT) were investigated, and the relationships among the moisture content-starch structure-starch digestibility were revealed. HMT could simultaneously disorder and reassemble the rice starch molecules across multi-scale lengths and convert some fractions of rapidly-digestible starch (RDS) into slowly-digestible starch (SDS) and resistant starch (RS). In particular, the HMT rice starch with less than 30% moisture content showed a higher SDS+RS content (25.0%). During HMT, SDS and RS were preferably formed by the degraded starch molecules with M w between 4×10 5 and 4×10 6 g/mol, single helices and amylose-lipids complexes that were formed by degraded starch chains with higher thermal stability and crystalline lamellae with greater thicknesses. Thus, our research suggests a potential approach using HMT to control the digestion of starch products with desired digestibility. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Multi-Scale Stochastic Resonance Spectrogram for fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qingbo; Wu, Enhao; Pan, Yuanyuan

    2018-04-01

    It is not easy to identify incipient defect of a rolling element bearing by analyzing the vibration data because of the disturbance of background noise. The weak and unrecognizable transient fault signal of a mechanical system can be enhanced by the stochastic resonance (SR) technique that utilizes the noise in the system. However, it is challenging for the SR technique to identify sensitive fault information in non-stationary signals. This paper proposes a new method called multi-scale SR spectrogram (MSSRS) for bearing defect diagnosis. The new method considers the non-stationary property of the defective bearing vibration signals, and treats every scale of the time-frequency distribution (TFD) as a modulation system. Then the SR technique is utilized on each modulation system according to each frequencies in the TFD. The SR results are sensitive to the defect information because the energy of transient vibration is distributed in a limited frequency band in the TFD. Collecting the spectra of the SR outputs at all frequency scales then generates the MSSRS. The proposed MSSRS is able to well deal with the non-stationary transient signal, and can highlight the defect-induced frequency component corresponding to the impulse information. Experimental results with practical defective bearing vibration data have shown that the proposed method outperforms the former SR methods and exhibits a good application prospect in rolling element bearing fault diagnosis.

  14. Multi-Scale Pixel-Based Image Fusion Using Multivariate Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveed ur Rehman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel scheme to perform the fusion of multiple images using the multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD algorithm is proposed. Standard multi-scale fusion techniques make a priori assumptions regarding input data, whereas standard univariate empirical mode decomposition (EMD-based fusion techniques suffer from inherent mode mixing and mode misalignment issues, characterized respectively by either a single intrinsic mode function (IMF containing multiple scales or the same indexed IMFs corresponding to multiple input images carrying different frequency information. We show that MEMD overcomes these problems by being fully data adaptive and by aligning common frequency scales from multiple channels, thus enabling their comparison at a pixel level and subsequent fusion at multiple data scales. We then demonstrate the potential of the proposed scheme on a large dataset of real-world multi-exposure and multi-focus images and compare the results against those obtained from standard fusion algorithms, including the principal component analysis (PCA, discrete wavelet transform (DWT and non-subsampled contourlet transform (NCT. A variety of image fusion quality measures are employed for the objective evaluation of the proposed method. We also report the results of a hypothesis testing approach on our large image dataset to identify statistically-significant performance differences.

  15. Relay transport of aerosols to Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region by multi-scale atmospheric circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Guo, Jianping; Liu, Shuhua; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Gen; Yan, Yan; He, Jing

    2017-09-01

    The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region experiences heavy aerosol pollution, which is found to have close relationships with the synoptic- and local-scale atmospheric circulations. However, how and to what extent these multi-scale circulations interplay to modulate aerosol transport have not been fully understood. To this end, this study comprehensively investigated the impacts of these circulations on aerosol transport in BTH by focusing on an episode occurred on 1 June 2013 through combining both observations and three-dimensional simulations. It was found that during this episode, the Bohai Sea acted as a transfer station, and the high-pressure system over the Yellow Sea and sea-breeze in BTH took turns to affect the transport of aerosols. In the morning, influenced by the high-pressure system, lots of aerosols emitted from Shandong and Jiangsu provinces were first transported to the Bohai Sea. After then, these aerosols were brought to the BTH region in the afternoon through the inland penetration of sea-breeze, significantly exacerbating the air quality in BTH. The inland penetration of sea-breeze could be identified by the sharp changes in ground-based observed temperature, humidity, and wind when the sea-breeze front (SBF) passed by. Combining observations with model outputs, the SBF was found to be able to advance inland more than ∼150 km till reaching Beijing. This study has important implications for better understanding the aerosol transport in BTH, and improving the forecast of such aerosol pollution.

  16. Study on multi-scale urban planning supported by spatial information technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Anrong; He, Xindong; Li, Yongfu

    2008-10-01

    Considering the demand of urban and rural planning and the characteristics of spatial information technology (SIT), the study focuses on the application of SIT to support multi-scale urban planning. Three scales of urban and rural planning, such as city and town system planning, urban master planning, and detailed urban planning, were studied based on SIT. Firstly, tacking Great Beijing Region as an example, which includes Beijing, Tianjin, and northern of Hebei province, the city and town system planning was studied, supported by the theory of spatial interaction between cities and towns, and GIS spatial analysis. Then, for the urban master planning of Beijing, the RS and GIS were applied to do the spatial development analysis based on RS image data and GIS spatial analysis. Regarding to the conservation planning of Beijing's Inner city, the third scale is detailed urban planning. RS, GIS, and VR were integrated to determine the conservation region and digital conservation way as well. Finally, three conclusions were worked out.

  17. Multi-scale poro-creep model for cement-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Shui-Tao; Thai, Minh-Quan; Bary, Benoit; He, Qi-Chang

    2012-01-01

    Experimental observations clearly show that the relative humidity (h r ) conditions influence significantly the creep behavior of cement-based materials, indicating that the water present within these materials plays a crucial role. This work presents a creep model for hardened cement pastes (HCP), based on a multi-scale homogenization approach. It takes into account both free and adsorbed water contained in the porosity and investigates their effects on the HCP macroscopic creep behavior. The calcium silicate hydrate phase is assumed to be linear viscoelastic, and the Mori-Tanaka scheme is applied in the Laplace-Carson space to the composite formed of porosity, calcium silicate hydrate, and the other main hydrated compounds (which behavior is linearly elastic) by making use of the correspondence principle. With this model, estimations of the evolution of the macroscopic creep behavior of HCP submitted to constant external loading are examined under different h r and compared with available experimental data. Finally, a method for implementing the model in a finite element code is proposed, and simulations of standard creep tests are performed to assess its validity. (authors)

  18. A multi-scaled approach to evaluating the fish assemblage structure within southern Appalachian streams USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Joseph; Peterson, James T.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable uncertainty about the relative roles of stream habitat and landscape characteristics in structuring stream-fish assemblages. We evaluated the relative importance of environmental characteristics on fish occupancy at the local and landscape scales within the upper Little Tennessee River basin of Georgia and North Carolina. Fishes were sampled using a quadrat sample design at 525 channel units within 48 study reaches during two consecutive years. We evaluated species–habitat relationships (local and landscape factors) by developing hierarchical, multispecies occupancy models. Modeling results suggested that fish occupancy within the Little Tennessee River basin was primarily influenced by stream topology and topography, urban land coverage, and channel unit types. Landscape scale factors (e.g., urban land coverage and elevation) largely controlled the fish assemblage structure at a stream-reach level, and local-scale factors (i.e., channel unit types) influenced fish distribution within stream reaches. Our study demonstrates the utility of a multi-scaled approach and the need to account for hierarchy and the interscale interactions of factors influencing assemblage structure prior to monitoring fish assemblages, developing biological management plans, or allocating management resources throughout a stream system.

  19. Development and Characterization of Embedded Sensory Particles Using Multi-Scale 3D Digital Image Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Stephen R.; Leser, William P.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Hartl, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    A method for detecting fatigue cracks has been explored at NASA Langley Research Center. Microscopic NiTi shape memory alloy (sensory) particles were embedded in a 7050 aluminum alloy matrix to detect the presence of fatigue cracks. Cracks exhibit an elevated stress field near their tip inducing a martensitic phase transformation in nearby sensory particles. Detectable levels of acoustic energy are emitted upon particle phase transformation such that the existence and location of fatigue cracks can be detected. To test this concept, a fatigue crack was grown in a mode-I single-edge notch fatigue crack growth specimen containing sensory particles. As the crack approached the sensory particles, measurements of particle strain, matrix-particle debonding, and phase transformation behavior of the sensory particles were performed. Full-field deformation measurements were performed using a novel multi-scale optical 3D digital image correlation (DIC) system. This information will be used in a finite element-based study to determine optimal sensory material behavior and density.

  20. Development of a multi-scale simulation model of tube hydroforming for superconducting RF cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.S.; Sumption, M.D.; Bong, H.J.; Lim, H.; Collings, E.W.

    2017-01-01

    This work focuses on finite element modeling of the hydroforming process for niobium tubes intended for use in superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. The hydroforming of tubular samples into SRF-relevant shapes involves the complex geometries and loading conditions which develop during the deformation, as well as anisotropic materials properties. Numerical description of the process entails relatively complex numerical simulations. A crystal plasticity (CP) model was constructed that included the evolution of crystallographic orientation during deformation as well as the anisotropy of tubes in all directions and loading conditions. In this work we demonstrate a multi-scale simulation approach which uses both microscopic CP and macroscopic continuum models. In this approach a CP model (developed and implemented into ABAQUS using UMAT) was used for determining the flow stress curve only under bi-axial loading in order to reduce the computing time. The texture of the materials obtained using orientation imaging microscopy (OIM) and tensile test data were inputs for this model. Continuum FE analysis of tube hydroforming using the obtained constitutive equation from the CP modeling was then performed and compared to the results of hydraulic bulge testing. The results show that high quality predictions of the deformation under hydroforming of Nb tubes can be obtained using CP-FEM based on their known texture and the results of tensile tests. The importance of the CP-FEM based approach is that it reduces the need for hydraulic bulge testing, using a relatively simple computational approach.

  1. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Feifei; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Haiping; Zhang, Fuhua; Zheng, Lulu; Hu, Qingxi

    2014-03-01

    The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES) process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  2. A multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold prepared by 3D printing and NFES technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feifei Yan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current focus in the field of life science is the use of tissue engineering scaffolds to repair human organs, which has shown great potential in clinical applications. Extracellular matrix morphology and the performance and internal structure of natural organs are required to meet certain requirements. Therefore, integrating multiple processes can effectively overcome the limitations of the individual processes and can take into account the needs of scaffolds for the material, structure, mechanical properties and many other aspects. This study combined the biological 3D printing technology and the near-field electro-spinning (NFES process to prepare a multi-scale controlled tissue engineering scaffold. While using 3D printing technology to directly prepare the macro-scaffold, the compositing NFES process to build tissue micro-morphology ultimately formed a tissue engineering scaffold which has the specific extracellular matrix structure. This scaffold not only takes into account the material, structure, performance and many other requirements, but also focuses on resolving the controllability problems in macro- and micro-forming which further aim to induce cell directed differentiation, reproduction and, ultimately, the formation of target tissue organs. It has in-depth immeasurable significance to build ideal scaffolds and further promote the application of tissue engineering.

  3. Water Quality Variable Estimation using Partial Least Squares Regression and Multi-Scale Remote Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, K. T.; Wulamu, A.

    2017-12-01

    Water, essential to all living organisms, is one of the Earth's most precious resources. Remote sensing offers an ideal approach to monitor water quality over traditional in-situ techniques that are highly time and resource consuming. Utilizing a multi-scale approach, incorporating data from handheld spectroscopy, UAS based hyperspectal, and satellite multispectral images were collected in coordination with in-situ water quality samples for the two midwestern watersheds. The remote sensing data was modeled and correlated to the in-situ water quality variables including chlorophyll content (Chl), turbidity, and total dissolved solids (TDS) using Normalized Difference Spectral Indices (NDSI) and Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR). The results of the study supported the original hypothesis that correlating water quality variables with remotely sensed data benefits greatly from the use of more complex modeling and regression techniques such as PLSR. The final results generated from the PLSR analysis resulted in much higher R2 values for all variables when compared to NDSI. The combination of NDSI and PLSR analysis also identified key wavelengths for identification that aligned with previous study's findings. This research displays the advantages and future for complex modeling and machine learning techniques to improve water quality variable estimation from spectral data.

  4. Structural and mechanical multi-scale characterization of white New-Zealand rabbit Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Cyril J F; Dumas, Dominique; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira; Marie, Vanessa; Tran, Nguyen; Wang, Xiong; Cleymand, Franck

    2013-10-01

    Multi-scale characterization of structures and mechanical behavior of biological tissues are of huge importance in order to evaluate the quality of a biological tissue and/or to provide bio-inspired scaffold for functional tissue engineering. Indeed, the more information on main biological tissue structures we get, the more relevant we will be to design new functional prostheses for regenerative medicine or to accurately evaluate tissues. From this perspective, we have investigated the structures and their mechanical properties from nanoscopic to macroscopic scale of fresh ex-vivo white New-Zealand rabbit Achilles tendon using second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and tensile tests to provide a "simple" model whose parameters are relevant of its micro or nano structure. Thus, collagen fiber's crimping was identified then measured from SHG images as a plane sine wave with 28.4 ± 5.8 μm of amplitude and 141 ± 41 μm of wavelength. Young's moduli of fibrils (3.0 GPa) and amorphous phases (223 MPa) were obtained using TH-AFM. From these investigations, a non-linear Zener model linking a statistical Weibull's distribution of taut fibers under traction to crimp fibers were developed. This model showed that for small strain (tendon observations under static or dynamic solicitations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Classifying epileptic EEG signals with delay permutation entropy and Multi-Scale K-means.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guohun; Li, Yan; Wen, Peng Paul; Wang, Shuaifang

    2015-01-01

    Most epileptic EEG classification algorithms are supervised and require large training datasets, that hinder their use in real time applications. This chapter proposes an unsupervised Multi-Scale K-means (MSK-means) MSK-means algorithm to distinguish epileptic EEG signals and identify epileptic zones. The random initialization of the K-means algorithm can lead to wrong clusters. Based on the characteristics of EEGs, the MSK-means MSK-means algorithm initializes the coarse-scale centroid of a cluster with a suitable scale factor. In this chapter, the MSK-means algorithm is proved theoretically superior to the K-means algorithm on efficiency. In addition, three classifiers: the K-means, MSK-means MSK-means and support vector machine (SVM), are used to identify seizure and localize epileptogenic zone using delay permutation entropy features. The experimental results demonstrate that identifying seizure with the MSK-means algorithm and delay permutation entropy achieves 4. 7 % higher accuracy than that of K-means, and 0. 7 % higher accuracy than that of the SVM.

  6. Bayesian Fusion of Multi-Scale Detectors for Road Extraction from SAR Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an innovative road network extraction algorithm using synthetic aperture radar (SAR imagery for improving the accuracy of road extraction. The state-of-the-art approaches, such as fraction extraction and road network optimization, failed to obtain continuous road segments in separate successions, since the optimization could not change the parts ignored by the fraction extraction. In this paper, the proposed algorithm integrates the fraction extraction and optimization procedure simultaneously to extract the road network: (1 the Bayesian framework is utilized to transfer the road network extraction to joint reasoning of the likelihood of fraction extraction and the priority of network optimization; (2 the multi-scale linear feature detector (MLFD and the network optimization beamlet are introduced; (3 the conditional random field (CRF is used to reason jointly. The result is the global optimum since the fraction extraction and network optimization are exploited at the same time. The proposed algorithm solves the problem that the fractions are bound to reduce in the process of network optimization and has demonstrated effectiveness in real SAR images applications.

  7. A framework for multi-scale simulation of crystal growth in the presence of polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Taraknath; Huang, Wenjun; Mecca, Jodi M; Getchell, Ashley; Porter, William W; Larson, Ronald G

    2017-03-01

    We present a multi-scale simulation method for modeling crystal growth in the presence of polymer excipients. The method includes a coarse-grained (CG) model for small molecules of known crystal structure whose force field is obtained using structural properties from atomistic simulations. This CG model is capable of stabilizing the molecular crystal structure and capturing the crystal growth from the melt for a wide range of small organic molecules, as demonstrated by application of our method to the molecules isoniazid, urea, sulfamethoxazole, prilocaine, oxcarbazepine, and phenytoin. This CG model can also be used to study the effect of additives, such as polymers, on the inhibition of crystal growth by polymers, as exemplified by our simulation of suppression of the rate of crystal growth of phenytoin, an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), by a cellulose excipient, functionalized with acetate (Ac), hydroxy-propyl (Hp) and succinate (Su) groups. We show that the efficacy of the cellulosic polymers in slowing crystal growth of small molecules strongly depends on the functional group substitution on the cellulose backbone, with the acetate substituent group slowing crystal growth more than does the deprotonated succinate group, which we confirm by experimental drug supersaturation studies.

  8. Multi-scale simulations predict responses to non-invasive nerve root stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, Ilkka; Matsumoto, Hideyuki; Hirata, Akimasa; Terao, Yasuo; Hanajima, Ritsuko; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2014-10-01

    Objective. Established biophysical neurone models have achieved limited success in reproducing electrophysiological responses to non-invasive stimulation of the human nervous system. This is related to our insufficient knowledge of the induced electric currents inside the human body. Despite the numerous research and clinical applications of non-invasive stimulation, it is still unclear which internal sites are actually affected by it. Approach. We performed multi-scale computer simulations that, by making use of advances in computing power and numerical algorithms, combine a microscopic model of electrical excitation of neurones with a macroscopic electromagnetic model of the realistic whole-body anatomy. Main results. The simulations yield responses consistent with those experimentally recorded following magnetic and electrical motor root stimulation in human subjects, and reproduce the observed amplitudes and latencies for a wide variety of stimulation parameters. Significance. Our findings demonstrate that modern computational techniques can produce detailed predictions about which and where neurones are activated, leading to improved understanding of the physics and basic mechanisms of non-invasive stimulation and enabling potential new applications that make use of improved targeting of stimulation.

  9. Anisotropic multi-scale fluid registration: evaluation in magnetic resonance breast imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, W R; Tanner, C; Hawkes, D J

    2005-01-01

    Registration using models of compressible viscous fluids has not found the general application of some other techniques (e.g., free-form-deformation (FFD)) despite its ability to model large diffeomorphic deformations. We report on a multi-resolution fluid registration algorithm which improves on previous work by (a) directly solving the Navier-Stokes equation at the resolution of the images (b) accommodating image sampling anisotropy using semi-coarsening and implicit smoothing in a full multi-grid (FMG) solver and (c) exploiting the inherent multi-resolution nature of FMG to implement a multi-scale approach. Evaluation is on five magnetic resonance (MR) breast images subject to six biomechanical deformation fields over 11 multi-resolution schemes. Quantitative assessment is by tissue overlaps and target registration errors and by registering using the known correspondences rather than image features to validate the fluid model. Context is given by comparison with a validated FFD algorithm and by application to images of volunteers subjected to large applied deformation. The results show that fluid registration of 3D breast MR images to sub-voxel accuracy is possible in minutes on a 1.6 GHz Linux-based Athlon processor with coarse solutions obtainable in a few tens of seconds. Accuracy and computation time are comparable to FFD techniques validated for this application

  10. Pattern dynamics, pattern hierarchies, and forecasting in complex multi-scale earth systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Rundle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Catastrophic disasters afflicting human society are often triggered by tsunamis, earthquakes, widespread flooding, and weather and climate events. As human populations increasingly move into geographic areas affected by these earth system hazards, forecasting the onset of these large and damaging events has become increasingly urgent. In this paper we consider the fundamental problem of forecasting in complex multi-scale earth systems when the basic dynamical variables are either unobservable or incompletely observed. In such cases, the forecaster must rely on incompletely determined, but "tunable" models to interpret observable space-time patterns of events. The sequence of observable patterns constitute an apparent pattern dynamics, which is related to the underlying but hidden dynamics by a complex dimensional reduction process. As an example, we examine the problem of earthquakes, which must utilize current and past observations of observables such as seismicity and surface strain to produce forecasts of future activity. We show that numerical simulations of earthquake fault systems are needed in order to relate the fundamentally unobservable nonlinear dynamics to the readily observable pattern dynamics. We also show that the space-time patterns produced by the simulations lead to a scale-invariant hierarchy of patterns, similar to other nonlinear systems. We point out that a similar program of simulations has been very successful in weather forecasting, in which current and past observations of weather patterns are routinely extrapolated forward in time via numerical simulations in order to forecast future weather patterns.

  11. Multi-Scale Analysis of Very High Resolution Satellite Images Using Unsupervised Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie Sublime

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with the use of unsupervised methods to process very high resolution satellite images with minimal or little human intervention. In a context where more and more complex and very high resolution satellite images are available, it has become increasingly difficult to propose learning sets for supervised algorithms to process such data and even more complicated to process them manually. Within this context, in this article we propose a fully unsupervised step by step method to process very high resolution images, making it possible to link clusters to the land cover classes of interest. For each step, we discuss the various challenges and state of the art algorithms to make the full process as efficient as possible. In particular, one of the main contributions of this article comes in the form of a multi-scale analysis clustering algorithm that we use during the processing of the image segments. Our proposed methods are tested on a very high resolution image (Pléiades of the urban area around the French city of Strasbourg and show relevant results at each step of the process.

  12. Multi-scale Analysis of High Resolution Topography: Feature Extraction and Identification of Landscape Characteristic Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, P.; Sangireddy, H.; Stark, C. P.

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of digital terrain data, detailed information on terrain characteristics and on scale and location of geomorphic features is available over extended areas. Our ability to observe landscapes and quantify topographic patterns has greatly improved, including the estimation of fluxes of mass and energy across landscapes. Challenges still remain in the analysis of high resolution topography data; the presence of features such as roads, for example, challenges classic methods for feature extraction and large data volumes require computationally efficient extraction and analysis methods. Moreover, opportunities exist to define new robust metrics of landscape characterization for landscape comparison and model validation. In this presentation we cover recent research in multi-scale and objective analysis of high resolution topography data. We show how the analysis of the probability density function of topographic attributes such as slope, curvature, and topographic index contains useful information for feature localization and extraction. The analysis of how the distributions change across scales, quantified by the behavior of modal values and interquartile range, allows the identification of landscape characteristic scales, such as terrain roughness. The methods are introduced on synthetic signals in one and two dimensions and then applied to a variety of landscapes of different characteristics. Validation of the methods includes the analysis of modeled landscapes where the noise distribution is known and features of interest easily measured.

  13. A Globally Stable Lyapunov Pointing and Rate Controller for the Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission (MMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neerav

    2011-01-01

    The Magnetospheric MultiScale Mission (MMS) is scheduled to launch in late 2014. Its primary goal is to discover the fundamental plasma physics processes of reconnection in the Earth's magnetosphere. Each of the four MMS spacecraft is spin-stabilized at a nominal rate of 3 RPM. Traditional spin-stabilized spacecraft have used a number of separate modes to control nutation, spin rate, and precession. To reduce the number of modes and simplify operations, the Delta-H control mode is designed to accomplish nutation control, spin rate control, and precession control simultaneously. A nonlinear design technique, Lyapunov's method, is used to design the Delta-H control mode. A global spin rate controller selected as the baseline controller for MMS, proved to be insufficient due to an ambiguity in the attitude. Lyapunov's design method was used to solve this ambiguity, resulting in a controller that meets the design goals. Simulation results show the advantage of the pointing and rate controller for maneuvers larger than 90 deg and provide insight into the performance of this controller.

  14. Multi-scale approach in numerical reservoir simulation; Uma abordagem multiescala na simulacao numerica de reservatorios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guedes, Solange da Silva

    1998-07-01

    Advances in petroleum reservoir descriptions have provided an amount of data that can not be handled directly during numerical simulations. This detailed geological information must be incorporated into a coarser model during multiphase fluid flow simulations by means of some upscaling technique. the most used approach is the pseudo relative permeabilities and the more widely used is the Kyte and Berry method (1975). In this work, it is proposed a multi-scale computational model for multiphase flow that implicitly treats the upscaling without using pseudo functions. By solving a sequence of local problems on subdomains of the refined scale it is possible to achieve results with a coarser grid without expensive computations of a fine grid model. The main advantage of this new procedure is to treat the upscaling step implicitly in the solution process, overcoming some practical difficulties related the use of traditional pseudo functions. results of bidimensional two phase flow simulations considering homogeneous porous media are presented. Some examples compare the results of this approach and the commercial upscaling program PSEUDO, a module of the reservoir simulation software ECLIPSE. (author)

  15. Adaptive Multi-scale Prognostics and Health Management for Smart Manufacturing Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Benjamin Y; Adams, Stephen C; Weiss, Brian A; Marvel, Jeremy A; Beling, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    The Adaptive Multi-scale Prognostics and Health Management (AM-PHM) is a methodology designed to enable PHM in smart manufacturing systems. In application, PHM information is not yet fully utilized in higher-level decision-making in manufacturing systems. AM-PHM leverages and integrates lower-level PHM information such as from a machine or component with hierarchical relationships across the component, machine, work cell, and assembly line levels in a manufacturing system. The AM-PHM methodology enables the creation of actionable prognostic and diagnostic intelligence up and down the manufacturing process hierarchy. Decisions are then made with the knowledge of the current and projected health state of the system at decision points along the nodes of the hierarchical structure. To overcome the issue of exponential explosion of complexity associated with describing a large manufacturing system, the AM-PHM methodology takes a hierarchical Markov Decision Process (MDP) approach into describing the system and solving for an optimized policy. A description of the AM-PHM methodology is followed by a simulated industry-inspired example to demonstrate the effectiveness of AM-PHM.

  16. Multi-Scale Visualization Analysis of Bus Flow Average Travel Speed in Qingdao

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, HAN; Man, GAO; Xiao-Lei, ZHANG; Jie, LI; Ge, CHEN

    2016-11-01

    Public transportation is a kind of complex spatiotemporal behaviour. The traffic congestion and environmental pollution caused by the increase in private cars is becoming more and more serious in our city. Spatiotemporal data visualization is an effective tool for studying traffic, transforming non-visual data into recognizable images, which can reveal where/when congestion is formed, developed and disappeared in space and time simultaneously. This paper develops a multi-scale visualization of average travel speed derived from floating bus data, to enable congestion on urban bus networks to be shown and analyzed. The techniques of R language, Echarts, WebGL are used to draw statistical pictures and 3D wall map, which show the congestion in Qingdao from the view of space and time. The results are as follows:(1) There is a more severely delay in Shibei and Shinan areas than Licun and Laoshan areas; (2) The high congestion usually occurs on Hong Kong Middle Road, Shandong Road, Nanjing Road, Liaoyang West Road and Taiping Road;(3) There is a similar law from Monday to Sunday that the congestion is severer in the morning and evening rush hours than other hours; (4) On Monday morning the severity of congestion is higher than on Friday morning, and on Friday evening the severity is higher than on Monday evening. The research results will help to improve the public transportation of Qingdao.

  17. Multi-scale Analysis of MEMS Sensors Subject to Drop Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Zerbini

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of accidental drops on MEMS sensors are examined within the frame-work of a multi-scale finite element approach. With specific reference to a polysilicon MEMSaccelerometer supported by a naked die, the analysis is decoupled into macro-scale (at dielength-scale and meso-scale (at MEMS length-scale simulations, accounting for the verysmall inertial contribution of the sensor to the overall dynamics of the device. Macro-scaleanalyses are adopted to get insights into the link between shock waves caused by the impactagainst a target surface and propagating inside the die, and the displacement/acceleration his-tories at the MEMS anchor points. Meso-scale analyses are adopted to detect the most stresseddetails of the sensor and to assess whether the impact can lead to possible localized failures.Numerical results show that the acceleration at sensor anchors cannot be considered an ob-jective indicator for drop severity. Instead, accurate analyses at sensor level are necessary toestablish how MEMS can fail because of drops.

  18. Self-Adaptive Event-Driven Simulation of Multi-Scale Plasma Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelchenko, Yuri; Karimabadi, Homayoun

    2005-10-01

    Multi-scale plasmas pose a formidable computational challenge. The explicit time-stepping models suffer from the global CFL restriction. Efficient application of adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) to systems with irregular dynamics (e.g. turbulence, diffusion-convection-reaction, particle acceleration etc.) may be problematic. To address these issues, we developed an alternative approach to time stepping: self-adaptive discrete-event simulation (DES). DES has origin in operations research, war games and telecommunications. We combine finite-difference and particle-in-cell techniques with this methodology by assuming two caveats: (1) a local time increment, dt for a discrete quantity f can be expressed in terms of a physically meaningful quantum value, df; (2) f is considered to be modified only when its change exceeds df. Event-driven time integration is self-adaptive as it makes use of causality rules rather than parametric time dependencies. This technique enables asynchronous flux-conservative update of solution in accordance with local temporal scales, removes the curse of the global CFL condition, eliminates unnecessary computation in inactive spatial regions and results in robust and fast parallelizable codes. It can be naturally combined with various mesh refinement techniques. We discuss applications of this novel technology to diffusion-convection-reaction systems and hybrid simulations of magnetosonic shocks.

  19. Multi-scales modeling of reactive transport mechanisms. Impact on petrophysical properties during CO2 storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varloteaux, C.

    2012-01-01

    The geo-sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is an attractive option to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases. Within carbonate reservoirs, acidification of brine in place can occur during CO 2 injection. This acidification leads to mineral dissolution which can modify the transport properties of a solute in porous media. The aim of this study is to quantify the impact of reactive transport on a solute distribution and on the structural modification induced by the reaction from the pore to the reservoir scale. This study is focused on reactive transport problem in the case of single phase flow in the limit of long time. To do so, we used a multi-scale up-scaling method that takes into account (i) the local scale, where flow, reaction and transport are known; (ii) the pore scale, where the reactive transport is addressed by using averaged formulation of the local equations; (iii) the Darcy scale (also called core scale), where the structure of the rock is taken into account by using a three-dimensions network of pore-bodies connected by pore-throats; and (iv) the reservoir scale, where physical phenomenon, within each cell of the reservoir model, are taken into account by introducing macroscopic coefficients deduced from the study of these phenomenon at the Darcy scale, such as the permeability, the apparent reaction rate, the solute apparent velocity and dispersion. (author)

  20. GROUND FILTERING LiDAR DATA BASED ON MULTI-SCALE ANALYSIS OF HEIGHT DIFFERENCE THRESHOLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Rashidi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Separating point clouds into ground and non-ground points is a necessary step to generate digital terrain model (DTM from LiDAR dataset. In this research, a new method based on multi-scale analysis of height difference threshold is proposed for ground filtering of LiDAR data. The proposed method utilizes three windows with different sizes in small, average and large to cover the entire LiDAR point clouds, then with a height difference threshold, point clouds can be separated to ground and non-ground in each local window. Meanwhile, the best threshold values for size of windows are considered based on physical characteristics of the ground surface and size of objects. Also, the minimum of height of object in each window selected as height difference threshold. In order to evaluate the performance of the proposed algorithm, two datasets in rural and urban area were applied. The overall accuracy in rural and urban area was 96.06% and 94.88% respectively. These results of the filtering showed that the proposed method can successfully filters non-ground points from LiDAR point clouds despite of the data area.

  1. Integrating multi-scale data to create a virtual physiological mouse heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land, Sander; Niederer, Steven A; Louch, William E; Sejersted, Ole M; Smith, Nicolas P

    2013-04-06

    While the virtual physiological human (VPH) project has made great advances in human modelling, many of the tools and insights developed as part of this initiative are also applicable for facilitating mechanistic understanding of the physiology of a range of other species. This process, in turn, has the potential to provide human relevant insights via a different scientific path. Specifically, the increasing use of mice in experimental research, not yet fully complemented by a similar increase in computational modelling, is currently missing an important opportunity for using and interpreting this growing body of experimental data to improve our understanding of cardiac function. This overview describes our work to address this issue by creating a virtual physiological mouse model of the heart. We describe the similarities between human- and mouse-focused modelling, including the reuse of VPH tools, and the development of methods for investigating parameter sensitivity that are applicable across species. We show how previous results using this approach have already provided important biological insights, and how these can also be used to advance VPH heart models. Finally, we show an example application of this approach to test competing multi-scale hypotheses by investigating variations in length-dependent properties of cardiac muscle.

  2. Multi-Scale Finite Element Analyses of Thermal Conductivities of Three Dimensional Woven Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yufen; Song, Leilei; Li, Jialu; Jiao, Yanan

    2017-12-01

    This paper summarizes an extensive experimental and prediction study of thermal conductivities of three-dimensional woven composites (3DWCs). Three kinds of innovative 3D woven architectures are examined, including 2.5D angle-interlock, 2.5D angle-interlock (with warp reinforcement), and 3D orthogonal woven architectures. The differences of thermal behaviors of 3DWCs in plane and out of plane are assessed by using multi-scale finite element analysis. For the validation of models, the thickness direction thermal conductivity of 3DWCs are measured. It is indicated that the predicted results are in good agreement with the experimental results. The effects of weave density and fabric architecture on the distribution of heat flux and temperature have been discussed in this work, which determined the thermal conductivities of 3DWCs. From this study, it can be expected that the need of thermal performance of 3DWCs can obtained according to optimize the weave parameters based on the high designability of 3DWCs.

  3. Contextual Multi-Scale Region Convolutional 3D Network for Activity Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Bai, Yancheng

    2018-01-28

    Activity detection is a fundamental problem in computer vision. Detecting activities of different temporal scales is particularly challenging. In this paper, we propose the contextual multi-scale region convolutional 3D network (CMS-RC3D) for activity detection. To deal with the inherent temporal scale variability of activity instances, the temporal feature pyramid is used to represent activities of different temporal scales. On each level of the temporal feature pyramid, an activity proposal detector and an activity classifier are learned to detect activities of specific temporal scales. Temporal contextual information is fused into activity classifiers for better recognition. More importantly, the entire model at all levels can be trained end-to-end. Our CMS-RC3D detector can deal with activities at all temporal scale ranges with only a single pass through the backbone network. We test our detector on two public activity detection benchmarks, THUMOS14 and ActivityNet. Extensive experiments show that the proposed CMS-RC3D detector outperforms state-of-the-art methods on THUMOS14 by a substantial margin and achieves comparable results on ActivityNet despite using a shallow feature extractor.

  4. Multi-scale sustainability assessments for biomass-based and coal-based fuels in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Yi; Xiao, Honghua; Cai, Wei; Yang, Siyu

    2017-12-01

    Transportation liquid fuels production is heavily depend on oil. In recent years, developing biomass based and coal based fuels are regarded as promising alternatives for non-petroleum based fuels in China. With the rapid growth of constructing and planning b biomass based and coal based fuels production projects, sustainability assessments are needed to simultaneously consider the resource, the economic, and the environmental factors. This paper performs multi-scale analyses on the biomass based and coal based fuels in China. The production cost, life cycle cost, and ecological life cycle cost (ELCC) of these synfuels are investigated to compare their pros to cons and reveal the sustainability. The results show that BTL fuels has high production cost. It lacks of economic attractiveness. However, insignificant resource cost and environmental cost lead to a substantially lower ELCC, which may indicate better ecological sustainability. CTL fuels, on the contrary, is lower in production cost and reliable for economic benefit. But its coal consumption and pollutant emissions are both serious, leading to overwhelming resource cost and environmental cost. A shifting from petroleum to CTL fuels could double the ELCC, posing great threat to the sustainability of the entire fuels industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Rapid prototyping of multi-scale biomedical microdevices by combining additive manufacturing technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengsbach, Stefan; Lantada, Andrés Díaz

    2014-08-01

    The possibility of designing and manufacturing biomedical microdevices with multiple length-scale geometries can help to promote special interactions both with their environment and with surrounding biological systems. These interactions aim to enhance biocompatibility and overall performance by using biomimetic approaches. In this paper, we present a design and manufacturing procedure for obtaining multi-scale biomedical microsystems based on the combination of two additive manufacturing processes: a conventional laser writer to manufacture the overall device structure, and a direct-laser writer based on two-photon polymerization to yield finer details. The process excels for its versatility, accuracy and manufacturing speed and allows for the manufacture of microsystems and implants with overall sizes up to several millimeters and with details down to sub-micrometric structures. As an application example we have focused on manufacturing a biomedical microsystem to analyze the impact of microtextured surfaces on cell motility. This process yielded a relevant increase in precision and manufacturing speed when compared with more conventional rapid prototyping procedures.

  6. Equivalent Electromagnetic Constants for Microwave Application to Composite Materials for the Multi-Scale Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisaki, Keisuke; Ikeda, Tomoyuki

    2013-01-01

    To connect different scale models in the multi-scale problem of microwave use, equivalent material constants were researched numerically by a three-dimensional electromagnetic field, taking into account eddy current and displacement current. A volume averaged method and a standing wave method were used to introduce the equivalent material constants; water particles and aluminum particles are used as composite materials. Consumed electrical power is used for the evaluation. Water particles have the same equivalent material constants for both methods; the same electrical power is obtained for both the precise model (micro-model) and the homogeneous model (macro-model). However, aluminum particles have dissimilar equivalent material constants for both methods; different electric power is obtained for both models. The varying electromagnetic phenomena are derived from the expression of eddy current. For small electrical conductivity such as water, the macro-current which flows in the macro-model and the micro-current which flows in the micro-model express the same electromagnetic phenomena. However, for large electrical conductivity such as aluminum, the macro-current and micro-current express different electromagnetic phenomena. The eddy current which is observed in the micro-model is not expressed by the macro-model. Therefore, the equivalent material constant derived from the volume averaged method and the standing wave method is applicable to water with a small electrical conductivity, although not applicable to aluminum with a large electrical conductivity. PMID:28788395

  7. Multi-scale modeling of interaction between vacancies and alloying elements in ferritic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barouh, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    This PhD thesis is devoted to the study of interaction between vacancies and alloying elements in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels, which are promising candidate materials for future nuclear reactors. This work is based on multi-scale modeling of a simplified system composed by oxygen, yttrium and titanium atoms and vacancies in an α-iron lattice. We particularly focused on the role of vacancies which are created in excess during the fabrication of these steels. The stability and mobility of vacancy-solute clusters have been examined using ab initio calculations for oxygen, on one hand, which has been systematically compared to carbon and nitrogen, interstitial solutes frequently present in iron-based materials, and, on the other hand, for substitutional solutes: titanium and yttrium. The three interstitial solutes show very similar energetic and kinetic behaviors. The impact of small mobile vacancy-solute clusters has been verified using a cluster dynamics model based on our ab initio results. It has been thus demonstrated that with over-saturation of vacancies, diffusion of interstitial solutes may be accelerated, while substitutional solutes do not become necessarily faster. These conclusions are consistent with existing experimental observations. All these results have been then used to complete our understanding of nano-clusters formation mechanisms. It appeared that the relative mobility of yttrium and titanium, as well as the number of potential nuclei to form nanoparticles strongly depend on the total vacancy concentration in the system. (author) [fr

  8. Unsupervised Transfer Learning via Multi-Scale Convolutional Sparse Coding for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hang; Han, Ju; Zhong, Cheng; Snijders, Antoine M; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2018-05-01

    The capabilities of (I) learning transferable knowledge across domains; and (II) fine-tuning the pre-learned base knowledge towards tasks with considerably smaller data scale are extremely important. Many of the existing transfer learning techniques are supervised approaches, among which deep learning has the demonstrated power of learning domain transferrable knowledge with large scale network trained on massive amounts of labeled data. However, in many biomedical tasks, both the data and the corresponding label can be very limited, where the unsupervised transfer learning capability is urgently needed. In this paper, we proposed a novel multi-scale convolutional sparse coding (MSCSC) method, that (I) automatically learns filter banks at different scales in a joint fashion with enforced scale-specificity of learned patterns; and (II) provides an unsupervised solution for learning transferable base knowledge and fine-tuning it towards target tasks. Extensive experimental evaluation of MSCSC demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed MSCSC in both regular and transfer learning tasks in various biomedical domains.

  9. Multi-scale modelling of ions in solution: from atomistic descriptions to chemical engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molina, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ions in solution play a fundamental role in many physical, chemical, and biological processes. The PUREX process used in the nuclear industry to the treatment of spent nuclear fuels is considered as an example. For industrial applications these systems are usually described using simple analytical models which are fitted to reproduce the available experimental data. In this work, we propose a multi-scale coarse graining procedure to derive such models from atomistic descriptions. First, parameters for classical force-fields of ions in solution are extracted from ab-initio calculations. Effective (McMillan-Mayer) ion-ion potentials are then derived from radial distribution functions measured in classical molecular dynamics simulations, allowing us to define an implicit solvent model of electrolytes. Finally, perturbation calculations are performed to define the best possible representation for these systems, in terms of charged hard-sphere models. Our final model is analytical and contains no free 'fitting' parameters. It shows good agreement with the exact results obtained from Monte-Carlo simulations for the thermodynamic and structural properties. Development of a similar model for the electrolyte viscosity, from information derived from atomistic descriptions, is also introduced. (author)

  10. A Multi-scale Modeling System: Developments, Applications and Critical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Chern, Jiundar; Atlas, Robert; Randall, David; Lin, Xin; Khairoutdinov, Marat; Li, Jui-Lin; Waliser, Duane E.; Hou, Arthur; Peters-Lidard, Christa; hide

    2006-01-01

    A multi-scale modeling framework (MMF), which replaces the conventional cloud parameterizations with a cloud-resolving model (CRM) in each grid column of a GCM, constitutes a new and promising approach. The MMF can provide for global coverage and two-way interactions between the CRMs and their parent GCM. The GCM allows global coverage and the CRM allows explicit simulation of cloud processes and their interactions with radiation and surface processes. A new MMF has been developed that is based the Goddard finite volume GCM (fvGCM) and the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. This Goddard MMF produces many features that are similar to another MMF that was developed at Colorado State University (CSU), such as an improved .surface precipitation pattern, better cloudiness, improved diurnal variability over both oceans and continents, and a stronger, propagating Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) compared to their parent GCMs using conventional cloud parameterizations. Both MMFs also produce a precipitation bias in the western Pacific during Northern Hemisphere summer. However, there are also notable differences between two MMFs. For example, the CSU MMF simulates less rainfall over land than its parent GCM. This is why the CSU MMF simulated less overall global rainfall than its parent GCM. The Goddard MMF overestimates global rainfall because of its oceanic component. Some critical issues associated with the Goddard MMF are presented in this paper.

  11. Multi-scale models of grassland passerine abundance in a fragmented system in Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfrew, R.B.; Ribic, C.A.

    2008-01-01

    Fragmentation of grasslands has been implicated in grassland bird population declines. Multi-scale models are being increasingly used to assess potential factors that influence grassland bird presence, abundance, and productivity. However, studies rarely assess fragmentation metrics, and seldom evaluate more than two scales or interactions among scales. We evaluated the relative importance of characteristics at multiple scales to patterns in relative abundance of Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis), Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum), Eastern Meadowlark (Sturnella magna), and Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus). We surveyed birds in 74 southwestern Wisconsin pastures from 1997 to 1999 and compared models with explanatory variables from multiple scales: within-patch vegetation structure (microhabitat), patch (macrohabitat), and three landscape extents. We also examined interactions between macrohabitat and landscape factors. Core area of pastures was an important predictor of relative abundance, and composition of the landscape was more important than configuration. Relative abundance was frequently higher in pastures with more core area and in landscapes with more grassland and less wooded area. The direction and strength of the effect of core pasture size on relative abundance changed depending on amount of wooded area in the landscape. Relative abundance of grassland birds was associated with landscape variables more frequently at the 1200-m scale than at smaller scales. To develop better predictive models, parameters at multiple scales and their interactive effects should be included, and results should be evaluated in the context of microhabitat variability, landscape composition, and fragmentation in the study area. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  12. Multi-scale process and supply chain modelling: from lignocellulosic feedstock to process and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Ali; Shah, Nilay

    2011-01-01

    There is a large body of literature regarding the choice and optimization of different processes for converting feedstock to bioethanol and bio-commodities; moreover, there has been some reasonable technological development in bioconversion methods over the past decade. However, the eventual cost and other important metrics relating to sustainability of biofuel production will be determined not only by the performance of the conversion process, but also by the performance of the entire supply chain from feedstock production to consumption. Moreover, in order to ensure world-class biorefinery performance, both the network and the individual components must be designed appropriately, and allocation of resources over the resulting infrastructure must effectively be performed. The goal of this work is to describe the key challenges in bioenergy supply chain modelling and then to develop a framework and methodology to show how multi-scale modelling can pave the way to answer holistic supply chain questions, such as the prospects for second generation bioenergy crops. PMID:22482032

  13. Multi-scale-nonlinear interactions among micro-turbulence, double tearing instability and zonal flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizawa, A.; Nakajima, N.

    2007-01-01

    Micro-turbulence and macro-magnetohydrodynamic (macro-MHD) instabilities can appear in plasma at the same time and interact with each other in a plasma confinement. The multi-scale-nonlinear interaction among micro-turbulence, double tearing instability and zonal flow is investigated by numerically solving a reduced set of two-fluid equations. It is found that the double tearing instability, which is a macro-MHD instability, appears in an equilibrium formed by a balance between micro-turbulence and zonal flow when the double tearing mode is unstable. The roles of the nonlinear and linear terms of the equations in driving the zonal flow and coherent convective cell flow of the double tearing mode are examined. The Reynolds stress drives zonal flow and coherent convective cell flow, while the ion diamagnetic term and Maxwell stress oppose the Reynolds stress drive. When the double tearing mode grows, linear terms in the equations are dominant and they effectively release the free energy of the equilibrium current gradient

  14. Multi-scale Mexican spotted owl (Strix occidentalis lucida) nest/roost habitat selection in Arizona and a comparison with single-scale modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brad C. Timm; Kevin McGarigal; Samuel A. Cushman; Joseph L. Ganey

    2016-01-01

    Efficacy of future habitat selection studies will benefit by taking a multi-scale approach. In addition to potentially providing increased explanatory power and predictive capacity, multi-scale habitat models enhance our understanding of the scales at which species respond to their environment, which is critical knowledge required to implement effective...

  15. Multi-scale forcing and the formation of subtropical desert and monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. X. Wu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates three types of atmospheric forcing across the summertime subtropics that are shown to contribute in various ways to the occurrence of dry and wet climates in the subtropics. To explain the formation of desert over the western parts of continents and monsoon over the eastern parts, we propose a new mechanism of positive feedback between diabatic heating and vorticity generation that occurs via meridional advection of planetary vorticity and temperature. Monsoon and desert are demonstrated to coexist as twin features of multi-scale forcing, as follows.

    First, continent-scale heating over land and cooling over ocean induce the ascent of air over the eastern parts of continents and western parts of oceans, and descent over eastern parts of oceans and western parts of continents. Second, local-scale sea-breeze forcing along coastal regions enhances air descent over eastern parts of oceans and ascent over eastern parts of continents. This leads to the formation of the well-defined summertime subtropical LOSECOD quadruplet-heating pattern across each continent and adjacent oceans, with long-wave radiative cooling (LO over eastern parts of oceans, sensible heating (SE over western parts of continents, condensation heating (CO over eastern parts of continents, and double dominant heating (D: LO+CO over western parts of oceans. Such a quadruplet heating pattern corresponds to a dry climate over the western parts of continents and a wet climate over eastern parts. Third, regional-scale orographic-uplift-heating generates poleward ascending flow to the east of orography and equatorward descending flow to the west.

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP is located over the eastern Eurasian continent. The TP-forced circulation pattern is in phase with that produced by continental-scale forcing, and the strongest monsoon and largest deserts are formed over the Afro-Eurasian Continent. In contrast, the Rockies and the Andes are

  16. Multi-scale forcing and the formation of subtropical desert and monsoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. X. Wu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates three types of atmospheric forcing across the summertime subtropics that are shown to contribute in various ways to the occurrence of dry and wet climates in the subtropics. To explain the formation of desert over the western parts of continents and monsoon over the eastern parts, we propose a new mechanism of positive feedback between diabatic heating and vorticity generation that occurs via meridional advection of planetary vorticity and temperature. Monsoon and desert are demonstrated to coexist as twin features of multi-scale forcing, as follows. First, continent-scale heating over land and cooling over ocean induce the ascent of air over the eastern parts of continents and western parts of oceans, and descent over eastern parts of oceans and western parts of continents. Second, local-scale sea-breeze forcing along coastal regions enhances air descent over eastern parts of oceans and ascent over eastern parts of continents. This leads to the formation of the well-defined summertime subtropical LOSECOD quadruplet-heating pattern across each continent and adjacent oceans, with long-wave radiative cooling (LO over eastern parts of oceans, sensible heating (SE over western parts of continents, condensation heating (CO over eastern parts of continents, and double dominant heating (D: LO+CO over western parts of oceans. Such a quadruplet heating pattern corresponds to a dry climate over the western parts of continents and a wet climate over eastern parts. Third, regional-scale orographic-uplift-heating generates poleward ascending flow to the east of orography and equatorward descending flow to the west. The Tibetan Plateau (TP is located over the eastern Eurasian continent. The TP-forced circulation pattern is in phase with that produced by continental-scale forcing, and the strongest monsoon and largest deserts are formed over the Afro-Eurasian Continent. In contrast, the Rockies and the Andes are located over the western

  17. Multi-scale electromagnetic imaging of the Monte Aquila Fault (Agri Valley, Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocoli, Alessandro; Piscitelli, Sabatino; Romano, Gerardo; Balasco, Marianna; Lapenna, Vincenzo; Siniscalchi, Agata

    2010-05-01

    The Agri Valley is a NW-SE trending intermontane basin formed during the Quaternary times along the axial zone of the Southern Apennines thrust belt chain. This basin is about 30 Km long and 12 Km wide and is filled by Quaternary continental deposits, which cover down-thrown pre-Quaternary rocks of the Apennines chain. The Agri Valley was hit by the M 7.0, 1857 Basilicata earthquake (Branno et al., 1985), whose macroseismic field covered a wide sector of the Southern Apennines chain. The latest indications of Late Quaternary faulting processes in Agri Valley were reported in Maschio et al., (2005), which documented a unknown NE-dipping normal fault thanks to the finding of small-scale morphological features of recent tectonic activity. The identified structure was termed Monte Aquila Fault (MAF) and corresponds to the southern strand of the NW-SE trending Monti della Maddalena Fault System (Maschio et al., 2005; Burrato and Valensise, 2007). The NE-dipping MAF consists of a main northern segment, about 10 Km long, and two smaller segments with cumulate length of ~10 Km, thus bringing the total length to ~20 Km. The three segments are arranged in a right-stepping en-echelon pattern and are characterized by subtle geomorphic features. In order to provide more detailed and accurate information about the MAF, a strategy based on the application of complementary investigation tools was employed. In particular, multi-scale electromagnetic investigation, including Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) and Magnetotelluric (MT) methods, was used to image the MAF from near-surface to several hundred metres depth. Large-scale MT investigation proved to be useful in detecting the MAF location down to several hundred meters depth, but it didn't show any shallow evidence about MAF. Conversely, ERT and GPR surveys evidenced signatures of normal-faulting activity at shallow depth (e.g., back-tilting of the bedrock, colluvial wedges, etc.). In

  18. Multi-scale analysis of gas cooled reactors through CFD and system codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cioni, Olivier; Perdu, Fabien; Ducros, Frederic; Geffraye, Genevieve; Tauveron, Nicolas; Tenchine, Denis; Ruby, Alain; Saez, Manuel

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to define the space scales related to the thermalhydraulic phenomena in the case of a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR), and to propose a coherent set of numerical descriptions adapted to each scale. These descriptions will have to allow, by coupling simulations on different scales, to perform parametric studies for the design, or very precise safety studies in specific zones of the reactor. After having identified the various scales, the various types of couplings will be listed. This document is limited primarily to the description of the vessel (core and plenums), even if other elements of the primary circuit can benefit from a multi-scales description (exchangers, decay heat removal system, for example). Lastly, a section is devoted to the first step of coupling with the CFD code Trio U and the system code CATHARE. The paper has the following structure: 1. Introduction; 2. The different scales; 2.1. The system scale (tens of meters); 2.2. The vessel scale (metres); 2.2.1. The plenums and the downcomer; 2.2.2. The core; 2.3. The subassembly scale (centimeters); 2.3.1. The subassembly; 2.3.2. The gaps between subassemblies; 2.4. The fuel element scale (centimeters); 2.5. The fuel ball scale (micrometers); 3. Coupling methods; 3.1. Two possible approaches of coupling; 3.1.1. Domain Decomposition Method without overlapping; 3.1.2. Domain Decomposition Method with overlapping; 4. First realizations; 4.1. The subassembly scale: Blocking of Helium channels in a HTGR; 4.1.1. Description of the study; 4.1.2. Main results; 4.1.3. Conclusion; 4.2. The plenum scale: Thermal fluctuations in the lower plenum of a HTGR; 4.2.1. Description of the study; 4.2.2. Example of results; 4.2.3. Conclusion; 4.3. Scale of the core; 4.3.1. Application to a pebble bed reactor; 4.4. Preliminary work of coupling between the system code CATHARE and the CFD code Trio U; 5. Conclusion. To summarize, this document underlines the various scales, relating to the thermalhydraulic

  19. PUPIL: A systematic approach to software integration in multi-scale simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torras, Juan; He, Yao; Cao, Chao; Muralidharan, Krishna; Deumens, E.; Cheng, H.-P.; Trickey, S. B.

    2007-08-01

    We present a relatively straightforward way to integrate existing software packages into a full multi-scale simulation package in which each application runs in its own address space and there is no run-time intervention by the researcher. The PUPIL (Program for User Package Interfacing and Linking) architectural concept is to provide a simulation Supervisor, implemented as a Manager and various Workers which involve small wrapper interfaces written and installed within each application package and various communication services. The different, autonomous packages ("Calculation Units") are plugged into the PUPIL system which one then operates as a software driver for them. Well-defined protocols are provided for communication between the different Calculation Units and the PUPIL system. The CORBA communication protocol is used to exchange information between running processes. All simulation directives from the user are stored in an XML file that is interpreted by the PUPIL Manager and Workers. An initial version has been designed using the Object Oriented (OO) paradigm and implemented in Java as a fast prototyping language. Tests of implementation ease and of operational correctness (on toy physical systems) have been carried out. In the former category, we document how interfaces to both DL_POLY and SIESTA were done relatively straightforwardly. In the latter category, the most demanding test was the joining of three different packages to do a MD calculation with pattern recognition to identify the QM-forces region and an external QM force calculation. The results show that PUPIL provides ease of operation and maintenance with little overhead.

  20. Infrared Harvesting Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cell Based on Multi-scale Disordered Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Tian, Yi

    2015-06-23

    Colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics (CQDPV) offer a big potential to be a renewable energy source due to low cost and tunable band-gap. Currently, the certified power conversion efficiency of CQDPV has reached 9.2%. Compared to the 31% theoretical efficiency limit of single junction solar cells, device performances have still have a large potential to be improved. For photovoltaic devices, a classical way to enhance absorption is to increase the thickness of the active layers. Although this approach can improve absorption, it reduces the charge carriers extraction efficiency. Photo-generated carriers, in fact, are prone to recombine within the defects inside CQD active layers. In an effort to solve this problem, we proposed to increase light absorption from a given thickness of colloidal quantum dot layers with the assistance of disorder. Our approach is to develop new types of electrodes with multi-scale disordered features, which localize energy into the active layer through plasmonic effects. We fabricated nanostructured gold substrates by electrochemical methods, which allow to control surface disorder as a function of deposition conditions. We demonstrated that the light absorption from 600 nm to 800 nm is impressively enhanced, when the disorder of the nanostructured surface increases. Compared to the planar case, the most disorder case increased 65% light absorption at the wavelength of λ = 700nm in the 100 nm PbS film. The average absorption enhancement across visible and infrared region in 100 nm PbS film is 49.94%. By developing a photovoltaic module, we measured a dramatic 34% improvement in the short-circuit current density of the device. The power conversion efficiency of the tested device in top-illumination configuration showed 25% enhancement.

  1. A Multi-Scale Study on the Role of Trace Metals on Physiological and Pathological Mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammelkamp, Derek

    The work in this thesis provides mulit-scale contributions towards understanding the effects of trace metals on the pathological mineralization process relating to both the development of healthy bone tissue, the diseased state of osteoporosis, and microcalcifications which develop in breast cancers. A protein level study was performed on ECM protein fibronectin, which plays a role in cell adhesion. The protein studies showed zinc interactions with fibronectin and its fragment, anastellin, to influence protein structure. Zinc is also shown to decrease cell migration in vitro, which may be influenced by changes in fibronectin ECM structure. The effects of osteoporosis on micronutrient composition in vivo were examined using the technique of x-ray fluorescence (XRF) in an ovariectomized rat model. Compared to healthy bone, subtle difference are observed in zinc and iron in osteoporotic rat bones, showing micronutrients may play an important role in healthy bone regulation. Effects of micronutrient zinc was used to inhibit microcalcification formation in breast cancers. Microcalcifications have been linked malignancy of breast cancers, but the process of microcalcification formation has yet to be well understood. In this work, exogenous zinc is used to inhibit microcalcification formation, and metastatic potential in both a 2D and 3D spheroid environment. A novel in vitro self-assembled three dimensional multi-cellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) model for the study of breast cancer microcalcifications was developed for this experiment. A MCTS model for studying breast cancer microcalcifications has potential to be used in drug discovery, or for basic research applications studying mechanisms of microcalcification formation, which are still not fully understood. Taken together this study uses a multi-scale approach to gain a better understanding of micronutrients involved in pathological mineralization.

  2. Application of multi-scale wavelet entropy and multi-resolution Volterra models for climatic downscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, V.; Lakhanpal, A.; Maheswaran, R.; Khosa, R.; Sridhar, Venkataramana

    2018-01-01

    This study proposes a wavelet-based multi-resolution modeling approach for statistical downscaling of GCM variables to mean monthly precipitation for five locations at Krishna Basin, India. Climatic dataset from NCEP is used for training the proposed models (Jan.'69 to Dec.'94) and are applied to corresponding CanCM4 GCM variables to simulate precipitation for the validation (Jan.'95-Dec.'05) and forecast (Jan.'06-Dec.'35) periods. The observed precipitation data is obtained from the India Meteorological Department (IMD) gridded precipitation product at 0.25 degree spatial resolution. This paper proposes a novel Multi-Scale Wavelet Entropy (MWE) based approach for clustering climatic variables into suitable clusters using k-means methodology. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is used to obtain the representative Principal Components (PC) explaining 90-95% variance for each cluster. A multi-resolution non-linear approach combining Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) and Second Order Volterra (SoV) is used to model the representative PCs to obtain the downscaled precipitation for each downscaling location (W-P-SoV model). The results establish that wavelet-based multi-resolution SoV models perform significantly better compared to the traditional Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) based frameworks. It is observed that the proposed MWE-based clustering and subsequent PCA, helps reduce the dimensionality of the input climatic variables, while capturing more variability compared to stand-alone k-means (no MWE). The proposed models perform better in estimating the number of precipitation events during the non-monsoon periods whereas the models with clustering without MWE over-estimate the rainfall during the dry season.

  3. Multi-scale seismic tomography of the Merapi-Merbabu volcanic complex, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mujid Abdullah, Nur; Valette, Bernard; Potin, Bertrand; Ramdhan, Mohamad

    2017-04-01

    Merapi-Merbabu volcanic complex is the most active volcano located on Java Island, Indonesia, where the Indian plate subducts beneath Eurasian plate. We present a preliminary study of a multi-scale seismic tomography of the substructures of the volcanic complex. The main objective of our study is to image the feeding paths of the volcanic complex at an intermediate scale by using the data from the dense network (about 5 km spacing) constituted by 53 stations of the French-Indonesian DOMERAPI experiment complemented by the data of the German-Indonesian MERAMEX project (134 stations) and of the Indonesia Tsunami Early Warning System (InaTEWS) located in the vicinity of the complex. The inversion was performed using the INSIGHT algorithm, which follows a non-linear least squares approach based on a stochastic description of data and model. In total, 1883 events and 41846 phases (26647 P and 15199 S) have been processed, and a two-scale approach was adopted. The model obtained at regional scale is consistent with the previous studies. We selected the most reliable regional model as a prior model for the local tomography performed with a variant of the INSIGHT code. The algorithm of this code is based on the fact that inverting differences of data when transporting the errors in probability is equivalent to inverting initial data while introducing specific correlation terms in the data covariance matrix. The local tomography provides images of the substructure of the volcanic complex with a sufficiently good resolution to allow identification of a probable magma chamber at about 20 km.

  4. Investigation of multi-scale flash-weakening of rock surfaces during high speed slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbery, M. R.; Saber, O.; Chester, F. M.; Chester, J. S.

    2017-12-01

    A significant reduction in the coefficient of friction of rock can occur if sliding velocity approaches seismic rates as a consequence of weakening of microscopic sliding contacts by flash heating. Using a high-acceleration and -speed biaxial apparatus equipped with a high-speed Infra-Red (IR) camera to capture thermographs of the sliding surface, we have documented the heterogeneous distribution of temperature on flash-heated decimetric surfaces characterized by linear arrays of high-temperature, mm-size spots, and streaks. Numerical models that are informed by the character of flash heated surfaces and that consider the coupling of changes in temperature and changes in the friction of contacts, supports the hypothesis that independent mechanisms of flash weakening operate at different contact scales. Here, we report on new experiments that provide additional constraints on the life-times and rest-times of populations of millimeter-scale contacts. Rock friction experiments conducted on Westerly granite samples in a double-direct shear configuration achieve velocity steps from 1 mm/s to 900 mm/s at 100g accelerations over 2 mm of displacement with normal stresses of 22-36 MPa and 30 mm of displacement during sustained high-speed sliding. Sliding surfaces are machined to roughness similar to natural fault surfaces and that allow us to control the characteristics of millimeter-scale contact populations. Thermographs of the sliding surface show temperatures up to 200 C on millimeter-scale contacts, in agreement with 1-D heat conduction model estimates of 180 C. Preliminary comparison of thermal modeling results and experiment observations demonstrate that we can distinguish the different life-times and rest-times of contacts in thermographs and the corresponding frictional weakening behaviors. Continued work on machined surfaces that lead to different contact population characteristics will be used to test the multi-scale and multi-mechanism hypothesis for flash

  5. Multi-scale Gaussian representation and outline-learning based cell image segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Muhammad; Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Emmenlauer, Mario; Rämö, Pauli; Dehio, Christoph; Yli-Harja, Olli

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput genome-wide screening to study gene-specific functions, e.g. for drug discovery, demands fast automated image analysis methods to assist in unraveling the full potential of such studies. Image segmentation is typically at the forefront of such analysis as the performance of the subsequent steps, for example, cell classification, cell tracking etc., often relies on the results of segmentation. We present a cell cytoplasm segmentation framework which first separates cell cytoplasm from image background using novel approach of image enhancement and coefficient of variation of multi-scale Gaussian scale-space representation. A novel outline-learning based classification method is developed using regularized logistic regression with embedded feature selection which classifies image pixels as outline/non-outline to give cytoplasm outlines. Refinement of the detected outlines to separate cells from each other is performed in a post-processing step where the nuclei segmentation is used as contextual information. We evaluate the proposed segmentation methodology using two challenging test cases, presenting images with completely different characteristics, with cells of varying size, shape, texture and degrees of overlap. The feature selection and classification framework for outline detection produces very simple sparse models which use only a small subset of the large, generic feature set, that is, only 7 and 5 features for the two cases. Quantitative comparison of the results for the two test cases against state-of-the-art methods show that our methodology outperforms them with an increase of 4-9% in segmentation accuracy with maximum accuracy of 93%. Finally, the results obtained for diverse datasets demonstrate that our framework not only produces accurate segmentation but also generalizes well to different segmentation tasks.

  6. Land use/land cover mapping using multi-scale texture processing of high resolution data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S. N.; Sarker, M. L. R.

    2014-02-01

    Land use/land cover (LULC) maps are useful for many purposes, and for a long time remote sensing techniques have been used for LULC mapping using different types of data and image processing techniques. In this research, high resolution satellite data from IKONOS was used to perform land use/land cover mapping in Johor Bahru city and adjacent areas (Malaysia). Spatial image processing was carried out using the six texture algorithms (mean, variance, contrast, homogeneity, entropy, and GLDV angular second moment) with five difference window sizes (from 3×3 to 11×11). Three different classifiers i.e. Maximum Likelihood Classifier (MLC), Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Supported Vector Machine (SVM) were used to classify the texture parameters of different spectral bands individually and all bands together using the same training and validation samples. Results indicated that texture parameters of all bands together generally showed a better performance (overall accuracy = 90.10%) for land LULC mapping, however, single spectral band could only achieve an overall accuracy of 72.67%. This research also found an improvement of the overall accuracy (OA) using single-texture multi-scales approach (OA = 89.10%) and single-scale multi-textures approach (OA = 90.10%) compared with all original bands (OA = 84.02%) because of the complementary information from different bands and different texture algorithms. On the other hand, all of the three different classifiers have showed high accuracy when using different texture approaches, but SVM generally showed higher accuracy (90.10%) compared to MLC (89.10%) and ANN (89.67%) especially for the complex classes such as urban and road.

  7. Multi scale analysis of thermal-hydraulics of nuclear reactors - the neptune project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bestion, D.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows:The NEPTUNE project aims at building a new two-phase thermalhydraulic platform for nuclear reactor simulation. It is jointly developed by CEA-DEN and EDF-DRD and also supported by IRSN and FRAMATOME-ANP. NEPTUNE is a new generation multi-scale platform. The system scale models the whole reactor circuit with 0D, 1D and 3D modules and is generally applied with a coarse meshing including about a thousand meshes. The component scale models components like the reactor Core or Steam Generators with a finer nodalization and is generally applied with 10 4 to 10 5 meshes. Since these components contain rod bundles or tube bundles the physical modelling uses a homogenization technique with a porosity. For some specific applications it was found necessary to add a two-phase CFD tool able to zoom on a portion of the circuit where small scale phenomena are of importance for design purpose or safety issues. Here the basic equations are still averaged like in RANS approach for single phase, but the space resolution is finer than in component codes and typical application may require 10 5 to 10 7 meshes. These three scales have to be coupled in order to simulate many reactor transients where both local effects and system effects play a role. In addition, two-phase Direct Numerical Simulation Tools with Interface Tracking Techniques can be used for even smaller scale investigations for a better understanding of basic physical processes and for developing closure relations for averaged models. The main challenges of this project are here presented and some first results are presented. (authors)

  8. Multi-scale interaction between magnetic islands and microturbulence in magnetized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muraglia, M.

    2009-10-01

    In a tokamak, it exists many kinds of instability at the origin of a damage of the confinement and worst of a lost of a confinement. This work presents a study of the dynamics of a magnetic island in presence of turbulence in magnetized plasmas. More precisely, the goal is to understand the multi-scales interaction between turbulence, generated by a pressure gradient and the magnetic field curvature, and a magnetic island formed thanks to a tearing mode. Thanks to the derivation of a 2-dimensional slab model taking into account both tearing and interchange instabilities, theoretical and numerical linear studies show the pressure effect on the magnetic island linear formation and show interchange modes are stabilized in presence of a strong magnetic field. Then, a numerical nonlinear study is presented in order to understand how the interchange mechanism affects the nonlinear dynamics of a magnetic island. It is shown that the pressure gradient and the magnetic field curvature affect strongly the nonlinear evolution of a magnetic island through dynamics bifurcations. The nature of these bifurcations should be characterized in function of the linear situation. Finally, the last part of this work is devoted to the study of the origin of the nonlinear poloidal rotation of the magnetic island. A model giving the different contributions to the rotation is derived. It is shown, thanks to the model and to the numerical studies, that the nonlinear rotation of the island is mainly governed by the ExB poloidal flow and/or by the nonlinear diamagnetic drift. (author)

  9. Modelling an industrial anaerobic granular reactor using a multi-scale approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, H; Flores-Alsina, X; Ramin, P; Kjellberg, K; Jeppsson, U; Batstone, D J; Gernaey, K V

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to show the results of an industrial project dealing with modelling of anaerobic digesters. A multi-scale mathematical approach is developed to describe reactor hydrodynamics, granule growth/distribution and microbial competition/inhibition for substrate/space within the biofilm. The main biochemical and physico-chemical processes in the model are based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No 1 (ADM1) extended with the fate of phosphorus (P), sulfur (S) and ethanol (Et-OH). Wastewater dynamic conditions are reproduced and data frequency increased using the Benchmark Simulation Model No 2 (BSM2) influent generator. All models are tested using two plant data sets corresponding to different operational periods (#D1, #D2). Simulation results reveal that the proposed approach can satisfactorily describe the transformation of organics, nutrients and minerals, the production of methane, carbon dioxide and sulfide and the potential formation of precipitates within the bulk (average deviation between computer simulations and measurements for both #D1, #D2 is around 10%). Model predictions suggest a stratified structure within the granule which is the result of: 1) applied loading rates, 2) mass transfer limitations and 3) specific (bacterial) affinity for substrate. Hence, inerts (X I ) and methanogens (X ac ) are situated in the inner zone, and this fraction lowers as the radius increases favouring the presence of acidogens (X su ,X aa , X fa ) and acetogens (X c4 ,X pro ). Additional simulations show the effects on the overall process performance when operational (pH) and loading (S:COD) conditions are modified. Lastly, the effect of intra-granular precipitation on the overall organic/inorganic distribution is assessed at: 1) different times; and, 2) reactor heights. Finally, the possibilities and opportunities offered by the proposed approach for conducting engineering optimization projects are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  10. Multi-scale analysis of nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics-first applications using the NEPTUNE platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guelfi, A.; Boucker, M.; Mimouni, S.; Bestion, D.; Boudier, P.

    2005-01-01

    The NEPTUNE project aims at building a new two-phase flow thermal-hydraulics platform for nuclear reactor simulation. EDF (Electricite de France) and CEA (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) with the co-sponsorship of IRSN (Institut de Radioprotection et Surete Nucleaire) and FRAMATOME-ANP, are jointly developing the NEPTUNE multi-scale platform that includes new physical models and numerical methods for each of the computing scales. One usually distinguishes three different scales for industrial simulations: the 'system' scale, the 'component' scale (subchannel analysis) and CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics). In addition DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) can provide information at a smaller scale that can be useful for the development of the averaged scales. The NEPTUNE project also includes work on software architecture and research on new numerical methods for coupling codes since both are required to improve industrial calculations. All these R and D challenges have been defined in order to meet industrial needs and the underlying stakes (mainly the competitiveness and the safety of Nuclear Power Plants). This paper focuses on three high priority needs: DNB (Departure from Nucleate Boiling) prediction, directly linked to fuel performance; PTS (Pressurized Thermal Shock), a key issue when studying the lifespan of critical components and LBLOCA (Large Break Loss of Coolant Accident), a reference accident for safety studies. For each of these industrial applications, we provide a review of the last developments within the NEPTUNE platform and we present the first results. A particular attention is also given to physical validation and the needs for further experimental data. (authors)

  11. Localized deformation induced by heterogeneities in porous carbonate analysed by multi-scale digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dautriat, Jérémie; Bornert, Michel; Gland, Nicolas; Dimanov, Alexandre; Raphanel, Jean

    2011-04-01

    The understanding and the prevention of damage mechanisms, which have an impact on the hydrocarbon production and recovery rates, are of paramount interest for reservoir engineers. The modelling of such coupled processes relies essentially on experimentally obtained data, which characterize the macroscopic mechanical and transport properties. This approach however cannot account for the multi-scale structural heterogeneities of the considered rocks, in spite of their fundamental importance. The microstructural characterization of damage is usually based on 'post-mortem' observations of the samples, which provide both qualitative and quantitative information about the effects of the mechanisms activated at the grain scale and at intermediate scales, at a pervasive stage of damage after sample unloading. New techniques provide more quantitative and direct methods to follow the deformation history and the eventual development of localization and damage. In this study, the 2D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) technique has been applied to sequences of images taken from carbonate samples during uniaxial compression tests. Several scales have been considered, ranging from the centimetric scale of the samples to the local scale of their microstructure. For this purpose both optical observations and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used. Although the macroscopic strain at failure was very small (< 0.2%), the DIC technique has proven to be reliable, provided one selects carefully image acquisition conditions and DIC parameters, as highlighted in our discussion on the uncertainties and the evaluation of errors. This technique has allowed us to quantify both the global and local strain fields during the deformation process. We have thus been able to precisely identify the localizations of damage and the local compaction mechanisms, and to relate them to the characteristic structural heterogeneities of the tested carbonate.

  12. An automated multi-scale network-based scheme for detection and location of seismic sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poiata, N.; Aden-Antoniow, F.; Satriano, C.; Bernard, P.; Vilotte, J. P.; Obara, K.

    2017-12-01

    We present a recently developed method - BackTrackBB (Poiata et al. 2016) - allowing to image energy radiation from different seismic sources (e.g., earthquakes, LFEs, tremors) in different tectonic environments using continuous seismic records. The method exploits multi-scale frequency-selective coherence in the wave field, recorded by regional seismic networks or local arrays. The detection and location scheme is based on space-time reconstruction of the seismic sources through an imaging function built from the sum of station-pair time-delay likelihood functions, projected onto theoretical 3D time-delay grids. This imaging function is interpreted as the location likelihood of the seismic source. A signal pre-processing step constructs a multi-band statistical representation of the non stationary signal, i.e. time series, by means of higher-order statistics or energy envelope characteristic functions. Such signal-processing is designed to detect in time signal transients - of different scales and a priori unknown predominant frequency - potentially associated with a variety of sources (e.g., earthquakes, LFE, tremors), and to improve the performance and the robustness of the detection-and-location location step. The initial detection-location, based on a single phase analysis with the P- or S-phase only, can then be improved recursively in a station selection scheme. This scheme - exploiting the 3-component records - makes use of P- and S-phase characteristic functions, extracted after a polarization analysis of the event waveforms, and combines the single phase imaging functions with the S-P differential imaging functions. The performance of the method is demonstrated here in different tectonic environments: (1) analysis of the one year long precursory phase of 2014 Iquique earthquake in Chile; (2) detection and location of tectonic tremor sources and low-frequency earthquakes during the multiple episodes of tectonic tremor activity in southwestern Japan.

  13. Bayesian multi-scale smoothing of photon-limited images with applications to astronomy and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John

    Multi-scale models for smoothing Poisson signals or images have gained much attention over the past decade. A new Bayesian model is developed using the concept of the Chinese restaurant process to find structures in two-dimensional images when performing image reconstruction or smoothing. This new model performs very well when compared to other leading methodologies for the same problem. It is developed and evaluated theoretically and empirically throughout Chapter 2. The newly developed Bayesian model is extended to three-dimensional images in Chapter 3. The third dimension has numerous different applications, such as different energy spectra, another spatial index, or possibly a temporal dimension. Empirically, this method shows promise in reducing error with the use of simulation studies. A further development removes background noise in the image. This removal can further reduce the error and is done using a modeling adjustment and post-processing techniques. These details are given in Chapter 4. Applications to real world problems are given throughout. Photon-based images are common in astronomical imaging due to the collection of different types of energy such as X-Rays. Applications to real astronomical images are given, and these consist of X-ray images from the Chandra X-ray observatory satellite. Diagnostic medicine uses many types of imaging such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography that can also benefit from smoothing techniques such as the one developed here. Reducing the amount of radiation a patient takes will make images more noisy, but this can be mitigated through the use of image smoothing techniques. Both types of images represent the potential real world use for these methods.

  14. Multi-Scale Model of Galactic Cosmic Ray Effects on the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis

    An important concern for risk assessment from galactic cosmic ray (GCR) exposures is impacts to the central nervous systems including changes in cognition, and associations with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). AD, which affects about 50 percent of the population above age 80-yr, is a degenerative disease that worsens with time after initial onset leading to death, and has no known cure. AD is difficult to detect at early stages, and the small number of epidemiology studies that have considered the possibility have not identified an association with low dose radiation. However, experimental studies in transgenic mice suggest the possibility exits. We discuss modeling approaches to consider mechanisms whereby GCR would accelerate the occurrence of AD to earlier ages. Biomarkers of AD include Amyloid beta plaques, and neurofibrillary tangles (NFT) made up of aggregates of the hyper-phosphorylated form of the micro-tubule associated, tau protein. Related markers include synaptic degeneration, dendritic spine loss, and neuronal cell loss through apoptosis. GCR may affect these processes by causing oxidative stress, aberrant signaling following DNA damage, and chronic neuro-inflammation. Cell types considered in multi-scale models are neurons, astrocytes, and microglia. We developed biochemical and cell kinetics models of DNA damage signaling related to glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta and neuro-inflammation, and considered approaches to develop computer simulations of GCR induced cell interactions and their relationships to Amyloid beta plaques and NFTs. Comparison of model results to experimental data for the age specific development of plaques in transgenic mice and predictions of space radiation effects will be discussed.

  15. Vibration of a rotating shaft on hydrodynamic bearings: multi-scales surface effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebufa, Jocelyn

    2016-01-01

    The hydrodynamic bearing provides good damping properties in rotating machineries. However, the performances of rotor-bearings systems are highly impacted by nonlinear effects that are difficult to analyze. The rotor dynamics prediction requires advanced models for the flow in the bearings. The surface of the bearings seems to have a strong impact on the lubricant flow, acting on the static and dynamic properties of the rotating parts. This study aims to enhance the simulation of the bearings' surface state effect on the motion of the rotating shaft. The flexible shaft interacts with textured hydrodynamic bearings. Multi-scales homogenization is used in a multi-physics algorithm in order to describe the fluid-structure interaction. Different models are used to account for the cavitation phenomenon in the bearings. Nonlinear harmonic methods allow efficient parametric studies of periodic solutions as well as their stability. Moreover, a test rig has been designed to compare predictions to real measurements. Several textured shaft samples modified with femto-seconds LASER surface texturing are tested. In most cases the experimental study showed similar results than the simulation. Enhancements of the vibration behaviors of the rotor-bearing system have been revealed for certain texturing patterns. The self-excited vibration, also known as 'oil whirl' phenomenon, is stabilized on a wide rotating frequency range. However, the simulation tool does not predict well the enhancements that are observed. Vortices in surface texturing patterns have been revealed numerically with Navier-Stokes equation resolution. These results are opposed to the classical lubrication hypothesis. It is also a possible explanation of the enhancements that are experimentally measured with textured bearings. (author) [fr

  16. A REGION-BASED MULTI-SCALE APPROACH FOR OBJECT-BASED IMAGE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kavzoglu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Within the last two decades, object-based image analysis (OBIA considering objects (i.e. groups of pixels instead of pixels has gained popularity and attracted increasing interest. The most important stage of the OBIA is image segmentation that groups spectrally similar adjacent pixels considering not only the spectral features but also spatial and textural features. Although there are several parameters (scale, shape, compactness and band weights to be set by the analyst, scale parameter stands out the most important parameter in segmentation process. Estimating optimal scale parameter is crucially important to increase the classification accuracy that depends on image resolution, image object size and characteristics of the study area. In this study, two scale-selection strategies were implemented in the image segmentation process using pan-sharped Qickbird-2 image. The first strategy estimates optimal scale parameters for the eight sub-regions. For this purpose, the local variance/rate of change (LV-RoC graphs produced by the ESP-2 tool were analysed to determine fine, moderate and coarse scales for each region. In the second strategy, the image was segmented using the three candidate scale values (fine, moderate, coarse determined from the LV-RoC graph calculated for whole image. The nearest neighbour classifier was applied in all segmentation experiments and equal number of pixels was randomly selected to calculate accuracy metrics (overall accuracy and kappa coefficient. Comparison of region-based and image-based segmentation was carried out on the classified images and found that region-based multi-scale OBIA produced significantly more accurate results than image-based single-scale OBIA. The difference in classification accuracy reached to 10% in terms of overall accuracy.

  17. Multi-Scale and Multi-Dimensional Mineralogical Mapping using Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einsle, J. F.; Harrison, R. J.; Johnstone, D.; Martineau, B.; Collins, S. M.; Buisman, I.; Saghi, Z.; Eggeman, A.; Piotrowski, A. M.; Kirschvink, J. L.; Midgley, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Modern electron microscopes offer a variety of techniques for mapping chemical and crystallographic information in geological samples from micron to nanometer scales in both two and three dimensions. A typical data set comprises hundreds of thousands of spectra acquired pixel by pixel as the electron beam scans over the specimen. Routine analysis procedures include background subtraction, peak identification and quantification. This work highlights the application and benefits of machine learning to identify and extract the essential features that describe the mineralogical system being examined. Application of data decomposition techniques (similar to principal component analysis (PCA)) and clustering algorithms to multidimensional data sets reveals key and often-overlooked features. Unique sedimentary sources are identified in Southern Ocean cores using decomposition of SEM EDS to identify multiple mineral phases. SEM EDS of the ALH84001 Martian meteorite presents significant challenges due to specimen charging in cross sectional imaging. Using low kV SEM (2 kV) overcomes this challenge, but yields low X-ray counts in EDS spectra. By applying machine learning subtle details in the spectra are elucidated. Application of machine learning to comparative studies of the cloudy zone in the Tazewell IIICD iron meteorite produces a complete chemical and crystallographic characterization. Three-dimensional physical features found in the cloudy zone combine with decomposition of the EDS spectra to produce quantification of the constituent mineral phases that are within 2% of atom probe tomography results. Cluster analysis of the scanning precession electron diffraction maps enables identification of a Fe7Ni structure in the matrix phase of the cloudy zone. These studies demonstrate the potential for multi-scale and multi-dimensional mineralogical characterization using machine learning and electron microscopy.

  18. A multi-scale spatial model of hepatitis-B viral dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Cangelosi

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B viral infection (HBV afflicts around 250 million individuals globally and few options for treatment exist. Once infected, the virus entrenches itself in the liver with a notoriously resilient colonisation of viral DNA (covalently-closed circular DNA, cccDNA. The majority of infections are cleared, yet we do not understand why 5% of adult immune responses fail leading to the chronic state with its collateral morbid effects such as cirrhosis and eventual hepatic carcinoma. The liver environment exhibits particularly complex spatial structures for metabolic processing and corresponding distributions of nutrients and transporters that may influence successful HBV entrenchment. We assembled a multi-scaled mathematical model of the fundamental hepatic processing unit, the sinusoid, into a whole-liver representation to investigate the impact of this intrinsic spatial heterogeneity on the HBV dynamic. Our results suggest HBV may be exploiting spatial aspects of the liver environment. We distributed increased HBV replication rates coincident with elevated levels of nutrients in the sinusoid entry point (the periportal region in tandem with similar distributions of hepatocyte transporters key to HBV invasion (e.g., the sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide or NTCP, or immune system activity. According to our results, such co-alignment of spatial distributions may contribute to persistence of HBV infections, depending on spatial distributions and intensity of immune response as well. Moreover, inspired by previous HBV models and experimentalist suggestions of extra-hepatic HBV replication, we tested in our model influence of HBV blood replication and observe an overall nominal effect on persistent liver infection. Regardless, we confirm prior results showing a solo cccDNA is sufficient to re-infect an entire liver, with corresponding concerns for transplantation and treatment.

  19. Simulations of ecosystem hydrological processes using a unified multi-scale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Liu, Chongxuan; Fang, Yilin; Hinkle, Ross; Li, Hong-Yi; Bailey, Vanessa; Bond-Lamberty, Ben

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a unified multi-scale model (UMSM) that we developed to simulate hydrological processes in an ecosystem containing both surface water and groundwater. The UMSM approach modifies the Navier–Stokes equation by adding a Darcy force term to formulate a single set of equations to describe fluid momentum and uses a generalized equation to describe fluid mass balance. The advantage of the approach is that the single set of the equations can describe hydrological processes in both surface water and groundwater where different models are traditionally required to simulate fluid flow. This feature of the UMSM significantly facilitates modelling of hydrological processes in ecosystems, especially at locations where soil/sediment may be frequently inundated and drained in response to precipitation, regional hydrological and climate changes. In this paper, the UMSM was benchmarked using WASH123D, a model commonly used for simulating coupled surface water and groundwater flow. Disney Wilderness Preserve (DWP) site at the Kissimmee, Florida, where active field monitoring and measurements are ongoing to understand hydrological and biogeochemical processes, was then used as an example to illustrate the UMSM modelling approach. The simulations results demonstrated that the DWP site is subject to the frequent changes in soil saturation, the geometry and volume of surface water bodies, and groundwater and surface water exchange. All the hydrological phenomena in surface water and groundwater components including inundation and draining, river bank flow, groundwater table change, soil saturation, hydrological interactions between groundwater and surface water, and the migration of surface water and groundwater interfaces can be simultaneously simulated using the UMSM. Overall, the UMSM offers a cross-scale approach that is particularly suitable to simulate coupled surface and ground water flow in ecosystems with strong surface water and groundwater interactions.

  20. Multi-Scale Peak and Trough Detection Optimised for Periodic and Quasi-Periodic Neuroscience Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Steven M; Ercole, Ari

    2018-01-01

    The reliable detection of peaks and troughs in physiological signals is essential to many investigative techniques in medicine and computational biology. Analysis of the intracranial pressure (ICP) waveform is a particular challenge due to multi-scale features, a changing morphology over time and signal-to-noise limitations. Here we present an efficient peak and trough detection algorithm that extends the scalogram approach of Scholkmann et al., and results in greatly improved algorithm runtime performance. Our improved algorithm (modified Scholkmann) was developed and analysed in MATLAB R2015b. Synthesised waveforms (periodic, quasi-periodic and chirp sinusoids) were degraded with white Gaussian noise to achieve signal-to-noise ratios down to 5 dB and were used to compare the performance of the original Scholkmann and modified Scholkmann algorithms. The modified Scholkmann algorithm has false-positive (0%) and false-negative (0%) detection rates identical to the original Scholkmann when applied to our test suite. Actual compute time for a 200-run Monte Carlo simulation over a multicomponent noisy test signal was 40.96 ± 0.020 s (mean ± 95%CI) for the original Scholkmann and 1.81 ± 0.003 s (mean ± 95%CI) for the modified Scholkmann, demonstrating the expected improvement in runtime complexity from [Formula: see text] to [Formula: see text]. The accurate interpretation of waveform data to identify peaks and troughs is crucial in signal parameterisation, feature extraction and waveform identification tasks. Modification of a standard scalogram technique has produced a robust algorithm with linear computational complexity that is particularly suited to the challenges presented by large, noisy physiological datasets. The algorithm is optimised through a single parameter and can identify sub-waveform features with minimal additional overhead, and is easily adapted to run in real time on commodity hardware.

  1. Three-dimensional Crustal Structure beneath the Tibetan Plateau Revealed by Multi-scale Gravity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C.; Luo, Z.; Sun, R.; Li, Q.

    2017-12-01

    The Tibetan Plateau, the largest and highest plateau on Earth, was uplifted, shorten and thicken by the collision and continuous convergence of the Indian and Eurasian plates since 50 million years ago, the Eocene epoch. Fine three-dimensional crustal structure of the Tibetan Plateau is helpful in understanding the tectonic development. At present, the ordinary method used for revealing crustal structure is seismic method, which is inhibited by poor seismic station coverage, especially in the central and western plateau primarily due to the rugged terrain. Fortunately, with the implementation of satellite gravity missions, gravity field models have demonstrated unprecedented global-scale accuracy and spatial resolution, which can subsequently be employed to study the crustal structure of the entire Tibetan Plateau. This study inverts three-dimensional crustal density and Moho topography of the Tibetan Plateau from gravity data using multi-scale gravity analysis. The inverted results are in agreement with those provided by the previous works. Besides, they can reveal rich tectonic development of the Tibetan Plateau: (1) The low-density channel flow can be observed from the inverted crustal density; (2) The Moho depth in the west is deeper than that in the east, and the deepest Moho, which is approximately 77 km, is located beneath the western Qiangtang Block; (3) The Moho fold, the directions of which are in agreement with the results of surface movement velocities estimated from Global Positioning System, exists clearly on the Moho topography.This study is supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41504015), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2015M572146), and the Surveying and Mapping Basic Research Programme of the National Administration of Surveying, Mapping and Geoinformation (Grant No. 15-01-08).

  2. Perspective: Differential dynamic microscopy extracts multi-scale activity in complex fluids and biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbino, Roberto; Cicuta, Pietro

    2017-09-01

    Differential dynamic microscopy (DDM) is a technique that exploits optical microscopy to obtain local, multi-scale quantitative information about dynamic samples, in most cases without user intervention. It is proving extremely useful in understanding dynamics in liquid suspensions, soft materials, cells, and tissues. In DDM, image sequences are analyzed via a combination of image differences and spatial Fourier transforms to obtain information equivalent to that obtained by means of light scattering techniques. Compared to light scattering, DDM offers obvious advantages, principally (a) simplicity of the setup; (b) possibility of removing static contributions along the optical path; (c) power of simultaneous different microscopy contrast mechanisms; and (d) flexibility of choosing an analysis region, analogous to a scattering volume. For many questions, DDM has also advantages compared to segmentation/tracking approaches and to correlation techniques like particle image velocimetry. The very straightforward DDM approach, originally demonstrated with bright field microscopy of aqueous colloids, has lately been used to probe a variety of other complex fluids and biological systems with many different imaging methods, including dark-field, differential interference contrast, wide-field, light-sheet, and confocal microscopy. The number of adopting groups is rapidly increasing and so are the applications. Here, we briefly recall the working principles of DDM, we highlight its advantages and limitations, we outline recent experimental breakthroughs, and we provide a perspective on future challenges and directions. DDM can become a standard primary tool in every laboratory equipped with a microscope, at the very least as a first bias-free automated evaluation of the dynamics in a system.

  3. Boiling performance and material robustness of modified surfaces with multi scale structures for fuel cladding development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, HangJin; Kim, Jin Man; Yeom, Hwasung; Lee, Gi Cheol; Park, Hyun Sun; Kiyofumi, Moriyama; Kim, Moo Hwan; Sridharan, Kumar; Corradini, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We improved boiling performance and material robustness using surface modification. • We combined micro/millimeter post structures and nanoparticles with heat treatments. • Compactly-arranged micrometer posts had improved boiling performance. • CHF increased significantly due to capillary pumping by the deposited NP layers. • Sintering procedure increased mechanical strength of the NP coating surface. - Abstract: By regulating the geometrical characteristics of multi-scale structures and by adopting heat treatment for protective layer of nanoparticles (NPs), we improved critical heat flux (CHF), boiling heat transfer (BHT), and mechanical robustness of the modified surface. We fabricated 1-mm and 100-μm post structures and deposited NPs on the structured surface as a nano-scale structured layer and protective layer at the same time, then evaluated the CHF and BHT and material robustness of the modified surfaces. On the structured surfaces without NPs, the surface with compactly-arranged micrometer posts had improved CHF (118%) and BHT (41%). On the surface with structures on which NPs had been deposited, CHF increased significantly (172%) due to capillary pumping by the deposited NP layers. The heat treatment improved robustness of coating layer in comparison to the one of before heat treatment. In particular, low-temperature sintering increased the hardness of the modified surface by 140%. The increased mechanical strength of the NP coating is attributed to reduction in coating porosity during sintering. The combination of micrometer posts structures and sintered NP coating can increase the safety, efficiency and reliability of advanced nuclear fuel cladding

  4. Multi-scale simulation of asphaltene aggregation and deposition in capillary flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boek, Edo S; Headen, Thomas F; Padding, Johan T

    2010-01-01

    Asphaltenes are known as the 'cholesterol' of crude oil. They form nano-aggregates, precipitate, adhere to surfaces, block rock pores and may alter the wetting characteristics of mineral surfaces within the reservoir, hindering oil recovery efficiency. Despite a significant research effort, the structure, aggregation and deposition of asphaltenes under flowing conditions remain poorly understood. For this reason, we have investigated asphaltenes, their aggregation and their deposition in capillary flow using multi-scale simulations and experiments. At the colloid scale, we use a hybrid simulation approach: for the solvent, we used the stochastic rotation dynamics (also known as multi particle collision dynamics) simulation method, which provides both hydrodynamics and Brownian motion. This is coupled to a coarse-grained MD approach for the asphaltene colloids. The colloids interact through a screened Coulomb potential with varying well depth epsilon. We tune the flow rate to obtain Pe(flow) > 1 (hydrodynamic interactions dominate) and Re force (PMF) between pairs of asphaltene molecules in an explicit solvent. We obtain a reasonable fit using a -1/r2 attraction for the attractive tail of the PMF at intermediate distances. We speculate that this is due to the two-dimensional nature of the asphaltene molecules. Finally, we discuss how we can relate this interaction to the mesoscopic colloid aggregate interaction. We assume that the colloidal aggregates consist of nano-aggregates. Taking into account observed solvent entrainment effects, we deduct the presence of lubrication layers between the nano-aggregates, which leads to a significant screening of the direct asphaltene-asphaltene interactions.

  5. Evaluating the Performance of the Goddard Multi-Scale Modeling Framework with Different Cloud Microphysical Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, J.; Tao, W.; Lang, S. E.; Matsui, T.

    2012-12-01

    The accurate representation of clouds and cloud processes in atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) with relatively coarse resolution (~100 km) has been a long-standing challenge. With the rapid advancement in computational technology, new breed of GCMs that are capable of explicitly resolving clouds have been developed. Though still computationally very expensive, global cloud-resolving models (GCRMs) with horizontal resolutions of 3.5 to 14 km are already being run in an exploratory manner. Another less computationally demanding approach is the multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) that replaces conventional cloud parameterizations with a cloud-resolving model (CRM) in each grid column of a GCM. The Goddard MMF is based on the coupling of the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE), a CRM model, and the GEOS global model. In recent years a few new and improved microphysical schemes are developed and implemented to the GCE based on observations from field campaigns. It is important to evaluating these microphysical schemes for global applications such as the MMFs and GCRMs. Two-year (2007-2008) MMF sensitivity experiments have been carried out with different cloud microphysical schemes. The model simulated mean and variability of surface precipitation, cloud types, cloud properties such as cloud amount, hydrometeors vertical profiles, and cloud water contents, etc. in different geographic locations and climate regimes are evaluated against TRMM, CloudSat and CALIPSO satellite observations. The Goddard MMF has also been coupled with the Goddard Satellite Data Simulation Unit (G-SDSU), a system with multi-satellite, multi-sensor, and multi-spectrum satellite simulators. The statistics of MMF simulated radiances and backscattering can be directly compared with satellite observations to evaluate the performance of different cloud microphysical schemes. We will assess the strengths and/or deficiencies in of these microphysics schemes and provide guidance on how to improve

  6. The NCEP Eulerian Non-hydrostatic Multi-scale Model (NMMB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjic, Zavisa; Vasic, Ratko; Jovic, Dusan; Black, Tom

    2014-05-01

    The development of the unified Non-hydrostatic Multi-scale Model (NMMB) has continued at NCEP. The model dynamics preserve a number of important properties of differential operators and conserve a variety of first order and quadratic quantities. The nonlinear dynamics is controlled by conserving energy and enstrophy in case of non-divergent flow. Over-specification of vertical velocity is avoided. The physical package was developed from the WRF NMM's physics, but other physics options are also available. The regional version of the NMMB is run operationally as the main deterministic North American short-range forecasting model (NAM) and in a number of other applications. The global NMMB also has been run over the last few years experimentally in order to assess its capabilities and develop it further. In terms of large scale metrics, the performance of the global NMMB in medium range weather forecasting has been generally comparable to that of other major medium range forecasting systems. Its computational efficiency satisfies and exceeds the current and projected operational requirements. Recently, the transition has started of the operational hurricane forecasting system HWRF from the WRF NMM dynamics to those of the NMMB. This system involves the use of a hierarchy of 2-way interactive telescoping moving nests. The work on the interaction between clouds and radiation has continued. Extended range forecasts showed large sensitivity to the method for representing clouds. With the clouds represented by optical properties of their microphysics species, the results depend on the microphysics scheme used. Taking into account the impact of convective clouds remains a challenge with this approach. Development of an indigenous data assimilation system for the global NMMB has commenced. The system is based on the hybrid ensemble Kalman filter/3DVAR technique. It is believed that the potential of the NMMB can be better assessed using its own dedicated data assimilation

  7. Multi-scale Gaussian representation and outline-learning based cell image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background High-throughput genome-wide screening to study gene-specific functions, e.g. for drug discovery, demands fast automated image analysis methods to assist in unraveling the full potential of such studies. Image segmentation is typically at the forefront of such analysis as the performance of the subsequent steps, for example, cell classification, cell tracking etc., often relies on the results of segmentation. Methods We present a cell cytoplasm segmentation framework which first separates cell cytoplasm from image background using novel approach of image enhancement and coefficient of variation of multi-scale Gaussian scale-space representation. A novel outline-learning based classification method is developed using regularized logistic regression with embedded feature selection which classifies image pixels as outline/non-outline to give cytoplasm outlines. Refinement of the detected outlines to separate cells from each other is performed in a post-processing step where the nuclei segmentation is used as contextual information. Results and conclusions We evaluate the proposed segmentation methodology using two challenging test cases, presenting images with completely different characteristics, with cells of varying size, shape, texture and degrees of overlap. The feature selection and classification framework for outline detection produces very simple sparse models which use only a small subset of the large, generic feature set, that is, only 7 and 5 features for the two cases. Quantitative comparison of the results for the two test cases against state-of-the-art methods show that our methodology outperforms them with an increase of 4-9% in segmentation accuracy with maximum accuracy of 93%. Finally, the results obtained for diverse datasets demonstrate that our framework not only produces accurate segmentation but also generalizes well to different segmentation tasks. PMID:24267488

  8. Predictive Maturity of Multi-Scale Simulation Models for Fuel Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atamturktur, Sez; Unal, Cetin; Hemez, Francois; Williams, Brian; Tome, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The project proposed to provide a Predictive Maturity Framework with its companion metrics that (1) introduce a formalized, quantitative means to communicate information between interested parties, (2) provide scientifically dependable means to claim completion of Validation and Uncertainty Quantification (VU) activities, and (3) guide the decision makers in the allocation of Nuclear Energy's resources for code development and physical experiments. The project team proposed to develop this framework based on two complimentary criteria: (1) the extent of experimental evidence available for the calibration of simulation models and (2) the sophistication of the physics incorporated in simulation models. The proposed framework is capable of quantifying the interaction between the required number of physical experiments and degree of physics sophistication. The project team has developed this framework and implemented it with a multi-scale model for simulating creep of a core reactor cladding. The multi-scale model is composed of the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) code at the meso-scale, which represents the visco-plastic behavior and changing properties of a highly anisotropic material and a Finite Element (FE) code at the macro-scale to represent the elastic behavior and apply the loading. The framework developed takes advantage of the transparency provided by partitioned analysis, where independent constituent codes are coupled in an iterative manner. This transparency allows model developers to better understand and remedy the source of biases and uncertainties, whether they stem from the constituents or the coupling interface by exploiting separate-effect experiments conducted within the constituent domain and integral-effect experiments conducted within the full-system domain. The project team has implemented this procedure with the multi- scale VPSC-FE model and demonstrated its ability to improve the predictive capability of the model. Within this

  9. Predictive Maturity of Multi-Scale Simulation Models for Fuel Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atamturktur, Sez [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Williams, Brian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tome, Carlos [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-16

    The project proposed to provide a Predictive Maturity Framework with its companion metrics that (1) introduce a formalized, quantitative means to communicate information between interested parties, (2) provide scientifically dependable means to claim completion of Validation and Uncertainty Quantification (VU) activities, and (3) guide the decision makers in the allocation of Nuclear Energy’s resources for code development and physical experiments. The project team proposed to develop this framework based on two complimentary criteria: (1) the extent of experimental evidence available for the calibration of simulation models and (2) the sophistication of the physics incorporated in simulation models. The proposed framework is capable of quantifying the interaction between the required number of physical experiments and degree of physics sophistication. The project team has developed this framework and implemented it with a multi-scale model for simulating creep of a core reactor cladding. The multi-scale model is composed of the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) code at the meso-scale, which represents the visco-plastic behavior and changing properties of a highly anisotropic material and a Finite Element (FE) code at the macro-scale to represent the elastic behavior and apply the loading. The framework developed takes advantage of the transparency provided by partitioned analysis, where independent constituent codes are coupled in an iterative manner. This transparency allows model developers to better understand and remedy the source of biases and uncertainties, whether they stem from the constituents or the coupling interface by exploiting separate-effect experiments conducted within the constituent domain and integral-effect experiments conducted within the full-system domain. The project team has implemented this procedure with the multi- scale VPSC-FE model and demonstrated its ability to improve the predictive capability of the model. Within this

  10. Multi-Scale Computational Modeling of Ni-Base Superalloy Brazed Joints for Gas Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Bryan

    Brazed joints are commonly used in the manufacture and repair of aerospace components including high temperature gas turbine components made of Ni-base superalloys. For such critical applications, it is becoming increasingly important to account for the mechanical strength and reliability of the brazed joint. However, material properties of brazed joints are not readily available and methods for evaluating joint strength such as those listed in AWS C3.2 have inherent challenges compared with testing bulk materials. In addition, joint strength can be strongly influenced by the degree of interaction between the filler metal (FM) and the base metal (BM), the joint design, and presence of flaws or defects. As a result, there is interest in the development of a multi-scale computational model to predict the overall mechanical behavior and fitness-for-service of brazed joints. Therefore, the aim of this investigation was to generate data and methodology to support such a model for Ni-base superalloy brazed joints with conventional Ni-Cr-B based FMs. Based on a review of the technical literature a multi-scale modeling approach was proposed to predict the overall performance of brazed joints by relating mechanical properties to the brazed joint microstructure. This approach incorporates metallurgical characterization, thermodynamic/kinetic simulations, mechanical testing, fracture mechanics and finite element analysis (FEA) modeling to estimate joint properties based on the initial BM/FM composition and brazing process parameters. Experimental work was carried out in each of these areas to validate the multi-scale approach and develop improved techniques for quantifying brazed joint properties. Two Ni-base superalloys often used in gas turbine applications, Inconel 718 and CMSX-4, were selected for study and vacuum furnace brazed using two common FMs, BNi-2 and BNi-9. Metallurgical characterization of these brazed joints showed two primary microstructural regions; a soft

  11. A multi-scale integrated modeling framework to measure comprehensive impact of coastal reclamation activities in Yellow River estuary, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Cai, Yanpeng; Sun, Tao; Tan, Qian

    2017-09-15

    In this paper, an improved multi-scale integrated modeling framework has been established to evaluate coastal reclamation intensity (CRI). About 7 indicators are considered, including ecological degradation intensity (EDI), hydrodynamic disturbance (IHD), engineering types, water quality, economic investment, population growth, and reclaimed land area. Meanwhile, an integrated framework enhanced methods in terms of (a) measuring intensity of ecological degradation process under multi-scale impact, (b) developing the indicator system of CRI, and discussing the driving forces and trends of coastal reclamation, (c) determining fuzzy preference relations of weight and calculating the specific value of CRI with the case study areas of Yellow River estuary from 2000 to 2015. As the result, the CRI has been expanded unceasingly in recent years. The total growth rate from 2000 to 2015 is about 37.97%. It is concluded that CRI has climbed to a higher intensity level in resent 15years. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. A novel object-oriented stereo matching on multi-scale superpixels for low-resolution depth mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hanyang; Liu, Sheng; Liu, Nianjun; Barnes, Nick

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a novel object-oriented stereo matching on multi-scale superpixels to generate a low-resolution depth map. It overcomes the classic downsampling methods' disadvantages, such as boundary blurring, outlier enlargement and foreground objects merging to background, etc. The approach we exploited is to segment the image in three scales' superpixels from dense to sparse ones according to downsampling scale first, then compute disparity directly on superpixel's stereo matching. The post-processing of region constraint and local refinement uses hierarchical multi-scale superpixels as well. The proposed approach is validated on Middle-bury test-bed, and the experimental results outperform the current state-of-the-art stereo matching methods in low resolutions.

  13. Representation of Block-Based Image Features in a Multi-Scale Framework for Built-Up Area Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongwen Hu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The accurate extraction and mapping of built-up areas play an important role in many social, economic, and environmental studies. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for built-up area detection from high spatial resolution remote sensing images, using a block-based multi-scale feature representation framework. First, an image is divided into small blocks, in which the spectral, textural, and structural features are extracted and represented using a multi-scale framework; a set of refined Harris corner points is then used to select blocks as training samples; finally, a built-up index image is obtained by minimizing the normalized spectral, textural, and structural distances to the training samples, and a built-up area map is obtained by thresholding the index image. Experiments confirm that the proposed approach is effective for high-resolution optical and synthetic aperture radar images, with different scenes and different spatial resolutions.

  14. Multi-scale approach to radiation damage induced by ion beams: complex DNA damage and effects of thermal spikes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdutovich, E.; Yakubovich, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.; Surdutovich, E.; Yakubovich, A.V.; Solov'yov, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    We present the latest advances of the multi-scale approach to radiation damage caused by irradiation of a tissue with energetic ions and report the calculations of complex DNA damage and the effects of thermal spikes on biomolecules. The multi-scale approach aims to quantify the most important physical, chemical, and biological phenomena taking place during and following irradiation with ions and provide a better means for clinically-necessary calculations with adequate accuracy. We suggest a way of quantifying the complex clustered damage, one of the most important features of the radiation damage caused by ions. This quantification allows the studying of how the clusterization of DNA lesions affects the lethality of damage. We discuss the first results of molecular dynamics simulations of ubiquitin in the environment of thermal spikes, predicted to occur in tissue for a short time after an ion's passage in the vicinity of the ions' tracks. (authors)

  15. Formation of supermassive black holes in the center of galaxies. Importance of a multi-scale theoretical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakatsu, Nozomu; Wada, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    It is now widely accepted that most of normal galaxies have their central supermassive black holes (SMBHs). However, the formation and evolution of SMBHs is still open question and a hot topic in astrophysics. In this article, we review recent theoretical studies on the formation of SMBHs in the center of galaxies, and mention the importance of constructing a multi-scale theoretical model. (author)

  16. Systems-Pharmacology Dissection of Traditional Chinese Medicine Compound Saffron Formula Reveals Multi-scale Treatment Strategy for Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jianling; Mu, Jiexin; Zheng, Chunli; Chen, Xuetong; Guo, Zihu; Huang, Chao; Fu, Yingxue; Tian, Guihua; Shang, Hongcai; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been regarding as ?the world?s first killer? of human beings in recent years owing to the striking morbidity and mortality, the involved molecular mechanisms are extremely complex and remain unclear. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) adheres to the aim of combating complex diseases from an integrative and holistic point of view, which has shown effectiveness in CVDs therapy. However, system-level understanding of such a mechanism of multi-scale treatment s...

  17. Final Report: Multi-Scale Analysis of Deformation and Failure in Polycrystalline Titanium Alloys Under High Strain-Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-28

    polarized dislocation densities and are characterized by a non-zero net Burgers vector [6]. GNDs account for the crystal lattice curvatures which become...109(7), 2011. [12] R. Becker, A. Arsenlis, J. Marian, M. Rhee, M. Tang, and L. Yang . Continuum level formulation and imple- mentation of a multi-scale... Mills . Crystal plasticity modeling of deformation and creep in polycrystalline Ti-6242. Metall Trans A, 37A(5):1371–1388, 2006. [27] C.R. Dohrmann, M. W

  18. Magnetic hysteresis at the domain scale of a multi-scale material model for magneto-elastic behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanoost, D.; Steentjes, S.; Peuteman, J.; Gielen, G.; De Gersem, H.; Pissoort, D.; Hameyer, K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a multi-scale energy-based material model for poly-crystalline materials. Describing the behaviour of poly-crystalline materials at three spatial scales of dominating physical mechanisms allows accounting for the heterogeneity and multi-axiality of the material behaviour. The three spatial scales are the poly-crystalline, grain and domain scale. Together with appropriate scale transitions rules and models for local magnetic behaviour at each scale, the model is able to describe the magneto-elastic behaviour (magnetostriction and hysteresis) at the macroscale, although the data input is merely based on a set of physical constants. Introducing a new energy density function that describes the demagnetisation field, the anhysteretic multi-scale energy-based material model is extended to the hysteretic case. The hysteresis behaviour is included at the domain scale according to the micro-magnetic domain theory while preserving a valid description for the magneto-elastic coupling. The model is verified using existing measurement data for different mechanical stress levels. - Highlights: • A ferromagnetic hysteretic energy-based multi-scale material model is proposed. • The hysteresis is obtained by new proposed hysteresis energy density function. • Avoids tedious parameter identification.

  19. A Real-time Generalization and Multi-scale Visualization Method for POI Data in Volunteered Geographic Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Min

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available With the development of mobile and Web technologies, there has been an increasing number of map-based mushups which display different kinds of POI data in volunteered geographic information. Due to the lack of suitable mechanisms for multi-scale visualization, the display of the POI data often result in the icon clustering problem with icons touching and overlapping each other. This paper introduces a multi-scale visualization method for urban facility POI data by combing the classic methods of generalization and on-line environment. Firstly, we organize the POI data into hierarchical structure by preprocessing in the server-side; the POI features then will be obtained based on the display scale in the client-side and the displacement operation will be executed to resolve the local icon conflicts. Experiments show that this approach can not only achieve the requirements of real-time online, but also can get better multi-scale representation of POI data.

  20. Vision-based multi-scaled vehicle detection and distance relevant mix tracking for driver assistance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qin; Yang, Jianyu; Zhai, Yuqiang; Kong, Lingjiang

    2015-04-01

    This paper aims to improve the robustness of vision-based multi-scaled vehicle detection and tracking for an actual driver assistance system. Considering the problem of discontinuity of detection and tracking for multi-scaled vehicles especially in an ultra-close area, we propose a novel detection framework which concludes short-range local feature (license plate) detection and long-range skeleton detection. Specially, the rear license plate can be located accurately by introducing a multi-scaled morphological operator and analyzing the color information. Then, vehicles in a long supervising range can be detected with a Look-up Table-based AdaBoost classifier synchronically. Finally, an inverse perspective mapping-based tracking strategy is proposed to unite the location results in the framework. It is proved to make up the leak vehicle detection in the near supervising area and improve the robustness of tracking. The accuracy of license-based detection and the robust mix tracking have both been testified in several groups of experiments.

  1. Multi-scale thermodynamic analysis method for 2D SiC/SiC composite turbine guide vanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin LIU

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC turbine guide vanes possess multi-scale stress and strain with inhomogeneity at the microscopic scale. Given that the macroscopic distribution cannot reflect the microscopic stress fluctuation, the macroscopic method fails to meet the requirements of stress and strain analysis of CMC turbine guide vanes. Furthermore, the complete thermodynamic properties of 2D woven SiC/SiC-CMC cannot be obtained through experimentation. Accordingly, a method to calculate the thermodynamic properties of CMC and analyze multi-scale stress and strain of the turbine guide vanes should be established. In this study, the multi-scale thermodynamic analysis is investigated. The thermodynamic properties of Chemical Vapor Infiltration (CVI processed SiC/SiC-CMC are predicted by a Representative Volume Element (RVE model with porosity, leading to the result that the relative error between the calculated in-plane tensile modulus and the experimental value is 4.2%. The macroscopic response of a guide vane under given conditions is predicted. The relative error between the predicted strain on the trailing edge and the experimental value is 9.7%. The calculation of the stress distribution of micro-scale RVE shows that the maximum value of microscopic stress, which is located in the interlayer matrix, is more than 1.5 times that of macroscopic stress in the same direction and the microscopic stress distribution of the interlayer matrix is related to the pore distribution of the composite.

  2. Influence of MWCNTs addition on mechanical and thermal behaviour of epoxy/kenaf multi-scale nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, N. A. M.; Razak, J. A.; Ismail, S.; Mohamad, N.; Yaakob, M. Y.; Theng, T. H.

    2017-06-01

    This research was conducted to develop kenaf reinforced epoxy/MWCNTs multi-scale composite using kenaf fibre and MWCNTs as the reinforcement in epoxy as the hosted matrix. The composites were produced by using a combination of hand lay-up and vacuum bagging process. The selection of optimum composition of epoxy-MWCNTs is based on the MWCNTs loading and the resulted mixture viscosity. Lower resin viscosity is required to allow good wetting and interaction between matrix and filler, which will yielded superior final performance of the fabricated composites. Therefore, different loading of MWCNTs (0.0 wt. %, 0.5 wt. %, 1.0 wt. %, 3.0 wt. %, 5.0 wt. %, 7.0 wt. %) were used to investigate the mechanical and thermal properties of the composites. As a result, the epoxy/kenaf/MWCNTs multi-scale composite at 1.0 wt. % of MWCNTs addition had yielded substantial improvement by 15.54 % in tensile strength and 90.54 % in fracture toughness. Besides, the fracture surface morphology of the selected samples were analysed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation to further support the reinforcement characteristic of epoxy/kenaf/MWCNTs multi-scale composite.

  3. Multi-scale Model of Residual Strength of 2D Plain Weave C/SiC Composites in Oxidation Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xihui; Sun, Zhigang; Sun, Jianfen; Song, Yingdong

    2017-02-01

    Multi-scale models play an important role in capturing the nonlinear response of woven carbon fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites. In plain weave carbon fiber/silicon carbon (C/SiC) composites, the carbon fibers and interphases will be oxidized at elevated temperature and the strength of the composite will be degraded when oxygen enters micro-cracks formed in the as-produced parts due to the mismatch in thermal properties between constituents. As a result of the oxidation on fiber surface, fiber shows a notch-like morphology. In this paper, the change rule of fiber notch depth is fitted by circular function. And a multi-scale model based upon the change rule of fiber notch depth is developed to simulate the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of the composite. The multi-scale model is able to accurately predict the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of the composite. Besides, the simulated residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of 2D plain weave C/SiC composites in oxidation atmosphere show good agreements with experimental results. Furthermore, the oxidation time and temperature of the composite are investigated to show their influences upon the residual strength and post-oxidation stress-strain curves of plain weave C/SiC composites.

  4. An Improved Algorithm Based on Minimum Spanning Tree for Multi-scale Segmentation of Remote Sensing Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Hui

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As the basis of object-oriented information extraction from remote sensing imagery,image segmentation using multiple image features,exploiting spatial context information, and by a multi-scale approach are currently the research focuses. Using an optimization approach of the graph theory, an improved multi-scale image segmentation method is proposed. In this method, the image is applied with a coherent enhancement anisotropic diffusion filter followed by a minimum spanning tree segmentation approach, and the resulting segments are merged with reference to a minimum heterogeneity criterion.The heterogeneity criterion is defined as a function of the spectral characteristics and shape parameters of segments. The purpose of the merging step is to realize the multi-scale image segmentation. Tested on two images, the proposed method was visually and quantitatively compared with the segmentation method employed in the eCognition software. The results show that the proposed method is effective and outperforms the latter on areas with subtle spectral differences.

  5. Magnetic hysteresis at the domain scale of a multi-scale material model for magneto-elastic behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanoost, D., E-mail: dries.vanoost@kuleuven-kulak.be [KU Leuven Technology Campus Ostend, ReMI Research Group, Oostende B-8400 (Belgium); KU Leuven Kulak, Wave Propagation and Signal Processing Research Group, Kortrijk B-8500 (Belgium); Steentjes, S. [Institute of Electrical Machines, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen D-52062 (Germany); Peuteman, J. [KU Leuven Technology Campus Ostend, ReMI Research Group, Oostende B-8400 (Belgium); KU Leuven, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electrical Energy and Computer Architecture, Heverlee B-3001 (Belgium); Gielen, G. [KU Leuven, Department of Electrical Engineering, Microelectronics and Sensors, Heverlee B-3001 (Belgium); De Gersem, H. [KU Leuven Kulak, Wave Propagation and Signal Processing Research Group, Kortrijk B-8500 (Belgium); TU Darmstadt, Institut für Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, Darmstadt D-64289 (Germany); Pissoort, D. [KU Leuven Technology Campus Ostend, ReMI Research Group, Oostende B-8400 (Belgium); KU Leuven, Department of Electrical Engineering, Microelectronics and Sensors, Heverlee B-3001 (Belgium); Hameyer, K. [Institute of Electrical Machines, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen D-52062 (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    This paper proposes a multi-scale energy-based material model for poly-crystalline materials. Describing the behaviour of poly-crystalline materials at three spatial scales of dominating physical mechanisms allows accounting for the heterogeneity and multi-axiality of the material behaviour. The three spatial scales are the poly-crystalline, grain and domain scale. Together with appropriate scale transitions rules and models for local magnetic behaviour at each scale, the model is able to describe the magneto-elastic behaviour (magnetostriction and hysteresis) at the macroscale, although the data input is merely based on a set of physical constants. Introducing a new energy density function that describes the demagnetisation field, the anhysteretic multi-scale energy-based material model is extended to the hysteretic case. The hysteresis behaviour is included at the domain scale according to the micro-magnetic domain theory while preserving a valid description for the magneto-elastic coupling. The model is verified using existing measurement data for different mechanical stress levels. - Highlights: • A ferromagnetic hysteretic energy-based multi-scale material model is proposed. • The hysteresis is obtained by new proposed hysteresis energy density function. • Avoids tedious parameter identification.

  6. A new multi-scale geomorphological landscape GIS for the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerts, Henk; Kosian, Menne; Baas, Henk; Smit, Bjorn

    2013-04-01

    At present, the Cultural Heritage Agency of the Netherlands is developing a nationwide landscape Geographical Information System (GIS). In this new conceptual approach, the Agency puts together several multi-scale landscape classifications in a GIS. The natural physical landscapes lie at the basis of this GIS, because these landscapes provide the natural boundary conditions for anthropogenic. At the local scale a nationwide digital geomorphological GIS is available in the Netherlands. This map, that was originally mapped at 1:50,000 from the late 1970's to the 1990's, is based on geomorphometrical (observable and measurable in the field), geomorphological and, lithological and geochronological criteria. When used at a national scale, the legend of this comprehensive geomorphological map is very complex which hampers use in e.g. planning practice or predictive archaeology. At the national scale several landscape classifications have been in use in the Netherlands since the early 1950's, typically ranging in the order of 10 -15 landscape units for the entire country. A widely used regional predictive archaeological classification has 13 archaeo-landscapes. All these classifications have been defined "top-down" and their actual content and boundaries have only been broadly defined. Thus, these classifications have little or no meaning at a local scale. We have tried to combine the local scale with the national scale. To do so, we first defined national physical geographical regions based on the new 2010 national geological map 1:500,000. We also made sure there was a reference with the European LANMAP2 classification. We arrived at 20 landscape units at the national scale, based on (1) genesis, (2) large-scale geomorphology, (3) lithology of the shallow sub-surface and (4) age. These criteria that were chosen because the genesis of the landscape largely determines its (scale of) morphology and lithology that in turn determine hydrological conditions. All together

  7. MEGAPOLI: concept and first results of multi-scale modelling of megacity impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklanov, A. A.; Lawrence, M.; Pandis, S.

    2009-09-01

    major city, Paris, performing detailed analysis for 12 megacities with existing air quality datasets and investigate the effects of all megacities on climate and global atmospheric chemistry. The project focuses on the multi-scale modelling of interacting meteorology and air quality, spanning the range from emissions to air quality, effects on climate, and feedbacks and mitigation potentials. Our hypothesis is that megacities around the world have an impact on air quality not only locally, but also regionally and globally and therefore can also influence the climate of our planet. Some of the links between megacities, air quality and climate are reasonably well-understood. However, a complete quantitative picture of these interactions is clearly missing. Understanding and quantifying these missing links is the focus of MEGAPOLI. The current status and modeling results after the first project year on examples of Paris and other European megacities are discussed.

  8. Empirical evidence for multi-scaled controls on wildfire size distributions in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povak, N.; Hessburg, P. F., Sr.; Salter, R. B.

    2014-12-01

    Ecological theory asserts that regional wildfire size distributions are examples of self-organized critical (SOC) systems. Controls on SOC event-size distributions by virtue are purely endogenous to the system and include the (1) frequency and pattern of ignitions, (2) distribution and size of prior fires, and (3) lagged successional patterns after fires. However, recent work has shown that the largest wildfires often result from extreme climatic events, and that patterns of vegetation and topography may help constrain local fire spread, calling into question the SOC model's simplicity. Using an atlas of >12,000 California wildfires (1950-2012) and maximum likelihood estimation (MLE), we fit four different power-law models and broken-stick regressions to fire-size distributions across 16 Bailey's ecoregions. Comparisons among empirical fire size distributions across ecoregions indicated that most ecoregion's fire-size distributions were significantly different, suggesting that broad-scale top-down controls differed among ecoregions. One-parameter power-law models consistently fit a middle range of fire sizes (~100 to 10000 ha) across most ecoregions, but did not fit to larger and smaller fire sizes. We fit the same four power-law models to patch size distributions of aspect, slope, and curvature topographies and found that the power-law models fit to a similar middle range of topography patch sizes. These results suggested that empirical evidence may exist for topographic controls on fire sizes. To test this, we used neutral landscape modeling techniques to determine if observed fire edges corresponded with aspect breaks more often than expected by random. We found significant differences between the empirical and neutral models for some ecoregions, particularly within the middle range of fire sizes. Our results, combined with other recent work, suggest that controls on ecoregional fire size distributions are multi-scaled and likely are not purely SOC. California

  9. Multi scale imaging of the Cloudy Zone in the Tazewell IIICD Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einsle, J. F.; Harrison, R. J.; Nichols, C. I. O.; Blukis, R.; Midgley, P. A.; Eggeman, A.; Saghi, Z.; Bagot, P.

    2015-12-01

    Paleomagnetic studies of iron and stony iron meteorites suggest that many small planetary bodies possessed molten cores resulting in the generation of a magnetic field. As these bodies cooled, Fe-Ni metal trapped within their mantle underwent a series of low-temperature transitions, leading to the familiar Widmanstatten intergrowth of kamacite and taenite. Adjacent to the kamacite/taenite interface is the so-called "cloudy zone" (CZ): a nanoscale intergrowth of tetrataenite islands in an Fe-rich matrix phase formed via spinodal decomposition. It has recently been shown (Bryson et al. 2015, Nature) that the CZ encodes a time-series record of the evolution of the magnetic field generated by the molten core of the planetary body. Extracting meaningful paleomagnetic data from the CZ relies, on a thorough understanding of the 3D chemical and magnetic properties of the intergrowth focsusing on the interactions between the magnetically hard tetrataenite islands and the magnetically soft matrix. Here we present a multi scale study of the chemical and crystallographic make up of the CZ in the Tazewell IIICD meteorite, using a range of advanced microscopy techniques. The results provide unprecedented insight into the architecture of the CZ, with implications for how the CZ acquires chemical transformation remanance during cooling on the parent body. Previous 2D transmission electron microscope studies of the CZ suggested that the matrix is an ordered Fe3Ni phase with the L12 structure. Interpretation of the electron diffraction patterns and chemical maps in these studies was hindered by a failure to resolve signals from overlapping island and matrix phases. Here we obtain high resolution electron diffraction and 3D chemical maps with near atomic resolution using a combination of scanning precession electron diffraction, 3D STEM EDS and atom probe tomography. Using this combined methodology we reslove for the first time the phenomena of secondary precipitation in the

  10. Multi-scale simulation method with coupled finite/discrete element model and its application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xiwu; Liu, Zhenyu; Tan, Jianrong; Qiu, Chan; Chen, Fengbei

    2013-07-01

    The existing research on continuous structure is usually analyzed with finite element method (FEM) and granular medium with discrete element method (DEM), but there are few researches on the coupling interaction between continuous structure and discrete medium. To the issue of this coupling interaction, a multi-scale simulation method with coupled finite/discrete element model is put forward, in their respective domains of discrete and finite elements, the nodes follow force law and motion law of their own method, and on the their interaction interface, the touch type between discrete and finite elements is distinguished as two types: full touch and partial touch, the interaction force between them is calculated with linear elastic model. For full touch, the contact force is proportional to the overlap distance between discrete element and finite element patch. For partial touch, first the finite element patch is extended on all sides indefinitely to be a complete plane, the full contact force can be obtained with the touch type between discrete element and plane being viewed as full touch, then the full overlap area between them and the actual overlap area between discrete element and finite element patch are computed, the actual contact force is obtained by scaling the full contact force with a factor η which is determined by the ratio of the actual overlap area to the full overlap area. The contact force is equivalent to the finite element nodes and the force and displacement on the nodes can be computed, so the ideal simulation results can be got. This method has been used to simulate the cutter disk of the earth pressure balance shield machine (EPBSM) made in North Heavy Industry (NHI) with its excavation diameter of 6.28 m cutting and digging the sandy clay layer. The simulation results show that as the gradual increase of excavating depth of the cutter head, the maximum stress occurs at the roots of cutters on the cutter head, while for the soil, the

  11. Towards an integrated and multi-scale model of the land-sea continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Maet, T.; Hanert, E.

    2012-04-01

    The land-sea continuum is home to a rich and complex system, controlled by strong exchanges of material and energy between land, sea and atmosphere. All the elements of such a system have to be taken into account to understand the whole process, which means explicitly linking together the watersheds, rivers, estuaries and coastal seas. A central issue is that the involved processes take place at very different scales in space and time. To overcome this issue, we consider an integrated model using a multi-scale framework, based on the finite element method (FEM) and unstructured meshes. In this presentation we focus on surface and subsurface models which are both fully-explicit for optimal scaling on parallel architectures. These models have been coupled with the hydrodynamical model SLIM1 which is currently able to model the river-estuary-coastal sea continuum. All these models use the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) FEM and include a tracer transport module. The 3D variably saturated groundwater model is based on the Richards equation, the 2D surface water model uses the diffusive wave approximation of the shallow water equation and the 1D river model is based on the full shallow water equation. As the overall model is designed for large scale simulations, we assume that small rivers are included in the surface model. Explicit methods in time allow for perfect parallel scaling and easy coupling. Our explicit model for the saturated-unsaturated subsurface water is robust and fully conservative. It is based on a mixed formulation, using both the pressure head h and the water content θ. On the one hand, θ is used for the unsaturated zone, where it is know to be more efficient. On the other hand h is used for the saturated zone, where θ is constant. To produce an explicit formulation of the Richards equation, we use the false transient method in the saturated zone, where the hydrodynamics is described by an elliptic equation. To allow physical discontinuities between

  12. Multi-scale dynamical behavior of spatially distributed systems: a deterministic point of view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, S.; Le Jean, F.; Drapeau, L.; Huc, M.

    2015-12-01

    Physical and biophysical systems are spatially distributed systems. Their behavior can be observed or modelled spatially at various resolutions. In this work, a deterministic point of view is adopted to analyze multi-scale behavior taking a set of ordinary differential equation (ODE) as elementary part of the system.To perform analyses, scenes of study are thus generated based on ensembles of identical elementary ODE systems. Without any loss of generality, their dynamics is chosen chaotic in order to ensure sensitivity to initial conditions, that is, one fundamental property of atmosphere under instable conditions [1]. The Rössler system [2] is used for this purpose for both its topological and algebraic simplicity [3,4].Two cases are thus considered: the chaotic oscillators composing the scene of study are taken either independent, or in phase synchronization. Scale behaviors are analyzed considering the scene of study as aggregations (basically obtained by spatially averaging the signal) or as associations (obtained by concatenating the time series). The global modeling technique is used to perform the numerical analyses [5].One important result of this work is that, under phase synchronization, a scene of aggregated dynamics can be approximated by the elementary system composing the scene, but modifying its parameterization [6]. This is shown based on numerical analyses. It is then demonstrated analytically and generalized to a larger class of ODE systems. Preliminary applications to cereal crops observed from satellite are also presented.[1] Lorenz, Deterministic nonperiodic flow. J. Atmos. Sci., 20, 130-141 (1963).[2] Rössler, An equation for continuous chaos, Phys. Lett. A, 57, 397-398 (1976).[3] Gouesbet & Letellier, Global vector-field reconstruction by using a multivariate polynomial L2 approximation on nets, Phys. Rev. E 49, 4955-4972 (1994).[4] Letellier, Roulin & Rössler, Inequivalent topologies of chaos in simple equations, Chaos, Solitons

  13. Multi-scale and multi-physics model of the uterine smooth muscle with mechanotransduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yochum, Maxime; Laforêt, Jérémy; Marque, Catherine

    2018-02-01

    Preterm labor is an important public health problem. However, the efficiency of the uterine muscle during labor is complex and still poorly understood. This work is a first step towards a model of the uterine muscle, including its electrical and mechanical components, to reach a better understanding of the uterus synchronization. This model is proposed to investigate, by simulation, the possible role of mechanotransduction for the global synchronization of the uterus. The electrical diffusion indeed explains the local propagation of contractile activity, while the tissue stretching may play a role in the synchronization of distant parts of the uterine muscle. This work proposes a multi-physics (electrical, mechanical) and multi-scales (cell, tissue, whole uterus) model, which is applied to a realistic uterus 3D mesh. This model includes electrical components at different scales: generation of action potentials at the cell level, electrical diffusion at the tissue level. It then links these electrical events to the mechanical behavior, at the cellular level (via the intracellular calcium concentration), by simulating the force generated by each active cell. It thus computes an estimation of the intra uterine pressure (IUP) by integrating the forces generated by each active cell at the whole uterine level, as well as the stretching of the tissue (by using a viscoelastic law for the behavior of the tissue). It finally includes at the cellular level stretch activated channels (SACs) that permit to create a loop between the mechanical and the electrical behavior (mechanotransduction). The simulation of different activated regions of the uterus, which in this first "proof of concept" case are electrically isolated, permits the activation of inactive regions through the stretching (induced by the electrically active regions) computed at the whole organ scale. This permits us to evidence the role of the mechanotransduction in the global synchronization of the uterus. The

  14. Investigating mechanisms of tendon damage by measuring multi-scale recovery following tensile loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Andrea H; Szczesny, Spencer E; Santare, Michael H; Elliott, Dawn M

    2017-07-15

    Tendon pathology is associated with damage. While tendon damage is likely initiated by mechanical loading, little is known about the specific etiology. Damage is defined as an irreversible change in the microstructure that alters the macroscopic mechanical parameters. In tendon, the link between mechanical loading and microstructural damage, resulting in macroscopic changes, is not fully elucidated. In addition, tendon damage at the macroscale has been proposed to initiate when tendon is loaded beyond a strain threshold, yet the metrics to define the damage threshold are not determined. We conducted multi-scale mechanical testing to investigate the mechanism of tendon damage by simultaneously quantifying macroscale mechanical and microstructural changes. At the microscale, we observe full recovery of the fibril strain and only partial recovery of the interfibrillar sliding, indicating that the damage initiates at the interfibrillar structures. We show that non-recoverable sliding is a mechanism for tendon damage and is responsible for the macroscale decreased linear modulus and elongated toe-region observed at the fascicle-level, and these macroscale properties are appropriate metrics that reflect tendon damage. We concluded that the inflection point of the stress-strain curve represents the damage threshold and, therefore, may be a useful parameter for future studies. Establishing the mechanism of damage at multiple length scales can improve prevention and rehabilitation strategies for tendon pathology. Tendon pathology is associated with mechanically induced damage. Damage, as defined in engineering, is an irreversible change in microstructure that alters the macroscopic mechanical properties. Although microstructural damage and changes to macroscale mechanics are likely, this link to microstructural change was not yet established. We conducted multiscale mechanical testing to investigate the mechanism of tendon damage by simultaneously quantifying macroscale

  15. Multi-scale coarse-graining of non-conservative interactions in molecular liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izvekov, Sergei; Rice, Betsy M.

    2014-01-01

    A new bottom-up procedure for constructing non-conservative (dissipative and stochastic) interactions for dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) models is described and applied to perform hierarchical coarse-graining of a polar molecular liquid (nitromethane). The distant-dependent radial and shear frictions in functional-free form are derived consistently with a chosen form for conservative interactions by matching two-body force-velocity and three-body velocity-velocity correlations along the microscopic trajectories of the centroids of Voronoi cells (clusters), which represent the dissipative particles within the DPD description. The Voronoi tessellation is achieved by application of the K-means clustering algorithm at regular time intervals. Consistently with a notion of many-body DPD, the conservative interactions are determined through the multi-scale coarse-graining (MS-CG) method, which naturally implements a pairwise decomposition of the microscopic free energy. A hierarchy of MS-CG/DPD models starting with one molecule per Voronoi cell and up to 64 molecules per cell is derived. The radial contribution to the friction appears to be dominant for all models. As the Voronoi cell sizes increase, the dissipative forces rapidly become confined to the first coordination shell. For Voronoi cells of two and more molecules the time dependence of the velocity autocorrelation function becomes monotonic and well reproduced by the respective MS-CG/DPD models. A comparative analysis of force and velocity correlations in the atomistic and CG ensembles indicates Markovian behavior with as low as two molecules per dissipative particle. The models with one and two molecules per Voronoi cell yield transport properties (diffusion and shear viscosity) that are in good agreement with the atomistic data. The coarser models produce slower dynamics that can be appreciably attributed to unaccounted dissipation introduced by regular Voronoi re-partitioning as well as by larger

  16. Multi-scale cell/surface interaction on modified titanium aluminum vanadium surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianbo

    This dissertation presents a series of experimental studies of the effects of multi-scale cell/surface interactions on modified Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. These include laser-grooved surfaces; porous structures and RGD-coated laser-grooved surfaces. A nano-second DPSS UV lasers with a Gaussian pulse energy profile was used to introduce the desired micro-groove geometries onto Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. This was done without inducing micro-cracks or significant changes in surface chemistry within the heat affected zones. The desired 8-12 mum groove depths and widths were achieved by the control of pulse frequency, scan speed, and the lens focal length that controls spot size. The interactions between human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells and laser-grooved Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were investigated after 48 hours of cell culture. The cell behavior, including cell spreading, alignment and adhesion, was elucidated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), immuno-fluorescence staining and enzymatic detachment. Contact guidance was shown to increase as grooved spacing decreased. For the range of micro-groove geometries studied, micro-grooves with groove spacings of 20 mum provided the best combination of cell orientation and adhesion. Short-term adhesion experiments (15 mins to 1 day) also revealed that there is a positive correlation between cell orientation and cell adhesion. Contact guidance on the micro-grooved surfaces is shown to be enhanced by nano- and micro-scale asperities that provide sites for the attachment of lamellopodia during cell locomotion and spreading. Contact guidance is also promoted by the geometrical confinement provided by laser grooves. An experimental study of initial cell spreading and ingrowth into Ti-6Al-4V porous structures was also carried out on porous structures with different pore sizes and geometries. A combination of SEM, the tetrazolium salt (MTT) colorimetric assay and enzymatic detachment were used to study cell spreading and adhesion. The extent of cell

  17. Development of a hybrid multi-scale phantom for Monte-Carlo based internal dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcatili, S.; Villoing, D.; Bardies, M.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Aim: in recent years several phantoms were developed for radiopharmaceutical dosimetry in clinical and preclinical settings. Voxel-based models (Zubal, Max/Fax, ICRP110) were developed to reach a level of realism that could not be achieved by mathematical models. In turn, 'hybrid' models (XCAT, MOBY/ROBY, Mash/Fash) allow a further degree of versatility by offering the possibility to finely tune each model according to various parameters. However, even 'hybrid' models require the generation of a voxel version for Monte-Carlo modeling of radiation transport. Since absorbed dose simulation time is strictly related to geometry spatial sampling, a compromise should be made between phantom realism and simulation speed. This trade-off leads on one side in an overestimation of the size of small radiosensitive structures such as the skin or hollow organs' walls, and on the other hand to unnecessarily detailed voxellization of large, homogeneous structures. The Aim of this work is to develop a hybrid multi-resolution phantom model for Geant4 and Gate, to better characterize energy deposition in small structures while preserving reasonable computation times. Materials and Methods: we have developed a pipeline for the conversion of preexisting phantoms into a multi-scale Geant4 model. Meshes of each organ are created from raw binary images of a phantom and then voxellized to the smallest spatial sampling required by the user. The user can then decide to re-sample the internal part of each organ, while leaving a layer of smallest voxels at the edge of the organ. In this way, the realistic shape of the organ is maintained while reducing the voxel number in the inner part. For hollow organs, the wall is always modeled using the smallest voxel sampling. This approach allows choosing different voxel resolutions for each organ according to a specific application. Results: preliminary results show that it is possible to

  18. Coarse-graining and hybrid methods for efficient simulation of stochastic multi-scale models of tumour growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cruz, Roberto; Guerrero, Pilar; Calvo, Juan; Alarcón, Tomás

    2017-12-01

    The development of hybrid methodologies is of current interest in both multi-scale modelling and stochastic reaction-diffusion systems regarding their applications to biology. We formulate a hybrid method for stochastic multi-scale models of cells populations that extends the remit of existing hybrid methods for reaction-diffusion systems. Such method is developed for a stochastic multi-scale model of tumour growth, i.e. population-dynamical models which account for the effects of intrinsic noise affecting both the number of cells and the intracellular dynamics. In order to formulate this method, we develop a coarse-grained approximation for both the full stochastic model and its mean-field limit. Such approximation involves averaging out the age-structure (which accounts for the multi-scale nature of the model) by assuming that the age distribution of the population settles onto equilibrium very fast. We then couple the coarse-grained mean-field model to the full stochastic multi-scale model. By doing so, within the mean-field region, we are neglecting noise in both cell numbers (population) and their birth rates (structure). This implies that, in addition to the issues that arise in stochastic-reaction diffusion systems, we need to account for the age-structure of the population when attempting to couple both descriptions. We exploit our coarse-graining model so that, within the mean-field region, the age-distribution is in equilibrium and we know its explicit form. This allows us to couple both domains consistently, as upon transference of cells from the mean-field to the stochastic region, we sample the equilibrium age distribution. Furthermore, our method allows us to investigate the effects of intracellular noise, i.e. fluctuations of the birth rate, on collective properties such as travelling wave velocity. We show that the combination of population and birth-rate noise gives rise to large fluctuations of the birth rate in the region at the leading edge of

  19. Multi-scale characterization by FIB-SEM/TEM/3DAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, T; Sepehri-Amin, H; Sasaki, T T; Hono, K

    2014-11-01

    In order to improve properties of functional materials, it is important to understand the relation between the structure and the properties since the structure has large effect to the properties. This can be done by using multi-scale microstructure analysis from macro-scale to nano and atomic scale. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with focused ion beam (FIB), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and 3D atom probe (3DAP) are complementary analysis tools making it possible to know the structure and the chemistry from micron to atomic resolution. SEM gives us overall microstructural and chemical information by various kinds of detectors such as secondary electron, backscattered electron, EDS and EBSD detectors. Also, it is possible to analyze 3D structure and chemistry via FIB serial sectioning. In addition, using TEM we can focus on desired region to get more complementary information from HRTEM/STEM/Lorentz images, SAED/NBD patterns and EDS/EELS to see the detail micro or nano-structure and chemistry. Especially, combination of probe Cs corrector and split EDS detectors with large detector size enable us to analyze the atomic scale elemental distribution. Furthermore, if the specimen has a complicated 3D nanostructure, or we need to analyze light elements such as hydrogen, lithium or boron, 3DAP can be used as the only technique which can visualize and analyze distribution of all constituent atoms of our materials within a few hundreds nm area. Hence, site-specific sample preparation using FIB/SEM is necessary to get desired information from region of interest. Therefore, this complementary analysis combination works very well to understand the detail of materials.In this presentation, we will show the analysis results obtained from some of functional materials by Carl Zeiss CrossBeam 1540EsB FIB/SEM, FEI Tecnai G(2) F30, Titan G2 80-200 TEMs and locally build laser assisted 3DAP. As the one of the example, result of multi-scale characterization for

  20. A multi scale approximation solution for the time dependent Boltzmann-transport equation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merk, B.

    2004-03-01

    The basis of all transient simulations for nuclear reactor cores is the reliable calculation of the power production. The local power distribution is generally calculated by solving the space, time, energy and angle dependent neutron transport equation known as Boltzmann equation. The computation of exact solutions of the Boltzmann equation is very time consuming. For practical numerical simulations approximated solutions are usually unavoidable. The objective of this work is development of an effective multi scale approximation solution for the Boltzmann equation. Most of the existing methods are based on separation of space and time. The new suggested method is performed without space-time separation. This effective approximation solution is developed on the basis of an expansion for the time derivative of different approximations to the Boltzmann equation. The method of multiple scale expansion is used for the expansion of the time derivative, because the problem of the stiff time behaviour can't be expressed by standard expansion methods. This multiple scale expansion is used in this work to develop approximation solutions for different approximations of the Boltzmann equation, starting from the expansion of the point kinetics equations. The resulting analytic functions are used for testing the applicability and accuracy of the multiple scale expansion method for an approximation solution with 2 delayed neutron groups. The results are tested versus the exact analytical results for the point kinetics equations. Very good agreement between both solutions is obtained. The validity of the solution with 2 delayed neutron groups to approximate the behaviour of the system with 6 delayed neutron groups is demonstrated in an additional analysis. A strategy for a solution with 4 delayed neutron groups is described. A multiple scale expansion is performed for the space-time dependent diffusion equation for one homogenized cell with 2 delayed neutron groups. The result is

  1. Multi-scale investigation of tensile creep of ultra-high performance concrete for bridge applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garas Yanni, Victor Youssef

    Ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) is relatively a new generation of concretes optimized at the nano and micro-scales to provide superior mechanical and durability properties compared to conventional and high performance concretes. Improvements in UHPC are achieved through: limiting the water-to-cementitious materials ratio (i.e., w/cm ≤ 0.20), optimizing particle packing, eliminating coarse aggregate, using specialized materials, and implementing high temperature and high pressure curing regimes. In addition, and randomly dispersed and short fibers are typically added to enhance the material's tensile and flexural strength, ductility, and toughness. There is a specific interest in using UHPC for precast prestressed bridge girders because it has the potential to reduce maintenance costs associated with steel and conventional concrete girders, replace functionally obsolete or structurally deficient steel girders without increasing the weight or the depth of the girder, and increase bridge durability to between 75 and 100 years. UHPC girder construction differs from that of conventional reinforced concrete in that UHPC may not need transverse reinforcement due to the high tensile and shear strengths of the material. Before bridge designers specify such girders without using shear reinforcement, the long-term tensile performance of the material must be characterized. This multi-scale study provided new data and understanding of the long-term tensile performance of UHPC by assessing the effect of thermal treatment, fiber content, and stress level on the tensile creep in a large-scale study, and by characterizing the fiber-cementitious matrix interface at different curing regimes through nanoindentation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in a nano/micro-scale study. Tensile creep of UHPC was more sensitive to investigated parameters than tensile strength. Thermal treatment decreased tensile creep by about 60% after 1 year. Results suggested the possibility of

  2. Change in Urban Albedo in London: A Multi-scale Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susca, T.; Kotthaus, S.; Grimmond, S.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization-induced change in land use has considerable implications for climate, air quality, resources and ecosystems. Urban-induced warming is one of the most well-known impacts. This directly and indirectly can extend beyond the city. One way to reduce the size of this is to modify the surface atmosphere exchanges through changing the urban albedo. As increased rugosity caused by the morphology of a city results in lower albedo with constant material characteristics, the impacts of changing the albedo has impacts across a range of scales. Here a multi-scale assessment of the potential effects of the increase in albedo in London is presented. This includes modeling at the global and meso-scale informed by local and micro-scale measurements. In this study the first order calculations are conducted for the impact of changing the albedo (e.g. a 0.01 increase) on the radiative exchange. For example, when incoming solar radiation and cloud cover are considered, based on data retrieved from NASA (http://power.larc.nasa.gov/) for ~1600 km2 area of London, would produce a mean decrease in the instantaneous solar radiative forcing on the same surface of 0.40 W m-2. The nature of the surface is critical in terms of considering the impact of changes in albedo. For example, in the Central Activity Zone in London pavement and building can vary from 10 to 100% of the plan area. From observations the albedo is seen to change dramatically with changes in building materials. For example, glass surfaces which are being used increasingly in the central business district results in dramatic changes in albedo. Using the documented albedo variations determined across different scales the impacts are considered. For example, the effect of the increase in urban albedo is translated into the corresponding amount of avoided emission of carbon dioxide that produces the same effect on climate. At local scale, the effect that the increase in urban albedo can potentially have on local

  3. Towards a physically-based multi-scale ecohydrological simulator for semi-arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviedes-Voullième, Daniel; Josefik, Zoltan; Hinz, Christoph

    2017-04-01

    The use of numerical models as tools for describing and understanding complex ecohydrological systems has enabled to test hypothesis and propose fundamental, process-based explanations of the system system behaviour as a whole as well as its internal dynamics. Reaction-diffusion equations have been used to describe and generate organized pattern such as bands, spots, and labyrinths using simple feedback mechanisms and boundary conditions. Alternatively, pattern-matching cellular automaton models have been used to generate vegetation self-organization in arid and semi-arid regions also using simple description of surface hydrological processes. A key question is: How much physical realism is needed in order to adequately capture the pattern formation processes in semi-arid regions while reliably representing the water balance dynamics at the relevant time scales? In fact, redistribution of water by surface runoff at the hillslope scale occurs at temporal resolution of minutes while the vegetation development requires much lower temporal resolution and longer times spans. This generates a fundamental spatio-temporal multi-scale problem to be solved, for which high resolution rainfall and surface topography are required. Accordingly, the objective of this contribution is to provide proof-of-concept that governing processes can be described numerically at those multiple scales. The requirements for a simulating ecohydrological processes and pattern formation with increased physical realism are, amongst others: i. high resolution rainfall that adequately captures the triggers of growth as vegetation dynamics of arid regions respond as pulsed systems. ii. complex, natural topography in order to accurately model drainage patterns, as surface water redistribution is highly sensitive to topographic features. iii. microtopography and hydraulic roughness, as small scale variations do impact on large scale hillslope behaviour iv. moisture dependent infiltration as temporal

  4. PERFORM 60 - Prediction of the effects of radiation for reactor pressure vessel and in-core materials using multi-scale modelling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Sylvain; Lidbury, David; Van Dyck, Steven; Moinereau, Dominique; Alamo, Ana; Mazouzi, Abdou Al

    2010-11-01

    In nuclear power plants, materials may undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational life. Utilities that operate these reactors need to quantify the ageing and the potential degradations of some essential structures of the power plant to ensure safe and reliable plant operation. So far, the material databases needed to take account of these degradations in the design and safe operation of installations mainly rely on long-term irradiation programs in test reactors as well as on mechanical or corrosion testing in specialized hot cells. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and continuous progress in computer sciences have now made possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the effects of irradiation on materials microstructure. A first step towards this goal has been successfully reached through the development of the RPV-2 and Toughness Module numerical tools by the scientific community created around the FP6 PERFECT project. These tools allow to simulate irradiation effects on the constitutive behaviour of the reactor pressure vessel low alloy steel, and also on its failure properties. Relying on the existing PERFECT Roadmap, the 4 years Collaborative Project PERFORM 60 has mainly for objective to develop multi-scale tools aimed at predicting the combined effects of irradiation and corrosion on internals (austenitic stainless steels) and also to improve existing ones on RPV (bainitic steels). PERFORM 60 is based on two technical sub-projects: (i) RPV and (ii) internals. In addition to these technical sub-projects, the Users' Group and Training sub-project shall allow representatives of constructors, utilities, research organizations… from Europe, USA and Japan to receive the information and training to get their own appraisal on limits and potentialities of the developed tools. An important effort will also be made to teach young

  5. Introduction: The Pan-Eurasian Experiment (PEEX) - multi-disciplinary, multi-scale and multi-component research and capacity building initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmala, M.; Lappalainen, H. K.; Petäjä, T.; Kurten, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Viisanen, Y.; Hari, P.; Bondur, V.; Kasimov, N.; Kotlyakov, V.; Matvienko, G.; Baklanov, A.; Guo, H. D.; Ding, A.; Hansson, H.-C.; Zilitinkevich, S.

    2015-08-01

    The Pan-Eurasian Experiment (PEEX) is a multi-disciplinary, multi-scale and multi-component research, research infrastructure and capacity building program. PEEX has originated from a bottom-up approach by the science communities, and is aiming at resolving the major uncertainties in Earth System Science and global sustainability issues concerning the Arctic and boreal Pan-Eurasian regions, as well as China. The vision of PEEX is to solve interlinked global grand challenges influencing human well-being and societies in northern Eurasia and China. Such challenges include climate change, air quality, biodiversity loss, urbanization, chemicalization, food and fresh water availability, energy production and use of natural resources by mining, industry, energy production and transport sectors. Our approach is integrative and supra-disciplinary, recognizing the important role of the Arctic and boreal ecosystems in the Earth system. The PEEX vision includes establishing and maintaining long-term, coherent and coordinated research activities as well as continuous, comprehensive research and educational infrastructures and related capacity building across the PEEX domain. In this paper we present the PEEX structure, summarize its motivation, objectives and future outlook.

  6. PERFORM 60: Prediction of the effects of radiation for reactor pressure vessel and in-core materials using multi-scale modelling - 60 years foreseen plant lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Mazouzi, A.; Alamo, A.; Lidbury, D.; Moinereau, D.; Van Dyck, S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Multi-scale and multi-physics modelling are adopted by PERFORM 60 to predict irradiation damage in nuclear structural materials. → PERFORM 60 allows to Consolidate the community and improve the interaction between universities/industries and safety authorities. → Experimental validation at the relevant scale is a key for developing the multi-scale modelling methodology. - Abstract: In nuclear power plants, materials undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational lifetime. Utilities that operate these reactors need to quantify the ageing and potential degradation of certain essential structures of the power plant to ensure their safe and reliable operation. So far, the monitoring and mitigation of these degradation phenomena rely mainly on long-term irradiation programs in test reactors as well as on mechanical or corrosion testing in specialized hot cells. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and progress in computer sciences have now made possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the materials behaviour in a nuclear environment. Indeed, within the PERFECT project of the EURATOM framework program (FP6), a first step has been successfully reached through the development of a simulation platform that contains several advanced numerical tools aiming at the prediction of irradiation damage in both the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and its internals using available, state-of-the-art-knowledge. These tools allow simulation of irradiation effects on the nanostructure and the constitutive behaviour of the RPV low alloy steels, as well as their fracture mechanics properties. For the more highly irradiated reactor internals, which are commonly produced using austenitic stainless steels, the first partial models were established, describing radiation effects on the nanostructure and providing a first description of the

  7. Defect detection in industrial radiography: a multi-scale approach; Detection de defauts en radiographie industrielle: approches multiechelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lefevre, M.

    1995-10-01

    Radiography is used by Electricite de France for pipe inspection in nuclear power plant in order to detect defects. For several years, the RD Division of EDF has undertaken research to define image processing methods well adapted to radiographic images. The main issues raised by these images are their low contrast, their high level of noise, the presence of a trend and the variable size of the defects. A data base of digitized radiographs of pipes has been gathered and the statistical, topological and geometrical properties of all of these images have been analyzed. From this study, a global indicator of the presence of defects and local features, leading to a classification of images into areas with or without defects, have been extracted. The defect localisation problem has been considered in a multi-scale framework based on the creation of a family of images with increasing regularity and defined as a solution of a partial differential equation. From a choice of axioms, a set of equations may be deduced which define various multi-scale analyses. The survey of the properties of such analysed, when applied to images altered with different types of noise, has lead to the selection of the digitized radiographs best adapted multi-scale analysis. The segmentation process, uses the geodesic information attached to defects via connection cost concept. The final decision is based on a summary of the information extracted at several scales. A fuzzy logic approach has been proposed to solve this part. We then developed methods and tools for expertise guidance and validated them on a complete data base of images. Some global indicators have been extracted and a detection and localisation process has been achieved for large defects. (author). 117 refs., 73 figs.

  8. Analysing and Correcting the Differences between Multi-Source and Multi-Scale Spatial Remote Sensing Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yingying; Luo, Ruisen; Feng, Haikuan; Wang, Jihua; Zhao, Jinling; Zhu, Yining; Yang, Guijun

    2014-01-01

    Differences exist among analysis results of agriculture monitoring and crop production based on remote sensing observations, which are obtained at different spatial scales from multiple remote sensors in same time period, and processed by same algorithms, models or methods. These differences can be mainly quantitatively described from three aspects, i.e. multiple remote sensing observations, crop parameters estimation models, and spatial scale effects of surface parameters. Our research proposed a new method to analyse and correct the differences between multi-source and multi-scale spatial remote sensing surface reflectance datasets, aiming to provide references for further studies in agricultural application with multiple remotely sensed observations from different sources. The new method was constructed on the basis of physical and mathematical properties of multi-source and multi-scale reflectance datasets. Theories of statistics were involved to extract statistical characteristics of multiple surface reflectance datasets, and further quantitatively analyse spatial variations of these characteristics at multiple spatial scales. Then, taking the surface reflectance at small spatial scale as the baseline data, theories of Gaussian distribution were selected for multiple surface reflectance datasets correction based on the above obtained physical characteristics and mathematical distribution properties, and their spatial variations. This proposed method was verified by two sets of multiple satellite images, which were obtained in two experimental fields located in Inner Mongolia and Beijing, China with different degrees of homogeneity of underlying surfaces. Experimental results indicate that differences of surface reflectance datasets at multiple spatial scales could be effectively corrected over non-homogeneous underlying surfaces, which provide database for further multi-source and multi-scale crop growth monitoring and yield prediction, and their corresponding

  9. Comparison of single- and multi-scale models for the prediction of the Culicoides biting midge distribution in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renke Lühken

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study analysed Culicoides presence-absence data from 46 sampling sites in Germany, where monitoring was carried out from April 2007 until May 2008. Culicoides presence-absence data were analysed in relation to land cover data, in order to study whether the prevalence of biting midges is correlated to land cover data with respect to the trapping sites. We differentiated eight scales, i.e. buffer zones with radii of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7.5 and 10 km, around each site, and chose several land cover variables. For each species, we built eight single-scale models (i.e. predictor variables from one of the eight scales for each model based on averaged, generalised linear models and two multiscale models (i.e. predictor variables from all of the eight scales based on averaged, generalised linear models and generalised linear models with random forest variable selection. There were no significant differences between performance indicators of models built with land cover data from different buffer zones around the trapping sites. However, the overall performance of multi-scale models was higher than the alternatives. Furthermore, these models mostly achieved the best performance for the different species using the index area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. However, as also presented in this study, the relevance of the different variables could significantly differ between various scales, including the number of species affected and the positive or negative direction. This is an even more severe problem if multi-scale models are concerned, in which one model can have the same variable at different scales but with different directions, i.e. negative and positive direction of the same variable at different scales. However, multi-scale modelling is a promising approach to model the distribution of Culicoides species, accounting much more for the ecology of biting midges, which uses different resources (breeding sites, hosts, etc. at

  10. Spatio-Temporal Super-Resolution Reconstruction of Remote-Sensing Images Based on Adaptive Multi-Scale Detail Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Tang, Xinming; Xie, Junfeng; Song, Weidong; Mo, Fan; Gao, Xiaoming

    2018-01-01

    There are many problems in existing reconstruction-based super-resolution algorithms, such as the lack of texture-feature representation and of high-frequency details. Multi-scale detail enhancement can produce more texture information and high-frequency information. Therefore, super-resolution reconstruction of remote-sensing images based on adaptive multi-scale detail enhancement (AMDE-SR) is proposed in this paper. First, the information entropy of each remote-sensing image is calculated, and the image with the maximum entropy value is regarded as the reference image. Subsequently, spatio-temporal remote-sensing images are processed using phase normalization, which is to reduce the time phase difference of image data and enhance the complementarity of information. The multi-scale image information is then decomposed using the L0 gradient minimization model, and the non-redundant information is processed by difference calculation and expanding non-redundant layers and the redundant layer by the iterative back-projection (IBP) technique. The different-scale non-redundant information is adaptive-weighted and fused using cross-entropy. Finally, a nonlinear texture-detail-enhancement function is built to improve the scope of small details, and the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) is used as an iterative constraint. Ultimately, high-resolution remote-sensing images with abundant texture information are obtained by iterative optimization. Real results show an average gain in entropy of up to 0.42 dB for an up-scaling of 2 and a significant promotion gain in enhancement measure evaluation for an up-scaling of 2. The experimental results show that the performance of the AMED-SR method is better than existing super-resolution reconstruction methods in terms of visual and accuracy improvements. PMID:29414893

  11. Spatio-Temporal Super-Resolution Reconstruction of Remote-Sensing Images Based on Adaptive Multi-Scale Detail Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong; Tang, Xinming; Xie, Junfeng; Song, Weidong; Mo, Fan; Gao, Xiaoming

    2018-02-07

    There are many problems in existing reconstruction-based super-resolution algorithms, such as the lack of texture-feature representation and of high-frequency details. Multi-scale detail enhancement can produce more texture information and high-frequency information. Therefore, super-resolution reconstruction of remote-sensing images based on adaptive multi-scale detail enhancement (AMDE-SR) is proposed in this paper. First, the information entropy of each remote-sensing image is calculated, and the image with the maximum entropy value is regarded as the reference image. Subsequently, spatio-temporal remote-sensing images are processed using phase normalization, which is to reduce the time phase difference of image data and enhance the complementarity of information. The multi-scale image information is then decomposed using the L ₀ gradient minimization model, and the non-redundant information is processed by difference calculation and expanding non-redundant layers and the redundant layer by the iterative back-projection (IBP) technique. The different-scale non-redundant information is adaptive-weighted and fused using cross-entropy. Finally, a nonlinear texture-detail-enhancement function is built to improve the scope of small details, and the peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR) is used as an iterative constraint. Ultimately, high-resolution remote-sensing images with abundant texture information are obtained by iterative optimization. Real results show an average gain in entropy of up to 0.42 dB for an up-scaling of 2 and a significant promotion gain in enhancement measure evaluation for an up-scaling of 2. The experimental results show that the performance of the AMED-SR method is better than existing super-resolution reconstruction methods in terms of visual and accuracy improvements.

  12. Analysing and correcting the differences between multi-source and multi-scale spatial remote sensing observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yingying; Luo, Ruisen; Feng, Haikuan; Wang, Jihua; Zhao, Jinling; Zhu, Yining; Yang, Guijun

    2014-01-01

    Differences exist among analysis results of agriculture monitoring and crop production based on remote sensing observations, which are obtained at different spatial scales from multiple remote sensors in same time period, and processed by same algorithms, models or methods. These differences can be mainly quantitatively described from three aspects, i.e. multiple remote sensing observations, crop parameters estimation models, and spatial scale effects of surface parameters. Our research proposed a new method to analyse and correct the differences between multi-source and multi-scale spatial remote sensing surface reflectance datasets, aiming to provide references for further studies in agricultural application with multiple remotely sensed observations from different sources. The new method was constructed on the basis of physical and mathematical properties of multi-source and multi-scale reflectance datasets. Theories of statistics were involved to extract statistical characteristics of multiple surface reflectance datasets, and further quantitatively analyse spatial variations of these characteristics at multiple spatial scales. Then, taking the surface reflectance at small spatial scale as the baseline data, theories of Gaussian distribution were selected for multiple surface reflectance datasets correction based on the above obtained physical characteristics and mathematical distribution properties, and their spatial variations. This proposed method was verified by two sets of multiple satellite images, which were obtained in two experimental fields located in Inner Mongolia and Beijing, China with different degrees of homogeneity of underlying surfaces. Experimental results indicate that differences of surface reflectance datasets at multiple spatial scales could be effectively corrected over non-homogeneous underlying surfaces, which provide database for further multi-source and multi-scale crop growth monitoring and yield prediction, and their corresponding

  13. Using multi-scale entropy and principal component analysis to monitor gears degradation via the motor current signature analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouabdi, Salim; Taibi, Mahmoud; Bouras, Slimane; Boutasseta, Nadir

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes an approach for identifying localized gear tooth defects, such as pitting, using phase currents measured from an induction machine driving the gearbox. A new tool of anomaly detection based on multi-scale entropy (MSE) algorithm SampEn which allows correlations in signals to be identified over multiple time scales. The motor current signature analysis (MCSA) in conjunction with principal component analysis (PCA) and the comparison of observed values with those predicted from a model built using nominally healthy data. The Simulation results show that the proposed method is able to detect gear tooth pitting in current signals.

  14. Source-to-exposure assessment with the Pangea multi-scale framework – case study in Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wannaz, Cedric; Fantke, Peter; Lane, Joe

    2017-01-01

    measures. This paper aims to extend the Pangea spatial multi-scale multimedia framework to evaluate source-to-receptor relationships of industrial sources of organic pollutants in Australia. Pangea solves a large compartmental system in parallel by block to determine arrays of masses at steady...... the main sources contributing to exposure at five locations. Overall, this paper demonstrates high interest in addressing exposures from both an emitter perspective well-suited to inform product oriented approaches such as LCA, and from a receptor perspective for health risk mitigation....

  15. Final Progress Report: FRACTURE AND SUBCRITICAL DEBONDING IN THIN LAYERED STRUCTURES: EXPERIMENTS AND MULTI-SCALE MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    2005-08-30

    Final technical report detailing unique experimental and multi-scale computational modeling capabilities developed to study fracture and subcritical cracking in thin-film structures. Our program to date at Stanford has studied the mechanisms of fracture and fatigue crack-growth in structural ceramics at high temperature, bulk and thin-film glasses in selected moist environments where we demonstrated the presence of a true mechanical fatigue effect in some glass compositions. We also reported on the effects of complex environments and fatigue loading on subcritical cracking that effects the reliability of MEMS and other micro-devices using novel micro-machined silicon specimens and nanomaterial layers.

  16. Combining global and multi-scale features in a description of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Ukhorskiy

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The solar wind-magnetosphere coupling during substorms exhibits dynamical features in a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The goal of our work is to combine the global and multi-scale description of magnetospheric dynamics in a unified data-derived model. For this purpose we use deterministic methods of nonlinear dynamics, together with a probabilistic approach of statistical physics. In this paper we discuss the mathematical aspects of such a combined analysis. In particular we introduce a new method of embedding analysis based on the notion of a mean-field dimension. For a given level of averaging in the system the mean-filed dimension determines the minimum dimension of the embedding space in which the averaged dynamical system approximates the actual dynamics with the given accuracy. This new technique is first tested on a number of well-known autonomous and open dynamical systems with and without noise contamination. Then, the dimension analysis is carried out for the correlated solar wind-magnetosphere database using vBS time series as the input and AL index as the output of the system. It is found that the minimum embedding dimension of vBS - AL time series is a function of the level of ensemble averaging and the specified accuracy of the method. To extract the global component from the observed time series the ensemble averaging is carried out over the range of scales populated by a high dimensional multi-scale constituent. The wider the range of scales which are smoothed away, the smaller the mean-field dimension of the system. The method also yields a probability density function in the reconstructed phase space which provides the basis for the probabilistic modeling of the multi-scale dynamical features, and is also used to visualize the global portion of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. The structure of its input-output phase portrait reveals the existence of two energy levels in the system with non

  17. Combining global and multi-scale features in a description of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Y. Ukhorskiy

    Full Text Available The solar wind-magnetosphere coupling during substorms exhibits dynamical features in a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The goal of our work is to combine the global and multi-scale description of magnetospheric dynamics in a unified data-derived model. For this purpose we use deterministic methods of nonlinear dynamics, together with a probabilistic approach of statistical physics. In this paper we discuss the mathematical aspects of such a combined analysis. In particular we introduce a new method of embedding analysis based on the notion of a mean-field dimension. For a given level of averaging in the system the mean-filed dimension determines the minimum dimension of the embedding space in which the averaged dynamical system approximates the actual dynamics with the given accuracy. This new technique is first tested on a number of well-known autonomous and open dynamical systems with and without noise contamination. Then, the dimension analysis is carried out for the correlated solar wind-magnetosphere database using vBS time series as the input and AL index as the output of the system. It is found that the minimum embedding dimension of vBS - AL time series is a function of the level of ensemble averaging and the specified accuracy of the method. To extract the global component from the observed time series the ensemble averaging is carried out over the range of scales populated by a high dimensional multi-scale constituent. The wider the range of scales which are smoothed away, the smaller the mean-field dimension of the system. The method also yields a probability density function in the reconstructed phase space which provides the basis for the probabilistic modeling of the multi-scale dynamical features, and is also used to visualize the global portion of the solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. The structure of its input-output phase portrait reveals the existence of two energy

  18. Evolutionary, multi-scale analysis of river bank line retreat using continuous wavelet transforms: Jamuna River, Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Mount, Nick J.; Tate, Nicholas J.; Sarker, Maminul H.; Thorne, Colin R.

    2013-01-01

    In this study continuous wavelet transforms are used to explore spatio-temporal patterns of multi-scale bank line retreat along a 204 km reach of the Jamuna River, Bangladesh. A sequence of eight bank line retreat series, derived from remotely-sensed imagery for the period 1987-1999, is transformed using the Morlet mother wavelet. Bank erosion is shown to operate at several characteristic spatial and temporal scales. Local erosion and bank line retreat are shown to occur in short, well def...

  19. Developing and Testing a Robust, Multi-Scale Framework for the Recovery of Longleaf Pine Understory Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    recovery strategies will be effective, and (4) devising metrics to quantify recovery progress. To understand recovery of longleaf pine ( Pinus palustris...Seed bank germination in longleaf pine forests with a forested history or an agricultural history. Figure 3.2.3. Relationships between the number...of prescribed fires and A) number of germinants and B) number of species recruited from the seed bank samples. Figure 3.2.4. Geographic variation in

  20. A Multi-Scale Hybrid CFD-DEM-PBM Description of a Fluid-Bed Granulation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitraye Sen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a hybrid multi-scale model has been developed for a continuous fluid bed wet granulation process by dynamically coupling computational fluid dynamics (CFD with a discrete element model (DEM and population balance model (PBM. In this process, the granules are formed by spraying the liquid binder on the fluidized powder bed. The fluid flow field has been solved implementing CFD principles and the behavior of the solid particles has been modeled using DEM techniques whereas the change in particle size has been quantified with the help of PBM. The liquid binder droplets have been modeled implicitly in DEM. A detailed understanding of the process aids in the development of better design, optimization and control strategies. The model predicts the evolution of important process variables (i.e., average particle diameter, particle size distribution (PSD and particle liquid content over time, which have qualitative similarity with experimentally observed trends. The advantage of incorporating the multi-scale approach is that the model can be used to study the distributions of collision frequencies, particle velocity and particle liquid content in different sections of the fluid bed granulator (FBG, in a more mechanistic manner.

  1. GEMMER: GEnome-wide tool for Multi-scale Modeling data Extraction and Representation for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondeel, Thierry D G A; Crémazy, Frédéric; Barberis, Matteo

    2018-02-01

    Multi-scale modeling of biological systems requires integration of various information about genes and proteins that are connected together in networks. Spatial, temporal and functional information is available; however, it is still a challenge to retrieve and explore this knowledge in an integrated, quick and user-friendly manner. We present GEMMER (GEnome-wide tool for Multi-scale Modelling data Extraction and Representation), a web-based data-integration tool that facilitates high quality visualization of physical, regulatory and genetic interactions between proteins/genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. GEMMER creates network visualizations that integrate information on function, temporal expression, localization and abundance from various existing databases. GEMMER supports modeling efforts by effortlessly gathering this information and providing convenient export options for images and their underlying data. GEMMER is freely available at http://gemmer.barberislab.com. Source code, written in Python, JavaScript library D3js, PHP and JSON, is freely available at https://github.com/barberislab/GEMMER. M.Barberis@uva.nl. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Concurrent multi-scale design optimization of composite frame structures using the Heaviside penalization of discrete material model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Duan, Zunyi; Lund, Erik; Zhao, Guozhong

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the concurrent multi-scale optimization design of frame structure composed of glass or carbon fiber reinforced polymer laminates. In the composite frame structure, the fiber winding angle at the micro-material scale and the geometrical parameter of components of the frame in the macro-structural scale are introduced as the independent variables on the two geometrical scales. Considering manufacturing requirements, discrete fiber winding angles are specified for the micro design variable. The improved Heaviside penalization discrete material optimization interpolation scheme has been applied to achieve the discrete optimization design of the fiber winding angle. An optimization model based on the minimum structural compliance and the specified fiber material volume constraint has been established. The sensitivity information about the two geometrical scales design variables are also deduced considering the characteristics of discrete fiber winding angles. The optimization results of the fiber winding angle or the macro structural topology on the two single geometrical scales, together with the concurrent two-scale optimization, is separately studied and compared in the paper. Numerical examples in the paper show that the concurrent multi-scale optimization can further explore the coupling effect between the macro-structure and micro-material of the composite to achieve an ultra-light design of the composite frame structure. The novel two geometrical scales optimization model provides a new opportunity for the design of composite structure in aerospace and other industries.

  3. Protein multi-scale organization through graph partitioning and robustness analysis: application to the myosin–myosin light chain interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delmotte, A; Barahona, M; Tate, E W; Yaliraki, S N

    2011-01-01

    Despite the recognized importance of the multi-scale spatio-temporal organization of proteins, most computational tools can only access a limited spectrum of time and spatial scales, thereby ignoring the effects on protein behavior of the intricate coupling between the different scales. Starting from a physico-chemical atomistic network of interactions that encodes the structure of the protein, we introduce a methodology based on multi-scale graph partitioning that can uncover partitions and levels of organization of proteins that span the whole range of scales, revealing biological features occurring at different levels of organization and tracking their effect across scales. Additionally, we introduce a measure of robustness to quantify the relevance of the partitions through the generation of biochemically-motivated surrogate random graph models. We apply the method to four distinct conformations of myosin tail interacting protein, a protein from the molecular motor of the malaria parasite, and study properties that have been experimentally addressed such as the closing mechanism, the presence of conserved clusters, and the identification through computational mutational analysis of key residues for binding

  4. Multi-resolution and multi-scale simulation of the thermal hydraulics in fast neutron reactor assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angeli, P.-E.

    2011-01-01

    The present work is devoted to a multi-scale numerical simulation of an assembly of fast neutron reactor. In spite of the rapid growth of the computer power, the fine complete CFD of a such system remains out of reach in a context of research and development. After the determination of the thermalhydraulic behaviour of the assembly at the macroscopic scale, we propose to carry out a local reconstruction of the fine scale information. The complete approach will require a much lower CPU time than the CFD of the entire structure. The macro-scale description is obtained using either the volume averaging formalism in porous media, or an alternative modeling historically developed for the study of fast neutron reactor assemblies. It provides some information used as constraint of a down-scaling problem, through a penalization technique of the local conservation equations. This problem lean on the periodic nature of the structure by integrating periodic boundary conditions for the required microscale fields or their spatial deviation. After validating the methodologies on some model applications, we undertake to perform them on 'industrial' configurations which demonstrate the viability of this multi-scale approach. (author) [fr

  5. Documentation, Multi-scale and Multi-dimensional Representation of Cultural Heritage for the Policies of Redevelopment, Development and Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. De Masi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes reading criteria for the documentation for important buildings in Milan, Italy, as a case study of the research on the integration of new technologies to obtain 3D multi-scale representation architectures. In addition, affords an overview of the actual optical 3D measurements sensors and techniques used for surveying, mapping, digital documentation and 3D modeling applications in the Cultural Heritage field. Today new opportunities for an integrated management of data are given by multiresolution models, that can be employed for different scale of representation. The goal of multi-scale representations is to provide several representations where each representation is adapted to a different information density with several degrees of detail. The Digital Representation Platform, along with the 3D City Model, are meant to be particularly useful to heritage managers who are developing recording, documentation, and information management strategies appropriate to territories, sites and monuments. Digital Representation Platform and 3D City Model are central activities in a the decision-making process for heritage conservation management and several urban related problems. This research investigates the integration of the different level-of-detail of a 3D City Model into one consistent 4D data model with the creation of level-of-detail using algorithms from a GIS perspective. In particular, such project is based on open source smart systems, and conceptualizes a personalized and contextualized exploration of the Cultural Heritage through an experiential analysis of the territory.

  6. Documentation, Multi-scale and Multi-dimensional Representation of Cultural Heritage for the Policies of Redevelopment, Development and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, A.

    2015-09-01

    The paper describes reading criteria for the documentation for important buildings in Milan, Italy, as a case study of the research on the integration of new technologies to obtain 3D multi-scale representation architectures. In addition, affords an overview of the actual optical 3D measurements sensors and techniques used for surveying, mapping, digital documentation and 3D modeling applications in the Cultural Heritage field. Today new opportunities for an integrated management of data are given by multiresolution models, that can be employed for different scale of representation. The goal of multi-scale representations is to provide several representations where each representation is adapted to a different information density with several degrees of detail. The Digital Representation Platform, along with the 3D City Model, are meant to be particularly useful to heritage managers who are developing recording, documentation, and information management strategies appropriate to territories, sites and monuments. Digital Representation Platform and 3D City Model are central activities in a the decision-making process for heritage conservation management and several urban related problems. This research investigates the integration of the different level-of-detail of a 3D City Model into one consistent 4D data model with the creation of level-of-detail using algorithms from a GIS perspective. In particular, such project is based on open source smart systems, and conceptualizes a personalized and contextualized exploration of the Cultural Heritage through an experiential analysis of the territory.

  7. Multi-scale Modeling of the Impact Response of a Strain Rate Sensitive High-Manganese Austenitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orkun eÖnal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A multi-scale modeling approach was applied to predict the impact response of a strain rate sensitive high-manganese austenitic steel. The roles of texture, geometry and strain rate sensitivity were successfully taken into account all at once by coupling crystal plasticity and finite element (FE analysis. Specifically, crystal plasticity was utilized to obtain the multi-axial flow rule at different strain rates based on the experimental deformation response under uniaxial tensile loading. The equivalent stress – equivalent strain response was then incorporated into the FE model for the sake of a more representative hardening rule under impact loading. The current results demonstrate that reliable predictions can be obtained by proper coupling of crystal plasticity and FE analysis even if the experimental flow rule of the material is acquired under uniaxial loading and at moderate strain rates that are significantly slower than those attained during impact loading. Furthermore, the current findings also demonstrate the need for an experiment-based multi-scale modeling approach for the sake of reliable predictions of the impact response.

  8. Dayside response of the magnetosphere to a small shock compression: Van Allen Probes, Magnetospheric MultiScale, and GOES‐13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breneman, A.; Colpitts, C.; Dombeck, J.; Thaller, S.; Tian, S.; Wygant, J.; Fennell, J.; Hudson, M. K.; Ergun, Robert; Russell, C. T.; Torbert, Roy; Lindqvist, Per‐Arne; Burch, J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Observations from Magnetospheric MultiScale (~8 Re) and Van Allen Probes (~5 and 4 Re) show that the initial dayside response to a small interplanetary shock is a double‐peaked dawnward electric field, which is distinctly different from the usual bipolar (dawnward and then duskward) signature reported for large shocks. The associated E × B flow is radially inward. The shock compressed the magnetopause to inside 8 Re, as observed by Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS), with a speed that is comparable to the E × B flow. The magnetopause speed and the E × B speeds were significantly less than the propagation speed of the pulse from MMS to the Van Allen Probes and GOES‐13, which is consistent with the MHD fast mode. There were increased fluxes of energetic electrons up to several MeV. Signatures of drift echoes and response to ULF waves also were seen. These observations demonstrate that even very weak shocks can have significant impact on the radiation belts. PMID:29104327

  9. Dayside response of the magnetosphere to a small shock compression: Van Allen Probes, Magnetospheric MultiScale, and GOES-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattell, C.; Breneman, A.; Colpitts, C.; Dombeck, J.; Thaller, S.; Tian, S.; Wygant, J.; Fennell, J.; Hudson, M. K.; Ergun, Robert; Russell, C. T.; Torbert, Roy; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Burch, J.

    2017-09-01

    Observations from Magnetospheric MultiScale ( 8 Re) and Van Allen Probes ( 5 and 4 Re) show that the initial dayside response to a small interplanetary shock is a double-peaked dawnward electric field, which is distinctly different from the usual bipolar (dawnward and then duskward) signature reported for large shocks. The associated E × B flow is radially inward. The shock compressed the magnetopause to inside 8 Re, as observed by Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS), with a speed that is comparable to the E × B flow. The magnetopause speed and the E × B speeds were significantly less than the propagation speed of the pulse from MMS to the Van Allen Probes and GOES-13, which is consistent with the MHD fast mode. There were increased fluxes of energetic electrons up to several MeV. Signatures of drift echoes and response to ULF waves also were seen. These observations demonstrate that even very weak shocks can have significant impact on the radiation belts.

  10. Systems-Pharmacology Dissection of Traditional Chinese Medicine Compound Saffron Formula Reveals Multi-scale Treatment Strategy for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianling; Mu, Jiexin; Zheng, Chunli; Chen, Xuetong; Guo, Zihu; Huang, Chao; Fu, Yingxue; Tian, Guihua; Shang, Hongcai; Wang, Yonghua

    2016-01-27

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been regarding as "the world's first killer" of human beings in recent years owing to the striking morbidity and mortality, the involved molecular mechanisms are extremely complex and remain unclear. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) adheres to the aim of combating complex diseases from an integrative and holistic point of view, which has shown effectiveness in CVDs therapy. However, system-level understanding of such a mechanism of multi-scale treatment strategy for CVDs is still difficult. Here, we developed a system pharmacology approach with the purpose of revealing the underlying molecular mechanisms exemplified by a famous compound saffron formula (CSF) in treating CVDs. First, by systems ADME analysis combined with drug targeting process, 103 potential active components and their corresponding 219 direct targets were retrieved and some key interactions were further experimentally validated. Based on this, the network relationships among active components, targets and diseases were further built to uncover the pharmacological actions of the drug. Finally, a "CVDs pathway" consisted of several regulatory modules was incorporated to dissect the therapeutic effects of CSF in different pathological features-relevant biological processes. All this demonstrates CSF has multi-scale curative activity in regulating CVD-related biological processes, which provides a new potential way for modern medicine in the treatment of complex diseases.

  11. Multi-Level and Multi-Scale Feature Aggregation Using Pretrained Convolutional Neural Networks for Music Auto-Tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongpil; Nam, Juhan

    2017-08-01

    Music auto-tagging is often handled in a similar manner to image classification by regarding the 2D audio spectrogram as image data. However, music auto-tagging is distinguished from image classification in that the tags are highly diverse and have different levels of abstractions. Considering this issue, we propose a convolutional neural networks (CNN)-based architecture that embraces multi-level and multi-scaled features. The architecture is trained in three steps. First, we conduct supervised feature learning to capture local audio features using a set of CNNs with different input sizes. Second, we extract audio features from each layer of the pre-trained convolutional networks separately and aggregate them altogether given a long audio clip. Finally, we put them into fully-connected networks and make final predictions of the tags. Our experiments show that using the combination of multi-level and multi-scale features is highly effective in music auto-tagging and the proposed method outperforms previous state-of-the-arts on the MagnaTagATune dataset and the Million Song Dataset. We further show that the proposed architecture is useful in transfer learning.

  12. Multi-Scale Parameter Identification of Lithium-Ion Battery Electric Models Using a PSO-LM Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jing Shen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a multi-scale parameter identification algorithm for the lithium-ion battery (LIB electric model by using a combination of particle swarm optimization (PSO and Levenberg-Marquardt (LM algorithms. Two-dimensional Poisson equations with unknown parameters are used to describe the potential and current density distribution (PDD of the positive and negative electrodes in the LIB electric model. The model parameters are difficult to determine in the simulation due to the nonlinear complexity of the model. In the proposed identification algorithm, PSO is used for the coarse-scale parameter identification and the LM algorithm is applied for the fine-scale parameter identification. The experiment results show that the multi-scale identification not only improves the convergence rate and effectively escapes from the stagnation of PSO, but also overcomes the local minimum entrapment drawback of the LM algorithm. The terminal voltage curves from the PDD model with the identified parameter values are in good agreement with those from the experiments at different discharge/charge rates.

  13. Macrosystems ecology: novel methods and new understanding of multi-scale patterns and processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Songlin Fei; Qinfeng Guo; Kevin Potter

    2016-01-01

    As the global biomes are increasingly threatened by human activities, understanding of macroscale patterns and processes is pressingly needed for effective management and policy making. Macrosystems ecology, which studies multiscale ecologicalpatterns and processes, has gained growing interest in the research community. However, as a relatively new field in...

  14. Small lakes in big landscape: Multi-scale drivers of littoral ecosystem in alpine lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharescu, Dragos G; Burghelea, Carmen I; Hooda, Peter S; Lester, Richard N; Palanca-Soler, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    In low nutrient alpine lakes, the littoral zone is the most productive part of the ecosystem, and it is a biodiversity hotspot. It is not entirely clear how the scale and physical heterogeneity of surrounding catchment, its ecological composition, and larger landscape gradients work together to sustain littoral communities. A total of 113 alpine lakes from the central Pyrenees were surveyed to evaluate the functional connectivity between littoral zoobenthos and landscape physical and ecological elements at geographical, catchment and local scales, and to ascertain how they affect the formation of littoral communities. At each lake, the zoobenthic composition was assessed together with geolocation, catchment hydrodynamics, geomorphology and topography, riparian vegetation composition, the presence of trout and frogs, water pH and conductivity. Multidimensional fuzzy set models integrating benthic biota and environmental variables revealed that at geographical scale, longitude unexpectedly surpassed altitude and latitude in its effect on littoral ecosystem. This reflects a sharp transition between Atlantic and Mediterranean climates and suggests a potentially high horizontal vulnerability to climate change. Topography (controlling catchment type, snow coverage and lakes connectivity) was the most influential catchment-scale driver, followed by hydrodynamics (waterbody size, type and volume of inflow/outflow). Locally, riparian plant composition significantly related to littoral community structure, richness and diversity. These variables, directly and indirectly, create habitats for aquatic and terrestrial stages of invertebrates, and control nutrient and water cycles. Three benthic associations characterised distinct lakes. Vertebrate predation, water conductivity and pH had no major influence on littoral taxa. This work provides exhaustive information from relatively pristine sites, and unveils a strong connection between littoral ecosystem and catchment

  15. Design strategies for human & earth systems modeling to meet emerging multi-scale decision support needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spak, S.; Pooley, M.

    2012-12-01

    The next generation of coupled human and earth systems models promises immense potential and grand challenges as they transition toward new roles as core tools for defining and living within planetary boundaries. New frontiers in community model development include not only computational, organizational, and geophysical process questions, but also the twin objectives of more meaningfully integrating the human dimension and extending applicability to informing policy decisions on a range of new and interconnected issues. We approach these challenges by posing key policy questions that require more comprehensive coupled human and geophysical models, identify necessary model and organizational processes and outputs, and work backwards to determine design criteria in response to these needs. We find that modular community earth system model design must: * seamlessly scale in space (global to urban) and time (nowcasting to paleo-studies) and fully coupled on all component systems * automatically differentiate to provide complete coupled forward and adjoint models for sensitivity studies, optimization applications, and 4DVAR assimilation across Earth and human observing systems * incorporate diagnostic tools to quantify uncertainty in couplings, and in how human activity affects them * integrate accessible community development and application with JIT-compilation, cloud computing, game-oriented interfaces, and crowd-sourced problem-solving We outline accessible near-term objectives toward these goals, and describe attempts to incorporate these design objectives in recent pilot activities using atmosphere-land-ocean-biosphere-human models (WRF-Chem, IBIS, UrbanSim) at urban and regional scales for policy applications in climate, energy, and air quality.

  16. A multi-scale approach reveals random phylogenetic patterns at the edge of vascular plant life

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Y.; Liancourt, Pierre; Götzenberger, Lars; de Bello, Francesco; Altman, Jan; Brožová, V.; Chlumská, Z.; Dvorský, Miroslav; Čapková, Kateřina; Kopecký, Martin; Řeháková, Klára; Říha, Pavel; Lepš, Jan; Doležal, Jiří

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 30, February 2018 (2018), s. 22-30 ISSN 1433-8319 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-13368S; GA ČR GB14-36079G; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-19376S EU Projects: European Commission(ES) 656035 - DRYFUN; European Commission(XE) 267243 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:60077344 Keywords : alpine communities * elevation gradient * phylogenetic diversity Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; EH - Ecology, Behaviour (BC-A) OBOR OECD: Ecology; Ecology (BC-A) Impact factor: 3.123, year: 2016

  17. Development of the multi-scale model for urban climate analysis and evaluation of urban greening effects on energy consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamano, H.; Nakayama, T.; Fujita, T.; Hori, H.; Tagami, H.

    2009-12-01

    It is necessary to reduce Greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions drastically to stabilize climate change, and Japan is also required to assess its long-term global warming policy. In achieving the low carbon society and sustainable cities, the numerical evaluation of environmental impacts of the application of different technologies and policies was preliminarily examined by utilizing integrative urban environmental model. This research aims to develop the multi-scale model for urban climate analysis and to evaluate the urban greening effects on energy consumption from household and business sectors. It developed the multi-scale model combined the process-based NIES integrated catchment-based eco-hydrology (NICE) model with the meso-scale meteorological model (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System : RAMS) and urban canopy model to estimate the urban climate mitigation effects by introduction of urban heat environmental mitigation technology and scenario. The numerical simulation conducted with the multi-scale level horizontally consisting regional scale (260×260km with 2km grid) and urban area scale (36×26km with 0.2km grid) against the objective area, Kawasaki city of Japan. The urban canopy model predicts the three dimensional atmospheric conditions including anthropogenic heat effect from household, business and factory sectors. Furthermore the tile method applied into the urban canopy model for the improvement of numerical accuracy and detailed land use information in each grid. The validation of this model was conducted by comparison with the observed air temperature of 29 points in entire Kawasaki area from 1st to 31th of August, 2006. From the quantitative validation of model performance, the coefficient of correlation was 0.72 and the root mean square error was 2.99C. The introduction of patch method into urban canopy model made it possible to calculate the each land use effect, and the accuracy of predicted results was improved against the land use area

  18. Multi-scale glycemic variability: a link to gray matter atrophy and cognitive decline in type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingran Cui

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM accelerates brain aging and cognitive decline. Complex interactions between hyperglycemia, glycemic variability and brain aging remain unresolved. This study investigated the relationship between glycemic variability at multiple time scales, brain volumes and cognition in type 2 DM.Forty-three older adults with and 26 without type 2 DM completed 72-hour continuous glucose monitoring, cognitive tests and anatomical MRI. We described a new analysis of continuous glucose monitoring, termed Multi-Scale glycemic variability (Multi-Scale GV, to examine glycemic variability at multiple time scales. Specifically, Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition was used to identify five unique ultradian glycemic variability cycles (GVC1-5 that modulate serum glucose with periods ranging from 0.5-12 hrs.Type 2 DM subjects demonstrated greater variability in GVC3-5 (period 2.0-12 hrs than controls (P<0.0001, during the day as well as during the night. Multi-Scale GV was related to conventional markers of glycemic variability (e.g. standard deviation and mean glycemic excursions, but demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity to conventional markers, and was associated with worse long-term glycemic control (e.g. fasting glucose and HbA1c. Across all subjects, those with greater glycemic variability within higher frequency cycles (GVC1-3; 0.5-2.0 hrs had less gray matter within the limbic system and temporo-parietal lobes (e.g. cingulum, insular, hippocampus, and exhibited worse cognitive performance. Specifically within those with type 2 DM, greater glycemic variability in GVC2-3 was associated with worse learning and memory scores. Greater variability in GVC5 was associated with longer DM duration and more depression. These relationships were independent of HbA1c and hypoglycemic episodes.Type 2 DM is associated with dysregulation of glycemic variability over multiple scales of time. These time-scale-dependent glycemic fluctuations

  19. 3D terrestrial lidar data classification of complex natural scenes using a multi-scale dimensionality criterion: Applications in geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodu, N.; Lague, D.

    2012-03-01

    3D point clouds of natural environments relevant to problems in geomorphology (rivers, coastal environments, cliffs, …) often require classification of the data into elementary relevant classes. A typical example is the separation of riparian vegetation from ground in fluvial environments, the distinction between fresh surfaces and rockfall in cliff environments, or more generally the classification of surfaces according to their morphology (e.g. the presence of bedforms or by grain size). Natural surfaces are heterogeneous and their distinctive properties are seldom defined at a unique scale, prompting the use of multi-scale criteria to achieve a high degree of classification success. We have thus defined a multi-scale measure of the point cloud dimensionality around each point. The dimensionality characterizes the local 3D organization of the point cloud within spheres centered on the measured points and varies from being 1D (points set along a line), 2D (points forming a plane) to the full 3D volume. By varying the diameter of the sphere, we can thus monitor how the local cloud geometry behaves across scales. We present the technique and illustrate its efficiency in separating riparian vegetation from ground and classifying a mountain stream as vegetation, rock, gravel or water surface. In these two cases, separating the vegetation from ground or other classes achieve accuracy larger than 98%. Comparison with a single scale approach shows the superiority of the multi-scale analysis in enhancing class separability and spatial resolution of the classification. Scenes between 10 and one hundred million points can be classified on a common laptop in a reasonable time. The technique is robust to missing data, shadow zones and changes in point density within the scene. The classification is fast and accurate and can account for some degree of intra-class morphological variability such as different vegetation types. A probabilistic confidence in the classification

  20. A Unified Multi-scale Model for Cross-Scale Evaluation and Integration of Hydrological and Biogeochemical Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Yang, X.; Bailey, V. L.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Hinkle, C.

    2013-12-01

    Mathematical representations of hydrological and biogeochemical processes in soil, plant, aquatic, and atmospheric systems vary with scale. Process-rich models are typically used to describe hydrological and biogeochemical processes at the pore and small scales, while empirical, correlation approaches are often used at the watershed and regional scales. A major challenge for multi-scale modeling is that water flow, biogeochemical processes, and reactive transport are described using different physical laws and/or expressions at the different scales. For example, the flow is governed by the Navier-Stokes equations at the pore-scale in soils, by the Darcy law in soil columns and aquifer, and by the Navier-Stokes equations again in open water bodies (ponds, lake, river) and atmosphere surface layer. This research explores whether the physical laws at the different scales and in different physical domains can be unified to form a unified multi-scale model (UMSM) to systematically investigate the cross-scale, cross-domain behavior of fundamental processes at different scales. This presentation will discuss our research on the concept, mathematical equations, and numerical execution of the UMSM. Three-dimensional, multi-scale hydrological processes at the Disney Wilderness Preservation (DWP) site, Florida will be used as an example for demonstrating the application of the UMSM. In this research, the UMSM was used to simulate hydrological processes in rooting zones at the pore and small scales including water migration in soils under saturated and unsaturated conditions, root-induced hydrological redistribution, and role of rooting zone biogeochemical properties (e.g., root exudates and microbial mucilage) on water storage and wetting/draining. The small scale simulation results were used to estimate effective water retention properties in soil columns that were superimposed on the bulk soil water retention properties at the DWP site. The UMSM parameterized from smaller

  1. Texture of welded joints of 316L stainless steel, multi-scale orientation analysis of a weld metal deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouche, G.; Bechade, J.L.; Mathon, M.H.; Allais, L.; Gourgues, A.F.; Naze, L.

    2000-01-01

    Weld material of type 316L is widely used in stainless steel X weldments in fast breeder reactors. As it is difficult to cut test specimens from an X weldment, the two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinally deposited weld beads. The material consists of γ columnar grains which form a matrix where δ-ferrite dendrites can be found. The crystallographic texture of the material was investigated on the basis of a multi-scale approach. Neutron diffraction analysis showed that on a macroscopic scale both phases had predominantly the same fibre texture with some reinforcements, {1 0 0} γ being parallel to {1 0 0} δ . Further analysis on an increasingly fine scale were then carried out by EBSD and by TEM, showing that the ferrite dendrites were nearly parallel to the neighbouring austenite columnar grains

  2. Texture of welded joints of 316L stainless steel, multi-scale orientation analysis of a weld metal deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouche, G.; Béchade, J. L.; Mathon, M. H.; Allais, L.; Gourgues, A. F.; Nazé, L.

    2000-01-01

    Weld material of type 316L is widely used in stainless steel X weldments in fast breeder reactors. As it is difficult to cut test specimens from an X weldment, the two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinally deposited weld beads. The material consists of γ columnar grains which form a matrix where δ-ferrite dendrites can be found. The crystallographic texture of the material was investigated on the basis of a multi-scale approach. Neutron diffraction analysis showed that on a macroscopic scale both phases had predominantly the same fibre texture with some reinforcements, {1 0 0} γ being parallel to {1 0 0} δ. Further analysis on an increasingly fine scale were then carried out by EBSD and by TEM, showing that the ferrite dendrites were nearly parallel to the neighbouring austenite columnar grains

  3. Application of finite elements heterogeneous multi-scale method to eddy currents non destructive testing of carbon composites material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khebbab, Mohamed; Feliachi, Mouloud; El Hadi Latreche, Mohamed

    2018-03-01

    In this present paper, a simulation of eddy current non-destructive testing (EC NDT) on unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polymer is performed; for this magneto-dynamic formulation in term of magnetic vector potential is solved using finite element heterogeneous multi-scale method (FE HMM). FE HMM has as goal to compute the homogenized solution without calculating the homogenized tensor explicitly, the solution is based only on the physical characteristic known in micro domain. This feature is well adapted to EC NDT to evaluate defect in carbon composite material in microscopic scale, where the defect detection is performed by coil impedance measurement; the measurement value is intimately linked to material characteristic in microscopic level. Based on this, our model can handle different defects such as: cracks, inclusion, internal electrical conductivity changes, heterogeneities, etc. The simulation results were compared with the solution obtained with homogenized material using mixture law, a good agreement was found.

  4. Multi-scale environmental accounting: methodological lessons from the application of NAMEA at sub-national levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmazzone, Silvana; La Notte, Alessandra

    2013-11-30

    Extending the application of integrated environmental and economic accounts from the national to the local level of government serves several purposes. They can be used not only as an instrument for communicating on the state of the environment and reporting the results of policies, but also as an operational tool - for setting the objectives and designing policies - if made available to the local authorities who have responsibility over the administration of natural resources, land use and conservation policies. The aim of the paper is to test the feasibility of applying hybrid flow accounts at the intermediate and local government levels. As an illustration, NAMEA for air emissions and wastes is applied to a Region, a Province and a Municipality, thus covering the three nested levels of local government in Italy. The study identifies the main issues raised by multi-scale environmental accounting and provides an applied discussion of feasible solutions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental investigation of the flow dynamics and rheology of complex fluids in pipe flow by hybrid multi-scale velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haavisto, Sanna; Cardona, Maria J.; Salmela, Juha; Powell, Robert L.; McCarthy, Michael J.; Kataja, Markku; Koponen, Antti I.

    2017-11-01

    A hybrid multi-scale velocimetry method utilizing Doppler optical coherence tomography in combination with either magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound velocity profiling is used to investigate pipe flow of four rheologically different working fluids under varying flow regimes. These fluids include water, an aqueous xanthan gum solution, a softwood fiber suspension, and a microfibrillated cellulose suspension. The measurement setup enables not only the analysis of the rheological (bulk) behavior of a studied fluid but gives simultaneously information on their wall layer dynamics, both of which are needed for analyzing and solving practical fluid flow-related problems. Preliminary novel results on rheological and boundary layer flow properties of the working fluids are reported and the potential of the hybrid measurement setup is demonstrated.

  6. Multi-Scale Modeling of the Structural and Vibrational Behavior of Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Polymeric Nanocomposite Plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doagou Rad, Saeed; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Islam, Aminul

    2017-01-01

    Polymeric nanocomposites reinforced with carbon nanotubes are being considered as alternatives in many industrial applications. However, the mechanical behavior of the industrially produced nanocomposites is yet to be fully understood. In this study, Polyamide 6,6-based nanocomposites reinforced...... with different contents of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were manufactured using an injection moulding process. A multi-scale approach was followed to numerically model the mechanical behavior of the nanostructured materials. In order to find the stiffness matrix of the carbon nanotubes, different...... loading scenarios were conducted on the tubes using molecular dynamics simulations (LAMMPS). The derived properties of the carbon nanotubes from the atomistic simulations were included in a Benveniste Mori-Tanaka based micromechanical model allowing us to acquire the elastic mechanical properties...

  7. Modelling of fractured reservoirs. Case of multi-scale media; Modelisation des reservoirs fractures. Cas des milieux multi-echelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henn, N.

    2000-12-13

    Some of the most productive oil and gas reservoirs are found in formations crossed by multi-scale fractures/faults. Among them, conductive faults may closely control reservoir performance. However, their modelling encounters numerical and physical difficulties linked with (a) the necessity to keep an explicit representation of faults through small-size grid blocks, (b) the modelling of multiphase flow exchanges between the fault and the neighbouring medium. In this thesis, we propose a physically-representative and numerically efficient modelling approach in order to incorporate sub-vertical conductive faults in single and dual-porosity simulators. To validate our approach and demonstrate its efficiency, simulation results of multiphase displacements in representative field sector models are presented. (author)

  8. Stress-resultant models for ultimate load design of reinforced concrete frames and multi-scale parameter estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, B. H.; Brancherie, D.; Davenne, L.; Ibrahimbegovic, A.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, we present a new finite element for (geometrically linear) Timoshenko beam model for ultimate load computation of reinforced concrete frames. The proposed model combines the descriptions of the diffuse plastic failure in the beam-column followed by the creation of plastic hinges due to the failure or collapse of the concrete and of the re-bars. A modified multi-scale analysis is performed in order to identify the parameters for stress-resultant-based macro model, which is used to described the behavior of the Timoshenko beam element. For clarity, we focus upon the micro-scale models using the multi-fiber elements with embedded displacement discontinuities in mode I, which would typically be triggered by bending failure mode. More general case of micro-scale model capable of describing shear failure is described by Ibrahimbegovic et al. (Int J Numer Methods Eng 83(4):452-481, 2010).

  9. Multi-Scaled Modeling the Mechanical Properties of Tubular Composites Reinforced with Innovated 3D Weft Knitted Spacer Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omrani, Elahe; Hasani, Hossein; Dibajian, Sayed Houssain

    2018-02-01

    Textile composites of 3D integrated spacer configurations have been recently focused by several researchers all over the world. In the present study, newly-designed tubular composites reinforced with 3D spacer weft knitted fabrics were considered and the effects of their structural parameters on some applicable mechanical properties were investigated. For this purpose, two different samples of 3D spacer weft knitted textile types in tubular form were produced on an electronic flat knitting machine, using glass/nylon hybrid yarns. Thermoset tubular-shaped composite parts were manufactured via vacuum infusion molding process using epoxy resin. The mechanical properties of the produced knitted composites in term of external static and internal hydrostatic pressures were evaluated. Resistance of the produced composites against the external static and internal hydrostatic pressures was numerically simulated using multi-scale modeling method. The finding revealed that there is acceptable correlation between experimental and theoretical results.

  10. Multi-scale porous materials: from adsorption and poro-mechanics properties to energy and environmental applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellenq, Roland J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. 'Multi-scale Porous Materials under the Nano-scope'. Setting up the stage, one can list important engineering problems such as hydrogen storage for transportation applications, electric energy storage in batteries, CO 2 sequestration in used coal mines, earthquake mechanisms, durability of nuclear fuels, stability of soils and sediment and cements and concrete cohesive properties in the context of sustainability. With the exception of health, these are basically the challenging engineering problems of the coming century that address energy, environment and natural hazards. Behind all those problems are complex multi-scale porous materials that have a confined fluid in their pore void: water in the case of clays and cement, an electrolyte in the case of batteries and super-capacitors, weakly interacting molecular fluids in the case of hydrogen storage devices, gas-shale and nuclear fuel bars. So what do we mean by 'under the nano-scope'? The nano-scope does not exist as a single experimental technique able of assessing the 3D texture of complex multi-scale material. Obviously techniques such as TEM are part of the answer but are not the 'nano-scope' in itself. In our idea, the 'nano-scope' is more than a technique producing images. It is rather a concept that links a suite of modeling techniques coupled with experiments (electron and X-rays microscopies, tomography, nano-indentation, nano-scratching...). Fig 1 gives an outline of this strategy for cement. It allows accessing material texture, their chemistry, their mechanical behavior, their adsorption/condensation behavior at all scales starting from the nano-scale upwards. The toolbox of the simulation aspect of the 'nano-scope' is akin to a statistical physics description of material texture and properties including the thermodynamics and dynamics of the fluids confined to their pore voids as a means to linking atomic scale properties to macroscopic properties

  11. Multi-scale exploration of the technical, economic, and environmental dimensions of bio-based chemical production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhuang, Kai; Herrgard, Markus

    2015-01-01

    factories. To address this issue, we have developed a comprehensive Multi-scale framework for modeling Sustainable Industrial Chemicals production (MuSIC), which integrates modeling approaches for cellular metabolism, bioreactor design, upstream/downstream processes and economic impact assessment. We...... investment in a new bio-based chemical industry, there is a need for assessing the technological, economic, and environmental potentials of combinations of biomass feedstocks, biochemical products, bioprocess technologies, and metabolic engineering approaches in the early phase of development of cell...... demonstrate the use of the MuSIC framework in a case study where two major polymer precursors (1,3-propanediol and 3-hydroxypropionic acid) are produced from two biomass feedstocks (corn-based glucose and soy-based glycerol) through 66 proposed biosynthetic pathways in two host organisms (Escherichia coli...

  12. A multi-scale and model approach to estimate future tidal high water statistics in the southern German Bright

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, H.; Mai, S.; Mayer, B.; Pohlmann, T.; Barjenbruch, U.

    2012-04-01

    The interactions of tides, external surges, storm surges and waves with an additional role of the coastal bathymetry define the probability of extreme water levels at the coast. Probabilistic analysis and also process based numerical models allow the estimation of future states. From the physical point of view both, deterministic processes and stochastic residuals are the fundamentals of high water statistics. This study uses a so called model chain to reproduce historic statistics of tidal high water levels (Thw) as well as the prediction of future statistics high water levels. The results of the numerical models are post-processed by a stochastic analysis. Recent studies show, that for future extrapolation of extreme Thw nonstationary parametric approaches are required. With the presented methods a better prediction of time depended parameter sets seems possible. The investigation region of this study is the southern German Bright. The model-chain is the representation of a downscaling process, which starts with an emissions scenario. Regional atmospheric and ocean models refine the results of global climate models. The concept of downscaling was chosen to resolve coastal topography sufficiently. The North Sea and estuaries are modeled with the three-dimensional model HAMburg Shelf Ocean Model. The running time includes 150 years (1950 - 2100). Results of four different hindcast runs and also of one future prediction run are validated. Based on multi-scale analysis and the theory of entropy we analyze whether any significant periodicities are represented numerically. Results show that also hindcasting the climate of Thw with a model chain for the last 60 years is a challenging task. For example, an additional modeling activity must be the inclusion of tides into regional climate ocean models. It is found that the statistics of climate variables derived from model results differs from the statistics derived from measurements. E.g. there are considerable shifts in

  13. Multi scale analysis by acoustic emission of damage mechanisms in natural fibre woven fabrics/epoxy composites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touchard F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to develop an experimental program to characterize the type and the development of damage in composite with complex microstructure. A multi-scale analysis by acoustic emission has been developed and applied to hemp fibre woven fabrics/epoxy composite. The experimental program consists of tensile tests performed on single yarn, neat epoxy resin and composite materials to identify their AE amplitude signatures. A statistical analysis of AE amplitude signals has been realised and correlated with microscopic observations. Results have enabled to identify three types of damage in composites and their associated AE amplitudes: matrix cracking, interfacial debonding and reinforcement damage and fracture. Tracking of these damage mechanisms in hemp/epoxy composites has been performed to show the process of damage development in natural fibre reinforced composites.

  14. Multi-scale approach of the mechanical behaviour of reinforced concrete structures - Application to nuclear plant containment buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, M.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis develops a multi-scale strategy to describe the mechanical behaviour of steel reinforcements and prestressing tendons in a reinforced concrete structure. This strategy is declined in several steps, which allow gradual integration of new physical phenomena. The first asymptotic model represents the effective elastic behaviour of heterogeneities periodically distributed on a surface. It combines an elastic interface behaviour and a membrane behaviour. A second asymptotic model then focuses on the behaviour of rigid fibers distributed on a surface, which may slide with respect to the surrounding volume. These models induce less stress concentrations than the usual truss models. They are implemented in the finite element code Code-Aster, and validated with respect to reference three-dimensional simulations. Their interaction with a macroscopic crack is studied. Finally, this strategy allows the modeling of experimental tests carried out on a portion of a containment building in real scale. (author)

  15. A fault diagnosis scheme for planetary gearboxes using adaptive multi-scale morphology filter and modified hierarchical permutation entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongbo; Li, Guoyan; Yang, Yuantao; Liang, Xihui; Xu, Minqiang

    2018-05-01

    The fault diagnosis of planetary gearboxes is crucial to reduce the maintenance costs and economic losses. This paper proposes a novel fault diagnosis method based on adaptive multi-scale morphological filter (AMMF) and modified hierarchical permutation entropy (MHPE) to identify the different health conditions of planetary gearboxes. In this method, AMMF is firstly adopted to remove the fault-unrelated components and enhance the fault characteristics. Second, MHPE is utilized to extract the fault features from the denoised vibration signals. Third, Laplacian score (LS) approach is employed to refine the fault features. In the end, the obtained features are fed into the binary tree support vector machine (BT-SVM) to accomplish the fault pattern identification. The proposed method is numerically and experimentally demonstrated to be able to recognize the different fault categories of planetary gearboxes.

  16. Multi-scale modelling of the effect of a viscoelastic matrix on the strength of a carbon fibre composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Joel P.; Behzadi, Shabnam; Porter, David; Jones, Frank R.

    2010-11-01

    A recently developed multi-scale model has proven successful in predicting the tensile strength of a unidirectional fibre composite from fundamental molecular inputs. This technique is now extended to subtle changes in the properties of the matrix. The chemistry of the resin matrix is varied on the functional group level resulting in a series of stress-strain profiles predicted using group interaction modelling. The transfer of strain as the result of a fibre break in the composite is modelled using finite element methods. The resulting characteristic ineffective lengths and strain concentration factors are incorporated into a statistical simulation of the propagation of fibre failure events in a typical composite. This allows the prediction of ultimate tensile strength for a composite containing a yielding and non-yielding matrix phase.

  17. Network features of sector indexes spillover effects in China: A multi-scale view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Sida; Huang, Shupei; Qi, Yabin; Liu, Xueyong; Sun, Qingru; Wen, Shaobo

    2018-04-01

    The spillover effects among sectors are of concern for distinct market participants, who are in distinct investment horizons and concerned with the information in different time scales. In order to uncover the hidden spillover information in multi-time scales in the rapidly changing stock market and thereby offer guidance to different investors concerning distinct time scales from a system perspective, this paper constructed directional spillover effect networks for the economic sectors in distinct time scales. The results are as follows: (1) The "2-4 days" scale is the most risky scale, and the "8-16 days" scale is the least risky one. (2) The most influential and sensitive sectors are distinct in different time scales. (3) Although two sectors in the same community may not have direct spillover relations, the volatility of one sector will have a relatively strong influence on the other through indirect relations.

  18. Development of a multi-scale data assimilation system for model-observation integration and climate model evaluation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Liu, Y.; Lin, W.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Feng, S.; Fridlind, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    To improve our understanding and the representation of subgrid processes in climate models, an increasing number of ground-based long-term observing systems have been established. These systems focus on detailed measurements over a domain of a typical climate model grid size. An example is the US DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, which has been collecting data related to radiation, clouds and precipitation at three primary sites, the Southern Great Plains (SGP) of the USA, the North Slope of Alaska, and the Tropical West Pacific, for approximately 20 years. A well-established approach to use ARM-like measurements in climate model evaluation is jointly using the Single Column Model (SCM), Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs), and/or large eddy simulations (LESs). To enhance the effectiveness of this approach, we have developed multi-scale data assimilation (MS-DA) system on top of the NCEP Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) System and implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at the cloud resolving resolution (WRF-CRM) over the ARM Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. It is demonstrated that the MS-DA effectively assimilate the dense ARM in-situ observations and high-resolution satellite data, thus significantly reducing uncertainties in the WRF CRM simulation. We have used the WRF CRM simulation constrained by the MS-DA to derive multi-scale forcing that is used to drive SCMs, CRMs, and LESs, expand the large scale forcing parameters to hydrometeors that are not provided in the existing continuous forcing product, and characterize dependency of large-scale forcing on domain-size that represents SCM grid-sizes, sub-grid processes, and cloud-regimes.

  19. A Multi-Scale Validation Strategy for Albedo Products over Rugged Terrain and Preliminary Application in Heihe River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwen Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue for the validation of land surface remote sensing albedo products over rugged terrain is the scale effects between the reference albedo measurements and coarse scale albedo products, which is caused by the complex topography. This paper illustrates a multi-scale validation strategy specified for coarse scale albedo validation over rugged terrain. A Mountain-Radiation-Transfer-based (MRT-based albedo upscaling model was proposed in the process of multi-scale validation strategy for aggregating fine scale albedo to coarse scale. The simulated data of both the reference coarse scale albedo and fine scale albedo were used to assess the performance and uncertainties of the MRT-based albedo upscaling model. The results showed that the MRT-based model could reflect the albedo scale effects over rugged terrain and provided a robust solution for albedo upscaling from fine scale to coarse scale with different mean slopes and different solar zenith angles. The upscaled coarse scale albedos had the great agreements with the simulated coarse scale albedo with a Root-Mean-Square-Error (RMSE of 0.0029 and 0.0017 for black sky albedo (BSA and white sky albedo (WSA, respectively. Then the MRT-based model was preliminarily applied for the assessment of daily MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Albedo Collection V006 products (MCD43A3 C6 over rugged terrain. Results showed that the MRT-based model was effective and suitable for conducting the validation of MODIS albedo products over rugged terrain. In this research area, it was shown that the MCD43A3 C6 products with full inversion algorithm, were generally in agreement with the aggregated coarse scale reference albedos over rugged terrain in the Heihe River Basin, with the BSA RMSE of 0.0305 and WSA RMSE of 0.0321, respectively, which were slightly higher than those over flat terrain.

  20. Multi-scale research of time and space differences about ecological footprint and ecological carrying capacity of the water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiahong; Lei, Xiaohui; Fu, Qiang; Li, Tianxiao; Qiao, Yu; Chen, Lei; Liao, Weihong

    2018-03-01

    A multi-scale assessment framework for assessing and comparing the water resource sustainability based on the ecological footprint (EF) is introduced. The study aims to manage the water resource from different views in Heilongjiang Province. First of all, from the scale of each city, the water ecological carrying capacity (ECC) was calculated from 2000 to 2011, and map the spatial distribution of the recent 3 years which show that, the water ecological carrying capacity (ECC) is uneven and has a downward trend year by year. Then, from the perspective of the five secondary partition basins in Heilongjiang Province, the paper calculated the ecological carrying capacity (ECC), the ecological footprint (EF) and ecological surplus and deficit (S&D) situation of water resources from 2000 to 2011, which show that the ecological deficit situation is more prominent in Nenjiang and Suifenhe basins which are in an unsustainable development state. Finally, from the perspective of the province, the paper calculated the ecological carrying capacity (ECC), the ecological footprint (EF) and ecological S&D of water resources from 2000 to 2011 in Heilongjiang Province, which show that the ecological footprint (EF) is in the rising trend, and the correlation coefficient between the ecological carrying capacity (ECC) and the precipitation is 0.8. There are 5 years of unsustainable development state in Heilongjiang. The proposed multi-scale assessment of WEF aims to evaluate the complex relationship between water resource supply and consumption in different spatial scales and time series. It also provides more reasonable assessment result which can be used by managers and regulators.

  1. Multi-scale response of runoff to climate fluctuation in the headwater region of Kaidu River in Xinjiang of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ling; Chen, Zhongsheng; Xu, Jianhua; Li, Weihong

    2016-08-01

    Based on the hydrological and meteorological data in the headwater region of the Kaidu River during 1960-2009, the multi-scale characteristics of runoff variability were analyzed using the ensemble empirical mode decomposition method (EEMD), and the aim is to investigate the oscillation mode structure characteristics of runoff change and its response to climate fluctuation at different time scales. Results indicated that in the past 50 years, the overall runoff of Kaidu River in Xinjiang has showed a significant nonlinear upward trend, and its changes have obviously exhibited an inter-annual scale (quasi-3 and quasi-6-year) and inter-decadal scale (quasi-10 and quasi-25-year). Variance contribution rates of each component manifested that the inter-decadal change had been playing a more important role in the overall runoff change for Kaidu River, and the reconstructed inter-annual variation trend could describe the fluctuation state of the original runoff anomaly during the study period. The reconstructed inter-decadal variability effectively revealed that the runoff for Kaidu River changed over the years, namely the states of abundance and low water period appear alternately. In addition, we found that runoff has a positive correlation to precipitation and temperature at different time scales, but they are most significant and relevant at inter-decadal scale, indicating the inter-decadal scale is most suitable for investigating the responses of runoff dynamics to climate fluctuation. At the same time, the results also suggested that EEMD is an effective method to analyze the multi-scale characteristics of nonlinear and non-stationary signal.

  2. Multi-scale diffuse interface modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility

    KAUST Repository

    Kou, Jisheng

    2016-05-10

    In this paper, we introduce a diffuse interface model to simulate multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility based on a realistic equation of state (e.g. Peng-Robinson equation of state). Because of partial miscibility, thermodynamic relations are used to model not only interfacial properties but also bulk properties, including density, composition, pressure, and realistic viscosity. As far as we know, this effort is the first time to use diffuse interface modeling based on equation of state for modeling of multi-component two-phase flow with partial miscibility. In numerical simulation, the key issue is to resolve the high contrast of scales from the microscopic interface composition to macroscale bulk fluid motion since the interface has a nanoscale thickness only. To efficiently solve this challenging problem, we develop a multi-scale simulation method. At the microscopic scale, we deduce a reduced interfacial equation under reasonable assumptions, and then we propose a formulation of capillary pressure, which is consistent with macroscale flow equations. Moreover, we show that Young-Laplace equation is an approximation of this capillarity formulation, and this formulation is also consistent with the concept of Tolman length, which is a correction of Young-Laplace equation. At the macroscopical scale, the interfaces are treated as discontinuous surfaces separating two phases of fluids. Our approach differs from conventional sharp-interface two-phase flow model in that we use the capillary pressure directly instead of a combination of surface tension and Young-Laplace equation because capillarity can be calculated from our proposed capillarity formulation. A compatible condition is also derived for the pressure in flow equations. Furthermore, based on the proposed capillarity formulation, we design an efficient numerical method for directly computing the capillary pressure between two fluids composed of multiple components. Finally, numerical tests

  3. Morphology Dependent Flow Stress in Nickel-Based Superalloys in the Multi-Scale Crystal Plasticity Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriyar Keshavarz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a framework to obtain the flow stress of nickel-based superalloys as a function of γ-γ’ morphology. The yield strength is a major factor in the design of these alloys. This work provides additional effects of γ’ morphology in the design scope that has been adopted for the model developed by authors. In general, the two-phase γ-γ’ morphology in nickel-based superalloys can be divided into three variables including γ’ shape, γ’ volume fraction and γ’ size in the sub-grain microstructure. In order to obtain the flow stress, non-Schmid crystal plasticity constitutive models at two length scales are employed and bridged through a homogenized multi-scale framework. The multi-scale framework includes two sub-grain and homogenized grain scales. For the sub-grain scale, a size-dependent, dislocation-density-based finite element model (FEM of the representative volume element (RVE with explicit depiction of the γ-γ’ morphology is developed as a building block for the homogenization. For the next scale, an activation-energy-based crystal plasticity model is developed for the homogenized single crystal of Ni-based superalloys. The constitutive models address the thermo-mechanical behavior of nickel-based superalloys for a large temperature range and include orientation dependencies and tension-compression asymmetry. This homogenized model is used to obtain the morphology dependence on the flow stress in nickel-based superalloys and can significantly expedite crystal plasticity FE simulations in polycrystalline microstructures, as well as higher scale FE models in order to cast and design superalloys.

  4. Multi-Scale Multi-physics Methods Development for the Calculation of Hot-Spots in the NGNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downar, Thomas; Seker, Volkan

    2013-01-01

    Radioactive gaseous fission products are released out of the fuel element at a significantly higher rate when the fuel temperature exceeds 1600°C in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Therefore, it is of paramount importance to accurately predict the peak fuel temperature during all operational and design-basis accident conditions. The current methods used to predict the peak fuel temperature in HTGRs, such as the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), estimate the average fuel temperature in a computational mesh modeling hundreds of fuel pebbles or a fuel assembly in a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) or prismatic block type reactor (PMR), respectively. Experiments conducted in operating HTGRs indicate considerable uncertainty in the current methods and correlations used to predict actual temperatures. The objective of this project is to improve the accuracy in the prediction of local 'hot' spots by developing multi-scale, multi-physics methods and implementing them within the framework of established codes used for NGNP analysis.The multi-scale approach which this project will implement begins with defining suitable scales for a physical and mathematical model and then deriving and applying the appropriate boundary conditions between scales. The macro scale is the greatest length that describes the entire reactor, whereas the meso scale models only a fuel block in a prismatic reactor and ten to hundreds of pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. The smallest scale is the micro scale--the level of a fuel kernel of the pebble in a PBR and fuel compact in a PMR--which needs to be resolved in order to calculate the peak temperature in a fuel kernel.

  5. Multi-scale model of resistive-type superconducting fault current limiters based on 2G HTS coated conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnard, Charles-Henri; Sirois, Frédéric; Lacroix, Christian; Didier, Gaëtan

    2017-01-01

    In order to plan the integration of superconducting fault current limiters (SFCLs) in power systems, accurate models of SFCLs must be made available in commercial power system transient simulators. In this context, we developed such a model for the EMTP-RV software package, a power system transient simulator widely used by power utilities. The model can be used with any resistive-type SFCL (rSFCL) made of high temperature superconductor (HTS) tapes, which are discretized in ‘electro-thermal elements’. Those elements consist solely of electric circuit components, and are used to represent portions of tape of various sizes and dimensions (a ‘multi-scale’ approach). Both the electrical and thermal behaviors of the tape are modeled, including interfacial effects, nonlinear properties of materials and heat transfer to the surrounding environment. Such a multi-scale model can simulate accurately both the local quench dynamics of HTS tapes (microscopic scale) and the global impact of the rSFCL on the power system (macroscopic/system scale). In this paper, the model is used to compute phenomena such as propagation velocity of a hot spot and heat diffusion through the thickness of the tape. Results were verified by comparing EMTP-RV results with finite element simulations. In addition to the development of the multi-scale model itself, which is the major contribution of this paper, the use of the model allowed us to determine the conditions of validity of the commonly used ‘homogenization’ of the thermal properties across the tape thickness. Indeed, when the current flowing into the rSFCL is slightly above its critical current I c (and up to 2{I}{{c}}), very important errors in the power waveforms arise, leading to potentially wrong decisions of protection systems. Homogenized thermal models should thus be used with great care in practice.

  6. Predicting Species Distributions Using Record Centre Data: Multi-Scale Modelling of Habitat Suitability for Bat Roosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellamy, Chloe; Altringham, John

    2015-01-01

    Conservation increasingly operates at the landscape scale. For this to be effective, we need landscape scale information on species distributions and the environmental factors that underpin them. Species records are becoming increasingly available via data centres and online portals, but they are often patchy and biased. We demonstrate how such data can yield useful habitat suitability models, using bat roost records as an example. We analysed the effects of environmental variables at eight spatial scales (500 m - 6 km) on roost selection by eight bat species (Pipistrellus pipistrellus, P. pygmaeus, Nyctalus noctula, Myotis mystacinus, M. brandtii, M. nattereri, M. daubentonii, and Plecotus auritus) using the presence-only modelling software MaxEnt. Modelling was carried out on a selection of 418 data centre roost records from the Lake District National Park, UK. Target group pseudoabsences were selected to reduce the impact of sampling bias. Multi-scale models, combining variables measured at their best performing spatial scales, were used to predict roosting habitat suitability, yielding models with useful predictive abilities. Small areas of deciduous woodland consistently increased roosting habitat suitability, but other habitat associations varied between species and scales. Pipistrellus were positively related to built environments at small scales, and depended on large-scale woodland availability. The other, more specialist, species were highly sensitive to human-altered landscapes, avoiding even small rural towns. The strength of many relationships at large scales suggests that bats are sensitive to habitat modifications far from the roost itself. The fine resolution, large extent maps will aid targeted decision-making by conservationists and planners. We have made available an ArcGIS toolbox that automates the production of multi-scale variables, to facilitate the application of our methods to other taxa and locations. Habitat suitability modelling has the

  7. Thermo-Oxidative Induced Damage in Polymer Composites: Microstructure Image-Based Multi-Scale Modeling and Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Rafid M.; Chandrashekhara, K.

    2017-11-01

    A multi-scale modeling approach is presented to simulate and validate thermo-oxidation shrinkage and cracking damage of a high temperature polymer composite. The multi-scale approach investigates coupled transient diffusion-reaction and static structural at macro- to micro-scale. The micro-scale shrinkage deformation and cracking damage are simulated and validated using 2D and 3D simulations. Localized shrinkage displacement boundary conditions for the micro-scale simulations are determined from the respective meso- and macro-scale simulations, conducted for a cross-ply laminate. The meso-scale geometrical domain and the micro-scale geometry and mesh are developed using the object oriented finite element (OOF). The macro-scale shrinkage and weight loss are measured using unidirectional coupons and used to build the macro-shrinkage model. The cross-ply coupons are used to validate the macro-shrinkage model by the shrinkage profiles acquired using scanning electron images at the cracked surface. The macro-shrinkage model deformation shows a discrepancy when the micro-scale image-based cracking is computed. The local maximum shrinkage strain is assumed to be 13 times the maximum macro-shrinkage strain of 2.5 × 10-5, upon which the discrepancy is minimized. The microcrack damage of the composite is modeled using a static elastic analysis with extended finite element and cohesive surfaces by considering the modulus spatial evolution. The 3D shrinkage displacements are fed to the model using node-wise boundary/domain conditions of the respective oxidized region. Microcrack simulation results: length, meander, and opening are closely matched to the crack in the area of interest for the scanning electron images.

  8. A multi-scale GIS and hydrodynamic modelling approach to fish passage assessment: Clarence and Shoalhaven Rivers, NSW Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Rita M.; Reinfelds, Ivars V.; Butler, Gavin L.; Walsh, Chris T.; Broderick, Tony J.; Chisholm, Laurie A.

    2016-05-01

    Natural barriers such as waterfalls, cascades, rapids and riffles limit the dispersal and in-stream range of migratory fish, yet little is known of the interplay between these gradient dependent landforms, their hydraulic characteristics and flow rates that facilitate fish passage. The resurgence of dam construction in numerous river basins world-wide provides impetus to the development of robust techniques for assessment of the effects of downstream flow regime changes on natural fish passage barriers and associated consequences as to the length of rivers available to migratory species. This paper outlines a multi-scale technique for quantifying the relative magnitude of natural fish passage barriers in river systems and flow rates that facilitate passage by fish. First, a GIS-based approach is used to quantify channel gradients for the length of river or reach under investigation from a high resolution DEM, setting the magnitude of identified passage barriers in a longer context (tens to hundreds of km). Second, LiDAR, topographic and bathymetric survey-based hydrodynamic modelling is used to assess flow rates that can be regarded as facilitating passage across specific barriers identified by the river to reach scale gradient analysis. Examples of multi-scale approaches to fish passage assessment for flood-flow and low-flow passage issues are provided from the Clarence and Shoalhaven Rivers, NSW, Australia. In these river systems, passive acoustic telemetry data on actual movements and migrations by Australian bass (Macquaria novemaculeata) provide a means of validating modelled assessments of flow rates associated with successful fish passage across natural barriers. Analysis of actual fish movements across passage barriers in these river systems indicates that two dimensional hydraulic modelling can usefully quantify flow rates associated with the facilitation of fish passage across natural barriers by a majority of individual fishes for use in management

  9. Multi-scale modeling and analysis of convective boiling: towards the prediction of CHF in rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niceno, B.; Sato, Y.; Badillo, A.; Andreani, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe current activities on the project Multi-Scale Modeling and Analysis of convective boiling (MSMA), conducted jointly by the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and the Swiss Nuclear Utilities (Swissnuclear). The long-term aim of the MSMA project is to formulate improved closure laws for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations for prediction of convective boiling and eventually of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF). As boiling is controlled by the competition of numerous phenomena at various length and time scales, a multi-scale approach is employed to tackle the problem at different scales. In the MSMA project, the scales on which we focus range from the CFD scale (macro-scale), bubble size scale (meso-scale), liquid micro-layer and triple interline scale (micro-scale), and molecular scale (nano-scale). The current focus of the project is on micro- and meso- scales modeling. The numerical framework comprises a highly efficient, parallel DNS solver, the PSI-BOIL code. The code has incorporated an Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) to tackle complex geometries. For simulation of meso-scales (bubbles), we use the Constrained Interpolation Profile method: Conservative Semi-Lagrangian 2nd order (CIP-CSL2). The phase change is described either by applying conventional jump conditions at the interface, or by using the Phase Field (PF) approach. In this work, we present selected results for flows in complex geometry using the IBM, selected bubbly flow simulations using the CIP-CSL2 method and results for phase change using the PF approach. In the subsequent stage of the project, the importance of effects of nano-scale processes on the global boiling heat transfer will be evaluated. To validate the models, more experimental information will be needed in the future, so it is expected that the MSMA project will become the seed for a long-term, combined theoretical and experimental program

  10. Multi-Scale Multi-physics Methods Development for the Calculation of Hot-Spots in the NGNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Downar, Thomas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Seker, Volkan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-04-30

    Radioactive gaseous fission products are released out of the fuel element at a significantly higher rate when the fuel temperature exceeds 1600°C in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Therefore, it is of paramount importance to accurately predict the peak fuel temperature during all operational and design-basis accident conditions. The current methods used to predict the peak fuel temperature in HTGRs, such as the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), estimate the average fuel temperature in a computational mesh modeling hundreds of fuel pebbles or a fuel assembly in a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) or prismatic block type reactor (PMR), respectively. Experiments conducted in operating HTGRs indicate considerable uncertainty in the current methods and correlations used to predict actual temperatures. The objective of this project is to improve the accuracy in the prediction of local "hot" spots by developing multi-scale, multi-physics methods and implementing them within the framework of established codes used for NGNP analysis.The multi-scale approach which this project will implement begins with defining suitable scales for a physical and mathematical model and then deriving and applying the appropriate boundary conditions between scales. The macro scale is the greatest length that describes the entire reactor, whereas the meso scale models only a fuel block in a prismatic reactor and ten to hundreds of pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. The smallest scale is the micro scale--the level of a fuel kernel of the pebble in a PBR and fuel compact in a PMR--which needs to be resolved in order to calculate the peak temperature in a fuel kernel.

  11. Ocean Color Reveals Multi-scale Responses of Phytoplankton to Changing Sea Ice and Ocean Temperatures along the Western Antarctic Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, M.; Schofield, O.; Ducklow, H. W.; Doney, S. C.

    2016-02-01

    The western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) is experiencing dramatic climate change as maritime conditions expand poleward and interact with regional physics and local topography. In situ observations collected by the Palmer LTER project have provided three decades of insight regarding changes in phytoplankton abundance and community structure seasonally at Palmer station, and spatially during annual cruises across the WAP shelf. Despite the challenges with cloud cover and high latitude retrieval, satellite-based phytoplankton observations have extended inference from in situ observations and have improved our understanding of ecological pattern and process in this region. Multi-sensor satellite analyses were conducted to extend in situ observations and determine the multi-scale response of phytoplankton to changes in sea-ice and temperature. At local scales, enhanced phytoplankton standing stock and diatom dominance were evident at canyons, which act as conduits or reservoirs for warm, nutrient rich Upper Circumpolar Deep Water. However, this positive effect was absent during low ice years. At regional scales, sea-ice declines and warming temperatures were evident over the modern satellite era (since 1997) and were consistent with cross-shelf and latitudinal gradients in phytoplankton responses. Shifts towards smaller size classes were evident across the entire shelf, suggesting a decline in export potential. Phytoplankton abundance in the northern WAP decreased over time, and increased in the southern WAP, although the spatial extent of positive response appears to have retreated in the past decade. Thus, while positive responses to sea-ice loss are evident at both local and regional scales, their capacity to offset climate trends appear to be diminishing.

  12. Multi-Scale Governance of Sustainable Natural Resource Use—Challenges and Opportunities for Monitoring and Institutional Development at the National and Global Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Bringezu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In a globalized economy, the use of natural resources is determined by the demand of modern production and consumption systems, and by infrastructure development. Sustainable natural resource use will require good governance and management based on sound scientific information, data and indicators. There is a rich literature on natural resource management, yet the national and global scale and macro-economic policy making has been underrepresented. We provide an overview of the scholarly literature on multi-scale governance of natural resources, focusing on the information required by relevant actors from local to global scale. Global natural resource use is largely determined by national, regional, and local policies. We observe that in recent decades, the development of public policies of natural resource use has been fostered by an “inspiration cycle” between the research, policy and statistics community, fostering social learning. Effective natural resource policies require adequate monitoring tools, in particular indicators for the use of materials, energy, land, and water as well as waste and GHG emissions of national economies. We summarize the state-of-the-art of the application of accounting methods and data sources for national material flow accounts and indicators, including territorial and product-life-cycle based approaches. We show how accounts on natural resource use can inform the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs and argue that information on natural resource use, and in particular footprint indicators, will be indispensable for a consistent implementation of the SDGs. We recognize that improving the knowledge base for global natural resource use will require further institutional development including at national and international levels, for which we outline options.

  13. Multi-scale simulations of droplets in generic time-dependent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Felix; Biferale, Luca; Sbragaglia, Mauro; Toschi, Federico

    2017-11-01

    We study the deformation and dynamics of droplets in time-dependent flows using a diffuse interface model for two immiscible fluids. The numerical simulations are at first benchmarked against analytical results of steady droplet deformation, and further extended to the more interesting case of time-dependent flows. The results of these time-dependent numerical simulations are compared against analytical models available in the literature, which assume the droplet shape to be an ellipsoid at all times, with time-dependent major and minor axis. In particular we investigate the time-dependent deformation of a confined droplet in an oscillating Couette flow for the entire capillary range until droplet break-up. In this way these multi component simulations prove to be a useful tool to establish from ``first principles'' the dynamics of droplets in complex flows involving multiple scales. European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie Grant Agreement No 642069. & European Research Council under the European Community's Seventh Framework Program, ERC Grant Agreement No 339032.

  14. Multi-scale Homogenization of Caddisfly Metacomminities in Human-modified Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simião-Ferreira, Juliana; Nogueira, Denis Silva; Santos, Anna Claudia; De Marco, Paulo; Angelini, Ronaldo

    2018-04-01

    The multiple scale of stream networks spatial organization reflects the hierarchical arrangement of streams habitats with increasingly levels of complexity from sub-catchments until entire hydrographic basins. Through these multiple spatial scales, local stream habitats form nested subsets of increasingly landscape scale and habitat size with varying contributions of both alpha and beta diversity for the regional diversity. Here, we aimed to test the relative importance of multiple nested hierarchical levels of spatial scales while determining alpha and beta diversity of caddisflies in regions with different levels of landscape degradation in a core Cerrado area in Brazil. We used quantitative environmental variables to test the hypothesis that landscape homogenization affects the contribution of alpha and beta diversity of caddisflies to regional diversity. We found that the contribution of alpha and beta diversity for gamma diversity varied according to landscape degradation. Sub-catchments with more intense agriculture had lower diversity at multiple levels, markedly alpha and beta diversities. We have also found that environmental predictors mainly associated with water quality, channel size, and habitat integrity (lower scores indicate stream degradation) were related to community dissimilarity at the catchment scale. For an effective management of the headwater biodiversity of caddisfly, towards the conservation of these catchments, heterogeneous streams with more pristine riparian vegetation found within the river basin need to be preserved in protected areas. Additionally, in the most degraded areas the restoration of riparian vegetation and size increase of protected areas will be needed to accomplish such effort.

  15. Multi-scale drought and ocean-atmosphere variability in monsoon Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Manuel; Ummenhofer, Caroline C.; Anchukaitis, Kevin J.

    2015-07-01

    Spatially extensive and persistent drought episodes have repeatedly influenced human history, including the ‘Strange Parallels’ drought event in monsoon Asia during the mid-18th century. Here we explore the dynamics of sustained monsoon failure using observed and tree-ring reconstructed drought patterns and a 1300-year pre-industrial community earth system model control run. Both modern observational and climate model drought patterns during years with extremely weakened South Asian monsoon resemble those reconstructed for the Strange Parallels drought. Model analysis reveals that this pattern arises during boreal spring over Southeast Asia, with decreased precipitation and moisture flux, while related summertime climate anomalies are confined to the Indian subcontinent. Years with simulated South Asian drying exhibit canonical El Niño conditions over the Pacific and associated shifts in the Walker circulation. In contrast, multi-year drought periods, resembling those sustained during the Strange Parallels drought, feature anomalous Pacific warming around the dateline, typical of El Niño Modoki events.

  16. Multi-scale temporal patterns in fish presence in a high-velocity tidal channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehman, Haley A; Zydlewski, Gayle Barbin

    2017-01-01

    The natural variation of fish presence in high-velocity tidal channels is not well understood. A better understanding of fish use of these areas would aid in predicting fish interactions with marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices, the effects of which are uncertain but of high concern. To characterize the patterns in fish presence at a tidal energy site in Cobscook Bay, Maine, we examined two years of hydroacoustic data continuously collected at the proposed depth of an MHK turbine with a bottom-mounted, side-looking echosounder. The maximum number of fish counted per hour ranged from hundreds in the early spring to over 1,000 in the fall. Counts varied greatly with tidal and diel cycles in a seasonally changing relationship, likely linked to the seasonally changing fish community of the bay. In the winter and spring, higher hourly counts were generally confined to ebb tides and low slack tides near sunrise and sunset. In summer and fall of each year, the highest fish counts shifted to night and occurred during ebb, low slack, and flood tides. Fish counts were not linked to current speed, and did not decrease as current speed increased, contrary to observations at other tidal power sites. As fish counts may be proportional to the encounter rate of fish with an MHK turbine at the same depth, highly variable counts indicate that the risk to fish is similarly variable. The links between fish presence and environmental cycles at this site will likely be present at other locations with similar environmental forcing, making these observations useful in predicting potential fish interactions at tidal energy sites worldwide.

  17. Multi-scale responses to warming in an experimental insect metacommunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Tess Nahanni; Gilbert, Benjamin

    2017-12-01

    In metacommunities, diversity is the product of species interactions at the local scale and dispersal between habitat patches at the regional scale. Although warming can alter both species interactions and dispersal, the combined effects of warming on these two processes remains uncertain. To determine the independent and interactive effects of warming-induced changes to local species interactions and dispersal, we constructed experimental metacommunities consisting of enclosed milkweed patches seeded with five herbivorous milkweed specialist insect species. We treated metacommunities with two levels of warming (unwarmed and warmed) and three levels of connectivity (isolated, low connectivity, high connectivity). Based on metabolic theory, we predicted that if plant resources were limited, warming would accelerate resource drawdown, causing local insect declines and increasing both insect dispersal and the importance of connectivity to neighboring patches for insect persistence. Conversely, given abundant resources, warming could have positive local effects on insects, and the risk of traversing a corridor to reach a neighboring patch could outweigh the benefits of additional resources. We found support for the latter scenario. Neither resource drawdown nor the weak insect-insect associations in our system were affected by warming, and most insect species did better locally in warmed conditions and had dispersal responses that were unchanged or indirectly affected by warming. Dispersal across the matrix posed a species-specific risk that led to declines in two species in connected metacommunities. Combined, this scaled up to cause an interactive effect of warming and connectivity on diversity, with unwarmed metacommunities with low connectivity incurring the most rapid declines in diversity. Overall, this study demonstrates the importance of integrating the complex outcomes of species interactions and spatial structure in understanding community response to climate

  18. Multi-scale, multi-model assessment of projected land allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, C. R.; Huang, M.; Chen, M.; Calvin, K. V.; Le Page, Y.; Kraucunas, I.

    2017-12-01

    Effects of land use and land cover change (LULCC) on climate are generally classified into two scale-dependent processes: biophysical and biogeochemical. An extensive amount of research has been conducted related to the impact of each process under alternative climate change futures. However, these studies are generally focused on the impacts of a single process and fail to bridge the gap between sector-driven scale dependencies and any associated dynamics. Studies have been conducted to better understand the relationship of these processes but their respective scale has not adequately captured overall interdependencies between land surface changes and changes in other human-earth systems (e.g., energy, water, economic, etc.). There has also been considerable uncertainty surrounding land use land cover downscaling approaches due to scale dependencies. Demeter, a land use land cover downscaling and change detection model, was created to address this science gap. Demeter is an open-source model written in Python that downscales zonal land allocation projections to the gridded resolution of a user-selected spatial base layer (e.g., MODIS, NLCD, EIA CCI, etc.). Demeter was designed to be fully extensible to allow for module inheritance and replacement for custom research needs, such as flexible IO design to facilitate the coupling of Earth system models (e.g., the Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy (ACME) and the Community Earth System Model (CESM)) to integrated assessment models (e.g., the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM)). In this study, we first assessed the sensitivity of downscaled LULCC scenarios at multiple resolutions from Demeter to its parameters by comparing them to historical LULC change data. "Optimal" values of key parameters for each region were identified and used to downscale GCAM-based future scenarios consistent with those in the Land Use Model Intercomparison Project (LUMIP). Demeter-downscaled land use scenarios were then compared to the

  19. Multi-scale model analysis of boundary layer ozone over East Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available This study employs the regional Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ model to examine seasonal and diurnal variations of boundary layer ozone (O3 over East Asia. We evaluate the response of model simulations of boundary layer O3 to the choice of chemical mechanisms, meteorological fields, boundary conditions, and model resolutions. Data obtained from surface stations, aircraft measurements, and satellites are used to advance understanding of O3 chemistry and mechanisms over East Asia and evaluate how well the model represents the observed features. Satellite measurements and model simulations of summertime rainfall are used to assess the impact of the Asian monsoon on O3 production. Our results suggest that summertime O3 over Central Eastern China is highly sensitive to cloud cover and monsoonal rainfall over this region. Thus, accurate simulation of the East Asia summer monsoon is critical to model analysis of atmospheric chemistry over China. Examination of hourly summertime O3 mixing ratios from sites in Japan confirms the important role of diurnal boundary layer fluctuations in controlling ground-level O3. By comparing five different model configurations with observations at six sites, the specific mechanisms responsible for model behavior are identified and discussed. In particular, vertical mixing, urban chemistry, and dry deposition depending on boundary layer height strongly affect model ability to capture observed behavior. Central Eastern China appears to be the most sensitive region in our study to the choice of chemical mechanisms. Evaluation with TRACE-P aircraft measurements reveals that neither the CB4 nor the SAPRC99 mechanisms consistently capture observed behavior of key photochemical oxidants in springtime. However, our analysis finds that SAPRC99 performs somewhat better in simulating mixing ratios of H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide

  20. A multi-scale metrics approach to forest fragmentation for Strategic Environmental Impact Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eunyoung; Song, Wonkyong; Lee, Dongkun

    2013-01-01

    Forests are becoming severely fragmented as a result of land development. South Korea has responded to changing community concerns about environmental issues. The nation has developed and is extending a broad range of tools for use in environmental management. Although legally mandated environmental compliance requirements in South Korea have been implemented to predict and evaluate the impacts of land-development projects, these legal instruments are often insufficient to assess the subsequent impact of development on the surrounding forests. It is especially difficult to examine impacts on multiple (e.g., regional and local) scales in detail. Forest configuration and size, including forest fragmentation by land development, are considered on a regional scale. Moreover, forest structure and composition, including biodiversity, are considered on a local scale in the Environmental Impact Assessment process. Recently, the government amended the Environmental Impact Assessment Act, including the SEA, EIA, and small-scale EIA, to require an integrated approach. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish an impact assessment system that minimizes the impacts of land development using an approach that is integrated across multiple scales. This study focused on forest fragmentation due to residential development and road construction sites in selected Congestion Restraint Zones (CRZs) in the Greater Seoul Area of South Korea. Based on a review of multiple-scale impacts, this paper integrates models that assess the impacts of land development on forest ecosystems. The applicability of the integrated model for assessing impacts on forest ecosystems through the SEIA process is considered. On a regional scale, it is possible to evaluate the location and size of a land-development project by considering aspects of forest fragmentation, such as the stability of the forest structure and the degree of fragmentation. On a local scale, land-development projects should

  1. Multi-Scale Hydrometeorological Modeling, Land Data Assimilation and Parameter Estimation with the Land Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters-Lidard, Christa D.

    2011-01-01

    The Land Information System (LIS; http://lis.gsfc.nasa.gov) is a flexible land surface modeling framework that has been developed with the goal of integrating satellite-and ground-based observational data products and advanced land surface modeling techniques to produce optimal fields of land surface states and fluxes. As such, LIS represents a step towards the next generation land component of an integrated Earth system model. In recognition of LIS object-oriented software design, use and impact in the land surface and hydrometeorological modeling community, the LIS software was selected as a co-winner of NASA?s 2005 Software of the Year award.LIS facilitates the integration of observations from Earth-observing systems and predictions and forecasts from Earth System and Earth science models into the decision-making processes of partnering agency and national organizations. Due to its flexible software design, LIS can serve both as a Problem Solving Environment (PSE) for hydrologic research to enable accurate global water and energy cycle predictions, and as a Decision Support System (DSS) to generate useful information for application areas including disaster management, water resources management, agricultural management, numerical weather prediction, air quality and military mobility assessment. LIS has e volved from two earlier efforts -- North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) and Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS) that focused primarily on improving numerical weather prediction skills by improving the characterization of the land surface conditions. Both of GLDAS and NLDAS now use specific configurations of the LIS software in their current implementations.In addition, LIS was recently transitioned into operations at the US Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA) to ultimately replace their Agricultural Meteorology (AGRMET) system, and is also used routinely by NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)/Environmental Modeling

  2. Revisiting drought impact on tropical forest photosynthesis: a novel multi-scale integrated approach reveals new insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detto, M.; Wu, J.; Xu, X.; Serbin, S.; Rogers, A.

    2017-12-01

    A fundamental unanswered question for global change ecology is to determine the vulnerability of tropical forests to climate change, particularly with increasing intensity and frequency of drought events. This question, despite its apparent simplicity, remains difficult for earth system models to answer, and is controversial in remote sensing literature. Here, we leverage unique multi-scale remote sensing measurements (from leaf to crown) in conjunction with four-continuous-year (2013-2017) eddy covariance measurements of ecosystem carbon fluxes in a tropical forest in Panama to revisit this question. We hypothesize that drought impacts tropical forest photosynthesis through variation in abiotic drivers (solar radiation, diffuse light fraction, and vapor pressure deficit) that interact with physiological traits that govern photosynthesis, and biotic variation in ecosystem photosynthetic capacity associated with changes in the traits themselves. Our study site, located in a seasonal tropical forest on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama, experienced a significant drought in 2015. Local eddy covariance derived photosynthesis shows an abrupt increase during the drought year. Our specific goal here is to assess the relative impact of abiotic and biotic drivers of such photosynthesis response to interannual drought. To this goal, we derived abiotic drivers from eddy tower-based meteorological measurements. We will derive the biotic drivers using a recently developed leaf demography-ontogeny model, where ecosystem photosynthetic capacity can be described as the product of field measured, age-dependent leaf photosynthetic capacity and local tower-camera derived ecosystem-scale inter-annual variability in leaf age demography of the same time period (2013-2017). Lastly, we will use a process-based model to assess the separate and joint effects of abiotic and biotic drivers on eddy covariance derive photosynthetic interannual variability. Collectively, this novel multi-scale

  3. ProteoLens: a visual analytic tool for multi-scale database-driven biological network data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Tianxiao; Sivachenko, Andrey Y; Harrison, Scott H; Chen, Jake Y

    2008-08-12

    New systems biology studies require researchers to understand how interplay among myriads of biomolecular entities is orchestrated in order to achieve high-level cellular and physiological functions. Many software tools have been developed in the past decade to help researchers visually navigate large networks of biomolecular interactions with built-in template-based query capabilities. To further advance researchers' ability to interrogate global physiological states of cells through multi-scale visual network explorations, new visualization software tools still need to be developed to empower the analysis. A robust visual data analysis platform driven by database management systems to perform bi-directional data processing-to-visualizations with declarative querying capabilities is needed. We developed ProteoLens as a JAVA-based visual analytic software tool for creating, annotating and exploring multi-scale biological networks. It supports direct database connectivity to either Oracle or PostgreSQL database tables/views, on which SQL statements using both Data Definition Languages (DDL) and Data Manipulation languages (DML) may be specified. The robust query languages embedded directly within the visualization software help users to bring their network data into a visualization context for annotation and exploration. ProteoLens supports graph/network represented data in standard Graph Modeling Language (GML) formats, and this enables interoperation with a wide range of other visual layout tools. The architectural design of ProteoLens enables the de-coupling of complex network data visualization tasks into two distinct phases: 1) creating network data association rules, which are mapping rules between network node IDs or edge IDs and data attributes such as functional annotations, expression levels, scores, synonyms, descriptions etc; 2) applying network data association rules to build the network and perform the visual annotation of graph nodes and edges

  4. The Sub-Arctic Carbon Cycle: Assimilating Multi-Scale Chamber, Tower and Aircraft Flux Observations into Ecological Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. C.; Stoy, P. C.; Baxter, R.; Clement, R.; Disney, M.; Evans, J.; Fletcher, B.; Gornall, J.; Harding, R.; Hartley, I. P.; Ineson, P.; Moncrieff, J.; Phoenix, G.; Sloan, V.; Poyatos, R.; Prieto-Blanco, A.; Subke, J.; Street, L.; Wade, T. J.; Wayolle, A.; Wookey, P.; Williams, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    The Arctic has already warmed significantly, and warming of 4-7 °C is expected over the next century. However, linkages between climate, the carbon cycle, the energy balance, and hydrology mean that the response of arctic ecosystems to these changes remains poorly understood. The release by warming of considerable but poorly quantified carbon stores from high latitude soils could accelerate the build-up of atmospheric CO2. The Arctic Biosphere Atmosphere Coupling at Multiple Scales (ABACUS) project, part of International Polar Year, was designed to improve predictions of the response of the Arctic terrestrial biosphere to climate change. The project operated at two sites (Abisko, Sweden and Kevo, Finland) over multiple years, utilising roving flux chambers (CO2/CH4), five flux towers (CO2/CH4/H2O) and a research aircraft equipped for fluxes (CO2/H2O) to directly measure multi-scale exchanges in-conjunction with other observations (both plot level and satellite). We show how these data can be combined using data assimilation approaches to address the question “what controls the temporal and spatial variability of carbon exchange by sub-Arctic ecosystems?” Eddy covariance measurements of mire methane exchanges agreed with chamber estimates, indicating that mires were strong summer sources, while birch woodland was a weak sink. However, remote sensing of mire extent was limited at resolutions > 30 m, and variations in sink/source activity suggested that upscaling CH4 exchanges (from chamber, to tower, to landscape) required higher resolution (ideally <10 m) landcover data in heterogeneous Arctic landscapes. Chamber and eddy covariance measurements of CO2 exchange recorded similar seasonal timing over a range of vegetation types. Birch woodlands had the greatest range of CO2 exchanges compared to tundra and mires. The challenge of measuring continuous fluxes across the full annual cycle, and inherent uncertainties in the methods, complicates the determination of

  5. Modelling concrete behaviour at early-age: multi-scale analysis and simulation of a massive disposal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honorio-De-Faria, Tulio

    2015-01-01

    The accurate prediction of the long and short-term behaviour of concrete structures in the nuclear domain is essential to ensure optimal performances (integrity, containment properties) during their service life. In the particular case of massive concrete structures, at early age the heat produced by hydration reactions cannot be evacuated fast enough so that high temperatures may be reached and the resulting gradients of temperature might lead to cracking according to the external and internal restraints to which the structures are subjected. The goals of this study are (1) to perform numerical simulations in order to describe and predict the thermo-chemo-mechanical behaviour at early-age of a massive concrete structure devoted to nuclear waste disposal on surface, and (2) to develop and apply up-scaling tools to estimate rigorously the key properties of concrete needed in an early-age analysis from the composition of the material. Firstly, a chemo-thermal analysis aims at determining the influence of convection, solar radiation, re-radiation and hydration heat on the thermal response of the structure. Practical recommendations regarding concreting temperatures are provided in order to limit the maximum temperature reached within the structure. Then, by means of a mechanical analysis, simplified and more complex (i.e. accounting for coupled creep and damage) modelling strategies are used to assess scenarios involving different boundary conditions defined from the previous chemo-thermal analysis. Secondly, a study accounting for the multi-scale character of concrete is performed. A simplified model of cement hydration kinetics is proposed. The evolution of the different phases at the cement paste level can be estimated. Then, analytical and numerical tools to upscale the ageing properties are presented and applied to estimate the mechanical and thermal properties of cement based materials. Finally, the input data used in the structural analysis are compared with

  6. A semi-analytical model for the flow behavior of naturally fractured formations with multi-scale fracture networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Pin; Cheng, Linsong; Huang, Shijun; Wu, Yonghui

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a semi-analytical model for the flow behavior of naturally fractured formations with multi-scale fracture networks. The model dynamically couples an analytical dual-porosity model with a numerical discrete fracture model. The small-scale fractures with the matrix are idealized as a dual-porosity continuum and an analytical flow solution is derived based on source functions in Laplace domain. The large-scale fractures are represented explicitly as the major fluid conduits and the flow is numerically modeled, also in Laplace domain. This approach allows us to include finer details of the fracture network characteristics while keeping the computational work manageable. For example, the large-scale fracture network may have complex geometry and varying conductivity, and the computations can be done at predetermined, discrete times, without any grids in the dual-porosity continuum. The validation of the semi-analytical model is demonstrated in comparison to the solution of ECLIPSE reservoir simulator. The simulation is fast, gridless and enables rapid model setup. On the basis of the model, we provide detailed analysis of the flow behavior of a horizontal production well in fractured reservoir with multi-scale fracture networks. The study has shown that the system may exhibit six flow regimes: large-scale fracture network linear flow, bilinear flow, small-scale fracture network linear flow, pseudosteady-state flow, interporosity flow and pseudoradial flow. During the first four flow periods, the large-scale fracture network behaves as if it only drains in the small-scale fracture network; that is, the effect of the matrix is negligibly small. The characteristics of the bilinear flow and the small-scale fracture network linear flow are predominantly determined by the dimensionless large-scale fracture conductivity. And low dimensionless fracture conductivity will generate large pressure drops in the large-scale fractures surrounding the wellbore. With

  7. Corrigendum to: Multi-scale defect interactions in high-rate brittle material failure. Part I: Model formulation and application to AlON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, A. L.; Ramesh, K. T.

    2017-09-01

    A minor error was present in one equation in the original paper, "Multi-scale defect interactions in high-rate brittle material failure. Part I: Model formulation and application to AlON" and in the corresponding computational implementation. The correction is provided here. None of the primary conclusions of the original paper are affected.

  8. Mechanisms and multi-scale modelling of the brittle fracture modifications induced by thermal ageing of a pressurised water reactor steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrieu, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    The use of some PWR components at a relatively high temperature generates a drop of their fracture properties. This embrittlement is generally attributed to the segregation of some impurities at grains boundaries. This work aims at correlating the kinetics of this segregation to the embrittlement kinetics through a multi-scale approach, combining thermodynamical and micro-mechanical analysis. (author)

  9. A comprehensive, multi-scale dynamical model of ErbB receptor signal transduction in human mammary epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Helikar

    Full Text Available The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Src and receptor tyrosine kinase epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB1 have been established as collaborators in cellular signaling and their combined dysregulation plays key roles in human cancers, including breast cancer. In part due to the complexity of the biochemical network associated with the regulation of these proteins as well as their cellular functions, the role of Src in EGFR regulation remains unclear. Herein we present a new comprehensive, multi-scale dynamical model of ErbB receptor signal transduction in human mammary epithelial cells. This model, constructed manually from published biochemical literature, consists of 245 nodes representing proteins and their post-translational modifications sites, and over 1,000 biochemical interactions. Using computer simulations of the model, we find it is able to reproduce a number of cellular phenomena. Furthermore, the model predicts that overexpression of Src results in increased endocytosis of EGFR in the absence/low amount of the epidermal growth factor (EGF. Our subsequent laboratory experiments also suggest increased internalization of EGFR upon Src overexpression under EGF-deprived conditions, further supporting this model-generated hypothesis.

  10. Multi-scale structures and pasting characteristics of starch in whole-wheat flour treated by superfine grinding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Meng; Zhang, Binjia; Jia, Caihua; Zhao, Siming

    2017-11-01

    The multi-scale structures and pasting properties of starch in WWF were investigated after superfine grinding. Five particle size distributions of WWF and their corresponding starch were obtained. The grinding process reduced the particle size of WWF and starch. However, a slight increase of fragments from starch granules was observed with enhanced grinding strength because of the small decrease in starch particle size and the existence of other WWF components that undertook some of shearing force and friction during grinding. A prominent reduction in starch crystallinity was resulted due to the destruction of crystalline structure by grinding. Small-angle X-ray scattering analyses indicated the disordering in starch semi-crystalline lamellae with thinner lamellae thickness. Additionally, the 13 C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectra demonstrated the alterations in starch chain conformation by varying peak areas of starch carbons (C1 and C4). Along with these structural changes, Starch pasting characteristics showed substantial variations, indicating decreased viscosities and higher pasting stability. The results suggest that the grinding treatments influenced the structures and pasting properties of starch even at a non-separated state, the changes in starch structures were related to the variations in starch gelatinization characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A multi-scale and multi-field coupling nonlinear constitutive theory for the layered magnetoelectric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hao; Pei, Yongmao; Li, Faxin; Fang, Daining

    2018-05-01

    The magnetic, electric and mechanical behaviors are strongly coupled in magnetoelectric (ME) materials, making them great promising in the application of functional devices. In this paper, the magneto-electro-mechanical fully coupled constitutive behaviors of ME laminates are systematically studied both theoretically and experimentally. A new probabilistic domain switching function considering the surface ferromagnetic anisotropy and the interface charge-mediated effect is proposed. Then a multi-scale multi-field coupling nonlinear constitutive model for layered ME composites is developed with physical measureable parameters. The experiments were performed to compare the theoretical predictions with the experimental data. The theoretical predictions have a good agreement with experimental results. The proposed constitutive relation can be used to describe the nonlinear multi-field coupling properties of both ME laminates and thin films. Several novel coupling experimental phenomena such as the electric-field control of magnetization, and the magnetic-field tuning of polarization are observed and analyzed. Furthermore, the size-effect of the electric tuning behavior of magnetization is predicted, which demonstrates a competition mechanism between the interface strain-mediated effect and the charge-driven effect. Our study offers deep insight into the coupling microscopic mechanism and macroscopic properties of ME layered composites, which is benefit for the design of electromagnetic functional devices.

  12. Analytic and Computational Perspectives of Multi-Scale Theory for Homogeneous, Laminated Composite, and Sandwich Beams and Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessler, Alexander; Gherlone, Marco; Versino, Daniele; DiSciuva, Marco

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the theoretical foundation and computational mechanics aspects of the recently developed shear-deformation theory, called the Refined Zigzag Theory (RZT). The theory is based on a multi-scale formalism in which an equivalent single-layer plate theory is refined with a robust set of zigzag local layer displacements that are free of the usual deficiencies found in common plate theories with zigzag kinematics. In the RZT, first-order shear-deformation plate theory is used as the equivalent single-layer plate theory, which represents the overall response characteristics. Local piecewise-linear zigzag displacements are used to provide corrections to these overall response characteristics that are associated with the plate heterogeneity and the relative stiffnesses of the layers. The theory does not rely on shear correction factors and is equally accurate for homogeneous, laminated composite, and sandwich beams and pl