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Sample records for models relate bedload

  1. Stochastic Modeling of Non-equilibrium Bedload Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuai, Z.; Tsai, C. W.

    2009-05-01

    Traditional stochastic bed load models aimed to solve for the equilibrium bedload transport rate by matching the rate of bed erosion with the rate of deposition. Bedload transport can be in nonequilibrium even under the steady flow condition, as the quantity of moving particles in the bedload layer may vary. In a nonequilibrium condition, the interchange of sediment particles occurs not only between the bedload layer and the bed surface, but also across the interface between bedload and suspended load. The proposed approach attempts to add a new bedload-suspended load interchange layer to a stochastic bedlod transport model based on the Markov chain. The bedload transport rate is the product of the total particle volume in saltation and the average saltating velocity. We can quantify the number of saltating particles by modeling the occupancy probabilities vector of particles staying in three states (i.e., bed surface, bedload layer, and the interchange layer between the bedload and the suspended load.). The new stochastic bedload relation is validated against existing bedload model. The sudden change of flow and/or sediment condition leads to changes in the transition probabilities. The influence of sudden changes in flow-sediment properties on the bedload transport rate is investigated in this preliminary study. It is found that the neglecting the exchange process between the bedload layer and the suspended layer may lead to non-negligible errors in bedload calculation when the flow and/or sediment conditions change.

  2. Development of A Stochastic Bedload Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, C. W.; Kuai, Z.

    2009-12-01

    Sediment particle transport can be viewed as a Markov chain process. In a non-equilibrium condition, the interchange of sediment particles occurs not only between the bedload layer and the bed surface, but also across the interface between bedload and suspended load. We can quantify the number of saltating particles by modeling the occupancy probabilities vector of particles staying in three states, namely, the bed surface, bedload layer, and suspended sediment layer. Most bedload transport models in the literature are formulated in terms of the mean bed shear stress or flow velocity. The proposed Markovian bedload model and the bedload transport rates are governed by various transition probabilities. These transition probabilities are all functions of the bed shear stress. The stochastic property of the bed shear stress can be incorporated into the above bedload transport model knowing the probability density function of the bed shear stress. This study presents a theoretical method to compute stochastic bedload transport rates considering the stochastic fluctuation of the bed shear stress.

  3. A minimal coupled fluid-discrete element model for bedload transport

    CERN Document Server

    Maurin, Raphael; Chareyre, Bruno; Frey, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    A minimal Lagragian two-phase model to study turbulent bedload transport focusing on the granular phase is presented, and validated with experiments. The model intends to describe bedload transport of massive particles in fully rough flows at relatively low Shields numbers, for which no suspension occurs. A discrete element method for the granular phase is coupled with a one dimensional volume-averaged two-phase momentum equation for the fluid phase. The coupling between the discrete granular phase and the continuous fluid phase is discussed, and a consistent averaging formulation adapted to bedload transport is introduced. An original simple discrete random walk model is proposed to account for the fluid velocity fluctuations. The model is compared with experiments considering both classical sediment transport rate as a function of the Shields number, and depth profiles of solid velocity, volume fraction, and transport rate density, from existing bedload transport experiments in inclined flume. The results s...

  4. A minimal coupled fluid-discrete element model for bedload transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurin, R.; Chauchat, J.; Chareyre, B.; Frey, P.

    2015-11-01

    A minimal Lagrangian two-phase model to study turbulent bedload transport focusing on the granular phase is presented and validated with experiments. The model intends to describe bedload transport of massive particles in fully rough flows at relatively low Shields numbers, for which no suspension occurs. A discrete element method for the granular phase is coupled with a one dimensional volume-averaged two-phase momentum equation for the fluid phase. The coupling between the discrete granular phase and the continuous fluid phase is discussed, and a consistent averaging formulation adapted to bedload transport is introduced. An original simple discrete random walk model is proposed to account for the fluid velocity fluctuations. The model is compared with experiments considering both classical sediment transport rate as a function of the Shields number, and depth profiles of solid velocity, volume fraction, and transport rate density, from existing bedload transport experiments in inclined flume. The results successfully reproduce the classical 3/2 power law, and more importantly describe well the depth profiles of the granular phase, showing that the model is able to reproduce the particle scale mechanisms. From a sensitivity analysis, it is shown that the fluctuation model allows to reproduce a realistic critical Shields number, and that the influence of the granular parameters on the macroscopic results is weak. Nevertheless, the analysis of the corresponding depth profiles reveals an evolution of the depth structure of the granular phase with varying restitution and friction coefficients, which denotes the non-trivial underlying physical mechanisms.

  5. Experimental modelling of marginal bed-load transport in an alpine mountain river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerlander, Johannes; Gems, Bernhard; Koessler, Daniel; Aufleger, Markus

    2014-05-01

    The presented work deals with experimental transport modelling of bed-load over a self-stabilized channel bed, as it is often observed in alpine mountain streams. A reach of the Gurgler Ache, a mountain river situated in the Oetztal valley in Tyrol (Austria), was reproduced within a physical scale model (1:20) in the hydraulic engineering laboratory at the University of Innsbruck. The investigated river reach features a length of 280 m, a mean channel slope of 0.03 m/m, a bankful channel width of roughly 14 m, and a channel bed surface with a d84 of approximately 0.3 m. Experimental modelling was based on Froude's similarity law. At the lower end of the flume the bed was artificially fixed. Further, the lower boundary condition featured supercritical flow conditions as the water dropped into a tank, which was mounted on load cells. Ensuring an invariable relation of water level and volume in the tank the increase of weight is thus attributable to the bed-load leaving the flume. To ensure similar conditions as observed in the field, a bulk sediment mixture, corresponding to the sub-surface material of the Gurgler Ache, was set to a certain bed-level and a discharge (about one third of the mean annual peak flow) was applied until the bed-load transport decreased to virtually zero. With it, the observed mean bed slope as well as the characteristics of the bed surface could be configured. This was the initial condition of each experimental series. A series itself consisted of several experimental runs, each at a steady discharge, where 50 kg of sediment was added manually at the upper boundary of the flume. The sediment feeding was best possibly tried to be done at a constant rate. Once the 50 kg were fully added, the experimental run was continued for one third of the feeding duration. While for each experimental series a different grain size were added, the runs within one series differed in the discharges applied and were done successively, starting with the lowest

  6. Modeling of spatial lag in bed-load transport processes and its effect on dune morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duin, van O.J.M.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Ribberink, J.S.; Dohmen-Janssen, C.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, two bed-load transport models are introduced in an existing idealized dune model. These allow for the modeling of the spatial lag between the sediment transport rate and bed shear stress along dune surfaces. This lag is an important factor in determining transitions between bed

  7. Coupled large eddy simulation and discrete element model of bedload motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furbish, D.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2011-12-01

    We combine a three-dimensional large eddy simulation of turbulence to a three-dimensional discrete element model of turbulence. The large eddy simulation of the turbulent fluid is extended into the bed composed of non-moving particles by adding resistance terms to the Navier-Stokes equations in accordance with the Darcy-Forchheimer law. This allows the turbulent velocity and pressure fluctuations to penetrate the bed of discrete particles, and this addition of a porous zone results in turbulence structures above the bed that are similar to previous experimental and numerical results for hydraulically-rough beds. For example, we reproduce low-speed streaks that are less coherent than those over smooth-beds due to the episodic outflow of fluid from the bed. Local resistance terms are also added to the Navier-Stokes equations to account for the drag of individual moving particles. The interaction of the spherical particles utilizes a standard DEM soft-sphere Hertz model. We use only a simple drag model to calculate the fluid forces on the particles. The model reproduces an exponential distribution of bedload particle velocities that we have found experimentally using high-speed video of a flat bed of moving sand in a recirculating water flume. The exponential distribution of velocity results from the motion of many particles that are nearly constantly in contact with other bed particles and come to rest after short distances, in combination with a relatively few particles that are entrained further above the bed and have velocities approaching that of the fluid. Entrainment and motion "hot spots" are evident that are not perfectly correlated with the local, instantaneous fluid velocity. Zones of the bed that have recently experienced motion are more susceptible to motion because of the local configuration of particle contacts. The paradigm of a characteristic saltation hop length in riverine bedload transport has infused many aspects of geomorphic thought, including

  8. Modeling bed-load transport of coarse sediments in the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgili, A.; Swift, M. R.; Lynch, D. R.; Ip, J. T. C.

    2003-12-01

    Current, sea level and bed-load transport are investigated in the Lower Piscataqua River section of the Great Bay Estuary, New Hampshire, USA—a well-mixed and geometrically complex system with low freshwater input, having main channel tidal currents ranging between 0.5 and 2 m s -1. Current and sea level forced by the M 2M 4M 6 tides at the estuarine mouth are simulated by a vertically averaged, non-linear, time-stepping finite element model. The hydrodynamic model uses a fixed boundary computational domain and accounts for flooding-drying of tidal flats by making use of a groundwater component. Inertia terms are neglected in comparison with pressure gradient and bottom friction terms, which is consistent with the observed principal dynamic balance for this section of the system. The accuracy of hydrodynamic predictions in the study area is demonstrated by comparison with four tidal elevation stations and two cross-section averaged current measurements. Simulated current is then used to model bed-load transport in the vicinity of a rapidly growing shoal located in the main channel of the lower system. Consisting of coarse sand and gravel, the shoal must be dredged every five to eight years. Two approaches are taken—an Eulerian parametric method in which nodal bed-load flux vectors are averaged over the tidal cycle and a Lagrangian particle tracking approach in which a finite number of sediment particles are released and tracked. Both methods yield pathways and accumulations in agreement with the observed shoal formation and the long-term rate of sediment accumulation in the shoal area.

  9. Evaluating bedload transport with RFID and accelerometer tracers, airborne LiDAR, and HEC-GeoRAS modeling: field experiments in Reynolds Creek, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinde, L.; Johnson, J. P.; Pierson, F. B.

    2012-12-01

    records, confirming minimal motion after peak spring flow. Accelerometer clasts also revealed that cobbles deposited in relatively close vicinities can have similar and different modes of transport- some traveled consistently over weeks as discharge increased while others of similar sizes traveled in short bursts to arrive at the same stream location. At tracer deposition locations, we extracted local channel characteristics from airborne LiDAR and field surveys. Finally, we modeled shear stress with HEC-GeoRAS, airborne LiDAR, and discharge to identify locations with significant shear stress changes and compared these areas to where RFID particles preferentially deposited. The combination of field methods, statistical analysis, and flow modeling provide additional insight into bedload transport mechanisms.

  10. Bedload Transport on Steep Slopes with Coupled Modeling Based on the Discrete Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauchat, J.; Maurin, R.; Chareyre, B.; Frey, P.

    2014-12-01

    After more than a century of research, a clear understanding of the physical processes involved in sediment transport problems is still lacking. In particular, modeling of intergranular interactions and fluid-particle interactions in bedload transport need to be improved. In this contribution, we propose a simple numerical model coupling a Discrete Element Method (DEM) for the grain dynamics with a simple 1D vertical fluid phase model inspired from the two-phase approach [1] in order to contribute to this open question. The Reynolds stress is parameterized by a mixing length model which depends on the integral of the grain volume fraction. The coupling between the grains and the fluid phase is essentially achieved through buoyancy and drag forces. The open source DEM code Yade [2] is used with a linear spring-dashpot contact law that allows the description of the behavior of the particles from the quasi-static to the dynamical state. The model is compared with classical results [3] and with particle-scale experimental results obtained in the quasi-2D flume at IRSTEA, Grenoble [4]. We discuss the closures of the model and the sensitivity to the different physical and numerical parameters. [1] Revil-Baudard, T. and J. Chauchat. A two-phase model for sheet flow regime based on dense granular flow rheology. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 118(2):619-634, 2013. [2] Šmilauer V. , E. Catalano, B. Chareyre, S. Dorofeenko, J. Duriez, A. Gladky, J. Kozicki, C . Modenese, L. Scholtès, L. Sibille, J. Str.nský, and K. Thoeni. Yade Documentation (V. Šmilauer, ed.), The Yade Project, 1st ed., http://yade-dem.org/doc/., 2010. [3] Meyer-Peter, E. and R. Müller. Formulas for bed-load transport. In Proc. 2nd Meeting, pages 39-64. IAHR, 1948. [4] Frey, P. Particle velocity and concentration profiles in bedload experiments on a steep slope. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 39(5):646-655, 2014.

  11. River network bedload model: a tool to investigate the impact of flow regulation on grain size distribution in a large Alpine catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Anna; Molnar, Peter

    2017-04-01

    Sediment transport rates along rivers and the grain size distribution (GSD) of coarse channel bed sediment are the result of the long term balance between transport capacity and sediment supply. Transport capacity, mainly a function of channel geometry and flow competence, can be altered by changes in climatic forcing as well as by human activities. In Alpine rivers it is hydropower production systems that are the main causes of modification to the transport capacity of water courses through flow regulation, leading over longer time scales to the adjustment of river bed GSDs. We developed a river network bedload transport model to evaluate the impacts of hydropower on the transfer of sediments and the GSDs of the Upper Rhône basin, a 5,200 km2 catchment located in the Swiss Alps. Many large reservoirs for hydropower production have been built along the main tributaries of the Rhône River since the 1960s, resulting in a complex system of intakes, tunnels, and pumping stations. Sediment storage behind dams and intakes, is accompanied by altered discharge due to hydropower operations, mainly higher flow in winter and lower in summer. It is expected that this change in flow regime may have resulted in different bedload transport. However, due the non-linear, threshold-based nature of the relation between discharge and sediment mobilization, the effects of changed hydraulic conditions are not easily deducible, and because observations of bedload in pre- and post-dam conditions are usually not available, a modelling approach is often necessary. In our modelling approach, the river network is conceptualized as a series of connected links (river reaches). Average geometric characteristics of each link (width, length, and slope of cross section) are extracted from digital elevation data, while surface roughness coefficients are assigned based on the GSD. Under the assumptions of rectangular prismatic cross sections and normal flow conditions, bed shear stress is estimated

  12. Coupling the 3D hydro-morphodynamic model Telemac-3D-sisyphe and seismic measurements to estimate bedload transport rates in a small gravel-bed river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostache, Renaud; Krein, Andreas; Barrière, Julien

    2014-05-01

    Coupling the 3D hydro-morphodynamic model Telemac-3D-sisyphe and seismic measurements to estimate bedload transport rates in a small gravel-bed river. Renaud Hostache, Andreas Krein, Julien Barrière During flood events, amounts of river bed material are transported via bedload. This causes problems, like the silting of reservoirs or the disturbance of biological habitats. Some current bedload measuring techniques have limited possibilities for studies in high temporal resolutions. Optical systems are usually not applicable because of high turbidity due to concentrated suspended sediment transported. Sediment traps or bedload samplers yield only summative information on bedload transport with low temporal resolution. An alternative bedload measuring technique is the use of seismological systems installed next to the rivers. The potential advantages are observations in real time and under undisturbed conditions. The study area is a 120 m long reach of River Colpach (21.5 km2), a small gravel bed river in Northern Luxembourg. A combined approach of hydro-climatological observations, hydraulic measurements, sediment sampling, and seismological measurements is used in order to investigate bedload transport phenomena. Information derived from seismic measurements and results from a 3-dimensional hydro-morphodynamic model are exemplarily discussed for a November 2013 flood event. The 3-dimensional hydro-morphodynamic model is based on the Telemac hydroinformatic system. This allows for dynamically coupling a 3D hydrodynamic model (Telemac-3D) and a morphodynamic model (Sisyphe). The coupling is dynamic as these models exchange their information during simulations. This is a main advantage as it allows for taking into account the effects of the morphologic changes of the riverbed on the water hydrodynamic and the bedload processes. The coupled model has been calibrated using time series of gauged water depths and time series of bed material collected sequentially (after

  13. First Results of using the Process-based Model PROMAB-GIS for Runoff a Bedload Transport Estimation in the Lainbach Torrent Catchment Area (Benediktbeuern, Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinderer, M.; Jenewein, S.; Ploner, A.; Sönser, T.

    2003-04-01

    As growing damage potential makes society more and more vulnerable to natural hazards, the pressure on the official authorities responsible for the guarantee of public safety is increasing rapidly. Modern computer technology, e.g. Geographical Information Systems (GIS), can provide remarkable help in assessing the risks resulting from natural hazards. The modelling in PROMAB-GIS, which is an user friendly software based on ESRI ArcView for assessing runoff and bedload transport in torrent catchments, is strongly based on interdisciplinary process-orientated field investigations. This paper presents results of the application of PROMAB-GIS to estimate the runoff and bedload transport potential of the Lainbach catchment area which has repeatedly been affected by heavy rain storms triggering remarkable events. The operational steps needed to gain process orientated, reproducible results for assessing design events in watersheds are highlighted. A key issue in this context is the need for detailed field-investigation of the geo-, bio-, hydro-inventory of a catchment area. The second part of the paper presents the model results for design events. The data of the event which caused severe damage in June 1990 provides a perfect basis for the evaluation of the model. The results show the potential of PROMAB-GIS for assessing runoff and bedload transport in alpine torrent systems.

  14. Apparatus and techniques for measuring bedload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbell, David Wellington

    1964-01-01

    The need for accurate determinations of the total sediment discharge of particles of bedload size has prompted this investigation of available and possible measuring apparatus and procedures. The accuracy of measurements of sediment discharge made with trap-type samplers is affected by the variability of sampler efficiency, by the oscillatory variation of bedload discharge, and by sampler placement. Equations that were developed for determining total discharge from measured bedioad discharge and measured suspended-sediment discharge are simplest if the bedload apparatus measures only the true bedload. Early bedload samplers are generally unsatisfactory. Recently developed or suggested apparatus include various improved samplers of the pressure-difference type, a pumping sampler, a magnetic sampler, acoustical instruments that measure the magnitude of the sound of particle collisions, an ultrasonic bedload sampler designed to measure and integrate electronically the concentration and velocity, and a tiltmeter designed to measure the total sediment discharge from the ground tilt that results from the passage of flow. All the pressure-difference samplers are improvements over early samplers, but none are void of the inherent shortcomings of trap-type apparatus; probably the Sphinx (Dutch) and VUV (Hungarian) samplers are the most satisfactory. The acoustical instruments are capable of measuring only the relative discharge. The ultrasonic sampler and the tiltmeter are not adequate without further development. Some new possible apparatus and means for measuring or aiding in measuring bedload discharge are small pit samplers, ultrasonic sounders, pressure transducers, and photography. A small pit sampler for measuring bedload discharge was designed to provide self-placement and portability ; however, its practicability and efficiency are undetermined. Exploratory films show that by using slowmotion photography the discharge of particles larger than about pea size can be

  15. Quantifying uncertainty in morphologically-derived bedload transport rates for large braided rivers: insights from high-resolution, high-frequency digital elevation model differencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasington, J.; Hicks, M.; Wheaton, J. M.; Williams, R. D.; Vericat, D.

    2013-12-01

    Repeat surveys of channel morphology provide a means to quantify fluvial sediment storage and enable inferences about changes in long-term sediment supply, watershed delivery and bed level adjustment; information vital to support effective river and land management. Over shorter time-scales, direct differencing of fluvial terrain models may also offer a route to predict reach-averaged sediment transport rates and quantify the patterns of channel morphodynamics and the processes that force them. Recent and rapid advances in geomatics have facilitated these goals by enabling the acquisition of topographic data at spatial resolutions and precisions suitable for characterising river morphology at the scale of individual grains over multi-kilometre reaches. Despite improvements in topographic surveying, inverting the terms of the sediment budget to derive estimates of sediment transport and link these to morphodynamic processes is, nonetheless, often confounded by limited knowledge of either the sediment supply or efflux across a boundary of the control volume, or unobserved cut-and-fill taking place between surveys. This latter problem is particularly poorly constrained, as field logistics frequently preclude surveys at a temporal frequency sufficient to capture changes in sediment storage associated with each competent event, let alone changes during individual floods. In this paper, we attempt to quantify the principal sources of uncertainty in morphologically-derived bedload transport rates for the large, labile, gravel-bed braided Rees River which drains the Southern Alps of NZ. During the austral summer of 2009-10, a unique timeseries of 10 high quality DEMs was derived for a 3 x 0.7 km reach of the Rees, using a combination of mobile terrestrial laser scanning, aDcp soundings and aerial image analysis. Complementary measurements of the forcing flood discharges and estimates of event-based particle step lengths were also acquired during the field campaign

  16. Universal shape evolution of particles by bed-load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerolmack, D. J.; Domokos, G.; Shaw, S.; Sipos, A.; Szabo, T.

    2016-12-01

    River currents, wind and waves drive bed-load transport, in which sediment particles collide with each other and the Earth's surface. A generic consequence is erosion and rounding of particles as a result of chipping, often referred to in geological literature as abrasion. Recent studies have shown that the erosion of river pebbles can be modeled as diffusion of surface curvature, indicating that geometric aspects of chipping erosion are insensitive to details of collisions and material properties. Here we present data from fluvial, aeolian and coastal environments that suggest a universal relation between particle circularity and mass lost due to bed-load chipping. Simulations and experiments support the diffusion model and demonstrate that three constraints are required to produce this universal curve: (i) initial particles are fragments; (ii) erosion is dominated by collisions among like-sized particles; and (iii) collision energy is small enough that chipping dominates over fragmentation. We show that the mechanics of bedrock weathering and bed-load transport select these constraints, providing the foundation to estimate a particle's erosion rate from its shape alone in most sedimentary environments. These findings may be used to determine the contribution of chipping to downstream fining in rivers and deserts, and to infer transport conditions using only images of sediment grains.

  17. A particle counting system for calculation of bedload fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Luís; Antico, Federica; Sanches, Pedro; Alegria, Francisco; Aleixo, Rui; Ferreira, Rui M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Channel bed morphology depends on bedload fluxes which are difficult to determine even in controlled laboratory conditions. Particle counting can provide time resolved bedload fluxes. Determination of particle rates by means of digital image processing is computationally expensive and the requirement for optical access is not always met. Weighing methods are limited by short dynamic ranges. To overcome these difficulties this paper presents a prototype of a particle counter device that works by detecting impacts on a sensitive surface. The accuracy of the device is validated, by means of laboratory experiments, contrasting its results against those obtained by means of digital image analysis. This device proved to be capable of measuring bedload fluxes, determining long time series of bedload transport rates, in particles per unit time, with high accuracy and with a much lower computation cost relatively to digital image processing. The device is also able to gather meaningful data in real-time, like particle arrival time-series and real-time lateral bedload distribution. The parameters involved in the detection criterion must be previously set through a heuristic procedure. However, the method itself is direct—it requires no calibration between the acquired signal and bedload transport rates. Particle counts can be transformed in bedload discharges by a simple binning process or by taking finite differences of the cumulative mass function. First and second order moments of bedload discharge are in agreement with the values obtained by direct counting. The low requirement for data storage, allowing for very large data series, the real time analysis capabilities, the low cost of such system when compared with a digital image acquisition system constitute the main advantages of the device for the study of integral scales of bedload and bedload intermittency.

  18. Damage costs due to bedload transport processes in Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badoux, A.; Andres, N.; Turowski, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    In Alpine regions, floods are often associated with erosion, transport and deposition of coarse sediment along the streams. These processes are related to bedload transport and pose a hazard in addition to the elevated water discharge. However, it is unclear to what extent they contribute to total damage caused by natural hazards. Using the Swiss flood and landslide damage database - which collects financial damage data of naturally triggered floods, debris flows and landslides - we estimated the contribution of fluvial bedload transport processes to total damage costs in Switzerland. For each database entry an upper and lower limit of financial losses caused by or related to bedload transport processes was estimated, and the quality of the estimate was judged. When compared to total damage, the fraction of bedload transport damage in the 40 yr study period lies between 0.32 and 0.37. However, this value is highly variable for individual years (from 0.02 to 0.72). Bedload transport processes have induced cumulative financial losses between CHF 4.3 and 5.1 billion. Spatial analysis revealed a considerable heterogeneous distribution with largest damage for mountainous regions. The analysis of the seasonal distribution shows that more than 75 % of the bedload damage costs occurs in summer (June-August), and ∼ 23% in autumn (September-November). With roughly 56 %, by far most of the damage has been registered in August. Bedload transport processes are presently still inadequately understood, and the predictive quality of common bedload equations is often poor. Our analysis demonstrates the importance of bedload transport as a natural hazard and financial source of risk, and thus the need for future structured research on transport processes in steep streams.

  19. Linking hydrologic and bedload transport models to simulate fluvial response to changing precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickert, A. D.; Ng, G. H. C.; Tofelde, S.; Savi, S.; Schildgen, T. F.; Alonso, R. N.; Strecker, M. R.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in precipitation can drive river aggradation or incision through their influence on both hillslope processes, which supply sediment to the channel, and sediment transport capacity, which moves sediment downstream. Whether a particular change in precipitation intensity and/or duration will result in aggradation or incision is difficult to predict due to these competing effects. In particular, fluvial response to climate change is sensitive to (1) thresholds and nonlinearities involved in sediment production and sediment transport, (2) how different modes of sediment production affect the grain size of the sediment provided to the channel, and (3) impacts of drainage basin geometry on sediment storage time and locations of rapid sediment production and/or transport. A better mechanistic understanding of the relationship between rainfall and river bed elevation changes will help us to understand modern river channel response to climate change and decipher the causes for fluvial terrace formation. Here we couple a hydrologic model, the Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), with a model of sediment transport through a fluvial network, sedFlow, to predict patterns of bed elevation change. We first perform schematic example simulations on an idealized synthetic landscape with a single river channel to show how simple fluvial systems can respond to changes in rainfall. We then expand these numerical tests to full fluvial networks, in which the segments of the tributary network propagate signals of aggradation and incision, leading to a more complex response that embodies the interference between magnitudes and time-scales of sediment transfer in the tributary links. We showcase the possible complexity of the fluvial response with an example from the Quebrada del Toro of NW Argentina, which is currently experiencing rapid and spatially-variable aggradation and incision, possibly in response to an increase in extreme rainfall events in the east-central Andes.

  20. The role of unsteady forces for sediment particles in bedload transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Detian; Liu, Xiaofeng; Fu, Xudong

    2016-04-01

    In engineering, bedload transport is usually predicted by a variety of formulas, and huge uncertainty is found from case to case. One of the fundamental reasons is the lack of fully understanding the dynamic behavior of bedload particles. We explore the dynamic characteristics of sediment particles transported in turbulent open-channel flows. A numerical model of sediment transport is built by combining the large eddy simulation (LES) with discrete element model (DEM) using a fully four-way coupling method. Particular attention is paid to the hydrodynamic forces acting on bedload particles. The result shows that, in addition to drag force, the unsteady forces (i.e. Basset history force and added mass force) are important (40%~60% in the summation of all the time-averaged magnitude of forces) for fine sediment particles (with a diameter of 0.5 mm), which are usually ignored for computational complexity. While the lift force has been found to be significant for gravel particles (with a diameter of 31 mm)[1], it is not relatively dominant for such fine particles (less than 3% in the summation). This helps explaining why the prediction of the same formula change greatly from case to case. The comparison with experimental data also shows great potential of the current LES-DEM model for fundamental research in bedload transport. Reference: [1] Nino, Y., & Garcia, M. (1994). Gravel saltation 2. Modeling. Water Resources Research, 30(6), 1915-1924.

  1. Bedload transport of small rivers in Malaysia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra ZANGENEH SIRDARI; Aminuddin AB GHANI; Zorkeflee Abu HASSAN

    2014-01-01

    Numerous time-consuming equations, based on the relationship between the reliability and representativeness of the data utilized in defining variables and constants, require complex parameters to estimate bedload transport. In this study the easily accessible data including flow discharge, water depth, water surface slope, and surface grain diameter (d50) from small rivers in Malaysia were used to estimate bedload transport. Genetic programming (GP) and artificial neural network (ANN) models are applied as complementary tools to estimate bed load transport based on a balance between simplicity and accuracy in small rivers. The developed models demonstrate higher performance with an overall accuracy of 97% and 93% for ANN and GP, respectively compared with other traditional methods and empirical equations.

  2. Bedload transport controls bedrock erosion under sediment-starved conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, A. R.; Turowski, J. M.

    2015-07-01

    Fluvial bedrock incision constrains the pace of mountainous landscape evolution. Bedrock erosion processes have been described with incision models that are widely applied in river-reach and catchment-scale studies. However, so far no linked field data set at the process scale had been published that permits the assessment of model plausibility and accuracy. Here, we evaluate the predictive power of various incision models using independent data on hydraulics, bedload transport and erosion recorded on an artificial bedrock slab installed in a steep bedrock stream section for a single bedload transport event. The influence of transported bedload on the erosion rate (the "tools effect") is shown to be dominant, while other sediment effects are of minor importance. Hence, a simple temporally distributed incision model, in which erosion rate is proportional to bedload transport rate, is proposed for transient local studies under detachment-limited conditions. This model can be site-calibrated with temporally lumped bedload and erosion data and its applicability can be assessed by visual inspection of the study site. For the event at hand, basic discharge-based models, such as derivatives of the stream power model family, are adequate to reproduce the overall trend of the observed erosion rate. This may be relevant for long-term studies of landscape evolution without specific interest in transient local behavior. However, it remains to be seen whether the same model calibration can reliably predict erosion in future events.

  3. Change in bedload transport frequency with climate warming in gravel-bed streams of the Oregon Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempel, L. A.; Grant, G.; Lewis, S.; Safeeq, M.

    2014-12-01

    Previous modeling studies have predicted that high flows in the Oregon Cascades will become larger and shift towards earlier in the winter season with climate warming. The impact of those changes on bedload transport frequency and channel morphology remains unknown, however. We examined changes in the timing and magnitude of bedload transport under modeled flow scenarios to identify which rivers draining the Cascades with different hydrologic regimes are most vulnerable to increased frequency of bedload transport. Such increases in the frequency or magnitude of gravel entrainment might lead to disturbance of fragile salmon or bull trout habitat. We calculated bedload transport rates using field measurements of surface sediment size, channel geometry, and channel slope along 14 reaches that included streams with a range of drainage areas and flow regimes (i.e., spring-fed and surface-runoff dominated). Our findings suggest that both spring-fed and surface-runoff streams are vulnerable to predicted changes in the flow regime, but in different ways. Spring-fed streams, characterized by relatively uniform discharge, will likely experience changes in both the timing and magnitude of transport. Spring-fed streams are poised just above the critical transport threshold for a large portion of the year, therefore small changes in the highest flows may lead to marked changes in transport rates. Transport events in surface-runoff streams, which are already characterized by flashy flows, will likely become larger and more frequent. Changes in the frequency and timing of bedload transport in both spring-fed and surface runoff streams will impact bed stability and texture and should be considered for managing these watersheds in the future.

  4. Evaluation of multiple-frequency, active and passive acoustics as surrogates for bedload transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Molly S.; Fosness, Ryan L.; Pachman, Gregory; Lorang, Mark; Tonolla, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The use of multiple-frequency, active acoustics through deployment of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) shows potential for estimating bedload in selected grain size categories. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the University of Montana (UM), evaluated the use of multiple-frequency, active and passive acoustics as surrogates for bedload transport during a pilot study on the Kootenai River, Idaho, May 17-18, 2012. Four ADCPs with frequencies ranging from 600 to 2000 kHz were used to measure apparent moving bed velocities at 20 stations across the river in conjunction with physical bedload samples. Additionally, UM scientists measured the sound frequencies of moving particles with two hydrophones, considered passive acoustics, along longitudinal transects in the study reach. Some patterns emerged in the preliminary analysis which show promise for future studies. Statistically significant relations were successfully developed between apparent moving bed velocities measured by ADCPs with frequencies 1000 and 1200 kHz and bedload in 0.5 to 2.0 mm grain size categories. The 600 kHz ADCP seemed somewhat sensitive to the movement of gravel bedload in the size range 8.0 to 31.5 mm, but the relation was not statistically significant. The passive hydrophone surveys corroborated the sample results and could be used to map spatial variability in bedload transport and to select a measurement cross-section with moving bedload for active acoustic surveys and physical samples.

  5. Prediction of the bed-load transport by gas-liquid stratified flows in horizontal ducts

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Erick de Moraes

    2016-01-01

    Solid particles can be transported as a mobile granular bed, known as bed-load, by pressure-driven flows. A common case in industry is the presence of bed-load in stratified gas-liquid flows in horizontal ducts. In this case, an initially flat granular bed may be unstable, generating ripples and dunes. This three-phase flow, although complex, can be modeled under some simplifying assumptions. This paper presents a model for the estimation of some bed-load characteristics. Based on parameters easily measurable in industry, the model can predict the local bed-load flow rates and the celerity and the wavelength of instabilities appearing on the granular bed.

  6. Managing bedload sediment in regulated rivers: Examples from California, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondolf, G. Mathias

    The continuity of bedload transport has been profoundly altered in many rivers by construction of reservoirs and mining of sand and gravel for construction aggregate from the active channel. These impacts are especially well illustrated in California because of the extent of reservoir construction and strong demand for aggregate. As a result, many river channels have become starved of bedload sediment and have incised. Salmonid spawning gravel has been lost, and bridges and other structures have been undermined. State policies regulating reservoir sedimentation and sediment sluicing from reservoirs are often contradictory and are not based on an understanding of the role of bedload sediment in maintaining the river system. Regulation of gravel mining from active channels has been ineffective at preventing resource degradation, despite numerous permit requirements from various federal, state, and local agencies. The principal burden for regulating gravel mining falls on local governments, which lack resources or technical expertise to analyze geomorphic effects of gravel mining. Despite their common occurrence and inter-related nature throughout California, the problems resulting from disruption of natural bedload transport have thus far been treated on a site-specific basis only, without explicit recognition of links among processes and impacts. Environmentally sound management of bedload sediment resources requires basin-level and regional analysis of bedload sediment sources and transport rates, recognition of hydrologic alterations caused by reservoirs, and identification of suitable aggregate sources (including quarries and recycled concrete rubble). Gravel mining should generally be prohibited from channels downstream of reservoirs.

  7. Application of dimensionless sediment rating curves to predict suspended-sediment concentrations, bedload, and annual sediment loads for rivers in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Christopher A.; Groten, Joel T.; Lorenz, David L.; Koller, Karl S.

    2016-10-27

    -of-fit that included proximity of the model(s) fitted line to the 95-percent confidence intervals of the site-specific model, Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency values, model biases, and deviation of annual sediment loads from each model to the annual sediment loads calculated from measured data.Composite plots comparing Pagosa Springs DSRCs, Minnesota DSRCs, site-specific regression models, and measured data indicated that regionally developed DSRCs (Minnesota DSRC models) more closely approximated measured data for nearly every site. Pagosa Springs DSRC models had markedly larger exponents (slopes) when compared to the Minnesota DSRC models and the site-specific regression models, and over-represent SSC and bedload at streamflows exceeding bankfull. The Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency values for the Minnesota DSRC model for suspended-sediment concentrations closely matched Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency values of the site-specific regression models for 12 out of 16 sites. Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency values associated with Minnesota DSRCs were greater than those associated with Pagosa Springs DSRCs for every site except the Whitewater River near Beaver, Minnesota site. Pagosa Springs DSRC models were less accurate than the mean of the measured data at predicting SSC values for one-half of the sites for good/fair stability sites and one-half of the sites for poor stability sites. Relative model biases were calculated and determined to be substantial (greater than 5 percent) for Pagosa Springs and Minnesota models, with Minnesota models having a lower mean model bias. For predicted annual suspended-sediment loads (SSL), the Minnesota DSRC models for good/fair and poor stream stability sites more closely approximated the annual SSLs calculated from the measured data as compared to the Pagosa Springs DSRC model.Results of data analyses indicate that DSRC models developed using data collected in Minnesota were more effective at compensating for differences in individual stream characteristics across a

  8. An analysis of bedload and suspended load interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recking, alain; Navratil, Oldrich

    2013-04-01

    Several approaches were used to develop suspension equations. It includes semi-theoretical equations based on the convection diffusion equation (Einstein 1950; Van Rijn 1984; Camenen and Larson 2008; Julien 2010), semi-empirical tools based on energy concept (Velikanov 1954; Bagnold 1966), empirical adjustments (Prosser and Rusttomji 2000). One essential characteristic of all these equations is that most of them were developed by considering continuity between bedload and suspended load, and that the partitioning between these two modes of transport evolves progressively with increasing shear stress, which is the case for fine bed materials. The use of these equations is thus likely to be welcome in estuaries or lowland sandy rivers, but may be questionable in gravel-bed rivers and headwater streams where the bed is usually structured vertically and fine sediments potentially contributing to suspension are stored under a poorly mobile surface armour comprising coarse sediments. Thus one question this work aimed to answer is does the presence of an armour at the bed surface influence suspended load? This was investigated through a large field data set comprising instantaneous measurements of both bedload and suspension. We also considered the river characteristics, distinguishing between lowland rivers, gravel bed rivers and headwater streams. The results showed that a correlation exist between bedload and suspension for lowland and gravel bed rivers. This suggests that in gravel bed rivers a large part of the suspended load is fed by subsurface material, and depends on the remobilization of the surface material. No correlation was observed for head water streams where the sediment production is more likely related to hillslope processes. These results were used with a bedload transport equation for proposing a method for suspended load estimate. The method is rough, but especially for gravel bed rivers, it predicts suspended load reasonably well when compared to

  9. Seismologically determined bedload flux during the typhoon season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Wei-An; Wu, Yih-Min; Zhao, Li; Tsai, Victor C; Chen, Chi-Hsuan

    2015-02-05

    Continuous seismic records near river channels can be used to quantify the energy induced by river sediment transport. During the 2011 typhoon season, we deployed a seismic array along the Chishan River in the mountain area of southern Taiwan, where there is strong variability in water discharge and high sedimentation rates. We observe hysteresis in the high-frequency (5-15 Hz) seismic noise level relative to the associated hydrological parameters. In addition, our seismic noise analysis reveals an asymmetry and a high coherence in noise cross-correlation functions for several station pairs during the typhoon passage, which corresponds to sediment particles and turbulent flows impacting along the riverbed where the river bends sharply. Based on spectral characteristics of the seismic records, we also detected 20 landslide/debris flow events, which we use to estimate the sediment supply. Comparison of sediment flux between seismologically determined bedload and derived suspended load indicates temporal changes in the sediment flux ratio, which imply a complex transition process from the bedload regime to the suspension regime between typhoon passage and off-typhoon periods. Our study demonstrates the possibility of seismologically monitoring river bedload transport, thus providing valuable additional information for studying fluvial bedrock erosion and mountain landscape evolution.

  10. Passive acoustic inversion to estimate bedload size distribution in rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrut, Teodor; Geay, Thomas; Belleudy, Philippe; Gervaise, Cédric

    2016-04-01

    The knowledge of sediment transport rate in rivers is related to issues like changes in channel forms, inundation risks and river's ecological functions. The passive acoustic method introduced here measures the bedload processes by recording the noise generated by the inter-particle collisions. In this research, an acoustic inversion is proposed to estimate the size distribution of mobile particles. The theoretical framework of Hertz's impact between two solids rigid is used to model the sediment-generated noise. This model combined with the acoustical power spectrum density gives the information on the particle sizes. The sensitivity of the method is performed and finally the experimental validation is done through a series of tests in the laboratory as well in a natural stream. The limitations of the proposed inversion method are drawn assuming the wave propagation effects in the channel. It is stated that propagation effects limit the applicability of the method to large rivers, like fluvial channels, in the detriment of mountain torrents.

  11. Bedload Dynamics of a Lowland Gravel-Bedded River Monitored Using Geophones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, P. W.; Taylor, A.; Soar, P. J.

    2013-12-01

    Bedload dynamics of the River Avon (Devon, UK) were monitored using geophones during an extremely wet period in 2012-3 which included multiple overtopping discharges and the instantaneous and daily mean flows of record. Seismic impact plate geophones have been suggested to provide a reliable record of transport of grains in excess of ca.20 mm. Our geophones, positioned in a reach with a central flow thalweg, consistently recorded a lower threshold of bedload movement at ~4 m3s-1 which accords to a shear stress theoretically capable of moving sediment just exceeding 20 mm. The relationship of discharge to bedload rate (i.e., impact frequency) during individual events was highly complex: increasing scatter at discharges in excess of bankfull may in part reflect sensitivity of the device to bedload size and saltation dynamics. Considerable intra-event hysteresis including in-bank transport peaks during flow recession may relate to changing sediment supply dynamics due to local mass and cantilever bank failures. Variation in impact frequencies between events may reflect regional changes in sediment supply dynamics although lateral displacement in the dominant track of bedload would provide the same result: later installation of multiple geophones demonstrated a high degree of cross-stream variability in recorded bedload but the persistent dominance of the central plate meant that the discharge-transport relationship was not significantly improved by using multiple plates. Despite this intra- and inter-event variability, the product of instantaneous discharge versus impact frequency indicated an effective discharge for bedload close to the morphological ';bar-full' level - this may be plausible in this exceptionally wet period during which time 20 mm grains were estimated to be mobile during 66% of daily mean flows and the channel underwent appreciable morphological adjustment. The results generally support the value of impact plates as indicators of relative sediment

  12. A curved flume bed-load experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talmon, A.M.; Marsman, E.R.A.

    1988-01-01

    In this report the results of a bed-load experiment in a curved flume are presented. The experiments have been carried out in the Laboratory of Fluid Mechanics (L.F.M.) at the Delft University of Technology. The main object of the experiments is to develop and to test data-acquisition procedures for

  13. Streak instability induced by bedload diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramian, Anaïs; Seizilles, Grégoire; Devauchelle, Olivier; Lajeunesse, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The bed of an alluvial river is made of the sediment it transports. Its shape and size are controlled mostly by bedload transport which, at first order, entrains sediment grains along the flow. Gravity also pulls the moving grains towards the center of the channel, thus eroding the banks continually (Parker 1978). However, laboratory observations show that, due to the bed roughness, the trajectory of a transported grain fluctuates in the transverse direction (Seizilles et al. 2014). The bedload layer is therefore a collection of random walkers which diffuse towards the less active areas of the bed. In a river at equilibrium, bedload diffusion counteracts gravity to maintain the banks. If an initially flat bed of sediment is perturbed with longitudinal streaks, the flow-induced shear stress is weaker where the flow is shallower. Therefore, we expect bedload diffusion to induce a flux of sediment towards the crests of the perturbation. This positive feedback induces an instability which can generate new channels. We suggest that this mechanism could explain the transition from a single-thread river to a braided one.

  14. Nonlinear Analysis of Bedload Transport Rate of Paroxysm Debris Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The evolution characteristics of bedload transport feature of paroxysm debris flow have been studied by means of both theory analysis and experimental data.The analysis based on the flume experiment data of a sand pile model as well as a large amount of field data of debris flow clearly shown that the statistical distribu- tion for the main variable of the sand pile made of non-uniform sand (according the sand pile experiment,φ≥2.55) conform to the negative power law,that means the non-uniform sand syste...

  15. Estimating bedload transport in a large sand-gravel bed river from direct sampling, dune tracking and empirical formulas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude, Nicolas; Rodrigues, Stéphane; Bustillo, Vincent; Bréhéret, Jean-Gabriel; Macaire, Jean-Jacques; Jugé, Philippe

    2012-12-01

    Three methods used to estimate river bedload discharges were compared in a large sand-gravel bed river. The unit and total bedload transport rates estimated by sediment sampling, dune tracking method and the equations of Van Rijn and Meyer-Peter and Müller were compared. The analysis was based on a large data set obtained from field surveys that combined sediment sampling, acoustic doppler profiler (ADP) measurements, and multibeam echosoundings of the middle reach of the River Loire (France) for contrasting flow conditions ranging from low flows to 2-year floods. For transport stages between 2 and 6 (i.e. between the annual mean discharge and the discharge for a 2-year flood), the tested equations predicted fairly well the unit and total bedload discharges and roughly estimated the temporal variability of the bedload during floods. For these transport conditions, the best agreement with the sediment sampling measurements was observed with the Van Rijn formula. For lower flow conditions, the tested formulas provide lower estimates than those sampled. To improve the accuracy of the equations for low flows, potential solutions include integrating near-bed turbulences and non uniformity of bed particles into the models. The ability of the formulas to predict the temporal variability of the bedload can be improved by using the bedform roughness to adjust the estimates. The bedload transport rates calculated with dune tracking method are lower than the fluxes sampled because a substantial fraction of the bedload does not participate to the dune migration. Finally, a first rating curve that was implemented for the River Loire estimates the annual bedload discharge for 2010 to be 480,000 t.

  16. Monitoring bedload entrainment and transport in snowmelt-dominated forest streams of the Columbia Mountains, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kim; Brardinoni, Francesco; Alila, Younes

    2014-05-01

    We monitor bedload transport and water discharge at six stations in two forested headwater streams of the Columbia Mountains, Canada. The monitoring network of sediment traps is designed to examine the effects of channel bed texture, and the influence of alluvial (i.e., step pools, and riffle pools) and semi-alluvial morphologies (i.e., boulder cascades and forced step pools) on bedload entrainment and transport. Results suggest that patterns of bedload entrainment are influenced by flow resistance while the value of the critical dimensionless shear stress for mobilization of the surface D50 varies due to channel gradient, grain sheltering effects and, to a less extent, flow resistance. Regardless of channel morphology we observe: (i) equal-threshold entrainment for all mobile grains in channels with high grain and/or form resistance; and (ii) initial equal-threshold entrainment of calibers ≤ 22mm, and subsequent size-selective entrainment of coarser material in channels with low form resistance (e.g. riffle pool). Scaled fractional analysis reveals that in reaches with high flow resistance most bedload transport occurs in partial mobility fashion relative to the available bed material and that only material finer than 16mm attains full mobility during over-bank flows. Equal mobility transport for a wider range of grain sizes is achieved in reaches with reduced flow resistance. Evaluation of bedload rating curves across sites identifies that grain effects predominate with respect to bedload flux whereas morphological effects (i.e. form resistance) play a secondary role. Application of selected empirical formulae developed in steep alpine channels present variable success in predicting transport rates in the study reaches.

  17. A new geophone device for understanding environmental impacts caused by gravel bedload during artificial floods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubaki, Ryota; Kawahara, Yoshihisa; Zhang, Xin-Hua; Tsuboshita, Kentaro

    2017-02-01

    To assess the contribution of gravel bedload on the removal of attached-algae and aquatic plants from a cobble-bed river during small floods, we propose a geophone type method for measuring the local bedload of non-uniform sized gravel. Due to limited peak discharge for focused events during our study, a large fraction of bed material (here cobbles) was immobile and only a small fraction of bed material (sand and gravel) was expected to be transported during the flushing flows we analyzed. The device we developed has a size equivalent to immobile bed material and a shape similar to bed material (rounded cobbles) at the site. The instrument's design allows avoidance of disturbances in river bed micro-topography during installation and local bedload transport during floods. A flume experiment was conducted in order to establish an empirical algorithm for estimating the diameter of impacted gravel, and uncertainty related to diameter estimation is discussed. The proposed method was utilized to quantify gravel bedload in a cobble-bed river during flushing flows. We also discuss the contribution of measured gravel bedload during flushing flows on the removal of attached-algae (up to a 37% reduction in chlorophyll-a density) and aquatic plants (a reduction of 38% in dry mass per area). Based on time variation for the measured gravel bedload, we also suggest the propagation of a bed-form composed of the fine sediment fraction migrating on immobile larger sediment and implications for the propagation of the fine sediment wave for attached-algae removal.

  18. Dense granular flow rheology in turbulent bedload transport

    CERN Document Server

    Maurin, Raphael; Frey, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The local granular rheology is investigated numerically in idealised turbulent bedload transport configurations. Using a coupled fluid-discrete element model, the stress tensor is computed as a function of the depth for a series of simulations varying the Shields number, the specific density and the particle diameter. The results are analyzed in the framework of the $\\mu(I)$ rheology and exhibit a collapse of both the shear to normal stress ratio and the solid volume fraction over a wide range of inertial numbers. The effect of the interstitial fluid on the granular rheology is shown to be negligible, supporting recent work suggesting the absence of a clear transition between the free-fall and the turbulent regime. In addition, the data collapse is observed up to unexpectedly high inertial numbers $I\\sim2$, challenging the existing conceptions and parametrization of the $\\mu(I)$ rheology. Focusing upon bedload transport modelling, the results are pragmatically analyzed in the $\\mu(I)$ framework in order to pr...

  19. Bed-Load Dispersion: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    However, the work of Phillips et al. (2013) suggested that the asymptotic limit of bed-load dispersion is super- dispersive. Fischer et al. (1979...Olinde and Johnson 2015, Phillips et al. 2013, Martin et al. 2012 and 2014). Campagnol et al. (2015) showed that if the particles are exhibiting...vertical dispersion. Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface 119(9): 1818–1832. Phillips , C. B., R. L. Martin, and D. J. Jerolmack. 2013

  20. Modification of the Engelund bed-load formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Meng; Danxun Li; Xingkui Wang

    2016-01-01

    The classic Engelund bed-load formula involves four oversimplified assumptions concerning the quantity of particles per unit bed area that can be potentially entrained into motion, the probability of sediment being entrained into motion at a given instant, the mean velocity of bed-load motion, and the dimen-sionless incipient shear stress. These four aspects are reexamined in the light of new findings in hydrodynamics, and a modified bed-load formula is then proposed. The modified formula shows promise as being reliable in predicting bed-load transport rates in a wide range of flow intensities.

  1. Bedload pulses in a hydropower affected alpine gravel bed river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigner, Johann; Kreisler, Andrea; Rindler, Rolf; Hauer, Christoph; Habersack, Helmut

    2017-08-01

    This study investigated the sediment resupply and transport dynamics at the Upper Drau River upstream of Lienz (Eastern Tyrol, Austria). Due to a hydropower plant, a 24 km long river reach of this alpine gravel bed river is under residual flow conditions, although sediment is still resupplied into the reach through many active torrents and tributaries. As a result, sediment deposition in the residual flow reach intensified, hence increasing maintenance efforts to stabilize this river section and ensure flood protection. In combination with a new sediment management program, a continuous bedload monitoring system was installed 2 km downstream of the residual reach in 2001 to support the development of adapted sediment management strategies. The surrogate bedload monitoring system consists of 16 impact plate geophones, installed over a 17 m wide cross section. The unprecedented 15-year dataset of high-resolution bedload intensity revealed a complex process of gravel storage and intermittent resupply from the residual reach, allowing the authors a detailed analysis of frequently occurring bedload pulses. These transport features are triggered by increased discharges during floods in the residual reach and created pronounced anticlockwise bedload hysteresis or, with a temporal shift to the event peak, caused distinct shifts in the bedload activity downstream. Bedload pulses produce very high bedload fluxes while in transit, tend to increase bedload flux in the post-event phase, and can alter and reduce the upstream sediment storage leading to a lowering of bedload availability for future pulses. The observed time lags between main discharge events and the arrival of the macro-pulses are correlated with mean water discharge during pulse propagation, thus enabling a prediction of the pulse arrival at the monitoring station solely based on the hydrograph. In combination with the hydrological setup of the reach, the observed bedload pulse time lags allowed an estimation of

  2. Vegetative impacts upon bedload transport capacity and channel stability for differing alluvial planforms in the Yellow River source zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi Wei; Yu, Guo An; Brierley, Gary; Wang, Zhao Yin

    2016-07-01

    The influence of vegetation upon bedload transport and channel morphodynamics is examined along a channel stability gradient ranging from meandering to anabranching to anabranching-braided to fully braided planform conditions along trunk and tributary reaches of the Upper Yellow River in western China. Although the regional geology and climate are relatively consistent across the study area, there is a distinct gradient in the presence and abundance of riparian vegetation for these reaches atop the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (elevations in the study area range from 2800 to 3400 m a.s.l.). To date, the influence of vegetative impacts upon channel planform and bedload transport capacity of alluvial reaches of the Upper Yellow River remains unclear because of a lack of hydrological and field data. In this region, the types and pattern of riparian vegetation vary with planform type as follows: trees exert the strongest influence in the anabranching reach, the meandering reach flows through meadow vegetation, the anabranching-braided reach has a grass, herb, and sparse shrub cover, and the braided reach has no riparian vegetation. A non-linear relation between vegetative cover on the valley floor and bedload transport capacity is evident, wherein bedload transport capacity is the highest for the anabranching reach, roughly followed by the anabranching-braided, braided, and meandering reaches. The relationship between the bedload transport capacity of a reach and sediment supply from upstream exerts a significant influence upon channel stability. Bedload transport capacity during the flood season (June-September) in the braided reach is much less than the rate of sediment supply, inducing bed aggradation and dynamic channel adjustments. Rates of channel adjustment are less pronounced for the anabranching-braided and anabranching reaches, while the meandering reach is relatively stable (i.e., this is a passive meandering reach).

  3. Pressure-based impact method to count bedload particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antico, Federica; Mendes, Luís; Aleixo, Rui; Ferreira, Rui M. L.

    2017-04-01

    Bedload transport processes determine morphological changes in fluvial, estuarine and coastal domains, thus impacting the diversity and quality of ecosystems and human activities such as river management, coastal protection or dam operation. In spite of the advancements made in the last 60 years, driven by the improvements in measurement techniques, research efforts on grain-scale mechanics of bedload are still required, especially to clarify the intermittent nature of bedload, its stochastic structure and its scale dependence. A new impact-based device to measure bedload transport - MiCas system - is presented in this work. It was designed to meet the following key requirements: simple data output composed of time instant and location of impacts; no need for post-processing - impacts determined through hardware and firmware; capable of computing simple statistics in real time such as cumulative particle counting and discrete lateral distribution of cumulative particle counts; able to run for very large time periods (days, weeks); ability to detect particle impacts of large size fractions that are separated by a few milliseconds; composed of robust and relatively cheap components. The system's firmware analyses pressure time series, namely recognizing the imprints of impacts of individual particles as they hit pressurized membranes. A pattern analysis algorithm is used to identify the impact events. The implementation of this principle in a dedicated microprocessor allows for the real-time measurements of particle hits and cumulative particle count. To validate the results obtained by the MiCas system, Experiments were carried out in the 12.5m long and 40.5cm wide glass-sided flume of the Laboratory of Hydraulics and Environment of Instituto Superior Técnico, Lisbon. This flume has two independent circuits for water and sediment recirculation. A cohesionless granular bed, composed of 4 layers of 5 mm glass beads, subjected to a steady-uniform turbulent open

  4. Experimental Study of Bedrock Incision Processes by Both Suspended Load and Bedload Abrasions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatanantavet, P.; Whipple, K. X.; Adams, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    , the new scaling relations for bedload saltation were found to fit all data well transitioning nicely from smooth bed to rough/alluvial beds as opposed to the traditional scaling formulas using grain size and bed shear stress in alluvial channels. Interaction between fluid flow and sediment in transport with evolving bed roughness combined with these new saltation trajectory scaling relations may explain key aspects of the divergence between our experimental results and existing theory.

  5. Flume-based calibration of different surrogate devices for bedload monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Luca; Escauriaza, Cristian; Gordo, Fernanda; Carrillo, Ricardo

    2014-05-01

    Bedload assessment is important for geomorphological, engineering, and ecological studies of gravel-bed rivers. Bedload is usually assessed using portable traps, which allows measuring instantaneous transport rates, but at a single point and at high costs and operational risks. Slot traps or other fixed devices allow measuring bedload rate for longer periods, but require expensive maintenance. The need of measuring continuously bedload intensity and dynamics has therefore increased the use and enhancement of surrogate methods, such as geophones, hydrophones, and acoustic sensors. However, converting the signals recorded by these instruments to actual bedload fluxes, direct bedload measurements are needed to obtain a calibration relationship. Even if some noticeable examples are available in literature, only few flume experiments have been undertaken to calibrate rate and grain size of transported sediments, and to explore rigorously the sensitivity and signal dampening effects of various surrogate devices. Here we present some preliminary results obtained from a set of flume experiments on which different devices have been used. We have tested a 1m-long Japanese acoustic pipe sensor, a 150×130×6 mm steel plate linked to an accelerometer and a count input data logger, and a hydrophone. Experiments were made in a 0.8m-wide flume, using 4 homogeneous (4, 8, 32, and 45 mm) sediment mixtures. These fractions were then combined in order to obtain 3 further heterogeneous mixtures. Experiments with different discharges and slopes were performed, allowing to observe a wide range of shear stresses and transport rates. All transported sediments were captured with traps, weighted, and then manually recirculated at the upstream end of the flume. Preliminary results show that devices have different sensitivity to lower grain size that could be detected, being the transport of 4 mm particles detected relatively well only by the impact plates. Intense transport of 8 mm particles

  6. Effect of upward seepage on bedload transport rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-xie LIU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an investigation of injection effects on the bedload transport rate. According to dimensional analysis, two dimensionless groups, an Einstein’s parameter group and a modified densimetric Froude number group, were chosen to examine how injection affects the bedload transport rate. Experimental studies were conducted in an open-channel flume with an upward seepage zone. The sediment particles used for the test were 0.9 mm in diameter. The experimental results show that an increase in the injection velocity causes a reduction in the shear velocity excess, which is defined as the difference between the shear and critical shear velocities, leading to a reduction in the bedload transport rate. The equation for predicting the bedload transport rate in the presence of upward seepage was derived empirically. The proposed prediction method is suitable for engineering practice, since it only requires the undisturbed flow condition, properties of sediment particles, and the injection velocity.

  7. Measurements and theory for transport layer structure in intense bed-load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccarollo, L.; Capart, H.

    2012-04-01

    We focus on sediment laden flows driven by turbulent open-channel flows where the bed surface is fully mobilized and nonetheless the thickness of the bedload layer is conveniently smaller than the flow depth. This regime presents dynamic and kinematic features which persist in the range of applied Shields stress between about 0.3 and 3. Below the lower limit the moving grains do not develop significant stresses compared to the applied ones; above the upper limit, debris-flow type frictional contacts develop in a non negligible portion of the bedload layer. We report laboratory experiments in which, using high-speed cameras and a laser light sheet, detailed profiles of granular velocity and concentration have been measured. We checked that the transversal bed profile is flat and that the sidewall measurements are representative of the interior domain. The profiles provide new information on transport layer structure and its relation to the applied Shields stress. Contrary to expectations, we find that intense bed-load layers respond to changes in flow conditions by adjusting their granular concentration at the base. Two mechanisms account for the resulting behavior: stresses generated by immersed granular collisions, and equilibration by density stratification. Without parameter adjustment, the deduced constitutive relations capture the responses of velocity, concentration, and layer thickness in the above reported ten-fold increase Shields-stress range. Away from this intermediate range, in both directions, we show how the flow features rapidly change and the theoretical inferences decay.

  8. INFLUENCE OF PIPE ANGLE ON BEDLOAD TRANSPORT IN AN INCLINED PIPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    David M. ADMIRAAL

    2003-01-01

    A number of reservoirs in Nebraska have been retrofitted with sediment bypass systems to extend their lifespan. The bypass systems are best suited for rerouting sediment that travels as bedload since bedload is relatively easy to capture at reservoir inlets. Because of their size, the captured sediment particles sometimes travel as bedload in the bypass system as well. Studies have been done to quantify head losses in horizontal pipes with different water and sediment flow rates, and the results have been used to assess the practicality of bypass systems for specific prototypes. However, much less has been done to evaluate the performance of inclined pipes for bypassing sediment. Furthermore, little has been done to understand how bedforms influence head losses in the pipes. In order to better understand the behavior of sediment transport within pipes, an experimental apparatus was constructed to simulate a range of sediment loading rates, water flow rates, and pipe inclination angles. Three pressure taps with a spacing of 1.5 m were installed in the pipe at a location sufficiently downstream from the inlet. One section of the pipe was replaced with an acrylic pipe of equivalent internal diameter so that bedform shapes and sizes could be measured for different flow conditions. For each flow condition, the pressure drop in the pipe and the sediment transport rate are recorded over time. For coarse sediment, the inclination angle ofthe pipe and the sediment transport rate both have a strong influence on flow properties, and, thus, head losses in the pipe.

  9. Bedrock incision by bedload: insights from direct numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, Guilhem; Langlois, Vincent J.; Allemand, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Bedload sediment transport is one of the main processes that contribute to bedrock incision in a river and is therefore one of the key control parameters in the evolution of mountainous landscapes. In recent years, many studies have addressed this issue through experimental setups, direct measurements in the field, or various analytical models. In this article, we present a new direct numerical approach: using the classical methods of discrete-element simulations applied to granular materials, we explicitly compute the trajectories of a number of pebbles entrained by a turbulent water stream over a rough solid surface. This method allows us to extract quantitatively the amount of energy that successive impacts of pebbles deliver to the bedrock, as a function of both the amount of sediment available and the Shields number. We show that we reproduce qualitatively the behaviour observed experimentally by Sklar and Dietrich (2001) and observe both a "tool effect" and a "cover effect". Converting the energy delivered to the bedrock into an average long-term incision rate of the river leads to predictions consistent with observations in the field. Finally, we reformulate the dependency of this incision rate with Shields number and sediment flux, and predict that the cover term should decay linearly at low sediment supply and exponentially at high sediment supply.

  10. Bedload transport rates in a gravel bedded-river derived from high-resolution monitoring using seismic impact plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Peter; Soar, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Accurate characterisation of bedload transport rates is critical for a better understanding of geomorphological process dynamics, aquatic habitats, sediment budgets and strategies for catchment-scale initiatives in sediment management under conditions of climate change. However, rate estimation is challenging in practice: direct measurements are costly and logistically difficult to achieve with acceptable accuracy over geomorphologically-relevant time periods, and the uncertainty in transport rates predicted from empirical formulae and numerical simulation is rarely below 50 per cent. Partly reflecting these issues, passive technologies for continuous bedload monitoring are becoming increasingly popular. Sensors such as seismic impact plates offer the opportunity to characterise bedload activity at exceptionally high resolution - monitoring from the River Avon, (Devon, UK) indicated that despite significant intra-event and between-plate differences in apparent bedload transport aggregated over 5-minute periods, the magnitude-frequency product of discharge and impact frequency result in a highly plausible effective discharge, supporting the potential value of impact plates as indicators of relative sediment transport loads over annual timescales. Whereas the focus in bedload rate estimation to date has been on developing satisfactory sediment rating curves from detection signals, we instead develop a method for directly estimating bedload transport rates from impact plate data as a function of intensity of transport (count, n, per second), bed material mass (kg) and cross-stream transport variability. Bulk sediment samples are converted to a mass in transit for each instantaneous discharge according to the intensity of transport and a Monte Carlo simulation of the load in transit determined at random from the bed material particle size distribution. The lower detection threshold is determined using experimental calibration and the upper size limit is determined from

  11. Bedload transport in an inlet channel during a tidal cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ernstsen, V. B.; Becker, M.; Winter, C.

    2007-01-01

    in the troughs of the large ebb-directed compound dunes during the flood tide than during the ebb tide, due to higher near-bed flow velocities in the troughs of the compound dunes during the flood tide as compared to the ebb tide, resulting from flow exposure, i.e. the trough-sheltering effect of the compound...... dunes being active during the ebb tide, but negligible during the flood tide. Bedload transport was also predicted using five classical and widely used formulae. These predictors were all unable to depict the temporal variation in bedload transport during the tidal cycle. It is suggested that temporal...

  12. Investigation into Improving Predictions of Channel Morphology: Scale Invariance Conditions of the One-Dimension Non-Equilibrium Bedload Transport Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, K. J.; Ercan, A.; Kavvas, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    While bedload is commonly accepted as contributing only 5 to 10% of the total sediment load in a stream, it is pivotal in describing channel morphology. Because bedload (rolling, sliding and saltating particles) often dominates bed-material load (the portion of the sediment load that interacts with the bed) accurate representations of bedload are central to understanding and predicting changes in channel shape and direction. Channel morphology can be effected by a variety of anthropogenic factors, some of which are acute and planned (hydraulic structures, diversions, restoration efforts). Physical scale modeling of proposed changes could serve to predict morphological consequences, and could compliment numerical modeling of the same, if scale errors are reduced. It is proposed that scale errors could be reduced through identification of the conditions under which non-equilibrium bedload sediment transport is self-similar and scale invariant. These conditions are investigated through application of the one-parameter Lie group of point scaling transformations to the one-dimensional non-equilibrium bedload transport process. Self-similarity conditions imposed due to initial and boundary conditions are also examined. The proposed scaling approach identifies the self-similarity conditions due to the initial and boundary conditions of the corresponding initial and boundary value problem, along with those due to the governing equations, thus expanding scaling of transport to unsteady non-equilibrium conditions.

  13. Preliminary Results on Sediment Sorting Under Intense Bedload Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez Moreira, R. R.; Vautin, D.; Mathews, S. L.; Kuprenas, R.; Viparelli, E.

    2014-12-01

    Previous experiments show that parallel-laminated deposits are emplaced under upper plane bed regime by the migration of small-amplitude, long-wavelength bedforms. The present research focuses on how sediment is sorted under upper plane bed and sheet flow transport regimes, and whether parallel-lamination is inhibited during sheet flow transport. The problem of studying the sorting of sediment under so intense transport conditions is plagued by the uncertainties related to flow resistances and bedload transport rates. We simplify the problem by first running the experiments with uniform sediment, to establish a baseline that will aid in the design of the experiments with poorly sorted material. We are running experiments at the Hydraulics Laboratory of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, in a unidirectional sediment-feed flume, 9 meters long by 0.2 meters wide, of which 7 meters are used as test section. During the experiments, water surface and bed elevations are periodically measured to characterize the global parameters of the flow, e.g. mean flow velocity and bed shear stress. When the flow and the sediment transport reach conditions of mobile bed equilibrium, bed elevation fluctuations are measured with ultrasonic transducer systems at six fixed locations. Channel bed aggradation is then induced by slowly raising the tail gate of the flume such that there is no change in transport regime, as confirmed by additional measurements of water surface and bed elevation and bed elevation fluctuations. Preliminary observations under upper plane bed regime show the formation of the small-amplitude and long-wavelength bedforms, as well as hints of parallel lamination in the deposits. In the near future we aim to achieve sheet flow transport conditions with both uniform and non-uniform grain size distributions to look at the internal structure of the emplaced deposit.

  14. Bedload and river hydraulics - Inferences from the East Fork River, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Emmett, William W.

    1997-01-01

    During 1973-79, bedload data were collected in a sophisticated trap on a river of moderate size, the East Fork. The transport rate was measured most days through a full snowmelt season, and the rate was determined separately for eight zones across the channel width. The quantitative data are unique and unlikely to be repeated. Nor need they be, because as a result of this effort a practical bedload sampler was adequately tested against full river measurement.It was shown that bedload moves sporadically and randomly on the river bed. Therefore, transport rate is highly variable in short periods of time. There is also a wide variance from day to day. Yet, different rivers have transport rates, which are functions of discharge, depth, and sediment size, that are clearly distinct. Comparison of computed and measured transport rates indicates that a major problem remains: What grain size is representative of the bedload when there is a wide or heterogeneous particle-size distribution? Size of the bedload in motion may be very different from the size of bed material obtained from samples of the streambed.For general computation, the river channel slope may be averaged, and it may be assumed that water-surface slope does not change materially with changing discharge. Indeed, this generality is correct, in that, compared with depth, velocity, and width, slope is conservative at-a-station. However, in more detail, slope changes importantly with discharge in short reaches of channel, and those changes are very different in pool and riffle.These local changes in slope are not merely an aspect of a detailed longitudinal profile but involve cross-channel as well as down-channel components. The pool and riffle sequence involves not only undulation of bed elevation and bar formation on alternate sides of the channel, but alternation of the zone of superovulation of the water surface, and changing relation of watersurface slope to discharge. These details can be seen only in the

  15. 18,000 displacement vectors and 44 positions surveys of RFID tracers show a normal diffusion of the bedload in a proglacial stream (Bossons glacier, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillon, Hervé; Mugnier, Jean-Louis; Buoncristiani, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    Bedload transport is a stochastic process during which each particle hops for a random length then rests for a random duration. In recent years, this probabilistic approach was investigated by theoretical models, numerical simulations and laboratory experiments. These experiments are generally carried out on short time scales with sand, but underline the diffusive behaviour of the bedload. Conversely, marked pebbles in natural streams have mainly be used to infer about transport processes and transport time of the bedload. In this study, the stochastic characteristics of bedload transport are inferred from the radio-frequency identification (RFID) of pebbles. In particular, we provide insights for answering the following question : is the bedload transport sub-diffusive, normally diffusive or super-diffusive at the long time scale (i.e. global range)? Experiments designed to investigate the phenomenology of bedload transport have been carried out in the proglacial area of Bossons glacier. This 350 m long alluvial plain exhibits daily flood from the glacial system and is still redistributing material from catastrophic events pre-dating our investigations. From 2011 to 2014, the position of the ˜ 1000 RFID tracers have been measured by a mobile antenna and a differential GPS during 44 surveys providing ˜ 2500 tracer positions. Additionnaly, in 2014, 650 new tracers were seeded upstream from a static RFID antenna located at the outlet of the study area. For the 1 to 32 cm fraction surveyed, both mobile and static antenna results show no evidence for a significant export outside of the surveyed zone. Initial data have been maximized by using each possible campaign pairs leading to ˜700 campaign pairs and more than 18,000 displacement vectors. To our knowledge, this is one of the most extensive dataset of tracers positions measured in a natural stream using the RFID methodology. Using 152 campaigns pairs with at least 20 retrieved tracers,r standard probability

  16. Wavelike movement of bedload sediment, East Fork River, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Bedload is moved down the East Fork River in distinct wavelike pulses that have the form of composite dune fields The moving material consists mostly of coarse sand and fine gravel The wavelengths of the pulses are about 500-600 m, a distance that is predetermined by the pattern of stoage of bed sediment in the river during low water As the river discharge increases, the bed sediment is scoured from the storage areas, and it is moved onto and across the interventing riffles As the river discharge decreases, the bed sediment is scoured off the riffles and moved into the next storage area downstream Each successive pulse of water discharge sets into motion a wave of bedload that continues to move unitil it reaches the next storage area ?? 1985 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  17. Quantifying the coevolution of bedload transport rates and bed topography in mountain rivers: a field experiment in Reynolds Creek, ID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olinde, L.; Johnson, J.; Pierson, F. B.

    2010-12-01

    Bedload transport rates in upland rivers remain difficult to predict, even to within an order of magnitude. We are conducting a field experiment by modifying the morphology of a mountain river channel and monitoring its response to better understand the evolution of bed topography and, ultimately, to improve bedload transport rate predictions. The field site is upper Reynolds Creek, a perennial gravel-cobble stream in the northern Owyhee Mountains, Idaho, within the USDA-ARS Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed. Discharge is dominated by predictable snowmelt runoff and rain-on-snow events , and is well constrained by a 40-year record of discharge and suspended sediment transport rates collected at a gauging station immediately downstream of our study reach. The Reynolds Creek experiment consists of perturbing a 100m reach by straightening, steepening, and smoothing the channel using construction equipment. Quantifying bedload transport rates and changes in bed topography and reach morphology over several years following the perturbation will provide temporal constraints on system dynamics and feedbacks between transport and bed topography. To date, we have collected field data to document reach conditions prior to the channel manipulation, including ground based LiDAR, detailed 10cm bed topography surveys, and grain size distribution analyzes. We have also installed a series of time-lapse cameras throughout this reach to relate stage-discharge conditions to channel width and channel response to precipitation. We will quantify bed roughness changes throughout the experiment over varied length scales with ground-based high resolution LiDAR and detailed survey data. Deployed Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tagged particles and receiving antennas established along several cross sections will record changes in bedload transport rates. We hypothesize that subsequent runoff events will rework the smoothed bed topography into a rougher topography due to the

  18. ASSESSMENT OF BED-LOAD PREDICTORS BASED ON SAMPLING IN A GRAVEL BED RIVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HADDADCHI Arman; OMID Mohammad H.; DEHGHANI Amir A.

    2012-01-01

    Bedload transport in alluvial channels has been extensively studied and different equations based on field and/or experimental data have been proposed.Prediction of bed-load transport rate using different equations results in wide ranges which are not always reliable.In this study,some of the universal bedload predictors were evaluated with measured load by a Helley-Smith sampler in the Node River,a gravel bed fiver in the northeast part of Iran.From 19 sets of data,14 series of data were used to evaluate the bed-load transport equations.The results show that the equations presented by Van Rijn,Meyer-Peter and Mueller,and Ackers and White may adequately predict bedload transport in the range of field data.

  19. A Bigraph Relational Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beauquier, Maxime; Schürmann, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a model based on relations for bigraphical reactive system [Milner09]. Its defining characteristics are that validity and reaction relations are captured as traces in a multi-set rewriting system. The relational model is derived from Milner's graphical definition...

  20. Bedload monitoring under conditions of ultra-high suspended sediment concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liébault, F.; Jantzi, H.; Klotz, S.; Laronne, J. B.; Recking, A.

    2016-09-01

    The bedload response of the Moulin Ravine, a small alluvial system draining a very active Mediterranean badlands landscape entrenched into Jurassic black marls of the Southern French Prealps, has been investigated using an automatic Reid bedload slot sampler. This site is known for its exceptional sediment transport conditions thanks to a long-term monitoring program that started in the late 1980s, revealing a mean annual bedload yield of 2810 t km-2 yr-1, and suspended sediment concentrations (SSCs) during flow events commonly reaching 100 g L-1. With the deployment of the slot sampler, it has been possible to record instantaneous bedload fluxes during 10 s time increments and to investigate bedload response under flow conditions with ultra-high SSCs. Bedload records cover 4 flashy summer flow events induced by heavy convective storms including a 20-yr return period event. Due to the very high SSC conditions these events challenge bedload monitoring. Even if slot sampling has been recognized as insensitive to fine sediments (silts and clays), it has never been tested in such exceptional muddy flow conditions. The bedload slot sampler performed well in such conditions. A flow-invariant proportion of fines (∼15-20%) was captured in the slot sampler during flows. This proportion is equivalent to its content in the active bedload layer during summer flows, suggesting that fines enter the slot embedded with coarse particles. Instantaneous bedload fluxes recorded in the Moulin are amongst the highest hitherto reported values worldwide, providing evidence of the exceptional sediment transport conditions of marly alpine badlands. The dimensionless entrainment threshold is one order of magnitude higher than commonly reported for gravel-bed rivers, likely reflecting the cohesion effect of fines intruded in the channel surface and subsurface.

  1. Particle tracking via RFID technology to monitor bedload sediment dynamics in mountain streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Matteo; Fraccarollo, Luigi; Corbo, Simona; Maggioni, Alberto; Brardinoni, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    In this contribution we present preliminary results on the monitoring of bedload entrainment and transport in two mountain streams, the Grigno Creek (90 km2) and its tributary, the Tolvà Creek (14 km2), located in Valsugana, Autonomous Province of Trento. In particular, we monitor bedload by means of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology in conjunction with Passive Integrated Transponders (PIT) (e.g., Lamarre et al., 2005) injected into pebble-to-cobble sized tracer stones (b-axis ranging from 30 to 130 mm). In the Grigno Creek 120 PITs were released in December 2013 along a 100-m channel reach and have been surveyed 10 times. In the Tolvà Creek 100 PITs were released in July 2013 along a 100-m channel reach, and the site has been surveyed 4 times. Particle tracking is conducted by integrating two complementary antenna types: (i) a portable one, which enables to estimate travel distances of tagged clasts; and (ii) a set of four fixed antennas (25m apart from each other), which allows detecting motion/rest periods of particles, entrainment thresholds and transport velocities. Particle tracking is combined with on-site high-frequency (i.e., 10 minutes) water stage monitoring. Salt dilution method is monthly applied to relate flow discharge to water stage. The analyzed river reaches extend over different morphologic units (steps, pools, glides and boulder-cascades). We are looking to estimate (i) the channel forming discharge; (ii) a quantitative evaluation of specific bedload transport. These information will be associated to the surficial bed texture and bed morphology. Data collected from fixed and mobile antennas will enable to infer statistical information of the trajectories run by tracer ensemble, in particular the step lengths, the total travel distances and the rest periods. Lamarre H., MacVicar B., Roy A.G. 2005 Using Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags to investigate sediment transport in gravel-bed rivers. Journal of Sedimentary Research

  2. Influence of bed material size heterogeneity on bedload transport uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Stone, Mark C.

    2008-01-01

    The bed material grain size distribution of gravel bed streams is often spatially heterogeneous. The heterogeneity is actually a random parameter, even for a "well-mixed mixture," which potentially causes the transport rate for a given bed material to become an uncertain variable. The cause of bed material heterogeneity is the nonuniformity of the bed material, which is analyzed in this paper using examples from field observations and experimental data. The Monte Carlo simulation method is applied to study the uncertainty of the bedload transport rate using Wilcock's experimental data (P. R. Wilcock et al., 2001; P. R. Wilcock and J. C. Crowe, 2003). Each realization of the Monte Carlo simulation employed a randomly generated grain size distribution field for the entire simulation domain. With sufficient realizations the simulation results were adequate to show that the transport rates were a random variable and the mean transport rates did not fall on a single-valued curve when the local heterogeneity was taken into account. The results indicate that the bedload transport rate of nonuniform sediment has an intrinsic uncertainty that can result solely from the bed material. The results also partially account for the scatter of the fractional transport rate within Wilcock's experimental data. This study presents an important concept in understanding the uncertainty associated with estimates of sediment transport.

  3. Statistics of bedload transport over steep slopes: Separation of time scales and collective motion

    CERN Document Server

    Heyman, J; Ma, H B; Ancey, C

    2016-01-01

    Steep slope streams show large fluctuations of sediment discharge across several time scales. These fluctuations may be inherent to the internal dynamics of the sediment transport process. A probabilistic framework thus seems appropriate to analyze such a process. In this letter, we present an experimental study of bedload transport over a steep slope flume for small to moderate Shields numbers. The sampling technique allows the acquisition of high-resolution time series of the solid discharge. The resolved time scales range from $10^{-2}$s up to $10^{5}$s. We show that two distinct time scales can be observed in the probability density function for the waiting time between moving particles. We make the point that the separation of time scales is related to collective dynamics. Proper statistics of a Markov process including collective entrainment are derived. The separation of time scales is recovered theoretically for low entrainment rates.

  4. Thermochronology of the modern Indus River bedload: New insight into the controls on the marine stratigraphic record

    OpenAIRE

    P. D. Clift; Campbell, I. H.; Pringle, M.S.; Carter, A; Zhang, X.; Hodges, K.V.; Khan, A A; Allen, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The Indus River is the only major drainage in the western Himalaya and delivers a long geological record of continental erosion to the Arabian Sea, which may be deciphered and used to reconstruct orogenic growth if the modern bedload can be related to the mountains. In this study we collected thermochronologic data from river sediment collected near the modern delta. U-Pb ages of zircons spanning 3 Gyr show that only ∼5% of the eroding crust has been generated since India-Asia collision. The ...

  5. Bedload entrainment in low-gradient paraglacial coastal rivers of Maine, U.S.A.: Implications for habitat restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Noah P.; Castele, Michael R.; Wright, Jed R.

    2009-02-01

    The rivers of coastal Maine flow through mainstem lakes and long low-gradient reaches that break the continuum of bedload transport expected in nonparaglacial landscapes. Stream erosion of glacial deposits supplies coarse sediment to these systems. The land use history includes intensive timber harvest and associated dam construction, which may have altered the frequency of substrate-mobilizing events. These watersheds are vital habitat for the last remaining wild anadromous Atlantic salmon in the United States. Future adjustments in channel morphology and habitat quality (via natural stream processes or restoration projects) depend on erosion, transport, and deposition of coarse sediment. These factors motivate our study of competence at four sites in the Sheepscot and Narraguagus watersheds. Three of the four sites behaved roughly similarly, with particle entrainment during intervals that include winter ice and spring flood conditions, and relatively minor bed mobilization during moderate floods in the summer and fall (with a recurrence interval of 2-3 years). The fourth site, on the Sheepscot River mainstem, exhibits more vigorous entrainment of marked particles and more complex three-dimensional channel morphology. This contrast is partially due to local geomorphic conditions that favor high shear stresses (particularly relatively steep gradient), but also likely to nourishment of the bedload saltation system by recruitment from an eroding glacial deposit upstream. Our results suggest that the frequency and magnitude of bedload transport are reach specific, depending on factors including local channel geometry, upstream sediment supply and transport, and formation of anchor ice. This presents a challenge for stream practitioners in this region: different reaches may require contrasting management strategies. Our results underscore the importance of understanding channel processes at a given site and assessing conditions upstream and downstream as a prerequisite

  6. Bed disturbance via foraging fish increases bedload transport during subsequent high flows and is controlled by fish size and species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pledger, A. G.; Rice, S. P.; Millett, J.

    2016-01-01

    Benthic foraging by fish can modify the nature and rates of fine sediment accrual and the structure and topography of coarse-grained fluvial substrates, with the potential to alter bed material characteristics, particle entrainment thresholds, and bedload transport fluxes. However, knowledge of what controls the nature, extent, and intensity of benthic foraging and the consequent influence of these controls on geomorphic impact remain rudimentary. An ex-situ experiment utilising Barbel Barbus barbus and Chub Leuciscus cephalus extended previous work by considering the role of fish size and species as controls of sediment disturbance by foraging and the implications for bed material characteristics and bedload transport. In a laboratory flume, changes in bed microtopography and structure were measured when a water-worked bed of 5.6-22.6 mm gravels was exposed to four size classes of Barbel (4-5″, 5-6″, 6-8″, 8-10″ in length) and a single size class of Chub (8-10″). In line with other studies that have investigated animal size as a control of zoogeomorphic agency, increasing the size of Barbel had a significant effect on measured disturbance and transport metrics. Specifically, the area of disturbed substrate, foraging depth, and the fish's impact on microtopographic roughness and imbrication all increased as a function of fish size. In a comparison of the foraging effects of like-sized Barbel and Chub, 8-10″ in length, Barbel foraged a larger area of the test bed and had a greater impact on microtopographic roughness and sediment structure. Relative to water-worked beds that were not foraged, bed conditioning by both species was associated with increased bedload transport during the subsequent application of high flows. However, the bedload flux after foraging by Barbel, which is a specialist benthivore, was 150% higher than that following foraging by Chub, which feed opportunistically from the bed, and the total transported mass of sediment was 98

  7. Flume and field-based calibration of surrogate sensors for monitoring bedload transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, L.; Carrillo, R.; Escauriaza, C.; Iroume, A.

    2016-01-01

    Bedload transport assessment is important for geomorphological, engineering, and ecological studies of gravel-bed rivers. Bedload can be monitored at experimental stations that require expensive maintenance or by using portable traps, which allows measuring instantaneous transport rates but at a single point and at high costs and operational risks. The need for continuously measuring bedload intensity and dynamics has therefore increased the use and enhancement of surrogate methods. This paper reports on a set of flume experiments in which a Japanese acoustic pipe and an impact plate have been tested using four well-sorted and three poorly sorted sediment mixtures. Additional data were collected in a glacierized high-gradient Andean stream (Estero Morales) using a portable Bunte-type bedload sampler. Results show that the data provided by the acoustic pipe (which is amplified on 6 channels having different gains) can be calibrated for the grain size and for the intensity of transported sediments coarser than 9 mm (R2 = 0.93 and 0.88, respectively). Even if the flume-based calibration is very robust, upscaling the calibration to field applications is more challenging, and the bedload intensity could be predicted better than the grain size of transported sediments (R2 = 0.61 and 0.43, respectively). The inexpensive impact plate equipped with accelerometer could be calibrated for bedload intensity quite well in the flume but only poorly in the field (R2 = 0.16) and could not provide information on the size of transported sediments.

  8. Modelling dense relational data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard;

    2012-01-01

    Relational modelling classically consider sparse and discrete data. Measures of influence computed pairwise between temporal sources naturally give rise to dense continuous-valued matrices, for instance p-values from Granger causality. Due to asymmetry or lack of positive definiteness they are no......Relational modelling classically consider sparse and discrete data. Measures of influence computed pairwise between temporal sources naturally give rise to dense continuous-valued matrices, for instance p-values from Granger causality. Due to asymmetry or lack of positive definiteness...... they are not naturally suited for kernel K-means. We propose a generative Bayesian model for dense matrices which generalize kernel K-means to consider off-diagonal interactions in matrices of interactions, and demonstrate its ability to detect structure on both artificial data and two real data sets....

  9. Coupling fine particle and bedload transport in gravel-bedded streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungsu; Hunt, James R.

    2017-09-01

    Fine particles in the silt- and clay-size range are important determinants of surface water quality. Since fine particle loading rates are not unique functions of stream discharge this limits the utility of the available models for water quality assessment. Data from 38 minimally developed watersheds within the United States Geological Survey stream gauging network in California, USA reveal three lines of evidence that fine particle release is coupled with bedload transport. First, there is a transition in fine particle loading rate as a function of discharge for gravel-bedded sediments that does not appear when the sediment bed is composed of sand, cobbles, boulders, or bedrock. Second, the discharge at the transition in the loading rate is correlated with the initiation of gravel mobilization. Third, high frequency particle concentration and discharge data are dominated by clockwise hysteresis where rising limb discharges generally have higher concentrations than falling limb discharges. These three observations across multiple watersheds lead to a conceptual model that fine particles accumulate within the sediment bed at discharges less than the transition and then the gravel bed fluidizes with fine particle release at discharges above the transition discharge. While these observations were individually recognized in the literature, this analysis provides a consistent conceptual model based on the coupling of fine particle dynamics with filtration at low discharges and gravel bed fluidization at higher discharges.

  10. Evaluation of High-Temporal-Resolution Bedload Sensors for Tracking Channel Bed Movement and Transport Thresholds in Forested Mountain Headwater Catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S.; Conklin, M. H.; Bales, R. C.

    2014-12-01

    High temporal resolution data is required to take channel bed movement data beyond time integrated changes between measurements where many of the subtleties of bedload movement patterns are often missed. This study used continuous bedload scour sensors (flexible, fluid-filled pans connected to a pressure transducer) to collect high temporal resolution, long term bedload movement data for 4 high elevation (1500-1800 m) Sierra Nevada headwater streams draining 1 km2 catchments and to investigate the physical channel characteristics under which they perform best. Data collected by the scour sensors were used to investigate the disturbance and recovery patterns of these streams, to relate the observed patterns to channel bed stability, and to evaluate whether the channel bed is acting as a sediment source, sink, or storage across various temporal scales. Finally, attempts are made to identify discharge thresholds for bed movement from scour sensor and discharge data and to compare these threshold values to observed changes in the channel bed. Bedload scour data, turbidity data, and stream discharge data were collected at 15 minute intervals for (WY 2011 to WY 2014), including both above average (2011) and below average (2012, 2013, 2014) water years. Bedload scour sensors were found to have a relatively high (60%) failure rate in these systems. In addition, they required in situ calibrations as the factory and laboratory calibrations did not translate well to the field deployments. Data from the working sensors, showed patterns of abrupt channel bed disturbance (scour and/or fill) on an hour to day temporal scale followed by gradual recovery on a day to month scale back to a stable equilibrium bed surface elevation. These observed patterns suggest the bed acts as a short term source or sink for sediment, but is roughly sediment neutral over longer time periods implying the changes in bed elevation are reflective of fluctuations in storage rather than a true source or

  11. ON THE PHYSICS OF FLOW-DRIVEN SEDIMENTS (BED-LOAD)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ulrich C. E. ZANKE

    2001-01-01

    More than three dozen significant formulae for bed-load transport have been developed over a period of more than 100 years with varying degrees of success. Major problems have been the use of completely or partly empirical approaches and too few data for fitting. This paper presents an analytical formulation for bed-load transport. It is based on a balance of forces for the determination of the thickness of the moving bed-load layer and on the determination of the velocity of this layer. The formula derived is compared to a set of approx. 2000 data published by 32 authors. It is demonstrated that the basic form of the MPM-formula is a special case of the analytical solution. The derivation also includes the effect of bed features such as ripples and dunes on quantitative transport.

  12. BED-LOAD TRANSPORT IN THE SOUTH CHANNEL OF THE CHANGJIANG ESTUARY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cailan GONG; Caixing YUN; Jianjun JIN

    2002-01-01

    The bed-load movement and the evolution of the Changjiang (Yangtze) Estuary are studied by using the geographic information system and the remote sensing image processing software Analysis on the erosion and siltation of the river mouth is performed for the period 1988-2000. The possible location and thickness of the future deposition areas in the estuarine channels are predicted.

  13. Bedload transport monitoring with acoustic sensors in the Swiss Albula mountain river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickenmann, Dieter; Antoniazza, Gilles; Wyss, Carlos R.; Fritschi, Bruno; Boss, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Bedload transport measurements with acoustic sensors were obtained during summer 2015 in the Albula River in Switzerland. An impact plate measuring system was used with geophone and accelerometer sensors. This system provides indirect estimations of bedload transport in water courses. In April 2015, 30 impact sensors were installed in a new permanent measuring station to monitor continuously bedload transport in a mountain river with a large annual rate of sediment transport (around 90 000 m3 yr-1). Records of the first year of measurement showed that (i) the signal response in terms of geophone and accelerometer impulses is comparable for both types of sensors; (ii) there is a good correlation between discharge data and impulses recorded by both types of sensors; (iii) the critical discharge at the start of bedload transport is around 5 m3 s-1; (iv) a mean calibration factor for the geophone impulses can be estimated which is in a similar range as values determined from other sites with field calibration measurements.

  14. Low-pass filtered continuum streambed and bedload sediment mass balance laws for an alluvial, gravel-bed stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeTemple, B.; Wilcock, P.

    2011-12-01

    In an alluvial, gravel-bed stream governed by a plane-bed bedload transport regime, the physicochemical properties, size distribution, and granular architecture of the sediment grains that constitute the streambed surface influence many hydrodynamic, geomorphic, chemical, and ecological processes. Consequently, the abilities to accurately characterize the morphology and model the morphodynamics of the streambed surface and its interaction with the bedload above and subsurface below are necessary for a more complete understanding of how sediment, flow, organisms, and biogeochemistry interact. We report on our progress in the bottom-up development of low-pass filtered continuum streambed and bedload sediment mass balance laws for an alluvial, gravel-bed stream. These balance laws are assembled in a four stage process. First, the stream sediment-water system is conceptually abstracted as a nested, multi-phase, multi-species, structured continuum. Second, the granular surface of an aggregate of sediment grains is mathematically defined. Third, an integral approach to mass balance, founded in the continuum theory of multiphase flow, is used to formulate primordial, differential, instantaneous, local, continuum, mass balance laws applicable at any material point within a gravel-bed stream. Fourth, area averaging and time-after-area averaging, employing planform, low-pass filtering expressed as correlation or convolution integrals and based on the spatial and temporal filtering techniques found in the fields of multiphase flow, porous media flow, and large eddy simulation of turbulent fluid flow, are applied to smooth the primordial equations while maximizing stratigraphic resolution and preserving the definitions of relevant morphodynamic surfaces. Our approach unifies, corrects, contextualizes, and generalizes prior efforts at developing stream sediment continuity equations, including the top-down derivations of the surface layer (or "active layer") approach of Hirano

  15. On the determination of net bedload transport patters in a natural tidal inlet system (Knudedyb in the Danish Wadden Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernstsen, V. B.; Lefebvre, A.; Bartholdy, J.; Bartholomä, A.; Winter, C.

    2012-04-01

    An airborne swath topography survey using a LIDAR (Laser Induced Detection And Ranging or Light Detection And Ranging) system and a ship borne swath bathymetry survey using a multibeam echosounder (MBES) system were carried out within a 100 km2 quadratic section of the natural tidal inlet system Knudedyb in the Danish Wadden Sea. On the basis of the LIDAR data a detailed (0.5 m grid cell size) digital elevation model (DEM) of the dry-lying areas around low water (with the intertidal flats being of primary concern) was generated; whereas the MBES data were used to generate a detailed (also 0.5 m grid cell size) DEM of the tidal inlet main channel. The spatial distribution and characteristics of bedforms in a coastal system potentially yield information on the net bedload transport patterns in the system. The sandy main channel and intertidal flats of the Knudedyb tidal inlet are covered by bedforms. Bedform characterisation using a random field statistical approach (2D spectral analysis, cf. Lefebvre et al. 2011) as well as a discrete approach, in which the geometric variables of individual bedforms are determined (cf. Ernstsen et al. 2010), will be applied to the high-resolution DEMs. Based on these analyses net bedload transport patterns in the Knudedyb tidal inlet system will be determined. The findings will be used to investigate a potential exchange of sand between the main tidal channel and the adjacent intertidal flats. Acknowledgements This work is funded by the Danish Council for Independent Research | Natural Sciences (grant 10-081102) and the German Research Foundation DFG-Research Center / Excellence Cluster "The Ocean in the Earth System".

  16. Rainfall intensity–duration thresholds for bedload transport initiation in small Alpine watersheds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Badoux

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Although channel discharge represents one of the primary controls of bedload transport rates in mountain streams, it is rarely measured in small, steep catchments. Thus, it is often impossible to use it as a predictor of hazardous bedload events. In this study, the characteristics of rainfall events leading to bedload transport were investigated in five small Alpine catchments located in different geographical and morphological regions of Switzerland, Italy and France. Using rainfall data at high temporal resolution, a total of 370 rainfall events were identified that led to abundant sediment transport in the different catchments, and corresponding threshold lines were defined using a power law in intensity–duration space. Even though considerable differences in the distribution of the rainfall data were identified between catchments located in various regions, the determined threshold lines show rather similar characteristics.

    Such threshold lines indicate critical conditions for bedload transport initiation, but rainfall events that do not cause transport activity (so called no-bedload events can still plot above them. With 0.67 overall in the Erlenbach (Swiss Prealps and 0.90 for long-duration, low-intensity rainfall, the false alarm rate is considerable. However, for short-duration, high-intensity events, it is substantially smaller (0.33 and comparable to values determined in previous studies on the triggering of Alpine debris flows. Our results support the applicability of a traditional, generalized threshold for prediction or warning purposes during high-intensity rainfall. Such (often convective rainfall events are unfortunately (i difficult to measure, even by dense rain gauge networks, and (ii difficult to accurately predict, both due to their small spatial and temporal scales. Still, for the protection of human life (e.g. along transportation infrastructure such as roads and railway automated alerts based on power law

  17. Bedload transport in two creeks at the ice-free area of the Baranowski Glacier, King George Island, West Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sziło Joanna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a unique case study and methodology for measurements of the bedload transport in the two, newly created troughs at the forefield of the Baranowski Glacier: Fosa and Siodło creeks. The weather conditions and the granulometric analysis are presented and discussed briefly. Rating curves for the Fosa and Siodło creeks are presented for the first time for this region. Changes of the bedload transport as well as water discharge and water velocity at both creeks are investigated. The hysteresis for the relationships between rate of bedload transport and water discharges were identified showing that for both creeks for the higher water levels a figure of eight loop may be easily recognized. Moreover, a new method for the calculation of bedload transport rate, based on the weighted arithmetic mean instead of the arithmetic mean, is proposed.

  18. Relative survival multistate Markov model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huszti, Ella; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Alioum, Ahmadou; Binquet, Christine; Quantin, Catherine

    2012-02-10

    Prognostic studies often have to deal with two important challenges: (i) separating effects of predictions on different 'competing' events and (ii) uncertainty about cause of death. Multistate Markov models permit multivariable analyses of competing risks of, for example, mortality versus disease recurrence. On the other hand, relative survival methods help estimate disease-specific mortality risks even in the absence of data on causes of death. In this paper, we propose a new Markov relative survival (MRS) model that attempts to combine these two methodologies. Our MRS model extends the existing multistate Markov piecewise constant intensities model to relative survival modeling. The intensity of transitions leading to death in the MRS model is modeled as the sum of an estimable excess hazard of mortality from the disease of interest and an 'offset' defined as the expected hazard of all-cause 'natural' mortality obtained from relevant life-tables. We evaluate the new MRS model through simulations, with a design based on registry-based prognostic studies of colon cancer. Simulation results show almost unbiased estimates of prognostic factor effects for the MRS model. We also applied the new MRS model to reassess the role of prognostic factors for mortality in a study of colorectal cancer. The MRS model considerably reduces the bias observed with the conventional Markov model that does not permit accounting for unknown causes of death, especially if the 'true' effects of a prognostic factor on the two types of mortality differ substantially.

  19. Analysis of an ordinary bedload transport event in a mountain torrent (Rio Vanti, Verona, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastorello, Roberta; D'Agostino, Vincenzo

    2016-04-01

    The correct simulation of the sediment-transport response of mountain torrents both for extreme and ordinary flood events is a fundamental step to understand the process, but also to drive proper decisions on the protection works. The objective of this research contribution is to reconstruct the 'ordinary' flood event with the associated sediment-graph of a flood that caused on the 14th of October, 2014 the formation of a little debris cone (about 200-210 m3) at the junction between the 'Rio Vanti' torrent catchment and the 'Selva di Progno' torrent (Veneto Region, Prealps, Verona, Italy). To this purpose, it is important to notice that a great part of equations developed for the computation of the bedload transport capacity, like for example that of Schoklitsch (1962) or Smart and Jaeggi (1983), are focused on extraordinary events heavily affecting the river-bed armour. These formulas do not provide reliable results if used on events, like the one under analysis, not too far from the bankfull conditions. The Rio Vanti event was characterized by a total rainfall depth of 36.2 mm and a back-calculated peak discharge of 6.12 m3/s with a return period of 1-2 years. The classical equations to assess the sediment transport capacity overestimate the total volume of the event of several orders of magnitude. By the consequence, the following experimental bedload transport equation has been applied (D'Agostino and Lenzi, 1999), which is valid for ordinary flood events (q: unit water discharge; qc: unit discharge of bedload transport initiation; qs: unit bedload rate; S: thalweg slope): -qs-˜= 0,04ṡ(q- qc) S3/2 In particular, starting from the real rainfall data, the hydrograph and the sediment-graph have been reconstructed. Then, comparing the total volume calculated via the above cited equation to the real volume estimated using DoD techniques on post-event photogrammetric survey, a very satisfactory agreement has been obtained. The result further supports the thesis

  20. Object-relational mapping model

    OpenAIRE

    Žukauskas, Arūnas

    2007-01-01

    This work is analyzing problems, arising because of sematical gap between relational and object-oriented approaches and discusses how to utilize object-relational mapping for solving this problem. After analysis of object-relational mapping framework (further – ORM) principles and features of existing ORM frameworks a model is suggested, that allows to implement ORM by utilizing MVP principles in a way that retains major portion of both approach pros and is perfect for transitioning existing ...

  1. Dynamics and mechanics of bed-load tracer particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Phillips

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanics of bed load at the flood scale is necessary to link hydrology to landscape evolution. Here we report on observations of the transport of coarse sediment tracer particles in a cobble-bedded alluvial river and a step-pool bedrock tributary, at the individual flood and multi-annual timescales. Tracer particle data for each survey are composed of measured displacement lengths for individual particles, and the number of tagged particles mobilized. For single floods we find that measured tracer particle displacement lengths are exponentially distributed; the number of mobile particles increases linearly with peak flood Shields stress, indicating partial bed load transport for all observed floods; and modal displacement distances scale linearly with excess shear velocity. These findings provide quantitative field support for a recently proposed modeling framework based on momentum conservation at the grain scale. Tracer displacement is weakly negatively correlated with particle size at the individual flood scale; however cumulative travel distance begins to show a stronger inverse relation to grain size when measured over many transport events. The observed spatial sorting of tracers approaches that of the river bed, and is consistent with size-selective deposition models and laboratory experiments. Tracer displacement data for the bedrock and alluvial channels collapse onto a single curve – despite more than an order of magnitude difference in channel slope – when variations of critical Shields stress and flow resistance between the two are accounted for. Results show how bed load dynamics may be predicted from a record of river stage, providing a direct link between climate and sediment transport.

  2. Three perspectives on bedload transport at a sandy gravel beach (Advocate Harbour, Nova Scotia) with focus on sediment properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, N.; Hay, A. E.; Guest, T.; Hatcher, M. G.; Cheel, R. A.; Barclay, D. J.; Zedel, L. J.; Lake, C. B.

    2012-12-01

    Bedload transport is the major transport mode for coarse sediment in coastal zones. Understanding its mechanisms requires knowledge of the driving force (hydrodynamics), the stabilizing force (sediment properties), and the bed characteristics (bed roughness, bed slope, bedforms). During a 3-week-long field experiment at Advocate Beach, Nova Scotia, bedload transport was targeted from three perspectives: (i) The water column: using a new acoustic Doppler profiler (MFDop), 3D flow velocities were monitored to assess bed shear stress over a range of conditions. Additionally, sediment concentrations close to the bed (~10 cm) were determined by water sampling under calm conditions (0.15-0.6 g/l) and within the shorebreak (1-50 g/l). (ii) The bed: rotary sonars were used to observe the development of ripples and bed elevation change as a measure of ongoing sediment transport. Also, the net displacement of 20 marked cobbles on the seabed surface was measured, revealing significant changes in transport direction and distance (ranging from 0 to 50 m). (iii) The sediment properties: grain size ranged from medium sand to small cobbles. The finer-grained particles were rounded, but showed an elliptic to plate-like shape. Grain size distributions varied significantly across the shoreface as well as under different hydrodynamic conditions. Observed beach cusps were strongly sorted (coarse pebbles at the horns, coarse sand in the bays). Direct shear tests were carried out to determine peak shear strengths of the sediment and friction angles. Peak shear strengths under low normal stress (0.47 kPa) can be compared best to surficial sediment conditions, and did not exceed 9 kPa in the case of the sands. The sediment showed a surprisingly strong dilative behavior during shearing and high friction angles considering the grain size, the low load and low density conditions during the tests. Thus, grain shape and the particle re-organization under shearing played important roles. Finally

  3. Bed-Load Transport Rate Based on the Entrainment Probabilities of Sediment Grains by Rolling and Lifting

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun-De; Lin, Binliang

    2016-01-01

    A function for the bed-load sediment transport rate is derived. This is achieved from the first principle by using the entrainment probabilities of the sediment grains by rolling and lifting, and by introducing two travel lengths, respectively, for the first time. The predictions from the new bed-load function agree well with the experimental results over the entire experimental range and show significant improvement over the commonly used formula for bed-load transport rate. The new function shows that, in terms of contributing to the bed-load transport rate, the total entrainment probability of the sediment grains is a weighted summation of those by the lifted and rolling grains, rather than a simple addition of the two. The function has also been used to predict the total entrainment probability, saltation length and the bed layer thickness at high bed-load transport rate. These predictions all agree well with the experimental results. It is found that, on average, the travel length for the rolling sand gr...

  4. A Model for International Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Since the end of the Cold War, the new international environment has required a new model of relationship between major countries. The basis of the new relations is to safeguard one's own national interests while respecting the national interests of the other country. The process of establishing such rela-

  5. The Influence of Splat Events on the Spatiotemporal Pattern of Bedload Transport over Bedforms: Laboratory Experiments Downstream of a Backward-Facing Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, K. P.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2015-12-01

    Despite numerous experimental and numerical studies investigating transport over ripples and dunes in rivers, the spatiotemporal details of the pattern of transport over bedforms remain largely unknown. Here we report turbulence-resolving, simultaneous measurements of bedload motion and near-bed fluid velocity downstream of a backward facing step in a laboratory flume. Two synchronized high-speed video cameras simultaneously observed bedload motion and the motion of neutrally buoyant particles in a laser light sheet 6 mm above the bed at 250 frames/s downstream of a 3.8 cm backward-facing step. Particle imaging velocimetry algorithms were applied to the laser sheet images to obtain two-dimensional field of two-dimensional vectors while manual particle tracking techniques were applied to the video images of the bed. As expected, the experiments exhibit a strong positive correlation between sediment flux and near-bed fluid velocity. The effect of flow separation on the pattern of sediment flux is explored by comparing experimentally observed sediment transport to sediment transport modeled as a function of boundary shear stress using a Meyer-Peter Müller type equation. Modeled sediment transport underestimates observed sediment transport near flow reattachment. This region of underestimated transport corresponds to an increase in the variance of near-bed vertical fluid velocity. Localized, intermittent, high-magnitude transport events are more apparent near flow reattachment than farther downstream. Often, these high-magnitude events are seen to have significant cross-stream particle velocities. In addition, downstream and cross-stream sediment transport events are of comparable magnitudes near reattachment. In contrast, farther downstream of the zone of underestimated transport, cross-stream transport events are small compared to downstream transport. The pattern of intermittent, high-magnitude cross- and downstream transport events near flow reattachment is

  6. Cobble deposits observed by drone in Vieux-Habitants River (Guadeloupe, France): consequences on bedload transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allemand, Pascal; Lajeunesse, Eric; Quiquerez, Amélie; Langlois, Vincent; Devauchelle, Olivier; Delacourt, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    The physics of bedload transport has been investigated in artificial rivers, in natural rivers and by numerical simulations. These approaches demonstrated that bedload transport depends on diameter of pebbles and of the shear stress that acts on the river bed above a threshold stress. These parameters are difficult to estimate in natural rivers where the granulometry is spread out several tenths of centimeters and where the basal shear stress is very difficult to estimate. Three hundred meters of the alluvial portion of the Vieux Habitants River (Guadeloupe Island, French Antilles) have been imaged by drone once a year during 7 years. The hydrograph of the river was measured upstream at 2 km of the study area. An ortho-image at a resolution around 3 cm was computed from the images of each mission. The cobbles that were deposited or transported away between two acquisitions were mapped in a GIS. The volumetric density of deposited cobbles by classes of 10 cm for a diameter of 0.1 to 1m was reported against the maximum water flow of the river that occurred between two acquisitions. This volumetric density reflects the flow of transported cobble during the flood. The dataset shows that the volumetric density of deposited cobbles is very low when water flow is lower than 35m3/s. Above this value, the volumetric density of deposited pebble increases with the flow. During the years of study, the hydrograph shows that the threshold for significant displacement was reached less than 0.03% of the time. Bedload transport occurs only during extreme meteorological events for cobbles with a diameter larger than 10 cm in a river such as Vieux-Habitants

  7. Effects of bed-load movement on flow resistance over bed forms

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammad Hossein Omid; Masoud Karbasi; Javad Farhoudi

    2010-12-01

    The effect of bed-load transport on flow resistance of alluvial channels with undulated bed was experimentally investigated. The experiments were carried out in a tilting flume 250 mm wide and 12·5 m long with glass-sides of rectangular cross-section and artificial dune shaped floor that was made from Plexi-glass. Steady flow of clear as against sediment-laden water with different flow depths and velocities were studied in the experiments with a fine sand ($d_{50} =$ 0·5 mm). The results indicate that the transport of fine particles ($d_{50} =$ 0·5 mm) can decrease the friction factor by 22% and 24% respectively for smooth and rough beds. Increasing the bed-load size ($d_{50} =$ 2·84 mm) can decrease the friction factor by 32% and 39% respectively for smooth and rough beds. The decrease in flow resistance is due to filling up of the troughs of dunes. This separation zone is responsible for increasing the flow resistance. On the upstream side of dunes condition is similar to plane bed. Presence of bed-load causes to increase the shear velocity and hence increasing flow resistance. But decreasing in flow resistance is more and it causes to decrease the total flow resistance. Grains saturated the troughs in the bed topography, effectively helping in smoothening of bed irregularities.

  8. Thermochronology of the modern Indus River bedload: New insight into the controls on the marine stratigraphic record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Peter D.; Campbell, Ian H.; Pringle, Malcolm S.; Carter, Andrew; Zhang, Xifan; Hodges, Kip V.; Khan, Ali Athar; Allen, Charlotte M.

    2004-10-01

    The Indus River is the only major drainage in the western Himalaya and delivers a long geological record of continental erosion to the Arabian Sea, which may be deciphered and used to reconstruct orogenic growth if the modern bedload can be related to the mountains. In this study we collected thermochronologic data from river sediment collected near the modern delta. U-Pb ages of zircons spanning 3 Gyr show that only ˜5% of the eroding crust has been generated since India-Asia collision. The Greater Himalaya are the major source of zircons, with additional contributions from the Karakoram and Lesser Himalaya. The 39Ar/40Ar dating of muscovites gives ages that cluster between 10 and 25 Ma, differing from those recorded in the Bengal Fan. Biotite ages are generally younger, ranging 0-15 Ma. Modern average exhumation rates are estimated at ˜0.6 km/m.y. or less, and have slowed progressively since the early Miocene (˜20 Ma), although fission track (FT) dating of apatites may indicate a recent moderate acceleration in rates since the Pliocene (˜1.0 km/m.y.) driven by climate change. The 39Ar/40Ar and FT techniques emphasize the dominance of high topography in controlling the erosional flux to the ocean. Localized regions of tectonically driven, very rapid exhumation (e.g., Nanga Parbat, S. Karakoram metamorphic domes) do not dominate the erosional record.

  9. Experimental study on bed-load sediment transport under irregular wave and current combined flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Using an irregularly oscillating tray and flume, a series of experiments are completed to evaluate bed-load sediment transport rate under irregular wave- current coexistent fild. Testing conditions include three interaction angles 0°, 45°, 90° and two kinds of median sizes (0.38 and 1.10 mm).The results of transport rate show that the net sediment transport rate can be expressed approximately as the function of the maximum bottom shear stress of waves, mean shear stress of current and the grain size.

  10. The flow over bedload sheets and sorted bedforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondeaux, Paolo; Vittori, Giovanna

    2014-08-01

    Field surveys show the existence of morphological patterns (named bed load sheets in fluvial enviroments and sorted bedforms in coastal environments) which consist of alternate bands of coarse and fine sediments and are characterized by a negligible spatial variation of the bottom elevation. Previous analyses show that these bottom patterns are self-organizing features which are originated by the interaction of poorly sorted sediments, fractional sediment transport and turbulence dynamics. Presently, we describe the results of an investigation of turbulence dynamics over a flat bottom but characterized by alternate bands of small and large roughness. Turbulence characteristics are obtained by means of the two-equation turbulence model of Saffman (1970) which is shown to provide a reliable description of turbulence structure both in steady and oscillatory flows, as those generated in coastal environments by surface wave propagation. Moreover, the turbulence model can describe both smooth and rough walls and provide fair results also at moderate values of the Reynolds number. The results are validated by comparing the predictions of the model with the experimental data of Jensen et al. (1989) and Fredsøe et al. (1993) who measured the velocity field and the bottom shear stress under a turbulent oscillatory flow over a plane bed with a uniform roughness and sudden spatial change of the roughness size, respectively. The measurements of Fredsøe et al. (1993) were simulated also by Fuhrman et al. (2011) by means of the k-ω turbulence model of Wilcox (2006, 2008) and an indirect comparison of the model results with the results of Fuhrman et al. (2011) can be made. The investigation shows that the streamwise advection of turbulence plays a significant role such that turbulence is more intense over the rough bottom than over the smooth bottom, if a region close to the bottom is considered. However, moving far from the bottom, an opposite trend is found. Moreover, the

  11. 推移质滚动的机理及统计规律%Statistical analysis on motion characteristics of bedload rolling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐海珏; 沈颖; 白玉川

    2014-01-01

    Gravel bedload transport is of great significance to the development and utilization of mountain⁃ous rivers. Generally, the bed particles may perform rolling, sliding or saltating motions depending on flow and bed conditions. In low flow intensity range, rolling is the main form of movement;even the saltation particles which account for the majority of bedload usually need to roll some distance before leaps. There⁃fore, it is necessary to carry some research into rolling sediment particles. On the basis of analyzing the forces of one rolling particle, a mechanical model was built which divided a single-step movement into two parts, i.e. touching movement and free movement. Then expressions for the rate and distance of a sin⁃gle-step movement were obtained by methods of numerical calculation and regression analysis. Finally by modifying the erosion probability of particles and the dimensionless step length used in Einstein's bedload function transport rate formula was derived and validated with actual measured data.%卵石推移质运动规律研究对山区河流开发利用意义重大。推移质颗粒一般是以滚动(间或滑动)、跃移等形式运动的。在低水流强度范围内,颗粒运动形式以滚动为主;即使占推移质大部分的跃移颗粒,通常也并不是在起动之后随即跃起,而往往需要先滚动一段距离。因此,有必要进行泥沙颗粒滚动机理研究。本文建立了粗颗粒泥沙滚动力学模型,将滚动步划分为接触步和自由步,经计算得到脱离角、单步运动步长、平均滚动速度等表达式;并采用爱因斯坦方法,修正了其公式中的单步步长和冲刷率,进而得到相应的推移质输沙率公式,并用实际输沙率资料进行了验证。

  12. Longterm Measurements of Bedload-Transport in alpine Catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achleitner, Stefan; Kammerlander, Johannes; Eichner, Bernhard; Schöber, Johannes; Chiari, Michael

    2016-04-01

    In recent years the necessity of predicting the long-term behavior of sediment transport has increased. On the one hand, the effects of technical measures (e.g. retaining measures, hydropower, etc.) in the natural system are to be evaluated. On the other hand long term ecological studies that are strongly linked to the sediment budgets and its variation are more and more evolving. The ACRP Project DevoBeta-CC addresses the dynamics of long term sediment transport dynamics and its temporal altering. The focus is put on smaller tributary catchments enabling the model development. In total the data from ten catchments connected to the hydropower station Kaunertal (Tyrol/Austria) and eleven catchments linked to the power plant group Sellrain-Silz (Tyrol/Austria) are available. The considered catchments vary regarding their characteristics such as size (3 km³ to 27 km²), glaciation (0 % to 53 %), mean catchment slope (53 % to 92 %) and mean channel gradient (4 % to 49 %). The main data basis are records from the water intake structures operated (partly since 1965) by the TIWAG (Tiroler Wasserkraft AG). The sedimentation dynamics and operational flushings of the connected settling basins are used to measure the transported sediments. Since 1985 even high resolution data (15min intervals) are available. At selected catchments, the operationally recorded data (flushings, load membrane measurements,...) are verified within measuring campaigns using bed load traps upstream. Further, the sedimentation dynamics and grain size distributions in the settling basins are evaluated. Therefor two water intakes were put temporally out of operation, allowing an improved measurement of settled volumes by means of terrestrial surveying. Uncertainty assessments reveal an overall accuracy of estimated annual bed load volumes lower than a factor of two. Additionally, the data set enables to address sediment transport at a sub-annual basis, hence, the presented data set is unique regarding

  13. sedFlow – a tool for simulating fractional bedload transport and longitudinal profile evolution in mountain streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. U. M. Heimann

    2015-01-01

    floods. The model is intended for temporal scales from the individual event (several hours to few days up to longer-term evolution of stream channels (several years. The envisaged spatial scale covers complete catchments at a spatial discretisation of several tens of metres to a few hundreds of metres. sedFlow can deal with the effects of streambeds that slope uphill in a downstream direction and uses recently proposed and tested approaches for quantifying macro-roughness effects in steep channels. sedFlow offers different options for bedload transport equations, flow-resistance relationships and other elements which can be selected to fit the current application in a particular catchment. Local grain-size distributions are dynamically adjusted according to the transport dynamics of each grain-size fraction. sedFlow features fast calculations and straightforward pre- and postprocessing of simulation data. The high simulation speed allows for simulations of several years, which can be used, e.g., to assess the long-term impact of river engineering works or climate change effects. In combination with the straightforward pre- and postprocessing, the fast calculations facilitate efficient workflows for the simulation of individual flood events, because the modeller gets the immediate results as direct feedback to the selected parameter inputs. The model is provided together with its complete source code free of charge under the terms of the GNU General Public License (GPL (www.wsl.ch/sedFlow. Examples of the application of sedFlow are given in a companion article by Heimann et al. (2015.

  14. Large-scale laboratory testing of bedload-monitoring technologies: overview of the StreamLab06 Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Jeffrey D.G.; Gray, John R.; Davis, Broderick E.; Ellis, Chris; Johnson, Sara; Gray, John R.; Laronne, Jonathan B.; Marr, Jeffrey D.G.

    2010-01-01

    A 3-month-long, large-scale flume experiment involving research and testing of selected conventional and surrogate bedload-monitoring technologies was conducted in the Main Channel at the St. Anthony Falls Laboratory under the auspices of the National Center for Earth-surface Dynamics. These experiments, dubbed StreamLab06, involved 25 researchers and volunteers from academia, government, and the private sector. The research channel was equipped with a sediment-recirculation system and a sediment-flux monitoring system that allowed continuous measurement of sediment flux in the flume and provided a data set by which samplers were evaluated. Selected bedload-measurement technologies were tested under a range of flow and sediment-transport conditions. The experiment was conducted in two phases. The bed material in phase I was well-sorted siliceous sand (0.6-1.8 mm median diameter). A gravel mixture (1-32 mm median diameter) composed the bed material in phase II. Four conventional bedload samplers – a standard Helley-Smith, Elwha, BLH-84, and Toutle River II (TR-2) sampler – were manually deployed as part of both experiment phases. Bedload traps were deployed in study Phase II. Two surrogate bedload samplers – stationarymounted down-looking 600 kHz and 1200 kHz acoustic Doppler current profilers – were deployed in experiment phase II. This paper presents an overview of the experiment including the specific data-collection technologies used and the ambient hydraulic, sediment-transport and environmental conditions measured as part of the experiment. All data collected as part of the StreamLab06 experiments are, or will be available to the research community.

  15. How do macro-roughness elements affect bed-load sediment motion?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radice, Alessio; Campagnol, Jenny

    2015-04-01

    Experimental results are here presented for bed-load particle motion in the presence of macro-roughness elements (MREs). Experiments were performed at the Hydraulics Laboratory of the Politecnico di Milano using plastic particles (size of 3 mm) as bed-load sediment that was fed into a rectangular-section, pressurized duct. The bottom of the duct was covered with a number of MREs, represented by concrete semi-spheres (diameter of 35 mm) that were not mobilized by the hydrodynamic conditions used. The experiments thus mimicked the transport of fine sediment in the presence of immobile boulders, that is one possible idealized representation of the granulometric variability found in natural water courses. The work is part of a project devoted to the characterization of particle kinematics for different roughness of the bed, undertaken within a long-term cooperation with the Environmental and Industrial Fluid Mechanics group at the University of Aberdeen (UK). Different flow conditions were tested. For each, MREs were placed in two different arrangements, corresponding to triangular grids with variable side length (130 mm and 100 mm). Colour of sediment was appropriately chosen (white grains over black background) to enable bed-load particles to be tracked by an image processing software (Streams, developed by the University of Canterbury, New Zealand). Particle kinematics was described using typical quantities: path length and tortuosity, path-averaged and instantaneous velocity components in the stream-wise and transverse directions, duration of motion events. The collected database was considerably wide, in terms of both measured particle paths and instantaneous velocity values. Results are discussed in terms of the measured kinematic properties and also comparing the sediment motion to that obtained for the same hydrodynamic conditions and in the absence of MREs. A discussion is made about comparability of the different scenarios, as the presence/absence of the MREs

  16. Fluctuations and time scales for bed-load sediment motion over a smooth bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesco Ballio n; Alessio Radice

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented for experiments of bed-load sediment transport over a plane, smooth bed. The smooth-bed configuration, though not adequate for mimicking natural streams, enables the effects of bed roughness to be filtered out, thus, highlighting the role of flow turbulence for particle dynamics. Sediments were individually tracked along their paths, measuring position and velocity of the individual grains. A number of analyses were then applied to the data: probability density function, auto-correla-tion, and spectra of the grain velocity. Several Lagrangian time scales of particle motion were obtained and compared to available data for the turbulent flow field to determine a phenomenological inter-pretation of the process.

  17. Effects of check dams on bed-load transport and steep-slope stream morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piton, Guillaume; Recking, Alain

    2017-08-01

    Check dams are transversal structures built across morphologically-active streams in mountainous regions. These structures have been used widely in torrent-hazard mitigation for over 150 years. Thousands of them are regularly maintained by stream managers and torrent-control services. The stabilization role of these structures is well known, i.e. they durably constrain the stream-bed through the creation of vertical and planar fixed points. What is not yet clear is to what extent check dams influence bed-load transport: How do peak solid discharge or flood-transported volume change when check dams are added to a reach? To address these questions, long-lasting small-scale experiments were conducted in a 4.8-m-long flume with either one, three or no structures. The results show that the addition of structures creates independent compartments in the bed level, which have a strong influence on bed surface armouring and stream morphodynamics: the consequence is that instantaneous transport intensities are unchanged, but peak solid discharge occur more often and for shorter duration. This results in the same total transported volume over the long term, but reduced volume for a single transport event. It reaffirms the observation of pioneering authors of the mid-19th and early 20th century who conceptualized the possible sediment transport regulation function of check dams: in addition to stabilizing the stream-bed, check dams influence bed-load transport through a buffering effect, releasing frequently and in small doses what, in their absence, would be transported abruptly en masse during rare extreme events.

  18. Can riverside seismic monitoring constrain temporal and spatial variations in bedload transport during a controlled flood of the Trinity River?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, M. E.; Schmandt, B.; Gaeuman, D.

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the utility of riverside seismic monitoring for constraining temporal and spatial variations in coarse bedload transport in gravel-bed rivers we collected seismic data during a dam-controlled flood of the Trinity River in northern California in May 2015. This field area was chosen because the Trinity River Restoration Project conducts extensive monitoring of water and sediment transport, and riverbed morphology to guide management of the river with the goal of improving salmon habitat. Four three component broadband seismometers were collocated with water discharge and bedload physical sampling sites along a ~30 km reach of the Trinity River downstream of the Lewiston Dam. Arrays with 10-80 cable-free vertical component geophones were also deployed at each of the four sites in order to constrain spatial variability and amplitude decay of seismic signals emanating from the river. Nominal inter-station spacing within the geophone arrays was ~30 m. The largest geophone array consisted of 83 nodes along a 700 m reach of the Trinity River with a gravel augmentation site at its upstream end. Initial analyses of the seismic data show that ground velocity power from averaged from ~7 - 90 Hz is correlated with discharge at all sites. The array at the gravel injection site shows greater high frequency (>30 Hz) power at the upstream end where gravel was injected during the release compared to ~300 m downstream, consistent with bedload transport providing a significant source of seismic energy in addition to water discharge. Declining seismic power during a ~3 day plateau at peak discharge when physical sampler data shows decreasing bedload flux provides a further indication that the seismic data are sensitive to bedload transport. We will use the array data to back-project the seismic signals in multiple frequency bands into the channel to create maps of the time-varying spatial intensity of seismic energy production. We hypothesize that the greatest seismic

  19. Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erskine, W. D.; Saynor, M. J.; Turner, K.; Whiteside, T.; Boyden, J.; Evans, K. G.

    2015-03-01

    Soil erosion rates on plots of waste rock at Ranger uranium mine and basin sediment yields have been measured for over 30 years in Magela Creek in northern Australia. Soil erosion rates on chlorite schist waste rock are higher than for mica schist and weathering is also much faster. Sediment yields are low but are further reduced by sediment trapping effects of flood plains, floodouts, billabongs and extensive wetlands. Suspended sediment yields exceed bedload yields in this deeply weathered, tropical landscape, but the amount of sand transported greatly exceeds that of silt and clay. Nevertheless, sand is totally stored above the topographic base level. Longitudinal continuity of sediment transport is not maintained. As a result, suspended sediment and bedload do not move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek and lower Magela Creek wetlands trap about 90.5% of the total sediment load input.

  20. Cosmological models in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B B Paul

    2003-12-01

    LRS Bianchi type-I space-time filled with perfect fluid is considered here with deceleration parameter as variable. The metric potentials and are functions of as well as . Assuming '/=(), where prime denotes differentiation with respect to , it was found that =('/) and =(), where =() and is the scale factor which is a function of only. The value of Hubble’s constant 0 was found to be less than half for non-flat model and is equal to 1.3 for a flat model.

  1. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON BED-LOAD SEDIMENT TRANSPORT IN IRREGULAR WAVE-CURRENT COEXISTENT FIELD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In order to evaluate bed-load sediment transport in an irregular wave-current coexistent field, a series of experiments were completed in laboratory with an irregularly oscillating tray, which was specially designed to simulate the irregular wave-current coexistent field. Experimental results are presented on the initial motion of sediment and the rates of transport over flat horizontal bed. Testing conditions included three interaction angles, 0°, 45°, 90° and six kinds of grain sizes. Four kinds (0.2mm, 0.46mm, 0.85mm and 1.3mm) were used for the tests of initial motion, while the other two kinds (0.38mm and 1.1mm) for the tests of transport rate. Comparisons between experimental results of initial motion and modified Shields curve indicate that the Shields curve is still valid for the case of irregular wave-current coexistent field. Analysis of flow regime shows that initial conditions fall within smooth-turbulent transitional region. The results of transport rate show us that net sediment transport rate can be expressed approximately as the function of the maximum bottom shear stress and mean shear stress. A dimensionless formula is proposed on the basis of mechanism "Waves erode sediments, tides transport sediments".

  2. Comparison of bedload transport measurements at the Suggadinbach stream with geophones and modified pipe hydrophones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiari, Michael; Berktold, Maximilian; Jäger, Gerald; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    A new bedload transport monitoring station has been designed by the Institute of Mountain Risk engineering at the Suggadinbach in Austria (Vorarlberg). In cooperation with the Austrian Service for Torrent and Avalanche Control the station has been installed in June 2013 in a check dam. Two different types of measuring systems are installed: 13 Swiss type geophone sensors record the vibrations of the transported sediment. Additionally 3 modified Japanese pipe hydrophones are mounted under steel plates in order to record the acoustic signal produced by the sediment transport. Both systems can be compared directly because they are arranged consecutively in flow direction. For calibration of the sensors a series of systematic tests have been carried out during low water conditions. Sediment has been fed by a crane with a concrete container. A flume has been installed in order to obtain controlled flow and transport over the measuring system. Four different grain classes up to 64 mm and a mixture of all classes were tested. A total amount of 4 tons were fed during the experiments. The signal was recorded with 9.6 kHz. Frequency analyses were performed for different grain-classes in order to investigate the influence of the grain-size distribution on the shape of the signal and the influence of neighbouring sensors. The standard evaluation and storage procedure for 1 minute aggregated data show that the modified pipe hydrophone is able to detect finer grain-sizes than the geophone sensor.

  3. "State of the Art" of technical protection measures in Austria and the effectiveness documented during bedload and debris flow events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Markus; Mehlhorn, Susanne; Rudolf-Miklau, Florian; Suda, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Since the beginning of systematic torrent control in Austria 130 years ago, barriers are constructed for protection purposes. Until the end of the 1960s, solid barriers were built at the exits of depositional areas to prevent dangerous debris flows from reaching high consequence areas. The development of solid barriers with large slots or slits to regulate sediment transport began with the use of reinforced concrete during the 1970s (Rudolf-Miklau, Suda 2011). In order to dissipate the energy of debris flows debris flow breakers have been designed since the 1980s. By slowing and depositing the surge front of the debris flow, downstream reaches of the stream channel and settlement areas should be exposed to considerably lower dynamic impact. In the past, the technological development of these constructions was only steered by the experiences of the engineering practice while an institutionalized process of standardization comparable to other engineering branches was not existent. In future all structures have to be designed and dimensioned according to the EUROCODE standards. This was the reason to establish an interdisciplinary working group (ON-K 256) at the Austrian Standards Institute (ASI), which has managed to developed comprehensive new technical standards for torrent control engineering, including load models, design, dimensioning and life cycle assessment of torrent control works (technical standard ONR 24800 - series). Extreme torrential events comprise four definable displacement processes floods; fluvial solid transport; hyper-concentrated solid transport (debris floods) and debris flow (stony debris flow or mud-earth flow). As a rule, the design of the torrential barriers has to follow its function (Kettl, 1984). Modern protection concepts in torrent control are scenario-oriented and try to optimize different functions in a chain of protections structures (function chain). More or less the first step for the designing the optimal construction type is

  4. A geomorphic approach to the analysis of bedload and bed morphology of the Lower Mississippi River near the Old River Control Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Richard L.; Latrubesse, Edgardo M.

    2016-09-01

    The Mississippi River is the ultimate single-thread meandering river. Five hundred kilometers upstream from its mouth, about 25% of the river's discharge and sediment load is diverted into the Atchafalaya River. This diversion is controlled by the Old River Control Structure (ORCS), built by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in stages since 1961, to stop the avulsion of the Mississippi River into the Atchafalaya. The effects of ORCS on sediment and water discharge and geomorphic change to the Lower Mississippi River (LMR) channel are not yet completely understood and require placing the river into a geomorphic context, first classifying the channel into similar categories before evaluating change. The objectives of this study are to estimate the LMR bedload, develop and apply a geomorphic classification of the LMR near the ORCS, and explore geomorphic change within the classified areas. We studied a 115-km-long stretch between ORCS and Baton Rouge that is highly impacted by engineering. We used six sets of bathymetric multibeam echosounder surveys conducted by the USACE, multitemporal cartographies, and a field survey supported by multibeam echosounder bathymetry, acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements, sediment samples collection, and geomorphic observations. A three-dimensional method for estimating bedload from time-elapsed bathymetric surveys was developed and applied on seven sets of time-elapsed surveys downstream from ORCS from 2010, 2011, and 2012. We estimate that the fraction of bedload as a percentage of total sand load between 2003 and 2011 was 13.2%. A bedform classification scheme, based on bedform height, was developed. The bed was almost completely mantled by sandy bedforms above the - 24-m isoline. The studied reach was divided into ten zones according to four geomorphic types based on channel planform, geologic controls, presence of islands, and other morphometric parameters. These zones were shown to be physically distinct

  5. Relative risk regression models with inverse polynomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yang; Woodward, Mark

    2013-08-30

    The proportional hazards model assumes that the log hazard ratio is a linear function of parameters. In the current paper, we model the log relative risk as an inverse polynomial, which is particularly suitable for modeling bounded and asymmetric functions. The parameters estimated by maximizing the partial likelihood are consistent and asymptotically normal. The advantages of the inverse polynomial model over the ordinary polynomial model and the fractional polynomial model for fitting various asymmetric log relative risk functions are shown by simulation. The utility of the method is further supported by analyzing two real data sets, addressing the specific question of the location of the minimum risk threshold.

  6. Lifted Inference for Relational Continuous Models

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Jaesik; Hill, David J

    2012-01-01

    Relational Continuous Models (RCMs) represent joint probability densities over attributes of objects, when the attributes have continuous domains. With relational representations, they can model joint probability distributions over large numbers of variables compactly in a natural way. This paper presents a new exact lifted inference algorithm for RCMs, thus it scales up to large models of real world applications. The algorithm applies to Relational Pairwise Models which are (relational) products of potentials of arity 2. Our algorithm is unique in two ways. First, it substantially improves the efficiency of lifted inference with variables of continuous domains. When a relational model has Gaussian potentials, it takes only linear-time compared to cubic time of previous methods. Second, it is the first exact inference algorithm which handles RCMs in a lifted way. The algorithm is illustrated over an example from econometrics. Experimental results show that our algorithm outperforms both a groundlevel inferenc...

  7. A Model of Egoistical Relative Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Faye

    1976-01-01

    Examines the theory of relative deprivation. This theory states, basically, that objective and subjective well-being are not isomorphically related, so that sometimes the better-off one is, the worse-off one feels subjectively. After a brief review of work in the area of relative deprivation, a formal model is developed. (Editor/RK)

  8. Bedload exports in a forest catchment following wildfire and terracing, north-central Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Martinho A. S.; Machado, Ana I.; Serpa, Dalila; Prats, Sergio A.; Faria, Sílvia R.; Varela, María E. T.; González-Pelayo, Óscar; Keizer, J. Jacob

    2014-05-01

    In Portugal, the occurrences of wildfires are frequently, on average, affects some 100.000 ha of rural lands each year, but in extreme years such as 2003 and 2005 the burnt areas can go over 300.000 ha. Studies in various parts of the world, including Portugal, have well-documented a strong and sometimes extreme response in overland flow generation and associated soil losses following wildfire. Over the last two decades, the construction of terraces in preparation of a new eucalypt plantation has become increasingly common in the mountain areas of north-central Portugal, including in recently burnt areas. Terraces are traditionally viewed as a soil conservation technique, however, the present authors have measured high splash and inter-rill erosion on recent terraces and have frequently observed gully formation connecting the terraces over the full hill slope length, as well as within the adjacent unsealed roads. The present study was carried out in a forest catchment in the north-central Portugal that was burnt by a wildfire during the summer of 2010 and logged and then terraced with a bulldozer during the winter 2010. The burnt catchment of roughly 25 ha was instrumented with two subsequent flumes with maximum discharge capacities of 120 and 1700 l sec-1. The bed load that deposited in the smallest flume was removed and weighted in the field at regular intervals during the subsequent three years. The records are being now analyzed, nonetheless preliminary results suggested that, besides the wildfire effects, also post-fire land management played an important role on bedload exports.

  9. Methods of modelling relative growth rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arne Pommerening; Anders Muszta

    2015-01-01

    Background:Analysing and modelling plant growth is an important interdisciplinary field of plant science. The use of relative growth rates, involving the analysis of plant growth relative to plant size, has more or less independently emerged in different research groups and at different times and has provided powerful tools for assessing the growth performance and growth efficiency of plants and plant populations. In this paper, we explore how these isolated methods can be combined to form a consistent methodology for modelling relative growth rates. Methods:We review and combine existing methods of analysing and modelling relative growth rates and apply a combination of methods to Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) stem-analysis data from North Wales (UK) and British Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesi (Mirb.) Franco) yield table data. Results:The results indicate that, by combining the approaches of different plant-growth analysis laboratories and using them simultaneously, we can advance and standardise the concept of relative plant growth. Particularly the growth multiplier plays an important role in modelling relative growth rates. Another useful technique has been the recent introduction of size-standardised relative growth rates. Conclusions:Modelling relative growth rates mainly serves two purposes, 1) an improved analysis of growth performance and efficiency and 2) the prediction of future or past growth rates. This makes the concept of relative growth ideally suited to growth reconstruction as required in dendrochronology, climate change and forest decline research and for interdisciplinary research projects beyond the realm of plant science.

  10. Methods of modelling relative growth rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Pommerening

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Analysing and modelling plant growth is an important interdisciplinary field of plant science. The use of relative growth rates, involving the analysis of plant growth relative to plant size, has more or less independently emerged in different research groups and at different times and has provided powerful tools for assessing the growth performance and growth efficiency of plants and plant populations. In this paper, we explore how these isolated methods can be combined to form a consistent methodology for modelling relative growth rates. Methods We review and combine existing methods of analysing and modelling relative growth rates and apply a combination of methods to Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong. Carr. stem-analysis data from North Wales (UK and British Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb. Franco yield table data. Results The results indicate that, by combining the approaches of different plant-growth analysis laboratories and using them simultaneously, we can advance and standardise the concept of relative plant growth. Particularly the growth multiplier plays an important role in modelling relative growth rates. Another useful technique has been the recent introduction of size-standardised relative growth rates. Conclusions Modelling relative growth rates mainly serves two purposes, 1 an improved analysis of growth performance and efficiency and 2 the prediction of future or past growth rates. This makes the concept of relative growth ideally suited to growth reconstruction as required in dendrochronology, climate change and forest decline research and for interdisciplinary research projects beyond the realm of plant science.

  11. Bias Modeling for Distantly Supervised Relation Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Distant supervision (DS automatically annotates free text with relation mentions from existing knowledge bases (KBs, providing a way to alleviate the problem of insufficient training data for relation extraction in natural language processing (NLP. However, the heuristic annotation process does not guarantee the correctness of the generated labels, promoting a hot research issue on how to efficiently make use of the noisy training data. In this paper, we model two types of biases to reduce noise: (1 bias-dist to model the relative distance between points (instances and classes (relation centers; (2 bias-reward to model the possibility of each heuristically generated label being incorrect. Based on the biases, we propose three noise tolerant models: MIML-dist, MIML-dist-classify, and MIML-reward, building on top of a state-of-the-art distantly supervised learning algorithm. Experimental evaluations compared with three landmark methods on the KBP dataset validate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  12. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems,

  13. Relating business modelling and enterprise architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meertens, Lucas Onno

    2013-01-01

    This thesis proposes a methodology for creating business models, evaluating them, and relating them to enterprise architecture. The methodology consists of several steps, leading from an organization’s current situation to a target situation, via business models and enterprise architecture. Current

  14. Models and relations in economics and econometrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juselius, Katarina

    1999-01-01

    Based on a money market analysis using the cointegrated VAR model the paper demonstrates some possible pitfalls in macroeconomic inference as a direct consequence of inadequate stochastic model formulation. A number of questions related to concepts such as empirical and theoretical steady-states,...

  15. Relating business modelling and enterprise architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meertens, Lucas Onno

    2013-01-01

    This thesis proposes a methodology for creating business models, evaluating them, and relating them to enterprise architecture. The methodology consists of several steps, leading from an organization’s current situation to a target situation, via business models and enterprise architecture.

  16. The generic model of General Relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsamparlis, Michael, E-mail: mtsampa@phys.uoa.g [Department of Physics, Section Astrophysics Astronomy Mechanics, University of Athens, University of Athens, Zografos 15783, Athens (Greece)

    2009-10-01

    We develop a generic spacetime model in General Relativity from which all existing model results are produced under specific assumptions, depending on the case. We classify each type of possible assumption, especially the role of observers and that of symmetries, and discuss their role in the development of a model. We apply the results in a step by step approach to the case of a Bianchi I spacetime and a string fluid.

  17. Technical specifications of low-frequency radio identification bedload tracking from field experiments: Differences in antennas, tags and operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, F.; Piégay, H.; Vaudor, L.; Bultingaire, L.; Fantino, G.

    2015-06-01

    Low-frequency passive integrated transponders (PIT tags) have been increasingly used for tracking bedload transport in gravel-bed rivers. Prior studies have reported high recovery rates in small streams, while recovery rates remained much lower in large systems, in large part because of the limited reading distance of the tags (antenna size, tag orientation, burial, submergence, etc.). Beyond these tests, improving our understanding of PIT tag functioning, using different equipment within different environments, is still needed in order to select the most suitable device for each geomorphic context. We address this knowledge gap with technical specifications for a low-frequency radio identification (RFID) device by working for the first time with real fluvial constraints, i.e., the gravel deposits and the aquatic channel. The three-dimensional detection envelopes of two types of tags and three types of antennas are quantified as well as the effect of practices (interoperator bias, battery power) on the detection. The interoperator variability and the intertag variability can be considered as negligible. The influence of burial in dry and water-saturated sediment and the influence of water immersion are shown to be minor. Finally, we summarize practical implications for RFID bedload tracking through these experiments.

  18. Modelling anisotropic fluid spheres in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt

    2015-01-01

    We argue that an arbitrary general relativistic anisotropic fluid sphere, (spherically symmetric but with transverse pressure not equal to radial pressure), can nevertheless be successfully modelled by suitable linear combinations of quite ordinary classical matter: an isotropic perfect fluid, a classical electromagnetic field, and a classical (minimally coupled) scalar field. While the most general decomposition is not unique, a preferred minimal decomposition can be constructed that is unique. We show how the classical energy conditions for the anisotropic fluid sphere can be related to energy conditions for the isotropic perfect fluid, electromagnetic field, and scalar field components of the model. Furthermore we show how this decomposition relates to the distribution of electric charge density and scalar charge density throughout the model that is used to mimic the anisotropic fluid sphere. Consequently, we can build physically reasonable matter models for almost any spherically symmetric spacetime.

  19. Modeling Relational Data via Latent Factor Blockmodel

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Sheng; Gallinari, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of modeling relational data, which appear in many applications such as social network analysis, recommender systems and bioinformatics. Previous studies either consider latent feature based models but disregarding local structure in the network, or focus exclusively on capturing local structure of objects based on latent blockmodels without coupling with latent characteristics of objects. To combine the benefits of the previous work, we propose a novel model that can simultaneously incorporate the effect of latent features and covariates if any, as well as the effect of latent structure that may exist in the data. To achieve this, we model the relation graph as a function of both latent feature factors and latent cluster memberships of objects to collectively discover globally predictive intrinsic properties of objects and capture latent block structure in the network to improve prediction performance. We also develop an optimization transfer algorithm based on the general...

  20. Animal models of age related macular degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Pennesi, Mark E.; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the ...

  1. Bias Modeling for Distantly Supervised Relation Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Xiang; Yaoyun Zhang; Xiaolong Wang; Yang Qin; Wenying Han

    2015-01-01

    Distant supervision (DS) automatically annotates free text with relation mentions from existing knowledge bases (KBs), providing a way to alleviate the problem of insufficient training data for relation extraction in natural language processing (NLP). However, the heuristic annotation process does not guarantee the correctness of the generated labels, promoting a hot research issue on how to efficiently make use of the noisy training data. In this paper, we model two types of biases to reduce...

  2. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  3. A Quasi-2-Layer Morphodynamic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Maldonado, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Conventional approaches to simulating morphodynamics in open channels often suffer from a high degree of empiricism, which translates into uncertainty in the final results. Here, we derive a model for predicting sediment transport rates and morphological evolution, based on previous models for two-layer-averaged shallow flows over erodible beds. A distinct feature of the present model is the treatment of the lower (bedload) layer as having constant, vanishing thickness, but variable (in time and space) average density. There is no requirement to use a particular empirical formula for sediment transport rates in order to achieve closure, and so the model reduces the level of empiricism inherent to most conventional approaches. The model is validated against popular empirical formulae for bedload and total load, and proves to conform with established bedload theory. The model provides estimates of the thickness of a sheet transport layer in agreement with previous approaches, predicts the cubic proportionality ...

  4. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    2008-01-01

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems, on t

  5. Suspended-sediment concentrations, bedload, particle sizes, surrogate measurements, and annual sediment loads for selected sites in the lower Minnesota River Basin, water years 2011 through 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, Joel T.; Ellison, Christopher A.; Hendrickson, Jon S.

    2016-12-20

    Accurate measurements of fluvial sediment are important for assessing stream ecological health, calculating flood levels, computing sediment budgets, and managing and protecting water resources. Sediment-enriched rivers in Minnesota are a concern among Federal, State, and local governments because turbidity and sediment-laden waters are the leading impairments and affect more than 6,000 miles of rivers in Minnesota. The suspended sediment in the lower Minnesota River is deleterious, contributing about 75 to 90 percent of the suspended sediment being deposited into Lake Pepin. The Saint Paul District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District collaborate to maintain a navigation channel on the lower 14.7 miles of the Minnesota River through scheduled dredging operations. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency has adopted a sediment-reduction strategy to reduce sediment in the Minnesota River by 90 percent by 2040.The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, and the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District, collected suspended-sediment, bedload, and particle-size samples at five sites in the lower Minnesota River Basin during water years 2011 through 2014 and surrogate measurements of acoustic backscatter at one of these sites on the lower Minnesota River during water years 2012 through 2016 to quantify sediment loads and improve understanding of sediment-transport relations. Annual sediment loads were computed for calendar years 2011 through 2014.Data collected from water years 2011 through 2014 indicated that two tributaries, Le Sueur River and High Island Creek, had the highest sediment yield and concentrations of suspended sediment. These tributaries also had greater stream gradients than the sites on the Minnesota River. Suspended fines were greater than suspended sand at all sites in the study area. The range of median particle sizes matched

  6. Animal models of age related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennesi, Mark E; Neuringer, Martha; Courtney, Robert J

    2012-08-01

    Age related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of vision loss of those over the age of 65 in the industrialized world. The prevalence and need to develop effective treatments for AMD has lead to the development of multiple animal models. AMD is a complex and heterogeneous disease that involves the interaction of both genetic and environmental factors with the unique anatomy of the human macula. Models in mice, rats, rabbits, pigs and non-human primates have recreated many of the histological features of AMD and provided much insight into the underlying pathological mechanisms of this disease. In spite of the large number of models developed, no one model yet recapitulates all of the features of human AMD. However, these models have helped reveal the roles of chronic oxidative damage, inflammation and immune dysregulation, and lipid metabolism in the development of AMD. Models for induced choroidal neovascularization have served as the backbone for testing new therapies. This article will review the diversity of animal models that exist for AMD as well as their strengths and limitations.

  7. Evaluation of fluxes of suspended matters and bedload in the small granitic Strengbach catchment (Vosges massif, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotel, Solenn; Viville, Daniel; Pierret, Marie Claire; Benarioumlil, Sylvain; Chabaux, François

    2016-04-01

    Transport of suspended matters (SM) and bedload in river controls the erosion process and elements export of a catchment. Furthermore, the SM are heavily involved in the migration of organic matter, metals and pollutants. The knowledge of the dynamics of the SM export is also essential to better understand the hydrogeochemical functioning of natural ecosystem. We investigated this question at the scale of a catchment; the Strengbach basin (site of OHGE - Observatoire Hydro-Géochimique de l'Environnement) where meteorological and hydrological data are monitored since 30 years. This small granitic basin (0,8km²) is located in the Vosges massif at altitudes between 883m and 1146m with 1400mm mean annual precipitations. A first evaluation of the solid fluxes exported at the Strengbach catchment was carried out on the basis of fortnightly sampling and measurement (Viville et al., 2012). Two automatic water samplers have been set up at the outlet of the basin in december 2012, in order to 1) evaluate the potential bias generated by the sampling frequency and 2) improve the SM flux calculation accuracy especially by taking into account the high flow events. These two samplers allowed regular sampling at 16h time step as well as high flow events sampling. At the same time, the bedload flux was estimated fortnightly by measuring the volume of sediments accumulated in a flume. However, the characteristics of the small Strengbach catchment (low water level, low SM concentration and mountainous winter climatic conditions) required to adapt the conventionally used systems. In this way, the SM annual flux estimated with the data from the two samplers varied between 7,5T and 8,8T during the three years of the study. By comparison, the SM annual flux obtained with previous method (only fortnightly sampling) was significantly different with values ranging from 2,8T to 16,6T. The contribution from each sampler and thus each sampling strategy to the improvement of the SM flux

  8. Constitutive relations for multiphase flow modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, H.; Vaeth, L.; Thurnay, K. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-01-01

    The constitutive relations that are used in the three-field fluid dynamics code IVA-KA for determining the drag in three-phase mixtures and the heat transferred by radiation are described together with some comparisons of calculational results with experiments. In these experiments (QUEOS), large quantities of solid particles are injected into water. Potential deficiencies of the present drag model are discussed. (author)

  9. Lattice Boltzmann Model for Numerical Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Ilseven, E

    2015-01-01

    In the Bona-Masso formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for Numerical Relativity. Our model is validated with well-established tests, showing good agreement with analytical solutions. Furthermore, we show that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improves. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach a linear scaling law for parallelisation with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  10. Generative models: Human embryonic stem cells and multiple modeling relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Melinda Bonnie

    2016-04-01

    Model organisms are at once scientific models and concrete living things. It is widely assumed by philosophers of science that (1) model organisms function much like other kinds of models, and (2) that insofar as their scientific role is distinctive, it is in virtue of representing a wide range of biological species and providing a basis for generalizations about those targets. This paper uses the case of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) to challenge both assumptions. I first argue that hESC can be considered model organisms, analogous to classic examples such as Escherichia coli and Drosophila melanogaster. I then discuss four contrasts between the epistemic role of hESC in practice, and the assumptions about model organisms noted above. These contrasts motivate an alternative view of model organisms as a network of systems related constructively and developmentally to one another. I conclude by relating this result to other accounts of model organisms in recent philosophy of science. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilseven, E; Mendoza, M

    2016-02-01

    In the Z4 formulation, Einstein equations are written as a set of flux conservative first-order hyperbolic equations that resemble fluid dynamics equations. Based on this formulation, we construct a lattice Boltzmann model for numerical relativity and validate it with well-established tests, also known as "apples with apples." Furthermore, we find that by increasing the relaxation time, we gain stability at the cost of losing accuracy, and by decreasing the lattice spacings while keeping a constant numerical diffusivity, the accuracy and stability of our simulations improve. Finally, in order to show the potential of our approach, a linear scaling law for parallelization with respect to number of CPU cores is demonstrated. Our model represents the first step in using lattice kinetic theory to solve gravitational problems.

  12. Pertanggungjawaban Sosial Universitas: Implementasi Model Cycle Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Sinatra Wijaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The competition among Higher Education is getting tougher. They need to do their best in order to maintain their existence and getting more students coming to their institutions. One way to achieve that goal is through carrying out Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR programs or University Social Responsibility (USR for university. This study tries to investigate the implementation of ‘Cycle Relations’ model in CSR to increase the intake of Higher Education. This study involved seven Higher Educations and nineteen High schools in Central Java. In collecting the data, it used a depth-interview method with all the related parties in this study. The result showed that most of the Higher Education institutions have implemented Corporate Social Responsibility program in various ways. Their target audience included the high schools, society, and parents.  From the model implementation, it showed that the CSR program did have an impact towards the intake in their institution. However, one important thing to consider is that the role of the teachers at schools was quite significant in influencing the students to choose which university to go.  This reflects that although the Higher Education institution have planned and carried out CSR programs according to what the target audiences’ need, it does not guarantee that it will have direct impact towards their intake because the influence of teacher is quite significant. It may have a bigger impact in long term as the target audiences know the quality and contribution of the Higher Education institutions.

  13. Pertanggungjawaban Sosial Universitas: Implementasi Model Cycle Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Sinatra Wijaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The competition among Higher Education is getting tougher. They need to do their best in order to maintain their existence and getting more students coming to their institutions. One way to achieve that goal is through carrying out Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR programs or University Social Responsibility (USR for university. This study tries to investigate the implementation of ‘Cycle Relations’ model in CSR to increase the intake of Higher Education. This study involved seven Higher Educations and nineteen High schools in Central Java. In collecting the data, it used a depth-interview method with all the related parties in this study. The result showed that most of the Higher Education institutions have implemented Corporate Social Responsibility program in various ways. Their target audience included the high schools, society, and parents. From the model implementation, it showed that the CSR program did have an impact towards the intake in their institution. However, one important thing to consider is that the role of the teachers at schools was quite significant in influencing the students to choose which university to go. This reflects that although the Higher Education institution have planned and carried out CSR programs according to what the target audiences’ need, it does not guarantee that it will have direct impact towards their intake because the influence of teacher is quite significant. It may have a bigger impact in long term as the target audiences know the quality and contribution of the Higher Education institutions.

  14. AN ABSTRACT RELATIONAL MODEL AND NATURAL JOIN FUNCTORS

    OpenAIRE

    Kato, Akihiko

    1983-01-01

    A meta-model for database models called an abstract relational model which is obtained by a categorical abstraction of a relational model is proposed. This meta-model represents various database models, e.g. relational, network, hierarchical models as special cases. It is proved that a natural join is the right adjoint of a decomposition in the relational model. On the other hand, in our abstract relational model a natural join is defined as the right adjoint of a decomposition. A sufficient ...

  15. Peering inside the granular bed: illuminating feedbacks between bed-load transport and bed-structure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houssais, M.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Martin, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    O. Eiff, Erosion and deposition of particles on a bed sheared by a viscous flow, Journal of Fluid Mech., 519, 55-80, 2004 Frey, P. and Church, M. (2011), Bedload: a granular phenomenon. Earth Surf. Process. Landforms, 36: 58-69. doi: 10.1002/esp.2103 Turowski, J. M., A. Badoux, and D. Rickenmann (2011), Start and end of bedload transport in gravel-bed streams, Geophys. Res. Lett., 38, L04401, doi:10.1029/2010GL046558.

  16. Handbook of latent variable and related models

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Sik-Yum

    2011-01-01

    This Handbook covers latent variable models, which are a flexible class of models for modeling multivariate data to explore relationships among observed and latent variables.- Covers a wide class of important models- Models and statistical methods described provide tools for analyzing a wide spectrum of complicated data- Includes illustrative examples with real data sets from business, education, medicine, public health and sociology.- Demonstrates the use of a wide variety of statistical, computational, and mathematical techniques.

  17. Boundary Relations, Unitary Colligations, and Functional Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behrndt, Jussi; Hassi, Seppo; de Snoo, Henk

    2009-01-01

    Recently a new notion, the so-called boundary relation, has been introduced involving an analytic object, the so-called Weyl family. Weyl families and boundary relations establish a link between the class of Nevanlinna families and unitary relations acting from one Krein in space, a basic (state) sp

  18. Mapping Relational Operations onto Hypergraph Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-10-01

    ="false" Priority="31" SemiHidden="false" UnhideWhenUsed="false" QFormat="true" Name="Subtle Reference"/>

    The relational model is the most commonly used data model for storing large datasets, perhaps due to the simplicity of the tabular format which had revolutionized database management systems. However, many real world objects are recursive and associative in nature which makes storage in the relational model difficult. The hypergraph model is a generalization of a graph model, where each hypernode can be made up of other nodes or graphs and each hyperedge can be made up of one or more edges. It may address the recursive and associative limitations of relational model

  19. State of Flood Related Modeling Along Middle Rio Grande: Report Documentary 2007-2008 Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    for Sand Beds Nick A. Marsh, Andrew W. Western, and Rodger B. Grayson Influence of Bed Material Size Heterogeneity on Bedload Transport Uncertainty...Geospatial Representation of River Channels Venkatesh M. Merwade, David R. Maidment, and Ben R. Hodges Metrics for Assessing the Downstream Effects of

  20. Modeling behavioral considerations related to information security.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Moyano, I. J.; Conrad, S. H.; Andersen, D. F. (Decision and Information Sciences); (SNL); (Univ. at Albany)

    2011-01-01

    The authors present experimental and simulation results of an outcome-based learning model for the identification of threats to security systems. This model integrates judgment, decision-making, and learning theories to provide a unified framework for the behavioral study of upcoming threats.

  1. A Relational Scaffolding Model of Hybrid Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Jens O.; Tuckermann, Harald

    Two fundamental trends with important implications for today's management of organizations build the impetus for this paper. The first is the ubiquity of computer-mediated communication (CMC). The second is the revived interest for social relations and social networks at the workplace and its focus on relational processes in organizations.

  2. The social relations model for family data : A multilevel approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijders, TAB; Kenny, DA

    1999-01-01

    Multilevel models are proposed to study relational or dyadic data from multiple persons in families or other groups. The variable under study is assumed to refer to a dyadic relation between individuals in the groups. The proposed models are elaborations of the Social Relations Model. The different

  3. Verifying Interlevel Relations within Organizational Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, C.M.; Sharpanskykh, A.; Treur, J.; Yolum, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the formal theoretical basis used for transformation of a non-executable external behavioral specification for an organizational model into an executable format, required for enabling verification techniques, is explained in detail.

  4. Verifying Interlevel Relations within Organizational Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, C.M.; Sharpanskykh, A.; Treur, J.; Yolum, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the formal theoretical basis used for transformation of a non-executable external behavioral specification for an organizational model into an executable format, required for enabling verification techniques, is explained in detail.

  5. Measuring Bedload Sediment Flux in Large Rivers: New Data from the Mekong River and Its Applications in Assessing Geomorphic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, J.; Hackney, C. R.; Parsons, D. R.; Darby, S. E.; Leyland, J.; Aalto, R. E.; Nicholas, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    Many large rivers are undergoing renewed and increasing anthropogenic-induced change as water diversions, new dams and greater water demands place enhanced stresses on these river basins. Examples of rivers undergoing significant change include the Amazon, Madeira, Nile, Yangtze and Mekong, with considerable ongoing debate raging as to the long-term geomorphic and ecological effects of major anthropogenic interventions. Assessing the effects of such change in large rivers is demanding, one reason being that sediment transport is often exceedingly difficult to measure, and thus data needed to inform the debate on the impact of anthropogenic change is frequently lacking. Here, we report on one aspect of research being undertaken as part of STELAR-S2S - Sediment Transfer and Erosion on Large Alluvial Rivers - that is seeking to better understand the relationship between climate, anthropogenic impacts and sediment transport in some of the world's largest rivers. We are using the Lower Mekong River as our study site, with the Mekong delta being one of only three in the world classified by the IPCC as 'extremely vulnerable' to future changes in climate. Herein, we describe details of bedload sediment flux estimation using repeated high-resolution multibeam echo sounder (MBES) bathymetric mapping along the Lower Mekong and Tonle Sap rivers in Cambodia. We are using MBES to quantify the spatial variation in sediment transport both along and also across the river at 11 sites in the study area. Predicted increases in the extraction of sediment from the river through sand dredging are thought likely to cause a significant decrease in downstream sediment flux, and future dam construction along the Mekong main channel potentially offers another source of significant change. These field results will be set in the light of these anthropogenic drivers on sediment flux in the Mekong River and their possible future effects on bar formation and channel migration.

  6. Decision tree modeling with relational views

    CERN Document Server

    Bentayeb, Fadila

    2002-01-01

    Data mining is a useful decision support technique that can be used to discover production rules in warehouses or corporate data. Data mining research has made much effort to apply various mining algorithms efficiently on large databases. However, a serious problem in their practical application is the long processing time of such algorithms. Nowadays, one of the key challenges is to integrate data mining methods within the framework of traditional database systems. Indeed, such implementations can take advantage of the efficiency provided by SQL engines. In this paper, we propose an integrating approach for decision trees within a classical database system. In other words, we try to discover knowledge from relational databases, in the form of production rules, via a procedure embedding SQL queries. The obtained decision tree is defined by successive, related relational views. Each view corresponds to a given population in the underlying decision tree. We selected the classical Induction Decision Tree (ID3) a...

  7. Relative Motion Modeling and Autonomous Navigation Accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Model Expansion; Earth Gravitational Perturbation; Goddard Mission Analysis Tool; GMAT ; Hamiltonian Methods; LEO Orbits; Lunar-solar Perturbations...54  4.1.3  Numerical Verification using GMAT and a Graphical User Interface (GUI) ......... 58  4.2  Non-Earth Gravitational...and short period ... 52  Figure 3. Difference between the Kaula and GMAT with 20x20 gravity field without J22 secular and short period terms

  8. Experiments with non-uniform sediment in case of bed-load transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribberink, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out in the framework of a research project concerning the development of a mathematical model for morphological computations in rivers in case of non-uniform sediment. The study consists of a series of laboratory experiments in a straight flume under steady, uniform

  9. Modeling patterns in count data using loglinear and related models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, C.L.

    1995-12-01

    This report explains the use of loglinear and logit models, for analyzing Poisson and binomial counts in the presence of explanatory variables. The explanatory variables may be unordered categorical variables or numerical variables, or both. The report shows how to construct models to fit data, and how to test whether a model is too simple or too complex. The appropriateness of the methods with small data sets is discussed. Several example analyses, using the SAS computer package, illustrate the methods.

  10. Relating masses and mixing angles. A model-independent model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollik, Wolfgang Gregor [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Saldana-Salazar, Ulises Jesus [CINVESTAV (Mexico)

    2016-07-01

    In general, mixing angles and fermion masses are seen to be independent parameters of the Standard Model. However, exploiting the observed hierarchy in the masses, it is viable to construct the mixing matrices for both quarks and leptons in terms of the corresponding mass ratios only. A closer view on the symmetry properties leads to potential realizations of that approach in extensions of the Standard Model. We discuss the application in the context of flavored multi-Higgs models.

  11. Bedload transport of sand-gravel mixtures with antidunes: flume experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez González, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, the interaction between flow and sediment in alluvial channels is studied from an empirical approach, for conditions close or pertaining to supercritical flow, and for four types of sediment: sand, gravel and two mixtures with sand and gravel in a relative proportion of 70-30 and 55-45, respectively. The objective is to obtain by means of laboratory experiments a data set with the characteristics of flow, sediment transport, bed configurations and sediment sorting patterns in ...

  12. The semiotics of control and modeling relations in complex systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joslyn, C

    2001-01-01

    We provide a conceptual analysis of ideas and principles from the systems theory discourse which underlie Pattee's semantic or semiotic closure, which is itself foundational for a school of theoretical biology derived from systems theory and cybernetics, and is now being related to biological semiotics and explicated in the relational biological school of Rashevsky and Rosen. Atomic control systems and models are described as the canonical forms of semiotic organization, sharing measurement relations, but differing topologically in that control systems are circularly and models linearly related to their environments. Computation in control systems is introduced, motivating hierarchical decomposition, hybrid modeling and control systems, and anticipatory or model-based control. The semiotic relations in complex control systems are described in terms of relational constraints, and rules and laws are distinguished as contingent and necessary functional entailments, respectively. Finally, selection as a meta-level of constraint is introduced as the necessary condition for semantic relations in control systems and models.

  13. Basic relations for the period variation models of variable stars

    OpenAIRE

    Mikulášek, Zdeněk; Gráf, Tomáš; Zejda, Miloslav; Zhu, Liying; Qian, Shen-Bang

    2012-01-01

    Models of period variations are basic tools for period analyzes of variable stars. We introduce phase function and instant period and formulate basic relations and equations among them. Some simple period models are also presented.

  14. The script model in relation to autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trillingsgaard, A

    1999-03-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to investigate autistic children's scripts for social routines. Scripts specify familiar events in terms of who does what, when, to whom, and why. Scripts are verbalizations of mental event representations, containing and organizing generalized knowledge of how the world works. Scripts are presumed to be of vital importance for the development of shared meaning, communication, and social behaviour. In this study, children with autism were asked to explain well-known social routines, such as how you shop in a supermarket, make a cake or celebrate a birthday. The scripts of the 12 children with non-retarded autism were compared to scripts of matched normal control children. Despite the fact that all of the participating children with autism had an IQ above 90 and a mental age between 8 and 14, a significant difference in autistic and normal control children's ability to generate scripts for familiar social routines was found. The results are discussed in relation to the same children's ability to pass theory-of-mind tests and their verbal intelligence.

  15. Modelling Knowledge Systems using Relation Nets and Hypernets

    OpenAIRE

    Rooyen, Hendrik O. van; Geldenhuys, Aletta E.; Stetter, Franz

    2004-01-01

    In the book "Knowledge Representation and Relation Nets" we introduced a structural model called a Relation Net and a special relation net called a Concept Relationship Knowledge Structure (CRKS). In this work we broaden the notion of a relation net to produce a new but associated structural model, a Hypernet. We show that the general theory of hypernets has applications in the acquisition/learning, representation, retrieval, accommodation and assimilation, management and communication/teachi...

  16. Incorporating concern for relative wealth into economic models

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    This article develops a simple model that captures a concern for relative standing, or status. This concern is instrumental, in the sense that individuals do not get utility directly from their relative standing, but, rather, the concern is induced because their relative standing affects their consumption of standard commodities. The article investigates the consequences of a concern for relative wealth in models in which individuals are making labor/leisure decisions. The analysis shows how ...

  17. Research on evaluations of several grey relational models adapt to grey relational axioms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Naiming; Liu Sifeng

    2009-01-01

    Grey relational analysis is an important part of the grey systems theory, and it is the basis of the grey clustering analysis, grey decision-making and grey controlling. To research whether grey relational models satisfy the four grey relational theorems, several kinds of grey relational models are commented. Some problems including the properties of normality, pair symmetry and wholeness are discussed. The phenomenon that the lower value of almost each grey relational model is not equal to zero is proved. The contradiction problems between the properties of wholeness and pair symmetry are verified. Finally, several propositions are constructed to explain the above problems.

  18. Two-phase relative permeability models in reservoir engineering calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, S.; Hicks, P.J.; Ertekin, T.

    1999-01-15

    A comparison of ten two-phase relative permeability models is conducted using experimental, semianalytical and numerical approaches. Model predicted relative permeabilities are compared with data from 12 steady-state experiments on Berea and Brown sandstones using combinations of three white mineral oils and 2% CaCl1 brine. The model results are compared against the experimental data using three different criteria. The models are found to predict the relative permeability to oil, relative permeability to water and fractional flow of water with varying degrees of success. Relative permeability data from four of the experimental runs are used to predict the displacement performance under Buckley-Leverett conditions and the results are compared against those predicted by the models. Finally, waterflooding performances predicted by the models are analyzed at three different viscosity ratios using a two-dimensional, two-phase numerical reservoir simulator. (author)

  19. Variable Relation Parametric Model on Graphics Modelon for Collaboration Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yu-de; ZHAO Han; LI Yan-feng

    2005-01-01

    A new approach to variable relation parametric model for collaboration design based on the graphic modelon has been put forward. The paper gives a parametric description model of graphic modelon, and relating method for different graphic modelon based on variable constraint. At the same time, with the aim of engineering application in the collaboration design, the autonmous constraint in modelon and relative constraint between two modelons are given. Finally, with the tool of variable and relation dbase, the solving method of variable relating and variable-driven among different graphic modelon in a part, and doubleacting variable relating parametric method among different parts for collaboration are given.

  20. Spatiotemporal Relations and Modeling Motion Classes by Combined Topological and Directional Relations Method

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem Salamat; El-hadi Zahzah

    2012-01-01

    Defining spatiotemporal relations and modeling motion events are emerging issues of current research. Motion events are the subclasses of spatiotemporal relations, where stable and unstable spatio-temporal topological relations and temporal order of occurrence of a primitive event play an important role. In this paper, we proposed a theory of spatio-temporal relations based on topological and orientation perspective. This theory characterized the spatiotemporal relations into different classe...

  1. On grey relation projection model based on projection pursuit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shuo; Yang Shanlin; Ma Xijun

    2008-01-01

    Multidimensional grey relation projection value can be synthesized as one-dimensional projection value by u-sing projection pursuit model.The larger the projection value is,the better the model.Thus,according to the projection value,the best one can be chosen from the model aggregation.Because projection pursuit modeling based on accelera-ting genetic algorithm can simplify the implementation procedure of the projection pursuit technique and overcome its complex calculation as well as the difficulty in implementing its program,a new method can be obtained for choosing the best grey relation projection model based on the projection pursuit technique.

  2. Stochastic magnetic measurement model for relative position and orientation estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H.M.; Veltink, P.H.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a stochastic magnetic measurement model that can be used to estimate relative position and orientation. The model predicts the magnetic field generated by a single source coil at the location of the sensor. The model was used in a fusion filter that predicts the change of positio

  3. Stochastic magnetic measurement model for relative position and orientation estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, H. Martin; Veltink, Petrus H.

    2010-01-01

    This study presents a stochastic magnetic measurement model that can be used to estimate relative position and orientation. The model predicts the magnetic field generated by a single source coil at the location of the sensor. The model was used in a fusion filter that predicts the change of positio

  4. Comparing Structural Brain Connectivity by the Infinite Relational Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambrosen, Karen Marie Sandø; Herlau, Tue; Dyrby, Tim;

    2013-01-01

    The growing focus in neuroimaging on analyzing brain connectivity calls for powerful and reliable statistical modeling tools. We examine the Infinite Relational Model (IRM) as a tool to identify and compare structure in brain connectivity graphs by contrasting its performance on graphs from...... modeling tool for the identification of structure and quantification of similarity in graphs of brain connectivity in general....

  5. Modelling transport of graded sediment under partial transport conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuijnder, Arjan; Ribberink, Jan S.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Weerts, H.J.T.; Ritsema, I.L; van Os, A.G.

    2006-01-01

    Tentative plans are presented for research on the modelling of i) selective sediment transport in suspension and as bed-load, and ii) large-scale morphology in mixed sand-gravel bed rivers. Since the planning of the research is still in its early stages, the plans are flexible. Please feel free to

  6. Relational grounding facilitates development of scientifically useful multiscale models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Tai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We review grounding issues that influence the scientific usefulness of any biomedical multiscale model (MSM. Groundings are the collection of units, dimensions, and/or objects to which a variable or model constituent refers. To date, models that primarily use continuous mathematics rely heavily on absolute grounding, whereas those that primarily use discrete software paradigms (e.g., object-oriented, agent-based, actor typically employ relational grounding. We review grounding issues and identify strategies to address them. We maintain that grounding issues should be addressed at the start of any MSM project and should be reevaluated throughout the model development process. We make the following points. Grounding decisions influence model flexibility, adaptability, and thus reusability. Grounding choices should be influenced by measures, uncertainty, system information, and the nature of available validation data. Absolute grounding complicates the process of combining models to form larger models unless all are grounded absolutely. Relational grounding facilitates referent knowledge embodiment within computational mechanisms but requires separate model-to-referent mappings. Absolute grounding can simplify integration by forcing common units and, hence, a common integration target, but context change may require model reengineering. Relational grounding enables synthesis of large, composite (multi-module models that can be robust to context changes. Because biological components have varying degrees of autonomy, corresponding components in MSMs need to do the same. Relational grounding facilitates achieving such autonomy. Biomimetic analogues designed to facilitate translational research and development must have long lifecycles. Exploring mechanisms of normal-to-disease transition requires model components that are grounded relationally. Multi-paradigm modeling requires both hyperspatial and relational grounding.

  7. Testing Models: A Key Aspect to Promote Teaching Activities Related to Models and Modelling in Biology Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Moritz; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated biology teachers' (N = 148) understanding of models and modelling (MoMo), their model-related teaching activities and relations between the two. A framework which distinguishes five aspects of MoMo in science ("nature of models," "multiple models," "purpose of models," "testing…

  8. Testing Models: A Key Aspect to Promote Teaching Activities Related to Models and Modelling in Biology Lessons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krell, Moritz; Krüger, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated biology teachers' (N = 148) understanding of models and modelling (MoMo), their model-related teaching activities and relations between the two. A framework which distinguishes five aspects of MoMo in science ("nature of models," "multiple models," "purpose of models," "testing…

  9. Extending the Relational Model to Deal with Probabilistic Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Zongmin; ZHANG W. J; MA W. Y.

    2000-01-01

    According to the soundness and completeness of information in databases, the expressive form and the semantics of incomplete information are discussed in this paper. On the basis of the discussion, the current studies on incomplete data in relational databases are reviewed. In order to represent stochastic uncertainty in most general sense in the real world, probabilistic data are introduced into relational databases. An extended relational data model is presented to express and manipulate probabilistic data and the operations in relational algebra based on the extended model are defined in this paper.

  10. A Comparative Study of Relational and Non-Relational Database Models in a Web- Based Application

    OpenAIRE

    Cornelia Gyorödi; Robert Gyorödi; Roxana Sotoc

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a comparative study between relational and non-relational database models in a web-based application, by executing various operations on both relational and on non-relational databases thus highlighting the results obtained during performance comparison tests. The study was based on the implementation of a web-based application for population records. For the non-relational database, we used MongoDB and for the relational database, we used MSSQL 2014. W...

  11. Relative importance of secondary settling tank models in WWTP simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramin, Elham; Flores-Alsina, Xavier; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    Results obtained in a study using the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 1 (BSM1) show that a one-dimensional secondary settling tank (1-D SST) model structure and its parameters are among the most significant sources of uncertainty in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) simulations [Ramin et al., 2011......]. The sensitivity results consistently indicate that the prediction of sludge production is most sensitive to the variation of the settling parameters. In the present study, we use the Benchmark Simulation Model No. 2 (BSM2), a plant-wide benchmark, that combines the Activated Sludge Model No. 1 (ASM1......) with the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1). We use BSM2 as a vehicle to compare two different 1-D SST models, and to assess the relative significance of their performance on WWTP simulation model outputs. The two 1-D SST models assessed include the firstorder model by Takács et al. [1991] and the second...

  12. Computational Model for Internal Relative Humidity Distributions in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wondwosen Ali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A computational model is developed for predicting nonuniform internal relative humidity distribution in concrete. Internal relative humidity distribution is known to have a direct effect on the nonuniform drying shrinkage strains. These nonuniform drying shrinkage strains result in the buildup of internal stresses, which may lead to cracking of concrete. This may be particularly true at early ages of concrete since the concrete is relatively weak while the difference in internal relative humidity is probably high. The results obtained from this model can be used by structural and construction engineers to predict critical drying shrinkage stresses induced due to differential internal humidity distribution. The model uses finite elment-finite difference numerical methods. The finite element is used to space discretization while the finite difference is used to obtain transient solutions of the model. The numerical formulations are then programmed in Matlab. The numerical results were compared with experimental results found in the literature and demonstrated very good agreement.

  13. Spatio-temporal Data Model Based on Relational Database System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,the entity-relation data model for integrating spatio-temporal data is designed.In the design,spatio-temporal data can be effectively stored and spatiao-temporal analysis can be easily realized.

  14. Model, Materialism, and Immanent Utopia in Relational Aesthetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn Johansson, Troels

      This paper seeks to contribute to the development of socio-aesthetics by analysing the notion of model established in the discourse of relational art--that is of course with special reference to French art critic Nicolas Bourriad's theoretical writings. His seminal book, Relational Aesthetics (RA......) metaphor where social reality is staged and facilitated in order to document and present its development. At the same time however, the notion of model is difficult to dissociate from Bourriaud's materialism which draws on such different figures as the late Althusser, Lucretius, and Deleuze and which...... is tied up with a principle of immanence which is crucial for the understanding of Bourriaud's and many of his related artists' sense of utopia and avant-garde. Setting off from an analysis of the concept of model in RA, I would like to demonstrate the relationship between relational form, model...

  15. Comparative assessment of three-phase oil relative permeability models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaee, Ehsan; Riva, Monica; Porta, Giovanni M.; Guadagnini, Alberto

    2016-07-01

    We assess the ability of 11 models to reproduce three-phase oil relative permeability (kro) laboratory data obtained in a water-wet sandstone sample. We do so by considering model performance when (i) solely two-phase data are employed to render predictions of kro and (ii) two and three-phase data are jointly used for model calibration. In the latter case, a Maximum Likelihood (ML) approach is used to estimate model parameters. The tested models are selected among (i) classical models routinely employed in practical applications and implemented in commercial reservoir software and (ii) relatively recent models which are considered to allow overcoming some drawbacks of the classical formulations. Among others, the latter set of models includes the formulation recently proposed by Ranaee et al., which has been shown to embed the critical effects of hysteresis, including the reproduction of oil remobilization induced by gas injection in water-wet media. We employ formal model discrimination criteria to rank models according to their skill to reproduce the observed data and use ML Bayesian model averaging to provide model-averaged estimates (and associated uncertainty bounds) of kro by taking advantage of the diverse interpretive abilities of all models analyzed. The occurrence of elliptic regions is also analyzed for selected models in the framework of the classical fractional flow theory of displacement. Our study confirms that model outcomes based on channel flow theory and classical saturation-weighted interpolation models do not generally yield accurate reproduction of kro data, especially in the regime associated with low oil saturations, where water alternating gas injection (WAG) techniques are usually employed for enhanced oil recovery. This negative feature is not observed in the model of Ranaee et al. (2015) due to its ability to embed key effects of pore-scale phase distributions, such as hysteresis effects and cycle dependency, for modeling kro observed

  16. Personality, Relationship Conflict, and Teamwork-Related Mental Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vîrgă, Delia; CurŞeu, Petru Lucian; Maricuţoiu, Laurenţiu; Sava, Florin A.; Macsinga, Irina; Măgurean, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to explore whether neuroticism, agreeableness, and conscientiousness moderate the influence of relationship conflict experienced in groups on changes in group members' evaluative cognitions related to teamwork quality (teamwork-related mental models). Data from 216 students, nested in 48 groups were analyzed using a multilevel modeling approach. Our results show that the experience of relationship conflict leads to a negative shift from the pre-task to the post-task teamwork-related mental models. Moreover, the results indicate that conscientiousness buffered the negative association between relationship conflict and the change in teamwork-related mental models. Our results did not support the hypothesized moderating effect of agreeableness and show that the detrimental effect of relationship conflict on the shift in teamwork-related mental models is accentuated for group members scoring low rather than high on neuroticism. These findings open new research venues for exploring the association between personality, coping styles and change in teamwork-related mental models. PMID:25372143

  17. Personality, relationship conflict, and teamwork-related mental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vîrgă, Delia; Curşeu, Petru Lucian; CurŞeu, Petru Lucian; Maricuţoiu, Laurenţiu; Sava, Florin A; Macsinga, Irina; Măgurean, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to explore whether neuroticism, agreeableness, and conscientiousness moderate the influence of relationship conflict experienced in groups on changes in group members' evaluative cognitions related to teamwork quality (teamwork-related mental models). Data from 216 students, nested in 48 groups were analyzed using a multilevel modeling approach. Our results show that the experience of relationship conflict leads to a negative shift from the pre-task to the post-task teamwork-related mental models. Moreover, the results indicate that conscientiousness buffered the negative association between relationship conflict and the change in teamwork-related mental models. Our results did not support the hypothesized moderating effect of agreeableness and show that the detrimental effect of relationship conflict on the shift in teamwork-related mental models is accentuated for group members scoring low rather than high on neuroticism. These findings open new research venues for exploring the association between personality, coping styles and change in teamwork-related mental models.

  18. Neural Network Model for the Constitutive Relations of Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zeng Jing; Wang Jing-tao

    2003-01-01

    The soil constitutive relation is one of the important issues in soil mechanics. It is very difficult to establish mathematical models because of the complexity of soil mechanical behavior. We propose a new method of neural network analysis for establishing soil constitutive models. Based on triaxial experiments of sand in the laboratory, the nonlinear constitutive models of sand expressed by the neural network were set up. In comparison with Duncan-Chang's model, the neural network method for sand modeling has been proved to be more convenient, accurate and it has a strong fault-tolerance function.

  19. A Granular Computing Model Based on Tolerance relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guo-yin; HU Feng; HUANG Hai; WU Yu

    2005-01-01

    Granular computing is a new intelligent computing theory based on partition of problem concepts. It is an important problem in Rough Set theory to process incomplete information systems directly. In this paper, a granular computing model based on tolerance relation for processing incomplete information systems is developed. Furthermore, a criteria condition for attribution necessity is proposed in this model.

  20. Bianchi type IX string cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj Bali; Shuchi Dave

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated Bianchi type IX string cosmological models in general relativity. To get a determinate solution, we have assumed a condition ρ= i.e. rest energy density for a cloud of strings is equal to the string tension density. The various physical and geometrical aspects of the models are also discussed.

  1. Model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karsten Bo

    1994-01-01

    A series of scale model experiments related to outdoor propagation over an earth berm is described. The measurements are performed with a triggered spark source. The results are compared with data from an existing calculation model based upon uniform diffraction theory. Comparisons are made...

  2. Computational Models of Relational Processes in Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Graeme S.; Andrews, Glenda; Wilson, William H.; Phillips, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Acquisition of relational knowledge is a core process in cognitive development. Relational knowledge is dynamic and flexible, entails structure-consistent mappings between representations, has properties of compositionality and systematicity, and depends on binding in working memory. We review three types of computational models relevant to…

  3. Computational Models of Relational Processes in Cognitive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Graeme S.; Andrews, Glenda; Wilson, William H.; Phillips, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Acquisition of relational knowledge is a core process in cognitive development. Relational knowledge is dynamic and flexible, entails structure-consistent mappings between representations, has properties of compositionality and systematicity, and depends on binding in working memory. We review three types of computational models relevant to…

  4. The Social Relations Model in Family Studies: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelsheim, Veroni I.; Dekovic, Maja; Buist, Kirsten L.; Cook, William L.

    2009-01-01

    The Social Relations Model (SRM) allows for examination of family relations on three different levels: the individual level (actor and partner effects), the dyadic level (relationship effects), and the family level (family effect). The aim of this study was to present a systematic review of SRM family studies and identify general patterns in the…

  5. Off-shell BCJ Relation in Nonlinear Sigma Model

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Gang; Liu, Hanqing

    2016-01-01

    We investigate relations among tree-level off-shell currents in nonlinear sigma model. Under Cayley parametrization, we propose and prove a general revised BCJ relation for even-point currents. Unlike the on-shell BCJ relation, the off-shell one behaves quite differently from Yang-Mills theory although the algebraic structure is the same. After performing the permutation summation in the revised BCJ relation, the sum is non-vanishing, instead, it equals to the sum of sub-current products with the BCJ coefficients under a specific ordering, which is presented by an explicit formula. Taking on-shell limit, this identity is reduced to the on-shell BCJ relation, and thus provides the full off-shell correspondence of tree-level BCJ relation in nonlinear sigma model.

  6. RECENT RELATED RESEARCH IN TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Shih-Chih Chen; Shing-Han Li; Chien-Yi Li

    2011-01-01

    Technology Acceptance Model is widely applied to access users’ usage in various information system/information technology areas. Learning the critical role of Technology Acceptance Model can guide researchers to design different users’ interface for different online customers, and consequently achieve high user usage in different application areas. This study reviewed 24 studies to understand the past, now and future of Technology Acceptance Model. We discussed the related studies to ...

  7. A Comparative Study of Relational and Non-Relational Database Models in a Web- Based Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Gyorödi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to present a comparative study between relational and non-relational database models in a web-based application, by executing various operations on both relational and on non-relational databases thus highlighting the results obtained during performance comparison tests. The study was based on the implementation of a web-based application for population records. For the non-relational database, we used MongoDB and for the relational database, we used MSSQL 2014. We will also present the advantages of using a non-relational database compared to a relational database integrated in a web-based application, which needs to manipulate a big amount of data.

  8. From the Complete Yang Model to Snyder's Model, de Sitter Special Relativity and Their Duality

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hong-Tu; Guo, Han-Ying

    2008-01-01

    By means of Dirac procedure, we re-examine Yang's quantized space-time model, its relation to Snyder's model, the de Sitter special relativity and their UV-IR duality. Starting from a dimensionless dS_5-space in a 5+1-d Mink-space a complete Yang model at both classical and quantum level can be presented and there really exist Snyder's model, the dS special relativity and the duality.

  9. From the Complete Yang Model to Snyder's Model, de Sitter Special Relativity and Their Duality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Hong-Tu; HUANG Chao-Guang; GUO Han-Ying

    2008-01-01

    @@ By means of the Dirac procedure, we re-examine Yang's quantized space-time model, its relation to Snyder's model, the dS special relativity and their UV-IR duality. Starting from a dimensionless dS5-space in a (5+1)-dimensional Mink-space a complete Yang model at both classical and quantum level can be presented and there really exists Snyder's model, the dS special relativity and the duality.

  10. An improved car-following model considering relative velocity fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shaowei; Shi, Zhongke

    2016-07-01

    To explore and evaluate the impacts of relative velocity fluctuation on the dynamic characteristics and fuel consumptions of traffic flow, we present an improved car-following model considering relative velocity fluctuation based on the full velocity difference model, then we carry out several numerical simulations to determine the optimal time window length and to explore how relative velocity fluctuation affects cars' velocity and its fluctuation as well as fuel consumptions. It can be found that the improved car-following model can describe the phase transition of traffic flow and estimate the evolution of traffic congestion, and that taking relative velocity fluctuation into account in designing the advanced adaptive cruise control strategy can improve the traffic flow stability and reduce fuel consumptions.

  11. Infinite Multiple Membership Relational Modeling for Complex Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    Learning latent structure in complex networks has become an important problem fueled by many types of networked data originating from practically all fields of science. In this paper, we propose a new non-parametric Bayesian multiplemembership latent feature model for networks. Contrary to existing...... multiplemembership models that scale quadratically in the number of vertices the proposedmodel scales linearly in the number of links admittingmultiple-membership analysis in large scale networks. We demonstrate a connection between the single membership relational model and multiple membership models and show...

  12. RECENT RELATED RESEARCH IN TECHNOLOGY ACCEPTANCE MODEL: A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Chih Chen

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Technology Acceptance Model is widely applied to access users’ usage in various information system/information technology areas. Learning the critical role of Technology Acceptance Model can guide researchers to design different users’ interface for different online customers, and consequently achieve high user usage in different application areas. This study reviewed 24 studies to understand the past, now and future of Technology Acceptance Model. We discussed the related studies to clarify the extension of Technology Acceptance Model. Besides, the application areas are elaborated including electronic service, mobile data service, self-service technology, electronic learning and so on. Finally, the article concluded the conclusions and future research direction.

  13. A Relation-Based Modeling Method for Workshop Reconfiguration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Pan-jing; QIN Xian-sheng; WANG Ke-qin; LI Min

    2004-01-01

    To respond to the changes in the market rapidly, the workshop has become an ever-changing dynamic environment in regard to personnel change and organization alternation, etc. Therefore it is necessary to reconfigure the workshop system. In this paper, we present the point of view that the closer the relations are among elements in the system, the closer they should be connected with each other when they are integrated in designing and structural modeling of the workshop system. At first, this paper discusses the relationship among elements in the workshop system and events describing the relationship, and provides a technical overview of the expression, definition and classification of relationship. This paper focuses on the steps and algorithm to evaluate the degree of closeness of relations among elements in systems, and emphasizes the modeling methods for workshop reconfiguration by use of a fuzzy cluster. In light of the above steps and methods, types and contents of basic relationships among elements should be determined, and a standard relation tree should be set up. Then, correlation coefficients are calculated by the standard relation tree, and a fuzzy relation matrix is built up. After that, the structure modeling of the workshop equipment system can be completed through a fuzzy cluster. The paper eads with an application of a FMS ( Flexible Manufactuing System) function system modeling. Results of the modeling and calculations are presented.

  14. The Convoy Model: Explaining Social Relations From a Multidisciplinary Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonucci, Toni C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Social relations are a key aspect of aging and the life course. In this paper, we trace the scientific origins of the study of social relations, focusing in particular on research grounded in the convoy model. Design and Methods: We first briefly review and critique influential historical studies to illustrate how the scientific study of social relations developed. Next, we highlight early and current findings grounded in the convoy model that have provided key insights into theory, method, policy, and practice in the study of aging. Results: Early social relations research, while influential, lacked the combined approach of theoretical grounding and methodological rigor. Nevertheless, previous research findings, especially from anthropology, suggested the importance of social relations in the achievement of positive outcomes. Considering both life span and life course perspectives and grounded in a multidisciplinary perspective, the convoy model was developed to unify and consolidate scattered evidence while at the same time directing future empirical and applied research. Early findings are summarized, current evidence presented, and future directions projected. Implications: The convoy model has provided a useful framework in the study of aging, especially for understanding predictors and consequences of social relations across the life course. PMID:24142914

  15. Indeterminate direction relation model based on fuzzy description framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The indetermination of direction relation is a hot topic for fuzzy GIS researchers. The existing models only study the effects of indetermination of spatial objects,but ignore the uncertainty of direction reference framework. In this paper,first a for-malized representation model of indeterminate spatial objects is designed based on quadruple (x,y,A,μ),then a fuzzy direction reference framework is constructed by revising the cone method,in which the partitions of direction tiles are smooth and continuous,and two neighboring sections are overlapped in the transitional zones with fuzzy method. Grounded on these,a fuzzy description model for indeterminate direction relation is proposed in which the uncertainty of all three parts (source object,reference object and reference frame) is taken into account simultaneously. In the end,case studies are implemented to test the rationality and validity of the model.

  16. Modeling turkey growth with the relative growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, K; Potts, W J; Bacon, W L; Nestor, K E

    1998-01-01

    Six sigmoidal growth curves and two growth curves derived from a two-phase relative growth rate model were evaluated, using an experimental body-weight data from male and female turkeys of two genetic lines; a fast-growing (F) line and a randombred control (RBC) line from which the F line was developed. When their root mean square error was compared to the root mean square error of the local regression smoother, all sigmoidal growth curves: the logistic, Gompertz, von Bertalanffy, Richards, Weibull, and Morgan-Mercer-Flodin growth curves demonstrated a lack of fit. The primary source of the systematic lack of fit was identified with nonparametric estimates of the relative growth rate (the growth rate as a fraction of the body weight) of 20 turkeys. When the relative growth rate was estimated from the above sigmoidal growth curves, none could accommodate features of the nonparametric estimates of the relative growth rate. Based on the feature of the relative growth rate, two new growth curves were derived from a segmented two-phase model. Both models, in which the relative growth rate decreases in two linear phases with slopes of beta1 and beta2 joined together at time=kappa, gave growth curves that fit the experimental data acceptably. The linear-linear model with the smooth transition rendered better fit over the model with the abrupt transition. When the growth curves of male and female turkeys were compared, beta1, beta2, and kappa were smaller in males. When the F line was compared to the RBC line, beta1 and kappa were smaller and beta2 was closer to zero, indicating that the relative growth rate declined rapidly until about 61 days of age in the F line, while it declined less rapidly until about 71 days of age in the RBC line.

  17. Thermodynamics of Paint Related Systems with Engineering Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvig, Thomas; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2001-01-01

    Paints are complex materials composed of polymers (binders) dissolved in one or more solvents, pigments, and other additives. The thermodynamics of such systems is essential, for example, for selecting improved solvents and understanding a number of phenomena related especially! to adhesion...... to solid surfaces and drying. Many engineering models have been applied over the last decades for solutions with commoditity polymers. In this work the performance of some of these models is investigated for paint-related systems, focusing on those drying by the so-called " lacquer mechanism " (evaporation...

  18. Bianchi type-V string cosmological models in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anil Kumar Yadav; Vineet Kumar Yadav; Lallan Yadav

    2011-04-01

    Bianchi type-V string cosmological models in general relativity are investigated. To get the exact solution of Einstein’s field equations, we have taken some scale transformations used by Camci et al [Astrophys. Space Sci. 275, 391 (2001)]. It is shown that Einstein’s field equations are solvable for any arbitrary cosmic scale function. Solutions for particular forms of cosmic scale functions are also obtained. Some physical and geometrical aspects of the models are discussed.

  19. Hildegard E. Peplau and the model interpersonal relations

    OpenAIRE

    Ramšak-Pajk, Jožica

    2015-01-01

    The first part of the article shortly introduces Hildegard Peplau and defines her theory of interpersonal relations between nurse and patient. The four phases of the theory and the different roles, which the nurse takes through them, are described. In conclusion the article discusses the possibility of the application of the model of interpersonal relations to the nursing process. The conclusion emphasizes the value of the use of the mentioned modeland effective communication between nurse an...

  20. New Correlation Duality Relations for the Planar Potts Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, C.; Wu, F. Y.

    2002-05-01

    We introduce a new method to generate duality relations for correlation functions of the Potts model on a planar graph. The method extends previously known results, by allowing the consideration of the correlation function for arbitrarily placed vertices on the graph. We show that generally it is linear combinations of correlation functions, not the individual correlations, that are related by dualities. The method is illustrated in several non-trivial cases, and the relation to earlier results is explained. A graph-theoretical formulation of our results in terms of rooted dichromatic, or Tutte, polynomials is also given.

  1. An Improved Direction Relation Detection Model for Spatial Objects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Yucai; YI Baolin

    2004-01-01

    Direction is a common spatial concept that is used in our daily life. It is frequently used as a selection condition in spatial queries. As a result, it is important for spatial databases to provide a mechanism for modeling and processing direction queries and reasoning. Depending on the direction relation matrix, an inverted direction relation matrix and the concept of direction pre- dominance are proposed to improve the detection of direction relation between objects. Direction predicates of spatial systems are also extended. These techniques can improve the veracity of direction queries and reasoning. Experiments show excellent efficiency and performance in view of direction queries.

  2. Infinite multiple membership relational modeling for complex networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2011-01-01

    Learning latent structure in complex networks has become an important problem fueled by many types of networked data originating from practically all fields of science. In this paper, we propose a new non-parametric Bayesian multiple-membership latent feature model for networks. Contrary to exist......Learning latent structure in complex networks has become an important problem fueled by many types of networked data originating from practically all fields of science. In this paper, we propose a new non-parametric Bayesian multiple-membership latent feature model for networks. Contrary...... to existing multiplemembership models that scale quadratically in the number of vertices the proposed model scales linearly in the number of links admitting multiple-membership analysis in large scale networks. We demonstrate a connection between the single membership relational model and multiple membership...

  3. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Michaël; Vinken, Mathieu; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure can be the consequence of various etiologies, with most cases arising from drug-induced hepatotoxicity in Western countries. Despite advances in this field, the management of acute liver failure continues to be one of the most challenging problems in clinical medicine. The availability of adequate experimental models is of crucial importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and to allow identification of novel drug targets, testing the efficacy of new therapeutic interventions and acting as models for assessing mechanisms of toxicity. Experimental models of hepatotoxicity related to acute liver failure rely on surgical procedures, chemical exposure or viral infection. Each of these models has a number of strengths and weaknesses. This paper specifically reviews commonly used chemical in vivo and in vitro models of hepatotoxicity associated with acute liver failure. PMID:26631581

  4. Global assemblages and structural models of International Relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corry, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Rather than consigning assemblages to the micro-politics of international relations, the chapter argues that assemblages can also be seen to play a role in the ‘grand’ structures of international relations. Structural IR theory normally only considers how subjects are ordered – hierarchically......, anarchically, in core-periphery relations or in terms of networks. However, not only subjects but also assemblages – the bringing together of previously unconnected elements into novel constellations – play a critical role in structuring international relations. More specifically, one sub......-category of assemblages – those constructed as malleable and governable which I call ‘governance-objects’ – is central to structure in international relations. The chapter begins with standard definitions of what structures are – patterns of interaction between elements – and briefly covers the range of models currently...

  5. Goldberger-treiman relation in the renormalized sigma model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strubbe, H.J.

    1972-01-01

    The regularization and renormalization of the full sigma model is worked out explicitly in the tree and one-loop approximation. Various renormalized quantities relevant for chiral symmetry breaking are listed. The numerically calculated Goldberger-Treiman relation is also compared with experiment.

  6. Student Mental Models Related to Expansion and Contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnaz, Mehmet Altan; Emen, Ayse Yagmur

    2014-01-01

    Following up on the effects of learning environments is essential to learning. The aim of this study was to examine students' mental models related to the concepts of expansion and contraction of materials. The population of the case study consisted of 155 students in a city center in Turkey. The data was gathered using open-ended questions that…

  7. Refined functional relations for the elliptic SOS model

    CERN Document Server

    Galleas, W

    2012-01-01

    In this work we refine the method of [1] and obtain a novel kind of functional equation determining the partition function of the elliptic SOS model with domain wall boundaries. This functional relation is originated from the dynamical Yang-Baxter algebra and its solution is given in terms of multiple contour integrals.

  8. Assigning Grammatical Relations with a Back-off Model

    CERN Document Server

    De Lima, E F

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents a corpus-based method to assign grammatical subject/object relations to ambiguous German constructs. It makes use of an unsupervised learning procedure to collect training and test data, and the back-off model to make assignment decisions.

  9. Insect antifeedant activity of clerodane diterpenes and related model compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein Gebbinck, E.A.; Jansen, B.J.M.; Groot, de Æ.

    2002-01-01

    A comprehensive compilation of all test results on the insect antifeedant activity of clerodane diterpenes and related model compounds is reported. To increase the compatibility of data from different sources, some of the results reported in the literature have been converted into a standardized for

  10. Solvable Models on Noncommutative Spaces with Minimal Length Uncertainty Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Sanjib

    2014-01-01

    Our main focus is to explore different models in noncommutative spaces in higher dimensions. We provide a procedure to relate a three dimensional q-deformed oscillator algebra to the corresponding algebra satisfied by canonical variables describing non-commutative spaces. The representations for the corresponding operators obey algebras whose uncertainty relations lead to minimal length, areas and volumes in phase space, which are in principle natural candidates of many different approaches of quantum gravity. We study some explicit models on these types of noncommutative spaces, first by utilising the perturbation theory, later in an exact manner. In many cases the operators are not Hermitian, therefore we use PT -symmetry and pseudo-Hermiticity property, wherever applicable, to make them self-consistent. Apart from building mathematical models, we focus on the physical implications of noncommutative theories too. We construct Klauder coherent states for the perturbative and nonperturbative noncommutative ha...

  11. Salt marsh stability modelled in relation to sea level rise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Jesper; Bartholdy, Anders; Kroon, Aart

    2010-01-01

    Accretion on a natural backbarrier salt marsh was modeled as a function of high tide level, initial salt marsh level and distance to the source. Calibration of the model was based on up to ca 80 year old marker horizons, supplemented by 210Pb/137Cs datings and subsequent measurements of clay...... thickness. Autocompaction was incorporated in the model, and shown to play a major role for the translation of accretion rates measured as length per unit time to accumulation rates measured as mass per area per unit time. This is important, even for shallow salt marsh deposits for which it is demonstrated...... that mass depth down core can be directly related to the bulk dry density of the surface layer by means of a logarithmic function. The results allow for an evaluation of the use of marker horizons in the topmost layers and show that it is important to know the level of the marker in relation to the salt...

  12. Dispersion Relations for Electroweak Observables in Composite Higgs Models

    CERN Document Server

    Contino, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    We derive dispersion relations for the electroweak oblique observables measured at LEP in the context of $SO(5)/SO(4)$ composite Higgs models. It is shown how these relations can be used and must be modified when modeling the spectral functions through a low-energy effective description of the strong dynamics. The dispersion relation for the parameter $\\epsilon_3$ is then used to estimate the contribution from spin-1 resonances at the 1-loop level. Finally, it is shown that the sign of the contribution to the $\\hat S$ parameter from the lowest-lying spin-1 states is not necessarily positive definite, but depends on the energy scale at which the asymptotic behavior of current correlators is attained.

  13. Mouse models of age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chul; Someya, Shinichi

    2013-07-01

    Hearing loss is the most common sensory disorder in the elderly population. Overall, 10% of the population has a hearing loss in the US, and this age-related hearing disorder is projected to afflict more than 28 million Americans by 2030. Age-related hearing loss is associated with loss of sensory hair cells (sensory hearing loss) and/or spiral ganglion neurons (neuronal hearing loss) in the cochlea of the inner ear. Many lines of evidence indicate that oxidative stress and associated mitochondrial dysfunction play a central role in age-related neurodegenerative diseases and are a cause of age-related neurosensory hearing loss. Yet, the molecular mechanisms of how oxidative stress and/or mitochondrial dysfunction lead to hearing loss during aging remain unclear, and currently there is no treatment for this age-dependent disorder. Several mouse models of aging and age-related diseases have been linked to age-related mitochondrial neurosensory hearing loss. Evaluation of these animal models has offered basic knowledge of the mechanism underlying hearing loss associated with oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and aging. Here we review the evidence that specific mutations in the mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA that affect mitochondrial function result in increased oxidative damage and associated loss of sensory hair cells and/or spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea during aging, thereby causing hearing loss in these mouse models. Future studies comparing these models will provide further insight into fundamental knowledge about the disordered process of hearing and treatments to improve the lives of individuals with communication disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Mitochondrial function and dysfunction in neurodegeneration'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Inventory of environmental impact models related to energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Owen, P.T.; Dailey, N.S.; Johnson, C.A.; Martin, F.M. (eds.)

    1979-02-01

    The purpose of this inventory is to identify and collect data on computer simulations and computational models related to the environmental effects of energy source development, energy conversion, or energy utilization. Information for 33 data fields was sought for each model reported. All of the information which could be obtained within the time alloted for completion of the project is presented for each model listed. Efforts will be continued toward acquiring the needed information. Readers who are interested in these particular models are invited to contact ESIC for assistance in locating them. In addition to the standard bibliographic information, other data fields of interest to modelers, such as computer hardware and software requirements, algorithms, applications, and existing model validation information, are included. Indexes are provided for contact person, acronym, keyword, and title. The models are grouped into the following categories: atmospheric transport, air quality, aquatic transport, terrestrial food chains, soil transport, aquatic food chains, water quality, dosimetry, and human effects, animal effects, plant effects, and generalized environmental transport. Within these categories, the models are arranged alphabetically by last name of the contact person.

  15. A Survey of Probabilistic Models for Relational Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutsourelakis, P S

    2006-10-13

    Traditional data mining methodologies have focused on ''flat'' data i.e. a collection of identically structured entities, assumed to be independent and identically distributed. However, many real-world datasets are innately relational in that they consist of multi-modal entities and multi-relational links (where each entity- or link-type is characterized by a different set of attributes). Link structure is an important characteristic of a dataset and should not be ignored in modeling efforts, especially when statistical dependencies exist between related entities. These dependencies can in fact significantly improve the accuracy of inference and prediction results, if the relational structure is appropriately leveraged (Figure 1). The need for models that can incorporate relational structure has been accentuated by new technological developments which allow us to easily track, store, and make accessible large amounts of data. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in statistical models for dealing with richly interconnected, heterogeneous data, fueled largely by information mining of web/hypertext data, social networks, bibliographic citation data, epidemiological data and communication networks. Graphical models have a natural formalism for representing complex relational data and for predicting the underlying evolving system in a dynamic framework. The present survey provides an overview of probabilistic methods and techniques that have been developed over the last few years for dealing with relational data. Particular emphasis is paid to approaches pertinent to the research areas of pattern recognition, group discovery, entity/node classification, and anomaly detection. We start with supervised learning tasks, where two basic modeling approaches are discussed--i.e. discriminative and generative. Several discriminative techniques are reviewed and performance results are presented. Generative methods are discussed in a separate survey. A

  16. Animal Models of Hemophilia and Related Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Jay N.; Nichols, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of hemophilia and related diseases are important for development of novel treatments and to understand the pathophysiology of bleeding disorders in humans. Testing in animals with the equivalent human disorder provides informed estimates of doses and measures of efficacy, which aids in design of human trials. Many models of hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease have been developed from animals with spontaneous mutations (hemophilia A dogs, rats, sheep; hemophilia B dogs; and von Willebrand disease pigs and dogs), or by targeted gene disruption in mice to create hemophilia A, B, or VWD models. Animal models have been used to generate new insights into the pathophysiology of each bleeding disorder and also to perform pre-clinical assessments of standard protein replacement therapies as well as novel gene transfer technology. Both the differences between species and differences in underlying causative mutations must be considered in choosing the best animal for a specific scientific study PMID:23956467

  17. Online traffic flow model applying dynamic flow-density relation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y

    2002-01-01

    This dissertation describes a new approach of the online traffic flow modelling based on the hydrodynamic traffic flow model and an online process to adapt the flow-density relation dynamically. The new modelling approach was tested based on the real traffic situations in various homogeneous motorway sections and a motorway section with ramps and gave encouraging simulation results. This work is composed of two parts: first the analysis of traffic flow characteristics and second the development of a new online traffic flow model applying these characteristics. For homogeneous motorway sections traffic flow is classified into six different traffic states with different characteristics. Delimitation criteria were developed to separate these states. The hysteresis phenomena were analysed during the transitions between these traffic states. The traffic states and the transitions are represented on a states diagram with the flow axis and the density axis. For motorway sections with ramps the complicated traffic fl...

  18. Reappraisal of a model for deformed special relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Gubitosi, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    We revisit one of the earliest proposals for deformed dispersion relations in the light of recent results on dynamical dimensional reduction and production of cosmological fluctuations. Depending on the specification of the measure of integration and addition rule in momentum space the model may be completed so as to merely deform Lorentz invariance, or so as to introduce a preferred frame. Models which violate Lorentz invariance have a negative UV asymptotic dimension and a very red spectrum of quantum vacuum fluctuations. Instead, models which preserve frame independence can exhibit running to a UV dimension of 2, and a scale-invariant spectrum of fluctuations. The bispectrum of the fluctuations is another point of divergence between the two casings proposed here for the original model.

  19. Assessing Accuracy of Waveform Models against Numerical Relativity Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pürrer, Michael; LVC Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We compare currently available phenomenological and effective-one-body inspiral-merger-ringdown models for gravitational waves (GW) emitted from coalescing black hole binaries against a set of numerical relativity waveforms from the SXS collaboration. Simplifications are used in the construction of some waveform models, such as restriction to spins aligned with the orbital angular momentum, no inclusion of higher harmonics in the GW radiation, no modeling of eccentricity and the use of effective parameters to describe spin precession. In contrast, NR waveforms provide us with a high fidelity representation of the ``true'' waveform modulo small numerical errors. To focus on systematics we inject NR waveforms into zero noise for early advanced LIGO detector sensitivity at a moderately optimistic signal-to-noise ratio. We discuss where in the parameter space the above modeling assumptions lead to noticeable biases in recovered parameters.

  20. Direct relations between morphology and transport in Boolean models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Christian; Wirner, Frank; Klatt, Michael A; Hirneise, Daniel; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E; Mecke, Klaus; Bechinger, Clemens

    2015-10-01

    We study the relation of permeability and morphology for porous structures composed of randomly placed overlapping circular or elliptical grains, so-called Boolean models. Microfluidic experiments and lattice Boltzmann simulations allow us to evaluate a power-law relation between the Euler characteristic of the conducting phase and its permeability. Moreover, this relation is so far only directly applicable to structures composed of overlapping grains where the grain density is known a priori. We develop a generalization to arbitrary structures modeled by Boolean models and characterized by Minkowski functionals. This generalization works well for the permeability of the void phase in systems with overlapping grains, but systematic deviations are found if the grain phase is transporting the fluid. In the latter case our analysis reveals a significant dependence on the spatial discretization of the porous structure, in particular the occurrence of single isolated pixels. To link the results to percolation theory we performed Monte Carlo simulations of the Euler characteristic of the open cluster, which reveals different regimes of applicability for our permeability-morphology relations close to and far away from the percolation threshold.

  1. Differential Equations Related to the Williams-Bjerknes Tumour Model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Martinez; A R Villena

    2000-08-01

    We investigate an initial value problem which is closely related to the Williams-Bjerknes tumour model for a cancer which spreads through an epithelial basal layer modeled on ⊂ 2. The solution of this problem is a family =(()), where each () could be considered as an approximation to the probability that the cell situated at is cancerous at time . We prove that this problem has a unique solution, it is defined on [0, + ∞], and, for some relevant situations, lim → ∞ ()=1 for all ∈ . Moreover, we study the expected number of cancerous cells at time .

  2. Epistemology and Rosen's Modeling Relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dress, W.B.

    1999-11-07

    Rosen's modeling relation is embedded in Popper's three worlds to provide an heuristic tool for model building and a guide for thinking about complex systems. The utility of this construct is demonstrated by suggesting a solution to the problem of pseudo science and a resolution of the famous Bohr-Einstein debates. A theory of bizarre systems is presented by an analogy with entangled particles of quantum mechanics. This theory underscores the poverty of present-day computational systems (e.g., computers) for creating complex and bizarre entities by distinguishing between mechanism and organism.

  3. Modeling of humidity-related reliability in enclosures with electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hygum, Morten Arnfeldt; Popok, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Reliability of electronics that operate outdoor is strongly affected by environmental factors such as temperature and humidity. Fluctuations of these parameters can lead to water condensation inside enclosures. Therefore, modelling of humidity distribution in a container with air and freely exposed...... to predict humidity-related reliability of a printed circuit board (PCB) located in a cabinet by combining structural reliability methods and non-linear diffusion models. This framework can, thus, be used for reliability prediction from a climatic point-of-view. The proposed numerical approach is then tested...

  4. Probabilistic delay differential equation modeling of event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostwald, Dirk; Starke, Ludger

    2016-08-01

    "Dynamic causal models" (DCMs) are a promising approach in the analysis of functional neuroimaging data due to their biophysical interpretability and their consolidation of functional-segregative and functional-integrative propositions. In this theoretical note we are concerned with the DCM framework for electroencephalographically recorded event-related potentials (ERP-DCM). Intuitively, ERP-DCM combines deterministic dynamical neural mass models with dipole-based EEG forward models to describe the event-related scalp potential time-series over the entire electrode space. Since its inception, ERP-DCM has been successfully employed to capture the neural underpinnings of a wide range of neurocognitive phenomena. However, in spite of its empirical popularity, the technical literature on ERP-DCM remains somewhat patchy. A number of previous communications have detailed certain aspects of the approach, but no unified and coherent documentation exists. With this technical note, we aim to close this gap and to increase the technical accessibility of ERP-DCM. Specifically, this note makes the following novel contributions: firstly, we provide a unified and coherent review of the mathematical machinery of the latent and forward models constituting ERP-DCM by formulating the approach as a probabilistic latent delay differential equation model. Secondly, we emphasize the probabilistic nature of the model and its variational Bayesian inversion scheme by explicitly deriving the variational free energy function in terms of both the likelihood expectation and variance parameters. Thirdly, we detail and validate the estimation of the model with a special focus on the explicit form of the variational free energy function and introduce a conventional nonlinear optimization scheme for its maximization. Finally, we identify and discuss a number of computational issues which may be addressed in the future development of the approach.

  5. Black Hole Demography: From scaling relations to models

    CERN Document Server

    Shankar, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    In this contributed paper I review our current knowledge of the local Black Hole (BH) scaling relations, and their impact on the determination of the local BH mass function. I particularly emphasize the remaining systematic uncertainties impinging upon a secure determination of the BH mass function and how progress can be made. I then review and discuss the evidence for a different time evolution for separate BH-galaxy scaling relations, and how these independent empirical evidences can be reconciled with the overall evolution of the structural properties of the host galaxies. I conclude discussing BH demography in the context of semi-empirical continuity accretion models, as well as more complex evolutionary models, emphasizing the general constraints we can set on them.

  6. A vector relational data modeling approach to Insider threat intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan F.; Anderson, Thomas S.

    2016-05-01

    We address the problem of detecting insider threats before they can do harm. In many cases, co-workers notice indications of suspicious activity prior to insider threat attacks. A partial solution to this problem requires an understanding of how information can better traverse the communication network between human intelligence and insider threat analysts. Our approach employs modern mobile communications technology and scale free network architecture to reduce the network distance between human sensors and analysts. In order to solve this problem, we propose a Vector Relational Data Modeling approach to integrate human "sensors," geo-location, and existing visual analytics tools. This integration problem is known to be difficult due to quadratic increases in cost associated with complex integration solutions. A scale free network integration approach using vector relational data modeling is proposed as a method for reducing network distance without increasing cost.

  7. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Christian G [Department of Mathematics and Institute of Origins, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); De Risi, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli studi di Bari and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, sez. di Bari, Via G. Amendola 173, 70126 Bari (Italy); Harko, Tiberiu [Department of Physics and Center for Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pok Fu Lam Road (Hong Kong); Lobo, Francisco S N, E-mail: c.boehmer@ucl.ac.u, E-mail: giuseppe.derisi@ba.infn.i, E-mail: harko@hkucc.hku.h, E-mail: flobo@cii.fc.ul.p [Centro de Astronomia e Astrofisica da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-21

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models.

  8. Dynamic properties of fuzzy Petri net model and related analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周恺卿; Azlan Mohd Zain; 莫礼平

    2015-01-01

    Fuzzy Petri net (FPN) has been extensively applied in industrial fields for knowledge-based systems or systems with uncertainty. Although the applications of FPN are known to be successful, the theoretical research of FPN is still at an initial stage. To pave a way for further study, this work explores related dynamic properties of FPN including reachability, boundedness, safeness, liveness and fairness. The whole methodology is divided into two phases. In the first phase, a comparison between elementary net system (EN_system) and FPN is established to prove that the FPN is an extensive formalism of Petri nets using a backwards-compatible extension method. Next, current research results of dynamic properties are utilized to analyze FPN model. The results illustrate that FPN model is bounded, safe, weak live and fair, and can support theoretical evidences for designing related decomposition algorithm.

  9. Classical tests of general relativity in brane world models

    CERN Document Server

    Boehmer, Christian G; Harko, Tiberiu; Lobo, Francisco S N

    2009-01-01

    The classical tests of general relativity (perihelion precession, deflection of light, and the radar echo delay) are considered for several spherically symmetric static vacuum solutions in brane world models. Generally, the spherically symmetric vacuum solutions of the brane gravitational field equations have properties quite distinct as compared to the standard black hole solutions of general relativity. As a first step a general formalism that facilitates the analysis of general relativistic Solar System tests for any given spherically symmetric metric is developed. It is shown that the existing observational Solar System data on the perihelion shift of Mercury, on the light bending around the Sun (obtained using long-baseline radio interferometry), and ranging to Mars using the Viking lander, constrain the numerical values of the parameters of the specific models. Hence Solar System tests represent very convenient and efficient tools to test the viability of the different black hole solutions in brane worl...

  10. Modeling the Color Magnitude Relation for Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Jimenez, Noelia; Castelli, Analia Smith; Bassino, Lilia P

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the colour-magnitude relation (CMR) observed in cluster galaxies by using a combination of a cosmological N-body simulation of a cluster of galaxies and a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. The departure of galaxies in the bright end of the CMR with respect to the trend denoted by less luminous galaxies could be explained by the influence of minor mergers

  11. Relations between two-dimensional models from dimensional reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaral, R.L.P.G.; Natividade, C.P. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    1998-12-31

    In this work we explore the consequences of dimensional reduction of the 3D Maxwell-Chern-Simons and some related models. A connection between topological mass generation in 3D and mass generation according to the Schwinger mechanism in 2D is obtained. Besides, a series of relationships are established by resorting to dimensional reduction and duality interpolating transformations. Nonabelian generalizations are also pointed out. (author) 10 refs.

  12. Method of Numerical Modeling for Constitutive Relations of Clay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the method of numerical modeling for constitutive relations of clay, on the basis of the principle of interaction between plastic volumetric strain and plastic generalized shear strain, the two constitutive functionals that include the function of stress path were used as the basic framework of the constitutive model, which are able to demonstrate the dependence of stress path.The two partial differential cross terms appear in the expression of stress-strain increment relation, which are used to demonstrate the interaction between plastic volumetric strain and plastic generalized shear strain.The elasoplastic constitutive models of clay under two kinds of stress paths, CTC and TC, have been constructed using the triaxial test results.The three basic characteristics of deformation of soils, pressure sensitivity, dilatancy, and dependence of stress path, are well explained using these two models.Using visualization, the three-dimensional surfaces of shear and volume strains in the whole stress field under stress paths of CTC and TC are given.In addition, the two families of shear and volumetric yield loci under CTC and TC paths are plotted respectively.By comparing the results of deformation under these two stress paths, it has been found that, there are obvious differences in the strain peaks, the shapes of strain surfaces, and the trends of variation of volumetric yield loci, however both families of shear yield loci are similar.These results demonstrate that the influences of stress path on the constitutive relations of clay are considerably large and not negligible.The numerical modeling method that can sufficiently reflect the dependence of stress path is superior to the traditional one.

  13. Fluctuation relation based continuum model for thermoviscoplasticity in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy Chowdhury, Shubhankar; Roy, Debasish; Reddy, J. N.; Srinivasa, Arun

    2016-11-01

    A continuum plasticity model for metals is presented from considerations of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. Of specific interest is the application of a fluctuation relation that subsumes the second law of thermodynamics en route to deriving the evolution equations for the internal state variables. The modelling itself is accomplished in a two-temperature framework that appears naturally by considering the thermodynamic system to be composed of two weakly interacting subsystems, viz. a kinetic vibrational subsystem corresponding to the atomic lattice vibrations and a configurational subsystem of the slower degrees of freedom describing the motion of defects in a plastically deforming metal. An apparently physical nature of the present model derives upon considering the dislocation density, which characterizes the configurational subsystem, as a state variable. Unlike the usual constitutive modelling aided by the second law of thermodynamics that merely provides a guideline to select the admissible (though possibly non-unique) processes, the present formalism strictly determines the process or the evolution equations for the thermodynamic states while including the effect of fluctuations. The continuum model accommodates finite deformation and describes plastic deformation in a yield-free setup. The theory here is essentially limited to face-centered cubic metals modelled with a single dislocation density as the internal variable. Limited numerical simulations are presented with validation against relevant experimental data.

  14. Combined Effects of Dam Removal and Past Sediment Mining on a Relatively Large Lowland Sandy Gravelly Bed River (Vienne River, France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, S.; Ursache, O.; Bouchard, J. P.; Juge, P.

    2014-12-01

    Dam removal is of growing interest for the management of sediment fluxes, morphological evolution and ecological restoration of rivers. If dam removal experiments are well documented for small streams, examples of lowland and large rivers are scarce. We present the morphological response of a relatively large lowland river (Vienne River, France) to a dam removal. The objective is to understand and quantify the morphological adaptation on a reach of 50 km and over 15 years associated with the dam removal and the presence of ancient sand pits located along the riverbed. This study is based on field data collected during 7 surveys performed between 1998 and 2013. This dataset focuses on bed geometry, sediment grain size, and bedload fluxes. It was combined with a 1D numerical model to assess flow dynamics and sediment transport before and after dam removal. Results show that dam removal triggered both regressive and progressive erosions and that discharges higher than 100 m3.s-1 were sufficient to erode the sandy sediments trapped by the dam whereas gravels were mobilised for discharges higher than 300 m3.s-1. Since 1999, large bedload sediment waves coming from upstream migrated downstream at an average celerity of 2.2 km.year-1 and were trapped by three ancient sand pits located downstream. Some of these pits constitute efficient sediment traps even 15 years after dam removal. As a result, between 2002 and 2013, the slope of the river bed adjusted gently and observed morphological processes were minors compared with the time period between 1998 and 2002.

  15. Categorization of exchange fluxes explains the four relational models

    CERN Document Server

    Favre, Maroussia

    2013-01-01

    The theory of Relational Models (RMs) posits four elementary models of relationships governing all human interactions, singly or in combination: Communal Sharing, Authority Ranking, Equality Matching, and Market Pricing. By considering two agents that can act in one out of three ways towards one another: give resource A, give resource B, or give nothing, we find four discrete categories of exchange fluxes that map unequivocally to the four RMs. This categorization shows that the RMs form an exhaustive set of all possible elementary exchanges. Hence, the fluxes categorization answers why there are just four RMs and explains their discreteness. By considering the costs associated with extracting resources, storing them and implementing each flux category, we are able to propose conditions under which each RM should evolve. We also logically deduce the singular nature of the Authority Ranking model. Our propositions are compatible with anthropological, ethnological and historical observations and can be tested a...

  16. L^2-theoretical study of the relation between the LIBOR market model and the HJM model

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuoka, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In previous works, the author introduced metric spaces of term structure models to study the relation between the LIBOR market model and the HJM model. However that framework is not comprehensive, nor does it admit an extendable structure. This paper introduces a new metric space to better develop the perspective argument. A metric space is naturally constructed on the set of bond price processes such that the space allows many types of term structure models. This metric presents a general vi...

  17. Mouse models of SCN5A-related cardiac arrhythmias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavien eCharpentier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of SCN5A gene, which encodes the α-subunit of the voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.5, underlie hereditary cardiac arrhythmic syndromes such as the type 3 long QT syndrome, cardiac conduction diseases, the Brugada syndrome, the sick sinus syndrome, atrial standstill and numerous overlap syndromes. Patch-clamp studies in heterologous expression systems have provided important information to understand the genotype-phenotype relationships of these diseases. However, they could not clarify how SCN5A mutations can be responsible for such a large spectrum of diseases, for the late age of onset or the progressiveness of some of these diseases and for the overlapping syndromes. Genetically modified mice rapidly appeared as promising tools for understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of cardiac SCN5A-related arrhythmic syndromes and several mouse models have been established. This paper reviews some of the results obtained on these models that, for most of them, recapitulate the clinical phenotypes of the patients. It also points out that these models also have their own limitations. Overall, mouse models appear as powerful tools to elucidate the pathophysiological mechanisms of SCN5A-related diseases and offer the opportunity to investigate the secondary cellular consequences of SCN5A mutations such as the expression remodelling of other genes that might participate to the overall phenotype. Finally, they constitute useful tools for addressing the role of genetic and environmental modifiers on cardiac electrical activity.

  18. Semiotic aspects of control and modeling relations in complex systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joslyn, C.

    1996-08-01

    A conceptual analysis of the semiotic nature of control is provided with the goal of elucidating its nature in complex systems. Control is identified as a canonical form of semiotic relation of a system to its environment. As a form of constraint between a system and its environment, its necessary and sufficient conditions are established, and the stabilities resulting from control are distinguished from other forms of stability. These result from the presence of semantic coding relations, and thus the class of control systems is hypothesized to be equivalent to that of semiotic systems. Control systems are contrasted with models, which, while they have the same measurement functions as control systems, do not necessarily require semantic relations because of the lack of the requirement of an interpreter. A hybrid construction of models in control systems is detailed. Towards the goal of considering the nature of control in complex systems, the possible relations among collections of control systems are considered. Powers arguments on conflict among control systems and the possible nature of control in social systems are reviewed, and reconsidered based on our observations about hierarchical control. Finally, we discuss the necessary semantic functions which must be present in complex systems for control in this sense to be present at all.

  19. Microcanonical relation between continuous and discrete spin models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casetti, Lapo; Nardini, Cesare; Nerattini, Rachele

    2011-02-04

    A relation between a class of stationary points of the energy landscape of continuous spin models on a lattice and the configurations of an Ising model defined on the same lattice suggests an approximate expression for the microcanonical density of states. Based on this approximation we conjecture that if a O(n) model with ferromagnetic interactions on a lattice has a phase transition, its critical energy density is equal to that of the n=1 case, i.e., an Ising system with the same interactions. The conjecture holds true in the case of long-range interactions. For nearest-neighbor interactions, numerical results are consistent with the conjecture for n=2 and n=3 in three dimensions. For n=2 in two dimensions (XY model) the conjecture yields a prediction for the critical energy of the Berežinskij-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition, which would be equal to that of the two-dimensional Ising model. We discuss available numerical data in this respect.

  20. The velocity-density relation in the spherical model

    CERN Document Server

    Bilicki, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    We study the cosmic velocity-density relation using the spherical collapse model (SCM) as a proxy to non-linear dynamics. Although the dependence of this relation on cosmological parameters is known to be weak, we retain the density parameter Omega_m in SCM equations, in order to study the limit Omega_m -> 0. We show that in this regime the considered relation is strictly linear, for arbitrary values of the density contrast, on the contrary to some claims in the literature. On the other hand, we confirm that for realistic values of Omega_m the exact relation in the SCM is well approximated by the classic formula of Bernardeau (1992), both for voids (delta<0) and for overdensities up to delta ~ 3. Inspired by this fact, we find further analytic approximations to the relation for the whole range delta from -1 to infinity. Our formula for voids accounts for the weak Omega_m-dependence of their maximal rate of expansion, which for Omega_m < 1 is slightly smaller that 3/2. For positive density contrasts, we ...

  1. Models of political public relations: Testing the situation in Catalonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Jordi Xifra Triadú

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The idea that political communication strategies are an application of marketing strategies to political field is today commonly shared by specialists. For them public relations is viewed like a set of techniques that serves political parties and other actors of the political scene, concentrated on media relations. This instrumental perspective is not in keeping with structural dimension of public relations in political activity and communication of his actors: political parties, pressure groups and political leaders. In this point of view, during managing periods of governance or opposition and during electoral campaigns, the most applied communication form by political parties is structured in accordance with the major public relations models: press agent model, public information model, two way asymmetrical model, and two way symmetrical model. This research prove hypothesis in Catalonia according the results of a quantitative survey focused on inside professionals who provide services for the seven main political parties in this Spanish Autonomous Community.RESUMEN:La idea de que las estrategias de comunicación política constituyen una aplicación de las estrategias del marketing al ámbito político es hoy comúnmente compartida por los analistas. Para éstos, las relaciones públicas son percibidas como un conjunto de técnicas al servicio de los partidos políticos y de otros actores de la escena política concentradas en las relaciones con la prensa. Esta perspectiva instrumental no concuerda con la dimensión estructural de las relaciones públicas en la actividad política y comunicativa de sus actores: partidos políticos, grupos de presión y líderes. Desde este punto de vista, tanto en los periodos de gestión u oposición como en los electorales, la forma comunicativa más aplicada por los partidos políticos se estructura de acuerdo con los modelos tradicionales de las relaciones públicas: agente de prensa, información p

  2. DEPTH-INTEGRATED MODELING FOR AGGRADING/DEGRADING MOBILE CHANNELS I: MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    En-Tian LIN; Chih-Tsung HSU; Keh-Chia YEH

    2006-01-01

    A depth-integrated model has been developed to simulate the alluvial process of channel bed under overloading and under-loading sediment discharge conditions. The hydrodynamic sub-model based on the explicit-finite-analytic method is used to obtain the flow field. Then the sediment transport modes, including the bed-load and suspended load, are modeled with the aid of the empirically auxiliary relations. In the depth-integrated model, the sediment exchange rate is treated as a source term specified at the reference level, rather than a boundary condition as usually adopted in vertical 2-D or 3-D models. The deposition or erosion rate of the bed is then determined by comparing the flow-laden suspended-sediment concentration profile against the equilibrium concentration profile, and their difference is used to compute the sediment exchange rate for a given time interval. Assessment of the good accuracy of the proposed model is demonstrated by using van Rijn's (1981) experiment for the case of clear water passing a movable bed. In the companion paper, the verification and the field application of the proposed model are presented.

  3. Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Smith

    2004-09-09

    This report presents one of the analyses that support the Environmental Radiation Model for Yucca Mountain Nevada (ERMYN). The ''Biosphere Model Report'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169460]) describes the details of the conceptual model as well as the mathematical model and the required input parameters. The biosphere model is one of a series of process models supporting the postclosure Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the Yucca Mountain repository. A schematic representation of the documentation flow for the Biosphere input to TSPA is presented in Figure 1-1. This figure shows the evolutionary relationships among the products (i.e., analysis and model reports) developed for biosphere modeling, and the biosphere abstraction products for TSPA, as identified in the ''Technical Work Plan for Biosphere Modeling and Expert Support'' (TWP) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]). This figure is included to provide an understanding of how this analysis report contributes to biosphere modeling in support of the license application, and is not intended to imply that access to the listed documents is required to understand the contents of this report. This report, ''Soil-Related Input Parameters for the Biosphere Model'', is one of the five analysis reports that develop input parameters for use in the ERMYN model. This report is the source documentation for the six biosphere parameters identified in Table 1-1. The purpose of this analysis was to develop the biosphere model parameters associated with the accumulation and depletion of radionuclides in the soil. These parameters support the calculation of radionuclide concentrations in soil from on-going irrigation or ash deposition and, as a direct consequence, radionuclide concentration in other environmental media that are affected by radionuclide concentrations in soil. The analysis was performed in accordance with the TWP (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169573]) where the governing procedure

  4. THE JOINT DISTRIBUTION OF BIVARIATE EXPONENTIAL UNDER LINEARLY RELATED MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norou Diawara

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, fundamental results of the joint distribution of the bivariate exponential distributions are established.  The positive support multivariate distribution theory is important in reliability and survival analysis, and we applied it to the case where more than one failure or survival is observed in a given study. Usually, the multivariate distribution is restricted to those with marginal distributions of a specified and familiar lifetime family. The family of exponential distribution contains the absolutely continuous and discrete case models with a nonzero probability on a set of measure zero. Examples are given, and estimators are developed and applied to simulated data. Our findings generalize substantially known results in the literature, provide flexible and novel approach for modeling related events that can occur simultaneously from one based event.

  5. On virtual states and generalized completeness relation in Friedrichs Model

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    We study the well-known Friedrichs model, in which a discrete state is coupled to a continuum state. By examining the pole behaviors of the Friedrichs model in a specific form factor thoroughly, we find that, in general, when the bare discrete state is below the threshold of the continuum state, there should also be a virtual-state pole accompanying the bound-state pole originating from the bare discrete state as the coupling is turned on. There are also other second-sheet poles originating from the singularities of the form factor. We give a general argument for the existence of these two kinds of states. As the coupling is increased to a certain value, the second-sheet poles may merge and become higher-order poles. We then discuss the completeness relations incorporating bound states, virtual states, and resonant states corresponding to higher-order poles.

  6. Salt marsh stability modelled in relation to sea level rise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Jesper; Bartholdy, Anders; Kroon, Aart

    2010-01-01

    Accretion on a natural backbarrier salt marsh was modeled as a function of high tide level, initial salt marsh level and distance to the source. Calibration of the model was based on up to ca 80 year old marker horizons, supplemented by 210Pb/137Cs datings and subsequent measurements of clay...... rise, the marsh at the specific location will eventually drown, whereas - with a sea level rise below this level – it will grow towards the top of the rising tidal frame. The short term variation of salt marsh accretion was found to correlate well with variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation...... - relatively quickly grow above the level of the highest astronomical tide, whereas this - in practice - will never happen for the latter....

  7. A stellar model with diffusion in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Alho, Artur

    2016-01-01

    We consider a spherically symmetric stellar model in general relativity whose interior consists of a pressureless fluid undergoing microscopic velocity diffusion in a cosmological scalar field. We show that the diffusion dynamics compel the interior to be spatially homogeneous, by which one can infer immediately that within our model, and in contrast to the diffusion-free case, no naked singularities can form in the gravitational collapse. We then study the problem of matching an exterior Bondi type metric to the surface of the star and find that the exterior can be chosen to be a modified Vaidya metric with variable cosmological constant. Finally, we study in detail the causal structure of an explicit, self-similar solution.

  8. Heterogeneous anisotropic complex structure gradual model and constitutive relation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李永; 宋健; 张志民

    2003-01-01

    Four new gradually delaminate models of the three-dimensional macro-/mesoscopic structure and delamination of the heterogeneous anisotropic composite (HAC) are set up by conducting research into its structure and performance. A general theory, which demonstrates the three-dimensional constitutive relation of the macro-/mesoscopic performance of this structure is further developed. The macroscopic expression of HAC is presented in terms of a Tanigawa delaminate homogeneous equivalent approach, the mesoscopic problems are analysed utilizing Eshelby-Mori-Tanaka theory, with the introduction of the representative volume elements of monolayer single unit cell and interlaminar double unit cells.According to the gradual continuity of the structure as a whole, great attention is given to the modelling and research of the interlaminar macroscopic and mesoscopic problems of HAC structure. Comparison with the existing solutions is made through calculation of typical cases.

  9. A linearized dispersion relation for orthorhombic pseudo-acoustic modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Xiaolei

    2012-11-04

    Wavefield extrapolation in acoustic orthorhombic anisotropic media suffers from wave-mode coupling and stability limitations in the parameter range. We introduce a linearized form of the dispersion relation for acoustic orthorhombic media to model acoustic wavefields. We apply the lowrank approximation approach to handle the corresponding space-wavenumber mixed-domain operator. Numerical experiments show that the proposed wavefield extrapolator is accurate and practically free of dispersions. Further, there is no coupling of qSv and qP waves, because we use the analytical dispersion relation. No constraints on Thomsen\\'s parameters are required for stability. The linearized expression may provide useful application for parameter estimation in orthorhombic media.

  10. Relative Energy of the Taub Cosmological Model in Teleparallel Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Korunur, M

    2006-01-01

    In order to evaluate the energy distribution (due to matter and fields including gravitation) associated with a spacetime model of Taub solution, we consider the Einstein, Bergmann-Thomson and Landau-Lifshitz energy-momentum definitions in the teleparallel gravity (the tetrad theory of gravitation). In the teleparallel gravity using Einstein and Landau-Lifshitz prescriptions, we find the same energy-momentum distribution which is calculated in general relativity by P. Harpen. We also find that the energy-momentum prescription of Bergmann-Thomson in the tetrad theory of gravitation and general relativity. This result agrees with the previous works of Virbhadra, Xulu, Vargas, Vagenas and Salti et al. and supports the viewpoints of Albrow and Tryon.

  11. Anisotropic Generalized Ghost Pilgrim Dark Energy Model in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhi, M. Vijaya; Rao, V. U. M.; Aditya, Y.

    2017-02-01

    A spatially homogeneous and anisotropic locally rotationally symmetric (LRS) Bianchi type- I Universe filled with matter and generalized ghost pilgrim dark energy (GGPDE) has been studied in general theory of relativity. To obtain determinate solution of the field equations we have used scalar expansion proportional to the shear scalar which leads to a relation between the metric potentials. Some well-known cosmological parameters (equation of state (EoS) parameter ( ω Λ), deceleration parameter ( q) and squared speed of sound {vs2}) and planes (ω _{Λ }-dot {ω }_{Λ } and statefinder) are constructed for obtained model. The discussion and significance of these parameters is totally done through pilgrim dark energy parameter ( β) and cosmic time ( t).

  12. Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica Louise.

    2013-01-01

    This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

  13. Modified Dugdale crack models - some easy crack relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1997-01-01

    are assumed to be self created by local materials flow. The strength sigma_CR predictid by the Dugdale model is sigma_CR =(E Gamma_CR/phi1)^½ where E and 1 are Young’s modulus and crack half-length respectively of the material considered. The so-called critical strain energy rate is Gamma_CR = sigma......_Ldelta_CR where sigma_L is strength, and at the same time constant flow stress, of the uncracked material while delta_CR is flow limit (displacement).Obviously predictions by the Dugdale model are most reliable for materials with stress-strain relations where flow can actually be described (or well approximated......) by a constant flow stress (sigma_L). A number of materials, however, do not at all exhibit this kind of flow. Such materials are considered in this paper by Modified Dugdale crack models which apply for any cohesive stress distribution in crack front areas. Formally modified Dugdale crack models exhibit...

  14. Model Modification and Application on Carrying Capacity of Relative Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zehong; Dong Suocheng; Gao Dan

    2009-01-01

    Based on the retrospection of researches on carry-ing capacity, this article reviewed systematically the research progresses on carrying capacity of relative resources (CCRR).Then the viewpoint was put forward that CCRR is not an ap-propriate method of appraising the regional sustainability, but a sound way to obtain cognition for coordinating spatial loca-tion and flow of population and economy.However, as the most popular computing method of CCRR, the Weighting Linear Sum Model is defective in the random of weight choice and the neglect of matching among different resources.Therefore, this article established the Geometric Model on CCRR based on modifying Weighting Linear Sum Model, which can be used to appraise regions where resources are close matching.Em-ploying the Geometric Model, the article empirically analyzed the population and economic CCRR in Hubei Province from 1978 to 2006.The result indicates that the population in Hubei Province is overloading while the economic carrying capacity is abundant compared to the whole country, and the economic insufficiency restricts the population carrying capacity.In the future, Hubei Province will become one of the core developing zones which are characterized by economic conglomeration.

  15. Kinetic Relations for a Lattice Model of Phase Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwetlick, Hartmut; Zimmer, Johannes

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this article is to analyse travelling waves for a lattice model of phase transitions, specifically the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam chain with piecewise quadratic interaction potential. First, for fixed, sufficiently large subsonic wave speeds, we rigorously prove the existence of a family of travelling wave solutions. Second, it is shown that this family of solutions gives rise to a kinetic relation which depends on the jump in the oscillatory energy in the solution tails. Third, our constructive approach provides a very good approximate travelling wave solution.

  16. Arc-related porphyry molybdenum deposit model: Chapter D in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ryan D.; Hammarstrom, Jane M.; Piatak, Nadine M.; Seal, Robert R., II

    2012-01-01

    This report provides a descriptive model for arc-related porphyry molybdenum deposits. Presented within are geological, geochemical, and mineralogical characteristics that differentiate this deposit type from porphyry copper and alkali-feldspar rhyolite-granite porphyry molybdenum deposits. The U.S. Geological Survey's effort to update existing mineral deposit models spurred this research, which is intended to supplement previously published models for this deposit type that help guide mineral-resource and mineral-environmental assessments.

  17. Physiological fidelity or model parsimony? The relative performance of reverse-toxicokinetic modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Michael A; Perkins, Edward J; Mayo, Michael L

    2017-03-11

    Physiologically-based toxicokinetic (PBTK) models are often developed to facilitate in vitro to in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) using a top-down, compartmental approach, favoring architectural simplicity over physiological fidelity despite the lack of general guidelines relating model design to dynamical predictions. Here we explore the impact of design choice (high vs. low fidelity) on chemical distribution throughout an animal's organ system. We contrast transient dynamics and steady states of three previously proposed PBTK models of varying complexity in response to chemical exposure. The steady states for each model were determined analytically to predict exposure conditions from tissue measurements. Steady state whole-body concentrations differ between models, despite identical environmental conditions, which originates from varying levels of physiological fidelity captured by the models. These differences affect the relative predictive accuracy of the inverted models used in exposure reconstruction to link effects-based exposure data with whole-organism response thresholds obtained from in vitro assay measurements. Our results demonstrate how disregarding physiological fideltiy in favor of simpler models affects the internal dynamics and steady state estimates for chemical accumulation within tissues, which, in turn, poses significant challenges for the exposure reconstruction efforts that underlie many IVIVE methods. Developing standardized systems-level models for ecological organisms would not only ensure predictive consistency among future modeling studies, but also ensure pragmatic extrapolation of in vivo effects from in vitro data or modeling exposure-response relationships.

  18. Salt marsh stability modelled in relation to sea level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholdy, Jesper; Bartholdy, Anders T.; Kroon, Aart

    2010-05-01

    Accretion on a natural backbarrier salt marsh was modeled as a function of high tide level, initial salt marsh level and distance to the source. Calibration of the model was based on up to ca 80 year old marker horizons, supplemented by 210Pb/137Cs datings and subsequent measurements of clay thickness. Autocompaction was incorporated in the model, and shown to play a major role for the translation of accretion rates measured as length per unit time to accumulation rates measured as mass per area per unit time. This is important, even for shallow salt marsh deposits for which it is demonstrated that mass depth down core can be directly related to the bulk dry density of the surface layer by means of a logarithmic function. The results allow for an evaluation of the use of marker horizons in the topmost layers and show that it is important to know the level of the marker in relation to the salt marsh base. In general, deeper located markers will indicate successively smaller accretion rates with the same sediment input. Thus, stability analysis made on the basis of newly established marker horizons will be biased and indicate salt marsh stabilities far above the correct level. Running the model with a constant sea level revealed that balance between the inner and the outer salt marsh deposition can not be achieved within a reasonable time scale. Likewise it is shown that only one specific sea level rise provides equilibrium for a given location on the salt marsh. With a higher sea level rise, the marsh at the specific location will eventually drown, whereas - with a sea level rise below this level - it will grow towards the top of the rising tidal frame. The short term variation of salt marsh accretion was found to correlate well with variations in the North Atlantic Oscillation - the NAO winter index. Comparisons between the geomorphological development of wind tide affected salt marshes, like those present on the Danish North Sea coasts, and primary astronomically

  19. Modeling of movement-related potentials using a fractal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uşakli, Ali Bülent

    2010-06-01

    In bio-signal applications, classification performance depends greatly on feature extraction, which is also the case for electroencephalogram (EEG) based applications. Feature extraction, and consequently classification of EEG signals is not an easy task due to their inherent low signal-to-noise ratios and artifacts. EEG signals can be treated as the output of a non-linear dynamical (chaotic) system in the human brain and therefore they can be modeled by their dimension values. In this study, the variance fractal dimension technique is suggested for the modeling of movement-related potentials (MRPs). Experimental data sets consist of EEG signals recorded during the movements of right foot up, lip pursing and a simultaneous execution of these two tasks. The experimental results and performance tests show that the proposed modeling method can efficiently be applied to MRPs especially in the binary approached brain computer interface applications aiming to assist severely disabled people such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients in communication and/or controlling devices.

  20. Modeled Microgravity Affects Fibroblast Functions Related to Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialdai, Francesca; Vignali, Leonardo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Colciago, Alessandra; Celotti, Fabio; Santi, Alice; Caselli, Anna; Cirri, Paolo; Monici, Monica

    2017-02-01

    Wound healing is crucial for the survival of an organism. Therefore, in the perspective of space exploration missions, it is important to understand if and how microgravity conditions affect the behavior of the cell populations involved in wound healing and the evolution of the process. Since fibroblasts are the major players in tissue repair, this study was focused on the behavior of fibroblasts in microgravity conditions, modeled by a RCCS. Cell cytoskeleton was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy, the ability to migrate was assessed by microchemotaxis and scratch assay, and the expression of markers of fibroblast activation, angiogenesis, and inflammation was assessed by western blot. Results revealed that after cell exposure to modeled microgravity conditions, a thorough rearrangement of microtubules occurred and α-SMA bundles were replaced by a tight network of faulty and disorganized filaments. Exposure to modeled microgravity induced a decrease in α-SMA and E-CAD expressions. Also, the expression of the pro-angiogenic protein VEGF decreased, while that of the inflammatory signal COX-2 increased. Fibroblast ability to adhere, migrate, and respond to chemoattractants (PRP), closely related to cytoskeleton integrity and membrane junctions, was significantly impaired. Nevertheless, PRP was able to partially restore fibroblast migration.

  1. Application distribution model and related security attacks in VANET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikaein, Navid; Kanti Datta, Soumya; Marecar, Irshad; Bonnet, Christian

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we present a model for application distribution and related security attacks in dense vehicular ad hoc networks (VANET) and sparse VANET which forms a delay tolerant network (DTN). We study the vulnerabilities of VANET to evaluate the attack scenarios and introduce a new attacker`s model as an extension to the work done in [6]. Then a VANET model has been proposed that supports the application distribution through proxy app stores on top of mobile platforms installed in vehicles. The steps of application distribution have been studied in detail. We have identified key attacks (e.g. malware, spamming and phishing, software attack and threat to location privacy) for dense VANET and two attack scenarios for sparse VANET. It has been shown that attacks can be launched by distributing malicious applications and injecting malicious codes to On Board Unit (OBU) by exploiting OBU software security holes. Consequences of such security attacks have been described. Finally, countermeasures including the concepts of sandbox have also been presented in depth.

  2. New extended standard model, dark matters and relativity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae-Kwang

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional quantized space model is newly introduced as the extended standard model. Four three-dimensional quantized spaces with total 12 dimensions are used to explain the universes including ours. Electric (EC), lepton (LC) and color (CC) charges are defined to be the charges of the x1x2x3, x4x5x6 and x7x8x9 warped spaces, respectively. Then, the lepton is the xi(EC) - xj(LC) correlated state which makes 3x3 = 9 leptons and the quark is the xi(EC) - xj(LC) - xk(CC) correlated state which makes 3x3x3 = 27 quarks. The new three bastons with the xi(EC) state are proposed as the dark matters seen in the x1x2x3 space, too. The matter universe question, three generations of the leptons and quarks, dark matter and dark energy, hadronization, the big bang, quantum entanglement, quantum mechanics and general relativity are briefly discussed in terms of this new model. The details can be found in the article titled as ``journey into the universe; three-dimensional quantized spaces, elementary particles and quantum mechanics at https://www.researchgate.net/profile/J_Hwang2''.

  3. Modeled Microgravity Affects Fibroblast Functions Related to Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialdai, Francesca; Vignali, Leonardo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Colciago, Alessandra; Celotti, Fabio; Santi, Alice; Caselli, Anna; Cirri, Paolo; Monici, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Wound healing is crucial for the survival of an organism. Therefore, in the perspective of space exploration missions, it is important to understand if and how microgravity conditions affect the behavior of the cell populations involved in wound healing and the evolution of the process. Since fibroblasts are the major players in tissue repair, this study was focused on the behavior of fibroblasts in microgravity conditions, modeled by a RCCS. Cell cytoskeleton was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy, the ability to migrate was assessed by microchemotaxis and scratch assay, and the expression of markers of fibroblast activation, angiogenesis, and inflammation was assessed by western blot. Results revealed that after cell exposure to modeled microgravity conditions, a thorough rearrangement of microtubules occurred and α-SMA bundles were replaced by a tight network of faulty and disorganized filaments. Exposure to modeled microgravity induced a decrease in α-SMA and E-CAD expressions. Also, the expression of the pro-angiogenic protein VEGF decreased, while that of the inflammatory signal COX-2 increased. Fibroblast ability to adhere, migrate, and respond to chemoattractants (PRP), closely related to cytoskeleton integrity and membrane junctions, was significantly impaired. Nevertheless, PRP was able to partially restore fibroblast migration.

  4. Preon models, relativity, quantum mechanics and cosmology (I)

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Mestres, Luis

    2009-01-01

    Preons are hypothetic constituents of the standard particles. They were initially assumed to have basically similar properties to those of conventional matter. But this is not necessarily the case: the ultimate constituents of matter may feel a different space-time from that of special relativity and exhibit mechanical properties different from those predicted by standard quantum mechanics. They can also play an important cosmological role (inflation, dark matter, dark energy...). It is even not obvious that energy and momentum would have to be conserved in such a scenario. In this series of papers, we review the subject using the superbradyon model as an example, and suggest new ways to explore possible tests of the preon hypothesis.

  5. Ambiguities and Symmetry Relations in a Free Fermion Model

    CERN Document Server

    Battistel, O A

    1999-01-01

    We present a systematic study of one, two and three point functions of vector, axial-vector, scalar and pseudoscalar densities constructed in a free fermion model. The divergent content of the amplitudes are left in the form of (external momenta independent) 4-D integrals for which an appropriate regulating function is only implicitly assumed, and the integrals are not evaluated at any step of the calculation. The ambiguities and Symmetries Violations, in all cases, are shown to be associated with coefficients involving three relations between divergent integrals of the same degree of divergence. Setting these coefficients to zero is mandatory, e.g., for preserving gauge symmetry in QED. The implications for the ambiguities and symmetry violations are investigated. The results emerging from this alternative approach allow us to conclude that the traditional method used to establish the triangular anomalies could be questionable.

  6. DIFFERENT MODELS OF HEPATOTOXICITY AND RELATED LIVER DISEASES: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Robin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The liver is among the most complex and important organs in the human body. Its primary function is to control the flow and safety of substances absorbed from the digestive system before distribution of these substances to the systemic circulatory system. Hepatotoxicity implies chemical-driven liver damage. Chemicals that cause liver injury are called hepatotoxins. Hepatic injury leads to disturbances in transport function of hepatocytes resulting in leakage of plasma membrane thereby causing an increased enzyme level in serum. There are many diseases that are related with hepatotoxicity caused by certain chemicals or hepatotoxins. Herbal medicines are great demand in various chemicals and drugs disordered hepatic, the developed world for primary health care because of their efficacy, safety, lesser side effects and narrow therapeutic window. This review focus on liver, its function, liver diseases and different models of hepatotoxicity.

  7. MATHEMATICAL MODELLING OF DEGRADATION AND FLUVIAL PROCESS DOWNSTREAM RESERVOIRS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    To research into the problem of degradation and fluvial process downstream reservoirs and its influence on flood control and navigation, a 1-D mathematical model of degradation and fluvial process downstream the reservoir was established in this paper. The non-equilibrium transport of non-uniform suspended load, the non-uniform bedload transport and bed material sorting were considered in the model. Some techniques were suggested for some problems in calculation, such as the effective suspended load carrying capacity of the different reaches of bed materials, the coefficient of suspended load carrying capacity, the recovering coefficient of carrying capacity, the mixed layer thickness, the bedload transport width, bifurcation and confluence of main and branch channel, and the distribution of deposition and erosion along the cross section, etc. The model was tested by the data of degradation downstream the Danjiangkou reservoir on the Hanjiang River and the data of degradation downstream the Gezhouba Project on the Yangtze River.

  8. Vertebral classification using localized pathology-related shape model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zewail, R.; Elsafi, A.; Durdle, N.

    2008-03-01

    Radiographs of the spine are frequently examined for assessment of vertebral abnormalities. Features like osteophytes (bony growth of vertebra's corners), and disc space narrowing are often used as visual evidence of osteoarthris or degenerative joint disease. These symptoms result in remarkable changes in the shapes of the vertebral body. Statistical analysis of anatomical structure has recently gained increased popularity within the medical imaging community, since they have the potential to enhance the automated diagnosis process. In this paper, we present a novel method for computer-assisted vertebral classification using a localized, pathology-related shape model. The new classification scheme is able to assess the condition of multiple vertebrae simultaneously, hence is possible to directly classify the whole spine anatomy according to the condition of interest (anterior osteophites). At the core of this method is a new localized shape model that uses concepts of sparsity, dimension reduction, and statistical independence to extract sets of localized modes of deformations specific to each of the vertebrae under investigation. By projection of the shapes onto any specific set of deformation modes (or basis), we obtain low-dimensional features that are most directly related to the pathology of the vertebra of interest. These features are then used as input to a support vector machine classifier to classify the vertebra under investigation as normal or upnormal. Experiments are conducted using contours from digital x-ray images of five vertebrae of lumbar spine. The accuracy of the classification scheme is assessed using the ROC curves. An average specifity of 96.8 % is achieved with a sensitivity of 80 %.

  9. Modelling the genetic risk in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Grassmann

    Full Text Available Late-stage age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a common sight-threatening disease of the central retina affecting approximately 1 in 30 Caucasians. Besides age and smoking, genetic variants from several gene loci have reproducibly been associated with this condition and likely explain a large proportion of disease. Here, we developed a genetic risk score (GRS for AMD based on 13 risk variants from eight gene loci. The model exhibited good discriminative accuracy, area-under-curve (AUC of the receiver-operating characteristic of 0.820, which was confirmed in a cross-validation approach. Noteworthy, younger AMD patients aged below 75 had a significantly higher mean GRS (1.87, 95% CI: 1.69-2.05 than patients aged 75 and above (1.45, 95% CI: 1.36-1.54. Based on five equally sized GRS intervals, we present a risk classification with a relative AMD risk of 64.0 (95% CI: 14.11-1131.96 for individuals in the highest category (GRS 3.44-5.18, 0.5% of the general population compared to subjects with the most common genetic background (GRS -0.05-1.70, 40.2% of general population. The highest GRS category identifies AMD patients with a sensitivity of 7.9% and a specificity of 99.9% when compared to the four lower categories. Modeling a general population around 85 years of age, 87.4% of individuals in the highest GRS category would be expected to develop AMD by that age. In contrast, only 2.2% of individuals in the two lowest GRS categories which represent almost 50% of the general population are expected to manifest AMD. Our findings underscore the large proportion of AMD cases explained by genetics particularly for younger AMD patients. The five-category risk classification could be useful for therapeutic stratification or for diagnostic testing purposes once preventive treatment is available.

  10. Modeling the relation between income and commuting distance

    CERN Document Server

    Carra, Giulia; Fosgerau, Mogens; Barthelemy, Marc

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the distribution of commuting distances and its relation to income. Using data from Great Britain, US and Denmark, we show that the commuting distance is (i) broadly distributed with a tail decaying typically as $1/r^\\gamma$ with $\\gamma \\approx 3$ and (ii) an average growing slowly as a power law with an exponent less than one that depends on the country considered. The classical theory for job search is based on the idea that workers evaluate potential jobs on the wage as they arrive sequentially through time. Extending this model with space, we obtain predictions that are strongly contradicted by our empirical findings. We then propose an alternative model that is based on the idea that workers evaluate potential jobs based on a quality aspect and that workers search for jobs sequentially across space. We assume that the density of potential jobs depends on the skills of the worker and decreases with the wage. The predicted distribution of commuting distances decays as $1/r^3$ and is independent...

  11. Using computational models to relate structural and functional brain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlinka, Jaroslav; Coombes, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    Modern imaging methods allow a non-invasive assessment of both structural and functional brain connectivity. This has lead to the identification of disease-related alterations affecting functional connectivity. The mechanism of how such alterations in functional connectivity arise in a structured network of interacting neural populations is as yet poorly understood. Here we use a modeling approach to explore the way in which this can arise and to highlight the important role that local population dynamics can have in shaping emergent spatial functional connectivity patterns. The local dynamics for a neural population is taken to be of the Wilson-Cowan type, whilst the structural connectivity patterns used, describing long-range anatomical connections, cover both realistic scenarios (from the CoComac database) and idealized ones that allow for more detailed theoretical study. We have calculated graph-theoretic measures of functional network topology from numerical simulations of model networks. The effect of the form of local dynamics on the observed network state is quantified by examining the correlation between structural and functional connectivity. We document a profound and systematic dependence of the simulated functional connectivity patterns on the parameters controlling the dynamics. Importantly, we show that a weakly coupled oscillator theory explaining these correlations and their variation across parameter space can be developed. This theoretical development provides a novel way to characterize the mechanisms for the breakdown of functional connectivity in diseases through changes in local dynamics.

  12. Kubo Fluctuation Relations in the Generalized Elastic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Taloni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The generalized elastic model encompasses several linear stochastic models describing the dynamics of polymers, membranes, rough surfaces, and fluctuating interfaces. In this paper we show that the Fractional Langevin Equation (FLE is a suitable framework for the study of the tracer (probe particle dynamics, when an external force acts only on a single point x→⋆ (tagged probe belonging to the system. With the help of the Fox function formalism we study the scaling behaviour of the noise- and force-propagators for large and short times (distances. We show that the Kubo fluctuation relations are exactly fulfilled when a time periodic force is exerted on the tagged probe. Most importantly, by studying the large and low frequency behaviour of the complex mobility we illustrate surprising nontrivial physical scenarios. Our analysis shows that the system splits into two distinct regions whose size depends on the applied frequency, characterized by very different response to the periodic perturbation exerted, both in the phase shift and in the amplitude.

  13. Mouse Models of Diabetes, Obesity and Related Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glastras, Sarah J.; Chen, Hui; Teh, Rachel; McGrath, Rachel T.; Chen, Jason; Pollock, Carol A.; Wong, Muh Geot; Saad, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple rodent models have been used to study diabetic kidney disease (DKD). The purpose of the present study was to compare models of diabetes and obesity-induced metabolic syndrome and determine differences in renal outcomes. C57BL/6 male mice were fed either normal chow or high fat diet (HFD). At postnatal week 8, chow-fed mice were randomly assigned to low-dose streptozotocin (STZ, 55 mg/kg/day, five consecutive days) or vehicle control, whereas HFD-fed mice were given either one high-dose of STZ (100 mg/kg) or vehicle control. Intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests were performed at Week 14, 20 and 30. Urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (ACR) and serum creatinine were measured, and renal structure was assessed using Periodic Acid Schiff (PAS) staining at Week 32. Results showed that chow-fed mice exposed to five doses of STZ resembled type 1 diabetes mellitus with a lean phenotype, hyperglycaemia, microalbuminuria and increased serum creatinine levels. Their kidneys demonstrated moderate tubular injury with evidence of tubular dilatation and glycogenated nuclear inclusion bodies. HFD-fed mice resembled metabolic syndrome as they were obese with dyslipidaemia, insulin resistance, and significantly impaired glucose tolerance. One dose STZ, in addition to HFD, did not worsen metabolic features (including fasting glucose, non esterified fatty acid, and triglyceride levels). There were significant increases in urinary ACR and serum creatinine levels, and renal structural changes were predominantly related to interstitial vacuolation and tubular dilatation in HFD-fed mice. PMID:27579698

  14. Modeling classical swine fever outbreak-related outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar eYadav

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to estimate classical swine fever (CSF outbreak-related outcomes such as epidemic duration and number of infected, vaccinated, and depopulated premises, using defined most likely CSF outbreak scenarios. Risk metrics were established using empirical data to select the most likely CSF outbreak scenarios in Indiana. The scenarios were simulated using a stochastic between-premises disease spread model to estimate outbreak-related outcomes. A total of 19 single-site (i.e., with a single-index premises at the onset of an outbreak and 15 multiple-site (i.e., with more than one index premises at the onset of an outbreak outbreak scenarios of CSF were selected using the risk metrics. The number of index premises in the multiple-site outbreak scenarios ranged from 4 to 32. The multiple-site outbreak scenarios were further classified into clustered (N=6 and non-clustered (N=9 groups. The estimated median (5th, 95th percentiles epidemic duration (days was 224 (24, 343 in the single-site and was 190 (157, 251 and 210 (167, 302 in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. The median (5th, 95th percentiles number of infected premises was 323 (0, 488 in the single-site outbreak scenarios and was 529 (395, 662 and 465 (295, 640 in the clustered and non-clustered multiple-site outbreak scenarios, respectively. Both the number and spatial distribution of the index premises affected the outcome estimates. The results also showed the importance of implementing vaccinations to accommodate depopulation in the CSF outbreak controls. The use of routinely collected surveillance data in the risk metrics and disease spread model allows end users to generate timely outbreak-related information based on the initial outbreak’s characteristics. Swine producers can use this information to make an informed decision on management of swine operations and continuity of business so that potential losses could be

  15. Integrating Health Belief Model and Technology Acceptance Model: An Investigation of Health-Related Internet Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Background Today, people use the Internet to satisfy health-related information and communication needs. In Malaysia, Internet use for health management has become increasingly significant due to the increase in the incidence of chronic diseases, in particular among urban women and their desire to stay healthy. Past studies adopted the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and Health Belief Model (HBM) independently to explain Internet use for health-related purposes. Although both the TAM and HBM have their own merits, independently they lack the ability to explain the cognition and the related mechanism in which individuals use the Internet for health purposes. Objective This study aimed to examine the influence of perceived health risk and health consciousness on health-related Internet use based on the HBM. Drawing on the TAM, it also tested the mediating effects of perceived usefulness of the Internet for health information and attitude toward Internet use for health purposes for the relationship between health-related factors, namely perceived health risk and health consciousness on health-related Internet use. Methods Data obtained for the current study were collected using purposive sampling; the sample consisted of women in Malaysia who had Internet access. The partial least squares structural equation modeling method was used to test the research hypotheses developed. Results Perceived health risk (β=.135, t 1999=2.676) and health consciousness (β=.447, t 1999=9.168) had a positive influence on health-related Internet use. Moreover, perceived usefulness of the Internet and attitude toward Internet use for health-related purposes partially mediated the influence of health consciousness on health-related Internet use (β=.025, t 1999=3.234), whereas the effect of perceived health risk on health-related Internet use was fully mediated by perceived usefulness of the Internet and attitude (β=.029, t 1999=3.609). These results suggest the central role of

  16. Modeling chlorophyll a fluorescence transient: relation to photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirbet, A; Riznichenko, G Yu; Rubin, A B; Govindjee

    2014-04-01

    To honor Academician Alexander Abramovitch Krasnovsky, we present here an educational review on the relation of chlorophyll a fluorescence transient to various processes in photosynthesis. The initial event in oxygenic photosynthesis is light absorption by chlorophylls (Chls), carotenoids, and, in some cases, phycobilins; these pigments form the antenna. Most of the energy is transferred to reaction centers where it is used for charge separation. The small part of energy that is not used in photochemistry is dissipated as heat or re-emitted as fluorescence. When a photosynthetic sample is transferred from dark to light, Chl a fluorescence (ChlF) intensity shows characteristic changes in time called fluorescence transient, the OJIPSMT transient, where O (the origin) is for the first measured minimum fluorescence level; J and I for intermediate inflections; P for peak; S for semi-steady state level; M for maximum; and T for terminal steady state level. This transient is a real signature of photosynthesis, since diverse events can be related to it, such as: changes in redox states of components of the linear electron transport flow, involvement of alternative electron routes, the build-up of a transmembrane pH gradient and membrane potential, activation of different nonphotochemical quenching processes, activation of the Calvin-Benson cycle, and other processes. In this review, we present our views on how different segments of the OJIPSMT transient are influenced by various photosynthetic processes, and discuss a number of studies involving mathematical modeling and simulation of the ChlF transient. A special emphasis is given to the slower PSMT phase, for which many studies have been recently published, but they are less known than on the faster OJIP phase.

  17. Analysis of linear trade models and relation to scale economies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomory, R E; Baumol, W J

    1997-09-01

    We discuss linear Ricardo models with a range of parameters. We show that the exact boundary of the region of equilibria of these models is obtained by solving a simple integer programming problem. We show that there is also an exact correspondence between many of the equilibria resulting from families of linear models and the multiple equilibria of economies of scale models.

  18. Related work on reference modeling for collaborative networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Afsarmanesh, H.; Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Camarinha-Matos, L.M.; Afsarmanesh, H.

    2008-01-01

    Several international research and development initiatives have led to development of models for organizations and organization interactions. These models and their approaches constitute a background for development of reference models for collaborative networks. A brief survey of work on modeling t

  19. Relative and Absolute Fit Evaluation in Cognitive Diagnosis Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinsong; de la Torre, Jimmy; Zhang, Zao

    2013-01-01

    As with any psychometric models, the validity of inferences from cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs) determines the extent to which these models can be useful. For inferences from CDMs to be valid, it is crucial that the fit of the model to the data is ascertained. Based on a simulation study, this study investigated the sensitivity of various fit…

  20. MeCP2-Related Diseases and Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinelo D. Ezeonwuka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of epigenetics in human disease has become an area of increased research interest. Collaborative efforts from scientists and clinicians have led to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation is involved in the pathogenesis of many human diseases. Several neurological and non-neurological disorders are associated with mutations in genes that encode for epigenetic factors. One of the most studied proteins that impacts human disease and is associated with deregulation of epigenetic processes is Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2. MeCP2 is an epigenetic regulator that modulates gene expression by translating epigenetic DNA methylation marks into appropriate cellular responses. In order to highlight the importance of epigenetics to development and disease, we will discuss how MeCP2 emerges as a key epigenetic player in human neurodevelopmental, neurological, and non-neurological disorders. We will review our current knowledge on MeCP2-related diseases, including Rett Syndrome, Angelman Syndrome, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, Hirschsprung disease, and Cancer. Additionally, we will briefly discuss about the existing MeCP2 animal models that have been generated for a better understanding of how MeCP2 impacts certain human diseases.

  1. Ab initio modelling of boron related defects in amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Tiago A.; Torres, Vitor J.B. [Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, Campus Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-10-15

    We have modeled boron related point defects in amorphous silicon, using an ab initio method, the Density functional theory-pseudopotential code Aimpro. The boron atoms were embedded in 64 atom amorphous silicon cubic supercells. The calculations were performed using boron defects in 15 different supercells. These supercells were developed using a modified Wooten-Winer-Weaire bond switching mechanism. In average, the properties of the 15 supercells agree with the observed radial and bond angle distributions, as well the electronic and vibrational density of states and Raman spectra. In amorphous silicon it has been very hard to find real self-interstitials, since for almost all the tested configurations, the amorphous lattice relaxes overall. We found that substitutional boron prefers to be 4-fold coordinated. We find also an intrinsic hole-trap in the non-doped amorphous lattice, which may explain the low efficiency of boron doping. The local vibrational modes are, in average, higher than the correspondent crystalline values (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. MeCP2-Related Diseases and Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezeonwuka, Chinelo D.; Rastegar, Mojgan

    2017-01-01

    The role of epigenetics in human disease has become an area of increased research interest. Collaborative efforts from scientists and clinicians have led to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which epigenetic regulation is involved in the pathogenesis of many human diseases. Several neurological and non-neurological disorders are associated with mutations in genes that encode for epigenetic factors. One of the most studied proteins that impacts human disease and is associated with deregulation of epigenetic processes is Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2). MeCP2 is an epigenetic regulator that modulates gene expression by translating epigenetic DNA methylation marks into appropriate cellular responses. In order to highlight the importance of epigenetics to development and disease, we will discuss how MeCP2 emerges as a key epigenetic player in human neurodevelopmental, neurological, and non-neurological disorders. We will review our current knowledge on MeCP2-related diseases, including Rett Syndrome, Angelman Syndrome, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, Hirschsprung disease, and Cancer. Additionally, we will briefly discuss about the existing MeCP2 animal models that have been generated for a better understanding of how MeCP2 impacts certain human diseases.

  3. Relation Based Mining Model for Enhancing Web Document Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Reka

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The design of web Information management system becomes more complex one with more time complexity. Information retrieval is a difficult task due to the huge volume of web documents. The way of clustering makes the retrieval easier and less time consuming. Thisalgorithm introducesa web document clustering approach, which use the semantic relation between documents, which reduces the time complexity. It identifies the relations and concepts in a document and also computes the relation score between documents. This algorithm analyses the key concepts from the web documents by preprocessing, stemming, and stop word removal. Identified concepts are used to compute the document relation score and clusterrelation score. The domain ontology is used to compute the document relation score and cluster relation score. Based on the document relation score and cluster relation score, the web document cluster is identified. This algorithm uses 2,00,000 web documents for evaluation and 60 percentas trainingset and 40 percent as testing set.

  4. Developmental Relational Counseling: A Model for Self-Understanding in Relation to Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, Thelma; Haberstroh, Shane

    2012-01-01

    Developmental relational counseling (DRC) is an integrative framework designed to help clients develop personal awareness and relational functioning and conceptualize personal growth. DRC emerged from both authors' clinical work and was significantly influenced by relational-cultural theory and guided by the Enneagram personality typology and…

  5. Streambed Structure, Stream Power, and Bedload Transport: A Unified Outlook for Gravel-bed and Bedrock Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatanantavet, P.; Diplas, P.; Almedeij, J.

    2015-12-01

    Interactions among streambed structure, stream power, and sediment transport in rivers have been widely observed and documented. Perennial gravel-bed streams typically possess a surface bed layer that is coarser than the subsurface material. This coarser surface layer is, however, absent from some ephemeral gravel-bed streams and in some cases the reverse phenomenon occurs. Ephemeral streams also exhibit considerably higher efficiency in transporting sediment. In steep bedrock rivers, the hydraulic-rock interactive mechanism often self-creates step-pool or cascade bed configurations as forms of energy dissipation to control the transport efficiency of sediment. Here we aim to characterize bed structures and sediment transport in gravel-bed rivers and bedrock streams by using the concept of dimensionless stream power. We analyzed existing bed load data collected from field and experimental settings in an attempt to reach a unified outlook for both stream types and various channel bed features. We found that the mechanisms responsible for the features perceived to distinguish surface fining and surface coarsening are interrelated and triggered by different values of dimensionless stream power. The surface fining case has been attributed to fluidization of the entire bed material as demonstrated here in detail. The results also suggest that in bedrock rivers with large bedforms, such as stabled step-pool and immobile rock cascade, relatively medium-large values of stream power (i.e., floods of less than 30-year return period) do not equate with large bed load transport rates due to a portion of flow energy dissipating through local hydraulic jumps, leaving less energy to transport the bed load. Plot of transport efficiency values for each bed type and flood magnitude in bedrock rivers also helps us estimate how much fraction of flow energy is delivered to do bedrock erosive work by saltating bed load; hence, the implication for studies of landscape evolution.

  6. Modeling Phloem Temperatures Relative to Mountain Pine Beetle Phenology

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Matthew Jared

    2011-01-01

    We explore a variety of methods to estimate phloem temperatures from ambient air temperatures suitable for the mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae. A model's ability to induce the same phenology generated from observed phloem temperatures measures its effectiveness rather than a simple reconstruction of phloem temperatures. From a model's phenology results we are able to ascertain whether the model produces a similar amount of developmental energy exhibited by observed phloem temper...

  7. Coevolution of variability models and related software artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passos, Leonardo; Teixeira, Leopoldo; Dinztner, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    models coevolve with other artifact types, we study a large and complex real-world variant-rich software system: the Linux kernel. Specifically, we extract variability-coevolution patterns capturing changes in the variability model of the Linux kernel with subsequent changes in Makefiles and C source...

  8. The Modelling of Temporal Data in the Relational Database Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙远

    1995-01-01

    This research takes the view that the modelling of temporal data is a fundamental step towards the solution of capturing semantics of time.The problems inherent in the modelling of time are not unique to database processing.The representation of temporal knowledge and temporal reasoning arises in a wide range of other disciplines.In this paper an account is given of a technique for modelling the semantics of temporal data and its associated normalization method.It discusses the techniques of processing temporal data by employing a Time Sequence (TS) data model.It shows a number of different strategies which are used to classify different data properties of temporal data,and it goes on to develop the model of temporal data and addresses issues of temporal data application design by introducing the concept of temporal data normalisation.

  9. Animal models of suicide-trait-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkesman, Oz; Pine, Daniel S; Tragon, Tyson; Austin, Daniel R; Henter, Ioline D; Chen, Guang; Manji, Husseini K

    2009-04-01

    Although antidepressants are moderately effective in treating major depressive disorder (MDD), concerns have arisen that selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are associated with suicidal thinking and behavior, especially in children, adolescents and young adults. Almost no experimental research in model systems has considered the mechanisms by which SSRIs might be associated with this potential side effect in some susceptible individuals. Suicide is a complex behavior and impossible to fully reproduce in an animal model. However, by investigating traits that show strong cross-species parallels in addition to associations with suicide in humans, animal models might elucidate the mechanisms by which SSRIs are associated with suicidal thinking and behavior. Traits linked with suicide in humans that can be successfully modeled in rodents include aggression, impulsivity, irritability and hopelessness/helplessness. Modeling these relevant traits in animals can help to clarify the impact of SSRIs on these traits, suggesting avenues for reducing suicide risk in this vulnerable population.

  10. (Relatively) Simple Models of Flow in Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Peter; Weng, Wensong; Salmon, Jim

    2013-04-01

    The term, "complex terrain" includes both topography and variations in surface roughness and thermal properties. The scales that are affected can differ and there are some advantages to modeling them separately. In studies of flow in complex terrain we have developed 2 D and 3 D models of atmospheric PBL boundary layer flow over roughness changes, appropriate for longer fetches than most existing models. These "internal boundary layers" are especially important for understanding and predicting wind speed variations with distance from shorelines, an important factor for wind farms around, and potentially in, the Great Lakes. The models can also form a base for studying the wakes behind woodlots and wind turbines. Some sample calculations of wind speed evolution over water and the reduced wind speeds behind an isolated woodlot, represented simply in terms of an increase in surface roughness, will be presented. Note that these models can also include thermal effects and non-neutral stratification. We can use the model to deal with 3-D roughness variations and will describe applications to both on-shore and off-shore situations around the Great Lakes. In particular we will show typical results for hub height winds and indicate the length of over-water fetch needed to get the full benefit of siting turbines over water. The linear Mixed Spectral Finite-Difference (MSFD) and non-linear (NLMSFD) models for surface boundary-layer flow over complex terrain have been extended to planetary boundary-layer flow over topography This allows for their use for larger scale regions and increased heights. The models have been applied to successfully simulate the Askervein hill experimental case and we will show examples of applications to more complex terrain, typical of some Canadian wind farms. Output from the model can be used as an alternative to MS-Micro, WAsP or other CFD calculations of topographic impacts for input to wind farm design software.

  11. Algorithms, Visualization, and Mental Models: High School Students' Interactions with a Relative Motion Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, James M.; Clement, John

    2000-01-01

    Hypothesizes that the construction of visual models, resolution of these visual models with numeric models and, in many cases, rejection of commitments such as the belief in one true velocity, are necessary for students to form integrated mental models of relative motion events. Studies high school students' relative motion problem solving.…

  12. Modelling the relation between income and commuting distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carra, Giulia; Mulalic, Ismir; Fosgerau, Mogens

    2016-01-01

    slowly as a power law with an exponent less than one that depends on the country considered. The classical theory for job search is based on the idea that workers evaluate the wage of potential jobs as they arrive sequentially through time, and extending this model with space, we obtain predictions...... that are strongly contradicted by our empirical findings. We propose an alternative model that is based on the idea that workers evaluate potential jobs based on a quality aspect and that workers search for jobs sequentially across space. We also assume that the density of potential jobs depends on the skills...... of the worker and decreases with the wage. The predicted distribution of commuting distances decays as 1/r3 and is independent of the distribution of the quality of jobs. We find our alternative model to be in agreement with our data. This type of approach opens new perspectives for the modelling of mobility....

  13. 3D CFD Modeling of Local Scouring, Bed Armoring and Sediment Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gergely T. Török

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D numerical models are increasingly used to simulate flow, sediment transport and morphological changes of rivers. For the simulation of bedload transport, the numerical flow model is generally coupled with an empirical sediment transport model. The application range of the most widely used empirical models is, however, often limited in terms of hydraulic and sedimentological features and therefore the numerical model can hardly be applied to complex situations where different kinds of morphological processes take place at the same time, such as local scouring, bed armoring and aggradation of finer particles. As a possible solution method for this issue, we present the combined application of two bedload transport formulas that widens the application range and thus gives more appropriate simulation results. An example of this technique is presented in the paper by combining two bedload transport formulas. For model validation, the results of a laboratory experiment, where bed armoring, local scouring and local sediment deposition processes occurred, were used. The results showed that the combined application method can improve the reliability of the numerical simulations.

  14. Calculation of relative permeability in reservoir engineering using an interacting triangular tube bundle model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinxun Wang; Mingzhe Dong; Jun Yao

    2012-01-01

    Analytical expressions of relative permeability are derived for an interacting cylindrical tube bundle model.Equations for determining relative permeability curves from both the interacting uniform and interacting serial types of triangular tube bundle models are presented.Model parameters affecting the trend of relative permeability curves are discussed.Interacting triangular tube bundle models are used to history-match laboratory displacement experiments to determine the relative permeability curves of actual core samples.By adjusting model parameters to match the history of oil production and pressure drop,the estimated relative permeability curves provide a connection between the macroscopic flow behavior and the pore-scale characteristics of core samples.

  15. Parameters-related uncertainty in modeling sugar cane yield with an agro-Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valade, A.; Ciais, P.; Vuichard, N.; Viovy, N.; Ruget, F.; Gabrielle, B.

    2012-12-01

    Agro-Land Surface Models (agro-LSM) have been developed from the coupling of specific crop models and large-scale generic vegetation models. They aim at accounting for the spatial distribution and variability of energy, water and carbon fluxes within soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum with a particular emphasis on how crop phenology and agricultural management practice influence the turbulent fluxes exchanged with the atmosphere, and the underlying water and carbon pools. A part of the uncertainty in these models is related to the many parameters included in the models' equations. In this study, we quantify the parameter-based uncertainty in the simulation of sugar cane biomass production with the agro-LSM ORCHIDEE-STICS on a multi-regional approach with data from sites in Australia, La Reunion and Brazil. First, the main source of uncertainty for the output variables NPP, GPP, and sensible heat flux (SH) is determined through a screening of the main parameters of the model on a multi-site basis leading to the selection of a subset of most sensitive parameters causing most of the uncertainty. In a second step, a sensitivity analysis is carried out on the parameters selected from the screening analysis at a regional scale. For this, a Monte-Carlo sampling method associated with the calculation of Partial Ranked Correlation Coefficients is used. First, we quantify the sensitivity of the output variables to individual input parameters on a regional scale for two regions of intensive sugar cane cultivation in Australia and Brazil. Then, we quantify the overall uncertainty in the simulation's outputs propagated from the uncertainty in the input parameters. Seven parameters are identified by the screening procedure as driving most of the uncertainty in the agro-LSM ORCHIDEE-STICS model output at all sites. These parameters control photosynthesis (optimal temperature of photosynthesis, optimal carboxylation rate), radiation interception (extinction coefficient), root

  16. Quantitative property-structural relation modeling on polymeric dielectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ke

    Nowadays, polymeric materials have attracted more and more attention in dielectric applications. But searching for a material with desired properties is still largely based on trial and error. To facilitate the development of new polymeric materials, heuristic models built using the Quantitative Structure Property Relationships (QSPR) techniques can provide reliable "working solutions". In this thesis, the application of QSPR on polymeric materials is studied from two angles: descriptors and algorithms. A novel set of descriptors, called infinite chain descriptors (ICD), are developed to encode the chemical features of pure polymers. ICD is designed to eliminate the uncertainty of polymer conformations and inconsistency of molecular representation of polymers. Models for the dielectric constant, band gap, dielectric loss tangent and glass transition temperatures of organic polymers are built with high prediction accuracy. Two new algorithms, the physics-enlightened learning method (PELM) and multi-mechanism detection, are designed to deal with two typical challenges in material QSPR. PELM is a meta-algorithm that utilizes the classic physical theory as guidance to construct the candidate learning function. It shows better out-of-domain prediction accuracy compared to the classic machine learning algorithm (support vector machine). Multi-mechanism detection is built based on a cluster-weighted mixing model similar to a Gaussian mixture model. The idea is to separate the data into subsets where each subset can be modeled by a much simpler model. The case study on glass transition temperature shows that this method can provide better overall prediction accuracy even though less data is available for each subset model. In addition, the techniques developed in this work are also applied to polymer nanocomposites (PNC). PNC are new materials with outstanding dielectric properties. As a key factor in determining the dispersion state of nanoparticles in the polymer matrix

  17. Extended Nambu models: Their relation to gauge theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, C. A.; Urrutia, L. F.

    2017-05-01

    Yang-Mills theories supplemented by an additional coordinate constraint, which is solved and substituted in the original Lagrangian, provide examples of the so-called Nambu models, in the case where such constraints arise from spontaneous Lorentz symmetry breaking. Some explicit calculations have shown that, after additional conditions are imposed, Nambu models are capable of reproducing the original gauge theories, thus making Lorentz violation unobservable and allowing the interpretation of the corresponding massless gauge bosons as the Goldstone bosons arising from the spontaneous symmetry breaking. A natural question posed by this approach in the realm of gauge theories is to determine under which conditions the recovery of an arbitrary gauge theory from the corresponding Nambu model, defined by a general constraint over the coordinates, becomes possible. We refer to these theories as extended Nambu models (ENM) and emphasize the fact that the defining coordinate constraint is not treated as a standard gauge fixing term. At this level, the mechanism for generating the constraint is irrelevant and the case of spontaneous Lorentz symmetry breaking is taken only as a motivation, which naturally bring this problem under consideration. Using a nonperturbative Hamiltonian analysis we prove that the ENM yields the original gauge theory after we demand current conservation for all time, together with the imposition of the Gauss laws constraints as initial conditions upon the dynamics of the ENM. The Nambu models yielding electrodynamics, Yang-Mills theories and linearized gravity are particular examples of our general approach.

  18. Coevolution of variability models and related software artifacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passos, Leonardo; Teixeira, Leopoldo; Dinztner, Nicolas;

    2015-01-01

    to the evolution of different kinds of software artifacts, it is not surprising that industry reports existing tools and solutions ineffective, as they do not handle the complexity found in practice. Attempting to mitigate this overall lack of knowledge and to support tool builders with insights on how variability...... models coevolve with other artifact types, we study a large and complex real-world variant-rich software system: the Linux kernel. Specifically, we extract variability-coevolution patterns capturing changes in the variability model of the Linux kernel with subsequent changes in Makefiles and C source......Variant-rich software systems offer a large degree of customization, allowing users to configure the target system according to their preferences and needs. Facing high degrees of variability, these systems often employ variability models to explicitly capture user-configurable features (e...

  19. Well behaved anisotropic compact star models in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasim, M. K.; Maurya, S. K.; Gupta, Y. K.; Dayanandan, B.

    2016-11-01

    Anisotropic compact star models have been constructed by assuming a particular form of a metric function e^{λ}. We solved the Einstein field equations for determining the metric function e^{ν}. For this purpose we have assumed a physically valid expression of radial pressure (pr). The obtained anisotropic compact star model is representing the realistic compact objects such as PSR 1937 +21. We have done an extensive study about physical parameters for anisotropic models and found that these parameters are well behaved throughout inside the star. Along with these we have also determined the equation of state for compact star which gives the radial pressure is purely the function of density i.e. pr=f(ρ).

  20. Bulk Universality and Related Properties of Hermitian Matrix Models

    CERN Document Server

    Pastur, L

    2007-01-01

    We give a new proof of universality properties in the bulk of spectrum of the hermitian matrix models, assuming that the potential that determines the model is globally $C^{2}$ and locally $C^{3}$ function (see Theorem \\ref{t:U.t1}). The proof as our previous proof in \\cite{Pa-Sh:97} is based on the orthogonal polynomial techniques but does not use asymptotics of orthogonal polynomials. Rather, we obtain the $sin$-kernel as a unique solution of a certain non-linear integro-differential equation that follows from the determinant formulas for the correlation functions of the model. We also give a simplified and strengthened version of paper \\cite{BPS:95} on the existence and properties of the limiting Normalized Counting Measure of eigenvalues. We use these results in the proof of universality and we believe that they are of independent interest.

  1. Revisiting the thermodynamic relations in AdS /CMT models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Seungjoon; Park, Sang-A.; Yi, Sang-Heon

    2017-03-01

    Motivated by the recent unified approach to the Smarr-like relation of anti-de Sitter (AdS) planar black holes in conjunction with the quasilocal formalism on conserved charges, we revisit the quantum statistical and thermodynamic relations of hairy AdS planar black holes. By extending the previous results, we identify the hairy contribution in the bulk and show that the holographic computation can be improved so that it is consistent with the bulk computation. We argue that the first law can be retained in its universal form and that the relation between the on-shell renormalized Euclidean action and its free energy interpretation in gravity may also be undeformed even with the hairy contribution in hairy AdS black holes.

  2. Models of diagnostic relations in a wheeled tractor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Michalski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern wheeled tractors are equipped with new-generation electric and electronic systemswhich control the operation of actuator systems. Such solutions require an on-board computer foronline monitoring of functional performance, exhaust gas emissions, safety and operating parameters.Mechatronic diagnostic systems identify the machine’s actual operating load in different operatingmodes and under specific circumstances.Knowledge engineering methods have not yet been developed in the process of diagnosing a tractor’sdefects, but they seem to offer almost endless possibilities. A defect is defined as every event whichhas an adverse effect on tractor performance and which should be detected in the diagnostic processwith an indication of the type and place of damage as well as the magnitude and variability of damageover time. Diagnostic knowledge is a symbolic representation of empirical relations based on whichdiagnostic procedures are developed.The identification of diagnostic relations based on different methods and information sources willfoster the growth of reliable declarative knowledge comprising facts and state-symptom diagnosticrelations, as well as procedural knowledge which underlies diagnostic inference.The determination of symptom-damage relations requires a knowledge base of potential defects in theassemblies and subassemblies of a wheeled tractor. A diagnostic knowledge base can be created based on the identified diagnostic relations, including data acquired during damage simulations.The identification of diagnostic relations between specific defects and the corresponding parameterswas one of the key steps in the process of developing a mechatronic diagnostic system in a wheeledtractor. To facilitate the detection of specific defects at a given moment, a single set of diagnosticsymptoms was allocated to every defect in a wheeled tractor. Diagnostic symptoms are identified bysensors when threshold values are exceeded

  3. Tropical disturbances in relation to general circulation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estoque, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    The initial results of an evaluation of the performance of the Goddard Laboratory of Atmospheric Simulation general circulation model depicting the tropical atmosphere during the summer are presented. Because the results show the existence of tropical wave disturbances throughout the tropics, the characteristics of synoptic disturbances over Africa were studied and a synoptic case study of a selected disturbance in this area was conducted. It is shown that the model is able to reproduce wave type synoptic disturbances in the tropics. The findings show that, in one of the summers simulated, the disturbances are predominantly closed vortices; in another summer, the predominant disturbances are open waves.

  4. Zebrafish as a Model to Investigate Dynamin 2-Related Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Cinzia Bragato; Germano Gaudenzi; Flavia Blasevich; Giulio Pavesi; Lorenzo Maggi; Michele Giunta; Franco Cotelli; Marina Mora

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the dynamin-2 gene (DNM2) cause autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy (CNM) and dominant intermediate Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) neuropathy type B (CMTDIB). As the relation between these DNM2-related diseases is poorly understood, we used zebrafish to investigate the effects of two different DNM2 mutations. First we identified a new alternatively spliced zebrafish dynamin-2a mRNA (dnm2a-v2) with greater similarity to human DNM2 than the deposited sequence. Then we knocked-down...

  5. Control mechanisms for a nonlinear model of international relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentek, A.; Kadtke, J. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Inst. for Pure and Applied Physical Sciences; Lenhart, S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Mathematics Dept.; Protopopescu, V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.

    1997-07-15

    Some issues of control in complex dynamical systems are considered. The authors discuss two control mechanisms, namely: a short range, reactive control based on the chaos control idea and a long-term strategic control based on an optimal control algorithm. They apply these control ideas to simple examples in a discrete nonlinear model of a multi-nation arms race.

  6. Models to relate species to environment: a hierarchical statistical approac

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamil, T.

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, the interest of community ecologists in trait-based approaches has grown dramatically and these approaches have been increasingly applied to explain and predict response of species to environmental conditions. A variety of modelling techniques are available. The dominant

  7. Modeling personal exposure to traffic related air pollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montagne, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    The first part of this thesis is about the VE3SPA project. Land use regression (LUR) models are often used to predict the outdoor air pollution at the home address of study participants, to study long-term effects of air pollution. While several studies have documented that PM2.5 mass measured at a

  8. Models to relate species to environment: a hierarchical statistical approac

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jamil, T.

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, the interest of community ecologists in trait-based approaches has grown dramatically and these approaches have been increasingly applied to explain and predict response of species to environmental conditions. A variety of modelling techniques are available. The dominant tec

  9. Action Relations. Basic Design Concepts for Behaviour Modelling and Refinement.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quartel, Dick

    This thesis presents basic design concepts, design methods and a basic design language for distributed system behaviours. This language is based on two basic concepts: the action concept and the causality relation concept. Our methods focus on behaviour refinement, which consists of replacing an

  10. A Comparison of a Relational and Nested-Relational IDEF0 Data Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-03-01

    model represents the actual graphical constructs, e.g., boxes, line segments, etc., used to represent the particular IDEF0 anal - As with the essential...screen location represented in (x,y). select se.a, sa.ys. sexo , seye from segment so where se.sheet-id in select s.sheet-id from activity a, sheet s

  11. Relative Binding Free Energy Calculations Applied to Protein Homology Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappel, Daniel; Hall, Michelle Lynn; Lenselink, Eelke B; Beuming, Thijs; Qi, Jun; Bradner, James; Sherman, Woody

    2016-12-27

    A significant challenge and potential high-value application of computer-aided drug design is the accurate prediction of protein-ligand binding affinities. Free energy perturbation (FEP) using molecular dynamics (MD) sampling is among the most suitable approaches to achieve accurate binding free energy predictions, due to the rigorous statistical framework of the methodology, correct representation of the energetics, and thorough treatment of the important degrees of freedom in the system (including explicit waters). Recent advances in sampling methods and force fields coupled with vast increases in computational resources have made FEP a viable technology to drive hit-to-lead and lead optimization, allowing for more efficient cycles of medicinal chemistry and the possibility to explore much larger chemical spaces. However, previous FEP applications have focused on systems with high-resolution crystal structures of the target as starting points-something that is not always available in drug discovery projects. As such, the ability to apply FEP on homology models would greatly expand the domain of applicability of FEP in drug discovery. In this work we apply a particular implementation of FEP, called FEP+, on congeneric ligand series binding to four diverse targets: a kinase (Tyk2), an epigenetic bromodomain (BRD4), a transmembrane GPCR (A2A), and a protein-protein interaction interface (BCL-2 family protein MCL-1). We apply FEP+ using both crystal structures and homology models as starting points and find that the performance using homology models is generally on a par with the results when using crystal structures. The robustness of the calculations to structural variations in the input models can likely be attributed to the conformational sampling in the molecular dynamics simulations, which allows the modeled receptor to adapt to the "real" conformation for each ligand in the series. This work exemplifies the advantages of using all-atom simulation methods with

  12. Relating Cohesive Zone Model to Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John T.

    2010-01-01

    The conditions required for a cohesive zone model (CZM) to predict a failure load of a cracked structure similar to that obtained by a linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) analysis are investigated in this paper. This study clarifies why many different phenomenological cohesive laws can produce similar fracture predictions. Analytical results for five cohesive zone models are obtained, using five different cohesive laws that have the same cohesive work rate (CWR-area under the traction-separation curve) but different maximum tractions. The effect of the maximum traction on the predicted cohesive zone length and the remote applied load at fracture is presented. Similar to the small scale yielding condition for an LEFM analysis to be valid. the cohesive zone length also needs to be much smaller than the crack length. This is a necessary condition for a CZM to obtain a fracture prediction equivalent to an LEFM result.

  13. GEOMETRIC METHOD OF SEQUENTIAL ESTIMATION RELATED TO MULTINOMIAL DISTRIBUTION MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEIBOCHENG; LISHOUYE

    1995-01-01

    In 1980's differential geometric methods are successfully used to study curved expomential families and normal nonlinear regression models.This paper presents a new geometric structure to study multinomial distribution models which contain a set of nonlinear parameters.Based on this geometric structure,the suthors study several asymptotic properties for sequential estimation.The bias,the variance and the information loss of the sequential estimates are given from geomentric viewpoint,and a limit theorem connected with the observed and expected Fisher information is obtained in terms of curvatvre measures.The results show that the sequential estimation procednce has some better properties which are generally impossible for nonsequential estimation procedures.

  14. Host Pathogen Relations: Exploring Animal Models for Fungal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine G. Harwood

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic fungi cause superficial infections but pose a significant public health risk when infections spread to deeper tissues, such as the lung. Within the last three decades, fungi have been identified as the leading cause of nosocomial infections making them the focus of research. This review outlines the model systems such as the mouse, zebrafish larvae, flies, and nematodes, as well as ex vivo and in vitro systems available to study common fungal pathogens.

  15. Host pathogen relations: exploring animal models for fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwood, Catherine G; Rao, Reeta P

    2014-06-30

    Pathogenic fungi cause superficial infections but pose a significant public health risk when infections spread to deeper tissues, such as the lung. Within the last three decades, fungi have been identified as the leading cause of nosocomial infections making them the focus of research. This review outlines the model systems such as the mouse, zebrafish larvae, flies, and nematodes, as well as ex vivo and in vitro systems available to study common fungal pathogens.

  16. Animal Models of Suicide Trait-Related Behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Malkesman, Oz; Pine, Daniel; Tragon, Tyson; Austin, Daniel R.; Henter, Ioline D.; Chen, Guang; Manji, Husseini K.

    2009-01-01

    Although antidepressants are at least moderately effective in treating major depressive disorder (MDD), concerns have arisen that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are associated with suicidal thinking and behavior, especially in children, adolescents, and young adults. Virtually no experimental research in model systems has considered the mechanisms by which SSRIs may be associated with this potential side effect in some susceptible individuals. Suicide is a complex behavior th...

  17. MODELING OF THE VULNERABILITY RELATED TO THE DYNAMIC ROAD TRAFFIC

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    International audience; The utilization of the road network by vehicles with different behaviors can generate a danger under normal and especially under evacuation situations. In Le Havre agglomeration (CODAH), there are 33 establishments classified SEVESO with high threshold. The modeling and assessment of the danger is useful when it intersects with the exposed stakes. The most important factor is people. In the literature, vulnerability maps are constructed to help decision makers assess t...

  18. Generic scaling relation in the scalar $\\phi^{4}$ model

    CERN Document Server

    Derkachov, S E

    1996-01-01

    The results of analysis of the one--loop spectrum of anomalous dimensions of composite operators in the scalar \\phi^{4} model are presented. We give the rigorous constructive proof of the hypothesis on the hierarchical structure of the spectrum of anomalous dimensions -- the naive sum of any two anomalous dimensions generates a limit point in the spectrum. Arguments in favor of the nonperturbative character of this result and the possible ways of a generalization to other field theories are briefly discussed.

  19. A ferret model of COPD-related chronic bronchitis

    OpenAIRE

    Raju, S. Vamsee; Kim, Hyunki; Byzek, Stephen A.; Tang, Li Ping; Trombley, John E; Jackson, Patricia; Rasmussen, Lawrence; Wells, J. Michael; LIBBY, EMILY FALK; Dohm, Erik; Winter, Lindy; Samuel, Sharon L.; Kurt R. Zinn; Blalock, J. Edwin; Schoeb, Trenton R.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death in the US. The majority of COPD patients have symptoms of chronic bronchitis, which lacks specific therapies. A major impediment to therapeutic development has been the absence of animal models that recapitulate key clinical and pathologic features of human disease. Ferrets are well suited for the investigation of the significance of respiratory diseases, given prior data indicating similarities to human airway p...

  20. GENERAL RELATIVITY AND DYNAMICAL MODEL OF ELECTROMAGNETIC DRIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the dynamic model of the rocket motor electromagnetic type, consisting of a source of electromagnetic waves of radio frequency band and a conical cavity in which electromagnetic waves are excited. The processes of excitation of electromagnetic oscillations in a cavity with conducting walls, as well as the waves of the YangMills field are investigated. The multi-dimensional transient numerical model describing the processes of electromagnetic oscillations in a cavity with conducting wall created. Separately, the case of standing waves in the cavity with conducting walls considered. It is shown that the oscillations mode in the conducting resonator different from that in an ideal resonator, both in steady and unsteady processes. The mechanism of formation of traction for the changes in the space-time metric, the contribution of particle currents, the Yang-Mills and electromagnetic field proposed. It is shown that the Yang-Mills field calls the change of the dielectric constant, which leads to a change in the capacitance of the resonator. Thus, the parametric resonance occurs in the system, which leads to a strengthening of the Yang-Mills amplitude, and to the emergence of traction. We have developed a dynamic model, which enables optimal traction on a significant number of parameters. It was found that the thrust increases in the Yang-Mills field near the main resonance frequency. A model describing the excitation and emission of nonlinear waves of the Yang-Mills field was proposed. It is shown that nonlinear waves of the Yang-Mills field more effectively carry the momentum from the system in comparison with electromagnetic waves, and it explains the significant increase by several orders of thrust in the engines of the electromagnetic type, compared with the photon rocket

  1. Heterotic (0,2) Gepner Models and Related Geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuzer, Maximilian

    2009-01-01

    On the sad occasion of contributing to the memorial volume ``Fundamental Interactions'' for my teacher Wolfgang Kummer I decided to recollect and extend some unpublished notes from the mid 90s when I started to build up a string theory group in Vienna under Wolfgang as head of the particle physics group. His extremely supportive attitude was best expressed by his saying that one should let all flowers flourish. I hope that these notes will be useful in particular in view of the current renewed interest in heterotic model building. The content of this contribution is based on the bridge between exact CFT and geometric techniques that is provided by the orbifold interpretation of simple current modular invariants. After reformulating the Gepner construction in this language I describe the generalization to heterotic (0,2) models and its application to the Geometry/CFT equivalence between Gepner-type and Distler-Kachru models that was proposed by Blumenhagen, Schimmrigk and Wisskirchen. We analyze a series of so...

  2. Model Object Relational Database pada Aplikasi Notifikasi SMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrajani

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to analyse the database using object oriented approach. In addition, this research develops and designs an object-relational database structure to make easier the process of searching for the required information. The benefit of this research is to provide a data structure that can be reused for SMS notification application developer team, so that the developers can use existing objects for future use if there are changes in the current business process. The methods used are data collection, analysis, and design. The result obtained from this research is a database structure of SMS notification application, which can be used in various programming languages for using object-relational database approach. For conclusion, by using the object-relational database structure, application developers will be made easier in developing the current database structure. Programmer can add a new data type simply by creating a new object. Data is accessed or processed as object-oriented.

  3. Randomized shortest-path problems: two related models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saerens, Marco; Achbany, Youssef; Fouss, François; Yen, Luh

    2009-08-01

    This letter addresses the problem of designing the transition probabilities of a finite Markov chain (the policy) in order to minimize the expected cost for reaching a destination node from a source node while maintaining a fixed level of entropy spread throughout the network (the exploration). It is motivated by the following scenario. Suppose you have to route agents through a network in some optimal way, for instance, by minimizing the total travel cost-nothing particular up to now-you could use a standard shortest-path algorithm. Suppose, however, that you want to avoid pure deterministic routing policies in order, for instance, to allow some continual exploration of the network, avoid congestion, or avoid complete predictability of your routing strategy. In other words, you want to introduce some randomness or unpredictability in the routing policy (i.e., the routing policy is randomized). This problem, which will be called the randomized shortest-path problem (RSP), is investigated in this work. The global level of randomness of the routing policy is quantified by the expected Shannon entropy spread throughout the network and is provided a priori by the designer. Then, necessary conditions to compute the optimal randomized policy-minimizing the expected routing cost-are derived. Iterating these necessary conditions, reminiscent of Bellman's value iteration equations, allows computing an optimal policy, that is, a set of transition probabilities in each node. Interestingly and surprisingly enough, this first model, while formulated in a totally different framework, is equivalent to Akamatsu's model ( 1996 ), appearing in transportation science, for a special choice of the entropy constraint. We therefore revisit Akamatsu's model by recasting it into a sum-over-paths statistical physics formalism allowing easy derivation of all the quantities of interest in an elegant, unified way. For instance, it is shown that the unique optimal policy can be obtained by

  4. More general capillary pressure and relative permeability models from fractal geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kewen

    2010-01-15

    More general capillary pressure and relative permeability models were derived theoretically from fractal modeling of a porous medium. It was found that the new capillary pressure model could be reduced to the frequently-used Brooks-Corey capillary pressure model and the Li-Horne imbibition model when the fractal dimension of a porous medium takes specific values. This also demonstrates that the Brooks-Corey model and the Li-Horne model have a further confirmed theoretical basis. Capillary pressure data measured using mercury intrusion techinque were used to verify the model. The results demonstrated that the new capillary pressure model could represent the capillary pressure curves in those rocks with fracures or with great heterogeneity while the existing models cannot. The new relative permeability models can be reduced to the Brooks-Corey relative permeability model in a specific case. It has been proved theoretically that the relative permeability of each phase in a smooth fracture is only a linear function of its own saturation. Relative permeability data were calculated using the new models and the model results were compared with experimental data measured using a steady-state technique. The comparison demonstrated that the relative permeability models and experimental results were consistent with each other.

  5. Photosynthesis-related quantities for education and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Taras K; Kovalenko, Ilya B; Rubin, Andrew B; Tyystjärvi, Esa

    2013-11-01

    A quantitative understanding of the photosynthetic machinery depends largely on quantities, such as concentrations, sizes, absorption wavelengths, redox potentials, and rate constants. The present contribution is a collection of numbers and quantities related mainly to photosynthesis in higher plants. All numbers are taken directly from a literature or database source and the corresponding reference is provided. The numerical values, presented in this paper, provide ranges of values, obtained in specific experiments for specific organisms. However, the presented numbers can be useful for understanding the principles of structure and function of photosynthetic machinery and for guidance of future research.

  6. 3D mathematical modelling of scour around a circular pile in current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roulund, Andreas; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen;

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with scour around a circular pile exposed to a steady current. A 3D numerical model incorporated with the k-w,SST closure coupled with the sediment-continuity equation and a bedload sediment transport formula has been used to predict the scour. 3D calculations have also been...... to scour depth of 0.6-0.7 times the pile diameter. Calculations that describe the entire scour process (including the equilibrium stage) are underway....

  7. A ferret model of COPD-related chronic bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, S. Vamsee; Kim, Hyunki; Byzek, Stephen A.; Tang, Li Ping; Trombley, John E.; Jackson, Patricia; Rasmussen, Lawrence; Wells, J. Michael; Libby, Emily Falk; Winter, Lindy; Samuel, Sharon L.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Blalock, J. Edwin; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Dransfield, Mark T.; Rowe, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the third leading cause of death in the US. The majority of COPD patients have symptoms of chronic bronchitis, which lacks specific therapies. A major impediment to therapeutic development has been the absence of animal models that recapitulate key clinical and pathologic features of human disease. Ferrets are well suited for the investigation of the significance of respiratory diseases, given prior data indicating similarities to human airway physiology and submucosal gland distribution. Here, we exposed ferrets to chronic cigarette smoke and found them to approximate complex clinical features of human COPD. Unlike mice, which develop solely emphysema, smoke-exposed ferrets exhibited markedly higher numbers of early-morning spontaneous coughs and sporadic infectious exacerbations as well as a higher level of airway obstruction accompanied by goblet cell metaplasia/hyperplasia and increased mucus expression in small airways, indicative of chronic bronchitis and bronchiolitis. Overall, we demonstrate the first COPD animal model exhibiting clinical and pathologic features of chronic bronchitis to our knowledge, providing a key advance that will greatly facilitate the preclinical development of novel treatments for this disease. PMID:27699245

  8. PUBLIC RELATION BASED MODEL OF INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljupka Naumovska

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The marketing communications industry and theory are facing rapid changes in accordance with global business and society fluctuations. Global and local market conditions are constantly varying and thus creating hardly predictable environment. The most implemented tool for marketing communications – advertising, is losing its power for effective communications; customers are becoming over-advertised and resistant to traditional advertising stimuli. Advertising, as one-way communication mass media tool is no longer effective as previously, hence can no longer fulfill the role of leading marketing mix tool. Therefore, the necessity for altering the structure of the traditional marketing communication mix elements, emphasizing the role of other elements but advertising, with more personalized and interactive functions. One method for improvement of marketing communication’s mix efficiency is by reallocation the leading role of advertising with public relations. The practice of public relations tools can ensure higher level of transparency in internal and external organizational communications and thus can certify more effective marketing communication. The theoretical research is supported with qualitative research of business segment by conducting a detailed interview for the marketing communication practice.

  9. Two models at work : A study of interactions and specificity in relation to the Demand-Control Model and the Effort-Reward Imbalance Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegchel, N.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the relation between work and employee health, several work stress models, e.g., the Demand-Control (DC) Model and the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) Model, have been developed. Although these models focus on job demands and job resources, relatively little attention has been devoted

  10. Two models at work : A study of interactions and specificity in relation to the Demand-Control Model and the Effort-Reward Imbalance Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegchel, N.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the relation between work and employee health, several work stress models, e.g., the Demand-Control (DC) Model and the Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) Model, have been developed. Although these models focus on job demands and job resources, relatively little attention has been devoted t

  11. The Human-Computer Domain Relation in UX Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Torkil

    This paper argues that the conceptualization of the human, the computer and the domain of use in competing lines of UX research have problematic similarities and superficial differences. The paper qualitatively analyses concepts and models in five research papers that together represent two...... influential lines of UX research: aesthetics and temporal UX, and two use situations: using a website and starting to use a smartphone. The results suggest that the two lines of UX research share a focus on users’ evaluative judgments of technology, both focuses on product qualities rather than activity...... domains, give little details about users, and treat human-computer interaction as perception. The conclusion gives similarities and differences between the approaches to UX. The implications for theory building are indicated....

  12. Modelling colliding wind binaries with RAMSES, extension to special relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberts, Astrid; Dubus, Guillaume; Lesur, Geoffroy

    2012-01-01

    We present high resolution simulations with RAMSES of supersonic colliding stellar winds. The collision results in a double shock structure which is subject to different instabilities. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) introduces some mixing and variability. For isothermal winds, the Non-linear Thin Shell Instability violently affects the interaction region. Properly modelling these instabilities requires a high enough resolution and an adapted numerical method, especially when one of the winds strongly dominates the other one. At large scale, orbital motion is expected to turn the shocked zone into a spiral but we find that in some configurations the KHI may disrupt the spiral. A colliding wind structure is also expected in gamma-ray binaries composed of a massive star and a young pulsar which emits a highly relativistic wind. Numerical simulations are necessary to understand the geometry of such systems and should take into account the relativistic nature of the pulsar wind. We implemented a second ord...

  13. Geospatial Modeling of Asthma Population in Relation to Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kethireddy, Swatantra R.; Tchounwou, Paul B.; Young, John H.; Luvall, Jeffrey C.; Alhamdan, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Current observations indicate that asthma is growing every year in the United States, specific reasons for this are not well understood. This study stems from an ongoing research effort to investigate the spatio-temporal behavior of asthma and its relatedness to air pollution. The association between environmental variables such as air quality and asthma related health issues over Mississippi State are investigated using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) tools and applications. Health data concerning asthma obtained from Mississippi State Department of Health (MSDH) for 9-year period of 2003-2011, and data of air pollutant concentrations (PM2.5) collected from USEPA web resources, and are analyzed geospatially to establish the impacts of air quality on human health specifically related to asthma. Disease mapping using geospatial techniques provides valuable insights into the spatial nature, variability, and association of asthma to air pollution. Asthma patient hospitalization data of Mississippi has been analyzed and mapped using quantitative Choropleth techniques in ArcGIS. Patients have been geocoded to their respective zip codes. Potential air pollutant sources of Interstate highways, Industries, and other land use data have been integrated in common geospatial platform to understand their adverse contribution on human health. Existing hospitals and emergency clinics are being injected into analysis to further understand their proximity and easy access to patient locations. At the current level of analysis and understanding, spatial distribution of Asthma is observed in the populations of Zip code regions in gulf coast, along the interstates of south, and in counties of Northeast Mississippi. It is also found that asthma is prevalent in most of the urban population. This GIS based project would be useful to make health risk assessment and provide information support to the administrators and decision makers for establishing satellite clinics in future.

  14. Modeling Relations Among Relative Permeabilities, Fluid Saturations, and Capillary Pressures in Mixed-Wet Porous Media: Model Testing and Application to Oil-Water Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Mart (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Lenhard, Robert J.(INEEL); Delshad, M; Robertson, S D.(Spirit 76, Midland, TX); M.Th. van Genuchten, F.J. Leij and L. Wu

    1998-01-01

    A critical component of all multiphase flow codes is how relationships among relative permeabilities, fluid saturations, and capillary pressures (i.e., k-S-P relations) are described. Models that are able to mimic fundamental fluid-flow processes to predict k S-P relations are preferable than extrapolating measured data points to estimate k-S-P relations because they may have greater utility and may be more consistent. Furthermore, different saturation-path histories may be simulated with a computer code than those measured in the k-S-P experiments. Because the geometry of the pore spaces in natural porous media is very complex and will likely never be precisely known to predict k-S-P behavior from fundamental relationships, k-S-P models are largely empirical. In this paper, an empirical model based on theoretical considerations is developed to predict hysteretic k-S-P relations in porous media in which the smaller pores are water-wet and the larger pores are oil-wet, i.e., mixed-w et. At high oil-water capillary pressures, the water saturation is modeled to approach the residual water saturation. At low oil-water capillary pressures (i.e., negative), the oil saturation is modeled to approach the residual oil saturation. Relative permeabilities are predicted using parameters that describe main-drainage S-P relations and accounting for the distribution of water and oil in the pore spaces of mixed-wet porous media. The proposed algebraic expressions are easy to implement in multiphase flow codes and can be used to predict k-S-P relations for any saturation-path history. In addition, the model is relatively easy to calibrate to porous media.

  15. Network Analysis Modeling Towards GIS Based on Object-Relation Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Peng; WANG Yandong; GONG Jianya; HUANG Xianfeng

    2004-01-01

    This paper compares the differences between the mathematical model in graph theory and GIS network analysis model. Thus it claims that the GIS network analysis model needs to solve. Then this paper introduces the spatial data management methods in object-relation database for GIS and discusses its effects on the network analysis model. Finally it puts forward the GIS network analysis model based on the object-relation database. The structure of the model is introduced in detail and research is done to the internal and external memory data structure of the model. The results show that it performs well in practice.

  16. A Multilevel Secure Relation-Hierarchical Data Model for a Secure DBMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A multilevel secure relation-hierarchical data model formultilevel secure database is extended from the relation-hierarchical data model in single level environment in this paper. Based on the model, an upper-lower layer relational integrity is presented after we analyze and eliminate the covert channels caused by the database integrity. Two SQL statements are extended to process polyinstantiation in the multilevel secure environment. The system based on the multilevel secure relation-hierarchical data model is capable of integratively storing and manipulating complicated objects (e.g., multilevel spatial data) and conventional data (e.g., integer, real number and character string) in multilevel secure database.

  17. Exact mass-coupling relation of the simplest multi-scale quantum integrable model

    CERN Document Server

    Bajnok, Zoltan; Ito, Katsushi; Satoh, Yuji; Tóth, Gábor Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    We derive the exact mass-coupling relation of the simplest multi-scale quantum integrable model, i.e., the homogeneous sine-Gordon model with two mass scales. The relation is obtained by comparing the perturbed conformal field theory description of the model valid at short distances to the large distance bootstrap description based on the model's integrability. In particular, we find a differential equation for the relation by constructing conserved tensor currents which satisfy a generalization of the $\\Theta$ sum rule Ward identity. The mass-coupling relation is written in terms of hypergeometric functions.

  18. Water-sediment flow models for river reaches sediment related pollution control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sil, Briti Sundar; Choudhury, Parthasarathi

    2012-07-01

    Hybrid water-sediment flow models for river reaches have been for predicting sediment and sediment related pollutions in water courses. The models are developed by combining sediment rating model and the Muskingum model applicable for a reach. The models incorporate sediment concentration and water discharge variables for a river reach; allow defining downstream sediment rating curve in terms of upstream water discharges. The model is useful in generating sediment concentration graph for a station having no water discharge records. The hybrid models provide forecasting forms that can be used to forecast downstream sediment concentration/water discharges 2kx time unit ahead. The forecasting models are useful for applications in real time namely, in the real time management of sediment related pollution in water courses and in issuing flood warning. Integration of sediment rating model and the Muskingum model increases model parameters and nonlinearity requiring efficient estimation technique for parameter identification. To identify parameters in the hybrid models genetic algorithm (GA) based optimization technique can be used. The new model relies on the Muskingum model, obey continuity requirement and the parameters can be used in the Muskingum model with water discharges to estimate/predict downstream water discharge values. The proposed model formulations are demonstrated for simulating and forecasting sediment concentration and water discharges in the Mississippi River Basin, USA. Model parameters are estimated using non-dominated sorting Genetic Algorithm II (NSGA-II). Model results show satisfactory model performances.

  19. Trust and formalisation of the industrial relations structure with reference to purcell's model of industrial relations patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kritzinger

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available Purcell (1984 argues that the level of trust between management and union and the formalisation of the industrial relations structure, are two dimensions that will result in more effective industrial relations. The aim of this study is to establish empirically to what extent the model of Purcell (1984 is applicable to the South-African industrial relations system. A questionnaire that has bearing on the theoretical discussion and research hypotheses, has been developed. The overall results confirm that there are significant relationships between the two dimensions and an index of industrial relations effectiveness. Opsomming Vertroue en formalisering van arbeidsverhoudingestruktuur met verwysing na Purcell se model van arbeids-verhoudingepatrone. Purcell (1984 stel dit dat die vertroue tussen bestuur en vakbond asook die formalisering van die arbeidsverhoudingestruktuur twee kritiese dimensies is in die daarstelling van effektiewe arbeidsverhoudinge. Die doel van hierdie studie is om empirics vas te stel of Purcell (1984 se model in die Suid-Afrikaanse arbeidsverhoudingestelsel van toepassing is. 'n Vraelys wat op die teoretiese bespreking en gestelde navorsingshipoteses gebaseer is, is ontwikkel. Die resultate van hierdie studie bevestig die bestaan van beduidende verbande tussen die twee dimensies en 'n indeks van arbeidsverhoudinge-effektiwiteit.

  20. Relative Error Model Reduction via Time-Weighted Balanced Stochastic Singular Perturbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    A new mixed method for relative error model reduction of linear time invariant (LTI) systems is proposed in this paper. This order reduction technique is mainly based upon time-weighted balanced stochastic model reduction method and singular perturbation model reduction technique. Compared...... by using the concept and properties of the reciprocal systems. The results are further illustrated by two practical numerical examples: a model of CD player and a model of the atmospheric storm track....

  1. Suggested Model (Related to the Student Portfolio) Used in Evaluation the Students in University Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahasneh, Omar M.; Murad, Odeh S.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a suggested model related to the student's portfolio used in evaluating the students in the university courses. After revising the theoretical literature and previous studies, two tools of the study have been constructed: Suggested model related to the student portfolio, and identifying the specifications towards using…

  2. On the absence of finite approximation relative to model completeness in propositional provability logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Izbash

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we consider the expressibility of formulas in the provability logic $GL$ and related to it questions of the model completeness of system of formulas. We prove the absence of a finite approximation relative to model completeness in $GL$.

  3. The relationship between relational models and individualism and collectivism: evidence from culturally diverse work groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodosek, Markus

    2009-04-01

    Relational models theory (Fiske, 1991 ) proposes that all thinking about social relationships is based on four elementary mental models: communal sharing, authority ranking, equality matching, and market pricing. Triandis and his colleagues (e.g., Triandis, Kurowski, & Gelfand, 1994 ) have suggested a relationship between the constructs of horizontal and vertical individualism and collectivism and Fiske's relational models. However, no previous research has examined this proposed relationship empirically. The objective of the current study was to test the association between the two frameworks in order to further our understanding of why members of culturally diverse groups may prefer different relational models in interactions with other group members. Findings from this study support a relationship between Triandis' constructs and Fiske's four relational models and uphold Fiske's ( 1991 ) claim that the use of the relational models is culturally dependent. As hypothesized, horizontal collectivism was associated with a preference for equality matching and communal sharing, vertical individualism was related to a preference for authority ranking, and vertical collectivism was related to a preference for authority ranking and communal sharing. However, contrary to expectations, horizontal individualism was not related to a preference for equality matching and market pricing, and vertical individualism was not associated with market pricing. By showing that there is a relationship between Triandis' and Fiske's frameworks, this study closes a gap in relational models theory, namely how culture relates to people's preferences for relational models. Thus, the findings from this study will enable future researchers to explain and predict what relational models are likely to be used in a certain cultural context.

  4. The Social Force Model and its Relation to the Kladek Formula

    CERN Document Server

    Kretz, Tobias; Schlaich, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    It was recently found that the Social Force Model of pedestrian dynamics in a macroscopic limit for 1d movement does not reproduce the empirically found inflection point of the speed-density relation. It could be shown that, however, a simple and intuitively comprehensible extension of the Social Force Model shows the inflection point. Motivated by this observation in this contribution the relation of the Social Force Model with the Kladek formula for the speed-density relation of urban motorized traffic is discussed. Furthermore the models are compared to results data from experiments on vehicular, cycling, and pedestrian dynamics.

  5. Understanding decreases in land relative humidity with global warming: conceptual model and GCM simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Climate models simulate a strong land-ocean contrast in the response of near-surface relative humidity to global warming: relative humidity tends to increase slightly over oceans but decrease substantially over land. Surface energy balance arguments have been used to understand the response over ocean but are difficult to apply over more complex land surfaces. Here, a conceptual box model is introduced, involving moisture transport between the land and ocean boundary layers and evapotranspiration, to investigate the decreases in land relative humidity as the climate warms. The box model is applied to idealized and full-complexity (CMIP5) general circulation model simulations, and it is found to capture many of the features of the simulated changes in land relative humidity. The box model suggests there is a strong link between fractional changes in specific humidity over land and ocean, and the greater warming over land than ocean then implies a decrease in land relative humidity. Evapotranspiration is of sec...

  6. Exploiting prior knowledge in Intelligent Assistants - Combining relational models with hierarchies

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, Sriraam; Tadepalli, Prasad; Fern, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Statitsical relational models have been successfully used to model static probabilistic relationships between the entities of the domain. In this talk, we illustrate their use in a dynamic decison-theoretic setting where the task is to assist a user by inferring his intentional structure and taking appropriate assistive actions. We show that the statistical relational models can be used to succintly express the system's prior knowledge about the user's goal-subgoal structure...

  7. Combat-Related Heterotopic Ossification: Development of Animal Models for Identifying Mechanisms and Testing Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    etiology, treatment, and prevention is the absence of a reliable and reproducible small animal model that can be used to characterize combat‐related HO...contamination and subsequent wound colonization may be a key risk factor. Using a small animal model of blast-related extremity injury involving a...to the systemic and perhaps local antimicrobial therapies geared towards decreasing bioburden in combat wounds. 6 Using our blast-related HO

  8. Malaria in Africa: vector species' niche models and relative risk maps.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Moffett

    Full Text Available A central theoretical goal of epidemiology is the construction of spatial models of disease prevalence and risk, including maps for the potential spread of infectious disease. We provide three continent-wide maps representing the relative risk of malaria in Africa based on ecological niche models of vector species and risk analysis at a spatial resolution of 1 arc-minute (9 185 275 cells of approximately 4 sq km. Using a maximum entropy method we construct niche models for 10 malaria vector species based on species occurrence records since 1980, 19 climatic variables, altitude, and land cover data (in 14 classes. For seven vectors (Anopheles coustani, A. funestus, A. melas, A. merus, A. moucheti, A. nili, and A. paludis these are the first published niche models. We predict that Central Africa has poor habitat for both A. arabiensis and A. gambiae, and that A. quadriannulatus and A. arabiensis have restricted habitats in Southern Africa as claimed by field experts in criticism of previous models. The results of the niche models are incorporated into three relative risk models which assume different ecological interactions between vector species. The "additive" model assumes no interaction; the "minimax" model assumes maximum relative risk due to any vector in a cell; and the "competitive exclusion" model assumes the relative risk that arises from the most suitable vector for a cell. All models include variable anthrophilicity of vectors and spatial variation in human population density. Relative risk maps are produced from these models. All models predict that human population density is the critical factor determining malaria risk. Our method of constructing relative risk maps is equally general. We discuss the limits of the relative risk maps reported here, and the additional data that are required for their improvement. The protocol developed here can be used for any other vector-borne disease.

  9. The HEXACO and Five-Factor Models of Personality in Relation to RIASEC Vocational Interests

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Derek A.; Tokar, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The current study extended the empirical research on the overlap of vocational interests and personality by (a) testing hypothesized relations between RIASEC interests and the personality dimensions of the HEXACO model, and (b) exploring the HEXACO personality model's predictive advantage over the five-factor model (FFM) in capturing RIASEC…

  10. A novel knee prosthesis model of implant-related osteo- myelitis in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Niels H.; Jensen, Nina Vendel; Nürnberg, Birgit Meinecke;

    2012-01-01

    There have been numerous reports of animal models of osteomyelitis. Very few of these have been prosthesis models that imitate human conditions. We have developed a new rat model of implant-related osteomyelitis that mimics human osteomyelitis, to investigate the pathology of infection after...

  11. The Impact of Personality on Training-Related Aspects of Motivation: Test of a Longitudinal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowold, Jens

    2007-01-01

    A model that proposed dispositional influences on training-related aspects of motivation was developed. More specifically, the model predicted influences of the Big Five personality variables on motivation to learn and transfer motivation, while controlling for general attitudes toward training. The model was tested empirically, drawing on a…

  12. Tilted Bianchi type I dust fluid cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Raj Bali; Keshav Sharma

    2002-03-01

    In this paper, we have investigated a tilted Bianchi type I cosmological model filled with dust of perfect fluid in general relativity. To get a determinate solution, we have assumed a condition = between metric potentials. The physical and geometrical aspects of the model together with singularity in the model are also discussed.

  13. Numerical approximations for speeding up mcmc inference in the infinite relational model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Albers, Kristoffer Jon

    2015-01-01

    The infinite relational model (IRM) is a powerful model for discovering clusters in complex networks; however, the computational speed of Markov chain Monte Carlo inference in the model can be a limiting factor when analyzing large networks. We investigate how using numerical approximations of th...

  14. THE RELATIONS BETWEEN MODEL PARAMETERS AND CERTAIN PHENOMENA IN TRAFFIC FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Zhong-hui; TAO Ming-de; WU Zheng

    2004-01-01

    Based on the dimensionless dynamic model of traffic flow, the model parameters were compared with numerically simulating solutions, and the effects of the former on the latter was investigated. Some relations between the parameters were obtained. Investigation several idealized results from dimensionless dynamic model of traffic flow were concluded.

  15. Validation and verification of agent models for trust: Independent compared to relative trust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, M.; Jaffry, S.W.; Maanen, P.P. van

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the results of a validation experiment for two existing computational trust models describing human trust are reported. One model uses experiences of performance in order to estimate the trust in different trustees. The second model in addition carries the notion of relative trust. Th

  16. A neural joint model for entity and relation extraction from biomedical text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Zhang, Meishan; Fu, Guohong; Ji, Donghong

    2017-03-31

    Extracting biomedical entities and their relations from text has important applications on biomedical research. Previous work primarily utilized feature-based pipeline models to process this task. Many efforts need to be made on feature engineering when feature-based models are employed. Moreover, pipeline models may suffer error propagation and are not able to utilize the interactions between subtasks. Therefore, we propose a neural joint model to extract biomedical entities as well as their relations simultaneously, and it can alleviate the problems above. Our model was evaluated on two tasks, i.e., the task of extracting adverse drug events between drug and disease entities, and the task of extracting resident relations between bacteria and location entities. Compared with the state-of-the-art systems in these tasks, our model improved the F1 scores of the first task by 5.1% in entity recognition and 8.0% in relation extraction, and that of the second task by 9.2% in relation extraction. The proposed model achieves competitive performances with less work on feature engineering. We demonstrate that the model based on neural networks is effective for biomedical entity and relation extraction. In addition, parameter sharing is an alternative method for neural models to jointly process this task. Our work can facilitate the research on biomedical text mining.

  17. A Comparison of Three Data Models for Text Storage and Retrieval Systems: The Relational Model Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    1994-01-01

    A number of software toolkits exist for the development of text storage and retrieval systems (TSARS). This study compares three data models applicable to such toolkits and discusses the suitability of one of them as the basis of a toolkit unifying all three data models. The three data models are...

  18. On the relation between the linear factor model and the latent profile model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halpin, P.F.; Dolan, C.V.; Grasman, R.P.P.P.; de Boeck, P.

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between linear factor models and latent profile models is addressed within the context of maximum likelihood estimation based on the joint distribution of the manifest variables. Although the two models are well known to imply equivalent covariance decompositions, in general they do

  19. On the Relation between the Linear Factor Model and the Latent Profile Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpin, Peter F.; Dolan, Conor V.; Grasman, Raoul P. P. P.; De Boeck, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between linear factor models and latent profile models is addressed within the context of maximum likelihood estimation based on the joint distribution of the manifest variables. Although the two models are well known to imply equivalent covariance decompositions, in general they do not yield equivalent estimates of the…

  20. Relational event models for longitudinal network data with an application to interhospital patient transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Duy; Lomi, Alessandro; Mascia, Daniele; Pallotti, Francesca

    2017-06-30

    The main objective of this paper is to introduce and illustrate relational event models, a new class of statistical models for the analysis of time-stamped data with complex temporal and relational dependencies. We outline the main differences between recently proposed relational event models and more conventional network models based on the graph-theoretic formalism typically adopted in empirical studies of social networks. Our main contribution involves the definition and implementation of a marked point process extension of currently available models. According to this approach, the sequence of events of interest is decomposed into two components: (a) event time and (b) event destination. This decomposition transforms the problem of selection of event destination in relational event models into a conditional multinomial logistic regression problem. The main advantages of this formulation are the possibility of controlling for the effect of event-specific data and a significant reduction in the estimation time of currently available relational event models. We demonstrate the empirical value of the model in an analysis of interhospital patient transfers within a regional community of health care organizations. We conclude with a discussion of how the models we presented help to overcome some the limitations of statistical models for networks that are currently available. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. 3D Lagrangian Model of Particle Saltation in an Open Channel Flow with Emphasis on Particle-Particle Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, P. A.; Bombardelli, F. A.

    2012-12-01

    Particles laying motionless at the bed of rivers, lakes and estuaries can be put into motion when the shear stress exerted by the flow on the particles exceeds the critical shear stress. When these particles start their motion they can either remain suspended by long periods of time (suspended load) or move close to the bed (bed load). Particles are transported as bed load in three different modes: Sliding, rolling and saltation. Saltation is usually described as the bouncing motion of sediment particles in a layer a few particle diameters thick. The amount of particles and the bed-load mode in which they move depend on the particle size and density, and the flow intensity, usually quantified by the shear velocity. The bottom shear stress in natural streams will most likely be large enough to set saltation as the most important bed-load transport mechanism among all three modes. Thus, studying the saltation process is crucial for the overall understanding of bed-load transport. Particularly, numerical simulations of this process have been providing important insight regarding the relative importance of the physical mechanisms involved in it. Several processes occur when particles are saltating near the bed: i) Particles collide with the bed, ii) they "fly" between collisions with the bed, as a result of their interaction with the fluid flow, iii) and they collide among themselves. These processes can be simulated using a three-dimensional Eulerian-Lagrangian model. In order to mimic these processes we have experimented with an averaged turbulent flow field represented by the logarithmic law of the wall, and with a more involved approach in which a computed turbulent velocity field for a flat plate was used as a surrogate of the three-dimensional turbulent conditions present close to stream beds. Since flat-plate and open-channel boundary layers are essentially different, a dynamic similarity analysis was performed showing that the highly-resolved three

  2. Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Brewster, Hilary D

    2009-01-01

    The theory of relativity has become a cornerstone of modern physics. Over the course of time it has been scrutinized in a multitude of experiments and has always been verified with high accuracy. The correctness of this theory can no longer be called into question. Right after its discovery by Albert Einstein in 1905, special relativity was only gradually accepted because it made numerous predictions contradicting common sense, fervently castigated by Einstein, and also defied experiment for too long a time. It was only with the advent of particle or high energy physics that matter could be ac

  3. Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Einstein, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Time magazine's ""Man of the Century"", Albert Einstein is the founder of modern physics and his theory of relativity is the most important scientific idea of the modern era. In this short book, Einstein explains, using the minimum of mathematical terms, the basic ideas and principles of the theory that has shaped the world we live in today. Unsurpassed by any subsequent books on relativity, this remains the most popular and useful exposition of Einstein's immense contribution to human knowledge.With a new foreword by Derek Raine.

  4. Translation of overlay models of student knowledge for relative domains based on domain ontology mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sosnovsky, Sergey; Dolog, Peter; Henze, Nicola;

    2007-01-01

    argue that the implementation of underlying knowledge models in a sharable format, as domain ontologies - along with application of automatic ontology mapping techniques for model alignment - can help to overcome the "new-user" problem and will greatly widen opportunities for student model translation....... Moreover, it then becomes possible for systems from relevant domains to rely on knowledge transfer and reuse those portions of the student models that are related to overlapping concepts....

  5. The relational model is injective for Multiplicative Exponential Linear Logic (without weakenings)

    CERN Document Server

    de Carvalho, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We show that for a suitable fragment of linear logic the syntactical equivalence relation on proofs induced by cut-elimination coincide with the semantic equivalence relation on proofs induced by the multiset based relational model: one says that the interpretation in the model (or the semantics) is injective. More precisely, we prove that two cut-free proofs of the multiplicative and exponential fragment of linear logic with the same interpretation in the multiset based relational model are the same "up to the connections between the doors of exponential boxes". This result is proven in an untyped framework: two cut-free untyped Proof-Structures (PS) have the same Linear Proof-Structure (LPS). An immediate consequence is that two cut-free PS without weakenings with the same relational interpretation are the same; hence relational semantics is injective.

  6. Multivariate poisson-lognormal model for modeling related factors in crash frequency by severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Tazhibi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Traditionally, roadway safety analyses have used univariate distributions to model crash data for each level of severity separately. This paper uses the multivariate Poisson lognormal (MVPLN models to estimate the expected crash frequency by two levels of severity and then compares those estimates with the univariate Poisson-lognormal (UVPLN and the univariate Poisson (UVP models. Materials and Methods: The parameters estimation is done by Bayesian method for crash data at two levels of severity at the intersection of Isfahan city for 6 months. Results: The results showed that there was over-dispersion issue in data. The UVP model is not able to overcome this problem while the MVPLN model can account for over-dispersion. Also, the estimates of the extra Poisson variation parameters in the MVPLN model were smaller than the UVPLN model that causes improvement in the precision of the MNPLN model. Hence, the MVPLN model is better fitted to the data set. Also, results showed effect of the total Average annual daily traffic (AADT on the property damage only crash was significant in the all of models but effect of the total left turn AADT on the injuries and fatalities crash was significant just in the UVP model. Hence, holding all other factors fixed more property damage only crashes were expected on more the total AADT. For example, under MVPLN model an increase of 1000 vehicles in (average the total AADT was predicted to result in 31% more property damage only crash. Conclusion: Hence, reduction of total AADT was predicted to be highly cost-effective, in terms of the crash cost reductions over the long run.

  7. The field-space metric in spiral inflation and related models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Joshua; Olsen, Jackson; Wang, Zhen

    2016-09-01

    Multi-field inflation models include a variety of scenarios for how inflation proceeds and ends. Models with the same potential but different kinetic terms are common in the literature. We compare spiral inflation and Dante's inferno-type models, which differ only in their field-space metric. We justify a single-field effective description in these models and relate the single-field description to a mass-matrix formalism. We note the effects of the nontrivial field-space metric on inflationary observables, and consequently on the viability of these models. We also note a duality between spiral inflation and Dante's inferno models with different potentials.

  8. Application of a mixed DEA model to evaluate relative efficiency validity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Data envelopment analysis(DEA) model is widely used to evaluate the relative efficiency of producers. It is a kind of objective decision method with multiple indexes. However, the two basic models frequently used at present, the C2R model and the C2GS2 model have limitations when used alone,resulting in evaluations that are often unsatisfactory. In order to solve this problem, a mixed DEA model is built and is used to evaluate the validity of the business efficiency of listed companies. An explanation of how to use this mixed DEA model is offered and its feasibility is verified.

  9. Review of Solid Propellant Ignition Models Relative to the Interior Ballistic Modelling of Gun Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    the point of phase change is reached. Solid-phase exothermic reactions may occur in some propellant ingredients (such as AP [9] or ADN [4]) leading...M.L. Gross. Two-dimensional modeling of AP/HTPB utilizing a vorticity formula- tion and one-dimensional modeling of AP and ADN . PhD thesis, Brigham

  10. Relations between a micro-mechanical model and a damage model for ductile failure in shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2010-09-01

    Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro-cracks, which rotate and elongate until interaction with neighbouring micro-cracks gives coalescence. Thus, the failure mechanism is very different from that under tensile loading. Also, the Gurson model has recently been extended to describe failure in shear, by adding a damage term to the expression for the growth of the void volume fraction, and it has been shown that this extended model can represent experimental observations. Here, numerical studies are carried out to compare predictions of the shear-extended Gurson model with the shear failures predicted by the micro-mechanical cell model. Both models show a strong dependence on the level of hydrostatic tension. Even though the reason for this pressure dependence is different in the two models, as the shear-extended Gurson model does not describe voids flattening out and the associated failure mechanism by micro-cracks interacting with neighbouring micro-cracks, it is shown that the trends of the predictions are in good agreement.

  11. Understanding Decreases in Land Relative Humidity with Global Warming: Conceptual Model and GCM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Michael P.; O'Gorman, Paul A.

    2016-12-01

    Climate models simulate a strong land-ocean contrast in the response of near-surface relative humidity to global warming: relative humidity tends to increase slightly over oceans but decrease substantially over land. Surface energy balance arguments have been used to understand the response over ocean but are difficult to apply over more complex land surfaces. Here, a conceptual box model is introduced, involving moisture transport between the land and ocean boundary layers and evapotranspiration, to investigate the decreases in land relative humidity as the climate warms. The box model is applied to idealized and full-complexity (CMIP5) general circulation model simulations, and it is found to capture many of the features of the simulated changes in land relative humidity. The box model suggests there is a strong link between fractional changes in specific humidity over land and ocean, and the greater warming over land than ocean then implies a decrease in land relative humidity. Evapotranspiration is of secondary importance for the increase in specific humidity over land, but it matters more for the decrease in relative humidity. Further analysis shows there is a strong feedback between changes in surface-air temperature and relative humidity, and this can amplify the influence on relative humidity of factors such as stomatal conductance and soil moisture.

  12. Models for cooperative games with fuzzy relations among the agents fuzzy communication, proximity relation and fuzzy permission

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez-Losada, Andrés

    2017-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive introduction to cooperative game theory and a practice-oriented reference guide to new models and tools for studying bilateral fuzzy relations among several agents or players. It introduces the reader to several fuzzy models, each of which is first analyzed in the context of classical games (crisp games) and subsequently in the context of fuzzy games. Special emphasis is given to the value of Shapley, which is presented for the first time in the context of fuzzy games. Students and researchers will find here a self-contained reference guide to cooperative fuzzy games, characterized by a wealth of examples, descriptions of a wide range of possible situations, step-by-step explanations of the basic mathematical concepts involved, and easy-to-follow information on axioms and properties.

  13. Relations between a micro-mechanical model and a damage model for ductile failure in shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2010-01-01

    Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro-cracks, w......Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro......-cracks, which rotate and elongate until interaction with neighbouring micro-cracks gives coalescence. Thus, the failure mechanism is very different from that under tensile loading. Also, the Gurson model has recently been extended to describe failure in shear, by adding a damage term to the expression...... for the growth of the void volume fraction, and it has been shown that this extended model can represent experimental observations. Here, numerical studies are carried out to compare predictions of the shear-extended Gurson model with the shear failures predicted by the micro-mechanical cell model. Both models...

  14. Statistical imitation system using relational interest points and Gaussian mixture models

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Claassens, J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The author proposes an imitation system that uses relational interest points (RIPs) and Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) to characterize a behaviour. The system's structure is inspired by the Robot Programming by Demonstration (RDP) paradigm...

  15. Solving Two Kinds of JC Models Relating to Two-Photon Process by Supersymmetric Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN Hong-Yi; Wei-Jun

    2004-01-01

    We propose two kinds of new Jaynes Cummings models relating to two-photon process by using the supersymmetric unitary transformation. The corresponding energy eigenvalues and eigenvectors are obtained.

  16. Informing hydrological models with ground-based time-lapse relative gravimetry: potential and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer-Gottwein, Peter; Christiansen, Lars; Rosbjerg, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Coupled hydrogeophysical inversion emerges as an attractive option to improve the calibration and predictive capability of hydrological models. Recently, ground-based time-lapse relative gravity (TLRG) measurements have attracted increasing interest because there is a direct relationship between ...

  17. A linear dispersion relation for the hybrid kinetic-ion/fluid-electron model of plasma physics

    CERN Document Server

    Told, Daniel; Astfalk, Patrick; Jenko, Frank

    2016-01-01

    A dispersion relation for a commonly used hybrid model of plasma physics is developed, which combines fully kinetic ions and a massless-electron fluid description. Although this model and variations of it have been used to describe plasma phenomena for about 40 years, to date there exists no general dispersion relation to describe the linear wave physics contained in the model. Previous efforts along these lines are extended here to retain arbitrary wave propagation angles, temperature anisotropy effects, as well as additional terms in the generalized Ohm's law which determines the electric field. A numerical solver for the dispersion relation is developed, and linear wave physics is benchmarked against solutions of a full Vlasov-Maxwell dispersion relation solver. This work opens the door to a more accurate interpretation of existing and future wave and turbulence simulations using this type of hybrid model.

  18. Sector Models - A Toolkit for Teaching General Relativity. Part 1: Curved Spaces and Spacetimes

    CERN Document Server

    Zahn, C

    2014-01-01

    Teaching the general theory of relativity to high school or undergraduate students must be based on an approach that is conceptual rather than mathematical. In this paper we present such an approach that requires no more than elementary mathematics. The central idea of this introduction to general relativity is the use of so-called sector models. Sector models describe curved spaces the Regge calculus way by subdivision into blocks with euclidean geometry. This procedure is similar to the approximation of a curved surface by flat triangles. We outline a workshop for high school and undergraduate students that introduces the notion of curved space by means of sector models of black holes. We further describe the extension to sector models of curved spacetimes. The spacetime models are suitable for learners with a basic knowledge of special relativity. For online teaching materials, see http://www.spacetimetravel.org. ----- F\\"ur die Vermittlung der Allgemeinen Relativit\\"atstheorie in der Schule, im Grund- ode...

  19. RELATIONS BETWEEN PARAMETERS IN THE LINEAR RESERVOIR AND KINEMATIC WAVE MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the relation between the sets of parameters involved in the kinematic wave model and the linear reservoir model in runoff analyses. In the study, an approximate function of recession curves, obtained from the results of indoor rainfall-runoff experiments, is used to characterize the parameters involved in the two models and to explore the relations between the corresponding sets of parameters. Additionally, the observed hydrographs resulting from different rainfall durations and intensities on both bare and weed hillsides obtained from the rainfall experiments are simulated applying the two models. The simulation results indicate the applicability of the conversion relation between the two sets of parameters, which were determined based on the recession constants. This provides a better understanding of the link between the two models.

  20. Exploring nonlinear relations: models of clinical decision making by regression with optimal scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Armin; Van Der Kooij, Anita J; Zeeck, Almut

    2009-07-01

    In explorative regression studies, linear models are often applied without questioning the linearity of the relations between the predictor variables and the dependent variable, or linear relations are taken as an approximation. In this study, the method of regression with optimal scaling transformations is demonstrated. This method does not require predefined nonlinear functions and results in easy-to-interpret transformations that will show the form of the relations. The method is illustrated using data from a German multicenter project on the indication criteria for inpatient or day clinic psychotherapy treatment. The indication criteria to include in the regression model were selected with the Lasso, which is a tool for predictor selection that overcomes the disadvantages of stepwise regression methods. The resulting prediction model indicates that treatment status is (approximately) linearly related to some criteria and nonlinearly related to others.

  1. Relations between the baryon quantum numbers of the Standard Model and of the rotating neutrino model

    CERN Document Server

    Vayenas, Constantinos G; Grigoriou, Dimitrios P

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the common features between the Standard Model taxonomy of particles, based on electric charge, strangeness and isospin, and the taxonomy emerging from the key structural elements of the rotating neutrino model, which describes baryons as bound states formed by three highly relativistic electrically polarized neutrinos forming a symmetric ring rotating around a central electrically charged or polarized lepton. It is shown that the two taxonomies are fully compatible with each other.

  2. Adaptation to Climate Change: A Comparative Analysis of Modeling Methods for Heat-Related Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, Simon N; Hondula, David M; Bunker, Aditi; Ibarreta, Dolores; Liu, Junguo; Zhang, Xinxin; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2017-08-16

    Multiple methods are employed for modeling adaptation when projecting the impact of climate change on heat-related mortality. The sensitivity of impacts to each is unknown because they have never been systematically compared. In addition, little is known about the relative sensitivity of impacts to "adaptation uncertainty" (i.e., the inclusion/exclusion of adaptation modeling) relative to using multiple climate models and emissions scenarios. This study had three aims: a) Compare the range in projected impacts that arises from using different adaptation modeling methods; b) compare the range in impacts that arises from adaptation uncertainty with ranges from using multiple climate models and emissions scenarios; c) recommend modeling method(s) to use in future impact assessments. We estimated impacts for 2070-2099 for 14 European cities, applying six different methods for modeling adaptation; we also estimated impacts with five climate models run under two emissions scenarios to explore the relative effects of climate modeling and emissions uncertainty. The range of the difference (percent) in impacts between including and excluding adaptation, irrespective of climate modeling and emissions uncertainty, can be as low as 28% with one method and up to 103% with another (mean across 14 cities). In 13 of 14 cities, the ranges in projected impacts due to adaptation uncertainty are larger than those associated with climate modeling and emissions uncertainty. Researchers should carefully consider how to model adaptation because it is a source of uncertainty that can be greater than the uncertainty in emissions and climate modeling. We recommend absolute threshold shifts and reductions in slope. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP634.

  3. On the relation between hydrogen bonds, tetrahedral order and molecular mobility in model water

    CERN Document Server

    Pereyra, R G; Malaspina, D C; Carignano, M A

    2013-01-01

    We studied by molecular dynamics simulations the relation existing between the lifetime of hydrogen bonds, the tetrahedral order and the diffusion coefficient of model water. We tested four different models: SPC/E, TIP4P-Ew, TIP5P-Ew and Six-site, these last two having sites explicitly resembling the water lone pairs. While all the models perform reasonably well at ambient conditions, their behavior is significantly different for temperatures below 270 K. The models with explicit lone-pairs have a longer hydrogen bond lifetime, a better tetrahedral order and a smaller diffusion coefficient than the models without them.

  4. Pharmacodynamic Modelling of Placebo and Buprenorphine Effects on Event-Related Potentials in Experimental Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus V; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate placebo and buprenorphine effects on event-related potentials (ERPs) in experimental pain and the potential benefit of population pharmacodynamic modelling in data analysis. Nineteen healthy volunteers received transdermal placebo and buprenorphine...... in a cross-over study. Drug plasma concentrations and ERPs after electrical stimulation at the median nerve with intensity adjusted to pain detection threshold were recorded until 144 hrs after administration. Placebo and concentration-effect models were fitted to data using non-linear mixed......-effects modelling implemented in NONMEM (V7.2.0.). Pharmacodynamic models were developed to adequately describe both placebo and buprenorphine ERP data. Models predicted significant placebo effects, but did not predict significant effects related to buprenorphine concentration. Models revealed that ERPs varied both...

  5. A Social Relational Model of Disability: A Theoretical Framework for Special Needs Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindal, Solveig Magnus

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses various approaches to the phenomenon of disability in relation to special needs. Ever since disability researchers launched the social model of disability and criticised the field of special education for preserving an understanding of disability in accord with a medical model, the special education field has been in a state…

  6. Travelling wave analysis and jump relations for a fluid model of quasineutral plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordier, S. (Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France)); Degond, P. (Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France)); Markowich, P. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany)); Schmeiser, C. (Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria))

    1994-05-01

    A 1-D fluid model for a plasma is presented. In the quasineutral limit, this model leads to a non conservative hyperbolic system for which the jump relations are a-priority not well defined. The problem can be solved for sufficiently strong shocks via a travelling wave analysis. (authors). 5 refs.

  7. Developmental Relations between Vocabulary Knowledge and Reading Comprehension: A Latent Change Score Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jamie M.; Wagner, Richard K.; Petscher, Yaacov; Lopez, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The present study followed a sample of first-grade (N = 316, M[subscript age] = 7.05 at first test) through fourth-grade students to evaluate dynamic developmental relations between vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension. Using latent change score modeling, competing models were fit to the repeated measurements of vocabulary knowledge and…

  8. Exploring Undergraduate Students' Mental Models of the Environment: Are They Related to Environmental Affect and Behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu-Chiu; Lin, Huann-shyang

    2015-01-01

    A draw-and-explain task and questionnaire were used to explore Taiwanese undergraduate students' mental models of the environment and whether and how they relate to their environmental affect and behavioral commitment. We found that students generally held incomplete mental models of the environment, focusing on objects rather than on processes or…

  9. School Board Improvement Plans in Relation to the AIP Model of Educational Accountability: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Barneveld, Christina; Stienstra, Wendy; Stewart, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    For this study we analyzed the content of school board improvement plans in relation to the Achievement-Indicators-Policy (AIP) model of educational accountability (Nagy, Demeris, & van Barneveld, 2000). We identified areas of congruence and incongruence between the plans and the model. Results suggested that the content of the improvement…

  10. Comparison and clinical suitability of eight prediction models for cardiac surgery-related acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, H.D.; Boogaard, M.H.W.A. van den; Schoenmakers, M.C.J.; Hoeven, J.G. van der; Swieten, H.A. van; Heemskerk, S.; Pickkers, P.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cardiac surgery-related acute kidney injury (CS-AKI) results in increased morbidity and mortality. Different models have been developed to identify patients at risk of CS-AKI. While models that predict dialysis and CS-AKI defined by the RIFLE criteria are available, their predictive powe

  11. A Relational Goal-Oriented Model of Optimal Service Delivery to Children and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gillian

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a Relational Goal-Oriented Model of Service Delivery to Children with physical or mental health difficulties and their families. This research-informed and practice-relevant model provides a broad understanding of what effective service provision entails and requires from practitioners and service organizations. The model…

  12. Application of an IRT Polytomous Model for Measuring Health Related Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Antonio J. Rojas; Rojas, Oscar M. Lozano

    2005-01-01

    Background: The Item Response Theory (IRT) has advantages for measuring Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) as opposed to the Classical Tests Theory (CTT). Objectives: To present the results of the application of a polytomous model based on IRT, specifically, the Rating Scale Model (RSM), to measure HRQOL with the EORTC QLQ-C30. Methods: 103…

  13. A Social Relational Model of Disability: A Theoretical Framework for Special Needs Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reindal, Solveig Magnus

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses various approaches to the phenomenon of disability in relation to special needs. Ever since disability researchers launched the social model of disability and criticised the field of special education for preserving an understanding of disability in accord with a medical model, the special education field has been in a state…

  14. On the Theory of Resonances in Non-Relativistic QED and Related Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abou Salem, Walid K.; Faupin, Jeremy; Froehlich, Juerg;

    We study the mathematical theory of quantum resonances in the standard model of non-relativistic QED and in Nelson's model. In particular, we estimate the survival probability of metastable states corresponding to quantum resonances and relate the resonances to poles of an analytic continuation...

  15. A model of theory-practice relations in mathematics teacher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses an ATD based (Chevallard, 2012) model of theory-practice relations in mathematics teacher education. The notions of didactic transposition and praxeology are combined and concretized in order to form a comprehensive model for analysing the theory-practice problema...

  16. Developmental Relations between Vocabulary Knowledge and Reading Comprehension: A Latent Change Score Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jamie M.; Wagner, Richard K.; Petscher, Yaacov; Lopez, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The present study followed a sample of first-grade (N = 316, M[subscript age] = 7.05 at first test) through fourth-grade students to evaluate dynamic developmental relations between vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension. Using latent change score modeling, competing models were fit to the repeated measurements of vocabulary knowledge and…

  17. Relational Understanding of the Derivative Concept through Mathematical Modeling: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Zulal; Aydogan Yenmez, Arzu; Erbas, Ayhan Kursat

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate three second-year graduate students' awareness and understanding of the relationships among the "big ideas" that underlie the concept of derivative through modeling tasks and Skemp's distinction between relational and instrumental understanding. The modeling tasks consisting of warm-up,…

  18. Additive gamma frailty models with applications to competing risks in related individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Frank; Scheike, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of related individuals are often complicated by the fact that follow-up on the event type of interest is incomplete due to the occurrence of other events. We suggest a class of frailty models with cause-specific hazards for correlated competing events in related individuals...

  19. Supersymmetry approach to delocalization transitions in a network model of the weak-field quantum Hall effect and related models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, S [University of Chicago; Mkhitaryan, V V [Ames Laboratory; Gruzberg, I A [Ohio State University

    2014-06-01

    We consider a recently proposed network model of the integer quantum Hall (IQH) effect in a weak magnetic field. Using a supersymmetry approach, we reformulate the network model in terms of a superspin ladder. A subsequent analysis of the superspin ladder and the corresponding supersymmetric nonlinear sigma model allows us to establish the phase diagram of the network model, and the form of the critical line of the weak-field IQH transition. Our results confirm the universality of the IQH transition, which is described by the same sigma model in strong and weak magnetic fields. We apply the suspersymmetry method to several related network models that were introduced in the literature to describe the quantum Hall effect in graphene, the spin-degenerate Landau levels, and localization of electrons in a random magnetic field.

  20. The Kramers-Kronig relations for usual and anomalous Poisson-Nernst-Planck models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Luiz Roberto; Lenzi, Ervin Kaminski; Barbero, Giovanni

    2013-11-20

    The consistency of the frequency response predicted by a class of electrochemical impedance expressions is analytically checked by invoking the Kramers-Kronig (KK) relations. These expressions are obtained in the context of Poisson-Nernst-Planck usual or anomalous diffusional models that satisfy Poisson's equation in a finite length situation. The theoretical results, besides being successful in interpreting experimental data, are also shown to obey the KK relations when these relations are modified accordingly.

  1. New Retrieval Method Based on Relative Entropy for Language Modeling with Different Smoothing Methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huo Hua; Liu Junqiang; Feng Boqin

    2006-01-01

    A language model for information retrieval is built by using a query language model to generate queries and a document language model to generate documents. The documents are ranked according to the relative entropies of estimated document language models with respect to the estimated query language model. Two popular and relatively efficient smoothing methods, the JelinekMercer method and the absolute discounting method, are used to smooth the document language model in estimation of the document language. A combined model composed of the feedback document language model and the collection language model is used to estimate the query model. A performacne comparison between the new retrieval method and the existing method with feedback is made,and the retrieval performances of the proposed method with the two different smoothing techniques are evaluated on three Text Retrieval Conference (TREC) data sets. Experimental results show that the method is effective and performs better than the basic language modeling approach; moreover, the method using the Jelinek-Mercer technique performs better than that using the absolute discounting technique, and the perfomance is sensitive to the smoothing paramters.

  2. Bird-landscape relations in the Chihuahuan Desert: Coping with uncertainties about predictive models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller, K.J.; Barrow, W.C.

    2001-01-01

    During the springs of 1995-1997, we studied birds and landscapes in the Chihuahuan Desert along part of the Texas-Mexico border. Our objectives were to assess bird-landscape relations and their interannual consistency and to identify ways to cope with associated uncertainties that undermine confidence in using such relations in conservation decision processes. Bird distributions were often significantly associated with landscape features, and many bird-landscape models were valid and useful for predictive purposes. Differences in early spring rainfall appeared to influence bird abundance, but there was no evidence that annual differences in bird abundance affected model consistency. Model consistency for richness (42%) was higher than mean model consistency for 26 focal species (mean 30%, range 0-67%), suggesting that relations involving individual species are, on average, more subject to factors that cause variation than are richness-landscape relations. Consistency of bird-landscape relations may be influenced by such factors as plant succession, exotic species invasion, bird species' tolerances for environmental variation, habitat occupancy patterns, and variation in food density or weather. The low model consistency that we observed for most species indicates the high variation in bird-landscape relations that managers and other decision makers may encounter. The uncertainty of interannual variation in bird-landscape relations can be reduced by using projections of bird distributions from different annual models to determine the likely range of temporal and spatial variation in a species' distribution. Stochastic simulation models can be used to incorporate the uncertainty of random environmental variation into predictions of bird distributions based on bird-landscape relations and to provide probabilistic projections with which managers can weigh the costs and benefits of various decisions, Uncertainty about the true structure of bird-landscape relations

  3. BIG DATA-Related Challenges and Opportunities in Earth System Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamzai, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    Knowledge of the Earth's climate has increased immensely in recent decades, both through observational analysis and modeling. BIG DATA-related challenges emerge in our quest for understanding the variability and predictability of the climate and earth system on a range of time scales, as well as in our endeavor to improve predictive capability using state-of-the-science models. To enable further scientific discovery, bottlenecks in current paradigms need to be addressed. An overview of current NSF activities in Earth System Modeling with a focus on associated data-related challenges and opportunities, will be presented.

  4. Modeling spatial relation in skin lesion images by the graph walk kernel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Situ, Ning; Wadhawan, Tarun; Yuan, Xiaojing; Zouridakis, George

    2010-01-01

    Early skin cancer detection with the help of dermoscopic images is becoming more and more important. Previous methods generally ignored the spatial relation of the pixels or regions inside the lesion. We propose to employ a graph representation of the skin lesion to model the spatial relation. We then use the graph walk kernel, a similarity measure between two graphs, to build a classifier based on support vector machines for melanoma detection. In experiments, we compare the sensitivities and specificities of models with and without spatial information. Experimental results show that the model with spatial information performs the best in both sensitivity and specificity. Statistical test indicates that the improvement is significant.

  5. Constitutive Relations for Reactive Transport Modeling: Effects of Chemical Reactions on Multi-Phase Flow Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S.; Liu, H. H.; van Dijke, M. I.; Geiger, S.; Agar, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between flow properties and chemical reactions is key to modeling subsurface reactive transport. This study develops closed-form equations to describe the effects of mineral precipitation and dissolution on multiphase flow properties (capillary pressure and relative permeabilities) of porous media. The model accounts for the fact that precipitation/dissolution only takes place in the water-filled part of pore space. The capillary tube concept was used to connect pore-scale changes to macroscopic hydraulic properties. Precipitation/dissolution induces changes in the pore radii of water-filled pores and consequently in the pore-size distribution. The updated pore-size distribution is converted back to a new capillary pressure-water saturation relation from which the new relative permeabilities are calculated. Pore network modeling is conducted on a Berea sandstone to validate the new continuum-scale relations. The pore network modeling results are satisfactorily predicted by the new closed-form equations. Currently the effects of chemical reactions on flow properties are represented as a relation between permeability and porosity in reactive transport modeling. Porosity is updated after chemical calculations from the change of mineral volumes, then permeability change is calculated from the porosity change using an empirical permeability-porosity relation, most commonly the Carman-Kozeny relation, or the Verma-Pruess relation. To the best of our knowledge, there are no closed-form relations available yet for the effects of chemical reactions on multi-phase flow properties, and thus currently these effects cannot be accounted for in reactive transport modeling. This work presents new constitutive relations to represent how chemical reactions affect multi-phase flow properties on the continuum scale based on the conceptual model of parallel capillary tubes. The parameters in our new relations are either pre-existing input in a multi-phase flow

  6. Application of the Infinite Relational Model combined with the Bayesian Model of Generalization for Effective Cross-Cultural Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glückstad, Fumiko Kano; Mørup, Morten

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates how the Infinite Relational Model (IRM) [Kemp 2006], a novel unsupervised machine learning method, is effectively applied to loosely-structured datasets consisting of concepts and features for the purpose of mapping Culturally Specific Concepts (CSCs) in a multi...... the IRM directly to a matrix where the two CSC-feature matrices respectively representing the Danish- and Japanese educational domain knowledge are merged; and 3) applying the Bayesian Model of Generalization (BMG) [Tenenbaum 2001] to directly compute similarity relations between CSCs in the two cultures...

  7. Application of the Infinite Relational Model combined with the Bayesian Model of Generalization for Effective Cross-Cultural Knowledge Transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kano Glückstad, Fumiko; Mørup, Morten

    This paper investigates how the Infinite Relational Model (IRM) [Kemp 2006], a novel unsupervised machine learning method, is effectively applied to loosely-structured datasets consisting of concepts and features for the purpose of mapping Culturally Specific Concepts (CSCs) in a multi...... the IRM directly to a matrix where the two CSC-feature matrices respectively representing the Danish- and Japanese educational domain knowledge are merged; and 3) applying the Bayesian Model of Generalization (BMG) [Tenenbaum 2001] to directly compute similarity relations between CSCs in the two cultures...

  8. Milgrom Relation Models for Spiral Galaxies from Two-Dimensional Velocity Maps

    CERN Document Server

    Barnes, E I; Sellwood, J A; Barnes, Eric I.; Kosowsky, Arthur; Sellwood, Jerry A.

    2007-01-01

    Using two-dimensional velocity maps and I-band photometry, we have created mass models of 40 spiral galaxies using the Milgrom relation (the basis of modified Newtonian dynamics, or MOND) to complement previous work. A Bayesian technique is employed to compare several different dark matter halo models to Milgrom and Newtonian models. Pseudo-isothermal dark matter halos provide the best statistical fits to the data in a majority of cases, while the Milgrom relation generally provides good fits as well. We also find that Milgrom models give mass-to-light ratios that roughly correlate with galaxy color, as predicted by stellar population models. A subsample of galaxies in the Hydra cluster follow a tight relation between mass-to-light and color, but one that is significantly different from relations found in previous studies. Ruling out the Milgrom relation with rotational kinematics is difficult due to systematic uncertainties in the observations as well as underlying model assumptions. We discuss in detail two...

  9. A Rigorous Sharp Interface Limit of a Diffuse Interface Model Related to Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Elisabetta; Scala, Riccardo

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we study the rigorous sharp interface limit of a diffuse interface model related to the dynamics of tumor growth, when a parameter ɛ, representing the interface thickness between the tumorous and non-tumorous cells, tends to zero. More in particular, we analyze here a gradient-flow-type model arising from a modification of the recently introduced model for tumor growth dynamics in Hawkins-Daruud et al. (Int J Numer Math Biomed Eng 28:3-24, 2011) (cf. also Hilhorst et al. Math Models Methods Appl Sci 25:1011-1043, 2015). Exploiting the techniques related to both gradient flows and gamma convergence, we recover a condition on the interface Γ relating the chemical and double-well potentials, the mean curvature, and the normal velocity.

  10. Developmental relations between vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension: a latent change score modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jamie M; Wagner, Richard K; Petscher, Yaacov; Lopez, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The present study followed a sample of first-grade (N = 316, Mage = 7.05 at first test) through fourth-grade students to evaluate dynamic developmental relations between vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension. Using latent change score modeling, competing models were fit to the repeated measurements of vocabulary knowledge and reading comprehension to test for the presence of leading and lagging influences. Univariate models indicated growth in vocabulary knowledge, and reading comprehension was determined by two parts: constant yearly change and change proportional to the previous level of the variable. Bivariate models indicated previous levels of vocabulary knowledge acted as leading indicators of reading comprehension growth, but the reverse relation was not found. Implications for theories of developmental relations between vocabulary and reading comprehension are discussed.

  11. Multi-attribute decision making model based on optimal membership and relative entropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rao Congjun; Zhao Yong

    2009-01-01

    To study the problems of multi-attribute decision making in which the attribute values are given in the form of linguistic fuzzy numbers and the information of attribute weights are incomplete, a new multi-attribute decision making model is presented based on the optimal membership and the relative entropy. Firstly, the definitions of the optimal membership and the relative entropy are given. Secondly, for all alternatives, a set of preference weight vectors are obtained by solving a set of linear programming models whose goals are all to maximize the optimal membership. Thirdly, a relative entropy model is established to aggregate the preference weight vectors, thus an optimal weight vector is determined. Based on this optimal weight vector, the algorithm of deviation degree minimization is proposed to rank all the alternatives. Finally, a decision making example is given to demonstrate the feasibility and rationality of this new model.

  12. Tackling Longitudinal Round-Robin Data: A Social Relations Growth Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Steffen; Geukes, Katharina; Hutteman, Roos; Back, Mitja D

    2016-12-06

    The social relations model (SRM) is commonly used in the analysis of interpersonal judgments and behaviors that arise in groups. The SRM was developed only for use with cross-sectional data. Here, we introduce an extension of the SRM to longitudinal data. The social relations growth model represents a person's repeated SRM judgments of another person as a function of time. We show how the model's parameters can be estimated using restricted maximum likelihood, and how the effects of covariates on interindividual and interdyad variability in growth can be computed. An example is presented to illustrate the suggested approach. We also present the results of a small simulation study showing the suitability of the social relations growth model for the analysis of longitudinal SRM data.

  13. On the mass-coupling relation of multi-scale quantum integrable models

    CERN Document Server

    Bajnok, Zoltan; Ito, Katsushi; Satoh, Yuji; Toth, Gabor Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    We determine exactly the mass-coupling relation for the simplest multi-scale quantum integrable model, the homogenous sine-Gordon model with two independent mass-scales. We first reformulate its perturbed coset CFT description in terms of the perturbation of a projected product of minimal models. This representation enables us to identify conserved tensor currents on the UV side. These UV operators are then mapped via form factor perturbation theory to operators on the IR side, which are characterized by their form factors. The relation between the UV and IR operators is given in terms of the sought-for mass-coupling relation. By generalizing the $\\Theta$ sum rule Ward identity we are able to derive differential equations for the mass-coupling relation, which we solve in terms of hypergeometric functions. We check these results against the data obtained by numerically solving the thermodynamic Bethe Ansatz equations, and find a complete agreement.

  14. VISCOELASTIC CONSTITUTIVE MODEL RELATED TO DEFORMATION OF INSECT WING UNDER LOADING IN FLAPPING MOTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Lin; HU Jin-song; YU Yong-liang; CHENG Peng; XU Bo-qing; TONG Bing-gang

    2006-01-01

    Flexible insect wings deform passively under the periodic loading during flapping flight. The wing flexibility is considered as one of the specific mechanisms on improving insect flight performance. The constitutive relation of the insect wing material plays a key role on the wing deformation, but has not been clearly understood yet. A viscoelastic constitutive relation model was established based on the stress relaxation experiment of a dragonfly wing (in vitro). This model was examined by the finite clement analysis of the dynamic deformation response for a model insect wing under the action of the periodical inertial force in flapping. It is revealed that the viscoelastic constitutive relation is rational to characterize the biomaterial property of insect wings in contrast to the elastic one. The amplitude and form of the passive viscoelastic deformation of the wing is evidently dependent on the viscous parameters in the constitutive relation.

  15. Modelling Structured Societies: a Multi-relational Approach to Context Permeability

    CERN Document Server

    Nunes, Davide

    2015-01-01

    The structure of social relations is fundamental for the construction of plausible simulation scenarios. It shapes the way actors interact and create their identity within overlapping social contexts. Each actor interacts in multiple contexts within different types of social relations that constitute their social space. In this article, we present an approach to model structured agent societies with multiple coexisting social networks. We study the notion of context permeability, using a game in which agents try to achieve global consensus. We design and analyse two different models of permeability. In the first model, agents interact concurrently in multiple social networks. In the second, we introduce a context switching mechanism which adds a dynamic temporal component to agent interaction in the model. Agents switch between the different networks spending more or less time in each one. We compare these models and analyse the influence of different social networks regarding the speed of convergence to cons...

  16. Car-following model with relative-velocity effect and its experimental verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamoto, Daisuke; Tomoeda, Akiyasu; Nishi, Ryosuke; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2011-04-01

    In driving a vehicle, drivers respond to the changes of both the headway and the relative velocity to the vehicle in front. In this paper a new car-following model including these maneuvers is proposed. The acceleration of the model becomes infinite (has a singularity) when the distance between two vehicles is zero, and the asymmetry between the acceleration and the deceleration is incorporated in a nonlinear way. The model is simple but contains enough features of driving for reproducing real vehicle traffic. From the linear stability analysis, we confirm that the model shows the metastable homogeneous flow around the critical density, beyond which a traffic jam emerges. Moreover, we perform experiments to verify this model. From the data it is shown that the acceleration of a vehicle has a positive correlation with the relative velocity.

  17. A constituent-based model of age-related changes in conduit arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsamis, Alkiviadis; Rachev, Alexander; Stergiopulos, Nikos

    2011-10-01

    In the present report, a constituent-based theoretical model of age-related changes in geometry and mechanical properties of conduit arteries is proposed. The model was based on the premise that given the time course of the load on an artery and the accumulation of advanced glycation end-products in the arterial tissue, the initial geometric dimensions and properties of the arterial tissue can be predicted by a solution of a boundary value problem for the governing equations that follow from finite elasticity, structure-based constitutive modeling within the constrained mixture theory, continuum damage theory, and global growth approach for stress-induced structure-based remodeling. An illustrative example of the age-related changes in geometry, structure, composition, and mechanical properties of a human thoracic aorta is considered. Model predictions were in good qualitative agreement with available experimental data in the literature. Limitations and perspectives for refining the model are discussed.

  18. Group contribution modelling for the prediction of safety-related and environmental properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    We present a new set of property prediction models based on group contributions to predict major safety-related and environmental properties for organic compounds. The predicted list of properties includes lower and upper flammability limits, heat of combustion, auto ignition temperature, global...... models like group contribution (GC) models can estimate data. However, the estimation needs to be accurate, reliable and as little time-consuming as possible so that the models can be used on the fly. In this study the Marrero and Gani group contribution (MR GC) method has been used to develop the models...... for safety-related and environmental properties. The method considers the group contribution in three levels: The contributions from a specific functional group (1st order parameters), from poly-functional (2nd order parameters) as well as from structural groups (3rd order parameters). The latter two classes...

  19. A model of theory-practice relations in mathematics teacher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Kaj

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents and discusses an ATD based (Chevallard, 2012) model of theory-practice relations in mathematics teacher education. The notions of didactic transposition and praxeology are combined and concretized in order to form a comprehensive model for analysing the theory-practice problema......The paper presents and discusses an ATD based (Chevallard, 2012) model of theory-practice relations in mathematics teacher education. The notions of didactic transposition and praxeology are combined and concretized in order to form a comprehensive model for analysing the theory......-practice problematique. It is illustrated how the model can be used both as a descriptive tool to analyse interactions between and interviews with student teachers and teachers and as a normative tool to design and redesign learning environments in teacher education in this case a lesson study context....

  20. A model of relative translation and rotation in leader-follower spacecraft formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Kristiansen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a model of a leader-follower spacecraft formation in six degrees of freedom is derived and presented. The nonlinear model describes the relative translational and rotationalmotion of the spacecraft, and extends previous work by providing a more complete factorization, together with detailed information about the matrices in the model. The resulting model shows many similarities with models for systems such as robot manipulators and marine vehicles. In addition, mathematical models of orbital perturbations due to gravitational variations, atmospheric drag, solar radiation and third-body effects are presented for completeness. Results from simulations are presented to visualize the properties of the model and to show the impact of the different orbital perturbations on the flight path.

  1. Clouds and relative humidity in climate models; or what really regulates cloud cover?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walcek, C. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The response and impact of clouds remains one of the largest outstanding questions in GCMs. Clouds are not homogeneous, though they are treated as such in the models. When averaged over areas typically used as numerical grid elements by GCMs, observations suggest that there are some clouds at all relative humidities. Fractional cloud cover at 100% relative humidity is rarely 100%, and totally clear skies rarely occur, even for low relative humidities. Relative humidity is the best single indicator of cloud coverage. However, if there is a relationship between cloud coverage and relative humidity, our current models and observations are inadequate to reveal exactly what that relationship is. It does appear that cloud coverage decreases exponentially as humidity falls below 100%. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Adjustment problems and maladaptive relational style: a mediational model of sexual coercion in intimate relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salwen, Jessica K; O'Leary, K Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Four hundred and fifty-three married or cohabitating couples participated in the current study. A meditational model of men's perpetration of sexual coercion within an intimate relationship was examined based on past theories and known correlates of rape and sexual coercion. The latent constructs of adjustment problems and maladaptive relational style were examined. Adjustment problem variables included perceived stress, perceived low social support, and marital discord. Maladaptive relational style variables included psychological aggression, dominance, and jealousy. Sexual coercion was a combined measure of men's reported perpetration and women's reported victimization. As hypothesized, adjustment problems significantly predicted sexual coercion. Within the meditational model, adjustment problems were significantly correlated with maladaptive relational style, and maladaptive relational style significantly predicted sexual coercion. Once maladaptive relational style was introduced as a mediator, adjustment problems no longer significantly predicted sexual coercion. Implications for treatment, limitations, and future research are discussed.

  3. Engineering the object-relation database model in O-Raid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Prasun; Vikram, Ashish; Bhargava, Bharat

    1989-01-01

    Raid is a distributed database system based on the relational model. O-raid is an extension of the Raid system and will support complex data objects. The design of O-Raid is evolutionary and retains all features of relational data base systems and those of a general purpose object-oriented programming language. O-Raid has several novel properties. Objects, classes, and inheritance are supported together with a predicate-base relational query language. O-Raid objects are compatible with C++ objects and may be read and manipulated by a C++ program without any 'impedance mismatch'. Relations and columns within relations may themselves be treated as objects with associated variables and methods. Relations may contain heterogeneous objects, that is, objects of more than one class in a certain column, which can individually evolve by being reclassified. Special facilities are provided to reduce the data search in a relation containing complex objects.

  4. Relation Between Chiral Susceptibility and Solutions of Gap Equation in Nambu--Jona-Lasinio Model

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Y; Liu, Y; Yuan, W; Chang, Lei; Liu, Yu-xin; Yuan, Wei; Zhao, Yue

    2006-01-01

    We study the solutions of the gap equation, the thermodynamic potential and the chiral susceptibility in and beyond the chiral limit at finite chemical potential in the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model. We give an explicit relation between the chiral susceptibility and the thermodynamic potential in the NJL model. We find that the chiral susceptibility is a quantity being able to represent the furcation of the solutions of the gap equation and the concavo-convexity of the thermodynamic potential in NJL model. It indicates that the chiral susceptibility can identify the stable state and the possibility of the chiral phase transition in NJL model.

  5. What properties of numbers are needed to model accelerated observers in relativity?

    CERN Document Server

    Székely, Gergely

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the possible structures of numbers (as physical quantities) over which accelerated observers can be modeled in special relativity. We present a general axiomatic theory of accelerated observers which has a model over every real closed field. We also show that, if we would like to model certain accelerated observers, then not every real closed field is suitable, e.g., uniformly accelerated observers cannot be modeled over the field of real algebraic numbers. Consequently, the class of fields over which uniform acceleration can be investigated is not axiomatizable in the language of ordered fields.

  6. Forecasting asthma-related hospital admissions in London using negative binomial models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyiri, Ireneous N; Reidpath, Daniel D; Sarran, Christophe

    2013-05-01

    Health forecasting can improve health service provision and individual patient outcomes. Environmental factors are known to impact chronic respiratory conditions such as asthma, but little is known about the extent to which these factors can be used for forecasting. Using weather, air quality and hospital asthma admissions, in London (2005-2006), two related negative binomial models were developed and compared with a naive seasonal model. In the first approach, predictive forecasting models were fitted with 7-day averages of each potential predictor, and then a subsequent multivariable model is constructed. In the second strategy, an exhaustive search of the best fitting models between possible combinations of lags (0-14 days) of all the environmental effects on asthma admission was conducted. Three models were considered: a base model (seasonal effects), contrasted with a 7-day average model and a selected lags model (weather and air quality effects). Season is the best predictor of asthma admissions. The 7-day average and seasonal models were trivial to implement. The selected lags model was computationally intensive, but of no real value over much more easily implemented models. Seasonal factors can predict daily hospital asthma admissions in London, and there is a little evidence that additional weather and air quality information would add to forecast accuracy.

  7. Computational Modeling of Traffic Related Thoracic Injury of a 10-Year-Old Child Using Subject-Specific Modeling Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Jiang, Binhui; Hu, Jingwen; Wang, Yulong; Shen, Ming; Yang, King H

    2016-01-01

    Traffic injuries have become a major health-related issue to school-aged children. To study this type of injury with numerical simulations, a finite element model was developed to represent the full body of a 10-year-old (YO) child. The model has been validated against test data at both body-part and full-body levels in previous studies. Representing only the average 10-YO child, this model did not include subject-specific attributes, such as the variations in size and shape among different children. In this paper, a new modeling approach was used to morph this baseline model to a subject-specific model, based on anthropometric data collected from pediatric subjects. This mesh-morphing method was then used to rapidly morph the baseline mesh into the subject-specific geometry while maintaining a good mesh quality. The morphed model was subsequently applied to simulate a real-world motor vehicle crash accident. A lung injury observed in the accident was well captured by the subject-specific model. The findings of this study demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed morphing approach to develop subject-specific human models, and confirm their capability in prediction of traffic injuries.

  8. Effects of Dispersal-Related Factors on Species Distribution Model Accuracy for Boreal Lake Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Hallstan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution modeling is used in applied ecology; for example in predicting the consequences of global change. However, questions still remain about the robustness of model predictions. Here we estimate effects of landscape spatial configuration and organism flight ability—factors related to dispersal—on the accuracy of species distribution models. Distribution models were developed for 129 phytoplankton taxa, 164 littoral invertebrate taxa and 44 profundal invertebrate taxa sampled in 105 Swedish lakes, using six different modeling techniques (generalized linear models (GLM, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS, classification tree analysis (CTA, mixture discriminant analysis (MDA, generalized boosting models (GBM and random forests (RF. Model accuracy was not affected by dispersal ability (i.e., invertebrate flight ability, but the accuracy of phytoplankton assemblage predictions and, to a lesser extent, littoral invertebrate assemblages were related to ecosystem size and connectivity. Although no general pattern across species or spatial configuration was evident from our study, we recommend that dispersal and spatial configuration of ecosystems should be considered when developing species distribution models.

  9. THE NONLINEAR CUSP-CATASTROPHE MODEL OF THE SEDIMENT TRANSPORT RATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In the catastrophe theory of nonlinear science,the intensity of water-flow and the coefficient of non-uniformsediment m are regarded as two bound variables, and the in-tensity of bed-load transport Φ as the state variable in the mo-tion of non-uniform sediment in cusp-catastrophe model.Based on the standard equation of the cusp-catastrophe theo-ry, the relation equation between the intensity of bed-loadtransport Φ and the intensity of water-flow has been derivedby used coordinate transform and topology transform. The e-quation of bed load transport rate was built on the cusp-catas-trophe theory of nonlinear science. The others are applied toverify this equation, that the results calculated by the cusp-ca-tastrophe equation agree well with the other equations. Thisindicates that the cusp-catastrophe equation is reasonable, and the results fully reflect the characteristics of threshold motionand transport of non-uniform sediment. The purpose of thispaper is to explore the incipient motion and transport laws ofnon-uniform sediment from the viewpoint of nonlinear science.

  10. The use of ZIP and CART to model cryptosporidiosis in relation to climatic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenbiao; Mengersen, Kerrie; Fu, Shiu-Yun; Tong, Shilu

    2010-07-01

    This research assesses the potential impact of weekly weather variability on the incidence of cryptosporidiosis disease using time series zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) and classification and regression tree (CART) models. Data on weather variables, notified cryptosporidiosis cases and population size in Brisbane were supplied by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Queensland Department of Health, and Australian Bureau of Statistics, respectively. Both time series ZIP and CART models show a clear association between weather variables (maximum temperature, relative humidity, rainfall and wind speed) and cryptosporidiosis disease. The time series CART models indicated that, when weekly maximum temperature exceeded 31°C and relative humidity was less than 63%, the relative risk of cryptosporidiosis rose by 13.64 (expected morbidity: 39.4; 95% confidence interval: 30.9-47.9). These findings may have applications as a decision support tool in planning disease control and risk-management programs for cryptosporidiosis disease.

  11. The use of ZIP and CART to model cryptosporidiosis in relation to climatic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenbiao; Mengersen, Kerrie; Fu, Shiu-Yun; Tong, Shilu

    2010-07-01

    This research assesses the potential impact of weekly weather variability on the incidence of cryptosporidiosis disease using time series zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) and classification and regression tree (CART) models. Data on weather variables, notified cryptosporidiosis cases and population size in Brisbane were supplied by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, Queensland Department of Health, and Australian Bureau of Statistics, respectively. Both time series ZIP and CART models show a clear association between weather variables (maximum temperature, relative humidity, rainfall and wind speed) and cryptosporidiosis disease. The time series CART models indicated that, when weekly maximum temperature exceeded 31 degrees C and relative humidity was less than 63%, the relative risk of cryptosporidiosis rose by 13.64 (expected morbidity: 39.4; 95% confidence interval: 30.9-47.9). These findings may have applications as a decision support tool in planning disease control and risk-management programs for cryptosporidiosis disease.

  12. Non-Extensive Entropy Econometrics: New Statistical Features of Constant Elasticity of Substitution-Related Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Second Bwanakare

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Power-law (PL formalism is known to provide an appropriate framework for canonical modeling of nonlinear systems. We estimated three stochastically distinct models of constant elasticity of substitution (CES class functions as non-linear inverse problem and showed that these PL related functions should have a closed form. The first model is related to an aggregator production function, the second to an aggregator utility function (the Armington and the third to an aggregator technical transformation function. A q-generalization of K-L information divergence criterion function with a priori consistency constraints is proposed. Related inferential statistical indices are computed. The approach leads to robust estimation and to new findings about the true stochastic nature of this class of nonlinear—up until now—analytically intractable functions. Outputs from traditional econometric techniques (Shannon entropy, NLLS, GMM, ML are also presented.

  13. Bianchi Type-Ⅲ String Cosmological Model with Bulk Viscosity in General Relativity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xing-Xiang

    2005-01-01

    The Bianchi type-Ⅲcosmological model for a cloud string with bulk viscosity are studied. To obtain a determinate solution, it is assumed that the coefficient of bulk viscosity is a power function of the scalar of expansion ζ = kθm and the shear scalar is proportional to scalar of expansion σ∝θ, which leads to the relation between metric potentials B = Cn. The physical features of the model are also discussed. It is found that the power index mhas significant influence on the string model. There is a "big bang" start in the model when m ≤ 1 but there is no the big-bang start when m > 1. In the special case m = 0, the model reduces to the string model of constant coefficient of bulk viscosity that was the result previously given in the literature.

  14. Comparing relational model transformation technologies: implementing Query/View/Transformation with Triple Graph Grammars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenyer, Joel; Kindler, Ekkart

    2010-01-01

    The Model Driven Architecture (MDA) is an approach to develop software based on different models. There are separate models for the business logic and for platform specific details. Moreover, code can be generated automatically from these models. This makes transformations a core technology for MDA...... and for model-based software engineering approaches in general. QVT (Query/View/Transformation) is the transformation technology recently proposed for this purpose by the OMG. TGGs (Triple Graph Grammars) are another transformation technology proposed in the mid-nineties, used for example in the FUJABA CASE...... tool. In contrast to many other transformation technologies, both QVT and TGGs declaratively define the relation between two models. With this definition, a transformation engine can execute a transformation in either direction and, based on the same definition, can also propagate changes from one...

  15. The field-space metric in spiral inflation and related models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erlich, Joshua [High Energy Theory Group, Department of Physics, College of William and Mary,Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Olsen, Jackson [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota,Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Wang, Zhen [High Energy Theory Group, Department of Physics, College of William and Mary,Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States)

    2016-09-22

    Multi-field inflation models include a variety of scenarios for how inflation proceeds and ends. Models with the same potential but different kinetic terms are common in the literature. We compare spiral inflation and Dante’s inferno-type models, which differ only in their field-space metric. We justify a single-field effective description in these models and relate the single-field description to a mass-matrix formalism. We note the effects of the nontrivial field-space metric on inflationary observables, and consequently on the viability of these models. We also note a duality between spiral inflation and Dante’s inferno models with different potentials.

  16. Fast and accurate prediction of numerical relativity waveforms from binary black hole mergers using surrogate models

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, Jonathan; Galley, Chad R; Szilagyi, Bela; Scheel, Mark A; Tiglio, Manuel; Hemberger, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Simulating a binary black hole coalescence by solving Einstein's equations is computationally expensive, requiring days to months of supercomputing time. In this paper, we construct an accurate and fast-to-evaluate surrogate model for numerical relativity (NR) waveforms from non-spinning binary black hole coalescences with mass ratios from $1$ to $10$ and durations corresponding to about $15$ orbits before merger. Our surrogate, which is built using reduced order modeling techniques, is distinct from traditional modeling efforts. We find that the full multi-mode surrogate model agrees with waveforms generated by NR to within the numerical error of the NR code. In particular, we show that our modeling strategy produces surrogates which can correctly predict NR waveforms that were {\\em not} used for the surrogate's training. For all practical purposes, then, the surrogate waveform model is equivalent to the high-accuracy, large-scale simulation waveform but can be evaluated in a millisecond to a second dependin...

  17. The relation between a microscopic threshold-force model and macroscopic models of adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulikal, Srivatsan; Bhattacharya, Kaushik; Lapusta, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    This paper continues our recent work on the relationship between discrete contact interactions at the microscopic scale and continuum contact interactions at the macroscopic scale (Hulikal et al., J. Mech. Phys. Solids 76, 144-161, 2015). The focus of this work is on adhesion. We show that a collection of a large number of discrete elements governed by a threshold-force based model at the microscopic scale collectively gives rise to continuum fracture mechanics at the macroscopic scale. A key step is the introduction of an efficient numerical method that enables the computation of a large number of discrete contacts. Finally, while this work focuses on scaling laws, the methodology introduced in this paper can also be used to study rough-surface adhesion.

  18. A findings model for an ambulatory pediatric record: essential data, relational modeling, and vocabulary considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, R N

    1995-01-01

    Effective, computer-based representation of clinical observations requires balancing the advantages of structured, coded descriptions against those of free text narrative. An essential data set of relevant signs and symptoms was defined by a multidisciplinary group based on management goals published in a national guideline to meet the needs of clinicians in the Spina Bifida Clinic at Yale-New Haven Hospital. These core data elements are stored in a structured format. Additional material is stored as free text. A relational schema was devised that permits storage of both coded findings and narrative. Symptoms and signs are represented as subtypes of a supertype patient finding entity; they inherit common attributes and specialize others. The IVORY vocabulary was supplemented and modified to provide terms that describe relevant clinical observations. For this application, fields were added that enable predictive data entry of findings based on patient age and gender.

  19. Towards a Model of Work-Related Self: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor eKnez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Occupational work as personal and social identification can be conceptualized as one of the life goals that we strive for and find meaning in. A basic categorization of the phenomenon of work-related identity is suggested, based on psychological theories of identity, memory and relational schema. It distinguishes between organizational, workgroup and professional identity. The two former relate to the concepts of social identity and collective self and the latter to the concepts of personal identity and individual self. These are assumed to form functionally independent cognitive structures, leading to separate motivations and influences on work-related satisfaction. Given this, empirical research on the impact of work-related identity on employee satisfaction, in general terms, is reviewed. The article concludes with some prospective directions for future research by sketching a general model of work-related self. It is hypothesised to evolve by a causal progression from employment across time via emotional and cognitive components.

  20. Studying Sediment Transport in Oscillatory Sheet Flow by using a Large Eddy Simulation Eulerian Two-phase Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Z.; Hsu, T. J.; Chauchat, J.; Revil-Baudard, T.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal morphological evolution is caused by a wide range of coupled cross-shore and alongshore sediment transport processes associated with short waves, infragravity waves and wave-induced currents. However, the fundamental transport mechanisms occur within the thin bottom boundary layer and are dictated by turbulence-sediment interaction and inter-granular interactions. Recently, a turbulence-averaged two-phase Eulerian sediment transport model, called sedFoam, was developed and validated for U-tube sheet flows (Cheng et al., 2016). With closures of particle stresses and fluid-particle interactions, the model is able to resolve full profiles of sediment transport from the immobile bed, to the concentrated near-bed transport layer and up to dilute transport without conventional bedload/suspended load assumptions. In this study, we further extend this model with a 3D large eddy simulation (LES) approach, where substantial amount of the turbulence-sediment interaction is directly resolved. In the present LES model, a dynamic Smagorinsky sub-grid stress closure is adopted for both fluid and sediment phases, and the sub-grid contribution to the fluid-particle interactions is included by a sub-grid drift velocity in drag model (Ozel et al., 2013). The model is validated with high-resolution measurements in a unidirectional steady sheet flow experiment (Revil-Baudard et al. 2015). We further apply the LES Eulerian two-phase model to medium and fine sand in oscillatory sheet flows (O'Donoghue & Wright, 2004). The LES model performance for the medium sand is similar to the turbulence-averaged model, except that the LES model seems to be superior to the turbulence-averaged model during acceleration and decelerating phases. In addition, the LES model is able to capture the enhanced transport layer thickness for fine sand, which may be related to the burst events near the flow reversal. We further confirm that this phenomenon is absent for medium sand.

  1. Modelling Activities In Kinematics Understanding quantitative relations with the contribution of qualitative reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orfanos, Stelios

    2010-01-01

    In Greek traditional teaching a lot of significant concepts are introduced with a sequence that does not provide the students with all the necessary information required to comprehend. We consider that understanding concepts and the relations among them is greatly facilitated by the use of modelling tools, taking into account that the modelling process forces students to change their vague, imprecise ideas into explicit causal relationships. It is not uncommon to find students who are able to solve problems by using complicated relations without getting a qualitative and in-depth grip on them. Researchers have already shown that students often have a formal mathematical and physical knowledge without a qualitative understanding of basic concepts and relations." The aim of this communication is to present some of the results of our investigation into modelling activities related to kinematical concepts. For this purpose, we have used ModellingSpace, an environment that was especially designed to allow students from eleven to seventeen years old to express their ideas and gradually develop them. The ModellingSpace enables students to build their own models and offers the choice of observing directly simulations of real objects and/or all the other alternative forms of representations (tables of values, graphic representations and bar-charts). The students -in order to answer the questions- formulate hypotheses, they create models, they compare their hypotheses with the representations of their models and they modify or create other models when their hypotheses did not agree with the representations. In traditional ways of teaching, students are educated to utilize formulas as the most important strategy. Several times the students recall formulas in order to utilize them, without getting an in-depth understanding on them. Students commonly use the quantitative type of reasoning, since it is primarily used in teaching, although it may not be fully understood by them

  2. A corpus for mining drug-related knowledge from Twitter chatter: Language models and their utilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeed Sarker

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this data article, we present to the data science, natural language processing and public heath communities an unlabeled corpus and a set of language models. We collected the data from Twitter using drug names as keywords, including their common misspelled forms. Using this data, which is rich in drug-related chatter, we developed language models to aid the development of data mining tools and methods in this domain. We generated several models that capture (i distributed word representations and (ii probabilities of n-gram sequences. The data set we are releasing consists of 267,215 Twitter posts made during the four-month period—November, 2014 to February, 2015. The posts mention over 250 drug-related keywords. The language models encapsulate semantic and sequential properties of the texts.

  3. Large scale inference in the Infinite Relational Model: Gibbs sampling is not enough

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Kristoffer Jon; Moth, Andreas Leon Aagard; Mørup, Morten

    2013-01-01

    The stochastic block-model and its non-parametric extension, the Infinite Relational Model (IRM), have become key tools for discovering group-structure in complex networks. Identifying these groups is a combinatorial inference problem which is usually solved by Gibbs sampling. However, whether...... Gibbs sampling suffices and can be scaled to the modeling of large scale real world complex networks has not been examined sufficiently. In this paper we evaluate the performance and mixing ability of Gibbs sampling in the Infinite Relational Model (IRM) by implementing a high performance Gibbs sampler....... We find that Gibbs sampling can be computationally scaled to handle millions of nodes and billions of links. Investigating the behavior of the Gibbs sampler for different sizes of networks we find that the mixing ability decreases drastically with the network size, clearly indicating a need...

  4. Identification of Functional Clusters in the Striatum Using Infinite Relational Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Siebner, Hartwig

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate how the Infinite Relational Model can be used to infer functional groupings of the human striatum using resting state fMRI data from 30 healthy subjects. The Infinite Relational Model is a non-parametric Bayesian method for infering community structure in complex...... and non-links in the graphs as missing. We find that the model is performing well above chance for all subjects....... networks. We visualize the solution found by performing evidence accumulation clustering on the maximum a posterior solutions found in 100 runs of the sampling scheme. The striatal groupings found are symmetric between hemispheres indicating that the model is able to group voxels across hemispheres, which...

  5. Renormalization of the global quantum correlation and monogamy relation in the anisotropic Heisenberg XXZ model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Meng; Ren, Zhong-Zhou; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the global quantum correlation, monogamy relation and quantum phase transition of the Heisenberg XXZ model are investigated by the method of quantum renormalization group. We obtain, analytically, the expressions of the global negativity, the global measurement-induced disturbance and the monogamy relation for the system. The result shows that for a three-site block state, the partial transpose of an asymmetric block can get stronger entanglement than that of the symmetric one. The residual entanglement and the difference of the monogamy relation of measurement-induced disturbance show a scaling behavior with the size of the system becoming large. Moreover, the monogamy nature of entanglement measured by negativity exists in the model, while the nonclassical correlation quantified by measurement-induced disturbance violates the monogamy relation and demonstrates polygamy.

  6. A CONSOLIDATED MODEL OF ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONS BETWEEN POLITICS AND MANAGEMENT WITHIN PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Maria GEORGESCU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An interdisciplinary approach which combines the theoretical, empirical andconceptual dimensions, the present study tries to offer a new workperspective on the assessment and modeling of the relation between themanagement of public organizations and the political environment. Thetheoretical research was centered on reviewing the literature on the relationbetween the management of public organizations and the politicalenvironment. The empirical research was materialized by modeling with theregression technique of several aspects integrated to the relations betweenthe management of human resources within public organizations in theeducation field and the external political environment.

  7. Testing the applicability of a model of oral health-related quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Mello dos Santos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to test Wilson & Cleary’s conceptual model of the direct and mediated pathways between clinical and non-clinical variables in relation to oral health-related quality of life. A random sample of 578 older people was evaluated. Wilson & Cleary’s conceptual model was tested using structural equations modeling including: biological variables, symptom status, functional health, oral health perceptions, oral health-related quality of life. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed with the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14. In the final model, edentulism was negatively correlated to dissatisfaction of appearance of their dental prostheses (r = -0.25. Worse functional status was correlated with poor oral health perception (r = 0.24. Being aged over 68 (r = 0.25, being a female (r = 0.39 and living in rural areas (r = 0.15 had a direct effect on the edentulism. Age had a direct effect on OHIP-14 (r = -0.15. There was an indirect effect of sex on OHIP-14 via functional status (r = 0.12. The present findings partially support Wilson & Cleary’s model framework.

  8. Testing the applicability of a model of oral health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Camila Mello Dos; Celeste, Roger Keller; Hilgert, Juliana Balbinot; Hugo, Fernando Neves

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test Wilson & Cleary's conceptual model of the direct and mediated pathways between clinical and non-clinical variables in relation to oral health-related quality of life. A random sample of 578 older people was evaluated. Wilson & Cleary's conceptual model was tested using structural equations modeling including: biological variables, symptom status, functional health, oral health perceptions, oral health-related quality of life. Oral health-related quality of life was assessed with the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14). In the final model, edentulism was negatively correlated to dissatisfaction of appearance of their dental prostheses (r = -0.25). Worse functional status was correlated with poor oral health perception (r = 0.24). Being aged over 68 (r = 0.25), being a female (r = 0.39) and living in rural areas (r = 0.15) had a direct effect on the edentulism. Age had a direct effect on OHIP-14 (r = -0.15). There was an indirect effect of sex on OHIP-14 via functional status (r = 0.12). The present findings partially support Wilson & Cleary's model framework.

  9. NHL and RCGA Based Multi-Relational Fuzzy Cognitive Map Modeling for Complex Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Peng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to model multi-dimensions and multi-granularities oriented complex systems, this paper firstly proposes a kind of multi-relational Fuzzy Cognitive Map (FCM to simulate the multi-relational system and its auto construct algorithm integrating Nonlinear Hebbian Learning (NHL and Real Code Genetic Algorithm (RCGA. The multi-relational FCM fits to model the complex system with multi-dimensions and multi-granularities. The auto construct algorithm can learn the multi-relational FCM from multi-relational data resources to eliminate human intervention. The Multi-Relational Data Mining (MRDM algorithm integrates multi-instance oriented NHL and RCGA of FCM. NHL is extended to mine the causal relationships between coarse-granularity concept and its fined-granularity concepts driven by multi-instances in the multi-relational system. RCGA is used to establish high-quality high-level FCM driven by data. The multi-relational FCM and the integrating algorithm have been applied in complex system of Mutagenesis. The experiment demonstrates not only that they get better classification accuracy, but it also shows the causal relationships among the concepts of the system.

  10. Advancing the country image construct from a public relations perspective: from model to measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Buhmann, Alexander; Ingenhoff, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to develop and test a new model for the measurement of the constitution and effects of the country image as a central target construct in international public relations. Design/methodology/approach – The authors combine concepts from reputation management (Eisenegger and Imhof, 2008; Ingenhoff and Sommer, 2007), national identity theory (Smith, 1987), and attitude theory (Ajzen and Fishbein, 1980) to derive a four-dimensional model, conceptualizing count...

  11. Relation between pulmonary clearance and particle burden: a Michaelis-Menten-like kinetic model.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, R. C.; Rappaport, S.M.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the validity of a Michaelis-Menten-like kinetic model of pulmonary clearance of insoluble dusts. METHODS: Data were investigated from studies of pulmonary clearance in F344 rats exposed to antimony trioxide (Sb2O3), photocopy test toner, polyvinyl chloride powder (PVC), and diesel exhaust particles. The Michaelis-Menten-like model was used to develop a relation in which the pulmonary clearance half time was a linear function of lung burden. After combining all data, linear...

  12. Moringa oleifera Mitigates Memory Impairment and Neurodegeneration in Animal Model of Age-Related Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    To date, the preventive strategy against dementia is still essential due to the rapid growth of its prevalence and the limited therapeutic efficacy. Based on the crucial role of oxidative stress in age-related dementia and the antioxidant and nootropic activities of Moringa oleifera, the enhancement of spatial memory and neuroprotection of M. oleifera leaves extract in animal model of age-related dementia was determined. The possible underlying mechanism was also investigated. Male Wistar rat...

  13. A Model for Converting Solid State Fermentation Growth Profiles Between Absolute and Relative Measurement Bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciele Viccini

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is developed for converting between the two measurement bases commonly used in the construction of growth profiles in solid-state fermentation, namely absolute mass ratio m(dry biomass/m(initial dry matter and relative mass ratio m(dry biomass/m(dry matter. These are not equivalent, due to the loss of dry matter as CO2 during the fermentation. The model is equally applicable to any biomass component used in indirect measurements of growth, such as protein. Use of the model to convert absolute mass ratio of the biomass profiles for the growth of Rhizopus oligosporus to a relative basis gave profiles that agreed well with the experimentally determined relative biomass profiles. This agreement was obtained for three different fermentations using the same set of parameter values in the model, namely a yield coefficient of m(protein/m(dry substrate = 0.2 g/g and a maintenance coefficient of zero, giving confidence in the reliability of the model. The model was then used to show that the measurement basis used can affect the form of the curve and therefore can also affect the conclusion drawn about the type of kinetics shown by the organism, with the extent of this effect depending on the length of time that growth occurs and the values of the yield and maintenance coefficients. This work shows that great care must be taken in drawing conclusions about growth kinetics in solid-state fermentation.

  14. Extended unified SEM approach for modeling event-related fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Kathleen M; Molenaar, Peter C M; Hillary, Frank G; Slobounov, Semyon

    2011-01-15

    There has been increasing emphasis in fMRI research on the examination of how regions covary in a distributed neural network. Event-related data designs present a unique challenge to modeling how couplings among regions change in the presence of experimental manipulations. The present paper presents the extended unified SEM (euSEM), a novel approach for acquiring effective connectivity maps with event-related data. The euSEM adds to the unified SEM, which models both lagged and contemporaneous effects, by estimating the direct effects that experimental manipulations have on blood-oxygen-level dependent activity as well as the modulating effects the manipulations have on couplings among regions. Monte Carlos simulations included in this paper offer support for the model's ability to recover covariance patterns used to estimate data. Next, we apply the model to empirical data to demonstrate feasibility. Finally, the results of the empirical data are compared to those found using dynamic causal modeling. The euSEM provides a flexible approach for modeling event-related data as it may be employed in an exploratory, partially exploratory, or entirely confirmatory manner.

  15. Multi-state relative survival modelling of colorectal cancer progression and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilard-Pioc, Séverine; Abrahamowicz, Michal; Mahboubi, Amel; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Dejardin, Olivier; Huszti, Ella; Binquet, Christine; Quantin, Catherine

    2015-06-01

    Accurate identification of factors associated with progression of colorectal cancer remains a challenge. In particular, it is unclear which statistical methods are most suitable to separate the effects of putative prognostic factors on cancer progression vs cancer-specific and other cause mortality. To address these challenges, we analyzed 10 year follow-up data for patients who underwent curative surgery for colorectal cancer in 1985-2000. Separate analyses were performed in two French cancer registries. Results of three multivariable models were compared: Cox model with recurrence as a time-dependent variable, and two multi-state models, which separated prognostic factor effects on recurrence vs death, with or without recurrence. Conventional multi-state model analyzed all-cause mortality while new relative survival multi-state model focused on cancer-specific mortality. Among the 2517 and 2677 patients in the two registries, about 50% died without a recurrence, and 28% had a recurrence, of whom almost 90% died. In both multi-state models men had significantly increased risk of cancer recurrence in both registries (HR=0.79; 95% CI: 0.68-0.92 and HR=0.83; 95% CI: 0.71-0.96). However, the two multi-state models identified different prognostic factors for mortality without recurrence. In contrast to the conventional model, in the relative survival analyses gender had no independent association with cancer-specific mortality whereas patients diagnosed with stage III cancer had significantly higher risks in both registries (HR=1.67; 95% CI: 1.27-2.22 and HR=2.38; 95% CI: 1.29-3.27). In conclusion, relative survival multi-state model revealed that different factors may be associated with cancer recurrence vs cancer-specific mortality either after or without a recurrence.

  16. Reactive molecular dynamics models from ab initio molecular dynamics data using relative entropy minimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntsen, Christopher; Chen, Chen; Voth, Gregory A.

    2017-09-01

    We present two new multiscale molecular dynamics (MS-RMD) models for the hydrated excess proton in water developed directly from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulation data of the same system. The potential of mean force along the proton transfer reaction coordinate and radial distribution functions for the MS-RMD models are shown to faithfully reproduce those of AIMD. The models are developed using an algorithm based on relative entropy minimization, thus demonstrating the ability of the method to rapidly generate accurate and highly efficient reactive MD force fields.

  17. Relative Error Model Reduction via Time-Weighted Balanced Stochastic Singular Perturbation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahavori, Maryamsadat; Shaker, Hamid Reza

    2012-01-01

    A new mixed method for relative error model reduction of linear time invariant (LTI) systems is proposed in this paper. This order reduction technique is mainly based upon time-weighted balanced stochastic model reduction method and singular perturbation model reduction technique. Compared...... to the other analogous counterparts, the proposed method shows to provide more accurate results in terms of time weighted norms when applied to the practical examples. It is shown that important properties of the time-weighted stochastic balanced reduction technique are extended to the mixed reduction method...

  18. Synthetic event-related potentials: a computational bridge between neurolinguistic models and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrès, Victor; Simons, Arthur; Arbib, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Our previous work developed Synthetic Brain Imaging to link neural and schema network models of cognition and behavior to PET and fMRI studies of brain function. We here extend this approach to Synthetic Event-Related Potentials (Synthetic ERP). Although the method is of general applicability, we focus on ERP correlates of language processing in the human brain. The method has two components: Phase 1: To generate cortical electro-magnetic source activity from neural or schema network models; and Phase 2: To generate known neurolinguistic ERP data (ERP scalp voltage topographies and waveforms) from putative cortical source distributions and activities within a realistic anatomical model of the human brain and head. To illustrate the challenges of Phase 2 of the methodology, spatiotemporal information from Friederici's 2002 model of auditory language comprehension was used to define cortical regions and time courses of activation for implementation within a forward model of ERP data. The cortical regions from the 2002 model were modeled using atlas-based masks overlaid on the MNI high definition single subject cortical mesh. The electromagnetic contribution of each region was modeled using current dipoles whose position and orientation were constrained by the cortical geometry. In linking neural network computation via EEG forward modeling to empirical results in neurolinguistics, we emphasize the need for neural network models to link their architecture to geometrically sound models of the cortical surface, and the need for conceptual models to refine and adopt brain-atlas based approaches to allow precise brain anchoring of their modules. The detailed analysis of Phase 2 sets the stage for a brief introduction to Phase 1 of the program, including the case for a schema-theoretic approach to language production and perception presented in detail elsewhere. Unlike Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) and Bojak's mean field model, Synthetic ERP builds on models of networks

  19. Strategic Factors in the Choice of a Model of Public Relations. Case Study: Seventh-day Adventist Church World Headquarters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Holly M.

    A study tested a model of organizational variables that earlier research had identified as important in influencing what model(s) of public relations an organization selects. Models of public relations (as outlined by J. Grunig and Hunt in 1984) are defined as either press agentry, public information, two-way asymmetrical, or two-way symmetrical.…

  20. Strategic Factors in the Choice of a Model of Public Relations. Case Study: Seventh-day Adventist Church World Headquarters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Holly M.

    A study tested a model of organizational variables that earlier research had identified as important in influencing what model(s) of public relations an organization selects. Models of public relations (as outlined by J. Grunig and Hunt in 1984) are defined as either press agentry, public information, two-way asymmetrical, or two-way symmetrical.…

  1. Relative performance of different numerical weather prediction models for short term predition of wind wnergy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebel, G.; Landberg, L. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark); Moennich, K.; Waldl, H.P. [Carl con Ossietzky Univ., Faculty of Physics, Dept. of Energy and Semiconductor, Oldenburg (Germany)

    1999-03-01

    In several approaches presented in other papers in this conference, short term forecasting of wind power for a time horizon covering the next two days is done on the basis of Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models. This paper explores the relative merits of HIRLAM, which is the model used by the Danish Meteorological Institute, the Deutschlandmodell from the German Weather Service and the Nested Grid Model used in the US. The performance comparison will be mainly done for a site in Germany which is in the forecasting area of both the Deutschlandmodell and HIRLAM. In addition, a comparison of measured data with the forecasts made for one site in Iowa will be included, which allows conclusions on the merits of all three models. Differences in the relative performances could be due to a better tailoring of one model to its country, or to a tighter grid, or could be a function of the distance between the grid points and the measuring site. Also the amount, in which the performance can be enhanced by the use of model output statistics (topic of other papers in this conference) could give insights into the performance of the models. (au)

  2. Pediatric health-related quality of life: a structural equation modeling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Villalonga-Olives

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: One of the most referenced theoretical frameworks to measure Health Related Quality of Life (HRQoL is the Wilson and Cleary framework. With some adaptions this framework has been validated in the adult population, but has not been tested in pediatric populations. Our goal was to empirically investigate it in children. METHODS: The contributory factors to Health Related Quality of Life that we included were symptom status (presence of chronic disease or hospitalizations, functional status (developmental status, developmental aspects of the individual (social-emotional behavior, and characteristics of the social environment (socioeconomic status and area of education. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the measurement structure of the model in 214 German children (3-5 years old participating in a follow-up study that investigates pediatric health outcomes. RESULTS: Model fit was χ2 = 5.5; df = 6; p = 0.48; SRMR  = 0.01. The variance explained of Health Related Quality of Life was 15%. Health Related Quality of Life was affected by the area education (i.e. where kindergartens were located and development status. Developmental status was affected by the area of education, socioeconomic status and individual behavior. Symptoms did not affect the model. CONCLUSIONS: The goodness of fit and the overall variance explained were good. However, the results between children' and adults' tests differed and denote a conceptual gap between adult and children measures. Indeed, there is a lot of variety in pediatric Health Related Quality of Life measures, which represents a lack of a common definition of pediatric Health Related Quality of Life. We recommend that researchers invest time in the development of pediatric Health Related Quality of Life theory and theory based evaluations.

  3. Working memory contributions to relative clause attachment processing: a hierarchical linear modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxler, Matthew J

    2007-07-01

    An eye-movement-monitoring experiment tested readers' responses to sentences containing relative clauses that could be attached to one or both of two preceding nouns. Previous experiments with such sentences have indicated that globally ambiguous relative clauses are processed more quickly than are determinately attached relative clauses. Central to the present research, a recent study (Swets, Desmet, Hambrick, & Ferreira, 2007) showed that offline preferences for such sentences differ as a function of working memory capacity. Specifically, both English and Dutch participants' preference for the second of two nouns as the host for the relative clause increased as their working memory capacity increased. In the present study, readers' working memory capacity was measured, and eye movements were monitored. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to determine whether working memory capacity moderated readers' online processing performance. The modeling indicated that determinately attached sentences were harder to process than globally ambiguous sentences, that working memory did not affect processing of the relative clause itself, but that working memory did moderate how easy it was to integrate the relative clause with the preceding sentence context. Specifically, in contrast with the offline results from Swets and colleagues' study, readers with higher working memory capacity were more likely to prefer the first noun over the second noun as the host for the relative clause.

  4. Impacts of Participatory Modeling on Climate Change-related Water Management Impacts in Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halvorsen, K. E.; Kossak, D. J.; Mayer, A. S.; Vivoni, E. R.; Robles-Morua, A.; Gamez Molina, V.; Dana, K.; Mirchi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Climate change-related impacts on water resources are expected to be particularly severe in the arid developing world. As a result, we conducted a series of participatory modeling workshops on hydrologic and water resources systems modeling in the face of climate change in Sonora, Mexico. Pre-surveys were administered to participants on Day 1 of a series of four workshops spaced out over three months in 2013. Post-surveys repeated many pre-survey questions and included questions assessing the quality of the workshops and models. We report on significant changes in participant perceptions of water resource models and problems and their assessment of the workshops. These findings will be of great value to future participatory modeling efforts, particularly within the developing world.

  5. A mathematical model for malaria transmission relating global warming and local socioeconomic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun M Yang

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Sensitivity analysis was applied to a mathematical model describing malaria transmission relating global warming and local socioeconomic conditions. METHODS: A previous compartment model was proposed to describe the overall transmission of malaria. This model was built up on several parameters and the prevalence of malaria in a community was characterized by the values assigned to them. To assess the control efforts, the model parameters can vary on broad intervals. RESULTS: By performing the sensitivity analysis on equilibrium points, which represent the level of malaria infection in a community, the different possible scenarios are obtained when the parameters are changed. CONCLUSIONS: Depending on malaria risk, the efforts to control its transmission can be guided by a subset of parameters used in the mathematical model.

  6. A Relational Turbulence Model Perspective on Communication in Intimate Relationships Post-HPV Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey-Knowles, Jacquelyn; Faw, Meara H

    2016-01-01

    The Relational Turbulence Model (RTM) is a theoretical tool designed to understand how romantic partners navigate tumultuous events. In this article, we explore two RTM constructs, relational uncertainty and partner interference, in the context of romantic partners' human papillomavirus (HPV) diagnosis outcomes. We examine whether self-reported relational uncertainty and partner interference were differentially associated with a negative self-HPV diagnosis, a positive self-diagnosis, or a partner's positive diagnosis. Findings suggest that diagnosis type predicts relational uncertainty and partner interference in different ways. We also argue that partners' reported expression of affect after experiencing a relationally-relevant transition may manifest in both positive and negative ways. Our results support the contention that partners may express both positive and negative affect toward one another, particularly based on the type of HPV diagnosis outcome they receive.

  7. A GOCE only gravity model GOSG01S and the validation of GOCE related satellite gravity models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyu Xu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We compile the GOCE-only satellite model GOSG01S complete to spherical harmonic degree of 220 using Satellite Gravity Gradiometry (SGG data and the Satellite-to-Satellite Tracking (SST observations along the GOCE orbit based on applying a least-squares analysis. The diagonal components (Vxx, Vyy, Vzz of the gravitational gradient tensor are used to form the system of observation equations with the band-pass ARMA filter. The point-wise acceleration observations (ax, ay, az along the orbit are used to form the system of observation equations up to the maximum spherical harmonic degree/order 130. The analysis of spectral accuracy characteristics of the newly derived gravitational model GOSG01S and the existing models GOTIM04S, GODIR04S, GOSPW04S and JYY_GOCE02S based on their comparison with the ultra-high degree model EIGEN-6C2 reveals a significant consistency at the spectral window approximately between 80 and 190 due to the same period SGG data used to compile these models. The GOCE related satellite gravity models GOSG01S, GOTIM05S, GODIR05S, GOTIM04S, GODIR04S, GOSPW04S, JYY_GOCE02S, EIGEN-6C2 and EGM2008 are also validated by using GPS-leveling data in China and USA. According to the truncation at degree 200, the statistic results show that all GGMs have very similar differences at GPS-leveling points in USA, and all GOCE related gravity models have better performance than EGM2008 in China. This suggests that all these models provide much more information on the gravity field than EGM2008 in areas with low terrestrial gravity coverage. And STDs of height anomaly differences in China for the selected truncation degrees show that GOCE has improved the accuracy of the global models beyond degree 90 and the accuracies of the models improve from 24 cm to 16 cm. STDs of geoid height differences in USA show that GOSG01S model has best consistency comparing with GPS-leveling data for the frequency band of the degree between 20 and 160.

  8. Integrability of a family of quantum field theories related to sigma models

    CERN Document Server

    Ridout, D

    2011-01-01

    A method is introduced for constructing lattice discretizations of large classes of integrable quantum field theories. The method proceeds in two steps: The quantum algebraic structure underlying the integrability of the model is determined from the algebra of the interaction terms in the light-cone representation. The representation theory of the relevant quantum algebra is then used to construct the basic ingredients of the quantum inverse scattering method, the lattice Lax matrices and R-matrices. This method is illustrated with four examples: The Sinh-Gordon model, the affine sl(3) Toda model, a model called the fermionic sl(2|1) Toda theory, and the N=2 supersymmetric Sine-Gordon model. These models are all related to sigma models in various ways. The N=2 supersymmetric Sine-Gordon model, in particular, describes the Pohlmeyer reduction of string theory on AdS_2 x S^2, and is dual to a supersymmetric non-linear sigma model with a sausage-shaped target space.

  9. Integrability of a family of quantum field theories related to sigma models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridout, David, E-mail: david.ridout@anu.edu.au [Department of Theoretical Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Theory Group, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603, Hamburg (Germany); Teschner, Joerg [Theory Group, DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-12-11

    A method is introduced for constructing lattice discretizations of large classes of integrable quantum field theories. The method proceeds in two steps: The quantum algebraic structure underlying the integrability of the model is determined from the algebra of the interaction terms in the light-cone representation. The representation theory of the relevant quantum algebra is then used to construct the basic ingredients of the quantum inverse scattering method, the lattice Lax matrices and R-matrices. This method is illustrated with four examples: The sinh-Gordon model, the affine sl(3) Toda model, a model called the fermionic sl(2|1) Toda theory, and the N=2 supersymmetric sine-Gordon model. These models are all related to sigma models in various ways. The N=2 supersymmetric sine-Gordon model, in particular, describes the Pohlmeyer reduction of string theory on AdS{sub 2}xS{sup 2}, and is dual to a supersymmetric non-linear sigma model with a sausage-shaped target space.

  10. Rigorous selection of random forest models for identifying compounds that activate toxicity-related pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro eUesawa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Random forest (RF is a machine-learning ensemble method with high predictive performance. Majority voting in RF uses the discrimination results in numerous decision trees produced from bootstrapping data. For the same dataset, the bootstrapping process yields different predictive capacities in each generation. As participants in the Toxicology in the 21st Century (Tox21 DATA Challenge 2014, we produced numerous RF models for predicting the structures of compounds that can activate each toxicity-related pathway, and then selected the model with the highest predictive ability. Half of the compounds in the training dataset supplied by the competition organizer were allocated to the validation dataset. The remaining compounds were used in model construction. The charged and uncharged forms of each molecule were calculated using the molecular operating environment (MOE software. Subsequently, the descriptors were computed using MOE, MarvinView, and Dragon. These combined methods yielded over 4,071 descriptors for model construction. Using these descriptors, pattern recognition analyses were performed by RF implemented in JMP Pro (a statistical software package. A hundred to two hundred RF models were generated for each pathway. The predictive performance of each model was tested against the validation dataset, and the best-performing model was selected. In the competition, the latter model selected a best-performing model from the 50% test set that best predicted the structures of compounds that activate the estrogen receptor ligand-binding domain (ER-LBD.

  11. Integrability of a family of quantum field theories related to sigma models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridout, David [Australian National Univ., Canberra, ACT (Australia). Dept. of Theoretical Physics; DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group; Teschner, Joerg [DESY, Hamburg (Germany). Theory Group

    2011-03-15

    A method is introduced for constructing lattice discretizations of large classes of integrable quantum field theories. The method proceeds in two steps: The quantum algebraic structure underlying the integrability of the model is determined from the algebra of the interaction terms in the light-cone representation. The representation theory of the relevant quantum algebra is then used to construct the basic ingredients of the quantum inverse scattering method, the lattice Lax matrices and R-matrices. This method is illustrated with four examples: The Sinh-Gordon model, the affine sl(3) Toda model, a model called the fermionic sl(2 vertical stroke 1) Toda theory, and the N=2 supersymmetric Sine-Gordon model. These models are all related to sigma models in various ways. The N=2 supersymmetric Sine-Gordon model, in particular, describes the Pohlmeyer reduction of string theory on AdS{sub 2} x S{sup 2}, and is dual to a supersymmetric non-linear sigma model with a sausage-shaped target space. (orig.)

  12. The Relations between Implicit Intelligence Beliefs, Autonomous Academic Motivation, and School Persistence Intentions: A Mediation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud-Dubé, Andréanne; Guay, Frédéric; Talbot, Denis; Taylor, Geneviève; Koestner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This study attempts to test a model in which the relation between implicit theories of intelligence and students' school persistence intentions are mediated by intrinsic, identified, introjected, and external regulations. Six hundred and fifty students from a high school were surveyed. Contrary to expectations, results from ESEM analyses indicated…

  13. Relations between Minuchin's Structural Family Model and Kohut's Self-Psychology Constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perosa, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Examines relationship between structural family model and self-psychology constructs. College women (n=164) completed the Structural Family Interaction Scale-Revised (SFIS-R), the Parental Relations Inventory, and the Goal Instability and Superiority scales from the Self-Expression Inventory. Indicated that women raised in families with strong…

  14. Validating the Relationship Qualities of Influence and Persuasion with the Family Social Relations Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Rachel Oakley; Bagozzi, Richard P.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the family social relations model (SRM) to test for the personal relationship qualities of influence and persuasion in the family decision-making context of buying a new car. Uncovers patterns in the relationship qualities of influence and persuasion across three decisions families make when buying a new car (i.e., how much to spend, car…

  15. The User Interface: A Hypertext Model Linking Art Objects and Related Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moline, Judi

    This report presents a model combining the emerging technologies of hypertext and expert systems. Hypertext is relatively unexplored but promises an innovative approach to information retrieval. In contrast, expert systems have been used experimentally in many different application areas ranging from medical diagnosis to oil exploration. The…

  16. Relations of Transtheoretical Model Stage, Self-Efficacy, and Voluntary Physical Activity in African American Preadolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J.; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Westcott, Wayne L.

    2010-01-01

    The transtheoretical model (TTM; Prochaska, DiClemente, & Norcross, 1992) suggests that, at any point, an individual is in one of five stages-of-change related to adopting a behavior. People sequentially advance in stage but may also maintain or even regress, based on personal and environmental factors (Nigg, 2005). A classic study published in…

  17. Modeling the Relations among Parental Involvement, School Engagement and Academic Performance of High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alwan, Ahmed F.

    2014-01-01

    The author proposed a model to explain how parental involvement and school engagement related to academic performance. Participants were (671) 9th and 10th graders students who completed two scales of "parental involvement" and "school engagement" in their regular classrooms. Results of the path analysis suggested that the…

  18. The Relations between Implicit Intelligence Beliefs, Autonomous Academic Motivation, and School Persistence Intentions: A Mediation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud-Dubé, Andréanne; Guay, Frédéric; Talbot, Denis; Taylor, Geneviève; Koestner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This study attempts to test a model in which the relation between implicit theories of intelligence and students' school persistence intentions are mediated by intrinsic, identified, introjected, and external regulations. Six hundred and fifty students from a high school were surveyed. Contrary to expectations, results from ESEM analyses indicated…

  19. Modeling the Relations among Students' Epistemological Beliefs, Motivation, Learning Approach, and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizilgunes, Berna; Tekkaya, Ceren; Sungur, Semra

    2009-01-01

    The authors proposed a model to explain how epistemological beliefs, achievement motivation, and learning approach related to achievement. The authors assumed that epistemological beliefs influence achievement indirectly through their effect on achievement motivation and learning approach. Participants were 1,041 6th-grade students. Results of the…

  20. Relations of Transtheoretical Model Stage, Self-Efficacy, and Voluntary Physical Activity in African American Preadolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J.; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Westcott, Wayne L.

    2010-01-01

    The transtheoretical model (TTM; Prochaska, DiClemente, & Norcross, 1992) suggests that, at any point, an individual is in one of five stages-of-change related to adopting a behavior. People sequentially advance in stage but may also maintain or even regress, based on personal and environmental factors (Nigg, 2005). A classic study published in…

  1. Occupational Decision-Related Processes for Amotivated Adolescents: Confirmation of a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jae Yup; McCormick, John

    2011-01-01

    This study developed and (statistically) confirmed a new model of the occupational decision-related processes of adolescents, in terms of the extent to which they may be amotivated about choosing a future occupation. A theoretical framework guided the study. A questionnaire that had previously been administered to an Australian adolescent sample…

  2. Modeling printed circuit board curvature in relation to manufacturing process steps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuerink, G.A.; Slomp, M.; Wits, Wessel Willems; Legtenberg, R.; Legtenberg, R.; Kappel, E.A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical method to predict deformations of Printed Circuit Boards (PCBs) in relation to their manufacturing process steps. Classical Lamination Theory (CLT) is used as a basis. The model tracks internal stresses and includes the results of subsequent production steps, such a

  3. TENCompetence Assessment Model and Related Tools for Non Traditional Methods of Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrov, Milen; Aleksieva-Petrova, Adelina; Stefanov, Krassen; Schoonenboom, Judith; Miao, Yongwu

    2008-01-01

    Petrov, M., Aleksieva-Petrova, A., Stefanov, K., Schoonenboom, J., & Miao, Y. (2008). TENCompetence Assessment Model and Related Tools for Non Traditional Methods of Assessment. In H. W. Sligte & R. Koper (Eds). Proceedings of the 4th TENCompetence Open Workshop. Empowering Learners for Lifelong Com

  4. Simultaneous modeling of habitat suitability, occupancy, and relative abundance: African elephants in Zimbabwe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Julien; Chamaillé-Jammes, Simon; Nichols, James D; Fritz, Hervé; Hines, James E; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J; MacKenzie, Darryl I; Bailey, Larissa L

    2010-06-01

    The recent development of statistical models such as dynamic site occupancy models provides the opportunity to address fairly complex management and conservation problems with relatively simple models. However, surprisingly few empirical studies have simultaneously modeled habitat suitability and occupancy status of organisms over large landscapes for management purposes. Joint modeling of these components is particularly important in the context of management of wild populations, as it provides a more coherent framework to investigate the population dynamics of organisms in space and time for the application of management decision tools. We applied such an approach to the study of water hole use by African elephants in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe. Here we show how such methodology may be implemented and derive estimates of annual transition probabilities among three dry-season states for water holes: (1) unsuitable state (dry water holes with no elephants); (2) suitable state (water hole with water) with low abundance of elephants; and (3) suitable state with high abundance of elephants. We found that annual rainfall and the number of neighboring water holes influenced the transition probabilities among these three states. Because of an increase in elephant densities in the park during the study period, we also found that transition probabilities from low abundance to high abundance states increased over time. The application of the joint habitat-occupancy models provides a coherent framework to examine how habitat suitability and factors that affect habitat suitability influence the distribution and abundance of organisms. We discuss how these simple models can further be used to apply structured decision-making tools in order to derive decisions that are optimal relative to specified management objectives. The modeling framework presented in this paper should be applicable to a wide range of existing data sets and should help to address important ecological

  5. Simultaneous modeling of habitat suitability, occupancy, and relative abundance: African elephants in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Julien; Chamaille-Jammes, Simon; Nichols, James D.; Fritz, Herve; Hines, James E.; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J.; MacKenzie, Darryl I.; Bailey, Larissa L.

    2010-01-01

    The recent development of statistical models such as dynamic site occupancy models provides the opportunity to address fairly complex management and conservation problems with relatively simple models. However, surprisingly few empirical studies have simultaneously modeled habitat suitability and occupancy status of organisms over large landscapes for management purposes. Joint modeling of these components is particularly important in the context of management of wild populations, as it provides a more coherent framework to investigate the population dynamics of organisms in space and time for the application of management decision tools. We applied such an approach to the study of water hole use by African elephants in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe. Here we show how such methodology may be implemented and derive estimates of annual transition probabilities among three dry-season states for water holes: (1) unsuitable state (dry water holes with no elephants); (2) suitable state (water hole with water) with low abundance of elephants; and (3) suitable state with high abundance of elephants. We found that annual rainfall and the number of neighboring water holes influenced the transition probabilities among these three states. Because of an increase in elephant densities in the park during the study period, we also found that transition probabilities from low abundance to high abundance states increased over time. The application of the joint habitat–occupancy models provides a coherent framework to examine how habitat suitability and factors that affect habitat suitability influence the distribution and abundance of organisms. We discuss how these simple models can further be used to apply structured decision-making tools in order to derive decisions that are optimal relative to specified management objectives. The modeling framework presented in this paper should be applicable to a wide range of existing data sets and should help to address important ecological

  6. Time is of the essence: an application of a relational event model for animal social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patison, K P; Quintane, E; Swain, D L; Robins, G; Pattison, P

    Understanding how animal social relationships are created, maintained and severed has ecological and evolutionary significance. Animal social relationships are inferred from observations of interactions between animals; the pattern of interaction over time indicates the existence (or absence) of a social relationship. Autonomous behavioural recording technologies are increasingly being used to collect continuous interaction data on animal associations. However, continuous data sequences are typically aggregated to represent a relationship as part of one (or several) pictures of the network of relations among animals, in a way that parallels human social networks. This transformation entails loss of information about interaction timing and sequence, which are particularly important to understand the formation of relationships or their disruption. Here, we describe a new statistical model, termed the relational event model, that enables the analysis of fine-grained animal association data as a continuous time sequence without requiring aggregation of the data. We apply the model to a unique data set of interaction between familiar and unfamiliar steers during a series of 36 experiments to investigate the process of social disruption and relationship formation. We show how the model provides key insights into animal behaviour in terms of relationship building, the integration process of unfamiliar animals and group building dynamics. The relational event model is well suited to data structures that are common to animal behavioural studies and can therefore be applied to a range of social interaction data to understand animal social dynamics.

  7. From in vitro to in vivo Models of Bacterial Biofilm-Related Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeaux, David; Chauhan, Ashwini; Rendueles, Olaya; Beloin, Christophe

    2013-05-13

    The influence of microorganisms growing as sessile communities in a large number of human infections has been extensively studied and recognized for 30-40 years, therefore warranting intense scientific and medical research. Nonetheless, mimicking the biofilm-life style of bacteria and biofilm-related infections has been an arduous task. Models used to study biofilms range from simple in vitro to complex in vivo models of tissues or device-related infections. These different models have progressively contributed to the current knowledge of biofilm physiology within the host context. While far from a complete understanding of the multiple elements controlling the dynamic interactions between the host and biofilms, we are nowadays witnessing the emergence of promising preventive or curative strategies to fight biofilm-related infections. This review undertakes a comprehensive analysis of the literature from a historic perspective commenting on the contribution of the different models and discussing future venues and new approaches that can be merged with more traditional techniques in order to model biofilm-infections and efficiently fight them.

  8. From in vitro to in vivo Models of Bacterial Biofilm-Related Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Beloin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of microorganisms growing as sessile communities in a large number of human infections has been extensively studied and recognized for 30–40 years, therefore warranting intense scientific and medical research. Nonetheless, mimicking the biofilm-life style of bacteria and biofilm-related infections has been an arduous task. Models used to study biofilms range from simple in vitro to complex in vivo models of tissues or device-related infections. These different models have progressively contributed to the current knowledge of biofilm physiology within the host context. While far from a complete understanding of the multiple elements controlling the dynamic interactions between the host and biofilms, we are nowadays witnessing the emergence of promising preventive or curative strategies to fight biofilm-related infections. This review undertakes a comprehensive analysis of the literature from a historic perspective commenting on the contribution of the different models and discussing future venues and new approaches that can be merged with more traditional techniques in order to model biofilm-infections and efficiently fight them.

  9. From in vitro to in vivo Models of Bacterial Biofilm-Related Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebeaux, David; Chauhan, Ashwini; Rendueles, Olaya; Beloin, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The influence of microorganisms growing as sessile communities in a large number of human infections has been extensively studied and recognized for 30–40 years, therefore warranting intense scientific and medical research. Nonetheless, mimicking the biofilm-life style of bacteria and biofilm-related infections has been an arduous task. Models used to study biofilms range from simple in vitro to complex in vivo models of tissues or device-related infections. These different models have progressively contributed to the current knowledge of biofilm physiology within the host context. While far from a complete understanding of the multiple elements controlling the dynamic interactions between the host and biofilms, we are nowadays witnessing the emergence of promising preventive or curative strategies to fight biofilm-related infections. This review undertakes a comprehensive analysis of the literature from a historic perspective commenting on the contribution of the different models and discussing future venues and new approaches that can be merged with more traditional techniques in order to model biofilm-infections and efficiently fight them. PMID:25437038

  10. Surrogate models of precessing numerical relativity gravitational waveforms for use in parameter estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Jonathan; Field, Scott; Galley, Chad; Hemberger, Daniel; Scheel, Mark; Schmidt, Patricia; Smith, Rory; SXS Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We are now in the advanced detector era of gravitational wave astronomy, and the merger of two black holes (BHs) is one of the most promising sources of gravitational waves that could be detected on earth. To infer the BH masses and spins, the observed signal must be compared to waveforms predicted by general relativity for millions of binary configurations. Numerical relativity (NR) simulations can produce accurate waveforms, but are prohibitively expensive to use for parameter estimation. Other waveform models are fast enough but may lack accuracy in portions of the parameter space. Numerical relativity surrogate models attempt to rapidly predict the results of a NR code with a small or negligible modeling error, after being trained on a set of input waveforms. Such surrogate models are ideal for parameter estimation, as they are both fast and accurate, and have already been built for the case of non-spinning BHs. Using 250 input waveforms, we build a surrogate model for waveforms from the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) for a subspace of precessing systems.

  11. The advisory working alliance and research training: test of a relational efficacy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, M Ashley; Lent, Robert W

    2014-10-01

    Relatively little research attention has been devoted to understanding the mechanisms through which the advising relationship functions as a medium for fostering doctoral students' development as researchers. Adapting Lent and Lopez's (2002) model of relational efficacy, we examined three types of efficacy beliefs (self-efficacy, other-efficacy, and relation-inferred self-efficacy) in relation to the advisory working alliance and the prediction of doctoral students' research interest and productivity. Gelso's (1993) concept of the research training environment was also included in model testing to capture a view of the advisory relationship as existing within a larger program training context. Participants were 274 doctoral students in a variety of academic fields. The results suggested that a slightly revised version of the hypothesized model produced good fit to the data. In particular, controlling for year in the graduate program, we found the advisory working alliance was linked to students' research self-efficacy indirectly via relation-inferred self-efficacy (i.e., students' beliefs about how their advisors viewed their research capabilities). Students' self-efficacy was, in turn, predictive of their interest in and productivity at research. We discuss the implications of these findings for future research and the practice of advising and research training. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Feature network models for proximity data : statistical inference, model selection, network representations and links with related models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, Laurence Emmanuelle

    2006-01-01

    Feature Network Models (FNM) are graphical structures that represent proximity data in a discrete space with the use of features. A statistical inference theory is introduced, based on the additivity properties of networks and the linear regression framework. Considering features as predictor variab

  13. Military Children's Difficulty With Reintegration After Deployment: A Relational Turbulence Model Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Leanne K; Knobloch-Fedders, Lynne M; Yorgason, Jeremy B; Ebata, Aaron T; McGlaughlin, Patricia C

    2017-02-16

    This study drew on the relational turbulence model to investigate how the interpersonal dynamics of military couples predict parents' reports of the reintegration difficulty of military children upon homecoming after deployment. Longitudinal data were collected from 118 military couples once per month for 3 consecutive months after reunion. Military couples reported on their depressive symptoms, characteristics of their romantic relationship, and the reintegration difficulty of their oldest child. Results of dyadic growth curve models indicated that the mean levels of parents' depressive symptoms (H1), relationship uncertainty (H2), and interference from a partner (H3) were positively associated with parents' reports of military children's reintegration difficulty. These findings suggest that the relational turbulence model has utility for illuminating the reintegration difficulty of military children during the postdeployment transition. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. Secondary infall model and dark matter scaling relations in intermediate redshift early - type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, V F; Tortora, C; Napolitano, N R

    2011-01-01

    Scaling relations among dark matter (DM) and stellar quantities are a valuable tool to constrain formation scenarios and the evolution of galactic structures. However, most of the DM properties are actually not directly measured, but derived through model dependent mass mapping procedures. It is therefore crucial to adopt theoretically and observationally well founded models. We use here an updated version of the secondary infall model (SIM) to predict the halo density profile, taking into account the effects of angular momentum, dissipative friction and baryons collapse. The resulting family of halo profiles depends on one parameter only, the virial mass, and nicely fits the projected mass and aperture velocity dispersion of a sample of intermediate redshift lens galaxies. We derive DM related quantities (namely the column density and the Newtonian acceleration) and investigate their correlations with stellar mass, luminosity, effective radius and virial mass.

  15. Exploring the use of fuzzy logic models to describe the relation between SBP and RR values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Sónia; Brás, Susana

    2012-01-01

    In this work, fuzzy logic based models are used to describe the relation between systolic blood pressure (SBP) and tachogram (RR) values as a function of the SBP level. The applicability of these methods is tested using real data in Lying (L) and Standing (S) conditions and generated surrogate data. The results indicate that fuzzy models exhibit a similar performance in both conditions, and their performance is significantly higher with real data than with surrogate data. These results point out the potential of a fuzzy logic approach to model properly the relation between SBP and RR values. As a future work, it remains to assess the clinical impact of these findings and inherent repercussion on the estimation of time domain baroreflex sensitivity indices.

  16. The investigation of a relative contrast index model for fingerprint quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwee, Jana; Porter, Glenn; Renshaw, Adrian; Bell, Michael

    2011-01-30

    The quantification of fingerprint contrast is a relatively new concept in fingerprint enhancement research. It has emerged as a mode of fingerprint assessment to reduce the potential biased of visual qualitative assessment. Subjective qualitative methods that are currently reported in the literature include; side-by-side assessment, assigning a score to a treatment based on visible criteria and stating observed results without presenting supporting validation. These qualitative methods often do not state clearly the visual assessment parameters and produce a degree of ambiguity when defining the enhancement results. The relative contrast index model was constructed to empirically quantify the difference in contrast between fingerprint ridges and valleys, using measurements gained from a microspectrophotometer. This paper seeks to further investigate this recent research and test the model using three different microspectrophotometers. Data from these separate sources will determine whether the theoretical aspects of the model would pragmatically produce reliable and repeatable results across a range of microspectrophotometers found in forensic laboratories.

  17. a Dynamical Model with Next-Nearest Interaction in Relative Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhipeng; Liu, Yuncai; Liu, Fuqiang

    By introducing the velocity difference between the preceding car and the car before the preceding one into the optimal velocity model (OVM), we present an extended dynamical model which takes into account the next-nearest-neighbor interaction in relative velocity. The stability condition of this model is derived by considering a small perturbation around the uniform flow solution and the validity of our theoretical analysis is also confirmed by direct simulations. The analytic and simulation results indicate that traffic congestion is suppressed efficiently by incorporating the effect of new consideration. Moreover, the effect of the new consideration is investigated by numerical simulation. In particular, the jamming flow, the current-density relation, and the propagation speed of small disturbance are examined in detail by varying various values of the parameter.

  18. Quark-Lepton Mass Relation in a Realistic A4 Extension of the Standard Model

    CERN Document Server

    King, S F; Peinado, E; Valle, J W F

    2013-01-01

    We propose a realistic A4 extension of the Standard Model involving a particular quark-lepton mass relation, namely that the ratio of the third family mass to the geometric mean of the first and second family masses are equal for down-type quarks and charged leptons. This relation, which is approximately renormalization group invariant, is usually regarded as arising from the Georgi-Jarlskog relations, but in the present model there is no unification group or supersymmetry. In the neutrino sector we propose a simple modification of the so called Zee-Wolfenstein mass matrix pattern which allows an acceptable reactor angle along with a deviation of the atmospheric and solar angles from their bi-maximal values. Quark masses, mixing angles and CP violation are well described by a numerical fit.

  19. Adjusting a cancer mortality-prediction model for disease status-related eligibility criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmel Marek

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Volunteering participants in disease studies tend to be healthier than the general population partially due to specific enrollment criteria. Using modeling to accurately predict outcomes of cohort studies enrolling volunteers requires adjusting for the bias introduced in this way. Here we propose a new method to account for the effect of a specific form of healthy volunteer bias resulting from imposing disease status-related eligibility criteria, on disease-specific mortality, by explicitly modeling the length of the time interval between the moment when the subject becomes ineligible for the study, and the outcome. Methods Using survival time data from 1190 newly diagnosed lung cancer patients at MD Anderson Cancer Center, we model the time from clinical lung cancer diagnosis to death using an exponential distribution to approximate the length of this interval for a study where lung cancer death serves as the outcome. Incorporating this interval into our previously developed lung cancer risk model, we adjust for the effect of disease status-related eligibility criteria in predicting the number of lung cancer deaths in the control arm of CARET. The effect of the adjustment using the MD Anderson-derived approximation is compared to that based on SEER data. Results Using the adjustment developed in conjunction with our existing lung cancer model, we are able to accurately predict the number of lung cancer deaths observed in the control arm of CARET. Conclusions The resulting adjustment was accurate in predicting the lower rates of disease observed in the early years while still maintaining reasonable prediction ability in the later years of the trial. This method could be used to adjust for, or predict the duration and relative effect of any possible biases related to disease-specific eligibility criteria in modeling studies of volunteer-based cohorts.

  20. Winter precipitation characteristics in western US related to atmospheric river landfalls: observations and model evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.; Guan, B.; Waliser, D. E.; Ferraro, R. D.; Case, J. L.; Iguchi, T.; Kemp, E.; Putman, W.; Wang, W.; Wu, D.; Tian, B.

    2017-03-01

    Winter precipitation (PR) characteristics in western United States (WUS) related to atmospheric river (AR) landfalls are examined using the observation-based PRISM data. The observed AR-related precipitation characteristics are in turn used to evaluate model precipitation data from the NASA MERRA2 reanalysis and from seven dynamical downscaling simulations driven by the MERRA2. Multiple metrics including mean bias, Taylor diagram, and two skill scores are used to measure model performance for three climatological sub-regions in WUS, Pacific Northwest (PNW), Pacific Southwest (PSW) and Great Basin (GB). All model data well represent the winter-mean PR with spatial pattern correlations of 0.8 or higher with PRISM for the three sub-regions. Higher spatial resolutions and/or the use of spectral nudging generally yield higher skill scores in simulating the geographical distribution of PR for the entire winter. The PRISM data shows that the AR-related fraction of winter PR and associated daily PR PDFs in each region vary strongly for landfall locations; AR landfalls in the northern WUS coast (NC) affect mostly PNW while those in the southern WUS coast (SC) affect both PSW and GB. NC (SC) landfalls increase the frequency of heavy PR in PNW (PSW and GB) but reduce it in PSW (PNW). All model data reasonably represent these observed variations in the AR-related winter PR fractions and the daily PR PDFs according to AR landfall locations. However, unlike for the entire winter period, no systematic effects of resolution and/or spectral nudging are identified in these AR-related PR characteristics. Dynamical downscaling in this study generally yield positive added values to the MERRA2 PR in the AR-related PR fraction for most sub-regions and landfall locations, most noticeably for PSW by NU-WRF. The downscaling also generate positive added value in p95 for PNW, but negative values for PSW and GB due to overestimation of heavy precipitation events.