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Sample records for models provide critical

  1. Criticality Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Alsaed

    2004-09-14

    The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of

  2. A critical subset model provides a conceptual basis for the high antiviral activity of major HIV drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Rabi, S Alireza; Sedaghat, Ahmad R; Shan, Liang; Lai, Jun; Xing, Sifei; Siliciano, Robert F

    2011-07-13

    Control of HIV-1 replication was first achieved with regimens that included a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) or a protease inhibitor (PI); however, an explanation for the high antiviral activity of these drugs has been lacking. Indeed, conventional pharmacodynamic measures like IC(50) (drug concentration causing 50% inhibition) do not differentiate NNRTIs and PIs from less active nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). Drug inhibitory potential depends on the slope of the dose-response curve (m), which represents how inhibition increases as a function of increasing drug concentration and is related to the Hill coefficient, a measure of intramolecular cooperativity in ligand binding to a multivalent receptor. Although NNRTIs and PIs bind univalent targets, they unexpectedly exhibit cooperative dose-response curves (m > 1). We show that this cooperative inhibition can be explained by a model in which infectivity requires participation of multiple copies of a drug target in an individual life cycle stage. A critical subset of these target molecules must be in the unbound state. Consistent with experimental observations, this model predicts m > 1 for NNRTIs and PIs and m = 1 in situations where a single drug target/virus mediates a step in the life cycle, as is the case with NRTIs and integrase strand transfer inhibitors. This model was tested experimentally by modulating the number of functional drug targets per virus, and dose-response curves for modulated virus populations fit model predictions. This model explains the high antiviral activity of two drug classes important for successful HIV-1 treatment and defines a characteristic of good targets for antiviral drugs in general, namely, intermolecular cooperativity.

  3. Zika Virus: Critical Information for Emergency Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastry, Siri; Koenig, Kristi L; Hirshon, Jon Mark

    2016-08-01

    Zika virus is an arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family. It is primarily a minimally symptomatic mosquito-borne infection. However, with Zika's 2015 to 2016 introduction into the Western Hemisphere and its dramatic and rapid spread, it has become a public health concern, in large part due to congenital abnormalities associated with infection in pregnant women. In early 2016, the World Health Organization declared the microcephaly and other neurologic conditions associated with Zika virus infection a public health emergency of international concern. This article discusses the current epidemiologic and clinical understanding of Zika virus, focusing on critical information needed by emergency providers.

  4. Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

    2009-11-01

    One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

  5. Modeling Dependencies in Critical Infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuijs, A.H.; Luiijf, H.A.M.; Klaver, M.H.A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a model for expressing critical infrastructure dependencies. The model addresses the limitations of existing approaches with respect to clarity of definition, support for quality and the influence of operating states of critical infrastructures and environmental factors.

  6. The critical thinking curriculum model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, William Haviland

    The Critical Thinking Curriculum Model (CTCM) utilizes a multidisciplinary approach that integrates effective learning and teaching practices with computer technology. The model is designed to be flexible within a curriculum, an example for teachers to follow, where they can plug in their own critical issue. This process engages students in collaborative research that can be shared in the classroom, across the country or around the globe. The CTCM features open-ended and collaborative activities that deal with current, real world issues which leaders are attempting to solve. As implemented in the Critical Issues Forum (CIF), an educational program administered by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the CTCM encompasses the political, social/cultural, economic, and scientific realms in the context of a current global issue. In this way, students realize the importance of their schooling by applying their efforts to an endeavor that ultimately will affect their future. This study measures student attitudes toward science and technology and the changes that result from immersion in the CTCM. It also assesses the differences in student learning in science content and problem solving for students involved in the CTCM. A sample of 24 students participated in classrooms at two separate high schools in New Mexico. The evaluation results were analyzed using SPSS in a MANOVA format in order to determine the significance of the between and within-subjects effects. A comparison ANOVA was done for each two-way MANOVA to see if the comparison groups were equal. Significant findings were validated using the Scheffe test in a Post Hoc analysis. Demographic information for the sample population was recorded and tracked, including self-assessments of computer use and availability. Overall, the results indicated that the CTCM did help to increase science content understanding and problem-solving skills for students, thereby positively effecting critical thinking. No matter if the

  7. A critical review of clarifier modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plósz, Benedek; Nopens, Ingmar; Rieger, Leiv;

    This outline paper aims to provide a critical review of secondary settling tank (SST) modelling approaches used in current wastewater engineering and develop tools not yet applied in practice. We address the development of different tier models and experimental techniques in the field with a part...

  8. Conserving critical sites for biodiversity provides disproportionate benefits to people.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank W Larsen

    Full Text Available Protecting natural habitats in priority areas is essential to halt the loss of biodiversity. Yet whether these benefits for biodiversity also yield benefits for human well-being remains controversial. Here we assess the potential human well-being benefits of safeguarding a global network of sites identified as top priorities for the conservation of threatened species. Conserving these sites would yield benefits--in terms of a climate change mitigation through avoidance of CO(2 emissions from deforestation; b freshwater services to downstream human populations; c retention of option value; and d benefits to maintenance of human cultural diversity--significantly exceeding those anticipated from randomly selected sites within the same countries and ecoregions. Results suggest that safeguarding sites important for biodiversity conservation provides substantial benefits to human well-being.

  9. Conserving critical sites for biodiversity provides disproportionate benefits to people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Frank W; Turner, Will R; Brooks, Thomas M

    2012-01-01

    Protecting natural habitats in priority areas is essential to halt the loss of biodiversity. Yet whether these benefits for biodiversity also yield benefits for human well-being remains controversial. Here we assess the potential human well-being benefits of safeguarding a global network of sites identified as top priorities for the conservation of threatened species. Conserving these sites would yield benefits--in terms of a) climate change mitigation through avoidance of CO(2) emissions from deforestation; b) freshwater services to downstream human populations; c) retention of option value; and d) benefits to maintenance of human cultural diversity--significantly exceeding those anticipated from randomly selected sites within the same countries and ecoregions. Results suggest that safeguarding sites important for biodiversity conservation provides substantial benefits to human well-being.

  10. Conserving critical sites for biodiversity provides disproportionate benefits to people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Frank Wugt; Turner, Will R.; Brooks, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Protecting natural habitats in priority areas is essential to halt the loss of biodiversity. Yet whether these benefits for biodiversity also yield benefits for human well-being remains controversial. Here we assess the potential human well-being benefits of safeguarding a global network of sites...... identified as top priorities for the conservation of threatened species. Conserving these sites would yield benefits - in terms of a) climate change mitigation through avoidance of CO2 emissions from deforestation; b) freshwater services to downstream human populations; c) retention of option value; and d......) benefits to maintenance of human cultural diversity - significantly exceeding those anticipated from randomly selected sites within the same countries and ecoregions. Results suggest that safeguarding sites important for biodiversity conservation provides substantial benefits to human well-being....

  11. Conserving Critical Sites for Biodiversity Provides Disproportionate Benefits to People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Frank W.; Turner, Will R.; Brooks, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    Protecting natural habitats in priority areas is essential to halt the loss of biodiversity. Yet whether these benefits for biodiversity also yield benefits for human well-being remains controversial. Here we assess the potential human well-being benefits of safeguarding a global network of sites identified as top priorities for the conservation of threatened species. Conserving these sites would yield benefits – in terms of a) climate change mitigation through avoidance of CO2 emissions from deforestation; b) freshwater services to downstream human populations; c) retention of option value; and d) benefits to maintenance of human cultural diversity – significantly exceeding those anticipated from randomly selected sites within the same countries and ecoregions. Results suggest that safeguarding sites important for biodiversity conservation provides substantial benefits to human well-being. PMID:22666337

  12. The National Resource Center on LGBT Aging provides critical training to aging service providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Hilary; Johnston, Tim R

    2014-01-01

    The National Resource Center on LGBT Aging was created in 2010 by Services & Advocacy for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Elders (SAGE) with seed funding from the US Department of Health and Human Services. Three years into the project, thousands of aging and LGBT service providers have been reached with training and technical assistance; however, a great need, especially for cultural competency training, remains.

  13. A Holographic Model For Quantum Critical Responses

    CERN Document Server

    Myers, Robert C; Witczak-Krempa, William

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the dynamical response functions of strongly interacting quantum critical states described by conformal field theories (CFTs). We construct a self-consistent holographic model that incorporates the relevant scalar operator driving the quantum critical phase transition. Focusing on the finite temperature dynamical conductivity $\\sigma(\\omega,T)$, we study its dependence on our model parameters, notably the scaling dimension of the relevant operator. It is found that the conductivity is well-approximated by a simple ansatz proposed by Katz et al [1] for a wide range of parameters. We further dissect the conductivity at large frequencies $\\omega >> T$ using the operator product expansion, and show how it reveals the spectrum of our model CFT. Our results provide a physically-constrained framework to study the analytic continuation of quantum Monte Carlo data, as we illustrate using the O(2) Wilson-Fisher CFT. Finally, we comment on the variation of the conductivity as we tune away from the quantum cri...

  14. Development of Model for Providing Feasible Scholarship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Dhika

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current work focuses on the development of a model to determine a feasible scholarship recipient on the basis of the naiv¨e Bayes’ method using very simple and limited attributes. Those attributes are the applicants academic year, represented by their semester, academic performance, represented by their GPa, socioeconomic ability, which represented the economic capability to attend a higher education institution, and their level of social involvement. To establish and evaluate the model performance, empirical data are collected, and the data of 100 students are divided into 80 student data for the model training and the remaining of 20 student data are for the model testing. The results suggest that the model is capable to provide recommendations for the potential scholarship recipient at the level of accuracy of 95%.

  15. Improving Agent Based Modeling of Critical Incidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Till

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Agent Based Modeling (ABM is a powerful method that has been used to simulate potential critical incidents in the infrastructure and built environments. This paper will discuss the modeling of some critical incidents currently simulated using ABM and how they may be expanded and improved by using better physiological modeling, psychological modeling, modeling the actions of interveners, introducing Geographic Information Systems (GIS and open source models.

  16. The Impact of Process Capability on Service Reliability for Critical Infrastructure Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Clemith J., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between organizational processes that have been identified as promoting resiliency and their impact on service reliability within the scope of critical infrastructure providers. The importance of critical infrastructure to the nation is evident from the body of research and is supported by instances where…

  17. Critical behavior of a dynamical percolation model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Mei-Ling; XU Ming-Mei; LIU Zheng-You; LIU Lian-Shou

    2009-01-01

    The critical behavior of the dynamical percolation model, which realizes the molecular-aggregation conception and describes the crossover between the hadronic phase and the partonic phase, is studied in detail. The critical percolation distance for this model is obtained by using the probability P∞ of the appearance of an infinite cluster. Utilizing the finite-size scaling method the critical exponents γ/v and T are extracted from the distribution of the average cluster size and cluster number density. The influences of two model related factors, I.e. The maximum bond number and the definition of the infinite cluster, on the critical behavior are found to be small.

  18. Prehospital management of evolving critical illness by the primary care provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Kerri A; Hosseinnezhad, Alireza; Ullah, Ashfaq; Vinagre, Yuka-Marie; Baker, Stephen P; Lilly, Craig M

    2013-10-01

    The factors that limit primary care providers (PCPs) from intervening for adults with evolving, acute, severe illness are less understood than the increasing frequency of management by acute care providers. Rates of prehospital patient management by a PCP and of communication with acute care teams were measured in a multicenter, cross-sectional, descriptive study conducted in all four of the adult medical ICUs of the three hospitals in central Massachusetts that provide tertiary care. Rates were measured for 390 critical care encounters, using a validated instrument to abstract the medical record and conduct telephone interviews. PCPs implemented prehospital management for eight episodes of acute illness among 300 encounters. Infrequent prehospital management by PCPs was attributed to their lack of awareness of the patient's evolving acute illness. Only 21% of PCPs were aware of the acute illness before their patient was admitted to an ICU, and 33% were not aware that their patient was in an ICU. Rates of PCP involvement were not appreciably different among provider groups or by patient age, sex, insurance status, hospital, ICU, or ICU staffing model. We identified lack of PCP awareness of patients' acute illness and high rates of PCP referral to acute care providers as the most frequent barriers to prehospital management of evolving acute illness. These findings suggest that implementing processes that encourage early patient-PCP communication and increase rates of prehospital management of infections and acute exacerbations of chronic diseases could reduce use of acute care services.

  19. Cost Calculation Model for Logistics Service Providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán Bokor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The exact calculation of logistics costs has become a real challenge in logistics and supply chain management. It is essential to gain reliable and accurate costing information to attain efficient resource allocation within the logistics service provider companies. Traditional costing approaches, however, may not be sufficient to reach this aim in case of complex and heterogeneous logistics service structures. So this paper intends to explore the ways of improving the cost calculation regimes of logistics service providers and show how to adopt the multi-level full cost allocation technique in logistics practice. After determining the methodological framework, a sample cost calculation scheme is developed and tested by using estimated input data. Based on the theoretical findings and the experiences of the pilot project it can be concluded that the improved costing model contributes to making logistics costing more accurate and transparent. Moreover, the relations between costs and performances also become more visible, which enhances the effectiveness of logistics planning and controlling significantly

  20. Critical Review of Membrane Bioreactor Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naessens, W.; Maere, T.; Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios;

    2012-01-01

    modelling. In this paper, the vast literature on hydrodynamic and integrated modelling in MBR is critically reviewed. Hydrodynamic models are used at different scales and focus mainly on fouling and only little on system design/optimisation. Integrated models also focus on fouling although the ones...

  1. Critical state model with anisotropic critical current density

    CERN Document Server

    Bhagwat, K V; Ravikumar, G

    2003-01-01

    Analytical solutions of Bean's critical state model with critical current density J sub c being anisotropic are obtained for superconducting cylindrical samples of arbitrary cross section in a parallel geometry. We present a method for calculating the flux fronts and magnetization curves. Results are presented for cylinders with elliptical cross section with a specific form of the anisotropy. We find that over a certain range of the anisotropy parameter the flux fronts have shapes similar to those for an isotropic sample. However, in general, the presence of anisotropy significantly modifies the shape of the flux fronts. The field for full flux penetration also depends on the anisotropy parameter. The method is extended to the case of anisotropic J sub c that also depends on the local field B, and magnetization hysteresis curves are presented for typical values of the anisotropy parameter for the case of |J sub c | that decreases exponentially with |B|.

  2. Nursing practice models for acute and critical care: overview of care delivery models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, Maria R

    2008-12-01

    This article provides a historical overview of nursing models of care for acute and critical care based on currently available literature. Models of care are defined and their advantages and disadvantages presented. The distinctive differences between care delivery models and professional practice models are explained. The historical overview of care delivery models provides a foundation for the introduction of best practice models that will shape the environment for acute and critical care in the future.

  3. Critical gradient response of the Weiland model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asp, E.; Weiland, J.; Garbet, X.; Parail, V.; Strand, P.; JET EFDA contributors, the

    2007-08-01

    The success the Weiland model has had in reproducing modulation experiments prompted this in-depth investigation into its behaviour as a critical gradient model (CGM). The critical gradient properties of the Weiland model is examined analytically and numerically and compared with the empirical CGM commonly used in experiment. A simplified Weiland CGM is derived in which the height-above-threshold dependence is not necessarily linear. Simultaneously, the validity of the empirical CGM was examined. It is shown that an effective threshold, which is higher than the instability threshold, can be obtained if pinches influence the diffusivity.

  4. Critical conceptualism in environmental modeling and prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christakos, G

    2003-10-15

    Many important problems in environmental science and engineering are of a conceptual nature. Research and development, however, often becomes so preoccupied with technical issues, which are themselves fascinating, that it neglects essential methodological elements of conceptual reasoning and theoretical inquiry. This work suggests that valuable insight into environmental modeling can be gained by means of critical conceptualism which focuses on the software of human reason and, in practical terms, leads to a powerful methodological framework of space-time modeling and prediction. A knowledge synthesis system develops the rational means for the epistemic integration of various physical knowledge bases relevant to the natural system of interest in order to obtain a realistic representation of the system, provide a rigorous assessment of the uncertainty sources, generate meaningful predictions of environmental processes in space-time, and produce science-based decisions. No restriction is imposed on the shape of the distribution model or the form of the predictor (non-Gaussian distributions, multiple-point statistics, and nonlinear models are automatically incorporated). The scientific reasoning structure underlying knowledge synthesis involves teleologic criteria and stochastic logic principles which have important advantages over the reasoning method of conventional space-time techniques. Insight is gained in terms of real world applications, including the following: the study of global ozone patterns in the atmosphere using data sets generated by instruments on board the Nimbus 7 satellite and secondary information in terms of total ozone-tropopause pressure models; the mapping of arsenic concentrations in the Bangladesh drinking water by assimilating hard and soft data from an extensive network of monitoring wells; and the dynamic imaging of probability distributions of pollutants across the Kalamazoo river.

  5. On the criticality of inferred models

    CERN Document Server

    Mastromatteo, Iacopo

    2011-01-01

    Advanced inference techniques allow one to reconstruct the pattern of interaction from high dimensional data sets. We focus here on the statistical properties of inferred models and argue that inference procedures are likely to yield models which are close to a phase transition. On one side, we show that the reparameterization invariant metrics in the space of probability distributions of these models (the Fisher Information) is directly related to the model's susceptibility. As a result, distinguishable models tend to accumulate close to critical points, where the susceptibility diverges in infinite systems. On the other, this region is the one where the estimate of inferred parameters is most stable. In order to illustrate these points, we discuss inference of interacting point processes with application to financial data and show that sensible choices of observation time-scales naturally yield models which are close to criticality.

  6. Off-Critical Logarithmic Minimal Models

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    We consider the integrable minimal models ${\\cal M}(m,m';t)$, corresponding to the $\\varphi_{1,3}$ perturbation off-criticality, in the {\\it logarithmic limit\\,} $m, m'\\to\\infty$, $m/m'\\to p/p'$ where $p, p'$ are coprime and the limit is taken through coprime values of $m,m'$. We view these off-critical minimal models ${\\cal M}(m,m';t)$ as the continuum scaling limit of the Forrester-Baxter Restricted Solid-On-Solid (RSOS) models on the square lattice. Applying Corner Transfer Matrices to the Forrester-Baxter RSOS models in Regime III, we argue that taking first the thermodynamic limit and second the {\\it logarithmic limit\\,} yields off-critical logarithmic minimal models ${\\cal LM}(p,p';t)$ corresponding to the $\\varphi_{1,3}$ perturbation of the critical logarithmic minimal models ${\\cal LM}(p,p')$. Specifically, in accord with the Kyoto correspondence principle, we show that the logarithmic limit of the one-dimensional configurational sums yields finitized quasi-rational characters of the Kac representatio...

  7. Pediatric triage and allocation of critical care resources during disaster: Northwest provider opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Erin Margaret; Diekema, Douglas S; Lewis-Newby, Mithya; King, Mary A

    2014-10-01

    Following Hurricane Katrina and the 2009 H1N1 epidemic, pediatric critical care clinicians recognized the urgent need for a standardized pediatric triage/allocation system. This study collected regional provider opinion on issues of care allocation and pediatric triage in a disaster/pandemic setting. This study was a cross-sectional survey of United States (US) health care providers and public health workers who demonstrated interest in critical care and/or disaster care medicine by attending a Northwest regional pediatric critical care symposium on disaster preparation, held in 2012 at Seattle Children's Hospital in Seattle, Washington (USA). The survey employed an electronic audience response system and included demographic, ethical, and logistical questions. Differences in opinions between respondents grouped by professions and work locations were evaluated using a chi-square test. One hundred and twelve (97%) of 116 total attendees responded to at least one question; however, four of these responders failed to answer every question. Sixty-two (55%) responders were nurses, 29 (26%) physicians, and 21 (19%) other occupations. Fifty-five (51%) responders worked in pediatric hospitals vs 53 (49%) in other locations. Sixty-three (58%) of 108 successful responses prioritized children predicted to have a good neuro-cognitive outcome. Seventy-one (68%) agreed that no pediatric age group should be prioritized. Twenty-two (43%) of providers working in non-pediatric hospital locations preferred a triage system based on an objective score alone vs 14 (26%) of those in pediatric hospitals (P = .038).

  8. Moral distress and its contribution to the development of burnout syndrome among critical care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumis, Renata Rego Lins; Junqueira Amarante, Gustavo Adolpho; de Fátima Nascimento, Andréia; Vieira Junior, José Mauro

    2017-12-01

    Burnout appears to be common among critical care providers. It is characterized by three components: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and personal accomplishment. Moral distress is the inability of a moral agent to act according to his or her core values and perceived obligations due to internal and external constraints. We aimed to estimate the correlation between moral distress and burnout among all intensive care unit (ICU) and the step-down unit (SDU) providers (physicians, nurses, nurse technicians and respiratory therapists). A survey was conducted from August to September 2015. For data collection, a self-administered questionnaire for each critical care provider was used including basic demographic data, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and the Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R). Correlation analysis between MBI domains and moral distress score and regression analysis to assess independent variables associated with burnout were performed. A total of 283 out of 389 (72.7%) critical care providers agreed to participate. The same team of physicians attended both ICU and SDU, and severe burnout was identified in 18.2% of them. Considering all others critical care providers of both units, we identified that overall 23.1% (95% CI 18.0-28.8%) presented severe burnout, and it did not differ between professional categories. The mean MDS-R rate for all ICU and SDU respondents was 111.5 and 104.5, respectively, p = 0.446. Many questions from MDS-R questionnaire were significantly associated with burnout, and those respondents with high MDS-R score (>100 points) were more likely to suffer from burnout (28.9 vs 14.4%, p = 0.010). After regression analysis, moral distress was independently associated with burnout (OR 2.4, CI 1.19-4.82, p = 0.014). Moral distress, resulting from therapeutic obstinacy and the provision of futile care, is an important issue among critical care providers' team, and it was significantly associated with severe burnout.

  9. The human factor: the critical importance of effective teamwork and communication in providing safe care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, M; Graham, S; Bonacum, D

    2004-10-01

    Effective communication and teamwork is essential for the delivery of high quality, safe patient care. Communication failures are an extremely common cause of inadvertent patient harm. The complexity of medical care, coupled with the inherent limitations of human performance, make it critically important that clinicians have standardised communication tools, create an environment in which individuals can speak up and express concerns, and share common "critical language" to alert team members to unsafe situations. All too frequently, effective communication is situation or personality dependent. Other high reliability domains, such as commercial aviation, have shown that the adoption of standardised tools and behaviours is a very effective strategy in enhancing teamwork and reducing risk. We describe our ongoing patient safety implementation using this approach within Kaiser Permanente, a non-profit American healthcare system providing care for 8.3 million patients. We describe specific clinical experience in the application of surgical briefings, properties of high reliability perinatal care, the value of critical event training and simulation, and benefits of a standardised communication process in the care of patients transferred from hospitals to skilled nursing facilities. Additionally, lessons learned as to effective techniques in achieving cultural change, evidence of improving the quality of the work environment, practice transfer strategies, critical success factors, and the evolving methods of demonstrating the benefit of such work are described.

  10. Knowledge of Critical Care Provider on Prevention of Ventilator Associated Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passang Chiki Sherpa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP continues to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in ventilated patient. Prevention of VAP in critically ill patient is significant concern for health care team in intensive care units (ICUs. Knowledge on prevention of VAP would have a significant impact on patient outcome. Aims and Objectives: To assess knowledge on prevention of VAP in critical care providers and to find the association between knowledge on prevention of VAP and educational qualification and years of experience in ICUs. Settings and Design: The study was conducted in 5 different ICUs of Kasturba Hospital, Manipal, and using descriptive study design. Material and Methods: The study involved a purposive sample of 138 critical care providers. Critical care providers who were willing to participate in the study were included. Tools on demographic proforma and self-administered structured knowledge questionnaire on prevention of VAP were developed and content validity was established. The reliability of the tools was established.The data was categorized and analyzed by using descriptive and inferential statistics. The SPSS 16.0 version was used for the analysis of the study. Result: Majority 89.1% of the participant were 20-29 years, 63% unmarried 51.4% had completed diploma course and majority 81.2% were from nursing discipline. The study revealed that only 55.80% of subjects were having adequate knowledge on prevention of VAP based on median score. There was no significant association between knowledge score and educational qualification (÷²=0, p=0.833, years of experience in ICU (÷²= 2.221, p=0.329.

  11. Nonextensive critical effects in the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model

    CERN Document Server

    Rozynek, Jacek

    2009-01-01

    The critical phenomena in strongly interaction matter are generally investigated using the mean-field model and are characterized by well defined critical exponents. However, such models provide only average properties of the corresponding order parameters and neglect altogether their possible fluctuations. Also the possible long range effect are neglected in the mean field approach. Here we investigate the critical behavior in the nonextensive version of the Nambu Jona-Lasinio model (NJL). It allows to account for such effects in a phenomenological way by means of a single parameter $q$, the nonextensivity parameter. In particular, we show how the nonextensive statistics influence the region of the critical temperature and chemical potential in the NJL mean field approach.

  12. New approaches to provide ride-through for critical loads in electric power distribution systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero-Hernandez, Oscar C.

    2001-07-01

    The extensive use of electronic circuits has enabled modernization, automation, miniaturization, high quality, low cost, and other achievements regarding electric loads in the last decades. However, modern electronic circuits and systems are extremely sensitive to disturbances from the electric power supply. In fact, the rate at which these disturbances happen is considerable as has been documented in recent years. In response to the power quality concerns presented previously, this dissertation is proposing new approaches to provide ride-through for critical loads during voltage disturbances with emphasis on voltage sags. In this dissertation, a new approach based on an AC-DC-AC system is proposed to provide ride-through for critical loads connected in buildings and/or an industrial system. In this approach, a three-phase IGBT inverter with a built in Dc-link voltage regulator is suitably controlled along with static by-pass switches to provide continuous power to critical loads. During a disturbance, the input utility source is disconnected and the power from the inverter is connected to the load. The remaining voltage in the AC supply is converted to DC and compensated before being applied to the inverter and the load. After detecting normal utility conditions, power from the utility is restored to the critical load. In order to achieve an extended ride-through capability a second approach is introduced. In this case, the Dc-link voltage regulator is performed by a DC-DC Buck-Boost converter. This new approach has the capability to mitigate voltage variations below and above the nominal value. In the third approach presented in this dissertation, a three-phase AC to AC boost converter is investigated. This converter provides a boosting action for the utility input voltages, right before they are applied to the load. The proposed Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) control strategy ensures independent control of each phase and compensates for both single-phase or poly

  13. A group randomized trial of critical incident stress debriefing provided to U.S. peacekeepers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Amy B; Litz, Brett T; Castro, Carl Andrew; Suvak, Michael; Thomas, Jeffrey L; Burrell, Lolita; McGurk, Dennis; Wright, Kathleen M; Bliese, Paul D

    2008-06-01

    In a group randomized trial of critical incident stress debriefing (CISD) with platoons of 952 peacekeepers, CISD was compared with a stress management class (SMC) and survey-only (SO) condition. Multilevel growth curve modeling found that CISD did not differentially hasten recovery compared to the other two conditions. For those soldiers reporting the highest degree of exposure to mission stressors, CISD was minimally associated with lower reports of posttraumatic stress and aggression (vs. SMC), higher perceived organizational support (vs. SO), and more alcohol problems than SMC and SO. Soldiers reported that they liked CISD more than the SMC, and CISD did not cause undue distress.

  14. The Grand Tack model: a critical review

    CERN Document Server

    Raymond, Sean N

    2014-01-01

    The `Grand Tack' model proposes that the inner Solar System was sculpted by the giant planets' orbital migration in the gaseous protoplanetary disk. Jupiter first migrated inward then Jupiter and Saturn migrated back outward together. If Jupiter's turnaround or "tack" point was at ~1.5 AU the inner disk of terrestrial building blocks would have been truncated at ~1 AU, naturally producing the terrestrial planets' masses and spacing. During the gas giants' migration the asteroid belt is severely depleted but repopulated by distinct planetesimal reservoirs that can be associated with the present-day S and C types. The giant planets' orbits are consistent with the later evolution of the outer Solar System. Here we confront common criticisms of the Grand Tack model. We show that some uncertainties remain regarding the Tack mechanism itself; the most critical unknown is the timing and rate of gas accretion onto Saturn and Jupiter. Current isotopic and compositional measurements of Solar System bodies -- including ...

  15. QCD Critical Point in a Quasiparticle Model

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, P K; Singh, C P

    2010-01-01

    Recent theoretical investigations have unveiled a rich structure in the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) phase diagram which consists of quark gluon plasma (QGP) and the hadronic phases but also supports the existence of a cross-over transition ending at a critical end point (CEP). We find a too large variation in determination of the coordinates of the CEP in the temperature (T), baryon chemical potential ($\\mu_{B}$) plane and, therefore, its identification in the current heavy-ion experiments becomes debatable. Here we use an equation of state (EOS) for a deconfined QGP using a thermodynamically consistent quasiparticle model involving quarks and gluons having thermal masses. We further use a thermodynamically consistent excluded volume model for the hadron gas (HG) which was recently proposed by us. Using these equations of state, a first order deconfining phase transition is constructed using Gibbs' criteria. This leads to an interesting finding that the phase transition line ends at a critical point (CEP) be...

  16. Critical properties of random Potts models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, Wolfgang; Domany, Eytan

    1981-04-01

    The critical properties of Potts models with random bonds are considered in two dimensions. A position-space renormalization-group procedure, based on the Migdal-Kadanoff method, is developed. While all previous position-space calculations satisfied the Harris criterion and the resulting scaling relation only approximately, we found conditions under which these relations are exactly satisfied, and constructed our renormalization-group procedure accordingly. Numerical results for phase diagrams and thermodynamic functions for various random-bond Potts models are presented. In addition, some exact results obtained using a duality transformation, as well as an heuristic derivation of scaling properties that correspond to the percolation problem are given.

  17. Health care policy development: a critical analysis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Jean E; Pauling, Carolyn D; Franzen, Debra B

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a phased approach for teaching baccalaureate nursing students critical analysis of health care policy, including refinement of existing policy or the foundation to create new policy. Central to this approach is the application of an innovative framework, the Grand View Critical Analysis Model, which was designed to provide a conceptual base for the authentic learning experience. Students come to know the interconnectedness and the importance of the model, which includes issue selection and four phases: policy focus, colleagueship analysis, evidence-based practice analysis, and policy analysis and development.

  18. Modelling critical NDVI curves in perennial ryegrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gislum, R; Boelt, B

    2010-01-01

      The use of optical sensors to measure canopy reflectance and calculate crop index as e.g. normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is widely used in agricultural crops, but has so far not been implemented in herbage seed production. The present study has the purpose to develop a critical...... NDVI curve where the critical NDVI, defined as the minimum NDVI obtained to achieve a high seed yield, will be modelled during the growing season. NDVI measurements were made at different growing degree days (GDD) in a three year field experiment where different N application rates were applied....... There was a clear maximum in the correlation coefficient between seed yield and NDVI in the period from approximately 700 to 900 GDD. At this time there was an exponential relationship between NDVI and seed yield where highest seed yield were at NDVI ~0.9. Theoretically the farmers should aim for an NDVI of 0...

  19. The "virtual" obstetrical intensive care unit: providing critical care for contemporary obstetrics in nontraditional locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leovic, Michael P; Robbins, Hailey N; Foley, Michael R; Starikov, Roman S

    2016-12-01

    Management of the critically ill pregnant patient presents a clinical dilemma in which there are sparse objective data to determine the optimal setting for provision of high-quality care to these patients. This clinical scenario will continue to present a challenge for providers as the chronic illness and comorbid conditions continue to become more commonly encountered in the obstetric population. Various care models exist across a broad spectrum of facilities that are characterized by differing levels of resources; however, no studies have identified which model provides the highest level of care and patient safety while maintaining a reasonable degree of cost-effectiveness. The health care needs of the critically ill obstetric patient calls for clinicians to move beyond the traditional definition of the intensive care unit and develop a well-rounded, quickly responsive, and communicative interdisciplinary team that can provide high-quality, unique, and versatile care that best meets the needs of each particular patient. We propose a model in which a virtual intensive care unit team composed of preselected specialists from multiple disciplines (maternal-fetal medicine, neonatology, obstetric anesthesiology, cardiology, pulmonology, etc) participate in the provision of individualized, precontemplated care that is readily adapted to the specific patient's clinical needs, regardless of setting. With this team-based approach, an environment of trust and familiarity is fostered among team members and well thought-out patient care plans are developed through routine prebrief discussions regarding individual clinical care for parturients anticipated to required critical care services. Incorporating debriefings between team members following these intricate cases will allow for the continued evolution of care as the medical needs of this patient population change as well.

  20. [Nursing fundamentals: critical incidents related to care provided in supervised training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsecchi, Elizabeth Amâncio de Souza da Silva; Nogueira, Maria Suely

    2002-01-01

    The course of Nursing fundamentals introduces the students to supervised training and can result in anxiety and tension. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify positive/negative aspects related to the care provided during the supervised training, based on the critical incidents technique. The subjects were students of the 2 degrees, 3 degrees and 4 degrees years of the Nursing Undergraduate Program offered by the State University of Maringá-PR. Authors identified 95 reports: 48(50.5%) positive and 47(49.5) negative. The positive aspects were related to the faculty's presence mediating the teaching-learning process; and the negative ones were related to the professionals insensibility regarding pain and death.

  1. Introduced fire ants can exclude native ants from critical mutualist-provided resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Shawn M; Barnum, Thomas R; Holway, David A; Suarez, Andrew V; Eubanks, Micky D

    2013-05-01

    Animals frequently experience resource imbalances in nature. For ants, one resource that may be particularly valuable for both introduced and native species is high-carbohydrate honeydew from hemipteran mutualists. We conducted field and laboratory experiments: (1) to test if red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) competed with native ants for access to mutualisms with aphids, and (2) to quantify the effects of aphid honeydew presence or absence on colony growth of native ants. We focused on native dolichoderine ants (Formicidae, Dolichoderinae) because they are abundant ants that have omnivorous diets that frequently include mutualist-provided carbohydrates. At two sites in the southeastern US, native dolichoderine ants were far less frequent, and fire ants more frequent, at carbohydrate baits than would be expected based on their frequency in pitfall traps. A field experiment confirmed that a native ant species, Dorymyrmex bureni, was only found tending aphids when populations of S. invicta were suppressed. In the laboratory, colonies of native dolichoderine ants with access to both honeydew and insect prey had twice as many workers and over twice as much brood compared to colonies fed only ad libitum insect prey. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that introduced ants compete for access to mutualist-provided carbohydrates with native ants and that these carbohydrates represent critical resources for both introduced and native ants. These results challenge traditional paradigms of arthropod and ant nutrition and contribute to growing evidence of the importance of nutrition in mediating ecological interactions.

  2. `Dhara': An Open Framework for Critical Zone Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, P. V.; Kumar, P.

    2016-12-01

    Processes in the Critical Zone, which sustain terrestrial life, are tightly coupled across hydrological, physical, biological, chemical, pedological, geomorphological and ecological domains over both short and long timescales. Observations and quantification of the Earth's surface across these domains using emerging high resolution measurement technologies such as light detection and ranging (lidar) and hyperspectral remote sensing are enabling us to characterize fine scale landscape attributes over large spatial areas. This presents a unique opportunity to develop novel approaches to model the Critical Zone that can capture fine scale intricate dependencies across the different processes in 3D. The development of interdisciplinary tools that transcend individual disciplines and capture new levels of complexity and emergent properties is at the core of Critical Zone science. Here we introduce an open framework for high-performance computing model (`Dhara') for modeling complex processes in the Critical Zone. The framework is designed to be modular in structure with the aim to create uniform and efficient tools to facilitate and leverage process modeling. It also provides flexibility to maintain, collaborate, and co-develop additional components by the scientific community. We show the essential framework that simulates ecohydrologic dynamics, and surface - sub-surface coupling in 3D using hybrid parallel CPU-GPU. We demonstrate that the open framework in Dhara is feasible for detailed, multi-processes, and large-scale modeling of the Critical Zone, which opens up exciting possibilities. We will also present outcomes from a Modeling Summer Institute led by Intensively Managed Critical Zone Observatory (IMLCZO) with representation from several CZOs and international representatives.

  3. Critical Points in Nuclei and Interacting Boson Model Intrinsic States

    CERN Document Server

    Ginocchio, J N; Ginocchio, Joseph N.

    2003-01-01

    We consider properties of critical points in the interacting boson model, corresponding to flat-bottomed potentials as encountered in a second-order phase transition between spherical and deformed $\\gamma$-unstable nuclei. We show that intrinsic states with an effective $\\beta$-deformation reproduce the dynamics of the underlying non-rigid shapes. The effective deformation can be determined from the the global minimum of the energy surface after projection onto the appropriate symmetry. States of fixed $N$ and good O(5) symmetry projected from these intrinsic states provide good analytic estimates to the exact eigenstates, energies and quadrupole transition rates at the critical point.

  4. Critical review of wind tunnel modeling of atmospheric heat dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1977-05-01

    There is increasing concern by scientists that future proposed energy or power parks may significantly affect the environment by releasing large quantities of heat and water vapor to the atmosphere. A critical review is presented of the potential application of physical modeling (wind tunnels) to assess possible atmospheric effects from heat dissipation systems such as cooling towers. A short inventory of low-speed wind tunnel facilities is included in the review. The useful roles of wind tunnels are assessed and the state-of-the-art of physical modeling is briefly reviewed. Similarity criteria are summarized and present limitations in satisfying these criteria are considered. Current physical models are defined and limitations are discussed. Three experimental problems are discussed in which physical modeling may be able to provide data. These are: defining the critical atmospheric heat load; topographic and local circulation effects on thermal plumes; and plume rise and downstream effects.

  5. Evaluation of District-Provided Professional Development on Critical Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedosky, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Critical thinking skills are often not being taught or used in classrooms. Instead, more testing has become the norm, leaving students less equipped to discern information and become well-informed, conscientious citizens. Based on research concerning the importance of critical thinking skills and professional development for teachers, this study…

  6. Comprehensive Care For Joint Replacement Model - Provider Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Model - provider data. This data set includes provider data for two quality measures tracked during an episode of care:...

  7. Assessment of Stirling Technology Has Provided Critical Data Leading Toward Flight Readiness of the Stirling Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Lanny G.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is supporting the development of a Stirling converter with the Department of Energy (DOE, Germantown, Maryland) for an advanced Stirling Radioisotope Power System (SRPS) to provide spacecraft onboard electric power for NASA space science missions. A key technology assessment completed by Glenn and DOE has led to the SRPS being identified as a high-efficiency power source for such deep space missions as the Europa Orbiter and the Solar Probe. In addition, the Stirling system is now being considered for unmanned Mars rovers, especially where mission profiles may exclude the use of photovoltaic power systems, such as exploration at high Martian latitudes or for missions of long duration. The SRPS efficiency of over 20 percent will reduce the required amount of radioisotope by more than a factor of 3 in comparison to current radioisotope thermoelectric generators. This significantly reduces radioisotope cost, radiological inventory, and system cost, and it provides efficient use of scarce radioisotope resources. In support of this technology assessment, Glenn conducted a series of independent evaluations and tests to determine the technology readiness of a 55-We Stirling converter developed by Stirling Technology Company (Kennewick, Washington) and DOE. Key areas evaluated by Glenn included: 1) Radiation tolerance of materials; 2) Random vibration testing of the Stirling converter in Glenn's Structural Dynamics Lab to simulate operation in the launch environment; 3) Electromagnetic interference and compatibility (EMI/EMC) of the converter operating in Glenn's EMI lab; Independent failure modes, effects, and criticality analysis, and life and reliability 4. Independent failure modes, effects, and criticality analysis, and life and reliability assessment; and 5) SRPS cost estimate. The data from these evaluations were presented to NASA Headquarters and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory mission office by a joint industry/Government team

  8. Teaching for Art Criticism: Incorporating Feldman's Critical Analysis Learning Model in Students' Studio Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Maithreyi; Hanafi, Jaffri; Putih, Abu Talib

    2016-01-01

    This study adopted 30 first year graphic design students' artwork, with critical analysis using Feldman's model of art criticism. Data were analyzed quantitatively; descriptive statistical techniques were employed. The scores were viewed in the form of mean score and frequencies to determine students' performances in their critical ability.…

  9. Customer-Provider Strategic Alignment: A Maturity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luftman, Jerry; Brown, Carol V.; Balaji, S.

    This chapter presents a new model for assessing the maturity of a ­customer-provider relationship from a collaborative service delivery perspective: the Customer-Provider Strategic Alignment Maturity (CPSAM) Model. This model builds on recent research for effectively managing the customer-provider relationship in IT service outsourcing contexts and a validated model for assessing alignment across internal IT service units and their business customers within the same organization. After reviewing relevant literature by service science and information systems researchers, the six overarching components of the maturity model are presented: value measurements, governance, partnership, communications, human resources and skills, and scope and architecture. A key assumption of the model is that all of the components need be addressed to assess and improve customer-provider alignment. Examples of specific metrics for measuring the maturity level of each component over the five levels of maturity are also presented.

  10. Modern statistical models for forensic fingerprint examinations: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Joshua; Champod, Christophe; Lennard, Chris; Roux, Claude

    2013-10-10

    Over the last decade, the development of statistical models in support of forensic fingerprint identification has been the subject of increasing research attention, spurned on recently by commentators who claim that the scientific basis for fingerprint identification has not been adequately demonstrated. Such models are increasingly seen as useful tools in support of the fingerprint identification process within or in addition to the ACE-V framework. This paper provides a critical review of recent statistical models from both a practical and theoretical perspective. This includes analysis of models of two different methodologies: Probability of Random Correspondence (PRC) models that focus on calculating probabilities of the occurrence of fingerprint configurations for a given population, and Likelihood Ratio (LR) models which use analysis of corresponding features of fingerprints to derive a likelihood value representing the evidential weighting for a potential source.

  11. IEEE 802.15.4 Frame Aggregation Enhancement to Provide High Performance in Life-Critical Patient Monitoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Muhammad Sajjad; Yu, Hongnian; Cang, Shuang

    2017-01-28

    In wireless body area sensor networks (WBASNs), Quality of Service (QoS) provision for patient monitoring systems in terms of time-critical deadlines, high throughput and energy efficiency is a challenging task. The periodic data from these systems generates a large number of small packets in a short time period which needs an efficient channel access mechanism. The IEEE 802.15.4 standard is recommended for low power devices and widely used for many wireless sensor networks applications. It provides a hybrid channel access mechanism at the Media Access Control (MAC) layer which plays a key role in overall successful transmission in WBASNs. There are many WBASN's MAC protocols that use this hybrid channel access mechanism in variety of sensor applications. However, these protocols are less efficient for patient monitoring systems where life critical data requires limited delay, high throughput and energy efficient communication simultaneously. To address these issues, this paper proposes a frame aggregation scheme by using the aggregated-MAC protocol data unit (A-MPDU) which works with the IEEE 802.15.4 MAC layer. To implement the scheme accurately, we develop a traffic patterns analysis mechanism to understand the requirements of the sensor nodes in patient monitoring systems, then model the channel access to find the performance gap on the basis of obtained requirements, finally propose the design based on the needs of patient monitoring systems. The mechanism is initially verified using numerical modelling and then simulation is conducted using NS2.29, Castalia 3.2 and OMNeT++. The proposed scheme provides the optimal performance considering the required QoS.

  12. Critical thinking in clinical nurse education: application of Paul's model of critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrea Sullivan, E

    2012-11-01

    Nurse educators recognize that many nursing students have difficulty in making decisions in clinical practice. The ability to make effective, informed decisions in clinical practice requires that nursing students know and apply the processes of critical thinking. Critical thinking is a skill that develops over time and requires the conscious application of this process. There are a number of models in the nursing literature to assist students in the critical thinking process; however, these models tend to focus solely on decision making in hospital settings and are often complex to actualize. In this paper, Paul's Model of Critical Thinking is examined for its application to nursing education. I will demonstrate how the model can be used by clinical nurse educators to assist students to develop critical thinking skills in all health care settings in a way that makes critical thinking skills accessible to students.

  13. Critical Behavior of the Widom-Rowlinson Lattice Model

    CERN Document Server

    Dickman, R; Dickman, Ronald; Stell, George

    1995-01-01

    We report extensive Monte Carlo simulations of the Widom-Rowlinson lattice model in two and three dimensions. Our results yield precise values for the critical activities and densities, and clearly place the critical behavior in the Ising universality class.

  14. Models, measurement, and strategies in developing critical-thinking skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunt, Barbara A

    2005-01-01

    Health care professionals must use critical-thinking skills to solve increasingly complex problems. Educators need to help nurses develop their critical-thinking skills to maintain and enhance their competence. This article reviews various models of critical thinking, as well as methods used to evaluate critical thinking. Specific educational strategies to develop nurses' critical-thinking skills are discussed. Additional research studies are needed to determine how the process of nursing practice can nurture and develop critical-thinking skills, and which strategies are most effective in developing and evaluating critical thinking.

  15. A Model for Teaching Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Marnice K.

    2013-01-01

    In an age in which information is available almost instantly and in quantities unimagined just a few decades ago, most educators would agree that teaching adult learners to think critically about what they are reading, seeing, and hearing has never been more important. But just what is critical thinking? Do adult learners agree with educators that…

  16. Toward Developing Genetic Algorithms to Aid in Critical Infrastructure Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2007-05-01

    Today’s society relies upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, telecommunication, financial and energy. Understanding these interdependencies is necessary in order to protect our critical infrastructure. The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System, CIMS©, examines the interrelationships between infrastructure networks. CIMS© development is sponsored by the National Security Division at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in its ongoing mission for providing critical infrastructure protection and preparedness. A genetic algorithm (GA) is an optimization technique based on Darwin’s theory of evolution. A GA can be coupled with CIMS© to search for optimum ways to protect infrastructure assets. This includes identifying optimum assets to enforce or protect, testing the addition of or change to infrastructure before implementation, or finding the optimum response to an emergency for response planning. This paper describes the addition of a GA to infrastructure modeling for infrastructure planning. It first introduces the CIMS© infrastructure modeling software used as the modeling engine to support the GA. Next, the GA techniques and parameters are defined. Then a test scenario illustrates the integration with CIMS© and the preliminary results.

  17. A critical appraisal of Markov state models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütte, Ch.; Sarich, M.

    2015-09-01

    Markov State Modelling as a concept for a coarse grained description of the essential kinetics of a molecular system in equilibrium has gained a lot of attention recently. The last 10 years have seen an ever increasing publication activity on how to construct Markov State Models (MSMs) for very different molecular systems ranging from peptides to proteins, from RNA to DNA, and via molecular sensors to molecular aggregation. Simultaneously the accompanying theory behind MSM building and approximation quality has been developed well beyond the concepts and ideas used in practical applications. This article reviews the main theoretical results, provides links to crucial new developments, outlines the full power of MSM building today, and discusses the essential limitations still to overcome.

  18. A Workforce Design Model: Providing Energy to Organizations in Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halm, Barry J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the change in performance realized by a professional services organization, which resulted in the Life Giving Workforce Design (LGWD) model through a grounded theory research design. This study produced a workforce design model characterized as an organizational blueprint that provides virtuous…

  19. Geobiology of the Critical Zone: the Hierarchies of Process, Form and Life provide an Integrated Ontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotterill, Fenton P. D.

    2016-04-01

    Press). Equally, Africa's freshwater fish fauna stands apart in its high endemism, preponderance of highly specialized species flocks, and ancient lineages that have seeded recent radiations (Otero O 2010. Cybium 2010, 34(1): 93-113). Nevertheless, Africa's fossil record - botanical and zoological - is too patchy and incomplete to build palaeoenvironmental narratives with the precision needed to resolve details of mesoscale events in landscape dynamics (especially at timescales >10 000 yr). Ideally, the biological evidence we seek to resolve a high fidelity narrative of landscape dynamics must extend back into the Cenozoic, and quantify turnovers of individual species on respective landforms. Births, deaths and tenures of species are its core currencies. The genomic record holds this evidence in its evolutionary archives, and we can read these signatures in the DNA of living organisms. This interdisciplinary approach exploits patterns of DNA variation in living organisms to reconstruct evolutionary events in landscape history at the mesoscale. Coupling the technological advances in 21st century molecular biology (especially genomics) with key tenets of ecological theory, we can exploit the remarkable variety of evolutionary signals preserved in the extant biodiversity of a landscape. Deciphering the genomic record, Geoecodynamics exploits the fidelity of individual species to their respective habitats; where the biota has persisted within/on encompassing landforms. This spatial resolution is determined principally by the degree of niche conservatism that has acted to lock the species into finite ecophysiological boundaries in the landscape. These ecophysiological envelopes of species can be mapped and modelled in a GIS framework, using variables familiar to geomorphologists: including altitude, surface roughness, lithology, and especially drainage attributes (stream topology and limnological variables). Geoecodynamics studies terrestrial and aquatic species as

  20. Self-Organized Criticality in a Random Network Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nirei, Makoto

    1998-01-01

    A new model of self-organized criticality is defined by incorporating a random network model in order to explain endogenous complex fluctuations of economic aggregates. The model can feature many globally interactive systems such as economies or societies.

  1. A critical review of {sup 55}Fe dosimetric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thind, K.S. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Whitby, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-01-01

    The available literature on {sup 55}Fe dosimetry has been devoted to environmental exposures and medical iron kinetic studies. For occupational dosimetry, ICRP published a non-recycling dosimetric model for iron. These ICRP publications do not provide information on iron excretion. Johnson and Dunford published dose conversion factors and urinary excretion curves based on the ICRP and MIRD iron metabolic models. A critical review of these models was undertaken to select a model for occupational dose assignment. The review indicated that the information and recommendations in ICRP and Johnson and Dunford are dependent on unrealistic assumptions that do not agree with known iron metabolism. Therefore, an alternative model is proposed for dosimetric application. Calculations of dose conversion factors and urinary excretion curve for class W{sup 55}Fe inhalation exposure (1 {mu}m AMAD) using the proposed model are compared with predictions based on ICRP and Johnson and Dunford models. The difference in the practical outcome (i.e., dose assignment) is examined by applying the proposed and reviewed models to a realistic bioassay case. The Johnson and Dunford model yields a dose estimate which is roughly a factor of ten higher than values predicted by ICRP and the proposed model. Some of the disagreement is due to uncertainty in the fraction of radio-iron excretion via urine. Further research on this subject is recommended. In the interim, the proposed model is recommended for occupational dose assignment. 31 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Teaching For Art Criticism: Incorporating Feldman’s Critical Analysis Learning Model In Students’ Studio Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maithreyi Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study adopted 30 first year graphic design students’ artwork, with critical analysis using Feldman’s model of art criticism. Data were analyzed quantitatively; descriptive statistical techniques were employed. The scores were viewed in the form of mean score and frequencies to determine students’ performances in their critical ability. Pearson Correlation Coefficient was used to find out the correlation between students’ studio practice and art critical ability scores. The findings showed most students performed slightly better than average in the critical analyses and performed best in selecting analysis among the four dimensions assessed. In the context of the students’ studio practice and critical ability, findings showed there are some connections between the students’ art critical ability and studio practice.

  3. Bring Your Own Device - Providing Reliable Model of Data Access

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stąpór Paweł

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a model of Bring Your Own Device (BYOD as a model network, which provides the user reliable access to network resources. BYOD is a model dynamically developing, which can be applied in many areas. Research network has been launched in order to carry out the test, in which as a service of BYOD model Work Folders service was used. This service allows the user to synchronize files between the device and the server. An access to the network is completed through the wireless communication by the 802.11n standard. Obtained results are shown and analyzed in this article.

  4. Critical Exponents in Percolation Model of Track Region Critical Exponents in Percolation Model of Track Region Critical Exponents in Percolation Model of Track Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. Demchyshyn

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Differences between critical exponents of this model and the continuous percolation model indicate that the dependence of the modified structure area on the dose and the angle related with the correlation between individual tracks. It results in next effect: angular dependence of the surface area of the branched structure has maximum value at certain «critical» angle of ions incidence. Differences between critical exponents of this model and the continuous percolation model indicate that the dependence of the modified structure area on the dose and the angle related with the correlation between individual tracks. It results in next effect: angular dependence of the surface area of the branched structure has maximum value at certain «critical» angle of ions incidence. Differences between critical exponents of this model and the continuous percolation model indicate that the dependence of the modified structure area on the dose and the angle related with the correlation between individual tracks. It results in next effect: angular dependence of the surface area of the branched structure has maximum value at certain «critical» angle of ions incidence.

  5. Trust Your Cloud Service Provider: User Based Crypto Model. Sitanaboina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Lakshmi Parvathi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Data Storage as a Service (STaaS cloud computing environment, the equipment used for business operations can be leased from a single service provider along with the application, and the related business data can be stored on equipment provided by the same service provider. This type of arrangement can help a company save on hardware and software infrastructure costs, but storing the company’s data on the service provider’s equipment raises the possibility that important business information may be improperly disclosed to others [1]. Some researchers have suggested that user data stored on a service-provider’s equipment must be encrypted [2]. Encrypting data prior to storage is a common method of data protection, and service providers may be able to build firewalls to ensure that the decryption keys associated with encrypted user data are not disclosed to outsiders. However, if the decryption key and the encrypted data are held by the same service provider, it raises the possibility that high-level administrators within the service provider would have access to both the decryption key and the encrypted data, thus presenting a risk for the unauthorized disclosure of the user data. we in this paper provides an unique business model of cryptography where crypto keys are distributed across the user and the trusted third party(TTP with adoption of such a model mainly the CSP insider attack an form of misuse of valuable user data can be treated secured.

  6. Chemical elemental distribution and soil DNA fingerprints provide the critical evidence in murder case investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concheri, Giuseppe; Bertoldi, Daniela; Polone, Elisa; Otto, Stefan; Larcher, Roberto; Squartini, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The scientific contribution to the solution of crime cases, or throughout the consequent forensic trials, is a crucial aspect of the justice system. The possibility to extract meaningful information from trace amounts of samples, and to match and validate evidences with robust and unambiguous statistical tests, are the key points of such process. The present report is the authorized disclosure of an investigation, carried out by Attorney General appointment, on a murder case in northern Italy, which yielded the critical supporting evidence for the judicial trial. The proportional distribution of 54 chemical elements and the bacterial community DNA fingerprints were used as signature markers to prove the similarity of two soil samples. The first soil was collected on the crime scene, along a corn field, while the second was found in trace amounts on the carpet of a car impounded from the main suspect in a distant location. The matching similarity of the two soils was proven by crossing the results of two independent techniques: a) elemental analysis via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) approaches, and b) amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis by gel electrophoresis (ARDRA). Besides introducing the novel application of these methods to forensic disciplines, the highly accurate level of resolution observed, opens new possibilities also in the fields of soil typing and tracking, historical analyses, geochemical surveys and global land mapping.

  7. Chemical elemental distribution and soil DNA fingerprints provide the critical evidence in murder case investigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Concheri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The scientific contribution to the solution of crime cases, or throughout the consequent forensic trials, is a crucial aspect of the justice system. The possibility to extract meaningful information from trace amounts of samples, and to match and validate evidences with robust and unambiguous statistical tests, are the key points of such process. The present report is the authorized disclosure of an investigation, carried out by Attorney General appointment, on a murder case in northern Italy, which yielded the critical supporting evidence for the judicial trial. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The proportional distribution of 54 chemical elements and the bacterial community DNA fingerprints were used as signature markers to prove the similarity of two soil samples. The first soil was collected on the crime scene, along a corn field, while the second was found in trace amounts on the carpet of a car impounded from the main suspect in a distant location. The matching similarity of the two soils was proven by crossing the results of two independent techniques: a elemental analysis via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS and optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES approaches, and b amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis by gel electrophoresis (ARDRA. CONCLUSIONS: Besides introducing the novel application of these methods to forensic disciplines, the highly accurate level of resolution observed, opens new possibilities also in the fields of soil typing and tracking, historical analyses, geochemical surveys and global land mapping.

  8. A Critical Information Literacy Model: Library Leadership within the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Troy

    2011-01-01

    It is a time for a new model for teaching students to find, evaluate, and use information by drawing on critical pedagogy theory in the education literature. This critical information literacy model views the information world as a dynamic place where authors create knowledge for many reasons; it seeks to understand students as information users,…

  9. Service Model for Multi-Provider IP Service Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Cheng-zhi; SONG Han-tao; LIU Li

    2005-01-01

    In order to solve the problems associated with Internet IP services management, a generic service model for multi-provider IP service management is proposed, which is based on a generalization of the bandwidth broker idea introduced in the differentiated services (DiffServ) environment. This model consists of a hierarchy of service brokers, which makes it fit into providing end-to-end Internet services with QoS support. A simple and scalable mechanism is used to communicate with other cooperative domains to enable customers to dynamically setup services connections over multiple DiffServ domains. The simulation results show that the proposed model is real-time, which can deal with many flow requests in a short period of time, so that it is fit for the service management in a reasonably large network.

  10. Critical review of glass performance modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourcier, W.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Borosilicate glass is to be used for permanent disposal of high-level nuclear waste in a geologic repository. Mechanistic chemical models are used to predict the rate at which radionuclides will be released from the glass under repository conditions. The most successful and useful of these models link reaction path geochemical modeling programs with a glass dissolution rate law that is consistent with transition state theory. These models have been used to simulate several types of short-term laboratory tests of glass dissolution and to predict the long-term performance of the glass in a repository. Although mechanistically based, the current models are limited by a lack of unambiguous experimental support for some of their assumptions. The most severe problem of this type is the lack of an existing validated mechanism that controls long-term glass dissolution rates. Current models can be improved by performing carefully designed experiments and using the experimental results to validate the rate-controlling mechanisms implicit in the models. These models should be supported with long-term experiments to be used for model validation. The mechanistic basis of the models should be explored by using modern molecular simulations such as molecular orbital and molecular dynamics to investigate both the glass structure and its dissolution process.

  11. Critical appraisal and data extraction for systematic reviews of prediction modelling studies: the CHARMS checklist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel G M Moons

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Carl Moons and colleagues provide a checklist and background explanation for critically appraising and extracting data from systematic reviews of prognostic and diagnostic prediction modelling studies. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  12. Neristatin 1 provides critical insight into bryostatin 1 structure-function relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedei, Noemi; Kraft, Matthew B; Keck, Gary E; Herald, Cherry L; Melody, Noeleen; Pettit, George R; Blumberg, Peter M

    2015-04-24

    Bryostatin 1, a complex macrocyclic lactone isolated from Bugula neritina, has been the subject of multiple clinical trials for cancer. Although it functions as an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) in vitro, bryostatin 1 paradoxically antagonizes most responses to the prototypical PKC activator, the phorbol esters. The bottom half of the bryostatin 1 structure has been shown to be sufficient to confer binding to PKC. In contrast, we have previously shown that the top half of the bryostatin 1 structure is necessary for its unique biological behavior to antagonize phorbol ester responses. Neristatin 1 comprises a top half similar to that of bryostatin 1 together with a distinct bottom half that confers PKC binding. We report here that neristatin 1 is bryostatin 1-like, not phorbol ester-like, in its biological activity on U937 promyelocytic leukemia cells. We conclude that the top half of the bryostatin 1 structure is largely sufficient for bryostatin 1-like activity, provided the molecule also possesses an appropriate PKC binding domain.

  13. Neristatin 1 Provides Critical Insight into Bryostatin 1 Structure–Function Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Bryostatin 1, a complex macrocyclic lactone isolated from Bugula neritina, has been the subject of multiple clinical trials for cancer. Although it functions as an activator of protein kinase C (PKC) in vitro, bryostatin 1 paradoxically antagonizes most responses to the prototypical PKC activator, the phorbol esters. The bottom half of the bryostatin 1 structure has been shown to be sufficient to confer binding to PKC. In contrast, we have previously shown that the top half of the bryostatin 1 structure is necessary for its unique biological behavior to antagonize phorbol ester responses. Neristatin 1 comprises a top half similar to that of bryostatin 1 together with a distinct bottom half that confers PKC binding. We report here that neristatin 1 is bryostatin 1-like, not phorbol ester-like, in its biological activity on U937 promyelocytic leukemia cells. We conclude that the top half of the bryostatin 1 structure is largely sufficient for bryostatin 1-like activity, provided the molecule also possesses an appropriate PKC binding domain. PMID:25808573

  14. Model of Providing Assistive Technologies in Special Education Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lersilp, Suchitporn; Putthinoi, Supawadee; Chakpitak, Nopasit

    2015-05-14

    Most students diagnosed with disabilities in Thai special education schools received assistive technologies, but this did not guarantee the greatest benefits. The purpose of this study was to survey the provision, use and needs of assistive technologies, as well as the perspectives of key informants regarding a model of providing them in special education schools. The participants were selected by the purposive sampling method, and they comprised 120 students with visual, physical, hearing or intellectual disabilities from four special education schools in Chiang Mai, Thailand; and 24 key informants such as parents or caregivers, teachers, school principals and school therapists. The instruments consisted of an assistive technology checklist and a semi-structured interview. Results showed that a category of assistive technologies was provided for students with disabilities, with the highest being "services", followed by "media" and then "facilities". Furthermore, mostly students with physical disabilities were provided with assistive technologies, but those with visual disabilities needed it more. Finally, the model of providing assistive technologies was composed of 5 components: Collaboration; Holistic perspective; Independent management of schools; Learning systems and a production manual for users; and Development of an assistive technology center, driven by 3 major sources such as Government and Private organizations, and Schools.

  15. A Model for Critical Games Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apperley, Tom; Beavis, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This article outlines a model for teaching both computer games and videogames in the classroom for teachers. The model illustrates the connections between in-game actions and youth gaming culture. The article explains how the out-of-school knowledge building, creation and collaboration that occurs in gaming and gaming culture has an impact on…

  16. Critical behaviors near the (tri-)critical end point of QCD within the NJL model

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Ya; Cui, Zhu-Fang; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its restoration at finite density and temperature within the two-flavor Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model, and mainly focus on the critical behaviors near the critical end point (CEP) and tricritical point (TCP) of QCD. The co-existence region of the Wigner and Nambu phase is determined in the phase diagram for the massive and massless current quark, respectively. We use the various susceptibilities to locate the CEP/TCP and then extract the critical exponents near them. Our calculations reveal that the various susceptibilities share the same critical behaviors for the physical current quark mass, while they show different features in the chiral limit. Furthermore the critical exponent of order parameter at the TCP, $\\beta$=1/4, differs from that on the $O(4)$ line, $\\beta$=1/2, which indicates a change in the universality class.

  17. Modelling catchment areas for secondary care providers: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Simon; Wardlaw, Jessica; Crouch, Susan; Carolan, Michelle

    2011-09-01

    Hospitals need to understand patient flows in an increasingly competitive health economy. New initiatives like Patient Choice and the Darzi Review further increase this demand. Essential to understanding patient flows are demographic and geographic profiles of health care service providers, known as 'catchment areas' and 'catchment populations'. This information helps Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) to review how their populations are accessing services, measure inequalities and commission services; likewise it assists Secondary Care Providers (SCPs) to measure and assess potential gains in market share, redesign services, evaluate admission thresholds and plan financial budgets. Unlike PCTs, SCPs do not operate within fixed geographic boundaries. Traditionally, SCPs have used administrative boundaries or arbitrary drive times to model catchment areas. Neither approach satisfactorily represents current patient flows. Furthermore, these techniques are time-consuming and can be challenging for healthcare managers to exploit. This paper presents three different approaches to define catchment areas, each more detailed than the previous method. The first approach 'First Past the Post' defines catchment areas by allocating a dominant SCP to each Census Output Area (OA). The SCP with the highest proportion of activity within each OA is considered the dominant SCP. The second approach 'Proportional Flow' allocates activity proportionally to each OA. This approach allows for cross-boundary flows to be captured in a catchment area. The third and final approach uses a gravity model to define a catchment area, which incorporates drive or travel time into the analysis. Comparing approaches helps healthcare providers to understand whether using more traditional and simplistic approaches to define catchment areas and populations achieves the same or similar results as complex mathematical modelling. This paper has demonstrated, using a case study of Manchester, that when estimating

  18. An analytic model with critical behavior in black hole formation

    CERN Document Server

    Koike, T; Koike, Tatsuhiko; Mishima, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    A simple analytic model is presented which exhibits a critical behavior in black hole formation, namely, collapse of a thin shell coupled with outgoing null fluid. It is seen that the critical behavior is caused by the gravitational nonlinearity near the event horizon. We calculate the value of the critical exponent analytically and find that it is very dependent on the coupling constants of the system.

  19. Software reliability models for critical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, H.; Pham, M.

    1991-12-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the ongoing EG&G Idaho, Inc. Software Reliability Research Program. The program is studying the existing software reliability models and proposes a state-of-the-art software reliability model that is relevant to the nuclear reactor control environment. This report consists of three parts: (1) summaries of the literature review of existing software reliability and fault tolerant software reliability models and their related issues, (2) proposed technique for software reliability enhancement, and (3) general discussion and future research. The development of this proposed state-of-the-art software reliability model will be performed in the second place. 407 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Software reliability models for critical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, H.; Pham, M.

    1991-12-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase of the ongoing EG G Idaho, Inc. Software Reliability Research Program. The program is studying the existing software reliability models and proposes a state-of-the-art software reliability model that is relevant to the nuclear reactor control environment. This report consists of three parts: (1) summaries of the literature review of existing software reliability and fault tolerant software reliability models and their related issues, (2) proposed technique for software reliability enhancement, and (3) general discussion and future research. The development of this proposed state-of-the-art software reliability model will be performed in the second place. 407 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Critical exponents of O(N) models in fractional dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Codello, A; D'Odorico, G

    2014-01-01

    We compute critical exponents of O(N) models in fractal dimensions between two and four, and for continuos values of the number of field components N, in this way completing the RG classification of universality classes for these models. In d=2 the N-dependence of the correlation length critical exponent gives us the last piece of information needed to establish a RG derivation of the Mermin-Wagner theorem. We also report critical exponents for multi-critical universality classes in the cases N>1 and N=0. Finally, in the large-N limit our critical exponents correctly approach those of the spherical model, allowing us to set N~100 as threshold for the quantitative validity of leading order large-N estimates.

  2. A Conceptual Model for Teaching Critical Thinking in a Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Clifton

    2011-01-01

    Critical thinking, viewed as rational and analytic thinking, is crucial for participation in a knowledge economy and society. This article provides a brief presentation of the importance of teaching critical thinking in a knowledge economy; suggests a conceptual model for teaching thinking; examines research on the historical role of teachers in…

  3. CRITICAL ANALYSIS OF EVALUATION MODEL LOMCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Bernal Agudo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation model that the LOMCE projects sinks its roots into the neoliberal beliefs, reflecting a specific way of understanding the world. What matters is not the process but the results, being the evaluation the center of the education-learning processes. It presents an evil planning, since the theory that justifies the model doesn’t specify upon coherent proposals, where there is an excessive worry for excellence and diversity is left out. A comprehensive way of understanding education should be recovered.

  4. Provider practice models in ambulatory oncology practice: analysis of productivity, revenue, and provider and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buswell, Lori A; Ponte, Patricia Reid; Shulman, Lawrence N

    2009-07-01

    Physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants often work in teams to deliver cancer care in ambulatory oncology practices. This is likely to become more prevalent as the demand for oncology services rises, and the number of providers increases only slightly.

  5. Critical exponents of a three dimensional O(4) spin model

    CERN Document Server

    Kanaya, K; Kanaya, K; Kaya, S

    1995-01-01

    By Monte Carlo simulation we study the critical exponents governing the transition of the three-dimensional classical O(4) Heisenberg model, which is considered to be in the same universality class as the finite-temperature QCD with massless two flavors. We use the single cluster algorithm and the histogram reweighting technique to obtain observables at the critical temperature. After estimating an accurate value of the inverse critical temperature \\Kc=0.9360(1) we make non-perturbative estimates for various critical exponents by finite-size scaling analysis. They are in excellent agreement with those obtained with the 4-\\epsilon expansion method with errors reduced to about halves of them.

  6. Wess-Zumino-Witten model off criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Cabra, D C

    1994-01-01

    We study the renormalization group flow properties of the Wess-Zumino-Witten model in the region of couplings between $g^2=0$ and $g^2=4\\pi/k$, by evaluating the two-loop Zamolodchikov's $c$-function. We also discuss the region of negative couplings.

  7. Critical state soil constitutive model for methane hydrate soil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S. Uchida; K. Soga; K. Yamamoto

    2012-01-01

      This paper presents a new constitutive model that simulates the mechanical behavior of methane hydrate-bearing soil based on the concept of critical state soil mechanics, referred to as the Methane...

  8. Competition-Induced Criticality in a Model of Meme Popularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, James P.; Ward, Jonathan A.; O'Sullivan, Kevin P.; Lee, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity occur naturally in a model of meme diffusion on social networks. Competition between multiple memes for the limited resource of user attention is identified as the mechanism that poises the system at criticality. The popularity growth of each meme is described by a critical branching process, and asymptotic analysis predicts power-law distributions of popularity with very heavy tails (exponent α <2, unlike preferential-attachment models), similar to those seen in empirical data.

  9. Competition-induced criticality in a model of meme popularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, James P; Ward, Jonathan A; O'Sullivan, Kevin P; Lee, William T

    2014-01-31

    Heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity occur naturally in a model of meme diffusion on social networks. Competition between multiple memes for the limited resource of user attention is identified as the mechanism that poises the system at criticality. The popularity growth of each meme is described by a critical branching process, and asymptotic analysis predicts power-law distributions of popularity with very heavy tails (exponent α<2, unlike preferential-attachment models), similar to those seen in empirical data.

  10. Fractal dimension of critical clusters in the Φ44 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, K.; Lang, C. B.

    1991-06-01

    We study the d=4 O(4) symmetric nonlinear sigma model at the pseudocritical points for 84-284 lattices. The Fortuin-Kasteleyn-Coniglio-Klein clusters are shown to have fractal dimension df~=3-in accordance with the conjectured scaling relation involving the odd critical exponent δ. For the one cluster algorithm introduced recently by Wolff the dynamical critical exponent z comes out to be compatible with zero in this model.

  11. Competition-induced criticality in a model of meme popularity

    CERN Document Server

    Gleeson, James P; O'Sullivan, Kevin P; Lee, William T

    2013-01-01

    Heavy-tailed distributions of meme popularity occur naturally in a model of meme diffusion on social networks. Competition between multiple memes for the limited resource of user attention is identified as the mechanism that poises the system at criticality. The popularity growth of each meme is described by a critical branching process, and asymptotic analysis predicts power-law distributions of popularity with very heavy tails (exponent $\\alpha<2$, unlike preferential-attachment models), similar to those seen in empirical data.

  12. Can quantum probability provide a new direction for cognitive modeling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothos, Emmanuel M; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2013-06-01

    Classical (Bayesian) probability (CP) theory has led to an influential research tradition for modeling cognitive processes. Cognitive scientists have been trained to work with CP principles for so long that it is hard even to imagine alternative ways to formalize probabilities. However, in physics, quantum probability (QP) theory has been the dominant probabilistic approach for nearly 100 years. Could QP theory provide us with any advantages in cognitive modeling as well? Note first that both CP and QP theory share the fundamental assumption that it is possible to model cognition on the basis of formal, probabilistic principles. But why consider a QP approach? The answers are that (1) there are many well-established empirical findings (e.g., from the influential Tversky, Kahneman research tradition) that are hard to reconcile with CP principles; and (2) these same findings have natural and straightforward explanations with quantum principles. In QP theory, probabilistic assessment is often strongly context- and order-dependent, individual states can be superposition states (that are impossible to associate with specific values), and composite systems can be entangled (they cannot be decomposed into their subsystems). All these characteristics appear perplexing from a classical perspective. However, our thesis is that they provide a more accurate and powerful account of certain cognitive processes. We first introduce QP theory and illustrate its application with psychological examples. We then review empirical findings that motivate the use of quantum theory in cognitive theory, but also discuss ways in which QP and CP theories converge. Finally, we consider the implications of a QP theory approach to cognition for human rationality.

  13. Locating the quantum critical point of the Bose-Hubbard model through singularities of simple observables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łącki, Mateusz; Damski, Bogdan; Zakrzewski, Jakub

    2016-12-02

    We show that the critical point of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model can be easily found through studies of either on-site atom number fluctuations or the nearest-neighbor two-point correlation function (the expectation value of the tunnelling operator). Our strategy to locate the critical point is based on the observation that the derivatives of these observables with respect to the parameter that drives the superfluid-Mott insulator transition are singular at the critical point in the thermodynamic limit. Performing the quantum Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model, we show that this technique leads to the accurate determination of the position of its critical point. Our results can be easily extended to the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model and different Hubbard-like models. They provide a simple experimentally-relevant way of locating critical points in various cold atomic lattice systems.

  14. Governance, Government, and the Search for New Provider Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltman, Richard B; Duran, Antonio

    2015-11-03

    A central problem in designing effective models of provider governance in health systems has been to ensure an appropriate balance between the concerns of public sector and/or government decision-makers, on the one hand, and of non-governmental health services actors in civil society and private life, on the other. In tax-funded European health systems up to the 1980s, the state and other public sector decision-makers played a dominant role over health service provision, typically operating hospitals through national or regional governments on a command-and-control basis. In a number of countries, however, this state role has started to change, with governments first stepping out of direct service provision and now de facto pushed to focus more on steering provider organizations rather than on direct public management. In this new approach to provider governance, the state has pulled back into a regulatory role that introduces market-like incentives and management structures, which then apply to both public and private sector providers alike. This article examines some of the main operational complexities in implementing this new governance reality/strategy, specifically from a service provision (as opposed to mostly a financing or even regulatory) perspective. After briefly reviewing some of the key theoretical dilemmas, the paper presents two case studies where this new approach was put into practice: primary care in Sweden and hospitals in Spain. The article concludes that good governance today needs to reflect practical operational realities if it is to have the desired effect on health sector reform outcome.

  15. Governance, Government, and the Search for New Provider Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B. Saltman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A central problem in designing effective models of provider governance in health systems has been to ensure an appropriate balance between the concerns of public sector and/or government decision-makers, on the one hand, and of non-governmental health services actors in civil society and private life, on the other. In tax-funded European health systems up to the 1980s, the state and other public sector decision-makers played a dominant role over health service provision, typically operating hospitals through national or regional governments on a command-and-control basis. In a number of countries, however, this state role has started to change, with governments first stepping out of direct service provision and now de facto pushed to focus more on steering provider organizations rather than on direct public management. In this new approach to provider governance, the state has pulled back into a regulatory role that introduces market-like incentives and management structures, which then apply to both public and private sector providers alike. This article examines some of the main operational complexities in implementing this new governance reality/strategy, specifically from a service provision (as opposed to mostly a financing or even regulatory perspective. After briefly reviewing some of the key theoretical dilemmas, the paper presents two case studies where this new approach was put into practice: primary care in Sweden and hospitals in Spain. The article concludes that good governance today needs to reflect practical operational realities if it is to have the desired effect on health sector reform outcome.

  16. Providing surgical care in Somalia: A model of task shifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ford Nathan P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somalia is one of the most political unstable countries in the world. Ongoing insecurity has forced an inconsistent medical response by the international community, with little data collection. This paper describes the "remote" model of surgical care by Medecins Sans Frontieres, in Guri-El, Somalia. The challenges of providing the necessary prerequisites for safe surgery are discussed as well as the successes and limitations of task shifting in this resource-limited context. Methods In January 2006, MSF opened a project in Guri-El located between Mogadishu and Galcayo. The objectives were to reduce mortality due to complications of pregnancy and childbirth and from violent and non-violent trauma. At the start of the program, expatriate surgeons and anesthesiologists established safe surgical practices and performed surgical procedures. After January 2008, expatriates were evacuated due to insecurity and surgical care has been provided by local Somalian doctors and nurses with periodic supervisory visits from expatriate staff. Results Between October 2006 and December 2009, 2086 operations were performed on 1602 patients. The majority (1049, 65% were male and the median age was 22 (interquartile range, 17-30. 1460 (70% of interventions were emergent. Trauma accounted for 76% (1585 of all surgical pathology; gunshot wounds accounted for 89% (584 of violent injuries. Operative mortality (0.5% of all surgical interventions was not higher when Somalian staff provided care compared to when expatriate surgeons and anesthesiologists. Conclusions The delivery of surgical care in any conflict-settings is difficult, but in situations where international support is limited, the challenges are more extreme. In this model, task shifting, or the provision of services by less trained cadres, was utilized and peri-operative mortality remained low demonstrating that safe surgical practices can be accomplished even without the presence of fully

  17. Some thoughts on providing effective mental health critical care for police departments after Line-of-Duty Deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jeffrey T; Levenson, Richard L

    2006-01-01

    There is no more stressful or emotionally painful event in the professional lives of police officers than a fellow officer's Line-of-Duty Death (LODD). In response to a LODD, crisis teams must apply Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) techniques in a systematic, organized, and responsible manner. Newly formed crisis teams are particularly vulnerable to choosing inappropriate tactics in complex situations. This article provides a strategic framework within which teams can work with police departments after a LODD. It includes cautionary information in connection with problematic situations and mistakes that can occur. Special modifications to the LODD debriefing process are recommended.

  18. Towards a realistic interpretation of quantum physics providing a physical model of the natural world

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    It is stressed the advantage of a realistic interpretation of quantum mechanics providing a physical model of the quantum world. After some critical comments on the most popular interpretations, the difficulties for a model are pointed out and possible solutions proposed. In particular the existence of discrete states, the quantum jumps, the alleged lack of objective properties, measurement theory, the probabilistic character of quantum physics, the wave-particle duality and the Bell inequalities are commented. It is conjectured that an intuitive picture of the quantum world could be obtained compatible with the quantum predictions for actual experiments, although maybe incompatible with alleged predictions for ideal, unrealizable, experiments.

  19. Modified Critical State Two-Surface Plasticity Model for Sands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Kris Wessel; Nielsen, Søren Kjær; Shajarati, Amir

    This article describes the outline of a numerical integration scheme for a critical state two-surface plasticity model for sands. The model is slightly modified by LeBlanc (2008) compared to the original formulation presented by Manzari and Dafalias (1997) and has the ability to correctly model...... calculations can be performed with the Forward Euler integration scheme. Furthermore, the model is formulated for a single point....

  20. Critical quasiparticles in single-impurity and lattice Kondo models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojta, M.; Bulla, R.; Wölfle, P.

    2015-07-01

    Quantum criticality in systems of local moments interacting with itinerant electrons has become an important and diverse field of research. Here we review recent results which concern (a) quantum phase transitions in single-impurity Kondo and Anderson models and (b) quantum phase transitions in heavy-fermion lattice models which involve critical quasiparticles. For (a) the focus will be on impurity models with a pseudogapped host density of states and their applications, e.g., in graphene and other Dirac materials, while (b) is devoted to strong-coupling behavior near antiferromagnetic quantum phase transitions, with potential applications in a variety of heavy-fermion metals.

  1. Critical Behaviour of the Gaussian Model on Sierpinski Carpets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林振权; 孔祥木

    2001-01-01

    The Gaussian model on Sierpinski carpets with two types of nearest neighbour interactions K and Kw and two corresponding types of the Gaussian distribution constants b and bw is constructed by generalizing that on a translationally invariant square lattice. The critical behaviours are studied by the renormalization-group approach and spin rescaling method. They are found to be quite different from that on a translationally invariant square lattice. There are two critical points at (K* = b, K*w = 0) and (K* = 0, K*w = bw), and the correlation length critical exponents are calculated.

  2. Critical fluctuations for quantum mean-field models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fannes, M.; Kossakowski, A.; Verbeure, A. (Univ. Louvain (Belgium))

    1991-11-01

    A Ginzburg-Landau-type approximation is proposed for the local Gibbs states for quantum mean-field models that leads to the exact thermodynamics. Using this approach, the spin fluctuations are computed for some spin-1/2 models. At the critical temperature, the distribution function showing abnormal fluctuations is found explicitly.

  3. Introducing a critical dialogical model for vocational teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alvunger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose with this article is to conceptualise and present what is referred to as a critical dialogical model for vocational teacher education that takes into account the interaction between theory/research and practice/experiential knowledge. The theoretical framework for the model is based on critical hermeneutics and the methodology of dialogue seminars with the aim to promote the development of a 'critical self' among the vocational teacher students. The model enacts an interface between theory and practice where a number of processes are identified: a reflective-analogical process, a critical-analytical process and an interactive critical self-building process. In order to include a theoretical argument concerning the issue of content, the concept of 'learning capital' and its four sub-categories in terms of curricular capital, instructional capital, moral capital and venture capital is used. We point at content-related aspects of student learning and how a critical self has the potential to promote various kinds of 'capital' and capacity building that may be of importance in the future work-life of the vocational teacher student.

  4. Solitary mammals provide an animal model for autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reser, Jared Edward

    2014-02-01

    Species of solitary mammals are known to exhibit specialized, neurological adaptations that prepare them to focus working memory on food procurement and survival rather than on social interaction. Solitary and nonmonogamous mammals, which do not form strong social bonds, have been documented to exhibit behaviors and biomarkers that are similar to endophenotypes in autism. Both individuals on the autism spectrum and certain solitary mammals have been reported to be low on measures of affiliative need, bodily expressiveness, bonding and attachment, direct and shared gazing, emotional engagement, conspecific recognition, partner preference, separation distress, and social approach behavior. Solitary mammals also exhibit certain biomarkers that are characteristic of autism, including diminished oxytocin and vasopressin signaling, dysregulation of the endogenous opioid system, increased Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity to social encounters, and reduced HPA activity to separation and isolation. The extent of these similarities suggests that solitary mammals may offer a useful model of autism spectrum disorders and an opportunity for investigating genetic and epigenetic etiological factors. If the brain in autism can be shown to exhibit distinct homologous or homoplastic similarities to the brains of solitary animals, it will reveal that they may be central to the phenotype and should be targeted for further investigation. Research of the neurological, cellular, and molecular basis of these specializations in other mammals may provide insight for behavioral analysis, communication intervention, and psychopharmacology for autism.

  5. Critical incident stress debriefing: a health promotion model for workplace violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antai-Otong, D

    2001-01-01

    To view the global impact of violence as a critical incident. Published literature, author's experience. Psychiatric nurses can use the critical incident stress debriefing protocol to minimize adverse outcomes after a traumatic event. Workplace violence threatens the safety and well-being of nurses. Psychiatric nurses are more likely to encounter workplace violence than nurses in other settings and must prepare themselves using proactive health-promoting activities, for example the critical incident stress debriefing (CISD) model. This health-promotion model provides immediate emotional support and education about normal stress reactions, and may reduce the risk of chronic and disabling emotional and physical consequences.

  6. A model project for reproducible papers: critical temperature for the Ising model on a square lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Dolfi, M; Hehn, A; Imriška, J; Pakrouski, K; Rønnow, T F; Troyer, M; Zintchenko, I; Chirigati, F; Freire, J; Shasha, D

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple, yet typical simulation in statistical physics, consisting of large scale Monte Carlo simulations followed by an involved statistical analysis of the results. The purpose is to provide an example publication to explore tools for writing reproducible papers. The simulation estimates the critical temperature where the Ising model on the square lattice becomes magnetic to be Tc /J = 2.26934(6) using a finite size scaling analysis of the crossing points of Binder cumulants. We provide a virtual machine which can be used to reproduce all figures and results.

  7. Nonequilibrium critical dynamics of two dimensional interacting monomer-dimer model: non-Ising criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Keekwon; Kim, Bongsoo; Jong Lee, Sung

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the nonequilibrium relaxation dynamics of an interacting monomer-dimer model with nearest neighbor repulsion on a square lattice, which possesses two symmetric absorbing states. The model is known to exhibit two nearby continuous transitions: the Z2 symmetry-breaking order-disorder transition and the absorbing transition with directed percolation criticality. We performed a more detailed analysis of our extensive simulations on bigger lattice systems which reaffirms that the symmetry-breaking transition exhibits a non-Ising critical behavior with β ≃ 0.149(2) and η ≃ 0.30(1) that are distinct from those values of a pure two dimensional Ising model. Finite size scaling of dimer density near the symmetry breaking transition gives logarithmic scaling (α = 0.0) which is consistent with the hyperscaling relation but the corresponding exponent of νB ≃ 1.37(2) exhibits a conspicuous deviation from the pure Ising value of 1. The value of dynamic critical exponent z, however, is found to be close to that of the kinetic Ising model as 1/z ≃ 0.466(5) from the relaxation of staggered magnetization (and also similar but slightly smaller values from coarsening).

  8. Critical-like behavior in a lattice gas model

    CERN Document Server

    Wieloch, A; Lukasik, J; Pawlowski, P; Pietrzak, T; Trautmann, W

    2010-01-01

    ALADIN multifragmentation data show features characteristic of a critical behavior, which are very well reproduced by a bond percolation model. This suggests, in the context of the lattice gas model, that fragments are formed at nearly normal nuclear densities and temperatures corresponding to the Kertesz line. Calculations performed with a lattice gas model have shown that similarly good reproduction of the data can also be achieved at lower densities, particularly in the liquid-gas coexistence region.

  9. OBESITY AND CRITICAL ILLNESS: INSIGHTS FROM ANIMAL MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittwede, Peter N; Clemmer, John S; Bergin, Patrick F; Xiang, Lusha

    2016-04-01

    Critical illness is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. While obesity is often detrimental in the context of trauma, it is paradoxically associated with improved outcomes in some septic patients. The reasons for these disparate outcomes are not well understood. A number of animal models have been used to study the obese response to various forms of critical illness. Just as there have been many animal models that have attempted to mimic clinical conditions, there are many clinical scenarios that can occur in the highly heterogeneous critically ill patient population that occupies hospitals and intensive care units. This poses a formidable challenge for clinicians and researchers attempting to understand the mechanisms of disease and develop appropriate therapies and treatment algorithms for specific subsets of patients, including the obese. The development of new, and the modification of existing animal models, is important in order to bring effective treatments to a wide range of patients. Not only do experimental variables need to be matched as closely as possible to clinical scenarios, but animal models with pre-existing comorbid conditions need to be studied. This review briefly summarizes animal models of hemorrhage, blunt trauma, traumatic brain injury, and sepsis. It also discusses what has been learned through the use of obese models to study the pathophysiology of critical illness in light of what has been demonstrated in the clinical literature.

  10. Do Lumped-Parameter Models Provide the Correct Geometrical Damping?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    This paper concerns the formulation of lumped-parameter models for rigid footings on homogenous or stratified soil. Such models only contain a few degrees of freedom, which makes them ideal for inclusion in aero-elastic codes for wind turbines and other models applied to fast evaluation of struct......This paper concerns the formulation of lumped-parameter models for rigid footings on homogenous or stratified soil. Such models only contain a few degrees of freedom, which makes them ideal for inclusion in aero-elastic codes for wind turbines and other models applied to fast evaluation...... response during excitation and the geometrical damping related to free vibrations of a hexagonal footing. The optimal order of a lumped-parameter model is determined for each degree of freedom, i.e. horizontal and vertical translation as well as torsion and rocking. In particular, the necessity of coupling...... between horizontal sliding and rocking is discussed....

  11. A Direct Calculation of Critical Exponents of Two-Dimensional Anisotropic Ising Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Gang; WANG Xiang-Rong

    2006-01-01

    Using an exact solution of the one-dimensional quantum transverse-field Ising model, we calculate the critical exponents of the two-dimensional anisotropic classicalIsing model (IM). We verify that the exponents are the same as those of isotropic classical IM. Our approach provides an alternative means of obtaining and verifying these well-known results.

  12. A model of cell biological signaling predicts a phase transition of signaling and provides mathematical formulae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruyama, Tatsuaki

    2014-01-01

    A biological signal is transmitted by interactions between signaling molecules in the cell. To date, there have been extensive studies regarding signaling pathways using numerical simulation of kinetic equations that are based on equations of continuity and Fick's law. To obtain a mathematical formulation of cell signaling, we propose a stability kinetic model of cell biological signaling of a simple two-parameter model based on the kinetics of the diffusion-limiting step. In the present model, the signaling is regulated by the binding of a cofactor, such as ATP. Non-linearity of the kinetics is given by the diffusion fluctuation in the interaction between signaling molecules, which is different from previous works that hypothesized autocatalytic reactions. Numerical simulations showed the presence of a critical concentration of the cofactor beyond which the cell signaling molecule concentration is altered in a chaos-like oscillation with frequency, which is similar to a discontinuous phase transition in physics. Notably, we found that the frequency is given by the logarithm function of the difference of the outside cofactor concentration from the critical concentration. This implies that the outside alteration of the cofactor concentration is transformed into the oscillatory alteration of cell inner signaling. Further, mathematical stability kinetic analysis predicted a discontinuous dynamic phase transition in the critical state at which the cofactor concentration is equivalent to the critical concentration. In conclusion, the present model illustrates a unique feature of cell signaling, and the stability analysis may provide an analytical framework of the cell signaling system and a novel formulation of biological signaling.

  13. A Modified Critical State Two-surface Plasticity Model for Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakmar, Christian LeBlanc; Hededal, O.; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    This paper provides background information and documentation for the implementation of a robust plasticity model as a user-subroutine in the commercial finite difference code, FLAC3D by Itasca. The plasticity model presented is equal to the 3 dimensional critical state two-surface plasticity model...... for sands by Manzari et al., but uses a modified multi-axial surface formulation based on a versatile shape function prescribing a family of smooth and convex contours in the π-plane. The model is formulated within the framework of critical state soil mechanics and is capable of accurately simulating...

  14. Sharp critical behavior for pinning model in random correlated environment

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Quentin

    2011-01-01

    This article investigates the effect for random pinning models of long range power-law decaying correlations in the environment. For a particular type of environment based on a renewal construction, we are able to sharply describe the phase transition from the delocalized phase to the localized one, giving the critical exponent for the (quenched) free-energy, and proving that at the critical point the trajectories are fully delocalized. These results contrast with what happens both for the pure model (i.e. without disorder) and for the widely studied case of i.i.d. disorder, where the relevance or irrelevance of disorder on the critical properties is decided via the so-called Harris Criterion.

  15. Do Lumped-Parameter Models Provide the Correct Geometrical Damping?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    This paper concerns the formulation of lumped-parameter models for rigid footings on homogenous or stratified soil with focus on the horizontal sliding and rocking. Such models only contain a few degrees of freedom, which makes them ideal for inclusion in aero-elastic codes for wind turbines...

  16. Do Lumped-Parameter Models Provide the Correct Geometrical Damping?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    This paper concerns the formulation of lumped-parameter models for rigid footings on homogenous or stratified soil with focus on the horizontal sliding and rocking. Such models only contain a few degrees of freedom, which makes them ideal for inclusion in aero-elastic codes for wind turbines...

  17. Interpretive and Critical Phenomenological Crime Studies: A Model Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miner-Romanoff, Karen

    2012-01-01

    The critical and interpretive phenomenological approach is underutilized in the study of crime. This commentary describes this approach, guided by the question, "Why are interpretive phenomenological methods appropriate for qualitative research in criminology?" Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to describe a model of the interpretive…

  18. Evolutionary Population Synthesis Models of Primeval Galaxies a Critical Appraisal

    CERN Document Server

    Buzzoni, A

    1997-01-01

    A theoretical approach relying on evolutionary population synthesis models could help refining the search criteria in deep galaxy surveys on the basis of a better knowledge of the expected apparent photometric properties of high-redshift objects. The following is a brief discussion reviewing some relevant aspects of the question in order to allow a more critical appraisal to primeval galaxy recognition.

  19. Critical analysis of the current approaches to modelling educational effectiveness : The importance of establishing a dynamic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creemers, B. P. M.; Kyriakides, L.

    2006-01-01

    Researchers in the area of educational effectiveness should attempt to develop a new theoretical framework. A critical analysis of the current models of educational effectiveness research is provided and reveals that a dynamic model of effectiveness must: (a) be multilevel in nature, (b) be based on

  20. Critical domain-wall dynamics of model B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, R H; Zheng, B; Zhou, N J

    2009-05-01

    With Monte Carlo methods, we simulate the critical domain-wall dynamics of model B, taking the two-dimensional Ising model as an example. In the macroscopic short-time regime, a dynamic scaling form is revealed. Due to the existence of the quasirandom walkers, the magnetization shows intrinsic dependence on the lattice size L . An exponent which governs the L dependence of the magnetization is measured to be sigma=0.243(8) .

  1. Self-organized Criticality Model for Ocean Internal Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gang; LIN Min; QIAO Fang-Li; HOU Yi-Jun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple spring-block model for ocean internal waves based on the self-organized criticality (SOC). The oscillations of the water blocks in the model display power-law behavior with an exponent of-2 in the frequency domain, which is similar to the current and sea water temperature spectra in the actual ocean and the universal Garrett and Munk deep ocean internal wave model [Geophysical Fluid Dynamics 2 (1972) 225; J. Geophys. Res. 80 (1975) 291]. The influence of the ratio of the driving force to the spring coefficient to SOC behaviors in the model is also discussed.

  2. Critical dynamics of a nonlocal model and critical behavior of perovskite manganites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rohit; Dutta, Kishore; Nandy, Malay K

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the nonconserved critical dynamics of a nonlocal model Hamiltonian incorporating screened long-range interactions in the quartic term. Employing dynamic renormalization group analysis at one-loop order, we calculate the dynamic critical exponent z=2+εf_{1}(σ,κ,n)+O(ε^{2}) and the linewidth exponent w=-σ+εf_{2}(σ,κ,n)+O(ε^{2}) in the leading order of ε, where ε=4-d+2σ, with d the space dimension, n the number of components in the order parameter, and σ and κ the parameters coming from the nonlocal interaction term. The resulting values of linewidth exponent w for a wide range of σ is found to be in good agreement with the existing experimental estimates from spin relaxation measurements in perovskite manganite samples.

  3. Critical behavior of the Schwinger model with Wilson fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Azcoiti, V; Galante, A; Grillo, A F; Laliena, V

    1996-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis, in the framework of the MFA approach of the critical behaviour of the lattice Schwinger model with Wilson fermions on lattices up to 24^2, through the study of the Lee-Yang zeros and the specific heat. We find compelling evidence for a critical line ending at \\kappa = 0.25 at large \\beta. Finite size scaling analysis on lattices 8^2,12^2,16^2, 20^2 and 24^2 indicates a continuous transition. The hyperscaling relation is verified in the explored \\beta region.

  4. Surface critical behavior of the smoothly inhomogeneous Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Theodore W.; Guim, Ihnsouk

    1984-01-01

    We consider a semi-infinite two-dimensional Ising model with nearest-neighbor coupling constants that deviate from the bulk coupling by Am-y for large m, m being the distance from the edge. The case ALeeuwen. We report exact results for the boundary magnetization and boundary pair-correlation function when A>0. At the bulk critical temperature there is a rich variety of critical behavior in the A -y plane with both paramagnetic and ferromagnetic surface phases. Some of our results can be derived and generalized with simple scaling arguments.

  5. Controlling self-organized criticality in sandpile models

    CERN Document Server

    Cajueiro, Daniel O

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an external control to reduce the size of avalanches in some sandpile models exhibiting self organized criticality. This rather intuitive approach seems to be missing in the vast literature on such systems. The control action, which amounts to triggering avalanches in sites that are near to be come critical, reduces the probability of very large events, so that energy dissipation occurs most locally. The control is applied to a directed Abelian sandpile model driven by both uncorrelated and correlated deposition. The latter is essential to design an efficient and simple control heuristic, but has only small influence in the uncontrolled avalanche probability distribution. The proposed control seeks a tradeoff between control cost and large event risk. Preliminary results hint that the proposed control works also for an undirected sandpile model.

  6. Magnetic critical behavior of the Ising model on fractal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monceau, Pascal; Perreau, Michel; Hébert, Frédéric

    1998-09-01

    The critical temperature and the set of critical exponents (β,γ,ν) of the Ising model on a fractal structure, namely the Sierpiński carpet, are calculated from a Monte Carlo simulation based on the Wolff algorithm together with the histogram method and finite-size scaling. Both cases of periodic boundary conditions and free edges are investigated. The calculations have been done up to the seventh iteration step of the fractal structure. The results show that, although the structure is not translationally invariant, the scaling behavior of thermodynamical quantities is conserved, which gives a meaning to the finite-size analysis. Although some discrepancies in the values of the critical exponents occur between periodic boundary conditions and free edges, the effective dimension obtained through the Rushbrooke and Josephson's scaling law have the same value in both cases. This value is slightly but significantly different from the fractal dimension.

  7. Stability of earthquake clustering models: Criticality and branching ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jiancang; Werner, Maximilian J.; Harte, David S.

    2013-12-01

    We study the stability conditions of a class of branching processes prominent in the analysis and modeling of seismicity. This class includes the epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model as a special case, but more generally comprises models in which the magnitude distribution of direct offspring depends on the magnitude of the progenitor, such as the branching aftershock sequence (BASS) model and another recently proposed branching model based on a dynamic scaling hypothesis. These stability conditions are closely related to the concepts of the criticality parameter and the branching ratio. The criticality parameter summarizes the asymptotic behavior of the population after sufficiently many generations, determined by the maximum eigenvalue of the transition equations. The branching ratio is defined by the proportion of triggered events in all the events. Based on the results for the generalized case, we show that the branching ratio of the ETAS model is identical to its criticality parameter because its magnitude density is separable from the full intensity. More generally, however, these two values differ and thus place separate conditions on model stability. As an illustration of the difference and of the importance of the stability conditions, we employ a version of the BASS model, reformulated to ensure the possibility of stationarity. In addition, we analyze the magnitude distributions of successive generations of the BASS model via analytical and numerical methods, and find that the compound density differs substantially from a Gutenberg-Richter distribution, unless the process is essentially subcritical (branching ratio less than 1) or the magnitude dependence between the parent event and the direct offspring is weak.

  8. Stability of earthquake clustering models: criticality and branching ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jiancang; Werner, Maximilian J; Harte, David S

    2013-12-01

    We study the stability conditions of a class of branching processes prominent in the analysis and modeling of seismicity. This class includes the epidemic-type aftershock sequence (ETAS) model as a special case, but more generally comprises models in which the magnitude distribution of direct offspring depends on the magnitude of the progenitor, such as the branching aftershock sequence (BASS) model and another recently proposed branching model based on a dynamic scaling hypothesis. These stability conditions are closely related to the concepts of the criticality parameter and the branching ratio. The criticality parameter summarizes the asymptotic behavior of the population after sufficiently many generations, determined by the maximum eigenvalue of the transition equations. The branching ratio is defined by the proportion of triggered events in all the events. Based on the results for the generalized case, we show that the branching ratio of the ETAS model is identical to its criticality parameter because its magnitude density is separable from the full intensity. More generally, however, these two values differ and thus place separate conditions on model stability. As an illustration of the difference and of the importance of the stability conditions, we employ a version of the BASS model, reformulated to ensure the possibility of stationarity. In addition, we analyze the magnitude distributions of successive generations of the BASS model via analytical and numerical methods, and find that the compound density differs substantially from a Gutenberg-Richter distribution, unless the process is essentially subcritical (branching ratio less than 1) or the magnitude dependence between the parent event and the direct offspring is weak.

  9. Contact terms and duality symmetry in the critical dissipative Hofstadter model

    CERN Document Server

    Freed, D E

    1993-01-01

    The dissipative Hofstadter model describes the quantum mechanics of a charged particle in two dimensions subject to a periodic potential, uniform magnetic field, and dissipative force. Its phase diagram exhibits an SL(2,Z) duality symmetry and has an infinite number of critical circles in the dissipation/magnetic field plane. In addition, multi-critical points on a particular critical circle correspond to non-trivial solutions of open string theory. The duality symmetry is expected to provide relations between correlation functions at different multi-critical points. Many of these correlators are contact terms. However we expect them to have physical significance because under duality they transform into functions that are non-zero for large separations of the operators. Motivated by the search for exact, regulator independent solutions for these contact terms, in this paper we derive many properties and symmetries of the coordinate correlation functions at the special multi-critical points. In particular, we...

  10. Introducing the Literary Critic: The CARS Model in the Introductions of Academic Papers in Literary Criticism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Sánta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Genre analysis as a “meta-study” is a topic that has been deeply investigated in the field of applied linguistics, one of its more specific areas of interest being research article introductions (RAIs. However, there are still certain kinds of scholarly activity that have received relatively little attention in this regard, such as literary criticism. The paper presents and discusses the results of a small-scale study of the introductions of ten academic essays in this field. The paper’s aim is to see how Swales’ (1990 CARS model can be applied to the rhetorical structure of these RAIs. It is found that at the cost of certain modifications necessitated by the structure of the essays in the corpus, it is not impossible to analyze critical texts produced by scholars belonging in the latter area. The demonstration of this has significance in fulfilling a perceived need for literary criticism to be considered among those disciplines that are worthy of the attention of applied linguistic research.

  11. A Quasispecies Continuous Contact Model in a Critical Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondratiev, Yuri; Pirogov, Sergey; Zhizhina, Elena

    2016-04-01

    We study a new non-equilibrium dynamical model: a marked continuous contact model in d-dimensional space (d ge 3). We prove that for certain values of rates (the critical regime) this system has the one-parameter family of invariant measures labelled by the spatial density of particles. Then we prove that the process starting from the marked Poisson measure converges to one of these invariant measures. In contrast with the continuous contact model studied earlier in Kondratiev (Infin Dimens Anal Quantum Probab Relat Top 11(2):231-258, 2008), now the spatial particle density is not a conserved quantity.

  12. Critical behavior in a stochastic model of vector mediated epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfinito, E.; Beccaria, M.; Macorini, G.

    2016-06-01

    The extreme vulnerability of humans to new and old pathogens is constantly highlighted by unbound outbreaks of epidemics. This vulnerability is both direct, producing illness in humans (dengue, malaria), and also indirect, affecting its supplies (bird and swine flu, Pierce disease, and olive quick decline syndrome). In most cases, the pathogens responsible for an illness spread through vectors. In general, disease evolution may be an uncontrollable propagation or a transient outbreak with limited diffusion. This depends on the physiological parameters of hosts and vectors (susceptibility to the illness, virulence, chronicity of the disease, lifetime of the vectors, etc.). In this perspective and with these motivations, we analyzed a stochastic lattice model able to capture the critical behavior of such epidemics over a limited time horizon and with a finite amount of resources. The model exhibits a critical line of transition that separates spreading and non-spreading phases. The critical line is studied with new analytical methods and direct simulations. Critical exponents are found to be the same as those of dynamical percolation.

  13. Critical Curves and Caustics of Triple-lens Models

    CERN Document Server

    Danek, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    Among the 25 planetary systems detected up to now by gravitational microlensing, there are two cases of a star with two planets, and two cases of a binary star with a planet. Other, yet undetected types of triple lenses include triple stars or stars with a planet with a moon. The analysis and interpretation of such events is hindered by the lack of understanding of essential characteristics of triple lenses, such as their critical curves and caustics. We present here analytical and numerical methods for mapping the critical-curve topology and caustic cusp number in the parameter space of $n$-point-mass lenses. We apply the methods to the analysis of four symmetric triple-lens models, and obtain altogether 9 different critical-curve topologies and 32 caustic structures. While these results include various generic types, they represent just a subset of all possible triple-lens critical curves and caustics. Using the analyzed models, we demonstrate interesting features of triple lenses that do not occur in two-p...

  14. Experimental studies on power transformer model winding provided with MOVs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.H. Kusumadevi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Surge voltage distribution across a HV transformer winding due to appearance of very fast rise time (rise time of order 1 μs transient voltages is highly non-uniform along the length of the winding for initial time instant of occurrence of surge. In order to achieve nearly uniform initial time instant voltage distribution along the length of the HV winding, investigations have been carried out on transformer model winding. By connecting similar type of metal oxide varistors across sections of HV transformer model winding, it is possible to improve initial time instant surge voltage distribution across length of the HV transformer winding. Transformer windings with α values 5.3, 9.5 and 19 have been analyzed. The experimental studies have been carried out using high speed oscilloscope of good accuracy. The initial time instant voltage distribution across sections of winding with MOV remains nearly uniform along length of the winding. Also results of fault diagnostics carried out with and without connection of MOVs across sections of winding are reported.

  15. Critical elements on fitting the Bayesian multivariate Poisson Lognormal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamzuri, Zamira Hasanah binti

    2015-10-01

    Motivated by a problem on fitting multivariate models to traffic accident data, a detailed discussion of the Multivariate Poisson Lognormal (MPL) model is presented. This paper reveals three critical elements on fitting the MPL model: the setting of initial estimates, hyperparameters and tuning parameters. These issues have not been highlighted in the literature. Based on simulation studies conducted, we have shown that to use the Univariate Poisson Model (UPM) estimates as starting values, at least 20,000 iterations are needed to obtain reliable final estimates. We also illustrated the sensitivity of the specific hyperparameter, which if it is not given extra attention, may affect the final estimates. The last issue is regarding the tuning parameters where they depend on the acceptance rate. Finally, a heuristic algorithm to fit the MPL model is presented. This acts as a guide to ensure that the model works satisfactorily given any data set.

  16. Do Cochrane reviews provide a good model for social science?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konnerup, Merete; Kongsted, Hans Christian

    2012-01-01

    Formalised research synthesis to underpin evidence-based policy and practice has become increasingly important in areas of public policy. In this paper we discuss whether the Cochrane standard for systematic reviews of healthcare interventions is appropriate for social research. We examine...... the formal criteria of the Cochrane Collaboration for including particular study designs and search the Cochrane Library to provide quantitative evidence on the de facto standard of actual Cochrane reviews. By identifying the sample of Cochrane reviews that consider observational designs, we are able...... to conclude that the majority of reviews appears limited to considering randomised controlled trials only. Because recent studies have delineated conditions for observational studies in social research to produce valid evidence, we argue that an inclusive approach is essential for truly evidence-based policy...

  17. Critical behavior in the cubic dimer model at nonzero monomer density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, G. J.; Powell, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    We study critical behavior in the classical cubic dimer model (CDM) in the presence of a finite density of monomers. With attractive interactions between parallel dimers, the monomer-free CDM exhibits an unconventional transition from a Coulomb phase to a dimer crystal. Monomers act as charges (or monopoles) in the Coulomb phase and, at nonzero density, lead to a standard Landau-type transition. We use large-scale Monte Carlo simulations to study the system in the neighborhood of the critical point, and find results in agreement with detailed predictions of scaling theory. Going beyond previous studies of the transition in the absence of monomers, we explicitly confirm the distinction between conventional and unconventional criticality, and quantitatively demonstrate the crossover between the two. Our results also provide additional evidence for the theoretical claim that the transition in the CDM belongs in the same universality class as the deconfined quantum critical point in the SU (2) JQ model.

  18. Critical Behavior in a Cellular Automata Animal Disease Transmission Model

    CERN Document Server

    Morley, P D; Chang, Julius

    2003-01-01

    Using a cellular automata model, we simulate the British Government Policy (BGP) in the 2001 foot and mouth epidemic in Great Britain. When clinical symptoms of the disease appeared on a farm, there is mandatory slaughter (culling) of all livestock on an infected premise (IP). Those farms that neighbor an IP (contiguous premise, CP), are also culled, aka nearest neighbor interaction. Farms where the disease may be prevalent from animal, human, vehicle or airborne transmission (dangerous contact, DC), are additionally culled, aka next-to-nearest neighbor iteractions and lightning factor. The resulting mathematical model possesses a phase transition, whereupon if the physical disease transmission kernel exceeds a critical value, catastrophic loss of animals ensues. The non-local disease transport probability can be as low as .01% per day and the disease can still be in the high mortality phase. We show that the fundamental equation for sustainable disease transport is the criticality equation for neutron fissio...

  19. From Safety Critical Java Programs to Timed Process Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Bent; Luckow, Kasper Søe; Thomsen, Lone Leth

    2015-01-01

    built and the tools have been used to analyse a number of systems for properties such as worst case execution time, schedulability and energy optimization [12–14,19,34,36,38]. In this paper we will elaborate on the theoretical underpinning of the translation from Java programs to timed automata models...... frameworks, we have in recent years pursued an agenda of translating hard-real-time embedded safety critical programs written in the Safety Critical Java Profile [33] into networks of timed automata [4] and subjecting those to automated analysis using the UPPAAL model checker [10]. Several tools have been...... and briefly summarize some of the results based on this translation. Furthermore, we discuss future work, especially relations to the work in [16,24] as Java recently has adopted first class higher order functions in the form of lambda abstractions....

  20. A software cost model with maintenance and risk costs for safety-critical systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hong-wei; YANG Xiao-zong; QU Feng; DONG Jian

    2006-01-01

    According to the consequences of software failures, software faults remaining in safety-critical systems can be classified into two sets: common faults and fatal faults. Common faults cause slight loss when they are activated. A fatal fault can lead to significant loss, and even damage the safety-critical system entirely when it is activated. A software reliability growth model for safety-critical systems is developed based on G-O model. And a software cost model is proposed too. The cost model considers maintenance and risk costs due to software failures. The optimal release policies are discussed to minimize the total software cost. A numerical example is provided to illustrate how to use the results we obtained.

  1. Drosophila provides rapid modeling of renal development, function, and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Julian A T; Romero, Michael F

    2010-12-01

    The evolution of specialized excretory cells is a cornerstone of the metazoan radiation, and the basic tasks performed by Drosophila and human renal systems are similar. The development of the Drosophila renal (Malpighian) tubule is a classic example of branched tubular morphogenesis, allowing study of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transitions, stem cell-mediated regeneration, and the evolution of a glomerular kidney. Tubule function employs conserved transport proteins, such as the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and V-ATPase, aquaporins, inward rectifier K(+) channels, and organic solute transporters, regulated by cAMP, cGMP, nitric oxide, and calcium. In addition to generation and selective reabsorption of primary urine, the tubule plays roles in metabolism and excretion of xenobiotics, and in innate immunity. The gene expression resource FlyAtlas.org shows that the tubule is an ideal tissue for the modeling of renal diseases, such as nephrolithiasis and Bartter syndrome, or for inborn errors of metabolism. Studies are assisted by uniquely powerful genetic and transgenic resources, the widespread availability of mutant stocks, and low-cost, rapid deployment of new transgenics to allow manipulation of renal function in an organotypic context.

  2. Critical Infrastructure Protection and Resilience Literature Survey: Modeling and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    produced the N- ABLE tool which is used to simulate critical infrastructure interdependencies of businesses in the U.S. economy . Idaho National Laboratory...International Journal of Risk Assessment and Management. 2006;6(4-6):423-439. 32. Zale JJ KB. A GIS-based football stadium evacuation model...of IT based disasters on the interdependent sectors of the US economy . In: proceedings from IEEE Systems and Information Engineering Design

  3. How Modelling of Crystal Defects at the Atomic Scale can Provide Information on Seismic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordier, P.; Carrez, P.; Goryaeva, A.; Gouriet, K.; Hirel, P.; Kraych, A.; Ritterbex, S.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic anisotropy represents one of the few sources of information about flow in the mantle that takes place at timescales that are barely accessible at human timescales. Seismic waves travelling through rocks at the speed of sound can reveal flow lines frozen in rocks over hundreds of million years. The interpretation of seismic anisotropy also needs to bridge length-scales since crystal defects are responsible for the plastic anisotropy that align crystals in a deforming rock thus revealing elastic anisotropy at the macroscopic scale. Knowing the easiest slip systems for a given crystal structure is thus the fundamental information needed. To obtain it we propose the following approach based on multiscale numerical modeling. As a first approach, we calculate generalized stacking faults which inform us about the easiest shear paths imposed by the crystal chemistry. This leads to a short list of potential slip systems for which lattice friction will be calculated. A further selection will be done by modeling the core structures of screw dislocations. The tendency for core spreading of screw dislocations impose a selection on potential glide planes which is further validated by modeling corresponding edge dislocations and their respective mobilities. Finally, we model the mobility of these dislocations under the conjugate influence of stress and temperature using the kink-pair model which is based on the activation enthalpy of the critical configuration which allows a dislocation to glide from one stable position to the next. The output of this model is the so-called critical resolved shear stress which is the onset of plastic glide at a given temperature and strain rate. Comparison between slip systems provides constraints on the plastic anisotropy. Examples are presented among the major phases of the Earth's mantle.

  4. Critical endpoint for deconfinement in matrix and other effective models

    CERN Document Server

    Kashiwa, Kouji; Skokov, Vladimir V

    2012-01-01

    We consider the position of the deconfining critical endpoint, where the first order transition for deconfinement is washed out by the presence of massive, dynamical quarks. We use an effective matrix model, employed previously to analyze the transition in the pure glue theory. If the param- eters of the pure glue theory are unaffected by the presence of dynamical quarks, and if the quarks only contribute perturbatively, then for three colors and three degenerate quark flavors this quark mass is very heavy, m_de \\sim 2.5 GeV, while the critical temperature, T_de, barely changes, \\sim 1% below that in the pure glue theory. The location of the deconfining critical endpoint is a sensitive test to differentiate between effective models. For example, models with a logarithmic potential for the Polyakov loop give much smaller values of the quark mass, m_de \\sim 1 GeV, and a large shift in T_de \\sim 10% lower than that in the pure glue theory.

  5. Model-based automated testing of critical PLC programs.

    CERN Document Server

    Fernández Adiego, B; Tournier, J-C; González Suárez, V M; Bliudze, S

    2014-01-01

    Testing of critical PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) programs remains a challenging task for control system engineers as it can rarely be automated. This paper proposes a model based approach which uses the BIP (Behavior, Interactions and Priorities) framework to perform automated testing of PLC programs developed with the UNICOS (UNified Industrial COntrol System) framework. This paper defines the translation procedure and rules from UNICOS to BIP which can be fully automated in order to hide the complexity of the underlying model from the control engineers. The approach is illustrated and validated through the study of a water treatment process.

  6. Developing Research Agendas on Whole School Improvement Models: The Model Providers' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shambaugh, Larisa; Graczewski, Cheryl; Therriault, Susan Bowles; Darwin, Marlene J.

    2007-01-01

    The current education policy environment places a heavy emphasis on scientifically based research. This article examines how whole school improvement models approach the development of a research agenda, including what influences and challenges model providers face in implementing their agenda. Responses also detail the advantages and…

  7. Critical Curves and Caustics of Triple-lens Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daněk, Kamil; Heyrovský, David

    2015-06-01

    Among the 25 planetary systems detected up to now by gravitational microlensing, there are two cases of a star with two planets, and two cases of a binary star with a planet. Other, yet undetected types of triple lenses include triple stars or stars with a planet with a moon. The analysis and interpretation of such events is hindered by the lack of understanding of essential characteristics of triple lenses, such as their critical curves and caustics. We present here analytical and numerical methods for mapping the critical-curve topology and caustic cusp number in the parameter space of n-point-mass lenses. We apply the methods to the analysis of four symmetric triple-lens models, and obtain altogether 9 different critical-curve topologies and 32 caustic structures. While these results include various generic types, they represent just a subset of all possible triple-lens critical curves and caustics. Using the analyzed models, we demonstrate interesting features of triple lenses that do not occur in two-point-mass lenses. We show an example of a lens that cannot be described by the Chang-Refsdal model in the wide limit. In the close limit we demonstrate unusual structures of primary and secondary caustic loops, and explain the conditions for their occurrence. In the planetary limit we find that the presence of a planet may lead to a whole sequence of additional caustic metamorphoses. We show that a pair of planets may change the structure of the primary caustic even when placed far from their resonant position at the Einstein radius.

  8. A self-organized critical model for evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flyvbjerg, H.; Bak, P.; Jensen, M.H.; Sneppen, K.

    1996-01-01

    A simple mathematical model of biological macroevolution is presented. It describes an ecology of adapting, interacting species. Species evolve to maximize their individual fitness in their environment. The environment of any given species is affected by other evolving species; hence it is not constant in time. The ecology evolves to a ``self-organized critical`` state where periods of stasis alternate with avalanches of causally connected evolutionary changes. This characteristic intermittent behaviour of natural history, known as ``punctuated equilibrium,`` thus finds a theoretical explanation as a selforganized critical phenomenon. In particular, large bursts of apparently simultaneous evolutionary activity require no external cause. They occur as the less frequent result of the very same dynamics that governs the more frequent small-scale evolutionary activity. Our results are compared with data from the fossil record collected by J. Sepkoski, Jr., and others.

  9. Robust criticality of Ising model on rewired directed networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lipowski, Adam; Lipowska, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    We show that preferential rewiring, which is supposed to mimick the behaviour of financial agents, changes a directed-network Ising ferromagnet with a single critical point into a model with robust critical behaviour. For the non-rewired random graph version, due to a constant number of links out-going from each site, we write a simple mean-field-like equation describing the behaviour of magnetization; we argue that it is exact and support the claim with extensive Monte Carlo simulations. For the rewired version, this equation is obeyed only at low temperatures. At higher temperatures, rewiring leads to strong heterogeneities, which apparently invalidates mean-field arguments and induces large fluctuations and divergent susceptibility. Such behaviour is traced back to the formation of a relatively small core of agents which influence the entire system.

  10. Critical dynamics of cluster algorithms in the dilute Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennecke, M.; Heyken, U.

    1993-08-01

    Autocorrelation times for thermodynamic quantities at T C are calculated from Monte Carlo simulations of the site-diluted simple cubic Ising model, using the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff cluster algorithms. Our results show that for these algorithms the autocorrelation times decrease when reducing the concentration of magnetic sites from 100% down to 40%. This is of crucial importance when estimating static properties of the model, since the variances of these estimators increase with autocorrelation time. The dynamical critical exponents are calculated for both algorithms, observing pronounced finite-size effects in the energy autocorrelation data for the algorithm of Wolff. We conclude that, when applied to the dilute Ising model, cluster algorithms become even more effective than local algorithms, for which increasing autocorrelation times are expected.

  11. A critical review of lexical analysis and Big Five model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Cristina Richaud de Minzi

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last years the idea has resurfaced that traits can be measured in a reliable and valid and this can be useful inthe prediction of human behavior. The five-factor model appears to represent a conceptual and empirical advances in the field of personality theory. Necessary orthogonal factors (Goldberg, 1992, p. 26 to show the relationships between the descriptors of the features in English is five, and its nature can be summarized through the broad concepts of Surgency, Agreeableness, Responsibility, Emotional Stability versus neuroticism and openness to experience (John, 1990, p96 Furthermore, despite the criticisms that have been given to the model, represents a breakthrough in the field of personality assessment. This approach means a contribution to the study of personality, without being the integrative model of personality.

  12. Self-organized criticality model for brain plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, Lucilla; Perrone-Capano, Carla; Herrmann, Hans J

    2006-01-20

    Networks of living neurons exhibit an avalanche mode of activity, experimentally found in organotypic cultures. Here we present a model that is based on self-organized criticality and takes into account brain plasticity, which is able to reproduce the spectrum of electroencephalograms (EEG). The model consists of an electrical network with threshold firing and activity-dependent synapse strengths. The system exhibits an avalanche activity in a power-law distribution. The analysis of the power spectra of the electrical signal reproduces very robustly the power-law behavior with the exponent 0.8, experimentally measured in EEG spectra. The same value of the exponent is found on small-world lattices and for leaky neurons, indicating that universality holds for a wide class of brain models.

  13. Characteristics and criticism of conventional eco- and environmental economics models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Karajz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to introduce basic theories of environmental economics, dealing with environment factors, and to present critical view on them. The results of the analysis. The necessity to create a new economic paradigm or to elaborate a new approach to economics can most efficiently be justified by providing a critical analysis of conventional economic theories. Following this view, the material introduces basic theories of environmental economics belonging to the branch of economics dealing with environmental factors and based on conventional or neoclassical foundations (problems of public welfare, Pigouvian taxes, the Coase theorem, optimal utilisation of natural resources, the standard price theory and presents critical views related to these issues. Conclusions and directions of further researches. The conventional economics is based on fundamental assumption of neoclassical welfare economics according to which the primarily aim of economics is obviously to achieve Pareto optimal conditions. This optimum can be in two meanings: if Pareto optimum means Pareto norms, it reflects relevant conditions for economic policy. If Pareto optimum is linked with marginal analysis when a determined fictitious economic optimum is sought for in a perfect competition situation, it an instrument used for formal analytical analysis. According to this allocation of resources or the volume of production is optimal if there is a situation in which it is possible to make any individual better off without making someone else worse off.

  14. Criticality in the scale invariant standard model (squared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Foot

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider first the standard model Lagrangian with μh2 Higgs potential term set to zero. We point out that this classically scale invariant theory potentially exhibits radiative electroweak/scale symmetry breaking with very high vacuum expectation value (VEV for the Higgs field, 〈ϕ〉≈1017–18 GeV. Furthermore, if such a vacuum were realized then cancellation of vacuum energy automatically implies that this nontrivial vacuum is degenerate with the trivial unbroken vacuum. Such a theory would therefore be critical with the Higgs self-coupling and its beta function nearly vanishing at the symmetry breaking minimum, λ(μ=〈ϕ〉≈βλ(μ=〈ϕ〉≈0. A phenomenologically viable model that predicts this criticality property arises if we consider two copies of the standard model Lagrangian, with exact Z2 symmetry swapping each ordinary particle with a partner. The spontaneously broken vacuum can then arise where one sector gains the high scale VEV, while the other gains the electroweak scale VEV. The low scale VEV is perturbed away from zero due to a Higgs portal coupling, or via the usual small Higgs mass terms μh2, which softly break the scale invariance. In either case, the cancellation of vacuum energy requires Mt=(171.53±0.42 GeV, which is close to its measured value of (173.34±0.76 GeV.

  15. Simple Model for Identifying Critical Regions in Atrial Fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common abnormal heart rhythm and the single biggest cause of stroke. Ablation, destroying regions of the atria, is applied largely empirically and can be curative but with a disappointing clinical success rate. We design a simple model of activation wave front propagation on an anisotropic structure mimicking the branching network of heart muscle cells. This integration of phenomenological dynamics and pertinent structure shows how AF emerges spontaneously when the transverse cell-to-cell coupling decreases, as occurs with age, beyond a threshold value. We identify critical regions responsible for the initiation and maintenance of AF, the ablation of which terminates AF. The simplicity of the model allows us to calculate analytically the risk of arrhythmia and express the threshold value of transversal cell-to-cell coupling as a function of the model parameters. This threshold value decreases with increasing refractory period by reducing the number of critical regions which can initiate and sustain microreentrant circuits. These biologically testable predictions might inform ablation therapies and arrhythmic risk assessment. PMID:25635565

  16. Critical noise of majority-vote model on complex networks

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hanshuang; He, Gang; Zhang, Haifeng; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2016-01-01

    The majority-vote model with noise is one of the simplest nonequilibrium statistical model that has been extensively studied in the context of complex networks. However, the relationship between the critical noise where the order-disorder phase transition takes place and the topology of the underlying networks is still lacking. In the paper, we use the heterogeneous mean-field theory to derive the rate equation for governing the model's dynamics that can analytically determine the critical noise $f_c$ in the limit of infinite network size $N\\rightarrow \\infty$. The result shows that $f_c$ depends on the ratio of ${\\left\\langle k \\right\\rangle }$ to ${\\left\\langle k^{3/2} \\right\\rangle }$, where ${\\left\\langle k \\right\\rangle }$ and ${\\left\\langle k^{3/2} \\right\\rangle }$ are the average degree and the $3/2$ order moment of degree distribution, respectively. Furthermore, we consider the finite size effect where the stochastic fluctuation should be involved. To the end, we derive the Langevin equation and obtai...

  17. Critical mingling and universal correlations in model binary active liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Nicolas; Bartolo, Denis

    2017-06-01

    Ensembles of driven or motile bodies moving along opposite directions are generically reported to self-organize into strongly anisotropic lanes. Here, building on a minimal model of self-propelled bodies targeting opposite directions, we first evidence a critical phase transition between a mingled state and a phase-separated lane state specific to active particles. We then demonstrate that the mingled state displays algebraic structural correlations also found in driven binary mixtures. Finally, constructing a hydrodynamic theory, we single out the physical mechanisms responsible for these universal long-range correlations typical of ensembles of oppositely moving bodies.

  18. Critical Exponents of Ferromagnetic Ising Model on Fractal Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Pai-Yi

    2001-04-01

    We review the value of the critical exponents ν-1, β/ν, and γ/ν of ferromagnetic Ising model on fractal lattices of Hausdorff dimension between one and three. They are obtained by Monte Carlo simulation with the help of Wolff algorithm. The results are accurate enough to show that the hyperscaling law df = 2β/ν + γ/ν is satisfied in non-integer dimension. Nevertheless, the discrepancy between the simulation results and the γ-expansion studies suggests that the strong universality should be adapted for the fractal lattices.

  19. Optimal management of the critically ill: anaesthesia, monitoring, data capture, and point-of-care technological practices in ovine models of critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemonges, Saul; Shekar, Kiran; Tung, John-Paul; Dunster, Kimble R; Diab, Sara; Platts, David; Watts, Ryan P; Gregory, Shaun D; Foley, Samuel; Simonova, Gabriela; McDonald, Charles; Hayes, Rylan; Bellpart, Judith; Timms, Daniel; Chew, Michelle; Fung, Yoke L; Toon, Michael; Maybauer, Marc O; Fraser, John F

    2014-01-01

    Animal models of critical illness are vital in biomedical research. They provide possibilities for the investigation of pathophysiological processes that may not otherwise be possible in humans. In order to be clinically applicable, the model should simulate the critical care situation realistically, including anaesthesia, monitoring, sampling, utilising appropriate personnel skill mix, and therapeutic interventions. There are limited data documenting the constitution of ideal technologically advanced large animal critical care practices and all the processes of the animal model. In this paper, we describe the procedure of animal preparation, anaesthesia induction and maintenance, physiologic monitoring, data capture, point-of-care technology, and animal aftercare that has been successfully used to study several novel ovine models of critical illness. The relevant investigations are on respiratory failure due to smoke inhalation, transfusion related acute lung injury, endotoxin-induced proteogenomic alterations, haemorrhagic shock, septic shock, brain death, cerebral microcirculation, and artificial heart studies. We have demonstrated the functionality of monitoring practices during anaesthesia required to provide a platform for undertaking systematic investigations in complex ovine models of critical illness.

  20. Spatial modeling of coupled hydrologic-biogeochemical processes for the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tague, C.

    2007-12-01

    One of the primary roles of modeling in critical zone research studies is to provide a framework for integrating field measurements and theory and for generalizing results across space and time. In the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (SCZO), significant spatial heterogeneity associated with mountainous terrain combined with high inter-annual and seasonal variation in climate, necessitates the use of spatial-temporal models for generating landscape scale understanding and predictions. Science questions related to coupled hydrologic and biogeochemical fluxes within the critical zone require a framework that can account for multiple and interacting processes. One of the core tools for the SCZO will be RHESSYs (Regional hydro-ecologic simulation system). RHESSys is an existing GIS-based model of hydrology and biogeochemical cycling. For the SCZO, we use RHESSys as an open-source, objected oriented model that can be extended to incorporate findings from field-based monitoring and analysis. We use the model as a framework for data assimilation, spatial-temporal interpolation, prediction, and scenario and hypothesis generation. Here we demonstrate the use of RHESSys as a hypothesis generation tool. We show how initial RHESSys predictions can be used to estimate when and where connectivity within the critical zone will lead to significant spatial or temporal gradients in vegetation carbon and moisture fluxes. We use the model to explore the potential implications of heterogeneity in critical zone controls on hydrologic processes at two scales: micro and macro. At the micro scale, we examine the role of preferential flowpaths. At the macro scale we consider the importance of upland-riparian zone connectivity. We show how the model can be used to design efficient field experiments by, a-priori providing quantitative estimate of uncertainty and highlighting when and where measurements might most effectively reduce that uncertainty.

  1. Defects in the tri-critical Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makabe, Isao; Watts, Gérard M. T.

    2017-09-01

    We consider two different conformal field theories with central charge c = 7 /10. One is the diagonal invariant minimal model in which all fields have integer spins; the other is the local fermionic theory with superconformal symmetry in which fields can have half-integer spin. We construct new conformal (but not topological or factorised) defects in the minimal model. We do this by first constructing defects in the fermionic model as boundary conditions in a fermionic theory of central charge c = 7 /5, using the folding trick as first proposed by Gang and Yamaguchi [1]. We then act on these with interface defects to find the new conformal defects. As part of the construction, we find the topological defects in the fermionic theory and the interfaces between the fermionic theory and the minimal model. We also consider the simpler case of defects in the theory of a single free fermion and interface defects between the Ising model and a single fermion as a prelude to calculations in the tri-critical Ising model.

  2. Integrable modification of the critical Chalker-Coddington network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikhlef, Yacine; Fendley, Paul; Cardy, John

    2011-10-01

    We consider the Chalker-Coddington network model for the integer quantum Hall effect, and examine the possibility of solving it exactly. In the supersymmetric path integral framework, we introduce a truncation procedure, leading to a series of well-defined two-dimensional loop models with two loop flavors. In the phase diagram of the first-order truncated model, we identify four integrable branches related to the dilute Birman-Wenzl-Murakami braid-monoid algebra and parameterized by the loop fugacity n. In the continuum limit, two of these branches (1,2) are described by a pair of decoupled copies of a Coulomb-gas theory, whereas the other two branches (3,4) couple the two loop flavors, and relate to an SU(2)r×SU(2)r/SU(2)2r Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) coset model for the particular values n=-2cos[π/(r+2)], where r is a positive integer. The truncated Chalker-Coddington model is the n=0 point of branch 4. By numerical diagonalization, we find that its universality class is neither an analytic continuation of the WZW coset nor the universality class of the original Chalker-Coddington model. It constitutes rather an integrable, critical approximation to the latter.

  3. Critical behavior of the random-bond clock model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Raymond P. H.; Lo, Veng-cheong; Huang, Haitao

    2012-09-01

    The critical behavior of the clock model in two-dimensional square lattice is studied numerically using Monte Carlo method with Wolff algorithm. The Kosterlitz-Thouless (KT) transition is observed in the 8-state clock model, where an intermediate phase exists between the low-temperature ordered phase and the high-temperature disordered phase. The bond randomness is introduced to the system by assuming a Gaussian distribution for the coupling coefficients with the mean μ = 1 and different values of variance: from σ2 = 0.1 to σ2 = 3.0. An abrupt jump in the helicity modulus at the transition, which is the key characteristic of the KT transition, is verified with a stability argument. Our results show that, a small amount of disorder (small σ) reduces the critical temperature of the system, without altering the nature of transition. However, a larger amount of disorder changes the transition from the KT-type into that of non-KT-type.

  4. Critical rotation of general-relativistic polytropic models revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geroyannis, V.; Karageorgopoulos, V.

    2013-09-01

    We develop a perturbation method for computing the critical rotational parameter as a function of the equatorial radius of a rigidly rotating polytropic model in the "post-Newtonia approximation" (PNA). We treat our models as "initial value problems" (IVP) of ordinary differential equations in the complex plane. The computations are carried out by the code dcrkf54.f95 (Geroyannis and Valvi 2012 [P1]; modified Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg code of fourth and fifth order for solving initial value problems in the complex plane). Such a complex-plane treatment removes the syndromes appearing in this particular family of IVPs (see e.g. P1, Sec. 3) and allows continuation of the numerical integrations beyond the surface of the star. Thus all the required values of the Lane-Emden function(s) in the post-Newtonian approximation are calculated by interpolation (so avoiding any extrapolation). An interesting point is that, in our computations, we take into account the complete correction due to the gravitational term, and this issue is a remarkable difference compared to the classical PNA. We solve the generalized density as a function of the equatorial radius and find the critical rotational parameter. Our computations are extended to certain other physical characteristics (like mass, angular momentum, rotational kinetic energy, etc). We find that our method yields results comparable with those of other reliable methods. REFERENCE: V.S. Geroyannis and F.N. Valvi 2012, International Journal of Modern Physics C, 23, No 5, 1250038:1-15.

  5. Modeling financial markets by self-organized criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondo, Alessio Emanuele; Pluchino, Alessandro; Rapisarda, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    We present a financial market model, characterized by self-organized criticality, that is able to generate endogenously a realistic price dynamics and to reproduce well-known stylized facts. We consider a community of heterogeneous traders, composed by chartists and fundamentalists, and focus on the role of informative pressure on market participants, showing how the spreading of information, based on a realistic imitative behavior, drives contagion and causes market fragility. In this model imitation is not intended as a change in the agent's group of origin, but is referred only to the price formation process. We introduce in the community also a variable number of random traders in order to study their possible beneficial role in stabilizing the market, as found in other studies. Finally, we also suggest some counterintuitive policy strategies able to dampen fluctuations by means of a partial reduction of information.

  6. Modeling financial markets by self-organized criticality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondo, Alessio Emanuele; Pluchino, Alessandro; Rapisarda, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    We present a financial market model, characterized by self-organized criticality, that is able to generate endogenously a realistic price dynamics and to reproduce well-known stylized facts. We consider a community of heterogeneous traders, composed by chartists and fundamentalists, and focus on the role of informative pressure on market participants, showing how the spreading of information, based on a realistic imitative behavior, drives contagion and causes market fragility. In this model imitation is not intended as a change in the agent's group of origin, but is referred only to the price formation process. We introduce in the community also a variable number of random traders in order to study their possible beneficial role in stabilizing the market, as found in other studies. Finally, we also suggest some counterintuitive policy strategies able to dampen fluctuations by means of a partial reduction of information.

  7. Modelling Financial Markets by Self-Organized Criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Biondo, A E; Rapisarda, A

    2015-01-01

    We present a financial market model, characterized by self-organized criticality, that is able to generate endogenously a realistic price dynamics and to reproduce well-known stylized facts. We consider a community of heterogeneous traders, composed by chartists and fundamentalists, and focus on the role of informative pressure on market participants, showing how the spreading of information, based on a realistic imitative behavior, drives contagion and causes market fragility. In this model imitation is not intended as a change in the agent's group of origin, but is referred only to the price formation process. We introduce in the community also a variable number of random traders in order to study their possible beneficial role in stabilizing the market, as found in other studies. Finally we also suggest some counterintuitive policy strategies able to dampen fluctuations by means of a partial reduction of information.

  8. The top five research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care: a consensus report from a European research collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockey David

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physician-manned emergency medical teams supplement other emergency medical services in some countries. These teams are often selectively deployed to patients who are considered likely to require critical care treatment in the pre-hospital phase. The evidence base for guidelines for pre-hospital triage and immediate medical care is often poor. We used a recognised consensus methodology to define key priority areas for research within the subfield of physician-provided pre-hospital critical care. Methods A European expert panel participated in a consensus process based upon a four-stage modified nominal group technique that included a consensus meeting. Results The expert panel concluded that the five most important areas for further research in the field of physician-based pre-hospital critical care were the following: Appropriate staffing and training in pre-hospital critical care and the effect on outcomes, advanced airway management in pre-hospital care, definition of time windows for key critical interventions which are indicated in the pre-hospital phase of care, the role of pre-hospital ultrasound and dispatch criteria for pre-hospital critical care services. Conclusion A modified nominal group technique was successfully used by a European expert group to reach consensus on the most important research priorities in physician-provided pre-hospital critical care.

  9. Hierarchical, model-based risk management of critical infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baiardi, F. [Polo G.Marconi La Spezia, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Informatica, Universita di Pisa, L.go B.Pontecorvo 3 56127, Pisa (Italy)], E-mail: f.baiardi@unipi.it; Telmon, C.; Sgandurra, D. [Dipartimento di Informatica, Universita di Pisa, L.go B.Pontecorvo 3 56127, Pisa (Italy)

    2009-09-15

    Risk management is a process that includes several steps, from vulnerability analysis to the formulation of a risk mitigation plan that selects countermeasures to be adopted. With reference to an information infrastructure, we present a risk management strategy that considers a sequence of hierarchical models, each describing dependencies among infrastructure components. A dependency exists anytime a security-related attribute of a component depends upon the attributes of other components. We discuss how this notion supports the formal definition of risk mitigation plan and the evaluation of the infrastructure robustness. A hierarchical relation exists among models that are analyzed because each model increases the level of details of some components in a previous one. Since components and dependencies are modeled through a hypergraph, to increase the model detail level, some hypergraph nodes are replaced by more and more detailed hypergraphs. We show how critical information for the assessment can be automatically deduced from the hypergraph and define conditions that determine cases where a hierarchical decomposition simplifies the assessment. In these cases, the assessment has to analyze the hypergraph that replaces the component rather than applying again all the analyses to a more detailed, and hence larger, hypergraph. We also show how the proposed framework supports the definition of a risk mitigation plan and discuss some indicators of the overall infrastructure robustness. Lastly, the development of tools to support the assessment is discussed.

  10. Determining the critical size of a rabbit rib segmental bone defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengzhen; Chen, Kun; Hou, Lei; Li, Keyi; Wang, Dawei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Xiumei

    2016-10-01

    In order to establish and standardize the rabbit rib segmental bone defect model, it is of vital importance to determine rabbit rib critical size defect (CSD). According to the general time needed for spontaneous long-bone regeneration, three-month observation period was set to determine the CSD. The rabbit rib segmental bone defects with different sizes from 1 to 5 cm with or without periosteum were performed in the eighth rib of 4-month-old male New Zealand rabbits and underwent X-ray examinations at the 4th, 8th and 12th weeks postoperatively. The gross and histological examinations at postoperative week 12 were evaluated, which showed that the critical sizes in the rabbit rib models with and without periosteum were 5 and 2 cm, respectively. This study provides prerequisite data for establishing rabbit rib CSD model and evaluating bone materials using this model.

  11. Critically Reflective Pedagogical Model: a Pragmatic Blueprint for Enhancing Learning and Teaching in Construction Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imriyas Kamardeen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available University lecturers who aspire to provide an improved learning experience for their students continually, and be recognised for high quality teaching should embrace a critically reflective practice. Nonetheless, developing as a reflective lecturer is challenging, although there are pedagogical literatures as general guidelines. This study introduces a new pedagogical model of critically reflective practice to simplify the efforts for lecturers and to shorten their journey to becoming effective teachers. A two-phased action research strategy was adopted for the development and validation of the new model. The first phase operationalised the Brookfield’s four-lens framework to create a reflective teaching practice model, which was then validated with a case study in the second phase. The model offers a pragmatic blueprint for lecturers to build a career with sustained quality of teaching, which in turn translates into improved learning experiences for students.

  12. Sadness, tragedy and mass disaster in Oklahoma City: providing critical incident stress debriefings to a community in crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J A

    1996-04-01

    Shortly after 09:00 h on 19 April 1995, the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, located in downtown Oklahoma City, was devastated with a bomb blast of such gigantic proportions that it was heard 60 miles away in neighbouring Norman, Oklahoma. Oklahomans routinely commuting to work on that sunny Wednesday morning went about their business as usual. A crude bomb chemically comprised of various organic compounds, chemical fertilizer, ammonium nitrate and diesel fuel, weighing an estimated 4800 pounds or more, was transported in a vehicle the size of a truck. It blew open a crater 6-8 ft deep in the street floor. The Murrah Federal Building was impacted immediately; floors, windows, communication equipment and almost all the innocent victims inside were razed to the ground. Outside the building, as far as 10 blocks away or more, hundreds of victims lay hurt, seriously injured or dead from shards of glass that flew from office windows hundreds of feet above the street floor. Without warning, the initial impact of the bomb immediately devastated the entire city. People were in a state of shock, disbelief and denial; acute symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) were commonplace. Oklahomans, 'numb' from the impact of the critical incident and ill-equipped to handle the chaos of such catastrophic proportions, struggled to regain control of their lives as friends, family and loved ones went unaccounted for or were found critically injured, dying or already dead. The critical incident on 19 April demanded the immediate attention of the nation, to come to the aid of the Oklahomans who were in desperate need. By 1 June, the exhaustive investigations revealed that 30 office buildings in downtown Oklahoma City had to be condemned, and as many as 300 others were damaged. In addition, 168 people had been found dead including 19 children and one nurse working as an emergency services rescue worker. Approximately 490 other victims had been reported injured from the blast

  13. Developing Critical and Creative Thinkers: Toward a Conceptual Model of Creative and Critical Thinking Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Liesl Baum; Cennamo, Katherine S.; Newbill, Phyllis Leary

    2009-01-01

    Critical and creative thinking skills are essential for students who plan to work and excel in the 21st-century workforce. This goal of the project reported in this article was to define critical and creative thinking in a way that would be useful for classroom teachers charged with developing such skills in their students. To accomplish their…

  14. Uncertainty modelling of critical column buckling for reinforced concrete buildings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kasim A Korkmaz; Fuat Demir; Hamide Tekeli

    2011-04-01

    Buckling is a critical issue for structural stability in structural design. In most of the buckling analyses, applied loads, structural and material properties are considered certain. However, in reality, these parameters are uncertain. Therefore, a prognostic solution is necessary and uncertainties have to be considered. Fuzzy logic algorithms can be a solution to generate more dependable results. This study investigates the material uncertainties on column design and proposes an uncertainty model for critical column buckling reinforced concrete buildings. Fuzzy logic algorithm was employed in the study. Lower and upper bounds of elastic modulus representing material properties were defined to take uncertainties into account. The results show that uncertainties play an important role in stability analyses and should be considered in the design. The proposed approach is applicable to both future numerical and experimental researches. According to the study results, it is seen that, calculated buckling load values are stayed in lower and upper bounds while the load values are different for same concrete strength values by using different code formula.

  15. The Critical Point Entanglement and Chaos in the Dicke Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Bao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ground state properties and level statistics of the Dicke model for a finite number of atoms are investigated based on a progressive diagonalization scheme (PDS. Particle number statistics, the entanglement measure and the Shannon information entropy at the resonance point in cases with a finite number of atoms as functions of the coupling parameter are calculated. It is shown that the entanglement measure defined in terms of the normalized von Neumann entropy of the reduced density matrix of the atoms reaches its maximum value at the critical point of the quantum phase transition where the system is most chaotic. Noticeable change in the Shannon information entropy near or at the critical point of the quantum phase transition is also observed. In addition, the quantum phase transition may be observed not only in the ground state mean photon number and the ground state atomic inversion as shown previously, but also in fluctuations of these two quantities in the ground state, especially in the atomic inversion fluctuation.

  16. Seeing the Forest through the Trees: Citizen Scientists Provide Critical Data to Refine Aboveground Carbon Estimates in Restored Riparian Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viers, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    Integrating citizen scientists into ecological informatics research can be difficult due to limited opportunities for meaningful engagement given vast data streams. This is particularly true for analysis of remotely sensed data, which are increasingly being used to quantify ecosystem services over space and time, and to understand how land uses deliver differing values to humans and thus inform choices about future human actions. Carbon storage and sequestration are such ecosystem services, and recent environmental policy advances in California (i.e., AB 32) have resulted in a nascent carbon market that is helping fuel the restoration of riparian forests in agricultural landscapes. Methods to inventory and monitor aboveground carbon for market accounting are increasingly relying on hyperspatial remotely sensed data, particularly the use of light detection and ranging (LiDAR) technologies, to estimate biomass. Because airborne discrete return LiDAR can inexpensively capture vegetation structural differences at high spatial resolution ( 1000 ha), its use is rapidly increasing, resulting in vast stores of point cloud and derived surface raster data. While established algorithms can quantify forest canopy structure efficiently, the highly complex nature of native riparian forests can result in highly uncertain estimates of biomass due to differences in composition (e.g., species richness, age class) and structure (e.g., stem density). This study presents the comparative results of standing carbon estimates refined with field data collected by citizen scientists at three different sites, each capturing a range of agricultural, remnant forest, and restored forest cover types. These citizen science data resolve uncertainty in composition and structure, and improve allometric scaling models of biomass and thus estimates of aboveground carbon. Results indicate that agricultural land and horticulturally restored riparian forests store similar amounts of aboveground carbon

  17. Techniques and Technology to Revise Content Delivery and Model Critical Thinking in the Neuroscience Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illig, Kurt R

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate neuroscience courses typically involve highly interdisciplinary material, and it is often necessary to use class time to review how principles of chemistry, math and biology apply to neuroscience. Lecturing and Socratic discussion can work well to deliver information to students, but these techniques can lead students to feel more like spectators than participants in a class, and do not actively engage students in the critical analysis and application of experimental evidence. If one goal of undergraduate neuroscience education is to foster critical thinking skills, then the classroom should be a place where students and instructors can work together to develop them. Students learn how to think critically by directly engaging with course material, and by discussing evidence with their peers, but taking classroom time for these activities requires that an instructor find a way to provide course materials outside of class. Using technology as an on-demand provider of course materials can give instructors the freedom to restructure classroom time, allowing students to work together in small groups and to have discussions that foster critical thinking, and allowing the instructor to model these skills. In this paper, I provide a rationale for reducing the use of traditional lectures in favor of more student-centered activities, I present several methods that can be used to deliver course materials outside of class and discuss their use, and I provide a few examples of how these techniques and technologies can help improve learning outcomes.

  18. Acute liver failure: a critical appraisal of available animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Mireille; Butterworth, Roger F

    2005-12-01

    The availability of adequate experimental models of acute liver failure (ALF) is of prime importance to provide a better understanding of this condition and allow the development and testing of new therapeutic approaches for patients with ALF. However, the numerous etiologies and complications of ALF contribute to the complexity of this condition and render the development of an ideal experimental model of ALF more difficult than expected. Instead, a number of different models that may be used for the study of specific aspects of ALF have been developed. The most common approaches used to induce ALFin experimental animals are surgical procedures, toxic liver injury,or a combination of both. Despite the high prevalence of viral hepatitis worldwide, very few satisfactory viral models of ALF are available. Established and newly developed models of ALF are reviewed.

  19. Self-organized criticality in a computer network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan; Ren; Shan

    2000-02-01

    We study the collective behavior of computer network nodes by using a cellular automaton model. The results show that when the load of network is constant, the throughputs and buffer contents of nodes are power-law distributed in both space and time. Also the feature of 1/f noise appears in the power spectrum of the change of the number of nodes that bear a fixed part of the system load. It can be seen as yet another example of self-organized criticality. Power-law decay in the distribution of buffer contents implies that heavy network congestion occurs with small probability. The temporal power-law distribution for throughput might be a reasonable explanation for the observed self-similarity in computer network traffic.

  20. Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: Reviewing Current Best Practice to Provide High-Quality Extracorporeal Therapy to Critically Ill Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Michael J; Karakala, Nithin

    2017-07-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) use continues to expand globally. Despite improving technology, CRRT remains a complex intervention. Delivery of high-quality CRRT requires close collaboration of a multidisciplinary team including members of the critical care medicine, nephrology, nursing, pharmacy, and nutrition support teams. While significant gaps in medical evidence regarding CRRT persist, the growing evidence base supports evolving best practice and consensus to define high-quality CRRT. Unfortunately, there is wide variability in CRRT operating characteristics and limited uptake of these best practices. This article will briefly review the current best practice on important aspects of CRRT delivery including CRRT dose, anticoagulation, dialysis vascular access, fluid management, and drug dosing in CRRT. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Critical properties of a dilute O(n) model on the kagome lattice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, B.; Guo, W.; Blöte, H.W.J.

    2008-01-01

    A critical dilute O(n) model on the kagome lattice is investigated analytically and numerically. We employ a number of exact equivalences which, in a few steps, link the critical O(n) spin model on the kagome lattice to the exactly solvable critical q-state Potts model on the honeycomb lattice with

  2. Critical, statistical, and thermodynamical properties of lattice models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varma, Vipin Kerala

    2013-10-15

    In this thesis we investigate zero temperature and low temperature properties - critical, statistical and thermodynamical - of lattice models in the contexts of bosonic cold atom systems, magnetic materials, and non-interacting particles on various lattice geometries. We study quantum phase transitions in the Bose-Hubbard model with higher body interactions, as relevant for optical lattice experiments of strongly interacting bosons, in one and two dimensions; the universality of the Mott insulator to superfluid transition is found to remain unchanged for even large three body interaction strengths. A systematic renormalization procedure is formulated to fully re-sum these higher (three and four) body interactions into the two body terms. In the strongly repulsive limit, we analyse the zero and low temperature physics of interacting hard-core bosons on the kagome lattice at various fillings. Evidence for a disordered phase in the Ising limit of the model is presented; in the strong coupling limit, the transition between the valence bond solid and the superfluid is argued to be first order at the tip of the solid lobe.

  3. Modeling Critical Forest Habitat in the Southern Coal Fields of West Virginia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E. Maxwell

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the Central Appalachians of the United States resource extraction primarily from coal mining has contributed to the majority of the forest conversion to barren and reclaimed pasture and grass. The loss of forests in this ecoregion is significantly impacting biodiversity at a regional scale. Since not all forest stands provide equal levels of ecological functions, it is critical to identify and map existing forested resources by the benefits that accrue from their unique spatial patterns, watershed drainage, and landscape positions. We utilized spatial analysis and remote sensing techniques to define critical forest characteristics. The characteristics were defined by applying a forest fragmentation model utilizing morphological image analysis, defining headwater catchments at a 1 : 24,000 scale, and deriving ecological land units (ELUs from elevation data. Once critical forest values were calculated, it was possible to identify clusters of critical stands using spatial statistics. This spatially explicit method for modeling forest habitat could be implemented as a tool for assessing the impact of resource extraction and aid in the conservation of critical forest habitat throughout a landscape.

  4. Mouse xenograft modeling of human adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia provides mechanistic insights into adult LIC biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Aditi; Castleton, Anna Z.; Schwab, Claire; Samuel, Edward; Sivakumaran, Janani; Beaton, Brendan; Zareian, Nahid; Zhang, Christie Yu; Rai, Lena; Enver, Tariq; Moorman, Anthony V.; Fielding, Adele K.

    2014-01-01

    The distinct nature of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adults, evidenced by inferior treatment outcome and different genetic landscape, mandates specific studies of disease-initiating mechanisms. In this study, we used NOD/LtSz-scid IL2Rγ nullc (NSG) mouse xenotransplantation approaches to elucidate leukemia-initiating cell (LIC) biology in primary adult precursor B (pre-B) ALL to optimize disease modeling. In contrast with xenografting studies of pediatric ALL, we found that modification of the NSG host environment using preconditioning total body irradiation (TBI) was indispensable for efficient engraftment of adult non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL, whereas t(4;11) pre-B ALL was successfully reconstituted without this adaptation. Furthermore, TBI-based xenotransplantation of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL enabled detection of a high frequency of LICs (<1:6900) and permitted frank leukemic engraftment from a remission sample containing drug-resistant minimal residual disease. Investigation of TBI-sensitive stromal-derived factor-1/chemokine receptor type 4 signaling revealed greater functional dependence of non-t(4;11) pre-B ALL on this niche-based interaction, providing a possible basis for the differential engraftment behavior. Thus, our studies establish the optimal conditions for experimental modeling of human adult pre-B ALL and demonstrate the critical protumorogenic role of microenvironment-derived SDF-1 in regulating adult pre-B LIC activity that may present a therapeutic opportunity. PMID:24825861

  5. An agent-based simulation model of patient choice of health care providers in accountable care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibrahim, Abdullah; Wu, Shinyi

    2016-10-04

    Accountable care organizations (ACO) in the United States show promise in controlling health care costs while preserving patients' choice of providers. Understanding the effects of patient choice is critical in novel payment and delivery models like ACO that depend on continuity of care and accountability. The financial, utilization, and behavioral implications associated with a patient's decision to forego local health care providers for more distant ones to access higher quality care remain unknown. To study this question, we used an agent-based simulation model of a health care market composed of providers able to form ACO serving patients and embedded it in a conditional logit decision model to examine patients capable of choosing their care providers. This simulation focuses on Medicare beneficiaries and their congestive heart failure (CHF) outcomes. We place the patient agents in an ACO delivery system model in which provider agents decide if they remain in an ACO and perform a quality improving CHF disease management intervention. Illustrative results show that allowing patients to choose their providers reduces the yearly payment per CHF patient by $320, reduces mortality rates by 0.12 percentage points and hospitalization rates by 0.44 percentage points, and marginally increases provider participation in ACO. This study demonstrates a model capable of quantifying the effects of patient choice in a theoretical ACO system and provides a potential tool for policymakers to understand implications of patient choice and assess potential policy controls.

  6. [Interventional Patient Hygiene Model. A critical reflection on basic nursing care in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambi, Stefano; Lucchini, Alberto; Solaro, Massimo; Lumini, Enrico; Rasero, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Interventional Patient Hygiene Model. A critical reflection on basic nursing care in intensive care units. Over the past 15 years, the model of medical and nursing care changed from being exclusively oriented to the diagnosis and treatment of acute illness, to the achievement of outcomes by preventing iatrogenic complications (Hospital Acquired Conditions). Nursing Sensitive Outcomes show as nursing is directly involved in the development and prevention of these complications. Many of these complications, including falls from the bed, use of restraints, urinary catheter associated urinary infections and intravascular catheter related sepsis, are related to basic nursing care. Ten years ago in critical care, a school of thought called get back to the basics, was started for the prevention of errors and risks associated with nursing. Most of these nursing practices involve hygiene and mobilization. On the basis of these reflections, Kathleen Vollman developed a model of nursing care in critical care area, defined Interventional Patient Hygiene (IPH). The IPH model provides a proactive plan of nursing interventions to strengthen the patients' through the Evidence-Based Nursing Care. The components of the model include interventions of oral hygiene, mobilization, dressing changes, urinary catheter care, management of incontinence and bed bath, hand hygiene and skin antisepsis. The implementation of IPH model follows the steps of Deming cycle, and requires a deep reflection on the priorities of nursing care in ICU, as well as the effective teaching of the importance of the basic nursing to new generations of nurses.

  7. Can Thromboelastography performed on kaolin-activated citrated samples from critically ill patients provide stable and consistent parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, H; Zollinger, C; Jones, M; Bird, R

    2010-04-01

    Thromboelastography (TEG) is a potentially useful tool but analysis within 4-6 min of collection imposes limitations on its use and access. The use of citrate blood tubes potentially increases the time frame for processing specimens. There is, however, limited research on the stability of citrate specimens, timing of processing and the accuracy of TEG results. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of early and delayed processing on TEG parameters using kaolin-activated citrated blood samples in the intensive care population. TEG analysis was performed on 61 patients. Blood was collected into two 3.2% sodium citrate (0.105 m) tubes. Kaolin-activated samples were analysed at 15, 30 and 120 min postcollection. TEG parameters analysed included reaction time (R), clot formation time (K), alpha angle (alpha), maximum amplitude, LY30, the coagulation index, time to maximum rate of thrombus generation, maximum rate of thrombus generation and total thrombus generation. Sixty-one critically ill patients were included. The results of the anova showed that time from collection was significantly associated with the TEG((R)) results (P kaolin-activated citrate TEG specimens can begin as early as 15 min postvenipuncture. However, delaying processing by more than 30 min leads to a significant change in results.

  8. Rdh10a Provides a Conserved Critical Step in the Synthesis of Retinoic Acid during Zebrafish Embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico D'Aniello

    Full Text Available The first step in the conversion of vitamin A into retinoic acid (RA in embryos requires retinol dehydrogenases (RDHs. Recent studies have demonstrated that RDH10 is a critical core component of the machinery that produces RA in mouse and Xenopus embryos. If the conservation of Rdh10 function in the production of RA extends to teleost embryos has not been investigated. Here, we report that zebrafish Rdh10a deficient embryos have defects consistent with loss of RA signaling, including anteriorization of the nervous system and enlarged hearts with increased cardiomyocyte number. While knockdown of Rdh10a alone produces relatively mild RA deficient phenotypes, Rdh10a can sensitize embryos to RA deficiency and enhance phenotypes observed when Aldh1a2 function is perturbed. Moreover, excess Rdh10a enhances embryonic sensitivity to retinol, which has relatively mild teratogenic effects compared to retinal and RA treatment. Performing Rdh10a regulatory expression analysis, we also demonstrate that a conserved teleost rdh10a enhancer requires Pax2 sites to drive expression in the eyes of transgenic embryos. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Rdh10a has a conserved requirement in the first step of RA production within vertebrate embryos.

  9. Critical behavior of the random-bond Ashkin-Teller model: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Shai; Domany, Eytan

    1995-04-01

    The critical behavior of a bond-disordered Ashkin-Teller model on a square lattice is investigated by intensive Monte Carlo simulations. A duality transformation is used to locate a critical plane of the disordered model. This critical plane corresponds to the line of critical points of the pure model, along which critical exponents vary continuously. Along this line the scaling exponent corresponding to randomness φ=(α/ν) varies continuously and is positive so that the randomness is relevant, and different critical behavior is expected for the disordered model. We use a cluster algorithm for the Monte Carlo simulations based on the Wolff embedding idea, and perform a finite size scaling study of several critical models, extrapolating between the critical bond-disordered Ising and bond-disordered four-state Potts models. The critical behavior of the disordered model is compared with the critical behavior of an anisotropic Ashkin-Teller model, which is used as a reference pure model. We find no essential change in the order parameters' critical exponents with respect to those of the pure model. The divergence of the specific heat C is changed dramatically. Our results favor a logarithmic type divergence at Tc, C~lnL for the random-bond Ashkin-Teller and four-state Potts models and C~ln lnL for the random-bond Ising model.

  10. A Model Of Critical Peer Feedback To Facilitate Business English Writing Using Qzone Weblogs Among Chinese Undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Xianwei

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore critical thinking skills in peer feedback for Business English writing in order to facilitate the quality of peer feedback and quality of Business English writing. “Critical peer feedback” was conceptualized with the integration of “critical thinking” and “peer feedback” in order to improve the quality of peer feedback. This study explored the process, content and factors of critical peer feedback through Qzone weblogs, and summarized the model of critical peer feedback. A qualitative case study was conducted with a group of six junior students majoring in Business English for one semester in a Chinese university. Three models of critical thinking including Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy, Paul-Elder Model and Reichenbach’s Six Steps Model, were transferred to the participants in the workshops. Three kinds of data including semi-structured interview transcripts, six writing assignments and artifacts of critical peer feedback, were analyzed by QSR NVivo 8. The findings revealed that the Revised Bloom’s Taxonomy is more acceptable for the beginners of critical peer feedback which provides a six-step model of critical thinking. The process of critical peer feedback in online context was summarized as four steps- “intake”, “critical thinking”, “output”, and “post-output”. Each of the four steps had several mental processes in critical peer feedback. This study may be significant for the knowledge of higher-order peer feedback to facilitate the quality of higher-level writing.

  11. Critical Differences of Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection from Standard Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, S.; Wada, T.; Fuchida, T.; Kondoh, K.

    2016-09-01

    We have clarified the structure of asymmetric magnetic reconnection in detail as the result of the spontaneous evolutionary process. The asymmetry is imposed as ratio k of the magnetic field strength in both sides of the initial current sheet (CS) in the isothermal equilibrium. The MHD simulation is carried out by the HLLD code for the long-term temporal evolution with very high spatial resolution. The resultant structure is drastically different from the symmetric case (e.g., the Petschek model) even for slight asymmetry k = 2. (1) The velocity distribution in the reconnection jet clearly shows a two-layered structure, i.e., the high-speed sub-layer in which the flow is almost field aligned and the acceleration sub-layer. (2) Higher beta side (HBS) plasma is caught in a lower beta side plasmoid. This suggests a new plasma mixing process in the reconnection events. (3) A new large strong fast shock in front of the plasmoid forms in the HBS. This can be a new particle acceleration site in the reconnection system. These critical properties that have not been reported in previous works suggest that we contribute to a better and more detailed knowledge of the reconnection of the standard model for the symmetric magnetic reconnection system.

  12. An integrated Biophysical CGE model to provide Sustainable Development Goal insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Marko; Cicowiez, Martin; Howells, Mark; Zepeda, Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Future projected changes in the energy system will inevitably result in changes to the level of appropriation of environmental resources, particularly land and water, and this will have wider implications for environmental sustainability, and may affect other sectors of the economy. An integrated climate, land, energy and water (CLEW) system will provide useful insights, particularly with regard to the environmental sustainability. However, it will require adequate integration with other tools to detect economic impacts and broaden the scope for policy analysis. A computable general equilibrium (CGE) model is a well suited tool to channel impacts, as detected in a CLEW analysis, onto all sectors of the economy, and evaluate trade-offs and synergies, including those of possible policy responses. This paper will show an application of such integration in a single-country CGE model with the following key characteristics. Climate is partly exogenous (as proxied by temperature and rainfall) and partly endogenous (as proxied by emissions generated by different sectors) and has an impact on endogenous variables such as land productivity and labor productivity. Land is a factor of production used in agricultural and forestry activities which can be of various types if land use alternatives (e.g., deforestation) are to be considered. Energy is an input to the production process of all economic sectors and a consumption good for households. Because it is possible to allow for substitution among different energy sources (e.g. renewable vs non-renewable) in the generation of electricity, the production process of energy products can consider the use of natural resources such as oil and water. Water, data permitting, can be considered as an input into the production process of agricultural sectors, which is particularly relevant in case of irrigation. It can also be considered as a determinant of total factor productivity in hydro-power generation. The integration of a CLEW

  13. Alternative Reimbursement Models: Bundled Payment and Beyond: AOA Critical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, A Seth; Bassano, Amy; Wiggins, Stephen; Froimson, Mark I

    2016-06-01

    The Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) initiative was begun in January 2013 by the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) through its Innovation Center authority, which was created by the U.S. Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA). The BPCI program seeks to improve health-care delivery and to ultimately reduce costs by allowing providers to enter into prenegotiated payment arrangements that include financial and performance accountability for a clinical episode in which a risk-and-reward calculus must be determined. BPCI is a contemporary 3-year experiment designed to test the applicability of episode-based payment models as a viable strategy to transform the CMS payment methodology while improving health outcomes. A summary of the 4 models being evaluated in the BPCI initiative is presented in addition to the awardee types and the number of awardees in each model. Data from one of the BPCI-designated pilot sites demonstrate that strategies do exist for successful implementation of an alternative payment model by keeping patients first while simultaneously improving coordination, alignment of care, and quality and reducing cost. Providers will need to embrace change and their areas of opportunity to gain a competitive advantage. Health-care providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, health-care professionals at post-acute care institutions, and product suppliers, all have a role in determining the strategies for success. Open dialogue between CMS and awardees should be encouraged to arrive at a solution that provides opportunity for gainsharing, as this program continues to gain traction and to evolve.

  14. Work-related critical incidents in hospital-based health care providers and the risk of post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, and depression: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Jacoba; Lok, Anja; Van't Verlaat, Ellen; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Bakker, Arnold B; Smit, Bert J

    2011-07-01

    This meta-analysis reviewed existing data on the impact of work-related critical incidents in hospital-based health care professionals. Work-related critical incidents may induce post-traumatic stress symptoms or even post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and depression and may negatively affect health care practitioners' behaviors toward patients. Nurses and doctors often cope by working part time or switching jobs. Hospital administrators and health care practitioners themselves may underestimate the effects of work-related critical incidents. Relevant online databases were searched for original research published from inception to 2009 and manual searches of the Journal of Traumatic Stress, reference lists, and the European Traumatic Stress Research Database were conducted. Two researchers independently decided on inclusion and study quality. Effect sizes were estimated using standardized mean differences with 95% confidence intervals. Consistency was evaluated, using the I(2)-statistic. Meta-analysis was performed using the random effects model. Eleven studies, which included 3866 participants, evaluated the relationship between work-related critical incidents and post-traumatic stress symptoms. Six of these studies, which included 1695 participants, also reported on the relationship between work-related critical incidents and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Heterogeneity among studies was high and could not be accounted for by study quality, character of the incident, or timing of data collection. Pooled effect sizes for the impact of work-related critical incidents on post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, and depression were small to medium. Remarkably, the effect was more pronounced in the longer than in the shorter term. In conclusion, this meta-analysis supports the hypothesis that work-related critical incidents are positively related to post-traumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, and depression in hospital-based health care professionals

  15. Quantitative Hydraulic Models Of Early Land Plants Provide Insight Into Middle Paleozoic Terrestrial Paleoenvironmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. P.; Fischer, W. W.

    2010-12-01

    Fossil plants provide useful proxies of Earth’s climate because plants are closely connected, through physiology and morphology, to the environments in which they lived. Recent advances in quantitative hydraulic models of plant water transport provide new insight into the history of climate by allowing fossils to speak directly to environmental conditions based on preserved internal anatomy. We report results of a quantitative hydraulic model applied to one of the earliest terrestrial plants preserved in three dimensions, the ~396 million-year-old vascular plant Asteroxylon mackei. This model combines equations describing the rate of fluid flow through plant tissues with detailed observations of plant anatomy; this allows quantitative estimates of two critical aspects of plant function. First and foremost, results from these models quantify the supply of water to evaporative surfaces; second, results describe the ability of plant vascular systems to resist tensile damage from extreme environmental events, such as drought or frost. This approach permits quantitative comparisons of functional aspects of Asteroxylon with other extinct and extant plants, informs the quality of plant-based environmental proxies, and provides concrete data that can be input into climate models. Results indicate that despite their small size, water transport cells in Asteroxylon could supply a large volume of water to the plant's leaves--even greater than cells from some later-evolved seed plants. The smallest Asteroxylon tracheids have conductivities exceeding 0.015 m^2 / MPa * s, whereas Paleozoic conifer tracheids do not reach this threshold until they are three times wider. However, this increase in conductivity came at the cost of little to no adaptations for transport safety, placing the plant’s vegetative organs in jeopardy during drought events. Analysis of the thickness-to-span ratio of Asteroxylon’s tracheids suggests that environmental conditions of reduced relative

  16. Improving Critical Thinking Skills of College Students through RMS Model for Learning Basic Concepts in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlisin, Ahmad; Susilo, Herawati; Amin, Mohamad; Rohman, Fatchur

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: 1) Examine the effect of RMS learning model towards critical thinking skills. 2) Examine the effect of different academic abilities against critical thinking skills. 3) Examine the effect of the interaction between RMS learning model and different academic abilities against critical thinking skills. The research…

  17. Improving Critical Thinking Skills of College Students through RMS Model for Learning Basic Concepts in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlisin, Ahmad; Susilo, Herawati; Amin, Mohamad; Rohman, Fatchur

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to: 1) Examine the effect of RMS learning model towards critical thinking skills. 2) Examine the effect of different academic abilities against critical thinking skills. 3) Examine the effect of the interaction between RMS learning model and different academic abilities against critical thinking skills. The research…

  18. Study of the ST2 model of water close to the liquid-liquid critical point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciortino, Francesco; Saika-Voivod, Ivan; Poole, Peter H

    2011-11-28

    We perform successive umbrella sampling grand canonical Monte Carlo computer simulations of the original ST2 model of water in the vicinity of the proposed liquid-liquid critical point, at temperatures above and below the critical temperature. Our results support the previous work of Y. Liu, A. Z. Panagiotopoulos and P. G. Debenedetti [J. Chem. Phys., 2009, 131, 104508], who provided evidence for the existence and location of the critical point for ST2 using the Ewald method to evaluate the long-range forces. Our results therefore demonstrate the robustness of the evidence for critical behavior with respect to the treatment of the electrostatic interactions. In addition, we verify that the liquid is equilibrated at all densities on the Monte Carlo time scale of our simulations, and also that there is no indication of crystal formation during our runs. These findings demonstrate that the processes of liquid-state relaxation and crystal nucleation are well separated in time. Therefore, the bimodal shape of the density of states, and hence the critical point itself, is a purely liquid-state phenomenon that is distinct from the crystal-liquid transition.

  19. Instructional Model of Critical Literacy in an EFL Context: Balancing Conventional and Critical Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Seonmin

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the general patterns of interactions between the teacher and students during the different instructional steps when the teacher attempted to incorporate both conventional skill-based reading and critical literacy in an English as a foreign language (EFL) literacy class in a Korean university. There has been a paucity of EFL…

  20. Instructional Model of Critical Literacy in an EFL Context: Balancing Conventional and Critical Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Seonmin

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the general patterns of interactions between the teacher and students during the different instructional steps when the teacher attempted to incorporate both conventional skill-based reading and critical literacy in an English as a foreign language (EFL) literacy class in a Korean university. There has been a paucity of EFL…

  1. Managing the complexity of critical infrastructures a modelling and simulation approach

    CERN Document Server

    Rosato, Vittorio; Kyriakides, Elias; Rome, Erich

    2016-01-01

    This book is open access under a CC BY 4.0 license. This book summarizes work being pursued in the context of the CIPRNet (Critical Infrastructure Preparedness and Resilience Research Network) research project, co-funded by the European Union under the Seventh Framework Programme (FP7). The project is intended to provide concrete and on-going support to the Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) research communities, enhancing their preparedness for CI-related emergencies, while also providing expertise and technologies for other stakeholders to promote their understanding and mitigation of the consequences of CI disruptions, leading to enhanced resilience. The book collects the tutorial material developed by the authors for several courses on the modelling, simulation and analysis of CIs, representing extensive and integrated CIP expertise. It will help CI stakeholders, CI operators and civil protection authorities understand the complex system of CIs, and help them adapt to these changes and threats in or...

  2. Phase diagram and criticality of the random anisotropy model in the large-N limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouhanna, Dominique; Tarjus, Gilles

    2016-12-01

    We revisit the thermodynamic behavior of the random-anisotropy O(N ) model by investigating its large-N limit. We focus on the system at zero temperature where the mean-field-like artifacts of the large-N limit are less severe. We analyze the connection between the description in terms of self-consistent Schwinger-Dyson equations and the functional renormalization group. We provide a unified description of the phase diagram and critical behavior of the model and clarify the nature of the possible "glassy" phases. Finally we discuss the implications of our findings for the finite-N and finite-temperature systems.

  3. Critical Analysis of the Quality, Readability, and Technical Aspects of Online Information Provided for Neck-Lifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayess, Hani; Zuliani, Giancarlo F; Gupta, Amar; Svider, Peter F; Folbe, Adam J; Eloy, Jean Anderson; Carron, Michael A

    2017-03-01

    The number of patients using the internet to obtain health information is growing. This material is unregulated and heterogeneous and can influence patient decisions. To compare the quality, readability, and technical aspects of online information about neck-lifts provided by private practice websites vs academic medical centers and reference sources. In this cross-sectional analysis conducted between November 2015 and January 2016, a Google search of the term neck-lift was performed, and the first 45 websites were evaluated. The websites were categorized as private practice vs other. Private websites (PWs) included sites created by private practice physicians. Other websites (OWs) were created by academic medical centers or reference sources. Quality, readability, and technical aspects of online websites related to neck-lifts. Quality was assessed using the DISCERN criteria and the Health on the Net principles (HONcode). Readability was assessed using 7 validated and widely used criteria. Consensus US reading grade level readability was provided by a website (readabilityformulas.com). Twelve technical aspects were evaluated based on criteria specified by medical website creators. Forty-five websites (8 OWs [18%] and 37 PWs [82%]) were analyzed. There was a significant difference in quality between OWs and PWs based on the DISCERN criteria and HONcode principles. The DISCERN overall mean (SD) scores were 2.3 (0.5) for OWs and 1.3 (0.3) for PWs (P analysis, the mean (SD) was 8.6 (1.8) (range, 5-11) for OW, and the mean (SD) was 5.8 (1.7) (range, 2-9) for PW. The mean (SD) readability consensus reading grade level scores were 11.7 (1.9) for OWs and 10.6 (1.9) for PWs. Of a total possible score of 12, the mean (SD) technical scores were 6.3 (1.8) (range, 4-9) for OWs and 6.4 (1.5) (range, 3-9) for PWs. Compared with PWs, OWs had a significantly higher quality score based on both the DISCERN criteria and HONcode principles. The mean readability for OWs and PWs was

  4. Queuing theory accurately models the need for critical care resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, Michael L; Long, Michael C; Cooper, Abbot; Litvak, Eugene

    2004-05-01

    Allocation of scarce resources presents an increasing challenge to hospital administrators and health policy makers. Intensive care units can present bottlenecks within busy hospitals, but their expansion is costly and difficult to gauge. Although mathematical tools have been suggested for determining the proper number of intensive care beds necessary to serve a given demand, the performance of such models has not been prospectively evaluated over significant periods. The authors prospectively collected 2 years' admission, discharge, and turn-away data in a busy, urban intensive care unit. Using queuing theory, they then constructed a mathematical model of patient flow, compared predictions from the model to observed performance of the unit, and explored the sensitivity of the model to changes in unit size. The queuing model proved to be very accurate, with predicted admission turn-away rates correlating highly with those actually observed (correlation coefficient = 0.89). The model was useful in predicting both monthly responsiveness to changing demand (mean monthly difference between observed and predicted values, 0.4+/-2.3%; range, 0-13%) and the overall 2-yr turn-away rate for the unit (21%vs. 22%). Both in practice and in simulation, turn-away rates increased exponentially when utilization exceeded 80-85%. Sensitivity analysis using the model revealed rapid and severe degradation of system performance with even the small changes in bed availability that might result from sudden staffing shortages or admission of patients with very long stays. The stochastic nature of patient flow may falsely lead health planners to underestimate resource needs in busy intensive care units. Although the nature of arrivals for intensive care deserves further study, when demand is random, queuing theory provides an accurate means of determining the appropriate supply of beds.

  5. Transfer matrix computation of critical polynomials for two-dimensional Potts models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykke Jacobsen, Jesper; Scullard, Christian R.

    2013-02-01

    In our previous work [1] we have shown that critical manifolds of the q-state Potts model can be studied by means of a graph polynomial PB(q, v), henceforth referred to as the critical polynomial. This polynomial may be defined on any periodic two-dimensional lattice. It depends on a finite subgraph B, called the basis, and the manner in which B is tiled to construct the lattice. The real roots v = eK - 1 of PB(q, v) either give the exact critical points for the lattice, or provide approximations that, in principle, can be made arbitrarily accurate by increasing the size of B in an appropriate way. In earlier work, PB(q, v) was defined by a contraction-deletion identity, similar to that satisfied by the Tutte polynomial. Here, we give a probabilistic definition of PB(q, v), which facilitates its computation, using the transfer matrix, on much larger B than was previously possible. We present results for the critical polynomial on the (4, 82), kagome, and (3, 122) lattices for bases of up to respectively 96, 162, and 243 edges, compared to the limit of 36 edges with contraction-deletion. We discuss in detail the role of the symmetries and the embedding of B. The critical temperatures vc obtained for ferromagnetic (v > 0) Potts models are at least as precise as the best available results from Monte Carlo simulations or series expansions. For instance, with q = 3 we obtain vc(4, 82) = 3.742 489 (4), vc(kagome) = 1.876 459 7 (2), and vc(3, 122) = 5.033 078 49 (4), the precision being comparable or superior to the best simulation results. More generally, we trace the critical manifolds in the real (q, v) plane and discuss the intricate structure of the phase diagram in the antiferromagnetic (v < 0) region.

  6. Microscopic approach to critical phenomena at interfaces: An application to complete wetting in the Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, A.; Parola, A.; Reatto, L.

    2004-11-01

    We study how the formalism of the hierarchical reference theory (HRT) can be extended to inhomogeneous systems. HRT is a liquid-state theory which implements the basic ideas of the Wilson momentum-shell renormalization group (RG) to microscopic Hamiltonians. In the case of homogeneous systems, HRT provides accurate results even in the critical region, where it reproduces scaling and nonclassical critical exponents. We applied the HRT to study wetting critical phenomena in a planar geometry. Our formalism avoids the explicit definition of effective surface Hamiltonians but leads, close to the wetting transition, to the same renormalization group equation already studied by RG techiques. However, HRT also provides information on the nonuniversal quantities because it does not require any preliminary coarse graining procedure. A simple approximation to the infinite HRT set of equations is discussed. The HRT evolution equation for the surface free energy is numerically integrated in a semi-infinite three-dimensional Ising model and the complete wetting phase transition is analyzed. A renormalization of the adsorption critical amplitude and of the wetting parameter is observed. Our results are compared to available Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Ecosystem-based fishery management: a critical review of concepts and ecological economic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thanh Viet

      An ecosystem approach means different things to different people. As a result the concept of ecosystem-based fishery management is evolving and it has no universal definition or consistent application. As regards ecosystem modeling, most economic models of fishery ignore the linkages to lower t...... trophic levels. In particular, environmental data and other bottom-up information is widely disregarded. The objective of this paper is to provide a critical review of concepts and ecological economic models relating to ecosystem-based fishery management.......  An ecosystem approach means different things to different people. As a result the concept of ecosystem-based fishery management is evolving and it has no universal definition or consistent application. As regards ecosystem modeling, most economic models of fishery ignore the linkages to lower...

  8. Avalanches in self-organized critical neural networks: a minimal model for the neural SOC universality class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybarsch, Matthias; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The brain keeps its overall dynamics in a corridor of intermediate activity and it has been a long standing question what possible mechanism could achieve this task. Mechanisms from the field of statistical physics have long been suggesting that this homeostasis of brain activity could occur even without a central regulator, via self-organization on the level of neurons and their interactions, alone. Such physical mechanisms from the class of self-organized criticality exhibit characteristic dynamical signatures, similar to seismic activity related to earthquakes. Measurements of cortex rest activity showed first signs of dynamical signatures potentially pointing to self-organized critical dynamics in the brain. Indeed, recent more accurate measurements allowed for a detailed comparison with scaling theory of non-equilibrium critical phenomena, proving the existence of criticality in cortex dynamics. We here compare this new evaluation of cortex activity data to the predictions of the earliest physics spin model of self-organized critical neural networks. We find that the model matches with the recent experimental data and its interpretation in terms of dynamical signatures for criticality in the brain. The combination of signatures for criticality, power law distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, as well as a specific scaling relationship between anomalous exponents, defines a universality class characteristic of the particular critical phenomenon observed in the neural experiments. Thus the model is a candidate for a minimal model of a self-organized critical adaptive network for the universality class of neural criticality. As a prototype model, it provides the background for models that may include more biological details, yet share the same universality class characteristic of the homeostasis of activity in the brain.

  9. Avalanches in self-organized critical neural networks: a minimal model for the neural SOC universality class.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Rybarsch

    Full Text Available The brain keeps its overall dynamics in a corridor of intermediate activity and it has been a long standing question what possible mechanism could achieve this task. Mechanisms from the field of statistical physics have long been suggesting that this homeostasis of brain activity could occur even without a central regulator, via self-organization on the level of neurons and their interactions, alone. Such physical mechanisms from the class of self-organized criticality exhibit characteristic dynamical signatures, similar to seismic activity related to earthquakes. Measurements of cortex rest activity showed first signs of dynamical signatures potentially pointing to self-organized critical dynamics in the brain. Indeed, recent more accurate measurements allowed for a detailed comparison with scaling theory of non-equilibrium critical phenomena, proving the existence of criticality in cortex dynamics. We here compare this new evaluation of cortex activity data to the predictions of the earliest physics spin model of self-organized critical neural networks. We find that the model matches with the recent experimental data and its interpretation in terms of dynamical signatures for criticality in the brain. The combination of signatures for criticality, power law distributions of avalanche sizes and durations, as well as a specific scaling relationship between anomalous exponents, defines a universality class characteristic of the particular critical phenomenon observed in the neural experiments. Thus the model is a candidate for a minimal model of a self-organized critical adaptive network for the universality class of neural criticality. As a prototype model, it provides the background for models that may include more biological details, yet share the same universality class characteristic of the homeostasis of activity in the brain.

  10. A state-of-the-art report on two-phase critical flow modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jae Joon; Jang, Won Pyo; Kim, Dong Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-01

    This report reviews and analyses two-phase, critical flow models. The purposes of the report are (1) to make a knowledge base for the full understanding and best-estimate of two-phase, critical flow, (2) to analyse the model development trend and to derive the direction of further studies. A wide range of critical flow models are reviewed. Each model, in general, predicts critical flow well only within specified conditions. The critical flow models of best-estimate codes are special process model included in the hydrodynamic model. The results of calculations depend on the nodalization, discharge coefficient, and other user`s options. The following topics are recommended for continuing studies: improvement of two-fluid model, development of multidimensional model, data base setup and model error evaluation, and generalization of discharge coefficients. 24 figs., 5 tabs., 80 refs. (Author).

  11. An actor-partner interdependence model of spousal criticism and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kristina M; Smith, David A

    2010-08-01

    Although perceived criticism is relational, most theory and research concerns only relatives' criticism toward patients and not the converse. With a sample of 33 depressed patients and their spouses, we take a fully relational approach to criticism by testing an actor-partner interdependence model (Kenny, Kashy, & Cook, 2006). Patient intended criticism was especially strongly associated with depressive symptoms for wives, whereas patient perceived criticism was especially negatively related to depressive symptoms for husbands. Nondepressed partner intended criticism was positively related to patient depressive symptoms, but nondepressed wife perceived criticism was negatively related to husband depressive symptoms. The importance of including patient intended and partner perceived criticism as well as examining sex differences in models of criticism and depression are discussed.

  12. Accurate Critical Parameters for the Modified Lennard-Jones Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kazuma; Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    The critical parameters of the modified Lennard-Jones system were examined. The isothermal-isochoric ensemble was generated by conducting a molecular dynamics simulation for the system consisting of 6912, 8788, 10976, and 13500 particles. The equilibrium between the liquid and vapor phases was judged from the chemical potential of both phases upon establishing the coexistence envelope, from which the critical temperature and density were obtained invoking the renormalization group theory. The finite-size scaling enabled us to finally determine the critical temperature, pressure, and density as Tc = 1.0762(2), pc = 0.09394(17), and ρc = 0.331(3), respectively.

  13. Curing critical links in oscillator networks as power grid models

    CERN Document Server

    Rohden, Martin; Timme, Marc; Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    Modern societies crucially depend on the robust supply with electric energy. Blackouts of power grids can thus have far reaching consequences. During a blackout, often the failure of a single infrastructure, such as a critical transmission line, results in several subsequent failures that spread across large parts of the network. Preventing such large-scale outages is thus key for assuring a reliable power supply. Here we present a non-local curing strategy for oscillatory power grid networks based on the global collective redistribution of loads. We first identify critical links and compute residual capacities on alternative paths on the remaining network from the original flows. For each critical link, we upgrade lines that constitute bottlenecks on such paths. We demonstrate the viability of this strategy for random ensembles of network topologies as well as topologies derived from real transmission grids and compare the nonlocal strategy against local back-ups of critical links. These strategies are indep...

  14. relevance of information warfare models to critical infrastructure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ismith

    Department of Homeland Security defines critical infrastructure as “the assets, systems, and networks, whether physical or virtual, so vital to the United States that ... result in noticeable effects in the information, energy or physical distribution ...

  15. A Critical Survey of Optimization Models for Tactical and Strategic Aspects of Air Traffic Flow Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsimas, Dimitris; Odoni, Amedeo

    1997-01-01

    This document presents a critical review of the principal existing optimization models that have been applied to Air Traffic Flow Management (TFM). Emphasis will be placed on two problems, the Generalized Tactical Flow Management Problem (GTFMP) and the Ground Holding Problem (GHP), as well as on some of their variations. To perform this task, we have carried out an extensive literature review that has covered more than 40 references, most of them very recent. Based on the review of this emerging field our objectives were to: (i) identify the best available models; (ii) describe typical contexts for applications of the models; (iii) provide illustrative model formulations; and (iv) identify the methodologies that can be used to solve the models. We shall begin our presentation below by providing a brief context for the models that we are reviewing. In Section 3 we shall offer a taxonomy and identify four classes of models for review. In Sections 4, 5, and 6 we shall then review, respectively, models for the Single-Airport Ground Holding Problem, the Generalized Tactical FM P and the Multi-Airport Ground Holding Problem (for the definition of these problems see Section 3 below). In each section, we identify the best available models and discuss briefly their computational performance and applications, if any, to date. Section 7 summarizes our conclusions about the state of the art.

  16. Micromagnetic modeling of critical current oscillations in magnetic Josephson junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Bol'ginov, V. V.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Abramov, N. N.; Ben Hamida, A.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Stolyarov, B. S.; Kupriyanov, M. Yu.; Golubov, A. A.; Ryazanov, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we propose and explore an effective numerical approach for investigation of critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for magnetic Josephson junctions with in-plane magnetization orientation. This approach is based on micromagnetic simulation of the magnetization reversal process in the ferromagnetic layer with introduced internal magnetic stiffness and subsequent reconstruction of the critical current value using total flux or reconstructed actual phase difference distribution. The approach is flexible and shows good agreement with experimental data obtained on Josephson junctions with ferromagnetic barriers. Based on this approach we have obtained a critical current dependence on applied magnetic field for rectangular magnetic Josephson junctions with high size aspect ratio. We have shown that the rectangular magnetic Josephson junctions can be considered for application as an effective Josephson magnetic memory element with the value of critical current defined by the orientation of magnetic moment at zero magnetic field. An impact of shape magnetic anisotropy on critical current is revealed and discussed. Finally, we have considered a curling magnetic state in the ferromagnetic layer and demonstrated its impact on critical current.

  17. Exploring the critical quality attributes and models of smart homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ted Luor, Tainyi; Lu, Hsi-Peng; Yu, Hueiju; Lu, Yinshiu

    2015-12-01

    Research on smart homes has significantly increased in recent years owing to their considerably improved affordability and simplicity. However, the challenge is that people have different needs (or attitudes toward smart homes), and provision should be tailored to individuals. A few studies have classified the functions of smart homes. Therefore, the Kano model is first adopted as a theoretical base to explore whether the functional classifications of smart homes are attractive or necessary, or both. Second, three models and test user attitudes toward three function types of smart homes are proposed. Based on the Kano model, the principal results, namely, two "Attractive Quality" and nine "Indifferent Quality" items, are found. Verification of the hypotheses also indicates that the entertainment, security, and automation functions are significantly correlated with the variables "perceive useful" and "attitude." Cost consideration is negatively correlated with attitudes toward entertainment and automation. Results suggest that smart home providers should survey user needs for their product instead of merely producing smart homes based on the design of the builder or engineer.

  18. Geometrical model for martensitic phase transitions: Understanding criticality and weak universality during microstructure growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrents, Genís; Illa, Xavier; Vives, Eduard; Planes, Antoni

    2017-01-01

    A simple model for the growth of elongated domains (needle-like) during a martensitic phase transition is presented. The model is purely geometric and the only interactions are due to the sequentiality of the kinetic problem and to the excluded volume, since domains cannot retransform back to the original phase. Despite this very simple interaction, numerical simulations show that the final observed microstructure can be described as being a consequence of dipolar-like interactions. The model is analytically solved in 2D for the case in which two symmetry related domains can grow in the horizontal and vertical directions. It is remarkable that the solution is analytic both for a finite system of size L ×L and in the thermodynamic limit L →∞ , where the elongated domains become lines. Results prove the existence of criticality, i.e., that the domain sizes observed in the final microstructure show a power-law distribution characterized by a critical exponent. The exponent, nevertheless, depends on the relative probabilities of the different equivalent variants. The results provide a plausible explanation of the weak universality of the critical exponents measured during martensitic transformations in metallic alloys. Experimental exponents show a monotonous dependence with the number of equivalent variants that grow during the transition.

  19. A model for facilitation of critical reflective practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TR Mavundla

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available The impressive growth in the extent and range of psychiatric services provided by general hospitals in South Africa creates stress among nurses employed in these settings who are not psychiatric trained. This manifests itself in negative attitudes displayed towards mentally ill people. The aim of this paper is to discuss the process followed in the development of the model of facilitative communication. A theory generative design was used. The research methods were dealt with in four steps of theory generation as set out below. . Step 1 entailed concept analysis. This step was dealt with in two phases, namely concept identification and concept definition. During concept identification, a qualitative research strategy that is explorative, descriptive and contextual was used. This was achieved through field research conducted in an urban general hospital. A sample of twelve professional nurses was selected from a population of 800 professional nurses employed in a general hospital using the purposive sampling technique. This sample size was determined by saturation of data in themes. Both semi-structured individual phenomenological interviews and observations were used as methods of data collection. Giorgi’s method of descriptive data analysis (1985 was used. Four themes emerged from the results of the study. The main concepts of the model were identified and classified using a survey list of Dickoff et al. (1968. Step 2 dealt with the creation of interrelationship statements between concepts identified in Step 1, while Step 3 dealt with the description of the model using strategies proposed by Chinn and Kramer (1991. In Step 4, the description of guidelines for operationalising in practice was ensured. To ensure valid results, a model for trustworthiness proposed by Guba (Lincoln & Guba, 1985 was used. The following criteria for trustworthiness were applied in all the steps of theory generation: truth value, applicability, consistency and

  20. Improving Junior High Schools' Critical Thinking Skills Based on Test Three Different Models of Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuad, Nur Miftahul; Zubaidah, Siti; Mahanal, Susriyati; Suarsini, Endang

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to find out the differences in critical thinking skills among students who were given three different learning models: differentiated science inquiry combined with mind map, differentiated science inquiry model, and conventional model, (2) to find out the differences of critical thinking skills among male and female…

  1. Critical Thinking and Political Participation: Development and Assessment of a Casual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith M.

    1988-01-01

    This study assessed a model of the relationship between critical thinking and political participation. Findings indicated that critical thinking has indirect positive effects on orientations toward political participation, that critical thinking positively affects personal control, political efficacy, and democratic attitude, and that personal…

  2. Phase structure, critical points and susceptibilities in Nambu-Jona-Lasinio type models

    CERN Document Server

    De Sousa, C A; Ruivo, M C

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the chiral phase transition at finite temperature and chemical potential within SU(2) and SU(3) Nambu-Jona-Lasinio type models. The behavior of the baryon number susceptibility and the specific heat, in the vicinity of the critical end point, is studied. The class of the critical points is analyzed by calculating critical exponents.

  3. Critical Thinking and Political Participation: Development and Assessment of a Casual Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith M.

    1988-01-01

    This study assessed a model of the relationship between critical thinking and political participation. Findings indicated that critical thinking has indirect positive effects on orientations toward political participation, that critical thinking positively affects personal control, political efficacy, and democratic attitude, and that personal…

  4. A reference model for model-based design of critical infrastructure protection systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young Don; Park, Cheol Young; Lee, Jae-Chon

    2015-05-01

    Today's war field environment is getting versatile as the activities of unconventional wars such as terrorist attacks and cyber-attacks have noticeably increased lately. The damage caused by such unconventional wars has also turned out to be serious particularly if targets are critical infrastructures that are constructed in support of banking and finance, transportation, power, information and communication, government, and so on. The critical infrastructures are usually interconnected to each other and thus are very vulnerable to attack. As such, to ensure the security of critical infrastructures is very important and thus the concept of critical infrastructure protection (CIP) has come. The program to realize the CIP at national level becomes the form of statute in each country. On the other hand, it is also needed to protect each individual critical infrastructure. The objective of this paper is to study on an effort to do so, which can be called the CIP system (CIPS). There could be a variety of ways to design CIPS's. Instead of considering the design of each individual CIPS, a reference model-based approach is taken in this paper. The reference model represents the design of all the CIPS's that have many design elements in common. In addition, the development of the reference model is also carried out using a variety of model diagrams. The modeling language used therein is the systems modeling language (SysML), which was developed and is managed by Object Management Group (OMG) and a de facto standard. Using SysML, the structure and operational concept of the reference model are designed to fulfil the goal of CIPS's, resulting in the block definition and activity diagrams. As a case study, the operational scenario of the nuclear power plant while being attacked by terrorists is studied using the reference model. The effectiveness of the results is also analyzed using multiple analysis models. It is thus expected that the approach taken here has some merits

  5. Critical evaluation of paradigms for modelling integrated supply chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dam, K.H.; Adhitya, A.; Srinivasan, R.; Lukszo, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary problems in process systems engineering often require model-based decision support tool. Among the various modelling paradigms, equation-based models and agent-based models are widely used to develop dynamic models of systems. Which is the most appropriate modelling paradigm for a suppl

  6. Critical fluctuations in models with van der Waals interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Vovchenko, V; Gorenstein, M I; Poberezhnyuk, R V; Stoecker, H

    2016-01-01

    Particle number fluctuations are considered within the van der Waals (VDW) equation, which contains both attractive (mean-field) and repulsive (eigenvolume) interactions. The VDW equation is used to calculate the scaled variance of particle number fluctuations in generic Boltzmann VDW system and in nuclear matter. The strongly intensive measures $\\Delta[E^*,N]$ and $\\Sigma[E^*,N]$ of the particle number and excitation energy fluctuations are also considered, and, similarly, show singular behavior near the critical point. The $\\Delta[E^*,N]$ measure is shown to attain both positive and negative values in the vicinity of critical point. Based on universality argument, similar behavior is expected to occur in the vicinity of the QCD critical point.

  7. Mott Quantum Criticality in the Anisotropic 2D Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Benjamin; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Pruschke, Thomas; Assaad, Fakher F.; Raczkowski, Marcin

    2016-02-01

    We present evidence for Mott quantum criticality in an anisotropic two-dimensional system of coupled Hubbard chains at half-filling. In this scenario emerging from variational cluster approximation and cluster dynamical mean-field theory, the interchain hopping t⊥ acts as a control parameter driving the second-order critical end point Tc of the metal-insulator transition down to zero at t⊥c/t ≃0.2 . Below t⊥c, the volume of the hole and electron Fermi pockets of a compensated metal vanishes continuously at the Mott transition. Above t⊥c, the volume reduction of the pockets is cut off by a first-order transition. We discuss the relevance of our findings to a putative quantum critical point in layered organic conductors, whose location remains elusive so far.

  8. An Extension of the Rasch Model for Ratings Providing Both Location and Dispersion Parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrich, David

    1982-01-01

    An elaboration of a psychometric model for rated data, which belongs to the class of Rasch models, is shown to provide a model with two parameters, one characterizing location and one characterizing dispersion. Characteristics of the dispersion parameter are discussed. (Author/JKS)

  9. Mott Quantum Criticality in the Anisotropic 2D Hubbard Model

    OpenAIRE

    Lenz, Benjamin; Manmana, Salvatore R.; Pruschke, Thomas; Assaad, Fakher F.; Raczkowski, Marcin

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence for Mott quantum criticality in an anisotropic two-dimensional system of coupled Hubbard chains at half-filling. In this scenario emerging from variational cluster approximation and cluster dynamical mean-field theory, the interchain hopping $t_{\\perp}$ acts as a control parameter driving the second-order critical end point $T_c$ of the metal-insulator transition down to zero at $t_{\\perp}^{c}/t\\simeq 0.2$. Below $t_{\\perp}^{c}$, the volume of the hole and electron Fermi p...

  10. A decision support model to determine the critical success factors of asset management services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jooste, Johannes Lodewyk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Business-to-business services relating to physical asset management play an increasingly important role in industry. This is in the context of the current pressures that organisations experience in realising optimal value from their assets. Complying with asset management standards such as ISO 55000 contributes towards the importance of these services. This paper summarises the findings from a study identifying the critical success factors for asset management services, and presents a decision support model that provides the asset management community with access to these factors for decision-making and for improving asset management services.

  11. Providing Real-time Sea Ice Modeling Support to the U.S. Coast Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Richard; Dykes, James; Hebert, David; Posey, Pamela; Rogers, Erick; Wallcraft, Alan; Phelps, Michael; Smedstad, Ole Martin; Wang, Shouping; Geiszler, Dan

    2016-04-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) supported the U.S. Coast Guard Research Development Center (RDC) through a demonstration project during the summer and autumn of 2015. Specifically, a modeling system composed of a mesoscale atmospheric model, regional sea ice model, and regional wave model were loosely coupled to provide real-time 72-hr forecasts of environmental conditions for the Beaufort/Chukchi Seas. The system components included a 2-km regional Community Ice CodE (CICE) sea ice model, 15-km Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) atmospheric model, and a 5-km regional WAVEWATCH III wave model. The wave model utilized modeled sea ice concentration fields to incorporate the effects of sea ice on waves. The other modeling components assimilated atmosphere, ocean, and ice observations available from satellite and in situ sources. The modeling system generated daily 72-hr forecasts of synoptic weather (including visibility), ice drift, ice thickness, ice concentration and ice strength for missions within the economic exclusion zone off the coast of Alaska and a transit to the North Pole in support of the National Science Foundation GEOTRACES cruise. Model forecasts graphics were shared on a common web page with selected graphical products made available via ftp for bandwidth limited users. Model ice thickness and ice drift show very good agreement compared with Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Ice Mass Balance buoys. This demonstration served as a precursor to a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave-ice modeling system under development. National Ice Center (NIC) analysts used these model data products (CICE and COAMPS) along with other existing model and satellite data to produce the predicted 48-hr position of the ice edge. The NIC served as a liaison with the RDC and NRL to provide feedback on the model predictions. This evaluation provides a baseline analysis of the current models for future comparison studies

  12. Modelling and mapping of critical thresholds in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posch M; de Smet PAM; Hettelingh JP; Downing RJ; MNV

    2001-01-01

    This report is the sixth in a bi-annual series prepared by the Coordination Center for Effects (CCE) to document the progress made in calculating and mapping critical loads in Europe. The CCE, as part of the Mapping Programme under the UN/ECE Working Group on Effects (WGE), develops methodologies a

  13. Action Learning and Critical Thinking: A Synthesis of Two Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soffe, Stephen M.; Marquardt, Michael J.; Hale, Enoch

    2011-01-01

    Recent scholarship and the news media have identified a lack of critical thinking and ethical behavior in the business world. These deficiencies have led to faulty decision-making, ineffective planning, and frequent organizational dysfunction. This situation has focused attention on both practitioners in the field of business and on the university…

  14. Critical Behavior of Gaussian Model on X Fractal Lattices in External Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ying; KONG Xiang-Mu; HUANG Jia-Yin

    2003-01-01

    Using the renormalization group method, the critical behavior of Gaussian model is studied in external magnetic fields on X fractal lattices embedded in two-dimensional and d-dimensional (d > 2) Euclidean spaces, respectively. Critical points and exponents are calculated. It is found that there is long-range order at finite temperature for this model, and that the critical points do not change with the space dimensionality d (or the fractal dimensionality dr). It is also found that the critical exponents are very different from results of Ising model on the same lattices, and that the exponents on X lattices are different from the exact results on translationally symmetric lattices.

  15. Critical properties of the classical Heisenberg and XY models : A mean field renormalization group study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sadeghi

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available  Using both mean field renormalization group (MFRG and Surface-Bulk MFRG (SBMFRG, we study the critical behavior of the classical Heisenberg and XY models on a simple cubic lattice. Critical temperatures as well as critical exponents, characteristic the universality classes of these two models were calculated, analytically for1, 2, 3 and 4 spin clusters. The results are in good agreement with higher accurate methods such as Monte Carlo and High- temperature series.

  16. Critical phenomena in the majority voter model on two-dimensional regular lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Lara, Ana L; Sastre, Francisco; Vargas-Arriola, José Raúl

    2014-05-01

    In this work we studied the critical behavior of the critical point as a function of the number of nearest neighbors on two-dimensional regular lattices. We performed numerical simulations on triangular, hexagonal, and bilayer square lattices. Using standard finite-size scaling theory we found that all cases fall in the two-dimensional Ising model universality class, but that the critical point value for the bilayer lattice does not follow the regular tendency that the Ising model shows.

  17. Model of mechanism of providing of strategic firmness of machine-building enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Movchan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article is considered theoretical aspects of strategic firmness and the developed algorithmic model of mechanism providing of strategic firmness of machine-building enterprise.

  18. A model NOT to be imitated?: Recent criticisms of Paul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Strijdom

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article recent criticisms of Paul are summarised under the headings of ethnicity (Mack, social class (Theissen, gender (Wire and homoeroticism (Nissinen. Horsley's positive appraisal of Paul's anti-imperial stance is  also surveyed. These views are introduced by means of the concept of imitation as a category of social ethics in Paul, the article, concludes with a statement on the morality of reading.

  19. Conformal symmetry of the critical 3D Ising model inside a sphere

    CERN Document Server

    Cosme, Catarina; Penedones, Joao

    2015-01-01

    We perform Monte-Carlo simulations of the three-dimensional Ising model at the critical temperature and zero magnetic field. We simulate the system in a ball with free boundary conditions on the two dimensional spherical boundary. Our results for one and two point functions in this geometry are consistent with the predictions from the conjectured conformal symmetry of the critical Ising model.

  20. Critical Infrastructure Interdependency Modeling: A Survey of U.S. and International Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2006-08-01

    The Nation’s health, wealth, and security rely on the production and distribution of certain goods and services. The array of physical assets, processes, and organizations across which these goods and services move are called "critical infrastructures".1 This statement is as true in the U.S. as in any country in the world. Recent world events such as the 9-11 terrorist attacks, London bombings, and gulf coast hurricanes have highlighted the importance of stable electric, gas and oil, water, transportation, banking and finance, and control and communication infrastructure systems. Be it through direct connectivity, policies and procedures, or geospatial proximity, most critical infrastructure systems interact. These interactions often create complex relationships, dependencies, and interdependencies that cross infrastructure boundaries. The modeling and analysis of interdependencies between critical infrastructure elements is a relatively new and very important field of study. The U.S. Technical Support Working Group (TSWG) has sponsored this survey to identify and describe this current area of research including the current activities in this field being conducted both in the U.S. and internationally. The main objective of this study is to develop a single source reference of critical infrastructure interdependency modeling tools (CIIMT) that could be applied to allow users to objectively assess the capabilities of CIIMT. This information will provide guidance for directing research and development to address the gaps in development. The results will inform researchers of the TSWG Infrastructure Protection Subgroup of research and development efforts and allow a more focused approach to addressing the needs of CIIMT end-user needs. This report first presents the field of infrastructure interdependency analysis, describes the survey methodology, and presents the leading research efforts in both a cumulative table and through individual datasheets. Data was

  1. Identification and Control of Aircrafts using Multiple Models and Adaptive Critics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Principe, Jose C.

    2007-01-01

    We compared two possible implementations of local linear models for control: one approach is based on a self-organizing map (SOM) to cluster the dynamics followed by a set of linear models operating at each cluster. Therefore the gating function is hard (a single local model will represent the regional dynamics). This simplifies the controller design since there is a one to one mapping between controllers and local models. The second approach uses a soft gate using a probabilistic framework based on a Gaussian Mixture Model (also called a dynamic mixture of experts). In this approach several models may be active at a given time, we can expect a smaller number of models, but the controller design is more involved, with potentially better noise rejection characteristics. Our experiments showed that the SOM provides overall best performance in high SNRs, but the performance degrades faster than with the GMM for the same noise conditions. The SOM approach required about an order of magnitude more models than the GMM, so in terms of implementation cost, the GMM is preferable. The design of the SOM is straight forward, while the design of the GMM controllers, although still reasonable, is more involved and needs more care in the selection of the parameters. Either one of these locally linear approaches outperform global nonlinear controllers based on neural networks, such as the time delay neural network (TDNN). Therefore, in essence the local model approach warrants practical implementations. In order to call the attention of the control community for this design methodology we extended successfully the multiple model approach to PID controllers (still today the most widely used control scheme in the industry), and wrote a paper on this subject. The echo state network (ESN) is a recurrent neural network with the special characteristics that only the output parameters are trained. The recurrent connections are preset according to the problem domain and are fixed. In a

  2. Critical behaviour and scaling functions of the three-dimensional O(6) model

    CERN Document Server

    Holtmann, S; Schulze, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    We numerically investigate the three-dimensional O(6) model on 12^3 to 120^3 lattices within the critical region at zero magnetic field, as well as at finite magnetic field on the critical isotherm and for several fixed couplings in the broken and the symmetric phase. We obtain from the Binder cumulant at vanishing magnetic field the critical coupling J_c=1.42865(3). The universal value of the Binder cumulant at this point is g_r(J_c)=-1.94456(10). At the critical coupling, the critical exponents \\gamma=1.604(6), \\beta=0.425(2) and \

  3. Effectiveness of Video Modeling Provided by Mothers in Teaching Play Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besler, Fatma; Kurt, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Video modeling is an evidence-based practice that can be used to provide instruction to individuals with autism. Studies show that this instructional practice is effective in teaching many types of skills such as self-help skills, social skills, and academic skills. However, in previous studies, videos used in the video modeling process were…

  4. Building the Bridge between Operations and Outcomes : Modelling and Evaluation of Health Service Provider Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Mahdavi (Mahdi)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The PhD research has two objectives: - To develop generally applicable operational models which allow developing the evidence base for health service operations in provider networks. - To contribute to the evidence base by validating the model through application to hea

  5. "Soft Technology" and Criticism of the Western Model of Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Peter

    1973-01-01

    Alternatives to the capitalistic Western model of develoment are suggested. Three problems afflicting Western society--alienation, resource exploitation, and eviornmental stability--are discussed and a model which advocates both political and technological change is proposed. (SM)

  6. Neither as harmful as feared by critics nor as empowering as promised by providers: risk information offered direct to consumer by personal genomics companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Anders

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I investigate ethical and policy aspects of the genetic services and web-rhetoric of companies offering genetic information direct to consumer, and I do so with a special focus on genetic risk information. On their websites, the companies stress that genetic risk testing for multifactorial complex medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease and cancer may empower the consumer and provide valuable input to personal identity. Critics maintain, on the other hand, that testing can be psychologically harmful, is of limited clinical and preventive value, and vulnerable to misinterpretation. I stress the importance of empirical studies in assessing the pros and cons of direct-to-consumer testing and point out that recent empirical studies indicate that this testing is neither as harmful as feared by critics nor as empowering as promised by the companies. However, the testing is not entirely harmless. Remaining problems include testing of third parties without consent and ownership of genotypic and phenotypic information. Moreover, the testing, although not particularly empowering, may still provide input to self-understanding that some people find valuable. Regarding policy-making, I suggest that self-regulation in terms of best practice guidelines may play an important role, but I also stress that national and international regulation may be necessary.

  7. Pseudo-critical point in anomalous phase diagrams of simple plasma models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigvintsev, A. Yu; Iosilevskiy, I. L.; Noginova, L. Yu

    2016-11-01

    Anomalous phase diagrams in subclass of simplified (“non-associative”) Coulomb models is under discussion. The common feature of this subclass is absence on definition of individual correlations for charges of opposite sign. It is e.g. modified OCP of ions on uniformly compressible background of ideal Fermi-gas of electrons OCP(∼), or a superposition of two non-ideal OCP(∼) models of ions and electrons etc. In contrast to the ordinary OCP model on non-compressible (“rigid”) background OCP(#) two new phase transitions with upper critical point, boiling and sublimation, appear in OCP(∼) phase diagram in addition to the well-known Wigner crystallization. The point is that the topology of phase diagram in OCP(∼) becomes anomalous at high enough value of ionic charge number Z. Namely, the only one unified crystal- fluid phase transition without critical point exists as continuous superposition of melting and sublimation in OCP(∼) at the interval (Z 1 equation of state provided by Chabrier and Potekhin (1998 Phys. Rev. E 58 4941).

  8. A multi-objective optimisation model for sewer rehabilitation considering critical risk of failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Ben; Savić, Dragan A

    2012-01-01

    A unique methodology for the optimal specification of sewer rehabilitation investment is presented in this paper. By accounting for the critical risk of asset failure, this methodology builds on previously successful work which explored the application of multi-objective optimisation tools to assist engineers with the specification of optimal rehabilitation strategies. The conventional sewerage rehabilitation specification process relies on the expertise of professional engineers to manually evaluate CCTV inspection information when determining the nature and extent of the rehabilitation solution. This process is not only tedious and subjective but it has no quantifiable means of identifying optimal solutions or possible combinations of optimal solutions in the delivery of catchment wide rehabilitation programmes. Therefore, the purely manual process of sewer rehabilitation design leaves a number of unanswered questions, such as: (1) Does the solution offer the greatest structural benefit to the network? (2) Is the solution the most cost-effective solution available? (3) Does the solution most greatly reduce the risk of critical asset failure? The application of a multi-objective genetic algorithm optimisation model, coupled with an enhanced critical risk methodology, has successfully answered these questions when applied to a case study data set provided by South West Water (UK).

  9. Application of queueing models to multiprogrammed computer systems operating in a time-critical environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, D. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A model of a central processor (CPU) which services background applications in the presence of time critical activity is presented. The CPU is viewed as an M/M/1 queueing system subject to periodic interrupts by deterministic, time critical process. The Laplace transform of the distribution of service times for the background applications is developed. The use of state of the art queueing models for studying the background processing capability of time critical computer systems is discussed and the results of a model validation study which support this application of queueing models are presented.

  10. Structural equation modelling of determinants of customer satisfaction of mobile network providers: Case of Kolkata, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibashish Chakraborty

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Indian market of mobile network providers is growing rapidly. India is the second largest market of mobile network providers in the world and there is intense competition among existing players. In such a competitive market, customer satisfaction becomes a key issue. The objective of this paper is to develop a customer satisfaction model of mobile network providers in Kolkata. The results indicate that generic requirements (an aggregation of output quality and perceived value, flexibility, and price are the determinants of customer satisfaction. This study offers insights for mobile network providers to understand the determinants of customer satisfaction.

  11. Critical phenomena in a disc-percolation model and their application to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE Hong-Wei; XU Ming-Mei; LIU Lian-Shou

    2009-01-01

    By studying the critical phenomena in continuum-percolation of discs, we find a new approach to locate the critical point, i.e.using the inflection point of P_∞ as an evaluation of the percolation threshold.The susceptibility, defined as the derivative of P_∞, possesses a finite-size scaling property, where the scaling exponent is the reciprocal of ν, the critical exponent of the correlation length.A possible application of this approach to the study of the critical phenomena in relativistic heavy ion collisions is discussed.The critical point for deconfinement can be extracted by the inflection point of P_(QGP)-the probability for the event with QGP formation.The finite-size scaling of its derivative can give the critical exponent ν, which is a rare case that can provide an experimental measure of a critical exponent in heavy ion collisions.

  12. Providing a Connection between a Bayesian Inverse Modeling Tool and a Coupled Hydrogeological Processes Modeling Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frystacky, H.; Osorio-Murillo, C. A.; Over, M. W.; Kalbacher, T.; Gunnell, D.; Kolditz, O.; Ames, D.; Rubin, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The Method of Anchored Distributions (MAD) is a Bayesian technique for characterizing the uncertainty in geostatistical model parameters. Open-source software has been developed in a modular framework such that this technique can be applied to any forward model software via a driver. This presentation is about the driver that has been developed for OpenGeoSys (OGS), open-source software that can simulate many hydrogeological processes, including couple processes. MAD allows the use of multiple data types for conditioning the spatially random fields and assessing model parameter likelihood. For example, if simulating flow and mass transport, the inversion target variable could be hydraulic conductivity and the inversion data types could be head, concentration, or both. The driver detects from the OGS files which processes and variables are being used in a given project and allows MAD to prompt the user to choose those that are to be modeled or to be treated deterministically. In this way, any combination of processes allowed by OGS can have MAD applied. As for the software, there are two versions, each with its own OGS driver. A Windows desktop version is available as a graphical user interface and is ideal for the learning and teaching environment. High-throughput computing can even be achieved with this version via HTCondor if large projects want to be pursued in a computer lab. In addition to this desktop application, a Linux version is available equipped with MPI such that it can be run in parallel on a computer cluster. All releases can be downloaded from the MAD Codeplex site given below.

  13. Thermodynamics and critical behavior in the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model of QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Pedro; De Sousa, C A

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter as a function of temperature and baryonic density/chemical potential, within Nambu-Jona-Lasinio type models. We perform a systematic study concerning the existence, location and properties of a critical end point/tricritical point, both in SU(2) and SU(3) versions of the model. We verify that, for $m_u=m_d=0$ and up to a critical strange quark mass, there is a tricritical point, which becomes a critical end point in a world with realistic values of the current quark masses. The critical properties of physical observables as the baryon number susceptibility and the specific heat are analyzed in the vicinity of the critical end point, with special focus on their critical exponents. The behavior of mesons in the $T-\\mu_B(\\rho_B)$ plane is analyzed in connection with possible signatures of partial and effective restoration of chiral symmetry.

  14. The Revised Hierarchical Model: A critical review and assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroll, J.F.; Hell, J.G. van; Tokowicz, N.; Green, D.W.

    2010-01-01

    Brysbaert and Duyck (this issue) suggest that it is time to abandon the Revised Hierarchical Model (Kroll and Stewart, 1994) in favor of connectionist models such as BIA+ (Dijkstra and Van Heuven, 2002) that more accurately account for the recent evidence on non-selective access in bilingual word re

  15. Online Model Learning Algorithms for Actor-Critic Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grondman, I.

    2015-01-01

    Classical control theory requires a model to be derived for a system, before any control design can take place. This can be a hard, time-consuming process if the system is complex. Moreover, there is no way of escaping modelling errors. As an alternative approach, there is the possibility of having

  16. Model of facilitation of emotional intelligence to promote wholeness of neophyte critical care nurses in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Towell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken in order to develop a model of facilitation of emotional intelligence to promote wholeness in neophyte critical care nurses in South Africa. A theory-generative, explorative, descriptive, contextual research design was used. The model was developed utilising the four steps of theory generation as proposed by Dickoff, James, and Wiedenbach (1968, Chinn and Kramer (2011 and Walker and Avant (2011. Step one dealt with the empirical phase in which the concepts were distilled. The facilitation of inherent affective and mental resourcefulness and resilience was the main concept of the model. Step two comprised the definition and classification of central and related concepts. Step three provides a description of the model. The model operates in three phases namely the dependent phase, partially dependent phase and the independent phase. Step four entailed the description of guidelines for operationalizing the model. During the three phases of the model a new nurse who starts to work in critical care moves from a latent ability to develop an inherent affective and mental resourcefulness and resilience to a state of developing an inherent affective and mental resourcefulness and resilience. This model provides a structured framework for the facilitation of emotional intelligence (EI to promote wholeness in nurses who commence to work in critical care units.

  17. Critical Values for Yen’s Q3: Identification of Local Dependence in the Rasch model using Residual Correlations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Karl Bang; Makransky, Guido; Horton, Mike

    2016-01-01

    The assumption of local independence is central to all IRT models. Violations can lead to inflated estimates of reliability and problems with construct validity. For the most widely used fit statistic Q3 there are currently no well-documented suggestions of the critical values which should be used...... guidelines that researchers and practitioners can follow when making decisions about local dependence during scale development and validation. We propose that a parametric bootstrapping procedure should be implemented in each separate situation in order to obtain the critical value of local dependence...... applicable to the data set, and provide example critical values for a number of data structure situations. The results show that for the Q3 fit statistic no single critical value is appropriate for all situations, as the percentiles in the empirical null distribution are influenced by the number of items...

  18. Providing a theoretical basis for nanotoxicity risk analysis departing from traditional physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Dirk P.

    The same novel properties of engineered nanoparticles that make them attractive may also present unique exposure risks. But, the traditional physiologically-based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling assumption of instantaneous equilibration likely does not apply to nanoparticles. This simulation-based research begins with development of a model that includes diffusion, active transport, and carrier mediated transport. An eigenvalue analysis methodology was developed to examine model behavior to focus future research. Simulations using the physico-chemical properties of size, shape, surface coating, and surface charge were performed and an equation was determined which estimates area under the curve for arterial blood concentration, which is a surrogate of nanoparticle dose. Results show that the cellular transport processes modeled in this research greatly affect the biokinetics of nanoparticles. Evidence suggests that the equation used to estimate area under the curve for arterial blood concentration can be written in terms of nanoparticle size only. The new paradigm established by this research leverages traditional in vitro, in vivo, and PBPK modeling, but includes area under the curve to bridge animal testing results to humans. This new paradigm allows toxicologists and policymakers to then assess risk to a given exposure and assist in setting appropriate exposure limits for nanoparticles. This research provides critical understanding of nanoparticle biokinetics and allows estimation of total exposure at any toxicological endpoint in the body. This effort is a significant contribution as it highlights future research needs and demonstrates how modeling can be used as a tool to advance nanoparticle risk assessment.

  19. Social models provide a norm of appropriate food intake for young women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenny R Vartanian

    Full Text Available It is often assumed that social models influence people's eating behavior by providing a norm of appropriate food intake, but this hypothesis has not been directly tested. In three experiments, female participants were exposed to a low-intake model, a high-intake model, or no model (control condition. Experiments 1 and 2 used a remote-confederate manipulation and were conducted in the context of a cookie taste test. Experiment 3 used a live confederate and was conducted in the context of a task during which participants were given incidental access to food. Participants also rated the extent to which their food intake was influenced by a variety of factors (e.g., hunger, taste, how much others ate. In all three experiments, participants in the low-intake conditions ate less than did participants in the high-intake conditions, and also reported a lower perceived norm of appropriate intake. Furthermore, perceived norms of appropriate intake mediated the effects of the social model on participants' food intake. Despite the observed effects of the social models, participants were much more likely to indicate that their food intake was influenced by taste and hunger than by the behavior of the social models. Thus, social models appear to influence food intake by providing a norm of appropriate eating behavior, but people may be unaware of the influence of a social model on their behavior.

  20. Structural identifiability of systems biology models: a critical comparison of methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana-Teodora Chis

    Full Text Available Analysing the properties of a biological system through in silico experimentation requires a satisfactory mathematical representation of the system including accurate values of the model parameters. Fortunately, modern experimental techniques allow obtaining time-series data of appropriate quality which may then be used to estimate unknown parameters. However, in many cases, a subset of those parameters may not be uniquely estimated, independently of the experimental data available or the numerical techniques used for estimation. This lack of identifiability is related to the structure of the model, i.e. the system dynamics plus the observation function. Despite the interest in knowing a priori whether there is any chance of uniquely estimating all model unknown parameters, the structural identifiability analysis for general non-linear dynamic models is still an open question. There is no method amenable to every model, thus at some point we have to face the selection of one of the possibilities. This work presents a critical comparison of the currently available techniques. To this end, we perform the structural identifiability analysis of a collection of biological models. The results reveal that the generating series approach, in combination with identifiability tableaus, offers the most advantageous compromise among range of applicability, computational complexity and information provided.

  1. Value-added strategy models to provide quality services in senior health business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Ting; Lin, Neng-Pai; Su, Shyi; Chen, Ya-Mei; Chang, Yao-Mao; Handa, Yujiro; Khan, Hafsah Arshed Ali; Elsa Hsu, Yi-Hsin

    2017-06-20

    The rapid population aging is now a global issue. The increase in the elderly population will impact the health care industry and health enterprises; various senior needs will promote the growth of the senior health industry. Most senior health studies are focused on the demand side and scarcely on supply. Our study selected quality enterprises focused on aging health and analyzed different strategies to provide excellent quality services to senior health enterprises. We selected 33 quality senior health enterprises in Taiwan and investigated their excellent quality services strategies by face-to-face semi-structured in-depth interviews with CEO and managers of each enterprise in 2013. A total of 33 senior health enterprises in Taiwan. Overall, 65 CEOs and managers of 33 enterprises were interviewed individually. None. Core values and vision, organization structure, quality services provided, strategies for quality services. This study's results indicated four type of value-added strategy models adopted by senior enterprises to offer quality services: (i) residential care and co-residence model, (ii) home care and living in place model, (iii) community e-business experience model and (iv) virtual and physical portable device model. The common part in these four strategy models is that the services provided are elderly centered. These models offer virtual and physical integrations, and also offer total solutions for the elderly and their caregivers. Through investigation of successful strategy models for providing quality services to seniors, we identified opportunities to develop innovative service models and successful characteristics, also policy implications were summarized. The observations from this study will serve as a primary evidenced base for enterprises developing their senior market and, also for promoting the value co-creation possibility through dialogue between customers and those that deliver service.

  2. A support vector machine model provides an accurate transcript-level-based diagnostic for major depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J S; Xue, A Y; Redei, E E; Bagheri, N

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a critical cause of morbidity and disability with an economic cost of hundreds of billions of dollars each year, necessitating more effective treatment strategies and novel approaches to translational research. A notable barrier in addressing this public health threat involves reliable identification of the disorder, as many affected individuals remain undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. An objective blood-based diagnostic test using transcript levels of a panel of markers would provide an invaluable tool for MDD as the infrastructure—including equipment, trained personnel, billing, and governmental approval—for similar tests is well established in clinics worldwide. Here we present a supervised classification model utilizing support vector machines (SVMs) for the analysis of transcriptomic data readily obtained from a peripheral blood specimen. The model was trained on data from subjects with MDD (n=32) and age- and gender-matched controls (n=32). This SVM model provides a cross-validated sensitivity and specificity of 90.6% for the diagnosis of MDD using a panel of 10 transcripts. We applied a logistic equation on the SVM model and quantified a likelihood of depression score. This score gives the probability of a MDD diagnosis and allows the tuning of specificity and sensitivity for individual patients to bring personalized medicine closer in psychiatry. PMID:27779627

  3. High-precision percolation thresholds and Potts-model critical manifolds from graph polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    >Jesper Lykke Jacobsen,

    2014-04-01

    The critical curves of the q-state Potts model can be determined exactly for regular two-dimensional lattices G that are of the three-terminal type. This comprises the square, triangular, hexagonal and bow-tie lattices. Jacobsen and Scullard have defined a graph polynomial PB(q, v) that gives access to the critical manifold for general lattices. It depends on a finite repeating part of the lattice, called the basis B, and its real roots in the temperature variable v = eK - 1 provide increasingly accurate approximations to the critical manifolds upon increasing the size of B. Using transfer matrix techniques, these authors computed PB(q, v) for large bases (up to 243 edges), obtaining determinations of the ferromagnetic critical point vc > 0 for the (4, 82), kagome, and (3, 122) lattices to a precision (of the order 10-8) slightly superior to that of the best available Monte Carlo simulations. In this paper we describe a more efficient transfer matrix approach to the computation of PB(q, v) that relies on a formulation within the periodic Temperley-Lieb algebra. This makes possible computations for substantially larger bases (up to 882 edges), and the precision on vc is hence taken to the range 10-13. We further show that a large variety of regular lattices can be cast in a form suitable for this approach. This includes all Archimedean lattices, their duals and their medials. For all these lattices we tabulate high-precision estimates of the bond percolation thresholds pc and Potts critical points vc. We also trace and discuss the full Potts critical manifold in the (q, v) plane, paying special attention to the antiferromagnetic region v < 0. Finally, we adapt the technique to site percolation as well, and compute the polynomials PB(p) for certain Archimedean and dual lattices (those having only cubic and quartic vertices), using very large bases (up to 243 vertices). This produces the site percolation thresholds pc to a precision of the order of 10-9.

  4. Fermionic coset realization of the critical Ising model

    CERN Document Server

    Cabra, D C; Rothe, K D

    1995-01-01

    We obtain an explicit realization of all the primary fields of the Ising model in terms of a conformal field theory of constrained fermions. The four-point correlators of the energy, order and disorder operators are explicitly calculated.

  5. Slab2 - Providing updated subduction zone geometries and modeling tools to the community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, G. P.; Hearne, M. G.; Portner, D. E.; Borjas, C.; Moore, G.; Flamme, H.

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey database of global subduction zone geometries (Slab1.0) combines a variety of geophysical data sets (earthquake hypocenters, moment tensors, active source seismic survey images of the shallow subduction zone, bathymetry, trench locations, and sediment thickness information) to image the shape of subducting slabs in three dimensions, at approximately 85% of the world's convergent margins. The database is used extensively for a variety of purposes, from earthquake source imaging, to magnetotelluric modeling. Gaps in Slab1.0 exist where input data are sparse and/or where slabs are geometrically complex (and difficult to image with an automated approach). Slab1.0 also does not include information on the uncertainty in the modeled geometrical parameters, or the input data used to image them, and provides no means to reproduce the models it described. Currently underway, Slab2 will update and replace Slab1.0 by: (1) extending modeled slab geometries to all global subduction zones; (2) incorporating regional data sets that may describe slab geometry in finer detail than do previously used teleseismic data; (3) providing information on the uncertainties in each modeled slab surface; (4) modifying our modeling approach to a fully-three dimensional data interpolation, rather than following the 2-D to 3-D steps of Slab1.0; (5) migrating the slab modeling code base to a more universally distributable language, Python; and (6) providing the code base and input data we use to create our models, such that the community can both reproduce the slab geometries, and add their own data sets to ours to further improve upon those models in the future. In this presentation we describe our vision for Slab2, and the first results of this modeling process.

  6. Provider dismissal policies and clustering of vaccine-hesitant families: an agent-based modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttenheim, Alison M; Cherng, Sarah T; Asch, David A

    2013-08-01

    Many pediatric practices have adopted vaccine policies that require parents who refuse to vaccinate according to the ACIP schedule to find another health care provider. Such policies may inadvertently cluster unvaccinated patients into practices that tolerate non vaccination or alternative schedules, turning them into risky pockets of low herd immunity. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of provider zero-tolerance vaccination policies on the clustering of intentionally unvaccinated children. We developed an agent-based model of parental vaccine hesitancy, provider non-vaccination tolerance, and selection of patients into pediatric practices. We ran 84 experiments across a range of parental hesitancy and provider tolerance scenarios. When the model is initialized, all providers accommodate refusals and intentionally unvaccinated children are evenly distributed across providers. As provider tolerance decreases, hesitant children become more clustered in a smaller number of practices and eventually are not able to find a practice that will accept them. Each of these effects becomes more pronounced as the level of hesitancy in the population rises. Heterogeneity in practice tolerance to vaccine-hesitant parents has the unintended result of concentrating susceptible individuals within a small number of tolerant practices, while providing little if any compensatory protection to adherent individuals. These externalities suggest an agenda for stricter policy regulation of individual practice decisions.

  7. Critical review of problem solving processes traditional theoretical models

    OpenAIRE

    Botía Sanabria, María Lucero; Universidad Antonio Nariño, Bogotá, Colombia; Orozco Pulido, Luis Humberto; Universidad Antonio Nariño, Bogotá, Colombia

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a brief analysis of most known problem solving theoretical models realized using epistemological categories such as observer position, object of study, methods and procedures, and descriptive or explicative scope. The review showed linear and cyclical models, the need to recognize method's limitations to generalizing, the relevance of expliciting observer position, and a diffuse delimitation of the object problem solving as a cognitive process. An integrative and molar the...

  8. Self-similar transformations of lattice-Ising models at critical temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, You-gang

    2012-01-01

    We classify geometric blocks that serve as spin carriers into simple blocks and compound blocks by their topologic connectivity, define their fractal dimensions and describe the relevant transformations. By the hierarchical property of transformations and a block-spin scaling law we obtain a relation between the block spin and its carrier's fractal dimension. By mapping we set up a block-spin Gaussian model and get a formula connecting the critical point and the minimal fractal dimension of the carrier, which guarantees the uniqueness of a fixed point corresponding to the critical point, changing the complicated calculation of critical point into the simple one of the minimal fractal dimension. The numerical results of critical points with high accuracy for five conventional lattice-Ising models prove our method very effective and may be suitable to all lattice-Ising models. The origin of fluctuations in structure at critical temperature is discussed. Our method not only explains the problems met in the renor...

  9. Criticality in Two-Variable Earthquake Model on a Random Graph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Fan; ZHANG Duan-Ming

    2008-01-01

    A two-variable earthquake model on a quenched random graph is established here. It can be seen as a generalization of the OFC models. We numerically study the critical behavior of the model when the system is nonconservative: the result indicates that the model exhibits self-organized criticality deep within the nonconservative regime. The probability distribution for avalanche size obeys finite size scaling. We compare our model with the model introduced by Stefano Lise and Maya Paczuski [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 (2002) 228301], it is proved that they are not in the same universality class.

  10. Critical surface of the Blume-Emery-Griffiths model on the honeycomb lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwa, Leh-Hun; Wu, F. Y.

    1991-06-01

    We consider the Blume-Emergy-Griffiths (BEG) model on the honeycomb lattice and obtain a closed-form expression for the critical surface of second-order transitions. The BEG model is first formulated as a three-state vertex model. Using the fact that the BEG critical surface coincides with that of a general three-state vertex model, we construct critical surfaces by forming polynomial combinations of vertex weights that are invariant under an O(3) gauge transformation. We then carry out a finite-size analysis of the BEG model, and use data so obtained to determine coefficients appearing in the polynomial combination. This procedure leads to a closed-form expression of the critical surface which reproduces all numerical data accurately.

  11. Knowledge Management: Review of the Critical Success Factors and Development of a Conceptual Classification Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Zand, F.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge management is a critical issue in today's business world. Knowledge is considered as one of the most strategic resources of the firm and sources of competitive advantage. This research provides a comprehensive review of the literature on the Critical Success Factors (CSFs) and identifies e

  12. EFFECT OF PROBLEM BASED LEARNING AND MODEL CRITICAL THINKING ABILITY TO PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unita S. Zuliani Nasution

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were to analyze the different between physic resolving problem ability by using problem based learning model and direct instruction model, the different of physic resolving problem ability between the students that have critical thinking ability upper the average and the students that have critical thinking ability under the average, and the interaction of problem based learning model toward critical thinking ability and students’ physic resolving problem ability. This research was quasy experimental research that use critical thinking ability tests and physic resolving problem ability tests as the instruments. Result of the research showed that the students’ physic resolving problem ability by using problem based learning model was better than by using direct instruction model, students’ physic resolving problem ability and critical thinking ability upper the average showed better different and result than students’ critical thinking ability under the average, besides there was an interaction between problem based learning model and critical thinking ability in improving students’ physic resolving problem ability.

  13. Modeling Potential Surface and Shallow Groundwater Storage Provided by Beaver Ponds Across Watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, K.; Wheaton, J. M.; Macfarlane, W.

    2016-12-01

    Damming of streams by North American Beaver (Castor canadensis) has been shown to provide a host of potentially desirable hydraulic and hydrologic impacts. Notably, increases in surface water storage and groundwater storage may alter the timing and delivery of water around individual dams and dam complexes. Anecdotal evidence suggests these changes may be important for increasing and maintaining baseflow and even helping some intermittent streams flow perennially. In the arid west, these impacts could be particularly salient in the face of climate change. However, few studies have examined the hydrologic impacts of beaver dams at scales large enough to provide insight for water management, in part because understanding or modeling these impacts at large spatial scales has been precluded by uncertainty concerning the number of beaver dams a drainage network can support. Using the recently developed Beaver Restoration Assessment Tool (BRAT) to identify possible densities and spatial configurations of beaver dams, we developed a model that predicts the area and volume of surface water storage associated with dams of various sizes, and applied this model at different dam densities across multiple watersheds (HUC12) in northern Utah. We then used model results as inputs to the MODFLOW groundwater model to identify the subsequent changes to shallow groundwater storage. The spatially explicit water storage estimates produced by our approach will be useful in evaluating potential beaver restoration and conservation, and will also provide necessary information for developing hydrologic models to specifically identify the effects beaver dams may have on water delivery and timing.

  14. Childhood Maltreatment, Shame-Proneness and Self-Criticism in Social Anxiety Disorder: A Sequential Mediational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahar, Ben; Doron, Guy; Szepsenwol, Ohad

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown a robust link between emotional abuse and neglect with social anxiety symptoms. However, the mechanisms through which these links operate are less clear. We hypothesized a model in which early experiences of abuse and neglect create aversive shame states, internalized into a stable shame-based cognitive-affective schema. Self-criticism is conceptualized as a safety strategy designed to conceal flaws and prevent further experiences of shame. However, self-criticism maintains negative self-perceptions and insecurity in social situations. To provide preliminary, cross-sectional support for this model, a nonclinical community sample of 219 adults from Israel (110 females, mean age = 38.7) completed measures of childhood trauma, shame-proneness, self-criticism and social anxiety symptoms. A sequential mediational model showed that emotional abuse, but not emotional neglect, predicted shame-proneness, which in turn predicted self-criticism, which in turn predicted social anxiety symptoms. These results provide initial evidence supporting the role of shame and self-criticism in the development and maintenance of social anxiety disorder. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. Previous research has shown that histories of emotional abuse and emotional neglect predict social anxiety symptoms, but the mechanisms that underlie these associations are not clear. Using psycho-evolutionary and emotion-focused perspectives, the findings of the current study suggest that shame and self-criticism play an important role in social anxiety and may mediate the link between emotional abuse and symptoms. These findings also suggest that therapeutic interventions specifically targeting shame and self-criticism should be incorporated into treatments for social anxiety, especially with socially anxious patients with abuse histories. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Moving beyond Assessment to Improving Students' Critical Thinking Skills: A Model for Implementing Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Ada; Lisic, Elizabeth; Goltz, Michele; Stein, Barry; Harris, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    This research examines how the use of the CAT (Critical thinking Assessment Test) and involvement in CAT-Apps (CAT Applications within the discipline) training can serve as an important part of a faculty development model that assists faculty in the assessment of students' critical thinking skills and in the development of these skills within…

  16. Critical Dynamics Behavior of the Wolff Algorithm in the Site-Bond-Correlated Ising Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, P. R. A.; Onody, R. N.

    Here we apply the Wolff single-cluster algorithm to the site-bond-correlated Ising model and study its critical dynamical behavior. We have verified that the autocorrelation time diminishes in the presence of dilution and correlation, showing that the Wolff algorithm performs even better in such situations. The critical dynamical exponents are also estimated.

  17. Critical flow-storm approach to total maximum daily load(TMDL) development: an analytical conceptual model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harry X.ZHANG; Shaw L.YU

    2008-01-01

    One of the key challenges in the total max-imum daily load (TMDL) development process is how to define the critical condition for a receiving water-body. The main concern in using a continuous simu-lation approach is the absence of any guarantee that the most critical condition will be captured during the selected representative hydrologic period, given the scar-city of long-term continuous data. The objectives of this paper are to clearly address the critical condition in the TMDL development process and to compare continu-ous and evEnt-based approaches in defining critical con-dition during TMDL development for a waterbody impacted by both point and nonpoint source pollution. A practical, event-based critical flow-storm (CFS) approach was developed to explicitly addresses the crit-ical condition as a combination of a low stream flow and a storm event of a selected magnitude, both having cer-tain frequencies of occurrence. This paper illustrated the CFS concept and provided its theoretical basis using a derived analytical conceptual model. The CFS approach clearly defined a critical condition, obtained reasonable results and could be considered as an alternative method in TMDL development.

  18. Models of alcoholic liver disease in rodents: a critical evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la M. Hall, P.; Lieber, C.S.; De Carli, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a workshop at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chairs were J. Christian Bode and Hiroshi Fukui. The presentations were (1) Essentials and the course of the pathological spectrum of alcoholic liver disease in humans, by P. de la M. Hall; (2......) Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet for alcohol-induced liver injury in rats, by C. S. Lieber and L. M. DeCarli; (3) Tsukamoto-French model of alcoholic liver injury, by S. W. French; (4) Animal models to study endotoxin-ethanol interactions, by K. O. Lindros and H. Järveläinen; and (5) Jejunoileal bypass...... operation in rats-A model for alcohol-induced liver injury? by Christiane Bode, Alexandr Parlesak, and J. Christian Bode....

  19. Towards a dynamic assessment of raw materials criticality: linking agent-based demand--with material flow supply modelling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoeri, Christof; Wäger, Patrick A; Stamp, Anna; Althaus, Hans-Joerg; Weil, Marcel

    2013-09-01

    Emerging technologies such as information and communication-, photovoltaic- or battery technologies are expected to increase significantly the demand for scarce metals in the near future. The recently developed methods to evaluate the criticality of mineral raw materials typically provide a 'snapshot' of the criticality of a certain material at one point in time by using static indicators both for supply risk and for the impacts of supply restrictions. While allowing for insights into the mechanisms behind the criticality of raw materials, these methods cannot account for dynamic changes in products and/or activities over time. In this paper we propose a conceptual framework intended to overcome these limitations by including the dynamic interactions between different possible demand and supply configurations. The framework integrates an agent-based behaviour model, where demand emerges from individual agent decisions and interaction, into a dynamic material flow model, representing the materials' stocks and flows. Within the framework, the environmental implications of substitution decisions are evaluated by applying life-cycle assessment methodology. The approach makes a first step towards a dynamic criticality assessment and will enhance the understanding of industrial substitution decisions and environmental implications related to critical metals. We discuss the potential and limitation of such an approach in contrast to state-of-the-art methods and how it might lead to criticality assessments tailored to the specific circumstances of single industrial sectors or individual companies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Fermionic coset realization of primaries in critical statistical models

    CERN Document Server

    Cabra, D C; Rothe, K D

    1995-01-01

    We obtain a fermionic coset realization of the primaries of minimal unitary models and show how their four-point functions may be calculated by the use of a reduction formula. We illustrate the construction for the Ising model, where we obtain an explicit realization of the energy operator, Onsager fermions, as well as of the order and disorder operators realizing the dual algebra, in terms of constrained Dirac fermions. The four-point correlators of these operators are shown to agree with those obtained by other methods.

  1. Tools and Algorithms to Link Horizontal Hydrologic and Vertical Hydrodynamic Models and Provide a Stochastic Modeling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah, Ahmad M.; Nelson, E. James; Williams, Gustavious P.

    2010-04-01

    We present algorithms and tools we developed to automatically link an overland flow model to a hydrodynamic water quality model with different spatial and temporal discretizations. These tools run the linked models which provide a stochastic simulation frame. We also briefly present the tools and algorithms we developed to facilitate and analyze stochastic simulations of the linked models. We demonstrate the algorithms by linking the Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA) model for overland flow with the CE-QUAL-W2 model for water quality and reservoir hydrodynamics. GSSHA uses a two-dimensional horizontal grid while CE-QUAL-W2 uses a two-dimensional vertical grid. We implemented the algorithms and tools in the Watershed Modeling System (WMS) which allows modelers to easily create and use models. The algorithms are general and could be used for other models. Our tools create and analyze stochastic simulations to help understand uncertainty in the model application. While a number of examples of linked models exist, the ability to perform automatic, unassisted linking is a step forward and provides the framework to easily implement stochastic modeling studies.

  2. Tools and Algorithms to Link Horizontal Hydrologic and Vertical Hydrodynamic Models and Provide a Stochastic Modeling Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M Salah

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We present algorithms and tools we developed to automatically link an overland flow model to a hydrodynamic water quality model with different spatial and temporal discretizations. These tools run the linked models which provide a stochastic simulation frame. We also briefly present the tools and algorithms we developed to facilitate and analyze stochastic simulations of the linked models. We demonstrate the algorithms by linking the Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA model for overland flow with the CE-QUAL-W2 model for water quality and reservoir hydrodynamics. GSSHA uses a two-dimensional horizontal grid while CE-QUAL-W2 uses a two-dimensional vertical grid. We implemented the algorithms and tools in the Watershed Modeling System (WMS which allows modelers to easily create and use models. The algorithms are general and could be used for other models. Our tools create and analyze stochastic simulations to help understand uncertainty in the model application. While a number of examples of linked models exist, the ability to perform automatic, unassisted linking is a step forward and provides the framework to easily implement stochastic modeling studies.

  3. Multi-Loop Calculations of Anomalous Exponents in the Models of Critical Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adzhemyan L. Ts.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Renormalization group method (RG is applied to the investigation of the E model of critical dynamics, which describes the transition from the normal to the superfluid phase in He4. The technique “Sector decomposition” with R’ operation is used for the calculation of the Feynman diagrams. The RG functions, critical exponents and critical dynamical exponent z, which determines the growth of the relaxation time near the critical point, have been calculated in the two-loop approximation in the framework of ε-expansion. The relevance of a fixed point for helium, where the dynamic scaling is weakly violated, is briefly discussed.

  4. The Effect of Concept Attainment Model on Mathematically Critical Thinking Ability of The University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angraini, L. M.; Kartasasmita, B.; Dasari, D.

    2017-02-01

    This study examined the university students’ mathematically critical thinking ability through Concept Attainment Model learning. The Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Levene test, t test, ANOVA one and two ways were used to analyse the data. The results of this study showed that (1) there is no difference grade on the student’s mathematical critical thinking ability between experimental group and conventional group as a whole, (2) there is no difference on the students’ mathematical critical thinking ability of experimental classes based on their mathematical early ability (3) there is no interaction between the learning that is used with the students’ mathematical early ability on the students’ mathematical critical thinking ability.

  5. Parameter sensitivity analysis of stochastic models provides insights into cardiac calcium sparks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Seon; Liu, Ona Z; Hwang, Hyun Seok; Knollmann, Bjorn C; Sobie, Eric A

    2013-03-05

    We present a parameter sensitivity analysis method that is appropriate for stochastic models, and we demonstrate how this analysis generates experimentally testable predictions about the factors that influence local Ca(2+) release in heart cells. The method involves randomly varying all parameters, running a single simulation with each set of parameters, running simulations with hundreds of model variants, then statistically relating the parameters to the simulation results using regression methods. We tested this method on a stochastic model, containing 18 parameters, of the cardiac Ca(2+) spark. Results show that multivariable linear regression can successfully relate parameters to continuous model outputs such as Ca(2+) spark amplitude and duration, and multivariable logistic regression can provide insight into how parameters affect Ca(2+) spark triggering (a probabilistic process that is all-or-none in a single simulation). Benchmark studies demonstrate that this method is less computationally intensive than standard methods by a factor of 16. Importantly, predictions were tested experimentally by measuring Ca(2+) sparks in mice with knockout of the sarcoplasmic reticulum protein triadin. These mice exhibit multiple changes in Ca(2+) release unit structures, and the regression model both accurately predicts changes in Ca(2+) spark amplitude (30% decrease in model, 29% decrease in experiments) and provides an intuitive and quantitative understanding of how much each alteration contributes to the result. This approach is therefore an effective, efficient, and predictive method for analyzing stochastic mathematical models to gain biological insight.

  6. A Multiscale Modeling System: Developments, Applications, and Critical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lau, William; Simpson, Joanne; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Atlas, Robert; Khairoutdinov, David Randall Marat; Li, Jui-Lin; Waliser, Duane E.; Jiang, Jonathan; Hou, Arthur; Lin, Xin; Peters-Lidard, Christa

    2009-01-01

    The foremost challenge in parameterizing convective clouds and cloud systems in large-scale models are the many coupled dynamical and physical processes that interact over a wide range of scales, from microphysical scales to the synoptic and planetary scales. This makes the comprehension and representation of convective clouds and cloud systems one of the most complex scientific problems in Earth science. During the past decade, the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Study (GCSS) has pioneered the use of single-column models (SCMs) and cloud-resolving models (CRMs) for the evaluation of the cloud and radiation parameterizations in general circulation models (GCMs; e.g., GEWEX Cloud System Science Team 1993). These activities have uncovered many systematic biases in the radiation, cloud and convection parameterizations of GCMs and have led to the development of new schemes (e.g., Zhang 2002; Pincus et al, 2003; Zhang and Wu 2003; Wu et al. 2003; Liang and Wu 2005; Wu and Liang 2005, and others). Comparisons between SCMs and CRMs using the same large-scale forcing derived from field campaigns have demonstrated that CRMs are superior to SCMs in the prediction of temperature and moisture tendencies (e.g., Das et al. 1999; Randall et al 2003b; Xie et al. 2005).

  7. Kinetic Modeling of Food Quality: A Critical Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekel, van T.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT: This article discusses the possibilities to study relevant quality aspects of food, such as color, nutrient content, and safety, in a quantitative way via mathematical models. These quality parameters are governed by chemical, biochemical, microbial, and physical changes. It is argued that

  8. Agonal Writing : Towards an Agonal Model for Critical Transvaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siemens, H.W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will examine the concept of „agonal culture‟ set out in Nietzsche's early essay Homer‟s Contest. The orientation is, in the first instance, hermeneutic: to what extent does agonal culture offer a fruitful model for Nietzsche's own writing? At its most ambitious, my claim is that the Greek

  9. Resilience and Critical Stock Size in a Stochastic Recruitment Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grasman, J.; Huiskes, M.J.

    2001-01-01

    A stochastic model for fish recruitment is fitted to data after performing an age-structured stock assessment. The main aim is to investigate the relation between safe levels of spawning stock size and fish stock resilience. Resilience indicators, such as stock recovery time and the frequency that a

  10. A Multiscale Modeling System: Developments, Applications, and Critical Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Lau, William; Simpson, Joanne; Chern, Jiun-Dar; Atlas, Robert; Khairoutdinov, David Randall Marat; Li, Jui-Lin; Waliser, Duane E.; Jiang, Jonathan; Hou, Arthur; hide

    2009-01-01

    The foremost challenge in parameterizing convective clouds and cloud systems in large-scale models are the many coupled dynamical and physical processes that interact over a wide range of scales, from microphysical scales to the synoptic and planetary scales. This makes the comprehension and representation of convective clouds and cloud systems one of the most complex scientific problems in Earth science. During the past decade, the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) Cloud System Study (GCSS) has pioneered the use of single-column models (SCMs) and cloud-resolving models (CRMs) for the evaluation of the cloud and radiation parameterizations in general circulation models (GCMs; e.g., GEWEX Cloud System Science Team 1993). These activities have uncovered many systematic biases in the radiation, cloud and convection parameterizations of GCMs and have led to the development of new schemes (e.g., Zhang 2002; Pincus et al, 2003; Zhang and Wu 2003; Wu et al. 2003; Liang and Wu 2005; Wu and Liang 2005, and others). Comparisons between SCMs and CRMs using the same large-scale forcing derived from field campaigns have demonstrated that CRMs are superior to SCMs in the prediction of temperature and moisture tendencies (e.g., Das et al. 1999; Randall et al 2003b; Xie et al. 2005).

  11. Providing evidence of likely being on time – Counterexample generation for CTMC model checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, T.; Katoen, J.P.; Namjoshi, K.; Yoneda, T.; Higashino, T.; Okamura, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Probabilistic model checkers typically provide a list of individual state probabilities on the refutation of a temporal logic formula. For large state spaces, this information is far too detailed to act as useful diagnostic feedback. For quantitative (constrained) reachability problems, sets of path

  12. Physical Models that Provide Guidance in Visualization Deconstruction in an Inorganic Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiltz, Holly K.; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2012-01-01

    Three physical model systems have been developed to help students deconstruct the visualization needed when learning symmetry and group theory. The systems provide students with physical and visual frames of reference to facilitate the complex visualization involved in symmetry concepts. The permanent reflection plane demonstration presents an…

  13. Using a Behavior Modeling Approach to Teach Students the Art of Providing and Receiving Verbal Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritz, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Using a behavior modeling approach, this study examined how students' perceived self-efficacy improved as they developed, delivered, and evaluated professional presentations. Using journal entries and a self-efficacy assessment, students' perceived self-efficacy increased as they learned to provide and receive verbal peer feedback, and to stage…

  14. Using a Behavior Modeling Approach to Teach Students the Art of Providing and Receiving Verbal Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maritz, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    Using a behavior modeling approach, this study examined how students' perceived self-efficacy improved as they developed, delivered, and evaluated professional presentations. Using journal entries and a self-efficacy assessment, students' perceived self-efficacy increased as they learned to provide and receive verbal peer feedback, and to stage…

  15. Using Models to Provide Predicted Ranges for Building-Human Interfaces: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, N.; Scheib, J.; Pless, S.; Schott, M.

    2013-09-01

    Most building energy consumption dashboards provide only a snapshot of building performance; whereas some provide more detailed historic data with which to compare current usage. This paper will discuss the Building Agent(tm) platform, which has been developed and deployed in a campus setting at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory as part of an effort to maintain the aggressive energyperformance achieved in newly constructed office buildings and laboratories. The Building Agent(tm) provides aggregated and coherent access to building data, including electric energy, thermal energy, temperatures, humidity, and lighting levels, and occupant feedback, which are displayed in various manners for visitors, building occupants, facility managers, and researchers. This paper focuseson the development of visualizations for facility managers, or an energy performance assurance role, where metered data are used to generate models that provide live predicted ranges of building performance by end use. These predicted ranges provide simple, visual context for displayed performance data without requiring users to also assess historical information or trends. Several energymodelling techniques were explored including static lookup-based performance targets, reduced-order models derived from historical data using main effect variables such as solar radiance for lighting performance, and integrated energy models using a whole-building energy simulation program.

  16. A dynamic modelling approach for estimating critical loads of nitrogen based on plant community changes under a changing climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyazid, Salim, E-mail: salim@belyazid.com [Belyazid Consulting and Communication, Stationsvaegen 13, SE-517 34 Bollebygd (Sweden); Kurz, Dani [EKG Geoscience, Maulbeerstrasse 14, CH-3011 Bern (Switzerland); Braun, Sabine [Institut fuer Angewandte Planzenbiologie, Sandgrubenstrasse 25, CH-4124 Schoenenbuch (Switzerland); Sverdrup, Harald [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lund University, PO Box 124, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Rihm, Beat [Meteotest, Fabrikstrasse 14, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Hettelingh, Jean-Paul [Coordination Centre for Effects, PO Box 303, NL-3720 AH Bilthoven (Netherlands)

    2011-03-15

    A dynamic model of forest ecosystems was used to investigate the effects of climate change, atmospheric deposition and harvest intensity on 48 forest sites in Sweden (n = 16) and Switzerland (n = 32). The model was used to investigate the feasibility of deriving critical loads for nitrogen (N) deposition based on changes in plant community composition. The simulations show that climate and atmospheric deposition have comparably important effects on N mobilization in the soil, as climate triggers the release of organically bound nitrogen stored in the soil during the elevated deposition period. Climate has the most important effect on plant community composition, underlining the fact that this cannot be ignored in future simulations of vegetation dynamics. Harvest intensity has comparatively little effect on the plant community in the long term, while it may be detrimental in the short term following cutting. This study shows: that critical loads of N deposition can be estimated using the plant community as an indicator; that future climatic changes must be taken into account; and that the definition of the reference deposition is critical for the outcome of this estimate. - Research highlights: > Plant community changes can be used to estimate critical loads of nitrogen. > Climate change is decisive for future changes of geochemistry and plant communities. > Climate change cannot be ignored in estimates of critical loads. > The model ForSAFE-Veg was successfully used to set critical loads of nitrogen. - Plant community composition can be used in dynamic modelling to estimate critical loads of nitrogen deposition, provided the appropriate reference deposition, future climate and target plant communities are defined.

  17. Modelling evapotranspiration during precipitation deficits: identifying critical processes in a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukkola, Anna M.; Pitman, Andy J.; Decker, Mark; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Abramowitz, Gab; Kala, Jatin; Wang, Ying-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Surface fluxes from land surface models (LSMs) have traditionally been evaluated against monthly, seasonal or annual mean states. The limited ability of LSMs to reproduce observed evaporative fluxes under water-stressed conditions has been previously noted, but very few studies have systematically evaluated these models during rainfall deficits. We evaluated latent heat fluxes simulated by the Community Atmosphere Biosphere Land Exchange (CABLE) LSM across 20 flux tower sites at sub-annual to inter-annual timescales, in particular focusing on model performance during seasonal-scale rainfall deficits. The importance of key model processes in capturing the latent heat flux was explored by employing alternative representations of hydrology, leaf area index, soil properties and stomatal conductance. We found that the representation of hydrological processes was critical for capturing observed declines in latent heat during rainfall deficits. By contrast, the effects of soil properties, LAI and stomatal conductance were highly site-specific. Whilst the standard model performs reasonably well at annual scales as measured by common metrics, it grossly underestimates latent heat during rainfall deficits. A new version of CABLE, with a more physically consistent representation of hydrology, captures the variation in the latent heat flux during seasonal-scale rainfall deficits better than earlier versions, but remaining biases point to future research needs. Our results highlight the importance of evaluating LSMs under water-stressed conditions and across multiple plant functional types and climate regimes.

  18. Adult attachment, dependence, self-criticism, and depressive symptoms: a test of a mediational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantazaro, Amy; Wei, Meifen

    2010-08-01

    Attachment anxiety is expected to be positively associated with dependence and self-criticism. However, attachment avoidance is expected to be negatively associated with dependence but positively associated with self-criticism. Both dependence and self-criticism are expected to be related to depressive symptoms. Data were analyzed from 424 undergraduate participants at a large Midwestern university, using structural equation modeling. Results indicated that the relation between attachment anxiety and depressive symptoms was fully mediated by dependence and self-criticism, whereas the relation between attachment avoidance and depressive symptoms was partially mediated by dependence and self-criticism. Moreover, through a multiple-group comparison analysis, the results indicated that men with high levels of attachment avoidance are more likely than women to be self-critical.

  19. Estimates of critical quantities from an expansion in mass: Ising model on the simple cubic lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    In Ising model on the simple cubic lattice, we describe the inverse temperature $\\beta$ and other quantities relevant for the computation of critical quantities in terms of a dimensionless squared mass $M$. The critical behaviors of those quantities are represented by the linear differential equations with constant coefficients which are related to critical exponents. We estimate the critical temperature and exponents via an expansion in the inverse powers of the mass under the use of $\\delta$-expansion. The critical inverse temperature $\\beta_{c}$ is estimated first in unbiased manner and then critical exponents are also estimated in biased and unbiased self-contained way including $\\omega$, the correction-to-scaling exponent, $\

  20. Modeling Customer Loyalty by System Dynamics Methodology (Case Study: Internet Service Provider Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Bafandeh Zendeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the complexity of the customer loyalty, we tried to provide a conceptual model to explain it in an Internet service provider company with system dynamics approach. To do so, the customer’s loyalty for statistical population was analyzed according to Sterman’s modeling methodology. First of all the reference modes (historical behavior of customer loyalty was evaluated. Then dynamic hypotheses was developed by utilizing causal - loop diagrams and stock-flow maps, based on theoretical literature. In third stage, initial conditions of variables, parameters, and mathematical functions between them were estimated. The model was tested, finally advertising, quality of services improvement and continuing the current situation scenarios were evaluated. Results showed improving the quality of service scenario is more effectiveness in compare to others

  1. Effects of Some Neurobiological Factors in a Self-organized Critical Model Based on Neural Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li-Ming; ZHANG Ying-Yue; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2005-01-01

    Based on an integrate-and-fire mechanism, we investigate the effect of changing the efficacy of the synapse,the transmitting time-delayed, and the relative refractoryperiod on the self-organized criticality in our neural network model.

  2. Nonequilibrium critical dynamics of the two-dimensional Ising model quenched from a correlated initial state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Környei, László; Pleimling, Michel; Iglói, Ferenc

    2008-01-01

    The universality class, even the order of the transition, of the two-dimensional Ising model depends on the range and the symmetry of the interactions (Onsager model, Baxter-Wu model, Turban model, etc.), but the critical temperature is generally the same due to self-duality. Here we consider a sudden change in the form of the interaction and study the nonequilibrium critical dynamical properties of the nearest-neighbor model. The relaxation of the magnetization and the decay of the autocorrelation function are found to display a power law behavior with characteristic exponents that depend on the universality class of the initial state.

  3. A Simple Model for Identifying Critical Structures in Atrial Fibrillation

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, Kim; Peters, Nicholas S

    2014-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common abnormal heart rhythm and the single biggest cause of stroke. Ablation, destroying regions of the atria, is applied largely empirically and can be curative but with a disappointing clinical success rate. We design a simple model of activation wavefront propagation on a structure mimicking the branching network architecture of heart muscle and show how AF emerges spontaneously as age-related parameters change. We identify regions responsible for the initiation and maintenance of AF, the ablation of which terminates AF. The simplicity of the model allows us to calculate analytically the risk of arrhythmia. This analytical result allows us to locate the transition in parameter space and highlights that the transition from regular to fibrillatory behaviour is a finite-size effect present in systems of any size. These clinically testable predictions might inform ablation therapies and arrhythmic risk assessment.

  4. Critical manifold of the Potts model: exact results and homogeneity approximation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F Y; Guo, Wenan

    2012-08-01

    The q-state Potts model has stood at the frontier of research in statistical mechanics for many years. In the absence of a closed-form solution, much of the past effort has focused on locating its critical manifold, trajectory in the parameter (q,e(J)) space where J is the reduced interaction, along which the free energy is singular. However, except in isolated cases, antiferromagnetic (AF) models with JPotts model with AF interactions focusing on obtaining its critical manifold in exact and/or closed-form expressions. We first reexamine the known critical frontiers in light of AF interactions. For the square lattice we confirm the Potts self-dual point to be the sole critical frontier for J>0. We also locate its critical frontier for J0. More generally we consider the centered-triangle (CT) and Union-Jack (UJ) lattices consisting of mixed J and K interactions, and deduce critical manifolds under homogeneity hypotheses. For K = 0 the CT lattice is the diced lattice, and we determine its critical manifold for all J and find q(c) = 3.32472. For K = 0 the UJ lattice is the square lattice and from this we deduce both the J > 0 and J < 0 critical manifolds and q(c) = 3. Our theoretical predictions are compared with recent numerical results.

  5. Critical energy density of O(n) models in d = 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerattini, Rachele; Trombettoni, Andrea; Casetti, Lapo

    2014-12-01

    A relation between O(n) models and Ising models has been recently conjectured (Casetti et al 2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 106 057208). Such a relation, inspired by an energy landscape analysis, implies that the microcanonical density of states of an O(n) spin model on a lattice can be effectively approximated in terms of the density of states of an Ising model defined on the same lattice and with the same interactions. Were this relation exact, it would imply that the critical energy densities of all the O(n) models (i.e. the average values per spin of the O(n) Hamiltonians at their respective critical temperatures) should be equal to that of the corresponding Ising model. It is therefore worth investigating how different the critical energies are and how this difference depends on n. We compare the critical energy densities of O(n) models in three dimensions in some specific cases: the O(1) or Ising model, the O(2) or XY model, the O(3) or Heisenberg model, the O(4) model and the O(∞) or spherical model, all defined on regular cubic lattices and with ferromagnetic nearest-neighbor interactions. The values of the critical energy density in the n = 2, n = 3 and n = 4 cases are derived through a finite-size scaling analysis of data produced by means of Monte Carlo simulations on lattices with up to 1283 sites. For n = 2 and n = 3 the accuracy of previously known results has been improved. We finally derive an interpolation formula showing that the difference between the critical energy densities of O(n) models and that of the Ising model is smaller than 1% if n < 8 and never exceeds 3% for any n.

  6. Modeling Ice Giant Interiors Using Constraints on the H2-H2O Critical Curve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, E.; Stevenson, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    We present a range of models of Uranus and Neptune, taking into account recent experimental data (Bali, 2013) implying the location of the critical curve of the H2-H2O system at pressures up to 2.6 GPa. The models presented satisfy the observed total mass of each planet and the radius at the observed 1-bar pressure level. We assume the existence of three regions at different depths: an outer adiabatic envelope composed predominately of H2 and He, with a helium mass fraction 0.26, a water-rich layer including varied amounts of rock and hydrogen, and a chemically homogeneous rock core. Using measured rotation rates of Uranus and Neptune, and a density profile obtained for each model using constituent equations of state and the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium, we calculate the gravitational harmonics J2 and J4 for comparison with observed values as an additional constraint. The H2-H2O critical curve provides information about the nature of the boundary between the outer, hydrogen-rich envelope and underlying water-rich layer. The extrapolated critical curve for hydrogen-water mixtures crosses the adiabat of the outer atmospheric shell in these models at two depths, implying a shallow outer region of limited miscibility, an intermediate region between ~90 and 98 percent of the total planet radius within which hydrogen and water can mix in all proportions, and another, deeper region of limited miscibility at less than ~90 percent of the total planet radius. The pressure and temperature of the gaseous adiabatic shell at the depth of the shallowest extent of the water-rich layer determines whether a gradual compositional transition or an ocean surface boundary may exist at depth in these planets. To satisfy the observed J2, the outer extent of the water-rich layer in these models must be located between approximately 80 and 85 percent of the total planet radius, within the deep region of limited H2-H2O miscibility, implying an ocean surface is possible within the

  7. Influence of Inhomogeneity on Critical Behavior of Earthquake Model on Random Graph

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Duan-Ming; SUN Fan; YU Bo-Ming; PAN Gui-Jun; YIN Yan-Ping; LI Rui; SU Xiang-Ying

    2006-01-01

    We consider the earthquake model on a random graph. A detailed analysis of the probability distribution of the size of the avalanches will be given. The model with different inhomogeneities is studied in order to compare the critical behavior of different systems. The results indicate that with the increase of the inhomogeneities, the avalanche exponents reduce, i.e., the different numbers of defects cause different critical behaviors of the system. This is virtually ascribed to the dynamical perturbation.

  8. Polychromatic Arm Exponents for the Critical Planar FK-Ising model

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    We derive the arm exponents of SLE$_{\\kappa}$ for $\\kappa\\in (4,8)$ and explain how to combine them with the convergence of the interface to obtain the arm exponents of critical FK-Ising model. We obtain six different patterns of boundary arm exponents and three different patterns of interior arm exponents of the critical planar FK-Ising model on the square lattice.

  9. Client value models provide a framework for rational library planning (or, phrasing the answer in the form of a question).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Moorsel, Guillaume

    2005-01-01

    Libraries often do not know how clients value their product/ service offerings. Yet at a time when the mounting costs for library support are increasingly difficult to justify to the parent institution, the library's ability to gauge the value of its offerings to clients has never been more critical. Client Value Models (CVMs) establish a common definition of value elements-or a "value vocabulary"-for libraries and their clients, thereby providing a basis upon which to make rational planning decisions regarding product/service acquisition and development. The CVM concept is borrowed from business and industry, but its application has a natural fit in libraries. This article offers a theoretical consideration and practical illustration of CVM application in libraries.

  10. Critical Interfaces in the Random-Bond Potts Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Jesper L.; Le Doussal, Pierre; Picco, Marco; Santachiara, Raoul; Wiese, Kay Jörg

    2009-02-01

    We study geometrical properties of interfaces in the random-temperature q-states Potts model as an example of a conformal field theory weakly perturbed by quenched disorder. Using conformal perturbation theory in q-2 we compute the fractal dimension of Fortuin-Kasteleyn (FK) domain walls. We also compute it numerically both via the Wolff cluster algorithm for q=3 and via transfer-matrix evaluations. We also obtain numerical results for the fractal dimension of spin clusters interfaces for q=3. These are found numerically consistent with the duality κspinκFK=16 as expressed in putative SLE parameters.

  11. Critical Appraisal of Translational Research Models for Suitability in Performance Assessment of Cancer Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Rajan, Abinaya; Sullivan, Richard; Bakker, Suzanne; van Harten, Wim H.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to critically appraise translational research models for suitability in performance assessment of cancer centers. Process models, such as the Process Marker Model and Lean and Six Sigma applications, seem to be suitable for performance assessment of cancer centers. However, they must be thoroughly tested in practice.

  12. Social Validity of the Critical Incident Stress Management Model for School-Based Crisis Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Julie Q.

    2007-01-01

    The Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) model for crisis intervention was developed for use with emergency service personnel. Research regarding the use of the CISM model has been conducted among civilians and high-risk occupation groups with mixed results. The purpose of this study is to examine the social validity of the CISM model for…

  13. A Modified Earthquake Model of Self-Organized Criticality on Small World Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Min; ZHAO Xiao-Wei; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2004-01-01

    A modified Olami Feder-Christensen model of self-organized criticality on a square lattice with the properties of small world networks has been studied.We find that our model displays power-law behavior and the exponent τ of the model depends on φ,the density of long-range connections in our network.

  14. Ising Critical Behavior of Inhomogeneous Curie-Weiss Models and Annealed Random Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dommers, Sander; Giardinà, Cristian; Giberti, Claudio; van der Hofstad, Remco; Prioriello, Maria Luisa

    2016-11-01

    We study the critical behavior for inhomogeneous versions of the Curie-Weiss model, where the coupling constant {J_{ij}(β)} for the edge {ij} on the complete graph is given by {J_{ij}(β)=β w_iw_j/( {sum_{kin[N]}w_k})}. We call the product form of these couplings the rank-1 inhomogeneous Curie-Weiss model. This model also arises [with inverse temperature {β} replaced by {sinh(β)} ] from the annealed Ising model on the generalized random graph. We assume that the vertex weights {(w_i)_{iin[N]}} are regular, in the sense that their empirical distribution converges and the second moment converges as well. We identify the critical temperatures and exponents for these models, as well as a non-classical limit theorem for the total spin at the critical point. These depend sensitively on the number of finite moments of the weight distribution. When the fourth moment of the weight distribution converges, then the critical behavior is the same as on the (homogeneous) Curie-Weiss model, so that the inhomogeneity is weak. When the fourth moment of the weights converges to infinity, and the weights satisfy an asymptotic power law with exponent {τ} with {τin(3,5)}, then the critical exponents depend sensitively on {τ}. In addition, at criticality, the total spin {S_N} satisfies that {S_N/N^{(τ-2)/(τ-1)}} converges in law to some limiting random variable whose distribution we explicitly characterize.

  15. Models for measuring and predicting shareholder value: A study of third party software service providers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Viswanadham; Poornima Luthra

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we use the strategic profit model (SPM) and the economic value-added (EVA to measure shareholder value). SPM measures the return on net worth (RONW) which is defined as the return on assets (ROA) multiplied by the financial leverage. EVA is defined as the firm’s net operating profit after taxes (NOPAT) minus the capital charge. Both, RONW and EVA provide an indication of how much shareholder value a firm creates for its shareholders, year on year. With the increasing focus on creation of shareholder value and core competencies, many companies are outsourcing their information technology (IT) related activities to third party software companies. Indian software companies have become leaders in providing these services. Companies from several other countries are also competing for the top slot. We use the SPM and EVA models to analyse the four listed players of the software industry using the publicly available published data. We compare the financial data obtained from the models, and use peer average data to provide customized recommendations for each company to improve their shareholder value. Assuming that the companies follow these rules, we also predict future RONW and EVA for the companies for the financial year 2005. Finally, we make several recommendations to software providers for effectively competing in the global arena.

  16. Conceptual Model of Providing Traffic Navigation Services to Visually Impaired Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Periša

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to include people of reduced mobility in the traffic system it is necessary to provide accessibility and information of the users to all the facilities surrounding them. By analysing the currently available information and communication technologies a new conceptual model of providing navigation services to the visually impaired persons has been proposed. This model is based on Cloud Computing platform, and this research describes the method of navigating the users based on accurate and updated data. The users’ requirements have been analysed according to the needs of the movement of visually impaired persons along the traffic network. The information and communication solutions with the function of informing these groups of users have to provide accurate and updated data, which is made possible by the proposed model. This research was conducted on the most frequent routes in the city of Zagreb. With the review of model efficiency user’s sense of security is increased in the amount of 87%.

  17. The Effect of Integrated Learning Model and Critical Thinking Skill of Science Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazriyah, N.; Supriyati, Y.; Rahayu, W.

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of integrated learning model and critical thinking skill toward science learning outcomes. The study was conducted in SDN Kemiri Muka 1 Depok in fifth grade school year 2014/2015 using cluster random sampling was done to 80 students. Retrieval of data obtained through tests and analysis by Variance (ANOVA) and two lines with the design treatment by level 2x2. The results showed that: (1) science learning outcomes students that given thematic integrated learning model is higher than in the group of students given fragmented learning model, (2) there is an interaction effect between critical thinking skills with integrated learning model, (3) for students who have high critical thinking skills, science learning outcomes students who given by thematic integrated learning model higher than fragmented learning model and (4) for students who have the ability to think critically low yield higher learning science fragmented model. The results of this study indicate that thematic learning model with critical thinking skills can improve science learning outcomes of students.

  18. Critical flow phenomena and modeling in advanced nuclear safety technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yuzhou [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing (China)

    2016-05-15

    The discharge could be non-choking or choking, depending on the break shape, length and conditions. This presents a challenge in the calculation of standard problems. A stable experiment of water was performed to study the break flow rate in nozzles of diameter of 1.41 and 2.0 mm with rounded-edge and sharp-edge. The pressure covered the ranges of 0.5 to 29.5 MPa, inlet quality 0 to 1.0 and subcooling up to 350 C. The results exhibited a close relation of thermal non-equilibrium with pressure. For supercritical pressure a modified equilibrium model in combination with the Bernoulli equation is presented.

  19. [Critical of the additive model of the randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussageon, Rémy; Gueyffier, François; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Felden-Dominiak, Géraldine

    2008-01-01

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are currently the best way to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of drugs. Its methodology relies on the method of difference (John Stuart Mill), through which the observed difference between two groups (drug vs placebo) can be attributed to the pharmacological effect of the drug being tested. However, this additive model can be questioned in the event of statistical interactions between the pharmacological and the placebo effects. Evidence in different domains has shown that the placebo effect can influence the effect of the active principle. This article evaluates the methodological, clinical and epistemological consequences of this phenomenon. Topics treated include extrapolating results, accounting for heterogeneous results, demonstrating the existence of several factors in the placebo effect, the necessity to take these factors into account for given symptoms or pathologies, as well as the problem of the "specific" effect.

  20. Combining models of behaviour with operational data to provide enhanced condition monitoring of AGR cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, Graeme M., E-mail: graeme.west@strath.ac.uk; Wallace, Christopher J.; McArthur, Stephen D.J.

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Combining laboratory model outputs with operational data. • Isolation of single component from noisy data. • Better understanding of the health of graphite cores. • Extended plant operation through leveraging existing data sources. - Abstract: Installation of new monitoring equipment in Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) is often difficult and expensive and therefore maximizing the information that can be extracted from existing monitoring equipment is highly desirable. This paper describes the process of combining models derived from laboratory experimentation with current operational plant data to infer an underlying measure of health. A demonstration of this process is provided where the fuel channel bore profile, a measure of core health, is inferred from data gathered during the refuelling process of an Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) nuclear power plant core. Laboratory simulation was used to generate a model of an interaction between the fuel assembly and the core. This model is used to isolate a single frictional component from a noisy input signal and use this friction component as a measure of health to assess the current condition of the graphite bricks that comprise the core. In addition, the model is used to generate an expected refuelling response (the noisy input signal) for a given set of channel bore diameter measurements for either insertion of new fuel or removal of spent fuel, providing validation of the model. This benefit of this work is that it provides a greater understanding of the health of the graphite core, which is important for continued and extended operation of the AGR plants in the UK.

  1. Evolution of N-species Kimura/voter models towards criticality, a surrogate for general models of accidental pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari, Peyman; Stollenwerk, Nico

    2012-09-01

    In models for accidental pathogens, with the paradigmatic epidemiological system of bacterial meningitis, there was evolution towards states exhibiting critical fluctuations with power law behaviour observed [1]. This is a model with many possibly pathogenic strains essentially evolving independently to low pathogenicity. A first and previous study had shown that in the limit of vanishing pathogenicity there are critical fluctuations with power law distributions observed, already when only two strains interact [2]. This earlier version of a two strain model was very recently reinvestigated [3] and named as Stollenwerk-Jansen model (SJ). Muñoz et al. demonstrated that this two-strain model for accidental pathogens is in the universality class of the so-called voter model. Though this model clearly shows criticality, its control parameter, the pathogenicity, is not self-tuning towards criticality. However, the multi-strain version mentioned above [1] is well evolving towards criticality, as well as a spatially explicit version of this, shown in [4] p. 155. These models of multi-strain type including explicitly mutations of the pathogenicity can be called SJ-models of type II [5]. Since the original epidemiological model is of SIRYX-type, the evolution to zero pathogenicity is slow and perturbed by large population noise. In the present article we now show on the basis of the notion of the voter-model universality classes the evolution of n-voter models with mutaion towards criticality, now much less perturbed by population noise, hence demonstrating a clear mechanism of self-organized criticality in the sense of [6, 7]. The present results have wide implications for many diseases in which a large proportion of infections is asymptomatic, meaning that the system has already evolved towards an average low pathogenicity. This holds not only for the original paradigmatic case of bacterial meningitis, but was reecently also suggested for example for dengue fever (DENFREE

  2. Self-organized Criticality in an Earthquake Model on Random Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A simplified Olami-Feder-Christensen model on a random network has been studied. We propose a new toppling rule - when there is an unstable site toppling, the energy of the site is redistributed to its nearest neighbors randomly not averagely. The simulation results indicate that the model displays self-organized criticality when the system is conservative, and the avalanche size probability distribution of the system obeys finite size scaling. When the system is nonconservative, the model does not display scaling behavior. Simulation results of our model with different nearest neighbors q is also compared, which indicates that the spatialtopology does not alter the critical behavior of the system.

  3. Self-organized Criticality in a Model Based on Neural Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xiao-Wei; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2001-01-01

    Based on the LISSOM neural network model, we introduce a model to investigate self-organized criticality in the activity of neural populations. The influence of connection (synapse) between neurons has been adequately considered in this model. It is found to exhibit self-organized criticality (SOC) behavior under appropriate conditions.``We also find that the learning process has promotive influence on emergence of SOC behavior. In addition, we analyze the influence of various factors of the model on the SOC behavior, which is characterized by the power-law behavior of the avalanche size distribution.``

  4. Three-compartment model: critical evaluation based on neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Analiza M; Shen, Wei; Wang, ZiMian; Aloia, John F; Nelson, Miriam E; Heymsfield, Steven B; Sardinha, Luis B; Heshka, Stanley

    2004-11-01

    There is renewed interest in Siri's classic three-compartment (3C) body composition model, requiring body volume (BV) and total body water (TBW) estimates, because dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and in vivo neutron activation (IVNA) systems cannot accommodate subjects with severe obesity. However, the 3C model assumption of a constant ratio (alpha) of mineral (M) to total body protein (TBPro) and related residual mass density (D(RES)) based on cadaver analyses might not be valid across groups differing in sex, race, age, and weight. The aim of this study was to derive new 3C model coefficients in vivo and to compare these estimates to those derived by Siri. Healthy adults (n = 323) were evaluated with IVNA and DEXA and the measured components used to derive alpha and D(RES). For all subjects combined, values of alpha and D(RES) (means +/- SD, 0.351 +/- 0.043; 1.565 +/- 0.023 kg/l) were similar to Siri's proposed values of 0.35 and 1.565 kg/l, respectively. However, alpha and D(RES) varied significantly as a function of sex, race, weight, and age. Expected errors in percent body fat arising by application of Siri's model were illustrated in a second group of 264 adults, including some whose size exceeded DEXA limits but whose BV and TBW had been measured by hydrodensitometry and (2)H(2)O dilution, respectively. Extrapolation of predictions by newly developed models to very high weights allows percent fat error estimation when Siri's model is applied in morbidly obese subjects. The present study results provide a critical evaluation of potential errors in the classic 3C model and present new formulas for use in selected populations.

  5. Quantitative physical models of volcanic phenomena for hazards assessment of critical infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic hazards may have destructive effects on economy, transport, and natural environments at both local and regional scale. Hazardous phenomena include pyroclastic density currents, tephra fall, gas emissions, lava flows, debris flows and avalanches, and lahars. Volcanic hazards assessment is based on available information to characterize potential volcanic sources in the region of interest and to determine whether specific volcanic phenomena might reach a given site. Volcanic hazards assessment is focussed on estimating the distances that volcanic phenomena could travel from potential sources and their intensity at the considered site. Epistemic and aleatory uncertainties strongly affect the resulting hazards assessment. Within the context of critical infrastructures, volcanic eruptions are rare natural events that can create severe hazards. In addition to being rare events, evidence of many past volcanic eruptions is poorly preserved in the geologic record. The models used for describing the impact of volcanic phenomena generally represent a range of model complexities, from simplified physics based conceptual models to highly coupled thermo fluid dynamical approaches. Modelling approaches represent a hierarchy of complexity, which reflects increasing requirements for well characterized data in order to produce a broader range of output information. In selecting models for the hazard analysis related to a specific phenomenon, questions that need to be answered by the models must be carefully considered. Independently of the model, the final hazards assessment strongly depends on input derived from detailed volcanological investigations, such as mapping and stratigraphic correlations. For each phenomenon, an overview of currently available approaches for the evaluation of future hazards will be presented with the aim to provide a foundation for future work in developing an international consensus on volcanic hazards assessment methods.

  6. Non-linear critical taper model and determination of accretionary wedge strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Che-Ming; Dong, Jia-Jyun; Hsieh, Yuan-Lung; Liu, Hsueh-Hua; Liu, Cheng-Lung

    2016-12-01

    The critical taper model has been widely used to evaluate the strength contrast between the wedge and the basal detachment of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges. However, determination of the strength parameters using the traditional critical taper model, which adopts the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion, is difficult, if not impossible. In this study, we propose a modified critical taper model that incorporates the non-linear Hoek-Brown failure criterion. The parameters in the proposed critical Hoek-Brown wedge CHBW model can be directly evaluated via field investigations and laboratory tests. Meanwhile, the wedge strength is a function of the wedge thickness, which is oriented from stress non-linearity. The fold-and-thrust belt in western central Taiwan was used as an example to validate the proposed model. The determined wedge strength was 0.86 using a representative wedge thickness of 5.3 km; this was close to the inferred value of 0.6 from the critical taper. Interestingly, a concave topographic relief is predicted as a result of the wedge thickness dependency of the wedge strength, even if the wedge is composed of homogeneous materials and if the strength of the detachment is uniform. This study demonstrates that the influence of wedge strength on the critical taper angle can be quantified by the spatial distribution of strength variables and by the consideration of the wedge thickness dependency of wedge strength.

  7. A general pairwise interaction model provides an accurate description of in vivo transcription factor binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Santolini

    Full Text Available The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs, in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM, a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting

  8. Partnerships to provide care and medicine for chronic diseases: a model for emerging markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goroff, Michael; Reich, Michael R

    2010-12-01

    The challenge of expanding access to treatment and medicine for chronic diseases in emerging markets is both a public health imperative and a commercial opportunity. Cross-sector partnerships-involving a pharmaceutical manufacturer; a local health care provider; and other private, public, and nonprofit entities-could address this challenge. Such partnerships would provide integrated, comprehensive care and medicines for a specific chronic disease, with medicines directly supplied to the partnership at preferential prices by the manufacturer. The model discussed here requires additional specification, using real numbers and specific contexts, to assess its feasibility. Still, we believe that this model has the potential for public health and private business to cooperate in addressing the rising problem of chronic diseases in emerging markets.

  9. Pollution models and inverse distance weighting: Some critical remarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mesnard, Louis

    2013-03-01

    When evaluating the impact of pollution, measurements from remote stations are often weighted by the inverse of distance raised to some nonnegative power (IDW). This is derived from Shepard's method of spatial interpolation (1968). The paper discusses the arbitrary character of the exponent of distance and the problem of monitoring stations that are close to the reference point. From elementary laws of physics, it is determined which exponent of distance should be chosen (or its upper bound) depending on the form of pollution encountered, such as radiant pollution (including radioactivity and sound), air pollution (plumes, puffs, and motionless clouds by using the classical Gaussian model), and polluted rivers. The case where a station is confused with the reference point (or zero distance) is also discussed: in real cases this station imposes its measurement on the whole area regardless of the measurements made by other stations. This is a serious flaw when evaluating the mean pollution of an area. However, it is shown that this is not so in the case of a continuum of monitoring stations, and the measurement at the reference point and for the whole area may differ, which is satisfactory.

  10. Fuzzy clustering: critical analysis of the contextual mechanisms employed by three neural network models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldi, Andrea; Parmiggiani, Flavio

    1996-06-01

    According to the following definition, taken from the literature, a fuzzy clustering mechanism allows the same input pattern to belong to multiple categories to different degrees. Many clustering neural network (NN) models claim to feature fuzzy properties, but several of them (like the Fuzzy ART model) do not satisfy this definition. Vice versa, we believe that Kohonen's Self-Organizing Map, SOM, satisfies the definition provided above, even though this NN model is well-known to (robustly) perform topologically ordered mapping rather than fuzzy clustering. This may sound as a paradox if we consider that several fuzzy NN models (such as the Fuzzy Learning Vector Quantization, FLVQ, which was first called Fuzzy Kohonen Clustering Network, FKCN) were originally developed to enhance Kohonen's models (such as SOM and the vector quantization model, VQ). The fuzziness of SOM indicates that a network of processing elements (PEs) can verify the fuzzy clustering definition when it exploits local rules which are biologically plausible (such as the Kohonen bubble strategy). This is equivalent to state that the exploitation of the fuzzy set theory in the development of complex systems (e.g., clustering NNs) may provide new mathematical tools (e.g., the definition of membership function) to simulate the behavior of those cooperative/competitive mechanisms already identified by neurophysiological studies. When a biologically plausible cooperative/competitive strategy is pursued effectively, neighboring PEs become mutually coupled to gain sensitivity to contextual effects. PEs which are mutually coupled are affected by vertical (inter-layer) as well as horizontal (intra-layer) connections. To summarize, we suggest to relate the study of fuzzy clustering mechanisms to the multi-disciplinary science of complex systems, with special regard to the investigation of the cooperative/competitive local rules employed by complex systems to gain sensitivity to contextual effects in

  11. A comparison of administrative and physiologic predictive models in determining risk adjusted mortality rates in critically ill patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle B Enfield

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hospitals are increasingly compared based on clinical outcomes adjusted for severity of illness. Multiple methods exist to adjust for differences between patients. The challenge for consumers of this information, both the public and healthcare providers, is interpreting differences in risk adjustment models particularly when models differ in their use of administrative and physiologic data. We set to examine how administrative and physiologic models compare to each when applied to critically ill patients. METHODS: We prospectively abstracted variables for a physiologic and administrative model of mortality from two intensive care units in the United States. Predicted mortality was compared through the Pearsons Product coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis. A subgroup of patients admitted directly from the emergency department was analyzed to remove potential confounding changes in condition prior to ICU admission. RESULTS: We included 556 patients from two academic medical centers in this analysis. The administrative model and physiologic models predicted mortalities for the combined cohort were 15.3% (95% CI 13.7%, 16.8% and 24.6% (95% CI 22.7%, 26.5% (t-test p-value<0.001. The r(2 for these models was 0.297. The Bland-Atlman plot suggests that at low predicted mortality there was good agreement; however, as mortality increased the models diverged. Similar results were found when analyzing a subgroup of patients admitted directly from the emergency department. When comparing the two hospitals, there was a statistical difference when using the administrative model but not the physiologic model. Unexplained mortality, defined as those patients who died who had a predicted mortality less than 10%, was a rare event by either model. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, while it has been shown that administrative models provide estimates of mortality that are similar to physiologic models in non-critically ill patients with pneumonia, our results

  12. Providing comprehensive and consistent access to astronomical observatory archive data: the NASA archive model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlynn, Thomas; Fabbiano, Giuseppina; Accomazzi, Alberto; Smale, Alan; White, Richard L.; Donaldson, Thomas; Aloisi, Alessandra; Dower, Theresa; Mazzerella, Joseph M.; Ebert, Rick; Pevunova, Olga; Imel, David; Berriman, Graham B.; Teplitz, Harry I.; Groom, Steve L.; Desai, Vandana R.; Landry, Walter

    2016-07-01

    Since the turn of the millennium a constant concern of astronomical archives have begun providing data to the public through standardized protocols unifying data from disparate physical sources and wavebands across the electromagnetic spectrum into an astronomical virtual observatory (VO). In October 2014, NASA began support for the NASA Astronomical Virtual Observatories (NAVO) program to coordinate the efforts of NASA astronomy archives in providing data to users through implementation of protocols agreed within the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA). A major goal of the NAVO collaboration has been to step back from a piecemeal implementation of IVOA standards and define what the appropriate presence for the US and NASA astronomy archives in the VO should be. This includes evaluating what optional capabilities in the standards need to be supported, the specific versions of standards that should be used, and returning feedback to the IVOA, to support modifications as needed. We discuss a standard archive model developed by the NAVO for data archive presence in the virtual observatory built upon a consistent framework of standards defined by the IVOA. Our standard model provides for discovery of resources through the VO registries, access to observation and object data, downloads of image and spectral data and general access to archival datasets. It defines specific protocol versions, minimum capabilities, and all dependencies. The model will evolve as the capabilities of the virtual observatory and needs of the community change.

  13. A Global Remote Laboratory Experimentation Network and the Experiment Service Provider Business Model and Plans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor Ivar Eikaas

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents results from the IST KAII Trial project ReLAX - Remote LAboratory eXperimentation trial (IST 1999-20827, and contributes with a framework for a global remote laboratory experimentation network supported by a new business model. The paper presents this new Experiment Service Provider business model that aims at bringing physical experimentation back into the learning arena, where remotely operable laboratory experiments used in advanced education and training schemes are made available to a global education and training market in industry and academia. The business model is based on an approach where individual experiment owners offer remote access to their high-quality laboratory facilities to users around the world. The usage can be for research, education, on-the-job training etc. The access to these facilities is offered via an independent operating company - the Experiment Service Provider. The Experiment Service Provider offers eCommerce services like booking, access control, invoicing, dispute resolution, quality control, customer evaluation services and a unified Lab Portal.

  14. Long-term modelling of nitrogen turnover and critical loads in a forested catchment using the INCA model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-J. Langusch

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Many forest ecosystems in Central Europe have reached the status of N saturation due to chronically high N deposition. In consequence, the NO3 leaching into ground- and surface waters is often substantial. Critical loads have been defined to abate the negative consequences of the NO3 leaching such as soil acidification and nutrient losses. The steady state mass balance method is normally used to calculate critical loads for N deposition in forest ecosystems. However, the steady state mass balance approach is limited because it does not take into account hydrology and the time until the steady state is reached. The aim of this study was to test the suitability of another approach: the dynamic model INCA (Integrated Nitrogen Model for European Catchments. Long-term effects of changing N deposition and critical loads for N were simulated using INCA for the Lehstenbach spruce catchment (Fichtelgebirge, NE Bavaria, Germany under different hydrological conditions. Long-term scenarios of either increasing or decreasing N deposition indicated that, in this catchment, the response of nitrate concentrations in runoff to changing N deposition is buffered by a large groundwater reservoir. The critical load simulated by the INCA model with respect to a nitrate concentration of 0.4 mg N l–1 as threshold value in runoff was 9.7 kg N ha–1yr–1 compared to 10 kg ha–1yr–1 for the steady state model. Under conditions of lower precipitation (520 mm the resulting critical load was 7.7 kg N ha–1yr–1 , suggesting the necessity to account for different hydrological conditions when calculating critical loads. The INCA model seems to be suitable to calculate critical loads for N in forested catchments under varying hydrological conditions e.g. as a consequence of climate change. Keywords: forest ecosystem, N saturation, critical load, modelling, long-term scenario, nitrate leaching, critical loads reduction, INCA

  15. Wind farms providing secondary frequency regulation: Evaluating the performance of model-based receding horizon control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Carl R.; Meyers, Johan; Meneveau, Charles; Gayme, Dennice F.

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the use of wind farms to provide secondary frequency regulation for a power grid. Our approach uses model-based receding horizon control of a wind farm that is tested using a large eddy simulation (LES) framework. In order to enable real-time implementation, the control actions are computed based on a time-varying one-dimensional wake model. This model describes wake advection and interactions, both of which play an important role in wind farm power production. This controller is implemented in an LES model of an 84-turbine wind farm represented by actuator disk turbine models. Differences between the velocities at each turbine predicted by the wake model and measured in LES are used for closed-loop feedback. The controller is tested on two types of regulation signals, “RegA” and “RegD”, obtained from PJM, an independent system operator in the eastern United States. Composite performance scores, which are used by PJM to qualify plants for regulation, are used to evaluate the performance of the controlled wind farm. Our results demonstrate that the controlled wind farm consistently performs well, passing the qualification threshold for all fastacting RegD signals. For the RegA signal, which changes over slower time scales, the controlled wind farm's average performance surpasses the threshold, but further work is needed to enable the controlled system to achieve qualifying performance all of the time.

  16. Providing critical laboratory results on time, every time to help reduce emergency department length of stay: how our laboratory achieved a Six Sigma level of performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blick, Kenneth E

    2013-08-01

    To develop a fully automated core laboratory, handling samples on a "first in, first out" real-time basis with Lean/Six Sigma management tools. Our primary goal was to provide services to critical care areas, eliminating turnaround time outlier percentage (TAT-OP) as a factor in patient length of stay (LOS). A secondary goal was to achieve a better laboratory return on investment. In 2011, we reached our primary goal when we calculated the TAT-OP distribution and found we had achieved a Six Sigma level of performance, ensuring that our laboratory service can be essentially eliminated as a factor in emergency department patient LOS. We also measured return on investment, showing a productivity improvement of 35%, keeping pace with our increased testing volume. As a result of our Lean process improvements and Six Sigma initiatives, in part through (1) strategic deployment of point-of-care testing and (2) core laboratory total automation with robotics, middleware, and expert system technology, physicians and nurses at the Oklahoma University Medical Center can more effectively deliver lifesaving health care using evidence-based protocols that depend heavily on "on time, every time" laboratory services.

  17. Sub-critical fouling in a membrane bioreactor for municipal wastewater treatment: experimental investigation and mathematical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Saroj, Devendra Prakash; Chiarani, Daniele; Andreottola, Gianni

    2007-09-01

    Fouling is a major limitation for the application of membrane bioreactors (MBRs) in municipal wastewater treatment; the critical flux concept represents a valid tool for process optimisation in planning fouling control strategies. The paper presents the results obtained on a large pilot MBR equipped with a plate-and-frame ultrafiltration membrane. The experimental assessment of flux criticality was carried out by flux-stepping tests showing the positive impact of liquid temperature on the value of the critical threshold. The reliability of short-term tests was then verified over a long period by determining the time of sustainability, t(sust), of six different sub-critical fluxes ranging between 17 and 30Lm(-2)h(-1). An exponential fitting was observed in terms of fouling rate both before and after t(sust), though fouling after t(sust) is likely to be ascribed not only to cake formation. Finally, a new mathematical formulation was proposed according to the local flux approach to model the sub-critical TMP transients. The model involves both bound and free forms of EPS and, once experimentally calibrated, it provided a fair prediction of the TMP jump.

  18. A FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT MODEL OF CRITICAL THINKING IN MATHEMATICS LEARNING IN JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rosnawati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to obtain a valid and reliable formative evaluation model of critical thinking. The method used in this research was the research and development by integrating Borg & Gall's model and  Plomp's development model. The ten steps Borg & Gall’s model were modified into five stages as the stages in the Plomp's model. The subjects in this study were 1,446 students of junior high schools in DIY, 14 mathematics teacher, and six experts. The content validity employed was expert judgment, the empirical validity and reliability used were loading factor, item analysis used PCM 1PL, and the relationship between disposition and critical thinking skill used was structural equation modeling (SEM. The developed formative evaluation model is the procedural model. There are five aspects of critical thinking skill: mathematic reasoning, interpretation, analysis, evaluation, and inference, which entirely composed of 42 items. The validity of the critical thinking skill instruments achieves a significance degree as indicated by the lowest and the highest loading factors of 0.38 and 0.74 subsequently, the reliability of every aspect in a good category. The average level of difficulty is 0.00 with the standard deviation of 0.45 which is in a good category. The peer assessment questionnaire of critical thinking disposition consists of seven aspects: truth-seeking, open-minded, analysis, systematic, self-confidence, inquisitiveness, and maturity with 23 items. The critical thinking disposition validity achieves the significance degree as indicated by the lowest and the high factor loading of 0.66 and 0.76 subsequently, and the reliability of every aspect in a good category. Based on the analysis of the structural equation model, the model fits the data.

  19. A study of critical reasoning in online learning: application of the Occupational Performance Process Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Anita Witt; Batorski, Rosemary E

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of an online guided independent study on critical reasoning skills. Twenty-one first-semester Master of Occupational Therapy students completed an online assignment designed to facilitate application of the Occupational Performance Process Model (Fearing & Clark) and kept reflective journals. Data from the journals were analyzed in relation to the three sets of questions, question type and results of the Watson-Glaser Critical Thinking Appraisal (WGCTA). This assignment appeared to be effective for enhancing awareness and use of critical reasoning skills. Differences in patterns of critical reasoning between students with high and low WGCTA scores and results of an inductive analysis of the journal entries are discussed. Future research investigating the types of feedback that effectively facilitate development of critical reasoning and whether students with high and low WGCTA scores might benefit from different types of instruction and/or feedback is recommended.

  20. Dynamic Critical Exponents of Three-Dimensional Ising Models and Two-Dimensional Three-States Potts Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Yohsuke; Ito, Nobuyasu

    2008-01-01

    Values of dynamic critical exponents are numerically estimated for various models with the nonequilibrium relaxation method to test the dynamic universality hypothesis. The dynamics used here are single-spin update with Metropolis-type transition probabities. The estimated values of nonequilibrium relaxation exponent of magnetization λm (=β/zν) of Ising models on bcc and fcc lattices are estimated to be 0.251(3) and 0.252(3), respectively, which are consistent with the value of the model on simple-cubic lattice, 0.250(2). The dynamic critical exponents of three-states Potts models on square, honeycomb and triangular lattices are also estimated to be 2.193(5), 2.198(4), and 2.199(3), respectively. They are consistent within the error bars. It is also confirmed that Ising models with regularly modulated coupling constants on square lattice have the same dynamic critical exponents with the uniformly ferromagnetic Ising model.

  1. Local criticality, diffusion and chaos in generalized Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev models

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Yingfei; Stanford, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    The Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model is a $(0+1)$-dimensional model describing Majorana fermions or complex fermions with random interactions. This model has various interesting properties such as approximate local criticality (power law correlation in time), zero temperature entropy, and quantum chaos. In this article, we propose a higher dimensional generalization of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model, which is a lattice model with $N$ Majorana fermions at each site and random interactions between them. Our model can be defined on arbitrary lattices in arbitrary spatial dimensions. In the large $N$ limit, the higher dimensional model preserves many properties of the Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev model such as local criticality in two-point functions, zero temperature entropy and chaos measured by the out-of-time-ordered correlation functions. In addition, we obtain new properties unique to higher dimensions such as diffusive energy transport and a "butterfly velocity" describing the propagation of chaos in space. We mainly present res...

  2. Radiation induced dissolution of UO 2 based nuclear fuel - A critical review of predictive modelling approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Trygve E.; Shoesmith, David W.; Jonsson, Mats

    2012-01-01

    Radiation induced dissolution of uranium dioxide (UO 2) nuclear fuel and the consequent release of radionuclides to intruding groundwater are key-processes in the safety analysis of future deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel. For several decades, these processes have been studied experimentally using both spent fuel and various types of simulated spent fuels. The latter have been employed since it is difficult to draw mechanistic conclusions from real spent nuclear fuel experiments. Several predictive modelling approaches have been developed over the last two decades. These models are largely based on experimental observations. In this work we have performed a critical review of the modelling approaches developed based on the large body of chemical and electrochemical experimental data. The main conclusions are: (1) the use of measured interfacial rate constants give results in generally good agreement with experimental results compared to simulations where homogeneous rate constants are used; (2) the use of spatial dose rate distributions is particularly important when simulating the behaviour over short time periods; and (3) the steady-state approach (the rate of oxidant consumption is equal to the rate of oxidant production) provides a simple but fairly accurate alternative, but errors in the reaction mechanism and in the kinetic parameters used may not be revealed by simple benchmarking. It is essential to use experimentally determined rate constants and verified reaction mechanisms, irrespective of whether the approach is chemical or electrochemical.

  3. The shift of prompt critical in reflected reactors and the limitations of the mean prompt-neutron lifetime model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriggs, G.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Busch, R.D. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

    1994-08-01

    Prompt critical in a bare reactor is defined as the point at which the reactivity {rho} of the reactor is equal to the effective delayed neutron fraction {beta}. In a reflected reactor, however, it is shown that prompt critical will occur at a reactivity of {rho} = {beta}(1-f) where f is the fraction of core neutrons that return to the core region after having leaked into the reflector. Furthermore, it is also shown that the mean prompt-neutron lifetime model that has been traditionally used to characterize the dynamic response of reflected reactors may not always provide an adequate representation of the system for reactivities greater than 1$. And finally, the coupled, point-kinetic equations proposed by Avery and further developed by Cohn for simple reflected systems are recast into a more usable form that can be readily used to perform superprompt critical transient analyses.

  4. The climate4impact platform: Providing, tailoring and facilitating climate model data access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagé, Christian; Pagani, Andrea; Plieger, Maarten; Som de Cerff, Wim; Mihajlovski, Andrej; de Vreede, Ernst; Spinuso, Alessandro; Hutjes, Ronald; de Jong, Fokke; Bärring, Lars; Vega, Manuel; Cofiño, Antonio; d'Anca, Alessandro; Fiore, Sandro; Kolax, Michael

    2017-04-01

    One of the main objectives of climate4impact is to provide standardized web services and tools that are reusable in other portals. These services include web processing services, web coverage services and web mapping services (WPS, WCS and WMS). Tailored portals can be targeted to specific communities and/or countries/regions while making use of those services. Easier access to climate data is very important for the climate change impact communities. To fulfill this objective, the climate4impact (http://climate4impact.eu/) web portal and services has been developed, targeting climate change impact modellers, impact and adaptation consultants, as well as other experts using climate change data. It provides to users harmonized access to climate model data through tailored services. It features static and dynamic documentation, Use Cases and best practice examples, an advanced search interface, an integrated authentication and authorization system with the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF), a visualization interface with ADAGUC web mapping tools. In the latest version, statistical downscaling services, provided by the Santander Meteorology Group Downscaling Portal, were integrated. An innovative interface to integrate statistical downscaling services will be released in the upcoming version. The latter will be a big step in bridging the gap between climate scientists and the climate change impact communities. The climate4impact portal builds on the infrastructure of an international distributed database that has been set to disseminate the results from the global climate model results of the Coupled Model Intercomparison project Phase 5 (CMIP5). This database, the ESGF, is an international collaboration that develops, deploys and maintains software infrastructure for the management, dissemination, and analysis of climate model data. The European FP7 project IS-ENES, Infrastructure for the European Network for Earth System modelling, supports the European

  5. ERK activation by the polyphenols fisetin and resveratrol provides neuroprotection in multiple models of Huntington's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, Pamela; Dargusch, Richard; Bodai, Laszlo; Gerard, Paul E.; Purcell, Judith M.; Marsh, J. Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an inherited, progressive and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by psychiatric, cognitive and motor symptoms. Among the pathways implicated in HD are those involving mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and particularly the Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Studies in both cells and animal models suggest that ERK activation might provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of HD but compounds that specifically activate ERK are few. To test the hypothesis that pharmaceutical activation of ERK might be protective for HD, a polyphenol, fisetin, which was previously shown to activate the Ras-ERK cascade, was tested in three different models of HD: PC12 cells expressing mutant Httex1 under the control of an inducible promoter, Drosophila expressing mutant Httex1 and the R6/2 mouse model of HD. The results indicate that fisetin can reduce the impact of mutant huntingtin in each of these disease models. Prompted by this observation, we determined that the related polyphenol, resveratrol, also activates ERK and is protective in HD models. Notably, although more than a dozen small molecule inhibitors of ERK activation are in clinical trials, very few small molecule activators of ERK signaling are reported. Thus, fisetin, resveratrol and related compounds might be useful for the treatment of HD by virtue of their unique ability to activate ERK. PMID:20952447

  6. Capabilities of stochastic rainfall models as data providers for urban hydrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haberlandt, Uwe

    2017-04-01

    For planning of urban drainage systems using hydrological models, long, continuous precipitation series with high temporal resolution are needed. Since observed time series are often too short or not available everywhere, the use of synthetic precipitation is a common alternative. This contribution compares three precipitation models regarding their suitability to provide 5 minute continuous rainfall time series for a) sizing of drainage networks for urban flood protection and b) dimensioning of combined sewage systems for pollution reduction. The rainfall models are a parametric stochastic model (Haberlandt et al., 2008), a non-parametric probabilistic approach (Bárdossy, 1998) and a stochastic downscaling of dynamically simulated rainfall (Berg et al., 2013); all models are operated both as single site and multi-site generators. The models are applied with regionalised parameters assuming that there is no station at the target location. Rainfall and discharge characteristics are utilised for evaluation of the model performance. The simulation results are compared against results obtained from reference rainfall stations not used for parameter estimation. The rainfall simulations are carried out for the federal states of Baden-Württemberg and Lower Saxony in Germany and the discharge simulations for the drainage networks of the cities of Hamburg, Brunswick and Freiburg. Altogether, the results show comparable simulation performance for the three models, good capabilities for single site simulations but low skills for multi-site simulations. Remarkably, there is no significant difference in simulation performance comparing the tasks flood protection with pollution reduction, so the models are finally able to simulate both the extremes and the long term characteristics of rainfall equally well. Bárdossy, A., 1998. Generating precipitation time series using simulated annealing. Wat. Resour. Res., 34(7): 1737-1744. Berg, P., Wagner, S., Kunstmann, H., Schädler, G

  7. Family child care home providers as role models for children: Cause for concern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Tovar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Health behaviors associated with chronic disease, particularly healthy eating and regular physical activity, are important role modeling opportunities for individuals working in child care programs. Prior studies have not explored these risk factors in family child care home (FCCH providers which care for vulnerable and at-risk populations. To address this gap, we describe the socio-demographic and health risk behavior profiles in a sample of providers (n = 166 FCCH taken from baseline data of an ongoing cluster-randomized controlled intervention (2011–2016 in North Carolina. Data were collected during on-site visits where providers completed self-administered questionnaires (socio-demographics, physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, number of hours of sleep per night and perceived stress and had their height and weight measured. A risk score (range: 0–6; 0 no risk to 6 high risk was calculated based on how many of the following were present: not having health insurance, being overweight/obese, not meeting physical activity, fruit and vegetable, and sleep recommendations, and having high stress. Mean and frequency distributions of participant and FCCH characteristics were calculated. Close to one third (29.3% of providers reported not having health insurance. Almost all providers (89.8% were overweight or obese with approximately half not meeting guidelines for physical activity, fruit and vegetable consumption, and sleep. Over half reported a “high” stress score. The mean risk score was 3.39 (±1.2, with close to half of the providers having a risk score of 4, 5 or 6 (45.7%. These results stress the need to promote the health of these important care providers.

  8. Critical incident stress debriefing for law enforcement: practical models and special applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    Critical incident stress debriefing (CISD) has evolved and diversified to address the needs of various subpopulations of public safety and emergency services personnel, including law enforcement. This article describes the concept of critical incident stress as it applies to police officers and other law enforcement agents. It then discusses the traditional debriefing models and the specialized modifications and applications that have been introduced to deal with the needs of law enforcement individuals and groups. Next, the role of peer-debriefing is described in addressing law enforcement critical incident stress, as well as specific examples of model programs within different types of law enforcement agencies. Finally, the as yet incompletely resolved legal and administrative issues surrounding the use of peers versus professional clinicians for critical incident intervention are addressed.

  9. Model-based schedulability analysis of safety critical hard real-time Java programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgholm, Thomas; Kragh-Hansen, Henrik; Olsen, Petur

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel approach to schedulability analysis of Safety Critical Hard Real-Time Java programs. The approach is based on a translation of programs, written in the Safety Critical Java profile introduced in [21] for the Java Optimized Processor [18], to timed automata models...... has been implemented in a tool, named SARTS, successfully used to verify the schedulability of a real-time sorting machine consisting of two periodic and two sporadic tasks. SARTS has also been applied on a number of smaller examples to investigate properties of our approach.......In this paper, we present a novel approach to schedulability analysis of Safety Critical Hard Real-Time Java programs. The approach is based on a translation of programs, written in the Safety Critical Java profile introduced in [21] for the Java Optimized Processor [18], to timed automata models...

  10. Direct measurement of the critical pore size in a model membrane

    CERN Document Server

    Ilton, Mark; Dalnoki-Veress, Kari

    2016-01-01

    We study pore nucleation in a model membrane system, a freestanding polymer film. Nucleated pores smaller than a critical size close, while pores larger than the critical size grow. Holes of varying size were purposefully prepared in liquid polymer films, and their evolution in time was monitored using optical and atomic force microscopy to extract a critical radius. The critical radius scales linearly with film thickness for a homopolymer film. The results agree with a simple model which takes into account the energy cost due to surface area at the edge of the pore. The energy cost at the edge of the pore is experimentally varied by using a lamellar-forming diblock copolymer membrane. The underlying molecular architecture causes increased frustration at the pore edge resulting in an enhanced cost of pore formation.

  11. Critical Casimir forces between defects in the 2D Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, P.; Maciołek, A.; Dietrich, S.

    2016-12-01

    An exact statistical mechanical derivation is given of the critical Casimir interactions between two defects in a planar lattice-gas Ising model. Each defect is a finite group of nearest-neighbor spins with modified coupling constants. Such a system can be regarded as a model of a binary liquid mixture with the molecules confined to a membrane and the defects mimicking protein inclusions embedded into the membrane. As suggested by recent experiments, certain cellular membranes appear to be tuned to the proximity of a critical demixing point belonging to the two-dimensional Ising universality class. Therefore one can expect the emergence of critical Casimir forces between membrane inclusions. These forces are governed by universal scaling functions, which we derive for simple defects. We prove that the scaling law appearing at criticality is the same for all types of defects considered here.

  12. Critical properties of the Ziff, Gulari, and Barshad (ZGB) model with inert sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoenicke, G L; de Andrade, M F; Figueiredo, W

    2014-08-21

    We study the model proposed by Ziff, Gulari, and Barshad to mimic the oxidation of carbon monoxide (CO) in the presence of fixed impurities distributed over the catalytic surface. Our focus is on the continuous phase transition between the active phase, where occurs the production of carbon dioxide (CO2), and the inactive phase, where all the non inert sites become filled with oxygen molecules. We employ Monte Carlo simulations to calculate the different ratios between moments of the order parameter at the critical point, as well as, we determine the critical exponents β and ν⊥ as a function of the concentration of impurities. We show that the presence of impurities over the catalytic surface changes the critical behavior of the system. The critical exponents depend on the concentration of impurities and the model does not belong to the directed percolation universality class.

  13. A meta-modelling strategy to identify the critical offshore conditions for coastal flooding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rohmer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available High water level at the coast may be the result of different combinations of offshore hydrodynamic conditions (e.g. wave characteristics, offshore water level, etc.. Providing the contour of the "critical" set of offshore conditions leading to high water level is of primary importance either to constrain early warning networks based on hydro-meteorological forecast or observations, or for the assessment of the coastal flood hazard return period. The challenge arises from the use of computationally intensive simulators, which prevent the application of a grid approach consisting in extracting the contour through the systematic evaluation of the simulator on a fine design grid defined in the offshore conditions domain. To overcome such a computational difficulty, we propose a strategy based on the kriging meta-modelling technique combined with an adaptive sampling procedure aiming at improving the local accuracy in the regions of the offshore conditions that contribute the most to the estimate of the targeted contour. This methodology is applied to two cases using an idealized site on the Mediterranean coast (southern France: (1 a two-dimensional case to ease the visual analysis and aiming at identifying the combination of offshore water level and of significant wave height; (2 a more complex case aiming at identifying four offshore conditions (offshore water level and offshore wave characteristics: height, direction and period. By using a simulator of moderate computation time cost (a few tens of minutes, the targeted contour can be estimated using a cluster composed of a moderate number of computer units. This reference contour is then compared with the results of the meta-model-based strategy. In both cases, we show that the critical offshore conditions can be estimated with a good level of accuracy using a very limited number (of a few tens of computationally intensive hydrodynamic simulations.

  14. Determining critical load in the multispan beams with the nonlinear model

    Science.gov (United States)

    DemÑ-r, D. Dönmez; Sinir, B. G.; Usta, L.

    2017-01-01

    The beams which are one of the most commonly used structural members are quite important for many researchers. Mathematical models determining the response of beams under external loads are concluded from elasticity theory through a series of assumptions concerning the kinematics of deformation and constitutive behavior. In this study, the derivation of the nonlinear model is introduced to determine the critical load in the multispan beams. Since the engineering practice of this kind of problems is very common, determining the critical load is quite important. For this purpose, the nonlinear mathematical model of the multispan Euler-Bernoulli beam is firstly obtained. To be able to obtain the independent of the material and the geometry, the present model are became dimensionless. Then, the critical axial load can be determined via the nonlinear solution of the governing equation.

  15. Deconfined criticality flow in the Heisenberg model with ring-exchange interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kun; Huang, Yuan; Deng, Youjin; Kuklov, A B; Prokof'ev, N V; Svistunov, B V

    2013-05-03

    Quantum transition points in the J-Q model--the test bed of the deconfined critical point theory--and the SU(2)-symmetric discrete noncompact CP(1) representation of the deconfined critical action are directly compared by the flowgram method. We find that the flows of two systems coincide in a broad region of linear system sizes (10 < L < 50 for the J-Q model), implying that the deconfined critical point theory correctly captures the mesoscopic physics of competition between the antiferromagnetic and valence-bond orders in quantum spin systems. At larger sizes, however, we observe significant deviations between the two flows which both demonstrate strong violations of scale invariance. This reliably rules out the second-order transition scenario in at least one of the two models and suggests the most likely explanation for the nature of the transition in the J-Q model.

  16. On power system blackout modeling and analysis based on self-organized criticality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper makes a comprehensive survey on power system blackout modeling and analysis based on SOC (self-organized criticality). Firstly,a generalized SOC theory from the viewpoint of cybernetics is introduced. Then the evolution model of power system and its relative mathematical description,which serves as a concrete example of the proposed generalized SOC,are given. Secondly,five blackout models capturing various critical properties of power systems in different time-scales are listed. Finally,this paper analyzes SOC in power systems,such as,the revelation of criticalities of proposed models in both micro-scale and macro-scale which can be used to assess the security of power system,and cas-cading failures process.

  17. On power system blackout modeling and analysis based on self-organized criticality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MEI ShengWei; XUE AnCheng; ZHANG XueMin

    2008-01-01

    This paper makes a comprehensive survey on power system blackout modeling and analysis based on SOC (self-organized criticality). Firstly, a generalized SOC theory from the viewpoint of cybernetics is introduced. Then the evolution model of power system and its relative mathematical description, which serves as a concrete example of the proposed generalized SOC, are given. Secondly, five blackout models capturing various critical properties of power systems in different time-scales are listed. Finally, this paper analyzes SOC in power systems, such as, the revelation of criticalities of proposed models in both micro-scale and macro-scale which can be used to assess the security of power system, and cascading failures process.

  18. Critical behavior of Gaussian model on diamond-type hierarchical lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔祥木; 李崧

    1999-01-01

    It is proposed that the Gaussian type distribution constant bqi in the Gaussian model depends on the coordination number qi of site i, and that the relation bqi/bqj = qi/qj holds among bqi’s. The Gaussian model is then studied on a family of the diamond-type hierarchical (or DH) lattices, by the decimation real-space renormalization group following spin-resealing method. It is found that the magnetic property of the Gaussian model belongs to the same universal class, and that the critical point K* and the critical exponent v are given by K*= bqi/qi and v=1/2, respectively.

  19. Using change-point models to estimate empirical critical loads for nitrogen in mountain ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Tobias; Kohli, Lukas; Rihm, Beat; Meier, Reto; Achermann, Beat

    2017-01-01

    To protect ecosystems and their services, the critical load concept has been implemented under the framework of the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (UNECE) to develop effects-oriented air pollution abatement strategies. Critical loads are thresholds below which damaging effects on sensitive habitats do not occur according to current knowledge. Here we use change-point models applied in a Bayesian context to overcome some of the difficulties when estimating empirical critical loads for nitrogen (N) from empirical data. We tested the method using simulated data with varying sample sizes, varying effects of confounding variables, and with varying negative effects of N deposition on species richness. The method was applied to the national-scale plant species richness data from mountain hay meadows and (sub)alpine scrubs sites in Switzerland. Seven confounding factors (elevation, inclination, precipitation, calcareous content, aspect as well as indicator values for humidity and light) were selected based on earlier studies examining numerous environmental factors to explain Swiss vascular plant diversity. The estimated critical load confirmed the existing empirical critical load of 5-15 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) for (sub)alpine scrubs, while for mountain hay meadows the estimated critical load was at the lower end of the current empirical critical load range. Based on these results, we suggest to narrow down the critical load range for mountain hay meadows to 10-15 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1).

  20. Critical properties of XY model on two-dimensional layered magnetic films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yi; Liu Xiao-Yan; Sun Lei; Zhang Xing; Han Ru-Qi

    2006-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulations, we have investigated the classical XY model on triangular lattices of ultra-thin film structures with middle ferromagnetic layers sandwiched between two antiferromagnetic layers. The internal energy,the specific heat, the chirality and the chiral susceptibility are calculated in order to clarify phase transitions and critical phenomena. From the finite-size scaling analyses, the values of critical exponents are determined. In a range of interaction parameters, we find that the chirality steeply goes up as temperature increases in a temperature range;correspondingly the value of a critical exponent for this change is estimated.

  1. Audio watermarking based on psychoacoustic model and critical band wavelet transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Zhi; ZHAO Heming; GU Jihua; WU Di

    2007-01-01

    Watermark embedding algorithm based on critical band wavelet transform of digital audio signal is proposed in this paper. The masking threshold for each audio signal segment was calculated on the basic of psychoacoustic model. According to the similarity between critical band of human auditory system and critical band wavelet transform, a watermark was embedded into the low-band and mid-band coefficients of digital wavelet. The embedding strength was adaptively controlled by the masking threshold. The experiment results show that the embedded watermark signal is inaudible, and the watermarked audio signal has good robustness against many attacks such as compression, noise, re-sampling, low-pass filtering.

  2. Self-Organized Criticality, Plasticity and Sensorimotor Coupling. Explorations with a Neurorobotic Model in a Behavioural Preference Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Miguel; Barandiaran, Xabier E.; Bedia, Manuel G.; Seron, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    During the last two decades, analysis of 1/ƒ noise in cognitive science has led to a considerable progress in the way we understand the organization of our mental life. However, there is still a lack of specific models providing explanations of how 1/ƒ noise is generated in coupled brain-body-environment systems, since existing models and experiments typically target either externally observable behaviour or isolated neuronal systems but do not address the interplay between neuronal mechanisms and sensorimotor dynamics. We present a conceptual model of a minimal neurorobotic agent solving a behavioural task that makes it possible to relate mechanistic (neurodynamic) and behavioural levels of description. The model consists of a simulated robot controlled by a network of Kuramoto oscillators with homeostatic plasticity and the ability to develop behavioural preferences mediated by sensorimotor patterns. With only three oscillators, this simple model displays self-organized criticality in the form of robust 1/ƒ noise and a wide multifractal spectrum. We show that the emergence of self-organized criticality and 1/ƒ noise in our model is the result of three simultaneous conditions: a) non-linear interaction dynamics capable of generating stable collective patterns, b) internal plastic mechanisms modulating the sensorimotor flows, and c) strong sensorimotor coupling with the environment that induces transient metastable neurodynamic regimes. We carry out a number of experiments to show that both synaptic plasticity and strong sensorimotor coupling play a necessary role, as constituents of self-organized criticality, in the generation of 1/ƒ noise. The experiments also shown to be useful to test the robustness of 1/ƒ scaling comparing the results of different techniques. We finally discuss the role of conceptual models as mediators between nomothetic and mechanistic models and how they can inform future experimental research where self-organized critically includes

  3. Self-organized criticality, plasticity and sensorimotor coupling. Explorations with a neurorobotic model in a behavioural preference task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Aguilera

    Full Text Available During the last two decades, analysis of 1/ƒ noise in cognitive science has led to a considerable progress in the way we understand the organization of our mental life. However, there is still a lack of specific models providing explanations of how 1/ƒ noise is generated in coupled brain-body-environment systems, since existing models and experiments typically target either externally observable behaviour or isolated neuronal systems but do not address the interplay between neuronal mechanisms and sensorimotor dynamics. We present a conceptual model of a minimal neurorobotic agent solving a behavioural task that makes it possible to relate mechanistic (neurodynamic and behavioural levels of description. The model consists of a simulated robot controlled by a network of Kuramoto oscillators with homeostatic plasticity and the ability to develop behavioural preferences mediated by sensorimotor patterns. With only three oscillators, this simple model displays self-organized criticality in the form of robust 1/ƒ noise and a wide multifractal spectrum. We show that the emergence of self-organized criticality and 1/ƒ noise in our model is the result of three simultaneous conditions: a non-linear interaction dynamics capable of generating stable collective patterns, b internal plastic mechanisms modulating the sensorimotor flows, and c strong sensorimotor coupling with the environment that induces transient metastable neurodynamic regimes. We carry out a number of experiments to show that both synaptic plasticity and strong sensorimotor coupling play a necessary role, as constituents of self-organized criticality, in the generation of 1/ƒ noise. The experiments also shown to be useful to test the robustness of 1/ƒ scaling comparing the results of different techniques. We finally discuss the role of conceptual models as mediators between nomothetic and mechanistic models and how they can inform future experimental research where self

  4. Self-organized criticality, plasticity and sensorimotor coupling. Explorations with a neurorobotic model in a behavioural preference task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Miguel; Barandiaran, Xabier E; Bedia, Manuel G; Seron, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    During the last two decades, analysis of 1/ƒ noise in cognitive science has led to a considerable progress in the way we understand the organization of our mental life. However, there is still a lack of specific models providing explanations of how 1/ƒ noise is generated in coupled brain-body-environment systems, since existing models and experiments typically target either externally observable behaviour or isolated neuronal systems but do not address the interplay between neuronal mechanisms and sensorimotor dynamics. We present a conceptual model of a minimal neurorobotic agent solving a behavioural task that makes it possible to relate mechanistic (neurodynamic) and behavioural levels of description. The model consists of a simulated robot controlled by a network of Kuramoto oscillators with homeostatic plasticity and the ability to develop behavioural preferences mediated by sensorimotor patterns. With only three oscillators, this simple model displays self-organized criticality in the form of robust 1/ƒ noise and a wide multifractal spectrum. We show that the emergence of self-organized criticality and 1/ƒ noise in our model is the result of three simultaneous conditions: a) non-linear interaction dynamics capable of generating stable collective patterns, b) internal plastic mechanisms modulating the sensorimotor flows, and c) strong sensorimotor coupling with the environment that induces transient metastable neurodynamic regimes. We carry out a number of experiments to show that both synaptic plasticity and strong sensorimotor coupling play a necessary role, as constituents of self-organized criticality, in the generation of 1/ƒ noise. The experiments also shown to be useful to test the robustness of 1/ƒ scaling comparing the results of different techniques. We finally discuss the role of conceptual models as mediators between nomothetic and mechanistic models and how they can inform future experimental research where self-organized critically includes

  5. Daily Suction Provided by External Volume Expansion Inducing Regeneration of Grafted Fat in a Murine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yuan; Liao, Yunjun; Lu, Feng; Gao, Jianhua

    2017-02-01

    Fat grafting has variable and sometimes poor outcomes, and therefore new methods are needed. Multiple studies have demonstrated the excellent performance of external volume expansion and focused only on preexpansion with emphasis on the recipient. Two mouse models (a suction model and a fat-exchange transplantation model) were established to investigate changes in the origins and biological behaviors of regeneration-related cells in grafted fat under daily suction provided by external volume expansion. Blood supply increased from new host-derived capillaries or macrophage infiltration under suction. CD34-positive cells showed increased migration from the host into the grafts under suction. At week 12, nearly half of the mature adipocytes regenerated in the grafts in the suction group were derived from the host. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ expression of the suction group was significantly higher than that of controls at weeks 2 and 4 during adipogenesis. The normalized sample weight of the grafted fat was significantly greater than that of controls at 1 (0.081 ± 0.001 versus 0.072 ± 0.005; p suction provided by external volume expansion favors the regeneration of grafted fat and improves retention by promoting the migration of regeneration-related cells and the differentiation of adipocytes. Thus, more mature fat tissue with a well-organized structure was formed under suction.

  6. Critical Thinking and Political Participation: The Development and Assessment of a Causal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith M.

    An assessment of a four-stage conceptual model reveals that critical thinking has indirect positive effects on political participation through its direct effects on personal control, political efficacy, and democratic attitudes. The model establishes causal relationships among selected personality variables (self-esteem, personal control, and…

  7. Critical Thinking and Political Participation: The Development and Assessment of a Causal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, Edith M.

    An assessment of a four-stage conceptual model reveals that critical thinking has indirect positive effects on political participation through its direct effects on personal control, political efficacy, and democratic attitudes. The model establishes causal relationships among selected personality variables (self-esteem, personal control, and…

  8. Critical Exponents of the Classical 3D Heisenberg Model A Single-Cluster Monte Carlo Study

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, C; Holm, Christian; Janke, Wolfhard

    1993-01-01

    We have simulated the three-dimensional Heisenberg model on simple cubic lattices, using the single-cluster Monte Carlo update algorithm. The expected pronounced reduction of critical slowing down at the phase transition is verified. This allows simulations on significantly larger lattices than in previous studies and consequently a better control over systematic errors. In one set of simulations we employ the usual finite-size scaling methods to compute the critical exponents $\

  9. Modeling, Evaluation and Detection of Jamming Attacks in Time-Critical Wireless Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    time-critical message delivery among electronic devices on physical infrastructures. However, the shared nature of wireless channels unavoidably exposes...critical than that in conventional data-service networks, such as cellular and WiFi networks. In this paper, we aim at modeling and detecting jamming attacks...technologies (e.g.,3G/4G and WiFi ) has already brought significant change and benefit to people’s life, such as ubiquitous wire- less Internet access, mobile

  10. Provide a model to improve the performance of intrusion detection systems in the cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foroogh Sedighi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available High availability of tools and service providers in cloud computing and the fact that cloud computing services are provided by internet and deal with public, have caused important challenges for new computing model. Cloud computing faces problems and challenges such as user privacy, data security, data ownership, availability of services, and recovery after breaking down, performance, scalability, programmability. So far, many different methods are presented for detection of intrusion in cloud computing. There are two important factors that differentarticlesand researches are presented based on them. These factors are location of establishing intrusion detection systems in cloud computing systems and also algorithms that are used in intrusion detection. Their final goal is maximum coverage of intrusions, increasing the speed and accuracy of intrusion detection, and decreasing of wrong alarms. Our goal in this article is to increase intrusion detection in cloud computing and decrease the rate of generatingfalsealarmsby presenting a combined method.

  11. Developing Critical Thinking through Leadership Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Daniel M.; Andenoro, Anthony C.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter provides the critical leadership logic model as a tool to help educators develop leadership-learning opportunities. This proactive logic model includes curricular and co-curricular educational experiences to ensure critical thinking through leadership education.

  12. Reserved or On-Demand Instances? A Revenue Maximization Model for Cloud Providers

    CERN Document Server

    Mazzucco, Michele

    2011-01-01

    We examine the problem of managing a server farm in a way that attempts to maximize the net revenue earned by a cloud provider by renting servers to customers according to a typical Platform-as-a-Service model. The Cloud provider offers its resources to two classes of customers: `premium' and `basic'. Premium customers pay upfront fees to reserve servers for a specified period of time (e.g. a year). Premium customers can submit jobs for their reserved servers at any time and pay a fee for the server-hours they use. The provider is liable to pay a penalty every time a `premium' job can not be executed due to lack of resources. On the other hand, `basic' customers are served on a best-effort basis, and pay a server-hour fee that may be higher than the one paid by premium customers. The provider incurs energy costs when running servers. Hence, it has an incentive to turn off idle servers. The question of how to choose the number of servers to allocate to each pool (basic and premium) is answered by analyzing a s...

  13. State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets - Fleet Compliance Annual Report: Model Year 2015, Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulates covered state government and alternative fuel provider fleets, pursuant to the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct), as amended. Covered fleets may meet their EPAct requirements through one of two compliance methods: Standard Compliance or Alternative Compliance. For model year (MY) 2015, the compliance rate with this program for the more than 3011 reporting fleets was 100%. More than 294 fleets used Standard Compliance and exceeded their aggregate MY 2015 acquisition requirements by 8% through acquisitions alone. The seven covered fleets that used Alternative Compliance exceeded their aggregate MY 2015 petroleum use reduction requirements by 46%.

  14. What ice can teach us about water interactions: a critical comparison of the performance of different water models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, C; Abascal, J L F; Conde, M M; Aragones, J L

    2009-01-01

    The performance of several popular water models (TIP3P, TIP4P, TIP5P and TIP4P/2005) is analyzed. For that purpose the predictions for ten different properties of water are investigated, namely: 1. vapour-liquid equilibria (VLE) and critical temperature; 2. surface tension; 3. densities of the different solid structures of water (ices); 4. phase diagram; 5. melting-point properties; 6. maximum in the density of water at room pressure and thermal coefficients alpha and KT; 7. structure of liquid water and ice; 8. equation of state at high pressures; 9. self-diffusion coefficient; 10. dielectric constant. For each property, the performance of each model is analyzed in detail with a critical discussion of the possible reason of the success or failure of the model. A final judgement on the quality of these models is provided. TIP4P/2005 provides the best description of almost all properties of the list, the only exception being the dielectric constant. In second position, TIP5P and TIP4P yield a similar performance overall, and the last place with the poorest description of the water properties is provided by TIP3P. The ideas leading to the proposal and design of the TIP4P/2005 are also discussed in detail. TIP4P/2005 is probably close to the best description of water that can be achieved with a non-polarizable model described by a single Lennard-Jones (LJ) site and three charges.

  15. A Critical Plane-energy Model for Multiaxial Fatigue Life Prediction of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Haoyang

    A new critical plane-energy model is proposed in this thesis for multiaxial fatigue life prediction of homogeneous and heterogeneous materials. Brief review of existing methods, especially on the critical plane-based and energy-based methods, are given first. Special focus is on one critical plane approach which has been shown to work for both brittle and ductile metals. The key idea is to automatically change the critical plane orientation with respect to different materials and stress states. One potential drawback of the developed model is that it needs an empirical calibration parameter for non-proportional multiaxial loadings since only the strain terms are used and the out-of-phase hardening cannot be considered. The energy-based model using the critical plane concept is proposed with help of the Mroz-Garud hardening rule to explicitly include the effect of non-proportional hardening under fatigue cyclic loadings. Thus, the empirical calibration for non-proportional loading is not needed since the out-of-phase hardening is naturally included in the stress calculation. The model predictions are compared with experimental data from open literature and it is shown the proposed model can work for both proportional and non-proportional loadings without the empirical calibration. Next, the model is extended for the fatigue analysis of heterogeneous materials integrating with finite element method. Fatigue crack initiation of representative volume of heterogeneous materials is analyzed using the developed critical plane-energy model and special focus is on the microstructure effect on the multiaxial fatigue life predictions. Several conclusions and future work is drawn based on the proposed study.

  16. Dynamical critical behavior of the Ziff-Gulari-Barshad model with quenched impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, M. F.; Figueiredo, W.

    2016-08-01

    The simplest model to explain the CO oxidation in some catalytic processes is the Ziff-Gulari-Barshad (ZGB) model. It predicts a continuous phase transition between an active phase and an absorbing phase composed of O atoms. By employing Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the dynamical critical behavior of the model as a function of the concentration of fixed impurities over the catalytic surface. By means of an epidemic analysis we calculate the critical exponents related to the survival probability Ps (t), the number of empty sites nv (t), and the mean square displacement R2 (t). We show that the critical exponents depend on the concentration of impurities over the lattice, even for small values of this quantity. We also show that the exponents do not belong to the Directed Percolation universality class and are in agreement with the Harris criterion since the quenched impurities behave as a weak disorder in the system.

  17. A new statistical model of wave heights based on the concept of wave breaking critical zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jiaxuan; LI Xunqiang; ZHU Shouxian; ZHANG Wenjing; WANG Lei

    2015-01-01

    When waves propagate from deep water to shallow water, wave heights and steepness increase and then waves roll back and break. This phenomenon is called surf. Currently, the present statistical calculation model of surf was derived mainly from the wave energy conservation equation and the linear wave dispersion relation, but it cannot reflect accurately the process which is a rapid increasing in wave height near the broken point. So, the concept of a surf breaking critical zone is presented. And the nearshore is divided as deep water zone, shallow water zone, surf breaking critical zone and after breaking zone. Besides, the calculation formula for the height of the surf breaking critical zone has founded based on flume experiments, thereby a new statistical calculation model on the surf has been established. Using the new model, the calculation error of wave height maximum is reduced from 17.62% to 6.43%.

  18. Survival data analyses in ecotoxicology: critical effect concentrations, methods and models. What should we use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forfait-Dubuc, Carole; Charles, Sandrine; Billoir, Elise; Delignette-Muller, Marie Laure

    2012-05-01

    In ecotoxicology, critical effect concentrations are the most common indicators to quantitatively assess risks for species exposed to contaminants. Three types of critical effect concentrations are classically used: lowest/ no observed effect concentration (LOEC/NOEC), LC( x) (x% lethal concentration) and NEC (no effect concentration). In this article, for each of these three types of critical effect concentration, we compared methods or models used for their estimation and proposed one as the most appropriate. We then compared these critical effect concentrations to each other. For that, we used nine survival data sets corresponding to D. magna exposition to nine different contaminants, for which the time-course of the response was monitored. Our results showed that: (i) LOEC/NOEC values at day 21 were method-dependent, and that the Cochran-Armitage test with a step-down procedure appeared to be the most protective for the environment; (ii) all tested concentration-response models we compared gave close values of LC50 at day 21, nevertheless the Weibull model had the lowest global mean deviance; (iii) a simple threshold NEC-model both concentration and time dependent more completely described whole data (i.e. all timepoints) and enabled a precise estimation of the NEC. We then compared the three critical effect concentrations and argued that the use of the NEC might be a good option for environmental risk assessment.

  19. Order, Criticality, and Excitations in the Extended Falicov-Kimball Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejima, S.; Kaneko, T.; Ohta, Y.; Fehske, H.

    2014-01-01

    Using exact numerical techniques, we investigate the nature of excitonic (electron-hole) bound states and the development of exciton coherence in the one-dimensional half-filled extended Falicov-Kimball model. The ground-state phase diagram of the model exhibits, besides band-insulator and staggered orbital ordered phases, an excitonic insulator (EI) with power-law correlations. The criticality of the EI state shows up in the von Neumann entropy. The anomalous spectral function and condensation amplitude provide the binding energy and coherence length of the electron-hole pairs which, on their part, point towards a Coulomb interaction driven crossover from BCS-like electron-hole pairing fluctuations to tightly bound excitons. We show that while a mass imbalance between electrons and holes does not affect the location of the BCS-BEC crossover regime, it favors staggered orbital ordering to the disadvantage of the EI. Within the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) regime, the quasiparticle dispersion develops a flat valence-band top, in accord with the experimental finding for Ta2NiSe5.

  20. Military service member and veteran reintegration: A critical review and adapted ecological model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Blevins, Cara L; Fisher, Michael P; Magruder, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    Returning military service members and veterans (MSMVs) experience a wide range of stress-related disorders in addition to social and occupational difficulties when reintegrating to the community. Facilitating reintegration of MSMVs following deployment is a societal priority. With an objective of identifying challenges and facilitators for reintegration of MSMVs of the current war era, we critically review and identify gaps in the literature. We searched 8 electronic databases and identified 1,764 articles. Screening of abstracts and full-text review based on our inclusion/exclusion criteria, yielded 186 articles for review. Two investigators evaluating relevant articles independently found a lack of clear definition or comprehensive theorizing about MSMV reintegration. To address these gaps, we linked the findings from the literature to provide a unified definition of reintegration and adapted the social ecological systems theory to guide research and practice aimed at MSMV reintegration. Furthermore, we identified individual, interpersonal, community, and societal challenges related to reintegration. The 186 studies published from 2001 (the start of the current war era) to 2015 included 6 experimental studies or clinical trials. Most studies do not adequately account for context or more than a narrow set of potential influences on MSMV reintegration. Little evidence was found that evaluated interventions for health conditions, rehabilitation, and employment, or effective models of integrated delivery systems. We recommend an ecological model of MSMV reintegration to advance research and practice processes and outcomes at 4 levels (individual, interpersonal, organizational, and societal). (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. A review of mouse critical size defect models in weight bearing bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jonathan S; Bemenderfer, Thomas B; Wessel, Alexander R; Kacena, Melissa A

    2013-07-01

    Current and future advances in orthopedic treatment are aimed at altering biological interactions to enhance bone healing. Currently, several clinical scenarios exist for which there is no definitive treatment, specifically segmental bone loss from high-energy trauma or surgical resection - and it is here that many are aiming to find effective solutions. To test experimental interventions and better understand bone healing, researchers employ critical size defect (CSD) models in animal studies. Here, an overview of CSDs is given that includes the specifications of varying models, a discussion of current scaffold and bone graft designs, and current outcome measures used to determine the extent of bone healing. Many promising graft designs have been discovered along with promising adjunctive treatments, yet a graft that offers biomechanical support while allowing for neovascularization with eventual complete resorption and remodeling remains to be developed. An overview of this important topic is needed to highlight current advances and provide a clear understanding of the ultimate goal in CSD research--develop a graft for clinical use that effectively treats the orthopedic conundrum of segmental bone loss.

  2. Study of the critical behavior of the driven lattice gas model with limited nonequilibrium dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracco, Gustavo P.; Rubio Puzzo, M. Leticia; Bab, Marisa A.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper the nonequilibrium critical behavior is investigated using a variant of the well-known two-dimensional driven lattice gas (DLG) model, called modified driven lattice gas (MDLG). In this model, the application of the external field is regulated by a parameter p ɛ [ 0 , 1 ] in such a way that if p = 0, the field is not applied, and it becomes the Ising model, while if p = 1, the DLG model is recovered. The behavior of the model is investigated for several values of p by studying the dynamic evolution of the system within the short-time regime in the neighborhood of a phase transition. It is found that the system experiences second-order phase transitions in all the interval of p for the density of particles ρ = 0.5. The determined critical temperatures Tc(p) are greater than the critical temperature of the Ising model TcI, and increase with p up to the critical temperature of the DLG model in the limit of infinite driving fields. The dependence of Tc(p) on p is compatible with a power-law behavior whose exponent is ψ = 0.27(3) . Furthermore, the complete set of the critical and the anisotropic exponents is estimated. For the smallest value of p, the ​dynamics and β exponents are close to that calculated for the Ising model, and the anisotropic exponent Δ is near zero. As p is increased, the exponents and Δ change, meaning that the anisotropy effects increase. For the largest value investigated, the set of exponents approaches to that reported by the most recent theoretical framework developed for the DLG model.

  3. The fornix provides multiple biomarkers to characterize circuit disruption in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badea, Alexandra; Kane, Lauren; Anderson, Robert J; Qi, Yi; Foster, Mark; Cofer, Gary P; Medvitz, Neil; Buckley, Anne F; Badea, Andreas K; Wetsel, William C; Colton, Carol A

    2016-11-15

    Multivariate biomarkers are needed for detecting Alzheimer's disease (AD), understanding its etiology, and quantifying the effect of therapies. Mouse models provide opportunities to study characteristics of AD in well-controlled environments that can help facilitate development of early interventions. The CVN-AD mouse model replicates multiple AD hallmark pathologies, and we identified multivariate biomarkers characterizing a brain circuit disruption predictive of cognitive decline. In vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed that CVN-AD mice replicate the hippocampal atrophy (6%), characteristic of humans with AD, and also present changes in subcortical areas. The largest effect was in the fornix (23% smaller), which connects the septum, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. In characterizing the fornix with diffusion tensor imaging, fractional anisotropy was most sensitive (20% reduction), followed by radial (15%) and axial diffusivity (2%), in detecting pathological changes. These findings were strengthened by optical microscopy and ultrastructural analyses. Ultrastructual analysis provided estimates of axonal density, diameters, and myelination-through the g-ratio, defined as the ratio between the axonal diameter, and the diameter of the axon plus the myelin sheath. The fornix had reduced axonal density (47% fewer), axonal degeneration (13% larger axons), and abnormal myelination (1.5% smaller g-ratios). CD68 staining showed that white matter pathology could be secondary to neuronal degeneration, or due to direct microglial attack. In conclusion, these findings strengthen the hypothesis that the fornix plays a role in AD, and can be used as a disease biomarker and as a target for therapy.

  4. Self-organized Criticality in a Modified Evolution Model on Generalized Barabási-Albert Scale-Free Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Min; WANG Gang; CHEN Tian-Lun

    2007-01-01

    A modified evolution model of self-organized criticality on generalized Barabási-Albert (GBA) scale-free networks is investigated. In our model, we find that spatial and temporal correlations exhibit critical behaviors. More importantly, these critical behaviors change with the parameter b, which weights the distance in comparison with the degree in the GBA network evolution.

  5. Milestones of critical thinking: a developmental model for medicine and nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Klara K; Huang, Grace C; Lauzon Clabo, Laurie M; Delva, Dianne; Fischer, Melissa; Konopasek, Lyuba; Schwartzstein, Richard M; Gusic, Maryellen

    2014-05-01

    Critical thinking is essential to a health professional's competence to assess, diagnose, and care for patients. Defined as the ability to apply higher-order cognitive skills (conceptualization, analysis, evaluation) and the disposition to be deliberate about thinking (being open-minded or intellectually honest) that lead to action that is logical and appropriate, critical thinking represents a "meta-competency" that transcends other knowledge, skills, abilities, and behaviors required in health care professions. Despite its importance, the developmental stages of critical thinking have not been delineated for nurses and physicians. As part of a task force of educators who considered different developmental stage theories, the authors have iteratively refined and proposed milestones in critical thinking. The attributes associated with unreflective, beginning, practicing, advanced, accomplished, and challenged critical thinkers are conceived as independent of an individual's level of training. Depending on circumstances and environmental factors, even the most experienced clinician may demonstrate attributes associated with a challenged thinker. The authors use the illustrative case of a patient with abdominal pain to demonstrate how critical thinking may manifest in learners at different stages of development, analyzing how the learner at each stage applies information obtained in the patient interaction to arrive at a differential diagnosis and plan for evaluation. The authors share important considerations and provide this work as a foundation for the development of effective approaches to teaching and promoting critical thinking and to establishing expectations for learners in this essential meta-competency.

  6. Integrating critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry across a four-year dental curriculum: a model for independent learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Teresa A; Straub-Morarend, Cheryl L; Handoo, Nidhi; Solow, Catherine M; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Finkelstein, Michael W

    2014-03-01

    Introducing critical thinking and evidence-based dentistry (EBD) content into an established dental curriculum can be a difficult and challenging process. Over the past three years, the University of Iowa College of Dentistry has developed and implemented a progressive four-year integrated critical thinking and EBD curriculum. The objective of this article is to describe the development and implementation process to make it available as a model for other dental schools contemplating introduction of critical thinking and EBD into their curricula. The newly designed curriculum built upon an existing problem-based learning foundation, which introduces critical thinking and the scientific literature in the D1 year, in order to expose students to the rationale and resources for practicing EBD in the D2 and D3 years and provide opportunities to practice critical thinking and apply the EBD five-step process in the D2, D3, and D4 years. All curricular content is online, and D3 and D4 EBD activities are integrated within existing clinical responsibilities. The curricular content, student resources, and student activities are described.

  7. Guarana Provides Additional Stimulation over Caffeine Alone in the Planarian Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, Dimitrios; Mezzio, Michael; Rodriguez, Branden R.; Constable, Mic Andre; Mulligan, Margaret E.; Voura, Evelyn B.

    2015-01-01

    The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of guarana over caffeine alone. Yet, despite the growing use of guarana as an additive in energy drinks, and a burgeoning market for it as a nutritional supplement, the science examining guarana and how it affects other dietary ingredients is lacking. To appreciate the stimulant effects of guarana and other natural products, a straightforward model to investigate their physiological properties is needed. The planarian provides such a system. The locomotor activity and convulsive response of planarians with substance exposure has been shown to provide an excellent system to measure the effects of drug stimulation, addiction and withdrawal. To gauge the stimulant effects of guarana we studied how it altered the locomotor activity of the planarian species Dugesia tigrina. We report evidence that guarana seeds provide additional stimulation over caffeine alone, and document the changes to this stimulation in the context of both caffeine and glucose. PMID:25880065

  8. Guarana provides additional stimulation over caffeine alone in the planarian model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Moustakas

    Full Text Available The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of guarana over caffeine alone. Yet, despite the growing use of guarana as an additive in energy drinks, and a burgeoning market for it as a nutritional supplement, the science examining guarana and how it affects other dietary ingredients is lacking. To appreciate the stimulant effects of guarana and other natural products, a straightforward model to investigate their physiological properties is needed. The planarian provides such a system. The locomotor activity and convulsive response of planarians with substance exposure has been shown to provide an excellent system to measure the effects of drug stimulation, addiction and withdrawal. To gauge the stimulant effects of guarana we studied how it altered the locomotor activity of the planarian species Dugesia tigrina. We report evidence that guarana seeds provide additional stimulation over caffeine alone, and document the changes to this stimulation in the context of both caffeine and glucose.

  9. Creating a market: an economic analysis of the purchaser-provider model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackley, P; Healey, A

    1993-09-01

    The focus of this paper is the extent to which the purchaser-provider split and the creation of a market in the provision of health care can be expected to bring about greater efficiency within the new NHS. The starting point is a theoretical discussion of markets and competition. In particular, emphasis is placed upon the economic model of perfect competition. It is argued that because of the existence of externalities, uncertainty and a lack of perfect information, an unregulated market in health care will almost certainly fail. In view of this, the imperfect provider markets of monopoly and contestable markets, which are of particular relevance to health care, are discussed. A description of the new health care market and the principal actors within it is followed by an evaluation of the new health care market. It is argued that in view of the restrictions to competition that exist between providers, some form of price regulation will be necessary to prevent monopolistic behaviour in the hospital sector. Regulation of purchasers is also suggested as a means of improving efficiency. It is concluded that competition may be a necessary condition for increased efficiency in health care provision, but is not sufficient in itself. Other incentives in the hospital sector are necessary to assist the market process and to enhance its impact on efficiency.

  10. MODEL REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS TO PROVIDE ENERGY AND OTHER ATTRIBUTES FROM AN OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

    2011-10-22

    This document provides a model RFP for new generation. The 'base' RFP is for a single-source offshore wind RFP. Required modifications are noted should a state or utility seek multi-source bids (e.g., all renewables or all sources). The model is premised on proposals meeting threshold requirements (e.g., a MW range of generating capacity and a range in terms of years), RFP issuer preferences (e.g., likelihood of commercial operation by a date certain, price certainty, and reduction in congestion), and evaluation criteria, along with a series of plans (e.g., site, environmental effects, construction, community outreach, interconnection, etc.). The Model RFP places the most weight on project risk (45%), followed by project economics (35%), and environmental and social considerations (20%). However, if a multi-source RFP is put forward, the sponsor would need to either add per-MWh technology-specific, life-cycle climate (CO2), environmental and health impact costs to bid prices under the 'Project Economics' category or it should increase the weight given to the 'Environmental and Social Considerations' category.

  11. Mathematical modeling provides kinetic details of the human immune response to vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dustin eLe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With major advances in experimental techniques to track antigen-specific immune responses many basic questions on the kinetics of virus-specific immunity in humans remain unanswered. To gain insights into kinetics of T and B cell responses in human volunteers we combine mathematical models and experimental data from recent studies employing vaccines against yellow fever and smallpox. Yellow fever virus-specific CD8 T cell population expanded slowly with the average doubling time of 2 days peaking 2.5 weeks post immunization. Interestingly, we found that the peak of the yellow fever-specific CD8 T cell response is determined by the rate of T cell proliferation and not by the precursor frequency of antigen-specific cells as has been suggested in several studies in mice. We also found that while the frequency of virus-specific T cells increases slowly, the slow increase can still accurately explain clearance of yellow fever virus in the blood. Our additional mathematical model describes well the kinetics of virus-specific antibody-secreting cell and antibody response to vaccinia virus in vaccinated individuals suggesting that most of antibodies in 3 months post immunization are derived from the population of circulating antibody-secreting cells. Taken together, our analysis provides novel insights into mechanisms by which live vaccines induce immunity to viral infections and highlight challenges of applying methods of mathematical modeling to the current, state-of-the-art yet limited immunological data.

  12. MODEL REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS TO PROVIDE ENERGY AND OTHER ATTRIBUTES FROM AN OFFSHORE WIND POWER PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeremy Firestone; Dawn Kurtz Crompton

    2011-10-22

    This document provides a model RFP for new generation. The 'base' RFP is for a single-source offshore wind RFP. Required modifications are noted should a state or utility seek multi-source bids (e.g., all renewables or all sources). The model is premised on proposals meeting threshold requirements (e.g., a MW range of generating capacity and a range in terms of years), RFP issuer preferences (e.g., likelihood of commercial operation by a date certain, price certainty, and reduction in congestion), and evaluation criteria, along with a series of plans (e.g., site, environmental effects, construction, community outreach, interconnection, etc.). The Model RFP places the most weight on project risk (45%), followed by project economics (35%), and environmental and social considerations (20%). However, if a multi-source RFP is put forward, the sponsor would need to either add per-MWh technology-specific, life-cycle climate (CO2), environmental and health impact costs to bid prices under the 'Project Economics' category or it should increase the weight given to the 'Environmental and Social Considerations' category.

  13. Influences of finite-size effectson the self-organized critical-ity of forest-fire model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The influences of finite-size effects on the self-organized criticality (SOC) of the traditional forest-fire model are investigated by means of a new method. The forest size is originally set to a value much greater than the correlation length of the forest. Finite-size effects are then studied by equally dividing the forest into more and more separate subsystems on condition that the forest size, igniting probability and planting probability are invariant. A new phenomenon, i.e. the finite-size effects with one-side frequency peak, is observed. The boundary between two neighboring subsystems can be regarded as a firebreak. The concept of 'separation ability' is introduced to represent the probability for the firebreak to block off the fire successfully. Restraining effects of separation ability on finite-size effects are analyzed. Finite-size effects and separation ability, as well as their relations are found to have practical importance to the actual forest-fire protection.

  14. Monte Carlo analysis of critical phenomenon of the Ising model on memory stabilizer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viteri, C. Ricardo; Tomita, Yu; Brown, Kenneth R.

    2009-10-01

    We calculate the critical temperature of the Ising model on a set of graphs representing a concatenated three-bit error-correction code. The graphs are derived from the stabilizer formalism used in quantum error correction. The stabilizer for a subspace is defined as the group of Pauli operators whose eigenvalues are +1 on the subspace. The group can be generated by a subset of operators in the stabilizer, and the choice of generators determines the structure of the graph. The Wolff algorithm, together with the histogram method and finite-size scaling, is used to calculate both the critical temperature and the critical exponents of each structure. The simulations show that the choice of stabilizer generators, both the number and the geometry, has a large effect on the critical temperature.

  15. Monte Carlo analysis of critical phenomenon of the Ising model on memory stabilizer structures

    CERN Document Server

    Viteri, C Ricardo; Brown, Kenneth R

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the critical temperature of the Ising model on a set of graphs representing a concatenated three-bit error-correction code. The graphs are derived from the stabilizer formalism used in quantum error correction. The stabilizer for a subspace is defined as the group of Pauli operators whose eigenvalues are +1 on the subspace. The group can be generated by a subset of operators in the stabilizer, and the choice of generators determines the structure of the graph. The Wolff algorithm, together with the histogram method and finite-size scaling, is used to calculate both the critical temperature and the critical exponents of each structure. The simulations show that the choice of stabilizer generators, both the number and the geometry, has a large effect on the critical temperature.

  16. Behavior of Early Warnings near the Critical Temperature in the Two-Dimensional Ising Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Irving O.; Landa, Emmanuel; Angeles, Carlos Calderon; Toledo, Juan C.; Rivera, Ana Leonor; Temis, Joel Mendoza; Frank, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Among the properties that are common to complex systems, the presence of critical thresholds in the dynamics of the system is one of the most important. Recently, there has been interest in the universalities that occur in the behavior of systems near critical points. These universal properties make it possible to estimate how far a system is from a critical threshold. Several early-warning signals have been reported in time series representing systems near catastrophic shifts. The proper understanding of these early-warnings may allow the prediction and perhaps control of these dramatic shifts in a wide variety of systems. In this paper we analyze this universal behavior for a system that is a paradigm of phase transitions, the Ising model. We study the behavior of the early-warning signals and the way the temporal correlations of the system increase when the system is near the critical point. PMID:26103513

  17. Behavior of Early Warnings near the Critical Temperature in the Two-Dimensional Ising Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irving O Morales

    Full Text Available Among the properties that are common to complex systems, the presence of critical thresholds in the dynamics of the system is one of the most important. Recently, there has been interest in the universalities that occur in the behavior of systems near critical points. These universal properties make it possible to estimate how far a system is from a critical threshold. Several early-warning signals have been reported in time series representing systems near catastrophic shifts. The proper understanding of these early-warnings may allow the prediction and perhaps control of these dramatic shifts in a wide variety of systems. In this paper we analyze this universal behavior for a system that is a paradigm of phase transitions, the Ising model. We study the behavior of the early-warning signals and the way the temporal correlations of the system increase when the system is near the critical point.

  18. Double transitions, non-Ising criticality and the critical absorbing phase in an interacting monomer-dimer model on a square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Keekwon; Park, Sangwoong; Kim, Bongsoo; Jong Lee, Sung

    2011-06-01

    We present a numerical study on an interacting monomer-dimer model with nearest neighbor repulsion on a square lattice, which possesses two symmetric absorbing states. The model is observed to exhibit two nearby continuous transitions: the Z2 symmetry-breaking order-disorder transition and the absorbing transition with directed percolation criticality. We find that the symmetry-breaking transition shows a non-Ising critical behavior, and that the absorbing phase becomes critical, in the sense that the critical decay of the dimer density observed at the absorbing transition persists even within the absorbing phase. Our findings call for further studies on microscopic models and the corresponding continuum description belonging to the generalized voter university class.

  19. Critical Behaviors in a Stochastic Local Limited One-Dimensional Rice-Pile Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Hong-Zhang; TANG Zheng-Xin

    2008-01-01

    A stochastic local fimited one-dimensional rice-pile model is numerically investigated. The distributions for ayalanche sizes have a clear power-law behavior and it displays a simple finite size scaling. We obtain the avalanche exponents Ts = 1.54±0.10, βs = 2.17±0.10 and τT = 1.80±0.10, βT = 1.46±0.10. This self-organized critical model belongs to the same universality class with the Oslo rice-pile model studied by K. Christensen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 107], a rice-pile model studied by L.A.N. Amaral et al. [Phys. Rev. E 54 (1996) 4512], and a simple deterministic self-organized critical model studied by M.S. Vieira [Phys. Rev. E 61 (2000) 6056].

  20. Critical slowing down exponents in structural glasses: Random orthogonal and related models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caltagirone, F.; Ferrari, U.; Leuzzi, L.; Parisi, G.; Rizzo, T.

    2012-08-01

    An important prediction of mode-coupling theory is the relationship between the power-law decay exponents in the β regime and the consequent definition of the so-called exponent parameter λ. In the context of a certain class of mean-field glass models with quenched disorder, the physical meaning of λ has recently been understood, yielding a method to compute it exactly in a static framework. In this paper we exploit this new technique to compute the critical slowing down exponents for such models including, as special cases, the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, the p-spin model, and the random orthogonal model.

  1. Modeling the Self-organized Critical Behavior of the Plasma Sheet Reconnection Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Alex; Uritsky, Vadim; Baker, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Analyses of Polar UVI auroral image data reviewed in our other presentation at this meeting (V. Uritsky, A. Klimas) show that bright night-side high-latitude UV emissions exhibit so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality (SOC) that an alternate interpretation has become virtually impossible. It is now necessary to find and model the source of this behavior. We note that the most common models of self-organized criticality are numerical sandpiles. These are, at root, models that govern the transport of some quantity from a region where it is loaded to another where it is unloaded. Transport is enabled by the excitation of a local threshold instability; it is intermittent and bursty, and it exhibits a number of scale-free statistical properties. Searching for a system in the magnetosphere that is analogous and that, in addition, is known to produce auroral signatures, we focus on the reconnection dynamics of the plasma sheet. In our previous work, a driven reconnection model has been constructed and has been under study. The transport of electromagnetic (primarily magnetic) energy carried by the Poynting flux into the reconnection region of the model has been examined. All of the analysis techniques, and more, that have been applied to the auroral image data have also been applied to this Poynting flux. Here, we report new results showing that this model also exhibits so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality that an alternate interpretation is implausible. Further, we find a strong correlation between these key properties of the model and those of the auroral UV emissions. We suggest that, in general, the driven reconnection model is an important step toward a realistic plasma physical model of self-organized criticality and we conclude, more specifically, that it is also a step in the right direction toward modeling the multiscale reconnection dynamics of the magnetotail.

  2. Modeling the Self-organized Critical Behavior of Earth's Plasma Sheet Reconnection Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimas, Alexander J.

    2006-01-01

    Analyses of Polar UVI auroral image data show that bright night-side high-latitude W emissions exhibit so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality that an alternate interpretation has become virtually impossible. These analyses will be reviewed. It is now necessary to find and model the source of this behavior. We note that the most common models of self-organized criticality are numerical sandpiles. These are, at root, models that govern the transport of some quantity from a region where it is loaded to another where it is unloaded. Transport is enabled by the excitation of a local threshold instability; it is intermittent and bursty, and it exhibits a number of scale-free statistical properties. Searching for a system in the magnetosphere that is analogous and that, in addition, is known to produce auroral signatures, we focus on the reconnection dynamics of the magnetotail plasma sheet. In our previous work, a driven reconnection model has been constructed and has been under study. The transport of electromagnetic (primarily magnetic) energy carried by the Poynting flux into the reconnection region of the model has been examined. All of the analysis techniques (and more) that have been applied to the auroral image data have also been applied to this Poynting flux. New results will be presented showing that this model also exhibits so many of the key properties of systems in self-organized criticality that an alternate interpretation is implausible. A strong correlation between these key properties of the model and those of the auroral UV emissions will be demonstrated. We suggest that, in general, the driven reconnection model is an important step toward a realistic plasma physical model of self-organized criticality and we conclude, more specifically, that it is also a step in the right direction toward modeling the multiscale reconnection dynamics of the magnetotail.

  3. Critical Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critical care helps people with life-threatening injuries and illnesses. It might treat problems such as complications ... a team of specially-trained health care providers. Critical care usually takes place in an intensive care ...

  4. Growth and division of active droplets provides a model for protocells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, David; Seyboldt, Rabea; Weber, Christoph A.; Hyman, Anthony A.; Jülicher, Frank

    2017-04-01

    It has been proposed that during the early steps in the origin of life, small droplets could have formed via the segregation of molecules from complex mixtures by phase separation. These droplets could have provided chemical reaction centres. However, whether these droplets could divide and propagate is unclear. Here we examine the behaviour of droplets in systems that are maintained away from thermodynamic equilibrium by an external supply of energy. In these systems, droplets grow by the addition of droplet material generated by chemical reactions. Surprisingly, we find that chemically driven droplet growth can lead to shape instabilities that trigger the division of droplets into two smaller daughters. Therefore, chemically active droplets can exhibit cycles of growth and division that resemble the proliferation of living cells. Dividing active droplets could serve as a model for prebiotic protocells, where chemical reactions in the droplet play the role of a prebiotic metabolism.

  5. Integration of remotely sensed and model data to provide the spatial information basis for sustainable landuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backhaus, R.; Braun, G.

    Sustainable development is by now generally accepted as the paramount objective of environmental policy. Environmental applications of Earth observation, on the other hand, have been successfully demonstrated over a wide range of monitoring activities, mostly with the aim of describing the spatial distribution and time course of geophysical parameters and land surface structures. With landuse structures being of major influence on the sustainability of terrestrial ecosystems, and being also a highly suitable object of Earth observation, it is still an open question, however, in which way Earth observation data can be processed and integrated to provide an approximate indicator of sustainability. Based on an ecological sustainability model developed by Ripl and his co-workers at Berlin Technical University, this question was investigated in the framework of the joint project "Development of a Land-Water-Management Concept to Decrease Matter Losses to Open Waters" (Stör project), which was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Research and Technology. Present results may be summarized as follows: 1. Apart from hydrological point measurements, there are several spatial parameters which are of indicative value as to sustainability, especially the spatio-temporal distribution of biomass, surface temperature, and precipitation. 2. To provide the spatial information basis for enhanced efficiency of immediate measures such as reforestation, agricultural extension etc., a global information system (GIS) concept was developed and demonstrated which is based on a landuse/vegetation classification derived from Landsat TM data, a digital evaluation mode (DEM) and a relief dependent water distribution model (WDM). Further implications such as the organisation of information systems which are to serve sustainability strategies are discussed.

  6. Critical phenomena of strange hadronic matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model

    CERN Document Server

    Miyazaki, K

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the liquid-gas phase transition of warm strange hadronic matter (SHM) in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model. We implement the Nijmegen soft-core potential model NSC97f of hyperon-hyperon interactions in terms of the (hidden) strange mesons. The saturation properties of pure Lambda and Xi matter by the potential essentially determine the dependence of the critical temperature on the strangeness fraction of SHM. We treat the liquid-gas phase transition of SHM as the first-order one and employ Maxwell construction so as to calculate the phase coexistence curves. The derived critical exponents beta \\simeq 1/3 and gamma=1.22 are almost independent of the strangeness fraction of SHM and almost agree with the empirical values derived from the recent multifragmentation reactions. Consequently, we have confirmed the universality of the critical phenomena in the liquid-gas phase transition of hadronic system.

  7. Cameroon mid-level providers offer a promising public health dentistry model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achembong Leo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Oral health services are inadequate and unevenly distributed in many developing countries, particularly those in sub-Saharan Africa. Rural areas in these countries and poorer sections of the population in urban areas often do not have access to oral health services mainly because of a significant shortage of dentists and the high costs of care. We reviewed Cameroon’s experience with deploying a mid-level cadre of oral health professionals and the feasibility of establishing a more formal and predictable role for these health workers. We anticipate that a task-shifting approach in the provision of dental care will significantly improve the uneven distribution of oral health services particularly in the rural areas of Cameroon, which is currently served by only 3% of the total number of dentists. Methods The setting of this study was the Cameroon Baptist Convention Health Board (BCHB, which has four dentists and 42 mid-level providers. De-identified data were collected manually from the registries of 10 Baptist Convention clinics located in six of Cameroon’s 10 regions and then entered into an Excel format before importing into STATA. A retrospective abstraction of all entries for patient visits starting October 2010, and going back in time until 1500 visits were extracted from each clinic. Results This study showed that mid-level providers in BCHB clinics are offering a full scope of dental work across the 10 clinics, with the exception of treatment for major facial injuries. Mid-level providers alone performed 93.5% of all extractions, 87.5% of all fillings, 96.5% of all root canals, 97.5% of all cleanings, and 98.1% of all dentures. The dentists also typically played a teaching role in training the mid-level providers. Conclusions The Ministry of Health in Cameroon has an opportunity to learn from the BCHB model to expand access to oral health care across the country. This study shows the benefits of using a simple, workable, low

  8. Factors Determinants the Choice of Mobile Service Providers: Structural Equation Modeling Approach on Bangladeshi Consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahasanul Haque

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to find out what were the factors that may have played significant role to select the telecommunication service providers. In general this research has an intention to develop a research framework grounded on a strong theoretical and literature review background. The survey instruments employed on Bangladeshi consumers included demographic background, price, service quality, product quality and availability and promotional offers for consumer perception. Thus the structural equation modeling approach was necessary in order to examine the variables. The data analysis was conducted using SPSS and AMOS (Analysis of Moment Structure with the software package for windows. From the result it is revealed that paths are related to the casual processes significantly. Among all the significant variables, from our result, Price is the most important among our respondents followed by Service quality, product quality and promotion. Further research should be considered to gather more information regarding the service quality and customers’ satisfaction dimensions in context of the Bangladeshi mobile phone operators. It is hoped that the findings of this study may assist mobile phone industry in Bangladesh about their services and promotion of their services. However, the findings of this study may provide needed feedback and contribute to the improvement of players’ strategy and their marketing program

  9. Immunization of stromal cell targeting fibroblast activation protein providing immunotherapy to breast cancer mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Mingyao; Wang, Wenju; Yan, Jun; Tan, Jing; Liao, Liwei; Shi, Jianlin; Wei, Chuanyu; Xie, Yanhua; Jin, Xingfang; Yang, Li; Jin, Qing; Zhu, Huirong; Tan, Weiwei; Yang, Fang; Hou, Zongliu

    2016-08-01

    Unlike heterogeneous tumor cells, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) are genetically more stable which serve as a reliable target for tumor immunotherapy. Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) which is restrictively expressed in tumor cells and CAF in vivo and plays a prominent role in tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis can function as a tumor rejection antigen. In the current study, we have constructed artificial FAP(+) stromal cells which mimicked the FAP(+) CAF in vivo. We immunized a breast cancer mouse model with FAP(+) stromal cells to perform immunotherapy against FAP(+) cells in the tumor microenvironment. By forced expression of FAP, we have obtained FAP(+) stromal cells whose phenotype was CD11b(+)/CD34(+)/Sca-1(+)/FSP-1(+)/MHC class I(+). Interestingly, proliferation capacity of the fibroblasts was significantly enhanced by FAP. In the breast cancer-bearing mouse model, vaccination with FAP(+) stromal cells has significantly inhibited the growth of allograft tumor and reduced lung metastasis indeed. Depletion of T cell assays has suggested that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were involved in the tumor cytotoxic immune response. Furthermore, tumor tissue from FAP-immunized mice revealed that targeting FAP(+) CAF has induced apoptosis and decreased collagen type I and CD31 expression in the tumor microenvironment. These results implicated that immunization with FAP(+) stromal cells led to the disruption of the tumor microenvironment. Our study may provide a novel strategy for immunotherapy of a broad range of cancer.

  10. Providing a Security Model Based on Service Oriented Architecture in Electronic Banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Emadi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available With the increasing advances in IT world and the use of distributed systems, complexity and performance ofapplications have also changed. Banks require proper cooperation and integration among organizational systems toprovide effective and correct services. On the other hand, they contain diverse and heterogeneous infrastructures,applications and systems. Cooperation and integration among these systems require interactions and informationsharing among the users. The service-oriented architecture is the latest generation of information systems'architecture and has become quickly inclusive in recent years. One of the important features of this architecture isthe numerous users of different subsystems and their communication and cooperation in activities. In thisarchitecture, resources and services are often provided in sharing for different users. But, such features in serviceorientedarchitecture have brought about some challenges to the technology, one of which is 'the security'. Theneed for a security model in service-oriented architecture seems essential due to the distributed nature of thearchitecture, its reusability and accessibility. In this model, security requirements and standards for different layersare studied.

  11. Modelling Water Uptake Provides a New Perspective on Grass and Tree Coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzacavallo, Michael G; Kulmatiski, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Root biomass distributions have long been used to infer patterns of resource uptake. These patterns are used to understand plant growth, plant coexistence and water budgets. Root biomass, however, may be a poor indicator of resource uptake because large roots typically do not absorb water, fine roots do not absorb water from dry soils and roots of different species can be difficult to differentiate. In a sub-tropical savanna, Kruger Park, South Africa, we used a hydrologic tracer experiment to describe the abundance of active grass and tree roots across the soil profile. We then used this tracer data to parameterize a water movement model (Hydrus 1D). The model accounted for water availability and estimated grass and tree water uptake by depth over a growing season. Most root biomass was found in shallow soils (0-20 cm) and tracer data revealed that, within these shallow depths, half of active grass roots were in the top 12 cm while half of active tree roots were in the top 21 cm. However, because shallow soils provided roots with less water than deep soils (20-90 cm), the water movement model indicated that grass and tree water uptake was twice as deep as would be predicted from root biomass or tracer data alone: half of grass and tree water uptake occurred in the top 23 and 43 cm, respectively. Niche partitioning was also greater when estimated from water uptake rather than tracer uptake. Contrary to long-standing assumptions, shallow grass root distributions absorbed 32% less water than slightly deeper tree root distributions when grasses and trees were assumed to have equal water demands. Quantifying water uptake revealed deeper soil water uptake, greater niche partitioning and greater benefits of deep roots than would be estimated from root biomass or tracer uptake data alone.

  12. Biochemical markers and the FDA Critical Path: how biomarkers may contribute to the understanding of pathophysiology and provide unique and necessary tools for drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsdal, M A; Henriksen, K; Leeming, D J;

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this review is to discuss the potential usefulness of a novel class of biochemical markers, neoepitopes, in the context of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Critical Path Initiative, which emphasizes biomarkers of safety and efficacy as areas of pivotal interest. Examples...

  13. The Evidence in Support of Physicians and Health Care Providers as Physical Activity Role Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobelo, Felipe; de Quevedo, Isabel Garcia

    2015-01-01

    Physical inactivity constitutes the fourth leading cause of death worldwide. Health care providers (HCPs) should play a key role in counseling and appropriately referring their patients to adopt physical activity (PA). Previous reports suggest that active HCPs are more likely to provide better, more credible, and motivating preventive counseling to their patients. This review summarizes the available evidence on the association between HCPs’ personal PA habits and their related PA counseling practices. Based on relevant studies, a snowball search strategy identified, out of 196 studies screened, a total of 47 pertinent articles published between 1979 and 2012. Of those, 23 described HCPs’ PA habits and/or their counseling practices and 24 analytic studies evaluated the association between HCPs’ personal PA habits and their PA counseling practices. The majority of studies came from the United States (n = 33), and 9 studies included nonphysicians (nurses, pharmacists, and other HCPs). PA levels were mostly self-reported, and counseling was typically assessed as self-reported frequency or perceived self-efficacy in clinical practice. Most (19 out of 24) analytic studies reported a significant positive association between HCPs’ PA habits and counseling frequency, with odds ratios ranging between 1.4 and 5.7 (P < .05), in 6 studies allowing direct comparison. This review found consistent evidence supporting the notion that physically active physicians and other HCPs are more likely to provide PA counseling to their patients and can indeed become powerful PA role models. This evidence appears sufficient to justify randomized trials to determine if adding interventions to promote PA among HCPs, also results in improvements in the frequency and quality of PA preventive counseling and referrals, delivered by HCPs, to patients in primary care settings. Future studies should also aim at objectively quantifying the effect of HCPs’ PA role-modeling and how it

  14. Uncertainty analysis on simple mass balance model to calculate critical loads for soil acidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbin Li; Steven G. McNulty

    2007-01-01

    Simple mass balance equations (SMBE) of critical acid loads (CAL) in forest soil were developed to assess potential risks of air pollutants to ecosystems. However, to apply SMBE reliably at large scales, SMBE must be tested for adequacy and uncertainty. Our goal was to provide a detailed analysis of uncertainty in SMBE so that sound strategies for scaling up CAL...

  15. Local and cluster critical dynamics of the 3d random-site Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivaneyko, D.; Ilnytskyi, J.; Berche, B.; Holovatch, Yu.

    2006-10-01

    We present the results of Monte Carlo simulations for the critical dynamics of the three-dimensional site-diluted quenched Ising model. Three different dynamics are considered, these correspond to the local update Metropolis scheme as well as to the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff cluster algorithms. The lattice sizes of L=10-96 are analysed by a finite-size-scaling technique. The site dilution concentration p=0.85 was chosen to minimize the correction-to-scaling effects. We calculate numerical values of the dynamical critical exponents for the integrated and exponential autocorrelation times for energy and magnetization. As expected, cluster algorithms are characterized by lower values of dynamical critical exponent than the local one: also in the case of dilution critical slowing down is more pronounced for the Metropolis algorithm. However, the striking feature of our estimates is that they suggest that dilution leads to decrease of the dynamical critical exponent for the cluster algorithms. This phenomenon is quite opposite to the local dynamics, where dilution enhances critical slowing down.

  16. Building a scholar in writing (BSW): A model for developing students' critical writing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Annette; Zanchetta, Margareth; Velasco, Divine; Pon, Gordon; Hassan, Aafreen

    2015-11-01

    Several authors have highlighted the importance of writing in developing reflective thinking skills, transforming knowledge, communicating expressions, and filling knowledge gaps. However, difficulties with higher order processing and critical analysis affect students' ability to write critical and thoughtful essays. The Building a Scholar in Writing (BSW) model is a 6-step process of increasing intricacies in critical writing development. Development of critical writing is proposed to occur in a processed manner that transitions from presenting simple ideas (just bones) in writing, to connecting ideas (connecting bones), to formulating a thesis and connecting key components (constructing a skeleton), to supporting ideas with evidence (adding muscle), to building creativity and originality (adding essential organs), and finally, developing strong, integrated, critical arguments (adding brain). This process symbolically represents the building of a scholar. The idea of building a scholar equates to progressively giving life and meaning to a piece of writing with unique scholarly characteristics. This progression involves a transformation in awareness, thinking, and understanding, as well as advancement in students' level of critical appraisal skills.

  17. A Co-Creation Blended KM Model for Cultivating Critical-Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-chu

    2012-01-01

    Both critical thinking (CT) and knowledge management (KM) skills are necessary elements for a university student's success. Therefore, this study developed a co-creation blended KM model to cultivate university students' CT skills and to explore the underlying mechanisms for achieving success. Thirty-one university students participated in this…

  18. Critical behavior of the spin-$1/2$ Baxter-Wu model: Entropic sampling simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Jorge, L N; Caparica, A A

    2015-01-01

    In this work we use a refined entropic sampling technique based on the Wang-Landau method to study the spin-$1/2$ Baxter-Wu model. The static critical exponents were determined as $\\alpha=0.6545(68)$, $\\beta=0.0818(30)$, $\\gamma=1.18193(77)$, and $\

  19. A critical study of quality parameters in health care establishment: developing an integrated quality model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Azam, M.; Rahman, Z.; Talib, F.; Singh, K.J.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this article is to identify and critically analyze healthcare establishment (HCE) quality parameters described in the literature. It aims to propose an integrated quality model that includes technical quality and associated supportive quality parameters to achieve optimum

  20. Improving Critical Thinking Skills Using Learning Model Logan Avenue Problem Solving (LAPS)-Heuristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggrianto, Desi; Churiyah, Madziatul; Arief, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    This research was conducted in order to know the effect of Logan Avenue Problem Solving (LAPS)-Heuristic learning model towards critical thinking skills of students of class X Office Administration (APK) in SMK Negeri 1 Ngawi, East Java, Indonesia on material curve and equilibrium of demand and supply, subject Introduction to Economics and…

  1. Entropy in the Bak-Sneppen Model for Self-Organized Criticality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨纯斌

    2003-01-01

    The distributions of fitness on the sites of one- and two-dimensional lattices are studied for the nearest-neighbour Bak-Sneppen model on self-organized criticality. The distributions show complicated behaviour showing that the system is far from equilibrium. By introducing the "energy" of a site, the entropy flow from the system to its environment is investigated.

  2. Variations on a Theme: As Needs Change, New Models of Critical Friends Groups Emerge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahey, Kevin; Ippolito, Jacy

    2015-01-01

    The Critical Friends Group, a highly articulated model of professional learning, posits that, in order for teachers to learn together in ways that change their practice, the content and nature of their conversations must change (National School Reform Faculty, 2012). The content needs to change from externally driven agendas that address (in a…

  3. On the critical end point of the QCD and the NJL model phase diagrams

    CERN Document Server

    Ruggieri, Marco

    2009-01-01

    In this talk I compare the knowledge on the critical end point of the QCD phase diagram grasped from lattice calculations, with that obtained from Nambu--Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model computations. The original publication is available at http://www.sif.it/SIF/en/portal/journals

  4. Implementation of the critical points model in a SFM-FDTD code working in oblique incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamidi, M; Belkhir, A; Lamrous, O [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Baida, F I, E-mail: omarlamrous@mail.ummto.dz [Departement d' Optique P.M. Duffieux, Institut FEMTO-ST UMR 6174 CNRS Universite de Franche-Comte, 25030 Besancon Cedex (France)

    2011-06-22

    We describe the implementation of the critical points model in a finite-difference-time-domain code working in oblique incidence and dealing with dispersive media through the split field method. Some tests are presented to validate our code in addition to an application devoted to plasmon resonance of a gold nanoparticles grating.

  5. Dynamical aspects of Kinouchi-Copelli model: emergence of avalanches at criticality

    CERN Document Server

    Mosqueiro, T S; Maia, L P

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the behavior of bursts of neural activity in the Kinouchi-Copelli model, originally conceived to explain information processing issues in sensory systems. We show that, at a critical condition, power-law behavior emerges for the size and duration of the bursts (avalanches), with exponents experimentally observed in real biological systems.

  6. A critical appraisal of ATLAS9 and NextGen 5 model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, E; Chavez, M; Rodríguez, L H

    2001-01-01

    The fitting atmosphere parameters (Teff, g, and [Fe/H]) for over 300 stars in the Gunn & Striker and Jacoby et al. catalogs have been obtained relying on the Kurucz (1992) ATLAS9 and Hauschildt et al (1999) NextGen5 synthesis models. The output results are compared, and a critical appraisal of both theoretical codes is performed.

  7. Critical behavior of the Gaussian model on fractal lattices in external magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    For inhomogeneous lattices we generalize the classical Gaussian model, i.e. it is proposed that the Gaussian type distribution constant and the external magnetic field of site i in this model depend on the coordination number qi of site i, and that the relation bqi/bqj=qi/qj holds among bqi's, where bqi is the Gaussian type distribution constant of site i. Using the decimation real-space renormalization group following the spin-rescaling method, the critical points and critical exponents of the Gaussian model are calculated on some Koch type curves and a family of the diamond-type hierarchical (or DH) lattices. At the critical points, it is found that the nearest-neighbor interaction and the magnetic field of site i can be expressed in the form K*=bqi/qi and h*qi=0, respectively. It is also found that most critical exponents depend on the fractal dimensionality of a fractal system. For the family of the DH lattices, the results are identical with the exact results on translation symmetric lattices, and if the fractal dimensionality df=4, the Gaussian model and the mean field theories give the same results.

  8. Growth hormone stimulates bone healing in a critical-sized bone defect model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theyse, L. F. H.; Oosterlaken-Dijksterhuis, M. A.; van Doorn, J.; Dhert, W. J. A.; Hazewinkel, H. A. W.

    2006-01-01

    Growth hormone plays an important role in bone metabolism. Treating bone deficits is a major topic in orthopaedic surgery. Our hypothesis was that local continuous growth hormone administration stimulates bone healing in a canine critical-sized bone defect model. Bone formation in the defects was qu

  9. Critical Behaviour of the One-Dimensional Ferromagnetic t - J Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨赋; 王玉鹏

    2002-01-01

    The one-dimensional super-symmetric ferromagnetic t - J model is studied via the thermal Bethe ansatz. Analytic expressions of the free energy for T → 0 are obtained. A new critical behaviour beyond the universal class of Luttinger liquids is found in this system.

  10. Critical analysis of the successes and failures of homology models of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Supriyo; Lam, Alfonso Ramon; Li, Hubert; Balaraman, Gouthaman; Niesen, Michiel Jacobus Maria; Vaidehi, Nagarajan

    2013-05-01

    We present a critical assessment of the performance of our homology model refinement method for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), called LITICon that led to top ranking structures in a recent structure prediction assessment GPCRDOCK2010. GPCRs form the largest class of drug targets for which only a few crystal structures are currently available. Therefore, accurate homology models are essential for drug design in these receptors. We submitted five models each for human chemokine CXCR4 (bound to small molecule IT1t and peptide CVX15) and dopamine D3DR (bound to small molecule eticlopride) before the crystal structures were published. Our models in both CXCR4/IT1t and D3/eticlopride assessments were ranked first and second, respectively, by ligand RMSD to the crystal structures. For both receptors, we developed two types of protein models: homology models based on known GPCR crystal structures, and ab initio models based on the prediction method MembStruk. The homology-based models compared better to the crystal structures than the ab initio models. However, a robust refinement procedure for obtaining high accuracy structures is needed. We demonstrate that optimization of the helical tilt, rotation, and translation is vital for GPCR homology model refinement. As a proof of concept, our in-house refinement program LITiCon captured the distinct orientation of TM2 in CXCR4, which differs from that of adrenoreceptors. These findings would be critical for refining GPCR homology models in future. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Relevance of Deconfined-Criticality Action in the Light of the J-Q Spin Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuan; Chen, Kun; Deng, Youjin; Kuklov, Anatoly; Prokofev, Nikolay; Svistunov, Boris

    2013-03-01

    We perform large scale Monte Carlo simulations to study critical flows of 2D spin-1/2 J-Q model and 3D SU(2) symmetric discrete NCCP1 model, a.k.a. deconfined-critical-point (DCP) action. The flows of the J-Q model and the DCP action collapse in a significantly large region of system sizes (up to L ~ 60 - 80), implying that the DCP theory (in general) and the discrete NCCP1 model (in particular) correctly capture mesoscopic physics of the competition between the antiferromagnetic and valence-bond orders in quantum spin systems. At larger sizes we observe significant deviations between the two flows which both demonstrate strong violations of scale invariance. Furthermore, while the Neel state is perfectly space-time symmetric, the competing phase shows significant deviations from this symmetry. Possible scenarios are outlined. NSF PHY-1005543

  12. Critical state model for magneto-elastic problem of thin superconducting disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Guang; Yong, Hua-Dong; Zhou, You-He

    2013-07-01

    The magneto-elastic problem of a thin superconducting disk in a perpendicular magnetic field is analyzed with field-dependent critical current. We calculate numerically the body force distribution and discuss the field dependence of Jc on the magneto-elastic behavior during field ascent and descent for three critical state models: Bean, Kim, and exponential models. The results show that when considering a field dependence of Jc, the flux and remagnetization fronts have a larger moving speed towards the center of a disk relative to the Bean model. Simultaneously, the most dangerous stage of possible cracking for the disk will arrive early in the field decreasing stage. The magnetostriction loops are also presented during a full cycle of the applied field. It is interesting that the calculated magnetostriction loops for the Kim and exponential models are quite similar to the corresponding magnetostriction curves at low and high temperatures measured in the experiment.

  13. Critical success factors model developing for sustainable Kaizen implementation in manufactur-ing industry in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haftu Hailu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to identify critical success factors and model developing for sustaining kaizen implementation. Peacock shoe is one of the manufacturing industries in Ethiopia facing challenges on sustaining. The methodology followed is factor analysis and empirically testing hypothesis. A database was designed using SPSS version 20. The survey was validated using statistical validation using the Cronbach alpha index; the result is 0.908. The KMO index value was obtained for the 32 items and had a value of 0.642 with Bartlett's Test of Sphericity Approx. Chi-Square 4503.007, degree of freedom 496 and significance value 0.000. A factor analysis by principal components and varimax rotation was applied for finding the critical success factors. Finding designates that 32 items were merged into eight critical success factors. All the eight factors together explain for 76.941 % of the variance. Multiple regression model analysis has indicated that some of the critical success factors had relationship with success indicators. Due to constraint of time, the researcher focused only at peacock shoe manufacturing industry. Other limitation also includes the absence of any local research that shows the critical success factors at the moment.

  14. Critical parameters of unrestricted primitive model electrolytes with charge asymmetries up to 10:1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Daniel W.; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2003-10-01

    The phase behavior of charge- and size-asymmetric primitive model electrolytes has been investigated using reservoir grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations. The simulations rely on the insertion and removal of neutral ion clusters from a reservoir of possible configurations. We first validated our approach by investigating the effect of Rc, the maximum allowable distance between the central cation and its associated anions, on the critical parameters of 2:1 and 3:1 electrolytes. We have shown that the effect of Rc is weak and does not change the qualitative dependence of the critical parameters on size and charge asymmetry. The critical temperature for 2:1 and 3:1 electrolytes shows a maximum at Rc≈3, while the critical volume fraction decreases more or less monotonically, consistent with previous results for 1:1 electrolytes by Romero-Enrique et al. [Phys. Rev. E 66, 041204 (2002)]. We have used the reservoir method to obtain the critical parameters for 5:1 and 10:1 electrolytes. The critical temperature decreases with increasing charge asymmetry and shows a maximum as a function of δ, the size asymmetry parameter. The critical volume fraction however, defined as the volume occupied by ions divided by the total volume of the simulation box, increases with increasing charge asymmetry and exhibits a minimum as a function of δ. This trend is contrary to what is generally predicted by theories, although more recent approaches based on the Debye-Hückel theory reproduce this observed trend. Our results deviate somewhat from the predictions of Linse [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 359, 853 (2001)] for the scaling of the critical temperature for a system of macroions with point counterions.

  15. Crystal structure of the amyloid-β p3 fragment provides a model for oligomer formation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streltsov, Victor A; Varghese, Joseph N; Masters, Colin L; Nuttall, Stewart D

    2011-01-26

    Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder associated with the presence of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide fibrillar plaques in the brain. However, current evidence suggests that soluble nonfibrillar Aβ oligomers may be the major drivers of Aβ-mediated synaptic dysfunction. Structural information on these Aβ species has been very limited because of their noncrystalline and unstable nature. Here, we describe a crystal structure of amylogenic residues 18-41 of the Aβ peptide (equivalent to the p3 α/γ-secretase fragment of amyloid precursor protein) presented within the CDR3 loop region of a shark Ig new antigen receptor (IgNAR) single variable domain antibody. The predominant oligomeric species is a tightly associated Aβ dimer, with paired dimers forming a tetramer in the crystal caged within four IgNAR domains, preventing uncontrolled amyloid formation. Our structure correlates with independently observed features of small nonfibrillar Aβ oligomers and reveals conserved elements consistent with residues and motifs predicted as critical in Aβ folding and oligomerization, thus potentially providing a model system for nonfibrillar oligomer formation in Alzheimer's disease.

  16. A Dynamic Neuro-Fuzzy Model Providing Bio-State Estimation and Prognosis Prediction for Wearable Intelligent Assistants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winters Jack M

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intelligent management of wearable applications in rehabilitation requires an understanding of the current context, which is constantly changing over the rehabilitation process because of changes in the person's status and environment. This paper presents a dynamic recurrent neuro-fuzzy system that implements expert-and evidence-based reasoning. It is intended to provide context-awareness for wearable intelligent agents/assistants (WIAs. Methods The model structure includes the following types of signals: inputs, states, outputs and outcomes. Inputs are facts or events which have effects on patients' physiological and rehabilitative states; different classes of inputs (e.g., facts, context, medication, therapy have different nonlinear mappings to a fuzzy "effect." States are dimensionless linguistic fuzzy variables that change based on causal rules, as implemented by a fuzzy inference system (FIS. The FIS, with rules based on expertise and evidence, essentially defines the nonlinear state equations that are implemented by nuclei of dynamic neurons. Outputs, a function of weighing of states and effective inputs using conventional or fuzzy mapping, can perform actions, predict performance, or assist with decision-making. Outcomes are scalars to be extremized that are a function of outputs and states. Results The first example demonstrates setup and use for a large-scale stroke neurorehabilitation application (with 16 inputs, 12 states, 5 outputs and 3 outcomes, showing how this modelling tool can successfully capture causal dynamic change in context-relevant states (e.g., impairments, pain as a function of input event patterns (e.g., medications. The second example demonstrates use of scientific evidence to develop rule-based dynamic models, here for predicting changes in muscle strength with short-term fatigue and long-term strength-training. Conclusion A neuro-fuzzy modelling framework is developed for estimating

  17. Characteristics of primary care providers who adopted the hospitalist model from 2001 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyasai, Romsai T; Lin, Yu-Li; Brotman, Daniel J; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Goodwin, James S

    2015-02-01

    The characteristics of primary care providers (PCPs) who use hospitalists are unknown. Retrospective study using 100% Texas Medicare claims from 2001 through 2009. Descriptive statistics characterized proportion of PCPs using hospitalists over time. Trajectory analysis and multilevel models of 1172 PCPs with ≥20 inpatients in every study year characterized how PCPs adopted the hospitalist model and PCP factors associated with this transition. Hospitalist use increased between 2001 and 2009. PCPs who adopted the hospitalist model transitioned rapidly. In multilevel models, hospitalist use was associated with US training (odds ratio [OR] 1.46, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.23-1.73 in 2007-2009), family medicine specialty (OR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.25-1.70 in 2007-2009), and having high outpatient volumes (OR: 1.32, 95% CI: 1.20-1.44 in 2007-2009). Over time, relative hospitalist use decreased among female PCPs (OR: 1.91, 95% CI: 1.46-2.50 in 2001-2003; OR: 1.50, 95% CI: 1.15-1.95 in 2007-2009), those in urban locations (OR: 3.34, 95% CI: 2.72-4.09 in 2001-2003; OR: 2.22, 95% CI: 1.82-2.71 in 2007-2009), and those with higher inpatient volumes (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 0.95-1.18 in 2001-2003; OR: 0.55, 95% CI: 0.51-0.60 in 2007-2009). Longest-practicing PCPs were more likely to transition in the early 2000s, but this effect disappeared by the end of the study period (OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.06-1.72 in 2001-2003; OR: 0.92, 95% CI: 0.73-1.17 in 2007-2009). PCPs with practice panels dominated by patients who were white, male, or had comorbidities are more likely to use hospitalists. PCP characteristics are associated with hospitalist use. The association between PCP characteristics and hospitalist use has evolved over time. © 2015 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  18. Weak magnetic field effects on chiral critical temperature in a nonlocal Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model

    CERN Document Server

    Loewe, M; Villavicencio, C; Zamora, R

    2014-01-01

    In this article we study the nonlocal Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model with a Gaussian regulator in the chiral limit. Finite temperature effects and the presence of a homogeneous magnetic field are considered. The magnetic evolution of the critical temperature for chiral symmetry restoration is then obtained. Here we restrict ourselves to the case of low magnetic field values, being this a complementary discussion to the exisiting analysis in nonlocal models in the strong magnetic field regime.

  19. Improving Critical Thinking Skills and Students Creativity through Concept Acquisition Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlina Ike Oktaviani

    2015-02-01

    Key Words: critical thinking, creative thinking, concept acquisition models   Abstrak: Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mendeskripsikan keterlaksanaan model pemerolehan konsep dalam pembelajaran biologi untuk meningkatkan kemampuan berpikir kritis dan kreatif siswa kelas VII. Melalui metode penelitian tindakan kelas dengan menggunakan instrumen pengumpulan data berupa lembar observasi kemampuan berpikir kritis dan kreatif siswa, lembar observasi keterlaksanaan pembelajaran, lembar penilaian validasi dan catatan lapangan. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan kemampuan berpikir kritis siswa kelas VII dalam Pembelajaran Biologi meningkat melalui penerapan model pemerolehan konsep.  Kata kunci: berpikir kritis, berpikir kreatif, model pemerolehan konsep

  20. Static and dynamical critical behavior of the monomer-monomer reaction model with desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, E. C.; Rusch, Flávio Roberto

    2016-06-01

    We studied in this work the monomer-monomer reaction model on a linear chain. The model is described by the following reaction: A + B → AB, where A and B are two monomers that arrive at the surface with probabilities yA and yB, respectively, and we have considered desorption of the monomer B with probability α. The model is studied in the adsorption controlled limit where the reaction rate is infinitely larger than the adsorption rate. We employ site and pair mean-field approximations as well as static and dynamical Monte Carlo simulations. We show that the model exhibits a continuous phase transition between an active steady state and an A-absorbing state, when the parameter yA is varied through a critical value, which depends on the value of α. Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling analysis near the critical point are used to determine the static critical exponents β and ν⊥ and the dynamical critical exponents ν∥ and z. The results found for the monomer-monomer reaction model with B desorption, in the linear chain, are different from those found by E. V. Albano (Albano, 1992) and are in accordance with the values obtained by Jun Zhuo and Sidney Redner (Zhuo and Redner, 1993), and endorse the conjecture of Grassberger, which states that any system undergoing a continuous phase transition from an active steady state to a single absorbing state, exhibits the same critical behavior of the directed percolation universality class.

  1. Estimated Nutritive Value of Low-Price Model Lunch Sets Provided to Garment Workers in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Makurat

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The establishment of staff canteens is expected to improve the nutritional situation of Cambodian garment workers. The objective of this study is to assess the nutritive value of low-price model lunch sets provided at a garment factory in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Methods: Exemplary lunch sets were served to female workers through a temporary canteen at a garment factory in Phnom Penh. Dish samples were collected repeatedly to examine mean serving sizes of individual ingredients. Food composition tables and NutriSurvey software were used to assess mean amounts and contributions to recommended dietary allowances (RDAs or adequate intake of energy, macronutrients, dietary fiber, vitamin C (VitC, iron, vitamin A (VitA, folate and vitamin B12 (VitB12. Results: On average, lunch sets provided roughly one third of RDA or adequate intake of energy, carbohydrates, fat and dietary fiber. Contribution to RDA of protein was high (46% RDA. The sets contained a high mean share of VitC (159% RDA, VitA (66% RDA, and folate (44% RDA, but were low in VitB12 (29% RDA and iron (20% RDA. Conclusions: Overall, lunches satisfied recommendations of caloric content and macronutrient composition. Sets on average contained a beneficial amount of VitC, VitA and folate. Adjustments are needed for a higher iron content. Alternative iron-rich foods are expected to be better suited, compared to increasing portions of costly meat/fish components. Lunch provision at Cambodian garment factories holds the potential to improve food security of workers, approximately at costs of <1 USD/person/day at large scale. Data on quantitative total dietary intake as well as physical activity among workers are needed to further optimize the concept of staff canteens.

  2. SU-E-T-170: Characterization of the Location, Extent, and Proximity to Critical Structures of Target Volumes Provides Detail for Improved Outcome Predictions Among Pancreatic Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Z; Moore, J; Rosati, L; Mian, O; Narang, A; Herman, J; McNutt, T [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, size, location and proximity of the target to critical structures influence treatment decisions. It has been shown that proximity of the target predicts dosimetric sparing of critical structures. In addition to dosimetry, precise location of disease has further implications such as tumor invasion, or proximity to major arteries that inhibit surgery. Knowledge of which patients can be converted to surgical candidates by radiation may have high impact on future treat/no-treat decisions. We propose a method to improve our characterization of the location of pancreatic cancer and treatment volume extent with respect to nearby arteries with the goal of developing features to improve clinical predictions and decisions. Methods: Oncospace is a local learning health system that systematically captures clinical outcomes and all aspects of radiotherapy treatment plans, including overlap volume histograms (OVH) – a measure of spatial relationships between two structures. Minimum and maximum distances of PTV and OARs based on OVH, PTV volume, anatomic location by ICD-9 code, and surgical outcome were queried. Normalized distance to center from the left and right kidney was calculated to indicate tumor location and laterality. Distance to critical arteries (celiac, superior mesenteric, common hepatic) is validated by surgical status (borderline resectable, locally advanced converted to resectable). Results: There were 205 pancreas stereotactic body radiotherapy patients treated from 2009–2015 queried. Location/laterality of tumor based on kidney OVH show strong trends between location by OVH and by ICD-9. Compared to the locally advanced group, the borderline resectable group showed larger geometrical distance from critical arteries (p=0.03). Conclusion: Our platform enabled analysis of shape/size-location relationships. These data suggest that PTV volume and attention to distance between PTVs and surrounding OARs and major arteries may be

  3. Critical phenomena of nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model

    CERN Document Server

    Miyazaki, K

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the thermodynamics of warm nuclear matter below the saturation density in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model. The EOS behaves like van der Waals one and shows the liquid-gas phase transition as the other microscopic EOSs. It predicts the critical temperature T_{C}=16.36MeV that agrees well with its empirical value. We have further calculated the phase coexistence curve and obtained the critical exponents beta=0.34 and gamma=1.22, which also agree with their universal values and empirical values derived in the recent experimental efforts.

  4. Critical behavior near the Mott transition in the half-filled asymmetric Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoang, Anh-Tuan, E-mail: hatuan@iop.vast.ac.vn [Institute of Physics, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Le, Duc-Anh [Faculty of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, Xuan Thuy 136, Cau Giay, Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam)

    2016-03-15

    We study the half-filled asymmetric Hubbard model within the two-site dynamical mean field theory. At zero temperature, explicit expressions of the critical interaction U{sub c} for the Mott transition and the local self-energy are analytically derived. Critical behavior of the quasiparticle weights and the double occupancy are obtained analytically as functions of the on-site interaction U and the hopping asymmetry r. Our results are in good agreement with the ones obtained by much more sophisticated theory.

  5. Critical behavior of the n-vector model for 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Man-Hot; Dasgupta, Chandan

    1987-01-01

    The Migdal-Kadanoff position-space renormalization-group scheme is used to study the critical behavior of the isotropic n-component-vector model in the previously unexplored region, 1=dl(n). The lower critical dimension dl(n) increases continuously, but nonlinearly from 1 to 2 as n changes from 1 to 2. For dl(n)<=d<2, the low-temperature phase is characterized by a power-law decay of the two-point correlation function with a temperature-independent exponent.

  6. Surface critical behavior and scaling functions for the three-dimensional mean spherical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Magdy E. [Mathematics Department, Ar' ar Teacher College, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (Saudi Arabia) and Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, Minia University (Egypt)]. E-mail: aminmagdy@yahoo.com

    2006-10-09

    The d-dimensional mean spherical model on a fully finite L{sup d} simple cubic lattice with Neumann-Dirichlet boundary conditions is considered in the presence of a surface external fields acting at the surfaces bounding the system. Exact calculations are evaluated for the fully finite system and in the case of a film geometry Lx{approx}{sup d-1}. Critical finite-size scaling functions both for the specific heat and the mean-square magnetization are derived and investigated close to and below the bulk critical temperature K{sub c}.

  7. Relevance of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling to clinical care of critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulitta, Jurgen B; Landersdorfer, Cornelia B; Forrest, Alan; Brown, Silvia V; Neely, Michael N; Tsuji, Brian T; Louie, Arnold

    2011-12-01

    Efficacious therapy is of utmost importance to save lives and prevent bacterial resistance in critically ill patients. This review summarizes pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) modeling methods to optimize clinical care of critically ill patients in empiric and individualized therapy. While these methods apply to all therapeutic areas, we focus on antibiotics to highlight important applications, as emergence of resistance is a significant problem. Nonparametric and parametric population PK modeling, multiple-model dosage design, Monte Carlo simulations, and Bayesian adaptive feedback control are the methods of choice to optimize therapy. Population PK can estimate between patient variability and account for potentially increased clearances and large volumes of distribution in critically ill patients. Once patient- specific PK data become available, target concentration intervention and adaptive feedback control algorithms can most precisely achieve target goals such as clinical cure of an infection or resistance prevention in stable and unstable patients with rapidly changing PK parameters. Many bacterial resistance mechanisms cause PK/PD targets for resistance prevention to be usually several-fold higher than targets for near-maximal killing. In vitro infection models such as the hollow fiber and one-compartment infection models allow one to study antibiotic-induced bacterial killing and emergence of resistance of mono- and combination therapies over clinically relevant treatment durations. Mechanism-based (and empirical) PK/PD modeling can incorporate effects of the immune system and allow one to design innovative dosage regimens and prospective validation studies. Mechanism-based modeling holds great promise to optimize mono- and combination therapy of anti-infectives and drugs from other therapeutic areas for critically ill patients.

  8. THE EFFECTS OF INQUIRY TRAINING LEARNING MODEL AND CRITICAL THINGKING ABILITY TOWARD SCIENCE PROCESS SKILLS OF SMA

    OpenAIRE

    Ferawati Hutapea; Motlan .

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of research are 1). To know are differences in science process skills of students with the applied of inquiry training learning model and direct instruction learning models, 2). To know are differences in science process skills of students who has high critical thinking ability and the  critically low ability, 3). To know the interaction inquiry training learning model and critical thinking ability toward students science process skills. The samples in this research conducted by c...

  9. Critical behavior of the Gaussian model on fractal lattices in external magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孔祥木; 林振权; 朱建阳

    2000-01-01

    For inhomogeneous lattices we generalize the classical Gaussian model, i. e. it is pro-posed that the Gaussian type distribution constant and the external magnetic field of site / in this model depend on the coordination number q, of site i, and that the relation bq1/bq1 = q1/q1 holds among bq1s, where bq1 is the Gaussian type distribution constant of site /. Using the decimation real-spacerenormalization group following the spin-rescaling method, the critical points and critical exponents of the Gaussian model are calculated on some Koch type curves and a family of the diamond-type hierar-chical (or DH) lattices. At the critical points, it is found that the nearest-neighbor interaction and the magnetic field of site i can be expressed in the form K’ = bq1/q1 and hq =0, respectively. it is also found that most critical exponents depend on the fractal dimensionality of a fractal system. For the family of the DH lattices, the results are identical with the exact results on translation symmetric lattices,

  10. Crossover Equation of State Models Applied to the Critical Behavior of Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrabos, Y.; Lecoutre, C.; Marre, S.; Guillaument, R.; Beysens, D.; Hahn, I.

    2015-03-01

    The turbidity () measurements of Güttinger and Cannell (Phys Rev A 24:3188-3201, 1981) in the temperature range along the critical isochore of homogeneous xenon are reanalyzed. The singular behaviors of the isothermal compressibility () and the correlation length () predicted from the master crossover functions are introduced in the turbidity functional form derived by Puglielli and Ford (Phys Rev Lett 25:143-146, 1970). We show that the turbidity data are thus well represented by the Ornstein-Zernike approximant, within 1 % precision. We also introduce a new crossover master model (CMM) of the parametric equation of state for a simple fluid system with no adjustable parameter. The CMM model and the phenomenological crossover parametric model are compared with the turbidity data and the coexisting liquid-gas density difference (). The excellent agreement observed for , , , and in a finite temperature range well beyond the Ising-like preasymptotic domain confirms that the Ising-like critical crossover behavior of xenon can be described in conformity with the universal features estimated by the renormalization-group methods. Only 4 critical coordinates of the vapor-liquid critical point are needed in the (pressure, temperature, molecular volume) phase surface of xenon.

  11. Global observations and modeling of atmosphere-surface exchange of elemental mercury: a critical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Lin, Che-Jen; Wang, Xun; Sommar, Jonas; Fu, Xuewu; Feng, Xinbin

    2016-04-01

    Reliable quantification of air-surface fluxes of elemental Hg vapor (Hg0) is crucial for understanding mercury (Hg) global biogeochemical cycles. There have been extensive measurements and modeling efforts devoted to estimating the exchange fluxes between the atmosphere and various surfaces (e.g., soil, canopies, water, snow, etc.) in the past three decades. However, large uncertainties remain due to the complexity of Hg0 bidirectional exchange, limitations of flux quantification techniques and challenges in model parameterization. In this study, we provide a critical review on the state of science in the atmosphere-surface exchange of Hg0. Specifically, the advancement of flux quantification techniques, mechanisms in driving the air-surface Hg exchange and modeling efforts are presented. Due to the semi-volatile nature of Hg0 and redox transformation of Hg in environmental media, Hg deposition and evasion are influenced by multiple environmental variables including seasonality, vegetative coverage and its life cycle, temperature, light, moisture, atmospheric turbulence and the presence of reactants (e.g., O3, radicals, etc.). However, the effects of these processes on flux have not been fundamentally and quantitatively determined, which limits the accuracy of flux modeling. We compile an up-to-date global observational flux database and discuss the implication of flux data on the global Hg budget. Mean Hg0 fluxes obtained by micrometeorological measurements do not appear to be significantly greater than the fluxes measured by dynamic flux chamber methods over unpolluted surfaces (p = 0.16, one-tailed, Mann-Whitney U test). The spatiotemporal coverage of existing Hg0 flux measurements is highly heterogeneous with large data gaps existing in multiple continents (Africa, South Asia, Middle East, South America and Australia). The magnitude of the evasion flux is strongly enhanced by human activities, particularly at contaminated sites. Hg0 flux observations in East

  12. Content Analysis in Computer-Mediated Communication: Analyzing Models for Assessing Critical Thinking through the Lens of Social Constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraphadeja, Vasa; Dawson, Kara

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews content analysis studies aimed to assess critical thinking in computer-mediated communication. It also discusses theories and content analysis models that encourage critical thinking skills in asynchronous learning environments and reviews theories and factors that may foster critical thinking skills and new knowledge…

  13. Content Analysis in Computer-Mediated Communication: Analyzing Models for Assessing Critical Thinking through the Lens of Social Constructivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buraphadeja, Vasa; Dawson, Kara

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews content analysis studies aimed to assess critical thinking in computer-mediated communication. It also discusses theories and content analysis models that encourage critical thinking skills in asynchronous learning environments and reviews theories and factors that may foster critical thinking skills and new knowledge…

  14. A model for a statewide critical incident stress (CIS) debriefing program for emergency services personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, K W; Spitzer, W J

    1997-01-01

    Emergency services personnel are highly vulnerable to acute and cumulative critical incident stress (CIS) that can manifest as anger, guilt, depression, and impaired decision-making, and, in certain instances, job loss. Interventions designed to identify such distress and restore psychological functioning becomes imperative. A statewide debriefing team was formed in 1988 through a collaborative effort between an academic department of emergency medicine and a social work department of a teaching hospital, and a metropolitan area fire department and ambulance service. Using an existing CIS debriefing model, 84 prescreened, mental health professionals and emergency services personnel were provided with 16 hours of training and were grouped into regional teams. Debriefing requests are received through a central number answered by a communicator in a 24-hour communications center located within the emergency department. Debriefings are conducted 48-72 hours after the event for specific types of incidents. Follow-up telephone calls are made by the debriefing team leader two to three weeks following a debriefing. The teams rely on donations to pay for travel and meals. One hundred sixty-eight debriefings were conducted during the first four years. Rural agencies accounted for 116 (69%) requests. During this period, 1,514 individuals were debriefed: 744 (49%) firefighters, 460 (30%) EMTs, and 310 (21%) police officers, dispatchers, and other responders. Deaths of children, extraordinary events, and incidents involving victims known to the responders (35%, 14%, and 14% respectively) were the most common reasons for requesting debriefings. Feedback was received from 48 (28%) of the agencies that requested the debriefing. All of those who responded felt that the debriefing had a beneficial effect on its personnel. Specific individuals identified by agency representatives as having the greatest difficulty were observed to be returned to their pre-incident state. CIS

  15. Glu311 and Arg337 Stabilize a Closed Active-site Conformation and Provide a Critical Catalytic Base and Countercation for Green Bioluminescence in Beetle Luciferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviani, V R; Simões, A; Bevilaqua, V R; Gabriel, G V M; Arnoldi, F G C; Hirano, T

    2016-08-30

    Beetle luciferases elicit the emission of different bioluminescence colors from green to red. Whereas firefly luciferases emit yellow-green light and are pH-sensitive, undergoing a typical red-shift at acidic pH and higher temperatures and in the presence of divalent heavy metals, click beetle and railroadworm luciferases emit a wider range of colors from green to red but are pH-independent. Despite many decades of study, the structural determinants and mechanisms of bioluminescence colors and pH sensitivity remain enigmatic. Here, through modeling studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and spectral and kinetic studies using recombinant luciferases from the three main families of bioluminescent beetles that emit different colors of light (Macrolampis sp2 firefly, Phrixotrix hirtus railroadworm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans click beetle), we investigated the role of E311 and R337 in bioluminescence color determination. All mutations of these residues in firefly luciferase produced red mutants, indicating that the preservation of opposite charges and the lengths of the side chains of E311 and R337 are essential for keeping a salt bridge that stabilizes a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission. Kinetic studies indicate that residue R337 is important for binding luciferin and creating a positively charged environment around excited oxyluciferin phenolate. In Pyrearinus green-emitting luciferase, the R334A mutation causes a 27 nm red-shift, whereas in Phrixotrix red-emitting luciferase, the L334R mutation causes a blue-shift that is no longer affected by guanidine. These results provide compelling evidence that the presence of arginine at position 334 is essential for blue-shifting the emission spectra of most beetle luciferases. Therefore, residues E311 and R337 play both structural and catalytic roles in bioluminescence color determination, by stabilizing a closed hydrophobic conformation favorable for green light emission, and also

  16. Testing a model for the critical degree of saturation at freezing of porous building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1996-01-01

    during freezing. The reliability and usefulness of the model are discussed, e.g. in relation to air-entrained materials and in relation to the description of the pore structure.Keywords: Brick tile, concrete, critical degree of saturation, eigenstrain, fracture mechanics, frost resistance, pore structure......Frost resistance of porous materials can be characterized by the critical degree of saturation, SCR. An experimental determination of SCR is very laborious and therefore only seldom used when testing frost resistance. A theoretical model for prediction of SCR based on fracture mechanics and phase...... of elasticity, tensile strength, amount of freezable water, thermal expansion coefficients and parameters characterizing the pore structure and its effect on strength, modulus of elasticity and volumetric expansion. For the present, the model assumes non air-entrained homogeneous materials subjected to freeze...

  17. Modelling critical degrees of saturation of porous building materials subjected to freezing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1996-01-01

    Frost resistance of porous materials can be characterized by the critical degree of saturation, SCR, and the actual degree of saturation, SACT. An experimental determination of SCR is very laborious and therefore only seldom used when testing frost resistance. A theoretical model for prediction...... the pore structure and its effect on strength, modulus of elasticity and volumetric expansion. Also the amount of freezable water and thermal expansion coefficients are involved. For the present, the model assumes non air-entrained homogeneous materials subjected to freeze-thaw without de-icing salts.......The model has been tested on various concretes without air-entrainment and on brick tiles with different porosities. Results agree qualitatively with values of the critical degree of saturation determined by measuring resonance frequencies and length change of sealed specimens during freezing...

  18. Modeling chiral criticality and its consequences for heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Almási, Gábor András; Redlich, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    We explore the critical fluctuations near the chiral critical endpoint (CEP) in a chiral effective model and discuss possible signals of the CEP, recently explored experimentally in nuclear collision. Particular attention is paid to the dependence of such signals on the location of the phase boundary and the EP relative to the chemical freeze-out conditions in nuclear collisions. We argue that in effective models, standard freeze-out fits to heavy-ion data should not be used directly. Instead, the relevant quantities should be examined on lines in the phase diagram that are defined self-consistently, within the framework of the model. We discuss possible choices for such an approach.

  19. The role of disorder in the dynamics of critical fluctuations of mean field models

    CERN Document Server

    Collet, Francesca

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze how the disorder affects the dynamics of critical fluctuations for two different types of interacting particle system: the Curie-Weiss and Kuramoto model. The models under consideration are a collection of spins and rotators respectively. They both are subject to a mean field interaction and embedded in a site-dependent, i.i.d. random environment. As the number of particles goes to infinity their limiting dynamics become deterministic and exhibit phase transition. The main result concern the fluctuations around this deterministic limit at the critical point in the thermodynamic limit. From a qualitative point of view, it indicates that when disorder is added spin and rotator systems belong to two different classes of universality, which is not the case for the homogeneous models (i.e., without disorder).

  20. Inducing Self-Organized Criticality in a network toy model by neighborhood assortativity

    CERN Document Server

    Allen-Perkins, Alfonso; Pastor, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Complex networks are a recent type of frameworks used to study complex systems with many interacting elements, such as Self-Organized Criticality (SOC). The network node's tendency to link to other nodes of similar type is characterized by assortative mixing. Real networks exhibit assortative mixing by vertex degree, however typical random network models, such as Erdos-Renyi or Barabasi-Albert, show no assortative arrangements. In this paper we introduce the neighborhood assortativity notion, as the tendency of a node to belong to a community (its neighborhood) showing an average property similar to its own. Imposing neighborhood assortative mixing by degree in a network toy model, SOC dynamics can be found. The long-range correlations resulting from the criticality have been characterized by means of fluctuation analysis and show an anticorrelation in the node's activity. The model contains only one parameter and its statistics plots for different values of the parameter can be collapsed into a single curve....

  1. Dynamical critical behavior in a cellular model of superconducting vortex avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkan, Tegy John

    Bak, Tang, and Wiesenfeld showed that certain driven dissipative systems with many degrees of freedom organize into a critical state characterized by avalanche dynamics and power law distribution of avalanche sizes and durations. They called this phenomenon self-organized criticality and sandpile became the prototype of such dynamical systems. Universality in these systems is not yet well established. Forty years ago, de Gennes noted that the Bean state in a type-II superconductor is similar to a sandpile. Motivated by strong experimental evidences, Bassler and Paczuski (BP) proposed a 2D sandpile model to study self-organization in the dynamics of vortices in superconductors. In this dissertation, the effect of anisotropy in the vortex-vortex interaction, stochasticity in the vortex toppling rule, and the configuration of the pinning centers on the scaling properties of the avalanches in the BP model is studied. Also, universality in the cellular model of vortex dynamics is investigated.

  2. Critical Behavior of the Spin-1/2 Baxter-Wu Model: Entropic Sampling Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, L. N.; Ferreira, L. S.; Leão, S. A.; Caparica, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we use a refined entropic sampling technique based on the Wang-Landau method to study the spin- 1/2 Baxter-Wu model. We adopt the total magnetization as the order parameter and, as a result, do not divide the system into three sub-lattices. The static critical exponents were determined as α = 0.6697(54), β = 0.0813(67), γ = 1.1772(33), and ν = 0.6574(61). The estimate for the critical temperature was T c = 2.26924(2). We compare the present results with those obtained from other well-established approaches, and we find a very good closeness with the exact values, besides the high precision reached for the critical temperature.

  3. Criticality and phase behavior in the restricted-primitive model electrolyte: Effect of ionic association

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Jianwen; Blum, Lesser; Bernard, Oliver; Prausnitz, John M.

    2001-11-01

    Ion association is incorporated into the restricted-primitive model (RPM) electrolyte to account for the strong attraction between unlike ions. Two methods are investigated within the McMillan-Mayer framework: first is the binding mean-spherical approximation (BIMSA) based on the Wertheim Ornstein-Zernike integral equation formalism; and the second is the combination of the BIMSA with a simple interpolation scheme (SIS) based on the Wertheim thermodynamic perturbation theory. The latter gives a better description. Four different association constants are used to calculate the degree of dissociation, the critical point and the vapor-liquid coexistence curve. An increase in the association constant leads to a lower critical temperature and a higher critical density, and better agreement with computer simulations. When unlike ions are fully paired, corresponding to a charged hard dumbbell (CHDB) system, we obtain the best agreement with the most recent computer simulations of the RPM electrolyte.

  4. Criticality and phase behavior in the restricted-primitive model electrolyte: Description of ion association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianwen; Blum, Lesser; Bernard, Oliver; Prausnitz, John M.; Sandler, Stanley I.

    2002-05-01

    Ion association is incorporated into the restricted-primitive model electrolyte to account for the strong attraction between unlike ions. Two methods are investigated within the McMillan-Mayer framework: first is the binding mean-spherical approximation (BIMSA) based on the Wertheim Ornstein-Zernike integral equation formalism; and the second is the combination of the BIMSA with a simple interpolation scheme based on the Wertheim thermodynamic perturbation theory. The latter gives a better description. Four different association constants are used to calculate the degree of dissociation, the critical point, and the vapor-liquid coexistence curve. An increase in the association constant leads to a lower critical temperature and a higher critical density, and better agreement with computer simulations. When unlike ions are fully paired, corresponding to a charged hard dumbbell system, we obtain the best agreement with the most recent computer simulations of the RPM electrolyte.

  5. Subtlety in the Critical Behavior of the Two Dimensional XY Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Kwon

    1996-03-01

    We study the two dimensional classical XY model using the single cluster Monte Carlo algorithm^1. We present extensive high -temperature -phase bulk data that are extracted based on a novel finite- size- scaling Monte Carlo technique^2. The largest value of the estimated bulk correlation length is 1390 in lattice units. Our data reveal that η=1/4 sets in near criticality. The standard finite-size-scaling analysis of the data close to criticality, however, seems to indicate that η=1/4 is compatible only for a critical temperature (T_c) over the range 0.900 Wolff, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 361 (1989) ^2 J.-K. Kim, Euro. Phys. Lett. 28, 211 (1994) Research supported in part by the NSF

  6. Critical phenomena of asymmetric nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model

    CERN Document Server

    Miyazaki, K

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the liquid-gas phase transition of warm asymmetric nuclear matter in the extended Zimanyi-Moszkowski model. The three sets of the isovector-meson coupling constants are used. It is found that the critical temperature depends only on the difference of the symmetry energy but not on the differences of each isovector coupling constant. We treat the asymmetric nuclear matter as one-component system and employ the Maxwell construction so as to calculate the liquid-gas phase coexistence curve. The derived critical exponents depend on neither the symmetry energy nor the asymmetry of the system. Their values beta=0.33 and gamma=1.21 agree with the empirical values derived from the recent multifragmentation reactions. Consequently, we have confirmed the universality of the critical phenomena in the liquid-gas phase transition of nuclear matter.

  7. A critical review of integrated urban water modelling – Urban drainage and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bach, Peter M.; Rauch, Wolfgang; Mikkelsen, Peter Steen

    2014-01-01

    considerations (e.g. data issues, model structure, computational and integration-related aspects), common methodology for model development (through a systems approach), calibration/optimisation and uncertainty are discussed, placing importance on pragmatism and parsimony. Integrated urban water models should......Modelling interactions in urban drainage, water supply and broader integrated urban water systems has been conceptually and logistically challenging as evidenced in a diverse body of literature, found to be confusing and intimidating to new researchers. This review consolidates thirty years...... of research (initially driven by interest in urban drainage modelling) and critically reflects upon integrated modelling in the scope of urban water systems. We propose a typology to classify integrated urban water system models at one of four ‘degrees of integration’ (followed by its exemplification). Key...

  8. Empirically Grounded Agent-Based Models of Innovation Diffusion: A Critical Review

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Innovation diffusion has been studied extensively in a variety of disciplines, including sociology, economics, marketing, ecology, and computer science. Traditional literature on innovation diffusion has been dominated by models of aggregate behavior and trends. However, the agent-based modeling (ABM) paradigm is gaining popularity as it captures agent heterogeneity and enables fine-grained modeling of interactions mediated by social and geographic networks. While most ABM work on innovation diffusion is theoretical, empirically grounded models are increasingly important, particularly in guiding policy decisions. We present a critical review of empirically grounded agent-based models of innovation diffusion, developing a categorization of this research based on types of agent models as well as applications. By connecting the modeling methodologies in the fields of information and innovation diffusion, we suggest that the maximum likelihood estimation framework widely used in the former is a promising paradigm...

  9. The role of multiple-point statistics and model selection in quantitative hydrogeophysical studies of the critical zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, N.

    2015-12-01

    Geophysical data are routinely used to provide qualitative insights about the main lithologies and the distribution of soil moisture in the critical zone. Quantitative hydrogeophysical inferences of critical zone properties and processes are much more challenging because of the multitude of interacting physical, biological and chemical gradients that may affect the geophysical measurement response. In this context, it is essential to incorporate the geophysical data within a wider modeling framework that centers on a conceptual model that describes the properties and processes under study together with appropriate boundary conditions. Based on recent groundwater applications, I describe how it is now possible to build geologically meaningful realizations of subsurface structure using multiple-point statistics (MPS) and to make uncertainty estimates. I will demonstrate conditioning of MPS simulations to geophysical tomograms, inclusion of summary statistics derived from MPS simulations within a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) inversion, and full MPS MCMC inversion based on fast (speed-up of 40 times) model proposal algorithms that we have adapted from computer vision. For future applications in the critical zone, I suggest that MPS simulations should be used to derive and perturb primary lithological properties and that biological, chemical, and hydrological state variables (given appropriate boundary conditions) are subsequently simulated using domain-specific algorithms. The geophysical data (an individual snap shot or time-series) are then used to guide the model update of the primary properties (and nuisance parameters such as petrophysical parameters) that in turn influence the predicted state variables and their associated fluxes. Instead of classical parameter estimation, I argue that it is often more appropriate to focus on model selection, in which alternative conceptual models of the subsurface are compared and ranked given the available data.

  10. Archetypal Criticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesebro, James W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Argues that archetypal criticism is a useful way of examining universal, historical, and cross-cultural symbols in classrooms. Identifies essential features of an archetype; outlines operational and critical procedures; illustrates archetypal criticism as applied to the cross as a symbol; and provides a synoptic placement for archetypal criticism…

  11. Self-Organized Criticality with Complex Scaling Exponents in the Train Model

    CERN Document Server

    Elmer, F J

    1997-01-01

    The train model which is a variant of the Burridge-Knopoff earthquake model is investigated for a velocity-strengthening friction law. It shows self-organized criticality with complex scaling exponents. That is, the probability density function of the avalanche strength is a power law times a log-periodic function. Exact results (scaling exponent: $3/2+2\\pi i/\\ln 4$) are found for a nonlocal cellular automaton which approximates the overdamped train model. Further the influence of random static friction is discussed.

  12. Critical Infrastructure Modeling: An Approach to Characterizing Interdependencies of Complex Networks & Control Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Walsh; Shane Cherry; Lyle Roybal

    2009-05-01

    Critical infrastructure control systems face many challenges entering the 21st century, including natural disasters, cyber attacks, and terrorist attacks. Revolutionary change is required to solve many existing issues, including gaining greater situational awareness and resiliency through embedding modeling and advanced control algorithms in smart sensors and control devices instead of in a central controller. To support design, testing, and component analysis, a flexible simulation and modeling capability is needed. Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory are developing and evaluating such a capability through their CIPRsim modeling and simulation framework.

  13. Primary Care Providers' Perceptions of and Experiences with an Integrated Healthcare Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westheimer, Joshua M.; Steinley-Bumgarner, Michelle; Brownson, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Objective and Participants: The authors examined the experiences of primary care providers participating in an integrated healthcare service between mental health and primary care in a university health center. In this program, behavioral health providers work collaboratively with primary care providers in the treatment of students. Participants…

  14. Critical Casimir force and its fluctuations in lattice spin models: exact and Monte Carlo results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantchev, Daniel; Krech, Michael

    2004-04-01

    We present general arguments and construct a stress tensor operator for finite lattice spin models. The average value of this operator gives the Casimir force of the system close to the bulk critical temperature T(c). We verify our arguments via exact results for the force in the two-dimensional Ising model, d -dimensional Gaussian, and mean spherical model with 2Monte Carlo simulations for three-dimensional Ising, XY, and Heisenberg models we demonstrate that the standard deviation of the Casimir force F(C) in a slab geometry confining a critical substance in-between is k(b) TD(T) (A/ a(d-1) )(1/2), where A is the surface area of the plates, a is the lattice spacing, and D(T) is a slowly varying nonuniversal function of the temperature T. The numerical calculations demonstrate that at the critical temperature T(c) the force possesses a Gaussian distribution centered at the mean value of the force = k(b) T(c) (d-1)Delta/ (L/a)(d), where L is the distance between the plates and Delta is the (universal) Casimir amplitude.

  15. Monte Carlo tests of renormalization-group predictions for critical phenomena in Ising models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Kurt; Luijten, Erik

    2001-04-01

    A critical review is given of status and perspectives of Monte Carlo simulations that address bulk and interfacial phase transitions of ferromagnetic Ising models. First, some basic methodological aspects of these simulations are briefly summarized (single-spin flip vs. cluster algorithms, finite-size scaling concepts), and then the application of these techniques to the nearest-neighbor Ising model in d=3 and 5 dimensions is described, and a detailed comparison to theoretical predictions is made. In addition, the case of Ising models with a large but finite range of interaction and the crossover scaling from mean-field behavior to the Ising universality class are treated. If one considers instead a long-range interaction described by a power-law decay, new classes of critical behavior depending on the exponent of this power law become accessible, and a stringent test of the ε-expansion becomes possible. As a final type of crossover from mean-field type behavior to two-dimensional Ising behavior, the interface localization-delocalization transition of Ising films confined between “competing” walls is considered. This problem is still hampered by questions regarding the appropriate coarse-grained model for the fluctuating interface near a wall, which is the starting point for both this problem and the theory of critical wetting.

  16. Red-bond exponents of the critical and the tricritical Ising model in three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Youjin; Blöte, Henk W. J.

    2004-11-01

    Using the Wolff and geometric cluster algorithms and finite-size scaling analysis, we investigate the critical Ising and the tricritical Blume-Capel models with nearest-neighbor interactions on the simple-cubic lattice. The sampling procedure involves the decomposition of the Ising configuration into geometric clusters, each of which consists of a set of nearest-neighboring spins of the same sign connected with bond probability p . These clusters include the well-known Kasteleyn-Fortuin clusters as a special case for p=1-exp(-2K) , where K is the Ising spin-spin coupling. Along the critical line K=Kc , the size distribution of geometric clusters is investigated as a function of p . We observe that, unlike in the case of two-dimensional tricriticality, the percolation threshold in both models lies at pc=1-exp(-2Kc) . Further, we determine the corresponding red-bond exponents as yr=0.757(2) and 0.501(5) for the critical Ising and the tricritical Blume-Capel models, respectively. On this basis, we conjecture yr=1/2 for the latter model.

  17. 75 FR 2562 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of the Model Health Care Continuation... document announces the availability of the model health care continuation coverage notices required by...

  18. 75 FR 26276 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of the Model Health Care Continuation... announces the availability of the model health care continuation coverage notices required by ARRA,...

  19. 75 FR 13595 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the availability of the Model Health Care Continuation... document announces the availability of the model health care continuation coverage notices required by...

  20. The EZ diffusion model provides a powerful test of simple empirical effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ravenzwaaij, Don; Donkin, Chris; Vandekerckhove, Joachim

    Over the last four decades, sequential accumulation models for choice response times have spread through cognitive psychology like wildfire. The most popular style of accumulator model is the diffusion model (Ratcliff Psychological Review, 85, 59–108, 1978), which has been shown to account for data

  1. Evaluation of atmospheric nitrogen deposition model performance in the context of U.S. critical load assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jason J.; Chung, Serena H.; Johansen, Anne M.; Lamb, Brian K.; Vaughan, Joseph K.; Beutel, Marc

    2017-02-01

    Air quality models are widely used to estimate pollutant deposition rates and thereby calculate critical loads and critical load exceedances (model deposition > critical load). However, model operational performance is not always quantified specifically to inform these applications. We developed a performance assessment approach designed to inform critical load and exceedance calculations, and applied it to the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. We quantified wet inorganic N deposition performance of several widely-used air quality models, including five different Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) simulations, the Tdep model, and 'PRISM x NTN' model. Modeled wet inorganic N deposition estimates were compared to wet inorganic N deposition measurements at 16 National Trends Network (NTN) monitoring sites, and to annual bulk inorganic N deposition measurements at Mount Rainier National Park. Model bias (model - observed) and error (|model - observed|) were expressed as a percentage of regional critical load values for diatoms and lichens. This novel approach demonstrated that wet inorganic N deposition bias in the Pacific Northwest approached or exceeded 100% of regional diatom and lichen critical load values at several individual monitoring sites, and approached or exceeded 50% of critical loads when averaged regionally. Even models that adjusted deposition estimates based on deposition measurements to reduce bias or that spatially-interpolated measurement data, had bias that approached or exceeded critical loads at some locations. While wet inorganic N deposition model bias is only one source of uncertainty that can affect critical load and exceedance calculations, results demonstrate expressing bias as a percentage of critical loads at a spatial scale consistent with calculations may be a useful exercise for those performing calculations. It may help decide if model performance is adequate for a particular calculation, help assess confidence in

  2. An improved mechanistic critical heat flux model for subcooled flow boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young Min [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    Based on the bubble coalescence adjacent to the heated wall as a flow structure for CHF condition, Chang and Lee developed a mechanistic critical heat flux (CHF) model for subcooled flow boiling. In this paper, improvements of Chang-Lee model are implemented with more solid theoretical bases for subcooled and low-quality flow boiling in tubes. Nedderman-Shearer`s equations for the skin friction factor and universal velocity profile models are employed. Slip effect of movable bubbly layer is implemented to improve the predictability of low mass flow. Also, mechanistic subcooled flow boiling model is used to predict the flow quality and void fraction. The performance of the present model is verified using the KAIST CHF database of water in uniformly heated tubes. It is found that the present model can give a satisfactory agreement with experimental data within less than 9% RMS error. 9 refs., 5 figs. (Author)

  3. Superconducting Pairing Correlations near a Kondo-destruction Quantum Critical Point in Cluster Impurity Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ang; Pixley, Jedediah; Si, Qimiao

    Heavy fermion metals represent a canonical system to study superconductivity driven by quantum criticality. We are particularly motivated by the properties of CeRhIn5, which shows the characteristic features of a Kondo destruction quantum critical point (QCP) in its normal state, and has one of the highest Tc's among the heavy fermion superconductors. As a first step to study this problem within a cluster-EDMFT approach, we analyze a four-site Anderson impurity model with the antiferromagnetic spin component of the cluster coupled to a sub-Ohmic bosonic bath. We find a QCP that belongs to the same universality class as the single-site Bose-Fermi Anderson model. Together with previous work on a two-site model, our result suggests that the Kondo destruction QCP is robust as cluster size increases. More importantly, we are able to calculate the d-wave pairing susceptibility, which we find to be enhanced near the QCP. Using this model as the effective cluster model of the periodic Anderson model, we are also able to study the superconducting pairing near the Kondo-destruction QCP of the lattice model; preliminary results will be presented.

  4. Tuning hydrological models for ecological modeling - improving simulations of low flows critical to stream ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Martin; Troldborg, Lars; Boegh, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The consequences of using simulated discharge from a conventional hydrological model as input in stream physical habitat modelling was investigated using output from the Danish national hydrological model and a physical habitat model of three small streams. It was found that low flow simulation...... errors could have large impact on simulation of physical habitat conditions. If these two models are to be used to assess groundwater abstraction impact on physical habitat conditions the hydrological model should be tuned to the purpose...

  5. Tuning hydrological models for ecological modeling - improving simulations of low flows critical to stream ecology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Martin; Troldborg, Lars; Boegh, Eva;

    2008-01-01

    The consequences of using simulated discharge from a conventional hydrological model as input in stream physical habitat modelling was investigated using output from the Danish national hydrological model and a physical habitat model of three small streams. It was found that low flow simulation...... errors could have large impact on simulation of physical habitat conditions. If these two models are to be used to assess groundwater abstraction impact on physical habitat conditions the hydrological model should be tuned to the purpose...

  6. Critical body residues linked to octanol-water partitioning, organism composition, and LC50 QSARs: meta-analysis and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, A Jan; Traas, Theo P; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2005-05-01

    To protect thousands of species from thousands of chemicals released in the environment, various risk assessment tools have been developed. Here, we link quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for response concentrations in water (LC50) to critical concentrations in organisms (C50) by a model for accumulation in lipid or non-lipid phases versus water Kpw. The model indicates that affinity for neutral body components such as storage fat yields steep Kpw-Kow relationships, whereas slopes for accumulation in polar phases such as proteins are gentle. This pattern is confirmed by LC50 QSARs for different modes of action, such as neutral versus polar narcotics and organochlorine versus organophosphor insecticides. LC50 QSARs were all between 0.00002 and 0.2Kow(-1). After calibrating the model with the intercepts and, for the first time also, with the slopes of the LC50 QSARs, critical concentrations in organisms C50 are calculated and compared to an independent validation data set. About 60% of the variability in lethal body burdens C50 is explained by the model. Explanations for differences between estimated and measured levels for 11 modes of action are discussed. In particular, relationships between the critical concentrations in organisms C50 and chemical (Kow) or species (lipid content) characteristics are specified and tested. The analysis combines different models proposed before and provides a substantial extension of the data set in comparison to previous work. Moreover, the concept is applied to species (e.g., plants, lean animals) and substances (e.g., specific modes of action) that were scarcely studied quantitatively so far.

  7. A comparison of critical shear force in low-voltage, all-polymer electroadhesives to a basic friction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson Chen, Abraham; Bergbreiter, Sarah

    2017-02-01

    Elastomer-based electroadhesion can be an effective method to provide tunable adhesion between robots and grasped objects or surfaces. However, there has been little work to develop models of electroadhesion and characterization of adhesive performance relative to these models. In this paper, a basic friction model is proposed to describe the critical shear force for a single electrode electroadhesive fabricated from conductive PDMS encased in parylene. The use of parylene results in thin dielectrics that require only tens of Volts to achieve shear pressures greater than 100 kPa. The experimental results gathered by characterizing voltage, dielectric thickness, adhesive area, and adhesive thickness follow the trends predicted by theory with some important deviations that are studied using high speed video capture of the soft adhesive failure.

  8. Reconceptualizing the University's Duty to Provide a Safe Learning Environment: A Criticism of the Doctrine of "In Loco Parentis" and the Restatement (Second) of Torts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Robert D.; Lake, Peter F.

    1994-01-01

    Litigation concerning the responsibility of a college or university to provide a safe environment for students is reviewed, focusing on interpretations of the "in loco parentis" doctrine. It is argued that institutions have a duty to not only provide campus security but also enforce a code of civility on campus. (MSE)

  9. A Monte Carlo method for critical systems in infinite volume: the planar Ising model

    CERN Document Server

    Herdeiro, Victor

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a Monte Carlo method for generating finite-domain marginals of critical distributions of statistical models in infinite volume. The algorithm corrects the problem of the long-range effects of boundaries associated to generating critical distributions on finite lattices. It uses the advantage of scale invariance combined with ideas of the renormalization group in order to construct a type of "holographic" boundary condition that encodes the presence of an infinite volume beyond it. We check the quality of the distribution obtained in the case of the planar Ising model by comparing various observables with their infinite-plane prediction. We accurately reproduce planar two-, three- and four-point functions of spin and energy operators. We also define a lattice stress-energy tensor, and numerically obtain the associated conformal Ward identities and the Ising central charge.

  10. Monte Carlo method for critical systems in infinite volume: The planar Ising model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdeiro, Victor; Doyon, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we propose a Monte Carlo method for generating finite-domain marginals of critical distributions of statistical models in infinite volume. The algorithm corrects the problem of the long-range effects of boundaries associated to generating critical distributions on finite lattices. It uses the advantage of scale invariance combined with ideas of the renormalization group in order to construct a type of "holographic" boundary condition that encodes the presence of an infinite volume beyond it. We check the quality of the distribution obtained in the case of the planar Ising model by comparing various observables with their infinite-plane prediction. We accurately reproduce planar two-, three-, and four-point of spin and energy operators. We also define a lattice stress-energy tensor, and numerically obtain the associated conformal Ward identities and the Ising central charge.

  11. The critical properties of the agent-based model with environmental-economic interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuscsik, Z.; Horváth, D.

    2008-05-01

    The steady-state and nonequilibrium properties of the model of environmental-economic interactions are studied. The interacting heterogeneous agents are simulated on the platform of the emission dynamics of cellular automaton. The diffusive emissions are produced by the factory agents, and the local pollution is monitored by the randomly walking (mobile) sensors. When the threshold concentration is exceeded, a feedback signal is transmitted from the sensor to the nearest factory that affects its actual production rate. The model predicts the discontinuous phase transition between safe and catastrophic ecology. Right at the critical line, the broad-scale power-law distributions of emission rates have been identified. The power-law fluctuations are triggered by the screening effect of factories and by the time delay between the environment contamination and its detection. The system shows the typical signs of the self-organized critical systems, such as power-law distributions and scaling laws.

  12. Analysis of Highly Wind Power Integrated Power System model performance during Critical Weather conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basit, Abdul; Hansen, Anca Daniela; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar

    2014-01-01

    . For this purpose, the power system model has been developed that represents the relevant dynamic features of power plants and compensates for power imbalances caused by the forecasting error during critical weather conditions. The regulating power plan, as an input time series for the developed power system model......Secure power system operation of a highly wind power integrated power system is always at risk during critical weather conditions, e.g. in extreme high winds. The risk is even higher when 50% of the total electricity consumption has to be supplied by wind power, as the case for the future Danish...... power system in 2020. This paper analyses and compares the performance of the future Danish power system during extreme wind speeds, where wind power plants are either controlled through a traditional High Wind Shut Down storm controller or a new High Wind Extended Production storm controller...

  13. Elasto-Plasticity Critical Corrosive Ratio Model for RC Structure Corrosive Expanding Crack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yueshun; LU Yiyan; LIU Li

    2007-01-01

    The parameter of filling expanding ratio n, plasticity factor k1 and deformation parameter k2 is raised, and then the elasto-plasticity critical corrosive ratio model for RC structure corrosive expanding crack based on elasto-plasticity theory is constructed in this paper. The influences of parameters such as filling expansion ratio n, plasticity factor k1, deformation parameter k2, Poisson ratio of concrete v, diameter of reinforced bar d and protective layer thickness c on the critical corrosive ratio are researched by theory analysis and experiments. The experimental results validate the accuracy of the model. According to the experimental study, the least squares solution is calculated as n=1.8,k1 =0.61,k2 =0.5.

  14. A Market Model for Evaluating Technologies That Impact Critical-Material Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Ananth V.; Vedantam, Aditya

    2016-07-01

    A recent Critical Materials Strategy report highlighted the supply chain risk associated with neodymium and dysprosium, which are used in the manufacturing of neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets (PM). In response, the Critical Materials Institute is developing innovative strategies to increase and diversify primary production, develop substitutes, reduce material intensity and recycle critical materials. Our goal in this paper is to propose an economic model to quantify the impact of one of these strategies, material intensity reduction. Technologies that reduce material intensity impact the economics of magnet manufacturing in multiple ways because of: (1) the lower quantity of critical material required per unit PM, (2) more efficient use of limited supply, and (3) the potential impact on manufacturing cost. However, the net benefit of these technologies to a magnet manufacturer is an outcome of an internal production decision subject to market demand characteristics, availability and resource constraints. Our contribution in this paper shows how a manufacturer's production economics moves from a region of being supply-constrained, to a region enabling the market optimal production quantity, to a region being constrained by resources other than critical materials, as the critical material intensity changes. Key insights for engineers and material scientists are: (1) material intensity reduction can have a significant market impact, (2) benefits to manufacturers are non-linear in the material intensity reduction, (3) there exists a threshold value for material intensity reduction that can be calculated for any target PM application, and (4) there is value for new intellectual property (IP) when existing manufacturing technology is IP-protected.

  15. Distribution of the largest event in the critical epidemic-type aftershock-sequence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vere-Jones, David; Zhuang, Jiancang

    2008-10-01

    This Brief Report corrects and extends the results of Zhuang and Ogata [Phys. Rev. E 73, 046134 (2006)] on the asymptotic behavior of the largest event in the epidemic-type aftershock-sequence model for earthquake occurrence. We show that, in the special case that the underlying branching process is critical, there exists a previously unnoticed mode of behavior, which occurs when the expected family size grows relatively slowly.

  16. Critical slowing down of cluster algorithms for Ising models coupled to 2-d gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowick, Mark; Falcioni, Marco; Harris, Geoffrey; Marinari, Enzo

    1994-02-01

    We simulate single and multiple Ising models coupled to 2-d gravity using both the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff algorithms to update the spins. We study the integrated autocorrelation time and find that there is considerable critical slowing down, particularly in the magnetization. We argue that this is primarily due to the local nature of the dynamical triangulation algorithm and to the generation of a distribution of baby universes which inhibits cluster growth.

  17. Critical Slowing Down of Cluster Algorithms for Ising Models Coupled to 2-d Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bowick, M; Harris, G; Marinari, E

    1994-01-01

    We simulate single and multiple Ising models coupled to 2-d gravity using both the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff algorithms to update the spins. We study the integrated autocorrelation time and find that there is considerable critical slowing down, particularly in the magnetization. We argue that this is primarily due to the local nature of the dynamical triangulation algorithm and to the generation of a distribution of baby universes which inhibits cluster growth.

  18. Distribution of the largest event in the critical epidemic-type aftershock-sequence model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vere-Jones, David; Zhuang, Jiancang

    2008-10-01

    This Brief Report corrects and extends the results of Zhuang and Ogata [Phys. Rev. E 73, 046134 (2006)] on the asymptotic behavior of the largest event in the epidemic-type aftershock-sequence model for earthquake occurrence. We show that, in the special case that the underlying branching process is critical, there exists a previously unnoticed mode of behavior, which occurs when the expected family size grows relatively slowly.

  19. Influence of polydispersity on the critical parameters of an effective-potential model for asymmetric hard-sphere mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largo, Julio; Wilding, Nigel B

    2006-03-01

    We report a Monte Carlo simulation study of the properties of highly asymmetric binary hard-sphere mixtures. This system is treated within an effective fluid approximation in which the large particles interact through a depletion potential [R. Roth, Phys. Rev. E 62 5360 (2000)] designed to capture the effects of a virtual sea of small particles. We generalize this depletion potential to include the effects of explicit size dispersity in the large particles and consider the case in which the particle diameters are distributed according to a Schulz form having a degree of polydispersity 14%. The resulting alteration (with respect to the monodisperse limit) of the metastable fluid-fluid critical point parameters is determined for two values of the ratio of the diameters of the small and large particles: q(triple bond)sigma(s)/(-)sigma(b)=0.1 and q=0.05. We find that the inclusion of polydispersity moves the critical point to lower reservoir volume fractions of the small particles and high volume fractions of the large ones. The estimated critical point parameters are found to be in good agreement with those predicted by a generalized corresponding states argument which provides a link to the known critical adhesion parameter of the adhesive hard-sphere model. Finite-size scaling estimates of the cluster percolation line in the one phase fluid region indicate that inclusion of polydispersity moves the critical point deeper into the percolating regime. This suggests that phase separation is more likely to be preempted by dynamical arrest in polydisperse systems.

  20. Effect of caffeine intake on critical power model parameters determined on a cycle ergometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinicius Machado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of caffeine intake on critical power model parameters determined on a cycle ergometer. Eight male subjects participated in this study. A double-blind protocol consisting of the intake of pure caffeine (6 mg/kg or placebo (maltodextrin 60 min before testing was used. Subjects were submitted to four constant-load tests on a cycle ergometer. These tests were conducted randomly in the caffeine and placebo groups [checar] at intensities of 80, 90, 100 and 110% maximum power at a rate of 70 rpm until exhaustion to determine the critical power. As a criterion for stopping the test was adopted any rate fall without recovery by more than five seconds. The critical power and anaerobic work capacity were obtained by nonlinear regression and fitting of the curve to a hyperbolic power-time model. The Shapiro-Wilk test and paired Student t-test were used for statistical analysis. No significant differences in critical power were observed between the caffeine and placebo groups (192.9 ± 31.3 vs 197.7 ± 29.4 W, respectively. The anaerobic work capacity was significantly higher in the caffeine group (20.1 ± 5.2 vs 16.3 ± 4.2 W, p< 0.01. A high association (r2 was observed between the caffeine and placebo conditions (0.98 ± 0.02 and 0.99 ± 0.0, respectively. We conclude that caffeine intake did not improve critical power performance but increased anaerobic work capacity by influencing performance at loads of higher intensity and shorter duration.