WorldWideScience

Sample records for models include site-specific

  1. Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Steve P.

    2005-02-24

    This interim report documents the collection of site-specific geologic and geophysical data characterizing the Waste Treatment Plant site and the modeling of the site-specific structure response to earthquake ground motions.

  2. Development of a site specific environmental radiation assessment model for Youngkwang NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Yang Geun; Song, Myung Jae; Shon, Soon Hwan; Shin, Sang Woon; Lee, Gap Bock; Yang, Kyung Hwa [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Pyung; Kim, Jeong Kyu; Shin, Dae Yoon; Kim, Hyun Ku; Lee, Kyung Jin [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    During the normal operation of nuclear power plants, a very small amount of radionuclide materials is released to the environment. The radionuclide releases to the environment may give rise to some additional radiation dose through a number of pathways. With a few exception, radionuclide transports are highly dependent on the environmental conditions such as topological features, atmospheric and oceanic conditions and socio-environmental characteristics, etc. The dose calculation in Korea are presently being performed using the models in US NRC Reg. Guide. However, these models which were originally released by the US NRC in 1977 are inadequate to deal with environmental movement of radionuclides in consideration of complex terrain, tidal condition of the Yellow Sea, and Youngkwang site specific conditions. KEPRI has developed the models to consider the site specific characteristics around Youngkwang NPPs, to give the realistic dose assessment, and to improve assurance and reliability in public dose calculation. (author). 41 figs., 70 refs.

  3. On the validity of evolutionary models with site-specific parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Scheffler

    Full Text Available Evolutionary models that make use of site-specific parameters have recently been criticized on the grounds that parameter estimates obtained under such models can be unreliable and lack theoretical guarantees of convergence. We present a simulation study providing empirical evidence that a simple version of the models in question does exhibit sensible convergence behavior and that additional taxa, despite not being independent of each other, lead to improved parameter estimates. Although it would be desirable to have theoretical guarantees of this, we argue that such guarantees would not be sufficient to justify the use of these models in practice. Instead, we emphasize the importance of taking the variance of parameter estimates into account rather than blindly trusting point estimates - this is standardly done by using the models to construct statistical hypothesis tests, which are then validated empirically via simulation studies.

  4. Testing the atmospheric dispersion model of CSA N288.1 with site-specific data

    CERN Document Server

    Chouhan, S L

    2001-01-01

    The atmospheric dispersion component of CSA Standard N288. 1, which provides guidelines for calculating derived release limits, has been tested. Long-term average concentrations of tritium in air were predicted using site-specific release rates and meteorological data and compared with measured concentrations at 43 monitoring sites at all CANDU stations in Canada. The predictions correlate well with the observations but were found to be conservative, overestimating by about 50% on average. The model overpredicted 84% of the time, with the highest prediction lying a factor of 5.5 above the corresponding observation. The model underpredicted the remaining 16% of the time, with the lowest prediction about one-half of the corresponding measurement. Possible explanations for this bias are discussed but no single reason appears capable of accounting for the discrepancy. Rather, the tendency to overprediction seems to result from the cumulative effects of a number of small conservatisms in the model. The model predi...

  5. Comparing measured and modelled soil carbon: which site-specific variables are linked to high stability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Andy; Schipanski, Meagan; Ma, Liwang; Ahuja, Lajpat; McNamara, Niall; Smith, Pete; Davies, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Changes in soil carbon (C) stocks have been studied in depth over the last two decades, as net greenhouse gas (GHG) sinks are highlighted to be a partial solution to the causes of climate change. However, the stability of this soil C is often overlooked when measuring these changes. Ultimately a net sequestration in soils is far less beneficial if labile C is replacing more stable forms. To date there is no accepted framework for measuring soil C stability, and as a result there is considerable uncertainty associated with the simulated impacts of land management and land use change when using process-based systems models. However, a recent effort to equate measurable soil C fractions to model pools has generated data that help to assess the impacts of land management, and can ultimately help to reduce the uncertainty of model predictions. Our research compiles this existing fractionation data along with site metadata to create a simplistic statistical model able to quantify the relative importance of different site-specific conditions. Data was mined from 23 published studies and combined with original data to generate a dataset of 100+ land use change sites across Europe. For sites to be included they required soil C fractions isolated using the Zimmermann et al. (2007) method and specific site metadata (mean annual precipitation, MAP; mean annual temperature, MAT; soil pH; land use; altitude). Of the sites, 75% were used to develop a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) to create coefficients where site parameters can be used to predict influence on the measured soil fraction C stocks. The remaining 25% of sites were used to evaluate uncertainty and validate this empirical model. Further, four of the aforementioned sites were used to simulate soil C dynamics using the RothC, DayCent and RZWQM2 models. A sensitivity analysis (4096 model runs for each variable applying Latin hypercube random sampling techniques) was then used to observe whether these models place

  6. Biodiversity in models of cyclic dominance is preserved by heterogeneity in site-specific invasion rates

    CERN Document Server

    Szolnoki, Attila

    2016-01-01

    Global, population-wide oscillations in models of cyclic dominance may result in the collapse of biodiversity due to the accidental extinction of one species in the loop. Previous research has shown that such oscillations can emerge if the interaction network has small-world properties, and more generally, because of long-range interactions among individuals or because of mobility. But although these features are all common in nature, global oscillations are rarely observed in actual biological systems. This begets the question what is the missing ingredient that would prevent local oscillations to synchronize across the population to form global oscillations. Here we show that, although heterogeneous species-specific invasion rates fail to have a noticeable impact on species coexistence, randomness in site-specific invasion rates successfully hinders the emergence of global oscillations and thus preserves biodiversity. Our model takes into account that the environment is often not uniform but rather spatiall...

  7. Oncologic doses of zoledronic acid induce site specific suppression of bone modelling in rice rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposto, C R; Oz, U; Callard, J S; Allen, M J; Khurana, H; Atri, A D'; Mo, X; Fernandez, S A; Tatakis, D N; Edmonds, K; Westgate, P M; Huja, S S

    2017-06-01

    To examine the effect of zoledronic acid (ZOL) on cortical bone modelling and healing of extraction sockets in the jaw bones of a rodent model. We hypothesized ZOL suppresses both the bone formation in the modelling mode in the jaw bones and alters the extraction site healing. Rice rats were administered saline solution and two dose regimens of ZOL: 0.1 mg/kg, twice a week, for 4 weeks (n=17, saline=8 & ZOL=9) and a higher dose of 0.4 mg/kg, weekly, for 9 weeks (n=30, saline=15 & ZOL=15). Two pairs of fluorochrome bone labels were administered. Extraction of maxillary teeth was performed in maxilla. Mineral apposition rate, mineralizing surface and bone formation rate (BFR) were quantified on periodontal (PDL), alveolar and basal bone surfaces, and in the trabecular bone of proximal tibia. Bone volume (BV) was evaluated at extraction sockets. Multivariate Gaussian models were used to account for repeated measurements, and analyzes were conducted in SAS V9.3. ZOL suppressed bone modelling (BFR/BS) at the PDL surfaces in the mandible (Pmodelling mode in the jaws demonstrates the site specific effects of ZOL in rice rats. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Biodiversity in models of cyclic dominance is preserved by heterogeneity in site-specific invasion rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2016-12-01

    Global, population-wide oscillations in models of cyclic dominance may result in the collapse of biodiversity due to the accidental extinction of one species in the loop. Previous research has shown that such oscillations can emerge if the interaction network has small-world properties, and more generally, because of long-range interactions among individuals or because of mobility. But although these features are all common in nature, global oscillations are rarely observed in actual biological systems. This begets the question what is the missing ingredient that would prevent local oscillations to synchronize across the population to form global oscillations. Here we show that, although heterogeneous species-specific invasion rates fail to have a noticeable impact on species coexistence, randomness in site-specific invasion rates successfully hinders the emergence of global oscillations and thus preserves biodiversity. Our model takes into account that the environment is often not uniform but rather spatially heterogeneous, which may influence the success of microscopic dynamics locally. This prevents the synchronization of locally emerging oscillations, and ultimately results in a phenomenon where one type of randomness is used to mitigate the adverse effects of other types of randomness in the system.

  9. Probing Site-Specific Structural Information of Peptides at Model Membrane Interface In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bei; Panahi, Afra; Ho, Jia-Jung; Laaser, Jennifer E; Brooks, Charles L; Zanni, Martin T; Chen, Zhan

    2015-08-19

    Isotope labeling is a powerful technique to probe detailed structures of biological molecules with a variety of analytical methods such as NMR and vibrational spectroscopies. It is important to obtain molecular structural information on biological molecules at interfaces such as cell membranes, but it is challenging to use the isotope labeling method to study interfacial biomolecules. Here, by individually (13)C═(16)O labeling ten residues of a peptide, Ovispirin-1, we have demonstrated for the first time that a site-specific environment of membrane associated peptide can be probed by the submonolayer surface sensitive sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy in situ. With the peptide associated with a single lipid bilayer, the sinusoidal trend of the SFG line width and peak-center frequency suggests that the peptide is located at the interface beneath the lipid headgroup region. The constructive interferences between the isotope labeled peaks and the main peptide amide I peak contributed by the unlabeled components were used to determine the membrane orientation of the peptide. From the SFG spectral peak-center frequency, line width, and polarization dependence of the isotope labeled units, we deduced structural information on individual units of the peptide associated with a model cell membrane. We also performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand peptide-membrane interactions. The physical pictures described by simulation agree well with the SFG experimental result. This research demonstrates the feasibility and power of using isotope labeling SFG to probe molecular structures of interfacial biological molecules in situ in real time.

  10. Skeletal site-specific response to ovariectomy in a rat model: change in bone density and microarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xi Ling; Li, Chun Lei; Lu, Weijia William; Cai, Wei Xin; Zheng, Li Wu

    2015-04-01

    Ovariectomized (OVX) rat model has been widely used in osteoporosis-related studies. However, the discrepancies in age and skeletal sites being investigated make it difficult to compare the results from different studies. The purpose of this study was to provide information of systemic skeletal site-specific changes in a stable OVX rat model. Thirty-three 6-month Spraque-Dawley female rats were used. Fifteen rats underwent ovariectomy, and fifteen received sham surgery. Three animals without any surgery were sacrificed at week 0 to serve as baseline. Three animals in the OVX and sham group, respectively, were euthanized at week 2, 4, 12, 24 and 36 post-surgery. Ten bone sites, including parietal bone, interparietal bone, maxilla, mandible, humerus, ulna, femur, tibia, lumber vertebra, and ilium, were subjected to micro-CT. Overall, long bones, lumber vertebra, and ilium showed similar trend of bone loss post-OVX, with tibia and femur suffered the most bone loss and spine the least (decreased by 75.0%, 70.4% and 36.6% in bone mineral density BMD at week 36 from base line, respectively). Upon OVX, jaw bones and cranial bones only showed a minor reduction in BMD (decreased by 1~3% from baseline) at week 36. Significant deterioration of trabecular structure was detected in long bones, lumber vertebra, and ilium post-OVX, while jaw bones remained relatively stable. This study for the first time assessed the systemic site-specific bone loss and microarchitecture changes in OVX rat model. It provided valuable information for selecting bone site and observation time in osteoporosis-related study. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Development of a regression model to predict copper toxicity to Daphnia magna and site-specific copper criteria across multiple surface-water drainages in an arid landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Barry A; Meyer, Joseph S

    2014-08-01

    The water effect ratio (WER) procedure developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency is commonly used to derive site-specific criteria for point-source metal discharges into perennial waters. However, experience is limited with this method in the ephemeral and intermittent systems typical of arid climates. The present study presents a regression model to develop WER-based site-specific criteria for a network of ephemeral and intermittent streams influenced by nonpoint sources of Cu in the southwestern United States. Acute (48-h) Cu toxicity tests were performed concurrently with Daphnia magna in site water samples and hardness-matched laboratory waters. Median effect concentrations (EC50s) for Cu in site water samples (n=17) varied by more than 12-fold, and the range of calculated WER values was similar. Statistically significant (α=0.05) univariate predictors of site-specific Cu toxicity included (in sequence of decreasing significance) dissolved organic carbon (DOC), hardness/alkalinity ratio, alkalinity, K, and total dissolved solids. A multiple-regression model developed from a combination of DOC and alkalinity explained 85% of the toxicity variability in site water samples, providing a strong predictive tool that can be used in the WER framework when site-specific criteria values are derived. The biotic ligand model (BLM) underpredicted toxicity in site waters by more than 2-fold. Adjustments to the default BLM parameters improved the model's performance but did not provide a better predictive tool compared with the regression model developed from DOC and alkalinity.

  12. A class frequency mixture model that adjusts for site-specific amino acid frequencies and improves inference of protein phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Karen

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widely used substitution models for proteins, such as the Jones-Taylor-Thornton (JTT or Whelan and Goldman (WAG models, are based on empirical amino acid interchange matrices estimated from databases of protein alignments that incorporate the average amino acid frequencies of the data set under examination (e.g JTT + F. Variation in the evolutionary process between sites is typically modelled by a rates-across-sites distribution such as the gamma (Γ distribution. However, sites in proteins also vary in the kinds of amino acid interchanges that are favoured, a feature that is ignored by standard empirical substitution matrices. Here we examine the degree to which the pattern of evolution at sites differs from that expected based on empirical amino acid substitution models and evaluate the impact of these deviations on phylogenetic estimation. Results We analyzed 21 large protein alignments with two statistical tests designed to detect deviation of site-specific amino acid distributions from data simulated under the standard empirical substitution model: JTT+ F + Γ. We found that the number of states at a given site is, on average, smaller and the frequencies of these states are less uniform than expected based on a JTT + F + Γ substitution model. With a four-taxon example, we show that phylogenetic estimation under the JTT + F + Γ model is seriously biased by a long-branch attraction artefact if the data are simulated under a model utilizing the observed site-specific amino acid frequencies from an alignment. Principal components analyses indicate the existence of at least four major site-specific frequency classes in these 21 protein alignments. Using a mixture model with these four separate classes of site-specific state frequencies plus a fifth class of global frequencies (the JTT + cF + Γ model, significant improvements in model fit for real data sets can be achieved. This simple mixture model also reduces the long

  13. Bioavailability of particulate metal to zebra mussels: Biodynamic modelling shows that assimilation efficiencies are site-specific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgeault, Adeline, E-mail: bourgeault@ensil.unilim.fr [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche Hydrosystemes et Bioprocedes, 1 rue Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, 92761 Antony (France); FIRE, FR-3020, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Gourlay-France, Catherine, E-mail: catherine.gourlay@cemagref.fr [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche Hydrosystemes et Bioprocedes, 1 rue Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, 92761 Antony (France); FIRE, FR-3020, 4 place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Priadi, Cindy, E-mail: cindy.priadi@eng.ui.ac.id [LSCE/IPSL CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ayrault, Sophie, E-mail: Sophie.Ayrault@lsce.ipsl.fr [LSCE/IPSL CEA-CNRS-UVSQ, Avenue de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Tusseau-Vuillemin, Marie-Helene, E-mail: Marie-helene.tusseau@ifremer.fr [IFREMER Technopolis 40, 155 rue Jean-Jacques Rousseau, 92138 Issy-Les-Moulineaux (France)

    2011-12-15

    This study investigates the ability of the biodynamic model to predict the trophic bioaccumulation of cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), nickel (Ni) and zinc (Zn) in a freshwater bivalve. Zebra mussels were transplanted to three sites along the Seine River (France) and collected monthly for 11 months. Measurements of the metal body burdens in mussels were compared with the predictions from the biodynamic model. The exchangeable fraction of metal particles did not account for the bioavailability of particulate metals, since it did not capture the differences between sites. The assimilation efficiency (AE) parameter is necessary to take into account biotic factors influencing particulate metal bioavailability. The biodynamic model, applied with AEs from the literature, overestimated the measured concentrations in zebra mussels, the extent of overestimation being site-specific. Therefore, an original methodology was proposed for in situ AE measurements for each site and metal. - Highlights: > Exchangeable fraction of metal particles did not account for the bioavailability of particulate metals. > Need for site-specific biodynamic parameters. > Field-determined AE provide a good fit between the biodynamic model predictions and bioaccumulation measurements. - The interpretation of metal bioaccumulation in transplanted zebra mussels with biodynamic modelling highlights the need for site-specific assimilation efficiencies of particulate metals.

  14. Measurement and Modeling of Site-specific Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide at Mace Head, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. J.; Saikawa, E.; Prinn, R. G.; Ono, S.

    2015-12-01

    Global mixing ratios of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas, have increased nearly linearly from the beginning of the modern industrial period to today, with the current global average in excess of 325 ppb. This increase can be largely attributed to anthropogenic activity above the level of N2O emissions from natural biotic sources. The effect of N2O on Earth's climate is twofold: in the troposphere, N2O is radiatively active and chemically inert, while it serves as a reactive source of ozone-destroying nitrogen oxides in the stratosphere. The marked altitudinal divide in its reactivity means that all stages in the N2O life cycle—emission, transport, and destruction—must be examined to understand the overall effect of N2O on Earth's climate. However, the understanding of the total impact of N2O is incomplete, as there remain significant uncertainties in the global budget of this gas. Due to unique isotopic substitutions (15N and 18O) made by different N2O sources and stratospheric chemical reactions, the measurement of N2O isotopic ratios in ambient air can help identify the distribution and magnitude of distinct source types. We present the first year of site-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition data from the MIT Stheno-tunable infrared direct absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) instrument at Mace Head, Ireland. Aided by the Stheno preconcentration system, Stheno-TILDAS can achieve measurement precisions of 0.10‰ or greater for all isotopic ratios (δ15N and δ18O) in ambient N2O. We further compare these data to the results from Model for Ozone and Related Tracers version 4 (MOZART-4) simulations, including N2O isotopic fractionation processes and MERRA/GEOS-5 reanalysis meteorological fields. These results will form the basis of future Bayesian inverse modeling simulations that will constrain global N2O source, circulation, and sink dynamics better.

  15. Deriving site-specific soil clean-up values for metals and metalloids: rationale for including protection of soil microbial processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Roman G; Siciliano, Steven D; Römbke, Jörg; Oorts, Koen

    2014-07-01

    Although it is widely recognized that microorganisms are essential for sustaining soil fertility, structure, nutrient cycling, groundwater purification, and other soil functions, soil microbial toxicity data were excluded from the derivation of Ecological Soil Screening Levels (Eco-SSL) in the United States. Among the reasons for such exclusion were claims that microbial toxicity tests were too difficult to interpret because of the high variability of microbial responses, uncertainty regarding the relevance of the various endpoints, and functional redundancy. Since the release of the first draft of the Eco-SSL Guidance document by the US Environmental Protection Agency in 2003, soil microbial toxicity testing and its use in ecological risk assessments have substantially improved. A wide range of standardized and nonstandardized methods became available for testing chemical toxicity to microbial functions in soil. Regulatory frameworks in the European Union and Australia have successfully incorporated microbial toxicity data into the derivation of soil threshold concentrations for ecological risk assessments. This article provides the 3-part rationale for including soil microbial processes in the development of soil clean-up values (SCVs): 1) presenting a brief overview of relevant test methods for assessing microbial functions in soil, 2) examining data sets for Cu, Ni, Zn, and Mo that incorporated soil microbial toxicity data into regulatory frameworks, and 3) offering recommendations on how to integrate the best available science into the method development for deriving site-specific SCVs that account for bioavailability of metals and metalloids in soil. Although the primary focus of this article is on the development of the approach for deriving SCVs for metals and metalloids in the United States, the recommendations provided in this article may also be applicable in other jurisdictions that aim at developing ecological soil threshold values for protection of

  16. GIS Modelling for Site-Specific Nitrogen Fertilization towards Soil Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonis Papadopoulos

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Farmers need to make decisions that in most cases incorporate the concept of prediction and can hardly be revoked. One such decision is the application of fertilizing inputs. During past crop management and decision-making on fertilizing practices, many significant errors have been recorded, which have led and continue to lead to reduced production and environmental burden. The methodology followed in this paper involves the use of GIS, fuzzy logic and expert knowledge, in order to model physical processes associated with nitrogen balance in cultivated ecosystems and to evaluate the capabilities of or limitations on the use of certain fertilizers, based on spatial criteria. An original spatial decision support system was designed, developed and applied in a given study area. The system is composed of two modules (“fertilizing rate” and “fertilizing type”, making use of soil, climate and cultivation practices’ data, as recorded in the area of interest in quantitative or categorical form. The results of the application spatially classify the involved area according to its demand for nitrogen on the basis of the characteristics of each sub-region. The “fertilizing rate” module suggests reduced fertilizing doses of nitrogenous fertilizers compared to those already applied in the area. The system further divides the area into zones where specific types of fertilizers should be applied, giving a certain prescription for the method and time of application.

  17. Environmental transportation of tritium and estimation of site-specific model parameters for Kaiga site, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reji, T K; Ravi, P M; Ajith, T L; Dileep, B N; Hegde, A G; Sarkar, P K

    2012-04-01

    Tritium content in air moisture, soil water, rain water and plant water samples collected around the Kaiga site, India was estimated and the scavenging ratio, wet deposition velocity and ratio of specific activities of tritium between soil water and air moisture were calculated and the results are interpreted. Scavenging ratio was found to vary from 0.06 to 1.04 with a mean of 0.46. The wet deposition velocity of tritium observed in the present study was in the range of 3.3E-03 to 1.1E-02 m s(-1) with a mean of 6.6E-03 m s(-1). The ratio of specific activity of tritium in soil moisture to that in air moisture ranged from 0.17 to 0.95 with a mean of 0.49. The specific activity of tritium in plant water in this study varied from 73 to 310 Bq l(-1). The present study is very useful for understanding the process and modelling of transfer of tritium through air/soil/plant system at the Kaiga site.

  18. Site Specific Weed Control Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend; Søgaard, Henning Tangen; Kudsk, Per;

    2009-01-01

    describe the basic parts of site specific weed control technologies, comprising of weed sensing systems, weed management models and precision weed control implements. A review of state-of-the-art technologies shows that several weed sensing systems and precision implements have been developed over the last...... of knowledge about the economic and environmental potential for increasing the resolution of weed control. The integration of site-specific information on weed distribution, weed species composition and density, and the effect on crop yield, is decisive for successful site-specific weed management.   Keywords......Site-specific weed control technologies are defined as machinery or equipment embedded with technologies that detect weeds growing in a crop and, taking into account predefined factors such as economics, takes action to maximise the chances of successfully controlling them. In the article, we...

  19. Site-Specific Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik; Hemmersam, Peter

    2015-01-01

    , but also places for emerging lifestyles and cultural processes. In this transformation process, harbours provide arenas for a new urban dynamics, involving multiple sectors and functions in society, as opposed to the monoculturalism prevailing in the ages of the industrial city. To us, the critical...... question is how innovation may contribute to urban life and site-specific qualities....

  20. Site-Specific Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik; Hemmersam, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Currently, cities across the Northern European region are actively redeveloping their former industrial harbours. Indeed, harbours areas are essential in the long-term transition from industrial to information and experience societies; harbours are becoming sites for new businesses and residences...... question is how innovation may contribute to urban life and site-specific qualities....

  1. Site-specific Microzonation Study in Delhi Metropolitan City by 2-D Modelling of SH and P-SV Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvez, Imtiyaz A.; Vaccari, F.; Panza, G. F.

    Delhi - the capital of India lies on a severe earthquake hazard threat not only from local earthquakes but also from Himalayan events just 200-250 km apart. The seismic ground motion in a part of Delhi City is computed with a hybrid technique based on the modal summation and the finite-difference scheme for site-specific strong ground motion modelling. Complete realistic SH and #E5/E5#-SV wave seismograms are computed along two geological cross sections, (1) north-south, from Inter State Bus Terminal (ISBT) to Sewanagar and (2) east-west, from Tilak Bridge to Punjabi Bagh. Two real earthquake sources of July 15, 1720 (MMI=IX, M=7.4) and August 27, 1960 (M=6.0) have been used in modelling. The response spectra ratio (RSR), i.e. the response spectra computed from the signals synthesized along the laterally varying section and normalized by the response spectra computed from the corresponding signals, synthesized for the bedrock reference regional model, have been determined. As expected, the sedimentary cover causes an increase of the signal amplitude, particularly in the radial and transverse components. To further check the site-effects, we reversed the source location to the other side of the cross section and recomputed the site amplifications. There are only a few sites where a large amplification is invariant with respect to the two source locations considered. The RSR ranges between 5 to 10 in the frequency range from 2.8 to 3.7 Hz for the radial and transverse components of motion along the NS cross section. Along the EW cross section RSR varies between 3.5 to 7.5 in the frequency range from 3.5 to 4.1 Hz. The amplification of the vertical component is considerable at high frequency (>4 Hz.) whereas it is negligible in lower frequency range.

  2. Calculating soil gas fluxes from gas concentration profiles: can we use standard DS models or should we use site-specific DS models?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Sinikka; Jochheim, Hubert; Wirth, Stephan; Maier, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The apparent gas diffusion coefficient in soil (DS) is an important parameter describing soil aeration. It also links the profiles of soil gas concentration and soil gas flux using Fick's law. Soil gas diffusivity depends mainly on the structure of the pore system and the soil moisture status. There are several standard DS-models available that can easily be used for calculating DS. Another, more laborious option is to calibrate site specific DS models on soil core samples from the respective profile. We tested 4 standard DS models and a site-specific model and compared the resulting soil gas fluxes in two forest soils. Differences between the models were substantial. Another very important effect, however, is that standard DS models are usually derived from a single soil moisture measurement (device), that can result in an substantial offset in soil moisture estimation. The mean soil moisture content at a depth can be addressed more accurately by taking several soil cores. As a consequence, using standard DS models in combination with a single soil moisture measurement is less reliable than using site-specific models based on several soil samples.

  3. Intercomparison of atmospheric reanalysis data in the Arctic region: To derive site-specific forcing data for terrestrial models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, J.; Saito, K.; Machiya, H.; Yabuki, H.; Ikawa, H.; Ohta, T.; Iijima, Y.; Kotani, A.; Suzuki, R.; Miyazaki, S.; Sato, A.; Hajima, T.; Sueyoshi, T.

    2015-12-01

    An intercomparison project for the Arctic terrestrial (physical and ecosystem) models, GTMIP, is conducted, targeting at improvements in the existing terrestrial schemes, as an activity of the Terrestrial Ecosystem research group in the Arctic of Japan GRENE Arctic Climate Change Research Project (GRENE-TEA). For site simulations for four GRENE-TEA sites (i.e., Fairbanks/AK, Kevo/Finland, Tiksi and Yakutsk/Siberia), we needed to prepare continuous, site-fit forcing data ready to drive the models. Due to scarcity of site observations in the region, however, it was difficult to make such data directly from the observations. Therefore, we decided to create a backbone dataset (Level 0 or Lv0) first by utilizing the reanalysis data to derive the site-specific data (Level 1 or Lv1). For selection of the best dataset for our purpose, we compared four atmospheric reanalysis datasets, i.e., ERA Interim, JRA-55, NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis 1, and NCEP-DOE Reanalysis 2, in terms of the climatic reproducibility (w.r.t. temperature at 2 m and precipitation) in the region north of 60°N. CRU for temperature and GPCP for precipitation were also used for monthly-mean ground-level climate. As we will show ERA-Interim showed the smallest bias for both the parameters in terms of RMSE. Especially, air temperature in the cold period was reproduced better in ERA-Interim than is in JRA-55 or other reanalysis products. Therefore, we created Lv0 from ERA-Interim. Comparison between the site observations and Lv0 showed good agreement except for wind speed at all sites and air temperature at Tiksi, a coastal site in the eastern Siberia. Air temperature of ERA-Interim showed significantly continental characteristics while the site observation more coastal. The 34-year-long, hourly, site-fit continuous data (Lv1) for each of the GRENE-TEA sites was then created from the Lv0 values at the grid point closest to the site, by merging with the observations.

  4. Aespoe modelling task force - experiences of the site specific flow and transport modelling (in detailed and site scale)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustafson, Gunnar [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden); Stroem, A.; Wikberg, P. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. , Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    The Aespoe Task Force on modelling of groundwater flow and transport of solutes was initiated in 1992. The Task Force shall be a forum for the organisations supporting the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory Project to interact in the area of conceptual and numerical modelling of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured rock. Much emphasis is put on building of confidence in the approaches and methods in use for modelling of groundwater flow and nuclide migration in order to demonstrate their use for performance and safety assessment. The modelling work within the Task Force is linked to the experiments performed at the Aespoe Laboratory. As the first Modelling Task, a large scale pumping and tracer experiment called LPT2 was chosen. This was the final part of the characterisation work for the Aespoe site before the construction of the laboratory in 1990. The construction of the Aespoe HRL access tunnel caused an even larger hydraulic disturbance on a much larger scale than that caused by the LPT2 pumping test. This was regarded as an interesting test case for the conceptual and numerical models of the Aespoe site developed during Task No 1, and was chosen as the third Modelling Task. The aim of Task 3 can be seen from two different perspectives. The Aespoe HRL project saw it as a test of their ability to define a conceptual and structural model of the site that can be utilised by independent modelling groups and be transformed to a predictive groundwater flow model. The modelling groups saw it as a means of understanding groundwater flow in a large fractured rock volume and of testing their computational tools. A general conclusion is that Task 3 has served these purposes well. Non-sorbing tracers tests, made as a part of the TRUE-experiments were chosen as the next predictive modelling task. A preliminary comparison between model predictions made by the Aespoe Task Force and the experimental results, shows that most modelling teams predicted breakthrough from

  5. WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the sediment transport modeling task

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, V.L.; Baron, L.A.

    1994-05-01

    This site-specific Work Plan/Health and Safety Checklist (WP/HSC) is a supplement to the general health and safety plan (HASP) for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 remedial investigation and site investigation (WAG 2 RI&SI) activities [Health and Safety Plan for the Remedial Investigation and Site Investigation of Waste Area Grouping 2 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (ORNL/ER-169)] and provides specific details and requirements for the WAG 2 RI&SI Sediment Transport Modeling Task. This WP/HSC identifies specific site operations, site hazards, and any recommendations by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) health and safety organizations [i.e., Industrial Hygiene (IH), Health Physics (HP), and/or Industrial Safety] that would contribute to the safe completion of the WAG 2 RI&SI. Together, the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI&SI (ORNL/ER-169) and the completed site-specific WP/HSC meet the health and safety planning requirements specified by 29 CFR 1910.120 and the ORNL Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) Program Manual. In addition to the health and safety information provided in the general HASP for the WAG 2 RI&SI, details concerning the site-specific task are elaborated in this site-specific WP/HSC, and both documents, as well as all pertinent procedures referenced therein, will be reviewed by all field personnel prior to beginning operations.

  6. Establishment of a Site-Specific Tropospheric Model Based on Ground Meteorological Parameters over the China Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chongchong; Peng, Bibo; Li, Wei; Zhong, Shiming; Ou, Jikun; Chen, Runjing; Zhao, Xinglong

    2017-07-27

    China is a country of vast territory with complicated geographical environment and climate conditions. With the rapid progress of the Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system (BDS); more accurate tropospheric models must be applied to improve the accuracy of navigation and positioning. Based on the formula of the Saastamoinen and Callahan models; this study develops two single-site tropospheric models (named SAAS_S and CH_S models) for the Chinese region using radiosonde data from 2005 to 2012. We assess the two single-site tropospheric models with radiosonde data for 2013 and zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) data from four International GNSS Service (IGS) stations and compare them to the results of the Saastamoinen and Callahan models. The experimental results show that: the mean accuracy of the SAAS_S model (bias: 0.19 cm; RMS: 3.19 cm) at all radiosonde stations is superior to those of the Saastamoinen (bias: 0.62 cm; RMS: 3.62 cm) and CH_S (bias: -0.05 cm; RMS: 3.38 cm) models. In most Chinese regions; the RMS values of the SAAS_S and CH_S models are about 0.51~2.12 cm smaller than those of their corresponding source models. The SAAS_S model exhibits a clear improvement in the accuracy over the Saastamoinen model in low latitude regions. When the SAAS_S model is replaced by the SAAS model in the positioning of GNSS; the mean accuracy of vertical direction in the China region can be improved by 1.12~1.55 cm and the accuracy of vertical direction in low latitude areas can be improved by 1.33~7.63 cm. The residuals of the SAAS_S model are closer to a normal distribution compared to those of the Saastamoinen model. Single-site tropospheric models based on the short period of the most recent data (for example 2 years) can also achieve a satisfactory accuracy. The average performance of the SAAS_S model (bias: 0.83 cm; RMS: 3.24 cm) at four IGS stations is superior to that of the Saastamoinen (bias: -0.86 cm; RMS: 3.59 cm) and CH_S (bias: 0.45 cm; RMS: 3.38 cm

  7. Calculation of site specific characterisation factors for metal ecotoxicity using decoupled multi species fate and exposure modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkved, Morten; Strandesen, Maria; Larsen, HF

    2004-01-01

    Calculation of characterisation factors (CF’s) for metal ecotoxicity typically involves fate and exposure modelling of metals in multi-media models developed for assessment of organic compounds. Metals do not follow the fate patterns of organic chemicals, and the results will therefore most likel...

  8. Soil erosion model predictions using parent material/soil texture-based parameters compared to using site-specific parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. B. Foltz; W. J. Elliot; N. S. Wagenbrenner

    2011-01-01

    Forested areas disturbed by access roads produce large amounts of sediment. One method to predict erosion and, hence, manage forest roads is the use of physically based soil erosion models. A perceived advantage of a physically based model is that it can be parameterized at one location and applied at another location with similar soil texture or geological parent...

  9. Calculation of site specific characterisation factors for metal ecotoxicity using decoupled multi species fate and exposure modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkved, Morten; Strandesen, Maria; Larsen, HF;

    2004-01-01

    Calculation of characterisation factors (CF’s) for metal ecotoxicity typically involves fate and exposure modelling of metals in multi-media models developed for assessment of organic compounds. Metals do not follow the fate patterns of organic chemicals, and the results will therefore most likel...

  10. Evaluation and application of site-specific data to revise the first-order decay model for estimating landfill gas generation and emissions at Danish landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mou, Zishen; Scheutz, Charlotte; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Methane (CH4) generated from low-organic waste degradation at four Danish landfills was estimated by three first-order decay (FOD) landfill gas (LFG) generation models (LandGEM, IPCC, and Afvalzorg). Actual waste data from Danish landfills were applied to fit model (IPCC and Afvalzorg) required...... categories. In general, the single-phase model, LandGEM, significantly overestimated CH4 generation, because it applied too high default values for key parameters to handle low-organic waste scenarios. The key parameters were biochemical CH4 potential (BMP) and CH4 generation rate constant (k.......Implications: Landfill operators use the first-order decay (FOD) models to estimate methane (CH4) generation. A single-phase model (LandGEM) and a traditional model (IPCC) could result in overestimation when handling a low-organic waste scenario. Site-specific data were important and capable of calibrating key parameter...

  11. Settings for Physical Activity – Developing a Site-specific Physical Activity Behavior Model based on Multi-level Intervention Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Jens; Klinker, Charlotte Demant; Breum, Lars

    Settings for Physical Activity – Developing a Site-specific Physical Activity Behavior Model based on Multi-level Intervention Studies Introduction: Ecological models of health behavior have potential as theoretical framework to comprehend the multiple levels of factors influencing physical...... activity (PA). The potential is shown by the fact that there has been a dramatic increase in application of ecological models in research and practice. One proposed core principle is that an ecological model is most powerful if the model is behavior-specific. However, based on multi-level interventions...... of the facilities. Despite the conceptual and contextual differences PA behavior is also affected by cultural and social values related to the specific site which not alone can be explained by intrapersonal, interpersonal or organizational factors. Discussion: The Ecological Model of Four Domains of Active Living...

  12. SU-E-T-760: Tolerance Design for Site-Specific Range in Proton Patient QA Process Using the Six Sigma Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lah, J [Myongji Hospital, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Shin, D [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To show how tolerance design and tolerancing approaches can be used to predict and improve the site-specific range in patient QA process in implementing the Six Sigma. Methods: In this study, patient QA plans were selected according to 6 site-treatment groups: head &neck (94 cases), spine (76 cases), lung (89 cases), liver (53 cases), pancreas (55 cases), and prostate (121 cases), treated between 2007 and 2013. We evaluated a model of the Six Sigma that determines allowable deviations in design parameters and process variables in patient-specific QA, where possible, tolerance may be loosened, then customized if it necessary to meet the functional requirements. A Six Sigma problem-solving methodology is known as DMAIC phases, which are used stand for: Define a problem or improvement opportunity, Measure process performance, Analyze the process to determine the root causes of poor performance, Improve the process by fixing root causes, Control the improved process to hold the gains. Results: The process capability for patient-specific range QA is 0.65 with only ±1 mm of tolerance criteria. Our results suggested the tolerance level of ±2–3 mm for prostate and liver cases and ±5 mm for lung cases. We found that customized tolerance between calculated and measured range reduce that patient QA plan failure and almost all sites had failure rates less than 1%. The average QA time also improved from 2 hr to less than 1 hr for all including planning and converting process, depth-dose measurement and evaluation. Conclusion: The objective of tolerance design is to achieve optimization beyond that obtained through QA process improvement and statistical analysis function detailing to implement a Six Sigma capable design.

  13. Settings for Physical Activity – Developing a Site-specific Physical Activity Behavior Model based on Multi-level Intervention Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsen, Jens; Klinker, Charlotte Demant; Breum, Lars

    Settings for Physical Activity – Developing a Site-specific Physical Activity Behavior Model based on Multi-level Intervention Studies Introduction: Ecological models of health behavior have potential as theoretical framework to comprehend the multiple levels of factors influencing physical...... of new established outdoor facilities for PA among 12 – 85 years old citizens (N=10,434). The SPACE and the WCMC study used objective measurements of PA combined with e-surveys, the VDPA study is based on self-reported e-survey data. Results: Merging the data from the three intervention studies clarifies...... activity (PA). The potential is shown by the fact that there has been a dramatic increase in application of ecological models in research and practice. One proposed core principle is that an ecological model is most powerful if the model is behavior-specific. However, based on multi-level interventions...

  14. Angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE2): comparative modeling of the active site, specificity requirements, and chloride dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Jodie L; Jackson, Richard M; Acharya, K Ravi; Sturrock, Edward D; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J

    2003-11-18

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a homologue of ACE, represents a new and potentially important target in cardio-renal disease. A model of the active site of ACE2, based on the crystal structure of testicular ACE, has been developed and indicates that the catalytic mechanism of ACE2 resembles that of ACE. Structural differences exist between the active site of ACE (dipeptidyl carboxypeptidase) and ACE2 (carboxypeptidase) that are responsible for the differences in specificity. The main differences occur in the ligand-binding pockets, particularly at the S2' subsite and in the binding of the peptide carboxy-terminus. The model explains why the classical ACE inhibitor lisinopril is unable to bind to ACE2. On the basis of the ability of ACE2 to cleave a variety of biologically active peptides, a consensus sequence of Pro-X-Pro-hydrophobic/basic for the protease specificity of ACE2 has been defined that is supported by the ACE2 model. The dipeptide, Pro-Phe, completely inhibits ACE2 activity at 180 microM with angiotensin II as the substrate. As with ACE, the chloride dependence of ACE2 is substrate-specific such that the hydrolysis of angiotensin I and the synthetic peptide substrate, Mca-APK(Dnp), are activated in the presence of chloride ions, whereas the cleavage of angiotensin II is inhibited. The ACE2 model is also suggestive of a possible mechanism for chloride activation. The structural insights provided by these analyses for the differences in inhibition pattern and substrate specificity among ACE and its homologue ACE2 and for the chloride dependence of ACE/ACE2 activity are valuable in understanding the function and regulation of ACE2.

  15. Modelling site-specific N2O emission factors from Austrian agricultural soils for targeted mitigation measures (NitroAustria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amon, Barbara; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Kasper, Martina; Foldal, Cecilie; Schiefer, Jasmin; Kitzler, Barbara; Schwarzl, Bettina; Zethner, Gerhard; Anderl, Michael; Sedy, Katrin; Gaugitsch, Helmut; Dersch, Georg; Baumgarten, Andreas; Haas, Edwin; Kiese, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    Results from a previous project "FarmClim" highlight that the IPCC default emission factor is not able to reflect region specific N2O emissions from Austrian arable soils. The methodology is limited in identifying hot spots and hot moments of N2O emissions. When estimations are based on default emission factors no recommendations can be given on optimisation measures that would lead to a reduction of soil N2O emissions. The better the knowledge is about Nitrogen and Carbon budgets in Austrian agricultural managed soils the better the situation can be reflected in the Austrian GHG emission inventory calculations. Therefore national and regionally modelled emission factors should improve the evidence for national deviation from the IPCC default emission factors and reduce the uncertainties. The overall aim of NitroAustria is to identify the drivers for N2O emissions on a regional basis taking different soil types, climate, and agricultural management into account. We use the LandscapeDNDC model to update the N2O emission factors for N fertilizer and animal manure applied to soils. Key regions in Austria were selected and region specific N2O emissions calculated. The model runs at sub-daily time steps and uses data such as maximum and minimum air temperature, precipitation, radiation, and wind speed as meteorological drivers. Further input data are used to reflect agricultural management practices, e.g., planting/harvesting, tillage, fertilizer application, irrigation and information on soil and vegetation properties for site characterization and model initialization. While at site scale, arable management data (crop cultivation, rotations, timings etc.) is obtained by experimental data from field trials or observations, at regional scale such data need to be generated using region specific proxy data such as land use and management statistics, crop cultivations and yields, crop rotations, fertilizer sales, manure resulting from livestock units etc. The farming

  16. Improvement of AEP Predictions Using Diurnal CFD Modelling with Site-Specific Stability Weightings Provided from Mesoscale Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, Y.; Oxley, G.; Žagar, M.

    2014-06-01

    The Bolund measurement campaign, performed by Danish Technical University (DTU) Wind Energy Department (also known as RISØ), provided significant insight into wind flow modeling over complex terrain. In the blind comparison study several modelling solutions were submitted with the vast majority being steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approaches with two equation k-epsilon turbulence closure. This approach yielded the most accurate results, and was identified as the state-of-the-art tool for wind turbine generator (WTG) micro-siting. Based on the findings from Bolund, further comparison between CFD and field measurement data has been deemed essential in order to improve simulation accuracy for turbine load and long-term Annual Energy Production (AEP) estimations. Vestas Wind Systems A/S is a major WTG original equipment manufacturer (OEM) with an installed base of over 60GW in over 70 countries accounting for 19% of the global installed base. The Vestas Performance and Diagnostic Centre (VPDC) provides online live data to more than 47GW of these turbines allowing a comprehensive comparison between modelled and real-world energy production data. In previous studies, multiple sites have been simulated with a steady neutral CFD formulation for the atmospheric surface layer (ASL), and wind resource (RSF) files have been generated as a base for long-term AEP predictions showing significant improvement over predictions performed with the industry standard linear WAsP tool. In this study, further improvements to the wind resource file generation with CFD are examined using an unsteady diurnal cycle approach with a full atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) formulation, with the unique stratifications throughout the cycle weighted according to mesoscale simulated sectorwise stability frequencies.

  17. PROCOV: maximum likelihood estimation of protein phylogeny under covarion models and site-specific covarion pattern analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Huai-Chun

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The covarion hypothesis of molecular evolution holds that selective pressures on a given amino acid or nucleotide site are dependent on the identity of other sites in the molecule that change throughout time, resulting in changes of evolutionary rates of sites along the branches of a phylogenetic tree. At the sequence level, covarion-like evolution at a site manifests as conservation of nucleotide or amino acid states among some homologs where the states are not conserved in other homologs (or groups of homologs. Covarion-like evolution has been shown to relate to changes in functions at sites in different clades, and, if ignored, can adversely affect the accuracy of phylogenetic inference. Results PROCOV (protein covarion analysis is a software tool that implements a number of previously proposed covarion models of protein evolution for phylogenetic inference in a maximum likelihood framework. Several algorithmic and implementation improvements in this tool over previous versions make computationally expensive tree searches with covarion models more efficient and analyses of large phylogenomic data sets tractable. PROCOV can be used to identify covarion sites by comparing the site likelihoods under the covarion process to the corresponding site likelihoods under a rates-across-sites (RAS process. Those sites with the greatest log-likelihood difference between a 'covarion' and an RAS process were found to be of functional or structural significance in a dataset of bacterial and eukaryotic elongation factors. Conclusion Covarion models implemented in PROCOV may be especially useful for phylogenetic estimation when ancient divergences between sequences have occurred and rates of evolution at sites are likely to have changed over the tree. It can also be used to study lineage-specific functional shifts in protein families that result in changes in the patterns of site variability among subtrees.

  18. Structure of human Rad51 protein filament from molecular modeling and site-specific linear dichroism spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Reymer, A.

    2009-07-08

    To get mechanistic insight into the DNA strand-exchange reaction of homologous recombination, we solved a filament structure of a human Rad51 protein, combining molecular modeling with experimental data. We build our structure on reported structures for central and N-terminal parts of pure (uncomplexed) Rad51 protein by aid of linear dichroism spectroscopy, providing angular orientations of substituted tyrosine residues of Rad51-dsDNA filaments in solution. The structure, validated by comparison with an electron microscopy density map and results from mutation analysis, is proposed to represent an active solution structure of the nucleo-protein complex. An inhomogeneously stretched double-stranded DNA fitted into the filament emphasizes the strategic positioning of 2 putative DNA-binding loops in a way that allows us speculate about their possibly distinct roles in nucleo-protein filament assembly and DNA strand-exchange reaction. The model suggests that the extension of a single-stranded DNA molecule upon binding of Rad51 is ensured by intercalation of Tyr-232 of the L1 loop, which might act as a docking tool, aligning protein monomers along the DNA strand upon filament assembly. Arg-235, also sitting on L1, is in the right position to make electrostatic contact with the phosphate backbone of the other DNA strand. The L2 loop position and its more ordered compact conformation makes us propose that this loop has another role, as a binding site for an incoming double-stranded DNA. Our filament structure and spectroscopic approach open the possibility of analyzing details along the multistep path of the strand-exchange reaction.

  19. Site-specific analysis of gene expression in early osteoarthritis using the Pond-Nuki model in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroki Keiichi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is a progressive and debilitating disease that often develops from a focal lesion and may take years to clinically manifest to a complete loss of joint structure and function. Currently, there is not a cure for OA, but early diagnosis and initiation of treatment may dramatically improve the prognosis and quality of life for affected individuals. This study was designed to determine the feasibility of analyzing changes in gene expression of articular cartilage using the Pond-Nuki model two weeks after ACL-transection in dogs, and to characterize the changes observed at this time point. Methods The ACL of four dogs was completely transected arthroscopically, and the contralateral limb was used as the non-operated control. After two weeks the dogs were euthanatized and tissues harvested from the tibial plateau and femoral condyles of both limbs. Two dogs were used for histologic analysis and Mankin scoring. From the other two dogs the surface of the femoral condyle and tibial plateau were divided into four regions each, and tissues were harvested from each region for biochemical (GAG and HP and gene expression analysis. Significant changes in gene expression were determined using REST-XL, and Mann-Whitney rank sum test was used to analyze biochemical data. Significance was set at (p Results Significant differences were not observed between ACL-X and control limbs for Mankin scores or GAG and HP tissue content. Further, damage to the tissue was not observed grossly by India ink staining. However, significant changes in gene expression were observed between ACL-X and control tissues from each region analyzed, and indicate that a unique regional gene expression profile for impending ACL-X induced joint pathology may be identified in future studies. Conclusion The data obtained from this study lend credence to the research approach and model for the characterization of OA, and the identification and validation of

  20. Statistical and Economic Techniques for Site-specific Nematode Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Griffin, Terry; Kirkpatrick, Terrence L

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in precision agriculture technologies and spatial statistics allow realistic, site-specific estimation of nematode damage to field crops and provide a platform for the site-specific delivery of nematicides within individual fields. This paper reviews the spatial statistical techniques that model correlations among neighboring observations and develop a spatial economic analysis to determine the potential of site-specific nematicide application. The spatial econometric methodology applied in the context of site-specific crop yield response contributes to closing the gap between data analysis and realistic site-specific nematicide recommendations and helps to provide a practical method of site-specifically controlling nematodes.

  1. Validation of individual-based Markov-like stochastic process model of insect behaviour and a ‘virtual farm’ concept for enhancement of site-specific IPM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Antoni Lux

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports application of a Markov-like stochastic process agent-based model and a ‘virtual farm’ concept for enhancement of site-specific Integrated Pest Management. Conceptually, the model represents a ‘bottom-up ethological’ approach and emulates behaviour of the ‘primary IPM actors’ - large cohorts of individual insects - within seasonally changing mosaics of spatiotemporally complex faming landscape, under the challenge of the local IPM actions. Algorithms of the proprietary PESTonFARM model were adjusted to reflect behaviour and ecology of R. cerasi. Model parametrization was based on compiled published information about R. cerasi and the results of auxiliary on-farm experiments. The experiments were conducted on sweet cherry farms located in Austria, Germany and Belgium. For each farm, a customised model-module was prepared, reflecting its spatiotemporal features. Historical data about pest monitoring, IPM treatments and fruit infestation were used to specify the model assumptions and calibrate it further. Finally, for each of the farms, virtual IPM experiments were simulated and the model-generated results were compared with the results of the real experiments conducted on the same farms. Implications of the findings for broader applicability of the model and the ‘virtual farm’ approach - were discussed.

  2. Validation of Individual-Based Markov-Like Stochastic Process Model of Insect Behavior and a "Virtual Farm" Concept for Enhancement of Site-Specific IPM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, Slawomir A; Wnuk, Andrzej; Vogt, Heidrun; Belien, Tim; Spornberger, Andreas; Studnicki, Marcin

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports application of a Markov-like stochastic process agent-based model and a "virtual farm" concept for enhancement of site-specific Integrated Pest Management. Conceptually, the model represents a "bottom-up ethological" approach and emulates behavior of the "primary IPM actors"-large cohorts of individual insects-within seasonally changing mosaics of spatiotemporally complex faming landscape, under the challenge of the local IPM actions. Algorithms of the proprietary PESTonFARM model were adjusted to reflect behavior and ecology of R. cerasi. Model parametrization was based on compiled published information about R. cerasi and the results of auxiliary on-farm experiments. The experiments were conducted on sweet cherry farms located in Austria, Germany, and Belgium. For each farm, a customized model-module was prepared, reflecting its spatiotemporal features. Historical data about pest monitoring, IPM treatments and fruit infestation were used to specify the model assumptions and calibrate it further. Finally, for each of the farms, virtual IPM experiments were simulated and the model-generated results were compared with the results of the real experiments conducted on the same farms. Implications of the findings for broader applicability of the model and the "virtual farm" approach-were discussed.

  3. Quantification of alterations in cortical bone geometry using Site Specificity Software in mouse models of aging and the responses to ovariectomy and altered loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel L Galea

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigations into the effect of (remodelling stimuli on cortical bone in rodents normally rely on analysis of changes in bone mass and architecture at a narrow cross-sectional site. However, it is well established that the effects of axial loading produce site-specific changes throughout bones’ structure. Non-mechanical influences (e.g. hormones can be additional to or oppose locally-controlled adaptive responses and may have more generalized effects. Tools currently available to study site-specific cortical bone adaptation are limited. Here we applied novel Site-Specificity software to measure bone mass and architecture at each 1% site along the length of the mouse tibia from standard micro-computed tomography (μCT images. Resulting measures are directly comparable to those obtained through μCT analysis (R2 > 0.96. Site-Specificity Analysis was used to compare a number of parameters in tibiae from young adult (19-week-old versus aged (19-month-old mice; ovariectomized and entire mice; limbs subjected to short periods of axial loading or disuse induced by sciatic neurectomy. Age was associated with uniformly reduced cortical thickness and site-specific decreases in cortical area most apparent in the proximal tibia. Mechanical loading site-specifically increased cortical area and thickness in the proximal tibia. Disuse uniformly decreased cortical thickness and decreased cortical area in the proximal tibia. Ovariectomy uniformly reduced cortical area without altering cortical thickness. Differences in polar moment of inertia between experimental groups were only observed in the proximal tibia. Ageing and ovariectomy also altered eccentricity in the distal tibia. In summary, Site-Specificity Analysis provides a valuable tool for measuring changes in cortical bone mass and architecture along the entire length of a bone. Changes in the (remodelling response determined at a single site may not reflect the response at different locations within

  4. Evaluation of the Biotic Ligand Model relative to other site-specific criteria derivation methods for copper in surface waters with elevated hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Genderen, Eric; Gensemer, Robert; Smith, Carrie; Santore, Robert; Ryan, Adam

    2007-08-30

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the reliability of the Biotic Ligand Model to predict Cu toxicity in very hard surface water (>200 mg/L as CaCO(3)), relative to current copper criteria methodologies (hardness-based equation and the water-effect ratio; WER). To test these methods, we conducted acute Cu toxicity tests with three aquatic test species (Ceriodaphnia dubia, Daphnia pulex and Pimephales promelas) in seven surface waters. The sites were representative of effluent-dependent or effluent-dominated streams common to the arid western United States of America (arid West) and a wide range of water quality variables were tested. In addition, concurrent Cu toxicity tests were conducted in laboratory waters that were matched to hardness and alkalinity of the sites to facilitate calculation of WER values. Results were used to characterize empirical relationships between water quality characteristics and Cu toxicity, and to compare measured Cu toxicity with Biotic Ligand Model (BLM) predictions. Acute toxicity tests were also conducted with C. dubia and P. promelas in a range of Ca or Mg-dominated hardness concentrations to determine the independent effects of Ca or Mg on Cu toxicity at high hardness levels. Conclusions from this study suggest that the BLM generates appropriate criteria for the waters tested in this study when compared to the hardness-based equation or WER approach. Although the historical site-specific methods are useful for surface waters with hardness alkalinity, Ca, Mg and Na). Therefore, the BLM offers an improved alternative to the hardness-based and WER approaches, particularly for situations where the current methods would be under-protective of sensitive aquatic life.

  5. Development of a Site-Specific Kinetic Model for Chlorine Decay and the Formation of Chlorination By-Products in Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhur Saeed

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine is used commonly to prevent biofouling in cooling water systems. The addition of chlorine poses environmental risks in natural systems due to its tendency to form chlorination by-products (CBPs when exposed to naturally-occurring organic matter (NOM. Some of these CBPs can pose toxic risks to aquatic and benthic species in the receiving waters. It is, therefore, important to study the fate of residual chlorine and CBPs to fully understand the potential impacts of chlorination to the environment. The goal of this study was to develop improved predictions of how chlorine and CBP concentrations in seawater vary with time, chlorine dose and temperature. In the present study, chlorination of once-through cooling water at Ras Laffan Industrial City (RLIC, Qatar, was studied by collecting unchlorinated seawater from the RLIC cooling water system intake, treating it with chlorine and measuring time series of chlorine and CBP concentrations. Multiple-rate exponential curves were used to represent fast and slow chlorine decay and CBP formation, and site-specific chlorine kinetic relationships were developed. Through extensive analysis of laboratory measurements, it was found that only some of the control parameters identified in the literature were important for predicting residual chlorine and CBP concentrations for this specific location. The new kinetic relationships were able to significantly improve the predictability and validity of Generalized Environmental Modeling System for Surfacewaters (GEMSS-chlorine kinetics module (CKM, a three-dimensional hydrodynamic and chlorine kinetics and transport model when applied for RLIC outfall studies using actual field measurements.

  6. Site-specific functionalization for chemical speciation of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) using polyaniline impregnated nanocellulose composite: equilibrium, kinetic, and thermodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Priyanka; Varshney, Shilpa; Srivastava, Shalini

    2017-07-01

    Site-specific functionalizations are the emergent attention for the enhancement of sorption latent of heavy metals. Limited chemistry has been applied for the fabrication of diafunctionalized materials having potential to tether both environmentally stable oxidation states of chromium (Cr(III) and Cr(VI). Polyaniline impregnated nanocellulose composite (PANI-NCC) has been fabricated using click chemistry and explored for the removal of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) from hydrological environment. The structure, stability, morphology, particle size, surface area, hydrophilicity, and porosity of fabricated PANI-NCC were characterized comprehensively using analytical techniques and mathematical tools. The maximum sorption performance of PANI-NCC was procured for (Cr(III): 47.06 mg g-1; 94.12 %) and (Cr(VI): 48.92 mg g-1; 97.84 %) by equilibrating 0.5 g sorbent dose with 1000 mL of 25 mg L-1 chromium conc. at pH 6.5 and 2.5 for Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively. The sorption data showed a best fit to the Langmuir isotherm and pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The negative value of ∆ G° (-8.59 and -11.16 kJ mol-1) and ∆ H° (66.46 × 10-1 and 17.84 × 10-1 kJ mol-1), and positive value of ∆ S° (26.66 and 31.46 J mol-1K-1) for Cr(III) and Cr(VI), respectively, reflect the spontaneous, feasibility, and exothermic nature of the sorption process. The application of fabricated PANI-NCC for removing both the forms of chromium in the presence of other heavy metals was also tested at laboratory and industrial waste water regime. These findings open up new avenues in the row of high performance, scalable, and economic nanobiomaterial for the remediation of both forms of chromium from water streams.

  7. Site-specific weed control technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S; Søgaard, H T; Kudsk, P

    2009-01-01

    Site-specific weed control technologies are defined as machinery or equipment embedded with technologies that detect weeds growing in a crop and, taking into account predefined factors such as economics, takes action to maximise the chances of successfully controlling them. In the article, we...... describe the basic parts of site specific weed control technologies, comprising of weed sensing systems, weed management models and precision weed control implements. A review of state-of-the-art technologies shows that several weed sensing systems and precision implements have been developed over the last...... two decades, though barriers prevent their breakthrough. Most important among these is the lack of a truly robust weed recognition method, owing to mutual shading among plants and limitations in the capacity of highly accurate spraying and weeding apparatuses.   Another barrier is the lack...

  8. Nanoparticles for Site Specific Genome Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeer, Nicole Ali

    translate gene therapies for diseases of the blood and immune system to clinical practice. In addition, we have expanded the use of this technology to an additional nonhematopoietic model system: correction of the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor gene in human bronchial epithelial cells. The work presented here represents (1) the first use of biodegradable nanoparticles for PNA delivery, (2) the first direct in vivo site-specific genome modification in human cells, and (3) the first use of triplex-PNA technology for site-specific genome editing in cystic fibrosis.

  9. Including Magnetostriction in Micromagnetic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conbhuí, Pádraig Ó.; Williams, Wyn; Fabian, Karl; Nagy, Lesleis

    2016-04-01

    The magnetic anomalies that identify crustal spreading are predominantly recorded by basalts formed at the mid-ocean ridges, whose magnetic signals are dominated by iron-titanium-oxides (Fe3-xTixO4), so called "titanomagnetites", of which the Fe2.4Ti0.6O4 (TM60) phase is the most common. With sufficient quantities of titanium present, these minerals exhibit strong magnetostriction. To date, models of these grains in the pseudo-single domain (PSD) range have failed to accurately account for this effect. In particular, a popular analytic treatment provided by Kittel (1949) for describing the magnetostrictive energy as an effective increase of the anisotropy constant can produce unphysical strains for non-uniform magnetizations. I will present a rigorous approach based on work by Brown (1966) and by Kroner (1958) for including magnetostriction in micromagnetic codes which is suitable for modelling hysteresis loops and finding remanent states in the PSD regime. Preliminary results suggest the more rigorously defined micromagnetic models exhibit higher coercivities and extended single domain ranges when compared to more simplistic approaches.

  10. Site-Specific, Climate-Friendly Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. J.; Brooks, E. S.; Eitel, J.; Huggins, D. R.; Painter, K.; Rupp, R.; Smith, J. L.; Stockle, C.; Vierling, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    Of the four most important atmospheric greenhouse gasses (GHG) enriched through human activities, only nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions are due primarily to agriculture. However, reductions in the application of synthetic N fertilizers could have significant negative consequences for a growing world population given the crucial role that these fertilizers have played in cereal yield increases since WWII. Increasing N use efficiency (NUE) through precision management of agricultural N in space and time will therefore play a central role in the reduction of agricultural N2O emissions. Precision N management requires a greater understanding of the spatio-temporal variability of factors supporting N management decisions such as crop yield, water and N availability, utilization and losses. We present an overview of a large, collaborative, multi-disciplinary project designed to improve our basic understanding of nitrogen (N), carbon (C) and water (H2O) spatio-temporal dynamics for wheat-based cropping systems on complex landscapes, and develop management tools to optimize water- and nitrogen-use efficiency for these systems and landscapes. Major components of this project include: (a) cropping systems experiments addressing nitrogen application rate and seeding density for different landscape positions; (b) GHG flux experiments and monitoring; (c) soil microbial genetics and stable isotope analyses to elucidate biochemical pathways for N2O production; (d) proximal soil sensing for construction of detailed soil maps; (e) LiDAR and optical remote sensing for crop growth monitoring; (f) hydrologic experiments, monitoring, and modeling; (g) refining the CropSyst simulation model to estimate biophysical processes and GHG emissions under a variety of management and climatic scenarios; and (h) linking farm-scale enterprise budgets to simulation modeling in order to provide growers with economically viable site-specific climate-friendly farming guidance.

  11. An Evaluation of Site-specific and Generalized Spatial Models of Aboveground Forest Biomass Based on Landsat Time-series and LiDAR Strip Samples in the Eastern U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, R. K.; Domke, G. M.; Russell, M.; Andersen, H. E.; Cohen, W. B.

    2016-12-01

    Aboveground forest biomass (AGB) contributes a large part of the terrestrial carbon and varies with forest types. While forest disturbance and land use changes significantly influence greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, international conventions on climate change mitigation have identified forest conservation and management as an efficient mechanism for enhancing carbon storage in live plant biomass to offset the emissions. Regional or national scale assessment of AGB on forest lands facilitates strategic plans such as the national GHG inventory per the requirement of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Large area inventory of AGB can be efficiently carried out by using remotely sensed data and a generalized statistical model in contrast to using only field measurements and site-specific models. In this study, we have integrated specialized forest inventory plot data with spatial predictors derived from time-series Landsat imagery and LiDAR strip samples in four sites across the eastern U.S.A.- Minnesota (MN), Maine (ME), Pennsylvania-New Jersey (PANJ) and South Carolina (SC) - to formulate statistical models. Pixel-level polynomial curve fit was applied to the time-series Landsat variables to obtain projected metrics in the target year 2014. Two forms of models based on ordinary least-squares regression (OLR) and the random forest (RF) algorithm were developed for each site and with the pooled (generalized) dataset. The site-specific models were tested with the national forest inventory (NFI) data as well as specialized plot data of the other sites while the generalized models were tested with the NFI data only. We observed similar level of accuracies with the OLR and RF models at the same site. Although the RF models yielded larger values for the amount of explained variance (i.e., pseudo R2) in the site-specific models, the generalized model was also promising. The amount of variance explained with the site-site specific models were

  12. Response to Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s ten questions pertaining to site-specific models for use in the license termination rule: Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buck, J.W.; Whelan, G.; Strenge, D.L.; Hoopes, B.L.; McDonald, J.P.; Castleton, K.J.; Pelton, M.A.; Gelston, G.M.; Taira, R.Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-05-01

    This paper is in response to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ten questions posed at the Modeling Workshop held November 13 and 14, 1997. The ten questions were developed in advance of the workshop to allow model developers to prepare a presentation at the Workshop. This paper is an expanded version of the Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) presentation given at the Modeling Workshop by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff. This paper is organized by the ten questions asked by the NRC, each section devoted to a single question. The current version of methodology is MEPAS 3.2 (NRC 1997) and the discussion in this paper will pertain to that version. In some cases, MEPAS 4.0, which is currently being developed under the Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES) (Whelan et al. 1997), will be referenced to inform the reader of potential capabilities in the near future. A separate paper is included in the document that discusses the FRAMES concept.

  13. RESRAD. Site-Specific Residual Radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, C. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    1989-06-01

    RESRAD is designed to derive site-specific guidelines for allowable residual concentrations of radionuclides in soil. A guideline is defined as a radionuclide concentration or a level of radiation or radioactivity that is acceptable if a site is to be used without radiological restrictions. Guidelines are expressed as (1) concentrations of residual radionuclides in soil, (2) concentrations of airborne radon decay products, (3) levels of external gamma radiation, (4) levels of radioactivity from surface contamination, and (5) concentrations of residual radionuclides in air and water. Soil is defined as unconsolidated earth material, including rubble and debris that may be present. The controlling principles of all guidelines are (1) the annual radiation dose received by a member of the critical population group from the residual radioactive material - predicted by a realistic but reasonably conservative analysis and averaged over a 50 year period - should not exceed 100 mrem/yr, and (2) doses should be kept as low as reasonably achievable. All significant exposure pathways for the critical population group are considered in deriving soil guidelines. These pathways include direct exposure to external radiation from the contaminated soil material; internal radiation from inhalation of airborne radionuclides; and internal radiation from ingestion of plant foods grown in the contaminated soil, meat and milk from livestock fed with contaminated fodder and water, drinking water from a contaminated well, and fish from a contaminated pond.

  14. Neural network-based crop growth model to predict processing tomato yield on a site-specific basis using remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Michal

    Remote sensing is one of the major data acquisition tools available to rapidly acquire soil and plant related information over a wide area for use in precision agriculture. Green canopy has very specific reflectance characteristics distinguishing it from other materials such as soil and dry vegetative matter. Reflectance values in red (R) and near infra-red (NIR) spectral bands have been widely used for calculating normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Many researchers have related NDVI values to plant vigor, water stress, leaf area index (LAI) and/or yield. However, vegetative indices such as NDVI are usually sensitive to background reflectance characteristics. Often soil adjusted vegetation indices (SAVI) are used to minimize the background effect. In this study we have developed a relationship between the processing tomato yield and SAVI based on the R and NIR reflectance. Eight three band (R, NIR and green) aerial images were obtained at approximately two-week intervals during the 2000 processing tomato growing season. These images were analyzed to obtain SAVI values which were in turn related to LAI using regression techniques. A tuned neural network was developed to predict daily LAI values based on the biweekly experimental LAI values derived from aerial images. The coefficients of multiple determination between the actual LAI and neural network predicted LAI values were greater than 0.96 for all 56 grid points. The LAI values were numerically integrated over the whole growing season to obtain cumulative leaf area index days (CLAID). The CLAID values predicted from the neural network correlated very well with experimentally derived CLAID values (coefficient of determination, r2 = 0.83) indicating that the neural network model simulated processing tomato growth well. A crop growth model that was capable of predicting crop yield based on neural network predicted LAI values and CIMIS weather data was developed. Although predicted yield tended to be low

  15. Site-specificity in small architectural interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie Bruun Jespersen, Line

    2016-01-01

    This paper is investigating the concepts of site-specificity, place and experience as they have been interpreted in a number of projects with at strong emphasis on the characteristics of the site, in the form of small architectural or artistic interventions. The idea of site-specificity is re......-emerging in contemporary architectural discourse in a series of projects, in e.g. the Norwegian project ”National Tourist Roads”. The small architectural interventions consequently work with enhancing or framing the qualities of site and aim at being a mediating element between man and nature. In this paper two main...... specificity in the small architectural interventions. The paper concludes that the small architectural interventions operate with a narrow concept of site, and that the large variety of artistic strategies and types of site-specificity found in contemporary art could serve as inspiration to open up...

  16. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Yen, Hai-Yun; Austria, Theresa; Pettersson, Jonas; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Maxson, Robert; Widschwendter, Martin; Dubeau, Louis

    2015-10-01

    Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r) promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr) promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30%) rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001), attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  17. A Mouse Model That Reproduces the Developmental Pathways and Site Specificity of the Cancers Associated With the Human BRCA1 Mutation Carrier State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Predisposition to breast and extrauterine Müllerian carcinomas in BRCA1 mutation carriers is due to a combination of cell-autonomous consequences of BRCA1 inactivation on cell cycle homeostasis superimposed on cell-nonautonomous hormonal factors magnified by the effects of BRCA1 mutations on hormonal changes associated with the menstrual cycle. We used the Müllerian inhibiting substance type 2 receptor (Mis2r promoter and a truncated form of the Follicle stimulating hormone receptor (Fshr promoter to introduce conditional knockouts of Brca1 and p53 not only in mouse mammary and Müllerian epithelia, but also in organs that control the estrous cycle. Sixty percent of the double mutant mice developed invasive Müllerian and mammary carcinomas. Mice carrying heterozygous mutations in Brca1 and p53 also developed invasive tumors, albeit at a lesser (30% rate, in which the wild type alleles were no longer present due to loss of heterozygosity. While mice carrying heterozygous mutations in both genes developed mammary tumors, none of the mice carrying only a heterozygous p53 mutation developed such tumors (P < 0.0001, attesting to a role for Brca1 mutations in tumor development. This mouse model is attractive to investigate cell-nonautonomous mechanisms associated with cancer predisposition in BRCA1 mutation carriers and to investigate the merit of chemo-preventive drugs targeting such mechanisms.

  18. Preparation of metallochelating microbubbles and study on their site-specific interaction with rGFP-HisTag as a model protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukáč, Róbert; Kauerová, Zuzana; Mašek, Josef; Bartheldyová, Eliška; Kulich, Pavel; Koudelka, Štěpán; Korvasová, Zina; Plocková, Jana; Papoušek, František; Kolář, František; Schmidt, Roland; Turánek, Jaroslav

    2011-04-19

    The histidine-metallochelating lipid complex is one of the smallest high affinity binding units used as tools for rapid noncovalent binding of histidine tagged molecules, especially recombinant proteins. The advantage of metallochelating complex over protein-ligand complexes (e.g., streptavidine-biotin, glutathiontransferase-glutathion) consists in its very low immunogenicity, if any. This concept for the construction of surface-modified metallochelating microbubbles was proved with recombinant green fluorescent protein (rGFP) containing 6His-tag. This protein is easy to be detected by various fluorescence techniques as flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Microbubbles (MB) composed of DPPC with various contents of metallochelating lipid DOGS-NTA-Ni were prepared by intensive shaking of the liposome suspension under the atmosphere of sulfur hexafluoride. For this purpose, the instrument 3M ESPE CapMix was used. Various techniques (static light scattering, flow cytometry, and optical microscopy) were compared and used for the measurements of the size distribution of MB. All three methods demonstrated that the prepared MB were homogeneous in their size, and the mean diameter of the MB in various batches was within the range of 2.1-2.8 μm (the size range of 1-10 μm). The presence of large MB (8-10 μm) was marginal. Counting of MB revealed that the average amount of MB prepared of 10 mg of phospholipid equaled approximately 10(9) MB/mL. Lyophilized MB were prepared with saccharose as a cryoprotectant. These MB were shown to be stable both in vitro (the estimated half-live of the MB in bovine serum at 37 °C was 3-7 min) and in vivo (mouse). The stability of the MB was affected by molar content of DOGS-NTA-Ni. DPPC-based metallochelating MB provided a clear and very contrast image of the ventricular cavity soon after the injection. Site selective and stable binding of rGFP-HisTag (as a model of His-tagged protein) onto the surface of metallochelating MB was

  19. Prospects for site specific weed management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend; Rasmussen, Jesper; Pedersen, Søren Marcus;

    2014-01-01

    Research on Site Specific Weed Management (SSWM) started in the late 80's. Since that moment, considerable research has been conducted on different aspects of SSWM, from fundamental studies on the spatial ecology of weeds to the applied development and testing of new technologies for weed detection...

  20. Determination of site-specific glycan heterogeneity on glycoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolarich, Daniel; Jensen, Pia Hønnerup; Altmann, Friedrich

    2012-01-01

    and the determination of site-specific glycan heterogeneity. The described workflow takes approximately 3-5 d, including sample preparation and data analysis. The data obtained from analyzing released glycans of rHuEPO and IgG, described in the second protocol of this series (10.1038/nprot.2012.063), provide...

  1. Site-Specific PEGylation of Therapeutic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K. Dozier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of proteins as therapeutics has a long history and is becoming ever more common in modern medicine. While the number of protein-based drugs is growing every year, significant problems still remain with their use. Among these problems are rapid degradation and excretion from patients, thus requiring frequent dosing, which in turn increases the chances for an immunological response as well as increasing the cost of therapy. One of the main strategies to alleviate these problems is to link a polyethylene glycol (PEG group to the protein of interest. This process, called PEGylation, has grown dramatically in recent years resulting in several approved drugs. Installing a single PEG chain at a defined site in a protein is challenging. Recently, there is has been considerable research into various methods for the site-specific PEGylation of proteins. This review seeks to summarize that work and provide background and context for how site-specific PEGylation is performed. After introducing the topic of site-specific PEGylation, recent developments using chemical methods are described. That is followed by a more extensive discussion of bioorthogonal reactions and enzymatic labeling.

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF WATER CIRCULATION MODEL INCLUDING IRRIGATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsuki, Shunji; Tanaka, Kenji; Kojiri, Toshiharu; Hamaguchi, Toshio

    It is well known that since agricultural water withdrawal has much affect on water circulation system, accurate analysis of river discharge or water balance are difficult with less regard for it. In this study, water circulation model composed of land surface model and distributed runoff model is proposed at 10km 10km resolution. In this model, irrigation water, which is estimated with land surface model, is introduced to river discharge analysis. The model is applied to the Chao Phraya River in Thailand, and reproduced seasonal water balance. Additionally, the discharge on dry season simulated with the model is improved as a result of including irrigation. Since the model, which is basically developed from global data sets, simulated seasonal change of river discharge, it can be suggested that our model has university to other river basins.

  3. Development of site-specific locking plates for acetabular fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Zhang, Li-Hai; Zhang, Ying-Ze; He, Chun-Qing; Zhang, Li-Cheng; Wang, Yan; Tang, Pei-Fu

    2013-05-01

    Site-specific locking plates have gained popularity for the treatment of fractures. However, the clinical use of a site-specific locking plate for acetabular fractures remains untested due to production limits. To design a universal site-specific locking plate for acetabular fractures, the 3-dimensional (3D) photographic records of 171 pelvises were retrospectively studied to generate a universal posterior innominate bone surface. Using 3D photographical processing software, the 3D coordinate system was reset according to bony landmarks and was scaled based on the acetabular diameter to allow a direct comparison between surfaces. The measured surface was separated into measurement units. At each measurement unit, the authors calculated the average z-axis values in all samples and obtained the 3D coordinate values of the point cloud that could be reconstructed into the universal surface. A plate was subsequently designed in 3D photographical processing software, and the orientation and distribution of locking screws was included. To manufacture a plate, the data were entered into Unigraphics NX version 6.0 software (Siemens PLM Software, Co, Ltd, Plano, Texas) and a CNC digital milling machine (FANUC Co, Ltd, Yamanashi, Japan). The resulting locking plate fit excellently with the reduced bone surface intraoperatively. Plate contouring was avoided intraoperatively. Universal 3.5-mm locking screws locked successfully into the plate, and their orientations were consistent with the design. No screw yielded to acetabular penetration. This method of designing a site-specific acetabular locking plate is practical, and the plates are suitable for clinical use. These site-specific locking plates may be an option for the treatment of acetabular fractures, particularly in elderly patients.

  4. Modelo de respuesta sitio-específica del maíz al nitrógeno y agua edáfica en un haplustol Site-specific corn nitrogen and soil water response model in haplustolls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Celeste Gregoret

    2006-12-01

    potential were identified: rainfed high and low potential and high potential with irrigation. The data are from on-farm trials for the 2004-2005 crop season, in Manfredi (Córdoba with a uniform N rate along strips (0, 32, 64, 96, 129 and 161 kg N ha-¹ in the dry land and 0, 64, 137, 212, 279 and 351 kg N ha-¹ in the irrigated area and a randomized complete block design to estimate site-specific crop response functions. Spatial autocorrelation is taken into account in regression estimation of N response functions by landscape position, in the form a spatial autoregressive error structure. Results suggest that N response differs significantly by landscape position and by soil water availability. Yields ranged from 4.914 to 11,346 kg ha-¹ in the zone of low productivity, between 4,956 and 12,204 kg ha-¹ in the one of high productivity and between 7,830 and 14,387 kg ha-¹ in irrigated plots. The agronomical (DOA and economically (DOE optimal N rates also differed among management zones, being DOA= 285, 184 and 162 kg ha-1 for the zones from greater to smaller productivity, meanwhile DOE values were 171, 111 and 90 kg ha-1, respectively. Initial soil nitrogen and available water inclusion allowed us to build a single N response model for the rainfed management zones. Besides, irrigated experiment maize performance was well predicted by the same model type but excluding available water (non-limiting factor, as input. The model performed well using either available N at 60 or 200 cm soil depth, and available water al 200 cm depth. This model allowed us to recommend fertilization rates using variable rate application, maximizing net return to N, and minimizing environment contamination risks, by over dose input (i.e. N fertilization application. Our conclusions are preliminary because they come from a single year experiment, which did not include the whole range of expectated initial conditions. More scenarios are needed in order to validate the proposed model.

  5. Site-specific dissociation dynamics of H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} on Ag(111) and Co(0001) and the validity of the site-averaging model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xixi [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiang, Bin [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Xie, Daiqian, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Guo, Hua, E-mail: dqxie@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Dissociative chemisorption of polyatomic molecules on metal surfaces involves high-dimensional dynamics, of which quantum mechanical treatments are computationally challenging. A promising reduced-dimensional approach approximates the full-dimensional dynamics by a weighted average of fixed-site results. To examine the performance of this site-averaging model, we investigate two distinct reactions, namely, hydrogen dissociation on Co(0001) and Ag(111), using accurate first principles potential energy surfaces (PESs). The former has a very low barrier of ∼0.05 eV while the latter is highly activated with a barrier of ∼1.15 eV. These two systems allow the investigation of not only site-specific dynamical behaviors but also the validity of the site-averaging model. It is found that the reactivity is not only controlled by the barrier height but also by the topography of the PES. Moreover, the agreement between the site-averaged and full-dimensional results is much better on Ag(111), though quantitative in neither system. Further quasi-classical trajectory calculations showed that the deviations can be attributed to dynamical steering effects, which are present in both reactions at all energies.

  6. Site-specific criteria for the completion of landfill aftercare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laner, David; Fellner, Johann; Brunner, Paul H

    2012-09-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills need to be managed after closure to assure long-term environmental compatibility. Aftercare can be completed when the authorities consider the landfill not likely to pose a threat to humans and the environment. In this work, a methodology for deriving site-specific aftercare completion criteria is presented and its application is illustrated via a case study. The evaluation method combines models addressing waste emission behavior, long-term barrier performance, and pollutant migration to assess the potential impact of landfill emissions on the environment. Based on the definition of acceptable impact levels at certain points of compliance, scenario- and pollutant-specific aftercare completion criteria are derived. The methodology was applied to a closed MSW landfill in Austria and potential aftercare durations were determined. While landfill gas emissions may become environmentally tolerable within decades at the site, leachate-related aftercare measures were expected to be necessary for centuries (primarily as a result of ammonium). Although the evaluation comes with large uncertainties, it allows for linking aftercare intensity and duration with respect to an environmentally compatible state of the landfill in the absence of aftercare. However, further case studies including regulatory review and acceptance are needed to use the methodology in a decision support tool on aftercare completion.

  7. Models of bovine babesiosis including juvenile cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad-Roy, C M; Shuai, Zhisheng; van den Driessche, P

    2015-03-01

    Bovine Babesiosis in cattle is caused by the transmission of protozoa of Babesia spp. by ticks as vectors. Juvenile cattle (Babesiosis, rarely show symptoms, and acquire immunity upon recovery. Susceptibility to the disease varies between breeds of cattle. Models of the dynamics of Bovine Babesiosis transmitted by the cattle tick that include these factors are formulated as systems of ordinary differential equations. Basic reproduction numbers are calculated, and it is proved that if these numbers are below the threshold value of one, then Bovine Babesiosis dies out. However, above the threshold number of one, the disease may approach an endemic state. In this case, control measures are suggested by determining target reproduction numbers. The percentage of a particular population (for example, the adult bovine population) needed to be controlled to eradicate the disease is evaluated numerically using Columbia data from the literature.

  8. Optimization under Uncertainty of Site-Specific Turbine Configurations: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quick, Julian; Dykes, Katherine; Graf, Peter; Zahle, Frederik

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty affects many aspects of wind energy plant performance and cost. In this study, we explore opportunities for site-specific turbine configuration optimization that accounts for uncertainty in the wind resource. As a demonstration, a simple empirical model for wind plant cost of energy is used in an optimization under uncertainty to examine how different risk appetites affect the optimal selection of a turbine configuration for sites of different wind resource profiles. If there is unusually high uncertainty in the site wind resource, the optimal turbine configuration diverges from the deterministic case and a generally more conservative design is obtained with increasing risk aversion on the part of the designer.

  9. Site-Specific ecological risk assessment. Case-study 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, John

    “Development of a decision support system for sustainable management of contaminated land by linking bioavailability, ecological risk and ground water pollution of organic pollutants”or in short “LIBERATION”. The presentation includes examples on how to scale and integrate the results from various scientific......The decision supporting and integrating assessment tool, TRIAD, is used site-specific on PAH- and heavy metal contaminated sites in Denmark. The various aspects of the TRIAD approach are used on a set of chemistry-, ecotoxicology- and ecology related data collected among others in the EU project...

  10. Oxygen as a site specific structural probe in neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuefeind, Joerg C [ORNL; Simonson, J Michael {Mike} [ORNL; Salmon, Phil [University of Bath; Zeidler, Anita [University of Bath; Fischer, Henry E [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Rauch, Helmut [E141 Atominstitut der & #xD6; sterreichischen Universit& #xE4; ten,; Markland, Thomas [Columbia University; Lemmel, Hartmut [Technical University Vienna

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen is a ubiquitous element, playing an essential role in most scientific and technological disciplines, and is often incorporated within a structurally disordered material where examples include molten silicates in planetary science, glasses used for lasers and optical communication, and water in biological processes. Establishing the structure of a liquid or glassy oxide and thereby its relation to the functional properties of a material is not, however, a trivial task owing to the complexity associated with atomic disorder. Here we approach this challenge by measuring the bound coherent neutron scattering lengths of the oxygen isotopes with the sensitive technique of neutron interferometry. We find that there is a small but finite contrast of 0.204(6) fm between the scattering lengths of the isotope 18O and oxygen of natural isotopic abundance natO, contrary to tables of recommended values. This has enabled us to investigate the structure of both light and heavy water by exploiting, for the first time, the method of oxygen isotope substitution in neutron diffraction, thus circumventing many of the significant problems associated with more traditional methods in which hydrogen is substituted by deuterium. We find a difference of ~0.5% between the O-H and O-D intra-molecular bond distances which is much smaller than recent estimates based on diffraction data and is found to be in excellent agreement with path integral molecular dynamics simulations made with a flexible polarisable water model. Our results demonstrate the potential for using oxygen isotope substitution as a powerful and effective site specific probe in a plethora of materials, of pertinence as instrumentation at next generation neutron sources comes online

  11. GIS-based procedure for site-specific risk assessment of pesticides for aquatic ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Serenella; Vighi, Marco

    2008-01-01

    The EU Water Framework Directive states that the management of surface water must be based on a site-specific assessment of water quality, that is dependent on land use. As a result, to develop a robust chemical management policy for aquatic ecosystems, the ecotoxicological risk must be strictly related to the local conditions and characteristics of the system. This paper presents a methodology developed to assess the ecotoxicological risk of pesticides to site-specific aquatic ecosystems. Spatial and relational databases, provisional models and risk indices were integrated into Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to produce maps of exposure, effect and risk at watershed scale. Each active ingredient is characterised by a data set that includes input data as well as results represented by a risk assessment cartography. The aim of this procedure is to perform a site-specific risk assessment by integrating geographical distribution of predicted environmental concentrations (PECs), ecotoxicological effects and the potential/actual quality of the exposed ecosystem. Examples of pesticide risk maps for surface waters in Lombardia Region (Northern Italy) are shown.

  12. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  13. Experimental investigations and geochemical modelling of site-specific fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions in underground storage of CO2/H2/CH4 mixtures: the H2STORE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, Marco; Pilz, Peter

    2015-04-01

    work packages hosted at the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ) focus on the fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions triggered by CO2, H2 and their mixtures. Laboratory experiments expose core samples to hydrogen and CO2/hydrogen mixtures under site-specific conditions (temperatures up to 200 °C and pressure up to 300 bar). The resulting qualitative and, whereas possible, quantitative data are expected to ameliorate the precision of predictive geochemical and reactive transport modelling, which is also performed within the project. The combination of experiments, chemical and mineralogical analyses and models is needed to improve the knowledge about: (1) solubility model and mixing rule for multicomponent gas mixtures in high saline formation fluids: no data are namely available in literature for H2-charged gas mixtures in the conditions expected in the potential sites; (2) chemical reactivity of different mineral assemblages and formation fluids in a broad spectrum of P-T conditions and composition of the stored gas mixtures; (3) thermodynamics and kinetics of relevant reactions involving mineral dissolution or precipitation. The resulting amelioration of site characterization and the overall enhancement in understanding the potential processes will benefit the operational reliability, the ecological tolerance, and the economic efficiency of future energy storing plants, crucial aspects for public acceptance and for industrial investors.

  14. Seepage Model for PA Including Dift Collapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Li; C. Tsang

    2000-12-20

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to document the predictions and analysis performed using the Seepage Model for Performance Assessment (PA) and the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel for both the Topopah Spring middle nonlithophysal and lower lithophysal lithostratigraphic units at Yucca Mountain. These results will be used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into waste-emplacement drifts at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as part of the evaluation of the long term performance of the potential repository. This AMR is in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153447]). This purpose is accomplished by performing numerical simulations with stochastic representations of hydrological properties, using the Seepage Model for PA, and evaluating the effects of an alternative drift geometry representing a partially collapsed drift using the Disturbed Drift Seepage Submodel. Seepage of water into waste-emplacement drifts is considered one of the principal factors having the greatest impact of long-term safety of the repository system (CRWMS M&O 2000 [153225], Table 4-1). This AMR supports the analysis and simulation that are used by PA to develop the probability distribution of water seepage into drift, and is therefore a model of primary (Level 1) importance (AP-3.15Q, ''Managing Technical Product Inputs''). The intended purpose of the Seepage Model for PA is to support: (1) PA; (2) Abstraction of Drift-Scale Seepage; and (3) Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report (PMR). Seepage into drifts is evaluated by applying numerical models with stochastic representations of hydrological properties and performing flow simulations with multiple realizations of the permeability field around the drift. The Seepage Model for PA uses the distribution of permeabilities derived from air injection testing in

  15. Enhanced battery model including temperature effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosca, B.; Wilkins, S.

    2013-01-01

    Within electric and hybrid vehicles, batteries are used to provide/buffer the energy required for driving. However, battery performance varies throughout the temperature range specific to automotive applications, and as such, models that describe this behaviour are required. This paper presents a dy

  16. Enhanced battery model including temperature effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosca, B.; Wilkins, S.

    2013-01-01

    Within electric and hybrid vehicles, batteries are used to provide/buffer the energy required for driving. However, battery performance varies throughout the temperature range specific to automotive applications, and as such, models that describe this behaviour are required. This paper presents a dy

  17. Enhanced battery model including temperature effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosca, B.; Wilkins, S.

    2013-01-01

    Within electric and hybrid vehicles, batteries are used to provide/buffer the energy required for driving. However, battery performance varies throughout the temperature range specific to automotive applications, and as such, models that describe this behaviour are required. This paper presents a

  18. Temporally-controlled site-specific recombination in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Hans

    Full Text Available Conventional use of the site-specific recombinase Cre is a powerful technology in mouse, but almost absent in other vertebrate model organisms. In zebrafish, Cre-mediated recombination efficiency was previously very low. Here we show that using transposon-mediated transgenesis, Cre is in fact highly efficient in this organism. Furthermore, temporal control of recombination can be achieved by using the ligand-inducible CreER(T2. Site-specific recombination only occurs upon administration of the drug tamoxifen (TAM or its active metabolite, 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4-OHT. Cre-mediated recombination is detectable already 4 or 2 hours after administration of TAM or 4-OHT, demonstrating fast recombination kinetics. In addition, low doses of TAM allow mosaic labeling of single cells. Combined, our results show that conditional Cre/lox will be a valuable tool for both, embryonic and adult zebrafish studies. Furthermore, single copy insertion transgenesis of Cre/lox constructs suggest a strategy suitable also for other organisms.

  19. Temporally-controlled site-specific recombination in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Stefan; Kaslin, Jan; Freudenreich, Dorian; Brand, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Conventional use of the site-specific recombinase Cre is a powerful technology in mouse, but almost absent in other vertebrate model organisms. In zebrafish, Cre-mediated recombination efficiency was previously very low. Here we show that using transposon-mediated transgenesis, Cre is in fact highly efficient in this organism. Furthermore, temporal control of recombination can be achieved by using the ligand-inducible CreER(T2). Site-specific recombination only occurs upon administration of the drug tamoxifen (TAM) or its active metabolite, 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (4-OHT). Cre-mediated recombination is detectable already 4 or 2 hours after administration of TAM or 4-OHT, demonstrating fast recombination kinetics. In addition, low doses of TAM allow mosaic labeling of single cells. Combined, our results show that conditional Cre/lox will be a valuable tool for both, embryonic and adult zebrafish studies. Furthermore, single copy insertion transgenesis of Cre/lox constructs suggest a strategy suitable also for other organisms.

  20. Site-specific tumor-targeted fluorescent contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achilefu, Samuel I.; Bugaj, Joseph E.; Dorshow, Richard B.; Jimenez, Hermo N.; Rajagopalan, Raghavan; Wilhelm, R. Randy; Webb, Elizabeth G.; Erion, Jack L.

    2001-01-01

    Site-specific delivery of drugs and contrast agents to tumors protects normal tissues from the cytotoxic effect of drugs, and enhances the contrast between normal and diseased tissues. In optical medicine, biocompatible dyes can be used as photo therapeutics or as contrast agents. Previous studies have shown that the use of covalent or non-covalent dye conjugates of carries such as antibodies, liposomes, and polysaccharides improves the delivery of such molecules to tumors. However, large biomolecules can elicit adverse immunogenic reactions and also result in prolonged blood circulation times, delaying visualization of target tissues. A viable alternative to this strategy is to use small bioactive molecule-dye conjugates. These molecules have several advantages over large biomolecules, including ease of synthesis of a variety of high purity compounds for combinatorial screening of new targets, enhanced diffusivity to solid tumors, and the ability to affect the pharmocokinetics of the conjugates by minor structural changes. Thus, we conjugated a near IR light absorbing dye to bioactive peptides that specifically target over expressed tumor receptors in established rat tumor lines. High tumor uptake of the conjugates was obtained without loss of either the peptide receptor affinity or the dye fluorescence. These findings demonstrate the efficacy of a small peptide-dye conjugate strategy for in vivo tumor imaging. Site-specific delivery of photodynamic therapy agents may also benefit form this approach.

  1. Appreciating Site-Specific Qualities in Urban Harbours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    When “site-specificity” becomes a central value in city and harbor transformation, it soon proves necessary to address the ways in which scholars and professionals actually determine site-specific qualities in urban fabrics and social life. This paper delves into the above questions by means...... of site-specificity, even in the traditional harbor settings. Considered with conceptual care, such situations may teach us what it means to “appreciate site-specific qualities”....

  2. Site-Specific Analyses for Demonstrating Compliance with 10 CFR 61 Performance Objectives - 12179

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, C.J.; Esh, D.W.; Yadav, P.; Carrera, A.G. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 11545 Rockville Pike, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is proposing to amend its regulations at 10 CFR Part 61 to require low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities to conduct site-specific analyses to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives in Subpart C. The amendments would require licensees to conduct site-specific analyses for protection of the public and inadvertent intruders as well as analyses for long-lived waste. The amendments would ensure protection of public health and safety, while providing flexibility to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives, for current and potential future waste streams. NRC staff intends to submit proposed rule language and associated regulatory basis to the Commission for its approval in early 2012. The NRC staff also intends to develop associated guidance to accompany any proposed amendments. The guidance is intended to supplement existing low-level radioactive waste guidance on issues pertinent to conducting site-specific analyses to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives. The guidance will facilitate implementation of the proposed amendments by licensees and assist competent regulatory authorities in reviewing the site-specific analyses. Specifically, the guidance provides staff recommendations on general considerations for the site-specific analyses, modeling issues for assessments to demonstrate compliance with the performance objectives including the performance assessment, intruder assessment, stability assessment, and analyses for long-lived waste. This paper describes the technical basis for changes to the rule language and the proposed guidance associated with implementation of the rule language. The NRC staff, per Commission direction, intends to propose amendments to 10 CFR Part 61 to require licensees to conduct site-specific analyses to demonstrate compliance with performance objectives for the protection of public health and the environment. The amendments would require a

  3. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Merkert

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies.

  4. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-06-24

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies.

  5. Site-specific crop management using geophysical proximal sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Key components of site-specific crop management are (i) identifying the site-specific factors that influence within-field crop yield variation and (ii) spatially characterizing those factors. Geo-referenced measurements of apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa) provide a potential means of cha...

  6. Innovation and Diffusion of Site-specific Crop Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Marcus; Pedersen, Jørgen Lindgaard

    2006-01-01

    Site-specific crop management or precision farming is a highly complex managementsystem for site-specific input application of lime, fertilizers and pesticides in arable farming. The Global Positioning System (GPS)is the backbone of the system. To conduct precision farming several technical systems...

  7. Synthesis of Site-Specific Radiolabeled Antibodies for Radioimmunotherapy via Genetic Code Expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yiming; Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Fei; Chen, Jingxian; Wang, Yufei; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Ziwei; Wu, Ling; Si, Longlong; Xu, Huan; Yao, Tianzhuo; Xiao, Sulong; Xia, Qing; Zhang, Lihe; Yang, Zhi; Zhou, Demin

    2016-10-19

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) delivers radioisotopes to antigen-expressing cells via monoantibodies for the imaging of lesions or medical therapy. The chelates are typically conjugated to the antibody through cysteine or lysine residues, resulting in heterogeneous chelate-to-antibody ratios and various conjugation sites. To overcome this heterogeneity, we have developed an approach for site-specific radiolabeling of antibodies by combination of genetic code expansion and click chemistry. As a proof-of-concept study, model systems including anti-CD20 antibody rituximab, positron-emitting isotope (64)Cu, and a newly synthesized bifunctional linker (4-dibenzocyclooctynol-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclotetradecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid, DIBO-DOTA) were used. The approach consists of three steps: (1) site-specific incorporation of an azido group-bearing amino acid (NEAK) via the genetic code expansion technique at the defined sites of the antibody as a "chemical handle"; (2) site-specific and quantitative conjugation of bifunctional linkers with the antibodies under a mild condition; and (3) radiolabeling of the chelate-modified antibodies with the appropriate isotope. We used heavy-chain A122NEAK rituximab as proof-of-concept and obtained a homogeneous radioconjugate with precisely two chelates per antibody, incorporated only at the chosen sites. The conjugation did not alter the binding and pharmacokinetics of the rituximab, as indicated by in vitro assays and in vivo PET imaging. We believe our research is a good supplement to the genetic code expansion technique for the development of novel radioimmunoconjugates.

  8. The Application of TAPM for Site Specific Wind Energy Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merlinde Kay

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The energy industry uses weather forecasts for determining future electricity demand variations due to the impact of weather, e.g., temperature and precipitation. However, as a greater component of electricity generation comes from intermittent renewable sources such as wind and solar, weather forecasting techniques need to now also focus on predicting renewable energy supply, which means adapting our prediction models to these site specific resources. This work assesses the performance of The Air Pollution Model (TAPM, and demonstrates that significant improvements can be made to only wind speed forecasts from a mesoscale Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP model. For this study, a wind farm site situated in North-west Tasmania, Australia was investigated. I present an analysis of the accuracy of hourly NWP and bias corrected wind speed forecasts over 12 months spanning 2005. This extensive time frame allows an in-depth analysis of various wind speed regimes of importance for wind-farm operation, as well as extreme weather risk scenarios. A further correction is made to the basic bias correction to improve the forecast accuracy further, that makes use of real-time wind-turbine data and a smoothing function to correct for timing-related issues. With full correction applied, a reduction in the error in the magnitude of the wind speed by as much as 50% for “hour ahead” forecasts specific to the wind-farm site has been obtained.

  9. Site-Specific Chemical Labeling of Long RNA Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Kasper; Olsen, Eva Maria; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of RNA molecules is a valuable tool for studying their structure and function. Here, we describe a new site-specific RNA labeling method, which utilizes a DNA-templated chemical reaction to attach a label at a specific internal nucleotide in an RNA molecule. The method...... is nonenzymatic and based on the formation of a four-way junction, where a donor strand is chemically coupled to an acceptor strand at a specific position via an activated chemical group. A disulfide bond in the linker is subsequently cleaved under mild conditions leaving a thiol group attached to the acceptor-RNA...... strand. The site-specific thiol-modified target RNA can then be chemically labeled with an optional group, here demonstrated by coupling of a maleimide-functionalized fluorophore. The method is rapid and allows site specific labeling of both in vitro and in vivo synthesized RNA with a broad range...

  10. Changing communities: documentary photography and site-specific installation

    OpenAIRE

    Voller, James

    2017-01-01

    This exegesis documents my Master of Fine practice-led research project exploring photography's intersection with site specificity. Through generating a dialogue about architectural changes in Melbourne's north and western suburbs, the project engages with ideas surrounding community engagement and engagement with photographic, site specific and archival practices. Beginning with the research question - How can documentary photography exist in local communities as site­ specific installation ...

  11. Multispectral videography for site-specific farm management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Gerald L.; Yang, C.

    1996-11-01

    Researchers are expending considerable effort to develop the technology and methodology needed to identify and map within-field management zones for site-specific farming. Much of the research has focused on the use of either a high-density geographically referenced grid of soil samples or mechanical yield sensor measurements that record geographic positions and production levels. In either case, complex spatial models are generally used to extrapolate the various soil variables and production level information across the entire field. Both procedures produce a wealth of information, however, the analysis of soil samples tend to be quite expensive and the accuracy of mechanical yield measurements does vary. This study represents an ongoing effort designed to evaluate remote sensing as a tool for determining within field management zones. Color-infrared aerial photography and multispectral videography were used in concert to map and stratify two grain sorghum fields into regions or zones of homogeneous spectral response. A limited number of soil and plant samples were acquired to characterize the biotic and edaphic conditions within each zone. Results obtained during the first year of the study indicated that multispectral video can be used to develop within field management zones. Simple univariate analysis indicated that soil pH, Ca, and Fe were important variables affecting yield. Analysis of the yield data indicated that the economic returns from 17% of the first field and 20% of the second field were insufficient to recoup planting costs. Multispectral video also proved instrumental in modeling the spatial variability of yield. A significant negative correlation (r2 greater than 0.90) was obtained between the red spectral band and crop yields for both fields. Stratification, in this case using image data, reduces the number of samples required to characterize a field by reducing the variance associated within each stratum. Image data also provided a

  12. Site specific protein labeling by enzymatic posttranslational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunbul, Murat; Yin, Jun

    2009-09-07

    Site specific protein labeling plays a key role in elucidating the function of the proteins at the molecular level by revealing their locations in the cell, their interaction networks with other cellular components and the dynamic mechanisms of their bio-generation, trafficking and degradation in response to regulatory signals in a biological system. Site specific protein labeling is, in essence, artificial modification of proteins with new chemical entities at the posttranslational stage. Based on the analogy between protein labeling and protein posttranslational modification, enzymatic tools have been developed for site specific and efficient labeling of target proteins with chemical probes of diverse structures and functionalities. This perspective surveys a number of protein labeling methods based on the application of protein posttranslational modification enzymes.

  13. Assessment of Wind Turbine for Site-Specific Conditions using Probabilistic Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heras, Enrique Gómez de las; Gutiérrez, Roberto; Azagra, Elena

    2013-01-01

    be very dependent on the site. The uncertainties on the wind properties depend on issues like the available wind data, the quality of the measurement sensors, the type of terrain or the accuracy of the engineering models for horizontal and vertical spatial extrapolation. An example is included showing two......This paper describes a new approach to assess the structural integrity of wind turbines for sitespecific conditions using probabilistic methods, taking into account the particular uncertainties associated to each site. This new approach intends to improve the site suitability analysis of wind...... turbines, helping to the decision making during the site assessment phase of wind farm designs. First, the design equation for the failure mode of interest is defined, where the loads associated to the site-specific wind conditions are compared with the design limits of the structural component. A limit...

  14. Innovation and Diffusion of Site-specific Crop Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Marcus; Pedersen, Jørgen Lindgaard

    2006-01-01

    Site-specific crop management or precision farming is a highly complex managementsystem for site-specific input application of lime, fertilizers and pesticides in arable farming. The Global Positioning System (GPS)is the backbone of the system. To conduct precision farming several technical systems...... and data interpretations are needed. Precision farming is aiming to be used by large farms because of scale advantages. In reality adoption and benefits harvested are limited. We have analysed information from 28 experts and stakeholders, focus group meetings with 35 participants and a multinational farm...

  15. Innovation and diffusion of site-specific crop management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Marcus; Pedersen, Jørgen Lindgaard

    2004-01-01

    Site-specific crop management or precision farming (PF) is a highly complex management system for site-specific input application of lime, fertilizers and pesticides in arable farming. The Global Positioning System (GPS) is the backbone of the system. To conduct PF several technical systems...... and data interpretations are needed. FP is aiming to be used by large farms because of scale advantages. In reality adoption and benefits harvested are limited. We have analysed information from 28 experts and stakeholders and focus group meetings with 35 participants and a multinational farm survey...

  16. Xer Site Specific Recombination: Double and Single Recombinase Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Fabio; Benmohamed, Amal; Szatmari, George

    2017-01-01

    The separation and segregation of newly replicated bacterial chromosomes can be constrained by the formation of circular chromosome dimers caused by crossing over during homologous recombination events. In Escherichia coli and most bacteria, dimers are resolved to monomers by site-specific recombination, a process performed by two Chromosomally Encoded tyrosine Recombinases (XerC and XerD). XerCD recombinases act at a 28 bp recombination site dif, which is located at the replication terminus region of the chromosome. The septal protein FtsK controls the initiation of the dimer resolution reaction, so that recombination occurs at the right time (immediately prior to cell division) and at the right place (cell division septum). XerCD and FtsK have been detected in nearly all sequenced eubacterial genomes including Proteobacteria, Archaea, and Firmicutes. However, in Streptococci and Lactococci, an alternative system has been found, composed of a single recombinase (XerS) genetically linked to an atypical 31 bp recombination site (difSL). A similar recombination system has also been found in 𝜀-proteobacteria such as Campylobacter and Helicobacter, where a single recombinase (XerH) acts at a resolution site called difH. Most Archaea contain a recombinase called XerA that acts on a highly conserved 28 bp sequence dif, which appears to act independently of FtsK. Additionally, several mobile elements have been found to exploit the dif/Xer system to integrate their genomes into the host chromosome in Vibrio cholerae, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Enterobacter cloacae. This review highlights the versatility of dif/Xer recombinase systems in prokaryotes and summarizes our current understanding of homologs of dif/Xer machineries. PMID:28373867

  17. Site-Specific Dance: Promoting Social Awareness in Choreography

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBean, Arianne

    2004-01-01

    Site-specific dance, which is often defined as dance that occurs outside of the conventional theater space, challenges choreographers to look at, listen to, feel, and think about the space in which the dance is performed. It also asks audiences to be active participants in the performance experience. The dances have to be informed by the space and…

  18. Using site-specific soil samples as a substitution for improved hydrological and nonpoint source predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Wang, Guobo; Zhong, Yucen; Zhao, Xin; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-08-01

    Soil databases are one of the most important inputs for watershed models, and the quality of soil properties affects how well a model performs. The objectives of this study were to (1) quantify the sensitivity of model outputs to soil properties and to (2) use site-specific soil properties as a substitution for more accurate hydrological and nonpoint source (H/NPS) predictions. Soil samples were collected from a typical mountainous watershed in China, and the impacts of soil sample parameters on H/NPS predictions were quantified using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). The most sensitive parameters related to predicting flow, sediment, and total phosphorus (TP) mainly were the soil hydrological, the channel erosion processes, and the initial soil chemical environment, respectively. When the site-specific soil properties were used, the uncertainties (coefficient of variation) related to predicting the hydrology, sediment and TP decreased by 75∼80 %, 75∼84 %, and 46∼61 %, respectively. Based on changes in the Nash-Sutcliff coefficient, the model performance improved by 4.9 and 19.45 % for the hydrological and sediment model, accordingly. However, site-specific soil properties did not contribute to better TP predictions because of the high spatial variability of the soil P concentrations across the large watershed. Thus, although site-specific soil samples can be used to obtain more accurate H/NPS predictions, more sampling sites are required to apply this method in large watersheds.

  19. Degradation of tropoelastin by matrix metalloproteinases--cleavage site specificities and release of matrikines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Andrea; Jung, Michael C; Duca, Laurent; Sippl, Wolfgang; Taddese, Samuel; Ihling, Christian; Rusciani, Anthony; Jahreis, Günther; Weiss, Anthony S; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Schmelzer, Christian E H

    2010-04-01

    To provide a basis for the development of approaches to treat elastin-degrading diseases, the aim of this study was to investigate the degradation of the natural substrate tropoelastin by the elastinolytic matrix metalloproteinases MMP-7, MMP-9, and MMP-12 and to compare the cleavage site specificities of the enzymes using complementary MS techniques and molecular modeling. Furthermore, the ability of the three proteases to release bioactive peptides was studied. Tropoelastin was readily degraded by all three MMPs. Eighty-nine cleavage sites in tropoelastin were identified for MMP-12, whereas MMP-7 and MMP-9 were found to cleave at only 58 and 63 sites, respectively. Cleavages occurred predominantly in the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of tropoelastin. With respect to the cleavage site specificities, the study revealed that all three MMPs similarly tolerate hydrophobic and/or aliphatic amino acids, including Pro, Gly, Ile, and Val, at P(1)'. MMP-7 shows a strong preference for Leu at P(1)', which is also well accepted by MMP-9 and MMP-12. Of all three MMPs, MMP-12 best tolerates bulky charged and aromatic amino acids at P(1)'. All three MMPs showed a clear preference for Pro at P(3) that could be structurally explained by molecular modeling. Analysis of the generated peptides revealed that all three MMPs show a similar ability to release bioactive sequences, with MMP-12 producing the highest number of these peptides. Furthermore, the generated peptides YTTGKLPYGYGPGG, YGARPGVGVGGIP, and PGFGAVPGA, containing GxxPG motifs that have not yet been proven to be bioactive, were identified as new matrikines upon biological activity testing.

  20. Design, synthesis, and characterization of nucleosomes containing site-specific DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-12-01

    How DNA damaged is formed, recognized, and repaired in chromatin is an area of intense study. To better understand the structure activity relationships of damaged chromatin, mono and dinucleosomes containing site-specific damage have been prepared and studied. This review will focus on the design, synthesis, and characterization of model systems of damaged chromatin for structural, physical, and enzymatic studies.

  1. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada, Souad; Louai, Fatima Zohra; Nait-Said, Nasreddine; Benabou, Abdelkader

    2016-07-01

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  2. Dynamic hysteresis modeling including skin effect using diffusion equation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Souad, E-mail: souadhamada@yahoo.fr [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Louai, Fatima Zohra, E-mail: fz_louai@yahoo.com [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Nait-Said, Nasreddine, E-mail: n_naitsaid@yahoo.com [LSP-IE: Research Laboratory, Electrical Engineering Department, University of Batna, 05000 Batna (Algeria); Benabou, Abdelkader, E-mail: Abdelkader.Benabou@univ-lille1.fr [L2EP, Université de Lille1, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2016-07-15

    An improved dynamic hysteresis model is proposed for the prediction of hysteresis loop of electrical steel up to mean frequencies, taking into account the skin effect. In previous works, the analytical solution of the diffusion equation for low frequency (DELF) was coupled with the inverse static Jiles-Atherton (JA) model in order to represent the hysteresis behavior for a lamination. In the present paper, this approach is improved to ensure the reproducibility of measured hysteresis loops at mean frequency. The results of simulation are compared with the experimental ones. The selected results for frequencies 50 Hz, 100 Hz, 200 Hz and 400 Hz are presented and discussed.

  3. Site-specific design optimization of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, P.; Bak, C.; Schepers, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    This article reports results from a European project, where site characteristics were incorporated into the design process of wind turbines, to enable site-specific design. Two wind turbines of different concept were investigated at six different sites comprising normal flat terrain, offshore...... of a new wind turbine. Both annual energy yield and design-determining loads depended on site characteristics, and this represented a potential for site-specific design. The maximum variation in annual energy yield was 37% and the maximum variation in blade root fatigue loads was 62%. Optimized site...... advantage of high-wind-speed sites. It was not possible to design a single wind turbine for all wind climates investigated, since the differences in the design loads were too large. Multiple-site wind turbines should be designed for generic wind conditions, which cover wind parameters encountered at flat...

  4. SITE-94. Site specific base data for the performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, J. [ed.] [Clearwater Hardrock Consulting, Monmouth, OR (United States); Tiren, S. [Geosigma AB, Uppsala (Sweden); Dverstorp, B. [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden); Glynn, P. [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    This report documents the site specific base data that were available, and the utilization of these data within SITE-94. A brief summary is given of SKB`s preliminary site investigations for the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL), which were the main source of site-specific data for SITE-94, and an overview is given of the field methods and instrumentation for the preliminary investigations. A compilation is given of comments concerning the availability and quality of the data for Aespoe, and specific recommendations are given for future site investigations. It was found that the HRL pre-investigations produced a large quantity of data which were, for the most part, of sufficient quality to be valuable for a performance assessment. However, some problems were encountered regarding documentation, procedural consistency, positional information, and storage of the data from the measurements. 77 refs, 4 tabs.

  5. Site-Specific Biomolecule Labeling with Gold Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerson, Christopher J.; Powell, Richard D.; Hainfeld, James F.

    2010-01-01

    Site-specific labeling of biomolecules in vitro with gold clusters can enhance the information content of electron cryomicroscopy experiments. This chapter provides a practical overview of well-established techniques for forming biomolecule/gold cluster conjugates. Three bioconjugation chemistries are covered: Linker-mediated bioconjugation, direct gold–biomolecule bonding, and coordination-mediated bonding of nickel(II) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-derivatized gold clusters to polyhistidine (...

  6. Pretargeted PET Imaging Using a Site-Specifically Labeled Immunoconjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Brendon E; Adumeau, Pierre; Membreno, Rosemery; Carnazza, Kathryn E; Brand, Christian; Reiner, Thomas; Agnew, Brian J; Lewis, Jason S; Zeglis, Brian M

    2016-08-17

    In recent years, both site-specific bioconjugation techniques and bioorthogonal pretargeting strategies have emerged as exciting technologies with the potential to improve the safety and efficacy of antibody-based nuclear imaging. In the work at hand, we have combined these two approaches to create a pretargeted PET imaging strategy based on the rapid and bioorthogonal inverse electron demand Diels-Alder reaction between a (64)Cu-labeled tetrazine radioligand ((64)Cu-Tz-SarAr) and a site-specifically modified huA33-trans-cyclooctene immunoconjugate ((ss)huA33-PEG12-TCO). A bioconjugation strategy that harnesses enzymatic transformations and strain-promoted azide-alkyne click chemistry was used to site-specifically append PEGylated TCO moieties to the heavy chain glycans of the colorectal cancer-targeting huA33 antibody. Preclinical in vivo validation studies were performed in athymic nude mice bearing A33 antigen-expressing SW1222 human colorectal carcinoma xenografts. To this end, mice were administered (ss)huA33-PEG12-TCO via tail vein injection and-following accumulation intervals of 24 or 48 h-(64)Cu-Tz-SarAr. PET imaging and biodistribution studies reveal that this strategy clearly delineates tumor tissue as early as 1 h post-injection (6.7 ± 1.7%ID/g at 1 h p.i.), producing images with excellent contrast and high tumor-to-background activity concentration ratios (tumor:muscle = 21.5 ± 5.6 at 24 h p.i.). Furthermore, dosimetric calculations illustrate that this pretargeting approach produces only a fraction of the overall effective dose (0.0214 mSv/MBq; 0.079 rem/mCi) of directly labeled radioimmunoconjugates. Ultimately, this method effectively facilitates the high contrast pretargeted PET imaging of colorectal carcinoma using a site-specifically modified immunoconjugate.

  7. Unsteady panel method for complex configurations including wake modeling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, Lourens H

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available implementations of the DLM are however not very versatile in terms of geometries that can be modeled. The ZONA6 code offers a versatile surface panel body model including a separated wake model, but uses a pressure panel method for lifting surfaces. This paper...

  8. Modeling Electric Double-Layers Including Chemical Reaction Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2014-01-01

    A physicochemical and numerical model for the transient formation of an electric double-layer between an electrolyte and a chemically-active flat surface is presented, based on a finite elements integration of the nonlinear Nernst-Planck-Poisson model including chemical reactions. The model works...

  9. Circuit Modeling of a MEMS Varactor Including Dielectric Charging Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giounanlis, P.; Andrade-Miceli, D.; Gorreta, S.; Pons-Nin, J.; Dominguez-Pumar, M.; Blokhina, E.

    2016-10-01

    Electrical models for MEMS varactors including the effect of dielectric charging dynamics are not available in commercial circuit simulators. In this paper a circuit model using lumped ideal elements available in the Cadence libraries and a basic Verilog-A model, has been implemented. The model has been used to simulate the dielectric charging in function of time and its effects over the MEMS capacitance value.

  10. Including investment risk in large-scale power market models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Jørgen Kjærgaard; Meibom, P.

    2003-01-01

    can be included in large-scale partial equilibrium models of the power market. The analyses are divided into a part about risk measures appropriate for power market investors and a more technical part about the combination of a risk-adjustment model and a partial-equilibrium model. To illustrate......Long-term energy market models can be used to examine investments in production technologies, however, with market liberalisation it is crucial that such models include investment risks and investor behaviour. This paper analyses how the effect of investment risk on production technology selection...... the analyses quantitatively, a framework based on an iterative interaction between the equilibrium model and a separate risk-adjustment module was constructed. To illustrate the features of the proposed modelling approach we examined how uncertainty in demand and variable costs affects the optimal choice...

  11. Selective pressures to maintain attachment site specificity of integrative and conjugative elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla L Menard

    Full Text Available Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs are widespread mobile genetic elements that are usually found integrated in bacterial chromosomes. They are important agents of evolution and contribute to the acquisition of new traits, including antibiotic resistances. ICEs can excise from the chromosome and transfer to recipients by conjugation. Many ICEs are site-specific in that they integrate preferentially into a primary attachment site in the bacterial genome. Site-specific ICEs can also integrate into secondary locations, particularly if the primary site is absent. However, little is known about the consequences of integration of ICEs into alternative attachment sites or what drives the apparent maintenance and prevalence of the many ICEs that use a single attachment site. Using ICEBs1, a site-specific ICE from Bacillus subtilis that integrates into a tRNA gene, we found that integration into secondary sites was detrimental to both ICEBs1 and the host cell. Excision of ICEBs1 from secondary sites was impaired either partially or completely, limiting the spread of ICEBs1. Furthermore, induction of ICEBs1 gene expression caused a substantial drop in proliferation and cell viability within three hours. This drop was dependent on rolling circle replication of ICEBs1 that was unable to excise from the chromosome. Together, these detrimental effects provide selective pressure against the survival and dissemination of ICEs that have integrated into alternative sites and may explain the maintenance of site-specific integration for many ICEs.

  12. Geothermal investment analysis with site-specific applications to Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassel, T.A.V.; Edelstein, R.H.; Blair, P.D.

    1978-12-01

    The analysis and modeling of investment behavior in the development of hydrothermal electric power facilities are reported. This investment behavior reflects a degree of sensitivity to public policy alternatives concerning taxation and regulation of the resource and its related energy conversion facilities. The objective of the current research is to provide a realistic and theoretically sound means for estimating the impacts of such public policy alternatives. A stochastic simulation model was developed which offers an efficient means for site-specific investment analysis of private sector firms and investors. The results of the first year of work are discussed including the identification, analysis, quantification and modeling of: a decision tree reflecting the sequence of procedures, timing and stochastic elements of hydrothermal resource development projects; investment requirements, expenses and revenues incurred in the exploration, development and utilization of hydrothermal resources for electric power generation; and multiattribute investment decision criteria of the several types of firms in the geothermal industry. An application of the investment model to specific resource sites in the state of Utah is also described. Site specific data for the Known Geothermal Resource Areas of Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove Fort-Sulphurdale are given together with hypothesized generation capacity growth rates.

  13. Site Specific Probable Maximum Precipitation Estimates and Professional Judgement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, B. D.; Kao, S. C.; Kanney, J. F.; Quinlan, K. R.; DeNeale, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    State and federal regulatory authorities currently rely upon the US National Weather Service Hydrometeorological Reports (HMRs) to determine probable maximum precipitation (PMP) estimates (i.e., rainfall depths and durations) for estimating flooding hazards for relatively broad regions in the US. PMP estimates for the contributing watersheds upstream of vulnerable facilities are used to estimate riverine flooding hazards while site-specific estimates for small water sheds are appropriate for individual facilities such as nuclear power plants. The HMRs are often criticized due to their limitations on basin size, questionable applicability in regions affected by orographic effects, their lack of consist methods, and generally by their age. HMR-51 for generalized PMP estimates for the United States east of the 105th meridian, was published in 1978 and is sometimes perceived as overly conservative. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is currently reviewing several flood hazard evaluation reports that rely on site specific PMP estimates that have been commercially developed. As such, NRC has recently investigated key areas of expert judgement via a generic audit and one in-depth site specific review as they relate to identifying and quantifying actual and potential storm moisture sources, determining storm transposition limits, and adjusting available moisture during storm transposition. Though much of the approach reviewed was considered a logical extension of HMRs, two key points of expert judgement stood out for further in-depth review. The first relates primarily to small storms and the use of a heuristic for storm representative dew point adjustment developed for the Electric Power Research Institute by North American Weather Consultants in 1993 in order to harmonize historic storms for which only 12 hour dew point data was available with more recent storms in a single database. The second issue relates to the use of climatological averages for spatially

  14. Progressive IRP Models for Power Resources Including EPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the view of optimizing regional power supply and demand, the paper makes effective planning scheduling of supply and demand side resources including energy efficiency power plant (EPP, to achieve the target of benefit, cost, and environmental constraints. In order to highlight the characteristics of different supply and demand resources in economic, environmental, and carbon constraints, three planning models with progressive constraints are constructed. Results of three models by the same example show that the best solutions to different models are different. The planning model including EPP has obvious advantages considering pollutant and carbon emission constraints, which confirms the advantages of low cost and emissions of EPP. The construction of progressive IRP models for power resources considering EPP has a certain reference value for guiding the planning and layout of EPP within other power resources and achieving cost and environmental objectives.

  15. A probabilistic seismic hazard assessment for Greece and the surrounding region including site-specific considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mäntyniemi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A probabilistic approach was applied to map the seismic hazard in Greece and the surrounding region. The procedure does not require any specification of seismic sources or/and seismic zones and allows for the use of the whole seismological record, comprising both historical and instrumental data, available for the region of interest. The new seismic hazard map prepared for Greece and its vicinity specifies a 10% probability of exceedance of the given Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA values for shallow seismicity and intermediate soil conditions for an exposure time of 50 years. When preparing the map, the new PGA attenuation relation given by Margaris et al. (2001 was employed. The new map shows a spatial distribution of the seismic hazard that corresponds well with the features of shallow seismicity within the examined region. It depicts the level of seismic hazard in which the exceedance of the PGA value of 0.25 g may be expected to occur within limited areas. The highest estimated levels of seismic hazard inside the territory of Greece are found in the Northern Sporades Islands, where PGA values in excess of 0.50 g are reached at individual sites, and in the Zante Island in Western Greece, where PGA values in the range of 0.35 g to 0.40 g are obtained at more numerous localities. High values are also observed in the sea between the Karpathos and Rhodes islands, near the Island of Amorgos (Cyclades Archipelago and in the Southwestern Peloponnesus. The levels of seismic hazard at the sites of seven Greek cities (Athens, Jannena, Kalamata, Kozani, Larisa, Rhodes and Thessaloniki were also estimated in terms of probabilities that a given PGA value will be exceeded at least once during a time interval of 1, 50 and 100 years at those sites. These probabilities were based on the maximum horizontal PGA values obtained by applying the design earthquake procedure, and the respective median values obtained were 0.24 g for Athens, 0.28 g for Jannena, 0.30 g for Kalamata, 0.21 g for Kozani, 0.24 g for Larisa, 0.43 g for Rhodes and 0.35 g for Thessaloniki. The probabilities of exceedance of the estimated maximum possible PGA value were also calculated for the cities to illustrate the uncertainty of maximum PGA assessment.

  16. Modeling heart rate variability including the effect of sleep stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliński, Mateusz; Gierałtowski, Jan; Żebrowski, Jan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a model for heart rate variability (HRV) of a healthy individual during sleep with the assumption that the heart rate variability is predominantly a random process. Autonomic nervous system activity has different properties during different sleep stages, and this affects many physiological systems including the cardiovascular system. Different properties of HRV can be observed during each particular sleep stage. We believe that taking into account the sleep architecture is crucial for modeling the human nighttime HRV. The stochastic model of HRV introduced by Kantelhardt et al. was used as the initial starting point. We studied the statistical properties of sleep in healthy adults, analyzing 30 polysomnographic recordings, which provided realistic information about sleep architecture. Next, we generated synthetic hypnograms and included them in the modeling of nighttime RR interval series. The results of standard HRV linear analysis and of nonlinear analysis (Shannon entropy, Poincaré plots, and multiscale multifractal analysis) show that—in comparison with real data—the HRV signals obtained from our model have very similar properties, in particular including the multifractal characteristics at different time scales. The model described in this paper is discussed in the context of normal sleep. However, its construction is such that it should allow to model heart rate variability in sleep disorders. This possibility is briefly discussed.

  17. Mid-Season High-Resolution Satellite Imagery for Forecasting Site-Specific Corn Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahuel R. Peralta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A timely and accurate crop yield forecast is crucial to make better decisions on crop management, marketing, and storage by assessing ahead and implementing based on expected crop performance. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of high-resolution satellite imagery data collected at mid-growing season for identification of within-field variability and to forecast corn yield at different sites within a field. A test was conducted on yield monitor data and RapidEye satellite imagery obtained for 22 cornfields located in five different counties (Clay, Dickinson, Rice, Saline, and Washington of Kansas (total of 457 ha. Three basic tests were conducted on the data: (1 spatial dependence on each of the yield and vegetation indices (VIs using Moran’s I test; (2 model selection for the relationship between imagery data and actual yield using ordinary least square regression (OLS and spatial econometric (SPL models; and (3 model validation for yield forecasting purposes. Spatial autocorrelation analysis (Moran’s I test for both yield and VIs (red edge NDVI = NDVIre, normalized difference vegetation index = NDVIr, SRre = red-edge simple ratio, near infrared = NIR and green-NDVI = NDVIG was tested positive and statistically significant for most of the fields (p < 0.05, except for one. Inclusion of spatial adjustment to model improved the model fit on most fields as compared to OLS models, with the spatial adjustment coefficient significant for half of the fields studied. When selected models were used for prediction to validate dataset, a striking similarity (RMSE = 0.02 was obtained between predicted and observed yield within a field. Yield maps could assist implementing more effective site-specific management tools and could be utilized as a proxy of yield monitor data. In summary, high-resolution satellite imagery data can be reasonably used to forecast yield via utilization of models that include spatial adjustment to

  18. Multiplexed site-specific electrode functionalization for multitarget biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrie, Karen; Jans, Karolien; Vos, Rita; Ardakanian, Niyousha; Verellen, Niels; Van Hoof, Chris; Lagae, Liesbet; Stakenborg, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Multitarget biosensors hold great promise to improve point-of-care diagnostics as they enable simultaneous detection of different biomolecular markers. Multiplexed detection of different markers, like genes, proteins, or a combination of both, propels advancement in numerous fields such as genomics, medical diagnosis and therapy monitoring. The functionalization of these biosensors, however, necessitates patterned immobilization of different bioreceptors, which remains challenging and time-consuming. We demonstrate a simple method for the patterned multiplexing of bioreceptors on a multi-electrode chip. By using the lithographically defined electrodes for surface functionalization, additional patterning steps become obsolete. Using the electrodes for self-aligned immobilization provides a spatial resolution that is limited by the electrode patterning process and that cannot be easily obtained by alternative dispensing or coating techniques. Via electrochemical reduction of diazonium salts combined with click chemistry, we achieved site-specific immobilization of two different ssDNA probes side by side on a single chip. This method was experimentally verified by cyclic voltammetry (CV), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and specific target recognition was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. The combination of the electroaddressability of electrografting with the chemoselectivity of click chemistry, offers a versatile platform for highly efficient site-specific functionalization of multitarget biosensors.

  19. Site specific modification of the human plasma proteome by methylglyoxal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimzey, Michael J; Kinsky, Owen R; Yassine, Hussein N; Tsaprailis, George; Stump, Craig S; Monks, Terrence J; Lau, Serrine S

    2015-12-01

    Increasing evidence identifies dicarbonyl stress from reactive glucose metabolites, such as methylglyoxal (MG), as a major pathogenic link between hyperglycemia and complications of diabetes. MG covalently modifies arginine residues, yet the site specificity of this modification has not been thoroughly investigated. Sites of MG adduction in the plasma proteome were identified using LC-MS/MS analysis in vitro following incubation of plasma proteins with MG. Treatment of plasma proteins with MG yielded 14 putative MG hotspots from five plasma proteins (albumin [nine hotspots], serotransferrin, haptoglobin [2 hotspots], hemopexin, and Ig lambda-2 chain C regions). The search results revealed two versions of MG-arginine modification, dihydroxyimidazolidine (R+72) and hydroimidazolone (R+54) adducts. One of the sites identified was R257 in human serum albumin, which is a critical residue located in drug binding site I. This site was validated as a target for MG modification by a fluorescent probe displacement assay, which revealed significant drug dissociation at 300 μM MG from a prodan-HSA complex (75 μM). Moreover, twelve human plasma samples (six male, six female, with two type 2 diabetic subjects from both genders) were analyzed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) tandem mass spectrometry and revealed the presence of the MG-modified albumin R257 peptide. These data provide insights into the nature of the site-specificity of MG modification of arginine, which may be useful for therapeutic treatments that aim to prevent MG-mediated adverse responses in patients.

  20. Towards soft robotic devices for site-specific drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alici, Gursel

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research efforts have recently been dedicated to the establishment of various drug delivery systems (DDS) that are mechanical/physical, chemical and biological/molecular DDS. In this paper, we report on the recent advances in site-specific drug delivery (site-specific, controlled, targeted or smart drug delivery are terms used interchangeably in the literature, to mean to transport a drug or a therapeutic agent to a desired location within the body and release it as desired with negligibly small toxicity and side effect compared to classical drug administration means such as peroral, parenteral, transmucosal, topical and inhalation) based on mechanical/physical systems consisting of implantable and robotic drug delivery systems. While we specifically focus on the robotic or autonomous DDS, which can be reprogrammable and provide multiple doses of a drug at a required time and rate, we briefly cover the implanted DDS, which are well-developed relative to the robotic DDS, to highlight the design and performance requirements, and investigate issues associated with the robotic DDS. Critical research issues associated with both DDSs are presented to describe the research challenges ahead of us in order to establish soft robotic devices for clinical and biomedical applications.

  1. Editing livestock genomes with site-specific nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Daniel F; Tan, Wenfang; Hackett, Perry B; Fahrenkrug, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been a major transformation in our ability to precisely manipulate the genomes of animals. Efficiencies of introducing precise genetic alterations in large animal genomes have improved 100000-fold due to a succession of site-specific nucleases that introduce double-strand DNA breaks with a specificity of 10(-9). Herein we describe our applications of site-specific nucleases, especially transcription activator-like effector nucleases, to engineer specific alterations in the genomes of pigs and cows. We can introduce variable changes mediated by non-homologous end joining of DNA breaks to inactive genes. Alternatively, using homology-directed repair, we have introduced specific changes that support either precise alterations in a gene's encoded polypeptide, elimination of the gene or replacement by another unrelated DNA sequence. Depending on the gene and the mutation, we can achieve 10%-50% effective rates of precise mutations. Applications of the new precision genetics are extensive. Livestock now can be engineered with selected phenotypes that will augment their value and adaption to variable ecosystems. In addition, animals can be engineered to specifically mimic human diseases and disorders, which will accelerate the production of reliable drugs and devices. Moreover, animals can be engineered to become better providers of biomaterials used in the medical treatment of diseases and disorders.

  2. Site Specific Modification of the Human Plasma Proteome by Methylglyoxal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimzey, Michael J.; Kinsky, Owen R.; Yassine, Hussein N.; Tsaprailis, George; Stump, Craig; Monks, Terrence J.; Lau, Serrine S.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence identifies dicarbonyl stress from reactive glucose metabolites, such as methylglyoxal (MG), as a major pathogenic link between hyperglycemia and complications of diabetes. MG covalently modifies arginine residues, yet the site specificity of this modification has not been thoroughly investigated. Sites of MG adduction in the plasma proteome were identified using LC-MS/MS analysis in vitro following incubation of plasma proteins with MG. Treatment of plasma proteins with MG yielded 14 putative MG hotspots from five plasma proteins (albumin [nine hotspots], serotransferrin, haptoglobin [2 hotspots], hemopexin, and Ig lambda-2 chain C regions). The search results revealed two versions of MG-arginine modification, dihydroxyimidazolidine (R+72) and hydroimidazolone (R+54) adducts. One of the sites identified was R257 in human serum albumin, which is a critical residue located in drug binding site I. This site was validated as a target for MG modification by a fluorescent probe displacement assay, which revealed significant drug dissociation at 300 μM MG from a prodan-HSA complex (75 μM). Moreover, twelve human plasma samples (six male, six female, with two type 2 diabetic subjects from both genders) were analyzed using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) tandem mass spectrometry and revealed the presence of the MG-modified albumin R257 peptide. These data provide insights into the nature of the site-specificity of MG modification of arginine, which may be useful for therapeutic treatments that aim to prevent MG-mediated adverse responses in patients. PMID:26435215

  3. Evaluation of site-specific lateral inclusion zone for vapor intrusion based on an analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Wu, Yun; Tang, Mengling; Wang, Yue; Wang, Jianjin; Suuberg, Eric M; Jiang, Lin; Liu, Jing

    2015-11-15

    In 2002, U.S. EPA proposed a general buffer zone of approximately 100 feet (30 m) laterally to determine which buildings to include in vapor intrusion (VI) investigations. However, this screening distance can be threatened by factors such as extensive surface pavements. Under such circumstances, EPA recommended investigating soil vapor migration distance on a site-specific basis. To serve this purpose, we present an analytical model (AAMLPH) as an alternative to estimate lateral VI screening distances at chlorinated compound-contaminated sites. Based on a previously introduced model (AAML), AAMLPH is developed by considering the effects of impervious surface cover and soil geology heterogeneities, providing predictions consistent with the three-dimensional (3-D) numerical simulated results. By employing risk-based and contribution-based screening levels of subslab concentrations (50 and 500 μg/m(3), respectively) and source-to-subslab attenuation factor (0.001 and 0.01, respectively), AAMLPH suggests that buildings greater than 30 m from a plume boundary can still be affected by VI in the presence of any two of the three factors, which are high source vapor concentration, shallow source and significant surface cover. This finding justifies the concern that EPA has expressed about the application of the 30 m lateral separation distance in the presence of physical barriers (e.g., asphalt covers or ice) at the ground surface.

  4. Proposed Site-Specific Response Spectra for Surabaya-Madura Bridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Kusumastuti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a site-specific seismic hazard study to determine the recommended seismic design criteria for Suramadu Bridge. The study is performed using probabilistic seismic hazard approach to determine maximum acceleration and response spectra at bedrock and followed by local site effect analysis to determine maximum acceleration and response spectra at ground surface. The probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA is carried out using 3-dimension (3-D seismic source models (fault source model. Two hazard levels are analysed to represent 150 and 3,300 years return period of ground motion around site location. The local site effect analysis is performed using 1-dimension (1-D shear wave propagation theory to obtain peak ground acceleration and response spectra at ground surface. Finally, the site-specific surface response spectra with 5 percent damping are developed based on the mean plus one standard deviation concept from the result of local site effect analysis.

  5. Impact of smoking and excess body weight on overall and site-specific cancer mortality risk

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Julia; Rohrmann, Sabine; Bopp, Matthias; Faeh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Smoking and excess body weight are major preventable risk factors for premature death. This study aimed at analyzing their single and combined association with site-specific cancer mortality. Methods: Our study population comprised 35,784 men and women of ages 14 to 99 years, who participated in population-based health surveys conducted 1977–1993 in Switzerland and were followed up for mortality until 2008. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were calculated for diffe...

  6. A hydrodynamic model for granular material flows including segregation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilberg, Dominik; Klar, Axel; Steiner, Konrad

    2017-06-01

    The simulation of granular flows including segregation effects in large industrial processes using particle methods is accurate, but very time-consuming. To overcome the long computation times a macroscopic model is a natural choice. Therefore, we couple a mixture theory based segregation model to a hydrodynamic model of Navier-Stokes-type, describing the flow behavior of the granular material. The granular flow model is a hybrid model derived from kinetic theory and a soil mechanical approach to cover the regime of fast dilute flow, as well as slow dense flow, where the density of the granular material is close to the maximum packing density. Originally, the segregation model has been formulated by Thornton and Gray for idealized avalanches. It is modified and adapted to be in the preferred form for the coupling. In the final coupled model the segregation process depends on the local state of the granular system. On the other hand, the granular system changes as differently mixed regions of the granular material differ i.e. in the packing density. For the modeling process the focus lies on dry granular material flows of two particle types differing only in size but can be easily extended to arbitrary granular mixtures of different particle size and density. To solve the coupled system a finite volume approach is used. To test the model the rotational mixing of small and large particles in a tumbler is simulated.

  7. Drainage filters and constructed wetlands to mitigate site-specific nutrient losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Hoffmann, Carl Christian; Iversen, Bo Vangsø

    options targeting subsurface drainage are lacking. An end-of-pipe drainage filter solution offers the benefits of a targeted measure typically applied to point sources. This calls for a shift of paradigm towards the development of new, cost-efficient technologies to mitigate site-specific nutrient losses...... drainage. The project studies different approaches of implementing the filter technologies including drainage well or drainage pipe filters as well as surface-flow and sub-surface flow constructed wetlands....

  8. Synaptic channel model including effects of spike width variation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic Channel Model Including Effects of Spike Width Variation Hamideh Ramezani Next-generation and Wireless Communications Laboratory (NWCL) Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey Ozgur B. Akan Next-generation and Wireless Communications Laboratory (NWCL) Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey ABSTRACT An accu...

  9. A sonic boom propagation model including mean flow atmospheric effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, Joe; Sparrow, Victor W.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a time domain formulation of nonlinear lossy propagation in onedimension that also includes the effects of non-collinear mean flow in the acoustic medium. The model equation utilized is an augmented Burgers equation that includes the effects of nonlinearity, geometric spreading, atmospheric stratification, and also absorption and dispersion due to thermoviscous and molecular relaxation effects. All elements of the propagation are implemented in the time domain and the effects of non-collinear mean flow are accounted for in each term of the model equation. Previous authors have presented methods limited to showing the effects of wind on ray tracing and/or using an effective speed of sound in their model equation. The present work includes the effects of mean flow for all terms included in the augmented Burgers equation with all of the calculations performed in the time-domain. The capability to include the effects of mean flow in the acoustic medium allows one to make predictions more representative of real-world atmospheric conditions. Examples are presented for nonlinear propagation of N-waves and shaped sonic booms. [Work supported by Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation.

  10. Site-specific gene expression patterns in oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohwitter, Gesche; Buerger, Horst; Korsching, Eberhard; van Diest, Paul J; Kleinheinz, Johannes; Fillies, Thomas

    2017-05-10

    Squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) are the most prevalent malignant tumours within the head and neck. Evidence exists that distinct genes are differentially regulated in SCCs of the oral cavity compared to other head and neck regions. Given this background, the aim of this study was to investigate whether such tumour site-specific gene expression can also be observed in different localizations within the oral cavity. Using tissue microarrays (TMAs), we investigated 76 SCCs of the floor of the mouth, 49 SCCs of the tongue and 68 SCCs of other anatomic regions within the oral cavity. The expression of 17 genes involved in cell cycle and growth control (p16, p21, p27, p53, cyclin D1, EGFR, c-kit, bcl-6), cell adhesion (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenin), and apoptosis/stress response genes (Hif-1-alpha, Glut 1, CA IX, caspase, hsp70, XIAP) were investigated by means of immunohistochemistry. The data were subjected to chi(2), interdependency and Kaplan-Meier analysis. Our study suggests a remote difference in the site-specific gene expression patterns of oral cancer. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) showed a significantly higher expression (p oral cavity. The increased XIAP expression was further associated with significantly decreased overall survival in all cases of SCCs of the oral cavity (p Expression levels of p53, CA IX, beta-catenin, Hif-1-alpha, and c-kit were also observed to be inversely related between SCCs of the floor of the mouth and those of the tongue respectively, although these differences did not reach statistical significance. Overall and event-free survival did not differ in patients with T1/T2/N0 SCCs according to tumour localization. In summary, the protein expression patterns of SCCs of the oral cavity suggest the existence of a molecular and morphological spectrum of SCCs in the oral cavity. In particular the expression pattern of XIAP indicates distinct gene expression patterns between carcinomas of the floor of the mouth and oral tongue

  11. Site-specific growth of polymers on silica rods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Bo; Soligno, Giuseppe; Kamp, Marlous; de Nijs, Bart; de Graaf, Joost; Dijkstra, Marjolein; van Roij, René; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Imhof, Arnout

    2014-12-28

    Colloids specifically developed for self-assembly (SA) into advanced functional materials have rapidly become more complex, as this complexity allows for more ways to optimize both the SA process and the properties of the resulting materials. For instance, by creating 'patchy' particles more open structures can be achieved through directional interactions. However, the number of ways in which site-specific chemistry can be achieved on particle surfaces is still limited. Here, we show how polymer patches can be specifically grown onto only the flat end of bullet-shaped silica rods by utilizing a subtle anisotropy in surface tension and shape caused by the growth mechanism of the rods. Conversely, if the bullet-shaped silica rods are used as 'Pickering-emulsion' stabilizers the same surface tension effects exclusively direct the orientation of the rods into a 'hedgehog-morphology'. Finally, we demonstrate how an external electric field can direct the particles in a 'vectorial' way.

  12. Construction of Mouse Melanoma Cell Models of Wild-type Overexpression Connexin 43 and Site-specific Mutant Connexin 43%过表达及定点突变缝隙连接蛋白Cx43小鼠黑色素瘤细胞模型的构建

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玢; 张广献; 刘娟; 赵青; 谭宇蕙; 吴映雅; 易华; 杜标炎

    2014-01-01

    目的:构建小鼠黑色素瘤细胞(B16)过表达野生型及点突变型缝隙连接蛋白43(Connexin43, Cx43)细胞模型,为以缝隙连接(Gap Junction, GJ)为靶点的中药复方、中药单药及药物单体的研究提供可靠阳性对照和阴性对照。方法构建野生型Cx43、突变型Cx43G21R、突变型Cx43G138R重组荧光蛋白融合慢病毒表达质粒,用定点突变技术获得Cx43G21R和Cx43G138R突变体,对上述3种质粒进行双酶切和测序鉴定,并分别包装病毒感染B16细胞,使B16细胞过表达野生型Cx43、突变型Cx43G21R、突变型Cx43G138R。 Western blot检测Cx43蛋白表达水平变化,荧光示踪法观察缝隙连接通讯(Gap Junction Intercellular Communication, GJIC)功能变化。结果①酶切及测序证明,成功构建 pLVCx43-mCherry、 pLVCx43-mCherryG21R、 pLVCx43-mCherryG138R重组荧光蛋白融合慢病毒表达质粒。②成功感染B16细胞并筛选稳定过表达Cx43、 Cx43G21R、Cx43G138R细胞株, Western blot检测显示上述细胞株Cx43蛋白表达均高于对照组。③过表达野生型Cx43后B16细胞GJIC功能较对照组增强;过表达突变型Cx43后B16细胞GJIC功能较对照组减弱。结论过表达野生型Cx43可增强B16细胞GJIC功能,过表达突变型Cx43可抑制B16细胞GJIC功能。%Objective To construct mouse B16 melanoma cell models of wild-type overexpression Cx43 and site-specific mutant Cx43, thus to provide reliable positive and negative control for the study of gap junction targeted Chinese herbal formula, Chinese medicine ingredient, and drug monomer. Methods We constructed the recombined fluorescent protein(mCherry) infused with Lentivirus expression plasmid of wild-type Cx43(pLVCx43-mCherry), mutant R (pLVCx43G21R-mCherry) and mutant Cx43G138R(pLVCx43 G138R-mCherry). The Cx43G21R and Cx43G138R mutants were obtained by site-specific mutagenesis. The three kinds of plasmid were performed double restriction

  13. Site-Specific Integration of Exogenous Genes Using Genome Editing Technologies in Zebrafish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Kawahara

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The zebrafish (Danio rerio is an ideal vertebrate model to investigate the developmental molecular mechanism of organogenesis and regeneration. Recent innovation in genome editing technologies, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9 system, have allowed researchers to generate diverse genomic modifications in whole animals and in cultured cells. The CRISPR/Cas9 and TALEN techniques frequently induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs at the targeted gene, resulting in frameshift-mediated gene disruption. As a useful application of genome editing technology, several groups have recently reported efficient site-specific integration of exogenous genes into targeted genomic loci. In this review, we provide an overview of TALEN- and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated site-specific integration of exogenous genes in zebrafish.

  14. Site-Specific Integration of Exogenous Genes Using Genome Editing Technologies in Zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Atsuo; Hisano, Yu; Ota, Satoshi; Taimatsu, Kiyohito

    2016-05-13

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an ideal vertebrate model to investigate the developmental molecular mechanism of organogenesis and regeneration. Recent innovation in genome editing technologies, such as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, have allowed researchers to generate diverse genomic modifications in whole animals and in cultured cells. The CRISPR/Cas9 and TALEN techniques frequently induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the targeted gene, resulting in frameshift-mediated gene disruption. As a useful application of genome editing technology, several groups have recently reported efficient site-specific integration of exogenous genes into targeted genomic loci. In this review, we provide an overview of TALEN- and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated site-specific integration of exogenous genes in zebrafish.

  15. Recent Developments in the Site-Specific Immobilization of Proteins onto Solid Supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A

    2007-02-21

    Immobilization of proteins onto surfaces is of great importance in numerous applications, including protein analysis, drug screening, and medical diagnostics, among others. The success of all these technologies relies on the immobilization technique employed to attach a protein to the corresponding surface. Non-specific physical adsorption or chemical cross-linking with appropriate surfaces results in the immobilization of the protein in random orientations. Site-specific covalent attachment, on the other hand, leads to molecules being arranged in a definite, orderly fashion and allows the use of spacers and linkers to help minimize steric hindrances between the protein and the surface. The present work reviews the latest chemical and biochemical developments for the site-specific covalent attachment of proteins onto solid supports.

  16. Site-specific estimates of water yield applied in regional acid sensitivity surveys across western Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D. SHAW

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Runoff or water yield is an important input to the Steady-State Water Chemistry (SSWC model for estimating critical loads of acidity. Herein, we present site-specific water yield estimates for a large number of lakes (779 across three provinces of western Canada (Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and British Columbia using an isotope mass balance (IMB approach. We explore the impact of applying site-specific hydrology as compared to use of regional runoff estimates derived from gridded datasets in assessing critical loads of acidity to these lakes. In general, the average water yield derived from IMB is similar to the long-term average runoff; however, IMB results suggest a much larger range in hydrological settings of the lakes, attributed to spatial heterogeneity in watershed characteristics and landcover. The comparison of critical loads estimates from the two methods suggests that use of average regional runoff data in the SSWC model may overestimate critical loads for the majority of lakes due to systematic skewness in the actual runoff distributions. Implications for use of site-specific hydrology in regional critical loads assessments across western Canada are discussed.

  17. Chromosomal manipulation by site-specific recombinases and fluorescent protein-based vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munehiro Uemura

    Full Text Available Feasibility of chromosomal manipulation in mammalian cells was first reported 15 years ago. Although this technique is useful for precise understanding of gene regulation in the chromosomal context, a limited number of laboratories have used it in actual practice because of associated technical difficulties. To overcome the practical hurdles, we developed a Cre-mediated chromosomal recombination system using fluorescent proteins and various site-specific recombinases. These techniques enabled quick construction of targeting vectors, easy identification of chromosome-rearranged cells, and rearrangement leaving minimum artificial elements at junctions. Applying this system to a human cell line, we successfully recapitulated two types of pathogenic chromosomal translocations in human diseases: MYC/IgH and BCR/ABL1. By inducing recombination between two loxP sites targeted into the same chromosome, we could mark cells harboring deletion or duplication of the inter-loxP segments with different colors of fluorescence. In addition, we demonstrated that the intrachromosomal recombination frequency is inversely proportional to the distance between two recombination sites, implicating a future application of this frequency as a proximity sensor. Our method of chromosomal manipulation can be employed for particular cell types in which gene targeting is possible (e.g. embryonic stem cells. Experimental use of this system would open up new horizons in genome biology, including the establishment of cellular and animal models of diseases caused by translocations and copy-number variations.

  18. Site-specific cancer risk in the Baltic cohort of Chernobyl cleanup workers, 1986–2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahu, Kaja; Hakulinen, Timo; Smailyte, Giedre; Stengrevics, Aivars; Auvinen, Anssi; Inskip, Peter D.; Boice, John D.; Rahu, Mati

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess site-specific cancer risk in the Baltic cohort of Chernobyl cleanup workers 1986–2007. Methods The Baltic cohort includes 17,040 men from Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania who participated in the environmental cleanup after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in 1986–1991, and who were followed for cancer incidence until the end of 2007. Cancer cases diagnosed in the cohort and in the male population of each country were identified from the respective national cancer registers. The proportional incidence ratio (PIR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was used to estimate the site-specific cancer risk in the cohort. For comparison and as it was possible, the site-specific standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was calculated for the Estonian sub-cohort, which was not feasible for the other countries. Results Overall, 756 cancer cases were reported during 1986–2007. A higher proportion of thyroid cancers in relation to the male population was found (PIR=2.76; 95%CI 1.63–4.36), especially among those who started their mission shortly after the accident, in April–May 1986 (PIR=6.38; 95% CI 2.34–13.89). Also, an excess of oesophageal cancers was noted (PIR=1.52; 95% CI 1.06–2.11). No increased PIRs for leukaemia or radiation-related cancer sites combined were observed. PIRs and SIRs for the Estonian sub-cohort demonstrated the same site-specific cancer risk pattern. Conclusion Consistent evidence of an increase in radiation-related cancers in the Baltic cohort was not observed with the possible exception of thyroid cancer, where conclusions are hampered by known medical examination including thyroid screening among cleanup workers. PMID:23683549

  19. A model of Barchan dunes including lateral shear stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwämmle, V; Herrmann, H J

    2005-01-01

    Barchan dunes are found where sand availability is low and wind direction quite constant. The two dimensional shear stress of the wind field and the sand movement by saltation and avalanches over a barchan dune are simulated. The model with one dimensional shear stress is extended including surface diffusion and lateral shear stress. The resulting final shape is compared to the results of the model with a one dimensional shear stress and confirmed by comparison to measurements. We found agreement and improvements with respect to the model with one dimensional shear stress. Additionally, a characteristic edge at the center of the windward side is discovered which is also observed for big barchans. Diffusion effects reduce this effect for small dunes.

  20. Site-specific proteolysis of the transcriptional coactivator HCF-1 can regulate its interaction with protein cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Jodi L; Kristie, Thomas M

    2006-05-01

    Limited proteolytic processing is an important transcriptional regulatory mechanism. In various contexts, proteolysis controls the cytoplasmic-to-nuclear transport of important transcription factors or removes domains to produce factors with altered activities. The transcriptional coactivator host cell factor-1 (HCF-1) is proteolytically processed within a unique domain consisting of 20-aa reiterations. Site-specific cleavage within one or more repeats generates a family of amino- and carboxyl-terminal subunits that remain tightly associated. However, the consequences of HCF-1 processing have been undefined. In this study, it was determined that the HCF-1-processing domain interacts with several proteins including the transcriptional coactivator/corepressor four-and-a-half LIM domain-2 (FHL2). Analysis of this interaction has uncovered specificity with both sequence and context determinants within the reiterations of this processing domain. In cells, FHL2 interacts exclusively with the nonprocessed coactivator and costimulates transcription of an HCF-1-dependent target gene. The functional interaction of HCF-1 with FHL2 supports a model in which site-specific proteolysis regulates the interaction of HCF-1 with protein partners and thus can modulate the activity of this coactivator. This paradigm expands the biological significance of limited proteolytic processing as a regulatory mechanism in gene transcription.

  1. Cancer registries in Japan: National Clinical Database and site-specific cancer registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anazawa, Takayuki; Miyata, Hiroaki; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-02-01

    The cancer registry is an essential part of any rational program of evidence-based cancer control. The cancer control program is required to strategize in a systematic and impartial manner and efficiently utilize limited resources. In Japan, the National Clinical Database (NCD) was launched in 2010. It is a nationwide prospective registry linked to various types of board certification systems regarding surgery. The NCD is a nationally validated database using web-based data collection software; it is risk adjusted and outcome based to improve the quality of surgical care. The NCD generalizes site-specific cancer registries by taking advantage of their excellent organizing ability. Some site-specific cancer registries, including pancreatic, breast, and liver cancer registries have already been combined with the NCD. Cooperation between the NCD and site-specific cancer registries can establish a valuable platform to develop a cancer care plan in Japan. Furthermore, the prognosis information of cancer patients arranged using population-based and hospital-based cancer registries can help in efficient data accumulation on the NCD. International collaboration between Japan and the USA has recently started and is expected to provide global benchmarking and to allow a valuable comparison of cancer treatment practices between countries using nationwide cancer registries in the future. Clinical research and evidence-based policy recommendation based on accurate data from the nationwide database may positively impact the public.

  2. Goldilocks Models of Higher-Dimensional Inflation (including modulus stabilization)

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C P; Hayman, Peter; Patil, Subodh P

    2016-01-01

    We explore the mechanics of inflation in simplified extra-dimensional models involving an inflaton interacting with the Einstein-Maxwell system in two extra dimensions. The models are Goldilocks-like in that they are just complicated enough to include a mechanism to stabilize the extra-dimensional size, yet simple enough to solve the full 6D field equations using basic tools. The solutions are not limited to the effective 4D regime with H m_KK, but when they do standard 4D fluctuation calculations need not apply. When in a 4D regime the solutions predict eta ~ 0 hence n_s ~ 0.96 and r ~ 0.096 and so are ruled out if tensor modes remain unseen. Analysis of general parameters is difficult without a full 6D fluctuation calculation.

  3. Piv site-specific invertase requires a DEDD motif analogous to the catalytic center of the RuvC Holliday junction resolvases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchner, John M; Robertson, Anne E; Poynter, David J; Denniston, Shelby S; Karls, Anna C

    2005-05-01

    Piv, a unique prokaryotic site-specific DNA invertase, is related to transposases of the insertion elements from the IS110/IS492 family and shows no similarity to the site-specific recombinases of the tyrosine- or serine-recombinase families. Piv tertiary structure is predicted to include the RNase H-like fold that typically encompasses the catalytic site of the recombinases or nucleases of the retroviral integrase superfamily, including transposases and RuvC-like Holliday junction resolvases. Analogous to the DDE and DEDD catalytic motifs of transposases and RuvC, respectively, four Piv acidic residues D9, E59, D101, and D104 appear to be positioned appropriately within the RNase H fold to coordinate two divalent metal cations. This suggests mechanistic similarity between site-specific inversion mediated by Piv and transposition or endonucleolytic reactions catalyzed by enzymes of the retroviral integrase superfamily. The role of the DEDD motif in Piv catalytic activity was addressed using Piv variants that are substituted individually or multiply at these acidic residues and assaying for in vivo inversion, intermolecular recombination, and DNA binding activities. The results indicate that all four residues of the DEDD motif are required for Piv catalytic activity. The DEDD residues are not essential for inv recombination site recognition and binding, but this acidic tetrad does appear to contribute to the stability of Piv-inv interactions. On the basis of these results, a working model for Piv-mediated inversion that includes resolution of a Holliday junction is presented.

  4. DNA origami metallized site specifically to form electrically conductive nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Anthony C; Liu, Jianfei; Pound, Elisabeth; Uprety, Bibek; Woolley, Adam T; Davis, Robert C; Harb, John N

    2012-09-06

    DNA origami is a promising tool for use as a template in the design and fabrication of nanoscale structures. The ability to engineer selected staple strands on a DNA origami structure provides a high density of addressable locations across the structure. Here we report a method using site-specific attachment of gold nanoparticles to modified staple strands and subsequent metallization to fabricate conductive wires from DNA origami templates. We have modified DNA origami structures by lengthening each staple strand in select regions with a 10-base nucleotide sequence and have attached DNA-modified gold nanoparticles to the lengthened staple strands via complementary base-pairing. The high density of extended staple strands allowed the gold nanoparticles to pack tightly in the modified regions of the DNA origami, where the measured median gap size between neighboring particles was 4.1 nm. Gold metallization processes were optimized so that the attached gold nanoparticles grew until gaps between particles were filled and uniform continuous nanowires were formed. Finally, electron beam lithography was used to pattern electrodes in order to measure the electrical conductivity of metallized DNA origami, which showed an average resistance of 2.4 kΩ per metallized structure.

  5. Multispectral remote sensing for site-specific nitrogen fertilizer management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikrooz Bagheri

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the use of multispectral remote sensing for site-specific nitrogen fertilizer management. Satellite imagery from the advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer (Aster was acquired in a 23 ha corn-planted area in Iran. For the collection of field samples, a total of 53 pixels were selected by systematic randomized sampling. The total nitrogen content in corn leaf tissues in these pixels was evaluated. To predict corn canopy nitrogen content, different vegetation indices, such as normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, soil-adjusted vegetation index (Savi, optimized soil-adjusted vegetation index (Osavi, modified chlorophyll absorption ratio index 2 (MCARI2, and modified triangle vegetation index 2 (MTVI2, were investigated. The supervised classification technique using the spectral angle mapper classifier (SAM was performed to generate a nitrogen fertilization map. The MTVI2 presented the highest correlation (R²=0.87 and is a good predictor of corn canopy nitrogen content in the V13 stage, at 60 days after cultivating. Aster imagery can be used to predict nitrogen status in corn canopy. Classification results indicate three levels of required nitrogen per pixel: low (0-2.5 kg, medium (2.5-3 kg, and high (3-3.3 kg.

  6. Cre-inducible site-specific recombination in zebrafish oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon-Olejua, Alejandro; Welte, Cornelia; Chekuru, Avinash; Bosak, Viktoria; Brand, Michael; Hans, Stefan; Stuermer, Claudia A O

    2017-01-01

    The conditional Cre/lox system has recently emerged as a valuable tool for studies on both embryonic and adult Zebrafish. Temporal control and site-specific recombination are achieved by using the ligand-inducible CreER(T2) and administration of the drug tamoxifen (TAM) or its active metabolite, 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT). Here we report the generation of a transgenic Zebrafish line, which expresses an mCherry-tagged variant of CreER(T2) under the control of the myelin basic protein a (mbpa) promoter. Our analysis shows that larval and adult expression of the transgene recapitulates the endogenous mbpa expression pattern in oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, combination with a Cre-dependent EGFP reporter results in EGFP-expressing oligodendrocytes in the spinal cord, brain, and optic nerve in TAM- or 4-OHT-treated larvae and 4-month-old fish, but not in untreated controls. The transgenic Zebrafish line Tg(mbpa:mCherry-T2A-CreER(T2) ) elicits CreER(T2) expression specifically in myelinating glia cells. Cre-inducible targeted recombination of genes in oligodendrocytes will be useful to elucidate cellular and molecular mechanisms of myelination in vivo during development (myelination) and regeneration (remyelination) after injury to the central nervous system (CNS). It will also allow targeted expression and overexpression of genes of interest (transgenes) in oligodendrocytes at defined developmental and adult stages. Developmental Dynamics 246:41-49, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Genetic fate mapping using site-specific recombinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legué, Emilie; Joyner, Alexandra L

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how cells are assembled in three dimensions to generate an organ, or a whole organism, is a pivotal question in developmental biology. Similarly, it is critical to understand how adult stem cells integrate into an existing organ during regeneration or in response to injury. Key to discovering the answers to these questions is being able to study the various behaviors of distinct cell types during development or regeneration. Fate mapping techniques are fundamental to studying cell behaviors such as proliferation, movement, and lineage segregation, as the techniques allow precursor cells to be marked and their descendants followed and characterized over time. The generation of transgenic mice, combined with the use of site-specific recombinases (SSR) in the mouse genome, has provided a means to develop powerful genetic fate mapping approaches. A key advantage of genetic fate mapping is that it allows cells to be genetically marked, and therefore the mark is transmitted to all the descendants of the initially marked cells. By making modifications to the SSRs that render their enzymatic activity inducible, and the development of an assortment of reporter alleles for marking cells, increasingly sophisticated genetic fate mapping studies can be performed. In this chapter, we review the four main genetic fate mapping methods that utilize intrachromosomal recombination to mark cells (cumulative, inducible, clonal, and intersectional) and one interchromosomal method, the tools required to carry out each approach, and the practical considerations that have to be taken into account before embarking on each type of genetic fate mapping study.

  8. Kinetic models of gene expression including non-coding RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-03-01

    In cells, genes are transcribed into mRNAs, and the latter are translated into proteins. Due to the feedbacks between these processes, the kinetics of gene expression may be complex even in the simplest genetic networks. The corresponding models have already been reviewed in the literature. A new avenue in this field is related to the recognition that the conventional scenario of gene expression is fully applicable only to prokaryotes whose genomes consist of tightly packed protein-coding sequences. In eukaryotic cells, in contrast, such sequences are relatively rare, and the rest of the genome includes numerous transcript units representing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). During the past decade, it has become clear that such RNAs play a crucial role in gene expression and accordingly influence a multitude of cellular processes both in the normal state and during diseases. The numerous biological functions of ncRNAs are based primarily on their abilities to silence genes via pairing with a target mRNA and subsequently preventing its translation or facilitating degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Many other abilities of ncRNAs have been discovered as well. Our review is focused on the available kinetic models describing the mRNA, ncRNA and protein interplay. In particular, we systematically present the simplest models without kinetic feedbacks, models containing feedbacks and predicting bistability and oscillations in simple genetic networks, and models describing the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks. Mathematically, the presentation is based primarily on temporal mean-field kinetic equations. The stochastic and spatio-temporal effects are also briefly discussed.

  9. Progress Towards an LES Wall Model Including Unresolved Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, Kyle; Redman, Andrew; Aikens, Kurt

    2015-11-01

    Wall models used in large eddy simulations (LES) are often based on theories for hydraulically smooth walls. While this is reasonable for many applications, there are also many where the impact of surface roughness is important. A previously developed wall model has been used primarily for jet engine aeroacoustics. However, jet simulations have not accurately captured thick initial shear layers found in some experimental data. This may partly be due to nozzle wall roughness used in the experiments to promote turbulent boundary layers. As a result, the wall model is extended to include the effects of unresolved wall roughness through appropriate alterations to the log-law. The methodology is tested for incompressible flat plate boundary layers with different surface roughness. Correct trends are noted for the impact of surface roughness on the velocity profile. However, velocity deficit profiles and the Reynolds stresses do not collapse as well as expected. Possible reasons for the discrepancies as well as future work will be presented. This work used the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE), which is supported by National Science Foundation grant number ACI-1053575. Computational resources on TACC Stampede were provided under XSEDE allocation ENG150001.

  10. Site specific incorporation of heavy atom-containing unnatural amino acids into proteins for structure determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jianming; Wang, Lei; Wu, Ning; Schultz, Peter G.

    2008-07-15

    Translation systems and other compositions including orthogonal aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases that preferentially charge an orthogonal tRNA with an iodinated or brominated amino acid are provided. Nucleic acids encoding such synthetases are also described, as are methods and kits for producing proteins including heavy atom-containing amino acids, e.g., brominated or iodinated amino acids. Methods of determining the structure of a protein, e.g., a protein into which a heavy atom has been site-specifically incorporated through use of an orthogonal tRNA/aminoacyl tRNA-synthetase pair, are also described.

  11. Site-specific hydrogen diffusion rates during clinopyroxene dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriss, Elizabeth; Plank, Terry; Walker, David

    2016-06-01

    The rate of hydrogen diffusion in clinopyroxene is relevant to interpreting hydrogen ("water") concentrations in xenoliths, phenocrysts, and clinopyroxene-hosted melt inclusions to provide insight into the deep-earth water cycle and volcanic explosivity. Here, we determine bulk and site-specific hydrogen diffusivities in two diopsides and an augite by heating initially homogeneous water-bearing samples in a 1-atm CO/CO2 gas-mixing furnace at 800-1000 °C and oxygen fugacity at the quartz-fayalite-magnetite buffer and observing H-loss profiles. The O-H stretching range between wavenumbers 3000 and 4000 cm-1 in FTIR spectra is resolved into 4-6 peaks, each of which is assumed to represent a distinct defect site for the hydrogen, to determine peak-specific diffusivities using our previously published whole-block method. For the diopside from the Kunlun Mts. in China, Arrhenius relations are reported for peaks at 3645, 3617, 3540, 3443, and 3355 cm-1 based on measurements at 816, 904, and 1000 °C. Bulk and site-specific diffusivities are determined for the same set of peaks at 904 °C for the second diopside (Jaipur). The augite (PMR-53) was a triangular thin slab, and hydrogen diffusivities were determined for bulk hydrogen and peaks at 3620, 3550, 3460, and 3355 cm-1 in the thickness direction at 800 °C. Bulk hydrogen diffusivity in the Jaipur diopside is consistent with previous work, and hydrogen diffusivity in augite PMR-53 is slightly lower than the fast direction diffusivities measured || [100] and [001]* in Jaipur diopside. Both diopsides show 1-2 orders of magnitude differences in the peaks-specific diffusivities, with the fastest diffusivities at 3450 cm-1 and the slowest at 3645 cm-1. However, the hydrogen diffusivities in Jaipur diopside are 2-4 orders of magnitude higher than those in Kunlun diopside for bulk hydrogen and all peaks. Thus, peak-specific differences cannot by themselves adequately explain the 5 orders of magnitude range in hydrogen

  12. Numerical Modeling of Electroacoustic Logging Including Joule Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plyushchenkov, Boris D.; Nikitin, Anatoly A.; Turchaninov, Victor I.

    It is well known that electromagnetic field excites acoustic wave in a porous elastic medium saturated with fluid electrolyte due to electrokinetic conversion effect. Pride's equations describing this process are written in isothermal approximation. Update of these equations, which allows to take influence of Joule heating on acoustic waves propagation into account, is proposed here. This update includes terms describing the initiation of additional acoustic waves excited by thermoelastic stresses and the heat conduction equation with right side defined by Joule heating. Results of numerical modeling of several problems of propagation of acoustic waves excited by an electric field source with and without consideration of Joule heating effect in their statements are presented. From these results, it follows that influence of Joule heating should be taken into account at the numerical simulation of electroacoustic logging and at the interpretation of its log data.

  13. Remote Sensing and Geospatial Technological Applications for Site-specific Management of Fruit and Nut Crops: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel O. Paz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Site-specific crop management (SSCM is one facet of precision agriculture which is helping increase production with minimal input. It has enhanced the cost-benefit scenario in crop production. Even though the SSCM is very widely used in row crop agriculture like corn, wheat, rice, soybean, etc. it has very little application in cash crops like fruit and nut. The main goal of this review paper was to conduct a comprehensive review of advanced technologies, including geospatial technologies, used in site-specific management of fruit and nut crops. The review explores various remote sensing data from different platforms like satellite, LIDAR, aerial, and field imaging. The study analyzes the use of satellite sensors, such as Quickbird, Landsat, SPOT, and IRS imagery as well as hyperspectral narrow-band remote sensing data in study of fruit and nut crops in blueberry, citrus, peach, apple, etc. The study also explores other geospatial technologies such as GPS, GIS spatial modeling, advanced image processing techniques, and information technology for suitability study, orchard delineation, and classification accuracy assessment. The study also provides an example of a geospatial model developed in ArcGIS ModelBuilder to automate the blueberry production suitability analysis. The GIS spatial model is developed using various crop characteristics such as chilling hours, soil permeability, drainage, and pH, and land cover to determine the best sites for growing blueberry in Georgia, U.S. The study also provides a list of spectral reflectance curves developed for some fruit and nut crops, blueberry, crowberry, redblush citrus, orange, prickly pear, and peach. The study also explains these curves in detail to help researchers choose the image platform, sensor, and spectrum wavelength for various fruit and nut crops SSCM.

  14. Analysis of High Frequency Site-Specific Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide at Mace Head, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. J.; Harris, E. J.; Olszewski, W.; Ono, S.; Prinn, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) significantly impacts Earth's climate due to its dual role as an inert potent greenhouse gas in the troposphere and as a reactive source of ozone-destroying nitrogen oxides in the stratosphere. However, there remain significant uncertainties in the global budget of this gas. The marked spatial divide in its reactivity means that all stages in the N2O life cycle—emission, transport, and destruction—must be examined to understand the overall effect of N2O on climate. Source and sink processes of N2O lead to varying concentrations of N2O isotopologues (14N14N16O, 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, and 14N14N18O being measured) due to preferential isotopic production and elimination in different environments. Estimation of source and sink fluxes can be improved by combining isotopically resolved N2O observations with simulations using a chemical transport model with reanalysis meteorology and treatments of isotopic signatures of specific surface sources and stratospheric intrusions. We present the first few months of site-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition data from the Stheno-TILDAS instrument (Harris et al, 2013) at Mace Head, Ireland and compare these to results from MOZART-4 (Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4) chemical transport model runs including N2O isotopic fractionation processes and reanalysis meterological fields (NCEP/NCAR, MERRA, and GEOS-5). This study forms the basis for future inverse modeling experiments that will improve the accuracy of isotopically differentiated N2O emission and loss estimates. Ref: Harris, E., D. Nelson, W. Olszewski, M. Zahniser, K. Potter, B. McManus, A. Whitehill, R. Prinn, and S. Ono, Development of a spectroscopic technique for continuous online monitoring of oxygen and site-specific nitrogen isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrous oxide, Analytical Chemistry, 2013; DOI: 10.1021/ac403606u.

  15. Goldilocks models of higher-dimensional inflation (including modulus stabilization)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, C. P.; Enns, Jared J. H.; Hayman, Peter; Patil, Subodh P.

    2016-08-01

    We explore the mechanics of inflation within simplified extra-dimensional models involving an inflaton interacting with the Einstein-Maxwell system in two extra dimensions. The models are Goldilocks-like inasmuch as they are just complicated enough to include a mechanism to stabilize the extra-dimensional size (or modulus), yet simple enough to solve explicitly the full extra-dimensional field equations using only simple tools. The solutions are not restricted to the effective 4D regime with H ll mKK (the latter referring to the characteristic mass splitting of the Kaluza-Klein excitations) because the full extra-dimensional Einstein equations are solved. This allows an exploration of inflationary physics in a controlled calculational regime away from the usual four-dimensional lamp-post. The inclusion of modulus stabilization is important because experience with string models teaches that this is usually what makes models fail: stabilization energies easily dominate the shallow potentials required by slow roll and so open up directions to evolve that are steeper than those of the putative inflationary direction. We explore (numerically and analytically) three representative kinds of inflationary scenarios within this simple setup. In one the radion is trapped in an inflaton-dependent local minimum whose non-zero energy drives inflation. Inflation ends as this energy relaxes to zero when the inflaton finds its own minimum. The other two involve power-law scaling solutions during inflation. One of these is a dynamical attractor whose features are relatively insensitive to initial conditions but whose slow-roll parameters cannot be arbitrarily small; the other is not an attractor but can roll much more slowly, until eventually transitioning to the attractor. The scaling solutions can satisfy H > mKK, but when they do standard 4D fluctuation calculations need not apply. When in a 4D regime the solutions predict η simeq 0 and so r simeq 0.11 when ns simeq 0.96 and so

  16. Analysis of site-specific N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hang, Ivan; Lin, Chia-wei; Grant, Oliver C; Fleurkens, Susanna; Villiger, Thomas K; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo; Woods, Robert J; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The hallmark of N-linked protein glycosylation is the generation of diverse glycan structures in the secretory pathway. Dynamic, non-template-driven processes of N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi provide the cellular setting for structural diversity. We applied newly developed mass spectrometry-based analytics to quantify site-specific N-glycan remodeling of the model protein Pdi1p expressed in insect cells. Molecular dynamics simulation, mutational analysis, kinetic studies of in vitro processing events and glycan flux analysis supported the defining role of the protein in N-glycan processing. PMID:26240167

  17. Highly efficient site-specific transgenesis in cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Iacovos P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenes introduced into cancer cell lines serve as powerful tools for identification of genes involved in cancer. However, the random nature of genomic integration site of a transgene highly influences the fidelity, reliability and level of its expression. In order to alleviate this bottleneck, we characterized the potential utility of a novel PhiC31 integrase-mediated site-specific insertion system (PhiC31-IMSI for introduction of transgenes into a pre-inserted docking site in the genome of cancer cells. Methods According to this system, a “docking-site” was first randomly inserted into human cancer cell lines and clones with a single copy were selected. Subsequently, an “incoming” vector containing the gene of interest was specifically inserted in the docking-site using PhiC31. Results Using the Pc-3 and SKOV-3 cancer cell lines, we showed that transgene insertion is reproducible and reliable. Furthermore, the selection system ensured that all surviving stable transgenic lines harbored the correct integration site. We demonstrated that the expression levels of reporter genes, such as green fluorescent protein and luciferase, from the same locus were comparable among sister, isogenic clones. Using in vivo xenograft studies, we showed that the genetically altered cancer cell lines retain the properties of the parental line. To achieve temporal control of transgene expression, we coupled our insertion strategy with the doxycycline inducible system and demonstrated tight regulation of the expression of the antiangiogenic molecule sFlt-1-Fc in Pc-3 cells. Furthermore, we introduced the luciferase gene into the insertion cassette allowing for possible live imaging of cancer cells in transplantation assays. We also generated a series of Gateway cloning-compatible intermediate cassettes ready for high-throughput cloning of transgenes and demonstrated that PhiC31-IMSI can be achieved in a high throughput 96-well plate

  18. Physical activity and cancer risk: dose-response and cancer, all sites and site-specific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thune, I; Furberg, A S

    2001-06-01

    The association between physical activity and overall and site-specific cancer risk is elaborated in relation to whether any observed dose-response association between physical activity and cancer can be interpreted in terms of how much physical activity (type, intensity, duration, frequency) is needed to influence site- and gender-specific cancer risk. Observational studies were reviewed that have examined the independent effect of the volume of occupational physical activity (OPA) and/or leisure time physical activity (LPA) on overall and site-specific cancer risk. The evidence of cohort and case-control studies suggests that both leisure time and occupational physical activity protect against overall cancer risk, with a graded dose-response association suggested in both sexes. Confounding effects such as diet, body weight, and parity are often included as a covariate in the analyses, with little influence on the observed associations. A crude graded inverse dose-response association was observed between physical activity and colon cancer in 48 studies including 40,674 colon/colorectal cancer cases for both sexes. A dose-response effect of physical activity on colon cancer risk was especially observed, when participation in activities of at least moderate activity (>4.5 MET) and demonstrated by activities expressed as MET-hours per week. An observed inverse association with a dose-response relationship between physical activity and breast cancer was also identified in the majority of the 41 studies including 108,031 breast cancer cases. The dose-response relationship was in particular observed in case-control studies and supported by observations in cohort studies when participation in activities of at least moderate activity (>4.5 MET) and demonstrated by activities expressed by MET-hours per week. This association between physical activity and breast cancer risk is possibly dependent on age at exposure, age at diagnosis, menopausal status and other effect

  19. Evaluating the results of a site-specific PSHA from the perspective of a risk analyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klügel, Jens-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    From 1998 till 2015 Swiss Nuclear Power Plants sponsored a set of comprehensive site-specific PSHA-studies (PEGASOS, PEGASOS Refinement Project) to obtain the requested input for their plant specific probabilistic risk assessments following the US SSHAC procedures at their most elaborated level 4. The studies were performed by well-known earth scientists working completely independent from sponsors under participatory review of the Swiss Nuclear Safety Inspectorate. Risk analysts of Swiss Nuclear Power Plants recently have been mandated to implement the final results of the studies in their risk assessment studies. This triggered an in depth assessment of the results focussed on their practical applicability for risk studies. This assessment resulted in some important insights that are of interest for future PSHA studies performed for new nuclear power plants. The assessment included a review of the completeness of results with respect to risk applications as well as plausibility checks of hazard results based on Black Swan Theory and known historical events. The key lessons and recommendations for more detailed project output specifications for future projects are presented in the paper. It was established that future PSHA projects shall provide the joint probability distribution of ground motion hazard and the associated strong motion duration as the output to allow for a technically meaningful risk assessment. The recommendation of WENRA (West European Nuclear Regulators) published in their reference levels to perform natural hazard assessment preferably based on physical grounds (deterministic method) is also rationalized by recommending an holistic approach to hazard analysis comparing PSHA insights with the results of modelling deterministic Seismic Hazard Analysis.

  20. Site-specific, adult bone benefits attributed to loading during youth: A preliminary longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scerpella, Tamara A; Bernardoni, Brittney; Wang, Sijian; Rathouz, Paul J; Li, Quefeng; Dowthwaite, Jodi N

    2016-04-01

    We examined site-specific bone development in relation to childhood and adolescent artistic gymnastics exposure, comparing up to 10years of prospectively acquired longitudinal data in 44 subjects, including 31 non-gymnasts (NON) and 13 gymnasts (GYM) who participated in gymnastics from pre-menarche to ≥1.9years post-menarche. Subjects underwent annual regional and whole-body DXA scans; indices of bone geometry and strength were calculated. Anthropometrics, physical activity, and maturity were assessed annually, coincident with DXA scans. Non-linear mixed effect models centered growth in bone outcomes at menarche and adjusted for menarcheal age, height, and non-bone fat-free mass to evaluate GYM-NON differences. A POST-QUIT variable assessed the withdrawal effect of quitting gymnastics. Curves for bone area, mass (BMC), and strength indices were higher in GYM than NON at both distal radius metaphysis and diaphysis (pGYM BMC (pGYM endosteal diameter (pGYM advantages in narrow neck cortical thickness and buckling ratio (both pGYM than NON (pGYM slopes increased for distal radius diaphysis parameters (p≤0.01) and for narrow neck BR (p=0.02). At the distal radius metaphysis, GYM BMC and compressive strength slopes decreased, as did slopes for lumbar spine BMC, femoral neck BMC, and narrow neck cortical thickness (p<0.02). In conclusion, advantages in bone mass, geometry, and strength at multiple skeletal sites were noted across growth and into young adulthood in girls who participated in gymnastics loading to at least 1.9years post-menarche. Following gymnastics cessation, advantages at cortical bone sites improved or stabilized, while advantages at corticocancellous sites stabilized or diminished. Additional longitudinal observation is necessary to determine whether residual loading benefits enhance lifelong skeletal strength.

  1. Including spatial data in nutrient balance modelling on dairy farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Maricke; van Middelaar, Corina; Stoof, Cathelijne; Oenema, Jouke; Stoorvogel, Jetse; de Boer, Imke

    2017-04-01

    The Annual Nutrient Cycle Assessment (ANCA) calculates the nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) balance at a dairy farm, while taking into account the subsequent nutrient cycles of the herd, manure, soil and crop components. Since January 2016, Dutch dairy farmers are required to use ANCA in order to increase understanding of nutrient flows and to minimize nutrient losses to the environment. A nutrient balance calculates the difference between nutrient inputs and outputs. Nutrients enter the farm via purchased feed, fertilizers, deposition and fixation by legumes (nitrogen), and leave the farm via milk, livestock, manure, and roughages. A positive balance indicates to which extent N and/or P are lost to the environment via gaseous emissions (N), leaching, run-off and accumulation in soil. A negative balance indicates that N and/or P are depleted from soil. ANCA was designed to calculate average nutrient flows on farm level (for the herd, manure, soil and crop components). ANCA was not designed to perform calculations of nutrient flows at the field level, as it uses averaged nutrient inputs and outputs across all fields, and it does not include field specific soil characteristics. Land management decisions, however, such as the level of N and P application, are typically taken at the field level given the specific crop and soil characteristics. Therefore the information that ANCA provides is likely not sufficient to support farmers' decisions on land management to minimize nutrient losses to the environment. This is particularly a problem when land management and soils vary between fields. For an accurate estimate of nutrient flows in a given farming system that can be used to optimize land management, the spatial scale of nutrient inputs and outputs (and thus the effect of land management and soil variation) could be essential. Our aim was to determine the effect of the spatial scale of nutrient inputs and outputs on modelled nutrient flows and nutrient use efficiencies

  2. Site-specific modification of ED-B-targeting antibody using intein-fusion technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greven Simone

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A promising new approach in cancer therapy is the use of tumor specific antibodies coupled to cytotoxic agents. Currently these immunoconjugates are prepared by rather unspecific coupling chemistries, resulting in heterogeneous products. As the drug load is a key parameter for the antitumor activity, site-specific strategies are desired. Expressed protein ligation (EPL and protein trans-splicing (PTS are methods for the specific C-terminal modification of a target protein. Both include the expression as an intein fusion protein, followed by the exchange of the intein for a functionalized moiety. Results A full-length IgG specific for fibronectin ED-B was expressed as fusion protein with an intein (Mxe GyrA or Npu DnaE attached to each heavy chain. In vitro protocols were established to site-specifically modify the antibodies in high yields by EPL or PTS, respectively. Although reducing conditions had to be employed during the process, the integrity or affinity of the antibody was not affected. The protocols were used to prepare immunoconjugates containing two biotin molecules per antibody, attached to the C-termini of the heavy chains. Conclusion Full-length antibodies can be efficiently and site-specifically modified at the C-termini of their heavy chains by intein-fusion technologies. The described protocols can be used to prepare immunoconjugates of high homogeneity and with a defined drug load of two. The attachment to the C-termini is expected to retain the affinity and effector functions of the antibodies.

  3. A Discrete Velocity Traffic Kinetic Model Including Desired Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoufeng Lu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We introduce the desired speed variable into the table of games and formulate a new table of games and the corresponding discrete traffic kinetic model. We use the hybrid programming technique of VB and MATLAB to develop the program. Lastly, we compared the proposed model result and the detector data. The results show that the proposed model can describe the traffic flow evolution.

  4. Semi-holographic model including the radiation component

    CERN Document Server

    del Campo, Sergio; Magaña, Juan; Villanueva, J R

    2014-01-01

    In this letter we study the semi holographic model which corresponds to the radiative version of the model proposed by Zhang et al. (Phys. Lett. B 694 (2010), 177) and revisited by C\\'ardenas et al. (Mon. Not. Roy. Astron. Soc. 438 (2014), 3603). This inclusion makes the model more realistic, so allows us to test it with current observational data and then answer if the inconsistency reported by C\\'ardenas et al. is relaxed.

  5. A Fault Evolution Model Including the Rupture Dynamic Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Chen, X.

    2011-12-01

    We perform a preliminary numerical simulation of seismicity and stress evolution along a strike-slip fault in a 3D elastic half space. Following work of Ben-Zion (1996), the fault geometry is devised as a vertical plane which is about 70 km long and 17 km wide, comparable to the size of San Andreas Fault around Parkfield. The loading mechanism is described by "backslip" method. The fault failure is governed by a static/kinetic friction law, and induced stress transfer is calculated with Okada's static solution. In order to track the rupture propagation in detail, we allow induced stress to propagate through the medium at the shear wave velocity by introducing a distance-dependent time delay to responses to stress changes. Current simulation indicates small to moderate earthquakes following the Gutenberg-Richter law and quasi-periodical characteristic large earthquakes, which are consistent with previous work by others. Next we will consider introducing a more realistic friction law, namely, the laboratory-derived rate- and state- dependent law, which can simulate more realistic and complicated sliding behavior such as the stable and unstable slip, the aseismic sliding and the slip nucleation process. In addition, the long duration of aftershocks is expected to be reproduced due to this time-dependent friction law, which is not available in current seismicity simulation. The other difference from previous work is that we are trying to include the dynamic ruptures in this study. Most previous study on seismicity simulation is based on the static solution when dealing with failure induced stress changes. However, studies of numerical simulation of rupture dynamics have revealed lots of important details which are missing in the quasi-static/quasi- dynamic simulation. For example, dynamic simulations indicate that the slip on the ground surface becomes larger if the dynamic rupture process reaches the free surface. The concentration of stress on the propagating crack

  6. Evacuation modeling including traveler information and compliance behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pel, A.J.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Bliemer, M.C.J.

    2010-01-01

    Traffic simulation models are often used to support decisions when planning an evacuation. Scenario analyses based on these models then typically focus on traffic dynamics and the effect of traffic control measures in order to locate possible bottlenecks and predict evacuation times. A clear approac

  7. Global atmospheric model for mercury including oxidation by bromine atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Holmes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Global models of atmospheric mercury generally assume that gas-phase OH and ozone are the main oxidants converting Hg0 to HgII and thus driving mercury deposition to ecosystems. However, thermodynamic considerations argue against the importance of these reactions. We demonstrate here the viability of atomic bromine (Br as an alternative Hg0 oxidant. We conduct a global 3-D simulation with the GEOS-Chem model assuming gas-phase Br to be the sole Hg0 oxidant (Hg + Br model and compare to the previous version of the model with OH and ozone as the sole oxidants (Hg + OH/O3 model. We specify global 3-D Br concentration fields based on our best understanding of tropospheric and stratospheric Br chemistry. In both the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models, we add an aqueous photochemical reduction of HgII in cloud to impose a tropospheric lifetime for mercury of 6.5 months against deposition, as needed to reconcile observed total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations with current estimates of anthropogenic emissions. This added reduction would not be necessary in the Hg + Br model if we adjusted the Br oxidation kinetics downward within their range of uncertainty. We find that the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models are equally capable of reproducing the spatial distribution of TGM and its seasonal cycle at northern mid-latitudes. The Hg + Br model shows a steeper decline of TGM concentrations from the tropics to southern mid-latitudes. Only the Hg + Br model can reproduce the springtime depletion and summer rebound of TGM observed at polar sites; the snowpack component of GEOS-Chem suggests that 40% of HgII deposited to snow in the Arctic is transferred to the ocean and land reservoirs, amounting to a net deposition flux to the Arctic of 60 Mg a−1. Summertime events of depleted Hg0 at Antarctic sites due to subsidence are much better simulated by

  8. Pilot Wave model that includes creation and annihilation of particles

    CERN Document Server

    Sverdlov, Roman

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to come up with a Pilot Wave model of quantum field theory that incorporates particle creation and annihilation without sacrificing determinism. This has been previously attempted in an article by the same author titled "Incorporating particle creation and annihilation in Pilot Wave model", in a much less satisfactory way. In this paper I would like to "clean up" some of the things. In particular, I would like to get rid of a very unnatural concept of "visibility" of particles, which makes the model much simpler. On the other hand, I would like to add a mechanism for decoherence, which was absent in the previous version.

  9. Global atmospheric model for mercury including oxidation by bromine atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Holmes

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Global models of atmospheric mercury generally assume that OH and ozone are the main oxidants converting Hg0 to HgII and thus driving mercury deposition to ecosystems. However, thermodynamic considerations argue against the importance of these reactions. We demonstrate here the viability of atomic bromine (Br as an alternative Hg0 oxidant. We conduct a global 3-D simulation with the GEOS-Chem model assuming Br to be the sole Hg0 oxidant (Hg + Br model and compare to the previous version of the model with OH and ozone as the sole oxidants (Hg + OH/O3 model. We specify global 3-D Br concentration fields based on our best understanding of tropospheric and stratospheric Br chemistry. In both the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models, we add an aqueous photochemical reduction of HgII in cloud to impose a tropospheric lifetime for mercury of 6.5 months against deposition, as needed to reconcile observed total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations with current estimates of anthropogenic emissions. This added reduction would not be necessary in the Hg + Br model if we adjusted the Br oxidation kinetics downward within their range of uncertainty. We find that the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models are equally capable of reproducing the spatial distribution of TGM and its seasonal cycle at northern mid-latitudes. The Hg + Br model shows a steeper decline of TGM concentrations from the tropics to southern mid-latitudes. Only the Hg + Br model can reproduce the springtime depletion and summer rebound of TGM observed at polar sites; the snowpack component of GEOS-Chem suggests that 40% of HgII deposited to snow in the Arctic is transferred to the ocean and land reservoirs, amounting to a net deposition flux of 60 Mg a−1. Summertime events of depleted Hg0 at Antarctic sites due to subsidence are much better simulated by the Hg + Br model. Model

  10. An Intracellular Calcium Oscillations Model Including Mitochondrial Calcium Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-Min; LIU Zeng-Rong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Calcium is a ubiquitous second messenger. Mitochondria contributes significantly to intracellular Ca2+ dynamics.The experiment of Kaftan et al. [J. Biol. Chem. 275(2000) 25465] demonstrated that inhibiting mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake can reduce the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration oscillations of gonadotropes. By considering the mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling we develop a three-variable model of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations based on the models of Atri et al. [Biophys. J. 65 (1993) 1727] and Falcke et al. [Biophys. J. 77 (1999) 37]. The model reproduces the fact that mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling increases the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations, which accords with Kaftan's results. Moreover the model predicts that when the mitochondria overload with Ca2+, the cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations vanish, which may trigger apoptosis.

  11. Applying nitrogen site-specifically using soil electrical conductivity maps and precision agriculture technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, E D; Wolcott, M C; Hanson, G P

    2001-10-16

    Soil texture varies significantly within many agricultural fields. The physical properties of soil, such as soil texture, have a direct effect on water holding capacity, cation exchange capacity, crop yield, production capability, and nitrogen (N) loss variations within a field. In short, mobile nutrients are used, lost, and stored differently as soil textures vary. A uniform application of N to varying soils results in a wide range of N availability to the crop. N applied in excess of crop usage results in a waste of the grower"s input expense, a potential negative effect on the environment, and in some crops a reduction of crop quality, yield, and harvestability. Inadequate N levels represent a lost opportunity for crop yield and profit. The global positioning system (GPS)-referenced mapping of bulk soil electrical conductivity (EC) has been shown to serve as an effective proxy for soil texture and other soil properties. Soils with a high clay content conduct more electricity than coarser textured soils, which results in higher EC values. This paper will describe the EC mapping process and provide case studies of site-specific N applications based on EC maps. Results of these case studies suggest that N can be managed site-specifically using a variety of management practices, including soil sampling, variable yield goals, and cropping history.

  12. Applying Nitrogen Site-Specifically Using Soil Electrical Conductivity Maps and Precision Agriculture Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.D. Lund

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil texture varies significantly within many agricultural fields. The physical properties of soil, such as soil texture, have a direct effect on water holding capacity, cation exchange capacity, crop yield, production capability, and nitrogen (N loss variations within a field. In short, mobile nutrients are used, lost, and stored differently as soil textures vary. A uniform application of N to varying soils results in a wide range of N availability to the crop. N applied in excess of crop usage results in a waste of the grower’s input expense, a potential negative effect on the environment, and in some crops a reduction of crop quality, yield, and harvestability. Inadequate N levels represent a lost opportunity for crop yield and profit. The global positioning system (GPS-referenced mapping of bulk soil electrical conductivity (EC has been shown to serve as an effective proxy for soil texture and other soil properties. Soils with a high clay content conduct more electricity than coarser textured soils, which results in higher EC values. This paper will describe the EC mapping process and provide case studies of site-specific N applications based on EC maps. Results of these case studies suggest that N can be managed site-specifically using a variety of management practices, including soil sampling, variable yield goals, and cropping history.

  13. New developments for the site-specific attachment of protein to surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A

    2005-05-12

    Protein immobilization on surfaces is of great importance in numerous applications in biology and biophysics. The key for the success of all these applications relies on the immobilization technique employed to attach the protein to the corresponding surface. Protein immobilization can be based on covalent or noncovalent interaction of the molecule with the surface. Noncovalent interactions include hydrophobic interactions, hydrogen bonding, van der Waals forces, electrostatic forces, or physical adsorption. However, since these interactions are weak, the molecules can get denatured or dislodged, thus causing loss of signal. They also result in random attachment of the protein to the surface. Site-specific covalent attachment of proteins onto surfaces, on the other hand, leads to molecules being arranged in a definite, orderly fashion and uses spacers and linkers to help minimize steric hindrances between the protein surface. This work reviews in detail some of the methods most commonly used as well as the latest developments for the site-specific covalent attachment of protein to solid surfaces.

  14. Cement-aggregate compatibility and structure property relationships including modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennings, H.M.; Xi, Y.

    1993-07-15

    The role of aggregate, and its interface with cement paste, is discussed with a view toward establishing models that relate structure to properties. Both short (nm) and long (mm) range structure must be considered. The short range structure of the interface depends not only on the physical distribution of the various phases, but also on moisture content and reactivity of aggregate. Changes that occur on drying, i.e. shrinkage, may alter the structure which, in turn, feeds back to alter further drying and shrinkage. The interaction is dynamic, even without further hydration of cement paste, and the dynamic characteristic must be considered in order to fully understand and model its contribution to properties. Microstructure and properties are two subjects which have been pursued somewhat separately. This review discusses both disciplines with a view toward finding common research goals in the future. Finally, comment is made on possible chemical reactions which may occur between aggregate and cement paste.

  15. Including lateral interactions into microkinetic models of catalytic reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Anders; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina

    2007-01-01

    In many catalytic reactions lateral interactions between adsorbates are believed to have a strong influence on the reaction rates. We apply a microkinetic model to explore the effect of lateral interactions and how to efficiently take them into account in a simple catalytic reaction. Three differ...... different approximations are investigated: site, mean-field, and quasichemical approximations. The obtained results are compared to accurate Monte Carlo numbers. In the end, we apply the approximations to a real catalytic reaction, namely, ammonia synthesis....

  16. A systematic study of site-specific GalNAc-type O-glycosylation modulating proprotein convertase processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Vester-Christensen, Malene B; Goth, Christoffer K; Petersen, Thomas Nordahl; Brunak, Søren; Bennett, Eric P; Levery, Steven B; Clausen, Henrik

    2011-11-18

    Site-specific GalNAc-type O-glycosylation is emerging as an important co-regulator of proprotein convertase (PC) processing of proteins. PC processing is crucial in regulating many fundamental biological pathways and O-glycans in or immediately adjacent to processing sites may affect recognition and function of PCs. Thus, we previously demonstrated that deficiency in site-specific O-glycosylation in a PC site of the fibroblast growth factor, FGF23, resulted in marked reduction in secretion of active unprocessed FGF23, which cause familial tumoral calcinosis and hyperostosis hyperphosphatemia. GalNAc-type O-glycosylation is found on serine and threonine amino acids and up to 20 distinct polypeptide GalNAc transferases catalyze the first addition of GalNAc to proteins making this step the most complex and differentially regulated steps in protein glycosylation. There is no reliable prediction model for O-glycosylation especially of isolated sites, but serine and to a lesser extent threonine residues are frequently found adjacent to PC processing sites. In the present study we used in vitro enzyme assays and ex vivo cell models to systematically address the boundaries of the region within site-specific O-glycosylation affect PC processing. The results demonstrate that O-glycans within at least ±3 residues of the RXXR furin cleavage site may affect PC processing suggesting that site-specific O-glycosylation is a major co-regulator of PC processing.

  17. Site specific prediction equations for peak acceleration of ground motion due to earthquakes induced by underground mining in Legnica-Głogów Copper District in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasocki, Stanisław

    2013-10-01

    Ground motion database from the region of Żelazny Most tailings pond, the largest in Europe ore-flotation waste repository, is used to identify ground motion prediction equations (GMPE-s) for peak horizontal and peak vertical acceleration. A GMPE model including both geometrical spreading and anelastic damping terms cannot be correctly identified and the model with only spreading term is accepted. The analysis of variance of this model's residuals with station location as grouping variable indicates that station locations contribute significantly to the observed ground motion variability. Therefore, a site specific GMPE model with relative site amplifications is assessed. Despite short distances among stations, the amplification considerably vary from point to point, up to 1.8 times for the horizontal and 3.5 times for the vertical peak amplitude. The model including site effects enhances GMPE-s fit to observations, explains more than 60% dependent variables variability and correctly accounts for site effects.

  18. Site-specific time heterogeneity of the substitution process and its impact on phylogenetic inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Model violations constitute the major limitation in inferring accurate phylogenies. Characterizing properties of the data that are not being correctly handled by current models is therefore of prime importance. One of the properties of protein evolution is the variation of the relative rate of substitutions across sites and over time, the latter is the phenomenon called heterotachy. Its effect on phylogenetic inference has recently obtained considerable attention, which led to the development of new models of sequence evolution. However, thus far focus has been on the quantitative heterogeneity of the evolutionary process, thereby overlooking more qualitative variations. Results We studied the importance of variation of the site-specific amino-acid substitution process over time and its possible impact on phylogenetic inference. We used the CAT model to define an infinite mixture of substitution processes characterized by equilibrium frequencies over the twenty amino acids, a useful proxy for qualitatively estimating the evolutionary process. Using two large datasets, we show that qualitative changes in site-specific substitution properties over time occurred significantly. To test whether this unaccounted qualitative variation can lead to an erroneous phylogenetic tree, we analyzed a concatenation of mitochondrial proteins in which Cnidaria and Porifera were erroneously grouped. The progressive removal of the sites with the most heterogeneous CAT profiles across clades led to the recovery of the monophyly of Eumetazoa (Cnidaria+Bilateria, suggesting that this heterogeneity can negatively influence phylogenetic inference. Conclusion The time-heterogeneity of the amino-acid replacement process is therefore an important evolutionary aspect that should be incorporated in future models of sequence change.

  19. Comparison of Joint Modeling Approaches Including Eulerian Sliding Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomov, I; Antoun, T; Vorobiev, O

    2009-12-16

    Accurate representation of discontinuities such as joints and faults is a key ingredient for high fidelity modeling of shock propagation in geologic media. The following study was done to improve treatment of discontinuities (joints) in the Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN (Lomov and Liu 2005). Lagrangian methods with conforming meshes and explicit inclusion of joints in the geologic model are well suited for such an analysis. Unfortunately, current meshing tools are unable to automatically generate adequate hexahedral meshes for large numbers of irregular polyhedra. Another concern is that joint stiffness in such explicit computations requires significantly reduced time steps, with negative implications for both the efficiency and quality of the numerical solution. An alternative approach is to use non-conforming meshes and embed joint information into regular computational elements. However, once slip displacement on the joints become comparable to the zone size, Lagrangian (even non-conforming) meshes could suffer from tangling and decreased time step problems. The use of non-conforming meshes in an Eulerian solver may alleviate these difficulties and provide a viable numerical approach for modeling the effects of faults on the dynamic response of geologic materials. We studied shock propagation in jointed/faulted media using a Lagrangian and two Eulerian approaches. To investigate the accuracy of this joint treatment the GEODYN calculations have been compared with results from the Lagrangian code GEODYN-L which uses an explicit treatment of joints via common plane contact. We explore two approaches to joint treatment in the code, one for joints with finite thickness and the other for tight joints. In all cases the sliding interfaces are tracked explicitly without homogenization or blending the joint and block response into an average response. In general, rock joints will introduce an increase in normal compliance in addition to a reduction in shear strength. In the

  20. Neighboring extremal optimal control design including model mismatch errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hull, D.G. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics

    1994-11-01

    The mismatch control technique that is used to simplify model equations of motion in order to determine analytic optimal control laws is extended using neighboring extremal theory. The first variation optimal control equations are linearized about the extremal path to account for perturbations in the initial state and the final constraint manifold. A numerical example demonstrates that the tuning procedure inherent in the mismatch control method increases the performance of the controls to the level of a numerically-determined piecewise-linear controller.

  1. Double pendulum model for tennis stroke including a collision process

    CERN Document Server

    Youn, Sun-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    By means of adding a collision process between the ball and racket in double pendulum model, we analyzed the tennis stroke. It is possible that the speed of the rebound ball does not simply depend on the angular velocity of the racket, and higher angular velocity sometimes gives lower ball speed. We numerically showed that the proper time lagged racket rotation increases the speed of the rebound ball by 20%. We also showed that the elbow should move in order to add the angular velocity of the racket.

  2. Modelling of Dual-Junction Solar Cells including Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelaziz Amine

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monolithically stacked multijunction solar cells based on III–V semiconductors materials are the state-of-art of approach for high efficiency photovoltaic energy conversion, in particular for space applications. The individual subcells of the multi-junction structure are interconnected via tunnel diodes which must be optically transparent and connect the component cells with a minimum electrical resistance. The quality of these diodes determines the output performance of the solar cell. The purpose of this work is to contribute to the investigation of the tunnel electrical resistance of such a multi-junction cell through the analysis of the current-voltage (J-V characteristics under illumination. Our approach is based on an equivalent circuit model of a diode for each subcell. We examine the effect of tunnel resistance on the performance of a multi-junction cell using minimization of the least squares technique.

  3. Human sperm chromatin stabilization: a proposed model including zinc bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björndahl, Lars; Kvist, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    The primary focus of this review is to challenge the current concepts on sperm chromatin stability. The observations (i) that zinc depletion at ejaculation allows a rapid and total sperm chromatin decondensation without the addition of exogenous disulfide cleaving agents and (ii) that the human sperm chromatin contains one zinc for every protamine for every turn of the DNA helix suggest an alternative model for sperm chromatin structure may be plausible. An alternative model is therefore proposed, that the human spermatozoon could at ejaculation have a rapidly reversible zinc dependent chromatin stability: Zn(2+) stabilizes the structure and prevents the formation of excess disulfide bridges by a single mechanism, the formation of zinc bridges with protamine thiols of cysteine and potentially imidazole groups of histidine. Extraction of zinc enables two biologically totally different outcomes: immediate decondensation if chromatin fibers are concomitantly induced to repel (e.g. by phosphorylation in the ooplasm); otherwise freed thiols become committed into disulfide bridges creating a superstabilized chromatin. Spermatozoa in the zinc rich prostatic fluid (normally the first expelled ejaculate fraction) represent the physiological situation. Extraction of chromatin zinc can be accomplished by the seminal vesicular fluid. Collection of the ejaculate in one single container causes abnormal contact between spermatozoa and seminal vesicular fluid affecting the sperm chromatin stability. There are men in infertile couples with low content of sperm chromatin zinc due to loss of zinc during ejaculation and liquefaction. Tests for sperm DNA integrity may give false negative results due to decreased access for the assay to the DNA in superstabilized chromatin.

  4. Global model including multistep ionizations in helium plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Seung-Ju; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2016-12-01

    Particle and power balance equations including stepwise ionizations are derived and solved in helium plasmas. In the balance equations, two metastable states (21S1 in singlet and 23S1 triplet) are considered and the followings are obtained. The plasma density linearly increases and the electron temperature is relatively in a constant value against the absorbed power. It is also found that the contribution to multi-step ionization with respect to the single-step ionization is in the range of 8%-23%, as the gas pressure increases from 10 mTorr to 100 mTorr. Compared to the results in the argon plasma, there is little variation in the collisional energy loss per electron-ion pair created (ɛc) with absorbed power and gas pressure due to the small collision cross section and higher inelastic collision threshold energy.

  5. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  6. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2012-02-14

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  7. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA)

    2011-03-22

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  8. Site specific incorporation of keto amino acids into proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Wang, Lei [San Diego, CA

    2011-12-06

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate keto amino acids into proteins are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with keto amino acids using these orthogonal pairs.

  9. Modelization of a water tank including a PCM module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibanez, Manuel [Dept. de Medi Ambient i Ciencies del Sol, Universitat de Lleida, Rovira Roure 191, 25198 Lleida (Spain); Cabeza, Luisa F.; Sole, Cristian; Roca, Joan; Nogues, Miquel [Dept. d' Informatica i Eng. Industrial, Universitat de Lleida, Jaume II 69, 25001 Lleida (Spain)

    2006-08-15

    The reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions is a key component for today's governments. Therefore, implementation of more and more systems with renewable energies is necessary. Solar systems for single family houses or residential buildings need a big water tank that many times is not easy to locate. This paper studies the modelization of a new technology where PCM modules are implemented in domestic hot water tanks to reduce their size without reducing the energy stored. A new TRNSYS component, based in the already existing TYPE 60, was developed, called TYPE 60PCM. After tuning the new component with experimental results, two more experiences were developed to validate the simulation of a water tank with two cylindrical PCM modules using type 60PCM, the cooldown and reheating experiments. Concordance between experimental and simulated data was very good. Since the new TRNSYS component was developed to simulate full solar systems, comparison of experimental results from a pilot plant solar system with simulations were performed, and they confirmed that the type 60PCM is a powerful tool to evaluate the performance of PCM modules in water tanks. (author)

  10. Genome editing using artificial site-specific nucleases in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisano, Yu; Ota, Satoshi; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish is a model vertebrate suitable for genetic analysis. Forward genetic analysis via chemical mutagenesis screening has established a variety of zebrafish mutants that are defective in various types of organogenesis, and the genes responsible for the individual mutants have been identified from genome mapping. On the other hand, reverse genetic analysis via targeted gene disruption using embryonic stem (ES) cells (e.g., knockout mouse) can uncover gene functions by investigating the phenotypic effects. However, this approach is mostly limited to mice among the vertebrate models because of the difficulty in establishing ES cells. Recently, new gene targeting technologies, such as the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 systems, have been developed: that can directly introduce genome modifications at the targeted genomic locus. Here, we summarize these new and powerful genome editing techniques for the study of zebrafish.

  11. Mutational Studies on Resurrected Ancestral Proteins Reveal Conservation of Site-Specific Amino Acid Preferences throughout Evolutionary History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Valeria A.; Manssour-Triedo, Fadia; Delgado-Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Barroso-delJesus, Alicia; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Gavira, Jose A.; Gaucher, Eric A.; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    Local protein interactions (“molecular context” effects) dictate amino acid replacements and can be described in terms of site-specific, energetic preferences for any different amino acid. It has been recently debated whether these preferences remain approximately constant during evolution or whether, due to coevolution of sites, they change strongly. Such research highlights an unresolved and fundamental issue with far-reaching implications for phylogenetic analysis and molecular evolution modeling. Here, we take advantage of the recent availability of phenotypically supported laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins and β-lactamases to experimentally address the change of site-specific amino acid preferences over long geological timescales. Extensive mutational analyses support the notion that evolutionary adjustment to a new amino acid may occur, but to a large extent this is insufficient to erase the primitive preference for amino acid replacements. Generally, site-specific amino acid preferences appear to remain conserved throughout evolutionary history despite local sequence divergence. We show such preference conservation to be readily understandable in molecular terms and we provide crystallographic evidence for an intriguing structural-switch mechanism: Energetic preference for an ancestral amino acid in a modern protein can be linked to reorganization upon mutation to the ancestral local structure around the mutated site. Finally, we point out that site-specific preference conservation naturally leads to one plausible evolutionary explanation for the existence of intragenic global suppressor mutations. PMID:25392342

  12. Drainage filter technologies to mitigate site-specific phosphorus losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Charlotte; Heckrath, Goswin Johann; Iversen, Bo Vangsø

    2014-01-01

    of implementing the drainage filter technologies including surface-flow constructed wetlands, subsurface flow constructed wetlands, and drainage well filters (www.supremetech.dk). We will present results on P retention from (i) controlled column experiments with permeable filter substrates, and (ii) a full......-scale surface-flow constructed wetland. In the former, various natural and industrial P filter substrates have been tested for their ability to reduce inlet P concentrations to below environmental threshold values (... on laboratory experiments and field scale monitoring, the different filter technology approaches will be compared and evaluated from a case study perspective....

  13. Delivery methods for site-specific nucleases: Achieving the full potential of therapeutic gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Shui, Sai-Lan

    2016-12-28

    The advent of site-specific nucleases, particularly CRISPR/Cas9, provides researchers with the unprecedented ability to manipulate genomic sequences. These nucleases are used to create model cell lines, engineer metabolic pathways, produce transgenic animals and plants, perform genome-wide functional screen and, most importantly, treat human diseases that are difficult to tackle by traditional medications. Considerable efforts have been devoted to improving the efficiency and specificity of nucleases for clinical applications. However, safe and efficient delivery methods remain the major obstacle for therapeutic gene editing. In this review, we summarize the recent progress on nuclease delivery methods, highlight their impact on the outcomes of gene editing and discuss the potential of different delivery approaches for therapeutic gene editing.

  14. Site-specific Quantification of Bone Quality using Highly Nonlinear Solitary Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jinkyu; Borkowski, Sean; Silvestro, Claudio; De Nardo, Luigi; Daraio, Chiara; Ebramzadeh, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a well recognized problem affecting millions of individuals worldwide. Consequently, the need to effectively, efficiently, and affordably diagnose and identify those at risk is essential; moreover, site-specific assessment of bone quality is necessary, not only in the process of risk assessment, but may also be desirable for other applications. The present study evaluated a new one-dimensional granular crystal sensor, composed of a tightly packed chain of beads under Hertzian contact interaction, representing the most suitable fundamental component for solitary wave generation and propagation. First, the sensitivity of the novel sensor was tested using densities of rigid polyurethane foam, representing clinical bone quality ranging from healthy, to severely osteoporotic. Once the relationship between the signal response and known densities was established, the sensor was used to measure several sites located in the proximal femur of ten human cadaveric specimens. The accuracy of the model was ...

  15. Efficient and Site-specific Antibody Labeling by Strain-promoted Azide-alkyne Cycloaddition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanggil; Ko, Wooseok; Park, Hyunji; Lee, Hyun Soo

    2016-12-23

    There are currently many chemical tools available to introduce chemical probes into proteins to study their structure and function. A useful method is protein conjugation by genetically introducing an unnatural amino acid containing a bioorthogonal functional group. This report describes a detailed protocol for site-specific antibody conjugation. The protocol includes experimental details for the genetic incorporation of an azide-containing amino acid, and the conjugation reaction by strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC). This strain-promoted reaction proceeds by simple mixing of the reacting molecules at physiological pH and temperature, and does not require additional reagents such as copper(I) ions and copper-chelating ligands. Therefore, this method would be useful for general protein conjugation and development of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs).

  16. Site-specific PEGylation of human thyroid stimulating hormone to prolong duration of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Huawei; Boudanova, Ekaterina; Park, Anna; Bird, Julie J; Honey, Denise M; Zarazinski, Christine; Greene, Ben; Kingsbury, Jonathan S; Boucher, Susan; Pollock, Julie; McPherson, John M; Pan, Clark Q

    2013-03-20

    Recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rhTSH or Thyrogen) has been approved for thyroid cancer diagnostics and treatment under a multidose regimen due to its short circulating half-life. To reduce dosing frequency, PEGylation strategies were explored to increase the duration of action of rhTSH. Lysine and N-terminal PEGylation resulted in heterogeneous product profiles with 40% or lower reaction yields of monoPEGylated products. Eleven cysteine mutants were designed based on a structure model of the TSH-TSH receptor (TSHR) complex to create unique conjugation sites on both α and β subunits for site-specific conjugation. Sequential screening of mutant expression level, oligomerization tendency, and conjugation efficiency resulted in the identification of the αG22C rhTSH mutant for stable expression and scale-up PEGylation. The introduced cysteine in the αG22C rhTSH mutant was partially blocked when isolated from conditioned media and could only be effectively PEGylated after mild reduction with cysteine. This produced a higher reaction yield, ~85%, for the monoPEGylated product. Although the mutation had no effect on receptor binding, PEGylation of αG22C rhTSH led to a PEG size-dependent decrease in receptor binding. Nevertheless, the 40 kDa PEG αG22C rhTSH showed a prolonged duration of action compared to rhTSH in a rat pharmacodynamics model. Reverse-phase HPLC and N-terminal sequencing experiments confirmed site-specific modification at the engineered Cys 22 position on the α-subunit. This work is another demonstration of successful PEGylation of a cysteine-knot protein by an engineered cysteine mutation.

  17. Experiences from site-specific landslide early warning systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Michoud

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Landslide early warning systems (EWSs have to be implemented in areas with large risk for populations or infrastructures when classical structural remediation measures cannot be set up. This paper aims to gather experiences of existing landslide EWSs, with a special focus on practical requirements (e.g., alarm threshold values have to take into account the smallest detectable signal levels of deployed sensors before being established and specific issues when dealing with system implementations. Within the framework of the SafeLand European project, a questionnaire was sent to about one-hundred institutions in charge of landslide management. Finally, we interpreted answers from experts belonging to 14 operational units related to 23 monitored landslides. Although no standard requirements exist for designing and operating EWSs, this review highlights some key elements, such as the importance of pre-investigation work, the redundancy and robustness of monitoring systems, the establishment of different scenarios adapted to gradual increasing of alert levels, and the necessity of confidence and trust between local populations and scientists. Moreover, it also confirms the need to improve our capabilities for failure forecasting, monitoring techniques and integration of water processes into landslide conceptual models.

  18. Heritable site-specific mutagenesis using TALENs in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Char, Si Nian; Unger-Wallace, Erica; Frame, Bronwyn; Briggs, Sarah A; Main, Marcy; Spalding, Martin H; Vollbrecht, Erik; Wang, Kan; Yang, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) technology has been utilized widely for targeted gene mutagenesis, especially for gene inactivation, in many organisms, including agriculturally important plants such as rice, wheat, tomato and barley. This report describes application of this technology to generate heritable genome modifications in maize. TALENs were employed to generate stable, heritable mutations at the maize glossy2 (gl2) locus. Transgenic lines containing mono- or di-allelic mutations were obtained from the maize genotype Hi-II at a frequency of about 10% (nine mutated events in 91 transgenic events). In addition, three of the novel alleles were tested for function in progeny seedlings, where they were able to confer the glossy phenotype. In a majority of the events, the integrated TALEN T-DNA segregated independently from the new loss of function alleles, producing mutated null-segregant progeny in T1 generation. Our results demonstrate that TALENs are an effective tool for genome mutagenesis in maize, empowering the discovery of gene function and the development of trait improvement.

  19. Comparison of simulated crop yield patterns for site-specific management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uffelen, van C.G.R.; Verhagen, J.; Bouma, J.

    1997-01-01

    Site-specific management (SSM) aims to maximise crop production and make efficient use of agrochemicals. This is achieved by varying farm management practices with consideration of local variability. Maps displaying relevant soil variability are needed to guide these site-specific practices. As it t

  20. FLP recombinase-mediated site-specific recombination in silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comprehensive understanding of gene function and the production of site-specific genetically modified mutants are two major goals of genetic engineering in the post-genomic era. Although site-specific recombination systems have been powerful tools for genome manipulation of many organisms, they h...

  1. 75 FR 2859 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford

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    2010-01-19

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Hanford AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific... 4, 2010--9 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday, February 5, 2010--8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. ADDRESSES: Red Lion Hotel, 1101...

  2. 75 FR 19630 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Charter Renewal

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    2010-04-15

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Charter Renewal Pursuant to Section 14(a)(2)(A) of the...-Specific Advisory Board will be renewed for a two-year period beginning April 11, 2010. The Board provides... renewal of the Environmental Management Site- Specific Advisory Board has been determined to be...

  3. 77 FR 65374 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

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    2012-10-26

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... National Laboratory/ICP Public Involvement/ Communications Public Participation: The EM SSAB,...

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    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public at its advisory...

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    2011-07-05

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... National Laboratory (INL) 101. INL EM Budget. Calcine Path Forward. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment...

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    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Public Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public...

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    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... to Cleanup Idaho National Laboratory Site Wide Review--CERCLA Long-Term Ecological Program...

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    2010-07-07

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  14. 77 FR 53192 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... Closeout Process Public Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance...

  15. 76 FR 25682 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National ] Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act... National Laboratory, welcomes the attendance of the public at its advisory committee meetings and will...

  16. 75 FR 56527 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy... Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory. The Federal Advisory Committee Act.... Overview Legacy Management--Long-Term Land Use at Idaho National Laboratory. Integrated Waste...

  17. Site specific passive acoustic detection and densities of humpback whale calls off the coast of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helble, Tyler Adam

    Passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammal calls is an increasingly important method for assessing population numbers, distribution, and behavior. Automated methods are needed to aid in the analyses of the recorded data. When a mammal vocalizes in the marine environment, the received signal is a filtered version of the original waveform emitted by the marine mammal. The waveform is reduced in amplitude and distorted due to propagation effects that are influenced by the bathymetry and environment. It is important to account for these effects to determine a site-specific probability of detection for marine mammal calls in a given study area. A knowledge of that probability function over a range of environmental and ocean noise conditions allows vocalization statistics from recordings of single, fixed, omnidirectional sensors to be compared across sensors and at the same sensor over time with less bias and uncertainty in the results than direct comparison of the raw statistics. This dissertation focuses on both the development of new tools needed to automatically detect humpback whale vocalizations from single-fixed omnidirectional sensors as well as the determination of the site-specific probability of detection for monitoring sites off the coast of California. Using these tools, detected humpback calls are "calibrated" for environmental properties using the site-specific probability of detection values, and presented as call densities (calls per square kilometer per time). A two-year monitoring effort using these calibrated call densities reveals important biological and ecological information on migrating humpback whales off the coast of California. Call density trends are compared between the monitoring sites and at the same monitoring site over time. Call densities also are compared to several natural and human-influenced variables including season, time of day, lunar illumination, and ocean noise. The results reveal substantial differences in call densities

  18. Generalized theory on the mechanism of site-specific DNA-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjani, G.; Murugan, R.

    2016-05-01

    We develop a generalized theoretical framework on the binding of transcription factor proteins (TFs) with specific sites on DNA that takes into account the interplay of various factors regarding overall electrostatic potential at the DNA-protein interface, occurrence of kinetic traps along the DNA sequence, presence of other roadblock protein molecules along DNA and crowded environment, conformational fluctuations in the DNA binding domains (DBDs) of TFs, and the conformational state of the DNA. Starting from a Smolochowski type theoretical framework on site-specific binding of TFs we logically build our model by adding the effects of these factors one by one. Our generalized two-step model suggests that the electrostatic attractive forces present inbetween the positively charged DBDs of TFs and the negatively charged phosphate backbone of DNA, along with the counteracting shielding effects of solvent ions, is the core factor that creates a fluidic type environment at the DNA-protein interface. This in turn facilitates various one-dimensional diffusion (1Dd) processes such as sliding, hopping and intersegmental transfers. These facilitating processes as well as flipping dynamics of conformational states of DBDs of TFs between stationary and mobile states can enhance the 1Dd coefficient on a par with three-dimensional diffusion (3Dd). The random coil conformation of DNA also plays critical roles in enhancing the site-specific association rate. The extent of enhancement over the 3Dd controlled rate seems to be directly proportional to the maximum possible 1Dd length. We show that the overall site-specific binding rate scales with the length of DNA in an asymptotic way. For relaxed DNA, the specific binding rate will be independent of the length of DNA as length increases towards infinity. For condensed DNA as in in vivo conditions, the specific binding rate depends on the length of DNA in a turnover way with a maximum. This maximum rate seems to scale with the

  19. Assessing, mapping and validating site-specific ecotoxicological risk for pesticide mixtures: a case study for small scale hot spots in aquatic and terrestrial environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaj, Claudia; Barmaz, Stefania; Sørensen, Peter Borgen; Spurgeon, David; Vighi, Marco

    2011-11-01

    Mixture toxicity is a real world problem and as such requires risk assessment solutions that can be applied within different geographic regions, across different spatial scales and in situations where the quantity of data available for the assessment varies. Moreover, the need for site specific procedures for assessing ecotoxicological risk for non-target species in non-target ecosystems also has to be recognised. The work presented in the paper addresses the real world effects of pesticide mixtures on natural communities. Initially, the location of risk hotspots is theoretically estimated through exposure modelling and the use of available toxicity data to predict potential community effects. The concept of Concentration Addition (CA) is applied to describe responses resulting from exposure of multiple pesticides The developed and refined exposure models are georeferenced (GIS-based) and include environmental and physico-chemical parameters, and site specific information on pesticide usage and land use. As a test of the risk assessment framework, the procedures have been applied on a suitable study areas, notably the River Meolo basin (Northern Italy), a catchment characterised by intensive agriculture, as well as comparative area for some assessments. Within the studied areas, the risks for individual chemicals and complex mixtures have been assessed on aquatic and terrestrial aboveground and belowground communities. Results from ecological surveys have been used to validate these risk assessment model predictions. Value and limitation of the approaches are described and the possibilities for larger scale applications in risk assessment are also discussed.

  20. Hepatic DNA hydroxymethylation is site-specifically altered by chronic alcohol consumption and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammen, Stephanie A; Park, Lara K; Dolnikowski, Gregory G; Ausman, Lynne M; Friso, Simonetta; Choi, Sang-Woon

    2017-03-01

    Global DNA hydroxymethylation is markedly decreased in human cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma, which is associated with chronic alcohol consumption and aging. Because gene-specific changes in hydroxymethylcytosine may affect gene transcription, giving rise to a carcinogenic environment, we determined genome-wide site-specific changes in hepatic hydroxymethylcytosine that are associated with chronic alcohol consumption and aging. Young (4 months) and old (18 months) male C57Bl/6 mice were fed either an ethanol-containing Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet or an isocaloric control diet for 5 weeks. Genomic and gene-specific hydroxymethylcytosine patterns were determined through hydroxymethyl DNA immunoprecipitation array in hepatic DNA. Hydroxymethylcytosine patterns were more perturbed by alcohol consumption in young mice than in old mice (431 differentially hydroxymethylated regions, DhMRs, in young vs 189 DhMRs in old). A CpG island ~2.5 kb upstream of the glucocorticoid receptor gene, Nr3c1, had increased hydroxymethylation as well as increased mRNA expression (p = 0.015) in young mice fed alcohol relative to the control group. Aging alone also altered hydroxymethylcytosine patterns, with 331 DhMRs, but alcohol attenuated this effect. Aging was associated with a decrease in hydroxymethylcytosine ~1 kb upstream of the leptin receptor gene, Lepr, and decreased transcription of this gene (p = 0.029). Nr3c1 and Lepr are both involved in hepatic lipid homeostasis and hepatosteatosis, which may create a carcinogenic environment. These results suggest that the location of hydroxymethylcytosine in the genome is site specific and not random, and that changes in hydroxymethylation may play a role in the liver's response to aging and alcohol.

  1. Novel therapeutic approaches for pulmonary arterial hypertension: Unique molecular targets to site-specific drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Bhuvaneshwar; Gupta, Vivek

    2015-08-10

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a cardiopulmonary disorder characterized by increased blood pressure in the small arterioles supplying blood to lungs for oxygenation. Advances in understanding of molecular and cellular biology techniques have led to the findings that PAH is indeed a cascade of diseases exploiting multi-faceted complex pathophysiology, with cellular proliferation and vascular remodeling being the key pathogenic events along with several cellular pathways involved. While current therapies for PAH do provide for amelioration of disease symptoms and acute survival benefits, their full therapeutic potential is hindered by patient incompliance and off-target side effects. To overcome the issues related with current therapy and to devise a more selective therapy, various novel pathways are being investigated for PAH treatment. In addition, inability to deliver anti-PAH drugs to the disease site i.e., distal pulmonary arterioles has been one of the major challenges in achieving improved patient outcomes and improved therapeutic efficacy. Several novel carriers have been explored to increase the selectivity of currently approved anti-PAH drugs and to act as suitable carriers for the delivery of investigational drugs. In the present review, we have discussed potential of various novel molecular pathways/targets including RhoA/Rho kinase, tyrosine kinase, endothelial progenitor cells, vasoactive intestinal peptide, and miRNA in PAH therapeutics. We have also discussed various techniques for site-specific drug delivery of anti-PAH therapeutics so as to improve the efficacy of approved and investigational drugs. This review will provide gainful insights into current advances in PAH therapeutics with an emphasis on site-specific drug payload delivery.

  2. Dre recombinase, like Cre, is a highly efficient site-specific recombinase in E. coli, mammalian cells and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Fu, Jun; Patsch, Christoph; Hu, Shengbiao; Weidlich, Stefanie; Duerschke, Kristin; Buchholz, Frank; Edenhofer, Frank; Stewart, A Francis

    2009-01-01

    Tyrosine site-specific recombinases (SSRs) including Cre and FLP are essential tools for DNA and genome engineering. Cre has long been recognized as the best SSR for genome engineering, particularly in mice. Obtaining another SSR that is as good as Cre will be a valuable addition to the genomic toolbox. To this end, we have developed and validated reagents for the Dre-rox system. These include an Escherichia coli-inducible expression vector based on the temperature-sensitive pSC101 plasmid, a mammalian expression vector based on the CAGGs promoter, a rox-lacZ reporter embryonic stem (ES) cell line based on targeting at the Rosa26 locus, the accompanying Rosa26-rox reporter mouse line, and a CAGGs-Dre deleter mouse line. We also show that a Dre-progesterone receptor shows good ligand-responsive induction properties. Furthermore, we show that there is no crossover recombination between Cre-rox or Dre-loxP. Hence, we add another set of efficient tools to the genomic toolbox, which will enable the development of more sophisticated mouse models for the analysis of gene function and disease.

  3. Measurement of spatial proximity and accessibility of chromosomal loci in yeast using Cre/loxP site-specific recombination

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, Doris; Burgess, Sean M.

    2009-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to measure interactions between homologous chromosomes during meiosis in budding yeast. These include cytological analysis of fixed, spread nuclei using fluorescence in situ Hybridization (FISH) (1, 2), visualization of GFP-labeled chromosomal loci in living cells (3), and Chromosome-Conformation Capture (3C) (4). Here we describe a quantitative genetic assay that uses exogenous site-specific recombination to monitor the level of homolog associations betwee...

  4. FLP recombinase-mediated site-specific recombination in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-Pei Long

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of gene function and the production of site-specific genetically modified mutants are two major goals of genetic engineering in the post-genomic era. Although site-specific recombination systems have been powerful tools for genome manipulation of many organisms, they have not yet been established for use in the manipulation of the silkworm Bombyx mori genome. In this study, we achieved site-specific excision of a target gene at predefined chromosomal sites in the silkworm using a FLP/FRT site-specific recombination system. We first constructed two stable transgenic target silkworm strains that both contain a single copy of the transgene construct comprising a target gene expression cassette flanked by FRT sites. Using pre-blastoderm microinjection of a FLP recombinase helper expression vector, 32 G3 site-specific recombinant transgenic individuals were isolated from five of 143 broods. The average frequency of FLP recombinase-mediated site-specific excision in the two target strains genome was approximately 3.5%. This study shows that it is feasible to achieve site-specific recombination in silkworms using the FLP/FRT system. We conclude that the FLP/FRT system is a useful tool for genome manipulation in the silkworm. Furthermore, this is the first reported use of the FLP/FRT system for the genetic manipulation of a lepidopteran genome and thus provides a useful reference for the establishment of genome manipulation technologies in other lepidopteran species.

  5. Site-specific analysis of geothermal development-data files of prospective sites. Vol. III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, F.; Cohen, A.; Pfundstein, R.; Pond, S.

    1978-02-01

    Development scenarios for 37 hydrothermal and geopressured prospects in the United States were analyzed. This third of three volumes presents site-specific data and sample development schedules for the first plant on line at each of the 37 prospects.

  6. Gated rotation mechanism of site-specific recombination by  C31 integrase

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olorunniji, F. J; Buck, D. E; Colloms, S. D; McEwan, A. R; Smith, M. C. M; Stark, W. M; Rosser, S. J

    2012-01-01

    Integrases, such as that of the Streptomyces temperate bacteriophage [phi]C31, promote site-specific recombination between DNA sequences in the bacteriophage and bacterial genomes to integrate or excise the phage DNA. [phi...

  7. 75 FR 17701 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board Chairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... 28, 2010 EM Program Update, Priorities, and American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Discussion EM SSAB Chairs' Round Robin: Top Three Site-Specific Issues, EM SSAB Accomplishments, and Major Board...

  8. Design and integration of components for site specific control of fertilizer application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergeijk, van J.

    2001-01-01

    Keywords: Precision Agriculture, Site Specific Agriculture, Global Positioning System, GPS, Fertilizer Application, Information System.

    Spatial and temporal variability in soil, crop and climate characteristics results in non optimal use of fertilizers when the application

  9. Genetically encoded norbornene directs site-specific cellular protein labelling via a rapid bioorthogonal reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Kathrin; Davis, Lloyd; Torres-Kolbus, Jessica; Chou, Chungjung; Deiters, Alexander; Chin, Jason W.

    2012-01-01

    The site-specific incorporation of bioorthogonal groups via genetic code expansion provides a powerful general strategy for site-specifically labelling proteins with any probe. However, the slow reactivity of the bioorthogonal functional groups that can be encoded genetically limits the utility of this strategy. We demonstrate the genetic encoding of a norbornene amino acid using the pyrrolysyl tRNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair in Escherichia coli and mammalian cells. We developed a series of tetr...

  10. BALANCED SCORECARDS EVALUATION MODEL THAT INCLUDES ELEMENTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEM USING AHP MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Jovanović

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The research is oriented on improvement of environmental management system (EMS using BSC (Balanced Scorecard model that presents strategic model of measurem ents and improvement of organisational performance. The research will present approach of objectives and environmental management me trics involvement (proposed by literature review in conventional BSC in "Ad Barska plovi dba" organisation. Further we will test creation of ECO-BSC model based on business activities of non-profit organisations in order to improve envir onmental management system in parallel with other systems of management. Using this approach we may obtain 4 models of BSC that includ es elements of environmen tal management system for AD "Barska plovidba". Taking into acc ount that implementation and evaluation need long period of time in AD "Barska plovidba", the final choice will be based on 14598 (Information technology - Software product evaluation and ISO 9126 (Software engineering - Product quality using AHP method. Those standards are usually used for evaluation of quality software product and computer programs that serve in organisation as support and factors for development. So, AHP model will be bas ed on evolution criteria based on suggestion of ISO 9126 standards and types of evaluation from two evaluation teams. Members of team & will be experts in BSC and environmental management system that are not em ployed in AD "Barska Plovidba" organisation. The members of team 2 will be managers of AD "Barska Plovidba" organisation (including manage rs from environmental department. Merging results based on previously cr eated two AHP models, one can obtain the most appropriate BSC that includes elements of environmental management system. The chosen model will present at the same time suggestion for approach choice including ecological metrics in conventional BSC model for firm that has at least one ECO strategic orientation.

  11. Evolution of I-SceI Homing Endonucleases with Increased DNA Recognition Site Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Rakesh; Ho, Kwok Ki; Tenney, Kristen; Chen, Jui-Hui; Golden, Barbara L.; Gimble, Frederick S. (UIUC); (Purdue)

    2013-09-18

    Elucidating how homing endonucleases undergo changes in recognition site specificity will facilitate efforts to engineer proteins for gene therapy applications. I-SceI is a monomeric homing endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves within an 18-bp target. It tolerates limited degeneracy in its target sequence, including substitution of a C:G{sub +4} base pair for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} base pair. Libraries encoding randomized amino acids at I-SceI residue positions that contact or are proximal to A:T{sub +4} were used in conjunction with a bacterial one-hybrid system to select I-SceI derivatives that bind to recognition sites containing either the A:T{sub +4} or the C:G{sub +4} base pairs. As expected, isolates encoding wild-type residues at the randomized positions were selected using either target sequence. All I-SceI proteins isolated using the C:G{sub +4} recognition site included small side-chain substitutions at G100 and either contained (K86R/G100T, K86R/G100S and K86R/G100C) or lacked (G100A, G100T) a K86R substitution. Interestingly, the binding affinities of the selected variants for the wild-type A:T{sub +4} target are 4- to 11-fold lower than that of wild-type I-SceI, whereas those for the C:G{sub +4} target are similar. The increased specificity of the mutant proteins is also evident in binding experiments in vivo. These differences in binding affinities account for the observed -36-fold difference in target preference between the K86R/G100T and wild-type proteins in DNA cleavage assays. An X-ray crystal structure of the K86R/G100T mutant protein bound to a DNA duplex containing the C:G{sub +4} substitution suggests how sequence specificity of a homing enzyme can increase. This biochemical and structural analysis defines one pathway by which site specificity is augmented for a homing endonuclease.

  12. Improving probabilistic forecast skill by calibrating site-specific and gridded ensemble forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhen, Nina; Evans, Gavin; Jackson, Simon; Wright, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    While forecast ensembles allow for the design and usage of novel probabilistic forecast products, they still cannot capture all sources of uncertainty inherent to NWP forecasting. In particular they are often not calibrated, resulting in the fact that the probabilistic forecasts derived from ensembles are not statistically consistent with the corresponding observations. A number of statistical post-processing methods for the purpose of calibrating ensemble forecasts have been proposed over the last decade, with Bayesian Model Averaging and Ensemble Model Output Statistics (or Non-homogeneous Gaussian Regression) being among the most successful, as they can be applied to a variety of weather parameters. At the Met Office, the calibration of probabilistic forecasts has received more and more attention over the last few years and several calibration techniques based on BMA and EMOS are being trialled and assessed for their benefit over the raw ensemble forecasts. Challenges arise when addressing weather parameters which by nature don't exhibit a normal distribution. We present results for the calibration of site-specific and gridded forecasts, in the short- to medium-range, while highlighting the need for preserving the multivariate dependency structure inherent to the ensemble forecasts. We will also draw conclusions on the practicality of operational implementation and discuss the performance at individual sites.

  13. Site-Specific Analysis of Geothermal Development-Data Files of Prospective Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, F.; Cohen, A.; Pfundstein, R.; Pond, S.

    1977-10-01

    This document presents site-specific data and sample development schedules for the first plant on line at 30 hydrothermal and 7 geopressured prospective sites (prospects) that are believed to be suited for supporting the geothermal generation of electricity. This report includes many prospects from an earlier METREK report on geothermal development scenarios. The list has been augmented with other sites chosen as development prospects by the division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The DGE additions include a general area called ''Cascade Range''. METREK has chosen the following specific Cascade Range Sites in place of that general area: Baker Hot Springs, Mount Hood, Lassen and Glass Mountain/ Diablo. All the prospects have been selected on the basis of current knowledge of hydrothermal and geopressured resources. The selection is intended for program planning purposes. Neither METREK nor the Federal government warrants that any of these sites will necessarily be developed, nor does their selection necessarily imply any commitment on the part of the Federal government to their development. [DJE-2005

  14. Site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard analyses for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 1: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This report describes and summarizes a probabilistic evaluation of ground motions for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The purpose of this evaluation is to provide a basis for updating the seismic design criteria for the INEL. In this study, site-specific seismic hazard curves were developed for seven facility sites as prescribed by DOE Standards 1022-93 and 1023-96. These sites include the: Advanced Test Reactor (ATR); Argonne National Laboratory West (ANL); Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP or CPP); Power Burst Facility (PBF); Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC); Naval Reactor Facility (NRF); and Test Area North (TAN). The results, probabilistic peak ground accelerations and uniform hazard spectra, contained in this report are not to be used for purposes of seismic design at INEL. A subsequent study will be performed to translate the results of this probabilistic seismic hazard analysis to site-specific seismic design values for the INEL as per the requirements of DOE Standard 1020-94. These site-specific seismic design values will be incorporated into the INEL Architectural and Engineering Standards.

  15. Symptomatic and quality of life outcomes after site-specific fascial reattachment for pelvic organ prolapse repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyad, Abdalla M; Redhead, Emma; Awan, Noveen; Kyrgiou, Maria; Prashar, Sanjeev; Hill, Simon R

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess symptomatic and quality of life outcome scores following site specific fascial reattachment surgery for pelvic organ prolapse using the validated Prolapse Quality of Life (P-QOL) questionnaires. One hundred and ninety two women underwent surgery for pelvic organ prolapse; ninety four underwent anterior repair (thirty four of them had vaginal hysterectomy), and ninety eight had posterior repair. Patients filled P-QOL questionnaires 24 hours prior to surgery and a postal P-QOL questionnaire six months post operatively. Pre and post operative questionnaires were paired. Quality of life and symptoms scores were calculated using Wilcoxon signed rank test. One hundred and one women returned their questionnaires and were suitable to include in the study. Forty nine underwent anterior repair (fifteen had vaginal hysterectomy) and 52 underwent posterior repair. Quality of life scores showed significant improvement in the anterior and posterior repair groups with the exception of general health in the anterior repair group and general health and prolapse impact in the posterior repair group. Anterior repair significantly improved urinary voiding and storage symptoms. Posterior repair group showed significant improvement in defecatory symptoms. Both groups showed improvement in sexual function and general prolapse symptoms. Prolapse repair with site specific fascial reattachment results in significant improvement in quality of life scores six months after surgery. Anterior repair improves urinary voiding and storage symptoms and posterior repair improves defecatory dysfunction and urinary voiding. Sexual function improves following prolapse repair with site specific fascial reattachment.

  16. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of cysteine and site specific conjugated herceptin antibody-drug conjugates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dowdy Jackson

    Full Text Available Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs are monoclonal antibodies designed to deliver a cytotoxic drug selectively to antigen expressing cells. Several components of an ADC including the selection of the antibody, the linker, the cytotoxic drug payload and the site of attachment used to attach the drug to the antibody are critical to the activity and development of the ADC. The cytotoxic drugs or payloads used to make ADCs are typically conjugated to the antibody through cysteine or lysine residues. This results in ADCs that have a heterogeneous number of drugs per antibody. The number of drugs per antibody commonly referred to as the drug to antibody ratio (DAR, can vary between 0 and 8 drugs for a IgG1 antibody. Antibodies with 0 drugs are ineffective and compete with the ADC for binding to the antigen expressing cells. Antibodies with 8 drugs per antibody have reduced in vivo stability, which may contribute to non target related toxicities. In these studies we incorporated a non-natural amino acid, para acetyl phenylalanine, at two unique sites within an antibody against Her2/neu. We covalently attached a cytotoxic drug to these sites to form an ADC which contains two drugs per antibody. We report the results from the first direct preclinical comparison of a site specific non-natural amino acid anti-Her2 ADC and a cysteine conjugated anti-Her2 ADC. We report that the site specific non-natural amino acid anti-Her2 ADCs have superior in vitro serum stability and preclinical toxicology profile in rats as compared to the cysteine conjugated anti-Her2 ADCs. We also demonstrate that the site specific non-natural amino acid anti-Her2 ADCs maintain their in vitro potency and in vivo efficacy against Her2 expressing human tumor cell lines. Our data suggests that site specific non-natural amino acid ADCs may have a superior therapeutic window than cysteine conjugated ADCs.

  17. PCR-based site-specific mutagenesis of peptide antibiotics FALL-39 and its biologic activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-xia YANG; Yun FENG; Bo-yao WANG; Qi WU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct PGEX-1λT-FALL-39 expression vector and its mutant vector, and study the relationship of function and structure. METHODS: A cDNA encoding mature FALL-39 was cloned from SPCA- 1 cell mRNA and the prokaryotic expression vector PGEX- 1λT-FALL-39 was constructed. Two kinds of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the site-direction mutagenesis were used to construct FALL-39 mutant expression vector, FALL-39-Lys-32 and FALL-39-Lys-24. Minimal effective concentration, minimal inhibitory concentration, and minimal bactericidal concentration were used to assay the antibacterial activities of these peptides. Effects of different solution on the antibacterial activity of FALL-39 and FALL-39-Lys-32 were observed by CFU determination. The hemolytic effects of these peptides were also examined on human red blood cells. RESULTS: Two site-specific mutants FALL-39-Lys-32 and FALL-39-Lys24 were obtained by PCR-induced mutagenesis. In comparison with two-step PCR which required two pairs of primers, one step PCR which required one pair of primers is a simple and efficient method for the PCR based site-specific mutagenesis. Using the prokaryotic expression system, the E coli-based products of recombinant FALL39 and its mutant peptides were also obtained. The antibacterial assay showed that FALL-39-Lys-32 and FALL-39-Lys24 were more potential in the antibacterial activity against E coli ML35p and Pseltdomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 than that of FALL-39, and no increase in hemolysis was observed at the antibacterial concentrations. The antibacterial activity of FALL-39-Lys-32 against E coli was more potent than that of FALL-39 in NaCl-containing LB medium, while its activity was almost the same as FALL-39 in SO2-4 containing Medium E. CONCLUSION: PCR-based mutagensis is a useful model system for studying the structure and function relationship of antimicrobial peptides. Keeping α-helical conformation of FALL-39 and increasing net positive charge can increase the

  18. Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) Site-Specific Health and Safety Plan, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynn, N.C. Bechtel Jacobs

    2008-04-21

    The Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC) policy is to provide a safe and healthy workplace for all employees and subcontractors. The implementation of this policy requires that operations of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF), located one-half mile west of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex, be guided by an overall plan and consistent proactive approach to environment, safety and health (ES&H) issues. The BJC governing document for worker safety and health, BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', describes the key elements of the BJC Safety and Industrial Hygiene (IH) programs, which includes the requirement for development and implementation of a site-specific Health and Safety Plan (HASP) where required by regulation (refer also to BJC-EH-1012, 'Development and Approval of Safety and Health Plans'). BJC/OR-1745, 'Worker Safety and Health Program', implements the requirements for worker protection contained in Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 851. The EMWMF site-specific HASP requirements identifies safe operating procedures, work controls, personal protective equipment, roles and responsibilities, potential site hazards and control measures, site access requirements, frequency and types of monitoring, site work areas, decontamination procedures, and outlines emergency response actions. This HASP will be available on site for use by all workers, management and supervisors, oversight personnel and visitors. All EMWMF assigned personnel will be briefed on the contents of this HASP and will be required to follow the procedures and protocols as specified. The policies and procedures referenced in this HASP apply to all EMWMF operations activities. In addition the HASP establishes ES&H criteria for the day-to-day activities to prevent or minimize any adverse effect on the environment and personnel safety and health and to meet standards that define acceptable

  19. Geospatial evaluation of lead bioaccessibility and distribution for site specific prediction of threshold limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Jennifer A; Lister, Sydney; Hazebrouck, Garrett; Perdrial, Nicolas

    2017-10-01

    Recent work identified the need for site-specific Pb bioaccessibility evaluation and scaled contaminant modeling. Pb heterogeneity has made bioaccessibility characterization difficult, and complicated distribution models. Using field testing, bioaccessibility measurement, Integrated Exposure Uptake and Biokinetic (IEUBK) modeling, and geospatial techniques, we propose a framework for conducting applied risk-based, multiscale assessment. This framework was tested and implemented in Burlington, VT, an area of old housing stock and high Pb burden (up to 15 000 mg kg(-1)) derived primarily from paint. After analyzing local soil samples for total and bioaccessible Pb, it was determined that bioaccessible and total Pb were well correlated in this area, through which an average bioaccessibility parameter was derived approximating Pb bioaccessibility for this soil type and Pb impact. This parameter was used with the IEUBK to recommend the local limit for residential soil Pb be reduced from 400 to 360 mg kg(-1), taking into consideration the lowering of the blood lead level threshold for Pb poisoning from 10 to 5 μg dL(-1) by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Geospatial investigation incorporated samples collected during this investigation and samples from a high school summer science academy, and relied on three techniques, used at different scales: kriging of total and background Pb alone, kriging of total and background Pb with housing age as a well-sampled, well-correlated secondary variable (cokriging), and inverse distance weighting of total and bioaccessible Pb. Modeling at different scales allowed for characterization of Pb impact at single sites as well as citywide. Model maps show positive correlation between areas of older housing and areas of high Pb burden, as well as potential at different scales for reducing the effects of Pb heterogeneity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Design of Visco-Elastic Dampers for RC Frame for Site-Specific Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatchi, P.; Rama Raju, K.; Ravisankar, K.; Iyer, Nagesh R.

    2016-11-01

    Number of Reinforced Concrete (RC) framed buildings have got damaged at Ahmedabad city, India located at about 240 km away from epicenter during January 2001, 7.6 moment magnitude (Mw) Bhuj earthquake. In the present study, two dimensional nonlinear time history dynamic analyses of a typical 13 storey frame assumed to be located at Ahmedabad is carried out with the rock level and surface level site-specific ground motion for scenario earthquake of Mw 7.6 from Bhuj. Artificial ground motions are generated using extended finite source stochastic model with seismological parameters reported in literature for 2001 Bhuj earthquake. Surface level ground motions are obtained for a typical soil profile of 100 m depth reported in literature through one dimensional equivalent linear wave propagation analyses. From the analyses, failure of frame is observed for surface level ground motions which indicates that, in addition to the in-adequacy of the cross sections and reinforcement of the RC members of the frame chosen, the rich energy content of the surface level ground motion near the fundamental time period of the frame has also contributed for the failure of frame. As a part of retrofitting measure, five Visco-elastic Dampers (VED) in chevron bracing are added to frame. For the frame considered in the present study, provision of VED is found to be effective to mitigate damage for the soil site considered.

  1. Sensing site-specific structural characteristics and chirality using vibrational circular dichroism of isotope labeled peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiderling, Timothy A

    2017-10-04

    Isotope labeling has a long history in chemistry as a tool for probing structure, offering enhanced sensitivity, or enabling site selection with a wide range of spectroscopic tools. Chirality sensitive methods such as electronic circular dichroism are global structural tools and have intrinsically low resolution. Consequently, they are generally insensitive to modifications to enhance site selectivity. The use of isotope labeling to modify vibrational spectra with unique resolvable frequency shifts can provide useful site-specific sensitivity, and these methods have been recently more widely expanded in biopolymer studies. While the spectral shifts resulting from changes in isotopic mass can provide resolution of modes from specific parts of the molecule and can allow detection of local change in structure with perturbation, these shifts alone do not directly indicate structure or chirality. With vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), the shifted bands and their resultant sign patterns can be used to indicate local conformations in labeled biopolymers, particularly if multiple labels are used and if their coupling is theoretically modeled. This mini-review discusses selected examples of the use of labeling specific amides in peptides to develop local structural insight with VCD spectra. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Exploring site-specific chemical interactions at surfaces: a case study on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Omur E.; Götzen, Jan; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2016-12-01

    A material’s ability to interact with approaching matter is governed by the structural and chemical nature of its surfaces. Tailoring surfaces to meet specific needs requires developing an understanding of the underlying fundamental principles that determine a surface’s reactivity. A particularly insightful case occurs when the surface site exhibiting the strongest attraction changes with distance. To study this issue, combined noncontact atomic force microscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy experiments have been carried out, where the evolution of the local chemical interaction with distance leads to a contrast reversal in the force channel. Using highly ordered pyrolytic graphite surfaces and metallic probe tips as a model system, we find that at larger tip-sample distances, carbon atoms exhibit stronger attractions than hollow sites while upon further approach, hollow sites become energetically more favorable. For the tunneling current that is recorded at large tip-sample separations during acquisition of a constant-force image, the contrast is dominated by the changes in tip-sample distance required to hold the force constant (‘cross-talk’) at smaller separations the contrast turns into a convolution of this cross-talk and the local density of states. Analysis shows that the basic factors influencing the force channel contrast reversal are locally varying decay lengths and an onset of repulsive forces that occurs for distinct surface sites at different tip-sample distances. These findings highlight the importance of tip-sample distance when comparing the relative strength of site-specific chemical interactions.

  3. Site-specific recombination in the chicken genome using Flipase recombinase-mediated cassette exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hong Jo; Lee, Hyung Chul; Kim, Young Min; Hwang, Young Sun; Park, Young Hyun; Park, Tae Sub; Han, Jae Yong

    2016-02-01

    Targeted genome recombination has been applied in diverse research fields and has a wide range of possible applications. In particular, the discovery of specific loci in the genome that support robust and ubiquitous expression of integrated genes and the development of genome-editing technology have facilitated rapid advances in various scientific areas. In this study, we produced transgenic (TG) chickens that can induce recombinase-mediated gene cassette exchange (RMCE), one of the site-specific recombination technologies, and confirmed RMCE in TG chicken-derived cells. As a result, we established TG chicken lines that have, Flipase (Flp) recognition target (FRT) pairs in the chicken genome, mediated by piggyBac transposition. The transgene integration patterns were diverse in each TG chicken line, and the integration diversity resulted in diverse levels of expression of exogenous genes in each tissue of the TG chickens. In addition, the replaced gene cassette was expressed successfully and maintained by RMCE in the FRT predominant loci of TG chicken-derived cells. These results indicate that targeted genome recombination technology with RMCE could be adaptable to TG chicken models and that the technology would be applicable to specific gene regulation by cis-element insertion and customized expression of functional proteins at predicted levels without epigenetic influence.

  4. Design of Visco-Elastic Dampers for RC Frame for Site-Specific Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatchi, P.; Rama Raju, K.; Ravisankar, K.; Iyer, Nagesh R.

    2016-12-01

    Number of Reinforced Concrete (RC) framed buildings have got damaged at Ahmedabad city, India located at about 240 km away from epicenter during January 2001, 7.6 moment magnitude (Mw) Bhuj earthquake. In the present study, two dimensional nonlinear time history dynamic analyses of a typical 13 storey frame assumed to be located at Ahmedabad is carried out with the rock level and surface level site-specific ground motion for scenario earthquake of Mw 7.6 from Bhuj. Artificial ground motions are generated using extended finite source stochastic model with seismological parameters reported in literature for 2001 Bhuj earthquake. Surface level ground motions are obtained for a typical soil profile of 100 m depth reported in literature through one dimensional equivalent linear wave propagation analyses. From the analyses, failure of frame is observed for surface level ground motions which indicates that, in addition to the in-adequacy of the cross sections and reinforcement of the RC members of the frame chosen, the rich energy content of the surface level ground motion near the fundamental time period of the frame has also contributed for the failure of frame. As a part of retrofitting measure, five Visco-elastic Dampers (VED) in chevron bracing are added to frame. For the frame considered in the present study, provision of VED is found to be effective to mitigate damage for the soil site considered.

  5. Understanding site-specific residual strain and architecture in bovine cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Bijay; Tadano, Shigeru; Fujisaki, Kazuhiro; Todoh, Masahiro

    2008-11-14

    Living bone is considered as adaptive material to the mechanical functions, which continually undergoes change in its histological arrangement with respect to external prolonged loading. Such remodeling phenomena within bone depend on the degree of stimuli caused by the mechanical loading being experienced, and therefore, are specific to the sites. In the attempts of understanding strain adaptive phenomena within bones, different theoretical models have been proposed. Also, the existing literatures mostly follow the measurement of surface strains using strain gauges to experimentally quantify the strains experienced in the functional environment. In this work, we propose a novel idea of understanding site-specific functional adaptation to the prolonged load in bone on the basis of inherited residual strains and structural organization. We quantified the residual strains and amount of apatite crystals distribution, i.e., the degree of orientation, using X-ray diffraction procedures. The sites of naturally existing hole in bone, called foramen, are considered from bovine femur and metacarpal samples. Significant values of residual strains are found to exist in the specimens. Trends of residual strains noted in the specimens are mostly consistent with the degree of orientation of the crystallites. These features explain the response behavior of bone to the mechanical loading history near the foramen sites. Preferential orientation of crystals mapped around a femoral foramen specimen showed furnished tailored arrangement of the crystals around the hole. Effect of external loading at the femoral foramen site is also explained by the tensile loading experiment.

  6. Site-specific chromosomal integration in mammalian cells: highly efficient CRE recombinase-mediated cassette exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y Q; Seibler, J; Alami, R; Eisen, A; Westerman, K A; Leboulch, P; Fiering, S; Bouhassira, E E

    1999-10-01

    Expression of experimental constructs in mammalian cells or transgenic animals is difficult to control because it is markedly influenced by position effects. This has limited both the analysis of cis -DNA regulatory elements for transcription and replication, and the physiological analysis of proteins expressed from transgenes. We report here two new methods based on the concept of recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE) to perform site-specific chromosomal integration. The first method permits the exchange of a negative selectable marker pre-localized on the chromosome with a transgene via a CRE-mediated double recombination between inverted Lox sites. Integration efficiency is close to 100 % of negatively selected mouse erythroleukemia cells and ranges from 10 to 50 % in embryonic stem cells. The second method allows RMCE with no selection at all except for cells that have taken up plasmid transiently. While less efficient, this technique permits novel experimental approaches. We find that integration of a transgene at a given genomic site leads to reproducible expression. RMCE should be useful to develop artificial genetic loci that impart specific and reproducible regulation of transgenes in higher eukaryotes. This should facilitate the analysis of cis -regulatory DNA elements governing expression and position effects, improve our control over the physiological effects of transgenes, and accelerate the development of animal models for complex human diseases.

  7. A Site-Specific Index Based on Weathering Forms Visible in Central Oxford, UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary J. Thornbush

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The authenticity of much of the stone-work along Queen’s Lane in central Oxford, UK presented an opportunity to produce a photographic survey from which a weathering index could be established. This represents a site-specific approach to devising a weathering form. Because it is photo-based, weathering forms are visible for comparison and classification purposes across disciplines. Limestone pertaining to building ashlar and plinths along this roadway, which mainly belong to Queen’s College, St Edmund Hall, New College, and Hertford College, was classified according to this newly introduced weathering index, the size-extent (S-E index, through consideration of type, size, extent, impact, and trigger. This size- (range and extent-based classification system enables for the assessment of weathering forms of various types, including soiling and decay features as well as those potentially expected in the presence of vegetation and animals. Weathering forms of a range of sizes were present, with a slightly greater abundance of small types (mm-cm in the micro- to mesoscale and more discrete types with a low extent. For this location in central Oxford, chemical weathering was found to be the predominant type of soiling and decay.

  8. Site-specific integration and tailoring of cassette design for sustainable gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Angelo; Cesana, Daniela; Genovese, Pietro; Di Stefano, Bruno; Provasi, Elena; Colombo, Daniele F; Neri, Margherita; Magnani, Zulma; Cantore, Alessio; Lo Riso, Pietro; Damo, Martina; Pello, Oscar M; Holmes, Michael C; Gregory, Philip D; Gritti, Angela; Broccoli, Vania; Bonini, Chiara; Naldini, Luigi

    2011-08-21

    Integrative gene transfer methods are limited by variable transgene expression and by the consequences of random insertional mutagenesis that confound interpretation in gene-function studies and may cause adverse events in gene therapy. Site-specific integration may overcome these hurdles. Toward this goal, we studied the transcriptional and epigenetic impact of different transgene expression cassettes, targeted by engineered zinc-finger nucleases to the CCR5 and AAVS1 genomic loci of human cells. Analyses performed before and after integration defined features of the locus and cassette design that together allow robust transgene expression without detectable transcriptional perturbation of the targeted locus and its flanking genes in many cell types, including primary human lymphocytes. We thus provide a framework for sustainable gene transfer in AAVS1 that can be used for dependable genetic manipulation, neutral marking of the cell and improved safety of therapeutic applications, and demonstrate its feasibility by rapidly generating human lymphocytes and stem cells carrying targeted and benign transgene insertions.

  9. Site-specific muscle hyper-reactivity in musicians with occupational upper limb pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, B; Spence, S H

    1992-07-01

    Fourteen musicians who reported a history of pain in the upper limb associated with the playing of their instruments were compared with a sample of pain-free musicians, matched for age, sex and musical instrument. Four tasks were presented in random order and included neutral, general stressor, personal stressor and pain stressor tasks. Ratings of stressfulness and recordings of skin conductance level confirmed the effectiveness of the experimental manipulations for both subject groups. No differences were found between groups or tasks for frontalis surface electromyograph (EMG) activity. Evidence was found, however, of EMG elevation in flexor and trapezius muscles on the pain side for the pain subjects, in response to the task involving recall of a pain experience. This elevation was not found for the pain-free controls or for other stressor tasks, although some elevation in response to the pain stressor task was found for pain subjects in the trapezius muscles of the non-pain side. The duration of return to baseline of EMG following the pain stressor task was found to be extended in pain subjects for the trapezius, but not for the flexor muscles of the pain side. The findings suggest that site-specific muscle hyper-reactivity may play a role in the development and maintenance of occupational upper limb pain in musicians.

  10. Site-specific water quality guidelines: 1. Derivation approaches based on physicochemical, ecotoxicological and ecological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, R A; Humphrey, C L; Harford, A J; Sinclair, A; Jones, D R; Davies, S; Storey, A W

    2014-01-01

    Generic water quality guidelines (WQGs) are developed by countries/regions as broad scale tools to assist with the protection of aquatic ecosystems from the impacts of toxicants. However, since generic WQGs cannot adequately account for the many environmental factors that may affect toxicity at a particular site, site-specific WQGs are often needed, especially for high environmental value ecosystems. The Australian and New Zealand Guidelines for Fresh and Marine Water Quality provide comprehensive guidance on methods for refining or deriving WQGs for site-specific purposes. This paper describes three such methods for deriving site-specific WQGs, namely: (1) using local reference water quality data, (2) using biological effects data from laboratory-based toxicity testing, and (3) using biological effects data from field surveys. Two case studies related to the assessment of impacts arising from mining operations in northern Australia are used to illustrate the application of these methods. Finally, the potential of several emerging methods designed to assess thresholds of ecological change from field data for deriving site-specific WQGs is discussed. Ideally, multiple lines of evidence approaches, integrating both laboratory and field data, are recommended for deriving site-specific WQGs.

  11. Smart Voyage Planning Model Sensitivity Analysis Using Ocean and Atmospheric Models Including Ensemble Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    ATMOSPHERIC MODELS INCLUDING ENSEMBLE METHODS Scott E. Miller Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy B.S., University of South Carolina, 2000 B.S...Typical gas turbine fuel consumption curve and relationship to sea state .......51  Figure 16.  DDG 58 speed reduction curves for bow seas...Day Time Group ECDIS-N Electronic Chart Display and Information System – Navy ECMWF European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts EFAS

  12. Microbial profile comparisons of saliva, pooled and site-specific subgingival samples in periodontitis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belstrøm, Daniel; Sembler-Møller, Maria Lynn; Grande, Maria Anastasia

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to compare microbial profiles of saliva, pooled and site-specific subgingival samples in patients with periodontitis. We tested the hypotheses that saliva can be an alternative to pooled subgingival samples, when screening for presence of periopathogens....... DESIGN: Site specific subgingival plaque samples (n = 54), pooled subgingival plaque samples (n = 18) and stimulated saliva samples (n = 18) were collected from 18 patients with generalized chronic periodontitis. Subgingival and salivary microbiotas were characterized by means of HOMINGS (Human Oral...... to an AUC of 0.76 (sensitivity: 0.56, specificity: 0.94) in pooled subgingival samples. CONCLUSIONS: Site-specific presence of periodontal pathogens was detected with comparable accuracy in stimulated saliva samples and pooled subgingival plaque samples. Consequently, saliva may be a reasonable surrogate...

  13. Bifunctional chelating agent for the design and development of site specific radiopharmaceuticals and biomolecule conjugation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Prabhu, Kandikere R.; Gali, Hariprasad; Pillarsetty, Nagavara Kishore; Volkert, Wynn A.

    2003-10-21

    There is provided a method of labeling a biomolecule with a transition metal or radiometal in a site specific manner to produce a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical compound by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radio metal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. Also provided is a method of synthesizing the --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecules by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radiometal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting radio metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. There is provided a therapeutic or diagnostic agent comprising a --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecule.

  14. A Systematic Study of Site-specific GalNAc-type O-Glycosylation Modulating Proprotein Convertase Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Katrine Ter-Borch Gram; Vester-Christensen, Malene B.; Goth, Christoffer K.

    2011-01-01

    Site-specific GalNAc-type O-glycosylation is emerging as an important co-regulator of proprotein convertase (PC) processing of proteins. PC processing is crucial in regulating many fundamental biological pathways and O-glycans in or immediately adjacent to processing sites may affect recognition...... for O-glycosylation especially of isolated sites, but serine and to a lesser extent threonine residues are frequently found adjacent to PC processing sites. In the present study we used in vitro enzyme assays and ex vivo cell models to systematically address the boundaries of the region within site...

  15. Improved Subseasonal Prediction with Advanced Coupled Models including the 30km FIM-HYCOM Coupled Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Stan; Sun, Shan; Grell, Georg; Green, Benjamin; Bleck, Rainer; Li, Haiqin

    2017-04-01

    Extreme events for subseasonal duration have been linked to multi-week processes related to onset, duration, and cessation of blocking events or, more generally, quasi-stationary waves. Results will be shown from different sets of 32-day prediction experiments (3200 runs each) over a 16-year period for earth system processes key for subseasonal prediction for different resolution, numerics, and physics using the FIM-HYCOM coupled model. The coupled atmosphere (FIM) and ocean (HYCOM) modeling system is a relatively new coupled atmosphere-ocean model developed for subseasonal to seasonal prediction (Green et al. 2017 Mon.Wea.Rev. accepted, Bleck et al 2015 Mon. Wea. Rev.). Both component models operate on a common icosahedral horizontal grid and use an adaptive hybrid vertical coordinate (sigma-isentropic in FIM and sigma-isopycnic in HYCOM). FIM-HYCOM has been used to conduct 16 years of subseasonal retrospective forecasts following the NOAA Subseasonal (SubX) NMME protocol (32-day forward integrations), run with 4 ensemble members per week. Results from this multi-year FIM-HYCOM hindcast include successful forecasts out to 14-20 days for stratospheric warming events (from archived 10 hPa fields), improved MJO predictability (Green et al. 2017) using the Grell-Freitas (2014, ACP) scale-aware cumulus scheme instead of the Simplified Arakawa-Schubert scheme, and little sensitivity to resolution for blocking frequency. Forecast skill of metrics from FIM-HYCOM including 500 hPa heights and MJO index is at least comparable to that of the operational Climate Forecast System (CFSv2) used by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. Subseasonal skill is improved with a limited multi-model (FIM-HYCOM and CFSv2), consistent with previous seasonal multi-model ensemble results. Ongoing work will also be reported on for adding inline aerosol/chemistry treatment to the coupled FIM-HYCOM model and for advanced approaches to subgrid-scale clouds to address regional biases

  16. Understanding site-specific PSHA results by hazard deaggregation into site intensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klügel, Jens-Uwe

    2016-04-01

    From 1998 till 2015 Swiss Nuclear Power Plants sponsored a set of comprehensive site-specific PSHA-studies (PEGASOS, PEGASOS Refinement Project) to define review level earthquakes as well as the input for their plant specific probabilistic risk assessments. The studies were performed following the US SSHAC procedures at their most elaborated level 4. Safety experts and risk analysts of Swiss Nuclear Power Plants recently have been mandated to implement the final results of the studies in their risk assessment studies. For an in depth understanding of the consequences of the hazard on practical decision making it is reasonable to compare the new studies with the original hazard assessment studies used for the development of the seismic design basis of the plants. These studies were performed in terms of intensity. For the comparison a hazard deaggregation methodology was developed that allows for the conversion of standard uniform hazard spectra (UHS) into site-intensity (factors) hazard curves. The method was applied for the nuclear power plant Goesgen using the PEGASOS hazard. The results were compared with the results of earlier hazard studies as well as with actual deterministic and probabilistic hazard studies performed independently from the PEGASOS study in terms of EMS-98 intensities. The comparison revealed that the results of the PEGASOS study led to site intensity factors comparable with the results of studies from the 1970-ies. The study may have under predicted the safety importance of historical large earthquakes like the Basel earthquake of 1356. Therefore, an important conclusion is that probabilistic hazard studies for critical infrastructures have to be accompanied by an independent physics-based study (modelling hazard assessment) that allows to perform a safety evaluation of historical earthquakes. The paper presents the deaggregation methodology and the results of its application.

  17. Site specific endonucleases for human genome mapping. Final report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoche, K.; Selman, S.; Hung, L. [and others

    1994-06-01

    Current large scale genome mapping methodology suffers from a lack of tools for generating specific DNA fragments in the megabase size range. While technology such as pulsed field gel electrophoresis can resolve DNA fragments greater than 10 megabases in size, current methods for cleaving mammalian DNA using bacterial restriction enzymes are incapable of producing such fragments. Though several multidimensional approaches are underway to overcome this limitation, there currently is no single step procedure to generate specific DNA fragments in the 2-100 megabase size range. In order to overcome these limitations, we proposed to develop a family of site-specific endonucleases capable of generating DNA fragments in the 2-100 megabase size range in a single step. Additionally, we proposed to accomplish this by relaxing the specificity of a very-rare cutting intron-encoded endonucleases, I-Ppo I, and potentially using the process as a model for development of other enzymes. Our research has uncovered a great deal of information about intron-encoded endonucleases. We have found that I-Ppo I has a remarkable ability to tolerate degeneracy within its recognition sequence, and we have shown that the recognition sequence is larger than 15 base pairs. These findings suggest that a detailed study of the mechanism by which intron-encoded endonucleases recognize their target sequences should provide new sights into DNA-protein interactions; this had led to a continuation of the study of I-Ppo I in Dr. Raines` laboratory and we expect a more detailed understanding of the mechanism of I-Ppo I action to result.

  18. Comparison of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) to LiDAR for streambank erosion measurement at the site-specific and river network scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamshaw, S. D.; Dewoolkar, M. M.; Rizzo, D.; ONeil-Dunne, J.; Frolik, J.

    2016-12-01

    Measurement of rates and extent of streambank erosion along river corridors is an important component of many catchment studies and necessary for engineering projects such as river restoration, hazard assessment, and total maximum daily load (TMDL) development. A variety of methods have been developed to quantify streambank erosion, including bank pins, ground surveys, photogrammetry, LiDAR, and analytical models. However, these methods are not only resource intensive, but many are feasible and appropriate only for site-specific studies and not practical for erosion estimates at larger scales. Recent advancements in unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) and photogrammetry software provide capabilities for more rapid and economical quantification of streambank erosion and deposition at multiple scales (from site-specific to river network). At the site-specific scale, the capability of UAS to quantify streambank erosion was compared to terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) and RTK-GPS ground survey and assessed at seven streambank monitoring sites in central Vermont. Across all sites, the UAS-derived bank topography had mean errors of 0.21 m compared to TLS and GPS data. Highest accuracies were achieved in early spring conditions where mean errors approached 10 cm. The cross sectional area of bank erosion at a typical, vegetated streambank site was found to be reliably calculated within 10% of actual for erosion areas greater than 3.5 m2. At the river network-level scale, 20 km of river corridor along the New Haven, Winooski, and Mad Rivers was flown on multiple dates with UAS and used to generate digital elevation models (DEMs) that were then compared for change detection analysis. Airborne LiDAR data collected prior to UAS surveys was also compared to UAS data to determine multi-year rates of bank erosion. UAS-based photogrammetry for generation of fine scale topographic data shows promise for the monitoring of streambank erosion both at the individual site scale and river

  19. Configuration and specifications of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for early site specific weed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Sánchez, Jorge; López-Granados, Francisca; De Castro, Ana Isabel; Peña-Barragán, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    A new aerial platform has risen recently for image acquisition, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). This article describes the technical specifications and configuration of a UAV used to capture remote images for early season site- specific weed management (ESSWM). Image spatial and spectral properties required for weed seedling discrimination were also evaluated. Two different sensors, a still visible camera and a six-band multispectral camera, and three flight altitudes (30, 60 and 100 m) were tested over a naturally infested sunflower field. The main phases of the UAV workflow were the following: 1) mission planning, 2) UAV flight and image acquisition, and 3) image pre-processing. Three different aspects were needed to plan the route: flight area, camera specifications and UAV tasks. The pre-processing phase included the correct alignment of the six bands of the multispectral imagery and the orthorectification and mosaicking of the individual images captured in each flight. The image pixel size, area covered by each image and flight timing were very sensitive to flight altitude. At a lower altitude, the UAV captured images of finer spatial resolution, although the number of images needed to cover the whole field may be a limiting factor due to the energy required for a greater flight length and computational requirements for the further mosaicking process. Spectral differences between weeds, crop and bare soil were significant in the vegetation indices studied (Excess Green Index, Normalised Green-Red Difference Index and Normalised Difference Vegetation Index), mainly at a 30 m altitude. However, greater spectral separability was obtained between vegetation and bare soil with the index NDVI. These results suggest that an agreement among spectral and spatial resolutions is needed to optimise the flight mission according to every agronomical objective as affected by the size of the smaller object to be discriminated (weed plants or weed patches).

  20. Distinct and site-specific phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein at serine 612 in differentiated cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Hattori

    Full Text Available The retinoblastoma susceptibility protein (pRB is a phosphoprotein that regulates cell cycle progression at the G1/S transition. In quiescent and early G1 cells, pRB predominantly exists in the active hypophosphorylated form. The cyclin/cyclin-dependent protein kinase complexes phosphorylate pRB at the late G1 phase to inactivate pRB. This event leads to the dissociation and activation of E2F family transcriptional factors. At least 12 serine/threonine residues in pRB are phosphorylated in vivo. Although there have been many reports describing bulk phosphorylation of pRB, detail research describing the function of each phosphorylation site remains unknown. Besides its G1/S inhibitory function, pRB is involved in differentiation, prevention of cell death and control of tissue fate. To uncover the function of phosphorylation of pRB in various cellular conditions, we have been investigating phosphorylation of each serine/threonine residue in pRB with site-specific phospho-serine/threonine antibodies. Here we demonstrate that pRB is specifically phosphorylated at Ser612 in differentiated cells in a known kinase-independent manner. We also found that pRB phosphorylated at Ser612 still associates with E2F-1 and tightly binds to nuclear structures including chromatin. Moreover, expression of the Ser612Ala mutant pRB failed to induce differentiation. The findings suggest that phosphorylation of Ser612 provides a distinct function that differs from the function of phosphorylation of other serine/threonine residues in pRB.

  1. Site-Specific Fragment Identification Guided by Single-Step Free Energy Perturbation Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, E. Prabhu; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2012-01-01

    The in-silico Site Identification by Ligand Competitive Saturation (SILCS) approach identifies the binding sites of representative chemical entities on the entire protein surface, information that can be applied for computational fragment-based drug design. In this study, we report an efficient computational protocol that uses sampling of the protein-fragment conformational space obtained from the SILCS simulations and performs single step free energy perturbation (SSFEP) calculations to identify site-specific favorable chemical modifications of benzene involving substitutions of ring hydrogens with individual non-hydrogen atoms. The SSFEP method is able to capture the experimental trends in relative hydration free energies of benzene analogues and for two datasets of experimental relative binding free energies of congeneric series of ligands of the proteins α-thrombin and P38 MAP kinase. The approach includes a protocol in which data obtained from SILCS simulations of the proteins is first analyzed to identify favorable benzene binding sites following which an ensemble of benzene-protein conformations for that site is obtained. The SSFEP protocol applied to that ensemble results in good reproduction of experimental free energies of the α-thrombin ligands, but not for P38 MAP kinase ligands. Comparison with results from a P38 full-ligand simulation and analysis of conformations reveals the reason for the poor agreement being the connectivity with the remainder of the ligand, a limitation inherent in fragment-based methods. Since the SSFEP approach can identify favorable benzene modifications as well as identify the most favorable fragment conformations, the obtained information can be of value for fragment linking or structure-based optimization. PMID:23144598

  2. Configuration and specifications of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV for early site specific weed management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Torres-Sánchez

    Full Text Available A new aerial platform has risen recently for image acquisition, the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV. This article describes the technical specifications and configuration of a UAV used to capture remote images for early season site- specific weed management (ESSWM. Image spatial and spectral properties required for weed seedling discrimination were also evaluated. Two different sensors, a still visible camera and a six-band multispectral camera, and three flight altitudes (30, 60 and 100 m were tested over a naturally infested sunflower field. The main phases of the UAV workflow were the following: 1 mission planning, 2 UAV flight and image acquisition, and 3 image pre-processing. Three different aspects were needed to plan the route: flight area, camera specifications and UAV tasks. The pre-processing phase included the correct alignment of the six bands of the multispectral imagery and the orthorectification and mosaicking of the individual images captured in each flight. The image pixel size, area covered by each image and flight timing were very sensitive to flight altitude. At a lower altitude, the UAV captured images of finer spatial resolution, although the number of images needed to cover the whole field may be a limiting factor due to the energy required for a greater flight length and computational requirements for the further mosaicking process. Spectral differences between weeds, crop and bare soil were significant in the vegetation indices studied (Excess Green Index, Normalised Green-Red Difference Index and Normalised Difference Vegetation Index, mainly at a 30 m altitude. However, greater spectral separability was obtained between vegetation and bare soil with the index NDVI. These results suggest that an agreement among spectral and spatial resolutions is needed to optimise the flight mission according to every agronomical objective as affected by the size of the smaller object to be discriminated (weed plants or weed patches.

  3. Development of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles for Site-Specific Crop Production Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) have been developed and applied to support the practice of precision agriculture. Compared to piloted aircrafts, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle can focus on much smaller crop fields with much lower flight altitude than regular airplanes to perform site-specific management ...

  4. Microinjection of cre recombinase RNA induces site-specific recombination of a transgene in mouse oocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Drabek (Dubravka); F.G. Grosveld (Frank); T.P.M. de Wit (Ton)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractWe have developed a strategy for producing single copy transgenic mouse lines using Cre-loxP site specific recombination. The method is based on transient expression of the recombinase after injection of in vitro transcribed mRNA into the cytoplasm of fertil

  5. Summary of some feasibility studies for site-specific solar industrial process heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    Some feasibility studies for several different site specific solar industrial process heat applications are summarized. The followng applications are examined. Leather Tanning; Concrete Production: Lumber and Paper Processing; Milk Processing; Molding, Curing or Drying; Automobile Manufacture; and Food Processing and Preparation. For each application, site and process data, system design, and performance and cost estimates are summarized.

  6. 76 FR 18713 - Malheur National Forest; Oregon; Malheur National Forest Site-Specific Invasive Plants Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-05

    ... Forest Service Malheur National Forest; Oregon; Malheur National Forest Site- Specific Invasive Plants... invasive plant inventory and proposed action have been updated since then resulting in this correction. The... contain invasive plants within the Malheur National Forest. The Proposed Action is to treat invasive...

  7. CRISPR Outsourcing: Commissioning IHF for Site-Specific Integration of Foreign DNA at the CRISPR Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunzhou; Terns, Michael P

    2016-06-16

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Nuñez et al. (2016) report that site-specific integration of foreign DNA into CRISPR loci by the Cas1-Cas2 integrase complex is promoted by a host factor, IHF (integration host factor), that binds and bends CRISPR leader DNA.

  8. Stoichiometry of Site-specific Lysine Acetylation in an Entire Proteome*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Josue; Dowell, James A.; Smallegan, Michael J.; Fan, Jing; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Khan, Zia; Denu, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine ϵ-amino groups influences many cellular processes and has been mapped to thousands of sites across many organisms. Stoichiometric information of acetylation is essential to accurately interpret biological significance. Here, we developed and employed a novel method for directly quantifying stoichiometry of site-specific acetylation in the entire proteome of Escherichia coli. By coupling isotopic labeling and a novel pairing algorithm, our approach performs an in silico enrichment of acetyl peptides, circumventing the need for immunoenrichment. We investigated the function of the sole NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase, CobB, on both site-specific and global acetylation. We quantified 2206 peptides from 899 proteins and observed a wide distribution of acetyl stoichiometry, ranging from less than 1% up to 98%. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that metabolic enzymes, which either utilize or generate acetyl-CoA, and proteins involved in transcriptional and translational processes displayed the highest degree of acetylation. Loss of CobB led to increased global acetylation at low stoichiometry sites and induced site-specific changes at high stoichiometry sites, and biochemical analysis revealed altered acetyl-CoA metabolism. Thus, this study demonstrates that sirtuin deacetylase deficiency leads to both site-specific and global changes in protein acetylation stoichiometry, affecting central metabolism. PMID:24917678

  9. Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Site Specific Management Plan for the Hellsgate Project.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Matthew T.; Judd, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    This report contains a detailed site-specific management plan for the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project. The report provides background information about the mitigation process, the review process, mitigation acquisitions, Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) and mitigation crediting, current habitat conditions, desired future habitat conditions, restoration/enhancements efforts and maps.

  10. A method for site-specific labeling of multiple protein thiols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Johanna M.; Pluta, Radek; Huibers, Wim H. C.; Fusetti, Fabrizia; Geertsma, Eric R.; Poolman, Bert

    We present a generic method for the site-specific and differential labeling of multiple cysteine residues in one protein. Phenyl arsenic oxide has been employed as a protecting group of two closely spaced thiols, allowing first labeling of a single thiol. Subsequently, the protecting group is

  11. 30 CFR 46.11 - Site-specific hazard awareness training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... TRAINING TRAINING AND RETRAINING OF MINERS ENGAGED IN SHELL DREDGING OR EMPLOYED AT SAND, GRAVEL, SURFACE STONE, SURFACE CLAY, COLLOIDAL PHOSPHATE, OR SURFACE LIMESTONE MINES. § 46.11 Site-specific hazard... environmental conditions, recognition and avoidance of hazards such as electrical and powered-haulage...

  12. Site-specific protein modification using immobilized sortase in batch and continuous-flow systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witte, Martin D.; Wu, Tongfei; Guimaraes, Carla P.; Theile, Christopher S.; Blom, Annet E. M.; Ingram, Jessica R.; Li, Zeyang; Kundrat, Lenka; Goldberg, Shalom D.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2015-01-01

    Transpeptidation catalyzed by sortase A allows the preparation of proteins that are site-specifically and homogeneously modified with a wide variety of functional groups, such as fluorophores, PEG moieties, lipids, glycans, bio-orthogonal reactive groups and affinity handles. This protocol describes

  13. 76 FR 18540 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico (known locally as the Northern New Mexico Citizens....m.-4 p.m. ADDRESSES: Holiday Inn Express and Suites, 60 Entrada Drive, Los Alamos, New Mexico...

  14. 76 FR 11772 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-03

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico (known locally as the Northern New Mexico Citizens... Norte, Espanola, New Mexico 87532. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Menice Santistevan, Northern...

  15. 78 FR 38305 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-26

    ... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Northern New Mexico AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Northern New Mexico. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463... 87544. ] FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Menice Santistevan, Northern New Mexico Citizens'...

  16. Appreciating "Thirdspace": An Alternative Way of Viewing and Valuing Site-Specific Dance Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munjee, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific dance performance involves the presentation of choreography in connection with a site. The context of the site combined with a viewer's personal history, beliefs, and identity impact the reading and appreciation of the performance. Although both stage and site dance performance valuing elicit multiple interpretations of artistic…

  17. Site-Specific Earthquake Response Analysis for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth, Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), located near Paducah , Kentucky, under the same IAG and is reported under...Specific Earthquake Response Analysis for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant , Portsmouth, Ohio by David W. Sykora, Jennifer J. Davis Geotechnical Laboratory...PAPER Miscellaneous Paper GL-93-13 August 1993 Site-Specific Earthquke Response Analysis for Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant , Portsmouth, Ohio by

  18. Site-Specific Earthquake Response Analysis for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant , Paducah , Kentucky by David W. Sykora, Jennifer J. Davis Geotechnical Laboratory Approved For Public Release...1993 Site-Specific Earthquake Response Analysis for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant , Paducah , Kentucky by David W. Sykora, Jennifer J. Davis... Gaseous diffusion plants -- Kentucky -- Paducah . 3. Nuclear facilities - Kentucky -- Paducah . 1. Davis, Jennifer J. 11. United

  19. 77 FR 4799 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-31

    ... Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site Public Comments Adjourn Breaks Taken As Appropriate Public Participation: The... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY: Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86...

  20. 76 FR 80355 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... for Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Site. Public Comments. Adjourn. Breaks Taken As Appropriate... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Paducah AGENCY: Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION...-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Paducah. The Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463, 86...

  1. Mini-Tn7 transposons for site-specific tagging of bacteria with fluorescent proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, L.; Sternberg, Claus; Molin, Søren

    2004-01-01

    The mini-Tn7 transposon system is a convenient tool for site-specific tagging of bacteria in which the tagging DNA is inserted at a unique and neutral chromosomal site. We have expanded the panel of mini-Tn7 delivery plasmids expressing different fluorescent proteins (stable and unstable) from th...

  2. Integration of aerial imaging and variable-rate technology for site-specific aerial herbicide application

    Science.gov (United States)

    As remote sensing and variable rate technology are becoming more available for aerial applicators, practical methodologies on effective integration of these technologies are needed for site-specific aerial applications of crop production and protection materials. The objectives of this study were to...

  3. Site-specific dynamics in remnant populations of Northern Wheatears Oenanthe oenanthe in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosten, van H.H.; Turnhout, van C.; Hallmann, C.A.; Majoor, F.; Roodbergen, M.; Schekkerman, H.; Versluijs, R.; Waasdorp, S.; Siepel, H.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of populations may be synchronized at large spatial scales, indicating driving forces acting beyond local scales, but may also vary locally as a result of site-specific conditions. Conservation measures for fragmented and declining populations may need to address such local effects to avoid

  4. Appreciating "Thirdspace": An Alternative Way of Viewing and Valuing Site-Specific Dance Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munjee, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Site-specific dance performance involves the presentation of choreography in connection with a site. The context of the site combined with a viewer's personal history, beliefs, and identity impact the reading and appreciation of the performance. Although both stage and site dance performance valuing elicit multiple interpretations of artistic…

  5. Environmental Restoration Site-Specific Plan for the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, FY 93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-15

    The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe past, present, and future activities undertaken to implement Environmental Restoration and Waste Management goals at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). The SSP is presented in sections emphasizing Environmental Restoration description of activities, resources, and milestones.

  6. 40 CFR 170.232 - Knowledge of labeling and site-specific information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Knowledge of labeling and site... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS WORKER PROTECTION STANDARD Standard for Pesticide Handlers § 170.232 Knowledge of labeling and site-specific information. (a) Knowledge of labeling information. (1) The...

  7. Germinal transmission of site-specific excised genomic DNA by the bacterial ParA resolvase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome engineering is an essential tool in research and product development. Behind some of the recent advances in plant gene transfer is the development of site-specific recombination systems that enable the precise manipulation of DNA, e.g. the deletion, integration or translocation of DNA. DNA ...

  8. Stoichiometry of site-specific lysine acetylation in an entire proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeza, Josue; Dowell, James A; Smallegan, Michael J; Fan, Jing; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Khan, Zia; Denu, John M

    2014-08-01

    Acetylation of lysine ϵ-amino groups influences many cellular processes and has been mapped to thousands of sites across many organisms. Stoichiometric information of acetylation is essential to accurately interpret biological significance. Here, we developed and employed a novel method for directly quantifying stoichiometry of site-specific acetylation in the entire proteome of Escherichia coli. By coupling isotopic labeling and a novel pairing algorithm, our approach performs an in silico enrichment of acetyl peptides, circumventing the need for immunoenrichment. We investigated the function of the sole NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylase, CobB, on both site-specific and global acetylation. We quantified 2206 peptides from 899 proteins and observed a wide distribution of acetyl stoichiometry, ranging from less than 1% up to 98%. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that metabolic enzymes, which either utilize or generate acetyl-CoA, and proteins involved in transcriptional and translational processes displayed the highest degree of acetylation. Loss of CobB led to increased global acetylation at low stoichiometry sites and induced site-specific changes at high stoichiometry sites, and biochemical analysis revealed altered acetyl-CoA metabolism. Thus, this study demonstrates that sirtuin deacetylase deficiency leads to both site-specific and global changes in protein acetylation stoichiometry, affecting central metabolism.

  9. Site-Specific Differentiation of Fibroblasts in Normal and Scleroderma Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    noncoding RNA expression in scleroderma ● Construction of skin tissue microarrays ● Use of skin diversity TMA to interrogate site-specific gene...disrupted during disease. Tissue microarray: genomics and proteo- mics in the context of skin architecture Gene and tiling microarrays are useful for

  10. 76 FR 5365 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ..., waste management, and related activities. Purpose of the Industrial Sites Committee: The purpose of the... Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Nevada AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Industrial Sites and Soils Committees of...

  11. Recent advances in covalent, site-specific protein immobilization [version 1; referees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meldal, Morten Peter; Schoffelen, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    The properties of biosensors, biomedical implants, and other materials based on immobilized proteins greatly depend on the method employed to couple the protein molecules to their solid support. Covalent, site-specific immobilization strategies are robust and can provide the level of control that...

  12. Use of GIS-based Site-specific Nitrogen Management for Improving Energy Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    To our knowledge, geographical information system (GIS)-based site-specific nitrogen management (SSNM) techniques have not been used to assess agricultural energy costs and efficiency. This chapter uses SSNM case studies for corn (Zea mays L.) grown in Missouri and cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) gro...

  13. 75 FR 11872 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy..., Idaho National Laboratory to be held on March 16, 2010 75 FR 9590. In that notice, the meeting...

  14. 75 FR 346 - Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board, Idaho National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... Laboratory AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice announces a meeting of the Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board (EM SSAB), Idaho National Laboratory... Calcine Record of Decision. Public Participation: The EM SSAB, Idaho National Laboratory, welcomes...

  15. Site-specific labeling of cysteine-tagged camelid single-domain antibody-fragments for use in molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Sam; Xavier, Catarina; De Vos, Jens; Caveliers, Vicky; Lahoutte, Tony; Muyldermans, Serge; Devoogdt, Nick

    2014-05-21

    Site-specific labeling of molecular imaging probes allows the development of a homogeneous tracer population. The resulting batch-to-batch reproducible pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties are of great importance for clinical translation. Camelid single-domain antibody-fragments (sdAbs)-the recombinantly produced antigen-binding domains of heavy-chain antibodies, also called Nanobodies-are proficient probes for molecular imaging. To safeguard their intrinsically high binding specificity and affinity and to ensure the tracer's homogeneity, we developed a generic strategy for the site-specific labeling of sdAbs via a thio-ether bond. The unpaired cysteine was introduced at the carboxyl-terminal end of the sdAb to eliminate the risk of antigen binding interference. The spontaneous dimerization and capping of the unpaired cysteine required a reduction step prior to conjugation. This was optimized with the mild reducing agent 2-mercaptoethylamine in order to preserve the domain's stability. As a proof-of-concept the reduced probe was subsequently conjugated to maleimide-DTPA, for labeling with indium-111. A single conjugated tracer was obtained and confirmed via mass spectrometry. The specificity and affinity of the new sdAb-based imaging probe was validated in a mouse xenograft tumor model using a modified clinical lead compound targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) cancer biomarker. These data provide a versatile and standardized strategy for the site-specific labeling of sdAbs. The conjugation to the unpaired cysteine results in the production of a homogeneous group of tracers and is a multimodal alternative to the technetium-99m labeling of sdAbs.

  16. Too packed to change: side-chain packing and site-specific substitution rates in protein evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Marcos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In protein evolution, due to functional and biophysical constraints, the rates of amino acid substitution differ from site to site. Among the best predictors of site-specific rates are solvent accessibility and packing density. The packing density measure that best correlates with rates is the weighted contact number (WCN, the sum of inverse square distances between a site’s Cα and the Cα of the other sites. According to a mechanistic stress model proposed recently, rates are determined by packing because mutating packed sites stresses and destabilizes the protein’s active conformation. While WCN is a measure of Cα packing, mutations replace side chains. Here, we consider whether a site’s evolutionary divergence is constrained by main-chain packing or side-chain packing. To address this issue, we extended the stress theory to model side chains explicitly. The theory predicts that rates should depend solely on side-chain contact density. We tested this prediction on a data set of structurally and functionally diverse monomeric enzymes. We compared side-chain contact density with main-chain contact density measures and with relative solvent accessibility (RSA. We found that side-chain contact density is the best predictor of rate variation among sites (it explains 39.2% of the variation. Moreover, the independent contribution of main-chain contact density measures and RSA are negligible. Thus, as predicted by the stress theory, site-specific evolutionary rates are determined by side-chain packing.

  17. Theory on the mechanism of site-specific DNA-protein interactions in the presence of traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjani, G.; Murugan, R.

    2016-08-01

    The speed of site-specific binding of transcription factor (TFs) proteins with genomic DNA seems to be strongly retarded by the randomly occurring sequence traps. Traps are those DNA sequences sharing significant similarity with the original specific binding sites (SBSs). It is an intriguing question how the naturally occurring TFs and their SBSs are designed to manage the retarding effects of such randomly occurring traps. We develop a simple random walk model on the site-specific binding of TFs with genomic DNA in the presence of sequence traps. Our dynamical model predicts that (a) the retarding effects of traps will be minimum when the traps are arranged around the SBS such that there is a negative correlation between the binding strength of TFs with traps and the distance of traps from the SBS and (b) the retarding effects of sequence traps can be appeased by the condensed conformational state of DNA. Our computational analysis results on the distribution of sequence traps around the putative binding sites of various TFs in mouse and human genome clearly agree well the theoretical predictions. We propose that the distribution of traps can be used as an additional metric to efficiently identify the SBSs of TFs on genomic DNA.

  18. Too packed to change: side-chain packing and site-specific substitution rates in protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, María Laura; Echave, Julian

    2015-01-01

    In protein evolution, due to functional and biophysical constraints, the rates of amino acid substitution differ from site to site. Among the best predictors of site-specific rates are solvent accessibility and packing density. The packing density measure that best correlates with rates is the weighted contact number (WCN), the sum of inverse square distances between a site's C α and the C α of the other sites. According to a mechanistic stress model proposed recently, rates are determined by packing because mutating packed sites stresses and destabilizes the protein's active conformation. While WCN is a measure of C α packing, mutations replace side chains. Here, we consider whether a site's evolutionary divergence is constrained by main-chain packing or side-chain packing. To address this issue, we extended the stress theory to model side chains explicitly. The theory predicts that rates should depend solely on side-chain contact density. We tested this prediction on a data set of structurally and functionally diverse monomeric enzymes. We compared side-chain contact density with main-chain contact density measures and with relative solvent accessibility (RSA). We found that side-chain contact density is the best predictor of rate variation among sites (it explains 39.2% of the variation). Moreover, the independent contribution of main-chain contact density measures and RSA are negligible. Thus, as predicted by the stress theory, site-specific evolutionary rates are determined by side-chain packing.

  19. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of maize (Zea mays) with Cre-lox site specific recombination cassettes in BIBAC vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Juan M; Yu, Weichang; Han, Fangpu; Kato, Akio; Peters, Eric M; Zhang, Zhanyuan J; Birchler, James A

    2008-04-01

    The Cre/loxP site-specific recombination system has been applied in various plant species including maize (Zea mays) for marker gene removal, gene targeting, and functional genomics. A BIBAC vector system was adapted for maize transformation with a large fragment of genetic material including a herbicide resistance marker gene, a 30 kb yeast genomic fragment as a marker for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and a 35S-lox-cre recombination cassette. Seventy-five transgenic lines were generated from Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of a maize Hi II line with multiple B chromosomes. Eighty-four inserts have been localized among all 10 A chromosome pairs by FISH using the yeast DNA probe together with a karyotyping cocktail. No inserts were found on the B chromosomes; thus a bias against the B chromosomes by the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was revealed. The expression of a cre gene was confirmed in 68 of the 75 transgenic lines by a reporter construct for cre/lox mediated recombination. The placement of the cre/lox site-specific recombination system in many locations in the maize genome will be valuable materials for gene targeting and chromosome engineering.

  20. Site-specific hyperphosphorylation of pRb in HIV-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akay, C; Lindl, K A; Wang, Y; White, M G; Isaacman-Beck, J; Kolson, D L; Jordan-Sciutto, K L

    2011-06-01

    nonphosphorylatable pRb (ppRb S795A) attenuated HIV-MDM-induced neurotoxicity. These findings indicate that HIV-infection in the brain is associated with site-specific hyperphosphorylation of pRb at serine795, which is not induced by other tested stimuli, and that this phosphorylation contributes to neuronal death in this disease, demonstrating that specific pRb sites are differentially targeted and may have diverse impacts on the viability of post-mitotic neurons.

  1. Site-specific seismic probabilistic tsunami hazard analysis: performances and potential applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonini, Roberto; Volpe, Manuela; Lorito, Stefano; Selva, Jacopo; Orefice, Simone; Graziani, Laura; Brizuela, Beatriz; Smedile, Alessandra; Romano, Fabrizio; De Martini, Paolo Marco; Maramai, Alessandra; Piatanesi, Alessio; Pantosti, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    Seismic Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Analysis (SPTHA) provides probabilities to exceed different thresholds of tsunami hazard intensity, at a specific site or region and in a given time span, for tsunamis caused by seismic sources. Results obtained by SPTHA (i.e., probabilistic hazard curves and inundation maps) represent a very important input to risk analyses and land use planning. However, the large variability of source parameters implies the definition of a huge number of potential tsunami scenarios, whose omission could lead to a biased analysis. Moreover, tsunami propagation from source to target requires the use of very expensive numerical simulations. At regional scale, the computational cost can be reduced using assumptions on the tsunami modeling (i.e., neglecting non-linear effects, using coarse topo-bathymetric meshes, empirically extrapolating maximum wave heights on the coast). On the other hand, moving to local scale, a much higher resolution is required and such assumptions drop out, since detailed inundation maps require significantly greater computational resources. In this work we apply a multi-step method to perform a site-specific SPTHA which can be summarized in the following steps: i) to perform a regional hazard assessment to account for both the aleatory and epistemic uncertainties of the seismic source, by combining the use of an event tree and an ensemble modeling technique; ii) to apply a filtering procedure which use a cluster analysis to define a significantly reduced number of representative scenarios contributing to the hazard of a specific target site; iii) to perform high resolution numerical simulations only for these representative scenarios and for a subset of near field sources placed in very shallow waters and/or whose coseismic displacements induce ground uplift or subsidence at the target. The method is applied to three target areas in the Mediterranean located around the cities of Milazzo (Italy), Thessaloniki (Greece) and

  2. Integrated GlycoProteome Analyzer (I-GPA) for Automated Identification and Quantitation of Site-Specific N-Glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gun Wook; Kim, Jin Young; Hwang, Heeyoun; Lee, Ju Yeon; Ahn, Young Hee; Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Kwang Hoe; Jeong, Hoi Keun; Yun, Ki Na; Kim, Yong-Sam; Ko, Jeong-Heon; An, Hyun Joo; Kim, Jae Han; Paik, Young-Ki; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2016-02-17

    Human glycoproteins exhibit enormous heterogeneity at each N-glycosite, but few studies have attempted to globally characterize the site-specific structural features. We have developed Integrated GlycoProteome Analyzer (I-GPA) including mapping system for complex N-glycoproteomes, which combines methods for tandem mass spectrometry with a database search and algorithmic suite. Using an N-glycopeptide database that we constructed, we created novel scoring algorithms with decoy glycopeptides, where 95 N-glycopeptides from standard α1-acid glycoprotein were identified with 0% false positives, giving the same results as manual validation. Additionally automated label-free quantitation method was first developed that utilizes the combined intensity of top three isotope peaks at three highest MS spectral points. The efficiency of I-GPA was demonstrated by automatically identifying 619 site-specific N-glycopeptides with FDR ≤ 1%, and simultaneously quantifying 598 N-glycopeptides, from human plasma samples that are known to contain highly glycosylated proteins. Thus, I-GPA platform could make a major breakthrough in high-throughput mapping of complex N-glycoproteomes, which can be applied to biomarker discovery and ongoing global human proteome project.

  3. Derivation of site-specific relationships between hydraulic parameters and p-wave velocities based on hydraulic and seismic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brauchler, R.; Doetsch, J.; Dietrich, P.; Sauter, M.

    2012-01-10

    In this study, hydraulic and seismic tomographic measurements were used to derive a site-specific relationship between the geophysical parameter p-wave velocity and the hydraulic parameters, diffusivity and specific storage. Our field study includes diffusivity tomograms derived from hydraulic travel time tomography, specific storage tomograms, derived from hydraulic attenuation tomography, and p-wave velocity tomograms, derived from seismic tomography. The tomographic inversion was performed in all three cases with the SIRT (Simultaneous Iterative Reconstruction Technique) algorithm, using a ray tracing technique with curved trajectories. The experimental set-up was designed such that the p-wave velocity tomogram overlaps the hydraulic tomograms by half. The experiments were performed at a wellcharacterized sand and gravel aquifer, located in the Leine River valley near Göttingen, Germany. Access to the shallow subsurface was provided by direct-push technology. The high spatial resolution of hydraulic and seismic tomography was exploited to derive representative site-specific relationships between the hydraulic and geophysical parameters, based on the area where geophysical and hydraulic tests were performed. The transformation of the p-wave velocities into hydraulic properties was undertaken using a k-means cluster analysis. Results demonstrate that the combination of hydraulic and geophysical tomographic data is a promising approach to improve hydrogeophysical site characterization.

  4. Establishment and application of both FLP and Cre site-specific recombination systems at the same position in the genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Both FRT-FRT and LoxP-LoxP sites that are the target sequences of site-specific recombinases have been constructed in a vector,called C4LFY,using the recombinant DNA technique.C4LFY also contains P elements,2 exons and 1 intron of Drosophila yellow gene,yellow promoter and enhancers,and flanking DNA.Since C4LFY made use of two pairs of FRT and LoxP sites,this vector included two site-specific recombination systems.C4LFY was then integrated into Drosophila genome by P-element-mediated germ line transformation.In the presence of the FLP or Cre recombinase,either FLP/FRT or Cre/LoxP recombination reaction was successfully created at the same position in the genome.Using this system,the molecular basis of yellow gene expression and regulation during development have been investigated.Results indicate that the tissue-specific expression of yellow gene is directly regulated by transcriptional enhancers.In addition,the 5' and 3' genomic sequences flanking the yellow gene have been preliminarily studied and their potential role is discussed.

  5. Generating site-specifically modified proteins via a versatile and stable nucleophilic carbon ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudirka, Romas; Barfield, Robyn M; McFarland, Jesse; Albers, Aaron E; de Hart, Gregory W; Drake, Penelope M; Holder, Patrick G; Banas, Stefanie; Jones, Lesley C; Garofalo, Albert W; Rabuka, David

    2015-02-19

    There is a need for facile chemistries that allow for chemo- and regioselectivity in bioconjugation reactions. To address this need, we are pioneering site-specific bioconjugation methods that use formylglycine as a bioorthogonal handle on a protein surface. Here we introduce aldehyde-specific bioconjugation chemistry, the trapped-Knoevenagel ligation. The speed and stability of the trapped-Knoevenagel ligation further advances the repertoire of aldehyde-based bioconjugations and expands the toolbox for site-specific protein modifications. The trapped-Knoevenagel ligation reaction can be run at near neutral pH in the absence of catalysts to produce conjugates that are stable under physiological conditions. Using this new ligation, we generated an antibody-drug conjugate that demonstrates excellent efficacy in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Potentials for site-specific design of MW sized wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K.; Fuglsang, P.; Schepers, G.

    2001-01-01

    The potential for site specific design of MW sized wind turbines is quantified by comparing design loads for wind turbines installed at a range of different sites. The sites comprise on-shore normal flat terrain stand-alone conditions and wind farm conditions together with offshore and mountainous...... complex terrain wind farms. The design loads are established for a 1 MW active stall regulated wind turbine with the aeroelastic code HAWC. The load analysis is limited to fatigue loads. We do not consider ultimate loads in this paper. The results illustrate the differences in design wind conditions...... for different sites and the related differences in design loads for the 1 MW wind turbine. Based on the difference in the design loads, the potentials for site specific design of the wind turbine main components are identified. The results show that the variation in aerodynamically driven loads and energy...

  7. Tus-Ter as a tool to study site-specific DNA replication perturbation in eukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Nicolai B; Hickson, Ian D; Mankouri, Hocine W

    2014-01-01

    The high-affinity binding of the Tus protein to specific 21-bp sequences, called Ter, causes site-specific, and polar, DNA replication fork arrest in E coli. The Tus-Ter complex serves to coordinate DNA replication with chromosome segregation in this organism. A number of recent and ongoing studies...... have demonstrated that Tus-Ter can be used as a heterologous tool to generate site-specific perturbation of DNA replication when reconstituted in eukaryotes. Here, we review these recent findings and explore the molecular mechanism by which Tus-Ter mediates replication fork (RF) arrest in the budding...... yeast, S. cerevisiae. We propose that Tus-Ter is a versatile, genetically tractable, and regulatable RF blocking system that can be utilized for disrupting DNA replication in a diverse range of host cells....

  8. Engineering Bacillus thuringiensis bioinsecticides with an indigenous site-specific recombination system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, J A; Kakefuda, M; Gawron-Burke, C

    1996-12-01

    The cry genes of Bacillus thuringiensis encode a diverse group of crystal-forming proteins that exhibit insecticidal activity, particularly against the larvae of lepidopteran, coleopteran, and dipteran insects. The efficacy of B. thuringiensis-based biopesticides may be improved through the genetic manipulation of these genes. A gene transfer system has been developed for the introduction and maintenance of cloned insecticidal cry genes on small plasmids in B. thuringiensis. This vector system combines a B. thuringiensis plasmid replicon and an indigenous site-specific recombination system that allows for the selective removal of ancillary or foreign DNA from the recombinant bacterium after introduction of the Cry-encoding plasmid. The site-specific recombination system is useful for engineering strains with unique combinations of cry genes, resulting in new active ingredients with improved insecticidal properties.

  9. Site-specific growth of Au particles on ZnO nanopyramids under ultraviolet illumination

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Kexin

    2011-01-01

    In this work, wurtzite ZnO nanocrystals with unique "pyramid" morphology were firstly prepared via solvothermal synthesis. It was determined that the ZnO nanopyramids are grown along the polar c-axis with the vertexes pointing to the [001] direction. When the mixture of ZnO nanopyramids and Au precursor (HAuCl4) was exposed to ultraviolet (UV) illumination, Au particles were site-specifically formed on the vertexes of ZnO nanopyramids. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposite showed significantly enhanced photocatalytic activity as compared to the bare ZnO nanopyramids. First-principles based calculations well explained the formation of ZnO nanopyramids as well as the site-specific growth of Au, and revealed that during the photocatalysis process the Au particles can accommodate photoelectrons and thus facilitate the charge separation. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. The site-specific deoxyribonuclease from Bacillus pumilus (endonuclease R.Bpu1387).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, S; Shibata, T; Ando, T

    1976-12-01

    A new site-specific endonuclease (DNase) was isolated from the cells of Bacillus pumilus AHU 1387 strain. This enzyme (endonuclease R.Bpu 1387) introduced double-stranded scissions at unique sites on DNA's of coli phage lambda, lambdadvl, coli phage T7, Bacillus phage phi105C, Bacillus phage SP10, and Simian Virus 40, in the presence of magnesium ion. The activity was stimulated by the presence of NaCl.

  11. A powerful method combining homologous recombination and site-specific recombination for targeted mutagenesis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Guanjun; McMahon, Conor; Chen, Jie; Rong, Yikang S.

    2008-01-01

    Gene targeting provides a powerful tool for dissecting gene function. However, repeated targeting of a single locus remains a practice mostly limited to unicellular organisms that afford simple targeting methodologies. We developed an efficient method to repeatedly target a single locus in Drosophila. In this method, which we term “site-specific integrase mediated repeated targeting” (SIRT), an attP attachment site for the phage phiC31 integrase is first targeted to the vicinity of the gene o...

  12. Rapid Subtyping of Dengue Virus Serotypes 1 and 4 by Restriction Site-Specific PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Marize P Miagostovich; dos Santos, Flavia B.; Gutiérrez, C. Milena; Riley, Lee W.; Harris, Eva

    2000-01-01

    We previously reported a simple subtyping method, restriction site-specific PCR (RSS-PCR), for dengue virus serotypes 2 and 3; here we describe its application for subtyping dengue virus serotypes 1 and 4. Three major RSS-PCR types were observed for dengue virus serotype 1 and two types were observed for dengue virus serotype 4, in agreement with previous strain classifications based on sequence analysis. Because of its simplicity, this method is amenable to rapid subtyping and application to...

  13. Site-specific mutagenesis of histidine residues in the lac permease of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Padan, E; Sarkar, H K; Viitanen, P V; Poonian, M S; Kaback, H. R.

    1985-01-01

    The lacY gene of Escherichia coli, which encodes the lac permease, has been modified by oligonucleotide-directed, site-specific mutagenesis such that each of the four histidine residues in the molecule is replaced with an arginine residue. Replacement of histidine-35 and histidine-39 with arginine has no apparent effect on permease activity. In contrast, replacement of either histidine-205 or histidine-322 by arginine causes a dramatic loss of transport activity, although the cells contain a ...

  14. Site-specific herbicide splitting in field carrots based on camera detected weed infestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dammer, Karl-Heinz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The production of carrots for the German market comes mainly from domestic production. To ensure the efficiency of chemical weed control and to minimize the damage of the crop a splitting of the recommended dosage up to three times is often practiced. Because of large field areas of the carrot cropping and processing enterprises, the potential to save herbicides by practicing an herbicide application adapted to the weed occurrence is high. The efficiency of a site-specific herbicide splitting on the late weed occurrence as well as on yield parameters was tested in field strip trials. Weed species and abundance were determined manually by raster sampling using a counting frame in spring before spraying. Afterwards in the three leaf growth stages of the carrots the weed coverage level was detected online using a camera sensor developed by the Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering (ATB. Based on weed coverage level maps three application zones (200 L ha-1, 300 L ha-1, 400 L ha-1 were defined. On both sides of the site specific splitting strip a uniform splitting strip (400 L ha-1 was applied. The position of the application zones were the same during site-specific splitting at the second and third herbicide spraying respectively. Compared to a conventional uniform splitting herbicide savings were 16% (2005 und 20% (2006 at each spraying time. To evaluate the efficacy of the site-specific splitting on the yield manually harvesting were performed at opposite points in both treatments. The yield parameters fresh weight and numbers of carrots “total” and “marketable” were determined. Assuming a significance level of α = 5% the difference method for controlled treatment comparison in large scale field trials (t-test resulted in 19 of the 24 tests in total no differences between the treatments. The late weed occurrence in both treatments was low.

  15. Intruder scenarios for site-specific low-level radioactive waste classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Peloquin, R.A.

    1988-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has revised its low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management requirements and guidelines for waste generated at its facilities supporting defense missions. Specifically, draft DOE Order 5820.2A, Chapter 3 describes the purpose, policy, and requirements necessary for the management of defense LLW. The draft DOE policy calls for LLW operations to be managed to protect the health and safety of the public, preserve the environment, and ensure that no remedial action will be necessary after termination of operations. The basic approach used by DOE is to establish overall performance objectives, in terms of groundwater protection and public radiation dose limits, and to require site-specific performance assessments to determine compliance. As a result of these performance assessments, each site will develop waste acceptance criteria that define the allowable quantities and concentrations of specific radioisotopes. Additional limitations on waste disposal design, waste form, and waste treatment will also be developed on a site-specific basis. As a key step in the site-specific performance assessments, an evaluation must be conducted of potential radiation doses to intruders who may inadvertently move onto a closed DOE LLW disposal site after loss of institutional controls. This report (1) describes the types of intruder scenarios that should be considered when performing this step of the site-specific performance assessment, (2) provides the results of generic calculations performed using unit concentrations of various radionuclides as a comparison of the magnitude of importance of the various intruder scenarios, and (3) shows the relationship between the generic doses and waste classification limits for defense wastes.

  16. Wide band gap tunability in complex transition metal oxides by site-specific substitution

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Woo Seok; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Singh, David J.; Choi, Taekjib; Jellison Jr, Gerald E.; Lee, Ho Nyung

    2012-01-01

    Fabricating complex transition metal oxides with a tuneable band gap without compromising their intriguing physical properties is a longstanding challenge. Here we examine the layered ferroelectric bismuth titanate and demonstrate that, by site-specific substitution with the Mott insulator lanthanum cobaltite, its band gap can be narrowed as much as one electron volt, while remaining strongly ferroelectric. We find that when a specific site in the host material is preferentially substituted, ...

  17. Site-specific unfolding thermodynamics of a helix-turn-helix protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amunson, Krista E; Ackels, Loren; Kubelka, Jan

    2008-07-01

    The thermal unfolding of a 40-residue helix-turn-helix subdomain of the P22 viral coat protein was investigated using circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) with site-specific 13C isotopic labeling. Helix-turn-helix is the simplest alpha-helical structural motif that combines both secondary and tertiary structural elements. The CD of individual helical fragments reveals that the P22 subdomain is stabilized by tertiary interhelical interactions. Overall the temperature-dependent CD and FTIR data can be described by a three-state process with a partially folded intermediate. However, the analysis of the site-specific 13C IR signals reveals distinct unfolding thermodynamics for each of the labeled sites. The thermodynamic parameters of the thermal unfolding of each of the labeled segments were obtained using singular value decomposition in combination with target transformation and global fitting. The P22 subdomain unfolds from the N-terminus toward the helical segments near the turn. Our results show that as few as two 13C labeled residues can be detected in a 40 residue protein and provide local, site-specific structural information about protein unfolding, which is not resolved by standard, nonsite-specific spectroscopic probes.

  18. Site-Specific N-Glycosylation of Endothelial Cell Receptor Tyrosine Kinase VEGFR-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Kevin Brown; Leon, Deborah R; Meyer, Rosana D; Rahimi, Nader; Costello, Catherine E

    2017-02-03

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) is an important receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that plays critical roles in both physiologic and pathologic angiogenesis. The extracellular domain of VEGFR-2 is composed of seven immunoglobulin-like domains, each with multiple potential N-glycosylation sites (sequons). N-glycosylation plays a central role in RTK ligand binding, trafficking, and stability. However, despite its importance, the functional role of N-glycosylation of VEGFR-2 remains poorly understood. The objectives of the present study were to characterize N-glycosylation sites in VEGFR-2 via enzymatic release of the glycans and concomitant incorporation of (18)O into formerly N-glycosylated sites followed by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis to determine N-glycosylation site occupancy and the site-specific N-glycan heterogeneity of VEGFR-2 glycopeptides. The data demonstrated that all seven VEGFR-2 immunoglobulin-like domains have at least one occupied N-glycosylation site. MS/MS analyses of glycopeptides and deamidated, deglycosylated (PNGase F-treated) peptides from ectopically expressed VEGFR-2 in porcine aortic endothelial (PAE) cells identified N-glycans at the majority of the 17 potential N-glycosylation sites on VEGFR-2 in a site-specific manner. The data presented here provide direct evidence for site-specific, heterogeneous N-glycosylation and N-glycosylation site occupancy on VEGFR-2. The study has important implications for the therapeutic targeting of VEGFR-2, ligand binding, trafficking, and signaling.

  19. Synthesis of DNA Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing Site-Specific 1,3-Butadiene- Deoxyadenosine Lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickramaratne, Susith; Seiler, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Post-oligomerization synthesis is a useful technique for preparing site-specifically modified DNA oligomers. This approach involves site-specific incorporation of inherently reactive halogenated nucleobases into DNA strands using standard solid phase synthesis, followed by post-oligomerization nucleophilic aromatic substitution (SNAr) reactions with carcinogen-derived synthons. In these reactions, the inherent reactivities of DNA and carcinogen-derived species are reversed: the modified DNA nucleobase acts as an electrophile, while the carcinogen-derived species acts as a nucleophile. In the present protocol, we describe the use of the post-oligomerization approach to prepare DNA strands containing site- and stereospecific N6-adenine and N1, N6-adenine adducts induced by epoxide metabolites of the known human and animal carcinogen, 1,3-butadiene (BD). The resulting oligomers containing site specific, structurally defined DNA adducts can be used in structural and biological studies to reveal the roles of specific BD adducts in carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. PMID:26344227

  20. Site-specific immobilization of protein layers on gold surfaces via orthogonal sortases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeeszadeh-Sarmazdeh, Maryam; Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Boder, Eric T

    2015-04-01

    We report a site-specific, sortase-mediated ligation to immobilize proteins layer-by-layer on a gold surface. Recombinant fluorescent proteins with a Sortase A recognition tag at the C-terminus were immobilized on peptide-modified gold surfaces. We used two sortases with different substrate specificities (Streptococcus pyogenes Sortase A and Staphylococcus aureus Sortase A) to immobilize layers of GFP and mCherry site-specifically on the gold surface. Surfaces were characterized using fluorescence and atomic force microscopy after immobilizing each layer of protein. Fluorescent micrographs showed that both protein immobilization on the modified gold surface and protein oligomerization are sortase-dependent. AFM images showed that either homogenous protein monolayers or layers of protein oligomers can be generated using appropriately tagged substrate proteins. Using Sortase A variants with orthogonal peptide substrate specificities, site-specific immobilization of appropriately tagged GFP onto a layer of immobilized mCherry was achieved without disruption of the underlying protein layer.

  1. A general method for site specific fluorescent labeling of recombinant chemokines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuya Kawamura

    Full Text Available Chemokines control cell migration in many contexts including development, homeostasis, immune surveillance and inflammation. They are also involved in a wide range of pathological conditions ranging from inflammatory diseases and cancer, to HIV. Chemokines function by interacting with two types of receptors: G protein-coupled receptors on the responding cells, which transduce signaling pathways associated with cell migration and activation, and glycosaminoglycans on cell surfaces and the extracellular matrix which organize and present some chemokines on immobilized surface gradients. To probe these interactions, imaging methods and fluorescence-based assays are becoming increasingly desired. Herein, a method for site-specific fluorescence labeling of recombinant chemokines is described. It capitalizes on previously reported 11-12 amino acid tags and phosphopantetheinyl transferase enzymes to install a fluorophore of choice onto a specific serine within the tag through a coenzyme A-fluorophore conjugate. The generality of the method is suggested by our success in labeling several chemokines (CXCL12, CCL2, CCL21 and mutants thereof and visualizing them bound to chemokine receptors and glycosaminoglycans. CXCL12 and CCL2 showed the expected co-localization on the surface of cells with their respective receptors CXCR4 and CCR2 at 4 °C, and co-internalization with their receptors at 37 °C. By contrast, CCL21 showed the presence of large discrete puncta that were dependent on the presence of both CCR7 and glycosaminoglycans as co-receptors. These data demonstrate the utility of this labeling approach for the detection of chemokine interactions with GAGs and receptors, which can vary in a chemokine-specific manner as shown here. For some applications, the small size of the fluorescent adduct may prove advantageous compared to other methods (e.g. antibody labeling, GFP fusion by minimally perturbing native interactions. Other advantages of the method

  2. ATEFlap aerodynamic model, a dynamic stall model including the effects of trailing edge flap deflection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergami, L.; Gaunaa, M.

    2012-02-15

    The report presents the ATEFlap aerodynamic model, which computes the unsteady lift, drag and moment on a 2D airfoil section equipped with Adaptive Trailing Edge Flap. The model captures the unsteady response related to the effects of the vorticity shed into the wake, and the dynamics of flow separation a thin-airfoil potential flow model is merged with a dynamic stall model of the Beddoes-Leishmann type. The inputs required by the model are steady data for lift, drag, and moment coefficients as function of angle of attack and flap deflection. Further steady data used by the Beddoes- Leishmann dynamic stall model are computed in an external preprocessor application, which gives the user the possibility to verify, and eventually correct, the steady data passed to the aerodynamic model. The ATEFlap aerodynamic model is integrated in the aeroelastic simulation tool HAWC2, thus al- lowing to simulate the response of a wind turbine with trailing edge flaps on the rotor. The algorithms used by the preprocessor, and by aerodynamic model are presented, and modifications to previous implementations of the aerodynamic model are briefly discussed. The performance and the validity of the model are verified by comparing the dynamic response computed by the ATEFlap with solutions from CFD simulations. (Author)

  3. Importance of global aerosol modeling including secondary organic aerosol formed from monoterpene

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Daisuke; Takemura, Toshihiko; Nakajima, Teruyuki

    2008-01-01

    A global three-dimensional aerosol transport-radiation model, coupled to an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), has been extended to improve the model process for organic aerosols, particularly secondary organic aerosols (SOA), and to estimate SOA contributions to direct and indirect radiative effects. Because the SOA formation process is complicated and unknown, the results in different model simulations include large differences. In this work, we simulate SOA production assuming v...

  4. MODEL ANALYSIS AND PARAMETER EXTRACTION FOR MOS CAPACITOR INCLUDING QUANTUM MECHANICAL EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-yan Jiang; Ping-wen Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The high frequency CV curves of MOS capacitor have been studied. It is shown that semiclassical model is a good approximation to quantum model and approaches to classical model when the oxide layer is thick. This conclusion provides us an efficient (semiclassical) model including quantum mechanical effects to do parameter extraction for ultrathi noxide device. Here the effective extracting strategy is designed and numerical experiments demonstrate the validity of the strategy.

  5. A finite element model of the face including an orthotropic skin model under in vivo tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Cormac; Stavness, Ian; Lloyd, John; Fels, Sidney

    2015-01-01

    Computer models of the human face have the potential to be used as powerful tools in surgery simulation and animation development applications. While existing models accurately represent various anatomical features of the face, the representation of the skin and soft tissues is very simplified. A computer model of the face is proposed in which the skin is represented by an orthotropic hyperelastic constitutive model. The in vivo tension inherent in skin is also represented in the model. The model was tested by simulating several facial expressions by activating appropriate orofacial and jaw muscles. Previous experiments calculated the change in orientation of the long axis of elliptical wounds on patients' faces for wide opening of the mouth and an open-mouth smile (both 30(o)). These results were compared with the average change of maximum principal stress direction in the skin calculated in the face model for wide opening of the mouth (18(o)) and an open-mouth smile (25(o)). The displacements of landmarks on the face for four facial expressions were compared with experimental measurements in the literature. The corner of the mouth in the model experienced the largest displacement for each facial expression (∼11-14 mm). The simulated landmark displacements were within a standard deviation of the measured displacements. Increasing the skin stiffness and skin tension generally resulted in a reduction in landmark displacements upon facial expression.

  6. Hot DA white dwarf model atmosphere calculations: Including improved Ni PI cross sections

    CERN Document Server

    Preval, S P; Badnell, N R; Hubeny, I; Holberg, J B

    2016-01-01

    To calculate realistic models of objects with Ni in their atmospheres, accurate atomic data for the relevant ionization stages needs to be included in model atmosphere calculations. In the context of white dwarf stars, we investigate the effect of changing the Ni {\\sc iv}-{\\sc vi} bound-bound and bound-free atomic data has on model atmosphere calculations. Models including PICS calculated with {\\sc autostructure} show significant flux attenuation of up to $\\sim 80$\\% shortward of 180\\AA\\, in the EUV region compared to a model using hydrogenic PICS. Comparatively, models including a larger set of Ni transitions left the EUV, UV, and optical continua unaffected. We use models calculated with permutations of this atomic data to test for potential changes to measured metal abundances of the hot DA white dwarf G191-B2B. Models including {\\sc autostructure} PICS were found to change the abundances of N and O by as much as $\\sim 22$\\% compared to models using hydrogenic PICS, but heavier species were relatively unaf...

  7. Mathematical Model of Thyristor Inverter Including a Series-parallel Resonant Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslaw Luft

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a mathematical model of thyristor inverter including a series-parallel resonant circuit with theaid of state variable method. Maple procedures are used to compute current and voltage waveforms in the inverter.

  8. A Verilog-A large signal model for InP DHBT including thermal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuxia, Shi; Zhi, Jin; Zhijian, Pan; Yongbo, Su; Yuxiong, Cao; Yan, Wang

    2013-06-01

    A large signal model for InP/InGaAs double heterojunction bipolar transistors including thermal effects has been reported, which demonstrated good agreements of simulations with measurements. On the basis of the previous model in which the double heterojunction effect, current blocking effect and high current effect in current expression are considered, the effect of bandgap narrowing with temperature has been considered in transport current while a formula for model parameters as a function of temperature has been developed. This model is implemented by Verilog-A and embedded in ADS. The proposed model is verified with DC and large signal measurements.

  9. Modelling Mediterranean agro-ecosystems by including agricultural trees in the LPJmL model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, M.; von Bloh, W.; Shi, S.; Bondeau, A.; Cramer, W.

    2015-11-01

    In the Mediterranean region, climate and land use change are expected to impact on natural and agricultural ecosystems by warming, reduced rainfall, direct degradation of ecosystems and biodiversity loss. Human population growth and socioeconomic changes, notably on the eastern and southern shores, will require increases in food production and put additional pressure on agro-ecosystems and water resources. Coping with these challenges requires informed decisions that, in turn, require assessments by means of a comprehensive agro-ecosystem and hydrological model. This study presents the inclusion of 10 Mediterranean agricultural plants, mainly perennial crops, in an agro-ecosystem model (Lund-Potsdam-Jena managed Land - LPJmL): nut trees, date palms, citrus trees, orchards, olive trees, grapes, cotton, potatoes, vegetables and fodder grasses. The model was successfully tested in three model outputs: agricultural yields, irrigation requirements and soil carbon density. With the development presented in this study, LPJmL is now able to simulate in good detail and mechanistically the functioning of Mediterranean agriculture with a comprehensive representation of ecophysiological processes for all vegetation types (natural and agricultural) and in a consistent framework that produces estimates of carbon, agricultural and hydrological variables for the entire Mediterranean basin. This development paves the way for further model extensions aiming at the representation of alternative agro-ecosystems (e.g. agroforestry), and opens the door for a large number of applications in the Mediterranean region, for example assessments of the consequences of land use transitions, the influence of management practices and climate change impacts.

  10. Modelling Mediterranean agro-ecosystems by including agricultural trees in the LPJmL model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fader

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Climate and land use change in the Mediterranean region is expected to affect natural and agricultural ecosystems by decreases in precipitation, increases in temperature as well as biodiversity loss and anthropogenic degradation of natural resources. Demographic growth in the Eastern and Southern shores will require increases in food production and put additional pressure on agro-ecosystems and water resources. Coping with these challenges requires informed decisions that, in turn, require assessments by means of a comprehensive agro-ecosystem and hydrological model. This study presents the inclusion of 10 Mediterranean agricultural plants, mainly perennial crops, in an agro-ecosystem model (LPJmL: nut trees, date palms, citrus trees, orchards, olive trees, grapes, cotton, potatoes, vegetables and fodder grasses. The model was successfully tested in three model outputs: agricultural yields, irrigation requirements and soil carbon density. With the development presented in this study, LPJmL is now able to simulate in good detail and mechanistically the functioning of Mediterranean agriculture with a comprehensive representation of ecophysiological processes for all vegetation types (natural and agricultural and in a consistent framework that produces estimates of carbon, agricultural and hydrological variables for the entire Mediterranean basin. This development pave the way for further model extensions aiming at the representation of alternative agro-ecosystems (e.g. agroforestry, and opens the door for a large number of applications in the Mediterranean region, for example assessments on the consequences of land use transitions, the influence of management practices and climate change impacts.

  11. Numerical Acoustic Models Including Viscous and Thermal losses: Review of Existing and New Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Risby; Cutanda Henriquez, Vicente; Aage, Niels

    2017-01-01

    This work presents an updated overview of numerical methods including acoustic viscous and thermal losses. Numerical modelling of viscothermal losses has gradually become more important due to the general trend of making acoustic devices smaller. Not including viscothermal acoustic losses in such...

  12. Site-specific electronic structure of Pr in $Pr_{1+x} Ba_{2-x} Cu _{3} O_{7-} \\delta$

    CERN Document Server

    Staub, U; O'Conner, A G; Kramer, M J; Knapp, M

    2001-01-01

    We report on resonant X-ray powder-diffraction measurements in the vicinity of the Pr L/sub 3/ absorption edge of Pr/sub 1+x/Ba/sub 2-x /Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7- delta /. The Pr site occupation has been accurately determined: 6+or-2% of the Pr is on the Ba site. From an analysis of the energy dependence of selected Bragg reflections, the site-specific oxidation state of Pr has been obtained. These results are discussed in the context of models describing the suppression of superconductivity by Pr, and they indicate that Pr on the R site is responsible for T/sub c/ suppression. (34 refs).

  13. Mutations of the kissing-loop dimerization sequence influence the site specificity of murine leukemia virus recombination in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, J G; Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M

    2000-01-01

    synthesis in newly infected cells. We have previously shown that template shifts within the 5' leader of murine leukemia viruses occur preferentially within the kissing stem-loop motif, a cis element crucial for in vitro RNA dimer formation. By use of a forced recombination approach based on single......-cycle transfer of Akv murine leukemia virus-based vectors harboring defective primer binding site sequences, we now report that modifications of the kissing-loop structure, ranging from a deletion of the entire sequence to introduction of a single point mutation in the loop motif, significantly disturb site...... specificity of recombination within the highly structured 5' leader region. In addition, we find that an intact kissing-loop sequence favors optimal RNA encapsidation and vector transduction. Our data are consistent with the kissing-loop dimerization model and suggest that a direct intermolecular RNA...

  14. A systematic study of modulation of ADAM-mediated ectodomain shedding by site-specific O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goth, Christoffer K; Halim, Adnan; Khetarpal, Sumeet A;

    2015-01-01

    -glycosylation is often found and examples of crosstalk between shedding and O-glycosylation have been reported. Here, we systematically investigated the potential of site-specific O-glycosylation mediated by distinct polypeptide GalNAc-transferase (GalNAc-T) isoforms to coregulate ectodomain shedding mediated...... by the A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase (ADAM) subfamily of proteases and in particular ADAM17. We analyzed 25 membrane proteins that are known to undergo ADAM17 shedding and where the processing sites included Ser/Thr residues within ± 4 residues that could represent O-glycosites. We used in vitro GalNAc-T enzyme...... and ADAM cleavage assays to demonstrate that shedding of at least 12 of these proteins are potentially coregulated by O-glycosylation. Using TNF-α as an example, we confirmed that shedding mediated by ADAM17 is coregulated by O-glycosylation controlled by the GalNAc-T2 isoform both ex vivo in isogenic cell...

  15. Dry Deposition Velocity Estimation for the Savannah River Site: Part 2 -- Parametric and Site-Specific Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Cook, Kary M.

    2013-09-12

    Values for the dry deposition velocity of airborne particles were estimated with the GENII Version 2.10.1 computer code for the Savannah River site using assumptions about surface roughness parameters and particle size and density. Use of the GENII code is recommended by the U.S. Department of Energy for this purpose. Meteorological conditions evaluated include atmospheric stability classes D, E, and F and wind speeds of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 m/s. Local surface roughness values ranging from 0.03 to 2 meters were evaluated. Particles with mass mean diameters of 1, 5, and 10 microns and densities of 1, 3, 4, and 5 g/cm3 were evaluated. Site specific meteorology was used to predict deposition velocity for Savannah River conditions for a range of distances from 670 to 11,500 meters.

  16. Direct site-specific glycoform identification and quantitative comparison of glycoprotein therapeutics: imiglucerase and velaglucerase alfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hongping; Hill, John; Gucinski, Ashley C; Boyne, Michael T; Buhse, Lucinda F

    2015-03-01

    Gaucher disease, the most common lysosomal metabolic disorder, can be treated with enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Recombinant human glucocerebrosidase imiglucerase (Cerezyme(®)), produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells, has been used for ERT of Gaucher disease for 20 years. Another recombinant glucocerebrosidase velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV), expressed in a human fibroblast cell line, was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2010. The amino acid sequence difference at residue 495 of these two products is well documented. The overall N-linked qualitative glycan composition of these two products has also been reported previously. Herein, employing our recently developed approach utilizing isobaric tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and an LTQ Orbitrap XL electron transfer dissociation (ETD) hybrid mass spectrometer, the site-specific glycoforms of these products were identified with ETD and collision-induced dissociation (CID) spectra. The quantitative comparison of site-specific glycans was achieved utilizing higher-energy collisional dissociation (HCD) spectra with a NanoMate used as both a fraction collector and a sample introduction device. From the trypsin-digested mixture of these two products, over 90 glycopeptides were identified by accurate mass matching. In addition to those previously reported, additional glycopeptides were detected with moderate abundance. The relative amount of each glycoform at a specific glycosylation site was determined based on reporter signal intensities of the TMT labeling reagents. This is the first report of site-specific simultaneous qualitative and quantitative comparison of glycoforms for Cerezyme(®) and VPRIV. The results demonstrate that this method could be utilized for biosimilarity determination and counterfeit identification of glycoproteins.

  17. Spatial Distribution and Site-Specific Spraying of Main Sucking Pests of Elm Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, R; Iranipour, S

    2016-11-09

    Elm trees are important landscape trees and sucking insects weaken the elm trees and produce large amounts of honeydew. The main objectives of this study were to identify main honeydew-producing pests of elm trees and do site-specific spraying against these pests. To map the spatial distribution of the sucking pests in the large scale, the study area was divided into 40 × 40 m grids and one tree was chosen randomly from each grid (a total of 55 trees). These trees were sampled twice a year in 2011 and 2012. Each sample was a 30-cm branch terminal. Eight samples were taken from each tree in four cardinal directions and two canopy levels. The number of sucking insects and leaves of each sample were counted and recorded. Spatial analysis of the data was carried out using geostatistics. Kriging was used for producing prediction maps. Insecticide application was restricted to the regions with populations higher than threshold. To identify within-tree distribution of the honeydew-producing pests, six and four elm trees were chosen in 2011 and 2012 respectively, and sampled weekly. These trees were sampled as described previously. European elm scale (EES), Gossyparia spuria (Modeer) and two species of aphids were the dominant honeydew-producing pests. The results revealed that the effects of direction, canopy level and their interactions on insect populations were not statistically significant (P < 0.05). Site-specific spraying decreased the amount of insecticides used by ca. 20%, while satisfactory control of the sucking pests and honeydew excretion was obtained. Considering the environmental and economic benefits of site-specific spraying, it is worth doing more complementary works in this area.

  18. How to awaken your nanomachines: Site-specific activation of focal adhesion kinases through ligand interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Walkiewicz, Katarzyna Wiktoria

    2015-06-17

    The focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the related protein-tyrosine kinase 2-beta (Pyk2) are highly versatile multidomain scaffolds central to cell adhesion, migration, and survival. Due to their key role in cancer metastasis, understanding and inhibiting their functions are important for the development of targeted therapy. Because FAK and Pyk2 are involved in many different cellular functions, designing drugs with partial and function-specific inhibitory effects would be desirable. Here, we summarise recent progress in understanding the structural mechanism of how the tug-of-war between intramolecular and intermolecular interactions allows these protein ‘nanomachines’ to become activated in a site-specific manner.

  19. Study on Site Specific Design Earthquake Ground Motion of Nuclear Power Plants in China1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Bochang; Li Xiaojun; Li Yaqi

    2008-01-01

    The main technical backgrounds and requirements are introduced with regard to earthquake ground motion design parameters in several domestic and American standards,codes and guides involved in the seismic analysis and design activities of nuclear power plants in China.Based on the research results from site seismic safety evaluation of domestic nuclear power plant projects in the last years,characteristics and differences of site specific design spectra are analyzed in comparison with standard response spectra,and the suitability of standard response spectra for domestic nuclear power plant projects is discussed.

  20. Environmental restoration and waste management Site-Specific Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-15

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to achieving and maintaining environmental regulatory compliance while responding to public concerns and emphasizing waste minimization. DOE publishes the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) annually to document its progress towards these goals. The purpose of this Site-Specific Plan (SSP) is to describe the activities undertaken to implement the FYP goals at the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE/OR) installations and programs specifically for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and surrounding areas. This SSP addresses activities and goals to be accomplished during FY93 even through the FYP focuses on FY94.

  1. Basewide Engineering Evaluation-Cost Analysis for Soil Vapor Extraction. Site Specific Document IC 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-11-01

    7, BASEW= ENGPRMMG EVALUAnON- COff ANAIYSIS FOR SOLL VAPOR EXTRAmON, SITE SPECIFIC DOCUMENT IC 1 93-2886 McCleflan Air Force Bwe DISCLAIMER NOTICE...Antalisis Secton 2 ~I&LLT Site 47, Electroplating Shop * ~DmMt of bonngs 0 0eញft o > 60 feea 0 0 C30 10I ILcto Z=g Figure 2-1 ZU 13S" Maps and Site...storage removed by parking (1946-1949) 1981 Open air storage Most structures razed area (after 1957) by 1982 Site 47 Building 666 Electroplating shop

  2. Site Specific Synthesis and in-situ Immobilization of Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters on DNA Nanoscaffolds Using Tollens Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, Suchetan [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Varghese, R. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Deng, Z. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zhao, Z. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Kumar, A. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Yan, Hao [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Liu, Yan [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2011-04-06

    DNA strands with specific sequences and covalently attached sugar moieties were used for the site-specific incorporation of the sugar units on a DNA origami scaffold. This approach enabled the subsequent site-specific synthesis and in situ immobilization of fluorescent Ag clusters at predefined positions on the DNA nanoscaffold by treatment with the Tollens reagent.

  3. 40 CFR Table 9 to Subpart Jjj of... - Site-specific Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Site-specific Compliance Schedules and Increments of Progress 9 Table 9 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... or Before August 30, 1999 Pt. 62, Subpt. JJJ, Table 9 Table 9 to Subpart JJJ of Part 62—Site-specific...

  4. Site-Specific, Covalent Immobilization of Dehalogenase ST2570 Catalyzed by Formylglycine-Generating Enzymes and Its Application in Batch and Semi-Continuous Flow Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Jian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Formylglycine-generating enzymes can selectively recognize and oxidize cysteine residues within the sulfatase sub motif at the terminus of proteins to form aldehyde-bearing formylglycine (FGly residues, and are normally used in protein labeling. In this study, an aldehyde tag was introduced to proteins using formylglycine-generating enzymes encoded by a reconstructed set of the pET28a plasmid system for enzyme immobilization. The haloacid dehalogenase ST2570 from Sulfolobus tokodaii was used as a model enzyme. The C-terminal aldehyde-tagged ST2570 (ST2570CQ exhibited significant enzymological properties, such as new free aldehyde groups, a high level of protein expression and improved enzyme activity. SBA-15 has widely been used as an immobilization support for its large surface and excellent thermal and chemical stability. It was functionalized with amino groups by aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The C-terminal aldehyde-tagged ST2570 was immobilized to SBA-15 by covalent binding. The site-specific immobilization of ST2570 avoided the chemical denaturation that occurs in general covalent immobilization and resulted in better fastening compared to physical adsorption. The site-specific immobilized ST2570 showed 3-fold higher thermal stability, 1.2-fold higher catalytic ability and improved operational stability than free ST2570. The site-specific immobilized ST2570 retained 60% of its original activity after seven cycles of batch operation, and it was superior to the ST2570 immobilized to SBA-15 by physical adsorption, which loses 40% of its original activity when used for the second time. It is remarkable that the site-specific immobilized ST2570 still retained 100% of its original activity after 10 cycles of reuse in the semi-continuous flow reactor. Overall, these results provide support for the industrial-scale production and application of site-specific, covalently immobilized ST2570.

  5. Development of site-specific sediment quality guidelines for North and South Atlantic littoral zones: comparison against national and international sediment quality benchmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choueri, R B; Cesar, A; Abessa, D M S; Torres, R J; Morais, R D; Riba, I; Pereira, C D S; Nascimento, M R L; Mozeto, A A; DelValls, T A

    2009-10-15

    We aimed to develop site-specific sediment quality guidelines (SQGs) for two estuarine and port zones in Southeastern Brazil (Santos Estuarine System and Paranaguá Estuarine System) and three in Southern Spain (Ría of Huelva, Bay of Cádiz, and Bay of Algeciras), and compare these values against national and traditionally used international benchmark values. Site-specific SQGs were derived based on sediment physical-chemical, toxicological, and benthic community data integrated through multivariate analysis. This technique allowed the identification of chemicals of concern and the establishment of effects range correlatively to individual concentrations of contaminants for each site of study. The results revealed that sediments from Santos channel, as well as inner portions of the SES, are considered highly polluted (exceeding SQGs-high) by metals, PAHs and PCBs. High pollution by PAHs and some metals was found in São Vicente channel. In PES, sediments from inner portions (proximities of the Ponta do Félix port's terminal and the Port of Paranaguá) are highly polluted by metals and PAHs, including one zone inside the limits of an environmental protection area. In Gulf of Cádiz, SQGs exceedences were found in Ria of Huelva (all analysed metals and PAHs), in the surroundings of the Port of Cádiz (Bay of Cádiz) (metals), and in Bay of Algeciras (Ni and PAHs). The site-specific SQGs derived in this study are more restricted than national SQGs applied in Brazil and Spain, as well as international guidelines. This finding confirms the importance of the development of site-specific SQGs to support the characterisation of sediments and dredged material. The use of the same methodology to derive SQGs in Brazilian and Spanish port zones confirmed the applicability of this technique with an international scope and provided a harmonised methodology for site-specific SQGs derivation.

  6. Catalytic conversion of lignin pyrolysis model compound- guaiacol and its kinetic model including coke formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiyan; Wang, Yun; Shao, Shanshan; Xiao, Rui

    2016-11-01

    Lignin is the most difficult to be converted and most easy coking component in biomass catalytic pyrolysis to high-value liquid fuels and chemicals. Catalytic conversion of guaiacol as a lignin model compound was conducted in a fixed-bed reactor over ZSM-5 to investigate its conversion and coking behaviors. The effects of temperature, weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) and partial pressure on product distribution were studied. The results show the maximum aromatic carbon yield of 28.55% was obtained at temperature of 650 °C, WHSV of 8 h‑1 and partial pressure of 2.38 kPa, while the coke carbon yield was 19.55%. The reaction pathway was speculated to be removing methoxy group to form phenols with further aromatization to form aromatics. The amount of coke increased with increasing reaction time. The surface area and acidity of catalysts declined as coke formed on the acid sites and blocked the pore channels, which led to the decrease of aromatic yields. Finally, a kinetic model of guaiacol catalytic conversion considering coke deposition was built based on the above reaction pathway to properly predict product distribution. The experimental and model predicting data agreed well. The correlation coefficient of all equations were all higher than 0.90.

  7. Including operational data in QMRA model: development and impact of model inputs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaidi, Kenza; Barbeau, Benoit; Carrière, Annie; Desjardins, Raymond; Prévost, Michèle

    2009-03-01

    A Monte Carlo model, based on the Quantitative Microbial Risk Analysis approach (QMRA), has been developed to assess the relative risks of infection associated with the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in drinking water. The impact of various approaches for modelling the initial parameters of the model on the final risk assessments is evaluated. The Monte Carlo simulations that we performed showed that the occurrence of parasites in raw water was best described by a mixed distribution: log-Normal for concentrations > detection limit (DL), and a uniform distribution for concentrations risks significantly. The mean annual risks for conventional treatment are: 1.97E-03 (removal credit adjusted by log parasite = log spores), 1.58E-05 (log parasite = 1.7 x log spores) or 9.33E-03 (regulatory credits based on the turbidity measurement in filtered water). Using full scale validated SCADA data, the simplified calculation of CT performed at the plant was shown to largely underestimate the risk relative to a more detailed CT calculation, which takes into consideration the downtime and system failure events identified at the plant (1.46E-03 vs. 3.93E-02 for the mean risk).

  8. Nonlinear Modeling of a High Precision Servo Injection Molding Machine Including Novel Molding Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何雪松; 王旭永; 冯正进; 章志新; 杨钦廉

    2003-01-01

    A nonlinear mathematical model of the injection molding process for electrohydraulic servo injection molding machine (IMM) is developed.It was found necessary to consider the characteristics of asymmetric cylinder for electrohydraulic servo IMM.The model is based on the dynamics of the machine including servo valve,asymmetric cylinder and screw,and the non-Newtonian flow behavior of polymer melt in injection molding is also considered.The performance of the model was evaluated based on novel approach of molding - injection and compress molding,and the results of simulation and experimental data demonstrate the effectiveness of the model.

  9. a Better Description of Liquid Jet Breakup Using a Spatial Model Including Viscous Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschlag, William Brian

    Theoretical models describing the operation and disintegration of a liquid jet are often based on an approximate solution of an inviscid jet in the temporal frame of reference. These models provide only a fair first order prediction of growth rate and breakoff length, and are based solely on a surface tension induced instability. A spatial model yielding jet growth rate and including both jet and surrounding atmosphere viscosity and density is now developed. This model is seen to reproduce all the features and limitations of the Weber viscous jet theory. When tested against experiments of water, water and glycerol mixes and binary eutectic tin/lead solder, only fair agreement is observed.

  10. ADMA/SDMA in Elderly Subjects with Asymptomatic Carotid Atherosclerosis: Values and Site-Specific Association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziano Riccioni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA is an endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor known as a mediator of endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. Circulating ADMA levels are correlated with cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, arterial hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperhomocysteinemia, age and smoking. We assessed the relationship between ADMA values and site-specific association of asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis (intima-media thickness (CIMT and plaque in elderly subjects. One hundred and eighty subjects underwent a complete history and physical examination, determination of serum chemistries and ADMA levels, and carotid ultrasound investigation (CUI. All subjects had no acute or chronic symptoms of carotid atherosclerosis. Statistical analyses showed that high plasma levels of ADMA/SDMA were positively correlated to carotid atherosclerosis (CIMT and plaque (p < 0.001, with significant site-specific association. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides and C-reactive protein plasma concentrations were significantly associated with asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis (p < 0.001. High serum concentrations of ADMA and SDMA were associated with carotid atherosclerotic lesions as measured by CIMT ad plaque and may represent a new marker of asymptomatic carotid atherosclerosis in elderly subjects.

  11. Site-Specific Incorporation of Functional Components into RNA by an Unnatural Base Pair Transcription System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Kawai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Toward the expansion of the genetic alphabet, an unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds and pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (Pa functions as a third base pair in replication and transcription, and provides a useful tool for the site-specific, enzymatic incorporation of functional components into nucleic acids. We have synthesized several modified-Pa substrates, such as alkylamino-, biotin-, TAMRA-, FAM-, and digoxigenin-linked PaTPs, and examined their transcription by T7 RNA polymerase using Ds-containing DNA templates with various sequences. The Pa substrates modified with relatively small functional groups, such as alkylamino and biotin, were efficiently incorporated into RNA transcripts at the internal positions, except for those less than 10 bases from the 3′-terminus. We found that the efficient incorporation into a position close to the 3′-terminus of a transcript depended on the natural base contexts neighboring the unnatural base, and that pyrimidine-Ds-pyrimidine sequences in templates were generally favorable, relative to purine-Ds-purine sequences. The unnatural base pair transcription system provides a method for the site-specific functionalization of large RNA molecules.

  12. Intein-mediated site-specific conjugation of Quantum Dots to proteins in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skourides Paris A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We describe an intein based method to site-specifically conjugate Quantum Dots (QDs to target proteins in vivo. This approach allows the covalent conjugation of any nanostructure and/or nanodevice to any protein and thus the targeting of such material to any intracellular compartment or signalling complex within the cells of the developing embryo. We genetically fused a pleckstrin-homology (PH domain with the N-terminus half of a split intein (IN. The C-terminus half (IC of the intein was conjugated to QDs in vitro. IC-QD's and RNA encoding PH-IN were microinjected into Xenopus embryos. In vivo intein-splicing resulted in fully functional QD-PH conjugates that could be monitored in real time within live embryos. Use of Near Infra Red (NIR-emitting QDs allowed monitoring of QD-conjugates within the embryo at depths where EGFP is undetectable demonstrating the advantages of QD's for this type of experiment. In conclusion, we have developed a novel in vivo methodology for the site-specific conjugation of QD's and other artificial structures to target proteins in different intracellular compartments and signaling complexes.

  13. Completion of proteomic data sets by Kd measurement using cell-free synthesis of site-specifically labeled proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Majkut

    Full Text Available The characterization of phosphotyrosine mediated protein-protein interactions is vital for the interpretation of downstream pathways of transmembrane signaling processes. Currently however, there is a gap between the initial identification and characterization of cellular binding events by proteomic methods and the in vitro generation of quantitative binding information in the form of equilibrium rate constants (Kd values. In this work we present a systematic, accelerated and simplified approach to fill this gap: using cell-free protein synthesis with site-specific labeling for pull-down and microscale thermophoresis (MST we were able to validate interactions and to establish a binding hierarchy based on Kd values as a completion of existing proteomic data sets. As a model system we analyzed SH2-mediated interactions of the human T-cell phosphoprotein ADAP. Putative SH2 domain-containing binding partners were synthesized from a cDNA library using Expression-PCR with site-specific biotinylation in order to analyze their interaction with fluorescently labeled and in vitro phosphorylated ADAP by pull-down. On the basis of the pull-down results, selected SH2's were subjected to MST to determine Kd values. In particular, we could identify an unexpectedly strong binding of ADAP to the previously found binding partner Rasa1 of about 100 nM, while no evidence of interaction was found for the also predicted SH2D1A. Moreover, Kd values between ADAP and its known binding partners SLP-76 and Fyn were determined. Next to expanding data on ADAP suggesting promising candidates for further analysis in vivo, this work marks the first Kd values for phosphotyrosine/SH2 interactions on a phosphoprotein level.

  14. Completion of proteomic data sets by Kd measurement using cell-free synthesis of site-specifically labeled proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majkut, Paul; Claußnitzer, Iris; Merk, Helmut; Freund, Christian; Hackenberger, Christian P R; Gerrits, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The characterization of phosphotyrosine mediated protein-protein interactions is vital for the interpretation of downstream pathways of transmembrane signaling processes. Currently however, there is a gap between the initial identification and characterization of cellular binding events by proteomic methods and the in vitro generation of quantitative binding information in the form of equilibrium rate constants (Kd values). In this work we present a systematic, accelerated and simplified approach to fill this gap: using cell-free protein synthesis with site-specific labeling for pull-down and microscale thermophoresis (MST) we were able to validate interactions and to establish a binding hierarchy based on Kd values as a completion of existing proteomic data sets. As a model system we analyzed SH2-mediated interactions of the human T-cell phosphoprotein ADAP. Putative SH2 domain-containing binding partners were synthesized from a cDNA library using Expression-PCR with site-specific biotinylation in order to analyze their interaction with fluorescently labeled and in vitro phosphorylated ADAP by pull-down. On the basis of the pull-down results, selected SH2's were subjected to MST to determine Kd values. In particular, we could identify an unexpectedly strong binding of ADAP to the previously found binding partner Rasa1 of about 100 nM, while no evidence of interaction was found for the also predicted SH2D1A. Moreover, Kd values between ADAP and its known binding partners SLP-76 and Fyn were determined. Next to expanding data on ADAP suggesting promising candidates for further analysis in vivo, this work marks the first Kd values for phosphotyrosine/SH2 interactions on a phosphoprotein level.

  15. Direct analysis of site-specific N-glycopeptides of serological proteins in dried blood spot samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Na Young; Hwang, Heeyoun; Ji, Eun Sun; Park, Gun Wook; Lee, Ju Yeon; Lee, Hyun Kyoung; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2017-08-01

    Dried blood spot (DBS) samples have a number of advantages, especially with respect to ease of collection, transportation, and storage and to reduce biohazard risk. N-glycosylation is a major post-translational modification of proteins in human blood that is related to a variety of biological functions, including metastasis, cell-cell interactions, inflammation, and immunization. Here, we directly analyzed tryptic N-glycopeptides from glycoproteins in DBS samples using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) without centrifugation of blood samples, depletion of major proteins, desalting of tryptic peptides, and enrichment of N-glycopeptides. Using this simple method, we identified a total of 41 site-specific N-glycopeptides from 16 glycoproteins in the DBS samples, from immunoglobulin gamma 1 (IgG-1, 10 mg/mL) down to complement component C7 (50 μg/mL). Of these, 32 N-glycopeptides from 14 glycoproteins were consistently quantified over 180 days stored at room temperature. The major abundant glycoproteins in the DBS samples were IgG-1 and IgG-2, which contain nine asialo-fucosylated complex types of 16 different N-glycopeptide isoforms. Sialo-non-fucosylated complex types were primarily detected in the other glycoproteins such as alpha-1-acid glycoprotein 1, 2, alpha-1-antitypsin, alpha-2-macroglobulin, haptoglobin, hemopexin, Ig alpha 1, 2 chain C region, kininogen-1, prothrombin, and serotransferrin. We first report the characterization of site-specific N-glycoproteins in DBS samples by LC-MS/MS with minimal sample preparation.

  16. Including hydrological self-regulating processes in peatland models: Effects on peatmoss drought projections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijp, Jelmer J; Metselaar, Klaas; Limpens, Juul; Teutschbein, Claudia; Peichl, Matthias; Nilsson, Mats B; Berendse, Frank; van der Zee, Sjoerd E A T M

    2017-02-15

    The water content of the topsoil is one of the key factors controlling biogeochemical processes, greenhouse gas emissions and biosphere - atmosphere interactions in many ecosystems, particularly in northern peatlands. In these wetland ecosystems, the water content of the photosynthetic active peatmoss layer is crucial for ecosystem functioning and carbon sequestration, and is sensitive to future shifts in rainfall and drought characteristics. Current peatland models differ in the degree in which hydrological feedbacks are included, but how this affects peatmoss drought projections is unknown. The aim of this paper was to systematically test whether the level of hydrological detail in models could bias projections of water content and drought stress for peatmoss in northern peatlands using downscaled projections for rainfall and potential evapotranspiration in the current (1991-2020) and future climate (2061-2090). We considered four model variants that either include or exclude moss (rain)water storage and peat volume change, as these are two central processes in the hydrological self-regulation of peatmoss carpets. Model performance was validated using field data of a peatland in northern Sweden. Including moss water storage as well as peat volume change resulted in a significant improvement of model performance, despite the extra parameters added. The best performance was achieved if both processes were included. Including moss water storage and peat volume change consistently reduced projected peatmoss drought frequency with >50%, relative to the model excluding both processes. Projected peatmoss drought frequency in the growing season was 17% smaller under future climate than current climate, but was unaffected by including the hydrological self-regulating processes. Our results suggest that ignoring these two fine-scale processes important in hydrological self-regulation of northern peatlands will have large consequences for projected climate change impact on

  17. Modeling an elastic beam with piezoelectric patches by including magnetic effects

    CERN Document Server

    Ozer, A O

    2014-01-01

    Models for piezoelectric beams using Euler-Bernoulli small displacement theory predict the dynamics of slender beams at the low frequency accurately but are insufficient for beams vibrating at high frequencies or beams with low length-to-width aspect ratios. A more thorough model that includes the effects of rotational inertia and shear strain, Mindlin-Timoshenko small displacement theory, is needed to predict the dynamics more accurately for these cases. Moreover, existing models ignore the magnetic effects since the magnetic effects are relatively small. However, it was shown recently \\cite{O-M1} that these effects can substantially change the controllability and stabilizability properties of even a single piezoelectric beam. In this paper, we use a variational approach to derive models that include magnetic effects for an elastic beam with two piezoelectric patches actuated by different voltage sources. Both Euler-Bernoulli and Mindlin-Timoshenko small displacement theories are considered. Due to the magne...

  18. Stability analysis of the extended ADI-FDTD technique including lumped models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN ZhiHui; CHU QingXin

    2008-01-01

    The numerical stability of the extended alternating-direction-implicit-finite-difference-time-domain (ADI-FDTD) method including lumped models is analyzed.Three common lumped models are investigated:resistor,capacitor,and inductor,and three different formulations for each model are analyzed:the explicit,semi-implicit and implicit schemes.Analysis results show that the extended ADI-FDTD algorithm is not unconditionally stable in the explicit scheme case,and the stability criterion depends on the value of lumped models,but in the semi-implicit and implicit cases,the algorithm is stable.Finally,two simple microstrip circuits including lumped elements are simulated to demonstrate validity of the theoretical results.

  19. The Dynamic Modeling of Multiple Pairs of Spur Gears in Mesh, Including Friction and Geometrical Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengxiang Jia

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a dynamic model of three shafts and two pair of gears in mesh, with 26 degrees of freedom, including the effects of variable tooth stiffness, pitch and profile errors, friction, and a localized tooth crack on one of the gears. The article also details howgeometrical errors in teeth can be included in a model. The model incorporates the effects of variations in torsional mesh stiffness in gear teeth by using a common formula to describe stiffness that occurs as the gears mesh together. The comparison between the presence and absence of geometrical errors in teeth was made by using Matlab and Simulink models, which were developed from the equations of motion. The effects of pitch and profile errors on the resultant input pinion angular velocity coherent-signal of the input pinion's average are discussed by investigating some of the common diagnostic functions and changes to the frequency spectra results.

  20. SAMI2-PE: A model of the ionosphere including multistream interhemispheric photoelectron transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, R. H.; Swartz, W. E.; Hysell, D. L.; Huba, J. D.

    2012-06-01

    In order to improve model comparisons with recently improved incoherent scatter radar measurements at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory we have added photoelectron transport and energy redistribution to the two dimensional SAMI2 ionospheric model. The photoelectron model uses multiple pitch angle bins, includes effects associated with curved magnetic field lines, and uses an energy degradation procedure which conserves energy on coarse, non-uniformly spaced energy grids. The photoelectron model generates secondary electron production rates and thermal electron heating rates which are then passed to the fluid equations in SAMI2. We then compare electron and ion temperatures and electron densities of this modified SAMI2 model with measurements of these parameters over a range of altitudes from 90 km to 1650 km (L = 1.26) over a 24 hour period. The new electron heating model is a significant improvement over the semi-empirical model used in SAMI2. The electron temperatures above the F-peak from the modified model qualitatively reproduce the shape of the measurements as functions of time and altitude and quantitatively agree with the measurements to within ˜30% or better during the entire day, including during the rapid temperature increase at dawn.

  1. General spherical anisotropic Jeans models of stellar kinematics: including proper motions and radial velocities

    CERN Document Server

    Cappellari, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Cappellari (2008) presented a flexible and efficient method to model the stellar kinematics of anisotropic axisymmetric and spherical stellar systems. The spherical formalism could be used to model the line-of-sight velocity second moments allowing for essentially arbitrary radial variation in the anisotropy and general luminous and total density profiles. Here we generalize the spherical formalism by providing the expressions for all three components of the projected second moments, including the two proper motion components. A reference implementation is now included in the public JAM package available at http://purl.org/cappellari/software

  2. Modeling Within-Host Dynamics of Influenza Virus Infection Including Immune Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Pawelek, Kasia A.; Huynh, Giao T; Michelle Quinlivan; Ann Cullinane; Libin Rong; Perelson, Alan S.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus infection remains a public health problem worldwide. The mechanisms underlying viral control during an uncomplicated influenza virus infection are not fully understood. Here, we developed a mathematical model including both innate and adaptive immune responses to study the within-host dynamics of equine influenza virus infection in horses. By comparing modeling predictions with both interferon and viral kinetic data, we examined the relative roles of target cell availability, ...

  3. A lumped element transformer model including core losses and winding impedances

    OpenAIRE

    Ribbenfjärd, David

    2007-01-01

    In order to design a power transformer it is important to understand its internal electromagnetic behaviour. That can be obtained by measurements on physical transformers, analytical expressions and computer simulations. One benefit with simulations is that the transformer can be studied before it is built physically and that the consequences of changing dimensions and parameters easily can be tested. In this thesis a time-domain transformer model is presented. The model includes core losses ...

  4. Target echo strength modelling at FOI, including results from the BeTSSi II workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Östberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    An overview of the target echo strength (TS) modelling capacity at the Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI) is presented. The modelling methods described range from approximate ones, such as raytracing and Kirchhoff approximation codes, to high accuracy full field codes including boundary integral equation methods and finite elements methods. Illustrations of the applicability of the codes are given for a few simple cases tackled during the BeTTSi II (Benchmark Target Echo Strength Simulation) workshop held in Kiel 2014.

  5. Including leakage in network models: an application to calibrate leak valves in EPANET

    OpenAIRE

    Cobacho Jordán, Ricardo; Arregui de la Cruz, Francisco; Soriano Olivares, Javier; Cabrera Rochera, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    EPANET is one of the most widely used software packages for water network hydraulic modelling, and is especially interesting for educational and research purposes because it is in the public domain. However, EPANET simulations are demand-driven, and the program does not include a specific functionality to model water leakage, which is pressure-driven. Consequently, users are required to deal with this drawback by themselves. As a general solution for this problem, this paper presents a method...

  6. Key Characteristics of Combined Accident including TLOFW accident for PSA Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo Gyung; Kang, Hyun Gook [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ho Joon [Khalifa University of Science, Technology and Research, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates)

    2015-05-15

    The conventional PSA techniques cannot adequately evaluate all events. The conventional PSA models usually focus on single internal events such as DBAs, the external hazards such as fire, seismic. However, the Fukushima accident of Japan in 2011 reveals that very rare event is necessary to be considered in the PSA model to prevent the radioactive release to environment caused by poor treatment based on lack of the information, and to improve the emergency operation procedure. Especially, the results from PSA can be used to decision making for regulators. Moreover, designers can consider the weakness of plant safety based on the quantified results and understand accident sequence based on human actions and system availability. This study is for PSA modeling of combined accidents including total loss of feedwater (TLOFW) accident. The TLOFW accident is a representative accident involving the failure of cooling through secondary side. If the amount of heat transfer is not enough due to the failure of secondary side, the heat will be accumulated to the primary side by continuous core decay heat. Transients with loss of feedwater include total loss of feedwater accident, loss of condenser vacuum accident, and closure of all MSIVs. When residual heat removal by the secondary side is terminated, the safety injection into the RCS with direct primary depressurization would provide alternative heat removal. This operation is called feed and bleed (F and B) operation. Combined accidents including TLOFW accident are very rare event and partially considered in conventional PSA model. Since the necessity of F and B operation is related to plant conditions, the PSA modeling for combined accidents including TLOFW accident is necessary to identify the design and operational vulnerabilities.The PSA is significant to assess the risk of NPPs, and to identify the design and operational vulnerabilities. Even though the combined accident is very rare event, the consequence of combined

  7. Analysis of a generalized model for influenza including differential susceptibility due to immunosuppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hincapié, Doracelly; Ospina, Juan

    2014-06-01

    Recently, a mathematical model of pandemic influenza was proposed including typical control strategies such as antivirals, vaccination and school closure; and considering explicitly the effects of immunity acquired from the early outbreaks on the ulterior outbreaks of the disease. In such model the algebraic expression for the basic reproduction number (without control strategies) and the effective reproduction number (with control strategies) were derived and numerically estimated. A drawback of this model of pandemic influenza is that it ignores the effects of the differential susceptibility due to immunosuppression and the effects of the complexity of the actual contact networks between individuals. We have developed a generalized model which includes such effects of heterogeneity. Specifically we consider the influence of the air network connectivity in the spread of pandemic influenza and the influence of the immunosuppresion when the population is divided in two immune classes. We use an algebraic expression, namely the Tutte polynomial, to characterize the complexity of the contact network. Until now, The influence of the air network connectivity in the spread of pandemic influenza has been studied numerically, but not algebraic expressions have been used to summarize the level of network complexity. The generalized model proposed here includes the typical control strategies previously mentioned (antivirals, vaccination and school closure) combined with restrictions on travel. For the generalized model the corresponding reproduction numbers will be algebraically computed and the effect of the contact network will be established in terms of the Tutte polynomial of the network.

  8. The No-Core Gamow Shell Model: Including the continuum in the NCSM

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, B R; Michel, N; Płoszajczak, M

    2015-01-01

    We are witnessing an era of intense experimental efforts that will provide information about the properties of nuclei far from the line of stability, regarding resonant and scattering states as well as (weakly) bound states. This talk describes our formalism for including these necessary ingredients into the No-Core Shell Model by using the Gamow Shell Model approach. Applications of this new approach, known as the No-Core Gamow Shell Model, both to benchmark cases as well as to unstable nuclei will be given.

  9. Silencing of end-joining repair for efficient site-specific gene insertion after TALEN/CRISPR mutagenesis in Aedes aegypti

    OpenAIRE

    Basu, Sanjay; Aryan, Azadeh; Overcash, Justin M.; Samuel, Glady Hazitha; Anderson, Michelle A.E.; Dahlem, Timothy J.; Myles, Kevin M.; Adelman, Zach N.

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors of both parasites and viruses responsible for high-impact diseases including malaria, dengue, and chikungunya. Novel interventions based on genetic modification of the mosquito genome are currently being developed and implemented. To comprehensively exploit such interventions, detailed knowledge of mosquito physiology, genetics, and genome engineering are required. We developed and validated a two-step process for performing high-efficiency site-specific insertion of ge...

  10. Mercury speciation modeling using site specific chemical and redox data from the TNXOD OU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D.I.

    2000-03-22

    The objective of this study was to evaluate mercury speciation under reducing conditions expected in sediments at the TNX Outfall Delta Operable Unit. These changes in speciation would then be used to infer whether mercury toxicity and mobility would be expected to be significantly altered under reducing conditions. The results from this work suggest that mercury would likely become more strongly retained by the solid phase under reducing conditions than under oxidizing conditions at the TNX Outfall Delta Site. Considering that experimental results indicate that mercury is extremely tightly bound to the solid phase under oxidizing conditions, little mercury mobility would therefore be expected under reducing conditions.

  11. Rough Set Model for Nutrition Management in Site Specific Rice Growing Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lavanya

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The optimized fertilizer usage for better yield of rice cultivation is influenced by key factors like soil fertility, crop variety, duration, season, nutrient content of the fertilizer, time of application etc., It is observed that 60 percent of yield gap in tamilnadu is due to farmers lack of knowledge on key factors and informal sources of information by pesticide dealers. In this study the major contributing factors for fertilizer requirement and optimum crop yield were analyzed based on rough set theory. In data analytics perspective the nutrient plan is sort of multiple attribute decision-making processes. To reduce the complexity of decision making, key factors that are indiscernible to conclusion are eliminated. Our rough set based approach improved the quality of agricultural data through removal of missing and redundant attributes. After pretreatment the data formed as target information, then attribute reduction algorithm was used to derive rules. The generated rules were used to structure the nutrition management decision-making. The precision was above 88% and experiments proved the feasibility of the developed decision support system for nutrient management.

  12. Evaluating the All-Ages Lead Model Using SiteSpecific Data: Approaches and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lead (Pb) exposure continues to be a problem in the United States. Even after years of progress in reducing environmental levels, CDC estimates at least 500,000 U.S. children ages 1-5 years have blood Pb levels (BLL) above the CDC reference level of 5 µg/dL. Childhood Pb ex...

  13. The Watts-Strogatz network model developed by including degree distribution: theory and computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y W [Surface Physics Laboratory and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Zhang, L F [Surface Physics Laboratory and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Huang, J P [Surface Physics Laboratory and Department of Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2007-07-20

    By using theoretical analysis and computer simulations, we develop the Watts-Strogatz network model by including degree distribution, in an attempt to improve the comparison between characteristic path lengths and clustering coefficients predicted by the original Watts-Strogatz network model and those of the real networks with the small-world property. Good agreement between the predictions of the theoretical analysis and those of the computer simulations has been shown. It is found that the developed Watts-Strogatz network model can fit the real small-world networks more satisfactorily. Some other interesting results are also reported by adjusting the parameters in a model degree-distribution function. The developed Watts-Strogatz network model is expected to help in the future analysis of various social problems as well as financial markets with the small-world property.

  14. Dynamics Analysis of an HIV Infection Model including Infected Cells in an Eclipse Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengyu Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an HIV infection model including an eclipse stage of infected cells is considered. Some quicker cells in this stage become productively infected cells, a portion of these cells are reverted to the uninfected class, and others will be latent down in the body. We consider CTL-response delay in this model and analyze the effect of time delay on stability of equilibrium. It is shown that the uninfected equilibrium and CTL-absent infection equilibrium are globally asymptotically stable for both ODE and DDE model. And we get the global stability of the CTL-present equilibrium for ODE model. For DDE model, we have proved that the CTL-present equilibrium is locally asymptotically stable in a range of delays and also have studied the existence of Hopf bifurcations at the CTL-present equilibrium. Numerical simulations are carried out to support our main results.

  15. Modeling of the dynamics of wind to power conversion including high wind speed behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litong-Palima, Marisciel; Bjerge, Martin Huus; Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio

    2016-01-01

    of power system studies, but the idea of the proposed wind turbine model is to include the main dynamic effects in order to have a better representation of the fluctuations in the output power and of the fast power ramping especially because of high wind speed shutdowns of the wind turbine. The high wind......This paper proposes and validates an efficient, generic and computationally simple dynamic model for the conversion of the wind speed at hub height into the electrical power by a wind turbine. This proposed wind turbine model was developed as a first step to simulate wind power time series...... for power system studies. This paper focuses on describing and validating the single wind turbine model, and is therefore neither describing wind speed modeling nor aggregation of contributions from a whole wind farm or a power system area. The state-of-the-art is to use static power curves for the purpose...

  16. Development of remote sensing based site specific weed management for Midwest mint production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumz, Mary Saumur Paulson

    Peppermint and spearmint are high value essential oil crops in Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin. Although the mints are profitable alternatives to corn and soybeans, mint production efficiency must improve in order to allow industry survival against foreign produced oils and synthetic flavorings. Weed control is the major input cost in mint production and tools to increase efficiency are necessary. Remote sensing-based site-specific weed management offers potential for decreasing weed control costs through simplified weed detection and control from accurate site specific weed and herbicide application maps. This research showed the practicability of remote sensing for weed detection in the mints. Research was designed to compare spectral response curves of field grown mint and weeds, and to use these data to develop spectral vegetation indices for automated weed detection. Viability of remote sensing in mint production was established using unsupervised classification, supervised classification, handheld spectroradiometer readings and spectral vegetation indices (SVIs). Unsupervised classification of multispectral images of peppermint production fields generated crop health maps with 92 and 67% accuracy in meadow and row peppermint, respectively. Supervised classification of multispectral images identified weed infestations with 97% and 85% accuracy for meadow and row peppermint, respectively. Supervised classification showed that peppermint was spectrally distinct from weeds, but the accuracy of these measures was dependent on extensive ground referencing which is impractical and too costly for on-farm use. Handheld spectroradiometer measurements of peppermint, spearmint, and several weeds and crop and weed mixtures were taken over three years from greenhouse grown plants, replicated field plots, and production peppermint and spearmint fields. Results showed that mints have greater near infrared (NIR) and lower green reflectance and a steeper red edge slope than

  17. Determination of quantitative and site-specific DNA methylation of perforin by pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeevan Mangalathu S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differential expression of perforin (PRF1, a gene with a pivotal role in immune surveillance, can be attributed to differential methylation of CpG sites in its promoter region. A reproducible method for quantitative and CpG site-specific determination of perforin methylation is required for molecular epidemiologic studies of chronic diseases with immune dysfunction. Findings We developed a pyrosequencing based method to quantify site-specific methylation levels in 32 out of 34 CpG sites in the PRF1 promoter, and also compared methylation pattern in DNAs extracted from whole blood drawn into PAXgene blood DNA tubes (whole blood DNA or DNA extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC DNA from the same normal subjects. Sodium bisulfite treatment of DNA and touchdown PCR were highly reproducible (coefficient of variation 1.63 to 2.18% to preserve methylation information. Application of optimized pyrosequencing protocol to whole blood DNA revealed that methylation level varied along the promoter in normal subjects with extremely high methylation (mean 86%; range 82–92% in the distal enhancer region (CpG sites 1–10, a variable methylation (range 49%–83% in the methylation sensitive region (CpG sites 11–17, and a progressively declining methylation level (range 12%–80% in the proximal promoter region (CpG sites 18–32 of PRF1. This pattern of methylation remained the same between whole blood and PBMC DNAs, but the absolute values of methylation in 30 out of 32 CpG sites differed significantly, with higher values for all CpG sites in the whole blood DNA. Conclusion This reproducible, site-specific and quantitative method for methylation determination of PRF1 based on pyrosequencing without cloning is well suited for large-scale molecular epidemiologic studies of diseases with immune dysfunction. PBMC DNA may be better suited than whole blood DNA for examining methylation levels in genes associated with immune

  18. A statistical model including age to predict passenger postures in the rear seats of automobiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jangwoon; Ebert, Sheila M; Reed, Matthew P; Hallman, Jason J

    2016-06-01

    Few statistical models of rear seat passenger posture have been published, and none has taken into account the effects of occupant age. This study developed new statistical models for predicting passenger postures in the rear seats of automobiles. Postures of 89 adults with a wide range of age and body size were measured in a laboratory mock-up in seven seat configurations. Posture-prediction models for female and male passengers were separately developed by stepwise regression using age, body dimensions, seat configurations and two-way interactions as potential predictors. Passenger posture was significantly associated with age and the effects of other two-way interaction variables depended on age. A set of posture-prediction models are presented for women and men, and the prediction results are compared with previously published models. This study is the first study of passenger posture to include a large cohort of older passengers and the first to report a significant effect of age for adults. The presented models can be used to position computational and physical human models for vehicle design and assessment. Practitioner Summary: The significant effects of age, body dimensions and seat configuration on rear seat passenger posture were identified. The models can be used to accurately position computational human models or crash test dummies for older passengers in known rear seat configurations.

  19. Innovative Liner Concepts: Experiments and Impedance Modeling of Liners Including the Effect of Bias Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jeff; Betts, Juan Fernando; Fuller, Chris

    2000-01-01

    The study of normal impedance of perforated plate acoustic liners including the effect of bias flow was studied. Two impedance models were developed by modeling the internal flows of perforate orifices as infinite tubes with the inclusion of end corrections to handle finite length effects. These models assumed incompressible and compressible flows, respectively, between the far field and the perforate orifice. The incompressible model was used to predict impedance results for perforated plates with percent open areas ranging from 5% to 15%. The predicted resistance results showed better agreement with experiments for the higher percent open area samples. The agreement also tended to deteriorate as bias flow was increased. For perforated plates with percent open areas ranging from 1% to 5%, the compressible model was used to predict impedance results. The model predictions were closer to the experimental resistance results for the 2% to 3% open area samples. The predictions tended to deteriorate as bias flow was increased. The reactance results were well predicted by the models for the higher percent open area, but deteriorated as the percent open area was lowered (5%) and bias flow was increased. A fit was done on the incompressible model to the experimental database. The fit was performed using an optimization routine that found the optimal set of multiplication coefficients to the non-dimensional groups that minimized the least squares slope error between predictions and experiments. The result of the fit indicated that terms not associated with bias flow required a greater degree of correction than the terms associated with the bias flow. This model improved agreement with experiments by nearly 15% for the low percent open area (5%) samples when compared to the unfitted model. The fitted model and the unfitted model performed equally well for the higher percent open area (10% and 15%).

  20. Fusion rules for the logarithmic $N=1$ superconformal minimal models II: including the Ramond sector

    CERN Document Server

    Canagasabey, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The Virasoro logarithmic minimal models were intensively studied by several groups over the last ten years with much attention paid to the fusion rules and the structures of the indecomposable representations that fusion generates. The analogous study of the fusion rules of the $N=1$ superconformal logarithmic minimal models was initiated in arXiv:1504.03155 as a continuum counterpart to the lattice explorations of arXiv:1312.6763. These works restricted fusion considerations to Neveu-Schwarz representations. Here, this is extended to include the Ramond sector. Technical advances that make this possible include a fermionic Verlinde formula applicable to logarithmic conformal field theories and a twisted version of the fusion algorithm of Nahm and Gaberdiel-Kausch. The results include the first construction and detailed analysis of logarithmic structures in the Ramond sector.

  1. Site-specific functionalization of anisotropic nanoparticles: from colloidal atoms to colloidal molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Fan; Yoo, Won Cheol; Beernink, Molly B

    2009-01-01

    Multipodal nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled tethers are promising principal building blocks, useful for constructing more complex materials, much like atoms are connected into more complex molecules. Here we report colloidal sphere templating as a viable means to create tetrapodal NPs with site......-specific tethers. Amorphous sol-gel materials were molded by the template into shaped NPs that mimic tetravalent atoms but on the length scale of colloids. Synthetic methods were developed to modify only the tips of the tetrapods with a range of possible functional groups to generate anisotropic NPs capable...... of directional bonding to other NPs. We also illustrate that sets of tethered "colloidal atoms" can assemble themselves into "colloidal molecules" with precise placement of the modifying colloids. The templating and tethering approaches to these anisotropic colloidal building blocks and the assembly methods...

  2. Assessment of Wind Turbine for Site-Specific Conditions using Probabilistic Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heras, Enrique Gómez de las; Gutiérrez, Roberto; Azagra, Elena

    2013-01-01

    turbines, helping to the decision making during the site assessment phase of wind farm designs. First, the design equation for the failure mode of interest is defined, where the loads associated to the site-specific wind conditions are compared with the design limits of the structural component. A limit......This paper describes a new approach to assess the structural integrity of wind turbines for sitespecific conditions using probabilistic methods, taking into account the particular uncertainties associated to each site. This new approach intends to improve the site suitability analysis of wind...... state equation is defined making the loads and resistance depending on a set of stochastic variables representing the uncertainties. In this paper, special focus is put on the uncertainties related to the assessment of wind data, which is the main input for the sitespecific load assessment, and can...

  3. Impairments in site-specific AS160 phosphorylation and effects of exercise training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Consitt, Leslie A; Van Meter, Jessica; Newton, Christopher A

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if site-specific phosphorylation at the level of Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) is altered in skeletal muscle from sedentary humans across a wide range of the adult lifespan (18 to 84 years) and if endurance- and/or strength-oriented exercise training...... in whole-body insulin action were associated with impairments in insulin-induced phosphorylation of skeletal muscle AS160 on sites Ser-588, Thr-642, Ser-666 and phospho-Akt substrate (PAS), but not Ser-318 or Ser-751. Twelve weeks of either endurance- or strength-oriented exercise training increased whole...... population and that exercise training is an effective intervention for treating these impairments....

  4. Site-specific integration by the adeno-associated virus rep protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recchia, Alessandra; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2011-10-01

    Inserting genetic information at precise locations into the human genome has been the goal of gene transfer technology for almost two decades. The spectacular progress of mammalian genetics has led to the development of technology for genome editing and homologous recombination in human somatic cells that is finally approaching efficiency compatible with clinical application. Site-specific integration, or the insertion of genes at known locations by enzymes with target recognition capacity, has progressed slowly but steadily in recent years, and could very well be the basis of the next generation of gene transfer technology. This review focuses on the use of Rep, the replicase/integrase of the adeno-associated virus (AAV), to insert genes at the natural AAV integration site on human chromosome 19. This region (AAVS1) has characteristics that make it an ideal target for somatic transgenesis.

  5. Precision farming - Technology assessment of site-specific input application in cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Marcus

    About 400 Danish farmers have within the large 10 years adopted some precision farming technologies on their farms. Precision farming is a management system, in which the use of variable inputs (fertilisers, lime and pesticides) is applied according to the spatial soil and crop variation at a sub...... but it seems possible to obtain a socio-economic benefits from lime, variable rate herbicide and possibly nitrogen application • The technology may improve farm logistics, planning and crop quality (e.g. protein content) - but • The costs of implementing PF-practices are high and • Technical functionality...... and hardware-compatibility is a concern among farmers Precisions farming is primarily economic viable on relative large farm holdings and site-specific application is only economic attractive if some degree of soil texture variation is present on the field. There is a need for additional information about...

  6. Precision farming - Technology assessment of site-specific input application in cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren Marcus

    About 400 Danish farmers have within the large 10 years adopted some precision farming technologies on their farms. Precision farming is a management system, in which the use of variable inputs (fertilisers, lime and pesticides) is applied according to the spatial soil and crop variation at a sub......-field level. Most precision farming systems uses the GPS-system for geographical positioning. This study assesses the technical, environmental and economic barriers and potentials of precision farming in Denmark. The project is based on a combined participatory technology assessment approach with businesses...... economic and socio-economic analysis. The current status of precision farming in Denmark is as follows: • The technology is primarily applicable for large farm holdings • Economic viability depends on site-specific yield variation • So far, the business economic benefits from most PF-practices are modest...

  7. A site-specific curated database for the microorganisms of activated sludge and anaerobic digesters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Kirkegaard, Rasmus Hansen; McIlroy, Bianca

    the composition and dynamics of the most abundant organisms. However, to understand the relationship between the population dynamics and operational parameters of the system, a functional role must be attributed to each organism. The Microbial Database for Activated Sludge (MiDAS) and Anaerobic Digesters (AD......) presented here provides a site specific curated taxonomy for abundant and important microorganisms and integrates it into a community knowledge web platform about the microbes in activated sludge (AS) and their associated ADs (www.midasfieldguide.org). The MiDAS taxonomy, a manual curation of the SILVA......, to improve the classification of unknown organisms and link these names to the wealth of present and future functional information about their ecology....

  8. Site-Specific Oligonucleotide Binding Represses Transcription of the Human c-myc Gene in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Michael; Czernuszewicz, Graznya; Postel, Edith H.; Flint, S. Jane; Hogan, Michael E.

    1988-07-01

    A 27-base-long DNA oligonucleotide was designed that binds to duplex DNA at a single site within the 5' end of the human c-myc gene, 115 base pairs upstream from the transcription origin P1. On the basis of the physical properties of its bound complex, it was concluded that the oligonucleotide forms a colinear triplex with the duplex binding site. By means of an in vitro assay system, it was possible to show a correlation between triplex formation at -115 base pairs and repression of c-myc transcription. The possibility is discussed that triplex formation (site-specific RNA binding to a DNA duplex) could serve as the basis for an alternative program of gene control in vivo.

  9. Site-Specific Pyrolysis Induced Cleavage at Aspartic Acid Residue in Peptides and Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaofeng; Basile, Franco

    2011-01-01

    A simple and site-specific non-enzymatic method based on pyrolysis has been developed to cleave peptides and proteins. Pyrolytic cleavage was found to be specific and rapid as it induced a cleavage at the C-terminal side of aspartic acid in the temperature range of 220–250 °C in 10 seconds. Electrospray Ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) and tandem-MS (MS/MS) were used to characterize and identify pyrolysis cleavage products, confirming that sequence information is conserved after the pyrolysis process in both peptides and protein tested. This suggests that pyrolysis-induced cleavage at aspartyl residues can be used as a rapid protein digestion procedure for the generation of sequence specific protein biomarkers. PMID:17388620

  10. A general method for site-specific incorporation of unnatural amino acids into proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noren, C.J.; Anthony-Cahill, S.J; Griffith, M.C.; Schultz, P.G. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-04-14

    A new method has been developed that makes it possible to site-specifically incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins. Synthetic amino acids were incorporated into the enzyme {beta}-lactamase by the use of a chemically acylated suppressor transfer RNA that inserted the amino acid in response to a stop codon substituted for the codon encoding residue of interest. Peptide mapping localized the inserted amino acid to a single peptide, and enough enzyme could be generated for purification to homogeneity. The catalytic properties of several mutants at the conserved Phe{sup 66} were characterized. The ability to selectively replace amino acids in a protein with a wide variety of structural and electronic variants should provide a more detailed understanding of protein structure and function. 45 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Proteomic Approaches for Site-specific O-GlcNAcylation Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Sheng; Yang, Feng; Camp, David G.; Rodland, Karin D.; Qian, Weijun; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-10-01

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic protein post-translational modification of serine or threonine residues by an O-linked monosaccharide N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc). O-GlcNAcylation was discovered three decades ago, and it has been shown to contribute to various disease states, such as metabolic diseases, cancer and neurological diseases. Yet it remains technically difficult to characterize comprehensively and quantitatively, due to its exceptionally low abundance and extremely labile nature under conventional tandem mass spectrometry conditions. Herein, we review the recent efforts for tackling these challenges in developing proteomic approaches for site-specific O-GlcNAcylation analysis, such as specific enrichment of O-GlcNAc peptides/proteins, unambiguous site-determination of O-GlcNAc modification, and quantitative analysis of O-GlcNAcylation.

  12. Site-specific glycan-Peptide analysis for determination of N-glycoproteome heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Benjamin L; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten; Solis, Nestor;

    2013-01-01

    -tandem mass spectrometry (PGC-LC-MS/MS) and the data used to create an N-glycan modification database. In the next step, tryptic glycopeptides were enriched using zwitterionic hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (Zic-HILIC) and fractionated by reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC; pH 7......A combined glycomics and glycoproteomics strategy was developed for the site-specific analysis of N-linked glycosylation heterogeneity from a complex mammalian protein mixture. Initially, global characterization of the N-glycome was performed using porous graphitized carbon liquid chromatography.......9). The resulting fractions were each separated into two equal aliquots. The first set of aliquots were treated with peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase F) to remove N-glycans and the former N-glycopeptides analyzed by nano-RPLC-MS/MS (pH 2.7) and identified by Mascot database search. This enabled the creation...

  13. Access to site-specific Fc-cRGD peptide conjugates through streamlined expressed protein ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frutos, S; Jordan, J B; Bio, M M; Muir, T W; Thiel, O R; Vila-Perelló, M

    2016-10-12

    An ideal drug should be highly effective, non-toxic and be delivered by a convenient and painless single dose. We are still far from such optimal treatment but peptides, with their high target selectivity and low toxicity profiles, provide a very attractive platform from which to strive towards it. One of the major limitations of peptide drugs is their high clearance rates, which limit dosage regimen options. Conjugation to antibody Fc domains is a viable strategy to improve peptide stability by increasing their hydrodynamic radius and hijacking the Fc recycling pathway. We report the use of a split-intein based semi-synthetic approach to site-specifically conjugate a synthetic integrin binding peptide to an Fc domain. The strategy described here allows conjugating synthetic peptides to Fc domains, which is not possible via genetic methods, fully maintaining the ability of both the Fc domain and the bioactive peptide to interact with their binding partners.

  14. Use of Site-Specifically Tethered Chemical Nucleases to Study Macromolecular Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Srabani

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available During a complex macromolecular reaction multiple changes in molecular conformation and interactions with ligands may occur. X-ray crystallography may provide only a limited set of snapshots of these changes. Solution methods can augment such structural information to provide a more complete picture of a macromolecular reaction. We analyzed the changes in protein conformation and protein:nucleic acid interactions which occur during transcription initiation by using a chemical nuclease tethered to cysteines introduced site-specifically into the RNA polymerase of bacteriophage T7 (T7 RNAP. Changes in cleavage patterns as the polymerase steps through transcription reveal a series of structural transitions which mediate transcription initiation. Cleavage by tethered chemical nucleases is seen to be a powerful method for revealing the conformational dynamics of macromolecular reactions, and has certain advantages over cross-linking or energy transfer approaches.

  15. MEMLS3&a: Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks adapted to include backscattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Proksch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS was originally developed for microwave emissions of snowpacks in the frequency range 5–100 GHz. It is based on six-flux theory to describe radiative transfer in snow including absorption, multiple volume scattering, radiation trapping due to internal reflection and a combination of coherent and incoherent superposition of reflections between horizontal layer interfaces. Here we introduce MEMLS3&a, an extension of MEMLS, which includes a backscatter model for active microwave remote sensing of snow. The reflectivity is decomposed into diffuse and specular components. Slight undulations of the snow surface are taken into account. The treatment of like- and cross-polarization is accomplished by an empirical splitting parameter q. MEMLS3&a (as well as MEMLS is set up in a way that snow input parameters can be derived by objective measurement methods which avoid fitting procedures of the scattering efficiency of snow, required by several other models. For the validation of the model we have used a combination of active and passive measurements from the NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment campaign in Sodankylä, Finland. We find a reasonable agreement between the measurements and simulations, subject to uncertainties in hitherto unmeasured input parameters of the backscatter model. The model is written in Matlab and the code is publicly available for download through the following website: http://www.iapmw.unibe.ch/research/projects/snowtools/memls.html.

  16. MEMLS3&a: Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks adapted to include backscattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Proksch

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS was originally developed for microwave emissions of snowpacks in the frequency range 5–100 GHz. It is based on six-flux theory to describe radiative transfer in snow including absorption, multiple volume scattering, radiation trapping due to internal reflection and a combination of coherent and incoherent superposition of reflections between horizontal layer interfaces. Here we introduce MEMLS3&a, an extension of MEMLS, which includes a backscatter model for active microwave remote sensing of snow. The reflectivity is decomposed into diffuse and specular components. Slight undulations of the snow surface are taken into account. The treatment of like and cross polarization is accomplished by an empirical splitting parameter q. MEMLS3&a (as well as MEMLS is set up in a way that snow input parameters can be derived by objective measurement methods which avoids fitting procedures of the scattering efficiency of snow, required by several other models. For the validation of the model we have used a combination of active and passive measurements from the NoSREx campaign in Sodankylä, Finland. We find a reasonable agreement between the measurements and simulations, subject to uncertainties in hitherto unmeasured input parameters of the backscatter model. The model is written in MATLAB and the code is publicly available for download through the following website: http://www.iapmw.unibe.ch/research/projects/snowtools/memls.html.

  17. MEMLS3&a: Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks adapted to include backscattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proksch, M.; Mätzler, C.; Wiesmann, A.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Schwank, M.; Löwe, H.; Schneebeli, M.

    2015-08-01

    The Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) was originally developed for microwave emissions of snowpacks in the frequency range 5-100 GHz. It is based on six-flux theory to describe radiative transfer in snow including absorption, multiple volume scattering, radiation trapping due to internal reflection and a combination of coherent and incoherent superposition of reflections between horizontal layer interfaces. Here we introduce MEMLS3&a, an extension of MEMLS, which includes a backscatter model for active microwave remote sensing of snow. The reflectivity is decomposed into diffuse and specular components. Slight undulations of the snow surface are taken into account. The treatment of like- and cross-polarization is accomplished by an empirical splitting parameter q. MEMLS3&a (as well as MEMLS) is set up in a way that snow input parameters can be derived by objective measurement methods which avoid fitting procedures of the scattering efficiency of snow, required by several other models. For the validation of the model we have used a combination of active and passive measurements from the NoSREx (Nordic Snow Radar Experiment) campaign in Sodankylä, Finland. We find a reasonable agreement between the measurements and simulations, subject to uncertainties in hitherto unmeasured input parameters of the backscatter model. The model is written in Matlab and the code is publicly available for download through the following website: http://www.iapmw.unibe.ch/research/projects/snowtools/memls.html.

  18. Diagnosing Lee Wave Rotor Onset Using a Linear Model Including a Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. C. Teixeira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A linear model is used to diagnose the onset of rotors in flow over 2D hills, for atmospheres that are neutrally stratified near the surface and stably stratified aloft, with a sharp temperature inversion in between, where trapped lee waves may propagate. This is achieved by coupling an inviscid two-layer mountain-wave model and a bulk boundary-layer model. The full model shows some ability to diagnose flow stagnation associated with rotors as a function of key input parameters, such as the Froude number and the height of the inversion, in numerical simulations and laboratory experiments carried out by previous authors. While calculations including only the effects of mean flow attenuation and velocity perturbation amplification within the surface layer represent flow stagnation fairly well in the more non-hydrostatic cases, only the full model, taking into account the feedback of the surface layer on the inviscid flow, satisfactorily predicts flow stagnation in the most hydrostatic case, although the corresponding condition is unable to discriminate between rotors and hydraulic jumps. Versions of the model not including this feedback severely underestimate the amplitude of trapped lee waves in that case, where the Fourier transform of the hill has zeros, showing that those waves are not forced directly by the orography.

  19. Steady-state analysis of activated sludge processes with a settler model including sludge compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, S; Zambrano, J; Carlsson, B

    2016-01-01

    A reduced model of a completely stirred-tank bioreactor coupled to a settling tank with recycle is analyzed in its steady states. In the reactor, the concentrations of one dominant particulate biomass and one soluble substrate component are modelled. While the biomass decay rate is assumed to be constant, growth kinetics can depend on both substrate and biomass concentrations, and optionally model substrate inhibition. Compressive and hindered settling phenomena are included using the Bürger-Diehl settler model, which consists of a partial differential equation. Steady-state solutions of this partial differential equation are obtained from an ordinary differential equation, making steady-state analysis of the entire plant difficult. A key result showing that the ordinary differential equation can be replaced with an approximate algebraic equation simplifies model analysis. This algebraic equation takes the location of the sludge-blanket during normal operation into account, allowing for the limiting flux capacity caused by compressive settling to easily be included in the steady-state mass balance equations for the entire plant system. This novel approach grants the possibility of more realistic solutions than other previously published reduced models, comprised of yet simpler settler assumptions. The steady-state concentrations, solids residence time, and the wastage flow ratio are functions of the recycle ratio. Solutions are shown for various growth kinetics; with different values of biomass decay rate, influent volumetric flow, and substrate concentration.

  20. Latest cosmological constraints on Cardassian expansion models including the updated gamma-ray bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Liang; Pu-Xun Wua; Zong-Hong Zhu

    2011-01-01

    We constrain the Cardassian expansion models from the latest observations,including the updated Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs),which are calibrated using a cosmology independent method from the Union2 compilation of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia).By combining the GRB data with the joint observations from the Union2SNe Ia set,along with the results from the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation observation from the seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and the baryonic acoustic oscillation observation galaxy sample from the spectroscopic Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release,we find significant constraints on the model parameters of the original Cardassian model ΩM0=n 282+0.015-0.014,n=0.03+0.05-0.05;and n = -0.16+0.25-3.26,β=-0.76+0.34-0.58 of the modified polytropic Cardassian model,which are consistent with the ACDM model in a l-σ confidence region.From the reconstruction of the deceleration parameter q(z) in Cardassian models,we obtain the transition redshift ZT = 0.73 ± 0.04 for the original Cardassian model and ZT = 0.68 ± 0.04 for the modified polytropic Cardassian model.

  1. Safe distance car-following model including backward-looking and its stability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Da; Jin, Peter Jing; Pu, Yun; Ran, Bin

    2013-03-01

    The focus of this paper is the car-following behavior including backward-looking, simply called the bi-directional looking car-following behavior. This study is motivated by the potential changes of the physical properties of traffic flow caused by the fast developing intelligent transportation system (ITS), especially the new connected vehicle technology. Existing studies on this topic focused on general motors (GM) models and optimal velocity (OV) models. The safe distance car-following model, Gipps' model, which is more widely used in practice have not drawn too much attention in the bi-directional looking context. This paper explores the property of the bi-directional looking extension of Gipps' safe distance model. The stability condition of the proposed model is derived using the linear stability theory and is verified using numerical simulations. The impacts of the driver and vehicle characteristics appeared in the proposed model on the traffic flow stability are also investigated. It is found that taking into account the backward-looking effect in car-following has three types of effect on traffic flow: stabilizing, destabilizing and producing non-physical phenomenon. This conclusion is more sophisticated than the study results based on the OV bi-directional looking car-following models. Moreover, the drivers who have the smaller reaction time or the larger additional delay and think the other vehicles have larger maximum decelerations can stabilize traffic flow.

  2. Early precursors of site-specific cancers in college men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, A S; Paffenbarger, R S; Anderson, K; Lee, J E

    1985-01-01

    Physical and social characteristics recorded at college physical examination and reported in subsequent questionnaires to alumni in 1962 or 1966 by 50,000 former students from Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania were reviewed for their relationship to major site-specific cancer occurrence. The records of 1,359 subjects who died with a major site-specific cancer in a 16- to 50-year follow-up period and of 672 subjects who reported such a cancer by mail questionnaire in 1976 or 1977 were compared with those of 8,084 matched classmates who were known to be alive and free of cancer at the time subjects with cancer had died or had been diagnosed. Cigarette smoking, as reported both in student years and years as alumni, predicted increased risk for cancers of the respiratory tract, pancreas, and bladder. Student coffee consumption was associated with elevated risk for leukemia, but it was unrelated to cancers of the pancreas and bladder. Male students with a record of proteinuria at college physical examination experienced increased risk of kidney cancer, and those with a history of tonsillectomy experienced increased risk of prostate cancer. Students who at college entrance reported occasional vague abdominal pain were at elevated risk for pancreatic and colorectal cancers in later years. Increased body weight during college was associated with increased risks of kidney and bladder cancers, whereas for alumni this index was associated only with kidney cancer. Increased weight-for-height during college (but not in 1962 or 1966) predicted increased occurrence of female breast cancer. Jewish students experienced elevated risk for subsequent cancers of the female breast, colon, and combined colorectum. These and other findings are presented as clues deserving further exploration for any etiologic significance that they may hold for the cancer sites studied.

  3. Site-specific fab fragment biotinylation at the conserved nucleotide binding site for enhanced Ebola detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafaoglu, Nur; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar

    2015-07-01

    The nucleotide binding site (NBS) is a highly conserved region between the variable light and heavy chains at the Fab domains of all antibodies, and a small molecule that we identified, indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), binds specifically to this site. Fab fragment, with its small size and simple production methods compared to intact antibody, is good candidate for use in miniaturized diagnostic devices and targeted therapeutic applications. However, commonly used modification techniques are not well suited for Fab fragments as they are often more delicate than intact antibodies. Fab fragments are of particular interest for sensor surface functionalization but immobilization results in damage to the antigen binding site and greatly reduced activity due to their truncated size that allows only a small area that can bind to surfaces without impeding antigen binding. In this study, we describe an NBS-UV photocrosslinking functionalization method (UV-NBS(Biotin) in which a Fab fragment is site-specifically biotinylated with an IBA-EG11-Biotin linker via UV energy exposure (1 J/cm(2)) without affecting its antigen binding activity. This study demonstrates successful immobilization of biotinylated Ebola detecting Fab fragment (KZ52 Fab fragment) via the UV-NBS(Biotin) method yielding 1031-fold and 2-fold better antigen detection sensitivity compared to commonly used immobilization methods: direct physical adsorption and NHS-Biotin functionalization, respectively. Utilization of the UV-NBS(Biotin) method for site-specific conjugation to Fab fragment represents a proof of concept use of Fab fragment for various diagnostic and therapeutic applications with numerous fluorescent probes, affinity molecules and peptides.

  4. phiC31 integrase-mediated site-specific recombination in barley.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Kapusi

    Full Text Available The Streptomyces phage phiC31 integrase was tested for its feasibility in excising transgenes from the barley genome through site-specific recombination. We produced transgenic barley plants expressing an active phiC31 integrase and crossed them with transgenic barley plants carrying a target locus for recombination. The target sequence involves a reporter gene encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP, which is flanked by the attB and attP recognition sites for the phiC31 integrase. This sequence disruptively separates a gusA coding sequence from an upstream rice actin promoter. We succeeded in producing site-specific recombination events in the hybrid progeny of 11 independent barley plants carrying the above target sequence after crossing with plants carrying a phiC31 expression cassette. Some of the hybrids displayed fully executed recombination. Excision of the GFP gene fostered activation of the gusA gene, as visualized in tissue of hybrid plants by histochemical staining. The recombinant loci were detected in progeny of selfed F(1, even in individuals lacking the phiC31 transgene, which provides evidence of stability and generative transmission of the recombination events. In several plants that displayed incomplete recombination, extrachromosomal excision circles were identified. Besides the technical advance achieved in this study, the generated phiC31 integrase-expressing barley plants provide foundational stock material for use in future approaches to barley genetic improvement, such as the production of marker-free transgenic plants or switching transgene activity.

  5. Site-Specific Conjugation to Native and Engineered Lysines in Human Immunoglobulins by Microbial Transglutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spidel, Jared L; Vaessen, Benjamin; Albone, Earl F; Cheng, Xin; Verdi, Arielle; Kline, J Bradford

    2017-09-20

    The use of microbial transglutaminase (MTG) to produce site-specific antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) has thus far focused on the transamidation of engineered acyl donor glutamine residues in an antibody based on the hypothesis that the lower specificity of MTG for acyl acceptor lysines may result in the transamidation of multiple native lysine residues, thereby yielding heterogeneous products. We investigated the utilization of native IgG lysines as acyl acceptor sites for glutamine-based acyl donor substrates. Of the approximately 80 lysines in multiple recombinant IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), none were transamidated. Because recombinant mAbs lack the C-terminal Lys447 due to cleavage by carboxypeptidase B in the production cell host, we explored whether blocking the cleavage of Lys447 by the addition of a C-terminal amino acid could result in transamidation of Lys447 by a variety of acyl donor substrates. MTG efficiently transamidated Lys447 in the presence of any nonacidic, nonproline amino acid residue at position 448. Lysine scanning mutagenesis throughout the antibody further revealed several transamidation sites in both the heavy- and light-chain constant regions. Additionally, scanning mutagenesis of the hinge region in a Fab' fragment revealed sites of transamidation that were not reactive in the context of the full-length mAb. Here, we demonstrate the utility of single lysine substitutions and the C-terminal Lys447 for engineering efficient acyl acceptor sites suitable for site-specific conjugation to a range of glutamine-based acyl donor substrates.

  6. A Lumped Thermal Model Including Thermal Coupling and Thermal Boundary Conditions for High Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    Detailed thermal dynamics of high power IGBT modules are important information for the reliability analysis and thermal design of power electronic systems. However, the existing thermal models have their limits to correctly predict these complicated thermal behavior in the IGBTs: The typically used...... thermal distribution under long-term studies. Meanwhile the boundary conditions for the thermal analysis are modeled and included, which can be adapted to different real field applications of power electronic converters. Finally, the accuracy of the proposed thermal model is verified by FEM simulations...... thermal model based on one-dimensional RC lumps have limits to provide temperature distributions inside the device, moreover some variable factors in the real-field applications like the cooling and heating conditions of the converter cannot be adapted. On the other hand, the more advanced three...

  7. A Lumped Thermal Model Including Thermal Coupling and Thermal Boundary Conditions for High Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    Detailed thermal dynamics of high power IGBT modules are important information for the reliability analysis and thermal design of power electronic systems. However, the existing thermal models have their limits to correctly predict these complicated thermal behavior in the IGBTs: The typically used...... thermal distribution under long-term studies. Meanwhile the boundary conditions for the thermal analysis are modeled and included, which can be adapted to different real-field applications of power electronic converters. Finally, the accuracy of the proposed thermal model is verified by FEM simulations...... thermal model based on one-dimensional RC lumps have limits to provide temperature distributions inside the device, moreover some variable factors in the real-field applications like the cooling and heating conditions of the converter cannot be adapted. On the other hand, the more advanced three...

  8. Transmission line model for strained quantum well lasers including carrier transport and carrier heating effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Mingjun; Ghafouri-Shiraz, H

    2016-03-01

    This paper reports a new model for strained quantum well lasers, which are based on the quantum well transmission line modeling method where effects of both carrier transport and carrier heating have been included. We have applied this new model and studied the effect of carrier transport on the output waveform of a strained quantum well laser both in time and frequency domains. It has been found that the carrier transport increases the turn-on, turn-off delay times and damping of the quantum well laser transient response. Also, analysis in the frequency domain indicates that the carrier transport causes the output spectrum of the quantum well laser in steady state to exhibit a redshift which has a narrower bandwidth and lower magnitude. The simulation results of turning-on transients obtained by the proposed model are compared with those obtained by the rate equation laser model. The new model has also been used to study the effects of pump current spikes on the laser output waveforms properties, and it was found that the presence of current spikes causes (i) wavelength blueshift, (ii) larger bandwidth, and (iii) reduces the magnitude and decreases the side-lobe suppression ratio of the laser output spectrum. Analysis in both frequency and time domains confirms that the new proposed model can accurately predict the temporal and spectral behaviors of strained quantum well lasers.

  9. A numerical model including PID control of a multizone crystal growth furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzarella, Charles H.; Kassemi, Mohammad

    This paper presents a 2D axisymmetric combined conduction and radiation model of a multizone crystal growth furnace. The model is based on a programmable multizone furnace (PMZF) designed and built at NASA Lewis Research Center for growing high quality semiconductor crystals. A novel feature of this model is a control algorithm which automatically adjusts the power in any number of independently controlled heaters to establish the desired crystal temperatures in the furnace model. The control algorithm eliminates the need for numerous trial and error runs previously required to obtain the same results. The finite element code, FIDAP, used to develop the furnace model, was modified to directly incorporate the control algorithm. This algorithm, which presently uses PID control, and the associated heat transfer model are briefly discussed. Together, they have been used to predict the heater power distributions for a variety of furnace configurations and desired temperature profiles. Examples are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the PID controlled model in establishing isothermal, Bridgman, and other complicated temperature profies in the sample. Finally, an example is given to show how the algorithm can be used to change the desired profile with time according to a prescribed temperature-time evolution.

  10. A continuum model of solvation energies including electrostatic, dispersion, and cavity contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duignan, Timothy T; Parsons, Drew F; Ninham, Barry W

    2013-08-15

    Physically accurate continuum solvent models that can calculate solvation energies are crucial to explain and predict the behavior of solute particles in water. Here, we present such a model applied to small spherical ions and neutral atoms. It improves upon a basic Born electrostatic model by including a standard cavity energy and adding a dispersion component, consistent with the Born electrostatic energy and using the same cavity size parameter. We show that the well-known, puzzling differences between the solvation energies of ions of the same size is attributable to the neglected dispersion contribution. This depends on dynamic polarizability as well as size. Generally, a large cancellation exists between the cavity and dispersion contributions. This explains the surprising success of the Born model. The model accurately reproduces the solvation energies of the alkali halide ions, as well as the silver(I) and copper(I) ions with an error of 12 kJ mol(-1) (±3%). The solvation energy of the noble gases is also reproduced with an error of 2.6 kJ mol(-1) (±30%). No arbitrary fitting parameters are needed to achieve this. This model significantly improves our understanding of ionic solvation and forms a solid basis for the investigation of other ion-specific effects using a continuum solvent model.

  11. Model for resistance evolution in shape memory alloys including R-phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammajyosula, Ravindra; Buravalla, Vidyashankar; Khandelwal, Ashish

    2011-03-01

    The electrical resistance behavior of a shape memory alloy (SMA) wire can be used for sensing the state of an SMA device. Hence, this study investigates the resistance evolution in SMAs. A lumped parameter model with cosine kinetics to capture the resistance variation during the phase transformation is developed. Several SMA materials show the presence of trigonal or rhombohedral (R) phase as an intermediate phase, apart from the commonly recognized austenite and martensite phases. Most of the SMA models ignore the R-phase effect in their prediction of thermomechanical response. This may be acceptable since the changes in thermomechanical response associated with the R-phase are relatively less. However, the resistivity related effects are pronounced in the presence of the R-phase and its appearance introduces non-monotonicity in the resistivity evolution. This leads to additional complexities in the use of resistance signal for sensing and control. Hence, a lumped model is developed here for resistance evolution including the R-phase effects. A phase-diagram-based model is proposed for predicting electro-thermomechanical response. Both steady state hysteretic response and transient response are modeled. The model predictions are compared with the available test data. Numerical studies have shown that the model is able to capture all the essential features of the resistance evolution in SMAs in the presence of the R-phase.

  12. A New Circuit Model for Spin-Torque Oscillator Including Perpendicular Torque of Magnetic Tunnel Junction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyein Lim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spin-torque oscillator (STO is a promising new technology for the future RF oscillators, which is based on the spin-transfer torque (STT effect in magnetic multilayered nanostructure. It is expected to provide a larger tunability, smaller size, lower power consumption, and higher level of integration than the semiconductor-based oscillators. In our previous work, a circuit-level model of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR STO was proposed. In this paper, we present a physics-based circuit-level model of the magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ-based STO. MTJ-STO model includes the effect of perpendicular torque that has been ignored in the GMR-STO model. The variations of three major characteristics, generation frequency, mean oscillation power, and generation linewidth of an MTJ-STO with respect to the amount of perpendicular torque, are investigated, and the results are applied to our model. The operation of the model was verified by HSPICE simulation, and the results show an excellent agreement with the experimental data. The results also prove that a full circuit-level simulation with MJT-STO devices can be made with our proposed model.

  13. Does including physiology improve species distribution model predictions of responses to recent climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Lauren B; Waaser, Stephanie A; MacLean, Heidi J; Fox, Richard

    2011-12-01

    Thermal constraints on development are often invoked to predict insect distributions. These constraints tend to be characterized in species distribution models (SDMs) by calculating development time based on a constant lower development temperature (LDT). Here, we assessed whether species-specific estimates of LDT based on laboratory experiments can improve the ability of SDMs to predict the distribution shifts of six U.K. butterflies in response to recent climate warming. We find that species-specific and constant (5 degrees C) LDT degree-day models perform similarly at predicting distributions during the period of 1970-1982. However, when the models for the 1970-1982 period are projected to predict distributions in 1995-1999 and 2000-2004, species-specific LDT degree-day models modestly outperform constant LDT degree-day models. Our results suggest that, while including species-specific physiology in correlative models may enhance predictions of species' distribution responses to climate change, more detailed models may be needed to adequately account for interspecific physiological differences.

  14. Modeling of single char combustion, including CO oxidation in its boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, C.H.; Longwell, J.P.; Sarofim, A.F.

    1994-10-25

    The combustion of a char particle can be divided into a transient phase where its temperature increases as it is heated by oxidation, and heat transfer from the surrounding gas to an approximately constant temperature stage where gas phase reaction is important and which consumes most of the carbon and an extinction stage caused by carbon burnout. In this work, separate models were developed for the transient heating where gas phase reactions were unimportant and for the steady temperature stage where gas phase reactions were treated in detail. The transient char combustion model incorporates intrinsic char surface production of CO and CO{sub 2}, internal pore diffusion and external mass and heat transfer. The model provides useful information for particle ignition, burning temperature profile, combustion time, and carbon consumption rate. A gas phase reaction model incorporating the full set of 28 elementary C/H/O reactions was developed. This model calculated the gas phase CO oxidation reaction in the boundary layer at particle temperatures of 1250 K and 2500 K by using the carbon consumption rate and the burning temperature at the pseudo-steady state calculated from the temperature profile model but the transient heating was not included. This gas phase model can predict the gas species, and the temperature distributions in the boundary layer, the CO{sub 2}/CO ratio, and the location of CO oxidation. A mechanistic heat and mass transfer model was added to the temperature profile model to predict combustion behavior in a fluidized bed. These models were applied to data from the fluidized combustion of Newlands coal char particles. 52 refs., 60 figs.

  15. Including source uncertainty and prior information in the analysis of stable isotope mixing models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Eric J; Semmens, Brice X; Schindler, Daniel E

    2010-06-15

    Stable isotope mixing models offer a statistical framework for estimating the contribution of multiple sources (such as prey) to a mixture distribution. Recent advances in these models have estimated the source proportions using Bayesian methods, but have not explicitly accounted for uncertainty in the mean and variance of sources. We demonstrate that treating these quantities as unknown parameters can reduce bias in the estimated source contributions, although model complexity is increased (thereby increasing the variance of estimates). The advantages of this fully Bayesian approach are particularly apparent when the source geometry is poor or sample sizes are small. A second benefit to treating source quantities as parameters is that prior source information can be included. We present findings from 9 lake food-webs, where the consumer of interest (fish) has a diet composed of 5 sources: aquatic insects, snails, zooplankton, amphipods, and terrestrial insects. We compared the traditional Bayesian stable isotope mixing model with fixed source parameters to our fully Bayesian model-with and without an informative prior. The informative prior has much less impact than the choice of model-the traditional mixing model with fixed source parameters estimates the diet to be dominated by aquatic insects, while the fully Bayesian model estimates the diet to be more balanced but with greater importance of zooplankton. The findings from this example demonstrate that there can be stark differences in inference between the two model approaches, particularly when the source geometry of the mixing model is poor. These analyses also emphasize the importance of investing substantial effort toward characterizing the variation in the isotopic characteristics of source pools to appropriately quantify uncertainties in their contributions to consumers in food webs.

  16. Kinetic modeling of rhamnolipid production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including cell density-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Marius; Schmidberger, Anke; Vogelbacher, Markus; Kühnert, Christian; Beuker, Janina; Bernard, Thomas; Schwartz, Thomas; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2014-08-01

    The production of rhamnolipid biosurfactants by Pseudomonas aeruginosa is under complex control of a quorum sensing-dependent regulatory network. Due to a lack of understanding of the kinetics applicable to the process and relevant interrelations of variables, current processes for rhamnolipid production are based on heuristic approaches. To systematically establish a knowledge-based process for rhamnolipid production, a deeper understanding of the time-course and coupling of process variables is required. By combining reaction kinetics, stoichiometry, and experimental data, a process model for rhamnolipid production with P. aeruginosa PAO1 on sunflower oil was developed as a system of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs). In addition, cell density-based quorum sensing dynamics were included in the model. The model comprises a total of 36 parameters, 14 of which are yield coefficients and 7 of which are substrate affinity and inhibition constants. Of all 36 parameters, 30 were derived from dedicated experimental results, literature, and databases and 6 of them were used as fitting parameters. The model is able to describe data on biomass growth, substrates, and products obtained from a reference batch process and other validation scenarios. The model presented describes the time-course and interrelation of biomass, relevant substrates, and products on a process level while including a kinetic representation of cell density-dependent regulatory mechanisms.

  17. Codigestion of solid wastes: a review of its uses and perspectives including modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Alvarez, Joan; Dosta, Joan; Macé, Sandra; Astals, Sergi

    2011-06-01

    The last two years have witnessed a dramatic increase in the number of papers published on the subject of codigestion, highlighting the relevance of this topic within anaerobic digestion research. Consequently, it seems appropriate to undertake a review of codigestion practices starting from the late 1970s, when the first papers related to this concept were published, and continuing to the present day, demonstrating the exponential growth in the interest shown in this approach in recent years. Following a general analysis of the situation, state-of-the-art codigestion is described, focusing on the two most important areas as regards publication: codigestion involving sewage sludge and the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (including a review of the secondary advantages for wastewater treatment plant related to biological nutrient removal), and codigestion in the agricultural sector, that is, including agricultural - farm wastes, and energy crops. Within these areas, a large number of oversized digesters appear which can be used to codigest other substrates, resulting in economic and environmental advantages. Although the situation may be changing, there is still a need for good examples on an industrial scale, particularly with regard to wastewater treatment plants, in order to extend this beneficial practice. In the last section, a detailed analysis of papers addressing the important aspect of modelisation is included. This analysis includes the first codigestion models to be developed as well as recent applications of the standardised anaerobic digestion model ADM1 to codigestion. (This review includes studies ranging from laboratory to industrial scale.).

  18. Enhanced UWB Radio Channel Model for Short-Range Communication Scenarios Including User Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, Istvan Zsolt; Nguyen, Tuan Hung; Eggers, Patrick Claus F.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we propose a SISO UWB radio channel model for short-range radio link scenarios between a fixed device and a dynamic user hand-held device. The channel model is derived based on novel experimental UWB radio propagation investigations carried out in typical indoor PAN scenarios...... including realistic device and user terminal antenna configurations. The radio channel measurements have been performed in the lower UWB frequency band of 3GHz to 5GHz with a 2x4 MIMO antenna configuration. Several environments, user scenarios and two types of user terminals have been used. The developed...

  19. Fuzzy Control of Yaw and Roll Angles of a Simulated Helicopter Model Includes Articulated Manipulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Sadegh Lafmejani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fuzzy logic controller (FLC is a heuristic method by If-Then Rules which resembles human intelligence and it is a good method for designing Non-linear control systems. In this paper, an arbitrary helicopter model includes articulated manipulators has been simulated with Matlab SimMechanics toolbox. Due to the difficulties of modeling this complex system, a fuzzy controller with simple fuzzy rules has been designed for its yaw and roll angles in order to stabilize the helicopter while it is in the presence of disturbances or its manipulators are moving for a task. Results reveal that a simple FLC can appropriately control this system.

  20. Including Finite Surface Span Effects in Empirical Jet-Surface Interaction Noise Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Clifford A.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of finite span on the jet-surface interaction noise source and the jet mixing noise shielding and reflection effects is considered using recently acquired experimental data. First, the experimental setup and resulting data are presented with particular attention to the role of surface span on far-field noise. These effects are then included in existing empirical models that have previously assumed that all surfaces are semi-infinite. This extended abstract briefly describes the experimental setup and data leaving the empirical modeling aspects for the final paper.

  1. Analytical model for investigation of interior noise characteristics in aircraft with multiple propellers including synchrophasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. R.

    1986-01-01

    A simplified analytical model of transmission of noise into the interior of propeller-driven aircraft has been developed. The analysis includes directivity and relative phase effects of the propeller noise sources, and leads to a closed form solution for the coupled motion between the interior and exterior fields via the shell (fuselage) vibrational response. Various situations commonly encountered in considering sound transmission into aircraft fuselages are investigated analytically and the results obtained are compared to measurements in real aircraft. In general the model has proved successful in identifying basic mechanisms behind noise transmission phenomena.

  2. Site-specific Protocol for Monitoring Marsh Birds : Don Edwards San Francisco Bay and San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuges

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This site-specific survey protocol provides standardized methods for monitoring marsh birds and was designed for use by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) on...

  3. An air/sea flux model including the effects of capillary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    An improved model of the air/sea interface is developed. The improvements consist in including the effect of capillary (surface tension) waves on the tropical surface fluxes and the consideration of the sea state, both of which increase the magnitude of tropical surface fluxes. Changes in surface stress are most significant in the low wind-speed regions, which include the areas where westerly bursts occur. It is shown that the changes, from the regular wind conditions to those of a westerly burst or El-Nino, can double when the effects of capillary waves are considered. This implies a much stronger coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere than is predicted by other boundary layer models.

  4. A complete model of CH+ rotational excitation including radiative and chemical pumping processes

    CERN Document Server

    Godard, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Aims. Excitation of far-infrared and submillimetric molecular lines may originate from nonreactive collisions, chemical formation, or far infrared, near-infrared, and optical fluorescences. As a template, we investigate the impact of each of these processes on the excitation of the methylidyne cation CH+ and on the intensities of its rotational transitions recently detected in emission in dense photodissociation regions (PDRs) and in planetary nebulae. Methods. We have developed a nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) excitation model that includes the entire energy structure of CH+, i.e. taking into account the pumping of its vibrational and bound and unbound electronic states by near-infrared and optical photons. The model includes the theoretical cross-sections of nonreactive collisions with H, H2, He, and e-, and a Boltzmann distribution is used to describe the probability of populating the excited levels of CH+ during its chemical formation by hydrogenation of C+. To confirm our results we also pe...

  5. Including Flocculation in a Numerical Sediment Transport Model for a Partially-Mixed Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpley, D.; Harris, C. K.; Friedrichs, C. T.

    2016-12-01

    Particle settling velocity impacts the transport of suspended sediment to the first order but fine-grained material like muds tend to form loosely bound aggregates (flocs) whose settling velocity can vary widely. Properties of flocculated sediment such as settling velocity and particle density are difficult to predict because they change in response to several factors including salinity, suspended sediment concentration, turbulent mixing, and organic content. Knowledge of the mechanisms governing flocculation of cohesive sediment is rapidly expanding; especially in response to recent technical advances. As the understanding of particle dynamics progresses, numerical models describing flocculation and break-up are being developed with varying degrees of complexity. While complex models capture the dynamics of the system, their computational costs may prohibit their incorporation into larger model domains. It is important to determine if the computational costs of intricate floc models are justifiable compared to simpler formulations. For this study, we implement an idealized two-dimensional model designed to represent a longitudinal section of a partially mixed estuary that neglects across-channel variation but exhibits salinity driven estuarine circulation. The idealized domain is designed to mimic the primary features of the York River, VA. Suspended load, erosion and deposition are calculated within the sediment transport routines of the COAWST modeling system. We compare different methods for prescribing settling velocity of fine-grained material. The simplest, standard model neglects flocculation dynamics while the complex treatment is a size-class-based flocculation model (FLOCMOD). Differences in tidal and daily averages of suspended load, bulk settling velocity and bed deposition are compared between the standard and FLOCMOD runs, to examine the relative impact of flocculation on sediment transport patterns. We expect FLOCMOD to have greater variability and

  6. Multistate Statistical Modeling: A Tool to Build a Lung Cancer Microsimulation Model That Includes Parameter Uncertainty and Patient Heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, Mathilda L; de Ruysscher, Dirk; Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A; Coupé, V M H

    2016-01-01

    With the shift toward individualized treatment, cost-effectiveness models need to incorporate patient and tumor characteristics that may be relevant to treatment planning. In this study, we used multistate statistical modeling to inform a microsimulation model for cost-effectiveness analysis of individualized radiotherapy in lung cancer. The model tracks clinical events over time and takes patient and tumor features into account. Four clinical states were included in the model: alive without progression, local recurrence, metastasis, and death. Individual patients were simulated by repeatedly sampling a patient profile, consisting of patient and tumor characteristics. The transitioning of patients between the health states is governed by personalized time-dependent hazard rates, which were obtained from multistate statistical modeling (MSSM). The model simulations for both the individualized and conventional radiotherapy strategies demonstrated internal and external validity. Therefore, MSSM is a useful technique for obtaining the correlated individualized transition rates that are required for the quantification of a microsimulation model. Moreover, we have used the hazard ratios, their 95% confidence intervals, and their covariance to quantify the parameter uncertainty of the model in a correlated way. The obtained model will be used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of individualized radiotherapy treatment planning, including the uncertainty of input parameters. We discuss the model-building process and the strengths and weaknesses of using MSSM in a microsimulation model for individualized radiotherapy in lung cancer.

  7. Model for safety reports including descriptive examples; Mall foer saekerhetsrapporter med beskrivande exempel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    Several safety reports will be produced in the process of planning and constructing the system for disposal of high-level radioactive waste in Sweden. The present report gives a model, with detailed examples, of how these reports should be organized and what steps they should include. In the near future safety reports will deal with the encapsulation plant and the repository. Later reports will treat operation of the handling systems and the repository.

  8. Extending the formal model of a spatial data infrastructure to include volunteered geographical information

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Cooper, Antony K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available an aggregator of VGI, such as Ushahidi, and the provider of the infrastructure for collecting VGI, such as OpenStreetMap. 3) Broker: A stakeholder who brings End Users and Providers together and assists in the negotiation of contracts between them... model of a spatial data infrastructure to include volunteered geographical information Antony K Cooper*, Petr Rapant?, Jan Hjelmager?, Dominique Laurent?, Adam Iwaniak#, Serena Coetzee$, Harold Moellering? and Ulrich D?ren? *Logistics...

  9. QCD Equation of State From a Chiral Hadronic Model Including Quark Degrees of Freedom

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, Philip; Schramm, Stefan; Stöcker, Horst

    2013-01-01

    This work presents an effective model for strongly interacting matter and the QCD equation of state (EoS). The model includes both hadron and quark degrees of freedom and takes into account the transition of chiral symmetry restoration as well as the deconfinement phase transition. At low temperatures $T$ and baryonic densities $\\rho_B$ a hadron resonance gas is described using a SU(3)-flavor sigma-omega model and a quark phase is introduced in analogy to PNJL models for higher $T$ and $\\rho_B$. In this way, the correct asymptotic degrees of freedom are used in a wide range of $T$ and $\\rho_B$. Here, results of this model concerning the chiral and deconfinement phase transitions and thermodynamic model properties are presented. Large hadron resonance multiplicities in the transition region emphasize the importance of heavy-mass resonance states in this region and their impact on the chiral transition behavior. The resulting phase diagram of QCD matter at small chemical potentials is in line with latest lattic...

  10. A full model for simulation of electrochemical cells including complex behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esperilla, J. J.; Félez, J.; Romero, G.; Carretero, A.

    This communication presents a model of electrochemical cells developed in order to simulate their electrical, chemical and thermal behavior showing the differences when thermal effects are or not considered in the charge-discharge process. The work presented here has been applied to the particular case of the Pb,PbSO 4|H 2SO 4 (aq)|PbO 2,Pb cell, which forms the basis of the lead-acid batteries so widely used in the automotive industry and as traction batteries in electric or hybrid vehicles. Each half-cell is considered independently in the model. For each half-cell, in addition to the main electrode reaction, a secondary reaction is considered: the hydrogen evolution reaction in the negative electrode and the oxygen evolution reaction in the positive. The equilibrium potential is calculated with the Nernst equation, in which the activity coefficients are fitted to an exponential function using experimental data. On the other hand, the two main mechanisms that produce the overpotential are considered, that is the activation or charge transfer and the diffusion mechanisms. First, an isothermal model has been studied in order to show the behavior of the main phenomena. A more complex model has also been studied including thermal behavior. This model is very useful in the case of traction batteries in electric and hybrid vehicles where high current intensities appear. Some simulation results are also presented in order to show the accuracy of the proposed models.

  11. A High-Rate, Single-Crystal Model including Phase Transformations, Plastic Slip, and Twinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Addessio, Francis L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Bronkhorst, Curt Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Bolme, Cynthia Anne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Explosive Science and Shock Physics Division; Brown, Donald William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Cerreta, Ellen Kathleen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Lebensohn, Ricardo A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Lookman, Turab [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Luscher, Darby Jon [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Mayeur, Jason Rhea [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Morrow, Benjamin M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Rigg, Paulo A. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics. Inst. for Shock Physics

    2016-08-09

    An anisotropic, rate-­dependent, single-­crystal approach for modeling materials under the conditions of high strain rates and pressures is provided. The model includes the effects of large deformations, nonlinear elasticity, phase transformations, and plastic slip and twinning. It is envisioned that the model may be used to examine these coupled effects on the local deformation of materials that are subjected to ballistic impact or explosive loading. The model is formulated using a multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient. A plate impact experiment on a multi-­crystal sample of titanium was conducted. The particle velocities at the back surface of three crystal orientations relative to the direction of impact were measured. Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the details of the high-­rate deformation and pursue issues related to the phase transformation for titanium. Simulations using the single crystal model were conducted and compared to the high-­rate experimental data for the impact loaded single crystals. The model was found to capture the features of the experiments.

  12. A 3D model of the oculomotor plant including the pulley system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viegener, A; Armentano, R L [Fundacion Universitaria Dr. Rene G. Favaloro, SolIs 453 (1078) Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-11-15

    Early models of the oculomotor plant only considered the eye globes and the muscles that move them. Recently, connective tissue structures have been found enveloping the extraocular muscles (EOMs) and firmly anchored to the orbital wall. These structures act as pulleys; they determine the functional origin of the EOMs and, in consequence, their effective pulling direction. A three dimensional model of the oculomotor plant, including pulleys, has been developed and simulations in Simulink were performed during saccadic eye movements. Listing's law was implemented based on the supposition that there exists an eye orientation related signal. The inclusion of the pulleys in the model makes this assumption plausible and simplifies the problem of the plant noncommutativity.

  13. A flexible and qualitatively stable model for cell cycle dynamics including DNA damage effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Clark D; Johnson, Charles R; Zhou, Tong; Simpson, Dennis A; Kaufmann, William K

    2012-01-01

    This paper includes a conceptual framework for cell cycle modeling into which the experimenter can map observed data and evaluate mechanisms of cell cycle control. The basic model exhibits qualitative stability, meaning that regardless of magnitudes of system parameters its instances are guaranteed to be stable in the sense that all feasible trajectories converge to a certain trajectory. Qualitative stability can also be described by the signs of real parts of eigenvalues of the system matrix. On the biological side, the resulting model can be tuned to approximate experimental data pertaining to human fibroblast cell lines treated with ionizing radiation, with or without disabled DNA damage checkpoints. Together these properties validate a fundamental, first order systems view of cell dynamics. Classification Codes: 15A68.

  14. RELAP5-3D Code Includes Athena Features and Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard A. Riemke; Cliff B. Davis; Richard R. Schultz

    2006-07-01

    Version 2.3 of the RELAP5-3D computer program includes all features and models previously available only in the ATHENA version of the code. These include the addition of new working fluids (i.e., ammonia, blood, carbon dioxide, glycerol, helium, hydrogen, lead-bismuth, lithium, lithium-lead, nitrogen, potassium, sodium, and sodium-potassium) and a magnetohydrodynamic model that expands the capability of the code to model many more thermal-hydraulic systems. In addition to the new working fluids along with the standard working fluid water, one or more noncondensable gases (e.g., air, argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, helium, hydrogen, krypton, nitrogen, oxygen, sf6, xenon) can be specified as part of the vapor/gas phase of the working fluid. These noncondensable gases were in previous versions of RELAP5- 3D. Recently four molten salts have been added as working fluids to RELAP5-3D Version 2.4, which has had limited release. These molten salts will be in RELAP5-3D Version 2.5, which will have a general release like RELAP5-3D Version 2.3. Applications that use these new features and models are discussed in this paper.

  15. Including policy and management in socio-hydrology models: initial conceptualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Leon; Korbee, Dorien

    2017-04-01

    Socio-hydrology studies the interactions in coupled human-water systems. So far, the use of dynamic models that capture the direct feedback between societal and hydrological systems has been dominant. What has not yet been included with any particular emphasis, is the policy or management layer, which is a central element in for instance integrated water resources management (IWRM) or adaptive delta management (ADM). Studying the direct interactions between human-water systems generates knowledges that eventually helps influence these interactions in ways that may ensure better outcomes - for society and for the health and sustainability of water systems. This influence sometimes occurs through spontaneous emergence, uncoordinated by societal agents - private sector, citizens, consumers, water users. However, the term 'management' in IWRM and ADM also implies an additional coordinated attempt through various public actors. This contribution is a call to include the policy and management dimension more prominently into the research focus of the socio-hydrology field, and offers first conceptual variables that should be considered in attempts to include this policy or management layer in socio-hydrology models. This is done by drawing on existing frameworks to study policy processes throughout both planning and implementation phases. These include frameworks such as the advocacy coalition framework, collective learning and policy arrangements, which all emphasis longer-term dynamics and feedbacks between actor coalitions in strategic planning and implementation processes. A case about longter-term dynamics in the management of the Haringvliet in the Netherlands is used to illustrate the paper.

  16. EXACT SOLUTIONS FOR NONLINEAR TRANSIENT FLOW MODEL INCLUDING A QUADRATIC GRADIENT TERM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹绪龙; 同登科; 王瑞和

    2004-01-01

    The models of the nonlinear radial flow for the infinite and finite reservoirs including a quadratic gradient term were presented. The exact solution was given in real space for flow equation including quadratic gradiet term for both constant-rate and constant pressure production cases in an infinite system by using generalized Weber transform. Analytical solutions for flow equation including quadratic gradient term were also obtained by using the Hankel transform for a finite circular reservoir case. Both closed and constant pressure outer boundary conditions are considered. Moreover, both constant rate and constant pressure inner boundary conditions are considered. The difference between the nonlinear pressure solution and linear pressure solution is analyzed. The difference may be reached about 8% in the long time. The effect of the quadratic gradient term in the large time well test is considered.

  17. SPheno 3.1: extensions including flavour, CP-phases and models beyond the MSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porod, W.; Staub, F.

    2012-11-01

    We describe recent extensions of the program SPhenoincluding flavour aspects, CP-phases, R-parity violation and low energy observables. In case of flavour mixing all masses of supersymmetric particles are calculated including the complete flavour structure and all possible CP-phases at the 1-loop level. We give details on implemented seesaw models, low energy observables and the corresponding extension of the SUSY Les Houches Accord. Moreover, we comment on the possibilities to include MSSM extensions in SPheno. Catalogue identifier: ADRV_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADRV_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 154062 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1336037 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran95. Computer: PC running under Linux, should run in every Unix environment. Operating system: Linux, Unix. Classification: 11.6. Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADRV_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 153(2003)275 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: The first issue is the determination of the masses and couplings of supersymmetric particles in various supersymmetric models, the R-parity conserved MSSM with generation mixing and including CP-violating phases, various seesaw extensions of the MSSM and the MSSM with bilinear R-parity breaking. Low energy data on Standard Model fermion masses, gauge couplings and electroweak gauge boson masses serve as constraints. Radiative corrections from supersymmetric particles to these inputs must be calculated. Theoretical constraints on the soft SUSY breaking parameters from a high scale theory are imposed and the parameters at the electroweak scale are obtained from the

  18. DISPLAY-2: a two-dimensional shallow layer model for dense gas dispersion including complex features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venetsanos, A G; Bartzis, J G; Würtz, J; Papailiou, D D

    2003-04-25

    A two-dimensional shallow layer model has been developed to predict dense gas dispersion, under realistic conditions, including complex features such as two-phase releases, obstacles and inclined ground. The model attempts to predict the time and space evolution of the cloud formed after a release of a two-phase pollutant into the atmosphere. The air-pollutant mixture is assumed ideal. The cloud evolution is described mathematically through the Cartesian, two-dimensional, shallow layer conservation equations for mixture mass, mixture momentum in two horizontal directions, total pollutant mass fraction (vapor and liquid) and mixture internal energy. Liquid mass fraction is obtained assuming phase equilibrium. Account is taken in the conservation equations for liquid slip and eventual liquid rainout through the ground. Entrainment of ambient air is modeled via an entrainment velocity model, which takes into account the effects of ground friction, ground heat transfer and relative motion between cloud and surrounding atmosphere. The model additionally accounts for thin obstacles effects in three ways. First a stepwise description of the obstacle is generated, following the grid cell faces, taking into account the corresponding area blockage. Then obstacle drag on the passing cloud is modeled by adding flow resistance terms in the momentum equations. Finally the effect of extra vorticity generation and entrainment enhancement behind obstacles is modeled by adding locally into the entrainment formula without obstacles, a characteristic velocity scale defined from the obstacle pressure drop and the local cloud height.The present model predictions have been compared against theoretical results for constant volume and constant flux gravity currents. It was found that deviations of the predicted cloud footprint area change with time from the theoretical were acceptably small, if one models the frictional forces between cloud and ambient air, neglecting the Richardson

  19. Sensitivity of an atmospheric photochemistry model to chlorine perturbations including consideration of uncertainty propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Douglass, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    Models of stratospheric photochemistry are generally tested by comparing their predictions for the composition of the present atmosphere with measurements of species concentrations. These models are then used to make predictions of the atmospheric sensitivity to perturbations. Here the problem of the sensitivity of such a model to chlorine perturbations ranging from the present influx of chlorine-containing compounds to several times that influx is addressed. The effects of uncertainties in input parameters, including reaction rate coefficients, cross sections, solar fluxes, and boundary conditions, are evaluated using a Monte Carlo method in which the values of the input parameters are randomly selected. The results are probability distributions for present atmosheric concentrations and for calculated perturbations due to chlorine from fluorocarbons. For more than 300 Monte Carlo runs the calculated ozone perturbation for continued emission of fluorocarbons at today's rates had a mean value of -6.2 percent, with a 1-sigma width of 5.5 percent. Using the same runs but only allowing the cases in which the calculated present atmosphere values of NO, NO2, and ClO at 25 km altitude fell within the range of measurements yielded a mean ozone depletion of -3 percent, with a 1-sigma deviation of 2.2 percent. The model showed a nonlinear behavior as a function of added fluorocarbons. The mean of the Monte Carlo runs was less nonlinear than the model run using mean value of the input parameters.

  20. Health Promotion Behavior of Chinese International Students in Korea Including Acculturation Factors: A Structural Equation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Jung; Yoo, Il Young

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explain the health promotion behavior of Chinese international students in Korea using a structural equation model including acculturation factors. A survey using self-administered questionnaires was employed. Data were collected from 272 Chinese students who have resided in Korea for longer than 6 months. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. The p value of final model is .31. The fitness parameters of the final model such as goodness of fit index, adjusted goodness of fit index, normed fit index, non-normed fit index, and comparative fit index were more than .95. Root mean square of residual and root mean square error of approximation also met the criteria. Self-esteem, perceived health status, acculturative stress and acculturation level had direct effects on health promotion behavior of the participants and the model explained 30.0% of variance. The Chinese students in Korea with higher self-esteem, perceived health status, acculturation level, and lower acculturative stress reported higher health promotion behavior. The findings can be applied to develop health promotion strategies for this population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. S5-4: Formal Modeling of Affordance in Human-Included Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namhun Kim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In spite of it being necessary for humans to consider modeling, analysis, and control of human-included systems, it has been considered a challenging problem because of the critical role of humans in complex systems and of humans' capability of executing unanticipated actions–both beneficial and detrimental ones. Thus, to provide systematic approaches to modeling human actions as a part of system behaviors, a formal modeling framework for human-involved systems in which humans play a controlling role based on their perceptual information is presented. The theory of affordance provides definitions of human actions and their associated properties; Finite State Automata (FSA based modeling is capable of mapping nondeterministic humans into computable components in the system representation. In this talk, we investigate the role of perception in human actions in the system operation and examine the representation of perceptual elements in affordance-based modeling formalism. The proposed framework is expected to capture the natural ways in which humans participate in the system as part of its operation. A human-machine cooperative manufacturing system control example and a human agent simulation example will be introduced for the illustrative purposes at the end of the presentation.

  2. Net Mineralization Response to Fertilizer Application and Site-Specific Setting in a No-Till Dryland Wheat Agroecosystem in the Pacific Northwest (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Emily A.; Brown, David J.; Carpenter-Boggs, Lynn

    2015-04-01

    Application of nitrogen (N) fertilizers is pivotal to maintaining agricultural productivity. Nutrient management is typically guided by a combined assessment of crop yield requirements, residual soil inorganic N concentration, and predicted N supply from organic matter. However, laboratory assays employed to forecast mineralization potential do not reflect in situ processes occurring in soils, processes that can vary spatially within a field. Furthermore, fertilizer application alters biogeochemical cycles through a variety of mechanisms including priming effects and microbial community alterations. This study investigates in-situ ammonification/nitrification rates utilizing mineralization cores as part of a five-year Site-Specific Climate-Friendly Farming (SCF) project. In-depth accounting of nitrate and ammonium production and flux was possible via a six bag mixed-bed ion exchange resin system. Soil cores (7.5 cm diameter by 15 cm deep) were isolated from the surrounding soil by three resin bags sealed in the top and bottom of individual plastic cylinders. Fifteen locations were selected across a commercial direct-seed wheat field based on statistical clustering of primary and secondary topographic variables. In each location surface soil-resin cores were installed in fertilized and unfertilized plots immediately after spring planting and removed before harvest. In situ ammonification/nitrification rates will be analyzed as a function of both fertilizer application and site-specific environmental characteristics as determined from soil moisture monitoring, soil characterization, and crop analysis at each measurement location. This site-specific information on N transformations and availability can then be used to guide site-specific crop management.

  3. Assessment of Site Specific Mutational Effect on Transcription Initiation at Escherichia coli Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kannan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: It is widely accepted thought that the weak promoters control the RNA synthesis and play regulatory role in complex genetic networks in bacterial system. An experiment had been designed to address whether mutations in the -16/-17 region affect the rate of transcription at an activator-independent promoter in E. coli or not? Approach: The aim of this study was to determine whether mutations in the -16/-17 region affect the rate of expression at an activator-dependent promoter in JM109 strain of E. coli. Primers were constructed to amplify the mutant promoter genes through PCR. The amplified PCR product was checked and then inserted into the MCS region of pAA128 plasmid. Further the plasmid vector was transformed into JM109 strain of E. coli and then cloned the selected transformats. Finally, the plasmid from each mutant colony was then sequenced using the protocol supplied with the Amersham Pharmacia Biotech T7 sequencing Kit. The JM109 cultures for which the sequences were determined, then assayed for ß-galactosidase activity to assess the rate of gene expression from the altered promoters. Results: The present investigation revealed that the extended-10 promoter region has a substantial effect on the rate of transcription at weak promoter sequence and also bearing little resemblance to the consensus sequence recognized by RNA. The expression of the genetically engineered plasmid proved that the 2 bps (-16 and -17 base pair found adjacently upstream of the extended-10 promoter have an effect on the level of transcription. This was achieved by site specific base substitutions into the weak promoter of a modified lac operon lacking any activator or repressor binding sites. The results from gene expression assays of several mutants showed a distinct preference for either GG or TT located adjacently upstream of the extended promoter element. Thus the present study emphasized that

  4. An extended gene protein/products Boolean network model including post-transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benso, Alfredo; Di Carlo, Stefano; Politano, Gianfranco; Savino, Alessandro; Vasciaveo, Alessandro

    2014-05-07

    Networks Biology allows the study of complex interactions between biological systems using formal, well structured, and computationally friendly models. Several different network models can be created, depending on the type of interactions that need to be investigated. Gene Regulatory Networks (GRN) are an effective model commonly used to study the complex regulatory mechanisms of a cell. Unfortunately, given their intrinsic complexity and non discrete nature, the computational study of realistic-sized complex GRNs requires some abstractions. Boolean Networks (BNs), for example, are a reliable model that can be used to represent networks where the possible state of a node is a boolean value (0 or 1). Despite this strong simplification, BNs have been used to study both structural and dynamic properties of real as well as randomly generated GRNs. In this paper we show how it is possible to include the post-transcriptional regulation mechanism (a key process mediated by small non-coding RNA molecules like the miRNAs) into the BN model of a GRN. The enhanced BN model is implemented in a software toolkit (EBNT) that allows to analyze boolean GRNs from both a structural and a dynamic point of view. The open-source toolkit is compatible with available visualization tools like Cytoscape and allows to run detailed analysis of the network topology as well as of its attractors, trajectories, and state-space. In the paper, a small GRN built around the mTOR gene is used to demonstrate the main capabilities of the toolkit. The extended model proposed in this paper opens new opportunities in the study of gene regulation. Several of the successful researches done with the support of BN to understand high-level characteristics of regulatory networks, can now be improved to better understand the role of post-transcriptional regulation for example as a network-wide noise-reduction or stabilization mechanisms.

  5. An extended gene protein/products boolean network model including post-transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Networks Biology allows the study of complex interactions between biological systems using formal, well structured, and computationally friendly models. Several different network models can be created, depending on the type of interactions that need to be investigated. Gene Regulatory Networks (GRN) are an effective model commonly used to study the complex regulatory mechanisms of a cell. Unfortunately, given their intrinsic complexity and non discrete nature, the computational study of realistic-sized complex GRNs requires some abstractions. Boolean Networks (BNs), for example, are a reliable model that can be used to represent networks where the possible state of a node is a boolean value (0 or 1). Despite this strong simplification, BNs have been used to study both structural and dynamic properties of real as well as randomly generated GRNs. Results In this paper we show how it is possible to include the post-transcriptional regulation mechanism (a key process mediated by small non-coding RNA molecules like the miRNAs) into the BN model of a GRN. The enhanced BN model is implemented in a software toolkit (EBNT) that allows to analyze boolean GRNs from both a structural and a dynamic point of view. The open-source toolkit is compatible with available visualization tools like Cytoscape and allows to run detailed analysis of the network topology as well as of its attractors, trajectories, and state-space. In the paper, a small GRN built around the mTOR gene is used to demonstrate the main capabilities of the toolkit. Conclusions The extended model proposed in this paper opens new opportunities in the study of gene regulation. Several of the successful researches done with the support of BN to understand high-level characteristics of regulatory networks, can now be improved to better understand the role of post-transcriptional regulation for example as a network-wide noise-reduction or stabilization mechanisms. PMID:25080304

  6. General hypothesis and shell model for the synthesis of semiconductor nanotubes, including carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, S. Noor

    2010-09-01

    Semiconductor nanotubes, including carbon nanotubes, have vast potential for new technology development. The fundamental physics and growth kinetics of these nanotubes are still obscured. Various models developed to elucidate the growth suffer from limited applicability. An in-depth investigation of the fundamentals of nanotube growth has, therefore, been carried out. For this investigation, various features of nanotube growth, and the role of the foreign element catalytic agent (FECA) in this growth, have been considered. Observed growth anomalies have been analyzed. Based on this analysis, a new shell model and a general hypothesis have been proposed for the growth. The essential element of the shell model is the seed generated from segregation during growth. The seed structure has been defined, and the formation of droplet from this seed has been described. A modified definition of the droplet exhibiting adhesive properties has also been presented. Various characteristics of the droplet, required for alignment and organization of atoms into tubular forms, have been discussed. Employing the shell model, plausible scenarios for the formation of carbon nanotubes, and the variation in the characteristics of these carbon nanotubes have been articulated. The experimental evidences, for example, for the formation of shell around a core, dipole characteristics of the seed, and the existence of nanopores in the seed, have been presented. They appear to justify the validity of the proposed model. The diversities of nanotube characteristics, fundamentals underlying the creation of bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes, and the impurity generation on the surface of carbon nanotubes have been elucidated. The catalytic action of FECA on growth has been quantified. The applicability of the proposed model to the nanotube growth by a variety of mechanisms has been elaborated. These mechanisms include the vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, the oxide-assisted growth mechanism, the self

  7. Embracing the emerging precision agriculture technologies for site-specific management of yield-limiting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melakeberhan, H

    2002-09-01

    Precision agriculture (PA) is providing an information revolution using Global Positioning (GPS) and Geographic Information (GIS) systems and Remote Sensing (RS). These technologies allow better decision making in the management of crop yield-limiting biotic and abiotic factors and their interactions on a site-specific (SSM) basis in a wide range of production systems. Characterizing the nature of the problem(s) and public education are among the challenges that scientists, producers, and industry face when adapting PA technologies. To apply SSM, spatio-temporal characteristics of the problem(s) need to be determined and variations within a field demonstrated. Spatio-temporal characteristics of a given pathogen or pest problem may be known but may not be the only or primary cause of the problem. Hence, exact cause-and-effect relationships need to be established by incorporating GIS, GPS, and RS-generated data as well as possible interactions. Exploiting the potential of PA technologies in sustainable ways depends on whether or not we first ask ''Are we doing the right thing?'' (strategic) as opposed to ''Are we doing it right?'' (tactical).

  8. Site-Specific Zwitterionic Polymer Conjugates of a Protein Have Long Plasma Circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Somnath; Liu, Wenge; Wang, Wei-Han; Weitzhandler, Isaac; Li, Xinghai; Qi, Yizhi; Liu, Jinyao; Pang, Yan; Hunt, Donald F; Chilkoti, Ashutosh

    2015-11-01

    Many proteins suffer from suboptimal pharmacokinetics (PK) that limit their utility as drugs. The efficient synthesis of polymer conjugates of protein drugs with tunable PK to optimize their in vivo efficacy is hence critical. We report here the first study of the in vivo behavior of a site-specific conjugate of a zwitterionic polymer and a protein. To synthesize the conjugate, we first installed an initiator for atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) at the N terminus of myoglobin (Mb-N-Br). Subsequently, in situ ATRP was carried out in aqueous buffer to grow an amine-functionalized polymer from Mb-N-Br. The cationic polymer was further derivatized to two zwitterionic polymers by treating the amine groups of the cationic polymer with iodoacetic acid to obtain poly(carboxybetaine methacrylate) with a one-carbon spacer (PCBMA; C1 ), and sequentially with 3-iodopropionic acid and iodoacetic acid to obtain PCBMA(mix) with a mixture of C1 and C2 spacers. The Mb-N-PCBMA polymer conjugates had a longer in vivo plasma half-life than a PEG-like comb polymer conjugate of similar molecular weights (MW). The structure of the zwitterion plays a role in controlling the in vivo behavior of the conjugate, as the PCBMA conjugate with a C1 spacer had significantly longer plasma circulation than the conjugate with a mixture of C1 and C2 spacers.

  9. Operation of an efficient site-specific recombination system of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in tobacco cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onouchi, H; Yokoi, K; Machida, C; Matsuzaki, H; Oshima, Y; Matsuoka, K; Nakamura, K; Machida, Y

    1991-12-11

    Recombinase encoded by the R gene of pSR1 of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii mediates reciprocal recombination between two specific recombination sites (RSs) to induce excision or inversion of the DNA segment that is flanked by the RSs. We report here that site-specific recombination mediated by this system takes place effeciently in tobacco cells. To monitor the recombination events in tobacco cells, we have constructed two types of cryptic beta-glucuronidase reporter gene in such a way that recombination such as inversion of the construct or excision of the intervening sequence results in their expression. When these cryptic reporter constructs were transiently introduced together with the R gene by electroporation into protoplasts of tobacco cells, beta-glucuronidase activity was detected. The cryptic reporter genes, when stably resident in the chromosome of tobacco cells, were also activated by the R gene. Structural analyses of the genomic DNA isolated from these tobacco cells showed that the R protein did in fact catalyze precise recombination between two copies of RSs in tobacco cells, with resultant activation of the cryptic reporter genes. This observation provides the basis for development of a DNA technology whereby large regions of DNA can be manipulated in plant chromosomes. Potential uses of this recombination system are discussed.

  10. Site-specific function and regulation of Osterix in tooth root formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y. D.; Sui, B. D.; Li, M.; Huang, J.; Chen, S.; Wu, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diseases of tooth roots, in terms of developmental abnormalities of short and thin root phenotypes, can lead to loss of teeth. A more complete understanding of the genetic molecular pathways and biological processes controlling tooth root formation is required. Recent studies have revealed that Osterix (Osx), a key mesenchymal transcriptional factor participating in both the processes of osteogenesis and odontogenesis, plays a vital role underlying the mechanisms of developmental differences between root and crown. During tooth development, Osx expression has been identified from late embryonic to postnatal stages when the tooth root develops, particularly in odontoblasts and cementoblasts to promote their differentiation and mineralization. Furthermore, the site-specific function of Osx in tooth root formation has been confirmed, because odontoblastic Osx-conditional knockout mice demonstrate primarily short and thin root phenotypes with no apparent abnormalities in the crown (Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 30, 2014 and 742, Journal of Dental Research 94, 2015 and 430). These findings suggest that Osx functions to promote odontoblast and cementoblast differentiation and root elongation only in root, but not in crown formation. Mechanistic research shows regulatory networks of Osx expression, which can be controlled through manipulating the epithelial BMP signalling, mesenchymal Runx2 expression and cellular phosphorylation levels, indicating feasible routes of promoting Osx expression postnatally (Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 114, 2013 and 975). In this regard, a promising approach might be available to regenerate the congenitally diseased root and that regenerative therapy would be the best choice for patients with developmental tooth diseases. PMID:26599722

  11. Gated rotation mechanism of site-specific recombination by ϕC31 integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olorunniji, Femi J; Buck, Dorothy E; Colloms, Sean D; McEwan, Andrew R; Smith, Margaret C M; Stark, W Marshall; Rosser, Susan J

    2012-11-27

    Integrases, such as that of the Streptomyces temperate bacteriophage ϕC31, promote site-specific recombination between DNA sequences in the bacteriophage and bacterial genomes to integrate or excise the phage DNA. ϕC31 integrase belongs to the serine recombinase family, a large group of structurally related enzymes with diverse biological functions. It has been proposed that serine integrases use a "subunit rotation" mechanism to exchange DNA strands after double-strand DNA cleavage at the two recombining att sites, and that many rounds of subunit rotation can occur before the strands are religated. We have analyzed the mechanism of ϕC31 integrase-mediated recombination in a topologically constrained experimental system using hybrid "phes" recombination sites, each of which comprises a ϕC31 att site positioned adjacent to a regulatory sequence recognized by Tn3 resolvase. The topologies of reaction products from circular substrates containing two phes sites support a right-handed subunit rotation mechanism for catalysis of both integrative and excisive recombination. Strand exchange usually terminates after a single round of 180° rotation. However, multiple processive "360° rotation" rounds of strand exchange can be observed, if the recombining sites have nonidentical base pairs at their centers. We propose that a regulatory "gating" mechanism normally blocks multiple rounds of strand exchange and triggers product release after a single round.

  12. A protease substrate profiling method that links site-specific proteolysis with antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandersjöö, Lisa; Kostallas, George; Löfblom, John; Samuelson, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    Proteases are involved in many biological processes and have become important tools in biomedical research and industry. Technologies for engineering and characterization of, for example, proteolytic activity and specificity are essential in protease research. Here, we present a novel method for assessment of site-specific proteolysis. The assay utilizes plasmid-encoded reporters that, upon processing by a co-expressed protease, confer antibiotic resistance to bacteria in proportion to the cleavage efficiency. We have demonstrated that cells co-expressing cleavable reporters together with tobacco etch virus protease (TEVp) could be discriminated from cells with non-cleavable reporters by growth in selective media. Importantly, the resistance to antibiotics proved to correlate with the substrate processing efficiency. Thus, by applying competitive growth of a mock library in antibiotic-containing medium, we could show that the substrate preferred by TEVp was enriched relative to less-efficient substrates. We believe that this simple methodology will facilitate protease substrate identification, and hold great promise for directed evolution of proteases and protease recognition sequences towards improved or even new functionality.

  13. Site-specific genetic engineering of the Anopheles gambiae Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Federica; Galizi, Roberto; Menichelli, Miriam; Papathanos, Philippos-Aris; Dritsou, Vicky; Marois, Eric; Crisanti, Andrea; Windbichler, Nikolai

    2014-05-27

    Despite its function in sex determination and its role in driving genome evolution, the Y chromosome remains poorly understood in most species. Y chromosomes are gene-poor, repeat-rich and largely heterochromatic and therefore represent a difficult target for genetic engineering. The Y chromosome of the human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae appears to be involved in sex determination although very little is known about both its structure and function. Here, we characterize a transgenic strain of this mosquito species, obtained by transposon-mediated integration of a transgene construct onto the Y chromosome. Using meganuclease-induced homologous repair we introduce a site-specific recombination signal onto the Y chromosome and show that the resulting docking line can be used for secondary integration. To demonstrate its utility, we study the activity of a germ-line-specific promoter when located on the Y chromosome. We also show that Y-linked fluorescent transgenes allow automated sex separation of this important vector species, providing the means to generate large single-sex populations. Our findings will aid studies of sex chromosome function and enable the development of male-exclusive genetic traits for vector control.

  14. Magnetic norbornene polymer as multiresponsive nanocarrier for site specific cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao N, Vijayakameswara; Ganivada, Mutyala Naidu; Sarkar, Santu; Dinda, Himadri; Chatterjee, Koushik; Dalui, Tanmoy; Das Sarma, Jayasri; Shunmugam, Raja

    2014-02-19

    A site-specific, stimuli-responsive nanocarrier has been synthesized by conjugating folate, magnetic particles and doxorubicin to the backbone of norbornene polymer. Monomers, namely, cis-5-norbornene-6-(diethoxyphosphoryl)hexanote (mono 1), norbornene grafted poly(ethyleneglycol)-folate (mono 2), and norbornene derived doxorubicin (mono 3) are carefully designed to demonstrate the smart nanorcarrier capabilities. The synthesis and complete characterization of all three monomers are elaborately discussed. Their copolymerization is done by controlled/living ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) to get the triblock copolymer PHOS-FOL-DOX. NMR spectroscopy and gel permeation chromatography confirm the formation of the triblock copolymer, while FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, along with transmission electron microscope confirm the anchoring of iron particle (Fe3O4) to the PHOS-FOL-DOX. Drug release profile shows the importance of having the hydrazone linker that helps to release the drug exactly at the mild acidic conditions resembling the pH of the cancerous cells. The newly designed nanocarrier shows greater internalization (about 8 times) due to magnetic field. Also, increased intracellular DOX release is observed due to the folate receptor. From these results, it is clear that PHOS-FOL-DOX has the potential to act as a smart nanoreservoir with the magnetic field guidance, folate receptor targeting, and finally pH stimulation.

  15. Site Specific Effect of Tobacco Addiction in Upper Aerodigestive Tract Tumors: A Retrospective Clinicopathological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An institutional study was carried out in 102 patients to investigate the site specific effect of addictions, that is, tobacco smoking and tobacco chewing (smokeless, both independently and synergistically in development of malignancies in upper aerodigestive tract through retrograde questionnaire. The histopathologically proven cases were interviewed regarding different forms of addictions followed by clinical examination and investigations for grading (according to Modified Broadmann’s method and TNM staging (according to UICC according to the tumor site. Statistical analysis was done by Pearson test. Out of all proven cases of cancers, 29.4% were only tobacco chewers (smokeless, 25.5% were only smokers, 42.2% were having both types of tobacco addictions (smoke and smokeless, and only 2.9% were having no addiction. Out of only tobacco chewers (smokeless, 83.3% were of oral cavity cancers, 6.7% were of oro- and hypopharynx and the rest were of others. Among only smokers, 69.2% cases were of laryngeal and oro- and hypopharynx as compared to 11.5% of oral cavity cancers (nearly 6 times. Tobacco (smokeless chewing is associated with oral cancers whereas tobacco smoking is associated with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma. Both smoking and smokeless tobacco act in synergy with each other.

  16. Site specific seismic hazard analysis and determination of response spectra of Kolkata for maximum considered earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiuly, Amit; Sahu, R. B.; Mandal, Saroj

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents site specific seismic hazard analysis of Kolkata city, former capital of India and present capital of state West Bengal, situated on the world’s largest delta island, Bengal basin. For this purpose, peak ground acceleration (PGA) for a maximum considered earthquake (MCE) at bedrock level has been estimated using an artificial neural network (ANN) based attenuation relationship developed on the basis of synthetic ground motion data for the region. Using the PGA corresponding to the MCE, a spectrum compatible acceleration time history at bedrock level has been generated by using a wavelet based computer program, WAVEGEN. This spectrum compatible time history at bedrock level has been converted to the same at surface level using SHAKE2000 for 144 borehole locations in the study region. Using the predicted values of PGA and PGV at the surface, corresponding contours for the region have been drawn. For the MCE, the PGA at bedrock level of Kolkata city has been obtained as 0.184 g, while that at the surface level varies from 0.22 g to 0.37 g. Finally, Kolkata has been subdivided into eight seismic subzones, and for each subzone a response spectrum equation has been derived using polynomial regression analysis. This will be very helpful for structural and geotechnical engineers to design safe and economical earthquake resistant structures.

  17. Site-specific reverse splicing of a HEG-containing group I intron in ribosomal RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgisdottir, Åsa B.; Johansen, Steinar

    2005-01-01

    The wide, but scattered distribution of group I introns in nature is a result of two processes; the vertical inheritance of introns with or without losses, and the occasional transfer of introns across species barriers. Reversal of the group I intron self-splicing reaction, termed reverse splicing, coupled with reverse transcription and genomic integration potentially mediate an RNA-based intron mobility pathway. Compared to the well characterized endonuclease-mediated intron homing, reverse splicing is less specific and represents a likely explanation for many intron transpositions into new genomic sites. However, the frequency and general role of an RNA-based mobility pathway in the spread of natural group I introns is still unclear. We have used the twin-ribozyme intron (Dir.S956-1) from the myxomycete Didymium iridis to test how a mobile group I intron containing a homing endonuclease gene (HEG) selects between potential insertion sites in the small subunit (SSU) rRNA in vitro, in Escherichia coli and in yeast. Surprisingly, the results show a site-specific RNA-based targeting of Dir.S956-1 into its natural (S956) SSU rRNA site. Our results suggest that reverse splicing, in addition to the established endonuclease-mediated homing mechanism, potentially accounts for group I intron spread into the homologous sites of different strains and species. PMID:15817568

  18. Site-Specific Ser/Thr/Tyr Phosphoproteome of Sinorhizobium meliloti at Stationary Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Tian, Chang Fu; Chen, Wen Xin

    2015-01-01

    Sinorhizobium meliloti, a facultative microsymbiont of alfalfa, should fine-tune its cellular processes to live saprophytically in soils characterized with limited nutrients and diverse stresses. In this study, TiO2 enrichment and LC-MS/MS were used to uncover the site-specific Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphoproteome of S. meliloti in minimum medium at stationary phase. There are a total of 96 unique phosphorylated sites, with a Ser/Thr/Tyr distribution of 63:28:5, in 77 proteins. Phosphoproteins identified in S. meliloti showed a wide distribution pattern regarding to functional categories, such as replication, transcription, translation, posttranslational modification, transport and metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrate, inorganic ion, succinoglycan etc. Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphosites identified within the conserved motif in proteins of key cellular function indicate a crucial role of phosphorylation in modulating cellular physiology. Moreover, phosphorylation in proteins involved in processes related to rhizobial adaptation was also discussed, such as those identified in SMa0114 and PhaP2 (polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis), ActR (pH stress and microaerobic adaption), SupA (potassium stress), chaperonin GroEL2 (viability and potentially symbiosis), and ExoP (succinoglycan synthesis and secretion). These Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphosites identified herein would be helpful for our further investigation and understanding of the role of phosphorylation in rhizobial physiology.

  19. Site-Specific Ser/Thr/Tyr Phosphoproteome of Sinorhizobium meliloti at Stationary Phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    Full Text Available Sinorhizobium meliloti, a facultative microsymbiont of alfalfa, should fine-tune its cellular processes to live saprophytically in soils characterized with limited nutrients and diverse stresses. In this study, TiO2 enrichment and LC-MS/MS were used to uncover the site-specific Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphoproteome of S. meliloti in minimum medium at stationary phase. There are a total of 96 unique phosphorylated sites, with a Ser/Thr/Tyr distribution of 63:28:5, in 77 proteins. Phosphoproteins identified in S. meliloti showed a wide distribution pattern regarding to functional categories, such as replication, transcription, translation, posttranslational modification, transport and metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrate, inorganic ion, succinoglycan etc. Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphosites identified within the conserved motif in proteins of key cellular function indicate a crucial role of phosphorylation in modulating cellular physiology. Moreover, phosphorylation in proteins involved in processes related to rhizobial adaptation was also discussed, such as those identified in SMa0114 and PhaP2 (polyhydroxybutyrate synthesis, ActR (pH stress and microaerobic adaption, SupA (potassium stress, chaperonin GroEL2 (viability and potentially symbiosis, and ExoP (succinoglycan synthesis and secretion. These Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphosites identified herein would be helpful for our further investigation and understanding of the role of phosphorylation in rhizobial physiology.

  20. Custom-Designed Molecular Scissors for Site-Specific Manipulation of the Plant and Mammalian Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandavelou, Karthikeyan; Chandrasegaran, Srinivasan

    Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are custom-designed molecular scissors, engineered to cut at specific DNA sequences. ZFNs combine the zinc finger proteins (ZFPs) with the nonspecific cleavage domain of the FokI restriction enzyme. The DNA-binding specificity of ZFNs can be easily altered experimentally. This easy manipulation of the ZFN recognition specificity enables one to deliver a targeted double-strand break (DSB) to a genome. The targeted DSB stimulates local gene targeting by several orders of magnitude at that specific cut site via homologous recombination (HR). Thus, ZFNs have become an important experimental tool to make site-specific and permanent alterations to genomes of not only plants and mammals but also of many other organisms. Engineering of custom ZFNs involves many steps. The first step is to identify a ZFN site at or near the chosen chromosomal target within the genome to which ZFNs will bind and cut. The second step is to design and/or select various ZFP combinations that will bind to the chosen target site with high specificity and affinity. The DNA coding sequence for the designed ZFPs are then assembled by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using oligonucleotides. The third step is to fuse the ZFP constructs to the FokI cleavage domain. The ZFNs are then expressed as proteins by using the rabbit reticulocyte in vitro transcription/translation system and the protein products assayed for their DNA cleavage specificity.

  1. Site specificity of psoralen-DNA interstrand cross-linking determined by nuclease Bal31 digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhen, W P; Buchardt, O; Nielsen, Henrik

    1986-01-01

    A novel method for determination of psoralen photo-cross-linking sites in double-stranded DNA is described, which is based on a pronounced inhibition of Bal31 exonuclease activity by psoralen-DNA interstrand cross-links. The results using a 51 base pair fragment of plasmid pUC19 and a 346 base pair...... fragment of pBR322 show that 5'-TA sequences are preferred cross-linking sites compared to 3'-TA sequences. They also indicate that sequences flanking the 5'-TA site influence the cross-linking efficiency at the site. The DNA photo-cross-linking by 4,5',8-trimethylpsoralen and 8-methoxypsoralen...... was analyzed, and these two psoralens showed identical site specificity. The 5'-TA preference is rationalized on the basis of the local DNA structure in terms of the pi-pi electronic interaction between the thymines and the intercalated psoralens, as well as on the base tilt angles of the DNA....

  2. Design of a soil cutting resistance sensor for application in site-specific tillage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüera, Juan; Carballido, Jacob; Gil, Jesús; Gliever, Chris J; Perez-Ruiz, Manuel

    2013-05-10

    One objective of precision agriculture is to provide accurate information about soil and crop properties to optimize the management of agricultural inputs to meet site-specific needs. This paper describes the development of a sensor equipped with RTK-GPS technology that continuously and efficiently measures soil cutting resistance at various depths while traversing the field. Laboratory and preliminary field tests verified the accuracy of this prototype soil strength sensor. The data obtained using a hand-operated soil cone penetrometer was used to evaluate this field soil compaction depth profile sensor. To date, this sensor has only been tested in one field under one gravimetric water content condition. This field test revealed that the relationships between the soil strength profile sensor (SSPS) cutting force and soil cone index values are assumed to be quadratic for the various depths considered: 0-10, 10-20 and 20-30 cm (r2 = 0.58, 0.45 and 0.54, respectively). Soil resistance contour maps illustrated its practical value. The developed sensor provides accurate, timely and affordable information on soil properties to optimize resources and improve agricultural economy.

  3. Design of a Soil Cutting Resistance Sensor for Application in Site-Specific Tillage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Perez-Ruiz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available One objective of precision agriculture is to provide accurate information about soil and crop properties to optimize the management of agricultural inputs to meet site-specific needs. This paper describes the development of a sensor equipped with RTK-GPS technology that continuously and efficiently measures soil cutting resistance at various depths while traversing the field. Laboratory and preliminary field tests verified the accuracy of this prototype soil strength sensor. The data obtained using a hand-operated soil cone penetrometer was used to evaluate this field soil compaction depth profile sensor. To date, this sensor has only been tested in one field under one gravimetric water content condition. This field test revealed that the relationships between the soil strength profile sensor (SSPS cutting force and soil cone index values are assumed to be quadratic for the various depths considered: 0–10, 10–20 and 20–30 cm (r2 = 0.58, 0.45 and 0.54, respectively. Soil resistance contour maps illustrated its practical value. The developed sensor provides accurate, timely and affordable information on soil properties to optimize resources and improve agricultural economy.

  4. Site-specific conjugation of bifunctional chelator BAT to mouse IgG1 Fab' fragment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun LI; Xue-hao WANG; Xiao-ming WANG; Zhao-lai CHEN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To perform a site-specific conjugation of Fab' fragments of a mouse monoclonal antibody(MoAb) B43(of IgG1 subtype) to a bifunctional chelator 6-[p-(bromoacetamido) benzyl]-l,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid (BAT) via the thiol groups in the hinge distal to the antigenbinding site of the Fab'. Methods: B43 was cleaved using a simple 2-step method.First, stable F(ab')2 was produced by pepsin treatment. Fab' with free thiol in the hinge region was then obtained by cysteine reduction of F(ab')2. Second, a sitespecific conjugation of Fab' to thiol-specific BAT was performed in a one-step reaction. Results: The Fab' fragment had approximately 1.8 free thiol groups per molecule after cysteine reduction. The conjugation efficiency and the chemical yield were approximately 1.28 moles chelator/Fab' and 74% of the initial concentration of Fab', respectively. The F(ab')2, Fab' and Fab'-BAT all maintained reasonable antigen-binding properties. 67Cu labeling of the conjugate under standard conditions did not impair the immunoreactivity of Fab'-BAT. Conclusion: This is a simple and efficient method for producing immunoreactive conjugates of Fab'-BAT, which can be used to make radiometal-labeled conjugates for further diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  5. Applications of the site-specific recombinase Cre to the study of genomic imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh-McGinnis, Rosemary; Jones, Meaghan J; Lefebvre, Louis

    2010-07-01

    The development of gene targeting approaches has had a tremendous impact on the functional analysis of the mouse genome. A specific application of this technique has been the adaptation of the bacteriophage P1 Cre/loxP site-specific recombinase system which allows for the precise recombination between two loxP sites, resulting in deletion or inversion of the intervening sequences. Because of the efficiency of this system, it can be applied to conditional deletions of relatively short coding sequences or regulatory elements but also to more extensive chromosomal rearrangement strategies. Both mechanistic and functional studies of genomic imprinting have benefited from the development of the Cre/loxP technology. Since imprinted genes within large chromosomal regions are regulated by the action of cis-acting sequences known as imprinting centers, chromosomal engineering approaches are particularly well suited to the elucidation of long-range mechanisms controlling the imprinting of autosomal genes. Here we review the applications of the Cre/loxP technology to the study of genomic imprinting, highlight important insights gained from these studies and discuss future directions in the field.

  6. Novel method for the high-throughput production of phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Wakata, Yuka; Inobe, Tomonao; Kitamura, Haruki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuzawa, Shun; Kishi, Yoshihiro; Isobe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Threonine phosphorylation accounts for 10% of all phosphorylation sites compared with 0.05% for tyrosine and 90% for serine. Although monoclonal antibody generation for phospho-serine and -tyrosine proteins is progressing, there has been limited success regarding the production of monoclonal antibodies against phospho-threonine proteins. We developed a novel strategy for generating phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies by cloning immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells that were fixed, intracellularly stained with fluorescently labeled peptides and sorted without causing RNA degradation. Our high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting-based strategy, which targets abundant intracellular immunoglobulin as a tag for fluorescently labeled antigens, greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of antigen-specific plasma cell isolation, enabling the high-efficiency production of monoclonal antibodies with desired antigen specificity. This approach yielded yet-undescribed guinea pig monoclonal antibodies against threonine 18-phosphorylated p53 and threonine 68-phosphorylated CHK2 with high affinity and specificity. Our method has the potential to allow the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a variety of phosphorylated proteins. PMID:27125496

  7. Reprogrammable CRISPR/Cas9-based system for inducing site-specific DNA methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James I. McDonald

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Advances in sequencing technology allow researchers to map genome-wide changes in DNA methylation in development and disease. However, there is a lack of experimental tools to site-specifically manipulate DNA methylation to discern the functional consequences. We developed a CRISPR/Cas9 DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A fusion to induce DNA methylation at specific loci in the genome. We induced DNA methylation at up to 50% of alleles for targeted CpG dinucleotides. DNA methylation levels peaked within 50 bp of the short guide RNA (sgRNA binding site and between pairs of sgRNAs. We used our approach to target methylation across the entire CpG island at the CDKN2A promoter, three CpG dinucleotides at the ARF promoter, and the CpG island within the Cdkn1a promoter to decrease expression of the target gene. These tools permit mechanistic studies of DNA methylation and its role in guiding molecular processes that determine cellular fate.

  8. Site-Specific Variability in the Chemical Diversity of the Antarctic Red Alga Plocamium cartilagineum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Young

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plocamium cartilagineum is a common red alga on the benthos of Antarctica and can be a dominant understory species along the western Antarctic Peninsula. Algae from this region have been studied chemically, and like “P. cartilagineum” from other worldwide locations where it is common, it is rich in halogenated monoterpenes, some of which have been implicated as feeding deterrents toward sympatric algal predators. Secondary metabolites are highly variable in this alga, both qualitatively and quantitatively, leading us to probe individual plants to track the possible link of variability to genetic or other factors. Using cox1 and rbcL gene sequencing, we find that the Antarctic alga divides into two closely related phylogroups, but not species, each of which is further divided into one of five chemogroups. The chemogroups themselves, defined on the basis of Bray-Curtis similarity profiling of GC/QqQ chromatographic analyses, are largely site specific within a 10 km2 area. Thus, on the limited geographical range of this analysis, P. cartilagineum displays only modest genetic radiation, but its secondary metabolome was found to have experienced more extensive radiation. Such metabogenomic divergence demonstrated on the larger geographical scale of the Antarctic Peninsula, or perhaps even continent-wide, may contribute to the discovery of cryptic speciation.

  9. Site-specific variability in the chemical diversity of the Antarctic red alga Plocamium cartilagineum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ryan M; von Salm, Jacqueline L; Amsler, Margaret O; Lopez-Bautista, Juan; Amsler, Charles D; McClintock, James B; Baker, Bill J

    2013-06-14

    Plocamium cartilagineum is a common red alga on the benthos of Antarctica and can be a dominant understory species along the western Antarctic Peninsula. Algae from this region have been studied chemically, and like "P. cartilagineum" from other worldwide locations where it is common, it is rich in halogenated monoterpenes, some of which have been implicated as feeding deterrents toward sympatric algal predators. Secondary metabolites are highly variable in this alga, both qualitatively and quantitatively, leading us to probe individual plants to track the possible link of variability to genetic or other factors. Using cox1 and rbcL gene sequencing, we find that the Antarctic alga divides into two closely related phylogroups, but not species, each of which is further divided into one of five chemogroups. The chemogroups themselves, defined on the basis of Bray-Curtis similarity profiling of GC/QqQ chromatographic analyses, are largely site specific within a 10 km² area. Thus, on the limited geographical range of this analysis, P. cartilagineum displays only modest genetic radiation, but its secondary metabolome was found to have experienced more extensive radiation. Such metabogenomic divergence demonstrated on the larger geographical scale of the Antarctic Peninsula, or perhaps even continent-wide, may contribute to the discovery of cryptic speciation.

  10. Different thermostabilities of FLP and Cre recombinases: implications for applied site-specific recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchholz, F; Ringrose, L; Angrand, P O; Rossi, F; Stewart, A F

    1996-11-01

    Genomic manipulations using site-specific recombinases rely on their applied characteristics in living systems. To understand their applied properties so that they can be optimally deployed, we compared the recombinases FLP and Cre in two assays. In both Escherichia coli and in vitro, FLP shows a different temperature optimum than Cre. FLP is more thermolabile, having an optimum near 30 degrees C and little detectable activity above 39 degrees C. Cre is optimally efficient at 37 degrees C and above. Consistent with FLP thermolability, recombination in a mammalian cell line mediated by a ligand- regulated FLP-androgen receptor fusion protein is more efficient at 35 degrees C than at higher temperatures. We also document a mutation in a commercially available FLP plasmid (FLP-F70L) which renders this recombinase even more thermolabile. The different temperature optima of FLP, FLP-F70L and Cre influence their strategies of usage. Our results recommend the use of Cre for applications in mice that require efficient recombination. The thermolabilities of FLP and FLP-F70L can be usefully exploited for gain of function and cell culture applications.

  11. Site-specific proteolytic degradation of IgG monoclonal antibodies expressed in tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehle, Verena K; Lombardi, Raffaele; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Paul, Mathew J; Di Micco, Patrizio; Morea, Veronica; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello; Ma, Julian K-C

    2015-02-01

    Plants are promising hosts for the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). However, proteolytic degradation of antibodies produced both in stable transgenic plants and using transient expression systems is still a major issue for efficient high-yield recombinant protein accumulation. In this work, we have performed a detailed study of the degradation profiles of two human IgG1 mAbs produced in plants: an anti-HIV mAb 2G12 and a tumour-targeting mAb H10. Even though they use different light chains (κ and λ, respectively), the fragmentation pattern of both antibodies was similar. The majority of Ig fragments result from proteolytic degradation, but there are only a limited number of plant proteolytic cleavage events in the immunoglobulin light and heavy chains. All of the cleavage sites identified were in the proximity of interdomain regions and occurred at each interdomain site, with the exception of the VL /CL interface in mAb H10 λ light chain. Cleavage site sequences were analysed, and residue patterns characteristic of proteolytic enzymes substrates were identified. The results of this work help to define common degradation events in plant-produced mAbs and raise the possibility of predicting antibody degradation patterns 'a priori' and designing novel stabilization strategies by site-specific mutagenesis.

  12. Site-specific identification of heparan and chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycans in hybrid proteoglycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noborn, Fredrik; Gomez Toledo, Alejandro; Green, Anders; Nasir, Waqas; Sihlbom, Carina; Nilsson, Jonas; Larson, Göran

    2016-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) are complex polysaccharides that regulate important biological pathways in virtually all metazoan organisms. The polysaccharides often display opposite effects on cell functions with HS and CS structural motifs presenting unique binding sites for specific ligands. Still, the mechanisms by which glycan biosynthesis generates complex HS and CS polysaccharides required for the regulation of mammalian physiology remain elusive. Here we present a glycoproteomic approach that identifies and differentiates between HS and CS attachment sites and provides identity to the core proteins. Glycopeptides were prepared from perlecan, a complex proteoglycan known to be substituted with both HS and CS chains, further digested with heparinase or chondroitinase ABC to reduce the HS and CS chain lengths respectively, and thereafter analyzed by nLC-MS/MS. This protocol enabled the identification of three consensus HS sites and one hybrid site, carrying either a HS or a CS chain. Inspection of the amino acid sequence at the hybrid attachment locus indicates that certain peptide motifs may encode for the chain type selection process. This analytical approach will become useful when addressing fundamental questions in basic biology specifically in elucidating the functional roles of site-specific glycosylations of proteoglycans. PMID:27694851

  13. Assembled modules technology for site-specific prolonged delivery of norfloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Paulo Renato; Bernardi, Larissa Sakis; Strusi, Orazio Luca; Mercuri, Salvatore; Segatto Silva, Marcos A; Colombo, Paolo; Sonvico, Fabio

    2011-02-28

    The aim of this research was to design and study norfloxacin (NFX) release in floating conditions from compressed hydrophilic matrices of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC) or poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). Module assembling technology for drug delivery system manufacturing was used. Two differently cylindrical base curved matrix/modules, identified as female and male, were assembled in void configuration by friction interlocking their concave bases obtaining a floating release system. Drug release and floatation behavior of this assembly was investigated. Due to the higher surface area exposed to the release medium, faster release was observed for individual modules compared to their assembled configuration, independently on the polymer used and concentration. The release curves analyzed using the Korsmeyer exponential equation and Peppas & Sahlin binomial equation showed that the drug release was controlled both by drug diffusion and polymer relaxation or erosion mechanisms. However, convective transport was predominant with PEO and at low content of polymers. NFX release from PEO polymeric matrix was more erosion dependent than HPMC. The assembled systems were able to float in vitro for up to 240min, indicating that this drug delivery system of norfloxacin could provide gastro-retentive site-specific release for increasing norfloxacin bioavailability. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Hanford Integrated Planning Process: 1993 Hanford Site-specific science and technology plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-01

    This document is the FY 1993 report on Hanford Site-specific science and technology (S&T) needs for cleanup of the Site as developed via the Hanford Integrated Planning Process (HIPP). It identifies cleanup problems that lack demonstrated technology solutions and technologies that require additional development. Recommendations are provided regarding allocation of funding to address Hanford`s highest-priority technology improvement needs, technology development needs, and scientific research needs, all compiled from a Sitewide perspective. In the past, the S&T agenda for Hanford Site cleanup was sometimes driven by scientists and technologists, with minimal input from the ``problem owners`` (i.e., Westinghouse Hanford Company [WHC] staff who are responsible for cleanup activities). At other times, the problem-owners made decisions to proceed with cleanup without adequate scientific and technological inputs. Under both of these scenarios, there was no significant stakeholder involvement in the decision-making process. One of the key objectives of HIPP is to develop an understanding of the integrated S&T requirements to support the cleanup mission, (a) as defined by the needs of the problem owners, the values of the stakeholders, and the technology development expertise that exists at Hanford and elsewhere. This requires a periodic, systematic assessment of these needs and values to appropriately define a comprehensive technology development program and a complementary scientific research program. Basic to our success is a methodology that is defensible from a technical perspective and acceptable to the stakeholders.

  15. Regulation of Transient Site-specific Copy Gain by MicroRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joshua C; Zhang, Hailei; Kim, Jaegil; Getz, Gad; Whetstine, Johnathan R

    2016-03-04

    Intra-tumor copy number heterogeneity is commonly observed in cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to heterogeneity remain poorly understood. Up-regulation of the histone demethylase KDM4A promotes transient site-specific copy gain (TSSG) in cells; therefore, uncovering how KDM4A levels are controlled is important for understanding the regulation of copy number heterogeneity. Here, we demonstrate that KDM4A is regulated by hsa-mir-23a-3p, hsa-mir-23b-3p, and hsa-mir-137. Altering expression of these microRNAs (miRNAs) regulates KDM4A-dependent TSSG. miRNA inhibition promoted copy gains and increased expression of the drug-resistant oncogene CKS1B, which was further substantiated in primary breast tumors. Consistent with increased CKS1B expression, miRNA inhibition reduced breast cancer cell sensitivity to cisplatin. Our data identify these miRNAs as regulators of TSSG and copy gains of a drug resistance gene.

  16. Regulation of Transient Site-specific Copy Gain by MicroRNA*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joshua C.; Zhang, Hailei; Kim, Jaegil; Getz, Gad; Whetstine, Johnathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Intra-tumor copy number heterogeneity is commonly observed in cancer; however, the molecular mechanisms that contribute to heterogeneity remain poorly understood. Up-regulation of the histone demethylase KDM4A promotes transient site-specific copy gain (TSSG) in cells; therefore, uncovering how KDM4A levels are controlled is important for understanding the regulation of copy number heterogeneity. Here, we demonstrate that KDM4A is regulated by hsa-mir-23a-3p, hsa-mir-23b-3p, and hsa-mir-137. Altering expression of these microRNAs (miRNAs) regulates KDM4A-dependent TSSG. miRNA inhibition promoted copy gains and increased expression of the drug-resistant oncogene CKS1B, which was further substantiated in primary breast tumors. Consistent with increased CKS1B expression, miRNA inhibition reduced breast cancer cell sensitivity to cisplatin. Our data identify these miRNAs as regulators of TSSG and copy gains of a drug resistance gene. PMID:26755726

  17. TALE homeodomain proteins regulate site-specific terminal differentiation, LCE genes and epidermal barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Ben; Brown, Stuart J; Avilion, Ariel A; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Sully, Katherine; Akinduro, Olufolake; Murphy, Mark; Cleary, Michael L; Byrne, Carolyn

    2011-05-15

    The epidermal barrier varies over the body surface to accommodate regional environmental stresses. Regional skin barrier variation is produced by site-dependent epidermal differentiation from common keratinocyte precursors and often manifests as site-specific skin disease or irritation. There is strong evidence for body-site-dependent dermal programming of epidermal differentiation in which the epidermis responds by altering expression of key barrier proteins, but the underlying mechanisms have not been defined. The LCE multigene cluster encodes barrier proteins that are differentially expressed over the body surface, and perturbation of LCE cluster expression is linked to the common regional skin disease psoriasis. LCE subclusters comprise genes expressed variably in either external barrier-forming epithelia (e.g. skin) or in internal epithelia with less stringent barriers (e.g. tongue). We demonstrate here that a complex of TALE homeobox transcription factors PBX1, PBX2 and Pknox (homologues of Drosophila Extradenticle and Homothorax) preferentially regulate external rather than internal LCE gene expression, competitively binding with SP1 and SP3. Perturbation of TALE protein expression in stratified squamous epithelia in mice produces external but not internal barrier abnormalities. We conclude that epidermal barrier genes, such as the LCE multigene cluster, are regulated by TALE homeodomain transcription factors to produce regional epidermal barriers.

  18. Analysis of electronic models for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glitzky, Annegret

    2010-07-01

    We introduce an electronic model for solar cells including energy resolved defect densities. The resulting drift-diffusion model corresponds to a generalized van Roosbroeck system with additional source terms coupled with ODEs containing space and energy as parameters for all defect densities. The system has to be considered in heterostructures and with mixed boundary conditions from device simulation. We give a weak formulation of the problem. If the boundary data and the sources are compatible with thermodynamic equilibrium the free energy along solutions decays monotonously. In other cases it may be increasing, but we estimate its growth. We establish boundedness and uniqueness results and prove the existence of a weak solution. This is done by considering a regularized problem, showing its solvability and the boundedness of its solutions independent of the regularization level. (orig.)

  19. Nonlinear Acoustics FDTD method including Frequency Power Law Attenuation for Soft Tissue Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, Noé; Sánchez-Morcillo, Víctor; Camarena, Francisco; Hou, Yi; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a model for nonlinear acoustic wave propagation through absorbing and weakly dispersive media, and its numerical solution by means of finite differences in time domain method (FDTD). The attenuation is based on multiple relaxation processes, and provides frequency dependent absorption and dispersion without using computational expensive convolutional operators. In this way, by using an optimization algorithm the coefficients for the relaxation processes can be obtained in order to fit a frequency power law that agrees the experimentally measured attenuation data for heterogeneous media over the typical frequency range for ultrasound medical applications. Our results show that two relaxation processes are enough to fit attenuation data for most soft tissues in this frequency range including the fundamental and the first ten harmonics. Furthermore, this model can fit experimental attenuation data that do not follow exactly a frequency power law over the frequency range of interest. The main...

  20. Particle-based modeling of heterogeneous chemical kinetics including mass transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengar, A.; Kuipers, J. A. M.; van Santen, Rutger A.; Padding, J. T.

    2017-08-01

    Connecting the macroscopic world of continuous fields to the microscopic world of discrete molecular events is important for understanding several phenomena occurring at physical boundaries of systems. An important example is heterogeneous catalysis, where reactions take place at active surfaces, but the effective reaction rates are determined by transport limitations in the bulk fluid and reaction limitations on the catalyst surface. In this work we study the macro-micro connection in a model heterogeneous catalytic reactor by means of stochastic rotation dynamics. The model is able to resolve the convective and diffusive interplay between participating species, while including adsorption, desorption, and reaction processes on the catalytic surface. Here we apply the simulation methodology to a simple straight microchannel with a catalytic strip. Dimensionless Damkohler numbers are used to comment on the spatial concentration profiles of reactants and products near the catalyst strip and in the bulk. We end the discussion with an outlook on more complicated geometries and increasingly complex reactions.

  1. Site-specific assessments of the abundance of three inshore dolphin species to inform conservation and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mark Brown

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the abundance of wildlife populations is essential to their effective conservation and management. Concerns have been raised over the vulnerability of tropical inshore dolphins in waters off northern Australia to anthropogenic impacts on local populations, yet a lack of abundance data precludes assessment of their conservation status and the management of threats. Using small vessels as cost-effective research platforms, photo-identification surveys and capture-recapture models were applied to provide the first quantitative abundance data for Australian snubfin (Orcaella heinsohni, Australian humpback (Sousa sahulensis, and Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus at five sites in the Kimberley region of north-western Australia. The abundance of each species was highly variable between different sites, likely reflecting species-specific habitat preferences. Within the c. 130 km2 study sites, the estimated abundance of most species was ≤ 60 individuals (excluding calves, and fewer than 20 humpback dolphins were identified at each site in any one 3-5 week sampling period. However, larger estimates of c. 130 snubfin and c. 160 bottlenose dolphins were obtained at two different sites. Several local populations showed evidence of site fidelity, particularly snubfin dolphins. By implementing a standardized, multi-site approach, data on local populations were provided within a broader, regional context, and indicated that each species is patchily distributed in the region. This highlights the need for site-specific baseline data collection using appropriate survey techniques to quantitatively assess the potential impacts of threatening activities to local populations. These findings further illustrate the need to gain a greater understanding of known and potential threats to inshore dolphin populations, their relative impacts, and to mitigate where necessary. In particular, the level of interactions with inshore gillnet fisheries

  2. Models of epidemics: when contact repetition and clustering should be included

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scholz Roland W

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spread of infectious disease is determined by biological factors, e.g. the duration of the infectious period, and social factors, e.g. the arrangement of potentially contagious contacts. Repetitiveness and clustering of contacts are known to be relevant factors influencing the transmission of droplet or contact transmitted diseases. However, we do not yet completely know under what conditions repetitiveness and clustering should be included for realistically modelling disease spread. Methods We compare two different types of individual-based models: One assumes random mixing without repetition of contacts, whereas the other assumes that the same contacts repeat day-by-day. The latter exists in two variants, with and without clustering. We systematically test and compare how the total size of an outbreak differs between these model types depending on the key parameters transmission probability, number of contacts per day, duration of the infectious period, different levels of clustering and varying proportions of repetitive contacts. Results The simulation runs under different parameter constellations provide the following results: The difference between both model types is highest for low numbers of contacts per day and low transmission probabilities. The number of contacts and the transmission probability have a higher influence on this difference than the duration of the infectious period. Even when only minor parts of the daily contacts are repetitive and clustered can there be relevant differences compared to a purely random mixing model. Conclusion We show that random mixing models provide acceptable estimates of the total outbreak size if the number of contacts per day is high or if the per-contact transmission probability is high, as seen in typical childhood diseases such as measles. In the case of very short infectious periods, for instance, as in Norovirus, models assuming repeating contacts will also behave

  3. Standardized Competencies for Parenteral Nutrition Order Review and Parenteral Nutrition Preparation, Including Compounding: The ASPEN Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullata, Joseph I; Holcombe, Beverly; Sacks, Gordon; Gervasio, Jane; Adams, Stephen C; Christensen, Michael; Durfee, Sharon; Ayers, Phil; Marshall, Neil; Guenter, Peggi

    2016-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a high-alert medication with a complex drug use process. Key steps in the process include the review of each PN prescription followed by the preparation of the formulation. The preparation step includes compounding the PN or activating a standardized commercially available PN product. The verification and review, as well as preparation of this complex therapy, require competency that may be determined by using a standardized process for pharmacists and for pharmacy technicians involved with PN. An American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) standardized model for PN order review and PN preparation competencies is proposed based on a competency framework, the ASPEN-published interdisciplinary core competencies, safe practice recommendations, and clinical guidelines, and is intended for institutions and agencies to use with their staff.

  4. A generalized model for optimal transport of images including dissipation and density modulation

    KAUST Repository

    Maas, Jan

    2015-11-01

    © EDP Sciences, SMAI 2015. In this paper the optimal transport and the metamorphosis perspectives are combined. For a pair of given input images geodesic paths in the space of images are defined as minimizers of a resulting path energy. To this end, the underlying Riemannian metric measures the rate of transport cost and the rate of viscous dissipation. Furthermore, the model is capable to deal with strongly varying image contrast and explicitly allows for sources and sinks in the transport equations which are incorporated in the metric related to the metamorphosis approach by Trouvé and Younes. In the non-viscous case with source term existence of geodesic paths is proven in the space of measures. The proposed model is explored on the range from merely optimal transport to strongly dissipative dynamics. For this model a robust and effective variational time discretization of geodesic paths is proposed. This requires to minimize a discrete path energy consisting of a sum of consecutive image matching functionals. These functionals are defined on corresponding pairs of intensity functions and on associated pairwise matching deformations. Existence of time discrete geodesics is demonstrated. Furthermore, a finite element implementation is proposed and applied to instructive test cases and to real images. In the non-viscous case this is compared to the algorithm proposed by Benamou and Brenier including a discretization of the source term. Finally, the model is generalized to define discrete weighted barycentres with applications to textures and objects.

  5. Fluid-structure interaction including volumetric coupling with homogenised subdomains for modeling respiratory mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Lena; Roth, Christian J; Wall, Wolfgang A

    2017-04-01

    In this article, a novel approach is presented for combining standard fluid-structure interaction with additional volumetric constraints to model fluid flow into and from homogenised solid domains. The proposed algorithm is particularly interesting for investigations in the field of respiratory mechanics as it enables the mutual coupling of airflow in the conducting part and local tissue deformation in the respiratory part of the lung by means of a volume constraint. In combination with a classical monolithic fluid-structure interaction approach, a comprehensive model of the human lung can be established that will be useful to gain new insights into respiratory mechanics in health and disease. To illustrate the validity and versatility of the novel approach, three numerical examples including a patient-specific lung model are presented. The proposed algorithm proves its capability of computing clinically relevant airflow distribution and tissue strain data at a level of detail that is not yet achievable, neither with current imaging techniques nor with existing computational models. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Empirical Validation of a Thermal Model of a Complex Roof Including Phase Change Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Guichard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the empirical validation of a building thermal model of a complex roof including a phase change material (PCM. A mathematical model dedicated to PCMs based on the heat apparent capacity method was implemented in a multi-zone building simulation code, the aim being to increase the understanding of the thermal behavior of the whole building with PCM technologies. In order to empirically validate the model, the methodology is based both on numerical and experimental studies. A parametric sensitivity analysis was performed and a set of parameters of the thermal model has been identified for optimization. The use of the generic optimization program called GenOpt® coupled to the building simulation code enabled to determine the set of adequate parameters. We first present the empirical validation methodology and main results of previous work. We then give an overview of GenOpt® and its coupling with the building simulation code. Finally, once the optimization results are obtained, comparisons of the thermal predictions with measurements are found to be acceptable and are presented.

  7. Habitability of super-Earth planets around other suns: models including Red Giant Branch evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bloh, W; Cuntz, M; Schröder, K-P; Bounama, C; Franck, S

    2009-01-01

    The unexpected diversity of exoplanets includes a growing number of super-Earth planets, i.e., exoplanets with masses of up to several Earth masses and a similar chemical and mineralogical composition as Earth. We present a thermal evolution model for a 10 Earth-mass planet orbiting a star like the Sun. Our model is based on the integrated system approach, which describes the photosynthetic biomass production and takes into account a variety of climatological, biogeochemical, and geodynamical processes. This allows us to identify a so-called photosynthesis-sustaining habitable zone (pHZ), as determined by the limits of biological productivity on the planetary surface. Our model considers solar evolution during the main-sequence stage and along the Red Giant Branch as described by the most recent solar model. We obtain a large set of solutions consistent with the principal possibility of life. The highest likelihood of habitability is found for "water worlds." Only mass-rich water worlds are able to realize pHZ-type habitability beyond the stellar main sequence on the Red Giant Branch.

  8. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: Measurements and site-specific rate rules

    KAUST Repository

    Badra, Jihad

    2014-01-01

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (CO) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (CO), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group):P1,CO = 7.38 × 10-14 exp(-274 K/T) + 9.17 × 10-12 exp(-2499 K/T) (285-1355 K)S10,CO = 1.20 × 10-11 exp(-2046 K/T) + 2.20 × 10-13 exp(160 K/T) (222-1464 K)S11,CO = 4.50 × 10-11 exp(-3000 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1440 K/T) (248-1302 K)S11′,CO = 3.80 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 8.50 × 10-15 exp(1550 K/T) (263-1370 K)S 21,CO = 5.00 × 10-11 exp(-2500 K/T) + 4.00 × 10-13 exp(775 K/T) (297-1376 K) © 2014 the Partner Organisations.

  9. A transient energy function for power systems including the induction motor model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A construction method for power system transient energy function is studied in the paper, which is simple and universal, and can unify the forms of some current energy functions. A transient energy function including the induction motor model is derived using the method. The unintegrable term is dealt with to get an approximate energy function. Simulations in a 3-bus system and in the WSCC 4-generator system verify the validity of the proposed energy function. The function can be applied to direct transient stability analysis of multi-machine large power systems and provides a tool for analysis of the interaction between the generator angle stability and the load voltage stability.

  10. A laboratory model of the aortic root flow including the coronary arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querzoli, Giorgio; Fortini, Stefania; Espa, Stefania; Melchionna, Simone

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular flows have been extensively investigated by means of in vitro models to assess the prosthetic valve performances and to provide insight into the fluid dynamics of the heart and proximal aorta. In particular, the models for the study of the flow past the aortic valve have been continuously improved by including, among other things, the compliance of the vessel and more realistic geometries. The flow within the sinuses of Valsalva is known to play a fundamental role in the dynamics of the aortic valve since they host a recirculation region that interacts with the leaflets. The coronary arteries originate from the ostia located within two of the three sinuses, and their presence may significantly affect the fluid dynamics of the aortic root. In spite of their importance, to the extent of the authors' knowledge, coronary arteries were not included so far when modeling in vitro the transvalvular aortic flow. We present a pulse duplicator consisting of a passively pulsing ventricle, a compliant proximal aorta, and coronary arteries connected to the sinuses of Valsalva. The coronary flow is modulated by a self-regulating device mimicking the physiological mechanism, which is based on the contraction and relaxation of the heart muscle during the cardiac cycle. Results show that the model reproduces satisfyingly the coronary flow. The analysis of the time evolution of the velocity and vorticity fields within the aortic root reveals the main characteristics of the backflow generated through the aorta in order to feed the coronaries during the diastole. Experiments without coronary flow have been run for comparison. Interestingly, the lifetime of the vortex forming in the sinus of Valsalva during the systole is reduced by the presence of the coronaries. As a matter of fact, at the end of the systole, that vortex is washed out because of the suction generated by the coronary flow. Correspondingly, the valve closure is delayed and faster compared to the case with

  11. Including sugar cane in the agro-ecosystem model ORCHIDEE-STICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valade, A.; Vuichard, N.; Ciais, P.; Viovy, N.

    2010-12-01

    With 4 million ha currently grown for ethanol in Brazil only, approximately half the global bioethanol production in 2005 (Smeets 2008), and a devoted land area expected to expand globally in the years to come, sugar cane is at the heart of the biofuel debate. Indeed, ethanol made from biomass is currently the most widespread option for alternative transportation fuels. It was originally promoted as a carbon neutral energy resource that could bring energy independence to countries and local opportunities to farmers, until attention was drawn to its environmental and socio-economical drawbacks. It is still not clear to which extent it is a solution or a contributor to climate change mitigation. Dynamic Global Vegetation models can help address these issues and quantify the potential impacts of biofuels on ecosystems at scales ranging from on-site to global. The global agro-ecosystem model ORCHIDEE describes water, carbon and energy exchanges at the soil-atmosphere interface for a limited number of natural and agricultural vegetation types. In order to integrate agricultural management to the simulations and to capture more accurately the specificity of crops' phenology, ORCHIDEE has been coupled with the agronomical model STICS. The resulting crop-oriented vegetation model ORCHIDEE-STICS has been used so far to simulate temperate crops such as wheat, corn and soybean. As a generic ecosystem model, each grid cell can include several vegetation types with their own phenology and management practices, making it suitable to spatial simulations. Here, ORCHIDEE-STICS is altered to include sugar cane as a new agricultural Plant functional Type, implemented and parametrized using the STICS approach. An on-site calibration and validation is then performed based on biomass and flux chamber measurements in several sites in Australia and variables such as LAI, dry weight, heat fluxes and respiration are used to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate the specific

  12. A range of complex probabilistic models for RNA secondary structure prediction that includes the nearest-neighbor model and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Elena; Lang, Raymond; Eddy, Sean R

    2012-02-01

    The standard approach for single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction uses a nearest-neighbor thermodynamic model with several thousand experimentally determined energy parameters. An attractive alternative is to use statistical approaches with parameters estimated from growing databases of structural RNAs. Good results have been reported for discriminative statistical methods using complex nearest-neighbor models, including CONTRAfold, Simfold, and ContextFold. Little work has been reported on generative probabilistic models (stochastic context-free grammars [SCFGs]) of comparable complexity, although probabilistic models are generally easier to train and to use. To explore a range of probabilistic models of increasing complexity, and to directly compare probabilistic, thermodynamic, and discriminative approaches, we created TORNADO, a computational tool that can parse a wide spectrum of RNA grammar architectures (including the standard nearest-neighbor model and more) using a generalized super-grammar that can be parameterized with probabilities, energies, or arbitrary scores. By using TORNADO, we find that probabilistic nearest-neighbor models perform comparably to (but not significantly better than) discriminative methods. We find that complex statistical models are prone to overfitting RNA structure and that evaluations should use structurally nonhomologous training and test data sets. Overfitting has affected at least one published method (ContextFold). The most important barrier to improving statistical approaches for RNA secondary structure prediction is the lack of diversity of well-curated single-sequence RNA secondary structures in current RNA databases.

  13. Eubacterial SpoVG homologs constitute a new family of site-specific DNA-binding proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon L Jutras

    Full Text Available A site-specific DNA-binding protein was purified from Borrelia burgdorferi cytoplasmic extracts, and determined to be a member of the highly conserved SpoVG family. This is the first time a function has been attributed to any of these ubiquitous bacterial proteins. Further investigations into SpoVG orthologues indicated that the Staphylococcus aureus protein also binds DNA, but interacts preferentially with a distinct nucleic acid sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis and domain swapping between the S. aureus and B. burgdorferi proteins identified that a 6-residue stretch of the SpoVG α-helix contributes to DNA sequence specificity. Two additional, highly conserved amino acid residues on an adjacent β-sheet are essential for DNA-binding, apparently by contacts with the DNA phosphate backbone. Results of these studies thus identified a novel family of bacterial DNA-binding proteins, developed a model of SpoVG-DNA interactions, and provide direction for future functional studies on these wide-spread proteins.

  14. The three-dimensional microstructure of trabecular bone: Analysis of site-specific variation in the human jaw bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jo Eun; Yi, Won Jin; Heo, Min Suk; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Huh, Kyung Hoe [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae Myung [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sung Ook [A Plus Dental Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    This study was performed to analyze human maxillary and mandibular trabecular bone using the data acquired from micro-computed tomography (micro-CT), and to characterize the site-specific microstructures of trabeculae. Sixty-nine cylindrical bone specimens were prepared from the mandible and maxilla. They were divided into 5 groups by region: the anterior maxilla, posterior maxilla, anterior mandible, posterior mandible, and mandibular condyle. After the specimens were scanned using a micro-CT system, three-dimensional microstructural parameters such as the percent bone volume, bone specific surface, trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, trabecular number, structure model index, and degrees of anisotropy were analyzed. Among the regions other than the condylar area, the anterior mandibular region showed the highest trabecular thickness and the lowest value for the bone specific surface. On the other hand, the posterior maxilla region showed the lowest trabecular thickness and the highest value for the bone specific surface. The degree of anisotropy was lowest at the anterior mandible. The condyle showed thinner trabeculae with a more anisotropic arrangement than the other mandibular regions. There were microstructural differences between the regions of the maxilla and mandible. These results suggested that different mechanisms of external force might exist at each site.

  15. Site-specific carbon deposition for hierarchically ordered core/shell-structured graphitic carbon with remarkable electrochemical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yingying; Wu, Zhangxiong; Qian, Xufang; Fang, Yin; Feng, Dan; Xia, Yongyao; Tu, Bo; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2013-10-01

    A fascinating core-shell-structured graphitic carbon material composed of ordered microporous core and uniform mesoporous shell is fabricated for the first time through a site-specific chemical vapor deposition process by using a nanozeolite@mesostructured silica composite molecular sieve as the template. The mesostructure-directing agent cetyltrimethylammonium bromide in the shell of the template can be either burned off or carbonized so that it is successfully utilized as a pore switch to turn the shell of the template "on" or "off" to allow selective carbon deposition. The preferred carbon deposition process can be performed only in the inner microporous zeolite cores or just within the outer mesoporous shells, resulting in a zeolite-like ordered microporous carbon or a hollow mesoporous carbon. Full carbon deposition in the template leads to the new core-shell-structured microporous@mesoporous carbon with a nanographene-constructed framework for fast electron transport, a microporous nanocore with large surface area for high-capacity storage of lithium ions, a mesoporous shell with highly opened mesopores as a transport layer for lithium ions and electron channels to access inner cores. The ordered micropores are protected by the mesoporous shell, avoiding pore blockage as the formation of solid electrolyte interphase layers. Such a unique core-shell-structured microporous@mesoporous carbon material represents a newly established lithium ion storage model, demonstrating high reversible energy storage, excellent rate capability, and long cyclic stability.

  16. a New Model for Describing Evolution and Control of Disaster System Including Instantaneous and Continuous Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Kun; Li, Zhi; Sun, Yun-Feng

    A new model for describing the disaster system including instantaneous and continuous action synchronously has been developed. The model is composed of three primary parts, that is, the impact from its causative disaster events, stochastic noise of disaster node and self-healing function, and every part is modeled concretely in terms of their characteristics in practice. Some key parameters, namely link appearance probability, retardation coefficient, ultimate repair capacity of government, dynamical modes considering different disaster evolving chains, and the positions of link with the specific performance in disaster network system are involved. Combined with a case study, the proposed model is applied to a certain disaster evolution system, and the influence law of different parameters on disaster evolution process, in disaster networks with instantaneous-action and/or continuous-action, is presented and compared. The results indicate that the destructive impact in the networks by link in continuous action is far greater an order of magnitude than that in instantaneous action. If a link in continuous action emerges in the disaster network system, properties of the causative event for the link, link appearance probability and its position in the network all have a notable influence to the severity of the disaster network. In addition, some peculiar phenomena are also commendably observed in the disaster evolution process based on the model, such as the multipeaks emerging in the destroyed rate number curve for some crisis nodes caused by their various inducing paths together with the relevant retardation coefficients, the existence of the critical value for ultimate repair capacity to recover the disaster node, and so on.

  17. A model predicting fluindione dose requirement in elderly inpatients including genotypes, body weight, and amiodarone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, Caroline; Pautas, Eric; Duverlie, Charlotte; Berndt, Celia; Andro, Marion; Mahé, Isabelle; Emmerich, Joseph; Lacut, Karine; Le Gal, Grégoire; Peyron, Isabelle; Gouin-Thibault, Isabelle; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Loriot, Marie-Anne; Siguret, Virginie

    2014-04-01

    Indandione VKAs have been widely used for decades, especially in Eastern Europe and France. Contrary to coumarin VKAs, the relative contribution of individual factors to the indandione-VKA response is poorly known. In the present multicentre study, we sought to develop and validate a model including genetic and non-genetic factors to predict the daily fluindione dose requirement in elderly patients in whom VKA dosing is challenging. We prospectively recorded clinical and therapeutic data in 230 Caucasian inpatients mean aged 85 ± 6 years, who had reached international normalized ratio stabilisation (range 2.0-3.0) on fluindione. In the derivation cohort (n=156), we analysed 13 polymorphisms in seven genes potentially involved in the pharmacological effect or vitamin-K cycle (VKORC1, CYP4F2, EPHX1) and fluindione metabolism/transport (CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A5, ABCB1). We built a regression model incorporating non-genetic and genetic data and evaluated the model performances in a separate cohort (n=74).Body-weight, amiodarone intake, VKORC1, CYP4F2, ABCB1 genotypes were retained in the final model, accounting for 31.5% of dose variability. None influence of CYP2C9 was observed. Our final model showed good performances: in 83.3% of the validation cohort patients, the dose was accurately predicted within 5 mg, i.e.the usual step used for adjusting fluindione dosage. In conclusion, in addition to body-weight and amiodarone-intake, pharmacogenetic factors (VKORC1, CYP4F2, ABCB1) related to the pharmacodynamic effect and transport of fluindione significantly influenced the dose requirement in elderly patients while CYP2C9 did not. Studies are required to know whether fluindione could be an alternative VKA in carriers of polymorphic CYP2C9 alleles, hypersensitive to coumarins.

  18. Landslide Research at the British Geological Survey: Capture, Storage and Interpretation on a National and Site-Specific Scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Catherine PENNINGTON; Claire FOSTER; Jonathan CHAMBERS; Gareth JENKINS

    2009-01-01

    Landslide research at the British Geological Survey (BGS) is carried out through a number of activities, including surveying, database development and real-time monitoring of landslides.Landslide mapping across the UK has been carried out since BGS started geological mapping in 1835. Today, BGS geologists use a combination of remote sensing and ground-based investigations to survey landslides. The development of waterproof tablet computers (BGS-SIGMAmobile), with inbuilt GPS and GIS for field data capture provides an accurate and rapid mapping methodology for field surveys.Regional and national mapping of landslides is carried out in conjunction with site-specific monitoring, using terrestrial LiDAR and differential GPS technologies, which BGS has successfully developed for this application. In addition to surface monitoring, BGS is currently developing geophysical ground-imaging systems for landslide monitoring, which provide real-time information on subsurface changes prior to failure events. BGS's mapping and monitoring activities directly feed into the BGS National Landslide Database, the most extensive source of information on landslides in Great Britain. It currently holds over 14 000 records of landslide events. By combining BGS's corporate datasets with expert knowledge, BGS has developed a landslide hazard assessment tool,GeoSure, which provides information on the relative landslide hazard susceptibility at national scale.

  19. Cost of riparian buffer zones: A comparison of hydrologically adapted site-specific riparian buffers with traditional fixed widths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, T.; Lundström, J.; Kuglerová, L.; Laudon, H.; Öhman, K.; Ågren, A. M.

    2016-02-01

    Traditional approaches aiming at protecting surface waters from the negative impacts of forestry often focus on retaining fixed width buffer zones around waterways. While this method is relatively simple to design and implement, it has been criticized for ignoring the spatial heterogeneity of biogeochemical processes and biodiversity in the riparian zone. Alternatively, a variable width buffer zone adapted to site-specific hydrological conditions has been suggested to improve the protection of biogeochemical and ecological functions of the riparian zone. However, little is known about the monetary value of maintaining hydrologically adapted buffer zones compared to the traditionally used fixed width ones. In this study, we created a hydrologically adapted buffer zone by identifying wet areas and groundwater discharge hotspots in the riparian zone. The opportunity cost of the hydrologically adapted riparian buffer zones was then compared to that of the fixed width zones in a meso-scale boreal catchment to determine the most economical option of designing riparian buffers. The results show that hydrologically adapted buffer zones were cheaper per hectare than the fixed width ones when comparing the total cost. This was because the hydrologically adapted buffers included more wetlands and low productive forest areas than the fixed widths. As such, the hydrologically adapted buffer zones allows more effective protection of the parts of the riparian zones that are ecologically and biogeochemically important and more sensitive to disturbances without forest landowners incurring any additional cost than fixed width buffers.

  20. ISOLATION OF HEPATIC OVAL CELLS FROM DIFFERENT MODEL RATS INCLUDING DIABETIC RATS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ying-li; YE Ting-ting; XIA Fang-zhen; WANG Ning-jian; YANG Hua; CHEN Yi

    2009-01-01

    Objective To acquire oval cells (progenitor stem cells) from adult rat liver of different models including diabetic rats. Methods Thirty Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into 5 groups randomly: control, 2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF), 2-AAF+partial hepatectomy (PH), 2-AAF+carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and diabetic groups. As two-step collagenase perfusion protocol of Seglen, oval cells were isolated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. Thy1.1 positive cells were sorted by flow cytometry, and then cultured in Dulbeccos minimum Eagles medium (DMEM). Immunofluorescence staining was applied to labelling Thy1.1. Results Different rates of Thy1.1 positive oval cells were found in different rat model groups: 0.5% in 2-AAF, 0.3% in 2-hAAF+PH, 0.2% in 2-AAF+CCl4 , 0.1% in diabetic, and 0.0% in control. Isolated cells adhered to plate with fusiform or polygon as epithelial cells. Conclusion Progenitor stem cells exist in injured liver tissue including those from diabetic rats.