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Sample records for models fail compensatory

  1. Hybrid Compensatory-Noncompensatory Choice Sets in Semicompensatory Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Bekhor, Shlomo; Shiftan, Yoram

    2013-01-01

    Semicompensatory models represent a choice process consisting of an elimination-based choice set formation on satisfaction of criterion thresholds and a utility-based choice. Current semicompensatory models assume a purely noncompensatory choice set formation and therefore do not support...... multinomial criteria that involve trade-offs between attributes at the choice set formation stage. This study proposes a novel behavioral paradigm consisting of a hybrid compensatory-noncompensatory choice set formation process, followed by compensatory choice. The behavioral paradigm is represented...

  2. Partially Compensatory Multidimensional Item Response Theory Models: Two Alternate Model Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMars, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Partially compensatory models may capture the cognitive skills needed to answer test items more realistically than compensatory models, but estimating the model parameters may be a challenge. Data were simulated to follow two different partially compensatory models, a model with an interaction term and a product model. The model parameters were…

  3. Forward models and state estimation in compensatory eye movements

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    Maarten A Frens

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The compensatory eye movement system maintains a stable retinal image, integrating information from different sensory modalities to compensate for head movements. Inspired by recent models of physiology of limb movements, we suggest that compensatory eye movements (CEM can be modeled as a control system with three essential building blocks: a forward model that predicts the effects of motor commands; a state estimator that integrates sensory feedback into this prediction; and, a feedback controller that translates a state estimate into motor commands. We propose a specific mapping of nuclei within the CEM system onto these control functions. Specifically, we suggest that the Flocculus is responsible for generating the forward model prediction and that the Vestibular Nuclei integrate sensory feedback to generate an estimate of current state. Finally, the brainstem motor nuclei – in the case of horizontal compensation this means the Abducens Nucleus and the Nucleus Prepositus Hypoglossi – implement a feedback controller, translating state into motor commands. While these efforts to understand the physiological control system as a feedback control system are in their infancy, there is the intriguing possibility that compensatory eye movements and targeted voluntary movements use the same cerebellar circuitry in fundamentally different ways.

  4. Compensatory versus noncompensatory models for predicting consumer preferences

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    Anja Dieckmann

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Standard preference models in consumer research assume that people weigh and add all attributes of the available options to derive a decision, while there is growing evidence for the use of simplifying heuristics. Recently, a greedoid algorithm has been developed (Yee, Dahan, Hauser and Orlin, 2007; Kohli and Jedidi, 2007 to model lexicographic heuristics from preference data. We compare predictive accuracies of the greedoid approach and standard conjoint analysis in an online study with a rating and a ranking task. The lexicographic model derived from the greedoid algorithm was better at predicting ranking compared to rating data, but overall, it achieved lower predictive accuracy for hold-out data than the compensatory model estimated by conjoint analysis. However, a considerable minority of participants was better predicted by lexicographic strategies. We conclude that the new algorithm will not replace standard tools for analyzing preferences, but can boost the study of situational and individual differences in preferential choice processes.

  5. Development and estimation of a semi-compensatory model with a flexible error structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Shiftan, Yoram; Bekhor, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    distributed error terms across alternatives at the choice stage. This study relaxes the assumption by introducing nested substitution patterns and alternatively random taste heterogeneity at the choice stage, thus equating the structural flexibility of semi-compensatory models to their compensatory...... counterparts. The proposed model is applied to off-campus rental apartment choice by students. Results show the feasibility and importance of introducing a flexible error structure into semi-compensatory models....

  6. Log-binomial models: exploring failed convergence.

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    Williamson, Tyler; Eliasziw, Misha; Fick, Gordon Hilton

    2013-12-13

    Relative risk is a summary metric that is commonly used in epidemiological investigations. Increasingly, epidemiologists are using log-binomial models to study the impact of a set of predictor variables on a single binary outcome, as they naturally offer relative risks. However, standard statistical software may report failed convergence when attempting to fit log-binomial models in certain settings. The methods that have been proposed in the literature for dealing with failed convergence use approximate solutions to avoid the issue. This research looks directly at the log-likelihood function for the simplest log-binomial model where failed convergence has been observed, a model with a single linear predictor with three levels. The possible causes of failed convergence are explored and potential solutions are presented for some cases. Among the principal causes is a failure of the fitting algorithm to converge despite the log-likelihood function having a single finite maximum. Despite these limitations, log-binomial models are a viable option for epidemiologists wishing to describe the relationship between a set of predictors and a binary outcome where relative risk is the desired summary measure. Epidemiologists are encouraged to continue to use log-binomial models and advocate for improvements to the fitting algorithms to promote the widespread use of log-binomial models.

  7. Visual search and line bisection in hemianopia: computational modelling of cortical compensatory mechanisms and comparison with hemineglect.

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    Lanyon, Linda J; Barton, Jason J S

    2013-01-01

    Hemianopia patients have lost vision from the contralateral hemifield, but make behavioural adjustments to compensate for this field loss. As a result, their visual performance and behaviour contrast with those of hemineglect patients who fail to attend to objects contralateral to their lesion. These conditions differ in their ocular fixations and perceptual judgments. During visual search, hemianopic patients make more fixations in contralesional space while hemineglect patients make fewer. During line bisection, hemianopic patients fixate the contralesional line segment more and make a small contralesional bisection error, while hemineglect patients make few contralesional fixations and a larger ipsilesional bisection error. Hence, there is an attentional failure for contralesional space in hemineglect but a compensatory adaptation to attend more to the blind side in hemianopia. A challenge for models of visual attentional processes is to show how compensation is achieved in hemianopia, and why such processes are hindered or inaccessible in hemineglect. We used a neurophysiology-derived computational model to examine possible cortical compensatory processes in simulated hemianopia from a V1 lesion and compared results with those obtained with the same processes under conditions of simulated hemineglect from a parietal lesion. A spatial compensatory bias to increase attention contralesionally replicated hemianopic scanning patterns during visual search but not during line bisection. To reproduce the latter required a second process, an extrastriate lateral connectivity facilitating form completion into the blind field: this allowed accurate placement of fixations on contralesional stimuli and reproduced fixation patterns and the contralesional bisection error of hemianopia. Neither of these two cortical compensatory processes was effective in ameliorating the ipsilesional bias in the hemineglect model. Our results replicate normal and pathological patterns of

  8. Mode choice models' ability to express intention to change travel behaviour considering non-compensatory rules and latent variables

    OpenAIRE

    Sanko, Nobuhiro; Morikawa, Takayuki; Kurauchi, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Disaggregate behaviour choice models have been improved in many aspects, but they are rarely evaluated from the viewpoint of their ability to express intention to change travel behaviour. This study compared various models, including objective and latent models and compensatory and non-compensatory decision-making models. Latent models contain latent factors calculated using the LISREL (linear structural relations) model. Non-compensatory models are based on a lexicographic-semiorder heuristi...

  9. Compensatory mechanisms in genetic models of neurodegeneration: are the mice better than humans?

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    Grzegorz eKreiner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are one of the main causes of mental and physical disabilities. Neurodegeneration has been estimated to begin many years before the first clinical symptoms manifest, and even a prompt diagnosis at this stage provides very little advantage for a more effective treatment as the currently available pharmacotherapies are based on disease symptomatology. The etiology of the majority of neurodegenerative diseases remains unknown, and even for those diseases caused by identified genetic mutations, the direct pathways from gene alteration to final cell death have not yet been fully elucidated. Advancements in genetic engineering have provided many transgenic mice that are used as an alternative to pharmacological models of neurodegenerative diseases. Surprisingly, even the models reiterating the same causative mutations do not fully recapitulate the inevitable neuronal loss, and some fail to even show phenotypic alterations, which suggests the possible existence of compensatory mechanisms. A better evaluation of these mechanisms may not only help us to explain why neurodegenerative diseases are mostly late-onset disorders in humans but may also provide new markers and targets for novel strategies designed to extend neuronal function and survival. The aim of this mini-review is to draw attention to this under-explored field in which investigations may reasonably contribute to unveiling hidden reserves in the organism.

  10. Modeling and Compensatory Processes Underlying Involvement in Child Care among Kibbutz-Reared Fathers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunt, Ruth; Bassi, Liat

    2012-01-01

    This study examined modeling and compensatory processes underlying the effects of an early paternal model on father involvement in child care. Drawing on social learning theory, it was hypothesized that father-son relationships would moderate the association between a father's involvement and his own father's involvement. A sample of 136 kibbutz…

  11. A Multiobjective Programming Method for Ranking All Units Based on Compensatory DEA Model

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    Haifang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to rank all decision making units (DMUs on the same basis, this paper proposes a multiobjective programming (MOP model based on a compensatory data envelopment analysis (DEA model to derive a common set of weights that can be used for the full ranking of all DMUs. We first revisit a compensatory DEA model for ranking all units, point out the existing problem for solving the model, and present an improved algorithm for which an approximate global optimal solution of the model can be obtained by solving a sequence of linear programming. Then, we applied the key idea of the compensatory DEA model to develop the MOP model in which the objectives are to simultaneously maximize all common weights under constraints that the sum of efficiency values of all DMUs is equal to unity and the sum of all common weights is also equal to unity. In order to solve the MOP model, we transform it into a single objective programming (SOP model using a fuzzy programming method and solve the SOP model using the proposed approximation algorithm. To illustrate the ranking method using the proposed method, two numerical examples are solved.

  12. Development and estimation of a semi-compensatory model with flexible error structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Shiftan, Yoram; Bekhor, Shlomo

    2009-01-01

    that alleviates these simplifying assumptions concerning (i) the number of alternatives, (ii) the representation of choice set formation, and (iii) the error structure. The proposed semi-compensatory model represents a sequence of choice set formation based on the conjunctive heuristic with correlated thresholds......, and utility-based choice accommodating alternatively nested substitution patterns across the alternatives and random taste variation across the population. The proposed model is applied to off-campus rental apartment choice of students. Results show (i) the estimated model for a universal realm of 200...... alternatives and 41 choice sets, (ii) the threshold representation as a function of individual characteristics, and (iii) the feasibility and importance of introducing a flexible error structure into semi-compensatory models....

  13. Mode choice models' ability to express intention to change travel behaviour considering non-compensatory rules and latent variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhiro Sanko

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Disaggregate behaviour choice models have been improved in many aspects, but they are rarely evaluated from the viewpoint of their ability to express intention to change travel behaviour. This study compared various models, including objective and latent models and compensatory and non-compensatory decision-making models. Latent models contain latent factors calculated using the LISREL (linear structural relations model. Non-compensatory models are based on a lexicographic-semiorder heuristic. This paper proposes ‘probability increment’ and ‘joint probability increment’ as indicators for evaluating the ability of these models to express intention to change travel behaviour. The application to commuting travel data in the Chukyo metropolitan area in Japan showed that the appropriate non-compensatory and latent models outperform other models.

  14. The eternal quest for optimal balance between maximizing pleasure and minimizing harm: the compensatory health beliefs model.

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    Rabia, Marjorie; Knäuper, Bärbel; Miquelon, Paule

    2006-02-01

    Particularly in the health domain, humans thrive to reach an equilibrium between maximizing pleasure and minimizing harm. We propose that a cognitive strategy people employ to reach this equilibrium is the activation of Compensatory Health Beliefs (CHBs). CHBs are beliefs that the negative effects of an unhealthy behaviour can be compensated for, or "neutralized," by engaging in another, healthy behaviour. "I can eat this piece of cake now because I will exercise this evening" is an example of such beliefs. Our theoretical framework aims at explaining why people create CHBs and how they employ CHBs to regulate their health behaviours. The model extends current health behaviour models by explicitly integrating the motivational conflict that emerges from the interplay between affective states (i.e., cravings or desires) and motivation (i.e., health goals). As predicted by the model, previous research has shown that holding CHBs hinder an individual's success at positive health behaviour change, and may explain why many people fail to adhere to behaviour change programs such as dieting or exercising. Moreover, future research using the model and implications for possible interventions are discussed.

  15. Simple physics-based models of compensatory plant water uptake: concepts and eco-hydrological consequences

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    N. J. Jarvis

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Many land surface schemes and simulation models of plant growth designed for practical use employ simple empirical sub-models of root water uptake that cannot adequately reflect the critical role water uptake from sparsely rooted deep subsoil plays in meeting atmospheric transpiration demand in water-limited environments, especially in the presence of shallow groundwater. A failure to account for this so-called "compensatory" water uptake may have serious consequences for both local and global modeling of water and energy fluxes, carbon balances and climate. Some purely empirical compensatory root water uptake models have been proposed, but they are of limited use in global modeling exercises since their parameters cannot be related to measurable soil and vegetation properties. A parsimonious physics-based model of uptake compensation has been developed that requires no more parameters than empirical approaches. This model is described and some aspects of its behavior are illustrated with the help of example simulations. These analyses demonstrate that hydraulic lift can be considered as an extreme form of compensation and that the degree of compensation is principally a function of soil capillarity and the ratio of total effective root length to potential transpiration. Thus, uptake compensation increases as root to leaf area ratios increase, since potential transpiration depends on leaf area. Results of "scenario" simulations for two case studies, one at the local scale (riparian vegetation growing above shallow water tables in seasonally dry or arid climates and one at a global scale (water balances across an aridity gradient in the continental USA, are presented to illustrate biases in model predictions that arise when water uptake compensation is neglected. In the first case, it is shown that only a compensated model can match the strong relationships between water table depth and leaf area and transpiration observed in riparian forest

  16. Systematic review of the synergist muscle ablation model for compensatory hypertrophy.

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    Terena, Stella Maris Lins; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Bussadori, Sandra Kalill; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli

    2017-02-01

    The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of the experimental synergists muscle ablation model to promote muscle hypertrophy, determine the period of greatest hypertrophy and its influence on muscle fiber types and determine differences in bilateral and unilateral removal to reduce the number of animals used in this model. Following the application of the eligibility criteria for the mechanical overload of the plantar muscle in rats, nineteen papers were included in the review. The results reveal a greatest hypertrophy occurring between days 12 and 15, and based on the findings, synergist muscle ablation is an efficient model for achieving rapid hypertrophy and the contralateral limb can be used as there was no difference between unilateral and bilateral surgery, which reduces the number of animals used in this model. This model differs from other overload models (exercise and training) regarding the characteristics involved in the hypertrophy process (acute) and result in a chronic muscle adaptation with selective regulation and modification of fast-twitch fibers in skeletal muscle. This is an efficient and rapid model for compensatory hypertrophy.

  17. Systematic review of the synergist muscle ablation model for compensatory hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella Maris Lins Terena

    Full Text Available Summary Objective: The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of the experimental synergists muscle ablation model to promote muscle hypertrophy, determine the period of greatest hypertrophy and its influence on muscle fiber types and determine differences in bilateral and unilateral removal to reduce the number of animals used in this model. Method: Following the application of the eligibility criteria for the mechanical overload of the plantar muscle in rats, nineteen papers were included in the review. Results: The results reveal a greatest hypertrophy occurring between days 12 and 15, and based on the findings, synergist muscle ablation is an efficient model for achieving rapid hypertrophy and the contralateral limb can be used as there was no difference between unilateral and bilateral surgery, which reduces the number of animals used in this model. Conclusion: This model differs from other overload models (exercise and training regarding the characteristics involved in the hypertrophy process (acute and result in a chronic muscle adaptation with selective regulation and modification of fast-twitch fibers in skeletal muscle. This is an efficient and rapid model for compensatory hypertrophy.

  18. Compensatory renal hypertrophy and the handling of an acute nephrotoxicant in a model of aging.

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    Oliveira, Cláudia S; Joshee, Lucy; Zalups, Rudolfs K; Bridges, Christy C

    2016-03-01

    Aging often results in progressive losses of functioning nephrons, which can lead to a significant reduction in overall renal function. Because of age-related pathological changes, the remaining functional nephrons within aged kidneys may be unable to fully counteract physiological and/or toxicological challenges. We hypothesized that when the total functional renal mass of aged rats is reduced by 50%, the nephrons within the remnant kidney do not fully undergo the functional and physiological changes that are necessary to maintain normal fluid and solute homeostasis. We also tested the hypothesis that the disposition and handling of a nephrotoxicant are altered significantly in aged kidneys following an acute, 50% reduction in functional renal mass. To test these hypotheses, we examined molecular indices of renal cellular hypertrophy and the disposition of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)), a model nephrotoxicant, in young control, young uninephrectomized (NPX), aged control and aged NPX Wistar rats. We found that the process of aging reduces the ability of the remnant kidney to undergo compensatory renal growth. In addition, we found that an additional reduction in renal mass in aged animals alters the disposition of Hg(2+) and potentially alters the risk of renal intoxication by this nephrotoxicant. To our knowledge, this study represents the first report of the handling of a nephrotoxicant in an aged animal following a 50% reduction in functional renal mass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Applicability of the Compensatory Encoding Model in Foreign Language Reading: An Investigation with Chinese College English Language Learners.

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    Han, Feifei

    2017-01-01

    While some first language (L1) reading models suggest that inefficient word recognition and small working memory tend to inhibit higher-level comprehension processes; the Compensatory Encoding Model maintains that slow word recognition and small working memory do not normally hinder reading comprehension, as readers are able to operate metacognitive strategies to compensate for inefficient word recognition and working memory limitation as long as readers process a reading task without time constraint. Although empirical evidence is accumulated for support of the Compensatory Encoding Model in L1 reading, there is lack of research for testing of the Compensatory Encoding Model in foreign language (FL) reading. This research empirically tested the Compensatory Encoding Model in English reading among Chinese college English language learners (ELLs). Two studies were conducted. Study one focused on testing whether reading condition varying time affects the relationship between word recognition, working memory, and reading comprehension. Students were tested on a computerized English word recognition test, a computerized Operation Span task, and reading comprehension in time constraint and non-time constraint reading. The correlation and regression analyses showed that the strength of association was much stronger between word recognition, working memory, and reading comprehension in time constraint than that in non-time constraint reading condition. Study two examined whether FL readers were able to operate metacognitive reading strategies as a compensatory way of reading comprehension for inefficient word recognition and working memory limitation in non-time constraint reading. The participants were tested on the same computerized English word recognition test and Operation Span test. They were required to think aloud while reading and to complete the comprehension questions. The think-aloud protocols were coded for concurrent use of reading strategies, classified

  20. Organism-level models: When mechanisms and statistics fail us

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    Phillips, M. H.; Meyer, J.; Smith, W. P.; Rockhill, J. K.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To describe the unique characteristics of models that represent the entire course of radiation therapy at the organism level and to highlight the uses to which such models can be put. Methods: At the level of an organism, traditional model-building runs into severe difficulties. We do not have sufficient knowledge to devise a complete biochemistry-based model. Statistical model-building fails due to the vast number of variables and the inability to control many of them in any meaningful way. Finally, building surrogate models, such as animal-based models, can result in excluding some of the most critical variables. Bayesian probabilistic models (Bayesian networks) provide a useful alternative that have the advantages of being mathematically rigorous, incorporating the knowledge that we do have, and being practical. Results: Bayesian networks representing radiation therapy pathways for prostate cancer and head & neck cancer were used to highlight the important aspects of such models and some techniques of model-building. A more specific model representing the treatment of occult lymph nodes in head & neck cancer were provided as an example of how such a model can inform clinical decisions. A model of the possible role of PET imaging in brain cancer was used to illustrate the means by which clinical trials can be modelled in order to come up with a trial design that will have meaningful outcomes. Conclusions: Probabilistic models are currently the most useful approach to representing the entire therapy outcome process.

  1. A Physical Model of Mass Ejection in Failed Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Eric R.; Quataert, Eliot; Fernández, Rodrigo; Kasen, Daniel

    2018-03-01

    During the core collapse of massive stars, the formation of the protoneutron star is accompanied by the emission of a significant amount of mass-energy (˜0.3 M⊙) in the form of neutrinos. This mass-energy loss generates an outward-propagating pressure wave that steepens into a shock near the stellar surface, potentially powering a weak transient associated with an otherwise-failed supernova. We analytically investigate this mass-loss-induced wave generation and propagation. Heuristic arguments provide an accurate estimate of the amount of energy contained in the outgoing sound pulse. We then develop a general formalism for analyzing the response of the star to centrally concentrated mass loss in linear perturbation theory. To build intuition, we apply this formalism to polytropic stellar models, finding qualitative and quantitative agreement with simulations and heuristic arguments. We also apply our results to realistic pre-collapse massive star progenitors (both giants and compact stars). Our analytic results for the sound pulse energy, excitation radius, and steepening in the stellar envelope are in good agreement with full time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations. We show that prior to the sound pulses arrival at the stellar photosphere, the photosphere has already reached velocities ˜20 - 100% of the local sound speed, thus likely modestly decreasing the stellar effective temperature prior to the star disappearing. Our results provide important constraints on the physical properties and observational appearance of failed supernovae.

  2. A Model for the More Effective Use of Time as a Means to Improve Success of Compensatory Early Childhood Education Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, Walter E.

    A model is presented for the improvement of compensatory early childhood education through more effective use of student and staff time. A framework for research to test the model is also suggested. Sections of the document prefacing discussion of the model include (1) an overview of the historical antecedents and development of early childhood…

  3. Development and estimation of a semi-compensatory model with flexible error structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Shiftan, Yoram; Bekhor, Shlomo

    -response model and the utility-based choice by alternatively (i) a nested-logit model and (ii) an error-component logit. In order to test the suggested methodology, the model was estimated for a sample of 1,893 ranked choices and respective threshold values from 631 students who participated in a web-based two...

  4. African wildlife and people : finding solutions where equilibrium models fail

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poshiwa, X.

    2013-01-01

    Grazing systems, covering about half of the terrestrial surface, tend to be either equilibrial or non-equilibrial in nature, largely depending on the environmental stochasticity.The equilibrium model perspective stresses the importance of biotic feedbacks between herbivores and

  5. Failed oceanic transform models: experience of shaking the tree

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    Gerya, Taras

    2017-04-01

    In geodynamics, numerical modeling is often used as a trial-and-error tool, which does not necessarily requires full understanding or even a correct concept for a modeled phenomenon. Paradoxically, in order to understand an enigmatic process one should simply try to model it based on some initial assumptions, which must not even be correct… The reason is that our intuition is not always well "calibrated" for understanding of geodynamic phenomena, which develop on space- and timescales that are very different from our everyday experience. We often have much better ideas about physical laws governing geodynamic processes than on how these laws should interact on geological space- and timescales. From this prospective, numerical models, in which these physical laws are self-consistently implemented, can gradually calibrate our intuition by exploring what scenarios are physically sensible and what are not. I personally went through this painful learning path many times and one noteworthy example was my 3D numerical modeling of oceanic transform faults. As I understand in retrospective, my initial literature-inspired concept of how and why transform faults form and evolve was thermomechanically inconsistent and based on two main assumptions (btw. both were incorrect!): (1) oceanic transforms are directly inherited from the continental rifting and breakup stages and (2) they represent plate fragmentation structures having peculiar extension-parallel orientation due to the stress rotation caused by thermal contraction of the oceanic lithosphere. During one year (!) of high-resolution thermomechanical numerical experiments exploring various physics (including very computationally demanding thermal contraction) I systematically observed how my initially prescribed extension-parallel weak transform faults connecting ridge segments rotated away from their original orientation and get converted into oblique ridge sections… This was really an epic failure! However, at the

  6. Modeling the compensatory response of an invasive tree to specialist insect herbivory

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    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Xin; DeAngelis, Don; Zhai, Lu; Rayamajhi, Min B.; Ju, Shu

    2018-01-01

    The severity of the effects of herbivory on plant fitness can be moderated by the ability of plants to compensate for biomass loss. Compensation is an important component of the ecological fitness in many plants, and has been shown to reduce the effects of pests on agricultural plant yields. It can also reduce the effectiveness of biocontrol through introduced herbivores in controlling weedy invasive plants. This study used a modeling approach to predict the effect of different levels of foliage herbivory by biological control agents introduced to control the invasive tree Melaleuca quinquennervia (melaleuca) in Florida. It is assumed in the model that melaleuca can optimally change its carbon and nitrogen allocation strategies in order to compensate for the effects of herbivory. The model includes reallocation of more resources to production and maintenance of photosynthetic tissues at the expense of roots. This compensation is shown to buffer the severity of the defoliation effect, but the model predicts a limit on the maximum herbivory that melaleuca can tolerate and survive. The model also shows that the level of available limiting nutrient (e.g., soil nitrogen) may play an important role in a melaleuca’s ability to compensate for herbivory. This study has management implications for the best ways to maximize the level of damage using biological control or other means of defoliation.

  7. Joint modeling of constrained path enumeration and path choice behavior: a semi-compensatory approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2010-01-01

    A behavioural and a modelling framework are proposed for representing route choice from a path set that satisfies travellers’ spatiotemporal constraints. Within the proposed framework, travellers’ master sets are constructed by path generation, consideration sets are delimited according to spatio...... constraints are related to travellers’ socio-economic characteristics and that path choice is related to minimizing time and avoiding congestion....

  8. Zebrafish as a Model System for Investigating the Compensatory Regulation of Ionic Balance during Metabolic Acidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lletta Lewis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Zebrafish (Danio rerio have become an important model for integrative physiological research. Zebrafish inhabit a hypo-osmotic environment; to maintain ionic and acid-base homeostasis, they must actively take up ions and secrete acid to the water. The gills in the adult and the skin at larval stage are the primary sites of ionic regulation in zebrafish. The uptake of ions in zebrafish is mediated by specific ion transporting cells termed ionocytes. Similarly, in mammals, ion reabsorption and acid excretion occur in specific cell types in the terminal region of the renal tubules (distal convoluted tubule and collecting duct. Previous studies have suggested that functional regulation of several ion transporters/channels in the zebrafish ionocytes resembles that in the mammalian renal cells. Additionally, several mechanisms involved in regulating the epithelial ion transport during metabolic acidosis are found to be similar between zebrafish and mammals. In this article, we systemically review the similarities and differences in ionic regulation between zebrafish and mammals during metabolic acidosis. We summarize the available information on the regulation of epithelial ion transporters during acidosis, with a focus on epithelial Na+, Cl− and Ca2+ transporters in zebrafish ionocytes and mammalian renal cells. We also discuss the neuroendocrine responses to acid exposure, and their potential role in ionic compensation. Finally, we identify several knowledge gaps that would benefit from further study.

  9. Diaphragm remodeling and compensatory respiratory mechanics in a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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    Mead, A F; Petrov, M; Malik, A S; Mitchell, M A; Childers, M K; Bogan, J R; Seidner, G; Kornegay, J N; Stedman, H H

    2014-04-01

    Ventilatory insufficiency remains the leading cause of death and late stage morbidity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). To address critical gaps in our knowledge of the pathobiology of respiratory functional decline, we used an integrative approach to study respiratory mechanics in a translational model of DMD. In studies of individual dogs with the Golden Retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) mutation, we found evidence of rapidly progressive loss of ventilatory capacity in association with dramatic morphometric remodeling of the diaphragm. Within the first year of life, the mechanics of breathing at rest, and especially during pharmacological stimulation of respiratory control pathways in the carotid bodies, shift such that the primary role of the diaphragm becomes the passive elastic storage of energy transferred from abdominal wall muscles, thereby permitting the expiratory musculature to share in the generation of inspiratory pressure and flow. In the diaphragm, this physiological shift is associated with the loss of sarcomeres in series (∼ 60%) and an increase in muscle stiffness (∼ 900%) compared with those of the nondystrophic diaphragm, as studied during perfusion ex vivo. In addition to providing much needed endpoint measures for assessing the efficacy of therapeutics, we expect these findings to be a starting point for a more precise understanding of respiratory failure in DMD.

  10. Compensatory hypertrophy of the teres minor muscle after large rotator cuff tear model in adult male rat.

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    Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Shitara, Hitoshi; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Iizuka, Haku; Koibuchi, Noriyuki; Takagishi, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Rotator cuff tear (RCT) is a common musculoskeletal disorder in the elderly. The large RCT is often irreparable due to the retraction and degeneration of the rotator cuff muscle. The integrity of the teres minor (TM) muscle is thought to affect postoperative functional recovery in some surgical treatments. Hypertrophy of the TM is found in some patients with large RCTs; however, the process underlying this hypertrophy is still unclear. The objective of this study was to determine if compensatory hypertrophy of the TM muscle occurs in a large RCT rat model. Twelve Wistar rats underwent transection of the suprascapular nerve and the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons in the left shoulder. The rats were euthanized 4 weeks after the surgery, and the cuff muscles were collected and weighed. The cross-sectional area and the involvement of Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling were examined in the remaining TM muscle. The weight and cross-sectional area of the TM muscle was higher in the operated-on side than in the control side. The phosphorylated Akt/Akt protein ratio was not significantly different between these sides. The phosphorylated-mTOR/mTOR protein ratio was significantly higher on the operated-on side. Transection of the suprascapular nerve and the supraspinatus and infraspinatus tendons activates mTOR signaling in the TM muscle, which results in muscle hypertrophy. The Akt-signaling pathway may not be involved in this process. Nevertheless, activation of mTOR signaling in the TM muscle after RCT may be an effective therapeutic target of a large RCT. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Failing Failed States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Hans-Henrik

    2002-01-01

    from inaction. Often, the media are blamed. Politicians complain about the media when they interfere (the CNN effect), and when they do not. This article looks at how the media do cover failing states. Sierra Leone and Congo are used as examples. The analysis shows that there is little independent...

  12. A Scientific Investigation into why Firms Fail: A Model of corporate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research used modelling tools such as Gambler's Ruin Score, BCG, Wilcox's Probability of Ultimate Failure, Cash Flow Reinvestment Ratio, Z-Score to investigate 20 failed and successful banks. This study is significant because a proper scientific foundation on the critical success and failure factors responsible for this ...

  13. Improvement of preclinical animal models for autoimmune-mediated disorders via reverse translation of failed therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    't Hart, Bert A; Jagessar, S Anwar; Kap, Yolanda S; Haanstra, Krista G; Philippens, Ingrid H C H M; Serguera, Che; Langermans, Jan; Vierboom, Michel

    2014-09-01

    The poor translational validity of autoimmune-mediated inflammatory disease (AIMID) models in inbred and specific pathogen-free (SPF) rodents underlies the high attrition of new treatments for the corresponding human disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a frequently used preclinical AIMID model. We discuss here how crucial information needed for the innovation of current preclinical models can be obtained from postclinical analysis of the nonhuman primate EAE model, highlighting the mechanistic reasons why some therapies fail and others succeed. These new insights can also help identify new targets for treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fission product release model for failed plate-type fuel element and storage under water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terremoto, L.A.A.; Zeituni, C.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da; Castanheira, M.; Lucki, G.; Silva, A.T. e; Teodoro, C.A.; Damy, M. de A.

    2005-01-01

    Plate-type fuel elements burned-up inside the core of nuclear research reactors are stored mainly under deionized water of storage pools. When cladding failure occurs in such elements, radioactive fission products are released into the storage pool water. This work proposes a model to describe the release mechanism considering the diffusion through a postulated small cylindrical failure. As a consequence, an analytical expression is obtained for the activity released into the water as a function of the total storage time of a failed fuel plate. The proposed model reproduces the linear increasing of 137 Cs specific activity observed in sipping tests already performed on failed plate-type fuel elements. (author)

  15. Topology optimization of fail-safe structures using a simplified local damage model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansen, Miche; Lombaert, Geert; Schevenels, Mattias

    2014-01-01

    Topology optimization of mechanical structures often leads to efficient designs which resemble statically determinate structures. These economical structures are especially vulnerable to local loss of stiffness due to material failure. This paper therefore addresses local failure of continuum...... structures in topology optimization in order to design fail-safe structures which remain operable in a damaged state.A simplified model for local failure in continuum structures is adopted in the robust approach. The complex phenomenon of local failure is modeled by removal of material stiffness in patches...... for minimum compliance and a compliant mechanism. The robust approach is applied successfully in the design of fail-safe alternatives for the structures in these examples....

  16. Parameter estimation using compensatory neural networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Proposed here is a new neuron model, a basis for Compensatory Neural Network Architecture (CNNA), which not only reduces the total number of interconnections among neurons but also reduces the total computing time for training. The suggested model has properties of the basic neuron model as well as the higher ...

  17. Parameter estimation using compensatory neural networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Proposed here is a new neuron model, a basis for Compensatory. Neural Network Architecture (CNNA), which not only reduces the total number of interconnections among neurons but also reduces the total computing time for training. The suggested model has properties of the basic neuron model as well as the ...

  18. Incorporating root hydraulic redistribution and compensatory water uptake in the Common Land Model: Effects on site level and global land modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Siguang; Chen, Haishan; Zhang, Xiangxiang; Wei, Nan; Shangguan, Wei; Yuan, Hua; Zhang, Shupeng; Wang, Lili; Zhou, Lihua; Dai, Yongjiu

    2017-07-01

    Treatment of plant water uptake through the roots remains a significant issue in land surface models. Most current land surface models calculate the root water uptake (RWU) by extracting soil water in different soil layers based on the relative soil water availability and the root fraction of each layer within the rooting zone. This approach is also used as the default in the Common Land Model (CoLM). This approach often significantly underestimates plant transpiration during dry periods. Therefore, more realistic RWU functions are needed in land surface models. In this study, the modified CoLM with root hydraulic redistribution (HR) and compensatory water uptake (CWU) was evaluated against the CoLM with the default approach by comparing the observed and simulated latent and sensible heat fluxes observed from three sites that experience seasonal drought over the measured periods. We found that the CoLM using the default RWU significantly underestimated latent heat fluxes and overestimated the sensible heat fluxes over dry periods, whereas those biases were significantly reduced by the CoLM with HR and CWU functions. We also ran global offline simulations using the revised CoLM to evaluate the performance of these alternative RWU functions on the global scale. Compared with the estimated latent heat fluxes from the FLUXNET-model tree ensemble model product, CoLM with HR and CWU functions significantly improved the estimated latent heat fluxes over the Amazon, Southern Africa, and Central Asia during their dry seasons. Therefore, we recommend the implementation of HR and CWU in land surface models.

  19. Compensatory Motor Neuron Response to Chromatolysis in the Murine hSOD1G93A Model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riancho, Javier; Ruiz-Soto, Maria; Villagrá, Nuria T.; Berciano, Jose; Berciano, Maria T.; Lafarga, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We investigated neuronal self-defense mechanisms in a murine model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the transgenic hSOD1G93A, during both the asymptomatic and symptomatic stages. This is an experimental model of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress with severe chromatolysis. As a compensatory response to translation inhibition, chromatolytic neurons tended to reorganize the protein synthesis machinery at the perinuclear region, preferentially at nuclear infolding domains enriched in nuclear pores. This organization could facilitate nucleo-cytoplasmic traffic of RNAs and proteins at translation sites. By electron microscopy analysis, we observed that the active euchromatin pattern and the reticulated nucleolar configuration of control motor neurons were preserved in ALS chromatolytic neurons. Moreover the 5′-fluorouridine (5′-FU) transcription assay, at the ultrastructural level, revealed high incorporation of the RNA precursor 5′-FU into nascent RNA. Immunogold particles of 5′-FU incorporation were distributed throughout the euchromatin and on the dense fibrillar component of the nucleolus in both control and ALS motor neurons. The high rate of rRNA transcription in ALS motor neurons could maintain ribosome biogenesis under conditions of severe dysfunction of proteostasis. Collectively, the perinuclear reorganization of protein synthesis machinery, the predominant euchromatin architecture, and the active nucleolar transcription could represent compensatory mechanisms in ALS motor neurons in response to the disturbance of ER proteostasis. In this scenario, epigenetic activation of chromatin and nucleolar transcription could have important therapeutic implications for neuroprotection in ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. Although histone deacetylase inhibitors are currently used as therapeutic agents, we raise the untapped potential of the nucleolar transcription of ribosomal genes as an exciting new target for the therapy of some neurodegenerative

  20. Compensatory eye movements in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.M. van Alphen (Arjan)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis will address the generation of compensatory eye movements in naturally mutated or genetically modified mice. The reason for generating compensatory eye movements is solely related to the requirements for good vision. In a subject moving through its environment the projection

  1. Learnings from Compensatory, Preschool Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J. McVicker

    This paper presents a discussion of the value of compensatory education for preschool children from poor and uneducated families, focusing on knowledge gained from 12 years of experience with compensatory programs in the United States. The development of Project Head Start is described, and the role of behavioral science research in the…

  2. Monte Carlo modeling for realizing optimized management of failed fuel replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Kazunori; Yamamoto, Yasunori; Nakasuji, Toshiki

    2014-01-01

    Fuel cladding is one of the key components in a fission reactor to keep confining radioactive materials inside a fuel tube. During reactor operation, the cladding is however sometimes breached and radioactive materials leak from the fuel ceramic pellet into the coolant water through the breach. The primary coolant water is therefore monitored so that any leak is quickly detected, where the coolant water is periodically sampled and the concentration of, for example the radioactive iodine 131 (I-131), is measured. Depending on the measured concentration, the faulty fuel assembly with leaking rod is removed from the reactor and replaced by new one immediately or at the next refueling. In the present study, an effort has been made to develop a methodology to optimize the management for replacement of failed fuels due to cladding failures using the I-131 concentration measured in the sampled coolant water. A model numerical equation is proposed to describe the time evolution of I-131 concentration due to fuel leaks, and is then solved using the Monte-Carlo method as a function of sampling rate. Our results have indicated that, in order to achieve the rationalized management of failed fuels, higher resolution to detect a small amount of I-131 is not necessarily required but more frequent sampling is favorable. (author)

  3. Adding propensity scores to pure prediction models fails to improve predictive performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy S. Nowacki

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Propensity score usage seems to be growing in popularity leading researchers to question the possible role of propensity scores in prediction modeling, despite the lack of a theoretical rationale. It is suspected that such requests are due to the lack of differentiation regarding the goals of predictive modeling versus causal inference modeling. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to formally examine the effect of propensity scores on predictive performance. Our hypothesis is that a multivariable regression model that adjusts for all covariates will perform as well as or better than those models utilizing propensity scores with respect to model discrimination and calibration.Methods. The most commonly encountered statistical scenarios for medical prediction (logistic and proportional hazards regression were used to investigate this research question. Random cross-validation was performed 500 times to correct for optimism. The multivariable regression models adjusting for all covariates were compared with models that included adjustment for or weighting with the propensity scores. The methods were compared based on three predictive performance measures: (1 concordance indices; (2 Brier scores; and (3 calibration curves.Results. Multivariable models adjusting for all covariates had the highest average concordance index, the lowest average Brier score, and the best calibration. Propensity score adjustment and inverse probability weighting models without adjustment for all covariates performed worse than full models and failed to improve predictive performance with full covariate adjustment.Conclusion. Propensity score techniques did not improve prediction performance measures beyond multivariable adjustment. Propensity scores are not recommended if the analytical goal is pure prediction modeling.

  4. N-acetylcysteine manipulation fails to elicit an increase in glutathione in a teleost model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birnie-Gauvin, Kim; Larsen, Martin Hage; Aarestrup, Kim

    2018-01-01

    be synthesized from administered N-acetylcysteine (NAC). NAC has therefore often been used in a wide range of taxa to manipulate levels of GSH. Our objective was to validate this approach in a wild temperate teleost fish model, the brown trout (Salmo trutta). We used intracoelomic injections of NAC in saline...... and vegetable shortening, at two different concentrations (100 and 400 mg/kg), with the appropriate controls and shams, under controlled laboratory settings. We found that NAC failed to elicit an increase in GSH over three time periods and concluded that NAC is not an effective method to enhance GSH levels...... in teleost fish using the concentrations and vehicles tested here. We emphasize the importance of validation studies across all new species/taxa when possible and suggest that more investigation is required with regard toNAC manipulation in fish if this approach is to be used...

  5. Comparative Study of Compensatory Liver Regeneration in a Rat Model: Portal Vein Ligation Only versus Sequential Ligation of the Portal Vein and Hepatic Artery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Soo Young [Dept. of Pathology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Gyeong Sik [Dept. of Radiology, CHA Bundang Medical Center, College of Medicine, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Mo [Dept. of Surgery, Seoul Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    To compare the volume change and the regenerative capacity between portal vein ligation (embolization) (PVL) and heterochronous PVL with hepatic artery ligation (HAL) in a rodent model. The animals were separated into three groups: group I, ligation of the left lateral and median portal vein branches; group II, completion of PVL, followed by ligation of the same branches of the hepatic artery after 48 h; control group, laparotomy without ligation was performed. Five rats from each group were sacrificed on 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after the operation. Volume change measurement, liver function tests and immunohistochemical analysis were performed. The volume of the nonligated lobe between groups I and II was not significantly different by day 5 and day 7. Mean alanine aminotransferase and total bilirubin levels were significantly higher in group II, while the albumin level was higher in group I. Both c-kit- and MIB-5-positive cells used in the activity detection of regeneration were more prevalent in group I on day 1, 3, and 5, with statistical significance. There was no operation related mortality. PVL alone is safe and effective in compensatory liver regeneration. Performing both PVL and HAL does not confer any additional benefits.

  6. A risk assessment and control model for the failing Björk-Shiley convexo-concave heart valve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koornneef, F.; van Gaalen, G. L.; de Mol, B. A.

    1996-01-01

    For risk assessment and control of the failing Björk-Shiley convexo-concave heart valve, we present a life cycle-based complex system model and a risk intensity assessment model, allowing consistent analysis of this complex medical problem and identification of all pertinent aspects of

  7. Compensatory axon sprouting for very slow axonal die‐back in a transgenic model of spinal muscular atrophy type III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udina, Esther; Putman, Charles T.; Harris, Luke R.; Tyreman, Neil; Cook, Victoria E.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Smn +/− transgenic mouse is a model of the mildest form of spinal muscular atrophy.Although there is a loss of spinal motoneurons in 11‐month‐old animals, muscular force is maintained.This maintained muscular force is mediated by reinnervation of the denervated fibres by surviving motoneurons.The spinal motoneurons in these animals do not show an increased susceptibility to death after nerve injury and they retain their regenerative capacity.We conclude that the hypothesized immaturity of the neuromuscular system in this model cannot explain the loss of motoneurons by systematic die‐back. Abstract Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive disorder in humans and is the leading genetic cause of infantile death. Patients lack the SMN1 gene with the severity of the disease depending on the number of copies of the highly homologous SMN2 gene. Although motoneuron death in the Smn +/− transgenic mouse model of the mildest form of SMA, SMA type III, has been reported, we have used retrograde tracing of sciatic and femoral motoneurons in the hindlimb with recording of muscle and motor unit isometric forces to count the number of motoneurons with intact neuromuscular connections. Thereby, we investigated whether incomplete maturation of the neuromuscular system induced by survival motoneuron protein (SMN) defects is responsible for die‐back of axons relative to survival of motoneurons. First, a reduction of ∼30% of backlabelled motoneurons began relatively late, at 11 months of age, with a significant loss of 19% at 7 months. Motor axon die‐back was affirmed by motor unit number estimation. Loss of functional motor units was fully compensated by axonal sprouting to retain normal contractile force in four hindlimb muscles (three fast‐twitch and one slow‐twitch) innervated by branches of the sciatic nerve. Second, our evaluation of whether axotomy of motoneurons in the adult Smn +/− transgenic mouse increases their

  8. Compensatory axon sprouting for very slow axonal die-back in a transgenic model of spinal muscular atrophy type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udina, Esther; Putman, Charles T; Harris, Luke R; Tyreman, Neil; Cook, Victoria E; Gordon, Tessa

    2017-03-01

    Smn +/- transgenic mouse is a model of the mildest form of spinal muscular atrophy. Although there is a loss of spinal motoneurons in 11-month-old animals, muscular force is maintained. This maintained muscular force is mediated by reinnervation of the denervated fibres by surviving motoneurons. The spinal motoneurons in these animals do not show an increased susceptibility to death after nerve injury and they retain their regenerative capacity. We conclude that the hypothesized immaturity of the neuromuscular system in this model cannot explain the loss of motoneurons by systematic die-back. Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive disorder in humans and is the leading genetic cause of infantile death. Patients lack the SMN1 gene with the severity of the disease depending on the number of copies of the highly homologous SMN2 gene. Although motoneuron death in the Smn +/- transgenic mouse model of the mildest form of SMA, SMA type III, has been reported, we have used retrograde tracing of sciatic and femoral motoneurons in the hindlimb with recording of muscle and motor unit isometric forces to count the number of motoneurons with intact neuromuscular connections. Thereby, we investigated whether incomplete maturation of the neuromuscular system induced by survival motoneuron protein (SMN) defects is responsible for die-back of axons relative to survival of motoneurons. First, a reduction of ∼30% of backlabelled motoneurons began relatively late, at 11 months of age, with a significant loss of 19% at 7 months. Motor axon die-back was affirmed by motor unit number estimation. Loss of functional motor units was fully compensated by axonal sprouting to retain normal contractile force in four hindlimb muscles (three fast-twitch and one slow-twitch) innervated by branches of the sciatic nerve. Second, our evaluation of whether axotomy of motoneurons in the adult Smn +/- transgenic mouse increases their susceptibility to cell death demonstrated

  9. Failing Decision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Recently the Danish subway trains have begun to announce “on time” when they arrive at a station on time. This action reflects a worrying acceptance of the normality of failure. If trains were generally expected to be on time, there would be no reason to – triumphantly – announce it. This chapter...... as a controlled cost for achieving organizational goals. Decisions must fail so the organization can succeed. This chapter uses two cases to elaborate on these ideas. By way of introduction, I will reflect on the notion of ‘failing decisions’ within organization and decision theory. This chapter is also propelled...

  10. Testing the additive versus the compensatory hypothesis of mortality from ring recovery data using a random effects model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaub, M.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of an additional source of mortality with the underlying “natural” one strongly affects population dynamics. We propose an alternative way to test between two forms of interaction, total additivity and compensation. In contrast to existing approaches, only ring-recovery data where the cause of death of each recovered individual is known are needed. Cause-specific mortality proportions are estimated based on a multistate capture-recapture model. The hypotheses are tested by inspecting the correlation between the cause-specific mortality proportions. A variance decomposition is performed to obtain a proper estimate of the true process correlation. The estimation of the cause-specific mortality proportions is the most critical part of the approach. It works well if at least one of the two mortality rates varies across time and the two recovery rates are constant across time. We illustrate this methodology by a case study of White Storks Ciconia ciconia where we tested whether mortality induced by power line collision is additive to other forms of mortality.

  11. Learning Factor Models of Students at Risk of Failing in the Early Stage of Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Geraldine; McGuinness, Colm; Owende, Philip; Hofmann, Markus

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on a study to predict students at risk of failing based on data available prior to commencement of first year. The study was conducted over three years, 2010 to 2012, on a student population from a range of academic disciplines, n=1,207. Data was gathered from both student enrollment data and an online, self-reporting,…

  12. OnabotulinumtoxinA therapy for compensatory hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adefusika, Jessica A; Brewer, Jerry D

    2013-09-01

    Compensatory hyperhidrosis due to the treatment for focal primary hyperhidrosis can be devastating and life-altering. The purpose of this paper is to discuss use of the iodine starch test and dilute botulinum toxin to decrease compensatory hyperhidrosis over large surface areas. A large area of the trunk affected by compensatory hyperhidrosis was treated with dilute botulinum toxin therapy using a starch iodine test for localization. The patient had exceptional results with his compensatory truncal sweating returning to normal and remaining stable for multiple months. Treating compensatory hyperhidrosis of large surface areas with dilute botulinum toxin therapy is effective and safe. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Anabolic-androgenic steroid does not enhance compensatory muscle hypertrophy but significantly diminish muscle damages in the rat surgical ablation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Tetsuro; Uchiyama, Yoshiyasu; Okada, Yoshinori; Tono, Kayoko; Nitta, Masahiro; Hoshi, Akio; Akatsuka, Akira

    2009-07-01

    Cellular responses in the compensatory hypertrophied (plantaris) muscle induced by surgical ablation of synergistic muscles (soleus and gastrocnemius) were determined during 10-week anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) treatment. Adult Wistar male rats were divided randomly into the Control and Steroid groups, and contralateral surgery was performed. Nandrolone decanoate was administered to the Steroid group. [3H]thymidine and [14C]leucine labeling were used to determine the serial changes in cellular mitotic activity and amino acid uptake. Myogenic cells and cellular responses in blood vessels and nerve fibers were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Significantly lower cellular mitotic activity associated with lower volume of muscle fiber necrosis was observed in the Steroid group during the first week. However, amino acid uptake and final muscle wet weight gain did not differ between the groups. Marked activation/proliferation of muscular, vascular, and peripheral nerve-related cells was seen with the inflammatory responses in both groups. However, this activation was dependent on the volume of muscle fiber damage and was not preferentially accelerated by AAS loading. These results indicated that AAS loading significantly diminished muscle fiber damages, but they did not accelerate final muscle wet weight gain and activation of myogenic, vascular, and peripheral nerve related cells in the compensatory enlarged muscles.

  14. The Kimball Free-Cloud Model: A Failed Innovation in Chemical Education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William B.

    2014-01-01

    This historical review traces the origins of the Kimball free-cloud model of the chemical bond, otherwise known as the charge-cloud or tangent-sphere model, and the central role it played in attempts to reform the introductory chemical curriculum at both the high school and college levels in the 1960s. It also critically evaluates the limitations…

  15. Why most dieters fail but some succeed: A goal conflict model of eating behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroebe, W.; van Koningsbruggen, G.M.; Papies, E.K.; Aarts, H.

    2013-01-01

    Theories of eating regulation often attribute overweight to a malfunction of homeostatic regulation of body weight. With the goal conflict model of eating, we present a new perspective that attributes the difficulty of chronic dieters (i.e., restrained eaters) in regulating their food intake to a

  16. Improvement of preclinical animal models for autoimmune-mediated disorders via reverse translation of failed therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    't Hart, Bert A.; Jagessar, S. Anwar; Kap, Yolanda S.; Haanstra, Krista G.; Philippens, Ingrid H. C. H. M.; Serguera, Che; Langermans, Jan; Vierboom, Michel

    The poor translational validity of autoimmune-mediated inflammatory disease (AIMID) models in inbred and specific pathogen-free (SPF) rodents underlies the high attrition of new treatments for the corresponding human disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a frequently used

  17. What Happens when Representations Fail to Represent? Graduate Students' Mental Models of Organic Chemistry Diagrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Amanda M.; Kraft, Adam; Bhattacharyya, Gautam

    2010-01-01

    As part of our investigations into the development of representational competence, we report results from a study in which we elicited sixteen graduate students' expressed mental models of commonly-used terms for describing organic reactions--functional group, nucleophile/electrophile, acid/base--and for diagrams of transformations and their…

  18. Why Most Dieters Fail but Some Succeed: A Goal Conflict Model of Eating Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroebe, Wolfgang; van Koningsbruggen, Guido M.; Papies, Esther K.; Aarts, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Theories of eating regulation often attribute overweight to a malfunction of homeostatic regulation of body weight. With the goal conflict model of eating, we present a new perspective that attributes the difficulty of chronic dieters (i.e., restrained eaters) in regulating their food intake to a conflict between 2 incompatible goals--namely,…

  19. Medical students and professionalism - Do the hidden curriculum and current role models fail our future doctors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joynt, Gavin Matthew; Wong, Wai-Tat; Ling, Lowell; Lee, Anna

    2017-12-21

    Formal medical curricula aim to promote professionalism through learning from lectures, interactive tutorials and simulations. We report an exploratory voting exercise, conducted within a new integrated professional teaching module, examining the likely influence on students' knowledge and perceptions of truth telling. Responses were collected from cohorts of final year students over a six-year period. Students were asked to pick between two responses to a standardized clinical vignette, firstly the response that they personally thought was the more desirable action, and subsequently the response they believed would most likely result in the context of everyday real-life clinical practice. The difference (proportional change) in voting for "avoid full disclosure" from vote 1 (more desirable action) to vote 2 (likely real-life response) was 50% (95% CI: 36-64%, p strategies to manage the hidden curriculum, prepare clinical teachers to be good role models, and prepare students to be discerning about the hidden curriculum and when choosing role models.

  20. Why a neuromaturational model of memory fails: exuberant learning in early infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovee-Collier, Carolyn; Giles, Amy

    2010-02-01

    The characteristics of memory in infants and adults seem vastly different. The neuromaturational model attributes these differences to an ontogenetic change in the basic memory process, namely, to the hierarchical maturation of two distinct memory systems. The early-maturing (implicit) system is functional during the first third of infancy and supports the gradual learning of perceptual and motor skills; the late-maturing (explicit) system supports representations of contextually specific events, relationships, and associations. An alternative model holds that the basic memory process does not change, but what infants and adults select to encode for learning does. This ontogenetic change in selective attention has been mistaken for an ontogenetic shift in the basic memory process. Over the last 25 years, evidence from transfer studies with developing rats and human infants has revealed that the first third of infancy is actually a period of exuberant learning that ends, not coincidentally, at the same age that the late-maturing memory system presumably emerges. This article reviews data from recent studies of sensory preconditioning, potentiation, associative chains, and transitive inference with human infants that support this conclusion-data for which the neuromaturational model cannot account. Fast mapping is a general learning mechanism that accounts for this evidence. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Compensatory Reading among ESL Learners: A Reading Strategy Heuristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Shaik Abdul Malik Mohamed; Petras, Yusof Ede; Mohamed, Abdul Rashid; Eng, Lin Siew

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to gain an insight to the relationship of two different concepts about reading comprehension, namely, the linear model of comprehension and the interactive compensatory theory. Drawing on both the above concepts, a heuristic was constructed about three different reading strategies determined by the specific ways the literal,…

  2. T-tubule disruption promotes calcium alternans in failing ventricular myocytes: mechanistic insights from computational modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivala, Michael; Song, Zhen; Weiss, James N; Qu, Zhilin

    2015-02-01

    In heart failure (HF), T-tubule (TT) disruption contributes to dyssynchronous calcium (Ca) release and impaired contraction, but its role in arrhythmogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we investigate the effects of TT disruption and other HF remodeling factors on Ca alternans in ventricular myocytes using computer modeling. A ventricular myocyte model with detailed spatiotemporal Ca cycling modeled by a coupled Ca release unit (CRU) network was used, in which the L-type Ca channels and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels were simulated by random Markov transitions. TT disruption, which removes the L-type Ca channels from the associated CRUs, results in "orphaned" RyR clusters and thus provides increased opportunity for spark-induced Ca sparks to occur. This effect combined with other HF remodeling factors promoted alternans by two distinct mechanisms: 1) for normal sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca ATPase (SERCA) activity, alternans was caused by both CRU refractoriness and coupling. The increased opportunity for spark-induced sparks by TT disruption combined with the enhanced CRU coupling by Ca elevation in the presence or absence of increased RyR leakiness facilitated spark synchronization on alternate beats to promote Ca alternans; 2) for down-regulated SERCA, alternans was caused by the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca load-dependent mechanism, independent of CRU refractoriness. TT disruption and increased RyR leakiness shifted and steepened the SR Ca release-load relationship, which combines with down-regulated SERCA to promote Ca alternans. In conclusion, the mechanisms of Ca alternans for normal and down-regulated SERCA are different, and TT disruption promotes Ca alternans by both mechanisms, which may contribute to alternans at different stages of HF. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Proceedings: Conference on Compensatory/Remedial Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fea, Henry R., Ed.; And Others

    This document presents the papers and discussions from the Conference on Compensatory/Remedial Education. The contents include: "Institutional Programs for the Low Achievers" by Joan G. Roloff; "Communication in Compensatory Education" by Henry R. Fea; "Seminar: Special Programs for Minorities" by Constance Acholonu; "Seminar: Special Programs for…

  4. Protein dynamics associated with failed and rescued learning in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Mahiuddin Ahmed

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is caused by an extra copy of human chromosome 21 (Hsa21. Although it is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability (ID, there are, as yet, no effective pharmacotherapies. The Ts65Dn mouse model of DS is trisomic for orthologs of ∼55% of Hsa21 classical protein coding genes. These mice display many features relevant to those seen in DS, including deficits in learning and memory (L/M tasks requiring a functional hippocampus. Recently, the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine, was shown to rescue performance of the Ts65Dn in several L/M tasks. These studies, however, have not been accompanied by molecular analyses. In previous work, we described changes in protein expression induced in hippocampus and cortex in control mice after exposure to context fear conditioning (CFC, with and without memantine treatment. Here, we extend this analysis to Ts65Dn mice, measuring levels of 85 proteins/protein modifications, including components of MAP kinase and MTOR pathways, and subunits of NMDA receptors, in cortex and hippocampus of Ts65Dn mice after failed learning in CFC and after learning was rescued by memantine. We show that, compared with wild type littermate controls, (i of the dynamic responses seen in control mice in normal learning, >40% also occur in Ts65Dn in failed learning or are compensated by baseline abnormalities, and thus are considered necessary but not sufficient for successful learning, and (ii treatment with memantine does not in general normalize the initial protein levels but instead induces direct and indirect responses in approximately half the proteins measured and results in normalization of the endpoint protein levels. Together, these datasets provide a first view of the complexities associated with pharmacological rescue of learning in the Ts65Dn. Extending such studies to additional drugs and mouse models of DS will aid in identifying pharmacotherapies for effective

  5. Failed Radiatively Accelerated Dusty Outflow Model of the Broad Line Region in Active Galactic Nuclei. I. Analytical Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerny, B.; Panda, S.; Wildy, C.; Sniegowska, M. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, J.-M. [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Hryniewicz, K.; Sredzinska, J. [Copernicus Astronomical Center, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Karas, V., E-mail: bcz@cft.edu.pl [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences, Bocni II 1401, CZ-141 00 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-09-10

    The physical origin of the broad line region in active galactic nuclei is still unclear despite many years of observational studies. The reason is that the region is unresolved, and the reverberation mapping results imply a complex velocity field. We adopt a theory-motivated approach to identify the principal mechanism responsible for this complex phenomenon. We consider the possibility that the role of dust is essential. We assume that the local radiation pressure acting on the dust in the accretion disk atmosphere launches the outflow of material, but higher above the disk the irradiation from the central parts causes dust evaporation and a subsequent fallback. This failed radiatively accelerated dusty outflow is expected to represent the material forming low ionization lines. In this paper we formulate simple analytical equations to describe the cloud motion, including the evaporation phase. The model is fully described just by the basic parameters of black hole mass, accretion rate, black hole spin, and viewing angle. We study how the spectral line generic profiles correspond to this dynamic. We show that the virial factor calculated from our model strongly depends on the black hole mass in the case of enhanced dust opacity, and thus it then correlates with the line width. This could explain why the virial factor measured in galaxies with pseudobulges differs from that obtained from objects with classical bulges, although the trend predicted by the current version of the model is opposite to the observed trend.

  6. Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Intraspinal Transplants Fail to Improve Motor Outcomes in a Severe Model of Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, John H; Graham, Lori; Staufenberg, Eileen; Collyer, Eileen; Koffler, Jacob; Tuszynski, Mark H

    2016-06-15

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have been reported to exert potential neuroprotective properties in models of neurotrauma, although precise mechanisms underlying their benefits are poorly understood. Despite this lack of knowledge, several clinical trials have been initiated using these cells. To determine whether local mechanisms mediate BMSC neuroprotective actions, we grafted allogeneic BMSCs to sites of severe, compressive spinal cord injury (SCI) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Cells were administered 48 h after the original injury. Additional animals received allogeneic MSCs that were genetically modified to secrete brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to further determine whether a locally administered neurotrophic factor provides or extends neuroprotection. When assessed 2 months post-injury in a clinically relevant model of severe SCI, BMSC grafts with or without BDNF secretion failed to improve motor outcomes. Thus, allogeneic grafts of BMSCs do not appear to act through local mechanisms, and future clinical trials that acutely deliver BMSCs to actual sites of injury within days are unlikely to be beneficial. Additional studies should address whether systemic administration of BMSCs alter outcomes from neurotrauma.

  7. The genomic landscape of compensatory evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Szamecz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive evolution is generally assumed to progress through the accumulation of beneficial mutations. However, as deleterious mutations are common in natural populations, they generate a strong selection pressure to mitigate their detrimental effects through compensatory genetic changes. This process can potentially influence directions of adaptive evolution by enabling evolutionary routes that are otherwise inaccessible. Therefore, the extent to which compensatory mutations shape genomic evolution is of central importance. Here, we studied the capacity of the baker's yeast genome to compensate the complete loss of genes during evolution, and explored the long-term consequences of this process. We initiated laboratory evolutionary experiments with over 180 haploid baker's yeast genotypes, all of which initially displayed slow growth owing to the deletion of a single gene. Compensatory evolution following gene loss was rapid and pervasive: 68% of the genotypes reached near wild-type fitness through accumulation of adaptive mutations elsewhere in the genome. As compensatory mutations have associated fitness costs, genotypes with especially low fitnesses were more likely to be subjects of compensatory evolution. Genomic analysis revealed that as compensatory mutations were generally specific to the functional defect incurred, convergent evolution at the molecular level was extremely rare. Moreover, the majority of the gene expression changes due to gene deletion remained unrestored. Accordingly, compensatory evolution promoted genomic divergence of parallel evolving populations. However, these different evolutionary outcomes are not phenotypically equivalent, as they generated diverse growth phenotypes across environments. Taken together, these results indicate that gene loss initiates adaptive genomic changes that rapidly restores fitness, but this process has substantial pleiotropic effects on cellular physiology and evolvability upon

  8. Compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Conquy, Minou; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc

    2009-01-01

    The concept of 'Compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome' (CARS) was proposed in 1997 by Roger Bone (1941-1997) to qualify the consequences of the counter-regulatory mechanisms initiated to limit the overzealous inflammatory process in patients with infectious (sepsis) or non-infectious systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). One major consequence of CARS is the modification of the immune status that could favour the enhanced susceptibility of intensive care patients to nosocomial infections. Indeed, most animal 'two-hit' models illustrate an enhanced sensitivity to infection after a first insult. However, this observation is highly dependent on the experimental procedure. Numerous functions of circulating leukocytes are altered in sepsis and SIRS patients, as well as in animal models of sepsis or SIRS. However, this is rather a reprogramming of circulating leukocytes, since there is not a global defect of the immune cells functions. Furthermore, within tissues, leukocytes are rather primed or activated than immunosuppressed. Thus, CARS may be considered as an adapted compartmentalized response with the aim to silence some acute proinflammatory genes, and to maintain the possible expression of certain genes involved in the anti-infectious process.

  9. Mycobacterium ulcerans fails to infect through skin abrasions in a guinea pig infection model: implications for transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Heather R; Mosi, Lydia; Donnell, Robert; Aqqad, Maha; Merritt, Richard W; Small, Pamela L C

    2014-04-01

    Transmission of M. ulcerans, the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer, from the environment to humans remains an enigma despite decades of research. Major transmission hypotheses propose 1) that M. ulcerans is acquired through an insect bite or 2) that bacteria enter an existing wound through exposure to a contaminated environment. In studies reported here, a guinea pig infection model was developed to determine whether Buruli ulcer could be produced through passive inoculation of M. ulcerans onto a superficial abrasion. The choice of an abrasion model was based on the fact that most bacterial pathogens infecting the skin are able to infect an open lesion, and that abrasions are extremely common in children. Our studies show that after a 90d infection period, an ulcer was present at intra-dermal injection sites of all seven animals infected, whereas topical application of M. ulcerans failed to establish an infection. Mycobacterium ulcerans was cultured from all injection sites whereas infected abrasion sites healed and were culture negative. A 14d experiment was conducted to determine how long organisms persisted after inoculation. Mycobacterium ulcerans was isolated from abrasions at one hour and 24 hours post infection, but cultures from later time points were negative. Abrasion sites were qPCR positive up to seven days post infection, but negative at later timepoints. In contrast, M. ulcerans DNA was detected at intra-dermal injection sites throughout the study. M. ulcerans was cultured from injection sites at each time point. These results suggest that injection of M. ulcerans into the skin greatly facilitates infection and lends support for the role of an invertebrate vector or other route of entry such as a puncture wound or deep laceration where bacteria would be contained within the lesion. Infection through passive inoculation into an existing abrasion appears a less likely route of entry.

  10. LA LÓGICA DIFUSA COMPENSATORIA / THE COMPENSATORY FUZZY LOGIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Cejas-Montero

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    La Lógica Difusa Compensatoria es un modelo lógico que permite la modelación simultánea de los procesos deductivos y de toma de decisiones. Sus características más importantes son: la flexibilidad, la tolerancia con la imprecisión, la capacidad para moldear problemas no-lineales y su fundamento en el lenguaje de sentido común. El artículo pretende llevar a la comunidad académico-empresarial las ideas fundamentales de la Lógica Difusa Compensatoria, ilustrándola en sus posibles campos de aplicación para lograr la competitividad de una organización.

    Abstract

    The Compensatory Fuzzy Logic is a logical model that allows the simultaneous modeling of the deductive and decision-making processes. The most important characteristics of Compensatory Fuzzy Logic are: the flexibility, the tolerance with the inaccuracy, the capacity to model no-lineal problems and its foundation in the language of common sense. The article seeks to bring the basic ideas of the Compensatory Fuzzy Logic to the academic–managerial community, illustrating it in its possible fields of application, in order to achieve the competitiveness of an organization.

  11. Engaging Future Failing States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    military missions in the Middle East, the Balkans, Africa, Asia , and South America. There is an increasing proliferation of failed and failing states...disparity, overpopulation , food security, health services availability, migration pressures, environmental degradation, personal and 22 community

  12. Compensatory Hypertrophy of Skeletal Muscle: Contractile Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianuzzo, C. D.; Chen, V.

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment using rats that demonstrates contractile characteristics of normal and hypertrophied muscle. Compensatory hypertrophy of the plantaris muscle is induced by surgical removal of the synergistic gastrocnemium muscle. Includes methods for determination of contractile properties of normal and hypertrophied muscle and…

  13. Early compensatory sensory re-education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Hugo R; Aguado, Leda

    2003-02-01

    After a neurorrhaphy, there will be a distal disconnection between the cortex and skin receptors, along with interruption of sensibility information. This report demonstrates the efficacy of a new sensory re-education program for achieving optimal sensation in a relatively short time. Between 1999 and 2001, in the authors' Hand Rehabilitation Department, 11 patients with previous neurorrhaphy were subjected to a program of early "compensatory sensory re-education." Lesions were caused by clean cut. There were 13 primary digital nerve procedures, 12 at the distal palmar MP level, and one at the radial dorsal branch of the index (just after emerging from the common digital nerve). The technique of compensatory sensory re-education was based on a previous, but modified, sensory re-education method. In order to evaluate the results in the compensatory sensory re-education series described, additional tests for evaluation of achieved functional sensibility were used. The authors' best results were achieved in a maximum of 8 weeks (4-8 weeks), much less time than with the original method (1-2 years). Using the British classification, it was possible to compare the achieved levels of sensibility and the time required for optimal results. The different methods of sensibility re-education may be similar, but with the authors' compensatory sensory re-education method, substantial time is saved.

  14. Why Do Drivers Use Mobile Phones While Driving? The Contribution of Compensatory Beliefs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronggang Zhou

    Full Text Available The current study is the first to investigate the contribution of compensatory beliefs (i.e., the belief that the negative effects of an unsafe behavior can be "neutralized" by engaging in another safe behavior; e.g., "I can use a mobile phone now because I will slow down " on drivers' mobile phone use while driving. The effects of drivers' personal characteristics on compensatory beliefs, mobile phone use and self-regulatory behaviors were also examined. A series of questions were administered to drivers, which included (1 personal measures, (2 scales that measured compensatory beliefs generally in substance use and with regard to driving safety, and (3 questions to measure drivers' previous primary mobile phone usage and corresponding self-regulatory actions. Overall, drivers reported a low likelihood of compensatory beliefs, prior mobile phone use, and a strong frequency of self-regulatory behaviors. Respondents who had a higher tendency toward compensatory beliefs reported more incidents or crash involvement caused by making or answering calls and sending or reading messages. The findings provide strong support for the contribution of compensatory beliefs in predicting mobile phone usage in the context of driving. Compensatory beliefs can explain 41% and 43% of the variance in the active activities of making calls and texting/sending messages compared with 18% and 31% of the variance in the passive activities of answering calls and reading messages. Among the regression models for predicting self-regulatory behaviors at the tactical or operational level, compensatory beliefs emerge as significant predictors only in predicting shorter conversations while on a call. The findings and limitations of the current study are discussed.

  15. Why Do Drivers Use Mobile Phones While Driving? The Contribution of Compensatory Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ronggang; Yu, Mengli; Wang, Xinyi

    2016-01-01

    The current study is the first to investigate the contribution of compensatory beliefs (i.e., the belief that the negative effects of an unsafe behavior can be "neutralized" by engaging in another safe behavior; e.g., "I can use a mobile phone now because I will slow down ") on drivers’ mobile phone use while driving. The effects of drivers’ personal characteristics on compensatory beliefs, mobile phone use and self-regulatory behaviors were also examined. A series of questions were administered to drivers, which included (1) personal measures, (2) scales that measured compensatory beliefs generally in substance use and with regard to driving safety, and (3) questions to measure drivers’ previous primary mobile phone usage and corresponding self-regulatory actions. Overall, drivers reported a low likelihood of compensatory beliefs, prior mobile phone use, and a strong frequency of self-regulatory behaviors. Respondents who had a higher tendency toward compensatory beliefs reported more incidents or crash involvement caused by making or answering calls and sending or reading messages. The findings provide strong support for the contribution of compensatory beliefs in predicting mobile phone usage in the context of driving. Compensatory beliefs can explain 41% and 43% of the variance in the active activities of making calls and texting/sending messages compared with 18% and 31% of the variance in the passive activities of answering calls and reading messages. Among the regression models for predicting self-regulatory behaviors at the tactical or operational level, compensatory beliefs emerge as significant predictors only in predicting shorter conversations while on a call. The findings and limitations of the current study are discussed. PMID:27494524

  16. Analysis of the fitness effect of compensatory mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Liqing; Watson, Layne T.

    2008-01-01

    This paper extends previous work on the Darwinian evolutionary fitness effect of the fixation of deleterious mutations by incorporating compensatory mutations, which are mutations (deleterious by themselves) that ameliorate other deleterious mutations, thus reducing the genetic load of populations. Since having compensatory mutations essentially changes the distributional shapes of deleterious mutations, the effect of compensatory mutations is studied by comparing distributions of deleterious...

  17. Vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce epitope-specific T cell responses but confers non-specific protective immunity in a malaria model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon H Apte

    Full Text Available Vaccines against many pathogens for which conventional approaches have failed remain an unmet public health priority. Synthetic peptide-based vaccines offer an attractive alternative to whole protein and whole organism vaccines, particularly for complex pathogens that cause chronic infection. Previously, we have reported a promising lipid core peptide (LCP vaccine delivery system that incorporates the antigen, carrier, and adjuvant in a single molecular entity. LCP vaccines have been used to deliver several peptide subunit-based vaccine candidates and induced high titre functional antibodies and protected against Group A streptococcus in mice. Herein, we have evaluated whether LCP constructs incorporating defined CD4(+ and/or CD8(+ T cell epitopes could induce epitope-specific T cell responses and protect against pathogen challenge in a rodent malaria model. We show that LCP vaccines failed to induce an expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells following primary immunization or by boosting. We further demonstrated that the LCP vaccines induced a non-specific type 2 polarized cytokine response, rather than an epitope-specific canonical CD8(+ T cell type 1 response. Cytotoxic responses of unknown specificity were also induced. These non-specific responses were able to protect against parasite challenge. These data demonstrate that vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce canonical epitope-specific T cell responses, at least in our rodent model, but can nonetheless confer non-specific protective immunity against Plasmodium parasite challenge.

  18. Vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce epitope-specific T cell responses but confers non-specific protective immunity in a malaria model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Simon H; Groves, Penny L; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Fujita, Yoshio; Chang, Chenghung; Toth, Istvan; Doolan, Denise L

    2012-01-01

    Vaccines against many pathogens for which conventional approaches have failed remain an unmet public health priority. Synthetic peptide-based vaccines offer an attractive alternative to whole protein and whole organism vaccines, particularly for complex pathogens that cause chronic infection. Previously, we have reported a promising lipid core peptide (LCP) vaccine delivery system that incorporates the antigen, carrier, and adjuvant in a single molecular entity. LCP vaccines have been used to deliver several peptide subunit-based vaccine candidates and induced high titre functional antibodies and protected against Group A streptococcus in mice. Herein, we have evaluated whether LCP constructs incorporating defined CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T cell epitopes could induce epitope-specific T cell responses and protect against pathogen challenge in a rodent malaria model. We show that LCP vaccines failed to induce an expansion of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells following primary immunization or by boosting. We further demonstrated that the LCP vaccines induced a non-specific type 2 polarized cytokine response, rather than an epitope-specific canonical CD8(+) T cell type 1 response. Cytotoxic responses of unknown specificity were also induced. These non-specific responses were able to protect against parasite challenge. These data demonstrate that vaccination with lipid core peptides fails to induce canonical epitope-specific T cell responses, at least in our rodent model, but can nonetheless confer non-specific protective immunity against Plasmodium parasite challenge.

  19. Compensatory Hypertrophy After Living Donor Nephrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K W; Wu, M W F; Chen, Z; Tai, B C; Goh, Y S B; Lata, R; Vathsala, A; Tiong, H Y

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that kidney volume enhances the estimation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in kidney donors. This study aimed to describe the phenomenon of compensatory hypertrophy after donor nephrectomy as measured on computerized tomographic (CT) scans. An institutional Domain Specific Review Board (DSRB)-approved study involved approaching kidney donors to have a follow up CT scan from 6 months to 1 year after surgery; 29 patients participated; 55% were female. Clinical chart review was performed, and the patient's remaining kidney volume was measured before and after surgery based on CT scans. eGFR was determined with the use of the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease equation. Mean parenchymal volume of the remaining kidney for this population (mean age, 44.3 ± 8.5 y) was 204.7 ± 82.5 cc before surgery and 250.5 ± 113.3 cc after donor nephrectomy. Compensatory hypertrophy occurred in 79.3% of patients (n = 23). Mean increase in remaining kidney volume was 22.4 ± 23.2% after donor nephrectomy in healthy individuals. Over a median follow-up of 52.9 ± 19.8 months, mean eGFR was 68.9 ± 12.4 mL/min/1.73 m(2), with 24.1% of patients (n = 7) in chronic kidney disease grade 3. Absolute and relative change in kidney volume was not associated with sex, race, surgical approach, or background of hypertension (P = NS). There was a trend of decreased hypertrophy with increasing age (P = .5; Spearman correlation, -0.12). In healthy kidney donors, compensatory hypertrophy of the remaining kidney occurs in 79.3% of the patients, with an average increment of about 22.4%. Older patients may have a blunted compensatory hypertrophy response after surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Compensatory growth in slaughter pigs reared under organic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández, José Adalberto; Nørgaard, Jan Værum

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Compensatory growth is the physiological process leading to accelerated growth following a period of growth retardation. This study assessed different feeding strategies that may induce compensatory growth. Pigs from two sire breeds, reared under organic conditions, were subjected to...... that although compensatory growth does occur by re-alimentation after feed restriction, the compensation is far from always complete. The latter is a crucial aspect that has to be taken into account when considering the application of feeding strategies expected to lead to compensatory growth in organic pig...... production. The expectation of compensatory growth alone does not necessarily justify the application of these strategies. Copyright © 2009 Society of Chemical Industry...

  1. Compensatory Measures in European Nature Conservation Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert Van Hoorick

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Birds and Habitats Directives are the cornerstones of EU nature conservation law, aiming at the conservation of the Natura 2000 network, a network of protected sites under these directives, and the protection of species. The protection regime for these sites and species is not absolute: Member States may, under certain conditions, allow plans or projects that can have an adverse impact on nature. In this case compensatory measures can play an important role in safeguarding the Natura 2000 network and ensuring the survival of the protected species.This contribution analyses whether taking compensatory measures is always obligatory, and discusses the aim and the characteristics of compensatory measures, in relation to other kinds of measures such as mitigation measures, usual nature conservation measures, and former nature development measures, and to the assessment of the adverse impact caused by the plan or project and of the alternative solutions. The questions will be discussed in light of the contents of the legislation, the guidance and practice by the European Commission, (legal doctrine and case law, mainly of the Court of Justice of the European Union.

  2. DECOFF Probabilities of Failed Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gintautas, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    A statistical procedure of estimation of Probabilities of Failed Operations is described and exemplified using ECMWF weather forecasts and SIMO output from Rotor Lift test case models. Also safety factor influence is investigated. DECOFF statistical method is benchmarked against standard Alpha...

  3. Nutrient compensatory foraging in a free-living social insect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Keri L.; Gallacher, Anthony P.; Martin, Lizzie; Tong, Desmond; Elgar, Mark A.

    2010-10-01

    The geometric framework model predicts that animal foraging decisions are influenced by their dietary history, with animals targeting a combination of essential nutrients through compensatory foraging. We provide experimental confirmation of nutrient-specific compensatory foraging in a natural, free-living population of social insects by supplementing their diet with sources of protein- or carbohydrate-rich food. Colonies of the ant Iridomyrmex suchieri were provided with feeders containing food rich in either carbohydrate or protein for 6 days, and were then provided with a feeder containing the same or different diet. The patterns of recruitment were consistent with the geometric framework: while feeders with a carbohydrate diet typically attracted more workers than did feeders with protein diet, the difference in recruitment between the two nutrients was smaller if the colonies had had prior access to carbohydrate than protein. Further, fewer ants visited feeders if the colony had had prior access to protein than to carbohydrates, suggesting that the larvae play a role in worker foraging behaviour.

  4. The Role of Environmental Impact Assessment to Compensatory Measures Adoption

    OpenAIRE

    Livia Cristina Pinheiro Lopes; José Claudio Junqueira Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    This article aims to analyze the relationship between Environmental Impact Assessment - EIA, and Countervailing Measures that have been adopted in the environmental licensing. Through methodological critical analysis of legislation and adoption of compensatory measures for environmental licensing, it was identified imperfections, since, often, there is no link between the adopted compensatory measures and impacts verified in the EIA. Besides the compensatory measures arising from legal provis...

  5. A Compensatory Control Account of Meritocracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Goode

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Why are people motivated to support social systems that claim to distribute resources based on hard work and effort, even when those systems seem unfair? Recent research on compensatory control shows that lowered perceptions of personal control motivate a greater endorsement of external systems (e.g., God, government that compensate for a lack of personal control. The present studies demonstrate that U.S. citizens’ faith in a popular economic ideology, namely the belief that hard work guarantees success (i.e., meritocracy, similarly increases under conditions of decreased personal control. We found that a threat to personal control increased participants’ endorsement of meritocracy (Studies 1 and 2. Additionally, lowered perceptions of control led to increased feelings of anxiety regarding the future, but the subsequent endorsement of (Study 2 or exposure to (Study 3 meritocracy attenuated this effect. While the compensatory use of meritocracy may be a phenomenon unique to the United States of America, these studies provide important insight into the appeal and persistence of ideologies in general.

  6. The role of compensatory mutations in the emergence of drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Handel

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Pathogens that evolve resistance to drugs usually have reduced fitness. However, mutations that largely compensate for this reduction in fitness often arise. We investigate how these compensatory mutations affect population-wide resistance emergence as a function of drug treatment. Using a model of gonorrhea transmission dynamics, we obtain generally applicable, qualitative results that show how compensatory mutations lead to more likely and faster resistance emergence. We further show that resistance emergence depends on the level of drug use in a strongly nonlinear fashion. We also discuss what data need to be obtained to allow future quantitative predictions of resistance emergence.

  7. Analysis of urinary human chorionic gonadotrophin concentrations in normal and failing pregnancies using longitudinal, Cox proportional hazards and two-stage modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Lorrae; Zinaman, Michael; Abrams, Keith R; Crowther, Michael J; Johnson, Sarah

    2017-09-01

    Background Human chorionic gonadotrophin is a marker of early pregnancy. This study sought to determine the possibility of being able to distinguish between healthy and failing pregnancies by utilizing patient-associated risk factors and daily urinary human chorionic gonadotrophin concentrations. Methods Data were from a study that collected daily early morning urine samples from women trying to conceive (n = 1505); 250 of whom became pregnant. Data from 129 women who became pregnant (including 44 miscarriages) were included in these analyses. A longitudinal model was used to profile human chorionic gonadotrophin, a Cox proportional hazards model to assess demographic/menstrual history data on the time to failed pregnancy, and a two-stage model to combine these two models. Results The profile for log human chorionic gonadotrophin concentrations in women suffering miscarriage differs to that of viable pregnancies; rate of human chorionic gonadotrophin rise is slower in those suffering a biochemical loss (loss before six weeks, recognized by a rise and fall of human chorionic gonadotrophin) and tends to plateau at a lower log human chorionic gonadotrophin in women suffering an early miscarriage (loss six weeks or later), compared with viable pregnancies. Maternal age, longest cycle length and time from luteinizing hormone surge to human chorionic gonadotrophin reaching 25 mIU/mL were found to be significantly associated with miscarriage risk. The two-stage model found that for an increase of one day in the time from luteinizing hormone surge to human chorionic gonadotrophin reaching 25 mIU/mL, there is a 30% increase in miscarriage risk (hazard ratio: 1.30; 95% confidence interval: 1.04, 1.62). Conclusion Rise of human chorionic gonadotrophin in early pregnancy could be useful to predict pregnancy viability. Daily tracking of urinary human chorionic gonadotrophin may enable early identification of some pregnancies at risk of miscarriage.

  8. Failed endotracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheykhol Islami V

    1995-07-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of failed intubation is higher in obstetric than other surgical patients. Failed intubation was the 2nd commonest cause of mortality during anesthesia. Bearing in mind that failre to intubate may be unavoidable in certain circumstances, it is worth reviewing. The factors, which may contribute to a disastrous out come. Priorities of subsequent management must include maintaining oxygenation and preventing aspiration of gastric contents. Fiber optic intubation is now the technique of choice with a high success rate and with least trauma to the patient.

  9. The Objective Borderline Method (OBM): A Probability-Based Model for Setting up an Objective Pass/Fail Cut-Off Score in Medical Programme Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulruf, Boaz; Turner, Rolf; Poole, Phillippa; Wilkinson, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The decision to pass or fail a medical student is a "high stakes" one. The aim of this study is to introduce and demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of a new objective standard-setting method for determining the pass/fail cut-off score from borderline grades. Three methods for setting up pass/fail cut-off scores were compared: the…

  10. Partial deletion of the ROCK2 protein fails to reduce renal fibrosis in a unilateral ureteral obstruction model in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Itsuko; Egi, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Renal fibrosis is a well‑known cause for the progression of chronic kidney disease. Rho/Rho‑associated coiled‑coil kinase (ROCK) signaling is involved in renal fibrotic processes. Non‑selective ROCK1/2 inhibitors have been reported to reduce renal interstitial fibrosis in a rodent unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model. To clarify the role and contribution of ROCK2 in renal fibrosis, the present study used ROCK2 heterozygous knockout (HKO) mice to assess collagen deposition and fibrosis‑associated gene expression in the kidney of the UUO model. In the ROCK2 HKO mice, the expression level of ROCK2 in the normal kidney was half of that in the kidney of wild‑type (WT) mice. The expression levels of ROCK1 in the ROCK2 HKO mice and WT mice were equivalent. Furthermore, in the ROCK2 HKO and the WT mice, the hydroxyproline content and the gene expression levels of collagen I and transforming growth factor‑β1 in the obstructed kidneys were augmented following UUO. By contrast, the mRNA expression of α‑smooth muscle actin decreased in the ROCK2 HKO mice, compared with that in the WT mice. The activity of ROCK in the obstructed kidneys, indicated by the phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit‑1, which is a non‑selective substrate of ROCK1 and ROCK2, was equivalent among the ROCK2 HKO and WT mice. In conclusion, no differences in renal interstitial fibrosis or UUO‑induced ROCK activity were identified between the ROCK2 HKO and WT mice, indicating that the genetic partial disruption of ROCK2 is insufficient for protecting against renal fibrosis.

  11. Failed fuel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martucci, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    A failed fuel detection apparatus is described for a nuclear reactor having a liquid cooled core comprising a gas collection hood adapted to engage the top of the suspect assembly and means for delivering a stripping gas to the vicinity of the bottom of the suspect fuel assembly. (U.S.)

  12. Who Really Failed? Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiuri, Katherine M.; Leon, Raul A.

    2012-01-01

    Scott Jaschik's (2010) article "Who Really Failed?" details the experience of Dominique Homberger, a tenured faculty member at Louisiana State University (LSU) who was removed from teaching her introductory biology course citing student complaints in regards to "the extreme nature" of the grading policy. This removal has…

  13. FAILED FUEL DISPOSITION STUDY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    In May 2004 alpha contamination was found on the lid of the pre-filter housing in the Sodium Removal Ion Exchange System during routine filter change. Subsequent investigation determined that the alpha contamination likely came from a fuel pin(s) contained in an Ident-69 (ID-69) type pin storage container serial number 9 (ID-69-9) that was washed in the Sodium Removal System (SRS) in January 2004. Because all evidence indicated that the wash water interacted with the fuel, this ID49 is designated as containing a failed fuel pin with gross cladding defect and was set aside in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell until it could be determined how to proceed for long term dry storage of the fuel pin container. This ID49 contained fuel pins from the driver fuel assembly (DFA) 16392, which was identified as a Delayed Neutron Monitor (DNM) leaker assembly. However, this DFA was disassembled and the fuel pin that was thought to be the failed pin was encapsulated and was not located in this ID49 container. This failed fuel disposition study discusses two alternatives that could be used to address long term storage for the contents of ID-69-9. The first alternative evaluated utilizes the current method of identifying and storing DNM leaker fuel pin(s) in tubes and thus, verifying that the alpha contamination found in the SRS came from a failed pin in this pin container. This approach will require unloading selected fuel pins from the ID-69, visually examining and possibly weighing suspect fuel pins to identify the failed pin(s), inserting the failed pin(s) in storage tubes, and reloading the fuel pins into ID49 containers. Safety analysis must be performed to revise the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (Reference 1) for this fuel configuration. The second alternative considered is to store the failed fuel as-is in the ID-69. This was evaluated to determine if this approach would comply with storage requirements. This

  14. FAILED FUEL DISPOSITION STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2004-12-20

    In May 2004 alpha contamination was found on the lid of the pre-filter housing in the Sodium Removal Ion Exchange System during routine filter change. Subsequent investigation determined that the alpha contamination likely came from a fuel pin(s) contained in an Ident-69 (ID-69) type pin storage container serial number 9 (ID-69-9) that was washed in the Sodium Removal System (SRS) in January 2004. Because all evidence indicated that the wash water interacted with the fuel, this ID49 is designated as containing a failed fuel pin with gross cladding defect and was set aside in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell until it could be determined how to proceed for long term dry storage of the fuel pin container. This ID49 contained fuel pins from the driver fuel assembly (DFA) 16392, which was identified as a Delayed Neutron Monitor (DNM) leaker assembly. However, this DFA was disassembled and the fuel pin that was thought to be the failed pin was encapsulated and was not located in this ID49 container. This failed fuel disposition study discusses two alternatives that could be used to address long term storage for the contents of ID-69-9. The first alternative evaluated utilizes the current method of identifying and storing DNM leaker fuel pin(s) in tubes and thus, verifying that the alpha contamination found in the SRS came from a failed pin in this pin container. This approach will require unloading selected fuel pins from the ID-69, visually examining and possibly weighing suspect fuel pins to identify the failed pin(s), inserting the failed pin(s) in storage tubes, and reloading the fuel pins into ID49 containers. Safety analysis must be performed to revise the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) (Reference 1) for this fuel configuration. The second alternative considered is to store the failed fuel as-is in the ID-69. This was evaluated to determine if this approach would comply with storage requirements. This

  15. Compensatory weight control behaviors of women in emerging adulthood: associations between childhood abuse experiences and adult relationship avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bankoff, Sarah M; Valentine, Sarah E; Jackson, Michelle A; Schacht, Rebecca L; Pantalone, David W

    2013-01-01

    To examine correlates of compensatory weight control behaviors among women in transition between adolescence and adulthood. The authors recruited a sample of undergraduate women (N = 759) at a large northwestern university during the 2009-2010 academic year. Logistic regression was used to assess relations among childhood abuse, psychosocial functioning, adult dating relationship factors, and women's endorsement of compensatory weight control behaviors. The final model reliably distinguished between participants who endorsed versus denied use of compensatory behaviors (χ(2)[5, N = 747] = 36.37, p < .001), with global psychosocial functioning and relationship avoidance accounting for the most variance. These findings illustrate the importance of considering childhood abuse histories and adult relationships while assessing young women's compensatory weight control behaviors.

  16. Searching for Failed Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Jill; Kochanek, C. S.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the deaths of massive stars is key to understanding both stellar evolution and the chemical enrichment of the universe. Only by monitoring all the massive stars in a large sample over years are we able to take a statistical approach to the deaths of massive stars and possibly observe the rare phenomenon of a failed supernova, a massive star that collapses to form a black hole without a SN explosion. To this end, we have been monitoring 25 galaxies within 10 Mpc with the Large Binocular Telescope for the past 4 years. Analyzing the data using image subtraction, we monitor the fate of all ~106 evolved supergiants in these galaxies to obtain limits on the rate of failed supernovae. We search for stars that have "vanished'' over the course of our survey, by examining all stars showing a decrease in luminosity of ΔνLν ≥ 104L⊙ from the first to the last observation. If we can detect the variable source in our last observation, it is not considered a vanished supergiant or failed supernova. We also identify sources that have increased in luminosity by this same amount, allowing us to estimate our false-positive rates. In addition to the search that does not require a particular signature, we also search for the low luminosity, long period transients predicted by Lovegrove & Woosley (2013) for failed explosions of red supergiants. Among many other applications, the survey also provides photometry of SN progenitors and the first light curves of these stars. Here I present the first results of the survey and provide the first direct limits on the rate of failed supernovae.

  17. Local delivery of a selective androgen receptor modulator failed as an anabolic agent in a rat bone marrow ablation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aro, Hannu T; Kulkova, Julia; Moritz, Niko; Kähkönen, Esa; Mattila, Riina H

    2015-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) have been developed to have systemic anabolic effects on bones and muscles without the adverse effects of steroidal androgens. One unexplored therapeutic option is the targeted application of SARMs for the enhancement of local new bone formation. We evaluated the osteogenic efficacy of a locally released SARM (ORM-11984). ORM-11984 was mixed with a copolymer of L-lactide and ɛ-caprolactone (PLCL). An in vitro dissolution test confirmed the sustainable release of ORM-11984 from the matrix. A bone marrow ablation model was used in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Implants containing 10%, 30%, or 50% ORM-11984 by weight or pure PLCL were inserted into the medullary canal of the ablated tibia. At 6 and 12 weeks, the volume of intramedullary new bone and the perimeter of bone-implant contact were measured by micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry. Contrary to our hypothesis, there was a negative correlation between the amount of new bone around the implant and the dose of ORM-11984. There was only a mild (and not statistically significant) enhancement of bone formation in ablated bones subjected to the lowest dose of the SARM (10%). This study suggests that intramedullary/endosteal osteogenesis had a negative, dose-dependent response to locally released SARM. This result highlights the complexity of androgenic effects on bones and also suggests that there are biological limits to the targeted local application of SARMs.

  18. [Tremendous Human, Social, and Economic Losses Caused by Obstinate Application of the Failed Linear No-threshold Model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutou, Shizuyo

    2015-01-01

    The linear no-threshold model (LNT) was recommended in 1956, with abandonment of the traditional threshold dose-response for genetic risk assessment. Adoption of LNT by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) became the standard for radiation regulation worldwide. The ICRP recommends a dose limit of 1 mSv/year for the public, which is too low and which terrorizes innocent people. Indeed, LNT arose mainly from the lifespan survivor study (LSS) of atomic bomb survivors. The LSS, which asserts linear dose-response and no threshold, is challenged mainly on three points. 1) Radiation doses were underestimated by half because of disregard for major residual radiation, resulting in cancer risk overestimation. 2) The dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) of 2 is used, but the actual DDREF is estimated as 16, resulting in cancer risk overestimation by several times. 3) Adaptive response (hormesis) is observed in leukemia and solid cancer cases, consistently contradicting the linearity of LNT. Drastic reduction of cancer risk moves the dose-response curve close to the control line, allowing the setting of a threshold. Living organisms have been evolving for 3.8 billion years under radiation exposure, naturally acquiring various defense mechanisms such as DNA repair mechanisms, apoptosis, and immune response. The failure of LNT lies in the neglect of carcinogenesis and these biological mechanisms. Obstinate application of LNT continues to cause tremendous human, social, and economic losses. The 60-year-old LNT must be rejected to establish a new scientific knowledge-based system.

  19. Compensatory mechanisms activated with intermittent energy restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Sílvia Ribeiro; Halset, Eline Holli; Gåsbakk, Sigrid

    2017-01-01

    Background & aims: Strong compensatory responses, with reduced resting metabolic rate (RMR), increased exercise efficiency (ExEff) and appetite, are activated when weight loss (WL) is achieved with continuous energy restriction (CER), which try to restore energy balance. Intermittent energy......: 39 ± 9 y) with obesity (BMI: 36 ± 4 kg/m2) were randomized to lose a similar weight with an IER (N = 18) or a CER (N = 17) diet over a 12 week period. Macronutrient composition and overall energy restriction (33% reduction) were similar between groups. Body weight/composition, RMR, fasting......) were measured before and after WL. Results: Changes in body weight (≈12.5% WL) and composition were similar in both groups. Fasting RQ and ExEff at 10 W increased in both groups. Losing weight, either by IER or CER dieting, did not induce significant changes in subjective appetite ratings. RMR...

  20. Sensory cortex lesion triggers compensatory neuronal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depner, Manfred; Tziridis, Konstantin; Hess, Andreas; Schulze, Holger

    2014-05-01

    Lesions to the human brain often cause dramatic impairments in the life of patients because of the very limited capacity of the mammalian nervous system to regenerate. On the other hand, neuronal tissue has a high capacity to reorganize itself so that loss of function due to brain damage may be compensated through neuroplastic reorganization of undamaged tissue in brain regions adjacent or contralateral to the lesion site. In this study we investigated the effect of serial lesions of the auditory cortices (AC) in both hemispheres of Mongolian gerbils on discrimination performance for fast amplitude modulated tones (AM). Healthy animals were trained to discriminate two fast AM, an ability that has previously been shown to critically depend on cortical processing. Their ability to maintain significant discrimination performance was retested after unilateral AC lesion, and again after lesion of the contralateral AC, with 15 days of continuing training in between the two lesions. After bilateral cortical ablation of both AC and 45 days of training the animals show no change in pure tone detection threshold as measured with modulation of the acoustic startle reflex which has been shown to rely on subcortical structures. In contrast to simultaneous bilateral ablation of AC that results in complete loss of AM discrimination ability in this paradigm we found compensatory plasticity that seems to be triggered by unilateral cortical ablation with subsequent training and that is able to almost fully compensate for the lost cortical functions. Our results demonstrate that AM discrimination ability that normally depends on AC may be transferred to other brain regions when the brain has time to activate compensatory plasticity between the lesions of the two AC hemispheres. For this process to take place obviously one intact AC hemisphere is needed. This finding may open perspectives for new therapeutic strategies that may alleviate the impairments after multiple ischemic strokes.

  1. Endocrine Regulation of Compensatory Growth in Fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene T. Won

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Compensatory growth (CG is a period of accelerated growth that occurs following the alleviation of growth-stunting conditions during which an organism can make up for lost growth opportunity and potentially catch-up in size with non-stunted cohorts. Fish show a particularly robust capacity for the response and have been the focus of numerous studies that demonstrate their ability to compensate for periods of fasting once food is made available again. Compensatory growth is characterized by an elevated growth rate resulting from enhanced feed intake, mitogen production and feed conversion efficiency. Because little is known about the underlying mechanisms that drive the response, this review describes the sequential endocrine adaptations that lead to CG; namely during the precedent catabolic phase (fasting that taps endogenous energy reserves, and the following hyperanabolic phase (refeeding when accelerated growth occurs. In order to elicit a CG response, endogenous energy reserves must first be moderately depleted, which alters endocrine profiles that enhance appetite and growth potential. During this catabolic phase, elevated ghrelin and growth hormone (GH production increase appetite and protein-sparing lipolysis, while insulin-like growth factors (IGFs are suppressed, primarily due to hepatic GH resistance. During refeeding, temporal hyperphagia provides an influx of energy and metabolic substrates that are then allocated to somatic growth by resumed IGF signaling. Under the right conditions, refeeding results in hyperanabolism and a steepened growth trajectory relative to constantly fed controls. The response wanes as energy reserves are re-accumulated and homeostasis is restored. We ascribe possible roles for select appetite and growth-regulatory hormones in the context of these catabolic and hyperanabolic phases of the CG response in teleosts, with emphasis on GH, IGFs, cortisol, somatostatin, neuropeptide Y, ghrelin and leptin.

  2. Compensatory Effect between Aortic Stiffening and Remodelling during Ageing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Guala

    Full Text Available The arterial tree exhibits a complex spatio-temporal wave pattern, whose healthy behaviour depends on a subtle balance between mechanical and geometrical properties. Several clinical studies demonstrated that such a balance progressively breaks down during ageing, when the aorta stiffens and remodels by increasing its diameter. These two degenerative processes however, have different impacts on the arterial wave pattern. They both tend to compensate for each other, thus reducing the detrimental effect they would have had if they had arisen individually. This remarkable compensatory mechanism is investigated by a validated multi-scale model, with the aim to elucidate how aortic stiffening and remodelling quantitatively impact the complex interplay between forward and reflected backward waves in the arterial network. We focus on the aorta and on the pressure at the ventricular-aortic interface, which epidemiological studies demonstrate to play a key role in cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Compensatory Effect between Aortic Stiffening and Remodelling during Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guala, Andrea; Camporeale, Carlo; Ridolfi, Luca

    2015-01-01

    The arterial tree exhibits a complex spatio-temporal wave pattern, whose healthy behaviour depends on a subtle balance between mechanical and geometrical properties. Several clinical studies demonstrated that such a balance progressively breaks down during ageing, when the aorta stiffens and remodels by increasing its diameter. These two degenerative processes however, have different impacts on the arterial wave pattern. They both tend to compensate for each other, thus reducing the detrimental effect they would have had if they had arisen individually. This remarkable compensatory mechanism is investigated by a validated multi-scale model, with the aim to elucidate how aortic stiffening and remodelling quantitatively impact the complex interplay between forward and reflected backward waves in the arterial network. We focus on the aorta and on the pressure at the ventricular-aortic interface, which epidemiological studies demonstrate to play a key role in cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Motivation and goal attainment. The role of compensatory beliefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquelon, Paule; Knäuper, Bärbel; Vallerand, Robert J

    2012-04-01

    It was recently proposed that one cognitive strategy people might employ to find a balance between fulfilling their immediate desires and adhering to their long-term goals is to activate compensatory beliefs (CBs). CBs are convictions that the negative effects of a behavior can be compensated for by the positive effects of another behavior (e.g., "I can eat this piece of cake now because I will go to the gym tonight".). The purpose of the present research was to examine the motivational determinants and consequences of CBs in weight-loss dieting. It was proposed that autonomous motivation would lessen the activation of CBs. It was further proposed that activating CBs would decrease goal adherence, which, itself, would facilitate the attainment of one's dieting goals. Results of a prospective study using path analysis provided support for the model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. 5 CFR 532.504 - Compensatory time off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... equal amount of overtime work, whether or not irregular or occasional in nature. (c) An agency may not require that an employee be compensated for overtime work with an equal amount of compensatory time off... RATE SYSTEMS Premium Pay and Differentials § 532.504 Compensatory time off. (a) At the request of an...

  6. "Compensatory Legitimation" in Greek Educational Policy: An Explanation for the Abortive Educational Reforms in Greece in Comparison with Those in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persianis, Panayiotis

    1998-01-01

    Examines the political dynamics of planning and implementing educational reforms in Greece, with comparisons to France. Argues that, as in France, the state's concern for "compensatory legitimation" provides a better tool than those advanced by sociologists or historians for explaining Greece's many failed educational reforms. Compares…

  7. Probabilistic risk analysis of aging components which fail on demand. A Bayesian model. Application to maintenance optimization of Diesel engine linings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procaccia, H.; Lannoy, A.; Clarotti, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The optimization of preventive maintenance of aging materials can be well modelled through the application of the two-parameters Weibull law. Unfortunately there is no theoretical model describing the aging of components implied in emergency interventions which may fail in very moment of demand. These components are relevant to the safety of Nuclear Power Plants and the main problem with them is the optimization of the maintenance and the test schedule. Indeed the effect of any test is twofold, namely: the test reveals failures which otherwise would occur when the Power Plant would need urgent intervention but at the same time it causes the aging process to step up. The aging process is suspected to affect certain safeguard equipment, but it does not exist a theoretical model of component aging in function of demands. Sections 2.1 and 2.2 of the paper are devoted to the description of a Bayesian model of discrete aging, deriving the likelihood function of the model (data modelling) and to selecting 'the best prior' (Analyst knowledge) that can be associated to the likelihood, respectively. The aspects of numerical integration relative to assessing the predictive reliability of the aging components are discussed in Section 2.3. Section 3 reports a Reliability Centered Maintenance application of the model to cylinders of emergency electrical generators of the NPP nuclear sectors. These components are subjected to an annual endoscopic checking and to a systematical replacement at every 5 years. The statistical Bayesian decision theory was applied to determine an optimal period of cylinder replacement based on the aging model presented in this paper. It is shown that the optimal value is between 10 to 12 years. (author)

  8. Redundant dopaminergic activity may enable compensatory axonal sprouting in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkadir, David; Bergman, Hagai; Fahn, Stanley

    2014-03-25

    Neurodegenerative diseases become clinically apparent only after a substantial population of neurons is lost. This raises the possibility of compensatory mechanisms in the early phase of these diseases. The importance of understanding these mechanisms cannot be underestimated because it may guide future disease-modifying strategies. Because the anatomy and physiology of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways have been well described, the study of Parkinson disease can offer insight into these early compensatory mechanisms. Collateral axonal sprouting of dopaminergic terminals into the denervated striatum is the most studied compensatory mechanism in animal (almost exclusively rodent) models of Parkinson disease and is correlated with behavioral recovery after partial lesions. This sprouting, however, does not respect the normal anatomy of the original nigrostriatal pathways and leads to aberrant neuronal networks. We suggest here that the unique physiologic property of the dopaminergic innervation of the striatum, namely redundancy of information encoding, is crucial to the efficacy of compensatory axonal sprouting in the presence of aberrant anatomical connections. Redundant information encoding results from the similarity of representation of salient and rewarding events by many dopaminergic neurons, from the wide axonal field of a single dopaminergic neuron in the striatum, and from the nonspecific spatial effect of dopamine on striatal neurons (volume conductance). Finally, we discuss the relevance of these findings in animal models to human patients with Parkinson disease.

  9. HuCNS-SC Human NSCs Fail to Differentiate, Form Ectopic Clusters, and Provide No Cognitive Benefits in a Transgenic Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel E. Marsh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of neural stem cells (NSCs can improve cognition in animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, AD is a protracted disorder, and prior studies have examined only short-term effects. We therefore used an immune-deficient model of AD (Rag-5xfAD mice to examine long-term transplantation of human NSCs (StemCells Inc.; HuCNS-SCs. Five months after transplantation, HuCNS-SCs had engrafted and migrated throughout the hippocampus and exhibited no differences in survival or migration in response to β-amyloid pathology. Despite robust engraftment, HuCNS-SCs failed to terminally differentiate and over a quarter of the animals exhibited ectopic human cell clusters within the lateral ventricle. Unlike prior short-term experiments with research-grade HuCNS-SCs, we also found no evidence of improved cognition, no changes in brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and no increase in synaptic density. These data, while disappointing, reinforce the notion that individual human NSC lines need to be carefully assessed for efficacy and safety in appropriate long-term models.

  10. Failed fuel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogure, Sumio; Seya, Toru; Watanabe, Masaaki.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To enhance the reliability of a failed fuel detector which detects radioactivity of nuclear fission products leaked out from fuel elements in cooling water. Constitution: Collected specimen is introduced into a separator and co-existing material considered to be an impediment is separated and removed by ion exchange resins, after which this specimen is introduced into a container housing therein a detector to systematically measure radioactivity. Thereby, it is possible to detect a signal lesser in variation in background, and inspection work also becomes simple. (Kawakami, Y.)

  11. Abortion: Strong's counterexamples fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Nucci, Ezio

    2009-01-01

    This paper shows that the counterexamples proposed by Strong in 2008 in the Journal of Medical Ethics to Marquis's argument against abortion fail. Strong's basic idea is that there are cases--for example, terminally ill patients--where killing an adult human being is prima facie seriously morally......'s scenarios have some valuable future or admitted that killing them is not seriously morally wrong. Finally, if "valuable future" is interpreted as referring to objective standards, one ends up with implausible and unpalatable moral claims....

  12. Localization and stretch-dependence of lung elastase activity in development and compensatory growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sarah Marie; Liu, Sheng; Joshi, Rashika; Batie, Matthew R; Kofron, Matthew; Guo, Jinbang; Woods, Jason C; Varisco, Brian Michael

    2015-04-01

    Synthesis and remodeling of the lung matrix is necessary for primary and compensatory lung growth. Because cyclic negative force is applied to developing lung tissue during the respiratory cycle, we hypothesized that stretch is a critical regulator of lung matrix remodeling. By using quantitative image analysis of whole-lung and whole-lobe elastin in situ zymography images, we demonstrated that elastase activity increased twofold during the alveolar stage of postnatal lung morphogenesis in the mouse. Remodeling was restricted to alveolar walls and ducts and was nearly absent in dense elastin band structures. In the mouse pneumonectomy model of compensatory lung growth, elastase activity increased threefold, peaking at 14 days postpneumonectomy and was higher in the accessory lobe compared with other lobes. Remodeling during normal development and during compensatory lung growth was different with increased major airway and pulmonary arterial remodeling during development but not regeneration, and with homogenous remodeling throughout the parenchyma during development, but increased remodeling only in subpleural regions during compensatory lung growth. Left lung wax plombage prevented increased lung elastin during compensatory lung growth. To test whether the adult lung retains an innate capacity to remodel elastin, we developed a confocal microscope-compatible stretching device. In ex vivo adult mouse lung sections, lung elastase activity increased exponentially with strain and in peripheral regions of lung more than in central regions. Our study demonstrates that lung elastase activity is stretch-dependent and supports a model in which externally applied forces influence the composition, structure, and function of the matrix during periods of alveolar septation. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Compensatory lengthening and structure preservation revisited yet again

    OpenAIRE

    Kavitskaya, Darya

    2017-01-01

    In their seminal paper, deChene (1979) make a strong claim that pre-existing vowel length contrast is a necessary condition for the phonologization of vowel length through compensatory lengthening. Compensatory lengthening is thus predicted to be always a structure-preserving change. Since that time, the claim has been challenged in numerous works (Gess 1998, Hock1986, Morin 1992), among others). A closer examination of the cited counterexamples to de Chene and Anderson's claim reveals certa...

  14. Fail forward: Mitigating failure in energy research and innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    on participant observation and empirical field research in three case companies, the OFEI model is developed to identify inappropriate behaviors that cause energy research and innovation to fail. The OFEI model can be used to give failed (or failing) projects a second chance and the article concludes...

  15. The Use of Bovine Pericardial Buttress on Linear Stapler Fails to Reduce Pancreatic Fistula Incidence in a Porcine Pancreatic Transection Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Maciver

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effectiveness of buttressing the surgical stapler to reduce postoperative pancreatic fistulae in a porcine model. As a pilot study, pigs (n=6 underwent laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy using a standard stapler. Daily drain output and lipase were measured postoperative day 5 and 14. In a second study, pancreatic transection was performed to occlude the proximal and distal duct at the pancreatic neck using a standard stapler (n=6, or stapler with bovine pericardial strip buttress (n=6. Results. In pilot study, 3/6 animals had drain lipase greater than 3x serum on day 14. In the second series, drain volumes were not significantly different between buttressed and control groups on day 5 (55.3 ± 31.6 and 29.3 ± 14.2 cc, resp., nor on day 14 (9.5 ± 4.2 cc and 2.5 ± 0.8 cc, resp., P=0.13. Drain lipase was not statistically significant on day 5 (3,166 ± 1,433 and 6,063 ± 1,872 U/L, resp., P=0.25 or day 14 (924 ± 541 and 360 ± 250 U/L. By definition, 3/6 developed pancreatic fistula; only one (control demonstrating a contained collection arising from the staple line. Conclusion. Buttressed stapler failed to protect against pancreatic fistula in this rigorous surgical model.

  16. Why foreign aid fails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokopijević Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main point of this paper is that foreign aid fails because the structure of its incentives resembles that of central planning. Aid is not only ineffective, it is arguably counterproductive. Contrary to business firms that are paid by those they are supposed to serve (customers, aid agencies are paid by tax payers of developed countries and not by those they serve. This inverse structure of incentives breaks the stream of pressure that exists on the commercial market. It also creates larger loopholes in the principle-agent relationship on each point along the chain of aid delivery. Both factors enhance corruption, moral hazard and negative selection. Instead of promoting development, aid extends the life of bad institutions and those in power. Proposals to reform foreign aid – like aid privatization and aid conditionality – do not change the existing structure of the incentives in aid delivery, and their implementation may just slightly improve aid efficacy. Larger improvement is not possible. For that reason, foreign aid will continue to be a waste of resources, probably serving some objectives different to those that are usually mentioned, like recipient’s development poverty reduction and pain relief.

  17. 78 FR 53695 - Compensatory Time Off for Religious Observances and Other Miscellaneous Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... with employees who have a negative or positive balance of earned religious compensatory time off when... compensatory time off has been established and documented. In other words, earned religious compensatory time... separation or transfer. This section addresses how positive and negative balances of religious compensatory...

  18. Compensatory canine angulation in angle Class II and III patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Carlos Agner Busato

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurence of compensation in mesiodistal axial inclinations of canines in skeletal malocclusions patients. The sample consisted of 25 Angle Class II, division 1 malocclusion (group 1 and 19 Angle Class III malocclusion patients (group 2. After measurement of dental angulations through a method that associates plaster model photography and AutoCad software, comparisons between the groups were performed by T-test for independent samples. Results showed that there was no statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 between groups, when maxillary canine angulations were compared. Regarding the mandibular canines, there was a statistically significant difference in dental angulation, expressed by 3.2° for group 1 and 0.15° for group 2. An upright position tendency for mandibular canines was observed in the Angle Class III sample. This configures a pattern of compensatory coronary positioning, since the angulation of these teeth makes them occupy less space in the dental arch and consequently mandibular incisors can be in a more retracted position in the sagittal plane.

  19. Determinants of limb preference for initiating compensatory stepping poststroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Avril; Inness, Elizabeth L; Lakhani, Bimal; McIlroy, William E

    2012-07-01

    To investigate the determinants of limb preference for initiating compensatory stepping poststroke. Retrospective chart review. Inpatient rehabilitation. Convenience sample of individuals admitted to inpatient rehabilitation with poststroke hemiparesis. Not applicable. Compensatory stepping responses were evoked using a lean-and-release postural perturbation. The limb used to initiate compensatory stepping was determined. The relationships between stepping with the paretic limb and premorbid limb dominance, weight bearing on the paretic limb in quiet standing, ability to bear weight on the paretic limb, preperturbation weight bearing on the paretic limb, and lower-limb motor recovery scores were determined. The majority (59.1%) of responses were steps initiated with the nonparetic limb. Increased lower-limb motor recovery scores and preperturbation weight bearing on the nonparetic limb were significantly related to increased frequency of stepping with the paretic limb. When the preferred limb was physically blocked, an inappropriate response was initiated in 21% of trials (ie, nonstep responses or an attempt to step with the blocked limb). This study reveals the challenges that individuals with poststroke hemiparesis face when executing compensatory stepping responses to prevent a fall after a postural perturbation. The inability or challenges to executing a compensatory step with the paretic limb may increase the risk for falls poststroke. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Predictive procedure for compensatory hyperhidrosis before sympathectomy: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin Yong; Park, Hyung Joo; Park, Jae Kil; Jo, Keon Hyeon; Wang, Young Pil; Lee, Jongho; Shin, Jae Seong

    2014-08-01

    Compensatory hyperhidrosis is one of the most common and serious adverse effects following sympathectomy. We performed a local anesthetic procedure that predicts the occurrence and severity of compensatory hyperhidrosis, and evaluated the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of the procedure. From July 2009 to July 2010, 20 patients with severe primary palmar hyperhidrosis underwent predictive procedures. A sympathetic nerve block was obtained via thoracoscopic approach under local anesthesia. The patients were evaluated for compensatory hyperhidrosis 1 week after the procedure before deciding whether to proceed with sympathectomy. Of the 20 patients, 17 patients proceeded with sympathectomy and 3 refused the final procedure. Following sympathectomy, the occurrence and severity of compensatory hyperhidrosis in the remaining 17 patients were statistically analyzed with two tailed paired t test, and there is no significant difference between the predictive and final procedures (t = 1.69, df = 16, p > 0.1). Predictive procedure using local anesthesia to detect compensatory hyperhidrosis before sympathectomy may be useful for helping patients to decide whether to undergo the operation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  1. Treatment of compensatory hyperhidrosis of the trunk with radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Süleyman; Kavaklı, Kuthan; Çaylak, Hasan; Purtuloğlu, Tarık; Sapmaz, Ersin; İnangil, Gökhan; Atım, Abdulkadir; Gürkök, Sedat; Kurt, Ercan

    2015-01-01

    Although Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy is a widely accepted treatment method for patients with palmar hyperhidrosis, compensatory hyperhidrosis of the trunk remains a challenging side effect of the procedure. No satisfactory treatment options for this side effect were available until now. In this study, we aimed to define a new procedure for the treatment of compensatory hyperhidrosis of the trunk. A total of 10 patients admitted our institution for the treatment of compensatory hyperhidrosis of the trunk were enrolled in the study between November 2010 and January 2012 in a prospective manner. Sympathetic blockage was achieved via radiofrequency thermo-ablation technique. The results of treatment were evaluated via telephone calls. Ten patients (2 females, 8 males) underwent radiofrequency thermo-ablation of T6 sympathetic ganglion for compensatory hyperhidrosis of the trunk. The mean age was 29.2 years and the median duration of symptom was 10.5 months. The median follow-up period was 14 months. Six of ten patients (60%) were treated successfully. There was no procedure related complication. The radiofrequency treatment for patients with compensatory hyperhidrosis of the trunk is an alternative option with promising results.

  2. PDX-1 haploinsufficiency limits the compensatory islet hyperplasia that occurs in response to insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Rohit N; Jhala, Ulupi S; Winnay, Jonathon N; Krajewski, Stan; Montminy, Marc; Kahn, C Ronald

    2004-09-01

    Inadequate compensatory beta cell hyperplasia in insulin-resistant states triggers the development of overt diabetes. The mechanisms that underlie this crucial adaptive response are not fully defined. Here we show that the compensatory islet-growth response to insulin resistance in 2 models--insulin receptor (IR)/IR substrate-1 (IRS-1) double heterozygous mice and liver-specific IR KO (LIRKO) mice--is severely restricted by PDX-1 heterozygosity. Six-month-old IR/IRS-1 and LIRKO mice both showed up to a 10-fold increase in beta cell mass, which involved epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. In both models, superimposition of PDX-1 haploinsufficiency upon the background of insulin resistance completely abrogated the adaptive islet hyperplastic response, and instead the beta cells showed apoptosis resulting in premature death of the mice. This study shows that, in postdevelopmental states of beta cell growth, PDX-1 is a critical regulator of beta cell replication and is required for the compensatory response to insulin resistance.

  3. To fail or not to fail : clinical trials in depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santen, Gijs Willem Eduard

    2008-01-01

    To fail or not to fail – Clinical trials in depression investigates the causes of the high failure rate of clinical trials in depression research. Apart from the difficulties in the search for new antidepressants during drug discovery, faulty clinical trial designs hinder their evaluation during

  4. Consequences of biodiversity loss diverge from expectation due to post-extinction compensatory responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Matthias S.; Garcia, Clement; Bolam, Stefan G.; Parker, Ruth; Godbold, Jasmin A.; Solan, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Consensus has been reached that global biodiversity loss impairs ecosystem functioning and the sustainability of services beneficial to humanity. However, the ecosystem consequences of extinction in natural communities are moderated by compensatory species dynamics, yet these processes are rarely accounted for in impact assessments and seldom considered in conservation programmes. Here, we use marine invertebrate communities to parameterise numerical models of sediment bioturbation - a key mediator of biogeochemical cycling - to determine whether post-extinction compensatory mechanisms alter biodiversity-ecosystem function relations following non-random extinctions. We find that compensatory dynamics lead to trajectories of sediment mixing that diverge from those without compensation, and that the form, magnitude and variance of each probabilistic distribution is highly influenced by the type of compensation and the functional composition of surviving species. Our findings indicate that the generalized biodiversity-function relation curve, as derived from multiple empirical investigations of random species loss, is unlikely to yield representative predictions for ecosystem properties in natural systems because the influence of post-extinction community dynamics are under-represented. Recognition of this problem is fundamental to management and conservation efforts, and will be necessary to ensure future plans and adaptation strategies minimize the adverse impacts of the biodiversity crisis.

  5. Empirical Percentile Growth Curves with Z-scores Considering Seasonal Compensatory Growths for Japanese Thoroughbred Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONODA, Tomoaki; YAMAMOTO, Ryuta; SAWAMURA, Kyohei; MURASE, Harutaka; NAMBO, Yasuo; INOUE, Yoshinobu; MATSUI, Akira; MIYAKE, Takeshi; HIRAI, Nobuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Percentile growth curves are often used as a clinical indicator to evaluate variations of children’s growth status. In this study, we propose empirical percentile growth curves using Z-scores adapted for Japanese Thoroughbred horses, with considerations of the seasonal compensatory growth that is a typical characteristic of seasonal breeding animals. We previously developed new growth curve equations for Japanese Thoroughbreds adjusting for compensatory growth. Individual horses and residual effects were included as random effects in the growth curve equation model and their variance components were estimated. Based on the Z-scores of the estimated variance components, empirical percentile growth curves were constructed. A total of 5,594 and 5,680 body weight and age measurements of male and female Thoroughbreds, respectively, and 3,770 withers height and age measurements were used in the analyses. The developed empirical percentile growth curves using Z-scores are computationally feasible and useful for monitoring individual growth parameters of body weight and withers height of young Thoroughbred horses, especially during compensatory growth periods. PMID:24834004

  6. Method for repairing failed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shakudo, Taketomi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To repair fuel elements that became failed during burnup in a reactor or during handling. Method: After the surface in the vicinity of a failed part of a fuel element is cleaned, a socket made of a shape-memory alloy having a ring form or a horseshoe form made by cutting a part of the ring form is inserted into the failed position according to the position of the failed fuel element. The shape memory alloy socket remembers a slightly larger inside diameter in its original phase (high-temperature side) than the outside diameter of the cladding tube and also a slightly larger inside diameter of the socket in the martensite phase (low-temperature side) than the outside diameter of the cladding tube, such that the socket can easily be inserted into the failed position. The socket, inserted into the failed part of the cladding tube, is heated by a heating jig. The socket recovers the original phase, and the shape also tends to recover a smaller diameter than the outside diameter of the cladding tube that has been remembered, and accordingly the failed part of the cladding tube is fastened with a great force and the failed part is fully closed with the socket, thus keeping radioactive materials from going out. (Horiuchi, T.)

  7. COMPENSATORY AND NON COMPENSATORY FACTORS WHICH INFLUENCE THE BUYING DECISION OF CULINARY PRODUCTS, CONCENTRATED SOUP CATEGORY, IN CONSUMERS FROM BARRANQUILLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARÍA MERCEDES BOTERO

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to identify the main compensatory and non-compensatory factors influencing thepurchase of concentrated broth in consumers of the city of Barranquilla. This research compiles the data obtainedthrough 300 interviews applied to consumers of concentrated broth, who do their shopping in 41 supermarkets and8.000 general stores distributed along the city.The study demonstrated that brand and the flavor are the most important factors in buying concentrated broth.Additionally, customers usually buy the product that they previously have chosen, remaining loyal to their favoritebrand. This corroborates that non-compensatory factors such as memory, experience and tradition are determinantwhen choosing a product.

  8. Patterns of Compensatory Behaviors and Disordered Eating in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumberg, Katherine; Anderson, Lisa M.; Reilly, Erin; Anderson, Drew A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The current study investigated rates of endorsement of eating-related compensatory behaviors within a college sample. Participants: This sample included male and female students (N = 1,158). Methods: Participants completed the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). The study defined 3 groups of students: those who did not…

  9. Compensatory Education in Massachusetts: An Evaluation With Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, David C.; Spiess, Kathryn Hecht

    The general objective of this study is to assist in the improvement of compensatory education programs in Massachusetts through modifications of current programs based on evaluations specific enough to permit the formulation of concrete recommendations for improvement. A 10 percent sample of projects was chosen for study as theoretically…

  10. Compensatory growth assessment by plasma IGF-I hormone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to show the difference in compensatory growth (CG) with different starvation and feeding periods replications, depending on the IGF-I hormone level in the blood. There were 4 treatments in 3 replications. Other indexes like food coefficient ratio (FCR), specific growth rate (SGR) and daily food intake were ...

  11. 40 CFR 230.93 - General compensatory mitigation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) Considerations. (i) A watershed approach to compensatory mitigation considers the importance of landscape... higher. (i) Buffers. District engineers may require the restoration, establishment, enhancement, and preservation, as well as the maintenance, of riparian areas and/or buffers around aquatic resources where...

  12. 33 CFR 332.3 - General compensatory mitigation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... importance of landscape position and resource type of compensatory mitigation projects for the sustainability... compensation ratios shall be higher. (i) Buffers. District engineers may require the restoration, establishment, enhancement, and preservation, as well as the maintenance, of riparian areas and/or buffers around aquatic...

  13. Compensatory Self-Presentation in Upward Comparison Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, James M.

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the communication of compensatory self-presentations (CSP) (i.e., self-presentations that people engage in after publicly receiving unfavorable feedback), with prior work showing that people prudently constrain CSP to areas unrelated (vs. related) to the initial feedback. With the current project we examine the influence…

  14. Interactive compensatory response of growing pigs to feed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of fifty four Large White growing pigs with weight range of 21.70-23.89 kg were used in a 60-day trial to determine the compensatory response of growing pigs to feed withdrawal periods and ascorbic acid supplementation. The pigs were grouped on weight equalization into 9 treatments with 3 replicate groups of 2 ...

  15. Fitness-compensatory mutations facilitate the spread of drug ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charissa C. Naidoo

    2017-08-19

    Aug 19, 2017 ... In addition, it possessed a low-frequency rpoC mutation, suggesting that this strain was in the process of developing compensation. In contrast, no compensatory mutations ... fitness 'cost' as mutations may affect the normal function of target genes ..... to have increased expression during nutrient starvation,.

  16. Simulating fail-stop in asynchronous distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabel, Laura; Marzullo, Keith

    1994-01-01

    The fail-stop failure model appears frequently in the distributed systems literature. However, in an asynchronous distributed system, the fail-stop model cannot be implemented. In particular, it is impossible to reliably detect crash failures in an asynchronous system. In this paper, we show that it is possible to specify and implement a failure model that is indistinguishable from the fail-stop model from the point of view of any process within an asynchronous system. We give necessary conditions for a failure model to be indistinguishable from the fail-stop model, and derive lower bounds on the amount of process replication needed to implement such a failure model. We present a simple one-round protocol for implementing one such failure model, which we call simulated fail-stop.

  17. Effect of pain and analgesia on compensatory reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Fernandez, Jessie Renee D; Muniz, Gary W; Nawn, Corinne D; Burns, Rebecca K; Le, Thuan H; Porter, Kathy B; Hardy, John T; Convertino, Victor A

    2017-07-01

    The measurement of the body's capacity to compensate for reduced blood volume can be assessed with a compensatory reserve measurement (CRM). The CRM, which is calculated from changes in features of the arterial waveform, represents the integration of compensatory mechanisms during states of low tissue perfusion and oxygenation, such as hemorrhage. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that pain which activates compensatory mechanisms and analgesia that result in reduced blood pressure are associated with lower compensatory reserve. This study evaluated CRM in obstetric patients during labor as pain intensity increased from no pain to severe pain and compared CRM before and after epidural anesthesia. CRM was calculated from a finger pulse oximeter placed on the patient's index finger and connected to the DataOx monitor in healthy pregnant women (n = 20) before and during the active labor phase of childbirth. As pain intensity, based on an 11-point scale (0, no pain; 10, worst pain), increased from 0 to 8.4 ± 0.9 (mean ± SD), CRM was not affected (81 ± 10% to 82 ± 13%). Before analgesia, CRM was 84 ± 10%. CRM at 10 minutes, 20 minutes, 30 minutes, 40 minutes, 50 minutes, and 60 minutes after analgesia was 82 ± 11%, 83 ± 14%, 83 ± 15%, 86 ± 12%, 89 ± 9%, and 87 ± 10%, respectively. There was a transient 2% reduction followed by a 5% increase in CRM from before to after epidural anesthesia (p = 0.048). Pain scores before and after analgesia were 7 ± 2 and 1 ± 1, respectively (p < 0.001). These results indicate that pain and analgesia contribute minimally, but independently to the reduction in compensatory reserve associated with trauma and hemorrhage. As such, our findings suggest that analgesia can be safely administered on the battlefield while maintaining the maximal capacity of mechanisms to compensate for blood loss. Diagnostic study, level II.

  18. Preparation for Compensatory Forward Stepping in Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Laurie A.; St George, Rebecca J.; Carlson-Kuhta, Patricia; Nutt, John G.; Horak, Fay B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To characterize preparation for compensatory stepping in people with Parkinson’s disease (PD) compared with healthy control subjects, and to determine whether levodopa medication improves preparation or the execution phases of the step. Design Observational study. Setting Outpatient neuroscience laboratory. Participants Nineteen participants with idiopathic PD tested both in the on and off levodopa states and 17 healthy subjects. Intervention Moveable platform with posterior translations of 24cm at 56cm/s. Main Outcome Measures Compensatory steps forward, in response to a backward surface translation (24cm amplitude at 56cm/s), were categorized according to the presence of an anticipatory postural adjustment (APA) before stepping: no APA, single APA, or multiple APAs. The following step parameters were calculated: step latency, step length, center of mass (CoM) average velocity, and CoM displacement at the step initiation. Results Lateral APAs were evident in 57% and 42% of trials for people with PD in the off and on medication states, respectively, compared with only 10% of trials for control subjects. Compared with subjects with PD who did not have APAs, those subjects with PD who did make an APA prior to stepping had significantly later (mean ± SEM, 356 ± 16ms vs 305 ± 8ms) and shorter (mean ± SEM, 251 ± 27mm vs 300 ± 16mm) steps, their CoM was significantly farther forward (185 ± 7mm vs 171 ± 5mm) at foot-off, and they took significantly more steps to regain equilibrium. Levodopa did not affect the preparation or execution phase of compensatory stepping. Poor axial scores and reports of freezing in the United Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale were associated with use of 1 or more APAs before compensatory stepping. Conclusions Lateral postural preparation prior to compensatory stepping in subjects with PD was associated with inefficient balance recovery from external perturbations. PMID:20801249

  19. Fission product release model for failed plate-type fuel element and storage under water; Modelo para liberacao de produtos de fissao por placa combustivel falhada e armazenada sob agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, L.A.A.; Zeituni, C.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da; Castanheira, M.; Lucki, G.; Silva, A.T. e; Teodoro, C.A.; Damy, M. de A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: laaterre@ipen.br

    2005-07-01

    Plate-type fuel elements burned-up inside the core of nuclear research reactors are stored mainly under deionized water of storage pools. When cladding failure occurs in such elements, radioactive fission products are released into the storage pool water. This work proposes a model to describe the release mechanism considering the diffusion through a postulated small cylindrical failure. As a consequence, an analytical expression is obtained for the activity released into the water as a function of the total storage time of a failed fuel plate. The proposed model reproduces the linear increasing of {sup 137}Cs specific activity observed in sipping tests already performed on failed plate-type fuel elements. (author)

  20. Parameter estimation using compensatory neural networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    of interconnections among neurons but also reduces the total computing time for training. The suggested model has properties of the basic neuron ..... Engelbrecht A P, Cloete I, Geldenhuys J, Zurada J M 1995 Automatic scaling using gamma learning for feedforward neural networks. From natural to artificial computing.

  1. Social impairment in conversation: disfluency and compensatory mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Lambrechts, Anna; Weed, Ethan

    . Using simple measures of conversational turn-taking, we ask the following questions: i) How does autistic social impairment manifest itself in conversations? ii) How does the interlocutor react? iii) Are these dynamics related to specific clinical features? Methods: 17 ASD and 17 matched Typically...... of interactions with adults with ASD will help us understand how social impairment affects the life of people with ASD and which compensatory mechanisms can be used to minimize its effects. Objectives: We want to develop automated quantitative methods to assess dysfluency and compensatory dynamics in conversation......Background: Social impairment is a defining clinical feature of ASD. However, little is known about how it concretely unfolds during social exchanges: how interlocutors pick up and react to disfluency, and how patterns of interaction are affected. A better understanding of the dynamics...

  2. Social impairment in conversation: disfluency and compensatory mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fusaroli, Riccardo; Lambrechts, Anna; Weed, Ethan

    of interactions with adults with ASD will help us understand how social impairment affects the life of people with ASD and which compensatory mechanisms can be used to minimize its effects. Objectives: We want to develop automated quantitative methods to assess dysfluency and compensatory dynamics in conversation......Background: Social impairment is a defining clinical feature of ASD. However, little is known about how it concretely unfolds during social exchanges: how interlocutors pick up and react to disfluency, and how patterns of interaction are affected. A better understanding of the dynamics....... Using simple measures of conversational turn-taking, we ask the following questions: i) How does autistic social impairment manifest itself in conversations? ii) How does the interlocutor react? iii) Are these dynamics related to specific clinical features? Methods: 17 ASD and 17 matched Typically...

  3. Effectiveness of Compensatory Strategies applied to Cognitive impairment in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Peter; Østergaard, Birte; Nordentoft, Merete

    , studies using Cognitive Adaptation Training (CAT), including training of compensatory strategies to sequence patient's adaptive behaviours, have shown improvement in social functioning, decreased relapse, better compliance to medical treatment and increased quality of life. However, no studies, up to now......'t understand or speak Danish, who live at an institution or who are long-term hospitalized and patients who are unwillingly to complete protocol. Assessments Primary Outcome Measure Social functioning Secondary Outcome Measures Symptoms, Quality of Life and frequency of relapse and hospitalization Results...... to the integrated treatment of schizophrenia. In addition, the project may provide new knowledge about how compensatory strategies can be included in care and treatment. Furthermore, the project will provide further understanding of the practical application of psychological tests....

  4. Cortical hypermetabolism in MCI subjects: a compensatory mechanism?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashraf, A.; Fan, Z.; Brooks, D.J.; Edison, P. [Imperial College London, Neurology Imaging Unit, Division of Brain Sciences, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with amyloid accumulation that takes place decades before symptoms appear. Cognitive impairment in AD is associated with reduced glucose metabolism. However, neuronal plasticity/compensatory mechanisms might come into play before the onset of dementia. The aim of this study was to determine whether there is evidence of cortical hypermetabolism as a compensatory mechanism before amyloid deposition takes place in subjects with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Nine AD subjects and ten aMCI subjects had both [{sup 11}C]PIB and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET scans with arterial input in order to quantify the amyloid deposition and glucose metabolism in vivo in comparison with healthy control subjects who underwent either [{sup 11}C]PIB or [{sup 18}F]FDG PET scans. The [{sup 11}C]PIB PET scans were quantified using [{sup 11}C]PIB target region to cerebellum uptake ratio images created by integrating the activity collected from 60 to 90 min, and regional cerebral glucose metabolism was quantified using spectral analysis. In MCI subjects, cortical hypermetabolism was observed in four amyloid-negative subjects and one amyloid-positive subject, while hypometabolism was seen in five other MCI subjects with high amyloid load. Subjects with hypermetabolism and low amyloid did not convert to AD during clinical follow-up for 18 months in contrast to four amyloid-positive hypometabolic subjects who did convert to AD. This preliminary study suggests that compensatory hypermetabolism can occur in aMCI subjects, particularly in those who are amyloid-negative. The increase in metabolic rate in different cortical regions with predominance in the occipital cortex may be a compensatory response to the neuronal damage occurring early in the disease process. It may also reflect recruitment of relatively minimally affected cortical regions to compensate for reduced function in the temporoparietal cortical association areas. (orig.)

  5. Compensatory stepping responses in individuals with stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Bimal; Mansfield, Avril; Inness, Elizabeth L; McIlroy, William E

    2011-05-01

    Impaired postural control and a high incidence of falls are commonly observed following stroke. Compensatory stepping responses are critical to reactive balance control. We hypothesize that, following a stroke, individuals with unilateral limb dyscontrol will be faced with the unique challenge of controlling such rapid stepping reactions that may eventually be linked to the high rate of falling. The objectives of this exploratory pilot study were to investigate compensatory stepping in individuals poststroke with regard to: (1) choice of initial stepping limb (paretic or non-paretic); (2) step characteristics; and (3) differences in step characteristics when the initial step is taken with the paretic vs. the non-paretic limb. Four subjects following stroke (38-165 days post) and 11 healthy young adults were recruited. Anterior and posterior perturbations were delivered by using a weight drop system. Force plates recorded centre-of-pressure excursion prior to the onset of stepping and step timing. Of the four subjects, three only attempted to step with their non-paretic limb and one stepped with either limb. Time to foot-off was generally slow, whereas step onset time and swing time were comparable to healthy controls. Two of the four subjects executed multistep responses in every trial, and attempts to force stepping with the paretic limb were unsuccessful in three of the four subjects. Despite high clinical balance scores, these individuals with stroke demonstrated impaired compensatory stepping responses, suggesting that current clinical evaluations might not accurately reflect reactive balance control in this population.

  6. Nox2 and p47phox modulate compensatory growth of primary collateral arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStasi, Matthew R.; Unthank, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    The role of NADPH oxidase (Nox) in both the promotion and impairment of compensatory collateral growth remains controversial because the specific Nox and reactive oxygen species involved are unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the primary Nox and reactive oxygen species associated with early stage compensatory collateral growth in young, healthy animals. Ligation of the feed arteries that form primary collateral pathways in rat mesentery and mouse hindlimb was used to assess the role of Nox during collateral growth. Changes in mesenteric collateral artery Nox mRNA expression determined by real-time PCR at 1, 3, and 7 days relative to same-animal control arteries suggested a role for Nox subunits Nox2 and p47phox. Administration of apocynin or Nox2ds-tat suppressed collateral growth in both rat and mouse models, suggesting the Nox2/p47phox interaction was involved. Functional significance of p47phox expression was assessed by evaluation of collateral growth in rats administered p47phox small interfering RNA and in p47phox−/− mice. Diameter measurements of collateral mesenteric and gracilis arteries at 7 and 14 days, respectively, indicated no significant collateral growth compared with control rats or C57BL/6 mice. Chronic polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase administration significantly suppressed collateral development in rats and mice, implying a requirement for H2O2. Taken together, these results suggest that Nox2, modulated at least in part by p47phox, mediates early stage compensatory collateral development via a process dependent upon peroxide generation. These results have important implications for the use of antioxidants and the development of therapies for peripheral arterial disease. PMID:24633549

  7. Compensatory hyperhidrosis: results of pharmacologic treatment with oxybutynin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teivelis, Marcelo Passos; Wolosker, Nelson; Krutman, Mariana; Milanez de Campos, José Ribas; Kauffman, Paulo; Puech-Leão, Pedro

    2014-11-01

    Hyperhidrosis may affect nearly 3% of the population, and thoracic/lumbar sympathectomy has been highly effective. Compensatory hyperhidrosis is a risk associated with surgical procedures, and its treatment is both complex and not well defined. Treatment of primary hyperhidrosis with oxybutynin has yielded positive results; however, its use in compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH) has not been described. Twenty-one patients (11 female patients) received oxybutynin for severe CH at a median of 5 years after sympathectomy. Patients were evaluated to determine quality of life before starting oxybutynin and 6 weeks afterward; they assigned grades to determine improvement after 6 weeks and at their last consult visit for each site at which they complained of symptoms. Six and 15 patients underwent operation for axillary hyperhidrosis and palmar hyperhidrosis, respectively. Median follow-up time with oxybutynin was 377 days (49-1,831 days). Most common CH sites were the back (n=8) and abdomen (n=5). After 6 weeks, the quality of life improved in 71.4% of patients. Five patients stopped treatment: 2 because of unbearable dry mouth, 1 because of absence of pharmacologic response, 1 because of excessive somnolence, and 1 because of probable tachyphylaxis. At the last visit, 71.4% of patients presented with moderate to major improvement at the main sites at which sweating was noted. More than 70% of patients presented with improved overall quality of life and improvement at the most prominent site of compensatory sweating. Long-term treatment was ineffective in less than 25% of patients, primarily because of the side effects of dry mouth and somnolence. Oxybutynin appears to be effective in treating bothersome CH. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. CuATSM efficacy is independently replicated in a SOD1 mouse model of ALS while unmetallated ATSM therapy fails to reveal benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando G. Vieira

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A copper chelator known as diacetylbis(N(4-methylthiosemicarbazonato copper II (CuATSM, has been reported to be efficacious in multiple transgenic SOD1 models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, a fatal neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons. Here we report that we also observed CuATSM efficacy on disease onset and progression in a standardized litter-matched and gender-balanced efficacy study using B6SJL-SOD1G93A/1Gur mice. We also report improved survival trends with CuATSM treatment. In addition, we report a lack of efficacy by unmetallated ATSM in the same model using the same standardized study design. These results add to existing evidence supporting an efficacious role for copper delivery using chaperone molecules in mouse models of ALS.

  9. Overvaluation of body shape/weight and engagement in non-compensatory weight-control behaviors in eating disorders: is there a reciprocal relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabri, N; Murray, H B; Thomas, J J; Franko, D L; Herzog, D B; Eddy, K T

    2015-10-01

    Overvaluation of body shape/weight is thought to be the core psychopathology underlying eating disorders, which propels engagement in non-compensatory weight-control behaviors. In turn, these behaviors lead to binge eating and/or maintenance of low weight thereby reinforcing overvaluation. The present study investigated the reciprocal relationship between overvaluation and engagement in non-compensatory weight-control behaviors (defined in two ways: restrictive eating and compulsive exercise) among women diagnosed with anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa (N = 237). Participants completed clinical interviews in which weekly eating disorder symptoms and behaviors were assessed over 2 years. Overvaluation on a given week was associated with greater engagement in non-compensatory weight-control behaviors during the following week. Further, engagement in non-compensatory weight-control behaviors on a given week was associated with greater overvaluation during the following week. These findings held true regardless of participants' shape/weight concerns (feelings of fatness and fat phobia), and eating disorder diagnosis. Our data provide empirical support for key aspects of the transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral model of eating disorders and suggest that targeting non-compensatory weight-control behaviors in treatment may help alleviate overvaluation and shape/weight concerns.

  10. On thwarted goals and displaced aggression : A compensatory competence model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leander, N. Pontus; Chartrand, Tanya L.

    2017-01-01

    Thwarted goals and motivational obstacles are antecedents of aggression, but it is not entirely clear what motivates the aggressive response or why it is often displaced onto unrelated targets. The present work applies Goal Systems Theory (Kruglanski et al., 2002) to consider how displaced

  11. Decreasing Stoichiometric Resource Quality Drives Compensatory Feeding across Trophic Levels in Tropical Litter Invertebrate Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jochum, Malte; Barnes, Andrew D; Ott, David; Lang, Birgit; Klarner, Bernhard; Farajallah, Achmad; Scheu, Stefan; Brose, Ulrich

    2017-07-01

    Living organisms are constrained by both resource quantity and quality. Ecological stoichiometry offers important insights into how the elemental composition of resources affects their consumers. If resource quality decreases, consumers can respond by shifting their body stoichiometry, avoiding low-quality resources, or up-regulating feeding rates to maintain the supply of required elements while excreting excess carbon (i.e., compensatory feeding). We analyzed multitrophic consumer body stoichiometry, biomass, and feeding rates along a resource-quality gradient in the litter of tropical forest and rubber and oil-palm plantations. Specifically, we calculated macroinvertebrate feeding rates based on consumer metabolic demand and assimilation efficiency. Using linear mixed effects models, we assessed resource-quality effects on macroinvertebrate detritivore and predator communities. We did not detect shifts in consumer body stoichiometry or decreases in consumer biomass in response to declining resource quality, as indicated by increasing carbon-to-nitrogen ratios. However, across trophic levels, we found a strong indication of decreasing resource quality leading to increased consumer feeding rates through altered assimilation efficiency and community body size structure. Our study reveals the influence of resource quality on multitrophic consumer feeding rates and suggests compensatory feeding to be more common across consumer trophic levels than was formerly known.

  12. Biochemical and histological evaluation of the synovial-like tissue around failed (loose) total joint replacement prostheses in human subjects and a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornhill, T S; Ozuna, R M; Shortkroff, S; Keller, K; Sledge, C B; Spector, M

    1990-07-01

    The tissue around loose total joint replacement prostheses displays a synovial-like lining comprised of cells that produce IL-1 and PGE2, mediators of inflammation that stimulate bone resorption. Particles of titanium alloy, as well as cobalt-chromium alloy and polyethylene, were found to aggravate the histiocytic response and production of IL-1 and PGE2. Tissue with similar histological and biochemical features was produced in a canine model of the aseptic loose cemented femoral stem.

  13. Caudalized human iPSC-derived neural progenitor cells produce neurons and glia but fail to restore function in an early chronic spinal cord injury model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Samuel E.; Chang, Eun-Ah; Suhr, Steven T.; Schlosser, Laura O.; Mondello, Sarah E.; Moritz, Chet T.; Cibelli, Jose B.; Horner, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    Neural progenitor cells (NPCs) have shown modest potential and some side effects (e.g. allodynia) for treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). In only a few cases, however, have NPCs shown promise at the chronic stage. Given the 1.275 million people living with chronic paralysis, there is a significant need to rigorously evaluate the cell types and methods for safe and efficacious treatment of this devastating condition. For the first time, we examined the pre-clinical potential of NPCs derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to repair chronic SCI. hiPSCs were differentiated into region-specific (i.e. caudal) NPCs, then transplanted into a new, clinically relevant model of early chronic cervical SCI. We established the conditions for successful transplantation of caudalized hiPSC-NPCs and demonstrate their remarkable ability to integrate and produce multiple neural lineages in the early chronic injury environment. In contrast to prior reports in acute and sub-acute injury models, survival and integration of hiPSC-derived neural cells in the early chronic cervical model did not lead to significant improvement in forelimb function or induce allodynia. These data indicate that while hiPSCs show promise, future work needs to focus on the specific hiPSC-derivatives or co-therapies that will restore function in the early chronic injury setting. PMID:23891888

  14. [The compensatory and adaptive e reactions of the respiratory system as the diagnostic criteria for histological studies in forensic medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Os'minkin, V A; Os'minkin, S V

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to characterize the structural changes in the respiratory system equivalent to its compensatory and adaptive reactions in response to the action of various factors under the normal and extreme conditions for the assessment of the possibility of their further use for the purpose of diagnostics. The action of various factors on the tissues obtained from the human respiratory system for forensic medical examination was shown to cause combined histomorphological alterations that refelect a wide spectrum of protective, compensatory, and adaptive reactions. The range of potential morphological and functional changes in the respiratory system depends on the characteristics of endogenous and exogenous factors influencing the organism of the affected subjects. It is concluded that the use of the proposed approach to morphological diagnostics may be useful for the development of criteria for the evaluation of various variants of tanatogenesis with their objective confirmation by mathematical models.

  15. Juvenile compensatory growth has negative consequences for reproduction in Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Sonya K; Arendt, Jeffrey D; Chandramouli, Radhika; Reznick, David N

    2010-08-01

    Compensatory or 'catch-up' growth may be an adaptive mechanism that buffers the growth trajectory of young organisms from deviations caused by reduced food availability. Theory generally assumes that rapid juvenile compensatory growth impacts reproduction only through its positive effects on age and size at maturation, but potential reproductive costs to juvenile compensatory growth remain virtually unexplored. We used a food manipulation experiment to examine the reproductive consequences of compensatory growth in Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata). Compensatory growth did not affect adult growth rates, litter production rates or investment in offspring size. However, compensatory growth had negative effects on litter size, independent of the effects of female body length, resulting in a 20% decline in offspring production. We discuss potential mechanisms behind this observed cost to reproduction.

  16. Compensatory Changes in Energy Balance Regulation over One Athletic Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Analiza M; Matias, Catarina N; Santos, Diana A; Thomas, Diana; Bosy-Westphal, Anja; MüLLER, Manfred J; Heymsfield, Steven B; Sardinha, LUíS B

    2017-06-01

    Mechanisms in energy balance (EB) regulation may include compensatory changes in energy intake (EI) and metabolic adaption (MA), but information is unavailable in athletes who often change EB components. We aim to investigate EB regulation compensatory mechanisms over one athletic season. Fifty-seven athletes (39 males/18 females; handball, volleyball, basketball, triathlon, and swimming) were evaluated from the beginning to the competitive phase of the season. Resting and total energy expenditure (REE and TEE, respectively) were assessed by indirect calorimetry and doubly labeled water, respectively, and physical activity energy expenditure was determined as TEE - 0.1(TEE) - REE. Fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were evaluated by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry and changed body energy stores was determined by 1.0(ΔFFM/Δtime) + 9.5(ΔFM/Δtime). EI was derived as TEE + EB. REE was predicted from baseline FFM, FM, sex, and sports. %MA was calculated as 100(measured REE/predicted REE-1) and MA (kcal) as %MA/100 multiplied by baseline measured REE. Average EI minus average physical activity energy expenditure was computed as a proxy of average energy availability, assuming that a constant nonexercise EE occurred over the season. Body mass increased by 0.8 ± 2.5 kg (P sports and the demanding workloads these athletes are exposed to highlight the need for sport-specific energy requirements.

  17. Vertical control in the Class III compensatory treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Costa Sobral

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Compensatory orthodontic treatment, or simply orthodontic camouflage, consists in an important alternative to orthognathic surgery in the resolution of skeletal discrepancies in adult patients. It is important to point that, to be successfully performed, diagnosis must be detailed, to evaluate, specifically, dental and facial features, as well as the limitations imposed by the magnitude of the discrepancy. The main complaint, patient's treatment expectation, periodontal limits, facial pattern and vertical control are some of the items to be explored in the determination of the viability of a compensatory treatment. Hyperdivergent patients who carry a Class III skeletal discrepancy, associated with a vertical facial pattern, with the presence or tendency to anterior open bite, deserve special attention. In these cases, an efficient strategy of vertical control must be planned and executed. OBJECTIVE: The present article aims at illustrating the evolution of efficient alternatives of vertical control in hiperdivergent patients, from the use, in the recent past, of extra-oral appliances on the lower dental arch (J-hook, until nowadays, with the advent of skeletal anchorage. But for patients with a more balanced facial pattern, the conventional mechanics with Class III intermaxillary elastics, associated to an accentuated curve of Spee in the upper arch and a reverse Curve of Spee in the lower arch, and vertical elastics in the anterior region, continues to be an excellent alternative, if there is extreme collaboration in using the elastics.

  18. Compensatory recombination phenomena of neurological functions in central dysphagia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-dong Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We speculate that cortical reactions evoked by swallowing activity may be abnormal in patients with central infarction with dysphagia. The present study aimed to detect functional imaging features of cerebral cortex in central dysphagia patients by using blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging techniques. The results showed that when normal controls swallowed, primary motor cortex (BA4, insula (BA13, premotor cortex (BA6/8, supramarginal gyrus (BA40, and anterior cingulate cortex (BA24/32 were activated, and that the size of the activated areas were larger in the left hemisphere compared with the right. In recurrent cerebral infarction patients with central dysphagia, BA4, BA13, BA40 and BA6/8 areas were activated, while the degree of activation in BA24/32 was decreased. Additionally, more areas were activated, including posterior cingulate cortex (BA23/31, visual association cortex (BA18/19, primary auditory cortex (BA41 and parahippocampal cortex (BA36. Somatosensory association cortex (BA7 and left cerebellum in patients with recurrent cerebral infarction with central dysphagia were also activated. Experimental findings suggest that the cerebral cortex has obvious hemisphere lateralization in response to swallowing, and patients with recurrent cerebral infarction with central dysphagia show compensatory recombination phenomena of neurological functions. In rehabilitative treatment, using the favorite food of patients can stimulate swallowing through visual, auditory, and other nerve conduction pathways, thus promoting compensatory recombination of the central cortex functions.

  19. The lateral neostriatum is necessary for compensatory ingestive behaviour after intravascular dehydration in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelos, M J; Harrison, D J; Rosser, A E; Dunnett, S B

    2013-12-01

    Aberrant striatal function results in an array of physiological symptoms, including impaired consummatory and regulatory behaviours, which can lead to weight loss and dehydration. It was hypothesised, therefore, that cell loss in the neostriatum may contribute to altered fluid intake by regulating physiological signals related to dehydration status. To test this theory, rats with lesions of the lateral neostriatum and sham controls underwent a series of physiological challenges, including the experimental induction of intracellular and intravascular dehydration. No baseline differences in prandial or non-prandial drinking were observed, nor were differences in locomotor activity evident between groups. Furthermore, intracellular dehydration increased water intake in lesion rats in a manner comparable to sham rats. Interestingly, a specific impairment was evident in lesion rats after subcutaneous injection of poly-ethylene glycol was used to induce intravascular dehydration, such that lesion rats failed to adapt their water intake to this physiological change. The results suggest that the striatal lesions resulted in regulatory dysfunction by impairing motivational control over compensatory ingestive behaviour after intravascular hydration, while the physiological signals related to dehydration remain intact. Loss of these cells in neurodegenerative disorders, such Huntington's disease, may contribute to regulatory changes evident in the course of the disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Topical treatment with nanoliposomal Amphotericin B reduces early lesion growth but fails to induce cure in an experimental model of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania mexicana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varikuti, Sanjay; Oghumu, Steve; Saljoughian, Noushin; Pioso, Marissa S; Sedmak, Bren E; Khamesipour, Ali; Satoskar, Abhay R

    2017-09-01

    Leishmania mexicana infection causes localized skin lesions that can lead to tissue damage and permanent disfigurement if not resolved. Currently, recommended treatments include intravenous administration of Amphotericin B, which is undesirable due to the associated cost and patient burden related to receiving regular injections. In this study, we evaluated the effect of topical treatment with a nanoliposomal formulation of Amphotericin B that is penetrable to the skin (SinaAmphoLeish 0.4%) in mice infected with L. mexicana by using ulcerated (BALB/c) and non-ulcerated (129SVE) models. BALB/c mice received a 4 week treatment following ulcerated lesion development, while 129SVE mice received a 10 week treatment beginning at week 5 post-infection. Although mice from both models showed comparable susceptibility to L. mexicana infection after topical treatment with SinaAmphoLeish relative to controls, 129SVE mice displayed a transient decrease in lesion sizes which eventually became similar to control mice. On other hand this treatment resulted in no reduction in the lesion sizes in BALB/c mice. 129SVE treated mice exhibited greater IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 cytokine levels and higher T-cell proliferation in re-stimulated draining lymph node cells. BALB/c mice showed no differences in cytokine responses between treated and control mice. These findings indicate that topical SinaAmphoLeish treatment is not likely to be effective in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by L. mexicana. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Method of detecting failed fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizaki, Hideaki; Suzumura, Takeshi.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the settlement of the temperature of an adequate filling high temperature pure water by detecting the outlet temperature of a high temperature pure water filling tube to a fuel assembly to control the heating of the pure water and detecting the failed fuel due to the sampling of the pure water. Method: A temperature sensor is provided at a water tube connected to a sipping cap for filling high temperature pure water to detect the temperature of the high temperature pure water at the outlet of the tube, and the temperature is confirmed by a temperature indicator. A heater is controlled on the basis of this confirmation, an adequate high temperature pure water is filled in the fuel assembly, and the pure water is replaced with coolant. Then, it is sampled to settle the adequate temperature of the high temperature coolant used for detecting the failure of the fuel assembly. As a result, the sipping effect does not decrease, and the failed fuel can be precisely detected. (Yoshihara, H.)

  2. Chronic administration of a leupeptin-derived calpain inhibitor fails to ameliorate severe muscle pathology in a canine model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K Childers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Calpains likely play a role in the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. Accordingly, calpain inhibition may provide therapeutic benefit to DMD patients. In the present study, we sought to measure benefit from administration of a novel calpain inhibitor, C101, in a canine muscular dystrophy model. Specifically, we tested the hypothesis that treatment with C101 mitigates progressive weakness and severe muscle pathology observed in young dogs with golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD. Young (6 week-old GRMD dogs were treated daily with either C101 (17mg/kg twice daily oral dose, n=9 or placebo (vehicle only, n=7 for 8 weeks. A battery of functional tests, including tibiotarsal joint angle, muscle/fat composition, and pelvic limb muscle strength were performed at baseline and every two weeks during the 8-week study. Results indicate that C101-treated GRMD dogs maintained strength in their cranial pelvic limb muscles (tibiotarsal flexors while placebo-treated dogs progressively lost strength. However, concomitant improvement was not observed in posterior pelvic limb muscles (tibiotarsal extensors. C101 treatment did not mitigate force drop following repeated eccentric contractions and no improvement was seen in the development of joint contractures, lean muscle mass or muscle histopathology. Taken together, these data do not support the hypothesis that treatment with C101 mitigates progressive weakness or ameliorates severe muscle pathology observed in young dogs with GRMD.

  3. The Failed Image and the Possessed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suhr, Christian

    2015-01-01

    This article asks if the recurrent queries regarding the value of images in visual anthropology could find new answers by exploring responses to visual media in neo-orthodox Islam. It proposes that the visual display of the photographic image shares a curious resemblance to the bodies of people...... possessed by invisible spirits called jinn. The image as a failed example or model of reality works like the possessed body as an amplifier of invisibility pointing towards that which cannot be seen, depicted visually, or represented in writing. This suggests a negative epistemology in which images obtain...

  4. Endoscopic lumbar sympathectomy for women: effect on compensatory sweat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo de Paula Loureiro

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Plantar hyperhidrosis is present in 50% of patients with hyperhidrosis. Thoracic sympathectomy is an important tool for the treatment of this condition, which is successful in about 60% of patients. For the remaining patients, lumbar sympathectomy is the procedure of choice. As new minimally invasive techniques have been developed, a significant demand for this type of access has led to its adaptation to the lumbar sympathectomy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic retroperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy in controlling plantar hyperhidrosis and its effects on compensatory sweat. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty female patients with persistent plantar hyperhidrosis after thoracic sympathectomy were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to laparoscopic retroperitoneal lumbar sympathectomy (Group A or no surgical intervention (Group B - control groups. Quality-of-life modifications were assessed by specific questionnaires before and after surgery. In the same manner, direct sweat measurements were also performed pre- and post-intervention by evaluating trans-epidermal water loss. Despite the lack of intervention, the control group was evaluated at similar timepoints. RESULTS: In Group A, no major complications occurred in the peri-operative period. During the immediate post-operative period, three patients (20% experienced prolonged pain (more than ten days. Eight patients suffered from worsened compensatory sweating (53.3%. In Group A, after lumbar sympathectomy, the quality of life significantly improved (p<0.05, intra-group comparison beyond that of the control group (p<0.05, inter-group comparison. Also, lumbar sympathectomy resulted in significantly lower values of foot sweat (pre- vs. post-operative periods, p<0.05; Group A vs. Group B, p<0.05. These patients also developed higher values of sweat measurements on specific points of their dorsal and abdominal regions after the procedure (p<0

  5. Diggers failing to become diggers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars

    of mining as a national discourse beg the question how we might begin to assess mining’s actual long-term influence on the national imaginary. Two quite recent interventions – possibly at the tail end of another boom cycle – have sought to address how the ‘story of mining’ as a national narrative could......Mining has in recent years emerged as a national discourse in Australia as the combined result of the mining boom and national anxieties over the GFC featured prominently in references to Australia as a failed competitive state (the folding of manufacturing, where the closure of car factories plays...... a particular iconic role, not to mention perpetually troubled Qantas). Yet mining is not new to Australia, but has been pivotal to the country’s demographic growth post-settlement/post-invasion. Arguably, mining’s boom and bust cycles have given it at times a disproportionate influence on narratives...

  6. Detector for failed fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Masaru.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide automatic monitor for the separation or reactor water and sampling water, in a failed fuel element detector using a sipping chamber. Constitution: A positional detector for the exact mounting of a sipping chamber on a channel box and a level detector for the detection of complete discharge of cooling water in the sipping chamber are provided in the sipping chamber. The positional detector is contacted to the upper end of the channel box and operated when the sipping chamber is correctly mounted to the fuel assemblies. The level detector comprises a float and a limit switch and it is operated when the water in the sipping chamber is discharged by a predetermined amount. Isolation of reactor water and sampling water are automatically monitored by the signal from these two detectors. (Ikeda, J.)

  7. Why good projects fail anyway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matta, Nadim F; Ashkenas, Ronald N

    2003-09-01

    Big projects fail at an astonishing rate--more than half the time, by some estimates. It's not hard to understand why. Complicated long-term projects are customarily developed by a series of teams working along parallel tracks. If managers fail to anticipate everything that might fall through the cracks, those tracks will not converge successfully at the end to reach the goal. Take a companywide CRM project. Traditionally, one team might analyze customers, another select the software, a third develop training programs, and so forth. When the project's finally complete, though, it may turn out that the salespeople won't enter in the requisite data because they don't understand why they need to. This very problem has, in fact, derailed many CRM programs at major organizations. There is a way to uncover unanticipated problems while the project is still in development. The key is to inject into the overall plan a series of miniprojects, or "rapid-results initiatives," which each have as their goal a miniature version of the overall goal. In the CRM project, a single team might be charged with increasing the revenues of one sales group in one region by 25% within four months. To reach that goal, team members would have to draw on the work of all the parallel teams. But in just four months, they would discover the salespeople's resistance and probably other unforeseen issues, such as, perhaps, the need to divvy up commissions for joint-selling efforts. The World Bank has used rapid-results initiatives to great effect to keep a sweeping 16-year project on track and deliver visible results years ahead of schedule. In taking an in-depth look at this project, and others, the authors show why this approach is so effective and how the initiatives are managed in conjunction with more traditional project activities.

  8. Spatial climate patterns explain negligible variation in strength of compensatory density feedbacks in birds and mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrando-Pérez, Salvador; Delean, Steven; Brook, Barry W; Cassey, Phillip; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2014-01-01

    The use of long-term population data to separate the demographic role of climate from density-modified demographic processes has become a major topic of ecological investigation over the last two decades. Although the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that determine the strength of density feedbacks are now well understood, the degree to which climate gradients shape those processes across taxa and broad spatial scales remains unclear. Intuitively, harsh or highly variable environmental conditions should weaken compensatory density feedbacks because populations are hypothetically unable to achieve or maintain densities at which social and trophic interactions (e.g., competition, parasitism, predation, disease) might systematically reduce population growth. Here we investigate variation in the strength of compensatory density feedback, from long-term time series of abundance over 146 species of birds and mammals, in response to spatial gradients of broad-scale temperature precipitation variables covering 97 localities in 28 countries. We use information-theoretic metrics to rank phylogenetic generalized least-squares regression models that control for sample size (time-series length) and phylogenetic non-independence. Climatic factors explained < 1% of the remaining variation in density-feedback strength across species, with the highest non-control, model-averaged effect sizes related to extreme precipitation variables. We could not link our results directly to other published studies, because ecologists use contrasting responses, predictors and statistical approaches to correlate density feedback and climate--at the expense of comparability in a macroecological context. Censuses of multiple populations within a given species, and a priori knowledge of the spatial scales at which density feedbacks interact with climate, seem to be necessary to determine cross-taxa variation in this phenomenon. Despite the availability of robust modelling tools, the appropriate

  9. Spatial climate patterns explain negligible variation in strength of compensatory density feedbacks in birds and mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Herrando-Pérez

    Full Text Available The use of long-term population data to separate the demographic role of climate from density-modified demographic processes has become a major topic of ecological investigation over the last two decades. Although the ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that determine the strength of density feedbacks are now well understood, the degree to which climate gradients shape those processes across taxa and broad spatial scales remains unclear. Intuitively, harsh or highly variable environmental conditions should weaken compensatory density feedbacks because populations are hypothetically unable to achieve or maintain densities at which social and trophic interactions (e.g., competition, parasitism, predation, disease might systematically reduce population growth. Here we investigate variation in the strength of compensatory density feedback, from long-term time series of abundance over 146 species of birds and mammals, in response to spatial gradients of broad-scale temperature precipitation variables covering 97 localities in 28 countries. We use information-theoretic metrics to rank phylogenetic generalized least-squares regression models that control for sample size (time-series length and phylogenetic non-independence. Climatic factors explained < 1% of the remaining variation in density-feedback strength across species, with the highest non-control, model-averaged effect sizes related to extreme precipitation variables. We could not link our results directly to other published studies, because ecologists use contrasting responses, predictors and statistical approaches to correlate density feedback and climate--at the expense of comparability in a macroecological context. Censuses of multiple populations within a given species, and a priori knowledge of the spatial scales at which density feedbacks interact with climate, seem to be necessary to determine cross-taxa variation in this phenomenon. Despite the availability of robust modelling tools

  10. Walking while memorizing: age-related differences in compensatory behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K Z; Lindenberger, U; Freund, A M; Baltes, P B

    2001-05-01

    This study investigated predictions of the life-span theory of selection, optimization, and compensation, focusing on different patterns of task priority during dual-task performance in younger and older adults. Cognitive (memorizing) and sensorimotor (walking a narrow track) performance were measured singly, concurrently, and when task difficulty was manipulated. Use of external aids was measured to provide another index of task priority. Before dual-task testing, participants received extensive training with each component task and external aid. Age differences in dual-task costs were greater in memory performance than walking, suggesting that older adults prioritized walking over memory. Further, when given a choice of compensatory external aids to use, older adults optimized walking, whereas younger adults optimized memory performance. The results have broad implications for systemic theories of cognitive and sensorimotor aging, and the costs and benefits of assistive devices and environmental support for older populations.

  11. Effectiveness of Compensatory Strategies applied to Cognitive impairment in Schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Peter; Østergaard, Birte; Nordentoft, Merete

      Background Between 75% and 85% of patients with schizophrenia have cognitive impairments. The impairments have a negative influence on the patient's ability to maintain work, maintain contact with friends, independent living and living in a social relationship. Compared to treatment as usual......, studies using Cognitive Adaptation Training (CAT), including training of compensatory strategies to sequence patient's adaptive behaviours, have shown improvement in social functioning, decreased relapse, better compliance to medical treatment and increased quality of life. However, no studies, up to now......, have investigated the effect of CAT in younger patients with schizophrenia   Purpose The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effect of CAT in comparison with treatment as usual, focusing on social functions, symptoms, relapse, re-hospitalisation, and quality of life in younger outpatients...

  12. Misfits in Organization Design: Information Processing as a Compensatory Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Nanfeng Luo

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We propose a compensatory misfits theory which holds that an “over-fitting” organization structure can compensate for an “under-fitting” structure, thereby reducing the total misfit. In organizations, over-fit occurs when structural features misfit the core contingencies because the structural level is too high to fit the contingencies. An under-fit occurs when structural features misfit the contingencies because the structural level is too low. When an under-fit is compensated by an over-fit, the combination can produce performance outcomes that approximate those from fit. The reason inheres in information processing being a higher level factor that cuts across different contingencies and structural features that are mis-fitted to each other, so that compensation is possible. We identify the specific conditions that must be fulfilled for compensation to occur, and we discuss implications for organization design theory and practice.

  13. Clinical and Cognitive Insight in a Compensatory Cognitive Training Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Cynthia Z.; Vella, Lea; Twamley, Elizabeth W.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of limited insight is a crucial consideration in the treatment of individuals with psychiatric illness. In the context of psychosis, both clinical and cognitive insight have been described. This study aimed to evaluate the relationships between clinical and cognitive insight and neuropsychological functioning, psychiatric symptom severity, and everyday functioning in patients with a primary psychotic disorder participating in a compensatory cognitive training (CT) intervention. Sixty-nine individuals diagnosed with a primary psychotic disorder were randomized to a 3-month CT intervention or to standard pharmacotherapy, and they completed a comprehensive neuropsychological, clinical, and functional battery at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The CT intervention focused on habit formation and compensatory strategy learning in four domains: prospective memory, attention and vigilance, learning and memory, and problem-solving/cognitive flexibility. At baseline, better clinical insight was significantly related to better executive functioning and less severe negative symptoms. There was no significant association between cognitive insight and cognitive functioning, symptom severity, or everyday functioning ability. The CT intervention did not have an effect on clinical or cognitive insight, but better cognitive insight prior to participation in CT significantly predicted decreased positive and depressive symptom severity posttreatment, and better clinical insight predicted improved self-reported quality of life. Although clinical insight is related to executive functioning, the correlates of cognitive insight remain elusive. Intact insight appears to be beneficial in ameliorating clinical symptomatology like positive symptoms and depression, rather than augmenting cognition. It may be valuable to develop brief interventions aimed at improving clinical and cognitive insight prior to other psychosocial rehabilitation in order to maximize the benefit of

  14. Blueprint for Action: A Summary of Recommendations for Improving Compensatory Education in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Daniel C.; Spiess, Kathryn H.

    This summarizes a more detailed report "Compensatory Education in Massachusetts: An Evaluation with Recommendations." The first part outlines four critical courses of action which will strengthen compensatory education: (1) establish appropriate program objectives; (2) establish sound evaluation components in all Title I projects; (3) establish…

  15. Compensatory Advantage as a Mechanism of Educational Inequality: A Regression Discontinuity Based on Month of Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Compensatory advantage is a mechanism of social stratification that complements cumulative advantage and path dependence. In this article, I first discuss the theoretical foundations of the compensatory advantage and path dependence mechanisms and the methodological challenges that complicate identification of their effects. Next, I present a…

  16. 5 CFR 550.1407 - Forfeiture of unused compensatory time off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Compensatory Time Off for Travel § 550.1407 Forfeiture of unused... separates or is placed in a leave without pay status because of an on-the-job injury with entitlement to..., may extend the time limit for using such compensatory time off for travel for up to an additional 26...

  17. Effects of Displayed Error Scaling in Compensatory Roll-Axis Tracking Tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breur, S.W.; Pool, D.M.; Van Paassen, M.M.; Mulder, M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an investigation into the effects of displayed error scaling on manual control behavior during compensatory roll-axis tracking. Previous experiments have indicated that for compensatory displays that, similar to an artificial horizon, present the roll tracking errors in

  18. Cerebral pathological and compensatory mechanisms in the premotor phase of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 parkinsonism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuenen, B.F.L. van; Helmich, R.C.G.; Ferraye, M.U.; Thaler, A.; Hendler, T.; Orr-Urtreger, A.; Mirelman, A.; Bressman, S.; Marder, K.S.; Giladi, N.; Warrenburg, B.P.C. van de; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.

    2012-01-01

    Compensatory cerebral mechanisms can delay motor symptom onset in Parkinson's disease. We aim to characterize these compensatory mechanisms and early disease-related changes by quantifying movement-related cerebral function in subjects at significantly increased risk of developing Parkinson's

  19. Compensatory Feeding Following a Predator Removal Program : Detection and Mechanisms, 1982-1996 Progress Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, James H.

    2002-02-28

    Predator removal is one of the oldest management tools in existence, with evidence that ancient Greeks used a bounty reward for wolves over 3,000 years ago (Anonymous 1964). Efforts to control predators on fish have been documented in scientific journals for at least 60 years (Eschmeyer 1937; Lagler 1939; Foerster and Ricker 1941; Smith and Swingle 1941; Jeppson and Platts 1959), and has likely been attempted for much longer. Complete eradication of a target species from a body of water has rarely been the objective of predator removal programs, which instead have attempted to eliminate predators from specific areas, to reduce the density or standing stock of predators, or to kill the largest individuals in the population (Meronek et al. 1996). In evaluating management programs that remove only part of a predator population, the compensatory response(s) of the remaining predators must be considered. Some potential compensatory responses by remaining individuals include increased reproductive output, increased growth rate, or increased consumption of certain prey species (Jude et al. 1987). If compensation by predators that remain in the system following a removal effort occurs, it may reduce the effectiveness of the predator control program. Northern pike-minnow Ptychocheilus oregonensis (formerly called northern squawfish) consume juvenile salmon in rivers, lakes, and reservoirs in British Columbia, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and California. Northern pikeminnow have been estimated to consume about 11% of all juvenile salmon that migrate through John Day Reservoir on the Columbia River (Rieman et al. 1991). Modeling studies suggested that removal of 20% of the northern pikeminnow population in John Day Reservoir would result in a 50% decrease in predation-related mortality of juvenile salmon migrating through this reach (Beamesderfer et al. 1991). Since the early 1940's, other programs have been implemented to remove northern pikeminnow, with hopes of

  20. Does compensatory neural activity survive old-old age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daffner, Kirk R; Sun, Xue; Tarbi, Elise C; Rentz, Dorene M; Holcomb, Phillip J; Riis, Jenna L

    2011-01-01

    One mechanism that may allow older adults to continue to successfully perform certain cognitive tasks is to allocate more resources than their younger counterparts. Most prior studies have not included individuals beyond their 70s. Here, we investigated whether compensatory increases in neural activity previously observed in cognitively high-performing young-old adults would continue into old-old age. Event-related potentials were recorded from 72 cognitively high performing subjects, aged 18 to 96 years old, while they participated in a subject-controlled novelty oddball paradigm in which they determined viewing duration of standard, target, and novel visual stimuli. Compared to young and middle-aged subjects, both young-old and old-old subjects exhibited an impairment of preliminary mismatch/match detection operations, indexed by an attenuated anterior N2 component. This may have placed a greater burden on the subsequent controlled decision-making process, indexed by the P3, necessitating the allocation of more resources. The relationship between age and resource allocation, as measured by P3 amplitude, from midlife to very old age (45-96 years old) followed an inverted u-shaped curve (quadratic function). It peaked between the late 60s and early 70s. Thereafter, there was an inverse relationship between age and resource appropriation. This relationship remained significant after controlling for differences in task performance and MMSE. Examining the size of the P3 component across different age groups suggests that although cognitively high performing adults in their early 80s exhibit a reduction in P3 amplitude, they have a relatively well-preserved capacity to appropriate resources. However, by the late 80s, there is a robust decline (relative to young-old adults) in the size of the P3. Our results indicate that when carrying out controlled processing linked to directing attention to salient events, cognitively high performers reach the boundary of their

  1. Balance perturbation system to improve balance compensatory responses during walking in old persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melzer Itshak

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ageing commonly disrupts the balance control and compensatory postural responses that contribute to maintaining balance and preventing falls during perturbation of posture. This can lead to increased risk of falling in old adults (65 years old and over. Therefore, improving compensatory postural responses during walking is one of the goals in fall prevention programs. Training is often used to achieve this goal. Most fall prevention programs are usually directed towards improving voluntary postural control. Since compensatory postural responses triggered by a slip or a trip are not under direct volitional control these exercises are less expected to improve compensatory postural responses due to lack of training specificity. Thus, there is a need to investigate the use balance perturbations during walking to train more effectively compensatory postural reactions during walking. This paper describes the Balance Measure & Perturbation System (BaMPer System a system that provides small, controlled and unpredictable perturbations during treadmill walking providing valuable perturbation, which allows training compensatory postural responses during walking which thus hypothesize to improve compensatory postural responses in older adults.

  2. Compensatory interactions to stabilize multiple steady states or mitigate the effects of multiple deregulations in biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Campbell, Colin; Albert, RéKa

    Complex diseases can be modeled as damage to intra-cellular networks that results in abnormal cell behaviors. Network-based dynamic models such as Boolean models have been employed to model a variety of biological systems including those corresponding to disease. Previous work designed compensatory interactions to stabilize an attractor of a Boolean network after single node damage. We generalize this method to a multi-node damage scenario and to the simultaneous stabilization of multiple steady state attractors. We presents three key results. First, we use analytical and computational methods to study how network structure and regulatory logic affect the resilience of the network's steady states to single node perturbation. Second, we present an algorithm to design compensatory interventions to stabilize a steady state of the network after double node damage and evaluate it on random Boolean networks and two intra-cellular network models relevant to cancer. Third, we apply the algorithm on stabilizing two steady states simultaneously after a single node damage and discuss the emerging situations and their corresponding frequencies. We also apply the algorithm to the biological examples.

  3. Segmental heterogeneity of enzymatic response during compensatory renal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, T.; Bergeron, M.

    1985-01-01

    The activities of DNA polymerase α and key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and glycolysis were measured in different segments of the rat nephron at various times (up to 96 hrs) following a unilateral nephrectomy (UNx). Tubule fragments were obtained after collagenase treatment followed by centrifugation on a Percoll gradient. The DNA polymerase α activity in control rats showed moderate and similar values in different segmental extracts as well as in the whole kidney extract (1700-1800 μμmole[ 3 H] dAMP/mg DNA). In Unx rats, activity in proximal tubules (PT) measured at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hrs after nephrectomy represented an increase of 60%, 200%, 420% and 370% respectively over control values. Distal tubule fragments (DT) showed only minor increases. The results demonstrate that the proximal tubule accounts for most of the compensatory renal growth (CRG) in the remaining kidney. The gluconeogenic and glycolytic enzymes were confined to the PT and those of glycolysis to the DT fragments. Following UNx, the specific activities of these enzymes were not modified in the remaining kidney; however, the overall activity of gluconeogenesis was increased as a result of the cell hyperplasia occurring in the PT. The work also illustrates that biochemical studies of CRG on the whole organ may provide misleading information due to the presence of heterogeneous cell populations in the mammalian kidney and to their uneven response in CRG

  4. Dome-shaped macula: a compensatory mechanism in myopic anisometropia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Pearse A; Mitra, Arijit; Khan, Imran J; Quhill, Fahd; Elsherbiny, Samer M

    2012-05-31

    The purpose of this article was to describe a patient with dome-shaped macula in the setting of mild myopic anisometropia and to speculate regarding the role of this feature as a compensatory mechanism in ocular development. The clinical records of a 49-year-old woman with this condition were reviewed. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomographic images revealed evidence of a dome-shaped macula. B-scan ultrasonography measured axial lengths of 23.8 mm in the right eye and 22.8 mm in the left eye. Spherical equivalents were -1.375 and +0.375 in the right and left eyes, respectively. Examination of the left eye was unremarkable. Dome-shaped macula has previously only been described in patients with high myopia. These findings support the hypothesis that myopic anisometropia, rather than absolute refractive status, is central to the development of dome-shaped macula and that this feature represents a protective mechanism aimed at reducing the effects of anisometropia. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Reasoning and dyslexia: is visual memory a compensatory resource?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Alison M; Handley, Simon J

    2014-11-01

    Effective reasoning is fundamental to problem solving and achievement in education and employment. Protocol studies have previously suggested that people with dyslexia use reasoning strategies based on visual mental representations, whereas non-dyslexics use abstract verbal strategies. This research presents converging evidence from experimental and individual differences perspectives. In Experiment 1, dyslexic and non-dyslexic participants were similarly accurate on reasoning problems, but scores on a measure of visual memory ability only predicted reasoning accuracy for dyslexics. In Experiment 2, a secondary task loaded visual memory resources during concurrent reasoning. Dyslexics were significantly less accurate when reasoning under conditions of high memory load and showed reduced ability to subsequently recall the visual stimuli, suggesting that the memory and reasoning tasks were competing for the same visual cognitive resource. The results are consistent with an explanation based on limitations in the verbal and executive components of working memory in dyslexia and the use of compensatory visual strategies for reasoning. There are implications for cognitive activities that do not readily support visual thinking, whether in education, employment or less formal everyday settings. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Sexual hormones modulate compensatory renal growth and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azurmendi, Pablo J; Oddo, Elisabet M; Toledo, Jorge E; Martin, Rodolfo S; Ibarra, Fernando R; Arrizurieta, Elvira E

    2013-01-01

    The role played by sexual hormones and vasoactive substances in the compensatory renal growth (CRG) that follows uninephrectomy (uNx) is still controversial. Intact and gonadectomized adult Wistar rats of both sexes, with and without uNx, performed at 90 days age, were studied at age 150 days. Daily urine volume, electrolyte excretion and kallikrein activity (UKa) were determined. Afterwards, glomerular filtration rate and blood pressure were measured, the kidneys weighed and DNA, protein and RNA studied to determine nuclei content and cell size. When the remnant kidney weight at age 150 days was compared with the weight of the kidney removed at the time of uNx, male uNx rats showed the greatest CRG (50%) while growth in the other uNx groups was 25%, 15% and 19% in orchidectomized, female and ovariectomized rats, respectively. The small CRG observed in the uNx female rats was accompanied by the lowest glomerular filtration value, 0.56 ± 0.02 ml/ min/g kwt compared, with the other uNx groups, p hormones positively influenced CRG and its absence modulated cell size. Female sexual hormones, instead, did not appear to stimulate CRG. The kallikrein kinin system may not be involved in CRG.

  7. Thermal analysis of the failed equipment storage vault system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerrell, J.; Lee, S.Y.; Shadday, A.

    1995-07-01

    A storage facility for failed glass melters is required for radioactive operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). It is currently proposed that the failed melters be stored in the Failed Equipment Storage Vaults (FESV's) in S area. The FESV's are underground reinforced concrete structures constructed in pairs, with adjacent vaults sharing a common wall. A failed melter is to be placed in a steel Melter Storage Box (MSB), sealed, and lowered into the vault. A concrete lid is then placed over the top of the FESV. Two melters will be placed within the FESV/MSB system, separated by the common wall. There is no forced ventilation within the vault so that the melter is passively cooled. Temperature profiles in the Failed Equipment Storage Vault Structures have been generated using the FLOW3D software to model heat conduction and convection within the FESV/MSB system. Due to complexities in modeling radiation with FLOW3D, P/THERMAL software has been used to model radiation using the conduction/convection temperature results from FLOW3D. The final conjugate model includes heat transfer by conduction, convection, and radiation to predict steady-state temperatures. Also, the FLOW3D software has been validated as required by the technical task request

  8. The Development of a Novel Measure to Assess Motives for Compensatory Eating in Response to Exercise: The CEMQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshier, Samantha J; Landau, Aaron J; Hearon, Bridget A; Stein, Aliza T; Greathouse, Lee; Smits, Jasper A J; Otto, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    Compensatory eating in response to exercise may be an obstacle to achieving weight-loss and fitness goals. In this study we develop and conduct a preliminary examination of the psychometric properties of the Compensatory Eating Motives Questionnaire (CEMQ), a self-report questionnaire of motives for compensatory eating. Development and testing of the CEMQ was conducted in two student samples. Of respondents, 75% reported engaging in compensatory eating. Factor analysis yielded factors representing three domains of motives for compensatory eating: Eating for Reward, Eating for Recovery, and Eating for Relief. Internal consistency of the factors was adequate, and the factor structure was replicated. Correlations between the CEMQ subscales and trait questionnaires supported hypotheses for convergent and divergent validity. These results encourage further investigation of compensatory eating as a potential obstacle to weight loss, and support the continued assessment of the CEMQ as a tool to measure three conceptually distinct motives for compensatory eating.

  9. Ketosis in type 2 diabetes mellitus: complication or compensatory mechanism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kruljac

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The exact clinical role of diabetic ketosis in patients presenting to emergency departments with hyperglycemic crises is largely unknown. The aim of this brief review is to provide insights into possible mechanisms and clinical impact of diabetic ketosis in patients with hyperglycemic crises and clinical features of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Patients with T2DM have impaired ketogenesis and lower blood ketone levels. High insulin, low glucagon, IGF-I, ghrelin and adiponectin levels are associated with suppressed ketogenesis. Adenosine 5’-monophosphate-activated protein kinase is an enzyme expressed in skeletal muscle and seems to have pivotal role in impaired ketogenesis. An increase in ketogenesis is associated with weight loss, increase in insulin sensitivity and serum IGF-I levels, which have beneficial effects on glycemia but also on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Ketone bodies are far more efficient fuel sources than glucose, especially in diabetics with heart failure and kidney disease. In theory, ketogenesis in patients with T2DM can be improved by low- carbohydrate and low-calorie diet, physical activity, moderate alcohol use, metformin, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists and sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2 inhibitors. SGLT-2 inhibitors are the most potent inducers of ketogenesis. They induce profound glycosuria with a consequent shift to fatty acid metabolism and increased ketogenesis. This could potentially explain how SGLT-2 inhibitor empagliflozin lowers cardiovascular mortality and slowers progression of kidney disease. Therefore, we believe that diabetic ketosis in patients with hyperglycemic crisis may be a compensatory mechanism, rather than a complication itself. Further prospective studies are needed to test this hypothesis.

  10. Sexual hormones modulate compensatory renal growth and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo J. Azurmendi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The role played by sexual hormones and vasoactive substances in the compensatory renal growth (CRG that follows uninephrectomy (uNx is still controversial. Intact and gonadectomized adult Wistar rats of both sexes, with and without uNx, performed at 90 days age, were studied at age 150 days. Daily urine volume, electrolyte excretion and kallikrein activity (UKa were determined. Afterwards, glomerular filtration rate and blood pressure were measured, the kidneys weighed and DNA, protein and RNA studied to determine nuclei content and cell size. When the remnant kidney weight at age 150 days was compared with the weight of the kidney removed at the time of uNx, male uNx rats showed the greatest CRG (50% while growth in the other uNx groups was 25%, 15% and 19% in orchidectomized, female and ovariectomized rats, respectively. The small CRG observed in the uNx female rats was accompanied by the lowest glomerular filtration value, 0.56 ± 0.02 ml/min/g kwt compared, with the other uNx groups, p < 0.05. Cell size (protein or RNA/DNA was similar for all the groups except for uNx orchidectomized rats. In this group the cytoplasmatic protein or RNA content was lower than in the other groups while DNA (nuclei content was similar. Some degree of hyperplasia was determined by DNA content in the uNx groups. Male sexual hormones positively influenced CRG and its absence modulated cell size. Female sexual hormones, instead, did not appear to stimulate CRG. The kallikrein kinin system may not be involved in CRG.

  11. Compensatory mechanisms in basketball players with jumper's knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Julie A; Huxel, Kellie C; Swanik, C Buz

    2008-11-01

    Determining whether there are compensations in those with jumper's knee (JK) might further our understanding of the condition. Comparing lower extremity kinematics and jump performance of basketball athletes with JK with those of healthy controls (C). Repeated-measures control-match design. University laboratory. 24 male basketball players (12 JK, 12 C) matched by height, weight, position, experience, and frequency of play. Standing counter-movement and running layup jumps. Maximum vertical-jump height, footfall landing, and lower extremity sagittal-plane kinematics. There were no significant group differences (P > .05) in vertical-jump height (JK = 64.3 +/- 8.6 cm, C = 63.0 +/- 9.8 cm) or layup height (JK = 71.3 +/- 11.6 cm, C = 73.3 +/- 11.0 cm). JK subjects landed flat footed (50%) more than controls (8%). JK subjects showed significantly more hip flexion (JK = 105 degrees +/- 24.8 degrees, C = 89.8 degrees +/- 14.1 degrees; P = .039) with decreased hip acceleration during the countermovement (JK = -3039 +/- 1392 degrees /s2, C = -4229 +/- 1765 degrees /s2; P = .040). When landing from the countermovement jump, JK subjects had significantly less knee acceleration (JK = -4960 +/- 1512 degrees/s2, C = -6736 +/- 2009 degrees/s2, P = .023) and in the layup showed significantly less ankle dorsiflexion (JK = 106.5 degrees +/- 9.0 degrees, C = 112.5 degrees +/- 7.7 degrees; P = .048) and hip acceleration (JK = -2841 +/- 1094 degrees/s2, C = -3912 +/- 1575 degrees/s2; P = .033). Compensatory strategies observed in JK subjects might help maintain performance, because their jump height was similar to that of healthy controls.

  12. Sleep, stress and compensatory behaviors in Australian nurses and midwives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jillian Dorrian

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe sleep, stress and compensatory behaviors in nurses and midwives. METHODS: The study included 41 midwives and 21 nurses working in Australian hospitals between 2005 and 2009. Participation was voluntary. All participants recorded on a daily basis their work and sleep hours, levels of stress and exhaustion, caffeine intake and use of sleep aids for a month (1,736 days, 1,002 work shifts. RESULTS: Participants reported moderate to high levels of stress and exhaustion on 20-40% of work days; experienced sleep disruption on more than 50% of work days; struggled to remain awake on 27% of work days; and suffered extreme drowsiness or experienced a near accident while travelling home on 9% of workdays. Age, perceived sleep duration and work hours were significant predictors of caffeine intake. About 60% of participants reported using sleep aids (about 20% reported taking prescription medications and 44% of nurses and 9% of midwives reported alcohol use as a sleep aid at least once during the study. Stress and workdays were significant predictors of sedative use. Overall, 22% reported being indifferent or mildly dissatisfied with their job. CONCLUSIONS: Sleep problems, high levels of stress and exhaustion and low job satisfaction are prevalent among nurses and midwives. The use of alcohol and sleeping pills as sleep aids, and the use of caffeine to help maintain alertness is also common. Nurses and midwives may use caffeine to compensate for reduced sleep, especially on workdays, and sleeping pills to cope with their daily work-related stress.

  13. Interspecific variation in compensatory regrowth to herbivory associated with soil nutrients in three Ficus (Moraceae saplings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhao

    Full Text Available Plant compensatory regrowth is an induced process that enhances plant tolerance to herbivory. Plant behavior against herbivores differs between species and depends on resource availability, thus making general predictions related to plant compensatory regrowth difficult. To understand how soil nutrients determine the degree of compensatory regrowth for different plant species, we selected saplings of three Ficus species and treated with herbivore insects and artificial injury in both glasshouse conditions and in the field at two soil nutrient levels. Compensatory regrowth was calculated by biomass, relative growth rate and photosynthetic characteristics. A similar pattern was found in both the glasshouse and in the field for species F. hispida, where overcompensatory regrowth was triggered only under fertile conditions, and full compensatory regrowth occurred under infertile conditions. For F. auriculata, overcompensatory regrowth was stimulated only under infertile conditions and full compensatory regrowth occurred under fertile conditions. Ficus racemosa displayed full compensatory regrowth in both soil nutrient levels, but without overcompensatory regrowth following any of the treatments. The three Ficus species differed in biomass allocation following herbivore damage and artificial injury. The root/shoot ratio of F. hispida decreased largely following herbivore damage and artificial injury, while the root/shoot ratio for F. auriculata increased against damage treatments. The increase of shoot and root size for F. hispida and F. auriculata, respectively, appeared to be caused by a significant increase in photosynthesis. The results indicated that shifts in biomass allocation and increased photosynthesis are two of the mechanisms underlying compensatory regrowth. Contrasting patterns among the three Ficus species suggest that further theoretical and empirical work is necessary to better understand the complexity of the plant responses to

  14. Interspecific variation in compensatory regrowth to herbivory associated with soil nutrients in three Ficus (Moraceae) saplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jin; Chen, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Plant compensatory regrowth is an induced process that enhances plant tolerance to herbivory. Plant behavior against herbivores differs between species and depends on resource availability, thus making general predictions related to plant compensatory regrowth difficult. To understand how soil nutrients determine the degree of compensatory regrowth for different plant species, we selected saplings of three Ficus species and treated with herbivore insects and artificial injury in both glasshouse conditions and in the field at two soil nutrient levels. Compensatory regrowth was calculated by biomass, relative growth rate and photosynthetic characteristics. A similar pattern was found in both the glasshouse and in the field for species F. hispida, where overcompensatory regrowth was triggered only under fertile conditions, and full compensatory regrowth occurred under infertile conditions. For F. auriculata, overcompensatory regrowth was stimulated only under infertile conditions and full compensatory regrowth occurred under fertile conditions. Ficus racemosa displayed full compensatory regrowth in both soil nutrient levels, but without overcompensatory regrowth following any of the treatments. The three Ficus species differed in biomass allocation following herbivore damage and artificial injury. The root/shoot ratio of F. hispida decreased largely following herbivore damage and artificial injury, while the root/shoot ratio for F. auriculata increased against damage treatments. The increase of shoot and root size for F. hispida and F. auriculata, respectively, appeared to be caused by a significant increase in photosynthesis. The results indicated that shifts in biomass allocation and increased photosynthesis are two of the mechanisms underlying compensatory regrowth. Contrasting patterns among the three Ficus species suggest that further theoretical and empirical work is necessary to better understand the complexity of the plant responses to herbivore damage.

  15. Compensatory plasticity in the deaf brain: effects on perception of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Arla; Reed, Maureen J; Russo, Frank A

    2014-10-28

    When one sense is unavailable, sensory responsibilities shift and processing of the remaining modalities becomes enhanced to compensate for missing information. This shift, referred to as compensatory plasticity, results in a unique sensory experience for individuals who are deaf, including the manner in which music is perceived. This paper evaluates the neural, behavioural and cognitive evidence for compensatory plasticity following auditory deprivation and considers how this manifests in a unique experience of music that emphasizes visual and vibrotactile modalities.

  16. Compensatory Plasticity in the Deaf Brain: Effects on Perception of Music

    OpenAIRE

    Good, Arla; Reed, Maureen J.; Russo, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    When one sense is unavailable, sensory responsibilities shift and processing of the remaining modalities becomes enhanced to compensate for missing information. This shift, referred to as compensatory plasticity, results in a unique sensory experience for individuals who are deaf, including the manner in which music is perceived. This paper evaluates the neural, behavioural and cognitive evidence for compensatory plasticity following auditory deprivation and considers how this manifests in a ...

  17. Compensatory Plasticity in the Deaf Brain: Effects on Perception of Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arla Good

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available When one sense is unavailable, sensory responsibilities shift and processing of the remaining modalities becomes enhanced to compensate for missing information. This shift, referred to as compensatory plasticity, results in a unique sensory experience for individuals who are deaf, including the manner in which music is perceived. This paper evaluates the neural, behavioural and cognitive evidence for compensatory plasticity following auditory deprivation and considers how this manifests in a unique experience of music that emphasizes visual and vibrotactile modalities.

  18. When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaschke, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Review of: James R. Taylor and Elizabeth J. Van Every / When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters. (New York: Routledge, 2014. 220 pp. ISBN: 978 0415741668)......Review of: James R. Taylor and Elizabeth J. Van Every / When Organization Fails: Why Authority Matters. (New York: Routledge, 2014. 220 pp. ISBN: 978 0415741668)...

  19. Neglected City Narratives And Failed Rebranding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousten, Birthe; Locmele, Gunta

    2017-01-01

    Rīga, Latvia went through a failed rebranding process as the forerunner of its status as a European Capital of Culture (2014). The same thing happened in Aarhus, Denmark. Aarhus will be a European Capital of Culture (2017) and leading to this, it went through a failed rebranding process. Based on...

  20. Is journalism failing on climate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmstorf, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    How can we build a reliable and affordable energy supply based on renewables? How rapidly do we need to cut greenhouse gas emissions to keep climate change within manageable bounds? What does it take to maintain a stable common currency of different nations? These are just a few examples of questions that are critical for our future and that require an understanding of complex systems—the energy system, the climate system, the financial system. Finding sound answers to these questions requires sophisticated scientific analysis and expert knowledge; a lay person's intuition will clearly not suffice. Yet, decisions in a democracy are (and should be!) taken by politicians and the voting public who are not usually scientific experts. Hence the well-being of our societies—and even more so the living conditions of future generations, which are defined by the decisions we take today—depends on the wider public being well informed about the state of scientific knowledge and discourse. The media are the most important means by which lay people obtain their information about science. Good science journalism is therefore a decisive factor for the long-term success of modern society. Good science journalism clearly must be critical journalism, and it requires journalists who know what is what, who can put things into a perspective, and who are able to make well-informed judgements. After all, the role of science journalism is not simply to act as a 'translator' who conveys the findings of scientists in a language understandable to lay people. Rather, good science journalism will provide the public with a realistic impression of what is well established in science and what are current 'hot topics', uncertainties and controversies. It will also discuss the methods and social context of the scientific endeavour. There is ample evidence that in the area of climate science, journalism too often is failing to deliver this realistic picture to its audience, despite many good

  1. Subtype criteria for bulimia nervosa: short- versus long-term compensatory behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, F J; Peñas, E V; Ramos, M I; López-Ibor, J J; Guisado, J A

    2001-01-01

    Weight control methods used by a group of bulimic patients were studied, analyzing the relationship among compensatory strategies and other clinical variables. Sixty-nine female consecutive patients who sought help for DSM-IV bulimia nervosa were recruited for the study. The prevalence and frequency of use of binge eating and six compensatory methods (vomiting, laxatives, diuretics, diet pills, fasting, and compulsive exercise) were assessed in each patient. Factor analysis was used to group the variables, and a cluster analysis was performed on a second step. The clinical variables were finally analyzed in each of the groups isolated through cluster analysis. According to the results of the factor analysis, the compensatory strategies were identified as short-term compensatory methods (vomiting), long-term methods (diet pills, diuretics, and laxatives), and nonpurging methods (dieting and exercise). Three groups of patients were isolated through cluster analysis: short-term purgers (vomiting), long-term purgers (laxatives + diet pills + diuretics), and a mixed group (vomiting + laxatives). Long-term purgers were older and heavier, had a greater prevalence of past overweight, and used more compensatory methods. These results confirm the necessity to continue investigating alternative ways of classifying bulimia nervosa patients based on compensatory behaviors, considering the existence of clinical dimensions rather than rigid clinical subtypes.

  2. Numbers Speak Where Words Fail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Albert Fei

    2017-01-01

    ’s decision making model, this study posits that the two forms of OCRs (i.e., numerical ratings and opinionated reviews) facilitate consumers’ decisional processes in terms of the effectiveness of constructing consideration sets and the efficiency of arriving at a final decision. Consumers’ performance...... and populated with real restaurant review data. Except for two unexpected findings, all hypotheses were supported by the data analysis results. It is worth noting that, numerical rating exerts stronger positive influence on decisional process efficiency comparing to opinionated review. Furthermore, decisional...... outcome justifiability mediates the positive effects of both decisional process effectiveness and decisional process efficiency on decisional outcome confidence. This study contributes to both research and practice by offering a more in depth explanation to consumers’ reliance on OCRs through the lens...

  3. Altered trunk movements during gait in children with spastic diplegia: compensatory or underlying trunk control deficit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyrman, Lieve; Feys, Hilde; Molenaers, Guy; Jaspers, Ellen; Monari, Davide; Nieuwenhuys, Angela; Desloovere, Kaat

    2014-09-01

    Altered trunk movements during gait in children with CP are considered compensatory due to lower limb impairments, although scientific evidence for this assumption has not yet been provided. This study aimed to study the functional relation between trunk and lower limb movement deficits during gait in children with spastic diplegia. Therefore, the relationship between trunk control in sitting, and trunk and lower limb movements during gait was explored in 20 children with spastic diplegia (age 9.2 ± 3 yrs; GMFCS level I n=10, level II n=10). Trunk control in sitting was assessed with the Trunk Control Measurement Scale (TCMS), a clinical measure that reflects the presence of an underlying trunk control deficit. Trunk movements during gait were measured with a recently developed trunk model including the pelvis, thorax, head, shoulder line and spine. Lower limb movements were assessed with the Plug-in-Gait model (Vicon(®)). Range of motion (ROM) of the different trunk segments was calculated, as well as the Trunk Profile Score (TPS) and Trunk Variable Scores (TVSs). Similarly, the Gait Profile Score (GPS) and Gait Variable Scores (GVSs) were calculated to describe altered lower limb movements during gait. Correlation analyses were performed between the presence of impaired trunk control in sitting (TCMS) and altered trunk movements during gait (ROM, TPS/TVSs) and between these altered trunk movements and lower limb movements (GPS/GVSs) during gait. A poorer performance on the TCMS correlated with increased ROM and TPS/TVSs, particularly for the thorax, indicating the presence of an underlying trunk control deficit. No significant correlation was found between the TPS and GPS, suggesting that overall trunk and lower limb movement deficits were not strongly associated. Only few correlations between specific lower limb deficits (GVSs for hip ab/adduction, knee flexion/extension and ankle flexion/extension) and TVSs for thorax lateral bending and rotation were found

  4. Compensatory Hyperconnectivity in Developing Brains of Young Children With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggar, Manish; Tsalikian, Eva; Mauras, Nelly; Mazaika, Paul; White, Neil H; Weinzimer, Stuart; Buckingham, Bruce; Hershey, Tamara; Reiss, Allan L

    2017-03-01

    Sustained dysregulation of blood glucose (hyper- or hypoglycemia) associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been linked to cognitive deficits and altered brain anatomy and connectivity. However, a significant gap remains with respect to how T1D affects spontaneous at-rest connectivity in young developing brains. Here, using a large multisite study, resting-state functional MRI data were examined in young children with T1D ( n = 57; mean age = 7.88 years; 27 females) as compared with age-matched control subjects without diabetes ( n = 26; mean age = 7.43 years; 14 females). Using both model-driven seed-based analysis and model-free independent component analysis and controlling for age, data acquisition site, and sex, converging results were obtained, suggesting increased connectivity in young children with T1D as compared with control subjects without diabetes. Further, increased connectivity in children with T1D was observed to be positively associated with cognitive functioning. The observed positive association of connectivity with cognitive functioning in T1D, without overall group differences in cognitive function, suggests a putative compensatory role of hyperintrinsic connectivity in the brain in children with this condition. Altogether, our study attempts to fill a critical gap in knowledge regarding how dysglycemia in T1D might affect the brain's intrinsic connectivity at very young ages. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. The role of Compensatory Health Beliefs in eating behavior change: A mixed method study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amrein, Melanie A; Rackow, Pamela; Inauen, Jennifer; Radtke, Theda; Scholz, Urte

    2017-09-01

    Compensatory Health Beliefs (CHBs), defined as beliefs that an unhealthy behavior can be compensated for by engaging in another healthy behavior, are assumed to hinder health behavior change. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of CHBs for two distinct eating behaviors (increased fruit and vegetable consumption and eating fewer unhealthy snacks) with a mixed method approach. Participants (N = 232, mean age = 27.3 years, 76.3% women) were randomly assigned to a fruit and vegetable or an unhealthy snack condition. For the quantitative approach, path models were fitted to analyze the role of CHBs within a social-cognitive theory of health behavior change, the Health Action Process Approach (HAPA). With a content analysis, the qualitative approach investigated the occurrence of CHBs in smartphone chat groups when pursuing an eating goal. Both analyses were conducted for each eating behavior separately. Path models showed that CHBs added predictive value for intention, but not behavior over and above HAPA variables only in the unhealthy snack condition. CHBs were significantly negatively associated with intention and action planning. Content analysis revealed that people generated only a few CHB messages. However, CHBs were more likely to be present and were also more diverse in the unhealthy snack condition compared to the fruit and vegetable condition. Based on a mixed method approach, this study suggests that CHBs play a more important role for eating unhealthy snacks than for fruit and vegetable consumption. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Failed fuel action plan guidelines: Special report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The objective of this document is to provide a generic guideline that can be used to formulate a failed fuel action plan (FFAP) for specific application by a utility. This document is intended to be part of a comprehensive fuel reliability monitoring, management, and improvement program. The utilities may utilize this document as one resource in developing a failed fuel action plan. This document is not intended to be used as a failed fuel action plan standard. This document is intended to provide guidance on: management responsibilities; fuel performance parameters; cost/benefit analysis; action levels; long-term improvement methods; and data collection, analysis, and trending. 3 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  7. Compensatory beliefs, nutrition knowledge and eating styles of users and non-users of meal replacement products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Christina; Keller, Carmen; Siegrist, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Meal replacement products (MRPs) are used to regulate body weight, but the underlying eating behavior-related characteristics of MRP consumers are unknown. The study was based on an online survey of 490 women (221 who consume MRPs and 269 who do not) in Switzerland. Nutrition knowledge of calories, balanced meal composition and eating styles (restrained, emotional, external eating, overeating tendencies) were measured. In addition, compensatory beliefs regarding the effects of MRPs were assessed. The results showed that consumers of MRPs believed more strongly that MRPs can compensate for overeating, and that health behaviors key to successful weight regulation, such as physical exercise, do not have to be implemented when MRPs are consumed. Using binary logistic regression modeling, age, weight goal, compensatory beliefs regarding overconsumption, nutrition knowledge related to balanced meal composition, restrained eating and overeating tendencies were significant predictors of MRP consumption during the previous year. It was found that MRPs might be used as a license to indulge in palatable food, based on the perception that they can compensate for calorie overconsumption. Furthermore, they might help people with restraint eating tendencies and those who regularly overeat to compensate for overeating episodes and maintain dietary goals, even after excess food intake. Whether this approach is successful remains to be explored in future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Self-esteem threat combined with exposure to thin media images leads to body image compensatory self-enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarry, Josée L; Kossert, Amy L

    2007-03-01

    This study examined the effect of a self-esteem threat combined with exposure to thin images on body image (BI) satisfaction and investment. Female participants (N=94) received a self-esteem threat consisting of false failure feedback or received false success feedback on an intellectual task allegedly highly predictive of academic and professional success. They then viewed media images featuring thin models or products. After viewing thin models, women who had received failure feedback declared themselves more satisfied about their appearance and less invested in it than did women who had received success feedback. These results suggest that exposure to the thin ideal may inspire women experiencing self-esteem threats to use appearance as an alternative source of worth, thus maintaining their global esteem through BI compensatory self-enhancement. Potential long-term implications of this strategy, such as a paradoxical increase in BI investment and the development of eating pathology, are discussed.

  9. Exit, voice, and disappointment: mountain decline and EU compensatory rural policy in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collantes, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The article analyses the Spanish experience of EU compensatory rural policy in order to contribute to broader debates on the effectiveness of this kind of policy and the role of agriculture in the definition of European rural policies. In the case of Spain, compensatory allowances to mainly mountain farmers had little effect on economic trajectories or social cohesion because of the small sums involved, the exclusion of those with very small farms, and the decreasing role of agriculture in the rural economy. Other, more structural, instruments of rural policy focused on small-scale promotion of business growth but were ill-equipped to challenge some of the territorially defined items of living standard gaps. A historically grounded analysis suggests that the main changes in the social trajectory of Spain's mountain areas in the last decades have little to do with compensatory policy and are related to ordinary economic dynamics.

  10. Hyperactivity in Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Impairing Deficit or Compensatory Behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Dustin E; Rapport, Mark D; Kofler, Michael J; Raiker, Joseph S; Friedman, Lauren M

    2015-10-01

    Excess gross motor activity (hyperactivity) is considered a core diagnostic feature of childhood ADHD that impedes learning. This view has been challenged, however, by recent models that conceptualize excess motor activity as a compensatory mechanism that facilitates neurocognitive functioning in children with ADHD. The current study investigated competing model predictions regarding activity level's relation with working memory (WM) performance and attention in boys aged 8-12 years (M = 9.64, SD = 1.26) with ADHD (n = 29) and typically developing children (TD; n = 23). Children's phonological WM and attentive behavior were objectively assessed during four counterbalanced WM tasks administered across four separate sessions. These data were then sequenced hierarchically based on behavioral observations of each child's gross motor activity during each task. Analysis of the relations among intra-individual changes in observed activity level, attention, and performance revealed that higher rates of activity level predicted significantly better, but not normalized WM performance for children with ADHD. Conversely, higher rates of activity level predicted somewhat lower WM performance for TD children. Variations in movement did not predict changes in attention for either group. At the individual level, children with ADHD and TD children were more likely to be classified as reliably Improved and Deteriorated, respectively, when comparing their WM performance at their highest versus lowest observed activity level. These findings appear most consistent with models ascribing a functional role to hyperactivity in ADHD, with implications for selecting behavioral treatment targets to avoid overcorrecting gross motor activity during academic tasks that rely on phonological WM.

  11. Compensatory density feedback of Oncomelania hupensis populations in two different environmental settings in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guo-Jing; Zhou, Xiao-Nong; Sun, Le-Ping; Wu, Feng; Zhong, Bo; Qiu, Dong-Chuan; Utzinger, Jürg; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2011-07-13

    The most recent strategy for schistosomiasis control in the People's Republic of China aims to reduce the likelihood of environmental contamination of schistosome eggs. Despite considerable progress, it is believed that achievements would be further consolidated with additional intermediate host snail control measures. We provide an empirical framework for discerning the relative contribution of intrinsic effects (density feedback) from other extrinsic drivers of snail population dynamics. We set up experiments in two study locations to collect reproduction data of Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host snail of Schistosoma japonicum. We applied a set of four population dynamic models that have been widely used to study phenomenological time-series data to examine the properties of demographic density feedback patterns from abundance data. We also contrasted the obtained results with the component feedback of density on survival rate to determine whether adult survival was the principal driver of the demographic feedback observed. Demographic density feedback models (Ricker- and Gompertz-logistic) accounted for > 99% of Akaike's information criterion model weight, with the Gompertz ranking highest in all O. hupensis population groups. We found some evidence for stronger compensatory feedback in the O. hupensis population from Sichuan compared to a Jiangsu population. Survival rates revealed strong component feedback, but the log-linear relationships (i.e. Gompertz) had less support in the demographic feedback analysis. Our findings indicate that integrated schistosomiasis control measures must continue to reduce parasite abundance further because intermediate host snail populations tend to grow exponentially at low densities, especially O. hupensis populations in mountainous regions. We conclude that density feedback in adult survival is the principal component contribution to the demographic phenomenon observed in the population fitness (r

  12. Compensatory density feedback of Oncomelania hupensis populations in two different environmental settings in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The most recent strategy for schistosomiasis control in the People's Republic of China aims to reduce the likelihood of environmental contamination of schistosome eggs. Despite considerable progress, it is believed that achievements would be further consolidated with additional intermediate host snail control measures. We provide an empirical framework for discerning the relative contribution of intrinsic effects (density feedback) from other extrinsic drivers of snail population dynamics. Methods We set up experiments in two study locations to collect reproduction data of Oncomelania hupensis, the intermediate host snail of Schistosoma japonicum. We applied a set of four population dynamic models that have been widely used to study phenomenological time-series data to examine the properties of demographic density feedback patterns from abundance data. We also contrasted the obtained results with the component feedback of density on survival rate to determine whether adult survival was the principal driver of the demographic feedback observed. Results Demographic density feedback models (Ricker- and Gompertz-logistic) accounted for > 99% of Akaike's information criterion model weight, with the Gompertz ranking highest in all O. hupensis population groups. We found some evidence for stronger compensatory feedback in the O. hupensis population from Sichuan compared to a Jiangsu population. Survival rates revealed strong component feedback, but the log-linear relationships (i.e. Gompertz) had less support in the demographic feedback analysis. Conclusions Our findings indicate that integrated schistosomiasis control measures must continue to reduce parasite abundance further because intermediate host snail populations tend to grow exponentially at low densities, especially O. hupensis populations in mountainous regions. We conclude that density feedback in adult survival is the principal component contribution to the demographic phenomenon observed in the

  13. Compensatory Paracrine Mechanisms That Define The Urothelial Response to Injury in Partial Bladder Outlet Obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassuk, James; Lendvay, Thomas S.; Sweet, Robert; Han, Chang-Hee; Soygur, Tarkan; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Plaire, J. Chadwick; Charleston, Jay S.; Charleston, Lynne B.; Bagai, Shelly; Cochrane, Kimberly; Rubio, Eric; Bassuk, James A.; Fuchs, Elaine

    2007-06-21

    Diseases and conditions affecting the lower urinary tract are a leading cause of dysfunctional sexual health, incontinence, infection, and kidney failure. The growth, differentiation, and repair of the bladder's epithelial lining are regulated, in part, by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-7 and -10 via a paracrine cascade originating in the mesenchyme (lamina propria) and targeting the receptor for FGF-7 and -10 within the transitional epithelium (urothelium). The FGF-7 gene is located at the 15q15-q21.1 locus on chromosome 15 and four exons generate a 3.852-kb mRNA. Five duplicated FGF-7 gene sequences that localized to chromosome 9 were predicted not to generate functional protein products, thus validating the use of FGF-7-null mice as an experimental model. Recombinant FGF-7 and -10 induced proliferation of human urothelial cells in vitro and transitional epithelium of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice in vivo.To determine the extent that induction of urothelial cell proliferation during the bladder response to injury is dependent on FGF-7, an animal model of partial bladder outlet obstruction was developed. Unbiased stereology was used to measure the percentage of proliferating urothelial cells between obstructed groups of wild-type and FGF-7-null mice. The stereological analysis indicated that a statistical significant difference did not exist between the two groups, suggesting that FGF-7 is not essential for urothelial cell proliferation in response to partial outlet obstruction. In contrast, a significant increase in FGF-10 expression was observed in the obstructed FGF-7-null group, indicating that the compensatory pathway that functions in this model results in urothelial repair.

  14. Compensatory immigration depends on adjacent population size and habitat quality but not on landscape connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Katrine; Kramer, Donald L

    2012-11-01

    1. Populations experiencing localized mortality can recover in the short term by net movement of individuals from adjacent areas, a process called compensatory immigration or spillover. Little is known about the factors influencing the magnitude of compensatory immigration or its impact on source populations. Such information is important for understanding metapopulation dynamics, the use of protected areas for conservation, management of exploited populations and pest control. 2. Using two small, territorial damselfish species (Stegastes diencaeus and S. adustus) in their naturally fragmented habitat, we quantified compensatory immigration in response to localized mortality, assessed its impact on adjacent source populations and examined the importance of potential immigrants, habitat quality and landscape connectivity as limiting factors. On seven experimental sites, we repeatedly removed 15% of the initial population size until none remained and immigration ceased. 3. Immigrants replaced 16-72% of original residents in S. diencaeus and 0-69% in S. adustus. The proportion of the source population that immigrated into depleted areas varied from 9% to 61% in S. diencaeus and from 3% to 21% in S. adustus. In S. diencaeus, compensatory immigration was strongly affected by habitat quality, to a lesser extent by the abundance of potential immigrants and not by landscape connectivity. In S. adustus, immigration was strongly affected by the density of potential migrants and not by habitat quality and landscape connectivity. On two control sites, immigration in the absence of creation of vacancies was extremely rare. 4. Immigration occurred in response to localized mortality and was therefore compensatory. It was highly variable, sometimes producing substantial impacts on both depleted and source populations. The magnitude of compensatory immigration was influenced primarily by the availability of immigrants and by the potential improvement in territory quality that they

  15. Dynamic compensatory pattern matching in a fuzzy rule-based control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chuen-Tsai

    1991-01-01

    A dynamic compensatory matching procedure is suggested as a method to generate an aggregated measure for evaluating the appropriateness of rules for control systems. It is a dynamic weighted matching technique which takes into account incomplete information under real-time requirements. The initial weights of importance of variables are generated with a generalized neural network architecture and a gradient descent algorithm. An intuitive compensatory scheme based on correlations among input variables of training data is adopted so that the system is coherent to a noisy environment.

  16. Effects of low level laser in the morphology of the skeletal muscle fiber during compensatory hypertrophy in plantar muscle of rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terena, Stella Maris Lins; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Kalil, Sandra; Alves, Agnelo Neves; Mesquita Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli

    2015-06-01

    The hypertrophy is known as an increase the cross-sectional area of the muscle as a result of a muscular work against an overload, and it is compensatory because the overload is induced by functional elimination of synergistic muscles. The importance of study the compensatory hypertrophy is understand how this process can be influenced by the irradiation with regard to the weight and muscle cross-sectional area, to assist in the rehabilitation process and the effectiveness functional return. The aim was evaluate the effects of low-level laser irradiation on morphological aspects of muscle tissue, comparing the weight and cross-sectional area in rat skeletal muscle. Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control, hypertrophy group without irradiation (right plantar muscle) and hypertrophy group and irradiation (left plantar muscle), both analyzed after 7 and 14 days. The irradiation was performed daily immediately after the surgery. The parameters were: λ = 780nm, beam spot of 0.04 cm2, output power of 40mW, power density of 1W/cm2, energy density of 10J / cm2 and 10s exposure time with a total energy of 3.2 J. The results revealed that low level laser irradiation an increase the weight of the plantaris muscle after 7 and 14 days with a difference of 7.06% and 11.51% respectively. In conclusion, low level laser irradiation has an effect on compensatory hypertrophy to produce increased muscle weight and promoted an increase in cross-sectional area of muscle fibers in the compensatory hypertrophy model after 14 days with parameters cited above.

  17. Compensatory enlargement of Ossabaw miniature swine coronary arteries in diffuse atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny S. Choy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies in human and non-human primates have confirmed the compensatory enlargement or positive remodeling (Glagov phenomenon of coronary vessels in the presence of focal stenosis. To our knowledge, this is the first study to document arterial enlargement in a metabolic syndrome animal model with diffuse coronary artery disease (DCAD in the absence of severe focal stenosis. Two different groups of Ossabaw miniature pigs were fed a high fat atherogenic diet for 4 months (Group I and 12 months (Group II, respectively. Group I (6 pigs underwent contrast enhanced computed tomographic angiography (CCTA and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS at baseline and after 4 months of high fat diet, whereas Group II (7 pigs underwent only IVUS at 12 months of high fat diet. IVUS measurements of the left anterior descending (LAD, left circumflex (LCX and right coronary (RCA arteries in Group I showed an average increase in their lumen cross-sectional areas (CSA of 25.8%, 11.4%, and 43.4%, respectively, as compared to baseline. The lumen CSA values of LAD in Group II were found to be between the baseline and 4 month values in Group I. IVUS and CCTA measurements showed a similar trend and positive correlation. Fractional flow reserve (FFR was 0.91 ± 0.07 at baseline and 0.93 ± 0.05 at 4 months with only 2.2%, 1.6% and 1% stenosis in the LAD, LCX and RCA, respectively. The relation between percent stenosis and lumen CSA shows a classical Glagov phenomenon in this animal model of DCAD.

  18. The early time course of compensatory face processing in congenital prosopagnosia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Stollhoff

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prosopagnosia is a selective deficit in facial identification which can be either acquired, (e.g., after brain damage, or present from birth (congenital. The face recognition deficit in prosopagnosia is characterized by worse accuracy, longer reaction times, more dispersed gaze behavior and a strong reliance on featural processing. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We introduce a conceptual model of an apperceptive/associative type of congenital prosopagnosia where a deficit in holistic processing is compensated by a serial inspection of isolated, informative features. Based on the model proposed we investigated performance differences in different face and shoe identification tasks between a group of 16 participants with congenital prosopagnosia and a group of 36 age-matched controls. Given enough training and unlimited stimulus presentation prosopagnosics achieved normal face identification accuracy evincing longer reaction times. The latter increase was paralleled by an equally-sized increase in stimulus presentation times needed achieve an accuracy of 80%. When the inspection time of stimuli was limited (50 ms to 750 ms, prosopagnosics only showed worse accuracy but no difference in reaction time. Tested for the ability to generalize from frontal to rotated views, prosopagnosics performed worse than controls across all rotation angles but the magnitude of the deficit didn't change with increasing rotation. All group differences in accuracy, reaction or presentation times were selective to face stimuli and didn't extend to shoes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our study provides a characterization of congenital prosopagnosia in terms of early processing differences. More specifically, compensatory processing in congenital prosopagnosia requires an inspection of faces that is sufficiently long to allow for sequential focusing on informative features. This characterization of dysfunctional processing in prosopagnosia further emphasizes fast

  19. An optimal inspection strategy for randomly failing equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelbi, Anis; Ait-Kadi, Daoud

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of generating optimal inspection strategies for randomly failing equipment where imminent failure is not obvious and can only be detected through inspection. Inspections are carried out following a condition-based procedure. The equipment is replaced if it has failed or if it shows imminent signs of failure. The latter state is indicated by measuring certain predetermined control parameters during inspection. Costs are associated with inspection, idle time and preventive or corrective actions. An optimal inspection strategy is defined as the inspection sequence minimizing the expected total cost per time unit over an infinite span. A mathematical model and a numerical algorithm are developed to generate an optimal inspection sequence. As a practical example, the model is applied to provide a machine tool operator with a time sequence for inspecting the cutting tool. The tool life time distribution and the trend of one control parameter defining its actual condition are supposed to be known

  20. Why Do Large Infrastructure Projects Often Fail?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lando, Henrik

    The paper reports, in a systematic manner, the views of a group of experienced practitioners on why large infrastructure projects often fail. The views, centering on the role played by the Owner (the Client or Buyer), can be summarized as follows:The owner should be aware of the need of clarity...... elements in securing successful projects....

  1. Systems with randomly failing repairable components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Der Kiureghian, Armen; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Song, Junho

    2005-01-01

    Closed-form expressions are derived for the steady-state availability, mean rate of failure, mean duration of downtime and reliability of a general system with randomly and independently failing repairable components. Component failures are assumed to be homogeneous Poisson events in time and rep...

  2. I Failed the edTPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranishi, Adam; Oyler, Celia

    2017-01-01

    In this article, co-written by a teacher and a professor, the authors examine possible explanations for why Adam (first author), a New York City public school special educator, failed the edTPA, a teacher performance assessment required by all candidates for state certification. Adam completed a yearlong teaching residency where he was the special…

  3. Underachievement, Failing Youth and Moral Panics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Emma

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers contemporary "moral panics" around the underachievement of boys in school examinations in the UK and America. In the UK, in particular, the underachievement of boys is central to current "crisis accounts" about falling standards and failing pupils. "Underachievement" is a familiar word to those…

  4. Critical thinking: are the ideals of OBE failing us or are we failing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Critical thinking: are the ideals of OBE failing us or are we failing the ideals of OBE? K Lombard, M Grosser. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Journal of Education Vol. 28 (4) 2008: pp. 561-580. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  5. The development of a novel measure to assess motives for compensatory eating in response to exercise: The CEMQ

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moshier, S.J.; Landau, A.J.; Hearon, B.A.; Stein, A.T.; Greathouse, L.; Smits, J.A.J.; Otto, M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Compensatory eating in response to exercise may be an obstacle to achieving weight-loss and fitness goals. In this study we develop and conduct a preliminary examination of the psychometric properties of the Compensatory Eating Motives Questionnaire (CEMQ), a self-report questionnaire of motives for

  6. Impact of Compensatory Intervention in 6- to 18-Month-Old Babies at Risk of Motor Development Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Alessandra Bombarda; Saccani, Raquel; Valentini, Nadia Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Research indicates that delayed motor development observed in the first years of life can be prevented through compensatory intervention programmes that provide proper care during this critical period of child development. Method: This study analysed the impact of a 12-week compensatory motor intervention programme on 32 babies with…

  7. Both left and right posterior parietal activations contribute to compensatory processes in normal aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Mao; Polk, Thad A.; Goh, Joshua O.; Park, Denise C.

    2012-01-01

    Older adults often exhibit greater brain activation in prefrontal cortex compared to younger adults, and there is some evidence that this increased activation compensates for age-related neural degradation that would otherwise adversely affect cognitive performance. Less is known about aging and compensatory recruitment in the parietal cortex. In this event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we presented healthy young and old participants with two Stroop-like tasks (number magnitude and physical size). In young, the number magnitude task activated right parietal cortex and the physical size task activated left parietal cortex. In older adults, we observed contralateral parietal recruitment that depended on the task: in the number magnitude task older participants recruited left posterior parietal cortex (in addition to the right parietal activity observed in young) while in the physical size task they recruited right (in addition to left) posterior parietal cortex. In both cases, the additional parietal activity was associated with better performance suggesting that it played a compensatory role. Older adults also recruited left prefrontal cortex during both tasks and this common activation was also associated with better performance. The results provide evidence for task-specific compensatory recruitment in parietal cortex as well as task-independent compensatory recruitment in prefrontal cortex in normal aging. PMID:22063904

  8. Legalization, Expertise, and Participation: Strategies of Compensatory Legitimation in Educational Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiler, Hans N.

    1983-01-01

    Shows how the concept of legitimacy and, in particular, the theoretical construct of compensatory legitimation as a determinant of policy strategies may be useful for the comparative analysis of educational policy in advanced capitalist societies. Uses examples of educational policy in the Federal Republic of Germany and the United States. (BRR)

  9. Mitochondrial-nuclear interactions and accelerated compensatory evolution: evidence from the primate cytochrome C oxidase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Naoki; Akashi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Accelerated rates of mitochondrial protein evolution have been proposed to reflect Darwinian coadaptation for efficient energy production for mammalian flight and brain activity. However, several features of mammalian mtDNA (absence of recombination, small effective population size, and high mutation rate) promote genome degradation through the accumulation of weakly deleterious mutations. Here, we present evidence for "compensatory" adaptive substitutions in nuclear DNA- (nDNA) encoded mitochondrial proteins to prevent fitness decline in primate mitochondrial protein complexes. We show that high mutation rate and small effective population size, key features of primate mitochondrial genomes, can accelerate compensatory adaptive evolution in nDNA-encoded genes. We combine phylogenetic information and the 3D structure of the cytochrome c oxidase (COX) complex to test for accelerated compensatory changes among interacting sites. Physical interactions among mtDNA- and nDNA-encoded components are critical in COX evolution; amino acids in close physical proximity in the 3D structure show a strong tendency for correlated evolution among lineages. Only nuclear-encoded components of COX show evidence for positive selection and adaptive nDNA-encoded changes tend to follow mtDNA-encoded amino acid changes at nearby sites in the 3D structure. This bias in the temporal order of substitutions supports compensatory weak selection as a major factor in accelerated primate COX evolution.

  10. Chewing and spitting out food as a compensatory behavior in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Youn Joo; Lee, Jung-Hyun; Jung, Young-Chul

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that chewing and spitting out food may be associated with severe eating-related pathology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between chewing and spitting, and other symptoms of eating disorders. We hypothesized that patients who chew and spit as a compensatory behavior have more severe eating-related pathology than patients who have never engaged in chewing and spitting behavior. We divided 359 patients with eating disorders into two groups according to whether they engaged in chewing and spitting as a compensatory behavior to lose weight or not. After comparing eating-related pathology between the two groups, we examined factors associated with pathologic eating behaviors using logistic regression analysis. Among our 359 participants, 24.5% reported having engaged in chewing and spitting as a compensatory behavior. The chewing and spitting (CHSP+) group showed more severe eating disorder symptoms and suicidal behaviors. This group also had significantly higher scores on subscales that measured drive for thinness, bulimia, and impulse regulation on the EDI-2, Food Craving Questionnaire, Body Shape Questionnaire, Beck Depression Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Maudsley Obsessive Compulsive Inventory. Chewing and spitting is a common compensatory behavior among patients with eating disorders and is associated with more-pathologic eating behaviors and higher scores on psychometric tests. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Web-based survey design for unravelling semi-compensatory choice in transport and urban planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Bekhor, Shlomo; Shiftan, Yoram

    2012-01-01

    to comprehension bias, narrative inconsistency and misinterpretation of the choice protocols. The procedure is applied to rental apartment choice by students and results shed light on semi-compensatory choice by: (1) demonstrating the importance of choice set formation; (2) unravelling the distribution...

  12. 78 FR 45573 - Compensatory and Alternative Regulatory Measures for Nuclear Power Plant Fire Protection (CARMEN...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... receive feedback from the widest range of interested parties and to ensure that all information relevant... information on the differences between the two. 2. Are there any other examples of Alternative Compensatory..., contact the individual listed in the FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section of this document. Mail...

  13. Dietary creatine monohydrate supplementation increases satellite cell mitotic activity during compensatory hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangott, B; Schultz, E; Mozdziak, P E

    2000-01-01

    Nutritional status influences muscle growth and athletic performance, but little is known about the effect of nutritional supplements, such as creatine, on satellite cell mitotic activity. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of oral creatine supplementation on muscle growth, compensatory hypertrophy, and satellite cell mitotic activity. Compensatory hypertrophy was induced in the rat plantaris muscle by removing the soleus and gastrocnemius muscles. Immediately following surgery, a group of six rats was provided with elevated levels of creatine monohydrate in their diet. Another group of six rats was maintained as a non-supplemented control group. Twelve days following surgery, all rats were implanted with mini-osmotic pumps containing the thymidine analog 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label mitotically active satellite cells. Four weeks after the initial surgery the rats were killed, plantaris muscles were removed and weighed. Subsequently, BrdU-labeled and non-BrdU-labeled nuclei were identified on enzymatically isolated myofiber segments. Muscle mass and myofiber diameters were larger (P hypertrophy compared to the control muscles, but there were no differences between muscles from creatine-supplemented and non-creatine-supplemented rats. Similarly, compensatory hypertrophy resulted in an increased (P supplementation in combination with compensatory hypertrophy resulted in a higher (P hypertrophy without creatine supplementation. Thus, creatine supplementation in combination with an increased functional load results in increased satellite cell mitotic activity.

  14. Atypical hamstrings electromyographic activity as a compensatory mechanism in anterior cruciate ligament deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, AL; Hof, AL; Halbertsma, JPK; van Raaij, JJAM; Schenk, W; Diercks, RL; van Horn, [No Value; van Horn, J.R.

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency may cause functional instability of the knee (noncopers), while other patients compensate and perform at the same level as before injury (copers). This pilot study investigated whether there is a compensatory electromyographic (EMG) activity of the

  15. The effect of compensatory growth on feed intake, growth rate and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    maintenance metabolism of sheep. J. Agric. Sci., Camb. 99,. 611. BLAXTER, K.L. & WOOD, W.A., 1951. The nutrition of the young Ayrshire calf. 1. The endogenous nitrogen and basal energy metabolism of the calf. Sr. J. Nutr. 5, 11. BOHMAN, V.R., 1955. Compensatory growth of beef cattle. The effect of hay maturity. J. Anim.

  16. Compensatory movements during functional activities in ambulatory children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Martini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: During the transitional phase (ambulatory to non-ambulatory, synergies characterize the evolution of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD. This study was performed to describe and quantify compensatory movements while sitting down on/rising from the floor and climbing up/down steps. Method: Eighty videos (5 children × 4 assessments × 4 tasks were recorded quarterly in the year prior to gait loss. Compensatory movements from the videos were registered based on the Functional Evaluation Scale for DMD. Results: The most frequently observed compensatory movements were upper limb support on lower limbs/floor/handrail during all the tasks and lumbar hyperlordosis, trunk support on handrail, equinus foot, increased base of support, non-alternated descent, and pauses while climbing up/down steps. Conclusion: Climbing up/down steps showed a higher number of compensatory movements than sitting down on/rising from the floor, which seemed to be lost before climbing up/down steps in ambulatory children with DMD.

  17. The effect of compensatory growth on feed intake, growth rate, body ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The energy mctabolism of ruminants. Hutchinson. London. BURTON. J.H .• ANDERSON. M. & REID. J.T., 1974. Some biological aspects of weight of partial starvation. The effect of weight loss and regrowth on body composition in sheep. Br. J. Nutr. 32. 515. DREW, K.R & REID. J.T., 1975. Compensatory growth in immature.

  18. Compensatory and adaptive responses to real-time formant shifts in adults and children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terband, H.R.; van Brenk, F.J.

    2015-01-01

    Auditory feedback plays an important role in speech motor learning. Previous studies investigating auditory feedback in speech development suggest that crucial steps are made in the development of auditory-motor integration around the age of 4. The present study investigated compensatory and

  19. Compensatory effects of recruitment and survival when amphibian populations are perturbed by disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muths, E.; Scherer, R. D.; Pilliod, D.S.

    2011-01-01

    The need to increase our understanding of factors that regulate animal population dynamics has been catalysed by recent, observed declines in wildlife populations worldwide. Reliable estimates of demographic parameters are critical for addressing basic and applied ecological questions and understanding the response of parameters to perturbations (e.g. disease, habitat loss, climate change). However, to fully assess the impact of perturbation on population dynamics, all parameters contributing to the response of the target population must be estimated. We applied the reverse-time model of Pradel in Program mark to 6years of capture-recapture data from two populations of Anaxyrus boreas (boreal toad) populations, one with disease and one without. We then assessed a priori hypotheses about differences in survival and recruitment relative to local environmental conditions and the presence of disease. We further explored the relative contribution of survival probability and recruitment rate to population growth and investigated how shifts in these parameters can alter population dynamics when a population is perturbed. High recruitment rates (0??41) are probably compensating for low survival probability (range 0??51-0??54) in the population challenged by an emerging pathogen, resulting in a relatively slow rate of decline. In contrast, the population with no evidence of disease had high survival probability (range 0??75-0??78) but lower recruitment rates (0??25). Synthesis and applications.We suggest that the relationship between survival and recruitment may be compensatory, providing evidence that populations challenged with disease are not necessarily doomed to extinction. A better understanding of these interactions may help to explain, and be used to predict, population regulation and persistence for wildlife threatened with disease. Further, reliable estimates of population parameters such as recruitment and survival can guide the formulation and implementation of

  20. Compensatory changes in the function of the remaining kidney immediately after unilateral nephrectomy in sheep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziada, G.; Khalil, M.; Youseif, H.

    2009-01-01

    Live kidney donation is an established form of organ donation but carries the risk of an unnecessary surgery in a normal individual for the benefit of the recipient. Despite a number of recent studies on the renal function of long-term kidney donors, little attention has been paid to the damaging effects of compensatory hyper-filtration on renal tubular cells immediately after donor nephrectomy. The present study therefore aimed to examine the immediate changes in renal function of the remaining kidney using a sheep model of unilateral nephrectomy. We used the gamma camera-based method to measure the glomerular filtration rate and the tubular excretion values after simultaneous injection of 99m Tc-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid and 131 I-ortho-iodohippurate tracers. Compared were the differences in the functions between the remaining left kidney immediately after clamping the right renal pedicle and the baseline values that were measured one week before unilateral nephrectomy. After radionuclide data acquisition was completed, the right kidney was removed. The mean glomerular filtration rate (GFR) increased by 52.3% from the baseline values (29.5±2.7 to 45.0±6.7 ml/min; n=40, p<0.001), while the mean effective renal plasma flow (ERPF) increased by 40% (225.5±27.8 to 357.8±38.94 ml/min; p<0.001), respectively. Mean filtration fraction was increased from 0.117 to 0.127 immediately after nephrectomy (p<0.001). We conclude that after unilateral nephrectomy the remaining kidney immediately compensates for the loss of a donated kidney by increasing glomerular filtration rate and effective renal plasma flow. (author)

  1. Seasonal variations in ectotherm growth rates: Quantifying growth as an intermittent non steady state compensatory process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarini, J.-M.; Chauvaud, Laurent; Cloern, J.E.; Clavier, J.; Coston-Guarini, J.; Patry, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Generally, growth rates of living organisms are considered to be at steady state, varying only under environmental forcing factors. For example, these rates may be described as a function of light for plants or organic food resources for animals and these could be regulated (or not) by temperature or other conditions. But, what are the consequences for an individual's growth (and also for the population growth) if growth rate variations are themselves dynamic and not steady state? For organisms presenting phases of dormancy or long periods of stress, this is a crucial question. A dynamic perspective for quantifying short-term growth was explored using the daily growth record of the scallop Pecten maximus (L.). This species is a good biological model for ectotherm growth because the shell records growth striae daily. Independently, a generic mathematical function representing the dynamics of mean daily growth rate (MDGR) was implemented to simulate a diverse set of growth patterns. Once the function was calibrated with the striae patterns, the growth rate dynamics appeared as a forced damped oscillation during the growth period having a basic periodicity during two transitory phases (mean duration 43. days) and appearing at both growth start and growth end. This phase is most likely due to the internal dynamics of energy transfer within the organism rather than to external forcing factors. After growth restart, the transitory regime represents successive phases of over-growth and regulation. This pattern corresponds to a typical representation of compensatory growth, which from an evolutionary perspective can be interpreted as an adaptive strategy to coping with a fluctuating environment. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Chronic stress undermines the compensatory sleep efficiency increase in response to sleep restriction in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astill, Rebecca G; Verhoeven, Dorit; Vijzelaar, Romy L; Van Someren, Eus J W

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the effects of real-life stress on the sleep of adolescents, we performed a repeated-measures study on actigraphic sleep estimates and subjective measures during one regular school week, two stressful examination weeks and a week's holiday. Twenty-four adolescents aged 17.63 ± 0.10 years (mean ± standard error of the mean) wore actigraphs and completed diaries on subjective stress, fatigue, sleep quality, number of examinations and consumption of caffeine and alcohol for 4 weeks during their final year of secondary school. The resulting almost 500 assessments were analysed using mixed-effect models to estimate the effects of mere school attendance and additional examination stress on sleep estimates and subjective ratings. Total sleep time decreased from 7:38 h ± 12 min during holidays to 6:40 h ± 12 min during a regular school week. This 13% decrease elicited a partial compensation, as indicated by a 3% increase in sleep efficiency and a 6% decrease in the duration of nocturnal awakenings. During examination weeks total sleep time decreased to 6:23 h ± 8 min, but it was now accompanied by a decrease in sleep efficiency and subjective sleep quality and an increase in wake bout duration. In conclusion, school examination stress affects the sleep of adolescents. The compensatory mechanism of more consolidated sleep, as elicited by the sleep restriction associated with mere school attendance, collapsed during 2 weeks of sustained examination stress. © 2013 European Sleep Research Society.

  3. Effects of hypothermically reduced plantar skin inputs on anticipatory and compensatory balance responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Andresa M C; Schmidt, Daniel; Milani, Thomas L

    2016-06-29

    Anticipatory and compensatory balance responses are used by the central nervous system (CNS) to preserve balance, hence they significantly contribute to the understanding of physiological mechanisms of postural control. It is well established that various sensory systems contribute to the regulation of balance. However, it is still unclear which role each individual sensory system (e.g. plantar mechanoreceptors) plays in balance regulation. This becomes also evident in various patient populations, for instance in diabetics with reduced plantar sensitivity. To investigate these sensory mechanisms, approaches like hypothermia to deliberately reduce plantar afferent input have been applied. But there are some limitations regarding hypothermic procedures in previous studies: Not only plantar aspects of the feet might be affected and maintaining the hypothermic effect during data collection. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to induce a permanent and controlled plantar hypothermia and to examine its effects on anticipatory and compensatory balance responses. We hypothesized deteriorations in anticipatory and compensatory balance responses as increased center of pressure excursions (COP) and electromyographic activity (EMG) in response to the hypothermic plantar procedure. 52 healthy and young subjects (23.6 ± 3.0 years) performed balance tests (unexpected perturbations). Subjects' foot soles were exposed to three temperatures while standing upright: 25, 12 and 0 °C. COP and EMG were analyzed during two intervals of anticipatory and one interval of compensatory balance responses (intervals 0, 1 and 2, respectively). Similar plantar temperatures confirmed the successful implementation of the thermal platform. No significant COP and EMG differences were found for the anticipatory responses (intervals 0 and 1) under the hyperthermia procedure. Parameters in interval 2 showed generally decreased values in response to cooling. No changes in anticipatory

  4. Preexisting compensatory amino acids compromise fitness costs of a HIV-1 T cell escape mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Donglai; Zuo, Tao; Hora, Bhavna; Song, Hongshuo; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xianghui; Goonetilleke, Nilu; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Perelson, Alan S; Haynes, Barton F; McMichael, Andrew J; Gao, Feng

    2014-11-19

    Fitness costs and slower disease progression are associated with a cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutation T242N in Gag in HIV-1-infected individuals carrying HLA-B*57/5801 alleles. However, the impact of different context in diverse HIV-1 strains on the fitness costs due to the T242N mutation has not been well characterized. To better understand the extent of fitness costs of the T242N mutation and the repair of fitness loss through compensatory amino acids, we investigated its fitness impact in different transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses. The T242N mutation resulted in various levels of fitness loss in four different T/F viruses. However, the fitness costs were significantly compromised by preexisting compensatory amino acids in (Isoleucine at position 247) or outside (glutamine at position 219) the CTL epitope. Moreover, the transmitted T242N escape mutant in subject CH131 was as fit as the revertant N242T mutant and the elimination of the compensatory amino acid I247 in the T/F viral genome resulted in significant fitness cost, suggesting the fitness loss caused by the T242N mutation had been fully repaired in the donor at transmission. Analysis of the global circulating HIV-1 sequences in the Los Alamos HIV Sequence Database showed a high prevalence of compensatory amino acids for the T242N mutation and other T cell escape mutations. Our results show that the preexisting compensatory amino acids in the majority of circulating HIV-1 strains could significantly compromise the fitness loss due to CTL escape mutations and thus increase challenges for T cell based vaccines.

  5. Analysis of failed nuclear plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.

    1992-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted analyses of failed components from nuclear power generating stations since 1974. The considerations involved in working with and analyzing radioactive components are reviewed here, and the decontamination of these components is discussed. Analyses of four failed components from nuclear plants are then described to illustrate the kinds of failures seen in service. The failures discussed are (a) intergranular stress corrosion cracking of core spray injection piping in a boiling water reactor, (b) failure of canopy seal welds in adapter tube assemblies in the control rod drive head of a pressure water reactor, (c) thermal fatigue of a recirculation pump shaft in a boiling water reactor, and (d) failure of pump seal wear rings by nickel leaching in a boiling water reactor

  6. Recommended protocol for failed back surgery syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fakhr Tabatabaei SA

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS is many a times an intractable problem confronted in patients with surgical disease of lumbar spine and at the same time is a pressing problem for the physicians as well. This clinical entity is defined as continuation of pain in the lumbar region and lower extremities following surgery of the lumbar spine. Knowledge of the etiological factors and their prevention is the best line of treatment to overcome the evolution of this syndrome. During this study, which was conducted in Imam Khomeini hospital Tehran from the year 1989 till 1990, 43 out of 114 patients developed "FBSS". 23 cases responded to conservative treatment and psychotherapy whereas medical treatment failed to achieve fruitful results in the rest. The latter underwent extensive radiological investigations and repeat surgery. According to this study, we recommend that in the initial management of these patients. The surgeon should observe the dictum of "5-mis" to overcome and minimize the "FBSS" entity

  7. Removal of failed crown and bridge

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ashu; Rahul, G.R.; Poduval, Soorya T.; Shetty, Karunakar

    2012-01-01

    Crown and bridge have life span of many years but they fail for a number of reasons. Over the years, many devices have been designed to remove crowns and bridges from abutment teeth. While the removal of temporary crowns and bridges is usually very straightforward, the removal of a definitive cast crown with unknown cement is more challenging. Removal is often by destructive means. There are a number of circumstances, however, in which conservative disassembly would aid the practitioner in co...

  8. Mexico: Failing State or Emerging Democracy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    argue that President Calderón’s current counter-drug strategy actually triggered the displacement of malign actors throughout Mexico by aggravating...increasing violence in Mexico along the nearly 2,000-mile long U.S. southern border as greater than Iraq and on par with Iran as the greatest...USJFCOM), said either Mexico or Pakistan were “worst case scenarios” for U.S. national security should either nation rapidly fail or collapse.2 Tension

  9. FidFail: Coverage and Precision Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-07

    command line argument optionally disables static field analysis in order to reduce DidFail’s memory usage and analysis time. These new features make...unanalyzed taint flows. Finally, a new command line argument optionally disables static field analysis in order to reduce DidFail’s memory usage and...one of the apps has permission for. Unknown to the Android user, sensitive data could be exfiltrated to the Internet , if an app with permission to

  10. Revision of the Failed Thumb Carpometacarpal Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papatheodorou, Loukia K; Winston, Jonathan D; Bielicka, Deidre L; Rogozinski, Benjamin J; Lourie, Gary M; Sotereanos, Dean G

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome of revision surgery for failed thumb carpometacarpal (CMC) arthroplasty. We retrospectively analyzed 32 patients with failed thumb CMC arthroplasty. The primary reason for revision was pain caused by metacarpal subsidence. Revision surgery included soft tissue interposition and distraction pinning to address the metacarpal subsidence. Additional ligament reconstruction was performed in patients with thumb instability. Eight patients required additional metacarpophalangeal joint fusion for concomitant joint hyperextension. Eleven required additional partial excision of the trapezoid for concomitant scaphotrapezoidal joint arthritis. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiographically. Mean follow-up was 57 months (range, 24-121 months). Pain levels evaluated by visual analog scale were significantly reduced in all patients after revision surgery. Mean grip strength and key pinch strength significantly increased. Twenty-seven patients achieved good functional results; those for 5 patients were fair. This study showed that revision surgery with distraction pinning and soft tissue interposition with or without ligament reconstruction was an effective treatment for failed CMC arthroplasty of the thumb. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nitric oxide signaling is recruited as a compensatory mechanism for sustaining synaptic plasticity in Alzheimer's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakroborty, Shreaya; Kim, Joyce; Schneider, Corinne; West, Anthony R; Stutzmann, Grace E

    2015-04-29

    Synaptic plasticity deficits are increasingly recognized as causing the memory impairments which define Alzheimer's disease (AD). In AD mouse models, evidence of abnormal synaptic function is present before the onset of cognitive deficits, and presents as increased synaptic depression revealed only when synaptic homeostasis is challenged, such as with suppression of ryanodine receptor (RyR)-evoked calcium signaling. Otherwise, at early disease stages, the synaptic physiology phenotype appears normal. This suggests compensatory mechanisms are recruited to maintain a functionally normal net output of the hippocampal circuit. A candidate calcium-regulated synaptic modulator is nitric oxide (NO), which acts presynaptically to boost vesicle release and glutamatergic transmission. Here we tested whether there is a feedforward cycle between the increased RyR calcium release seen in presymptomatic AD mice and aberrant NO signaling which augments synaptic plasticity. Using a combination of electrophysiological approaches, two-photon calcium imaging, and protein biochemistry in hippocampal tissue from presymptomatic 3xTg-AD and NonTg mice, we show that blocking NO synthesis results in markedly augmented synaptic depression mediated through presynaptic mechanisms in 3xTg-AD mice. Additionally, blocking NO reduces the augmented synaptically evoked dendritic calcium release mediated by enhanced RyR calcium release. This is accompanied by increased nNOS levels in the AD mice and is reversed upon normalization of RyR-evoked calcium release with chronic dantrolene treatment. Thus, recruitment of NO is serving a compensatory role to boost synaptic transmission and plasticity during early AD stages. However, NO's dual role in neuroprotection and neurodegeneration may convert to maladaptive functions as the disease progresses. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/356893-10$15.00/0.

  12. A Compensatory Approach to Multiobjective Linear Transportation Problem with Fuzzy Cost Coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Gonce Kocken

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the Multiobjective Linear Transportation Problem that has fuzzy cost coefficients. In the solution procedure, many objectives may conflict with each other; therefore decision-making process becomes complicated. And also due to the fuzziness in the costs, this problem has a nonlinear structure. In this paper, fuzziness in the objective functions is handled with a fuzzy programming technique in the sense of multiobjective approach. And then we present a compensatory approach to solve Multiobjective Linear Transportation Problem with fuzzy cost coefficients by using Werner's and operator. Our approach generates compromise solutions which are both compensatory and Pareto optimal. A numerical example has been provided to illustrate the problem.

  13. A new perspective on behavioral inconsistency and neural noise in aging: Compensatory speeding of neural communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lee Hong

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to present a new perspective on the aging brain. Here, we make connections between two key phenomena of brain aging: 1 increased neural noise or random background activity; and 2 slowing of brain activity. Our perspective proposes the possibility that the slowing of neural processing due to decreasing nerve conduction velocities leads to a compensatory speeding of neuron firing rates. These increased firing rates lead to a broader distribution of power in the frequency spectrum of neural oscillations, which we propose, can just as easily be interpreted as neural noise. Compensatory speeding of neural activity, as we present, is constrained by the: A availability of metabolic energy sources; and B competition for frequency bandwidth needed for neural communication. We propose that these constraints lead to the eventual inability to compensate for age-related declines in neural function that are manifested clinically as deficits in cognition, affect, and motor behavior.

  14. Factors Influencing the Increase in Na-K-ATPase in Compensatory Renal Hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Franklin H.; Charney, Alan N.; Silva, Patricio

    1978-01-01

    An increase in Na-K-ATPase in kidney homogenates usually accompanies compensatory renal hypertrophy. While it may be evident in both the cortex and medulla of the kidney, it is most marked in the outer medulla and may be present only in that region. The increase in enzyme activity does not depend on an intact adrenal cortex and can be elicited in the absence of adrenal glucocorticoids. It is not seen in the form of renal hypertrophy produced by potassium depletion, in which the transport of sodium and potassium by the kidney is not increased. When present in compensatory renal growth, the enzyme change is correlated with an increase in the reabsorption of sodium, or the excretion of potassium, or both, per unit of renal tissue. It proceeds in the presence of either, but not in the absence of both. PMID:216164

  15. Comparison of compensatory reserve during lower-body negative pressure and hemorrhage in nonhuman primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jeffrey T.; Mulligan, Jane; Grudic, Greg Z.; Convertino, Victor A.

    2016-01-01

    Compensatory reserve was measured in baboons (n = 13) during hemorrhage (Hem) and lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) using a machine-learning algorithm developed to estimate compensatory reserve by detecting reductions in central blood volume during LBNP. The algorithm calculates compensatory reserve index (CRI) from normovolemia (CRI = 1) to cardiovascular decompensation (CRI = 0). The hypothesis was that Hem and LBNP will elicit similar CRI values and that CRI would have higher specificity than stroke volume (SV) in predicting decompensation. Blood was removed in four steps: 6.25%, 12.5%, 18.75%, and 25% of total blood volume. Four weeks after Hem, the same animals were subjected to four levels of LBNP that was matched on the basis of their central venous pressure. Data (mean ± 95% confidence interval) indicate that CRI decreased (P < 0.001) from baseline during Hem (0.69 ± 0.10, 0.57 ± 0.09, 0.36 ± 0.10, 0.16 ± 0.08, and 0.08 ± 0.03) and LBNP (0.76 ± 0.05, 0.66 ± 0.08, 0.36 ± 0.13, 0.23 ± 0.11, and 0.14 ± 0.09). CRI was not different between Hem and LBNP (P = 0.20). Linear regression analysis between Hem CRI and LBNP CRI revealed a slope of 1.03 and a correlation coefficient of 0.96. CRI exhibited greater specificity than SV in both Hem (92.3 vs. 82.1) and LBNP (94.8 vs. 83.1) and greater ROC AUC in Hem (0.94 vs. 0.84) and LBNP (0.94 vs. 0.92). These data support the hypothesis that Hem and LBNP elicited the same CRI response, suggesting that measurement of compensatory reserve is superior to SV as a predictor of cardiovascular decompensation PMID:27030667

  16. The compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Nicholas S; Casserly, Brian; Ayala, Alfred

    2008-12-01

    Like the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), the compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) is a complex pattern of immunologic responses to severe infection or injury. The difference is that while SIRS is a proinflammatory response tasked with killing infectious organisms through activation of the immune system, CARS is a global deactivation of the immune system tasked with restoring homeostasis. Much research now suggests that the timing and relative magnitude of this response have a profound impact on patient outcomes.

  17. Presence of different forms of compensatory behaviours among eating disordered patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontić Olga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Eating disorders indicate unhealthy habits in nutrition and/or behaviour in the feeding and maintaining of body weight. The main characteristic of these diseases is changed behaviour in nutrition, either as an intentional restriction of food, namely extreme dieting or overeating, i.e. binge eating. Extreme dieting, skipping meals, self-induced vomiting, excessive exercise, and misuse of laxatives and diuretics for the purpose of maintaining or reducing body weight are the forms of compensatory behaviour. Objective The purpose of the present research was to determine the presence of different inappropriate compensatory behaviours among eating disordered patients. Methods The experimental group included 35 female eating disordered patients of 23.02}3.46 years on average, with anorexia or bulimia nervosa. The control group consisted of 70 girls aged 23.1}3.0 years on average. Each participant completed a '24-hour Recall Questionnaire' and the 'Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale'. Results A high statistically significant difference existed in the presence of all compensatory behaviours in the experimental and control group, regarding vomiting (χ2=40.6; p<0.001, misuse of laxatives and diuretics (χ2=33.7; p<0.001, extreme dieting (χ2=23.4; p<0.001 and excessive exercising (χ2=27.1; p<0.001. Conclusion Eating disordered patients showed a significantly higher incidence of all evaluated forms of compensatory behaviour in comparison with the control group. This report confirms the presence of specific symptomatology of anorexia and bulimia patients. .

  18. Identify too big to fail banks and capital insurance: An equilibrium approach

    OpenAIRE

    Katerina Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is develop a rational expectation equilibrium model of capital insurance to identify too big to fail banks. The main results of this model include (1) too big to fail banks can be identified explicitly by a systemic risk measure, loss betas, of all banks in the entire financial sector; (2) the too big to fail feature can be largely justified by a high level of loss beta; (3) the capital insurance proposal benefits market participants and reduces the systemic risk; ...

  19. When Virtual Muscularity Enhances Physical Endurance: Masculinity Threat and Compensatory Avatar Customization Among Young Male Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Won, Roselyn J; Tang, Wai Yen; Kibbe, Mackenzie R

    2017-01-01

    Masculinity-threatened men attempt to resolve the negative states caused by the threat through compensatory behavior such as public display of muscularity, which constitutes one way in which men physically establish masculinity. Avatars serve as a key means for self-presentation in technology-mediated environments, and compensatory motives can drive avatar customization. Noting this, the present research examined whether masculinity-threatened young men engage in compensatory avatar customization and whether such customization can be self-affirming. Specifically, we conducted a laboratory experiment to investigate the effects of masculinity threat on customization of avatar muscularity and physical endurance on a task that represents behavioral self-regulation. Data from 238 male college students revealed that masculinity-threatened young men customized their avatar to have greater muscle definition than did their nonthreatened counterparts, and greater muscle definition of the customized avatar predicted greater physical endurance on a handgrip task. Furthermore, muscle definition of the customized avatar significantly mediated the relationship between masculinity threat and physical endurance. None of these effects were moderated by masculine norm conformity, which suggested that the effects overrode individual differences in the extent to which participants conformed to masculine norms and expectations. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Muller's Ratchet and compensatory mutation in Caenorhabditis briggsae mitochondrial genome evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denver Dee R

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The theory of Muller' Ratchet predicts that small asexual populations are doomed to accumulate ever-increasing deleterious mutation loads as a consequence of the magnified power of genetic drift and mutation that accompanies small population size. Evidence for Muller's Ratchet and knowledge on its underlying molecular mechanisms, however, are lacking for natural populations. Results We characterized mitochondrial genome evolutionary processes in Caenorhabditis briggsae natural isolates to show that numerous lineages experience a high incidence of nonsynonymous substitutions in protein-coding genes and accumulate unusual deleterious noncoding DNA stretches with associated heteroplasmic function-disrupting genome deletions. Isolate-specific deletion proportions correlated negatively with nematode fecundity, suggesting that these deletions might negatively affect C. briggsae fitness. However, putative compensatory mutations were also observed that are predicted to reduce heteroplasmy levels of deleterious deletions. Paradoxically, compensatory mutations were observed in one major intraspecific C. briggsae clade where population sizes are estimated to be very small (and selection is predicted to be relatively weak, but not in a second major clade where population size estimates are much larger and selection is expected to be more efficient. Conclusion This study provides evidence that the mitochondrial genomes of animals evolving in nature are susceptible to Muller's Ratchet, suggests that context-dependent compensatory mutations can accumulate in small populations, and predicts that Muller's Ratchet can affect fundamental evolutionary forces such as the rate of mutation.

  1. Can recycling compensate for speeding on highways? Similarity and difficulty of behaviors as key characteristics of green compensatory beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byrka Katarzyna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available People believe that the effects of unecological behaviors may be compensated for by engaging in alternative conservation activities. The problem is, however, that those who hold such beliefs are less likely to engage in real behaviors. Understanding the structure of compensatory beliefs could potentially minimize this negative effect. In a pair of studies (qualitative and quantitative we explored two aspects that appear key for compensatory beliefs 1 the similarity and 2 the relative difficulty of behaviors. We found that people spontaneously proposed compensatory behaviors which belonged to the same pro-ecological domain as the corresponding initial behaviors (Study 1. However, participants in the quantitative study agreed more often that they should compensate for one behavior with another when both behaviors belonged to the same cognitive category and simultaneously the compensatory behavior was relatively less demanding than the initial one (Study 2.

  2. Intergenerational transmission of occupational status: The role of voluntary association membership as an emerging compensatory strategy of reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houten, J.M.A. van; Gesthuizen, M.J.W.; Wolbers, M.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we raised the question as to what extent members from higher status groups effectuated social resources, more specifically voluntary association membership, as a possible new compensatory strategy to guarantee a successful intergenerational transmission of their occupational status.

  3. Lenke 1C and 5C spinal deformities fused selectively: 5-year outcomes of the uninstrumented compensatory curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilgenfritz, Ryan M; Yaszay, Burt; Bastrom, Tracey P; Newton, Peter O

    2013-04-15

    Multicenter review of prospectively collected data. To analyze the natural history of uninstrumented compensatory curves prospectively during a 5-year postoperative period in patients with selectively fused Lenke type 1C and 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. After a selective fusion for 1C and 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis curve types, there is concern that uninstrumented compensatory curves will continue to progress over time. However, to date, there have been no studies using prospectively collected data beyond 2 years to determine the natural history of these uninstrumented compensatory curves. Lenke 1C and 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis cases, prospectively collected from a multicenter study were analyzed. All patients underwent a selective fusion (1C only thoracic curve fused; 5C only thoracolumbar/lumbar curve fused). Preoperative, first-erect, 1-year, 2-year, and 5-year postoperative coronal, sagittal, and axial (Perdriolle) radiographical outcomes were compared using repeated measures analysis of variance with Bonferroni post hoc comparisons (P 5C curves were reviewed. Preoperative compensatory curve Cobb angles were 40° ± 6° and 25° ± 9°, respectively. In Lenke 1C curves, the uninstrumented compensatory lumbar curves were corrected by 32% ± 16% at first erect, 44% ± 17% correction at 1 year, 38% ± 15% correction at 2 years, and 39% ± 19% at 5 years. In Lenke 5C curves, the uninstrumented compensatory thoracic curves were corrected by a mean of 37% ± 29% at first erect, 42% ± 29% at 1 year, 37% ± 29% at 2 years, and 30% ± 23% at 5 years. The sagittal and axial measures of the compensatory curves remained stable during the postoperative period. In Lenke 1C and 5C adolescent idiopathic scoliosis deformity patterns fused selectively, the uninstrumented compensatory curves adjust to match the instrumented primary curve and do not seem to progress between 1 and 5 years postoperatively.

  4. Identify too big to fail banks and capital insurance: An equilibrium approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Ivanov

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is develop a rational expectation equilibrium model of capital insurance to identify too big to fail banks. The main results of this model include (1 too big to fail banks can be identified explicitly by a systemic risk measure, loss betas, of all banks in the entire financial sector; (2 the too big to fail feature can be largely justified by a high level of loss beta; (3 the capital insurance proposal benefits market participants and reduces the systemic risk; (4 the implicit guarantee subsidy can be estimated endogenously; and lastly, (5 the capital insurance proposal can be used to resolve the moral hazard issue. We implement this model and document that the too big to fail issue has been considerably reduced in the pro-crisis period. As a result, the capital insurance proposal could be a useful macro-regulation innovation policy tool

  5. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-10

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm's efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank's performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  6. Ranking nodes in growing networks: When PageRank fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Manuel Sebastian; Medo, Matúš; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2015-11-01

    PageRank is arguably the most popular ranking algorithm which is being applied in real systems ranging from information to biological and infrastructure networks. Despite its outstanding popularity and broad use in different areas of science, the relation between the algorithm’s efficacy and properties of the network on which it acts has not yet been fully understood. We study here PageRank’s performance on a network model supported by real data, and show that realistic temporal effects make PageRank fail in individuating the most valuable nodes for a broad range of model parameters. Results on real data are in qualitative agreement with our model-based findings. This failure of PageRank reveals that the static approach to information filtering is inappropriate for a broad class of growing systems, and suggest that time-dependent algorithms that are based on the temporal linking patterns of these systems are needed to better rank the nodes.

  7. Closed External Fixation for Failing or Failed Femoral Shaft Plating in a Developing Country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliakbar, Adil; Witwit, Ibrahim; Al-Algawy, Alaa A Hussein

    2017-08-01

    Femoral shaft fractures are one of the common injuries that is treated by open reduction, with internal fixation by plate and screws or intramedullary nailing, which can achieve a high union rate. To evaluate the outcome of using closed external fixation to augment a failing plate; with signs of screw loosening and increasing bone/plate gap; a failed plate; broken plate; screws completely out of bone with redisplacement of fracture. A retrospective study on 18 patients, aged between 17-42 years, who presented between 6-18 weeks after initial surgical fixation, with pain, difficulty in limb function, deformity and abnormal movement at fracture site, was done. X-Rays showed plating failure with acceptable amount of callus, which unfortunately had refractured. Cases associated with infection and no radiological evidence of callus formation were excluded from this study. Closed reduction was done by manipulation, then fracture fixation by AO external fixator. The patients were encouraged for full weight bearing as early as possible with dynamization later on. Of the 18 patients who underwent external fixation after close reduction, 15 cases showed bone healing in a period between 11-18 weeks (mean of 14.27 weeks) with good alignment (Radiologically). Removal of external fixator was done followed by physical therapy thereafter. Closed external fixation for treatment of failing or failed femoral plating, achieves good success rate and has less complications, is a short time procedure, especially in a hospital with limited resources.

  8. Clinical Outcomes Associated with a Failed Infant Car Seat Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Malika D; Dookeran, Keith A; Khan, Janine Y

    2017-01-01

    To assess comorbid conditions and clinical outcomes among late preterm and low birth weight term infants (Baby Unit. This was a retrospective chart review of consecutive infants who failed ICSC on the Mother-Baby Unit and were subsequently admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit at Prentice Women's Hospital between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2015. Regression models were used to estimate risk differences (RDs) with 95% CIs for factors related to length of stay. A total of 148 infants were studied (43% male; 37% delivered via cesarean). ICSC failure in the Mother-Baby Unit was due to desaturation, bradycardia, and tachypnea in 59%, 37%, and 4% of infants, respectively. During monitoring on the neonatal intensive care unit, 39% of infants experienced apnea (48% in preterm vs 17% in term infants) in the supine position, 19% received phototherapy, and 2% and 6.8% received nasogastric and thermoregulatory support, respectively. Univariate predictors of increased duration of stay (days) were younger gestational age, apnea, nasogastric support, intravenous fluids, and antibiotics (all P < .05). In multivariable analysis adjusted for gestational age and discharge weight, only apnea (RD, 4.87; 95% CI, 2.99-6.74; P < .001), administration of antibiotics (RD, 3.25; 95% CI, 0.29-6.21; P < .032), and intravenous fluid support (RD, 4.87; 95% CI, 0.076-9.66; P < .047) remained independent predictors of a longer duration of stay. Infants who failed ICSC were at risk for comorbid conditions that prolonged hospital stay beyond the neonatal intensive care unit observation period. Almost one-half of late preterm infants who failed ICSC had apnea events in the supine position. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Data mining and diagnosing IC fails

    CERN Document Server

    Huisman, Leendert M

    2005-01-01

    This book grew out of an attempt to describe a variety of tools that were developed over a period of years in IBM to analyze Integrated Circuit fail data. The selection presented in this book focuses on those tools that have a significant statistical or datamining component. The danger of describing sta­ tistical analysis methods is the amount of non-trivial mathematics that is involved and that tends to obscure the usually straigthforward analysis ideas. This book is, therefore, divided into two roughly equal parts. The first part contains the description of the various analysis techniques and focuses on ideas and experimental results. The second part contains all the mathematical details that are necessary to prove the validity of the analysis techniques, the existence of solutions to the problems that those techniques engender, and the correctness of several properties that were assumed in the first part. Those who are interested only in using the analysis techniques themselves can skip the second part, b...

  10. Use of ractopamine during compensatory gain of finishing pigs on carcass and meat performance and quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M.J. Barbosa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of compensatory gain associated with the use of 10ppm ractopamine after a period of feed restriction in finishing pigs on performance, carcass and meat quality. Twenty castrated males and 20 females, at 110 days of age and 66.137±6.13kg live weight, were submitted to four treatments using a 2 x 2 factorial design (fed ad libitum or with 20% restriction between 0(21 days of age and fed with or without 10ppm ractopamine for 22(42 days of experimentation, with 10 replicates (animals. There was no interaction between the factors for any of the evaluated parameters. Animals treated with ractopamine presented better weight gain (1.083 versus 1.259kg, feed conversion (2.910 versus 2.577, warm and cold carcass weight (86.08 versus 89.00 and 83.46 versus 87.20kg, respectively, loin depth (63.02 versus 68.40mm, loin eye area (41.43 versus 46.59mm2 and muscle fiber diameter (27.48 versus 35.85μm. Animals submitted to feed restriction followed by ad libitum feed presented compensatory gain without losses to carcass and meat characteristics, but with a reduction in the ethereal extract (2.19 versus 1.64% and lower water loss due to thawing in the meat (11.35 versus 9.42%. The effects of compensatory gain after food restriction and ractopamine are independent of the parameters evaluated.

  11. Herbivore impacts on marsh production depend upon a compensatory continuum mediated by salinity stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D Long

    Full Text Available Plant communities are disturbed by several stressors and they are expected to be further impacted by increasing anthropogenic stress. The consequences of these stressors will depend, in part, upon the ability of plants to compensate for herbivory. Previous studies found that herbivore impacts on plants can vary from negative to positive because of environmental control of plant compensatory responses, a.k.a. the Compensatory Continuum Hypothesis. While these influential studies enhanced our appreciation of the dynamic nature of plant-herbivore interactions, they largely focused on the impact of resource limitation. This bias limits our ability to predict how other environmental factors will shape the impact of herbivory. We examined the role of salinity stress on herbivory of salt marsh cordgrass, Spartina foliosa, by an herbivore previously hypothesized to influence the success of restoration projects (the scale insect, Haliaspis spartinae. Using a combination of field and mesocosm manipulations of scales and salinity, we measured how these factors affected Spartina growth and timing of senescence. In mesocosm studies, Spartina overcompensated for herbivory by growing taller shoots at low salinities but the impact of scales on plants switched from positive to neutral with increasing salinity stress. In field studies of intermediate salinities, scales reduced Spartina growth and increased the rate of senescence. Experimental salinity additions at this field site returned the impact of scales to neutral. Because salinity decreased scale densities, the switch in impact of scales on Spartina with increasing salinity was not simply a linear function of scale abundance. Thus, the impact of scales on primary production depended strongly upon environmental context because intermediate salinity stress prevented plant compensatory responses to herbivory. Understanding this context-dependency will be required if we are going to successfully predict the

  12. The recognition and evaluation of patterns of compensatory injury in patients with mechanical hip pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Sommer; Bedi, Asheesh; Voos, James E; Mauro, Craig S; Kelly, Bryan T

    2014-03-01

    In active individuals with femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), the resultant reduction in functional range of motion leads to high impaction loads at terminal ranges. These increased forces result in compensatory effects on bony and soft tissue structures within the hip joint and hemipelvis. An algorithm is useful in evaluating athletes with pre-arthritic, mechanical hip pain and associated compensatory disorders. A literature search was performed by a review of PubMed articles published from 1976 to 2013. Level 4. Increased stresses across the bony hemipelvis result when athletes with FAI attempt to achieve supraphysiologic, terminal ranges of motion (ROM) through the hip joint required for athletic competition. This can manifest as pain within the pubic joint (osteitis pubis), sacroiliac joint, and lumbosacral spine. Subclinical posterior hip instability may result when attempts to increase hip flexion and internal rotation are not compensated for by increased motion through the hemipelvis. Prominence of the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS) at the level of the acetabular rim can result in impingement of the anterior hip joint capsule or iliocapsularis muscle origin against the femoral head-neck junction, resulting in a distinct form of mechanical hip impingement (AIIS subspine impingement). Iliopsoas impingement (IPI) has also been described as an etiology for anterior hip pain. IPI results in a typical 3-o'clock labral tear as well as an inflamed capsule in close proximity to the overlying iliopsoas tendon. Injury in athletic pubalgia occurs during high-energy twisting activities in which abnormal hip ROM and resultant pelvic motion lead to shearing across the pubic symphysis. Failure to recognize and address concomitant compensatory injury patterns associated with intra-articular hip pathology can result in significant disability and persistent symptoms in athletes with pre-arthritic, mechanical hip pain. B.

  13. [Extramedullary hematopoyesis: compensatory mechanism or clinic syndrome? Case report and review of literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosada, J; Bindi, M; Pinelli, M; Pandolfo, C; Cassetti, G; Castiglioni, M

    2007-02-01

    Extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH) is a compensatory mechanism occurring in patients with chronic anemia. Liver, spleen, and lymph nodes are frequently involved. However, EMH may also develop in several sites such as thymus, kidneys, retroperitoneum, paravertebral areas of the thorax, lungs, bowel and others. Rarely symptomatic, it often shows a variety of clinical features. This condition, frequently, may be fatal. A correct early diagnosis of EHM might avoid, if possible, a bad prognosis. The Authors report a case where bone marrow cells were identified in centrifuge cerebrospinal fluid of a patient suffering from non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  14. [The structure of aggression of the patients with paranoid schizophrenia and compensatory behavioral trends].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverchuk, I V; Khudyakova, Yu Yu

    To study the structure of aggression of the patients with paranoid schizophrenia depending on sex and illness duration. 102 patients with paranoid schizophrenia and 101 healthy people, aged from 18 to 64 years, were examined. Quantitative indicators of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral components of aggression were measured using the Buss-Perry questionnaire. The projective Hand-test was administered to assess aggressive behavioral tendencies and inclinations to aggressive behavior. The authors identified the dissociated structure of aggressiveness in patients with paranoid schizophrenia that manifested with dissociated cognitive, emotional, and behavioral components. The specifics of the structure of aggression and compensatory behavioral trends are described.

  15. Department of Energy Plutonium ES ampersand H Vulnerability Assessment Savannah River Site interim compensatory measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickford, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has recently completed a self-assessment of potential vulnerabilities associated with plutonium and other transuranic materials stored at the site. An independent Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) appointed by DOE/ES ampersand H also performed an independent assessment, and reviewed and validated the site self-assessment. The purpose of this report is to provide a status of interim compensatory measures at SRS to address hazards in advance of any corrective actions. ES ampersand H has requested this status for all vulnerabilities ranked medium or higher with respect to potential consequences to workers, environment, and the public

  16. Department of Energy Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment Savannah River Site interim compensatory measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bickford, W.E.

    1994-09-15

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has recently completed a self-assessment of potential vulnerabilities associated with plutonium and other transuranic materials stored at the site. An independent Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) appointed by DOE/ES&H also performed an independent assessment, and reviewed and validated the site self-assessment. The purpose of this report is to provide a status of interim compensatory measures at SRS to address hazards in advance of any corrective actions. ES&H has requested this status for all vulnerabilities ranked medium or higher with respect to potential consequences to workers, environment, and the public.

  17. Disorganized junior doctors fail the MRCP (UK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Adrian G; Khan, Khalid M; Hussain, Walayat; Tweed, Michael

    2006-02-01

    Career progression during undergraduate and early postgraduate years is currently determined by successfully passing examinations. Both academic factors (secondary school examination results, learning style and training opportunities) and non-academic factors (maturity, ethnic origin, gender and motivation) have been identified as predicting examination outcome. Few studies have examined organization skills. Disorganized medical students are more likely to perform poorly in end-of-year examinations but this observation has not been examined in junior doctors. This study asked whether organization skills relate to examination outcome amongst junior doctors taking the clinical Part II examination for the Membership of the Royal College of Physicians (Practical Assessment of Clinical Examination Skills). The study was conducted prospectively at four consecutive clinical courses that provided clinical teaching and practice to prepare trainees for the examination. Arrival time at registration for the course was the chosen surrogate for organization skills. Trainees were advised that they should arrive promptly at 8.00 a.m. for registration and it was explained that the course would start at 8.30 a.m. Recorded arrival times were compared with the pass lists published by the Royal College of Physicians. The mean arrival time was 8.17 a.m. A total of 81 doctors (53.3%) passed the examination with a mean arrival time of 8.14 a.m. However, 71 doctors failed the exam and arrived, on average, six minutes later than doctors who passed (p?=?0.006). Better-prepared junior doctors were more likely to pass the final examination. Arriving on time represents a composite of several skills involved in the planning of appropriate travel arrangements and is therefore a valid marker of organization skills and preparation. This novel study has shown that good time-keeping skills are positively associated with examination outcome.

  18. Imaging studies for failed back surgery syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosnard, G.; Cordoliani, Y.S.; Sarrazin, J.L.; Soulie, D.

    1995-01-01

    In patients with failed back surgery syndrome, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be the best first-line imaging study because it simplifies the diagnosis. This update is based on over 600 cases. MRI shows the scar tissue at the surgical site, persistent evidence of disk herniation for several weeks after surgery, and evidence of local and regional edema in one-fourth of cases. The edema is most marked between two months and two years after the operation and can misleadingly suggest discitis. MRI is the best investigation for detecting recurrent herniation at the same vertebral level or another level. Herniated disk material is seen as a mass that does not enhance after gadolinium, in contrast to the vascularized scar tissue. Free fragments are often clearly visible within the scar tissue. Fragments that migrate to the epidural space can give rise to granulomatous reactions. Scar tissue can be seen in the epidural space and within the disk; it can show enhancement after gadolinium for several years. The scar can be atrophic or hypertrophic and can encase or impinge on the dural sac and nerve roots. Pathological fibrosis cannot be differentiated from ordinary scar tissue. Arachnoiditis causing adherence of the nerve roots to the dura mater or to each other occurs in 5 % to 10 % of cases. Nerve root enhancement after gadolinium is seen in three-fourths of cases. Bone lesions are common, especially some time after surgery; they are usually accompanied with other lesions. Hematomas are seen in less than 10 % of cases. Infections are similarly rare (0.25 % each for discitis and epiduritis). The diagnosis of discitis is difficult and requires percutaneous biopsy of the disk, especially when MRI shows fluid within the disk, with decreased signal intensity on T2 images, and non enhancement after intravenous gadolinium. (authors). 19 refs., 7 figs

  19. Conservative and compensatory evolution in oxidative phosphorylation complexes of angiosperms with highly divergent rates of mitochondrial genome evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havird, Justin C; Whitehill, Nicholas S; Snow, Christopher D; Sloan, Daniel B

    2015-12-01

    Interactions between nuclear and mitochondrial gene products are critical for eukaryotic cell function. Nuclear genes encoding mitochondrial-targeted proteins (N-mt genes) experience elevated rates of evolution, which has often been interpreted as evidence of nuclear compensation in response to elevated mitochondrial mutation rates. However, N-mt genes may be under relaxed functional constraints, which could also explain observed increases in their evolutionary rate. To disentangle these hypotheses, we examined patterns of sequence and structural evolution in nuclear- and mitochondrial-encoded oxidative phosphorylation proteins from species in the angiosperm genus Silene with vastly different mitochondrial mutation rates. We found correlated increases in N-mt gene evolution in species with fast-evolving mitochondrial DNA. Structural modeling revealed an overrepresentation of N-mt substitutions at positions that directly contact mutated residues in mitochondrial-encoded proteins, despite overall patterns of conservative structural evolution. These findings support the hypothesis that selection for compensatory changes in response to mitochondrial mutations contributes to the elevated rate of evolution in N-mt genes. We discuss these results in light of theories implicating mitochondrial mutation rates and mitonuclear coevolution as drivers of speciation and suggest comparative and experimental approaches that could take advantage of heterogeneity in rates of mtDNA evolution across eukaryotes to evaluate such theories. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  20. Binge eating, purging and non-purging compensatory behaviours decrease from adolescence to adulthood: A population-based, longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebe Dawit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Subclinical forms of eating disorders (ED are highly prevalent, but relatively little is known about age trends, gender differences and distinctions among symptoms. This study investigates age trends and gender difference in binge eating, purging and non-purging compensatory behaviours (CB and the relationship of such behaviours to psychosocial problems. Methods Data from the national representative longitudinal study "Young in Norway" (ages 14-34 years were analysed using χ2 tests, logistic random intercept models and analyses of covariance. Results For both genders, a decrease was found in the prevalence of CB from age 14-16 years to 23 years and over. For binging, however, a significant decrease was found only for females, whose binge eating also declined more markedly over time than did males'. A significant gender difference was detected for purging, with females at higher risk. Purging was related to particularly serious symptoms of psychosocial problems: Those who purged had significantly higher levels of appearance dissatisfaction, anxiety and depressive symptoms, alcohol consumption, self-concept instability and loneliness than those with symptoms of other forms of disordered eating. Conclusions Individuals affected by purging need to be targeted as a high-risk group. The distinction in severity among the subclinical ED may indicate the need for the reformulation of the eating disorder not otherwise specified category in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-V.

  1. Autonomous motivation is not enough: the role of compensatory health beliefs for the readiness to change stair and elevator use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Theda; Rackow, Pamela

    2014-11-28

    Compensatory health beliefs (CHBs) are beliefs that an unhealthy behavior can be compensated with a healthy behavior. In line with the CHBs model, the aim of this study was twofold. First, the study investigated the relationship between autonomous motivation and CHBs that physical inactivity can be compensated by taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Second, the study focused on the associations between CHBs and readiness to use the stairs more often and stair and elevator use. Thus, a cross-sectional online questionnaire was designed that was filled out by 135 participants. Path analysis showed that individuals with stronger autonomous motivation to use the stairs strongly agreed that sedentary behavior could be compensated by taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Moreover, CHBs were positively related to readiness to change behavior, but not to self-reported stair and elevator use. Even though future research is necessary to replicate these findings, autonomous motivation seems to have a positive impact on CHBs which, in turn, might boost an intended behavior change. Thus, promoting possible compensation of physical inactivity might foster the readiness to change the unhealthy behavior.

  2. Autonomous Motivation Is Not Enough: The Role of Compensatory Health Beliefs for the Readiness to Change Stair and Elevator Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theda Radtke

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Compensatory health beliefs (CHBs are beliefs that an unhealthy behavior can be compensated with a healthy behavior. In line with the CHBs model, the aim of this study was twofold. First, the study investigated the relationship between autonomous motivation and CHBs that physical inactivity can be compensated by taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Second, the study focused on the associations between CHBs and readiness to use the stairs more often and stair and elevator use. Thus, a cross-sectional online questionnaire was designed that was filled out by 135 participants. Path analysis showed that individuals with stronger autonomous motivation to use the stairs strongly agreed that sedentary behavior could be compensated by taking the stairs instead of the elevator. Moreover, CHBs were positively related to readiness to change behavior, but not to self-reported stair and elevator use. Even though future research is necessary to replicate these findings, autonomous motivation seems to have a positive impact on CHBs which, in turn, might boost an intended behavior change. Thus, promoting possible compensation of physical inactivity might foster the readiness to change the unhealthy behavior.

  3. Localization of adenovirus morphogenesis players, together with visualization of assembly intermediates and failed products, favor a model where assembly and packaging occur concurrently at the periphery of the replication center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela N Condezo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (AdV morphogenesis is a complex process, many aspects of which remain unclear. In particular, it is not settled where in the nucleus assembly and packaging occur, and whether these processes occur in a sequential or a concerted manner. Here we use immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy (immunoEM to trace packaging factors and structural proteins at late times post infection by either wildtype virus or a delayed packaging mutant. We show that representatives of all assembly factors are present in the previously recognized peripheral replicative zone, which therefore is the AdV assembly factory. Assembly intermediates and abortive products observed in this region favor a concurrent assembly and packaging model comprising two pathways, one for capsid proteins and another one for core components. Only when both pathways are coupled by correct interaction between packaging proteins and the genome is the viral particle produced. Decoupling generates accumulation of empty capsids and unpackaged cores.

  4. Localization of adenovirus morphogenesis players, together with visualization of assembly intermediates and failed products, favor a model where assembly and packaging occur concurrently at the periphery of the replication center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condezo, Gabriela N; San Martín, Carmen

    2017-04-01

    Adenovirus (AdV) morphogenesis is a complex process, many aspects of which remain unclear. In particular, it is not settled where in the nucleus assembly and packaging occur, and whether these processes occur in a sequential or a concerted manner. Here we use immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy (immunoEM) to trace packaging factors and structural proteins at late times post infection by either wildtype virus or a delayed packaging mutant. We show that representatives of all assembly factors are present in the previously recognized peripheral replicative zone, which therefore is the AdV assembly factory. Assembly intermediates and abortive products observed in this region favor a concurrent assembly and packaging model comprising two pathways, one for capsid proteins and another one for core components. Only when both pathways are coupled by correct interaction between packaging proteins and the genome is the viral particle produced. Decoupling generates accumulation of empty capsids and unpackaged cores.

  5. Transgenic supplementation of SIRT1 fails to alleviate acute loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons and gliosis in a mouse model of MPTP-induced parkinsonism [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5a9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Kitao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Dopamine (DA neuron-selective uptake and toxicity of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP causes parkinsonism in humans. Loss of DA neurons via mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress is reproduced by systemic injection of MPTP in animals, which serves as models of parkinsonism and Parkinson’s disease (PD. This study aimed to test whether pan-neural supplementation of the longevity-related, pleiotropic deacetylase SIRT1, which confers partial tolerance to at least three models of stroke and neurodegeneration, could also alleviate MPTP-induced acute pathological changes in nigrostriatal DA neurons and neighboring glia. Results We employed a line of prion promoter-driven Sirt1-transgenic (Sirt1Tg mice that chronically overexpress murine SIRT1 in the brain and spinal cord. Sirt1Tg and wild-type (WT male littermates (3‒4 months old were subjected to intraperitoneal injection of MPTP. Acute histopathological changes in the midbrain and striatum (caudoputamen were assessed with serial coronal sections triply labeled for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, and nuclear DNA. In the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc of the midbrain, the number of TH-positive neurons and the reactive gliosis were comparable between the Sirt1Tg and WT littermates. In the striatum, the relative fluorescence intensity of TH-positive nerve terminals and the level of gliosis did not differ by the genotypes. Conclusions Sirt1Tg and WT littermate mice exhibited comparable acute histopathological reactions to the systemic injection of MPTP, loss of TH-positive neurons and reactive gliosis. Thus, the genetic supplementation of SIRT1 does not confer histologically recognizable protection on nigrostriatal DA neurons against acute toxicity of MPTP.

  6. Is compensatory hyperhidrosis after thoracic sympathicotomy in palmar hyperhidrosis patients related to the excitability of thoracic sympathetic ganglions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun-Peng; Peng, A-Jing; Xu, Chen-Hui; Li, Guo-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Background The mechanism of compensatory hyperhidrosis remains unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between compensatory hyperhidrosis and thoracic sympathetic ganglion excitability to assess the effectiveness of thoracoscopic T4 sympathicotomy for treating palmar hyperhidrosis. Methods Sixty-six cases of T4 sympathetic ganglions were prospectively collected from patients with palmar hyperhidrosis who underwent thoracoscopic T4 sympathicotomy from 2013 to 2016 in our department. The expression levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and synaptophysin were detected using immunohistochemistry. Patients with palmar hyperhidrosis were followed-up for examination of postoperative sweating status. Results Thirty-eight cases (57.6%) of compensatory hyperhidrosis were identified. Mild compensatory hyperhidrosis occurred in 26 patients (39.4%), moderate in 11 (16.7%), and severe in 1 (1.5%). The rate of compensatory hyperhidrosis was higher in patients with axilla hyperhidrosis than those without (76.0% vs. 46.3%, P=0.018). However, the clinical data were similar between the compensatory hyperhidrosis group and the no compensatory hyperhidrosis group. In addition, the ChAT, VIP, and synaptophysin expression levels were not significantly different between the two groups (P values of 0.356, 0.071, and 0.141, respectively). Furthermore, the ChAT, VIP, and synaptophysin expression levels in the mild group were similar to those observed in the moderate/intense group (P values of 0.089, 0.124, and 0.149, respectively). The remission rate was 100% in palmar hyperhidrosis, 48.2% (27/56) in pedal hyperhidrosis, 56.0% (14/25) in axilla hyperhidrosis and 88.9% (16/18) in skin symptoms. No signs of chapped skin on the palms were found. Conclusions There was no significant correlation between compensatory hyperhidrosis and thoracic sympathetic ganglion excitability; however, compensatory hyperhidrosis is more likely to

  7. Expanded level of sympathetic chain removal does not increase the incidence or severity of compensatory hyperhidrosis after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Tyler M; Davis, Diane M; Speicher, James E; Rossi, Nicholas P; Parekh, Kalpaj R; Lynch, William R; Iannettoni, Mark D

    2014-12-01

    Compensatory hyperhidrosis is a common devastating adverse effect after endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for patients undergoing surgical treatment of primary hyperhidrosis. We sought to determine whether a correlation existed in our patient population between the level and extent of sympathetic chain resection and the subsequent development of compensatory hyperhidrosis. All patients undergoing endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy in the T2-T3, T2-T4, T2-T5, or T2-T6 levels for palmar or axillary hyperhidrosis at the University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics (n = 97) from January 2004 to January 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Differences in the preoperative patient characteristics were not statistically significant among the patients receiving T2-T3, T2-T4, T2-T5, or T2-T6 level resections. Of the 97 included patients, 28 (29%) experienced transient compensatory hyperhidrosis and 4 (4%) complained of severe compensatory hyperhidrosis and required additional treatment. No operative mortalities occurred, and the morbidity was similar among the groups. Most patients had successful outcomes after undergoing extensive resection without changes in the incidence of compensatory hyperhidrosis. Therefore, we recommend performing complete and adequate resection for relief of symptoms in patients with primary hyperhidrosis. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Expanded Level of Sympathetic Chain Removal Does Not Increase Incidence or Severity of Compensatory Hyperhidrosis Following Endoscopic Thoracic Sympathectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Tyler M.; Davis, Diane M.; Speicher, James E.; Rossi, Nicholas P.; Parekh, Kalpaj R.; Lynch, William R.; Iannettoni, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Compensatory hyperhidrosis is a common devastating adverse effect following endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for patients undergoing surgical treatment of primary hyperhidrosis. We sought to determine if there was a correlation in our patient population between the level and extent of sympathetic chain resection and the subsequent development of compensatory hyperhidrosis. Methods All patients undergoing endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy in the T2-3, T2-4, T2-5, or T2-6 levels for palmar or axillary hyperhidrosis at the University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics (n=97) between January 2004 and January 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. Results Differences in preoperative patient characteristics were not statistically significant between patients receiving either T2-3, T2-4, T2-5, or T2-6 level resections. Of the ninety-seven patients included in this study, twenty-eight patients (29%) experienced transient compensatory hyperhidrosis and four patients (4%) complained of severe compensatory hyperhidrosis and required further treatment. There were no operative mortalities and morbidity was similar amongst the groups. Conclusions Most patients had successful outcomes after undergoing extensive resection without change in incidence of compensatory hyperhidrosis. Therefore, we recommend performing a complete and adequate resection for relief of symptoms in patients with primary hyperhidrosis. PMID:25131173

  9. Compensatory and restorative mechanisms in victims in the late postblast period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Karpov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess restorative and compensatory mechanisms in victims of blast injury (BI in its late period.Patients and methods. A clinical and neurophysiological examination was made in 78 blast victims, among whom there were 75 men and 3 women at the age of 30 to 48 years (mean age 37.4±3.2 years. The patients were divided into two groups: 1 51 (65.4% patients with BI concurrent with varying degrees of brain injury and concomitant complications; 2 27 (34.6% patients with BI and mainly peripheral involvement (limb amputation. Most (84% victims were 20–40 years old. A control group consisted of 27 ageand gender-matched healthy individuals. The trend in BI sequels was traced within 3 years after injury. Cardiointervalography was employed to evaluate autonomic tone.Results. Varying degrees of adaptive processes were found in the groups under study; the neurophysiological price of traumatic impact of BI on the regulation of adaptive mechanisms in its late period was mathematically expressed. The most favorable adaptation according to autonomic support parameters and its stabilization were noted in Group 2 victims. These patients had long an autonomic imbalance with sympathetic dominance. An orthostatic test could reveal autonomic responsiveness in both groups, pointing to the breakdown of central regulatory mechanisms with emphasis to trophotropic parasympathetic dominance in the compensatory and restorative processes of autonomic support.

  10. Decreasing Compensatory Ability of Concentric Ventricular Hypertrophy in Aortic-Banded Rat Hearts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Lewalle

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cardiac system compensates for variations in physiological and pathophysiological conditions through a dynamic remodeling at the organ, tissue, and intracellular levels in order to maintain function. However, on longer time scales following the onset of ventricular pressure overload, such remodeling may begin to inhibit physiological function and ultimately lead to heart failure. This progression from compensatory to decompensatory behavior is poorly understood, in particular owing to the absence of a unified perspective of the concomitantly remodeling subsystems. To address this issue, the present study investigates the evolution of compensatory mechanisms, in response to overload, by integrating diffusion-tensor MRI, echocardiography, and intracellular and hemodynamic measurements within consistent computational simulations of aortic-banded rat hearts. This approach allows a comparison of the relative leverage of different cardiac properties (geometry, passive mechanical stiffness, fiber configuration, diastolic and peak calcium concentrations, calcium-binding affinity, and aortic impedance to affect cardiac contraction. Measurements indicate that, following aortic banding, an ejection fraction (EF of 75% was maintained, relative to control rats, despite significant remodeling of the left-ventricular wall thickness (increasing by ~90% over 4 weeks. Applying our framework, we identified the left-ventricular wall thickness (concentric hypertrophy and the intracellular calcium dynamics as playing the dominant roles in preserving EF acutely, whereas the significance of hypertrophy decreased subsequently. This trend suggests an increasing reliance on intracellular mechanisms (average increase ~50%, rather than on anatomical features (average decrease ~60%, to achieve compensation of pump function in the early phase of heart failure.

  11. Land use planning and social equity in North Carolina's compensatory wetland and stream mitigation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenDor, Todd; Stewart, Audrey

    2011-02-01

    The U.S. Clean Water Act requires compensatory mitigation for wetland and stream damage through restoration of damaged aquatic ecosystems. We evaluate the North Carolina's Ecosystem Enhancement Program (EEP), a state agency responsible for compensatory mitigation. We compare communities gaining and losing aquatic resources during mitigation, finding new types of socioeconomic disparities that contradict previous studies of mitigation program behavior. We find average distances between impact and mitigation sites for streams (43.53 km) and wetlands (50.3 km) to be larger in North Carolina than in off-site mitigation programs in other regions previously studied. We also find that aquatic resources in the State are lost from urbanized areas that are more affluent, white, and highly educated, and mitigated at sites in rural areas that are less affluent, less well educated, and have a higher percentage of minorities. We also analyze the relationship between urban growth indicators and EEP accumulation of compensation sites. Growth indicators and long-term population projections are uncorrelated with both projected transportation impacts and advance mitigation acquired by the EEP, suggesting that growth considerations can be more effectively incorporated into the EEP's planning process. We explore the possibility that spatial mismatches could develop between watersheds that are rapidly growing and those that are gaining mitigation. We make recommendations for ways that regulators incorporate growth indicators into the mitigation planning process.

  12. Prediction of compensatory hyperhidrosis with botulinum toxin A and local anesthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jin Yong; Park, Soo Seog; Sim, Sung Bo; Jo, Keon Hyon; Lee, Jongho; Oh, Saecheol; Shin, Jae Seong

    2015-08-01

    Compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH) is one of the most problematic complications of sympathectomy, which occurs often and is hard to treat. A predictive procedure (PP) for CH can help patients experience compensatory sweating before sympathectomy to determine whether or not to perform sympathectomy. Our study aimed to evaluate the CH after the PP and sympathectomy in patients with primary palmar hyperhidrosis using multiple drugs. We reviewed 83 patients who underwent a PP between July 2009 and August 2013 with primary palmar hyperhidrosis. In group A, we used levobupivacaine (n = 39). In group B, we used botulinum toxin A plus ropivacaine for the PP in group B (n = 44). The CH rate after the PP was 44 % (group A) and 25 % (group B), and after sympathectomy 80 % (group A) and 75 % (group B). The prediction value between the PP and the sympathectomy was statistically significant in group A (p < 0.05). The positive prediction rate was 73 % and the negative prediction rate was 27 % in group A. Local anesthetic alone has a better predictive value. From our finding, patients should be made aware that CH after sympathectomy is less severe in 73 % of cases than that experienced in the PP.

  13. The relationships between renal compensatory hypertrophy etiologic factors and anthropometric development in the pediatric age group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaygut, Demet; Soylu, Alper; Kasap, Belde; Türkmen, Mehmet; Cakmakcı, Handan; Kavukcu, Salih

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the factors associated with compensatory hypertrophy in the functional kidneys of children. The medical files of patients with a solitary functional kidney were reviewed retrospectively. Data regarding anthropometric measurements, functional renal length, functional renal length of standard deviation score (SDS) of functional kidney at diagnosis, and end of follow-up were obtained. Patients were divided into 2 groups, those with a unilateral kidney function of atrophy, group 1) and those with a solitary kidney (agenesis, and multicystic dysplastic kidney, group 2). A total of 126 patients (70 boys) were evaluated. Both the sizes of the functional kidney and functional kidney SDS values at diagnosis were greater in group 1 relative to group 2. At the end of the follow-up period, anthropometric values including functional kidney size were higher in group 2. Functional kidney size of 2 SDS above the normal was mostly predictive at age 17.5 months (odds ratio [OR] 5.06) and at a body height of 82 cm (OR 5.57). The most determining factors for renal length SDS values were age and height. Solitary kidneys complete compensatory hypertrophy by 17.5 months of age, and after that their growth continues in parallel to normal growth. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [The pathogenesis of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome and compensatory antiinflammatory response syndrome following surgical stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Satoshi; Ichikura, Takashi; Mochizuki, Hidetaka

    2003-07-01

    The inflammation charge cells such as the macrophages, neutrophils, endothelial cells, and fibroblasts are activated in surgical sites when tissue injury occurs due to the operation. Proinflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6, and IL-8 are induced from the activated inflammation charge cells. These cytokines amplify the information by autocrine and paracrine action, induce the production of other cytokines, and send the information to the whole body. Increases in body temperature, pulse rate, and leukocyte counts are then observed. This condition is called the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) clinically. On the other hand, the production of antiinflammatory cytokines against SIRS is induced simultaneously. The condition in which antiinflammatory cytokines are produced in excess and become dominant systemically is called the compensatory antiinflammatory response syndrome (CARS). No standard concrete diagnosis for CARS has been established, although CARS is a pathogenetic concept. However, recently the analysis of cytokine production and various types of surface molecules in the inflammation charge cells became possible with the development of molecular biological methods. As a result, it was found that the immune system is controlled by the balance between proinflammatory and antiinflammatory cytokine production, and if the compensatory antiinflammatory reaction is sufficiently severe, it will manifest clinically as anergy, with increased susceptibility to infection. In this manuscript, we explain the pathogenesis of SIRS and CARS following surgical stress by analyzing cytokine production and surface membrane molecules in the inflammation charge cells.

  15. The Role of Episodic Postprandial Peptides in Exercise-Induced Compensatory Eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Catherine; Blundell, John E; Caudwell, Phillipa; Webb, Dominic-Luc; Hellström, Per M; Näslund, Erik; Finlayson, Graham

    2017-11-01

    Prolonged physical activity gives rise to variable degrees of body weight and fat loss, and is associated with variability in appetite control. Whether these effects are modulated by postprandial, peptides is unclear. We examined the role of postprandial peptide response in compensatory eating during 12 weeks of aerobic exercise and in response to high-fat, low-carbohydrate (HFLC) and low-fat, high-carbohydrate (LFHC) meals. Of the 32 overweight/obese individuals, 16 completed 12 weeks of aerobic exercise and 16 nonexercising control subjects were matched for age and body mass index. Exercisers were classified as responders or nonresponders depending on net energy balance from observed compared with expected body composition changes from measured energy expenditure. Plasma samples were collected before and after meals to compare profiles of total and acylated ghrelin, insulin, cholecystokinin, glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), and total peptide YY (PYY) between HFLC and LFHC meals, pre- and postexercise, and between groups. No differences between pre- and postintervention peptide release. Responders had greater suppression of acylated ghrelin (P exercise. Responders to exercise-induced weight loss showed greater suppression of acylated ghrelin and greater release of GLP-1 and total PYY at baseline. Therefore, episodic postprandial peptide profiles appear to form part of the pre-existing physiology of exercise responders and suggest differences in satiety potential may underlie exercise-induced compensatory eating. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  16. Psychiatric comorbidity effects on compensatory cognitive training outcomes for veterans with traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Kristen H; Jak, Amy J; Twamley, Elizabeth W

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the influence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis, and PTSD and depression severity, on the postconcussive symptom trajectory over the course of a 1-year study period. Secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial comparing veterans who received supported employment combined with compensatory cognitive training to those who received supported employment only. Assessments were conducted at baseline, 3- (postintervention), 6-, and 12-months. Participants were 50 Operation Enduring and Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans with a history of mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) who were unemployed, seeking work, and who had neuropsychological impairment. Of all participants, 74% met diagnostic criteria for PTSD. All participants received supported employment and half of the sample also received Cognitive Symptom Management and Rehabilitation Therapy (CogSMART), a 12-session, manualized compensatory cognitive training intervention. Veterans with PTSD and greater depression severity endorsed significantly more severe postconcussive symptomatology at all assessment time points. However, the rate of CogSMART-associated improvement in postconcussive symptoms did not differ as a result of psychiatric symptomatology. Study results suggest that for veterans with a history of mild to moderate TBI, presence of comorbid PTSD or depressive symptoms should not preclude participation in cognitive rehabilitation interventions. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. 4D monitoring of actively failing rockslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Nick; Williams, Jack; Hardy, Richard; Brain, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the conditions which promote rockfall to collapse relies upon detailed monitoring, ideally before, during and immediately after failure. With standard repeat surveys it is common that surveys do not coincide with or capture precursors, or that surveys are widely spaced relative to the timing and duration of driving forces such as storms. As a result gaining insight into the controls on failure and the timescales over which precursors operate remains difficult to establish with certainty, and establishing direct links between environmental conditions and rock-falls, or sequences of events prior to rockfall, remain difficult to define. To address this, we present analysis of a high-frequency 3D laser scan dataset captured using a new permanently installed system developed to constantly monitor actively failing rock slopes. The system is based around a time of flight laser scanner, integrated with and remotely controlled by dedicated controls and analysis software. The system is configured to capture data at 0.1 m spacing across > 22,000 m3 at up to 30 minute intervals. Here we present results captured with this system over a period of 9 months, spanning spring to winter 2015. Our analysis is focussed upon improving the understanding of the nature of small (< 1m^3) rockfalls falling from near vertical rock cliffs. We focus here on the development of a set of algorithms for differencing that trade-off the temporal resolution of frequent surveys (hourly) against high spatial resolution point clouds (< 0.05 m) to enhance the precision of change detection, allowing both deformation and detachments to be monitored through time. From this dataset we derive rockfall volume frequency distributions based upon short-interval surveys, and identify the presence and/or absence of precursors, in what we believe to be the first constant volumetric measurement of rock face erosion. The results hold implications for understanding of rockfall mechanics, but also for how

  18. Wilson's operator expansion: can it fail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, V.A.; Shifman, M.A.; Vainshtein, A.I.; Zakharov, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    The status of poperator product expansion (OPE) in the presence of nonperturbative effects is duscussed within the framework of some simople models 4d Higgs model, 2d sigma-model and Schwinger model are considered. The general formulation of OPE is presented and it is demonstrated that there exists a consistent procedure allowing one to define unabiguously both coefficient functions and matrix elements of compositie operators. One of the key elements of the procedure is introduction of an auxiliary paramparameter, the normalization point μ. The two extremss considered are lambda phi 4 theory with no spontaneous breaking of the symmetry and O(N) sigma model in the limit N→infinity. In the former case there is only perturbative contribution to (phi 2 ) while in the latter case the perturbative pieces are suppressed by 1/N factors. Numerically QCD is much closer to the O(N) sigma model in the large N limit. Comments on specific features of QCD are presented

  19. Rescue of failed filtering blebs with ab interno trephination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shihadeh, Wisam A; Ritch, Robert; Liebmann, Jeffrey M

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of ab interno automated trephination as a technique for rescuing failed mature filtering blebs. A retrospective chart review of 40 failed blebs of 38 patients who had a posttrephination follow-up period of at least 3 months was done. With success defined as intraocular pressure (IOP) control with other modalities of management. Complications were few. We believe that ab interno trephination is an excellent option for rescuing selected failed filtering blebs.

  20. Development of failed fuel detection system for PWR (III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Churl Kew; Kang, Hee Dong; Jeong, Seung Ho; Cho, Byung Sub; Yoon, Byeong Joo; Yoon, Jae Seong

    1987-12-01

    Ultrasonic transducers satisfying the conditions for failed fuel rod detection for failed fuel rod detection have been designed and built. And performance tests for them have been carried out. Ultrasonic signal processing units, a manipulator guiding the ultrasonic probe through the fuel assembly lanes and its control units have been constructed. The performance of the system has been verified experimentally to be successful in failed fuel rod detection. (Author)

  1. Rockwell Fails in Response to Shuttle Disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, John A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the contingent media relations policy employed by Rockwell International, the prime contractor for the United States space shuttle program, following the January 28, 1986, destruction of the Challenger. Analyzes Rockwell's response through a theoretical model of crisis perception and Rockwell's policy in relation to the mass media. (MS)

  2. Sheep Hip Arthroplasty Model of Failed Implant Osseointegration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Thomas; Kold, Søren; Baas, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Early secure stability of an implant is important for long-term survival. We examined whether micromotion of implants consistently would induce bone resorption and formation of a fibrous membrane and thereby prevent osseointegration. One micromotion implant was inserted into one of the medial fem...... bone in a 1 mm zone around the implants. This study indicates that implant micromotion is sufficient to induce bone resorption and formation of a fibrous membrane....

  3. State of Compensatory-Adaptive Mechanisms in Patients with Purulent Meningitis in Dynamics of the Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Ryabokon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the clinical features of autonomic dysfunction and state of compensatory-adaptive mechanisms in patients with purulent meningitis in the dynamics of the disease. We found that in patients with purulent meningitis at the height of the disease dominance of cerebral, meningeal symptoms combined with some objective evidence of autonomic dysfunction and reduced power of heart rate variability with the presence of autonomic imbalance towards vagotonia. In the dynamics in patients with purulent meningitis against the background of conventional treatment clinical signs of autonomic dysfunction prevail from the 2nd week, they persist at discharge in 72.7 % of patients, combining with imbalanced parameters of neurohumoral regulation, in the form of reduced power of spectral parameters of heart rate variability with presence of autonomic imbalance towards vagotonia.

  4. Assessment of the correlation between nasal septal deviation and compensatory hypertrophy of the middle turbinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Deniz; Asil, Kıyasettin; Güven, Mehmet; Kayabaşoğlu, Gürkan; Yılmaz, Mahmut Sinan

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the relationship between nasal septal deviation and the middle turbinate hypertrophy using computed tomography. In this retrospective analysis, we examined 77 patients with nasal septal deviation. The mucosal and bone structures of the middle turbinate and the angle of the septum were measured using radiological analysis. Measurements of the middle turbinate on the convex side were compared to those on the concave side. Measurements of the bony and mucosal structure area of the middle turbinate were significantly greater than those on the concave side. The dimensions of medial mucosa thickness and bone thickness were not significantly different between the convex and concave sides. No significant correlation was found between the angle of deviation and other parameters. The present findings suggest that compensatory middle turbinate hypertrophy was caused both by conchal bone growth and mucosal hypertrophy in patients with nasal septal deviation.

  5. The nature of compensatory and restorative processes in the livers of animals irradiated during hypokinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, I. P.; Trusova, L. V.

    1981-01-01

    The nature of postirradiation repair in the livers of rats irradiated during hypokinesia is investigated. Hepatocyte population counts, mitotic activity, binuclear cell content, and karyometric studies were done to ascertain the effects of combined hypokinesia and radiation. Hypokinesia is shown to change the nature and rate of post-irradiation changes in the liver, the effect varying with the timing of irradiation relative to the length of hypokinesia. It is concluded that the changes in the compensatory and restorative processes are caused by stress developed in response to isolation and restricted mobility. By changing neuroendocrine system activity, the stress stimulates cell and tissue repair mechanisms at a certain stage essential to the body's reaction of subsequent irradiation.

  6. The impact of rate of weight loss on body composition and compensatory mechanisms during weight reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutinho, Sílvia Ribeiro; With, Emilie; Rehfeld, Jens F

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Rapid weight loss (WL) has been associated with a larger loss of fat free mass and a disproportional reduction in resting metabolic rate (RMR), but the evidence is inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate the impact of WL rate on body composition and compensatory mechanisms activated...... with WL (reduced RMR, increased exercise efficiency (ExEff) and appetite), both during negative and neutral energy balance (EB). METHODS: Thirty-five participants with obesity were randomized to lose a similar weight rapidly (4 weeks) or gradually (8 weeks), and afterwards to maintain it (4 weeks). Body...... weight and composition, RMR, ExEff (10, 25 and 50 W), appetite feelings and appetite-regulating hormones (active ghrelin, cholecystokinin, total peptide YY (PYY), active glucagon-like peptide-1 and insulin), in fasting and every 30 min up to 2.5 h, were measured at baseline and after each phase. RESULTS...

  7. Compensatory evolution reveals functional interactions between ribosomal proteins S12, L14 and L19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisnier-Patin, Sophie; Paulander, Wilhelm; Pennhag, Alexandra; Andersson, Dan I

    2007-02-09

    Certain mutations in S12, a ribosomal protein involved in translation elongation rate and translation accuracy, confer resistance to the aminoglycoside streptomycin. Previously we showed in Salmonella typhimurium that the fitness cost, i.e. reduced growth rate, due to the amino acid substitution K42N in S12 could be compensated by at least 35 different mutations located in the ribosomal proteins S4, S5 and L19. Here, we have characterized in vivo the fitness, translation speed and translation accuracy of four different L19 mutants. When separated from the resistance mutation located in S12, the three different compensatory amino acid substitutions in L19 at position 40 (Q40H, Q40L and Q40R) caused a decrease in fitness while the G104A change had no effect on bacterial growth. The rate of protein synthesis was unaffected or increased by the mutations at position 40 and the level of read-through of a UGA nonsense codon was increased in vivo, indicating a loss of translational accuracy. The mutations in L19 increased sensitivity to aminoglycosides active at the A-site, further indicating a perturbation of the decoding step. These phenotypes are similar to those of the classical S4 and S5 ram (ribosomal ambiguity) mutants. By evolving low-fitness L19 mutants by serial passage, we showed that the fitness cost conferred by the L19 mutations could be compensated by additional mutations in the ribosomal protein L19 itself, in S12 and in L14, a protein located close to L19. Our results reveal a novel functional role for the 50 S ribosomal protein L19 during protein synthesis, supporting published structural data suggesting that the interaction of L14 and L19 with 16 S rRNA could influence function of the 30 S subunit. Moreover, our study demonstrates how compensatory fitness-evolution can be used to discover new molecular functions of ribosomal proteins.

  8. Structural homeostasis: compensatory adjustments of dendritic arbor geometry in response to variations of synaptic input.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Tripodi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available As the nervous system develops, there is an inherent variability in the connections formed between differentiating neurons. Despite this variability, neural circuits form that are functional and remarkably robust. One way in which neurons deal with variability in their inputs is through compensatory, homeostatic changes in their electrical properties. Here, we show that neurons also make compensatory adjustments to their structure. We analysed the development of dendrites on an identified central neuron (aCC in the late Drosophila embryo at the stage when it receives its first connections and first becomes electrically active. At the same time, we charted the distribution of presynaptic sites on the developing postsynaptic arbor. Genetic manipulations of the presynaptic partners demonstrate that the postsynaptic dendritic arbor adjusts its growth to compensate for changes in the activity and density of synaptic sites. Blocking the synthesis or evoked release of presynaptic neurotransmitter results in greater dendritic extension. Conversely, an increase in the density of presynaptic release sites induces a reduction in the extent of the dendritic arbor. These growth adjustments occur locally in the arbor and are the result of the promotion or inhibition of growth of neurites in the proximity of presynaptic sites. We provide evidence that suggest a role for the postsynaptic activity state of protein kinase A in mediating this structural adjustment, which modifies dendritic growth in response to synaptic activity. These findings suggest that the dendritic arbor, at least during early stages of connectivity, behaves as a homeostatic device that adjusts its size and geometry to the level and the distribution of input received. The growing arbor thus counterbalances naturally occurring variations in synaptic density and activity so as to ensure that an appropriate level of input is achieved.

  9. Enhanced brain small-worldness after sleep deprivation: a compensatory effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huan; Li, Hong; Wang, Yulin; Lei, Xu

    2014-10-01

    Sleep deprivation has a variable impact on extrinsic activities during multiple cognitive tasks, especially on mood and emotion processing. There is also a trait-like individual vulnerability or compensatory effect in cognition. Previous studies have elucidated the altered functional connectivity after sleep deprivation. However, it remains unclear whether the small-world properties of resting-state network are sensitive to sleep deprivation. A small-world network is a type of graph that combines a high local connectivity as well as a few long-range connections, which ensures a higher information-processing efficiency at a low cost. The complex network of the brain can be described as a small-world network, in which a node is a brain region and an edge is present when there is a functional correlation between two nodes. Here, we investigated the topological properties of the human brain networks of 22 healthy subjects under sufficient sleep and sleep-deprived conditions. Specifically, small-worldness is utilized to quantify the small-world property, by comparing the clustering coefficient and path length of a given network to an equivalent random network with same degree distribution. After sufficient sleep, the brain networks showed the property of small-worldness. Compared with the resting state under sufficient sleep, the small-world property was significantly enhanced in the sleep deprivation condition, suggesting a possible compensatory adaptation of the human brain. Specifically, the altered measurements were correlated with the neuroticism of subjects, indicating that individuals with low-levels of neuroticism are more resilient to sleep deprivation. © 2014 European Sleep Research Society.

  10. Compensatory postural adjustments in Parkinson's disease assessed via a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelshyna, Darya; Gago, Miguel F; Bicho, Estela; Fernandes, Vítor; Gago, Nuno F; Costa, Luís; Silva, Hélder; Rodrigues, Maria Lurdes; Rocha, Luís; Sousa, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    Postural control is a complex dynamic mechanism, which integrates information from visual, vestibular and somatosensory systems. Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) patients are unable to produce appropriate reflexive responses to changing environmental conditions. Still, it is controversial what is due to voluntary or involuntary postural control, even less what is the effect of levodopa. We aimed to evaluate compensatory postural adjustments (CPA), with kinematic and time-frequency analyzes, and further understand the role of dopaminergic medication on these processes. 19 healthy subjects (Controls) and 15 idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) patients in the OFF and ON medication states, wearing IMUs, were submitted to a virtual reality scenario with visual downward displacements on a staircase. We also hypothesized if CPA would involve mechanisms occurring in distinct time scales. We subsequently analyzed postural adjustments on two frequency bands: low components between 0.3 and 1.5 Hz (LB), and high components between 1.5 and 3.5 Hz (HB). Vertical acceleration demonstrated a greater power for discriminating IPD patients from healthy subjects. Visual perturbation significantly increased the power of the HB in all groups, being particularly more evident in the OFF state. Levodopa significantly increased their basal power taking place on the LB. However, controls and IPD patients in the ON state revealed a similar trend of the control mechanism. Results indicate an improvement in muscular stiffness provided by levodopa. They also suggest the role of different compensatory postural adjustment patterns, with LB being related to inertial properties of the oscillating mass and HB representing reactions to the ongoing visual input-changing scenario. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ultrasonics aids the identification of failed fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Over a number of years Brown Boveri Reaktor of West Germany has developed and commercialized an ultrasonic failed fuel rod detection system. Sipping has up to now been the standard technique for failed fuel detection, but sipping can only indicate whether or not an assembly contains defective rods; the BBR system can tell which rod is defective. (author)

  12. 7 CFR 983.52 - Failed lots/rework procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA.... Each lot of substandard pistachios may be reworked to meet aflatoxin or quality requirements. The... reporting. If a lot fails to meet the aflatoxin and/or the quality requirements of this part, a failed lot...

  13. Management for failed back surgery syndrome: three-in-one ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Management for failed back surgery syndrome: three-in-one procedure versus percutaneous spinal fixation alone .... unchanged; Fair: definite relief of some preoperative symptoms, while other symptoms were either .... spinal fixation procedure alone for management of pain and handicap after failed back spinal surgery ...

  14. 75 FR 76321 - Source of Income From Qualified Fails Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... Source of Income From Qualified Fails Charges AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION... source of income attributable to qualified fails charges. This action is necessary to provide guidance...-basis taxation of foreign persons not otherwise subject to U.S. net-basis taxation and the withholding...

  15. Body fat loss and compensatory mechanisms in response to different doses of aerobic exercise - a randomized controlled trial in overweight sedentary males

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mads Rosenkilde; Auerbach, Pernille Landrock; Reichkendler, Michala Holm

    2012-01-01

    The amount of weight loss induced by exercise is often disappointing. A diet-induced negative energy balance triggers compensatory mechanisms, e.g. lower metabolic rate and increased appetite. However, knowledge about potential compensatory mechanisms triggered by increased aerobic exercise...

  16. College Admissions and Academic Ethic: How Context-Specific Evaluation within a Science-Based Compensatory Program Benefits African American Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooten, Melissa E.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how the college readiness of participants in a compensatory program designed to facilitate interest in science and engineering was determined. Archival data were used to qualitatively analyze the performance reports of 205 student participants during the compensatory program's first 5 years. Findings indicate participants…

  17. Model Programs: Compensatory Education. The Juan Morel Campos Bilingual Center, Chicago, Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Center for Educational Communication (DHEW/OE), Washington, DC.

    The bilingual program described in this booklet offers intermediate-grade English and Spanish instruction to Spanish-speaking children from an economically disadvantaged neighborhood in one of Chicago's largest school districts. The descriptive information presented here concerns context and objectives, necessary personnel, educational…

  18. Empirical Estimation of Standard Errors of Compensatory MIRT Model Parameters Obtained from the NOHARM Estimation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    2.13 Department of Psychlogy ~ Dr. Alfred It. FrcLJ, Uniserslty of Newcastle AFOSRJNL\\I Ble.11 D.i ~. Paul W. Holland N1IS.V. 2M0 Blolling AFB. DC 2-62.,t...Depsetrment of Educational University of South Carolina Dr. Clessen J. Marin Psychlogy A. Techtnology Columbia. SC 29208 office of Cliif of N.1vsl

  19. A quasi-proportional electoral system 'only for honest men'? The hidden potential for manipulating mixed compensatory electoral systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochsler, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    , and Venezuela, however, demonstrate a particular loophole for such systems: strategic voting, organized by political parties. Large parties can achieve over-representation by encouraging their voters to split their votes. In this way, they outsmart the compensatory mechanism designed to lead to proportional...

  20. Practice Brief: Assessing Compensatory Strategies and Motivational Factors in High-Achieving Postsecondary Students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Research speculates that high-achieving college students with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may demonstrate a set of compensatory strategies and experience areas of difficulty and motivational factors that differ from the general ADHD populace. This Practice Brief used informal surveys with seven undergraduates with ADHD who had…

  1. Implicit associations and compensatory health beliefs in smokers: Exploring their role for behaviour and their change through warning labels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glock, S.; Müller, B.C.N.; Krolak-Schwerdt, S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Smokers might think that the negative effects of smoking can be compensated for by other behaviours, such as doing exercise or eating healthily. This phenomenon is known as compensatory health beliefs (CHBs). Graphic warning labels on cigarette packets emphasize the negative effects of

  2. Compensatory regulation of HDAC5 in muscle maintains metabolic adaptive responses and metabolism in response to energetic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Sean L; Swinton, Courtney; Morrison, Shona; Gaur, Vidhi; Campbell, Duncan E; Jorgensen, Sebastian B; Kemp, Bruce E; Baar, Keith; Steinberg, Gregory R; Hargreaves, M

    2014-08-01

    Some gene deletions or mutations have little effect on metabolism and metabolic adaptation because of redundancy and/or compensation in metabolic pathways. The mechanisms for redundancy and/or compensation in metabolic adaptation in mammalian cells are unidentified. Here, we show that in mouse muscle and myogenic cells, compensatory regulation of the histone deacetylase (HDAC5) transcriptional repressor maintains metabolic integrity. HDAC5 phosphorylation regulated the expression of diverse metabolic genes and glucose metabolism in mouse C2C12 myogenic cells. However, loss of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a HDAC5 kinase, in muscle did not affect HDAC5 phosphorylation in mouse skeletal muscle during exercise, but resulted in a compensatory increase (32.6%) in the activation of protein kinase D (PKD), an alternate HDAC5 kinase. Constitutive PKD activation in mouse C2C12 myogenic cells regulated metabolic genes and glucose metabolism. Although aspects of this response were HDAC5 phosphorylation dependent, blocking HDAC5 phosphorylation when PKD was active engaged an alternative compensatory adaptive mechanism, which involved post-transcriptional reductions in HDAC5 mRNA (-93.1%) and protein. This enhanced the expression of a specific subset of metabolic genes and mitochondrial metabolism. These data show that compensatory regulation of HDAC5 maintains metabolic integrity in mammalian cells and reinforces the importance of preserving the cellular metabolic adaptive response. © FASEB.

  3. Metabolic adaptation and hormonal regulation in young rabbit does during long-term caloric restriction and subsequent compensatory growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommers, J.M.; Boiti, C.; Brecchia, G.; Meijerhof, R.; Noordhuizen, J.P.T.M.; Decuypere, M.P.; Kemp, B.

    2004-01-01

    An experiment was performed to assess the metabolic adaptation and hormonal regulation in young female rabbits during long-term food restriction and subsequent compensatory growth during rearing. Feeding level was either ad libitum (AL, no. = 52) or restricted (R, no. = 52). From 6 to 12 weeks of

  4. Elevated atmospheric CO2 triggers compensatory feeding by root herbivores on a C3 but not a C4 grass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott N Johnson

    Full Text Available Predicted increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations often reduce nutritional quality for herbivores by increasing the C:N ratio of plant tissue. This frequently triggers compensatory feeding by aboveground herbivores, whereby they consume more shoot material in an attempt to meet their nutritional needs. Little, however, is known about how root herbivores respond to such changes. Grasslands are particularly vulnerable to root herbivores, which can collectively exceed the mass of mammals grazing aboveground. Here we provide novel evidence for compensatory feeding by a grass root herbivore, Sericesthis nigrolineata, under elevated atmospheric CO2 (600 µmol mol(-1 on a C3 (Microlaena stipoides but not a C4 (Cymbopogon refractus grass species. At ambient CO2 (400 µmol mol(-1 M. stipoides roots were 44% higher in nitrogen (N and 7% lower in carbon (C concentrations than C. refractus, with insects performing better on M. stipoides. Elevated CO2 decreased N and increased C:N in M. stipoides roots, but had no impact on C. refractus roots. Root-feeders displayed compensatory feeding on M. stipoides at elevated CO2, consuming 118% more tissue than at ambient atmospheric CO2. Despite this, root feeder biomass remained depressed by 24%. These results suggest that compensatory feeding under elevated atmospheric CO2 may make some grass species particularly vulnerable to attack, potentially leading to future shifts in the community composition of grasslands.

  5. Cognitive compensatory processes of older, clinically fit patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy: A longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libert, Yves; Borghgraef, Cindy; Beguin, Yves; Delvaux, Nicole; Devos, Martine; Doyen, Chantal; Dubruille, Stéphanie; Etienne, Anne-Marie; Liénard, Aurore; Merckaert, Isabelle; Reynaert, Christine; Slachmuylder, Jean-Louis; Straetmans, Nicole; Van Den Neste, Eric; Bron, Dominique; Razavi, Darius

    2017-12-01

    Despite the well-known negative impacts of cancer and anticancer therapies on cognitive performance, little is known about the cognitive compensatory processes of older patients with cancer. This study was designed to investigate the cognitive compensatory processes of older, clinically fit patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy. We assessed 89 consecutive patients (age ≥ 65 y) without severe cognitive impairment and 89 age-, sex-, and education level-matched healthy controls. Cognitive compensatory processes were investigated by (1) comparing cognitive performance of patients and healthy controls in novel (first exposure to cognitive tasks) and non-novel (second exposure to the same cognitive tasks) contexts, and (2) assessing psychological factors that may facilitate or inhibit cognitive performance, such as motivation, psychological distress, and perceived cognitive performance. We assessed cognitive performance with the Trail-Making, Digit Span and FCSR-IR tests, psychological distress with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and perceived cognitive performance with the FACT-Cog questionnaire. In novel and non-novel contexts, average cognitive performances of healthy controls were higher than those of patients and were associated with motivation. Cognitive performance of patients was not associated with investigated psychological factors in the novel context but was associated with motivation and psychological distress in the non-novel context. Older, clinically fit patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing chemotherapy demonstrated lower cognitive compensatory processes compared to healthy controls. Reducing distress and increasing motivation may improve cognitive compensatory processes of patients in non-novel contexts. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Comparison of only T3 and T3-T4 sympathectomy for axillary hyperhidrosis regarding treatment effect and compensatory sweating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuncu, Gökhan; Turk, Figen; Ozturk, Gökhan; Atinkaya, Cansel

    2013-08-01

    Patients diagnosed with axillary hyperhidrosis can face psychosocial issues that can ultimately hinder their quality of life both privately and socially. The routine treatment for axillary hyperhidrosis is T3-T4 sympathectomy, but compensatory sweating is a serious side effect that is commonly seen with this approach. This study was designed to evaluate whether a T3 sympathectomy was effective for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis and whether this treatment led to less compensatory sweating than T3-T4 sympathectomies among our 60-patient population. One hundred and twenty endoscopic thoracic sympathectomies were performed on 60 patients who had axillary hyperhidrosis. The sympathectomies were accomplished by means of a single-lumen endotracheal tube and a single port. The axillary hyperhidrosis patients were randomly divided into two groups with 17 patients in Group 1 undergoing T3-T4 sympathectomies and 43 in Group 2 undergoing only T3 sympathectomies. We analysed the data associated with the resolution of axillary hyperhidrosis, the degree of patient satisfaction with the surgical outcome and the quality of life in parallel with compensatory sweating after the procedure as reported by the patient and confirmed by the examiner. Moreover, the results were compared statistically. No statistically significant difference was observed between the groups based on age (P=0.56), gender (P=0.81), duration of the surgery (P=0.35) or postoperative satisfaction levels (P=0.45). However, the incidence and degree of compensatory sweating were lower in the T3 group than the T3-T4 group at the 1-year follow-up (P=0.008). T3 sympathectomy was as effective as T3-T4 sympathectomy for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis based on the patients' reported postoperative satisfaction, and the T3 group demonstrated lower compensatory sweating at the 1-year follow-up.

  7. Childhood obesity: parents fail to recognise, general practitioners fail to act.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    White, A

    2012-01-01

    General Practitioners (GPs) have an important role to play in recognition of and intervention against childhood obesity in Ireland. Data were collected prospectively on a cohort of children aged 4-14 and their parents (n = 101 pairs) who attended consecutively to a semi-rural group general practice. Parents estimated their child\\'s weight status. Actual weight status was determined for both parent and child using the United States Centres\\' for Disease Control\\'s BMI-for-age references. 15 (14.9%) of the children and 49 (51.6%) of the parents were overweight or obese. While 71 (95.5%) of normal weight status children were correctly identified, parents showed poor concordance in identifying their children as overweight 2 (18.2%) or obese 0 (0%). BMI was only evidently recorded in the clinical records of 1 out of 15 cases of overweight children identified. With parents failing to recognise childhood obesity, GPs have a responsibility in tackling this problem at a family level.

  8. DOES GARP REALLY FAIL MISERABLY? A RESPONSE TO STOCKMAN ET AL. (2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockman et al. (2006) found that ecological niche models built using DesktopGARP 'failed miserably' to predict trapdoor spider (genus Promyrmekiaphila) distributions in California. This apparent failure of GARP (Genetic Algorithm for Rule-Set Production) was actually a failure ...

  9. Relationship between oxygen delivery and its compensatory factors and acute mountain sickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming LI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the changes in oxygen delivery (DO2 to the body and brain and its compensatory factors to acute hypoxia and their relation to acute mountain sickness (AMS. Methods  One hundred and forty-seven participants were recruited from Chinese young men who had lived in plain all along arrived in Tibet by flight. All of them were asked to complete an AMS questionnaire within 48h after arrival. The resting heart rate (HR, blood pressure (BP, cardiac output (CO, oxygen saturation (SaO2, stroke volume (SV and blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCAv were measured one week before departure from the plain and within 48h after arrival in Tibet. AMS was diagnosed according to Louis Lake Score System (LLS, and the results were then statistically analyzed. Results  AMS was diagnosed in eighty-six subjects (58.5%. After exposure to hypoxia, SaO2 was decreased by 10% and was negatively correlated with AMS score. Systemic DO2, CO and HR were increased by 19%, 32.5% and 31.7%, respectively, and were positively correlated with AMS, while the SV remained unchanged. MCAv accelerated by 10%, and that of AMS subjects was higher than of non-AMS ones. The cerebral DO2 (DO2C was maintained because the MCAv matched with SaO2 changes. The middle cerebral artery resistance units (RMCA decreased obviously with an increase in MBP, and RMCA in AMS subjects was lower than that in non-AMS ones. HR and MCAv, the key compensation factors of DO2, were used as the objective evaluation indices, in collaboration of HR≥85 beat/min and MCAv≥66cm/s, could be a better means to evaluate AMS, with a positive predictive value of 82.4% and specificity of 90.2%. Conclusions  DO2 and its compensatory factors may play a key role in the regulation response to acclimatize to acute hypoxia. Among them, HR and MCAv may relate to the mechanism of AMS development, and indirectly reflect the compensation level to oxygen debt, implying that HR and MCAv are

  10. Temporal effect of carbofuran on estrous cycle compensatory ovarian hypertrophy and follicles in hemiovariectomized albino mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baligar, P N; Kaliwal, B B

    2004-01-01

    Carbofuran, a systemic N-methyl carbamate pesticide was administered orally with an effective dose of 1.3mg/kg per day to hemiovariectomized (HOVX) mice for 5, 10, and 15 days. Sham-operated and HOVX control mice were administered a similar quantity of olive oil. The vaginal smear and body weight of the mice were recorded daily and mice were sacrificed on day 16. The results of the present study indicate that there is a significant decrease in the duration of the estrus with a concomitant significant increase in the duration of the diestrus with carbofuran treatment for 10 days. In the HOVX mice treated with carbofuran for 15 days there was a significant decrease in the length of the estrous cycle and the duration of the estrus and metestrus with a concomitant significant increase in the diestrus. There was a significant increase in the ovarian weight in HOVX control mice when compared to that of the sham operated control mice. HOVX mice treated with carbofuran for 10 and 15 days showed a significant decrease in the relative ovarian weight with a concomitant inhibition of compensatory ovarian hypertrophy in HOVX mice. There was also a significant decrease in the ovarian growth rate in relation to the contralateral ovary of the same animal. There was a significant decrease in the number of small and total number of healthy follicles with a concomitant significant increase in the number of medium, large and total number of atretic follicles in HOVX mice treated with carbofuran for 10 days. There was a significant decrease in the number of small, medium, large, and total number of healthy follicles with a concomitant significant increase in the number of medium, large, and total number of atretic follicles in HOVX mice treated with carbofuran for 15 days. The administration of carbofuran in the present study showed that there is no significant change in the body and organs weight such as uterus, kidney, adrenals, liver, spleen, thymus and thyroid in all the carbofuran

  11. Compensatory Mechanisms in Patients After a Partial or Total Glossectomy due to Oral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halczy-Kowalik, Ludmiła; Wiktor, Andrzej; Rzewuska, Anna; Kowalczyk, Robert; Wysocki, Rościsław; Posio, Violetta

    2015-12-01

    Excision of a part or the whole of tongue due to oral cancer disturbs swallowing and speech. Lower airways aspiration of the swallowed bolus in patients after such oral structures excision is a symptom of major swallowing disorder and may be the cause of aspiration pneumonia. Restoration of oral nutrition is possible after exclusion or reduction of aspiration threat in the patients. Video fluoroscopic evaluation of the swallowing performed at the beginning of the swallowing rehabilitation in 95 patients after a total or partial glossectomy due to oral cancer, who assessed their saliva swallowing as efficient on the day of examination, showed disturbances of all of the swallowing stages. The most common disturbances involved the oral stage: limited mobility of the oral tongue, impaired glossopalatal seal, and weak glossopharyngeal seal. The most serious among them involved pharyngeal stage of swallowing, as leakage into the larynx and aspiration. The patients used their own methods during barium suspension swallowing to facilitate the swallowing act. They used such methods as: changing the position of the head to the body, additional swallows, engaging the adjacent structures into sealing the oral fissure. We assumed that the compensatory mechanisms (CM) worked out by the patients before the swallowing examination will enable them efficient barium suspension swallowing. The CM were applied by 71 of 95 patients; 51 of the patients used more than one compensatory mechanism. Swallowing in 61 of the compensating patients was at least functional; swallowing in 10 of the compensating patients was non-efficient and caused recurrent aspiration. The results of our research negate the validity of multiple swallows (more than three) without apnea elongation because it may lead to aspiration. Aspiration was also recorded in patients with weak airways closure and immovable epiglottis, who complemented the impaired oral transport with gravitational oral transport by moving chin

  12. Securing Failed Inner-City Communities: The Military's Role

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Khan, Oral

    1997-01-01

    This study examines the threat to internal security posed by violent gangs. This threat was found to be particularly acute in inner-city communities that have over time devolved to a status that the author classified as failed communities...

  13. Failing the market, failing deliberative democracy: How scaling up corporate carbon reporting proliferates information asymmetries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingmar Lippert

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Corporate carbon footprint data has become ubiquitous. This data is also highly promissory. But as this paper argues, such data fails both consumers and citizens. The governance of climate change seemingly requires a strong foundation of data on emission sources. Economists approach climate change as a market failure, where the optimisation of the atmosphere is to be evidence based and data driven. Citizens or consumers, state or private agents of control, all require deep access to information to judge emission realities. Whether we are interested in state-led or in neoliberal ‘solutions’ for either democratic participatory decision-making or for preventing market failure, companies’ emissions need to be known. This paper draws on 20 months of ethnographic fieldwork in a Fortune 50 company’s environmental accounting unit to show how carbon reporting interferes with information symmetry requirements, which further troubles possibilities for contesting data. A material-semiotic analysis of the data practices and infrastructures employed in the context of corporate emissions disclosure details the situated political economies of data labour along the data processing chain. The explicit consideration of how information asymmetries are socially and computationally shaped, how contexts are shifted and how data is systematically straightened out informs a reflexive engagement with Big Data. The paper argues that attempts to automatise environmental accounting’s veracity management by means of computing metadata or to ensure that data quality meets requirements through third-party control are not satisfactory. The crossover of Big Data with corporate environmental governance does not promise to trouble the political economy that hitherto sustained unsustainability.

  14. National intelligence estimates and the Failed State Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voracek, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Across 177 countries around the world, the Failed State Index, a measure of state vulnerability, was reliably negatively associated with the estimates of national intelligence. Psychometric analysis of the Failed State Index, compounded of 12 social, economic, and political indicators, suggested factorial unidimensionality of this index. The observed correspondence of higher national intelligence figures to lower state vulnerability might arise through these two macro-level variables possibly being proxies of even more pervasive historical and societal background variables that affect both.

  15. Whole genome analysis of linezolid resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae reveals resistance and compensatory mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Légaré Danielle

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several mutations were present in the genome of Streptococcus pneumoniae linezolid-resistant strains but the role of several of these mutations had not been experimentally tested. To analyze the role of these mutations, we reconstituted resistance by serial whole genome transformation of a novel resistant isolate into two strains with sensitive background. We sequenced the parent mutant and two independent transformants exhibiting similar minimum inhibitory concentration to linezolid. Results Comparative genomic analyses revealed that transformants acquired G2576T transversions in every gene copy of 23S rRNA and that the number of altered copies correlated with the level of linezolid resistance and cross-resistance to florfenicol and chloramphenicol. One of the transformants also acquired a mutation present in the parent mutant leading to the overexpression of an ABC transporter (spr1021. The acquisition of these mutations conferred a fitness cost however, which was further enhanced by the acquisition of a mutation in a RNA methyltransferase implicated in resistance. Interestingly, the fitness of the transformants could be restored in part by the acquisition of altered copies of the L3 and L16 ribosomal proteins and by mutations leading to the overexpression of the spr1887 ABC transporter that were present in the original linezolid-resistant mutant. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the usefulness of whole genome approaches at detecting major determinants of resistance as well as compensatory mutations that alleviate the fitness cost associated with resistance.

  16. Self-regulation of trilobite diversity in Murero (middle Cambrian, Spain) due to compensatory extinction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Villalta, J.S.

    2016-07-01

    As species accumulate in a community, competition for available ecospace is expected to prevent the addition of new species and to facilitate species extinction, thus producing a dynamic equilibrium of diversity. This mechanism remains under debate since its empirical support comes mainly from indirect or partial evidence, with very few direct tests at the species level. Here a new method is described to detect the presence of selfregulation feedbacks between species richness and turnover rates. It consists of Monte Carlo simulations which randomize the distribution of species ranges among stratigraphic intervals, providing predictions which allow the detection of genuine self-regulation feedbacks in the real data. Since the simulations include any potential bias due to preservation, sampling, or change in depositional environment, and these biases would also affect the real dataset, they are thus ruled out as explanations for any difference found. This method is applied to one of the best known fossiliferous sequences worldwide, the Rambla de Valdemiedes in Murero (RV1 section, middle Cambrian, Spain), a classic locality that has been studied for more than 150 years and which stands out due to its excellent sampling density, continuous deposition, and homogeneous fossil preservation. The results show that trilobite species richness was self-regulated due to positive feedback with extinction rate, which implies that compensatory extinction regulated this fauna in spite of the on-going Cambrian radiation. The lack of evidence of any origination feedback suggests ecological opportunities were not limiting for new species to colonize this Cambrian community. (Author)

  17. Self-regulation of trilobite diversity in Murero (middle Cambrian, Spain) due to compensatory extinction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Villalta, J.S.

    2016-01-01

    As species accumulate in a community, competition for available ecospace is expected to prevent the addition of new species and to facilitate species extinction, thus producing a dynamic equilibrium of diversity. This mechanism remains under debate since its empirical support comes mainly from indirect or partial evidence, with very few direct tests at the species level. Here a new method is described to detect the presence of selfregulation feedbacks between species richness and turnover rates. It consists of Monte Carlo simulations which randomize the distribution of species ranges among stratigraphic intervals, providing predictions which allow the detection of genuine self-regulation feedbacks in the real data. Since the simulations include any potential bias due to preservation, sampling, or change in depositional environment, and these biases would also affect the real dataset, they are thus ruled out as explanations for any difference found. This method is applied to one of the best known fossiliferous sequences worldwide, the Rambla de Valdemiedes in Murero (RV1 section, middle Cambrian, Spain), a classic locality that has been studied for more than 150 years and which stands out due to its excellent sampling density, continuous deposition, and homogeneous fossil preservation. The results show that trilobite species richness was self-regulated due to positive feedback with extinction rate, which implies that compensatory extinction regulated this fauna in spite of the on-going Cambrian radiation. The lack of evidence of any origination feedback suggests ecological opportunities were not limiting for new species to colonize this Cambrian community. (Author)

  18. Coevolution within a transcriptional network by compensatory trans and cis mutations

    KAUST Repository

    Kuo, D.

    2010-10-26

    Transcriptional networks have been shown to evolve very rapidly, prompting questions as to how such changes arise and are tolerated. Recent comparisons of transcriptional networks across species have implicated variations in the cis-acting DNA sequences near genes as the main cause of divergence. What is less clear is how these changes interact with trans-acting changes occurring elsewhere in the genetic circuit. Here, we report the discovery of a system of compensatory trans and cis mutations in the yeast AP-1 transcriptional network that allows for conserved transcriptional regulation despite continued genetic change. We pinpoint a single species, the fungal pathogen Candida glabrata, in which a trans mutation has occurred very recently in a single AP-1 family member, distinguishing it from its Saccharomyces ortholog. Comparison of chromatin immunoprecipitation profiles between Candida and Saccharomyces shows that, despite their different DNA-binding domains, the AP-1 orthologs regulate a conserved block of genes. This conservation is enabled by concomitant changes in the cis-regulatory motifs upstream of each gene. Thus, both trans and cis mutations have perturbed the yeast AP-1 regulatory system in such a way as to compensate for one another. This demonstrates an example of “coevolution” between a DNA-binding transcription factor and its cis-regulatory site, reminiscent of the coevolution of protein binding partners.

  19. Compensatory growth response of sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna (Lesueur, 1821 to starvation and refeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Morshedi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Compensatory growth response and body composition of male sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna subjected to short-term starvation and subsequent feeding were studied for 54 days. Four feeding schedules were used in this study: C, Control (were fed to apparent satiation throughout the experiment; T1, Treatment 1 (3 days Starvation and 6 days refeeding; T2, Treatment 2 (6 days Starvation and 12 days refeeding; T3, Treatment 3 (9 days Starvation and 18 days refeeding. At the end of the experiment, the starved fish gained a body weight comparable to that of the control fish. There were no differences in condition factor, specific growth rate and weight gain between the starved and control fish at the end of the experiment. Daily feed intake was significantly higher in T3 than that in the control. Short-term starvation did not influence protein, lipid and ash contents. Moisture content of T2 and T3 fish were significantly higher than those of T1 and control fish. The results indicated that complete compensation occurred in the starved fish and that this species can tolerate to short term starvation without any significant effects on growth and feeding performance.

  20. Compensatory T cell responses in IRG-deficient mice prevent sustained Chlamydia trachomatis infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörn Coers

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common cause of bacterial sexually transmitted diseases in the United States. In women C. trachomatis can establish persistent genital infections that lead to pelvic inflammatory disease and sterility. In contrast to natural infections in humans, experimentally induced infections with C. trachomatis in mice are rapidly cleared. The cytokine interferon-γ (IFNγ plays a critical role in the clearance of C. trachomatis infections in mice. Because IFNγ induces an antimicrobial defense system in mice but not in humans that is composed of a large family of Immunity Related GTPases (IRGs, we questioned whether mice deficient in IRG immunity would develop persistent infections with C. trachomatis as observed in human patients. We found that IRG-deficient Irgm1/m3((-/- mice transiently develop high bacterial burden post intrauterine infection, but subsequently clear the infection more efficiently than wildtype mice. We show that the delayed but highly effective clearance of intrauterine C. trachomatis infections in Irgm1/m3((-/- mice is dependent on an exacerbated CD4(+ T cell response. These findings indicate that the absence of the predominant murine innate effector mechanism restricting C. trachomatis growth inside epithelial cells results in a compensatory adaptive immune response, which is at least in part driven by CD4(+ T cells and prevents the establishment of a persistent infection in mice.

  1. The effects of compensatory workplace exercises to reduce work-related stress and musculoskeletal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas-Swerts, Fabiana Cristina Taubert; Robazzi, Maria Lúcia do Carmo Cruz

    2014-01-01

    to assess the effect of a compensatory workplace exercise program on workers with the purpose of reducing work-related stress and musculoskeletal pain. quasi-experimental research with quantitative analysis of the data, involving 30 administrative workers from a Higher Education Public Institution. For data collection, questionnaires were used to characterize the workers, as well as the Workplace Stress Scale and the Corlett Diagram. The research took place in three stages: first: pre-test with the application of the questionnaires to the subjects; second: Workplace Exercise taking place twice a week, for 15 minutes, during a period of 10 weeks; third: post-test in which the subjects answered the questionnaires again. For data analysis, the descriptive statistics and non-parametric statistics were used through the Wilcoxon Test. work-related stress was present in the assessed workers, but there was no statistically significant reduction in the scores after undergoing Workplace Exercise. However, there was a statistically significant pain reduction in the neck, cervical, upper, middle and lower back, right thigh, left leg, right ankle and feet. the Workplace Exercise promoted a significant pain reduction in the spine, but did not result in a significant reduction in the levels of work-related stress.

  2. Body composition and compensatory growth in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus under different feeding intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Wang, Ziwei; Hur, Jun-wook; Lee, Jeong-Yeol

    2015-07-01

    We investigated the growth and body composition of Nile tilapia under five different feeding regimes. A control group was fed to satiation twice daily for 185 days; four treatment groups were fed at intervals of 2, 3, 4 or 7 days (dietary `restricted' period, days 0-80) and then fed to satiation (`refeeding' period, days 80-185). Compensatory growth in weight and length of the feed-restricted groups was observed during the refeeding period. However, the growth of none of the restricted groups caught up with that of the control group over the experimental period. Feed intake upon refeeding increased with the duration of deprivation. There were no significant differences in feed efficiency between the restricted and control groups during the refeeding stage, suggesting that hyperphagia was the mechanism responsible for the increased growth rates during this period. Tilapia preferentially used n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and nonessential amino acids during the restricted-feeding period. Higher production was achieved by higher feed consumption. We suggest that if attainment of market size in minimum time is required, fish should be consistently fed to satiation, while taking care to avoid the possible negative consequences of overfeeding.

  3. Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation Promotes Frontal Compensatory Mechanisms in Healthy Elderly Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Cespón

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have demonstrated that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS is potentially useful to improve working memory. In the present study, young and elderly subjects performed a working memory task (n-back task during an electroencephalogram recording before and after receiving anodal, cathodal, and sham tDCS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. We investigated modulations of behavioral performance and electrophysiological correlates of working memory processes (frontal and parietal P300 event-related potentials. A strong tendency to modulated working memory performance was observed after the application of tDCS. In detail, young, but not elderly, subjects benefited from additional practice in the absence of real tDCS, as indicated by their more accurate responses after sham tDCS. The cathodal tDCS had no effect in any group of participants. Importantly, anodal tDCS improved accuracy in elderly. Moreover, increased accuracy after anodal tDCS was correlated with a larger frontal P300 amplitude. These findings suggest that, in elderly subjects, improved working memory after anodal tDCS applied over the left DLPFC may be related to the promotion of frontal compensatory mechanisms, which are related to attentional processes.

  4. Intersubjectivity and Psychopathology in the Schizophrenia Spectrum: Complicated We, Compensatory Strategies, and Self-Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Mads Gram; Nilsson, Lars Siersbæk

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies in phenomenological psychopathology emphasize the importance of intersubjectivity for our understanding of schizophrenia. Yet, the central role of the "we" in social experience and engagement is largely absent from this literature. Our study explores the relation between psychopathology and intersubjectivity in the schizophrenia spectrum through the prism of the "we." First, we explore the role of intersubjectivity in the current schizophrenia spectrum definitions and discuss the main contemporary research trends. Second, we recollect some of the classical accounts of schizophrenia, which offer a different perspective on the pervasive and often persistent intersubjective difficulties in these conditions. Third, capitalizing on recent advances in collective intentionality studies, we present and discuss a conceptual framework of the "we" and of how the "we" may be disrupted in schizophrenia. Through this framework and with the use of clinical vignettes, we elicit 3 compensatory strategies, which, we suggest, reflect a fragile sense of "we" in the schizophrenia spectrum, i.e. (i) positive withdrawal, (ii) imposing a goal-oriented, spatiotemporal structure on intersubjective engagement, and (iii) preferring social activities with a clear attribution of social roles and rules. Finally, we discuss the relation between anomalous self-experiences (i.e. self-disorders) and the complicated "we." © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. [Unusual behaviors in sleep as "compensatory" reactions, aimed at normalizing sleep-alertness cycles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gol'bin, A Ts; Guzeva, V I; Shepoval'nikov, A N

    2013-01-01

    The present article is an attempt to perform a conceptual clinical and physiological analysis of a large spec- trum of sleep-related phenomena called parasomnias in children, based on data from three independent in- stitutions. Parasonmias appear in the process of falling asleep, at the time of sleep stage changes, and upon awakening. They are common for both healthy children and those with neurological and psychiatric disorders. Brief descriptions of clinical pictures of several groups of parasomnias and their polysomnographic characteristics are presented. Instances of stereotyped rhythmic movements (e.g. head rocking), paroxysmal somatic and behavioral episodes (night terrors and nightmares), "static" phenomena (sleep with open eyes, strange body positions), as well as somnambulism are specifically described. Common features of parasomnias as a group have been identified (the "Parasomnia syndrome"). It was found that sleep architecture frequently normalizes after a parasomnia episode, whereas parasomnias are self-liquidated after sleep matures (self-cure). The significance of gender differences in parasomnias have been reviewed. Possible compensatory physiological functions of parasomnias acting as "switches" or "stabilizers" of sleep stages to "off-set" deviated or immature sleep-wake mechanisms were discussed.

  6. The effects of compensatory workplace exercises to reduce work-related stress and musculoskeletal pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Cristina Taubert de Freitas-Swerts

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: to assess the effect of a compensatory workplace exercise program on workers with the purpose of reducing work-related stress and musculoskeletal pain.METHOD: quasi-experimental research with quantitative analysis of the data, involving 30 administrative workers from a Higher Education Public Institution. For data collection, questionnaires were used to characterize the workers, as well as the Workplace Stress Scale and the Corlett Diagram. The research took place in three stages: first: pre-test with the application of the questionnaires to the subjects; second: Workplace Exercise taking place twice a week, for 15 minutes, during a period of 10 weeks; third: post-test in which the subjects answered the questionnaires again. For data analysis, the descriptive statistics and non-parametric statistics were used through the Wilcoxon Test.RESULTS: work-related stress was present in the assessed workers, but there was no statistically significant reduction in the scores after undergoing Workplace Exercise. However, there was a statistically significant pain reduction in the neck, cervical, upper, middle and lower back, right thigh, left leg, right ankle and feet.CONCLUSION: the Workplace Exercise promoted a significant pain reduction in the spine, but did not result in a significant reduction in the levels of work-related stress.

  7. Compensatory mutations cause excess of antagonistic epistasis in RNA secondary structure folding

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    Adami Christoph

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Background The rate at which fitness declines as an organism's genome accumulates random mutations is an important variable in several evolutionary theories. At an intuitive level, it might seem natural that random mutations should tend to interact synergistically, such that the rate of mean fitness decline accelerates as the number of random mutations is increased. However, in a number of recent studies, a prevalence of antagonistic epistasis (the tendency of multiple mutations to have a mitigating rather than reinforcing effect has been observed. Results We studied in silico the net amount and form of epistatic interactions in RNA secondary structure folding by measuring the fraction of neutral mutants as a function of mutational distance d. We found a clear prevalence of antagonistic epistasis in RNA secondary structure folding. By relating the fraction of neutral mutants at distance d to the average neutrality at distance d, we showed that this prevalence derives from the existence of many compensatory mutations at larger mutational distances. Conclusions Our findings imply that the average direction of epistasis in simple fitness landscapes is directly related to the density with which fitness peaks are distributed in these landscapes.

  8. Delayed Compensatory Postural Adjustments After Lateral Perturbations Contribute to the Reduced Ability of Older Adults to Control Body Balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudino, Renato; Dos Santos, Marcio José; Mazo, Giovana Zarpellon

    2017-10-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the timing of compensatory postural adjustments in older adults during body perturbations in the mediolateral direction, circumstances that increase their risk of falls. The latencies of leg and trunk muscle activation to body perturbations at the shoulder level and variables of center of pressure excursion, which characterize postural stability, were analyzed in 40 older adults (nonfallers and fallers evenly split) and in 20 young participants. The older adults exhibited longer latencies of muscular activation in eight out of 15 postural muscles as compared with young participants; for three muscles, the latencies were longer for the older fallers than nonfallers. Simultaneously, the time for the center of pressure displacement reached its peak after the perturbation was significant longer in both groups of older adults. The observed delays in compensatory postural adjustments may affect the older adults' ability to prompt control body balance after postural disturbances and predispose them to falls.

  9. Setting and validating the pass/fail score for the NBDHE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Tsung-Hsun; Dixon, Barbara Leatherman

    2013-04-01

    This report describes the overall process used for setting the pass/fail score for the National Board Dental Hygiene Examination (NBDHE). The Objective Standard Setting (OSS) method was used for setting the pass/fail score for the NBDHE. The OSS method requires a panel of experts to determine the criterion items and proportion of these items that minimally competent candidates would answer correctly, the percentage of mastery and the confidence level of the error band. A panel of 11 experts was selected by the Joint Commission on National Dental Examinations (Joint Commission). Panel members represented geographic distribution across the U.S. and had the following characteristics: full-time dental hygiene practitioners with experience in areas of preventive, periodontal, geriatric and special needs care, and full-time dental hygiene educators with experience in areas of scientific basis for dental hygiene practice, provision of clinical dental hygiene services and community health/research principles. Utilizing the expert panel's judgments, the pass/fail score was set and then the score scale was established using the Rasch measurement model. Statistical and psychometric analysis shows the actual failure rate and the OSS failure rate are reasonably consistent (2.4% vs. 2.8%). The analysis also showed the lowest error of measurement, an index of the precision at the pass/fail score point and that the highest reliability (0.97) are achieved at the pass/fail score point. The pass/fail score is a valid guide for making decisions about candidates for dental hygiene licensure. This new standard was reviewed and approved by the Joint Commission and was implemented beginning in 2011.

  10. Nephron progenitor cell death elicits a limited compensatory response associated with interstitial expansion in the neonatal kidney

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    Sree Deepthi Muthukrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The final nephron number in an adult kidney is regulated by nephron progenitor cell availability and collecting duct branching in the fetal period. Fetal environmental perturbations that cause reductions in cell numbers in these two compartments result in low nephron endowment. Previous work has shown that maternal dietary factors influence nephron progenitor cell availability, with both caloric restriction and protein deprivation leading to reduced cell numbers through apoptosis. In this study, we evaluate the consequences of inducing nephron progenitor cell death on progenitor niche dynamics and on nephron endowment. Depletion of approximately 40% of nephron progenitor cells by expression of diphtheria toxin A at embryonic day 15 in the mouse results in 10-20% nephron reduction in the neonatal period. Analysis of cell numbers within the progenitor cell pool following induction of apoptosis reveals a compensatory response in which surviving progenitor cells increase their proliferation and replenish the niche. The proliferative response is temporally associated with infiltration of macrophages into the nephrogenic zone. Colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 has a mitogenic effect on nephron progenitor cells, providing a potential explanation for the compensatory proliferation. However, CSF1 also promotes interstitial cell proliferation, and the compensatory response is associated with interstitial expansion in recovering kidneys which can be pharmacologically inhibited by treatment with clodronate liposomes. Our findings suggest that the fetal kidney employs a macrophage-dependent compensatory regenerative mechanism to respond to acute injury caused by death of nephron progenitor cells, but that this regenerative response is associated with neonatal interstitial expansion.

  11. Development and reliability of the rating of compensatory movements in upper limb prosthesis wearers during work-related tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Tallie M J; Postema, Sietke G; Reneman, Michiel F; Bongers, Raoul M; van der Sluis, Corry K

    2018-02-10

    Reliability study. Quantifying compensatory movements during work-related tasks may help to prevent musculoskeletal complaints in individuals with upper limb absence. (1) To develop a qualitative scoring system for rating compensatory shoulder and trunk movements in upper limb prosthesis wearers during the performance of functional capacity evaluation tests adjusted for use by 1-handed individuals (functional capacity evaluation-one handed [FCE-OH]); (2) to examine the interrater and intrarater reliability of the scoring system; and (3) to assess its feasibility. Movement patterns of 12 videotaped upper limb prosthesis wearers and 20 controls were analyzed. Compensatory movements were defined for each FCE-OH test, and a scoring system was developed, pilot tested, and adjusted. During reliability testing, 18 raters (12 FCE experts and 6 physiotherapists/gait analysts) scored videotapes of upper limb prosthesis wearers performing 4 FCE-OH tests 2 times (2 weeks apart). Agreement was expressed in % and kappa value. Feasibility (focus area's "acceptability", "demand," and "implementation") was determined by using a questionnaire. After 2 rounds of pilot testing and adjusting, reliability of a third version was tested. The interrater reliability for the first and second rating sessions were к = 0.54 (confidence interval [CI]: 0.52-0.57) and к = 0.64 (CI: 0.61-0.66), respectively. The intrarater reliability was к = 0.77 (CI: 0.72-0.82). The feasibility was good but could be improved by a training program. It seems possible to identify compensatory movements in upper limb prosthesis wearers during the performance of FCE-OH tests reliably by observation using the developed observational scoring system. Interrater reliability was satisfactory in most instances; intrarater reliability was good. Feasibility was established. Copyright © 2018 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Targeted Gene-Silencing Reveals the Functional Significance of Myocardin Signaling in the Failing Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, Mario; Iglesias, Raquel; Centeno, Alberto; López, Eduardo; Mikhailov, Alexander T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Myocardin (MYOCD), a potent transcriptional coactivator of smooth muscle (SM) and cardiac genes, is upregulated in failing myocardium in animal models and human end-stage heart failure (HF). However, the molecular and functional consequences of myocd upregulation in HF are still unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings The goal of the present study was to investigate if targeted inhibition of upregulated expression of myocd could influence failing heart gene expression and function. To this end, we used the doxorubicin (Dox)-induced diastolic HF (DHF) model in neonatal piglets, in which, as we show, not only myocd but also myocd-dependent SM-marker genes are highly activated in failing left ventricular (LV) myocardium. In this model, intra-myocardial delivery of short-hairpin RNAs, designed to target myocd variants expressed in porcine heart, leads on day 2 post-delivery to: (1) a decrease in the activated expression of myocd and myocd-dependent SM-marker genes in failing myocardium to levels seen in healthy control animals, (2) amelioration of impaired diastolic dysfunction, and (3) higher survival rates of DHF piglets. The posterior restoration of elevated myocd expression (on day 7 post-delivery) led to overexpression of myocd-dependent SM-marker genes in failing LV-myocardium that was associated with a return to altered diastolic function. Conclusions/Significance These data provide the first evidence that a moderate inhibition (e.g., normalization) of the activated MYOCD signaling in the diseased heart may be promising from a therapeutic point of view. PMID:22028870

  13. Targeted gene-silencing reveals the functional significance of myocardin signaling in the failing heart.

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    Mario Torrado

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myocardin (MYOCD, a potent transcriptional coactivator of smooth muscle (SM and cardiac genes, is upregulated in failing myocardium in animal models and human end-stage heart failure (HF. However, the molecular and functional consequences of myocd upregulation in HF are still unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The goal of the present study was to investigate if targeted inhibition of upregulated expression of myocd could influence failing heart gene expression and function. To this end, we used the doxorubicin (Dox-induced diastolic HF (DHF model in neonatal piglets, in which, as we show, not only myocd but also myocd-dependent SM-marker genes are highly activated in failing left ventricular (LV myocardium. In this model, intra-myocardial delivery of short-hairpin RNAs, designed to target myocd variants expressed in porcine heart, leads on day 2 post-delivery to: (1 a decrease in the activated expression of myocd and myocd-dependent SM-marker genes in failing myocardium to levels seen in healthy control animals, (2 amelioration of impaired diastolic dysfunction, and (3 higher survival rates of DHF piglets. The posterior restoration of elevated myocd expression (on day 7 post-delivery led to overexpression of myocd-dependent SM-marker genes in failing LV-myocardium that was associated with a return to altered diastolic function. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide the first evidence that a moderate inhibition (e.g., normalization of the activated MYOCD signaling in the diseased heart may be promising from a therapeutic point of view.

  14. Obstetric Outcomes After Failed Hysteroscopic and Laparoscopic Sterilization Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandi, Kristyn; Morgan, Jake R; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Perkins, Rebecca B; White, Katharine OʼConnell

    2018-02-01

    To compare obstetric outcomes after failed hysteroscopic and laparoscopic sterilization. This retrospective cohort study examined pregnancy outcomes including live birth, preterm birth, stillbirth, spontaneous abortion, therapeutic abortion, ectopic pregnancies, and gestational trophoblastic disease using a commercial claims administrative database for the years 2007-2013. We used a Z-test to compare pregnancy outcomes per 100 person-years based on type of sterilization. Cox proportional hazard models controlled for patient age, geographic region, urbanicity, comorbidities, and insurance type. We evaluated 997 pregnancy outcomes among 817 women from a total of 70,115 women with a history of either hysteroscopic sterilization (n=387 pregnancies/27,724 cases) or laparoscopic sterilization (n=610 pregnancies/42,391 cases). Women undergoing hysteroscopic sterilization were slightly older than, but otherwise similar to, women undergoing laparoscopic sterilization. The most common outcome was live birth, which was more likely after hysteroscopic sterilization compared with laparoscopic sterilization (adjusted hazard ratio 1.32, 95% CI 1.09-1.60). The rate of spontaneous abortion was not statistically significantly different between the two groups. Therapeutic abortion occurred more often after hysteroscopic sterilization (adjusted hazard ratio 1.49, 95% CI 1.10-2.01), whereas ectopic pregnancies occurred less often (adjusted hazard ratio 0.12, 95% CI 0.05-0.29) compared with laparoscopic sterilization. Hysteroscopic sterilization is associated with higher rates of live birth and lower rates of ectopic pregnancy compared with laparoscopic sterilization. Spontaneous abortion and preterm birth rates were similar in both groups. These data do not support an adverse effect of hysteroscopic sterilization on subsequent pregnancy outcomes.

  15. Brief report: Compensatory health beliefs are negatively associated with intentions for regular fruit and vegetable consumption when self-efficacy is low.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Vera; Reinwand, Dominique; Wienert, Julian; Kuhlmann, Tim; De Vries, Hein; Lippke, Sonia

    2017-07-01

    Compensatory health beliefs (the beliefs that an unhealthy behaviour can be compensated by a healthy behaviour) can interfere with adherence to fruit and vegetable consumption recommendations. Fruit and vegetable consumption, social cognitive variables and compensatory health beliefs were investigated via self-report at baseline (T0) and 8-week follow-up (T1) in N = 790 participants. Self-efficacy predicted fruit and vegetable consumption intentions. Planning mediated between intentions and T1 fruit and vegetable consumption. Compensatory health beliefs negatively predicted intentions at low self-efficacy levels only. The results propose the use of self-efficacy interventions to diminish the negative effects of compensatory health beliefs when forming fruit and vegetable consumption intentions and foster planning to translate intentions into behaviour.

  16. Fail-safe reactivity compensation method for a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygaard, Erik T.; Angelo, Peter L.; Aase, Scott B.

    2018-01-23

    The present invention relates generally to the field of compensation methods for nuclear reactors and, in particular to a method for fail-safe reactivity compensation in solution-type nuclear reactors. In one embodiment, the fail-safe reactivity compensation method of the present invention augments other control methods for a nuclear reactor. In still another embodiment, the fail-safe reactivity compensation method of the present invention permits one to control a nuclear reaction in a nuclear reactor through a method that does not rely on moving components into or out of a reactor core, nor does the method of the present invention rely on the constant repositioning of control rods within a nuclear reactor in order to maintain a critical state.

  17. Measurement of Compensatory Reserve Predicts Racial Differences in Tolerance to Simulated Hemorrhage in Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, Megan M; Hinds, Kumba Adia; Howard, Jeffrey T; Nawn, Corinne D; Stachenfeld, Nina S; Convertino, Victor A

    2018-02-14

    The measurement of Compensatory Reserve (CRM) has been established to accurately measure the body's total integrated capacity to compensate for physiological states of reduced central blood volume, and predict hemodynamic decompensation associated with inadequate tissue oxygenation. We previously demonstrated that African American (AA) women have a higher tolerance to reductions in central blood volume. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the CRM would identify racial differences during simulated hemorrhage, prior to the onset of traditional signs/symptoms. We performed a retrospective analysis during simulated hemorrhage using lower body negative pressure in 23 AA (22 ± 1years; 24 ± 1kg/m) and 31 white women (WW; 20 ± 1years; 23 ± 1kg/m). Beat-by-beat blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) were recording during progressive lower body negative pressure to presyncope. BP waveforms were analyzed using a machine-learning algorithm to derive the CRM at each lower body negative pressure stage. Resting mean arterial BP (AA, 78 ± 3 vs. WW, 74 ± 2mmHg) and HR (AA, 68 ± 2 vs. WW, 65 ± 2bpm) were similar between groups. The CRM progressively decreased during LBNP in both groups, however the rate of decline in the CRM was less (PCRM was 4% higher in AA at -15mmHg lower body negative pressure and progressively increased to 21% higher at -50mmHg lower body negative pressure (Pdata support the notion that the greater tolerance to simulated hemorrhage induced by lower body negative pressure in AA women can be explained by their greater capacity to protect the reserve to compensate for progressive central hypovolemia compared to WW independent of standard vital signs. 2 STUDY TYPE: Diagnostic test.

  18. Canopy 2 attenuates the transition from compensatory hypertrophy to dilated heart failure in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian; Mihic, Anton; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Yuemei; Singh, Kaustabh; Dhingra, Sanjiv; Weisel, Richard D; Li, Ren-Ke

    2015-10-01

    A mismatch between adequate angiogenesis and overgrowth of myocytes may be a critical mechanism controlling the transition from adaptive hypertrophy to heart failure. Canopy 2 (CNPY2) was recently identified as a secreted, HIF-1α-regulated angiogenic growth factor. As angiogenic factors play important roles in the development of myocardial hypertrophy, we investigated the role of CNPY2 in molecular and functional changes during development of chronic heart failure using cardiac-specific transgenic (TG) mice that overexpress human CNPY2. We generated TG mice that constitutively express CNPY2 in the myocardium. Cardiomyopathy was induced in TG and wild-type (WT) mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). WT mice developed significant ventricular hypertrophy at 4 weeks and severe dilatation and heart failure at 12 weeks after TAC. However, TG mice preserved much better cardiac structure and function, with less severe ventricular dilatation and markedly reduced cardiac apoptosis and fibrosis following TAC. Excess CNPY2 in TG mice prevented significant loss of vasculature up to 12 weeks after TAC injury, resulting in a better local myocardial environment that facilitated myocyte survival and prevented excessive matrix remodelling compared with WT mice. TG mice had less accumulation of endogenous tumor suppressor p53 after TAC, indicating intrinsic activation of the p53-mediated repression of HIF-1α, and Cnpy2 was diminished in TG mice compared with WT controls. Our study showed a correlation between downregulation of endogenous mouse Cnpy2 and p53-mediated HIF-1α inhibition during late-stage hypertrophic development. Additional CNPY2 attenuated the transition from compensatory hypertrophic response to maladaptive ventricular dilatation and heart failure. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Compensatory proliferation of endogenous chicken primordial germ cells after elimination by busulfan treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung; Kim, Sung; Park, Tae; Rengaraj, Deivendran; Park, Kyung; Lee, Hong; Park, Soo Bong; Kim, Sung; Choi, Seong Bok; Han, Jae

    2013-11-05

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the major population of cells in the developing bilateral embryonic gonads. Little is known about the cellular responses of PGCs after treatment with toxic chemicals such as busulfan during embryo development. In this study, we investigated the elimination, restorative ability, and cell cycle status of endogenous chicken PGCs after busulfan treatment. Busulfan was emulsified in sesame oil by a dispersion-emulsifying system and injected into the chick blastoderm (embryonic stage X). Subsequently, we conducted flow cytometry analysis to evaluate changes in the PGC population and cell cycle status, and immunohistochemistry to examine the germ cell proliferation. Results of flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry analyses after busulfan treatment showed that the proportion of male PGCs at embryonic day 9 and female PGCs at embryonic day 7 were increased by approximately 60% when compared with embryonic day 5.5. This result suggests the existence of a compensatory mechanism in PGCs in response to the cytotoxic effects of busulfan. Results of cell cycling analysis showed that the germ cells in the G0/G1 phase were significantly decreased, while S/G2/M-phase germ cells were significantly increased in the treatment group compared with the untreated control group in both 9-day-old male and female embryos. In addition, in the proliferation analysis with 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation, we found that the proportion of EdU-positive cells among VASA homolog-positive cells in the 9-day embryonic gonads of the busulfan-treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. We conclude that PGCs enter a restoration pathway by promoting their cell cycle after experiencing a cytotoxic effect.

  20. A compensatory mutation provides resistance to disparate HIV fusion inhibitor peptides and enhances membrane fusion.

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    Matthew P Wood

    Full Text Available Fusion inhibitors are a class of antiretroviral drugs used to prevent entry of HIV into host cells. Many of the fusion inhibitors being developed, including the drug enfuvirtide, are peptides designed to competitively inhibit the viral fusion protein gp41. With the emergence of drug resistance, there is an increased need for effective and unique alternatives within this class of antivirals. One such alternative is a class of cyclic, cationic, antimicrobial peptides known as θ-defensins, which are produced by many non-human primates and exhibit broad-spectrum antiviral and antibacterial activity. Currently, the θ-defensin analog RC-101 is being developed as a microbicide due to its specific antiviral activity, lack of toxicity to cells and tissues, and safety in animals. Understanding potential RC-101 resistance, and how resistance to other fusion inhibitors affects RC-101 susceptibility, is critical for future development. In previous studies, we identified a mutant, R5-tropic virus that had evolved partial resistance to RC-101 during in vitro selection. Here, we report that a secondary mutation in gp41 was found to restore replicative fitness, membrane fusion, and the rate of viral entry, which were compromised by an initial mutation providing partial RC-101 resistance. Interestingly, we show that RC-101 is effective against two enfuvirtide-resistant mutants, demonstrating the clinical importance of RC-101 as a unique fusion inhibitor. These findings both expand our understanding of HIV drug-resistance to diverse peptide fusion inhibitors and emphasize the significance of compensatory gp41 mutations.

  1. Second language as a compensatory resource for maintaining verbal fluency in bilingual immigrants with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, D; Walters, J; Fine, J; Muchnik-Rozanov, Y; Paz, M; Lerner, V; Belmaker, R H; Bersudsky, Y

    2015-08-01

    Due to the large migrations over the past three decades, large numbers of individuals with schizophrenia are learning a second language and being seen in clinics in that second language. We conducted within-subject comparisons to clarify the contribution of clinical, linguistic and bilingual features in the first and second languages of bilinguals with schizophrenia. Ten bilingual Russian(L1) and Hebrew(L2) proficient patients, who developed clinical schizophrenia after achieving proficiency in both languages, were selected from 60 candidates referred for the study; they were resident in Israel 7-32 years with 3-10 years from immigration to diagnosis. Clinical, linguistic and fluency markers were coded in transcripts of clinical interviews. There was a trend toward more verbal productivity in the first language (L1) than the second language (L2). Clinical speech markers associated with thought disorder and cognitive impairment (blocking and topic shift) were similar in both languages. Among linguistic markers of schizophrenia, Incomplete syntax and Speech role reference were significantly more frequent in L2 than L1; Lexical repetition and Unclear reference demonstrated a trend in the same direction. For fluency phenomena, Discourse markers were more prevalent in L1 than L2, and Codeswitching was similar across languages, showing that the patients were attuned to the socio-pragmatics of language use. More frequent linguistic markers of schizophrenia in L2 show more impairment in the syntactic/semantic components of language, reflecting greater thought and cognitive dysfunction. Patients are well able to acquire a second language. Nevertheless, schizophrenia finds expression in that language. Finally, more frequent fluency markers in L1 suggests motivation to maintain fluency, evidenced in particular by codeswitched L2 lexical items, a compensatory resource. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. COMPENSATORY GROWTH OF Oreochromis niloticus SELECTED STRAIN FROM BOGOR, WEST JAVA

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    Vitas Atmadi Prakoso

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In efficient feed management strategy in aquaculture will increase the fish production cost. One of the most effective strategies to solve this problem is through a better understanding of the compensatory growth of cultured fish. O. niloticus BEST tilapia strain (total length: 7.23 ± 0.11 cm mean ± SD; Body weight: 7.04 ± 0.08 g mean ± SD were reared in aquariums at 26.3 ± 1.4oC for 10 weeks. During the experiment, the control group was fed twice a day. The other two groups were deprived of food for one and two weeks and then fed twice a day during refeeding period. At the end of the experiment, the fish deprived for one week had a body weight, biomass and specific growth rate that were not significantly different from the control group. The body weight, biomass and specific growth rate of fish deprived for two weeks were significantly lower than the other groups. This study revealed that concentrations of ash and lower concentrations of protein and lipid on the deprived groups were higher compared to those without feed deprivation. Mortality of fish was lower than 9% and not significantly different among the treatments. Fish aggressive behavior was the main reason for injuries and death. Given the results, BEST tilapia strain was only able to reach complete growth compensation not longer than one week deprivation period. The results of the present study could be applied as basic information for further research on feeding management of BEST tilapia strain.

  3. Compensatory increase of functional connectivity density in adolescents with internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xin; Yang, Yongxin; Gao, Peihong; Qi, Xin; Du, Guijin; Zhang, Yang; Li, Xiaodong; Zhang, Quan

    2017-12-01

    Behavioral studies have demonstrated visual attention bias and working memory deficits in individuals with internet gaming disorder (IGD). Neuroimaging studies demonstrated that individuals with IGD presented abnormalities in brain structures and functions including resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) disturbance. However, most previous studies investigated IGD-related rsFC alterations by using hypothesis-driven methods with priori selection of a region of interest, which cannot provide a full picture of the rsFC changes in IGD individuals. In this study, we recruited 27 male IGD adolescents and 35 demographically matched healthy controls (HCs) to investigate abnormal connective property of each voxel within whole brain of IGD adolescents using resting-state functional connectivity density (rsFCD) method, and further to evaluate the relationship between altered rsFCD and behavioral performances of visual attention and working memory. The results exhibited no significant intergroup difference in behavioral performance (visual working memory and attention). The IGD adolescents exhibited higher global/long-range rsFCD in the bilateral dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and the right inferior temporal cortex (ITC)/fusiform compared with the HCs. Although no significant correlation survived after Bonferroni correction, higher global/long-range rsFCD of the bilateral DLPFC was correlated with the Young's internet addiction test (IAT) score and/or behavioral performance in IGD adolescents using an uncorrected threshold of P < 0.05. In conclusion, IGD adolescents demonstrated increased rsFCD in the brain regions involved in working memory, spatial orientation and attention processing, which indicated that increased rsFCD may reflect a compensatory mechanism for maintaining the normal behavioral performance in IGD adolescents compared with the HCs.

  4. Compensatory gain of crossbred heifers supplemented in pastures under evaluation hormonal profile and blood parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Trindade Júnior

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to verify the effect of nutritional management that alternates periods of energy/protein restriction and refeeding of grazing crossbred heifers during their prepuberty on the hormonal profile and blood parameters. The study was conducted at Princesa do Mateiro farm in Ribeirão do Largo, in the southwest region of the state of Bahia. Twenty crossbred heifers 5/8 Dairy Guzerat x 3/8 Dutch with an average age of 12 months and average body weight of 187 ± 13.74 kg were used at the beginning of the experiment. It lasted 238 days, 14 out of them were for the animals’ adaptation. The animals were kept in rotational grazing of Brachiariabrizantha cv. Marandú pastures and randomly assigned to two treatments: Control (T100 = animals receiving concentrate supplement to supply 100% of the nutrients requirement to gain 750 g day-1 of live weight and Compensatory Nutrition (CN. The animals of the CN treatment alternated periods of Restriction (T80 = receiving concentrate supplement to meet 80% of the demand for nutrients of the (T100 and periods of Refeeding (T120 = getting concentrate supplement to supply 120% of the nutrient requirements of the (T100 The final plasma concentrations of IGF-I, glucose and urea were higher (P0.05. There were positive correlations (P<0.05 between IGF-I, insulin, glucose and cholesterol, and a negative correlation (P<0.05 between IGF-I and urea. There were also positive correlation (P<0.05 between insulin and glucose and positive correlation (P<0.05 between glucose and cholesterol. There was a negative correlation (P<0.05 of the urea with cholesterol, progesterone and protein. Progesterone also showed a positive correlation (P<0.05 with the protein.

  5. alpha-adrenergic Blockade Unmasks a Greater Compensatory Vasodilation in Hypoperfused Contracting Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren P. Casey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that acute hypoperfusion in exercising human muscle causes an immediate increase in vascular resistance that is followed by a partial restoration (less than 100% recovery of flow. In the current study we examined the contribution of alpha-adrenergic vasoconstriction in the initial changes in vascular resistance at the onset of hypoperfusion as well as in the recovery of flow over time. Nine healthy male subjects (29 ± 2 performed rhythmic forearm exercise (20% of maximum during hypoperfusion evoked by intra-arterial balloon inflation. Each trial included; baseline, exercise prior to inflation, exercise with inflation, and exercise after deflation (3 min each. Forearm blood flow (FBF; ultrasound, local (brachial artery, and systemic arterial pressure (MAP; Finometer were measured. The trial was repeated during phentolamine infusion (alpha-adrenergic receptor blockade. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; ml min-1 100 mmHg-1 and resistance (mmHg ml min-1 was calculated from BF (ml min-1 and local MAP (mmHg. Recovery of FBF and FVC (steady state inflation plus exercise value – nadir/ [steady state exercise (control value-nadir] with phentolamine was enhanced compared with the respective control (no drug trial (FBF = 97 ± 5% vs. 81 ± 6%, P < 0.05; FVC = 126 ± 9% vs. 91 ± 5%, P < 0.01. However, the absolute (0.05 ± 0.01 vs. 0.06 ± 0.01 mmHg ml min-1; P = 0.17 and relative (35 ± 5% vs. 31 ± 2%; P = 0.41 increase in vascular resistance at the onset of balloon inflation was not different between the alpha-adrenergic receptor inhibition and control (no drug trials. Therefore, our data indicate that alpha-adrenergic mediated vasoconstriction restricts compensatory vasodilation during forearm exercise with hypoperfusion, but is not responsible for the initial increase in vascular resistance at the onset of hypoperfusion.

  6. Seeking structure in social organization: compensatory control and the psychological advantages of hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Justin P; Kay, Aaron C; Eibach, Richard P; Galinsky, Adam D

    2014-04-01

    Hierarchies are a ubiquitous form of human social organization. We hypothesized that 1 reason for the prevalence of hierarchies is that they offer structure and therefore satisfy the core motivational needs for order and control relative to less structured forms of social organization. This hypothesis is rooted in compensatory control theory, which posits that (a) individuals have a basic need to perceive the world as orderly and structured, and (b) personal and external sources of control are capable of satisfying this need because both serve the comforting belief that the world operates in an orderly fashion. Our first 2 studies confirmed that hierarchies were perceived as more structured and orderly relative to egalitarian arrangements (Study 1) and that working in a hierarchical workplace promotes a feeling of self-efficacy (Study 2). We threatened participants' sense of personal control and measured perceptions of and preferences for hierarchy in 5 subsequent experiments. Participants who lacked control perceived more hierarchy occurring in ambiguous social situations (Study 3) and preferred hierarchy more strongly in workplace contexts (Studies 4-5). We also provide evidence that hierarchies are indeed appealing because of their structure: Preference for hierarchy was higher among individuals high in Personal Need for Structure and a control threat increased preference for hierarchy even among participants low in Personal Need for Structure (Study 5). Framing a hierarchy as unstructured reversed the effect of control threat on hierarchy (Study 6). Finally, hierarchy-enhancing jobs were more appealing after control threat, even when they were low in power and status (Study 7). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Failed MTR Fuel Element Detect in a Sipping Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeituni, C.A.; Terremoto, L.A.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da

    2004-01-01

    This work describes sipping tests performed on Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements of the IEA-R1 research reactor, in order to find out which one failed in the core during a routine operation. Radioactive iodine isotopes 131 I and 133 I, employed as failure monitors, were detected in samples corresponding to the failed fuel element. The specific activity of each sample, as well as the average leaking rate, were measured for 137 Cs. The nuclear fuels U 3 O 8 - Al dispersion and U - Al alloy were compared concerning their measured average leaking rates of 137 Cs

  8. Failed MTR Fuel Element Detect in a Sipping Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeituni, C.A.; Terremoto, L.A.A.; da Silva, J.E.R.

    2004-10-06

    This work describes sipping tests performed on Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements of the IEA-R1 research reactor, in order to find out which one failed in the core during a routine operation. Radioactive iodine isotopes {sup 131}I and {sup 133}I, employed as failure monitors, were detected in samples corresponding to the failed fuel element. The specific activity of each sample, as well as the average leaking rate, were measured for {sup 137}Cs. The nuclear fuels U{sub 3}O{sub 8} - Al dispersion and U - Al alloy were compared concerning their measured average leaking rates of {sup 137}Cs.

  9. Sipping tests on a failed irradiated MTR fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeituni, C. A.; Terremoto, L. A. A.; Da Silva, J. E. R.

    2004-01-01

    This work describes sipping tests performed on Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements of the IEA-R1 research reactor, in order to find out which one failed in the core during a routine operation. Radioactive iodine isotopes 131 I and 133 I, employed as failure monitors, were detected in samples corresponding to the failed fuel element. The specific activity of each sample, as well as the average leaking rate, were measured for 137 Cs. The nuclear fuels U 3 O 8 - Al dispersion and U - Al alloy were compared concerning their measured average leaking rates of 137 Cs. (authors)

  10. Predictors of failed attendances in a multi-specialty outpatient centre using electronic databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Mark I

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Failure to keep outpatient medical appointments results in inefficiencies and costs. The objective of this study is to show the factors in an existing electronic database that affect failed appointments and to develop a predictive probability model to increase the effectiveness of interventions. Methods A retrospective study was conducted on outpatient clinic attendances at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore from 2000 to 2004. 22864 patients were randomly sampled for analysis. The outcome measure was failed outpatient appointments according to each patient's latest appointment. Results Failures comprised of 21% of all appointments and 39% when using the patients' latest appointment. Using odds ratios from the mutliple logistic regression analysis, age group (0.75 to 0.84 for groups above 40 years compared to below 20 years, race (1.48 for Malays, 1.61 for Indians compared to Chinese, days from scheduling to appointment (2.38 for more than 21 days compared to less than 7 days, previous failed appointments (1.79 for more than 60% failures and 4.38 for no previous appointments, compared with less than 20% failures, provision of cell phone number (0.10 for providing numbers compared to otherwise and distance from hospital (1.14 for more than 14 km compared to less than 6 km were significantly associated with failed appointments. The predicted probability model's diagnostic accuracy to predict failures is more than 80%. Conclusion A few key variables have shown to adequately account for and predict failed appointments using existing electronic databases. These can be used to develop integrative technological solutions in the outpatient clinic.

  11. 77 FR 9846 - Source of Income From Qualified Fails Charges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... Administration for comment on its impact on small business. Drafting Information The principal author of these... unit if it satisfies the principles of Sec. 1.864-4(c)(5)(iii) (substituting ``qualified business unit... income, with two exceptions. Qualified fails charge income earned by a qualified business unit (QBU) of a...

  12. Failing Boys! Beyond Crisis, Moral Panic and Limiting Stereotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    For some time now, school boards, Ministries of Education, and the popular media have been expressing concerns about failing boys and how best to meet their needs, framing these concerns in terms of a crisis in which boys are the "new disadvantaged". This perspective does not provide an accurate representation of the problem and, in fact, detracts…

  13. When Consensus Decision-Making Fails: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Grant T.

    Habermas's theory of dialogue was used to evaluate the process of decision making that occurred in a labor-management committee's meeting to discuss flextime. The study attempted to determine why, at that meeting, the committee's consensus process of decision making failed. W.R. Bion's theory of unconscious group motives was also used to…

  14. Reversing Polarities: Anarchical (Failed States versus International Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Fernandez Moreno

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article explores how the literature on 'failed states' (reproduces the modern state as a regulatory ideal, obscuring its contingent character and its violent foundation. So, discursive practices, based on an Eurocentric account, construct the 'failed state' as deviant. The resultant hierarchy of states, in turn, creates favorable conditions for interventionist practices, whose agents are depicted as members of a 'progressive' and 'benevolent' 'international community'. As state failure is interpreted as exclusively domestic process, a well-demarcated boundary between the domestic level of 'anarchy' and the international realm of 'order' and 'progress' results. This article shows that the traditional image of an anarchical system versus an ordered and progressive state is turned on its head when viewed from the perspective of 'failed states'. In the latter, domestic anarchy is contrary to a modernizing international realm. By labelling the 'other' as 'traditional', 'failed', and 'backward' in distinction to a 'modern', 'successful' and 'progressive' international, the dominant discourse conditions us to conceive of these realms as homogeneous in themselves and radically different from each other, rather than as liminal areas with numerous ambiguities and overlaps.

  15. Chloroquine in the Ugandan market fails quality test: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Antimalaria treatment failure has been partly attributed to poor quality antimalarials in the drug market. A 1998 survey in Kampala showed that 55 % of tablets and 62 % of injection forms of chloroquine failed the quality test. Objective: This study was carried out as a follow-up to establish the quality of ...

  16. Why does Centralisation fail to internalise Policy Externalities?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Dur (Robert); H.J. Roelfsema (Hein)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractCentralisation of political decision making often fails to produce the desired results. For instance, it is frequently argued that decision making within the European Union results in overspending and overregulation in some policy areas, while too low spending and too little regulation

  17. "It's All Human Error!": When a School Science Experiment Fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viechnicki, Gail Brendel; Kuipers, Joel

    2006-01-01

    This paper traces the sophisticated negotiations to re-inscribe the authority of Nature when a school science experiment fails during the enactment of a highly rated science curriculum unit. Drawing on transcriptions from classroom videotapes, we identify and describe four primary patterns of interaction that characterize this process, arguing…

  18. Post-deportation risks for failed asylum seekers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Alpes

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available What happens to people who are deported after their asylum applications have failed? Many who are deported are at risk of harm when they return to their country of origin but there is little monitoring done of deportation outcomes.

  19. Refections of an Industrial Sociologist on the Failed Attempts to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Locating privatisation within the theoretical context of neo-liberalism, this paper reflects on the causes of the failed attempt to privatise NITEL as well as the reasons for dismal performances of most public enterprises in Nigeria. Reflecting on the utility or otherwise of privatising state-owned enterprises in Nigeria, the paper ...

  20. Factors associated with failed spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The use of spinal anaesthesia has increased in the last three decades, given that it is the recommended anaesthetic of choice for better foetal and maternal outcomes in Caesarean section. Failed spinal anaesthesia (FSA) exposes patients to unfavourable experience of pain and the potential complications of ...

  1. The ugly twins: Failed global sourcing projects and their substitutes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiele, Holger; Horn, Philipp; Horn, Philipp; Werner, Welf

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the paper and literature addressed: Analyzing the impact of failed global sourcing projects on the entire commodity group and exploring isomorphism as potential antecedent to the observed phenomenon. The paper is embedded in the global sourcing literature, as well as isomorphism and total

  2. Organization Theory: Bright Prospects for a Permanently Failing Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P.M.A.R. Heugens (Pursey)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractOrganization theory is a paradoxical field of scientific inquiry. It has struggled for more than fifty years to develop a unified theory of organizational effectiveness under girded by a coherent set of assumptions, and it has thus far failed to produce one. Yet, by other standards it is

  3. Therapeutic options after failed Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hulst, R. W.; Weel, J. F.; van der Ende, A.; ten Kate, F. J.; Dankert, J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Many of the currently used Helicobacter pylori eradication regimens fail to cure 5-20% of the patients. Those patients will remain at risk of developing a potentially fatal complication of peptic ulcer disease. Therefore, a new attempt to cure H. pylori infection after initial failure of

  4. Why pediatricians fail to diagnose hypertension: a multicenter survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, Merijn W.; Blufpand, Hester N.; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.; Bökenkamp, Arend

    2014-01-01

    To elucidate why pediatricians fail to diagnose childhood hypertension, with special emphasis on the use of blood pressure (BP) reference data. We hypothesized that pediatricians frequently omit BP measurements and do not routinely relate BP measurements to reference data. We conducted a multicenter

  5. Factors associated with failed spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adeyinka Abiodun Alabi

    Results: The incidence of failed spinal anaesthesia was 11.7%, which was slightly higher in emergency Caesarean sections. In univariate analysis, previous anaesthesia, obesity, dry tap of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), bloody CSF and duration of work experience less than one year were significantly associated with FSA in the ...

  6. Age of failed restorations: A deceptive longevity parameter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opdam, N.J.M.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Cenci, M.S.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Wilson, N.H.F.

    2011-01-01

    There is pressing need to enhance evidence base in respect of longevity of restorations. Currently, there is lack of appreciation of differences between survival data based on the age of failed restorations as compared to gold standard Kaplan-Meier statistics. OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken

  7. Delay factors in failed construction projects in southwestern Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out with a view to showing the contribution of delay factors in the overall consideration of failed construction projects in south western Nigeria. This is considered necessary because the traditional view of construction project failure as consisting mainly of structural or functional failures tends to excuse ...

  8. Failed total carpometacarpal joint prosthesis of the thumb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben Bæk; Homilius, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis. T...... in eight of 10 patients, but the mean Disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) scores, self-reported pinch-grip-related function, and pain were comparable with our earlier published results with the Elektra carpometacarpal total joint prosthesis.......Total joint prosthesis in carpometacarpal joint arthritis of the thumb often fails. Loosening of the implant is often treated by resection arthroplasty, and we reviewed 10 patients, mean age 54 years (range 47-63) who were treated by resection arthroplasty after a failed total joint prosthesis....... The male:female ratio was 1:4 and the mean duration of observation 32 months (range 6-52). In three patients the revised implant was a MOJE uncemented carpometacarpal joint prosthesis and in seven patients an Elektra uncemented one. At follow-up grip strength was reduced to less than 90% of the other hand...

  9. Counselor Liability for Failing to Report Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Samuel

    1983-01-01

    Describes the laws regarding counselor liability for failure to report child abuse and state laws designating mandated reporters of suspected child abuse. Notes how the law protects mandated reporters. Discusses criminal penalties for those who fail to report suspected abuse. (RC)

  10. Heterotopic Pregnancy in a Natural Conception Following Failed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This report presents another rare case of spontaneous simultaneous intrauterine and extrauterine tubal pregnancies following failed progestogen-only injectable contraceptive. The ruptured heterotopic pregnancy was diagnosed in unruptured state but could not be treated because the couple did not believe/accept the ...

  11. Rulers against Writers, Writers against Rulers: The Failed Promise of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various literary critics have dwelt on the nature, tenets and trends of commitment in Nigeria literature. However, there is paucity of scholarly studies on the representations of the failed promise to the public sphere in postcolonial Nigerian fiction. This paper, therefore, examines the strategies and technicalities of representing ...

  12. Civil Liability for Failing to Report Child Abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Neil J.

    1977-01-01

    The article examines the Landeros decision (which ruled that a doctor who fails to report a child abuse victim can be held liable for subsequent injuries inflicted on the child) and discusses three theories of proving civil liability for the failure to report child abuse victims. Addressed are the following topics: the problem of child abuse and…

  13. BENEFITS OF SHIRODKAR STITCH IN WOMEN WITH FAILED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-06-06

    Jun 6, 2011 ... BENEFITS OF SHIRODKAR STITCH IN WOMEN WITH FAILED McDONALD STITCH. Omondi-Ogutu, MBChB, MMed (O/G) PGDRM, ... advanced cervical changes (dilatation) are present on visual (speculum) and digital .... length at 23 weeks of gestation: the value of. Shirodkar Suture for the short cervix.

  14. Finite element analysis of bone loss around failing implants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolff, J.E.H.; Narra, N.; Antalainen, A.K.; Valasek, J.; Kaiser, J.; Sandor, G.K.; Marcian, P.

    2014-01-01

    Dental implants induce diverse forces on their surrounding bone. However, when excessive unphysiological forces are applied, resorption of the neighbouring bone may occur. The aim of this study was to assess possible causes of bone loss around failing dental implants using finite element analysis. A

  15. Characteristics of failed fertilized oocytes in patients with severe obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E A Pigarova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Реферат по статье: Machtinger R, Combelles CM, Missmer SA, Correia KF, Fox JH, Racowsky C. The association between severe obesity and characteristics of failed fertilized oocytes. Hum Reprod. 2012 Nov;27(11:3198-207.

  16. Failing hospitals: mission statements to drive service improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Annabel; Sarfraz, Aamer

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to consider whether the hospital mission statement can be used as a management tool to improve service provision in failing hospitals. A literature search into the potential value and harm of hospital mission statements was done, followed by a survey of initial attitudes within a failing hospital. Do they indicate likely success of the tool? Mission statement is a potentially valuable leadership tool in the hospital environment. The success of its implementation is broadly dependent on its being developed with the support of stakeholders and its real application to all management decisions and questions of asset allocation. The potential danger lies in the fact that it can be seen as an expensive expression of politically correct platitudes which leads to cynical alienation of stakeholders. This was a small study within a single UK failing hospital, and extending its range will help to clarify whether its findings are typical of attitudes within such institutions. The likely success of the hospital mission statement as a management tool within a failing hospital is significantly limited by initial attitudes and preconceptions. Our research suggests that implementation is likely to be detrimental without preparatory involvement of the local community and hospital staff at all levels. Hospital management cannot be divorced from the local community where patient confidence must be maintained. This paper complements previous research, which has looked at mission statement acceptance among the upper echelons of hospital management.

  17. Inhibition of GABA transporters fails to afford significant protection following focal cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lie, Maria Ek; Gowing, Emma K; Clausen, Rasmus P

    2017-01-01

    Brain ischemia triggers excitotoxicity and cell death, yet no neuroprotective drugs have made it to the clinic. While enhancing GABAergic signaling to counterbalance excitotoxicity has shown promise in animal models, clinical studies have failed. Blockade of GABA transporters (GATs) offers...... show that tiagabine can promote protection, our findings indicate that caution should be had when using GAT1 and GAT3 inhibitors for conditions of brain ischemia....

  18. Conversion of failed modern unicompartmental arthroplasty to total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, W N; Ozuna, R M; Scott, R D; Thornhill, T S

    1996-10-01

    Between January 1983 and January 1991, 29 patients (31 knees) with a failed Robert Brigham metal-backed knee arthroplasty (Johnson & Johnson, Raynham, MA) underwent revision to a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Twenty-five patients had osteoarthritis, three avascular necrosis, and one rheumatoid arthritis. The average patient age was 72.3 years (range, 49-88 years), and the average weight was 179 lb. (range, 112-242 lb.). The interval between the primary and secondary index procedures averaged 62 months (range, 7-106 months), and mean postrevision follow-up period was 45 months (range, 24-104 months). The primary mechanism of failure of the UKA was tibial polyethylene wear in 21 knees and opposite compartment progression of arthritis in 10 knees. Sixteen knees had particulate synovitis with dense metallic staining of the synovium. At revision, the posterior cruciate ligament was spared in 30 knees and substituted in 1 knee. Restoration of bony deficiency at revision required cancellous bone-graft for contained defects in seven knees, tibial wedges in four knees, and femoral wedges in two knees. No defects received structural allografts. The data suggest that failed, modern unicompartmental knee arthroplasty can successfully be converted to TKA. In most cases, the posterior cruciate ligament can be spared and bone defects corrected with simple wedges or cancellous grafts. Moreover, the results of revision of failed unicompartmental knee arthroplasty are superior to those of failed TKA and failed high tibial osteotomy and comparable to the authors' results of primary TKA with similar-length follow-up periods. Although these results are encouraging, longer-term follow-up evaluation is required to determine survivorship of these revision arthroplasties.

  19. Metallothionein as a compensatory component prevents intermittent hypoxia-induced cardiomyopathy in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Xia; Zhou, Shanshan [The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130021 (China); KCHRI at the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, 40202 (United States); Zheng, Yang, E-mail: zhengyang@jlu.edu.cn [The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, 130021 (China); Tan, Yi [KCHRI at the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, 40202 (United States); Chinese–American Research Institute for Diabetic Complications, Wenzhou Medical College School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou, 325035 (China); Kong, Maiying [Department of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Information Sciences, University of Louisville, Louisville, KY 40202 (United States); Wang, Bo [KCHRI at the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, 40202 (United States); Department of Pathology, Inner Mongolia Forestry General Hospital, Yakeshi, 022150 (China); Feng, Wenke [Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, 40202 (United States); Epstein, Paul N. [KCHRI at the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, 40202 (United States); Cai, Jun, E-mail: j0cai002@louisville.edu [KCHRI at the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, 40202 (United States); Cai, Lu [KCHRI at the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, 40202 (United States); Chinese–American Research Institute for Diabetic Complications, Wenzhou Medical College School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou, 325035 (China); Department of Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Louisville, Louisville, 40202 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) causes chronic intermittent hypoxia (IH) to induce cardiovascular disease, which may be related to oxidative damage. Metallothionein (MT) has been extensively proved to be an endogenous and highly inducible antioxidant protein expressed in the heart. Therefore, we tested the hypotheses that oxidative stress plays a critical role in OSA induced cardiac damage and MT protects the heart from OSA-induced cardiomyopathy. To mimic hypoxia/reoxygenation events that occur in adult OSA patients, mice were exposed to IH for 3 days to 8 weeks. The IH paradigm consisted of alternating cycles of 20.9% O{sub 2}/8% O{sub 2} F{sub I}O{sub 2} (30 episodes per hour) with 20 s at the nadir F{sub I}O{sub 2} for 12 h a day during daylight. IH significantly increased the ratio of heart weight to tibia length at 4 weeks with a decrease in cardiac function from 4 to 8 weeks. Cardiac oxidative damage and fibrosis were observed after 4 and 8 weeks of IH exposures. Endogenous MT expression was up-regulated in response to 3-day IH, but significantly decreased at 4 and 8 weeks of IH. In support of MT as a major compensatory component, mice with cardiac overexpression of MT gene and mice with global MT gene deletion were completely resistant, and highly sensitive, respectively, to chronic IH induced cardiac effects. These findings suggest that chronic IH induces cardiomyopathy characterized by oxidative stress-mediated cardiac damage and the antioxidant MT protects the heart from such pathological and functional changes. - Highlights: • The effect of intermittent hypoxia (IH) on cardiac metallothionein (MT) • Cardiac MT expression was up-regulated in response to 3-day IH. • Exposure to 4- or 8-week IH downregulated cardiac MT expression. • Overexpression of cardiac MT protects from IH-induced cardiac damage. • Global deletion of MT gene made the heart more sensitive to IH damage.

  20. Annual Adaptive Management Report for Compensatory Mitigation at Keyport Lagoon: Mitigation of Pier B Development at the Bremerton Naval Facilities - Compensatory Mitigation at Keyport Lagoon - Naval Underwater Warfare Center Division - Keyport, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vavrinec, John; Borde, Amy B.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2012-06-01

    Unites States Navy capital improvement projects are designed to modernize and improve mission capacity. Such capital improvement projects often result in unavoidable environmental impacts by increasing over-water structures, which results in a loss of subtidal habitat within industrial areas of Navy bases. In the Pacific Northwest, compensatory mitigation often targets alleviating impacts to Endangered Species Act-listed salmon species. The complexity of restoring large systems requires limited resources to target successful and more coordinated mitigation efforts to address habitat loss and improvements in water quality that will clearly contribute to an improvement at the site scale and can then be linked to a cumulative net ecosystem improvement.

  1. Compensatory selection for roads over natural linear features by wolves in northern Ontario: Implications for caribou conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Erica J; Patterson, Brent R; Anderson, Morgan L; Rodgers, Arthur R; Vander Vennen, Lucas M; Fryxell, John M

    2017-01-01

    Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) in Ontario are a threatened species that have experienced a substantial retraction of their historic range. Part of their decline has been attributed to increasing densities of anthropogenic linear features such as trails, roads, railways, and hydro lines. These features have been shown to increase the search efficiency and kill rate of wolves. However, it is unclear whether selection for anthropogenic linear features is additive or compensatory to selection for natural (water) linear features which may also be used for travel. We studied the selection of water and anthropogenic linear features by 52 resident wolves (Canis lupus x lycaon) over four years across three study areas in northern Ontario that varied in degrees of forestry activity and human disturbance. We used Euclidean distance-based resource selection functions (mixed-effects logistic regression) at the seasonal range scale with random coefficients for distance to water linear features, primary/secondary roads/railways, and hydro lines, and tertiary roads to estimate the strength of selection for each linear feature and for several habitat types, while accounting for availability of each feature. Next, we investigated the trade-off between selection for anthropogenic and water linear features. Wolves selected both anthropogenic and water linear features; selection for anthropogenic features was stronger than for water during the rendezvous season. Selection for anthropogenic linear features increased with increasing density of these features on the landscape, while selection for natural linear features declined, indicating compensatory selection of anthropogenic linear features. These results have implications for woodland caribou conservation. Prey encounter rates between wolves and caribou seem to be strongly influenced by increasing linear feature densities. This behavioral mechanism-a compensatory functional response to anthropogenic linear feature

  2. Spinal fusion limits upper body range of motion during gait without inducing compensatory mechanisms in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holewijn, R M; Kingma, I; de Kleuver, M; Schimmel, J J P; Keijsers, N L W

    2017-09-01

    Previous studies show a limited alteration of gait at normal walking speed after spinal fusion surgery for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), despite the presumed essential role of spinal mobility during gait. This study analyses how spinal fusion affects gait at more challenging walking speeds. More specifically, we investigated whether thoracic-pelvic rotations are reduced to a larger extent at higher gait speeds and whether compensatory mechanisms above and below the stiffened spine are present. 18 AIS patients underwent gait analysis at increasing walking speeds (0.45 to 2.22m/s) before and after spinal fusion. The range of motion (ROM) of the upper (thorax, thoracic-pelvic and pelvis) and lower body (hip, knee and ankle) was determined in all three planes. Spatiotemporal parameters of interest were stride length and cadence. Spinal fusion diminished transverse plane thoracic-pelvic ROM and this difference was more explicit at higher walking speeds. Transversal pelvis ROM was also decreased but this effect was not affected by speed. Lower body ROM, step length and cadence remained unaffected. Despite the reduction of upper body ROM after spine surgery during high speed gait, no altered spatiotemporal parameters or increased compensatory ROM above or below the fusion (i.e. in the shoulder girdle or lower extremities) was identified. Thus, it remains unclear how patients can cope so well with such major surgery. Future studies should focus on analyzing the kinematics of individual spinal levels above and below the fusion during gait to investigate possible compensatory mechanisms within the spine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Compensatory selection for roads over natural linear features by wolves in northern Ontario: Implications for caribou conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica J Newton

    Full Text Available Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou in Ontario are a threatened species that have experienced a substantial retraction of their historic range. Part of their decline has been attributed to increasing densities of anthropogenic linear features such as trails, roads, railways, and hydro lines. These features have been shown to increase the search efficiency and kill rate of wolves. However, it is unclear whether selection for anthropogenic linear features is additive or compensatory to selection for natural (water linear features which may also be used for travel. We studied the selection of water and anthropogenic linear features by 52 resident wolves (Canis lupus x lycaon over four years across three study areas in northern Ontario that varied in degrees of forestry activity and human disturbance. We used Euclidean distance-based resource selection functions (mixed-effects logistic regression at the seasonal range scale with random coefficients for distance to water linear features, primary/secondary roads/railways, and hydro lines, and tertiary roads to estimate the strength of selection for each linear feature and for several habitat types, while accounting for availability of each feature. Next, we investigated the trade-off between selection for anthropogenic and water linear features. Wolves selected both anthropogenic and water linear features; selection for anthropogenic features was stronger than for water during the rendezvous season. Selection for anthropogenic linear features increased with increasing density of these features on the landscape, while selection for natural linear features declined, indicating compensatory selection of anthropogenic linear features. These results have implications for woodland caribou conservation. Prey encounter rates between wolves and caribou seem to be strongly influenced by increasing linear feature densities. This behavioral mechanism-a compensatory functional response to anthropogenic

  4. Compensatory hyperinsulinemia in high-fat diet-induced obese mice is associated with enhanced insulin translation in islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Ayumi; Asahara, Shun-ichiro; Masuda, Katsuhisa; Matsuda, Tomokazu; Kimura-Koyanagi, Maki; Seino, Susumu; Ogawa, Wataru; Kido, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A high-fat diet (HF) is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia. Animal studies have shown compensatory mechanisms in pancreatic β-cells after high fat load, such as increased pancreatic β-cell mass, enhanced insulin secretion, and exocytosis. However, the effects of high fat intake on insulin synthesis are obscure. Here, we investigated whether insulin synthesis was altered in correlation with an HF diet, for the purpose of obtaining further understanding of the compensatory mechanisms in pancreatic β-cells. Mice fed an HF diet are obese, insulin resistant, hyperinsulinemic, and glucose intolerant. In islets of mice fed an HF diet, more storage of insulin was identified. We analyzed insulin translation in mouse islets, as well as in INS-1 cells, using non-radioisotope chemicals. We found that insulin translational levels were significantly increased in islets of mice fed an HF diet to meet systemic demand, without altering its transcriptional levels. Our data showed that not only increased pancreatic β-cell mass and insulin secretion but also elevated insulin translation is the major compensatory mechanism of pancreatic β-cells. - Highlights: • More stored insulin was recognized in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Insulin translation was not enhanced by fatty acids, but by insulin demand. • Insulin transcription was not altered in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Insulin translation was markedly enhanced in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Non-radioisotope chemicals were used to measure insulin translation in mouse islets

  5. Compensatory hypertrophy of the contralateral inferior turbinate in patients with unilateral nasal septal deviation. A computed tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa Estomba, Carlos; Rivera Schmitz, Teresa; Ossa Echeverri, Carla C; Betances Reinoso, Frank A; Osorio Velasquez, Alejandra; Santidrian Hidalgo, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    The compensatory hypertrophy of the inferior turbinate in patients with septal deviation to one of the nostrils is considered to protect the airways from the excess of air that could enter through the nostril and its potential negative effects such as dryness, alteration of air filtration, mucociliary flow, or lung involvement. A prospective, longitudinal, non-randomized study. Patients were divided in two groups: 10 consecutive patients, with nasal septal deviation and compensatory hypertrophy of the inferior turbinate in the contralateral nasal cavity (10 non-hypertrophied turbinates as control and 10 contralateral hypertrophied turbinates as study cases), and the second group with 5 patients without any nasal pathology (10 turbinates without any obvious pathology). In both groups CT scans of the nasal region were performed. A comparison of patients with nasal septal deviation with compensatory hypertrophy of the inferior turbinate in the contralateral nasal cavity and with non-pathological inferior turbinate was carried out. When analyzing the groups of patients with septal deviation, the contralateral hypertrophied turbinate and the non-hypertrophied turbinate side, we found a significant hypertrophy in the anterior portion of the inferior turbinate, at the level of the medial mucosa (P = 0.002) and bone (P = 0.001) in the group of patients with contralateral hypertrophied turbinate. However, when we compared the contralateral hypertrophic turbinate with the turbinate of patients without septal deviation, we found a significant difference in all volumes of the medial and lateral mucosa and the bone portion (P = 0.001, P = 0.005). Surgical correction of the nasal septum and lateralization or reduction of the volume of the inferior turbinate (which may include the medial mucosa, head or part of the bone) is necessary in order to improve air passage into the nasal valve.

  6. Social and demographic effects of anthropogenic mortality: a test of the compensatory mortality hypothesis in the red wolf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M Sparkman

    Full Text Available Whether anthropogenic mortality is additive or compensatory to natural mortality in animal populations has long been a question of theoretical and practical importance. Theoretically, under density-dependent conditions populations compensate for anthropogenic mortality through decreases in natural mortality and/or increases in productivity, but recent studies of large carnivores suggest that anthropogenic mortality can be fully additive to natural mortality and thereby constrain annual survival and population growth rate. Nevertheless, mechanisms underlying either compensatory or additive effects continue to be poorly understood. Using long-term data on a reintroduced population of the red wolf, we tested for evidence of additive vs. compensatory effects of anthropogenic mortality on annual survival and population growth rates, and the preservation and reproductive success of breeding pairs. We found that anthropogenic mortality had a strong additive effect on annual survival and population growth rate at low population density, though there was evidence for compensation in population growth at high density. When involving the death of a breeder, anthropogenic mortality was also additive to natural rates of breeding pair dissolution, resulting in a net decrease in the annual preservation of existing breeding pairs. However, though the disbanding of a pack following death of a breeder resulted in fewer recruits per litter relative to stable packs, there was no relationship between natural rates of pair dissolution and population growth rate at either high or low density. Thus we propose that short-term additive effects of anthropogenic mortality on population growth in the red wolf population at low density were primarily a result of direct mortality of adults rather than indirect socially-mediated effects resulting in reduced recruitment. Finally, we also demonstrate that per capita recruitment and the proportion of adults that became

  7. Compensatory hyperinsulinemia in high-fat diet-induced obese mice is associated with enhanced insulin translation in islets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanno, Ayumi, E-mail: akanno@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Asahara, Shun-ichiro, E-mail: asahara@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Masuda, Katsuhisa, E-mail: katsuhisa.m.0707@gmail.com [Division of Medical Chemistry, Department of Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan); Matsuda, Tomokazu, E-mail: tomokazu@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Kimura-Koyanagi, Maki, E-mail: koyanagi@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Seino, Susumu, E-mail: seino@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Molecular and Metabolic Medicine, Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0047 (Japan); Ogawa, Wataru, E-mail: ogawa@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Kido, Yoshiaki, E-mail: kido@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe 650-0017 (Japan); Division of Medical Chemistry, Department of Biophysics, Kobe University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kobe 654-0142 (Japan)

    2015-03-13

    A high-fat diet (HF) is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and hyperglycemia. Animal studies have shown compensatory mechanisms in pancreatic β-cells after high fat load, such as increased pancreatic β-cell mass, enhanced insulin secretion, and exocytosis. However, the effects of high fat intake on insulin synthesis are obscure. Here, we investigated whether insulin synthesis was altered in correlation with an HF diet, for the purpose of obtaining further understanding of the compensatory mechanisms in pancreatic β-cells. Mice fed an HF diet are obese, insulin resistant, hyperinsulinemic, and glucose intolerant. In islets of mice fed an HF diet, more storage of insulin was identified. We analyzed insulin translation in mouse islets, as well as in INS-1 cells, using non-radioisotope chemicals. We found that insulin translational levels were significantly increased in islets of mice fed an HF diet to meet systemic demand, without altering its transcriptional levels. Our data showed that not only increased pancreatic β-cell mass and insulin secretion but also elevated insulin translation is the major compensatory mechanism of pancreatic β-cells. - Highlights: • More stored insulin was recognized in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Insulin translation was not enhanced by fatty acids, but by insulin demand. • Insulin transcription was not altered in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Insulin translation was markedly enhanced in islets of mice fed a high-fat diet. • Non-radioisotope chemicals were used to measure insulin translation in mouse islets.

  8. Effect of Various Lengths of Single Phase Starvation on Compensatory Growth in Rainbow Trout under Summer Conditions (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    OpenAIRE

    Sevgili, Hüseyin; Hoşsu, * Belgin; Emre, Yılmaz; Kanyılmaz, Mahir

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of various lengths of starvation periods on following compensatory growth (CG) in rainbow trout under summer conditions (18.1°C and day length of 12.5-14.5 hours). Five treatments with triplicate tanks were as follows: control (C) fed to satiation over 84 days; one (S1), two (S2), three (S3), and four (S4) weeks of starvation; and then refeeding for the remaining eight weeks of the experiment. Starvation periods induced hyperphagia during refe...

  9. A survey of failed post-retained restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peutzfeldt, A; Sahafi, A; Asmussen, E

    2008-01-01

    functioned for 10 years or less. Fracture of the tooth was the most common type of failure reported, followed by loosening of the post and fracture of the post. Tapered posts implied an increased risk of tooth fracture compared to loosening or fracture of the post, and the relative risk of tooth fracture...... increased with the functioning time until failure. Fracture of the post was more common among male than female patients. On the basis of this survey of failed post-retained restorations, it was concluded that tapered posts were associated with a higher risk of tooth fracture than were parallel-sided posts......., the tooth, the restorative materials, and the techniques. Two-hundred and sixty questionnaires were collected from 171 practitioners over a 3-year period. Functioning time until failure varied between 3 months and 38 years. Mean survival time until failure was 11 years. Of the failed restorations, 61% had...

  10. 'HAs fail to consult Irish people in UK'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-10

    Health authorities are failing to consult local people on their health needs, a conference on the mental health of Irish people living in the UK heard last week. Consulting Irish people was often only 'symbolic', despite the requirements of the NHS and Community Care Act, conference Chair Padraic Kenna, Director of Innisfree Housing Association, told delegates. 'The Irish caught the boat in the 1950s only to miss the boat ever since,' he said.

  11. Amount of meniscal resection after failed meniscal repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, Nicolas; Barbier, Olivier; Boisrenoult, Philippe; Beaufils, Philippe

    2011-08-01

    The failure rate after arthroscopic meniscal repair ranges from 5% to 43.5% (mean, 15%) in the literature. But little is known about the amount of meniscal tissue removed after failed meniscal repair. The volume of subsequent meniscectomy after failed meniscal repair is not increased when compared with the volume of meniscectomy that would have been performed if not initially repaired. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. From January 2000 to December 2009, 295 knees underwent arthroscopic meniscal repair for unstable peripheral vertical tears. When present (219 cases), all anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears underwent reconstruction. Patients with multiple ligament injuries and posterior cruciate ligament injuries were excluded from the analysis. Thirty-two medial and 5 lateral menisci underwent subsequent meniscectomy after failed repair at a mean of 26 months postoperatively (range, 3-114 months). Five parameters were specifically evaluated: the amount of meniscectomy related to the initial tear, the ACL status, the appearance of chondral lesions, the time from the initial injury to meniscal repair, and the time from repair to meniscectomy. The posterior segment of the meniscus was involved in all tears and retears. Among failures, resection of the meniscal segments primarily repaired occurred for 17 medial and 2 lateral meniscal tears (52%); the tear extended in 5 cases (all medial menisci), and healing of some repaired segments led to a partial resection of the initial lesion in 35% of cases (10 medial menisci, 3 lateral menisci). The time from injury to meniscal repair was correlated with an increasing volume of meniscus removed (P lesions at revision (P meniscal lesion, even if it fails. The amount of meniscectomy is rarely increased when compared with the initial lesion. This study supports the hypothesis that the meniscus can be partially saved and that a risk of a partial failure should be taken when possible.

  12. Agrobacterium rhizogenes mutants that fail to bind to plant cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, J L; Colby, S; Matthysse, A G

    1990-01-01

    Transposon insertion mutants of Agrobacterium rhizogenes were screened to obtain mutant bacteria that failed to bind to carrot suspension culture cells. A light microscope binding assay was used. The bacterial isolates that were reduced in binding to carrot cells were all avirulent on Bryophyllum diagremontiana leaves and on carrot root disks. The mutants did not appear to be altered in cellulose production. The composition of the medium affected the ability of the parent and mutant bacteria ...

  13. When in vitro fertilization fails: a prospective view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, R B; Walther, V N; Chute, D; Greenfeld, D A

    1992-01-01

    New reproductive technologies such as in vitro fertilization (IVF) offer much hope to infertile couples, yet the odds for success are not high. In this study we examine the experiences of a cohort of women undergoing IVF or a related technology at three points in time: before technological intervention, approximately one month after the first failed cycle, and six months later. We consider the women's expectations and experiences and discuss implications of the findings for social work practice.

  14. Failing States as Epidemiologic Risk Zones: Implications for Global Health Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Katherine

    Failed states commonly experience health and mortality crises that include outbreaks of infectious disease, violent conflict, reductions in life expectancy, and increased infant and maternal mortality. This article draws from recent research in political science, security studies, and international relations to explore how the process of state failure generates health declines and outbreaks of infectious disease. The key innovation of this model is a revised definition of "the state" as a geographically dynamic rather than static political space. This makes it easier to understand how phases of territorial contraction, collapse, and regeneration interrupt public health programs, destabilize the natural environment, reduce human security, and increase risks of epidemic infectious disease and other humanitarian crises. Better understanding of these dynamics will help international health agencies predict and prepare for future health and mortality crises created by failing states.

  15. Management of Failed Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnahas, Ahmad Ibrahim; Jackson, Timothy D; Hong, Dennis

    2014-03-01

    Background: Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) has emerged as the gold standard for the management of morbid obesity. Accordingly, patients who fail to lose weight after LRYGB present a difficult problem for the bariatric surgeons. A literature review was performed to evaluate the management options for this select bariatric population. Methods: A literature search was conducted in the EMBASE and MEDLINE databases using the most comprehensive timeline. All relevant articles were identified and full texts were obtained and reviewed. Results: Thirteen articles were retrieved based on key word searches. Management for weight failure following LRYGB included revision using the following options: laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, pouch/anastomotic revision with or without endoluminal techniques, laparoscopic distal Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, and laparoscopic biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy may be considered in patients who fail LRYGB with nutritional deficiencies. Conclusion: Failed LRYGB should be managed based on the patient presentation and diagnostic evaluation. Patients may present with significant nutritional deficiencies/complications, failure to lose weight, or weight recidivism. A treatment algorithm is proposed based on the literature to guide bariatric surgeons with respect to management options. However, given the paucity of research with respect to this problem, additional studies are needed to provide more insight on the optimal surgical management.

  16. Failed magnetic resonance imaging examinations due to claustrophobia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarji, S.A.; Abdullah, B.J.J.; Kumar, G.; Tan, A.H.; Narayanan, P.

    1998-01-01

    A recognised cause of incomplete or cancelled MRI examinations is anxiety and claustrophobic symptoms in patients undergoing MR scanning. This appears to be a problem in many MRI centres in Western Europe and North America, where it is said to be costly in terms of loss of valuable scan time, and has led to researchers suggesting several anxiety reducing approaches for MRI. To determine the incidence of failed MRI examination among our patients and if there are any associations with a patient's sex, age and education level, we studied claustrophobia that led to premature termination of the MRI examination in the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) in 3324 patients over 28 months. The incidence of failed MRI examinations due to claustrophobia in the UMMC was found to be only 0.54%. There are associations between claustrophobia in MRI with the patients' sex, age and level of education. The majority of those affected were male patients and young patients in the 25-45-year age group. The patients' education level appears to be the strongest association with failed MRI examinations due to claustrophobia, where the majority of the affected were highly educated individuals. Claustrophobia in MRI is more of a problem among the educated individuals or patients from a higher socio-economic group, which may explain the higher incidence in Western European and North American patients. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  17. Hip arthroplasty in failed intertrochanteric fractures in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javahir A Pachore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Failed intertrochanteric fractures in elderly patients are surgical challenge with limited options. Hip arthroplasty is a good salvage procedure even though it involves technical issues such as implant removal, bone loss, poor bone quality, trochanteric nonunion and difficulty of surgical exposure. Materials and Methods: 30 patients of failed intertrochanteric fractures where hip arthroplasty was done between May 2008 and December 2011 were included in study. 13 were males and 17 were females with average age of 67.3 years. There were 2 cemented bipolar arthroplasties, 19 uncemented bipolar, 4 cemented total hip arthroplasty and 5 uncemented total hip arthroplasties. 16 patients had a trochanteric nonunion, which was treated by tension band principles. Total hip was considered where there was acetabular damage due to the penetration of implant. Results: The average followup was 20 months (range 6-48 months. Patients were followed up from 6 to 48 months with average followup of 20 months. None of the patients were lost to followup. There was no dislocation. All patients were ambulatory at the final followup. Conclusion: A predictable functional outcome can be achieved by hip arthroplasty in elderly patients with failed intertrochanteric fractures. Though technically demanding, properly performed hip arthroplasty can be a good salvage option for this patient group.

  18. Reasons why patients fail screening in Indian breast cancer trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Mahajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An increased number of screen failure patients in a clinical trial increases time and cost required for the recruitment. Assessment of reasons for screen failure can help reduce screen failure rates and improve recruitment. Materials and Methods: We collected retrospective data of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2 positive Indian breast cancer patients, who failed screening for phase 3 clinical trials and ascertained their reasons for screen failure from screening logs. Statistical comparison was done to ascertain if there are any differences between private and public sites. Results: Of 727 patients screened at 14 sites, 408 (56.1% failed screening. The data on the specific reasons for screen failures was not available at one of the public sites (38 screen failures out of 83 screened patients. Hence, after excluding that site, further analysis is based on 644 patients, of which 370 failed screening. Of these, 296 (80% screen failure patients did not meet selection criteria. The majority -266 were HER2 negative. Among logistical issues, 39 patients had inadequate breast tissue sample. Sixteen patients withdrew their consent at private sites as compared to six at public sites. The difference between private and public sites for the above three reasons was statistically significant. Conclusion: Use of prescreening logs to reduce the number of patients not meeting selection criteria and protocol logistics, and patient counseling to reduce consent withdrawals could be used to reduce screen failure rate.

  19. Palmitoylethanolamide in the Treatment of Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Paladini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This observational study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of ultramicronized palmitoylethanolamide (um-PEA (Normast® administration, as add-on therapy for chronic pain, in the management of pain-resistant patients affected by failed back surgery syndrome. Methods. A total of 35 patients were treated with tapentadol (TPD and pregabalin (PGB. One month after the start of standard treatment, um-PEA was added for the next two months. Pain was evaluated by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS at the time of enrollment (T0 and after one (T1, two (T2, and three (T3 months. Results. After the first month with TDP + PGB treatment only, VAS score decreased significantly from 5.7±0.12 at the time of enrollment (T0 to 4.3 ± 0.11 (T1 (p<0.0001; however, it failed to provide significant subjective improvement in pain symptoms. Addition of um-PEA led to a further and significant decrease in pain intensity, reaching VAS scores of 2.7 ± 0.09 (T2 and 1.7 ± 0.11 (T3, end of treatment (p<0.0001 without showing any side effects. Conclusions. This observational study provides evidence, albeit preliminary, for the efficacy and safety of um-PEA (Normast as part of a multimodal therapeutic regimen in the treatment of pain-resistant patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome.

  20. Failed magnetic resonance imaging examinations due to claustrophobia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarji, S.A.; Abdullah, B.J.J.; Kumar, G.; Tan, A.H.; Narayanan, P. [University of malaya Centre, Kuala Lumpar (Malaysia). Department of Radiology

    1998-11-01

    A recognised cause of incomplete or cancelled MRI examinations is anxiety and claustrophobic symptoms in patients undergoing MR scanning. This appears to be a problem in many MRI centres in Western Europe and North America, where it is said to be costly in terms of loss of valuable scan time, and has led to researchers suggesting several anxiety reducing approaches for MRI. To determine the incidence of failed MRI examination among our patients and if there are any associations with a patient`s sex, age and education level, we studied claustrophobia that led to premature termination of the MRI examination in the University Malaya Medical Centre (UMMC) in 3324 patients over 28 months. The incidence of failed MRI examinations due to claustrophobia in the UMMC was found to be only 0.54%. There are associations between claustrophobia in MRI with the patients` sex, age and level of education. The majority of those affected were male patients and young patients in the 25-45-year age group. The patients` education level appears to be the strongest association with failed MRI examinations due to claustrophobia, where the majority of the affected were highly educated individuals. Claustrophobia in MRI is more of a problem among the educated individuals or patients from a higher socio-economic group, which may explain the higher incidence in Western European and North American patients. Copyright (1998) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 9 refs.

  1. COMPENSATORY GROWTH AND FAT PARAMETERS ON BROILER FASTED IN EARLY LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sugiharto

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was carried out to investigate the effect of feed withholding in the very early life ofbird on its compensatory growth capacity and fat parameters. A total of 60 mixed-sexes of one day oldRoss chicks were used in the experiment conducted with completely randomized design of 2 differentfeeding times after hatching, i.e.: T1: given access to feed and water ad libitum immediately afterhatching until 35d of age; and T2: withheld from feed (fasted but not from water for 48h after hatchingand then fed ad libitum until d35. The birds were weighed at the start of experiment and weeklythereafter, and DWG was then calculated. Feed intakes and FCR were also recorded weekly. At d36,abdominal fat was taken out from 2 birds per pen and was weighed. Breast meat (skinless from thesame birds was also sampled for total FA analysis. Final BW (d35 and total feed consumption of earlyfastedbirds were 1935.17±43.90 kg and 2745.55±47.48 kg and those of unfasted birds were2019.00±50.85 kg and 2910.84±128.10 kg, respectively. FCR of early-fasted and unfasted birds at d35were 1.42±0.03 and 1.45±0.07. The magnitude difference of DWG between early-fasted and unfastedbirds was 27% at d7, whereas at d35 the difference was only 4.5%. Abdominal fat percentage to live BWof early-fasted birds was 1.65±0.09% (male and 1.60±0.10% (female and that of unfasted birds was2.00±0.19% (male and 1.89±0.38% (female. Total FA contained in meat of early-fasted and unfastedbirds were 0.82±0.10 and 0.85±0.10 g/100gDM. Overall, BW and feed consumption of early-fastedbirds were significantly lower (P<0.05 than unfasted birds. DWG, FCR, abdominal fat and total FAcontained in meat were not significantly different (P>0.05 between early-fasted and unfasted birds. Inconclusion, holding birds without feed following hatch (under practical conditions may limit thecompensatory growth capacity of birds in the later age. Fasting applied in the very early life of broilerleads to

  2. Efficacy of repeated 5-fluorouracil needling for failing and failed filtering surgeries based on simple gonioscopic examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashad MA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mohammad A RashadOphthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Ain Shams University, Cairo, EgyptPurpose: To evaluate the success rate of a modified bleb needling technique in eyes with previous glaucoma surgery that had elevated intraocular pressure.Methods: A retrospective study of 24 eyes of 24 patients that underwent repeated bleb needling performed for failing and failed blebs on slit lamp with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU injections on demand. This was performed after gonioscopic examination to define levels of filtration block.Results: There was significant reduction of mean IOP from 36.91 mmHg to 14.73 mmHg at the final follow-up (P < 0.001. The overall success rate was 92%.Conclusion: Repeated needling with adjunctive 5-FU proved a highly effective, safe alternative to revive filtration surgery rather than another medication or surgery.Keywords: bleb, failure, 5-FU, needling, gonioscopy

  3. "Too big to fail" or "Too non-traditional to fail"?: The determinants of banks' systemic importance

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Kyle; Zhou, Chen

    2013-01-01

    This paper empirically analyzes the determinants of banks' systemic importance. In constructing a measure on the systemic importance of financial institutions we find that size is a leading determinant. This confirms the usual "Too big to fail'' argument. Nevertheless, banks with size above a sufficiently high level have equal systemic importance. In addition to size, we find that the extent to which banks engage in non-traditional banking activities is also positively related to ...

  4. Compensatory plasticity in the action observation network: virtual lesions of STS enhance anticipatory simulation of seen actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenanti, Alessio; Annella, Laura; Candidi, Matteo; Urgesi, Cosimo; Aglioti, Salvatore M

    2013-03-01

    Observation of snapshots depicting ongoing motor acts increases corticospinal motor excitability. Such motor facilitation indexes the anticipatory simulation of observed (implied) actions and likely reflects computations occurring in the parietofrontal nodes of a cortical network subserving action perception (action observation network, AON). However, direct evidence for the active role of AON in simulating the future of seen actions is lacking. Using a perturb-and-measure transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) approach, we show that off-line TMS disruption of regions within (inferior frontal cortex, IFC) and upstream (superior temporal sulcus, STS) the parietofrontal AON transiently abolishes and enhances the motor facilitation to observed implied actions, respectively. Our findings highlight the critical role of IFC in anticipatory motor simulation. More importantly, they show that disruption of STS calls into play compensatory motor simulation activity, fundamental for counteracting the noisy visual processing induced by TMS. Thus, short-term plastic changes in the AON allow motor simulation to deal with any gap or ambiguity of ever-changing perceptual worlds. These findings support the active, compensatory, and predictive role of frontoparietal nodes of the AON in the perception and anticipatory simulation of implied actions.

  5. Failed magmatic eruptions: Late-stage cessation of magma ascent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, S.C.; Newhall, C.; Roman, D.C.

    2011-01-01

    When a volcano becomes restless, a primary question is whether the unrest will lead to an eruption. Here we recognize four possible outcomes of a magmatic intrusion: "deep intrusion", "shallow intrusion", "sluggish/viscous magmatic eruption", and "rapid, often explosive magmatic eruption". We define "failed eruptions" as instances in which magma reaches but does not pass the "shallow intrusion" stage, i. e., when magma gets close to, but does not reach, the surface. Competing factors act to promote or hinder the eventual eruption of a magma intrusion. Fresh intrusion from depth, high magma gas content, rapid ascent rates that leave little time for enroute degassing, opening of pathways, and sudden decompression near the surface all act to promote eruption, whereas decreased magma supply from depth, slow ascent, significant enroute degassing and associated increases in viscosity, and impingement on structural barriers all act to hinder eruption. All of these factors interact in complex ways with variable results, but often cause magma to stall at some depth before reaching the surface. Although certain precursory phenomena, such as rapidly escalating seismic swarms or rates of degassing or deformation, are good indicators that an eruption is likely, such phenomena have also been observed in association with intrusions that have ultimately failed to erupt. A perpetual difficulty with quantifying the probability of eruption is a lack of data, particularly on instances of failed eruptions. This difficulty is being addressed in part through the WOVOdat database. Papers in this volume will be an additional resource for scientists grappling with the issue of whether or not an episode of unrest will lead to a magmatic eruption.

  6. Fail-safe computer-based plant protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, A.B.

    1983-01-01

    A fail-safe mode of operation for computers used in nuclear reactor protection systems was first evolved in the UK for application to a sodium cooled fast reactor. The fail-safe properties of both the hardware and the software were achieved by permanently connecting test signals to some of the multiplexed inputs. This results in an unambiguous data pattern, each time the inputs are sequentially scanned by the multiplexer. The ''test inputs'' simulate transient excursions beyond defined safe limits. The alternating response of the trip algorithms to the ''out-of-limits'' test signals and the normal plant measurements is recognised by hardwired pattern recognition logic external to the computer system. For more general application to plant protection systems, a ''Test Signal Generator'' (TSG) is used to compute and generate test signals derived from prevailing operational conditions. The TSG, from its knowledge of the sensitivity of the trip algorithm to each of the input variables, generates a ''test disturbance'' which is superimposed upon each variable in turn, to simulate a transient excursion beyond the safe limits. The ''tripped'' status yielded by the trip algorithm when using data from a ''disturbed'' input forms part of a pattern determined by the order in which the disturbances are applied to the multiplexer inputs. The data pattern formed by the interleaved test disturbances is again recognised by logic external to the protection system's computers. This fail-safe mode of operation of computer-based protection systems provides a powerful defence against common-mode failure. It also reduces the importance of software verification in the licensing procedure. (author)

  7. Fail-safe neutron shutter used for thermal neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, R.D.; Morris, R.A.

    1976-11-01

    A fail-safe, reliable, easy-to-use neutron shutter was designed, built, and put into operation at the Omega West Reactor, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. The neutron shutter will be used primarily to perform thermal neutron radiography, but is also available for a highly collimated source of thermal neutrons [neutron flux = 3.876 x 10 6 (neutrons)/(cm 2 .s)]. Neutron collimator sizes of either 10.16 by 10.16 cm or 10.16 by 30.48 cm are available

  8. A Perplexed Economist Confronts 'too Big to Fail'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherer, F. M.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines premises and data underlying the assertion that some financial institutions in the U.S. economy were "too big to fail" and hence warranted government bailout. It traces the merger histories enhancing the dominance of six leading firms in the U. S. banking industry and he sharp increases in the concentration of financial institution assets accompanying that merger wave. Financial institution profits are found to have soared in tandem with rising concentration. The paper advances hypotheses why these phenomena might be related and surveys relevant empirical literature on the relationships between market concentration, interest rates received and charged by banks, and economies of scale in banking.

  9. Sipping test on a failed MTR fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac; Zeituni, Carlos Alberto; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e; Perrotta, Jose Augusto; Silva, Jose Eduardo Rosa da

    2002-01-01

    This work describes sipping tests performed on MTR fuel elements of the IEA-R1 research reactor, in order to determinate which one failed in the core during a routine operation of the reactor. radioactive iodine isotopes 131 I and 133 I, employed as failure indicators, were detected in samples corresponding to the fuel element IEA-156. The specific activity of each sample, as well as the average leaking rate, were measured for 137 Cs. The nuclear fuels U 3 O 8 - Al dispersion and U - Al alloy were compared concerning their measured average leaking rates of 137 Cs. (author)

  10. Has Multiculturalism Really Failed? A Canadian Muslim Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljit Nagra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, claims that multiculturalism has created segregated communities, encouraged terrorism, and failed to foster shared national identities in western nations have gained popularity. In this paper, we use young Canadian Muslims’ lived experience of multiculturalism to reflect on this debate. Contrary to popular rhetoric, our interviews of 50 young Muslim adults show that many maintain a dual Canadian-Muslim identity by utilizing the ideology of multiculturalism, even though they are increasingly stigmatized for their religion. These findings lead us to problematize the discourse surrounding the ‘failure’ of multiculturalism and to highlight the contradictions within it.

  11. Establishing Pass/Fail Criteria for Bronchoscopy Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konge, Lars; Clementsen, Paul; Larsen, Klaus Richter

    2012-01-01

    Background: Several tools have been created to assess competence in bronchoscopy. However, educational guidelines still use an arbitrary number of performed procedures to decide when basic competency is acquired. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to define pass/fail scores for two...... method. In the first we compared bronchoscopy performance scores of 14 novices with the scores of 14 experienced consultants to find the score that best discriminated between the two groups. In the second we asked an expert group of 7 experienced bronchoscopists to judge how a borderline trainee would...

  12. [Hospitals failing minimum volumes in 2004: reasons and consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraedts, M; Kühnen, C; Cruppé, W de; Blum, K; Ohmann, C

    2008-02-01

    In 2004 Germany introduced annual minimum volumes nationwide on five surgical procedures: kidney, liver, stem cell transplantation, complex oesophageal, and pancreatic interventions. Hospitals that fail to reach the minimum volumes are no longer allowed to perform the respective procedures unless they raise one of eight legally accepted exceptions. The goal of our study was to investigate how many hospitals fell short of the minimum volumes in 2004, whether and how this was justified, and whether hospitals that failed the requirements experienced any consequences. We analysed data on meeting the minimum volume requirements in 2004 that all German hospitals were obliged to publish as part of their biannual structured quality reports. We performed telephone interviews: a) with all hospitals not achieving the minimum volumes for complex oesophageal, and pancreatic interventions, and b) with the national umbrella organisations of all German sickness funds. In 2004, one quarter of all German acute care hospitals (N=485) performed 23,128 procedures where minimum volumes applied. 197 hospitals (41%) did not meet at least one of the minimum volumes. These hospitals performed N=715 procedures (3.1%) where the minimum volumes were not met. In 43% of these cases the hospitals raised legally accepted exceptions. In 33% of the cases the hospitals argued using reasons that were not legally acknowledged. 69% of those hospitals that failed to achieve the minimum volumes for complex oesophageal and pancreatic interventions did not experience any consequences from the sickness funds. However, one third of those hospitals reported that the sickness funds addressed the issue and partially announced consequences for the future. The sickness funds' umbrella organisations stated that there were only sparse activities related to the minimum volumes and that neither uniform registrations nor uniform proceedings in case of infringements of the standards had been agreed upon. In spite of the

  13. Recognizing and treating delayed or failed lactogenesis II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Nancy M

    2007-01-01

    Delayed or failed achievement of lactogenesis II--the onset of copious milk volume--occurs as a result of various maternal and/or infant factors. Early recognition of these risk factors is critical for clinicians who interact with breastfeeding women so that intervention and achievement of full or partial breastfeeding can be preserved. This article describes the maternal and infant conditions that contribute to the unsuccessful establishment of a full lactation. Treatment modalities that can maximize maternal lactation capacity and infant growth rates are offered.

  14. Looked-but-failed-to-see-errors in traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Mai-Britt; Jørgensen, N O

    2003-01-01

    Danish studies of traffic accidents at priority intersections have shown a particular type of accidents. In these accidents a car driver supposed to give way has collided with a bicycle rider on the priority road. Often the involved car drivers have maintained that they did not see the bicycle...... looking in the direction where the other parties were but have not seen (i.e. perceived the presence of) the other road user. This paper describes two studies approaching this problem.One study is based on 10 self-reported near accidents. It does show that "looked-but-failed-to-see" events do occur...

  15. Analysis of failed ramps during the RHIC FY09 run

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a versatile accelerator that supports operation with polarized protons of up to 250 GeV and ions with up to 100 GeV/nucleon. During any running period, various operating scenarios with different particle species, beam energies or accelerator optics are commissioned. In this report the beam commissioning periods for establishing full energy beams (ramp development periods) from the FY09 run are summarized and, for the purpose of motivating further developments, we analyze the reasons for all failed ramps.

  16. Fail-safe storage rack for irradiated fuel rod assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, D.R.

    1993-03-23

    A fail-safe storage rack is provided for interim storage of spent but radioactive nuclear fuel rod assemblies. The rack consists of a checkerboard array of substantially square, elongate receiving tubes fully enclosed by a double walled container, the outer wall of which is imperforate for liquid containment and the inner wall of which is provided with perforations for admitting moderator liquid flow to the elongate receiving tubes, the liquid serving to take up waste heat from the stored nuclear assemblies and dissipate same to the ambient liquid reservoir. A perforated cover sealing the rack facilitates cooling liquid entry and dissipation.

  17. How energy efficiency fails in the building industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryghaug, Marianne; Sorensen, Knut H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines how energy efficiency fails in the building industry based on many years of research into the integration of energy efficiency in the construction of buildings and sustainable architecture in Norway. It argues that energy-efficient construction has been seriously restrained by three interrelated problems: (1) deficiencies in public policy to stimulate energy efficiency, (2) limited governmental efforts to regulate the building industry, and (3) a conservative building industry. The paper concludes that innovation and implementation of new, energy-efficient technologies in the building industry requires new policies, better regulations and reformed practices in the industry itself

  18. On fail-safe principle and safety for reactor control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Chiyozi; Ito, Taiju

    1974-01-01

    Fail-safe technique is not systematically established yet in the safety technology in reactor operation, though the concept has been incorporated in design. The safey measures taken are multifold, with emphasis placed on the fair margin of design making sacrifice of economy and availability, and the policy of using multiplicity, independency and reliability freely is taken. The following matters are described: distinction between accidents and failures; principles for reactor safety and safety measures against radiation and accidents of cooling system, foolproof and interlock; the relation between safety and plant availability; safety manipulation and scram; reactor safety instrumentation; reliability of measuring instrumentation; and system reliability. (Mori, K.)

  19. John 21:24-25: A case of failed attestation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.F. Tolmie

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available John 21:24-25: A case of� failed attestation In� this article� the� tendency� to� interpret John� 21:24-25 narratologically as a highly sophisticated and effective� technique� is disputed.� Instead it is argued that� the Beloved Disciple� is� identified in� these� verses as� the� real author of the� Gospel� and� that� the� dominating� function� in� John� 21� :24-25� is� the testimonial function� (also� known� as� the function� of attestation.� It� is� also argued� that� the� intended� effect� of this� junction� is� undermined� by� the awkward manner in which� it is� fulfilled.

  20. Electromechanical Dyssynchrony and Resynchronization of the Failing Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Jonathan A.; Kass, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with heart failure and depressed function frequently develop discoordinate contraction due to electrical activation delay. Often termed dyssynchrony, this further depresses systolic function and chamber efficiency, and worsens morbidity and mortality. In the mid-1990s, a pacemaker-based treatment termed cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) was developed to restore mechanical synchrony by electrically activating both right and left sides of the heart. It is a major therapeutic advance for the new millennium.. Acute chamber-effects of CRT include increased cardiac output and mechanical efficiency, and reduced mitral regurgitation, while reduction in chamber volumes ensues more chronically. Patient candidates for CRT have a prolonged QRS duration and discoordinate wall-motion, although other factors may also be important as ∼30% of such selected subjects fail to respond to the treatment. In contrast to existing pharmacological inotropes, CRT both acutely and chronically increases cardiac systolic function and work yet it also reduces long-term mortality. Recent studies reveal unique molecular/cellular changes from CRT that may also contribute to this success. Heart failure with dyssynchrony displays depressed myocyte and myofilament function, calcium handling, beta-adrenergic responsiveness, mitochondrial ATP-synthase activity, cell survival signaling, and other changes. CRT reverses many of these abnormalities often by triggering entirely new pathways. In this review, we discuss chamber, circulatory, and basic myocardial effects of dyssynchrony and CRT in the failing heart, and highlight new research aiming to better target and implement CRT as well as leverage its molecular effects. PMID:23989718

  1. Mass Ejection in Failed Supernovae: Variation with Stellar Progenitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rodrigo; Quataert, Eliot; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Coughlin, Eric R.

    2018-02-01

    We study the ejection of mass during stellar core-collapse when the stalled shock does not revive and a black hole forms. Neutrino emission during the protoneutron star phase causes a decrease in the gravitational mass of the core, resulting in an outward going sound pulse that steepens into a shock as it travels out through the star. We explore the properties of this mass ejection mechanism over a range of stellar progenitors using spherically-symmetric, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations that treat neutrino mass loss parametrically and follow the shock propagation over the entire star. We find that all types of stellar progenitor can eject mass through this mechanism. The ejected mass is a decreasing function of the surface gravity of the star, ranging from several M⊙ for red supergiants to ˜0.1M⊙ for blue supergiants and ˜10-3M⊙ for Wolf-Rayet stars. We find that the final shock energy at the surface is a decreasing function of the core-compactness, and is ≲ 1047 - 1048 erg in all cases. In progenitors with a sufficiently large envelope, high core-compactness, or a combination of both, the sound pulse fails to unbind mass. Successful mass ejection is accompanied by significant fallback accretion that can last from hours to years. We predict the properties of shock breakout and thermal plateau emission produced by the ejection of the outer envelope of blue supergiant and Wolf-Rayet progenitors in otherwise failed supernovae.

  2. We still fail to account for Mendel's observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porteous John W

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present article corrects common textbook accounts of Mendel's experiments by re-establishing what he wrote and how he accounted for his observations. It notes the long-established tests for the validity of any explanations that purport to explain observations obtained by experiment. Application of these tests to Mendel's paper shows that the arguments he used to explain his observations were internally consistent but were, on one crucial issue, implausible. The same tests are applied to the currently accepted explanation for Mendel's observations. Conclusions The currently favoured explanation for Mendel's observations is untenable. It misrepresents Mendel, fails to distinguish between the parameters and the variables of any system of interacting components, its arguments are inconsistent, it repeats the implausibility in Mendel's paper, fails to give a rational explanation for his observed 3:1 trait ratio and cannot explain why this ratio is not always observed in experimental practice. A rational explanation for Mendel's observations is initiated. Readers are challenged to complete the process before a further article appears.

  3. Mechanical and Spectroscopic Analysis of Retrieved/Failed Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Daood

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine surface alterations and bone formation on the surface of failed dental implants (Straumann [ST] and TiUnite [TiUn] removed due to any biological reason. In addition, failure analysis was performed to test mechanical properties. Dental implants (n = 38 from two manufacturers were collected and subjected to chemical cleaning. The presence of newly formed hydroxyapatite bone around failed implants was evaluated using micro-Raman spectroscopy. Scanning electron microscopy was used to identify surface defects. Mechanical testing was performed using a Minneapolis servo-hydraulic system (MTS along with indentation using a universal testing machine and average values were recorded. A statistical analysis of mechanical properties was done using an unpaired t test, and correlation between observed defects was evaluated using Chi-square (p = 0.05. Apatite-formation was evident in both implants, but was found qualitatively more in the ST group. No significant difference was found in indentation between the two groups (p > 0.05. The percentage of “no defects” was significantly lower in the ST group (71%. Crack-like and full-crack defects were observed in 49% and 39% of TiUn. The ST group showed 11,061 cycles to failure as compared with 10,021 cycles in the TiUnite group. Implant failure mechanisms are complex with a combination of mechanical and biological reasons and these factors are variable with different implant systems.

  4. Outbreak of Drepanopeziza fungus in aspen forests and variation in stand susceptibility: leaf functional traits, compensatory growth and phenology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Anson C; St Clair, Samuel B

    2017-09-01

    In the spring of 2015, a severe outbreak of the necrotrophic pathogen Drepanopeziza (also known as Marssonina) spread across large portions of aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) forests in the western United States. Among adjacent stands, some were diseased and others were not. Drepanopeziza infection in diseased aspen stands stimulated compensatory growth of second-flush leaves at the top of the canopy. These patterns of infection provided an opportunity to characterize associations of pathogen infection and leaf functional traits. Eight pairs of adjacent healthy and diseased aspen stands were identified across a forest landscape in northern Utah. Average leaf surface area, specific leaf area (SLA), photosynthesis, starch concentration and defense chemistry expression (phenolic glycosides and condensed tannins) were measured on original, first-flush leaves in the lower portion of the tree canopy of healthy and diseased stands and compensatory, second-flush leaves produced in the canopy top of diseased stands. Only first-flush leaves of diseased stands showed high levels of Drepanopeziza infection. Leaf area of second-flush leaves of diseased stands was threefold larger than all other leaf types in healthy or diseased stands. Lower canopy leaves of healthy stands had the highest SLA. Photosynthesis was lowest in infected first-flush leaves, highest in second-flush leaves of diseased stands and intermediate in leaves of healthy stands. Foliar starch concentrations were lower in leaves of diseased stands than leaves from healthy stands. Condensed tannins were greater in second-flush leaves than first-flush leaves in both healthy and diseased stands. Phenolic glycoside concentrations were lowest in infected leaves of diseased stands. Diseased stands leafed out a week earlier in the spring than healthy stands, which may have exposed their emerging leaves to rainy conditions that promote Drepanopeziza infection. Compensatory leaf regrowth of diseased stands appears to

  5. Compensatory insulin receptor (IR) activation on inhibition of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R): rationale for cotargeting IGF-1R and IR in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Elizabeth; Gokhale, Prafulla C; Koujak, Susan; Brown, Eric; Eyzaguirre, Alexandra; Tao, Nianjun; Rosenfeld-Franklin, Maryland; Lerner, Lorena; Chiu, M Isabel; Wild, Robert; Epstein, David; Pachter, Jonathan A; Miglarese, Mark R

    2010-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) and critical activator of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-AKT pathway. IGF-1R is required for oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis. These observations have spurred anticancer drug discovery and development efforts for both biological and small-molecule IGF-1R inhibitors. The ability for one RTK to compensate for another to maintain tumor cell viability is emerging as a common resistance mechanism to antitumor agents targeting individual RTKs. As IGF-1R is structurally and functionally related to the insulin receptor (IR), we asked whether IR is tumorigenic and whether IR-AKT signaling contributes to resistance to IGF-1R inhibition. Both IGF-1R and IR(A) are tumorigenic in a mouse mammary tumor model. In human tumor cells coexpressing IGF-1R and IR, bidirectional cross talk was observed following either knockdown of IR expression or treatment with a selective anti-IGF-1R antibody, MAB391. MAB391 treatment resulted in a compensatory increase in phospho-IR, which was associated with resistance to inhibition of IRS1 and AKT. In contrast, treatment with OSI-906, a small-molecule dual inhibitor of IGF-1R/IR, resulted in enhanced reduction in phospho-IRS1/phospho-AKT relative to MAB391. Insulin or IGF-2 activated the IR-AKT pathway and decreased sensitivity to MAB391 but not to OSI-906. In tumor cells with an autocrine IGF-2 loop, both OSI-906 and an anti-IGF-2 antibody reduced phospho-IR/phospho-AKT, whereas MAB391 was ineffective. Finally, OSI-906 showed superior efficacy compared with MAB391 in human tumor xenograft models in which both IGF-1R and IR were phosphorylated. Collectively, these data indicate that cotargeting IGF-1R and IR may provide superior antitumor efficacy compared with targeting IGF-1R alone.

  6. An Assessment of Long-Term Compliance with Performance Standards in Compensatory Mitigation Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bosch, Kyle; Matthews, Jeffrey W

    2017-04-01

    Under the US Clean Water Act, wetland restoration is used to compensate for adverse impacts to wetlands. Following construction, compensation wetlands are monitored for approximately 5 years to determine if they comply with project-specific performance standards. Once a compensation site complies with performance standards, it is assumed that the site will continue to meet standards indefinitely. However, there have been few assessments of long-term compliance. We surveyed, in 2012, 30 compensation sites 8-20 years after restoration to determine whether projects continued to meet performance standards. Additionally, we compared floristic quality of compensation sites to the quality of adjacent natural wetlands to determine whether wetland condition in compensation sites could be predicted based on the condition of nearby wetlands. Compensation sites met, on average, 65% of standards during the final year of monitoring and 53% of standards in 2012, a significant decrease in compliance. Although forested wetlands often failed to meet standards for planted tree survival, the temporal decrease in compliance was driven by increasing dominance by invasive plants in emergent wetlands. The presumption of continued compliance with performance standards after a 5-year monitoring period was not supported. Wetlands restored near better quality natural wetlands achieved and maintained greater floristic quality, suggesting that landscape context was an important determinant of long-term restoration outcomes. Based on our findings, we recommend that compensation wetlands should be monitored for longer time periods, and we suggest that nearby or adjacent natural wetlands provide good examples of reasonably achievable restoration outcomes in a particular landscape.

  7. Unilateral sequential endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy for palmar hyperhidrosis: a proposed technique to overcome compensatory hyperhidrosis and improve plantar hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, Tamer; Soliman, Mosaad

    2015-05-01

    Although endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy (ETS) offers permanent cure of palmar hyperhidrosis (PH), compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH) often complicates the procedure. We analyzed the outcomes of a 2-month interval for unilateral sequential ETS (S-ETS) in comparison with simultaneous bilateral ETS (B-ETS), notably regarding CH and associated plantar hyperhidrosis, in treating patients with PH. Four hundred seven patients with intractable PH were randomly assigned into two groups: the B-ETS group (204 patients) and the S-ETS group (203 patients). Three hundred sixty-four patients completed the study. Complication rates were comparable for both groups. No patient died perioperatively, and no conversion was necessary. Treatment success on follow-up was 97.2% for S-ETS and 96.7% for B-ETS. The incidence of CH was decreased substantially from 131 (71.1%) patients in the B-ETS group to 22 (12.2%) patients in the S-ETS group (Phyperhidrosis.

  8. Glycopyrrolate-induced craniofacial compensatory hyperhidrosis successfully treated with oxybutynin: report of a novel adverse effect and subsequent successful treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prouty, Megan E; Fischer, Ryan; Liu, Deede

    2016-10-15

    Hyperhidrosis, or abnormally increased sweating, is a condition that may have a primary or secondary cause. Usually medication- induced secondary hyperhidrosis manifests with generalized, rather than focal sweating. We report a 32-year-old woman with a history of palmoplantar hyperhidrosis for 15 years who presented for treatment and was prescribed oral glycopyrrolate. One month later, the palmoplantar hyperhidrosis had resolved, but she developed new persistent craniofacial sweating. After an unsuccessful trial of clonidine, oxybutynin resolved the craniofacial hyperhidrosis. To our knowledge, this is the first case of compensatory hyperhidrosis secondary to glycopyrrolate reported in the literature. The case highlights the importance of reviewing medication changes that correlate with new onset or changing hyperhidrosis. It also demonstrates a rare drug adverse effect with successful treatment.

  9. Computer versus Compensatory Calendar Training in Individuals with Mild Cognitive Impairment: Functional Impact in a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Melanie J; Locke, Dona E C; Duncan, Noah L; Hanna, Sherrie M; Cuc, Andrea V; Fields, Julie A; Hoffman Snyder, Charlene R; Lunde, Angela M; Smith, Glenn E

    2017-09-06

    This pilot study examined the functional impact of computerized versus compensatory calendar training in cognitive rehabilitation participants with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Fifty-seven participants with amnestic MCI completed randomly assigned calendar or computer training. A standard care control group was used for comparison. Measures of adherence, memory-based activities of daily living (mADLs), and self-efficacy were completed. The calendar training group demonstrated significant improvement in mADLs compared to controls, while the computer training group did not. Calendar training may be more effective in improving mADLs than computerized intervention. However, this study highlights how behavioral trials with fewer than 30-50 participants per arm are likely underpowered, resulting in seemingly null findings.

  10. Femoral head retroposition as a potential compensatory mechanism in patients with a severe mismatch between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Zhang, Kai; Sun, Xiaojiang; Zhao, Changqing; Li, Hua; Zhao, Jie

    2017-12-01

    Severe mismatch between pelvic incidence (PI) and lumbar lordosis (LL) leads to extra anterior displacement of the gravity line. The objective of this study is to investigate whether femoral head retroposition is a separate compensatory mechanism responsible for the extra anterior displacement. Based on the values of PI and LL, 94 patients were divided into the PI-LL match group (PI-LL ≤ 0°), the mild PI-LL mismatch group (20°> PI-LL >0°), and the severe PI-LL mismatch group (PI-LL ≥ 20°). A series of parameters including PI, LL, PI-LL, thoracic kyphosis (TK), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), knee flexion angle (KFA), tibial obliquity angle (TOA), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), S1 overhang, femoral head shift (FHS), and pelvic shift (PS) were measured and compared among the three groups. The severe PI-LL mismatch group exhibited significantly greater PI, PI-LL, PT, KFA, SVA, PS, and FHS, and less LL and TK, compared with the control and mild PI-LL mismatch group. The mild PI-LL mismatch group had significantly greater PI-LL, PT, KFA, TOA, and S1 overhang, and less LL and SS than the control group. SS, TOA, and S1 overhang in the severe PI-LL mismatch group differed significantly from that in the control group, but did not differ significantly from that in the mild PI-LL mismatch group. Femoral head retroposition is an entirely separate compensatory mechanism and, in this study, participated in the compensation for the anterior displacement of the gravity line induced by extra-sagittal spinal malalignment in patients with severe PI-LL mismatch.

  11. Satisfaction and compensatory hyperhidrosis rates 5 years and longer after video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathotomy for hyperhidrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Ayesha S; Cerfolio, Robert James

    2014-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the long-term fate and factors of compensatory hyperhidrosis (CH) in patients who have undergone video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathotomy for focal hyperhidrosis. The same quality-of-life survey was administered 6 months postoperatively and then annually to all patients who underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathotomy for hyperhidrosis. A second rib (R2)/R3 sympathotomy was most commonly performed until September 2007 and then R4/R5 sympathotomy was used. From January 1999 until December 2012, 193 patients underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic sympathotomy for hyperhidrosis, of whom, 173 had provided ≥1 year of postoperative survey information. No operative mortalities occurred. Of the 173 patients, 133 (77%) reported "clinically bothersome" CH. This rate had decreased to an average of 35% at 5 and 12 years postoperatively. Univariate analysis showed the CH incidence was significantly greater for the patients who had undergone R2/R3 versus R4/R5 sympathotomy (P hyperhidrosis preoperatively (P = .022), or were female (P = .002). On multivariate analysis, only R2/R3 versus R4/R5 sympathotomy (P hyperhidrosis will commonly report "clinically bothersome" compensatory hyperhidrosis. CH will more likely if R2/R3 sympathetic interruption has been performed instead of R4/R5 and in patients who present with multiple areas of sweating. The severity of clinically bothersome CH decreased during the first 3 years postoperatively. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Compensatory role of Neuroglobin in nervous and non-nervous cancer cells in response to the nutrient deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fiocchetti

    Full Text Available Environmental factors or adverse growth conditions that may reduce cell function or viability are considered stress. The cell ability to sense and respond to environmental stresses determine its function and survival destiny. We recently defined Neuroglobin (NGB, a heme-protein, as a compensatory protein in the 17β-Estradiol (E2 anti-apoptotic activity and as a sensor of oxidative stress in both neurons and breast cancer cells. Here, the possibility that NGB levels could represent a pivotal regulator of integrated response of cancer cells to stress has been evaluated. Data obtained in neuroblastoma and in breast cancer cell lines evidence that nutrient deprivation significantly up-regulated NGB levels at different time points. However, the analysis of autophagy activation led to exclude any possible role of stress- or E2-induced NGB in the upstream regulation of general autophagy. However, the over-expression of Flag-NGB in ERα stable transfected HEK-293 cells completely affects nutrient deprivation-induced decrease in cell number. In addition, reported results indicate that modulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 level may play a key role in the protective NGB function against energetic stress. Overall, these data define a role of NGB as compensatory protein in the cell machinery activated in response to stress and as general stress adaptation marker of cancer cells susceptible to oxidative stress, oxygen and, as demonstrated here for the first time, even to nutrient willingness. Despite the lacking of any direct NGB role on autophagic flux activated by energetic stress, NGB upregulation appears functional in delaying stress-related cell death allowing an appropriate cell response and adaptation to the changing extracellular conditions.

  13. Neurophysiological Evidence of Compensatory Brain Mechanisms Underlying Attentional-Related Processes in Symptomatically Remitted Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yansong Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A recent electrophysiological study suggests existing compensatory brain activity as a mechanism for functional recovery of visual attention detection (the capacity for detecting external cues in symptomatically remitted schizophrenia patients. Despite such evidence, little is known about other aspects of attentional-related processes in schizophrenia during clinical remission, such as their capacity to concentrate on the task at hands without being interfered by distracting information. To this end, we recorded event-related brain potentials (ERPs from 20 symptomatically remitted schizophrenia patients and 20 healthy controls while they engaged in a classic Stroop task. Symptomatically remitted patients showed comparable Stroop interference to healthy controls, indicating a degree of functional recovery of such a capacity in these patients. On the neural level, the N450 over the fronto-central and central regions, a component of the ERPs related to conflict detection, was found across both groups, although patients presented a reduced N450 relative to healthy controls. By contrast, the amplitude of the sustained potential (SP (600–800 ms over the parieto-central and parietal regions, a component of the ERPs related to conflict resolution, was significantly increased in patients relative to healthy controls. Furthermore, such increased SP amplitude correlated positively with improved behavioral accuracy in symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia. These findings reveal that symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia increasingly recruited the parietal activity involving successful conflict resolution to offset reduced conflict detection. Therefore, this provides further insight into compensatory mechanisms potentially involving a degree of functional recovery of attentional-related processes in schizophrenia during clinical remission.

  14. FAILED PRIMARY TREATMENT OF CALCANEAL FRACTURE. WHAT TO DO?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Andoljšek

    2008-02-01

    When conservative treatment fails, operative treatment is indicated in most patients withbone and joint problems. The goals of surgical treatment are pain relief and restoration oftalocalcaneal alignment. In lateral impingement, when subtalar joint and general alignmentof the tuber are preserved, removal of the bulged lateral wall could suffice. In suchcases a corrective osteotomy of the tuber is rarely indicated. In painfull subtalar arthrosisfusion is the only option. Limited fusion is preferable. »In situ« subtalar fusion is advisablein cases without malalignment or deformity. When we have arthrosis and varus/valgusdeformity with preserved height, arthrodesis with corrective osteotomy is indicated. In mostcases, where complex deformity is present, corrective subtalar distraction bone-blockarthrodesis should be done

  15. A Novel Endoscopic Technique for Failed Nasogastric Tube Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, Andrew G

    2015-10-01

    Direct visualization of the nasopharynx gives the otolaryngologist a unique advantage for addressing difficult nasopharyngeal anatomy. One common situation is being consulted to assist when the blind placement of a nasogastric tube has failed. A novel technique for managing a patient with a nasogastric tube embedded in the adenoid remnant is described with illustrations. The atraumatic method is easily employed by a resident armed with a portable nasolaryngoscope and plain suture. By using a repeated pull-through technique, the nasogastric tube can be guided past difficult nasopharyngeal anatomy and into a position from where it can be advanced into the patient's esophagus. © American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  16. Trending a New Normal: Is Nigeria becoming a failed Nation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Olusegun Stober

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Judging from every economic parameter, Nigeria will suggest being a failed nation. Not so long ago international investors identified Nigeria as one of the world’s most promising investment opportunities, but things have changed drastically in the meantime. The slump in the price of crude oil has hit Nigerian economy hard, the twin curses of insecurity and corruption have not gone away either. The Nigerian currency - naira has also lost its value by 170% from its value in 2015. The question most analysts and citizens are now asking is if Nigeria will ever fulfil its potential. This study empirically analyses the current economic situation of Nigeria, and gives recommendations on what government should do in getting the country out of recession.

  17. Failed rapid sequence induction in an achondroplastic dwarf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasleen Kaur

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Achondroplasia, a common cause of short limbed type of dwarfism is due to quantitative decrease in rate of endochondral ossification. This abnormal bone growth leads to disproportionate body and head structure, thus placing them under high risk for anaesthetic management. There is paucity in literatures, regarding appropriate drug dosage selection in these patients. Use of drugs as per standard dosage recommendations based on body weight or body surface area, may not be adequate in these patients owing to discrepancies in overall body weight and lean body weight, especially during rapid sequence induction. Here, we report a case of failed rapid sequence induction due to abnormal response to administered drugs in an adult achondroplastic dwarf. Standard doses of thiopentone and rocuronium had to be repeated thrice to achieve adequate conditions for intubation.

  18. The ambivert: A failed attempt at a normal personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Ian J

    2017-09-01

    Recently, attention has been drawn toward an overlooked and nearly forgotten personality type: the ambivert. This paper presents a genealogy of the ambivert, locating the various contexts it traversed in order to highlight the ways in which these places and times have interacted and changed-ultimately elucidating our current situation. Proposed by Edmund S. Conklin in 1923, the ambivert only was meant for normal persons in between the introvert and extravert extremes. Although the ambivert could have been taken up by early personality psychologists who were transitioning from the study of the abnormal to the normal, it largely failed to gain traction. Whether among psychoanalysts, psychiatrists, or applied and personality psychologists, the ambivert was personality non grata. It was only within the context of Eysenck's integrative view of types and traits that the ambivert marginally persisted up to the present day and is now the focus of sales management and popular psychology. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Looked-but-failed-to-see-errors in traffic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herslund, Mai-Britt; Jørgensen, N O

    2003-01-01

    Danish studies of traffic accidents at priority intersections have shown a particular type of accidents. In these accidents a car driver supposed to give way has collided with a bicycle rider on the priority road. Often the involved car drivers have maintained that they did not see the bicycle...... until immediately before the collision even though the bicycle must have been clearly visible.Similar types of accidents have been the subject of studies elsewhere. In literature they are labelled "looked-but-failed-to-see", because it seems clear that in many cases the car drivers have actually been......, especially for well experienced drivers. The other study based on Gap Acceptance shows that the car driver acceptance of gaps towards cyclists depends on whether or not another car is present. Hypotheses for driver perception and for accident countermeasures are discussed....

  20. Failed manual removal of the placenta after vaginal delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjurström, Johanna; Collins, Sally; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2018-01-01

    and the UK provide examples of various treatment strategies such as ultrasound-guided vaginal removal, removal of the placenta through a hysterotomy and just leaving the placenta in situ. The placentas were all retained, but it was only possible to diagnose abnormal invasion in the one case, which had......PURPOSE: A retained placenta after vaginal delivery where manual removal of placenta fails is a clinical challenge. We present six cases that illustrate the heterogeneity of the condition and discuss the etiology and terminology as well as the clinical management. METHODS: Members of the European...... a histopathological diagnosis of increta. Based on these cases we present a flow chart to aid clinical management for future cases. CONCLUSION: We need properly defined stringent terminology for the different types of retained placenta, as well as improved tools to predict and diagnose both abnormally invasive...

  1. Mutuality: clinical and metapsychological potentials of a failed experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Mendoza, Carlos Alberto

    2012-03-01

    Ferenczi's experiments with mutual analysis are often dismissed, without acknowledging the results obtained from them and his own cautionary remarks about their limits. Though ultimately failed, Ferenczi's experiments with mutual analysis were a source of clinical and metapsychological knowledge, despite the fact that he was unable to elaborate them in his lifetime. In this paper I connect mutuality to the development of the psyche, especially to the constitutive core of the intrapsychic. To understand the latter, it is necessary to take into account, among others, issues such as the common attribute, the mutual flux between the unconsciouses, the dialogue of unconsciouses, the maternal profundity, the primal relationship with the mother, and, above all, the primal unity between mother and child, which are fundamental for the emergence and development of the primary psychic forces. Incidences of rupture, distortion of the core of mutuality in the psychic life, its loss and disadjustment, by means of external traumatizing forces, and some clinical implications are described.

  2. Why did ISO 9001:2008 system fail to deliver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, Melvyn

    2014-02-01

    This article is based on an actual investigation undertaken, and summarises the subsequent report's findings and observations. It has been anonymised for obvious reasons. In May 2013 an analysis was undertaken by a multidisciplinary team that compared an NHS Trust estates department's managerial systems against the NHS national recommendations. The conclusions stated that: 'There was a systemic failure across a large number of topics generating intolerable/substantial risks to the organisation, its staff, and patients; this despite the department's managerial systems being accredited to the International Standard ISO 9001:2008'. The natural question raised when presented with this demonstrable and auditable evidence was: 'Why did the ISO 9001:2008 system fail?'

  3. Outcome After Salvage Arthrodesis for Failed Total Ankle Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrad, Ilka; Henricson, Anders; Magnusson, Håkan; Carlsson, Åke; Rosengren, Björn E

    2016-03-01

    In cases with total ankle replacement (TAR) failure, a decision between revision TAR and salvage arthrodesis (SA) must be made. In a previous study, we analyzed revision TAR and found low functional outcome and satisfaction. The aims of the current study were to analyze SA concerning failure rate and patient-related outcome measures (PROMs). Until September 2014, a total of 1110 primary TARs were recorded in the Swedish Ankle Registry. Of the 188 failures, 118 were revised with SA (and 70 with revision TAR). Patient- and implant-specific data for SA cases were analyzed as well as arthrodesis techniques. Failure of SA was defined as repeat arthrodesis or amputation. Generic and region-specific PROMs of 68 patients alive with a solid unilateral SA performed more than 1 year before were analyzed. The first-attempt solid arthrodesis rate of SA was 90%. Overall, 25 of 53 (47%) patients were very satisfied or satisfied. Mean Self-reported Foot and Ankle Score (SEFAS) was 22 (95% confidence interval 20-24), Euro Qol-5 Dimensions 0.57 (0.49-0.65), Euro Qol-Visual Analogue Scale 59 (53-64), Short Form-36 physical 34 (31-37) and mental 50 (46-54). The scores and satisfaction were similar to those after revision TAR but the reoperation rate was significantly lower in SA (P < .05). Salvage arthrodesis after failed TAR had a solid arthrodesis rate of 90% at first attempt, but similar to revision TAR, less than 50% of the patients were satisfied and the functional scores were low. Until studies show true benefit of revision TAR over SA, we favor SA for failed TAR. Level IV, retrospective case series. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Alternative Splicing of NOX4 in the Failing Human Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán V. Varga

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress is a major contributor to the development and progression of heart failure, however, our knowledge on the role of the distinct NADPH oxidase (NOX isoenzymes, especially on NOX4 is controversial. Therefore, we aimed to characterize NOX4 expression in human samples from healthy and failing hearts. Explanted human heart samples (left and right ventricular, and septal regions were obtained from patients suffering from heart failure of ischemic or dilated origin. Control samples were obtained from donor hearts that were not used for transplantation. Deep RNA sequencing of the cardiac transcriptome indicated extensive alternative splicing of the NOX4 gene in heart failure as compared to samples from healthy donor hearts. Long distance PCR analysis with a universal 5′-3′ end primer pair, allowing amplification of different splice variants, confirmed the presence of the splice variants. To assess translation of the alternatively spliced transcripts we determined protein expression of NOX4 by using a specific antibody recognizing a conserved region in all variants. Western blot analysis showed up-regulation of the full-length NOX4 in ischemic cardiomyopathy samples and confirmed presence of shorter isoforms both in control and failing samples with disease-associated expression pattern. We describe here for the first time that NOX4 undergoes extensive alternative splicing in human hearts which gives rise to the expression of different enzyme isoforms. The full length NOX4 is significantly upregulated in ischemic cardiomyopathy suggesting a role for NOX4 in ROS production during heart failure.

  5. Evaluation and Management of Failed Shoulder Instability Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartucho, António; Moura, Nuno; Sarmento, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background: Failed shoulder instability surgery is mostly considered to be the recurrence of shoulder dislocation but subluxation, painful or non-reliable shoulder are also reasons for patient dissatisfaction and should be considered in the notion. Methods: The authors performed a revision of the literature and online contents on evaluation and management of failed shoulder instability surgery. Results: When we look at the reasons for failure of shoulder instability surgery we point the finger at poor patient selection, technical error and an additional traumatic event. More than 80% of surgical failures, for shoulder instability, are associated with bone loss. Quantification of glenoid bone loss and investigation of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion are determining facts. Adequate imaging studies are determinant to assess labrum and capsular lesions and to rule out associated pathology as rotator cuff tears. CT-scan is the method of choice to diagnose and quantify bone loss. Arthroscopic soft tissue procedures are indicated in patients with minimal bone loss and no contact sports. Open soft tissue procedures should be performed in patients with small bone defects, with hiperlaxity and practicing contact sports. Soft tissue techniques, as postero-inferior capsular plication and remplissage, may be used in patients with less than 25% of glenoid bone loss and Hill-Sachs lesions. Bone block procedures should be used for glenoid larger bone defects in the presence of an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion or in the presence of poor soft tissue quality. A tricortical iliac crest graft may be used as a primary procedure or as a salvage procedure after failure of a Bristow or a Latarjet procedure. Less frequently, the surgeon has to address the Hill-Sachs lesion. When a 30% loss of humeral head circumference is present a filling graft should be used. Conclusion: Reasons for failure are multifactorial. In order to address this entity, surgeons must correctly identify the causes and

  6. Remembering past exchanges: Apes fail to use social cues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Lewis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Nonhuman primates can remember events from their distant past. Furthermore, they can distinguish between very similar events by the process of binding. So far, research into long-term memory and binding has focused on the binding of contextual information, such as spatial surroundings. As such, we aimed to investigate if apes can bind and retrieve other types of information, specifically, social information. We presented great apes with three different object types; they learnt to exchange (via reinforcement one of the object types with one experimenter and another type with a second, different, experimenter. The remaining object type was not reinforced by either of the experimenters. After a delay of two or ten weeks, we assessed the apes’ memory of which object type was exchanged with which experimenter. Additionally, we introduced a new experimenter to see if the apes could infer by exclusion that the remaining object type should be exchanged with the new experimenter. The apes successfully remembered which object types were exchanged, but failed to distinguish which object type was exchanged with whom. This failure to bind an object type to a specific person may have resulted from the apes learning to use a rule based on recency, as opposed to learning a conditional rule involving social information. However, results from a second experiment suggested they fail to incorporate social information even when no other information could guide successful performance. Our findings are consistent with research showing long-term memory in primates, but suggest that social information may not be bound in memory as readily as spatial or contextual information.

  7. Failed fertilization with conventional oocyte insemination can be overcome with the ability of ICSI according to binding or failing to bind to the zona pellucida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Check, J H; Bollendorf, A; Wilson, C

    2016-01-01

    To determine the frequency of failed fertilization with conventional oocyte insemination and to determine the ability of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) to overcome the failed fertilization according to binding or failing to bind to the zona pellucida. Retrospective review of 12,448 in vitro fertilization (IVF) cycle to identify cycles where failed fertilization occurred following conventional oocyte insemination with seemingly normal sperm. A number of three oocytes retrieved was required. There were only 12 cases of failed fertilization (0.1%). Six were related to failure of any or few sperm attaching to the zona pellucida These six had high fertilization rates with ICSI. Six had normal attachment and five attempted another cycle, this time with ICSI. Only 60% had good fertilization. When there is failed fertilization with normal sperm oocyte binding following conventional oocyte insemination, ICSI may still be effective in 60% of the cases, but it would be probably recommended to combine ICSI with artificial oocyte activation by calcium ionophore.

  8. Unraveling the interaction between pathological upper limb synergies and compensatory trunk movements during reach-to-grasp after stroke: a cross-sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kordelaar, J.; van Wegen, E.E.H.; Kwakkel, G.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify how pathological limb synergies between shoulder and elbow movements interact with compensatory trunk movements during a functional movement with the paretic upper limb after stroke. 3D kinematic joint and trunk angles were measured during a

  9. Compensatory Beliefs about Glucose Testing are Associated with Low Adherence to Treatment and Poor Metabolic Control in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiau, Marjorie A.; Knauper, Barbel; Nguyen, Thien-Kim; Sufrategui, Maria; Polychronakos, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate whether compensatory beliefs (CBs) regarding glucose testing predict blood glucose levels and adherence to treatment in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. CBs are convictions that the negative effects of one behavior (e.g. not testing one's glucose level) can be compensated for by engaging in another…

  10. Comparison of only T3 and T3–T4 sympathectomy for axillary hyperhidrosis regarding treatment effect and compensatory sweating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuncu, Gökhan; Turk, Figen; Ozturk, Gökhan; Atinkaya, Cansel

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Patients diagnosed with axillary hyperhidrosis can face psychosocial issues that can ultimately hinder their quality of life both privately and socially. The routine treatment for axillary hyperhidrosis is T3–T4 sympathectomy, but compensatory sweating is a serious side effect that is commonly seen with this approach. This study was designed to evaluate whether a T3 sympathectomy was effective for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis and whether this treatment led to less compensatory sweating than T3–T4 sympathectomies among our 60-patient population. METHODS One hundred and twenty endoscopic thoracic sympathectomies were performed on 60 patients who had axillary hyperhidrosis. The sympathectomies were accomplished by means of a single-lumen endotracheal tube and a single port. The axillary hyperhidrosis patients were randomly divided into two groups with 17 patients in Group 1 undergoing T3–T4 sympathectomies and 43 in Group 2 undergoing only T3 sympathectomies. We analysed the data associated with the resolution of axillary hyperhidrosis, the degree of patient satisfaction with the surgical outcome and the quality of life in parallel with compensatory sweating after the procedure as reported by the patient and confirmed by the examiner. Moreover, the results were compared statistically. RESULTS No statistically significant difference was observed between the groups based on age (P = 0.56), gender (P = 0.81), duration of the surgery (P = 0.35) or postoperative satisfaction levels (P = 0.45). However, the incidence and degree of compensatory sweating were lower in the T3 group than the T3–T4 group at the 1-year follow-up (P = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS T3 sympathectomy was as effective as T3–T4 sympathectomy for the treatment of axillary hyperhidrosis based on the patients’ reported postoperative satisfaction, and the T3 group demonstrated lower compensatory sweating at the 1-year follow-up. PMID:23644731

  11. Disks around Failed Stars - a Question of Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-08-01

    First Ground-Based Mid-Infrared Observations of Brown Dwarfs [1] Summary A team of European astronomers [2] have observed eight Brown Dwarfs, i.e., small and faint objects also known as "failed stars", with the TIMMI2 infrared sensitive instrument at the ESO 3.6-m telescope on La Silla. From two of these, mid-infrared radiation is detected - for the first time ever from such objects with a ground-based telescope . While the younger Brown Dwarf, aged a few million years, is found to be surrounded by a dusty disk, no warm dust is present around the older ones. The new observations support the following formation hypothesis for Brown Dwarfs: they are born in the same way as "real" stars, by contraction in interstellar clouds of gas and dust . During the later stages of this process, the infalling material is transferred onto the star via a gas and dust disk . This disk - in which planets may possibly form - then disperses with time. PR Photo 17a/02 : Image of Brown Dwarf LP 944-20 PR Photo 17b/02 : Models of the disk around Brown Dwarf Cha HA 2 Brown Dwarfs are faint and cool objects Astronomical objects known as "Brown Dwarfs" are "failed stars" . Their comparatively small mass, less than about 7% of that of our Sun (or about 75 times the mass of planet Jupiter), is too small to achieve sufficiently high pressure and temperature at their centre to ignite energy-producing nuclear processes. Some astronomers also refer to Brown Dwarfs as a "missing link" between planets and stars, being neither one nor the other, yet with similarities to both. They do not burn hydrogen to helium as "real" stars do, but continue to emit faint light as they slowly contract and cool during millions of years. They end their inglorious life with a whimper and finally fade into eternal insignificance. Although Brown Dwarfs were theoretically predicted already in 1963, astronomers had to wait until 1995 for the first one to be discovered. This was mainly due to their extreme faintness as

  12. Hydraulic experiments on the failed fuel location module of prototype fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajesh, K.; Kumar, S.; Padmakumar, G.; Prakash, V.; Vijayashree, R.; Rajan Babu, V.; Govinda Rajan, S.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Prabhaker, R.

    2003-01-01

    The design of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is based on sound design concepts with emphasis on intrinsic safety. The uncertainties involved in the design of various components, which are difficult to assess theoretically, are experimentally verified before design is validated. In PFBR core, the coolant (liquid sodium) enters the bottom of the fuel subassembly, passes over the fuel pins picking up the fission heat and issues in to a hot pool. If there is any breach in the fuel pins, the fission products come in direct contact with the coolant. This is undesirable and it is necessary to locate the subassembly with the failed fuel pin and to isolate it. A component called Failed Fuel Location Module (FFLM) is employed for locating the failed SA by monitoring the coolant samples coming out of each Subassembly. The coolant sample from each Subassembly is drawn by FFLM using an EM pump through sampling tube and selector valve and is monitored for the presence of delayed neutrons which is an indication of failure of the Subassembly. The pressure drop across the selector valve determines the rating of the EM Pump. The dilution of the coolant sample across the selector valve determines the effectiveness of monitoring for contamination. It is not possible to predict pressure drop across the selector valve and dilution of the coolant sample theoretically. These two parameters are determined using a hydraulic experiment on the FFLM. The experiment was carried out in conditions that simulate the reactor conditions following appropriate similarity laws. The paper discusses the details of the model, techniques of experiments and the results from the studies

  13. 7 CFR 1951.264 - Action when borrower fails to cooperate, respond or graduate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Analyzing Credit Needs and Graduation of Borrowers § 1951.264 Action when borrower fails to cooperate, respond or graduate. (a) When borrowers with other than FCP loans fail to: (1) Provide information... appeal the decision. (b) If an FCP borrower fails to cooperate after a lender expresses a willingness to...

  14. Requirements: Towards an understanding on why software projects fail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.

    2016-08-01

    Requirement engineering is at the foundation of every successful software project. There are many reasons for software project failures; however, poorly engineered requirements process contributes immensely to the reason why software projects fail. Software project failure is usually costly and risky and could also be life threatening. Projects that undermine requirements engineering suffer or are likely to suffer from failures, challenges and other attending risks. The cost of project failures and overruns when estimated is very huge. Furthermore, software project failures or overruns pose a challenge in today's competitive market environment. It affects the company's image, goodwill, and revenue drive and decreases the perceived satisfaction of customers and clients. In this paper, requirements engineering was discussed. Its role in software projects success was elaborated. The place of software requirements process in relation to software project failure was explored and examined. Also, project success and failure factors were also discussed with emphasis placed on requirements factors as they play a major role in software projects' challenges, successes and failures. The paper relied on secondary data and empirical statistics to explore and examine factors responsible for the successes, challenges and failures of software projects in large, medium and small scaled software companies.

  15. Experimenting `learn by doing' and `learn by failing'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, Rossella; Noè, Carlo; Rossi, Tommaso

    2015-01-01

    According to the literature, in recent years, developing experiential learning has fulfilled the requirement of a deep understanding of lean philosophy by engineering students, demonstrating the advantages and disadvantages of some of the key principles of lean manufacturing. On the other hand, the literature evidences how some kinds of game-based experiential learning overlook daily difficulties, which play a central role in manufacturing systems. To fill the need of a game overcoming such lack of vision, an innovative game direct in-field, named Kart Factory, has been developed. Actual production shifts are simulated, while keeping all the elements peculiar to a real production set (i.e. complexity, effort, safety). The working environment is a real pedal car assembly department, the products to be assembled have relevant size and weight (i.e. up to 35 kg approximately), and the provided tools are real production equipment (e.g. keys, screwdrivers, trans-pallets, etc.). Due to the need to maximise the impact on students, a labour-intensive process characterises the production department. The whole training process is based on three educational principles: Experience Value Principle, Error Value Principle, and Team Value Principle. As the 'learn by doing' and 'learn by failing' are favoured, the theory follows the practice, while crating the willingness to 'do' instead of just designing or planning. The gathered data prove the Kart Factory's effectiveness in reaching a good knowledge of lean concepts, notwithstanding the students' initial knowledge level.

  16. Excisional Bleb Revision for Management of Failed Ahmed Glaucoma Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Yadollah; Fakhraie, Ghasem; Moghimi, Sasan; Zarei, Reza; Mohammadi, Masoud; Nabavi, Amin; Yaseri, Mehdi; Izadi, Ali

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome of excisonal bleb revision in patients with failed Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV). In total, 29 patients with uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP) despite of maximal tolerated medical therapy at least 6 months after AGV implantation were enrolled in this prospective interventional case series. Excision of fibrotic tissue around the reservoir with application of mitomycin C 0.02% was performed. IOP, number of glaucoma medications were evaluated at baseline and 1 week and 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Complete and qualified success was defined as IOP≤21 mm Hg with or without glaucoma medications, respectively. Intraoperative and postopervative complications were also recorded. Mean IOP was reduced from 30±4.2 mm Hg at baseline to 19.2±3.1 mm Hg at 12-month follow-up visit (Pglaucoma medications was decrease from 3.2±0.5 at baseline to 1.9±0.7 at 12-month follow-up (Pglaucoma surgeries were significantly associated with the failure of excisonal bleb revision. Excisional bleb revision could be considered as a relatively effective alternative option for management of inadequate IOP control after AGV implantation.

  17. Salvage of Failed Protein Targets by Reductive Alkylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kemin; Kim, Youngchang; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Chang, Changsoo; Cuff, Marianne; Chhor, Gekleng; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Michalska, Karolina; Nocek, Boguslaw; An, Hao; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Bigelow, Lance; Joachimiak, Grazyna; Li, Hui; Mack, Jamey; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Maltseva, Natalia; Mulligan, Rory; Tesar, Christine; Zhou, Min; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The growth of diffraction-quality single crystals is of primary importance in protein X-ray crystallography. Chemical modification of proteins can alter their surface properties and crystallization behavior. The Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG) has previously reported how reductive methylation of lysine residues in proteins can improve crystallization of unique proteins that initially failed to produce diffraction-quality crystals. Recently, this approach has been expanded to include ethylation and isopropylation in the MCSG protein crystallization pipeline. Applying standard methods, 180 unique proteins were alkylated and screened using standard crystallization procedures. Crystal structures of 12 new proteins were determined, including the first ethylated and the first isopropylated protein structures. In a few cases, the structures of native and methylated or ethylated states were obtained and the impact of reductive alkylation of lysine residues was assessed. Reductive methylation tends to be more efficient and produces the most alkylated protein structures. Structures of methylated proteins typically have higher resolution limits. A number of well-ordered alkylated lysine residues have been identified, which make both intermolecular and intramolecular contacts. The previous report is updated and complemented with the following new data; a description of a detailed alkylation protocol with results, structural features, and roles of alkylated lysine residues in protein crystals. These contribute to improved crystallization properties of some proteins. PMID:24590719

  18. Why have we failed to cure Alzheimer's disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2012-01-01

    There is widespread recognition in the urgency to understand the causes and mechanisms of senile dementia. Attempts to find cures for Alzheimer's disease (AD) have, however, failed so far, in spite of enormous investments, intellectual and financial. We therefore have to reconsider the problem from new angles. AD is regarded as a disease because of its clinical manifestations and underlying pathology. However, this combination does not define a disease but rather a syndrome, just like hepatic cirrhosis in which liver pathology causes metabolic changes, but which can result from many different etiologies. It is unlikely that attacking a downstream phenomenon, like apoptosis or amyloid-β accumulation, can cure AD, or prevent the progression of the disease. It is probable that senile dementia is the result of a combination of several processes, working differently in each person. Epidemiological studies have identified many risk factors for "senile dementia of the Alzheimer type", some genetic but most environmental and therefore modifiable. Thus, a concerted action to fight the dementia epidemic must be made by aggressive action against its risk factors, and this battle must begin in midlife, not in old age.

  19. Fail-fixed servovalve with positive fluid feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Howard B. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The servovalve includes a primary jet of fluid. A variable control signal is adapted to vary the angular position of the primary jet from its maximum recovery position. A first fluid path is adapted to supply fluid to a servopiston at a variable pressure determined at least in part by the control signal. A second fluid path is adapted to receive a predetermined portion of the primary jet fluid when the control signal reaches a predetermined value. The second fluid path terminates in the vicinity of the primary jet and is adapted to direct a secondary jet of fluid at the primary jet to deflect the primary jet toward the input orifice of the second fluid path. The resultant positive fluid feedback in the second fluid path causes the primary jet to latch in a first angular position relative to the maximum recovery position when the control signal reaches a predetermined value. The servovalve may further include a means to discharge the fluid and a means to block the first fluid path to the servopiston when the control signal falls below a second predetermined value. A method of operating a fail-fixed servovalve is also described.

  20. Sparse approximation problem: how rapid simulated annealing succeeds and fails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchi, Tomoyuki; Kabashima, Yoshiyuki

    2016-03-01

    Information processing techniques based on sparseness have been actively studied in several disciplines. Among them, a mathematical framework to approximately express a given dataset by a combination of a small number of basis vectors of an overcomplete basis is termed the sparse approximation. In this paper, we apply simulated annealing, a metaheuristic algorithm for general optimization problems, to sparse approximation in the situation where the given data have a planted sparse representation and noise is present. The result in the noiseless case shows that our simulated annealing works well in a reasonable parameter region: the planted solution is found fairly rapidly. This is true even in the case where a common relaxation of the sparse approximation problem, the G-relaxation, is ineffective. On the other hand, when the dimensionality of the data is close to the number of non-zero components, another metastable state emerges, and our algorithm fails to find the planted solution. This phenomenon is associated with a first-order phase transition. In the case of very strong noise, it is no longer meaningful to search for the planted solution. In this situation, our algorithm determines a solution with close-to-minimum distortion fairly quickly.

  1. Recurrent failings of medical humanitarianism: intractable, ignored, or just exaggerated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Sandro; Pavignani, Enrico

    2017-11-18

    Humanitarian health workers operate in dangerous and uncertain contexts, in which mistakes and failures are common, often have severe consequences, and are regularly repeated, despite being documented by many reviews. This Series paper aims to discuss the failures of medical humanitarianism. We describe why some of these recurrent failings, which are often not identified until much later, seem intractable: they are so entrenched in humanitarian action that they cannot be addressed by simple technical fixes. We argue that relief health-care interventions should be contextualised. Perhaps medical humanitarianism deserves a better reputation than the one at times tarnished by unfair criticism, resulting from inapplicable guiding principles and unrealistic expectations. The present situation is not conducive to radical reforms of humanitarian medicine; complex crises multiply and no political, diplomatic, or military solutions are in sight. Relief agencies have to compete for financial resources that do not increase at the same pace as health needs. Avoiding the repetition of failures requires recognising previous mistakes and addressing them through different policies by donors, stronger documentation and analysis of humanitarian programmes and interventions, increased professionalisation, improved, opportunistic relationships with the media, and better ways of working together with local health stakeholders and through indigenous institutions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Why Buildings Fail: Are We Learning From Our Mistakes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kevin Parfitt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Most building professionals have investigated or performed remedial designs for at least one architectural or engineering system failure during their careers. Other practitioners, especially those who work for forensic consultants or firms specializing in disaster response and repair, are more familiar with the variety and extent of building failures as they assist their clients in restoring damaged or deficient buildings. The advent of social medial and twenty-four-hour news channels along with the general ease of finding more examples of failures in the Internet have made us realize that building failures in the broad sense are much more common than we may have realized.Relatively recent events leading to building failures such as the Christchurch, New Zealand earthquakes, the roof/parking deck of the Algo Centre mall in the northern Ontario, Canada city of Elliot Lake and the Indiana State Fairground stage collapse in the US are just a few reminders that much more work needs to be done on a variety of fronts to prevent building failures from a life safety standpoint. The need is compounded by economic concerns from what would be considered more mundane or common failures. Inspections by the author after Hurricane Katrina revealed a huge number of failures associated rain water alone as roofs, windows, flashing, mechanical penetrations etc. failed leading to interior water penetration often resulting in more damage from damp conditions and mold propagation than outright structural collapses.

  3. Diagnostic Profiles of Patients Differentially Failing Executive Functioning Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammers, Dustin; Ramirez, Gabriela; Persad, Carol; Heidebrink, Judith; Barbas, Nancy; Giordani, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Limited research exists to explain differential executive functioning impairment in clinical populations, particularly between the Wisconsin Card Sorting Task (WCST) and the Trail Making Test (TMT). The distribution of clinical diagnoses was examined in patients failing none, one, or both tasks, and executive task performance was compared among dementia-related diagnoses. Two hundred and sixty-six participants received evaluations through an Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, which included executive tasks. Dementia-related diagnoses were established through consensus. Chi-square analyses indicated that TMT failure, with or without WCST failure, possessed higher associations with dementia diagnoses. Repeated measures analysis of variance similarly indicated that participants with dementia, especially mild and moderate severity, performed worse on TMT. Executive dysfunction was observed in dementia-related diagnoses, and TMT failure was implicated in dementia in higher proportions than WCST impairment. Trail Making Test appears more sensitive than WCST for assessing executive impairment across diagnoses, especially when time and resources are limited in screening and clinical settings. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. FGF23 fails to inhibit uremic parathyroid glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canalejo, Rocío; Canalejo, Antonio; Martinez-Moreno, Julio Manuel; Rodriguez-Ortiz, M Encarnacion; Estepa, Jose C; Mendoza, Francisco Javier; Munoz-Castaneda, Juan Rafael; Shalhoub, Victoria; Almaden, Yolanda; Rodriguez, Mariano

    2010-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) modulates mineral metabolism by promoting phosphaturia and decreasing the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3). FGF23 decreases parathyroid hormone (PTH) mRNA and secretion, but despite a marked elevation in FGF23 in uremia, PTH production increases. Here, we investigated the effect of FGF23 on parathyroid function in normal and uremic hyperplastic parathyroid glands in rats. In normal parathyroid glands, FGF23 decreased PTH production, increased expression of both the parathyroid calcium-sensing receptor and the vitamin D receptor, and reduced cell proliferation. Furthermore, FGF23 induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, which mediates the action of FGF23. In contrast, in hyperplastic parathyroid glands, FGF23 did not reduce PTH production, did not affect expression of the calcium-sensing receptor or vitamin D receptor, and did not affect cell proliferation. In addition, FGF23 failed to activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in hyperplastic parathyroid glands. We observed very low expression of the FGF23 receptor 1 and the co-receptor Klotho in uremic hyperplastic parathyroid glands, which may explain the lack of response to FGF23 in this tissue. In conclusion, in hyperparathyroidism secondary to renal failure, the parathyroid cells resist the inhibitory effects of FGF23, perhaps as a result of the low expression of FGF23 receptor 1 and Klotho in this condition.

  5. Investigation of the actions taken by adults who failed a telephone-based hearing screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Carly; Hickson, Louise; Khan, Asad; Hartley, David; Dillon, Harvey; Seymour, John

    2011-01-01

    Hearing impairment constitutes a highly prevalent chronic health condition among older adults worldwide which negatively impacts on communication and health-related quality of life. Irrespective of this, the majority of older adults do not seek professional help for hearing impairment and/or do not obtain hearing aids. Therefore, a new approach for detecting and promoting help-seeking for hearing impairment is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the actions taken by those who failed Telscreen, a telephone-based screening tool for hearing loss, and to increase our understanding of factors that influence taking action. A cohort of 193 participants (112 females, 81 males; age range 24-93 yr) who had failed Telscreen participated in a follow-up telephone interview 4 to 5 mo later. Participants were asked why they called Telscreen, about their hearing ability, their Telscreen result, and what action they had taken toward hearing rehabilitation. One outcome measure was identified: decision to seek professional help for hearing impairment (yes/no). Given that the outcome measure was dichotomized, a logistic regression model for binary outcomes was fitted to the data. Of the 193 participants who failed Telscreen, only 36% sought help from a range of sources (e.g., audiologist, hearing service or hearing aid provider, and family doctor). Results of the logistic regression analysis indicated that individuals who had considered hearing aids before calling Telscreen and/or who recalled their Telscreen result were significantly more likely to seek professional help for their hearing impairment. Nineteen participants who sought help for their hearing impairment had hearing aid fitting recommended to them. Eight participants had aid/s fitted, and of these, six reported a successful outcome. For every 100 individuals who fail a hearing screening, only 36 seek help. Of these 36 individuals who take some action, 13 are recommended hearing aids, approximately half of

  6. Reduced left ventricular filling following blood volume extraction does not result in compensatory augmentation of cardiac mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Rachel; MacLeod, David; George, Keith; Oxborough, David; Shave, Rob; Stembridge, Mike

    2018-04-01

    What is the central question of this study? A reduction in left ventricular (LV) filling, and concomitant increase in heart rate, augments LV mechanics to maintain stroke volume (SV); however, the impact of reduced LV filling in isolation on SV and LV mechanics is currently unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? An isolated decrease in LV filling did not provoke a compensatory increase in mechanics to maintain SV; in contrast, LV mechanics and SV were reduced. These data indicate that when LV filling is reduced without changes in heart rate, LV mechanics do not compensate to maintain SV. An acute non-invasive reduction in preload has been shown to augment cardiac mechanics to maintain stroke volume and cardiac output. Such interventions induce concomitant changes in heart rate, whereas blood volume extraction reduces preload without changes in heart rate. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a preload reduction in isolation resulted in augmented stroke volume achieved via enhanced cardiac mechanics. Nine healthy volunteers (four female, age 29 ± 11 years) underwent echocardiography for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) volumes and mechanics in a supine position at baseline and end extraction after the controlled removal of 25% of total blood volume (1062 ± 342 ml). Arterial blood pressure was monitored continuously by a pressure transducer attached to an indwelling radial artery catheter. Heart rate and total peripheral resistance were unchanged from baseline to end extraction, but systolic blood pressure was reduced (from 148 to 127 mmHg). From baseline to end extraction there were significant reductions in left ventricular end-diastolic volume (from 89 to 71 ml) and stroke volume (from 56 to 37 ml); however, there was no change in LV twist, basal or apical rotation. In contrast, LV longitudinal strain (from -20 to -17%) and basal circumferential strain (from -22 to -19%) were significantly reduced from

  7. Roles of eyes, leg proprioceptors and statocysts in the compensatory eye movements of freely walking land crabs (Cardisoma guanhumi)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul; Barnes; Varju

    1998-12-01

    The compound eyes, the canal organs of the statocysts and proprioceptors in the legs all generate compensatory eye movements in the horizontal plane in the land crab Cardisoma guanhumi. Frequency analyses of the compensatory eye reflexes elicited by each of these inputs show that visual (V) and proprioceptive (P) reflexes respond best below 0.1 Hz, while statocyst (S) reflexes only achieve a high gain above this frequency. They thus increase the range of frequencies over which compensation can occur. Eye and body movements were recorded in an arena under all possible combinations of crabs seeing or blind (V+ or V-), with or without statocysts (S+ or S-) and freely walking or passively transported on a trolley (P+ or P-). Intact crabs (V+S+P+) show good stabilisation of the eyes in space, the only movements with respect to external coordinates being saccadic resetting movements (fast phases of nystagmus). The eyes thus compensate well for body turns, but are unaffected by translatory movements of the body and turns that are not accompanied by a change in the orientation of the long axis of the body in space. In the absence of any one sense, compensation for rotation is significantly impaired, whether measured by the increase in the width of the histograms of changes in the angular positions of the eyes in space ( capdelta &phgr; E), by the mean angular velocity of the eyes (slope of regression line, mE) with respect to the angular velocity of the body (mB) or by response gain plotted against angular acceleration of body turn (a). The absence of two senses reduces the crab's ability to compensate still further, with the statocyst-only condition (V-S+P-) being little better than the condition when all three senses are absent (V-S-P-).Such multisensory control of eye compensation for body rotation is discussed both in terms of making use of every available cue for reducing retinal slip and in making available the information content of the optic flow field.

  8. Isolated pulmonary regurgitation causes decreased right ventricular longitudinal function and compensatory increased septal pumping in a porcine model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopic, S; Stephensen, S S; Heiberg, E

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Longitudinal ventricular contraction is a parameter of cardiac performance with predictive power. Right ventricular (RV) longitudinal function is impaired in patients with free pulmonary regurgitation (PR) following corrective surgery for Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). It remains unclear whether...

  9. Failed Tubule Recovery, AKI-CKD Transition, and Kidney Disease Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Joel M.; Kriz, Wilhelm; Bidani, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    The transition of AKI to CKD has major clinical significance. As reviewed here, recent studies show that a subpopulation of dedifferentiated, proliferating tubules recovering from AKI undergo pathologic growth arrest, fail to redifferentiate, and become atrophic. These abnormal tubules exhibit persistent, unregulated, and progressively increasing profibrotic signaling along multiple pathways. Paracrine products derived therefrom perturb normal interactions between peritubular capillary endothelium and pericyte-like fibroblasts, leading to myofibroblast transformation, proliferation, and fibrosis as well as capillary disintegration and rarefaction. Although signals from injured endothelium and inflammatory/immune cells also contribute, tubule injury alone is sufficient to produce the interstitial pathology required for fibrosis. Localized hypoxia produced by microvascular pathology may also prevent tubule recovery. However, fibrosis is not intrinsically progressive, and microvascular pathology develops strictly around damaged tubules; thus, additional deterioration of kidney structure after the transition of AKI to CKD requires new acute injury or other mechanisms of progression. Indeed, experiments using an acute-on-chronic injury model suggest that additional loss of parenchyma caused by failed repair of AKI in kidneys with prior renal mass reduction triggers hemodynamically mediated processes that damage glomeruli to cause progression. Continued investigation of these pathologic mechanisms should reveal options for preventing renal disease progression after AKI. PMID:25810494

  10. UV-light exposed prion protein fails to form amyloid fibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay Kumar Thakur

    Full Text Available Amyloid fibril formation involves three steps; structural perturbation, nucleation and elongation. We have investigated amyloidogenesis using prion protein as a model system and UV-light as a structural perturbant. We find that UV-exposed prion protein fails to form amyloid fibrils. Interestingly, if provided with pre-formed fibrils as seeds, UV-exposed prion protein formed amyloid fibrils albeit with slightly different morphology. Atomic force microscopy and electron microscopic studies clearly show the formation of fibrils under these conditions. Circular dichroism study shows loss in helicity in UV-exposed protein. UV-exposed prion protein fails to form amyloid fibrils. However, it remains competent for fibril extension, suggesting that UV-exposure results in loss of nucleating capability. This work opens up possibility of segregating nucleation and elongation step of amyloidogenesis, facilitating screening of new drug candidates for specifically inhibiting either of these processes. In addition, the work also highlights the importance of light-induced structural and functional alterations which are important in protein based therapeutics.

  11. Experience with failed or damaged spent fuel and its impacts on handling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1989-12-01

    Spent fuel management planning needs to include consideration of failed or damaged spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel. Described in this paper, which was prepared under the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program that is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are the following: the importance of fuel integrity and the behavior of failed fuel, the quantity and burnup of failed or damaged fuel in storage, types of defects, difficulties in evaluating data on failed or damaged fuel, experience with wet storage, experience with dry storage, handling of failed or damaged fuel, transporting of fuel, experience with higher burnup fuel, and conclusions. 15 refs

  12. Changes in seasonal climate outpace compensatory density-dependence in eastern brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassar, Ronald D.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Nislow, Keith H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how multiple extrinsic (density-independent) factors and intrinsic (density-dependent) mechanisms influence population dynamics has become increasingly urgent in the face of rapidly changing climates. It is particularly unclear how multiple extrinsic factors with contrasting effects among seasons are related to declines in population numbers and changes in mean body size and whether there is a strong role for density-dependence. The primary goal of this study was to identify the roles of seasonal variation in climate driven environmental direct effects (mean stream flow and temperature) versus density-dependence on population size and mean body size in eastern brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). We use data from a 10-year capture-mark-recapture study of eastern brook trout in four streams in Western Massachusetts, USA to parameterize a discrete-time population projection model. The model integrates matrix modeling techniques used to characterize discrete population structures (age, habitat type and season) with integral projection models (IPMs) that characterize demographic rates as continuous functions of organismal traits (in this case body size). Using both stochastic and deterministic analyses we show that decreases in population size are due to changes in stream flow and temperature and that these changes are larger than what can be compensated for through density-dependent responses. We also show that the declines are due mostly to increasing mean stream temperatures decreasing the survival of the youngest age class. In contrast, increases in mean body size over the same period are the result of indirect changes in density with a lesser direct role of climate-driven environmental change.

  13. Conditional Health-Related Benefits of Higher Education: An Assessment of Compensatory versus Accumulative Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Bauldry, Shawn

    2014-01-01

    A college degree is associated with a range of health-related benefits, but the effects of higher education are known to vary across different population subgroups. Competing theories have been proposed for whether people from more or less advantaged backgrounds or circumstances will gain greater health-related benefits from a college degree. This study draws on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health) and recently developed models for analyzing heterogeneou...

  14. Measuring mental disorders: The failed commensuration project of DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whooley, Owen

    2016-10-01

    Commensuration - the comparison of entities according to a common quantitative metric - is a key process in efforts to rationalize medicine. The push toward evidence-based medicine and quantitative assessment has led to the proliferation of metrics in healthcare. While social scientific attention has revealed the effects of these metrics once institutionalized - on clinical practice, on medical expertise, on outcome assessment, on valuations of medical services, and on experiences of illness - less attention has been paid to the process of developing metrics. This article examines the attempt to create severity scales during the revision to the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as a case of failed commensuration. Using data from interviews with participants in the DSM-5 revision (n = 30), I reconstruct the problems that emerged in the DSM-5 Task Force's effort to develop viable psychometric instruments to measure severity. Framed as a part of a "paradigm shift" in psychiatry, the revision produced ad hoc, heterogeneous severity scales with divergent logics. I focus on two significant issues of metric construction in this case - diagnostic validity and clinical utility. Typically perceived as technical and conceptual challenges of design, I show how these issues were infused with, and undermined by, professional political dynamics, specifically tensions between medical researchers and clinicians. This case reveals that, despite its association with objectivity and transparency, commensuration encompasses more than identifying, operationalizing, and measuring an entity; it demands the negotiation of extra-scientific, non-empirical concerns that get written into medical metrics themselves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Baseline series fragrance markers fail to predict contact allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Jack; McFadden, John P; White, Jonathan M L; White, Ian R; Banerjee, Piu

    2014-05-01

    Negative patch test results with fragrance allergy markers in the European baseline series do not always predict a negative reaction to individual fragrance substances. To determine the frequencies of positive test reactions to the 26 fragrance substances for which labelling is mandatory in the EU, and how effectively reactions to fragrance markers in the baseline series predict positive reactions to the fragrance substances that are labelled. The records of 1951 eczema patients, routinely tested with the labelled fragrance substances and with an extended European baseline series in 2011 and 2012, were retrospectively reviewed. Two hundred and eighty-one (14.4%) (71.2% females) reacted to one or more allergens from the labelled-fragrance substance series and/or a fragrance marker from the European baseline series. The allergens that were positive with the greatest frequencies were cinnamyl alcohol (48; 2.46%), Evernia furfuracea (44; 2.26%), and isoeugenol (40; 2.05%). Of the 203 patients who reacted to any of the 26 fragrances in the labelled-fragrance substance series, only 117 (57.6%) also reacted to a fragrance marker in the baseline series. One hundred and seven (52.7%) reacted to either fragrance mix I or fragrance mix II, 28 (13.8%) reacted to Myroxylon pereirae, and 13 (6.4%) reacted to hydroxyisohexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde. These findings confirm that the standard fragrance markers fail to identify patients with contact allergies to the 26 fragrances. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Heart failure: when form fails to follow function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Arnold M; Rolett, Ellis L

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac performance is normally determined by architectural, cellular, and molecular structures that determine the heart's form, and by physiological and biochemical mechanisms that regulate the function of these structures. Impaired adaptation of form to function in failing hearts contributes to two syndromes initially called systolic heart failure (SHF) and diastolic heart failure (DHF). In SHF, characterized by high end-diastolic volume (EDV), the left ventricle (LV) cannot eject a normal stroke volume (SV); in DHF, with normal or low EDV, the LV cannot accept a normal venous return. These syndromes are now generally defined in terms of ejection fraction (EF): SHF became 'heart failure with reduced ejection fraction' (HFrEF) while DHF became 'heart failure with normal or preserved ejection fraction' (HFnEF or HFpEF). However, EF is a chimeric index because it is the ratio between SV--which measures function, and EDV--which measures form. In SHF the LV dilates when sarcomere addition in series increases cardiac myocyte length, whereas sarcomere addition in parallel can cause concentric hypertrophy in DHF by increasing myocyte thickness. Although dilatation in SHF allows the LV to accept a greater venous return, it increases the energy cost of ejection and initiates a vicious cycle that contributes to progressive dilatation. In contrast, concentric hypertrophy in DHF facilitates ejection but impairs filling and can cause heart muscle to deteriorate. Differences in the molecular signals that initiate dilatation and concentric hypertrophy can explain why many drugs that improve prognosis in SHF have little if any benefit in DHF. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Failed surgery in primary hyperparathyroidism - what has changed with time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirowski, D; Goretzki, P E; Schwarz, K; Lammers, B J; Dotzenrath, C; Röher, H-D

    2013-06-01

    Advanced preoperative imaging of parathyroid adenomas and intraoperative parathyroid hormone determination optimized the results in the surgical treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism patients. We asked, whether reasons for failure have changed during the last 25 years.We retrospectively analyzed operations for persistent primary hyperparathyroidism in our department between 2001 and 2011 (n=67), and compared these results to our experience between 1986 and 2001 (n=80).From 2001 to 2011, 765 primary hyperparathyroidism patients were operated on at our department. All but 4 patients were cured (761/765, 99.5%). 67 operations were performed for persistent primary hyperparathyroidism. Main reasons for failure were a misdiagnosed sporadic multiple gland disease in our own patients (18/29, 62.1%), and an undetected solitary adenoma in patients referred to us after -initial operation in another hospital (22/38, 57.9%) (statistically significant). From 1986 to 2001 (1 105 primary hyperparathyroidism patients), main indications for re-operation due to persistent disease were an undiagnosed sporadic multiple gland disease in our own patients (15/24, 62.5%), and a missed solitary adenoma in patients being operated on primarily somewhere else (38/56, 67.9%) (statistically significant).Comparing our experience in 147 patients with persistent primary hyperparathyroidism being operated on between 2001-2011 and 1986-2001, not much has changed with the modern armamentarium of improved preoperative imaging or intraoperative biochemical control. Whereas sporadic multiple gland disease was the most common reason for unsuccessful surgery in experienced hands, other units mainly failed due to an undetected solitary adenoma. Re-operations for persistent primary hyperparathyroidism performed by us were successful in 93.8% (2001-2011) and 96.0% (1986-2001), respectively. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. δ-Tocotrienol Oxazine Derivative Antagonizes Mammary Tumor Cell Compensatory Response to CoCl2-Induced Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryatheja Ananthula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In response to low oxygen supply, cancer cells elevate production of HIF-1α, a hypoxia-inducible transcription factor that subsequently acts to stimulate blood vessel formation and promote survival. Studies were conducted to determine the role of δ-tocotrienol and a semisynthetic δ-tocotrienol oxazine derivative, compound 44, on +SA mammary tumor cell hypoxic response. Treatment with 150 µM CoCl2 induced a hypoxic response in +SA mammary tumor cells as evidenced by a large increase in HIF-1α levels, and combined treatment with compound 44 attenuated this response. CoCl2-induced hypoxia was also associated with a large increase in Akt/mTOR signaling, activation of downstream targets p70S6K and eIF-4E1, and a significant increase in VEGF production, and combined treatment with compound 44 blocked this response. Additional in vivo studies showed that intralesional treatment with compound 44 in BALB/c mice bearing +SA mammary tumors significantly decreased the levels of HIF-1α, and this effect was associated with a corresponding decrease in Akt/mTOR signaling and activation of downstream targets p70S6kinase and eIF-4E1. These findings demonstrate that treatment with the δ-tocotrienol oxazine derivative, compound 44, significantly attenuates +SA mammary tumor cell compensatory responses to hypoxia and suggests that this compound may provide benefit in the treatment of rapidly growing solid breast tumors.

  19. Genomic and lipidomic analyses differentiate the compensatory roles of two COX isoforms during systemic inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinzhi; Mazaleuskaya, Liudmila L; Ballantyne, Laurel L; Meng, Hu; FitzGerald, Garret A; Funk, Colin D

    2018-01-01

    Both cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2, encoded by Ptgs1 and Ptgs2 , function coordinately during inflammation. But the relative contributions and compensations of COX-1 and COX-2 to inflammatory responses remain unanswered. We used three engineered mouse lines where the Ptgs1 and Ptgs2 genes substitute for one another to discriminate the distinct roles and interchangeability of COX isoforms during systemic inflammation. In macrophages, kidneys, and lungs, "flipped" Ptgs genes generate a "reversed" COX expression pattern, where the knock-in COX-2 is expressed constitutively and the knock-in COX-1 is lipopolysaccharide inducible. A panel of eicosanoids detected in serum and kidney demonstrates that prostaglandin (PG) biosynthesis requires native COX-1 and cannot be rescued by the knock-in COX-2. Our data further reveal preferential compensation of COX isoforms for prostanoid production in macrophages and throughout the body, as reflected by urinary PG metabolites. NanoString analysis indicates that inflammatory networks can be maintained by isoform substitution in inflamed macrophages. However, COX-1>COX-2 macrophages show reduced activation of inflammatory signaling pathways, indicating that COX-1 may be replaced by COX-2 within this complex milieu, but not vice versa. Collectively, each COX isoform plays a distinct role subject to subcellular environment and tissue/cell-specific conditions, leading to subtle compensatory differences during systemic inflammation. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Invariance of head-pelvis alignment and compensatory mechanisms for asymptomatic adults older than 49 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amabile, Celia; Le Huec, Jean-Charles; Skalli, Wafa

    2018-02-01

    The aim was to quantify the postural alignment of asymptomatic elderly, in comparison to a reference population, searching for possible invariants and compensatory mechanisms. 41 volunteers (49-76 years old) underwent bi-planar X-rays with 3D reconstructions of the spine and pelvis. Alignment parameters were compared with those of a reference group of asymptomatic subjects younger than 40 years old, with a particular focus on center of acoustic meati (CAM) and odontoid (OD) with regard to hip axis (HA). Possible markers of compensation were also investigated. No significant difference among groups appeared for CAM-HA and OD-HA parameters. Twenty four percent of elders had an abnormally high SVA value and twenty seven percent had an abnormal global spine inclination. Increased pelvic tilt and cervical lordosis allowed maintaining the head above the pelvis. CAM-HA and OD-HA appeared quasi-invariant even in asymptomatic elderly. Some subjects exhibited alteration of spine alignment, compensated at the pelvis and cervical regions.