WorldWideScience

Sample records for models experimental results

  1. Microplasticity of MMC. Experimental results and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, E. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Lormand, G. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Gobin, P.F. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Fougeres, R. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-11-01

    The microplastic behavior of several MMC is investigated by means of tension and compression tests. This behavior is assymetric : the proportional limit is higher in tension than in compression but the work hardening rate is higher in compression. These differences are analysed in terms of maxium of the Tresca's shear stress at the interface (proportional limit) and of the emission of dislocation loops during the cooling (work hardening rate). On another hand, a model is proposed to calculate the value of the yield stress, describing the composite as a material composed of three phases : inclusion, unaffected matrix and matrix surrounding the inclusion having a gradient in the density of the thermally induced dilocations. (orig.).

  2. Impact Flash Physics: Modeling and Comparisons With Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, E.; Stickle, A. M.; Ernst, C. M.; Schultz, P. H.; Mehta, N. L.; Brown, R. C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Michaelis, C. H.; Erlandson, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    horizontal. High-speed radiometer measurements were made of the time-dependent impact flash at wavelengths of 350-1100 nm. We will present comparisons between these measurements and the output of APL's model. The results of this validation allow us to determine basic relationships between observed optical signatures and impact conditions.

  3. Infrared thermography for CFRP inspection: computational model and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Henrique C.; Zhang, Hai; Morioka, Karen; Ibarra-Castanedo, Clemente; López, Fernando; Maldague, Xavier P. V.; Tarpani, José R.

    2016-05-01

    Infrared Thermography (IRT) is a well-known Non-destructive Testing (NDT) technique. In the last decades, it has been widely applied in several fields including inspection of composite materials (CM), specially the fiber-reinforced polymer matrix ones. Consequently, it is important to develop and improve efficient NDT techniques to inspect and assess the quality of CM parts in order to warranty airworthiness and, at the same time, reduce costs of airline companies. In this paper, active IRT is used to inspect carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) at laminate with artificial inserts (built-in sample) placed on different layers prior to the manufacture. Two optical active IRT are used. The first is pulsed thermography (PT) which is the most widely utilized IRT technique. The second is a line-scan thermography (LST) technique: a dynamic technique, which can be employed for the inspection of materials by heating a component, line-by-line, while acquiring a series of thermograms with an infrared camera. It is especially suitable for inspection of large parts as well as complex shaped parts. A computational model developed using COMSOL Multiphysics® was used in order to simulate the inspections. Sequences obtained from PT and LST were processed using principal component thermography (PCT) for comparison. Results showed that it is possible to detect insertions of different sizes at different depths using both PT and LST IRT techniques.

  4. Transmission resonance Raman spectroscopy: experimental results versus theoretical model calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzálvez, Alicia G; González Ureña, Ángel

    2012-10-01

    A laser spectroscopic technique is described that combines transmission and resonance-enhanced Raman inelastic scattering together with low laser power (view, a model for the Raman signal dependence on the sample thickness is also presented. Essentially, the model considers the sample to be homogeneous and describes the underlying physics using only three parameters: the Raman cross-section, the laser-radiation attenuation cross-section, and the Raman signal attenuation cross-section. The model was applied successfully to describe the sample-size dependence of the Raman signal in both β-carotene standards and carrot roots. The present technique could be useful for direct, fast, and nondestructive investigations in food quality control and analytical or physiological studies of animal and human tissues.

  5. Removal of arsenic from wastewaters by cryptocrystalline magnesite: complimenting experimental results with modelling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available -1 Journal of Cleaner Production Removal of arsenic from wastewaters by cryptocrystalline magnesite: complimenting experimental results with modelling Vhahangwele Masindi W. Mugera Gitari Keywords: Arsenic Mine leachates Cryptocrystalline...

  6. Experimental and modelling results of a parallel-plate based active magnetic regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tura, A.; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Rowe, A.

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a permanent magnet magnetic refrigerator (PMMR) using gadolinium parallel plates is described. The configuration and operating parameters are described in detail. Experimental results are compared to simulations using an established twodimensional model of an active magnetic...

  7. Updating Finite Element Model of a Wind Turbine Blade Section Using Experimental Modal Analysis Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luczak, Marcin; Manzato, Simone; Peeters, Bart;

    2014-01-01

    of model parameters was selected for the model updating process. Design of experiment and response surface method was implemented to find values of model parameters yielding results closest to the experimental. The updated finite element model is producing results more consistent with the measurement...... is to validate finite element model of the modified wind turbine blade section mounted in the flexible support structure accordingly to the experimental results. Bend-twist coupling was implemented by adding angled unidirectional layers on the suction and pressure side of the blade. Dynamic test and simulations...... were performed on a section of a full scale wind turbine blade provided by Vestas Wind Systems A/S. The numerical results are compared to the experimental measurements and the discrepancies are assessed by natural frequency difference and modal assurance criterion. Based on sensitivity analysis, set...

  8. Parallel Path Magnet Motor: Development of the Theoretical Model and Analysis of Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirba, I.; Kleperis, J.

    2011-01-01

    Analytical and numerical modelling is performed for the linear actuator of a parallel path magnet motor. In the model based on finite-element analysis, the 3D problem is reduced to a 2D problem, which is sufficiently precise in a design aspect and allows modelling the principle of a parallel path motor. The paper also describes a relevant numerical model and gives comparison with experimental results. The numerical model includes all geometrical and physical characteristics of the motor components. The magnetic flux density and magnetic force are simulated using FEMM 4.2 software. An experimental model has also been developed and verified for the core of switchable magnetic flux linear actuator and motor. The results of experiments are compared with those of theoretical/analytical and numerical modelling.

  9. Updating Finite Element Model of a Wind Turbine Blade Section Using Experimental Modal Analysis Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Luczak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents selected results and aspects of the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research oriented for the experimental and numerical study of the structural dynamics of a bend-twist coupled full scale section of a wind turbine blade structure. The main goal of the conducted research is to validate finite element model of the modified wind turbine blade section mounted in the flexible support structure accordingly to the experimental results. Bend-twist coupling was implemented by adding angled unidirectional layers on the suction and pressure side of the blade. Dynamic test and simulations were performed on a section of a full scale wind turbine blade provided by Vestas Wind Systems A/S. The numerical results are compared to the experimental measurements and the discrepancies are assessed by natural frequency difference and modal assurance criterion. Based on sensitivity analysis, set of model parameters was selected for the model updating process. Design of experiment and response surface method was implemented to find values of model parameters yielding results closest to the experimental. The updated finite element model is producing results more consistent with the measurement outcomes.

  10. Photovoltaic Grid-Connected Modeling and Characterization Based on Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humada, Ali M.; Hojabri, Mojgan; Sulaiman, Mohd Herwan Bin; Hamada, Hussein M.; Ahmed, Mushtaq N.

    2016-01-01

    A grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system operates under fluctuated weather condition has been modeled and characterized based on specific test bed. A mathematical model of a small-scale PV system has been developed mainly for residential usage, and the potential results have been simulated. The proposed PV model based on three PV parameters, which are the photocurrent, IL, the reverse diode saturation current, Io, the ideality factor of diode, n. Accuracy of the proposed model and its parameters evaluated based on different benchmarks. The results showed that the proposed model fitting the experimental results with high accuracy compare to the other models, as well as the I-V characteristic curve. The results of this study can be considered valuable in terms of the installation of a grid-connected PV system in fluctuated climatic conditions. PMID:27035575

  11. Vertical Instability in EAST: Comparison of Model Predictions with Experimental Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Jinping; WAN Baonian; SHEN Biao; XIAO Bingjia; SUN Youwen; SHI Yuejiang; LIN Shiyao; LI Jiangang; GONG Xianzu

    2008-01-01

    Growth rates of the axisymmetric mode in elongated plasmas in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) are measured with zero feedback gains and then compared with numerically calculated growth rates for the reconstructed shapes. The comparison is made after loss of vertical position control. The open-loop growth rates were scanned with the number of vessel eigenmodes, which up to 20 is enough to make the growth rates settled. The agreement between the growth rates measured experimentally and the growth rates determined numerically is good. The results show that a linear RZIP model is essentially good enough for the vertical position feedback control.

  12. How modeling can reconcile apparently discrepant experimental results: the case of pacemaking in dopaminergic neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Drion

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain dopaminergic neurons are endowed with endogenous slow pacemaking properties. In recent years, many different groups have studied the basis for this phenomenon, often with conflicting conclusions. In particular, the role of a slowly-inactivating L-type calcium channel in the depolarizing phase between spikes is controversial, and the analysis of slow oscillatory potential (SOP recordings during the blockade of sodium channels has led to conflicting conclusions. Based on a minimal model of a dopaminergic neuron, our analysis suggests that the same experimental protocol may lead to drastically different observations in almost identical neurons. For example, complete L-type calcium channel blockade eliminates spontaneous firing or has almost no effect in two neurons differing by less than 1% in their maximal sodium conductance. The same prediction can be reproduced in a state of the art detailed model of a dopaminergic neuron. Some of these predictions are confirmed experimentally using single-cell recordings in brain slices. Our minimal model exhibits SOPs when sodium channels are blocked, these SOPs being uncorrelated with the spiking activity, as has been shown experimentally. We also show that block of a specific conductance (in this case, the SK conductance can have a different effect on these two oscillatory behaviors (pacemaking and SOPs, despite the fact that they have the same initiating mechanism. These results highlight the fact that computational approaches, besides their well known confirmatory and predictive interests in neurophysiology, may also be useful to resolve apparent discrepancies between experimental results.

  13. NACA 0012 benchmark model experimental flutter results with unsteady pressure distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Jose A., Jr.; Dansberry, Bryan E.; Bennett, Robert M.; Durham, Michael H.; Silva, Walter A.

    1992-01-01

    The Structural Dynamics Division at NASA Langley Research Center has started a wind tunnel activity referred to as the Benchmark Models Program. The primary objective of the program is to acquire measured dynamic instability and corresponding pressure data that will be useful for developing and evaluating aeroelastic type CFD codes currently in use or under development. The program is a multi-year activity that will involve testing of several different models to investigate various aeroelastic phenomena. This paper describes results obtained from a second wind tunnel test of the first model in the Benchmark Models Program. This first model consisted of a rigid semispan wing having a rectangular planform and a NACA 0012 airfoil shape which was mounted on a flexible two degree-of-freedom mount system. Experimental flutter boundaries and corresponding unsteady pressure distribution data acquired over two model chords located at the 60 and 95 percent span stations are presented.

  14. Experimental results and numerical simulations for transonic flow over the ONERA M4R model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Gabriel COJOCARU

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparison between experimental results of transonic flow over the ONERA M4R calibration model obtained in the INCAS Trisonic wind tunnel and the numerical results. The first purpose, emphasized in this paper is to compare and validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD techniques for internal transonic flows and to try to find the most suitable numerical methodology for these flows in both accuracy and computational resources. The second purpose is to develop a general method in experimental data correction and flight Reynolds extrapolation, using numerical simulations for both global and local pressure coefficients, as a replacement for the classical vortex lattices based method. That will be developed in a future paper. Besides the computational work, the periodic wind tunnel calibration is required as a quality insurance operation and a numerical model is developed such that future hardware modifications to be included and their impact to be properly considered.

  15. Experimental results and model simulation of the non-fall top

    OpenAIRE

    古川, 不二夫; 藤川, 卓爾

    2007-01-01

     The ordinary top spins for about 10 minutes. The spinning duration of the non-fall top is prolonged to more than 100 minutes in a vacuum, because friction loss due to air viscosity is reduced and the friction at fulcrum of the top's stem is mainly responsible for spinning loss. This paper introduces experimental results of non-fall tops and simulation using a simplified model.

  16. Isothermal (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of (cyclic ethers + chlorohexane) mixtures: Experimental results and SAFT modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandres, I.; Giner, B.; Lopez, M.C.; Artigas, H. [Departamento de Quimica Organica y Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Lafuente, C. [Departamento de Quimica Organica y Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)], E-mail: celadi@unizar.es

    2008-08-15

    Experimental data for the isothermal (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of mixtures formed by several cyclic ethers (tetrahydrofuran, tetrahydropyran, 1,3-dioxolane, and 1,4-dioxane) and chlorohexane at temperatures of (298.15 and 328.15) K are presented. Experimental results have been discussed in terms of both, molecular characteristics of pure compounds and potential intermolecular interaction between them using thermodynamic information of the mixtures obtained earlier. Furthermore, the influence of the temperature on the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of these mixtures has been explored and discussed. Transferable parameters of the SAFT-VR approach together with standard combining rules have been used to model the phase equilibrium of the mixtures and a description of the (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of them that is in excellent agreement with the experimental data are provided.

  17. Soil gas and radon entry into a simple test structure: Comparison of experimental and modelling results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.E.; Søgaard-Hansen, J.; Majborn, B.

    1994-01-01

    A radon test structure has been established at a field site at Riso National Laboratory. Measurements have been made of soil gas entry rates, pressure couplings and radon depletion. The experimental results have been compared with results obtained from measured soil parameters and a two......-dimensional steady-state numerical model of Darcy flow and combined diffusive and advective transport of radon. For most probe locations, the calculated values of the pressure couplings and the radon depletion agree well with the measured values, thus verifying important elements of the Darcy flow approximation......, and the ability of the model to treat combined diffusive and advective transport of radon. However, the model gives an underestimation of the soil gas entry rate. Even if it is assumed that the soil has a permeability equal to the highest of the measured values, the model underestimates the soil gas entry rate...

  18. Model On DROID Response With Imperfect Trapping Tested On Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijmering, R. A.; Kozorezov, A. G.; Verhoeve, P.; Martin, D. D. E.; Wigmore, J. K.; Venn, R.

    2009-12-01

    The DROID (Distributed Read-Out Imaging Detector) is being developed to overcome the limitation in sensitive area with the use of single STJ's (Superconducting Tunnel Junctions). The DROID configuration allows the reconstruction of the position of the photon absorption and therefore it can replace a number of single STJ's in a detector array. We present a 2D model which describes the response of DROIDs with partial trapping in the STJs. The model describes diffusion of quasiparticles (qps) and imperfect confinement via exchange of qps between the absorber and STJ. It incorporates possible diffusion mismatch between absorber and STJ, possible asymmetry between the STJs as well as between the base and top electrodes of the STJs, and photon absorption in the absorber or base or top film of the STJ. Dedicated experiments have been conducted to test the different aspects of the model. We find a good agreement between the model and experimental results.

  19. Comparison of results of experimental research with numerical calculations of a model one-sided seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachimiak Damian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Paper presents the results of experimental and numerical research of a model segment of a labyrinth seal for a different wear level. The analysis covers the extent of leakage and distribution of static pressure in the seal chambers and the planes upstream and downstream of the segment. The measurement data have been compared with the results of numerical calculations obtained using commercial software. Based on the flow conditions occurring in the area subjected to calculations, the size of the mesh defined by parameter y+ has been analyzed and the selection of the turbulence model has been described. The numerical calculations were based on the measurable thermodynamic parameters in the seal segments of steam turbines. The work contains a comparison of the mass flow and distribution of static pressure in the seal chambers obtained during the measurement and calculated numerically in a model segment of the seal of different level of wear.

  20. Femtosecond pulse laser ablation of chromium: experimental results and two-temperature model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghebfar, M.; Tehrani, M. K.; Darbani, S. M. R.; Majd, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the results of experimental and computational single- and multi-shot ablation threshold and the incubation effect of chromium metal sample, irradiated by ultrashort laser pulses, are presented. The experimental value of the ablation threshold is determined based on D2 method by measuring the outer ablation crater diameters as a function of incident laser pulse energy using 800 nm, 30 fs, laser pulses. The value of 0.19 ± 0.04 (J/cm2 ), is obtained for the single-shot ablation threshold fluence. The experimental results are compared with time-dependent heat flow calculations based on the two-temperature model and the effect of number and separation time of two consecutive laser pulses with the same total fluence is studied for the Cr target. Moreover, the role of pulse width and absorbed fluence in thermal equilibrium time between electrons and lattice is investigated in two-temperature model. The thermal equilibrium between electron and lattice is established after a few picoseconds for low fluences and after a few tens of picoseconds at higher fluences.

  1. Simulation and experimental results of optical and thermal modeling of gold nanoshells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghazanfari, Lida; Khosroshahi, Mohammad E., E-mail: khosrom@mie.utoronto.ca

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a generalized method for optical and thermal modeling of synthesized magneto-optical nanoshells (MNSs) for biomedical applications. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles with diameter of 9.5 ± 1.4 nm are fabricated using co-precipitation method and subsequently covered by a thin layer of gold to obtain 15.8 ± 3.5 nm MNSs. In this paper, simulations and detailed analysis are carried out for different nanoshell geometry to achieve a maximum heat power. Structural, magnetic and optical properties of MNSs are assessed using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–VIS spectrophotometer, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Magnetic saturation of synthesized magnetite nanoparticles are reduced from 46.94 to 11.98 emu/g after coating with gold. The performance of the proposed optical–thermal modeling technique is verified by simulation and experimental results. - Highlights: • Proposing a generalized method for optical and thermal modeling of nanoshells • Verification of the proposed modeling technique by simulation and experimental results • Simulations for different nanoshell geometry to achieve a maximum heat power • Synthesis and characterization of magneto-optical nanoshells.

  2. Non-linear spacecraft component parameters identification based on experimental results and finite element modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vismara, S. O.; Ricci, S.; Bellini, M.; Trittoni, L.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of the present paper is to describe a procedure to identify and model the non-linear behaviour of structural elements. The procedure herein applied can be divided into two main steps: the system identification and the finite element model updating. The application of the restoring force surface method as a strategy to characterize and identify localized non-linearities has been investigated. This method, which works in the time domain, has been chosen because it has `built-in' characterization capabilities, it allows a direct non-parametric identification of non-linear single-degree-of-freedom systems and it can easily deal with sine-sweep excitations. Two different application examples are reported. At first, a numerical test case has been carried out to investigate the modelling techniques in the case of non-linear behaviour based on the presence of a free-play in the model. The second example concerns the flap of the Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle that successfully completed its 100-min mission on 11 February 2015. The flap was developed under the responsibility of Thales Alenia Space Italia, the prime contractor, which provided the experimental data needed to accomplish the investigation. The procedure here presented has been applied to the results of modal testing performed on the article. Once the non-linear parameters were identified, they were used to update the finite element model in order to prove its capability of predicting the flap behaviour for different load levels.

  3. Comparison of experimental data with results of some drying models for regularly shaped products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, Ahmet [Aksaray University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aksaray (Turkey); Aydin, Orhan [Karadeniz Technical University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Trabzon (Turkey); Dincer, Ibrahim [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of drying of moist slab, cylinder and spherical products to study dimensionless moisture content distributions and their comparisons. Experimental study includes the measurement of the moisture content distributions of slab and cylindrical carrot, slab and cylindrical pumpkin and spherical blueberry during drying at various temperatures (e.g., 30, 40, 50 and 60 C) at specific constant velocity (U = 1 m/s) and the relative humidity {phi}=30%. In theoretical analysis, two moisture transfer models are used to determine drying process parameters (e.g., drying coefficient and lag factor) and moisture transfer parameters (e.g., moisture diffusivity and moisture transfer coefficient), and to calculate the dimensionless moisture content distributions. The calculated results are then compared with the experimental moisture data. A considerably high agreement is obtained between the calculations and experimental measurements for the cases considered. The effective diffusivity values were evaluated between 0.741 x 10{sup -5} and 5.981 x 10{sup -5} m{sup 2}/h for slab products, 0.818 x 10{sup -5} and 6.287 x 10{sup -5} m{sup 2}/h for cylindrical products and 1.213 x 10{sup -7} and 7.589 x 10{sup -7} m{sup 2}/h spherical products using the model-I and 0.316 x 10{sup -5}-5.072 x 10{sup -5} m{sup 2}/h for slab products, 0.580 x 10{sup -5}-9.587 x 10{sup -5} m{sup 2}/h for cylindrical products and 1.408 x 10{sup -7}-13.913 x 10{sup -7} m{sup 2}/h spherical products using the model-II. (orig.)

  4. Active vibration absorber for the CSI evolutionary model - Design and experimental results. [Controls Structures Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, Anne M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The development of control of large flexible structures technology must include practical demonstrations to aid in the understanding and characterization of controlled structures in space. To support this effort, a testbed facility has been developed to study practical implementation of new control technologies under realistic conditions. The paper discusses the design of a second order, acceleration feedback controller which acts as an active vibration absorber. This controller provides guaranteed stability margins for collocated sensor/actuator pairs in the absence of sensor/actuator dynamics and computational time delay. Experimental results in the presence of these factors are presented and discussed. The robustness of this design under model uncertainty is demonstrated.

  5. SAA drift: Experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, O. R.; Romashova, V. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    According to the paleomagnetic analysis there are variations of Earth’s magnetic field connected with magnetic moment changing. These variations affect on the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) location. Indeed different observations approved the existence of the SAA westward drift rate (0.1 1.0 deg/year) and northward drift rate (approximately 0.1 deg/year). In this work, we present the analysis of experimental results obtained in Scobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University (SINP MSU) onboard different Earth’s artificial satellites (1972 2003). The fluxes of protons with energy >50 MeV, gamma quanta with energy >500 keV and neutrons with energy 0.1 1.0 MeV in the SAA region have been analyzed. The mentioned above experimental data were obtained onboard the orbital stations Salut-6 (1979), MIR (1991, 1998) and ISS (2003) by the similar experimental equipment. The comparison of the data obtained during these two decades of investigations confirms the fact that the SAA drifts westward. Moreover the analysis of fluxes of electrons with energy about hundreds keV (Cosmos-484 (1972) and Active (Interkosmos-24, 1991) satellites) verified not only the SAA westward drift but northward drift also.

  6. Structural and vibrational study of graphene oxide via coronene based models: theoretical and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida de Mendonça, João Paulo; Henrique de Lima, Alessandro; Amaral Junqueira, Georgia Maria; Gianini Quirino, Welber; Legnani, Cristiano; Oliveira Maciel, Indhira; Sato, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    We use the Coronene (C24H12), a simple and finite molecule, to make a model to study the spectroscopic and structural alterations generated by oxygenated groups in graphene oxide (GO). Based on the Lerf-Klinowski model, we chose the hydroxyl [OH-], the carboxyl [COOH-] and the epoxy [the ring C2O inside the molecule] as our radicals of interest and study their collective and isolated effects. We perform geometry optimization, vibrational IR (via AM1 and DFT-B3LYP) and Raman spectra (via DFT-B3LYP) of a series of functionalized coronene molecules. As results, we obtain some useful data for the analysis of IR and Raman spectra of GO, which facilitate the understanding and identification of the peaks found in the experiment. Finally, we suggest a new model to study GO, producing an accurate signature when compared to our experimental data. Such molecule shows in more details of the structural effects caused by functionalization when compared to experimental data.

  7. RC Beams Strengthened with Mechanically Fastened Composites: Experimental Results and Numerical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Martinelli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of mechanically-fastened fiber-reinforced polymer (MF-FRP systems has recently emerged as a competitive solution for the flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC beams and slabs. An overview of the experimental research has proven the effectiveness and the potentiality of the MF-FRP technique which is particularly suitable for emergency repairs or when the speed of installation and immediacy of use are imperative. A finite-element (FE model has been recently developed by the authors with the aim to simulate the behavior of RC beams strengthened in bending by MF-FRP laminates; such a model has also been validated by using a wide experimental database collected from the literature. By following the previous study, the FE model and the assembled database are considered herein with the aim of better exploring the influence of some specific aspects on the structural response of MF-FRP strengthened members, such as the bearing stress-slip relationship assumed for the FRP-concrete interface, the stress-strain law considered for reinforcing steel rebars and the cracking process in RC members resulting in the well-known tension stiffening effect. The considerations drawn from this study will be useful to researchers for the calibration of criteria and design rules for strengthening RC beams through MF-FRP laminates.

  8. Gold Nanoparticles as Probes for Nano-Raman Spectroscopy: Preliminary Experimental Results and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Le Nader

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an effective Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectrometer (TERS in backscattering reflection configuration. It combines a tip-probe nanopositioning system with Raman spectroscope. Specific tips were processed by anchoring gold nanoparticles on the apex of tapered optical fibers, prepared by an improved chemical etching method. Hence, it is possible to expose a very small area of the sample (~20 nm2 to the very strong local electromagnetic field generated by the lightning rod effect. This experimental configuration was modelled and optimised using the finite element method, which takes into account electromagnetic effects as well as the plasmon resonance. Finally, TERS measurements on single-wall carbon nanotubes were successfully performed. These results confirm the high Raman scattering enhancement predicted by the modelling, induced by our new nano-Raman device.

  9. Simulation and experimental results of optical and thermal modeling of gold nanoshells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazanfari, Lida; Khosroshahi, Mohammad E

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a generalized method for optical and thermal modeling of synthesized magneto-optical nanoshells (MNSs) for biomedical applications. Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles with diameter of 9.5 ± 1.4 nm are fabricated using co-precipitation method and subsequently covered by a thin layer of gold to obtain 15.8 ± 3.5 nm MNSs. In this paper, simulations and detailed analysis are carried out for different nanoshell geometry to achieve a maximum heat power. Structural, magnetic and optical properties of MNSs are assessed using vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-VIS spectrophotometer, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Magnetic saturation of synthesized magnetite nanoparticles are reduced from 46.94 to 11.98 emu/g after coating with gold. The performance of the proposed optical-thermal modeling technique is verified by simulation and experimental results.

  10. Investigation of sonar transponders for offshore wind farms: modeling approach, experimental setup, and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Moritz B; Rolfes, Raimund

    2013-11-01

    The installation of offshore wind farms in the German Exclusive Economic Zone requires the deployment of sonar transponders to prevent collisions with submarines. The general requirements for these systems have been previously worked out by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Marine Geophysics of the Bundeswehr. In this article, the major results of the research project "Investigation of Sonar Transponders for Offshore Wind Farms" are presented. For theoretical investigations a hybrid approach was implemented using the boundary element method to calculate the source directivity and a three-dimensional ray-tracing algorithm to estimate the transmission loss. The angle-dependence of the sound field as well as the weather-dependence of the transmission loss are compared to experimental results gathered at the offshore wind farm alpha ventus, located 45 km north of the island Borkum. While theoretical and experimental results are in general agreement, the implemented model slightly underestimates scattering at the rough sea surface. It is found that the source level of 200 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m is adequate to satisfy the detectability of the warning sequence at distances up to 2 NM (≈3.7 km) within a horizontal sector of ±60° if realistic assumptions about signal-processing and noise are made. An arrangement to enlarge the angular coverage is discussed.

  11. Dynamics of dual prism adaptation: relating novel experimental results to a minimalistic neural model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Arévalo

    Full Text Available In everyday life, humans interact with a dynamic environment often requiring rapid adaptation of visual perception and motor control. In particular, new visuo-motor mappings must be learned while old skills have to be kept, such that after adaptation, subjects may be able to quickly change between two different modes of generating movements ('dual-adaptation'. A fundamental question is how the adaptation schedule determines the acquisition speed of new skills. Given a fixed number of movements in two different environments, will dual-adaptation be faster if switches ('phase changes' between the environments occur more frequently? We investigated the dynamics of dual-adaptation under different training schedules in a virtual pointing experiment. Surprisingly, we found that acquisition speed of dual visuo-motor mappings in a pointing task is largely independent of the number of phase changes. Next, we studied the neuronal mechanisms underlying this result and other key phenomena of dual-adaptation by relating model simulations to experimental data. We propose a simple and yet biologically plausible neural model consisting of a spatial mapping from an input layer to a pointing angle which is subjected to a global gain modulation. Adaptation is performed by reinforcement learning on the model parameters. Despite its simplicity, the model provides a unifying account for a broad range of experimental data: It quantitatively reproduced the learning rates in dual-adaptation experiments for both direct effect, i.e. adaptation to prisms, and aftereffect, i.e. behavior after removal of prisms, and their independence on the number of phase changes. Several other phenomena, e.g. initial pointing errors that are far smaller than the induced optical shift, were also captured. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms, a local adaptation of a spatial mapping and a global adaptation of a gain factor, explained asymmetric spatial transfer and generalization of prism

  12. COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS TO CFD MODELS FOR BLENDING IN A TANK USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, R.

    2011-08-07

    Research has been completed in a pilot scale, eight foot diameter tank to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets. The jets re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. Different jet diameters and different horizontal and vertical orientations of the jets were investigated. In all, eighty five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of several miles of two inch diameter, serpentine, vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, 1.3 million gallon, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Two types of tests were performed. One type of test used a tracer fluid, which was homogeneously blended into solution. Data were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for solutions of different density and viscosity, and the blending times were successfully compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The other type of test blended solutions of different viscosity. For example, in one test a half tank of water was added to a half tank of a more viscous, concentrated salt solution. In this case, the fluid mechanics of the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids. CFD models for stratification were not investigated. This paper is the fourth in a series of papers resulting from this research (Leishear, et.al. [1- 4]), and this paper documents final test results, statistical analysis of the data, a comparison of experimental results to CFD models, and scale-up of the results to a full scale tank.

  13. Modeling the Fracturing of Rock by Fluid Injection - Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Thomas; Galvan, Boris; Miller, Stephen

    2013-04-01

    Fluid-rock interactions are mechanically fundamental to many earth processes, including fault zones and hydrothermal/volcanic systems, and to future green energy solutions such as enhanced geothermal systems and carbon capture and storage (CCS). Modeling these processes is challenging because of the strong coupling between rock fracture evolution and the consequent large changes in the hydraulic properties of the system. In this talk, we present results of a numerical model that includes poro-elastic plastic rheology (with hardening, softening, and damage), and coupled to a non-linear diffusion model for fluid pressure propagation and two-phase fluid flow. Our plane strain model is based on the poro- elastic plastic behavior of porous rock and is advanced with hardening, softening and damage using the Mohr- Coulomb failure criteria. The effective stress model of Biot (1944) is used for coupling the pore pressure and the rock behavior. Frictional hardening and cohesion softening are introduced following Vermeer and de Borst (1984) with the angle of internal friction and the cohesion as functions of the principal strain rates. The scalar damage coefficient is assumed to be a linear function of the hardening parameter. Fluid injection is modeled as a two phase mixture of water and air using the Richards equation. The theoretical model is solved using finite differences on a staggered grid. The model is benchmarked with experiments on the laboratory scale in which fluid is injected from below in a critically-stressed, dry sandstone (Stanchits et al. 2011). We simulate three experiments, a) the failure a dry specimen due to biaxial compressive loading, b) the propagation a of low pressure fluid front induced from the bottom in a critically stressed specimen, and c) the failure of a critically stressed specimen due to a high pressure fluid intrusion. Comparison of model results with the fluid injection experiments shows that the model captures most of the experimental

  14. Turbulence in edge and core transport barriers: new experimental results and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuzawa, T.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, recent progressive studies on experimental analysis and theoretical models for turbulence phenomena around the transport barriers in high-performance magnetic confined fusion plasma are reviewed. The linkage of radial electric fields and turbulence, the importance of radial electric field curvature, and observations of spatiotemporal turbulence structures are described with related theoretical models.

  15. Fate and Transport of Graphene Oxide in Granular Porous Media: Experimental Results and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin

    2014-05-01

    Although graphene oxide (GO) has been used in many applications to improve human life quality, its environmental fate and behavior are still largely unknown. In this work, a range of laboratory experiments were conducted to explore the aggregation, deposition, and transport mechanisms of GO nano-sheets in porous media under various conditions. Stability experimental data showed that both cation valence and pH showed significant effect on the aggregation of GO sheets. The measured critical coagulation concentrations were in good agreement with the predictions of the extended Schulze-Hardy rule. Sand column experimental results indicated that deposition and transport of GO in porous media were strongly dependent on solution ionic strength. Particularly, GO showed high mobility under low ionic strength conditions in both saturated and unsaturated columns. Increasing ionic strength dramatically increased the retention of GO in porous media, mainly through secondary-minimum deposition. Recovery rates of GO in unsaturated sand columns were lower than that in saturated columns under the same ionic strength conditions, suggesting moisture content also played an important role in the retention of GO in porous media. Findings from the bubble column experiments showed that the GO did not attach to the air-water interface, which is consistent with the XDLVO predictions. Additional retention mechanisms, such as film straining, thus could be responsible to the reduced mobility of GO in unsaturated porous media. The breakthrough curves of GO in saturated and unsaturated columns could be accurately simulated by an advection-dispersion-reaction model.

  16. Contribution to modeling of the reflooding of a severely damaged reactor core using PRELUDE experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachrata, A.; Fichot, F.; Repetto, G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, Cadarache (France); Quintard, M. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Fleurot, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire IRSN, Cadarache (France)

    2012-07-01

    In case of accident at a nuclear power plant, water sources may not be available for a long period of time and the core heats up due to the residual power. The reflooding (injection of water into core) may be applied if the availability of safety injection is recovered during accident. If the injection becomes available only in the late phase of accident, water will enter a core configuration that will differ significantly from original rod-bundle geometry. Any attempt to inject water after significant core degradation can lead to further fragmentation of core material. The fragmentation of fuel rods may result in the formation of a 'debris bed'. The typical particle size in a debris bed might reach few millimeters (characteristic length-scale: 1 to 5 mm), i.e., a high permeability porous medium. The French 'Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire' is developing experimental programs (PEARL and PRELUDE) and simulation tools (ICARE-CATHARE and ASTEC) to study and optimize the severe accident management strategy and to assess the probabilities to stop the progress of in-vessel core degradation. It is shown that the quench front exhibits either a ID behaviour or a 2D one, depending on injection rate or bed characteristics. The PRELUDE experiment covers a rather large range of variation of parameters, for which the developed model appears to be quite predictive. (authors)

  17. Review on optical constants of Titan aerosols: Experimental results and modeling/observational data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassé, Coralie; Muñoz, Olga; Coll, Patrice; Raulin, François

    2014-05-01

    During the last years many studies have been performed to improve the experimental database of optical constants of Titan aerosols. Indeed, the determination of the optical constants of these particles is essential to quantify their capacity to absorb and to scatter solar radiation, and thus to evaluate their role on Titan's radiative balance and climate. The study of optical properties is also crucial to analyze and to better interpret many of Titan's observational data, in particular those acquired during the Cassini-Huygens mission. One way to determine Titan aerosols optical constant is to measure the optical constants of analogues of Titan complex organic material synthesized in the laboratory, usually named Titan's tholins (Sagan and Khare, 1979). But the optical constants depend on the chemical composition, the size and the shape of particles (Raulin et al., 2012). Those three parameters result from the experimental conditions such as energy source, gas mixing ratio, gas pressure, flow rate and irradiation time (Cable et al., 2012). Besides the determination of the refractive index in the laboratory, there are others methods using theoretical models or observational data. Nevertheless, theoretical models are based on laboratory data or/and observational data. The visible - near infrared spectral region of optical constants has been widely studied with laboratory analogues. Comparison of the obtained results suggest that tholins synthesized by Tran et al. (2003) and Majhoub et al. (2012) are the best representative of Titan aerosols with regards to their refractive indexes in this spectral region. The mid-infrared spectral range has been studied only by Imanaka et al. (2012) and slightly by Tran et al. (2003). In that spectral range, Titan tholins do not exhibit the features displayed by Kim and Courtin (2013) from Titan's observations. For spectral region of wavelengths smaller than 0.20µm or higher than 25µm, only the data from Khare et al. (1984) are

  18. Results of Numerical Modeling and Experimental Activities in Preparation of the Maxus-5 Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassano, Edmondo; Castagnolo, Dario; Albano, Floriana; Fortezza, Raimondo

    2002-01-01

    The present paper describes numerical and experimental research activities carried out at MARS center for the preparation of an experiment on the Marangoni migration of a dissolving drop, composed by a liquid binary mixture having a miscibility gap. The paper integrates the results already presented in the previous congress, the emphasis is set on the determination of the parameters to be used for the MAXUS 5 sounding rocket mission, which is scheduled for spring 2003. Level set technique has been used for the calculation of the non-steady thermo-solutal capillary flow evolution in a bounded medium.Migration velocities and volume variation are calculated for different Marangoni numbers. The results of the numerical simulations provide the determination of drop radii and temperature gradients to be used during 12 minutes of low gravity, as provided by a MAXUS rocket. Experimental results provide accurate information on the refraction index gradient variation, due to the improvement of the interpretation of the fringe pattern. These results have allowed us to determine the optical parameters that optimize the Wollaston interferometer features. Comparison between numerical and experimental results shows a good agreement.

  19. Plan Merging: Experimental results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Weerdt, M.M.; Van der Krogt, R.P.J.; Zutt, J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the results of a plan merging algorithm. This algorithm coordinates the plans of multiple, autonomous agents, each able to independently find a plan. This algorithm is evaluated using realistic data from a taxi company. We show that when we allow passengers to be a few minut

  20. GENERAL APROACH TO MODELING NONLINEAR AMPLITUDE AND FREQUENCY DEPENDENT HYSTERESIS EFFECTS BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Heine

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A detailed description of the rubber parts’ properties is gaining in importance in the current simulation models of multi-body simulation. One application example is a multi-body simulation of the washing machine movement. Inside the washing machine, there are different force transmission elements, which consist completely or partly of rubber. Rubber parts or, generally, elastomers usually have amplitude-dependant and frequency-dependent force transmission properties. Rheological models are used to describe these properties. A method for characterization of the amplitude and frequency dependence of such a rheological model is presented within this paper. Within this method, the used rheological model can be reduced or expanded in order to illustrate various non-linear effects. An original result is given with the automated parameter identification. It is fully implemented in Matlab. Such identified rheological models are intended for subsequent implementation in a multi-body model. This allows a significant enhancement of the overall model quality.

  1. The entrapment of organic dyes into sol gel matrix: Experimental results and modeling for photonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Sheila C. S.; Gester, Rodrigo M.; Guimarães, Jeconias R.; Amazonas, Jarlesson G.; Nero, Jordan Del; Silva, Sidicleia B. C.; Galembeck, Andre

    2008-05-01

    To better understand the electronic absorption spectra in the UV-vis region of the methyl red (MR) dye in its anionic, isoelectronic and zwitterionic forms in aqueous solution, high level sequential-Monte Carlo/quantum mechanics (s-MC/QM) methodology was performed and compared to experimental measurements. The theoretical procedure consists in treating the solute-solvent system separately using classical MC simulations to build the MR aqueous solution and then, the MC structures are treated by quantum approaches. Thus, the solvent effects were investigated including on the INDO/CI-S calculations initially the micro and further the first hydration shells. As we excepted the absorption spectra are characterized by a strong band placed in the region of lowest energies. To the basic form we computed shoulders at 434.33 ± 0.09 and 436.34 ± 0.56 nm corresponding to the micro and first hydration shells, respectively. Our experimental measurements display this shoulder at 431 nm. Under acidic forms (isoelectronic and zwitterionic), we computed the red shift in relation to the basic compound. To the isoelectronic structure we found the absorption maximum located at 485.80 ± 0.34 and 480.66 ± 0.67 nm to the micro and first shells, respectively. The experimental prediction of 513 nm is in good agreement with theoretical result. Finally the zwitterionic form we did not obtain a micro layer, therefore we used only the first shell. Our theoretical results are converged to 502.13 ± 0.79 nm in good concordance with the experimental confirmation of 511 nm. These samples were optically transparent, hard and resistant to dye leaching and to chemical attacks, being promising materials to be used in optical devices.

  2. Modeled and experimental results of an omnidirectional free-space optical receiver architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Syed H.; Lovell, Gregory L.; Finch, Michael F.

    2017-03-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communications provide point-to-point connectivity while offering many advantages in size, weight, and power as compared to radio frequency. It has the potential to provide fiber-optic data rates without the need for lengthy fiber cables. Omnidirectional FSO, also known as O-FSO systems, provide a non-line-of-sight option for data communications. They are gaining popularity in short-distance networks. Most existing O-FSO links range from 1 to 100 m and present experimental/simulated data rates ranging between 5 kb/s and 1 Mb/s. A 2.5-Gb/s O-FSO system was recently reported with a range of 25 cm. This paper employs a fiber bundle as an O-FSO receiver. The energy collected by the receiver is related to the acceptance cone of each fiber. The fiber bundle integrates the optical power gathered by the individual fibers and couples it to the photodetector. Experimental data rates approaching 100 kb/s over a meter long system are presented, whereas simulated results support a data rate up to 52 Mb/s for distances approaching a kilometer. Theoretical and experimental optical power versus range is also presented for the proposed O-FSO architecture, using on-off keying.

  3. Subionospehric VLF perturbations of red sprites: 3D FDTD modeling and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, M.; Hobara, Y.; Ohta, K.; Minatohara, T.; Otsuyama, T.; Hayakawa, M.

    2012-04-01

    Majority of red sprites occurs in association with large positive cloud to ground discharges. Although the red sprite consists of highly ionized structure, physical properties of the ionization columns such as electron density and spatial extent have not understood well. In this paper 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method carried out to compute the subionospheric VLF signal perturbations due to the sprite ionization columns. Spatial scales of columns are determined by the sprite images obtained from our optical observations during winter lightning activities over the sea of Japan. Numerical results indicate that the multiple sprites generate the complicated scattering pattern of the VLF transmitter waves depending on special orientation and extent of sprite ionization columns. Spatial dependence of the scattered amplitude are compared with those from the experimental results of VLF observation network.

  4. Modeling of contact mechanics and friction limit surfaces for soft fingers in robotics, with experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xydas, N.; Kao, I.

    1999-09-01

    A new theory in contact mechanics for modeling of soft fingers is proposed to define the relationship between the normal force and the radius of contact for soft fingers by considering general soft-finger materials, including linearly and nonlinearly elastic materials. The results show that the radius of contact is proportional to the normal force raised to the power of {gamma}, which ranges from 0 to 1/3. This new theory subsumes the Hertzian contact model for linear elastic materials, where {gamma} = 1/3. Experiments are conducted to validate the theory using artificial soft fingers made of various materials such as rubber and silicone. Results for human fingers are also compared. This theory provides a basis for numerically constructing friction limit surfaces. The numerical friction limit surface can be approximated by an ellipse, with the major and minor axes as the maximum friction force and the maximum moment with respect to the normal axis of contact, respectively. Combining the results of the contact-mechanics model with the contact-pressure distribution, the normalized friction limit surface can be derived for anthropomorphic soft fingers. The results of the contact-mechanics model and the pressure distribution for soft fingers facilitate the construction of numerical friction limit surfaces, and will enable us to analyze and simulate contact behaviors of grasping and manipulation in robotics.

  5. Sound propagation in forests: A comparison of experimental results and values predicted by the Nord 2000 model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarrero, A.I.; Martín, M.A.; González, J.

    2008-01-01

    to predict scattering effects when sound propagates in outdoor spaces with obstacles. The comparison of experimental results and predictions shows that the Nord 2000 model predicts the ground effect dip in forests with acceptable accuracy in about 60% of the cases if the flow resistivity of the ground......The purpose of the work described in this paper is twofold: (i) to present the results of an experimental investigation of the sound attenuation in different types of forest, and (ii) to validate a part of the Nord 2000 model. A number of measurements have been carried out in regular and irregular...... forests with trees with deciduous and evergreen leaves, different tree density, different trunk diameter, etc. The experimental results indicate that trees have a noticeable effect on sound propagation at medium and high frequencies at distances longer than 40m. The Nord 2000 model uses a simple algorithm...

  6. Pb-16Li/water interaction: Experimental results and preliminary modelling activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciampichetti, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.ciampichetti@enea.it [ENEA C.R. Brasimone, 40032 Camugno (Italy); Ricapito, Italo [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Forgione, Nicola; Pesetti, Alessio [Università di Pisa, DIMNP, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 2, 56122 Pisa (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • We studied the interaction between pressurised water and liquid Pb16Li. • The free volume is more impacting than the water enthalpy in determining the pressure evolution of the system. • If a large quantity of water is injected in Pb16Li the temperature increase is very high. • The pressure trends computed by the SIMMER code show a quite good agreement with the experimental data. • From the results some recommendations about the WCLL blanket design can be derived. -- Abstract: The Water Cooled Lithium Lead (WCLL) blanket is based on the eutectic liquid alloy Pb16Li as breeder material and neutron multiplier, and pressurised water as coolant. The liquid breeder flows at few mm/s in the blanket module while the pressurised water is circulated inside double-wall tubes. In spite of the adoption of double-wall tubes for the coolant, the probability of a water large leak because of a tube rupture accident cannot be considered negligible. As a consequence, the Pb16Li/water interaction due to a large break in one or more cooling tubes still remains one of the biggest concerns for this blanket concept. This paper reports the results of three experimental tests on Pb16Li/water interaction carried out at ENEA-Brasimone operating the LIFUS 5 facility. Water was injected into the reaction tank, containing Pb16Li at 330 °C, at a pressure of 155 bar with different values of sub-cooling and with different free volumes in the reaction system. In addition, post test analyses with SIMMER III code are presented in order to compare the pressure evolution measured during the experiments with that calculated by the code.

  7. Aerosol deposition in the respiratory tract of the rat. Experimental results and mathematical modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halík, J; Lenger, V; Kliment, V; Voboril, P

    1980-01-01

    The deposition fraction in the respiratory tract of rats were determined experimentally using aerosol 85Srl2 in saline. The dimensions of the particles [MMD 1.63 /+- /+- 0.47 micron, Sg = 1.29] were measured by two independent methods. Rats weighing 200 g were exposed for a period of 60 min [t] in the inhalation apparatus PIANO 3 with a generator according to Lauterbach. From the volume activity [A] of 3 - 11 Bq/litre air a depot of 35-129 kBq was formed in the animals. Spirometric values measured with a modified Jäger ergospirometer were: V = 178.8 /+- 42.9 ml, VT = = 1.18 /+- 0.24 ml. f = 163.1 /+- 28.1 cycles/min. The total amount inhaled [Q] was calculated [Q = V.A.t], the deposited amount [D] was measured by a whole body counter. THe mean deposition fraction was 0.570 /+- 0.052 and was not related either to exposure time or to aerosol activity. In view of the broad validity of the conclusions for aerosols of round-shaped particles, the mean deposition fraction was determined with the help of a mathematical model according to Landahl. The theoretical values amounted to 0.609 [from 0.522 to 0.686]. The good agreement between the mean deposition fractions estimated by two independent methods indicates that on the basis of the probability theory and dimensional analysis, the mathematical model can also be used in humans for simulation deposition as one of the basis foundations for a quantitative evaluation of inhalation risk from any kind of aerosol.

  8. Experimental Results and Integrated Modeling of Bacterial Growth on an Insoluble Hydrophobic Substrate (Phenanthrene)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, Iris K. U.; Rein, Arno; Miltner, Anja

    2014-01-01

    was fitted to the test results for the rates of dissolution, metabolism, and growth. The strains showed similar efficiency, with v(max) values of 12-18 g dw g(-1) d(-1), yields of 0.21 g g(-1), maximum growth rates of 2.5-3.8 d(-1), and decay rates of 0.04-0.05 d(-1). Sensitivity analysis with the model......Metabolism of a low-solubility substrate is limited by dissolution and availability and can hardly be determined. We developed a numerical model for simultaneously calculating dissolution kinetics of such substrates and their metabolism and microbial growth (Monod kinetics with decay) and tested...... shows that (i) retention in crystals or NAPLs or by sequestration competes with biodegradation, (ii) bacterial growth conditions (dissolution flux and resulting chemical activity of substrate) are more relevant for the final state of the system than the initial biomass, and (iii) the desorption flux...

  9. Heating stents with radio frequency energy to prevent tumor ingrowth: modeling and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Lawes, Kate; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    1998-04-01

    Stents are often inserted into internal orifices to treat blockage due to tumor ingrowth. Stents are favored due to their minimally invasive nature, possible avoidance of a surgical procedure, and their ability to palliate surgically non-resectable disease. Because of rapid tumor growth however, a treatment means to prevent overgrowth through the stent and resultant blockage is required. To further this goal, experiments were performed in which a stent was placed in tissue and heated with radiofrequency (RF) energy to coagulate a cylinder of tissue, thereby eradicating viable tissue in the proximity of the stent. Temperatures were measured at the central stent surface and edges over time during a 5 - 10 minute heating in phantom and in fresh tissue. In addition, a finite element model was used to simulate the electric field and temperature distribution. Blood flow was also introduced in the model by evaluating RF application to stents to determine effectiveness of the energy applications. Changing perfusion and tissue electrical conductivity as a function of temperature was applied as the tissue was heated to 100 degree(s)C. Results from the electric field model will be shown as well as the thermal distribution over time from the simulations. Lastly, results from the damage integral will be discussed.

  10. THE CORRELATION OF EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF THE COMPOSITE MATERIALS HARDNESS WITH THEORETICAL RESULTS OF A MATHEMATICAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minodora Maria PASARE

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is about of the Hays-Kendall theoretical model of testing the microhardness of the composites materials of NiP/SiC type. We used an indenter to establish the microhardness of the composite and different types of loads. The microhardness can be interpreted using a theoretical model Hays-Kendall and the Kick model.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM1: Experimental Results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Craig [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guala, Michele [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing nonproprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for opensource research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL). Reference Model 1 (RM1) is a 1:40 geometric scale dual-rotor axial flow horizontal axis device with counter-rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.5m. Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM1. Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2.425m3s-1, resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1.05ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec ≈ 3.0x105. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing turbulence performance models and their ability to accurately predict device performance metrics, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to predict turbulent inflow environments, reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order turbulent statistics, as well as device performance metrics.

  12. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM1: Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Craig [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guala, Michele [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing non-proprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for open-source research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL). Reference Model 1 (RM2) is a 1:40 geometric scale dual-rotor axial flow horizontal axis device with counter-rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.5m. Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM1. Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2.425m3s-1, resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1.05ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec ≈ 3.0x105. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing turbulence performance models and their ability to accurately predict device performance metrics, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to predict turbulent inflow environments, reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order turbulent statistics, as well as device performance metrics.

  13. Optimal piezoelectric beam shape for single and broadband vibration energy harvesting: Modeling, simulation and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthalif, Asan G. A.; Nordin, N. H. Diyana

    2015-03-01

    Harvesting energy from the surroundings has become a new trend in saving our environment. Among the established ones are solar panels, wind turbines and hydroelectric generators which have successfully grown in meeting the world's energy demand. However, for low powered electronic devices; especially when being placed in a remote area, micro scale energy harvesting is preferable. One of the popular methods is via vibration energy scavenging which converts mechanical energy (from vibration) to electrical energy by the effect of coupling between mechanical variables and electric or magnetic fields. As the voltage generated greatly depends on the geometry and size of the piezoelectric material, there is a need to define an optimum shape and configuration of the piezoelectric energy scavenger. In this research, mathematical derivations for unimorph piezoelectric energy harvester are presented. Simulation is done using MATLAB and COMSOL Multiphysics software to study the effect of varying the length and shape of the beam to the generated voltage. Experimental results comparing triangular and rectangular shaped piezoelectric beam are also presented.

  14. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM2: Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Craig [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guala, Michele [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL)

    2014-08-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing non-proprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for open-source research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN - SAFL) . Reference Model 2 (RM2) is a 1:15 geometric scale dual - rotor cross flow vertical axis device with counter - rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.43m and rotor height, hT = 0.323 m. RM2 is a river turbine designed for a site modeled after a reach in the lower Mississippi River near Baton Rouge, Louisiana (Barone et al. 2014) . Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM2 . Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2. 35m3s-1 , resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1. 2 ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec = 6 .1x104. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and their ability to accurately simulate turbulent inflow environments, device performance metrics, and to reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order

  15. The composite reinforcement production in digital manufacturing: experimental validation of the heat transfer and cure modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, I.; Krasnovskii, A.; Kutin, A.

    2017-02-01

    The experimental validation of the heat transfer and cure modeling results for 8-mm fiber-reinforced thermosetting composite reinforcement is reported in this article. The temperature and degree of cure of composite reinforcement are predicted using a two-dimensional heat transfer and curing model. The model uses the infrared radiant heating theory and takes into account the heat transfer between the composite rod and the surrounding air. The implicit finite difference method was used to solve the system of governing equations. The results obtained using mathematical model was compared to experimental data: the temperature field inside the composite reinforcement was measured by means of naked thermocouple; Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) was used to measure the degree of cure of the final product. Calculated and measured temperature and degree of cure fields were in good agreement.

  16. A Neighborhood-Scale Green Infrastructure Retrofit: Experimental Results, Model Simulations, and Resident Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefferson, A.; Avellaneda, P. M.; Jarden, K. M.; Turner, V. K.; Grieser, J.

    2016-12-01

    Distributed green infrastructure approaches to stormwater management that can be retrofit into existing development are of growing interest, but questions remain about their effectiveness at the watershed-scale. In suburban northeastern Ohio, homeowners on a residential street with 55% impervious surface were given the opportunity for free rain barrels, rain gardens, and bioretention cells. Of 163 parcels, only 22 owners (13.5%) chose to participate, despite intense outreach efforts. After pre-treatment monitoring, 37 rain barrels, 7 rain gardens, and 16 street-side bioretention cells were installed in 2013-2014. Using a paired watershed approach, a reduction in up to 33% of peak flow and 40% of total runoff volume per storm was measured in the storm sewer. Using the monitoring data, a calibrated and validated SWMM model was built to explore the long-term effectiveness of the green infrastructure against a wider range of hydrological conditions. Model results confirm the effectiveness of green infrastructure in reducing surface runoff and increasing infiltration and evaporation. Based on 20 years of historical precipitation data, the model shows that the green infrastructure is capable of reducing flows by >40% at the 1, 2, and 5 year return period, suggesting some resilience to projected increases in precipitation intensity in a changing climate. Further, in this project, more benefit is derived from the street-side bioretention cells than from the rain barrels and gardens that treat rooftop runoff. Substantial hydrological gains were achieved despite low homeowner participation. Surveys indicate that many residents viewed stormwater as the city's problem and had negative perceptions of green infrastructure, despite slightly pro-environment values generally. Overall, this study demonstrates green infrastructure's hydrological effectiveness but raises challenging questions about overcoming social barriers retrofits at the neighborhood scale.

  17. Carbon sequestration via reaction with basaltic rocks: geochemical modeling and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Thomas, Burt; Bischoff, James L.; Palandri, James

    2012-01-01

    Basaltic rocks are potential repositories for sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) because of their capacity for trapping CO2 in carbonate minerals. We carried out a series of thermodynamic equilibrium models and high pressure experiments, reacting basalt with CO2-charged fluids over a range of conditions from 50 to 200 °C at 300 bar. Results indicate basalt has a high reactivity to CO2 acidified brine. Carbon dioxide is taken up from solution at all temperatures from 50 to 200 °C, 300 bar, but the maximum extent and rate of reaction occurs at 100 °C, 300 bar. Reaction path simulations utilizing the geochemical modeling program CHILLER predicted an equilibrium carbonate alteration assemblage of calcite, magnesite, and siderite, but the only secondary carbonate identified in the experiments was a ferroan magnesite. The amount of uptake at 100 °C, 300 bar ranged from 8% by weight for a typical tholeite to 26% for a picrite. The actual amount of CO2 uptake and extent of rock alteration coincides directly with the magnesium content of the rock suggesting that overall reaction extent is controlled by bulk basalt Mg content. In terms of sequestering CO2, an average basaltic MgO content of 8% is equivalent to 2.6 × 108 metric ton CO2/km3 basalt.

  18. Experimental and Numerical Modeling of Fluid Flow Processes in Continuous Casting: Results from the LIMMCAST-Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmel, K.; Kratzsch, C.; Asad, A.; Schurmann, D.; Schwarze, R.; Eckert, S.

    2017-07-01

    The present paper reports about numerical simulations and model experiments concerned with the fluid flow in the continuous casting process of steel. This work was carried out in the LIMMCAST project in the framework of the Helmholtz alliance LIMTECH. A brief description of the LIMMCAST facilities used for the experimental modeling at HZDR is given here. Ultrasonic and inductive techniques and the X-ray radioscopy were employed for flow measurements or visualizations of two-phase flow regimes occurring in the submerged entry nozzle and the mold. Corresponding numerical simulations were performed at TUBAF taking into account the dimensions and properties of the model experiments. Numerical models were successfully validated using the experimental data base. The reasonable and in many cases excellent agreement of numerical with experimental data allows to extrapolate the models to real casting configurations. Exemplary results will be presented here showing the effect of electromagnetic brakes or electromagnetic stirrers on the flow in the mold or illustrating the properties of two-phase flows resulting from an Ar injection through the stopper rod.

  19. Radar Data Assimilation of the GRAPES Model and Experimental Results in a Typhoon Case

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hongya; XUE Jishan; GU Jianfeng; XU Haiming

    2012-01-01

    Constructing β-mesoscale weather systems in initial fields remains a challenging problem in a mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model.Without vertical velocity matching the β-mesoscale weather system,convection activities would be suppressed by downdraft and cooling caused by precipitating hydrometeors.In this study,a method,basing on the three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) assimilation technique,was developed to obtain reasonable structures of β-mesoscale weather systems by assimilating radar data in a next-generation NWP system named GRAPES (the Global and Regional Assimilation and Prediction System) of China.Single-point testing indicated that assimilating radial wind significantly improved the horizontal wind but had little effect on the vertical velocity,while assimilating the retrieved vertical velocity (taking Richardson's equation as the observational operator) can greatly improve the vertical motion.Experiments on a typhoon show that assimilation of the radial wind data can greatly improve the prediction of the typhoon track,and can ameliorate precipitation to some extent.Assimilating the retrieved vertical velocity and rainwater mixing ratio,and adjusting water vapor and cloud water mixing ratio in the initial fields simultaneously,can significantly improve the tropical cyclone rainfall forecast but has little effect on typhoon path.Joint assimilating these three kinds of radar data gets the best results.Taking into account the scale of different weather systems and representation of observational data,data quality control,error setting of background field and observation data are still requiring further in-depth study.

  20. Application of the dynamic model of Saeman to an industrial rotary kiln incinerator: numerical and experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, L G; Caillat, S; Chinnayya, A; Gambier, D; Baudoin, B

    2010-07-01

    In order to simulate granular materials structure in a rotary kiln under the steady-state regime, a mathematical model has been developed by Saeman (1951). This model enables the calculation of the bed profiles, the axial velocity and solids flow rate along the kiln. This model can be coupled with a thermochemical model, in the case of a reacting moving bed. This dynamic model was used to calculate the bed profile for an industrial size kiln and the model projections were validated by measurements in a 4 m diameter by 16 m long industrial rotary kiln. The effect of rotation speed under solids bed profile and the effect of the feed rate under filling degree were established. On the basis of the calculations and the experimental results a phenomenological relation for the residence time estimation was proposed for the rotary kiln.

  1. A new model based on experimental results for the thermal characterization of bricks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivancos, Jose-Luis [Instituto de Quimica Molecular Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera S/N, 46022 Valencia (Spain)]|[Departamento de Proyectos de Ingenieria, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera S/N, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Soto, Juan; Ros-Lis, Jose V.; Martinez-Manez, Ramon [Instituto de Quimica Molecular Aplicada, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera S/N, 46022 Valencia (Spain)]|[Departamento de Quimica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera S/N, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Perez, Israel [Casas Bioclimaticas. C/La Paz, 17, 46003 Valencia (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    The development of fast and reliable protocols to determine the characteristics of building materials is of importance in order to develop environmentally friendly houses with an efficient energy design. In this article heat flux evolution on different types of clay and concrete bricks has been studied using a guarded hot-plate. The studied bricks were purchased from local commercially available sources and included a solid face brick and a range of honeycombed and perforated bricks. From the data collected a new model to study heat flux is proposed. This model is based on the shape of the typical sigmoidal curves observed for the time dependent heat flux evolution. The model allows the calculation of the thermal resistance (R) and the heat flux in the steady-state ({phi}{sub {infinity}}). The model also calculates two new parameters, t{sub B} and {tau}{sub B}. t{sub B} represents the time at which half {phi}{sub {infinity}} is attained. This parameter (t{sub B}) has additionally been found to be dependent on the thermal diffusivity and the geometric characteristics of the brick. (author)

  2. Modeling and experimental results for condensing supercritical CO2 power cycles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven Alan; Conboy, Thomas M.; Radel, Ross F.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

    2011-01-01

    This Sandia supported research project evaluated the potential improvement that 'condensing' supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) power cycles can have on the efficiency of Light Water Reactors (LWR). The analytical portion of research project identified that a S-CO{sub 2} 'condensing' re-compression power cycle with multiple stages of reheat can increase LWR power conversion efficiency from 33-34% to 37-39%. The experimental portion of the project used Sandia's S-CO{sub 2} research loop to show that the as designed radial compressor could 'pump' liquid CO{sub 2} and that the gas-cooler's could 'condense' CO{sub 2} even though both of these S-CO{sub 2} components were designed to operate on vapor phase S-CO{sub 2} near the critical point. There is potentially very high value to this research as it opens the possibility of increasing LWR power cycle efficiency, above the 33-34% range, while lowering the capital cost of the power plant because of the small size of the S-CO{sub 2} power system. In addition it provides a way to incrementally build advanced LWRs that are optimally designed to couple to S-CO{sub 2} power conversion systems to increase the power cycle efficiency to near 40%.

  3. Review of LHC experimental results on low mass bosons in extended two Higgs doublet models

    CERN Document Server

    Aggleton, Robin; Bomark, Nils-Erik; Moretti, Stefano; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A number of searches at the LHC looking for low mass ($2m_{\\mu} - 62\\ \\mathrm{GeV}$) bosons in $\\sqrt{s} = 8\\ \\mathrm{TeV}$ data have recently been published. We summarise the most pertinent ones, and look at how their limits affect a variety of supersymmetric models which can give rise to such light bosons: the 2HDM (Types I and II), the NMSSM, and the nMSSM.

  4. Electronic sputtering of vitreous SiO{sub 2}: Experimental and modeling results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toulemonde, M., E-mail: toulemonde@ganil.fr [CIMAP (ENSICAEN, CEA, CNRS, Univ. Caen), Bd H. Becquerel, 14070 Caen (France); Assmann, W. [Fakultät für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Am Coulombwall 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Trautmann, C. [GSI Helmholzzentrum, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Technische Universität Darmstadt, Alarich-Weiss-Straße 2, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2016-07-15

    The irradiation of solids with swift heavy ions leads to pronounced surface and bulk effects controlled by the electronic energy loss of the projectiles. In contrast to the formation of ion tracks in bulk materials, the concomitant emission of atoms from the surface is much less investigated. Sputtering experiments with different ions ({sup 58}Ni, {sup 127}I and {sup 197}Au) at energies around 1.2 MeV/u were performed on vitreous SiO{sub 2} (a-SiO{sub 2}) in order to quantify the emission rates and compare them with data for crystalline SiO{sub 2} quartz. Stoichiometry of the sputtering process was verified by monitoring the thickness decreases of a thin SiO{sub 2} film deposited on a Si substrate. Angular distributions of the emitted atoms were measured by collecting sputtered atoms on arc-shaped Cu catcher foils. Subsequent analysis of the number of Si atoms deposited on the catcher foils was quantified by elastic recoil detection analysis providing differential as well as total sputtering yields. Compared to existing data for crystalline SiO{sub 2}, the total sputtering yields for vitreous SiO{sub 2} are by a factor of about five larger. Differences in the sputtering rate and track formation characteristics between amorphous and crystalline SiO{sub 2} are discussed within the frame of the inelastic thermal spike model.

  5. Silver release from nanocomposite Ag/alginate hydrogels in the presence of chloride ions: experimental results and mathematical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, Danijela; Vidovic, Srđan; Obradovic, Bojana

    2016-03-01

    A stepwise experimental and mathematical modeling approach was used to assess silver release from nanocomposite Ag/alginate microbeads in wet and dried forms into water and into normal saline solution chosen as a simplified model for certain biological fluids (e.g., blood plasma, wound exudates, sweat, etc). Three phenomena were connected and mathematically described: diffusion of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) within the alginate hydrogel, AgNP oxidation/dissolution and reaction with chloride ions, and diffusion of the resultant silver-chloride species. Mathematical modeling results agreed well with the experimental data with the AgNP diffusion coefficient estimated as 1.3 × 10-18 m2 s-1, while the first-order kinetic rate constant of AgNP oxidation/dissolution and diffusivity of silver-chloride species were shown to be inversely related. In specific, rapid rehydration and swelling of dry Ag/alginate microbeads induced fast AgNP oxidation/dissolution reaction with Cl- and AgCl precipitation within the microbeads with the lowest diffusivity of silver-chloride species compared to wet microbeads in normal saline. The proposed mathematical model provided an insight into the phenomena related to silver release from nanocomposite Ca-alginate hydrogels relevant for use of antimicrobial devices and established, at the same time, a basis for further in-depth studies of AgNP interactions in hydrogels in the presence of chloride ions.

  6. A comparison between experimental results and a mathematical model of the oxidation reactions induced by radiation of ferrous ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Mejorada, G. [Departamento de Anatomia, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: millang@servidor.unam.mx; Frias, D. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas, Universidad Estadual de Santa Cruz, Bahia (Brazil); Negron-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, Mexico 04510 D.F. (Mexico)

    2008-02-15

    The dependence of the response of chemical dosimeters as a function of the irradiation temperature is an important issue that has not yet been addressed within a mathematical modeling framework. The temperature dependence of the dose-response function has to be taken into account in practical applications, mainly in frozen food sterilization by radiation. Significant errors may occur if the dependence of the dosimeter response on the irradiation temperature is not taken into account properly. The experimental results obtained irradiating iron salt solutions at different temperatures below and above 0 deg. C show that the change in the valence of Fe{sup 2+} as a function of dose are linear for both liquid and frozen solutions. This led us to conclude that the iron salt solution seems suitable for low-temperature applications having a linear dose-response up to 600 Gy, despite a progressive decrease of sensitivity as temperature decreases. A nonlinear differential model for the kinetics of reactions induced by radiation in iron salt solutions was established. In the model a temperature correction factor was included in order to take into account abrupt changes observed in the kinetics of the chemical process when the irradiated solution's allotropic phase changes from liquid to solid (ice). Fitting the kinetic model to the experimental results at different temperatures we found the temperature correction factors.

  7. Simulating the mid-Pliocene climate with the MIROC general circulation model: experimental design and initial results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-L. Chan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, PlioMIP (Pliocene Model Intercomparison Project was established to assess the ability of various climate models to simulate the mid-Pliocene warm period (mPWP, 3.3–3.0 million years ago. We use MIROC4m, a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model (AOGCM, and its atmospheric component alone to simulate the mPWP, utilizing up-to-date data sets designated in PlioMIP as boundary conditions and adhering to the protocols outlined. In this paper, a brief description of the model is given, followed by an explanation of the experimental design and implementation of the boundary conditions, such as topography and sea surface temperature. Initial results show increases of approximately 10°C in the zonal mean surface air temperature at high latitudes accompanied by a decrease in the equator-to-pole temperature gradient. Temperatures in the tropical regions increase more in the AOGCM. However, warming of the AOGCM sea surface in parts of the northern North Atlantic Ocean and Nordic Seas is less than that suggested by proxy data. An investigation of the model-data discrepancies and further model intercomparison studies can lead to a better understanding of the mid-Pliocene climate and of its role in assessing future climate change.

  8. Ambient Vibration Tests of an Arch Dam with Different Reservoir Water Levels: Experimental Results and Comparison with Finite Element Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Vincenzo Calcina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the ambient vibration tests performed in an arch dam in two different working conditions in order to assess the effect produced by two different reservoir water levels on the structural vibration properties. The study consists of an experimental part and a numerical part. The experimental tests were carried out in two different periods of the year, at the beginning of autumn (October 2012 and at the end of winter (March 2013, respectively. The measurements were performed using a fast technique based on asynchronous records of microtremor time-series. In-contact single-station measurements were done by means of one single high resolution triaxial tromometer and two low-frequency seismometers, placed in different points of the structure. The Standard Spectral Ratio method has been used to evaluate the natural frequencies of vibration of the structure. A 3D finite element model of the arch dam-reservoir-foundation system has been developed to verify analytically determined vibration properties, such as natural frequencies and mode shapes, and their changes linked to water level with the experimental results.

  9. ASTRID: A 3D Eulerian software for subcooled boiling modelling - comparison with experimental results in tubes and annuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briere, E.; Larrauri, D.; Olive, J. [Electricite de France, Chatou (France)

    1995-09-01

    For about four years, Electricite de France has been developing a 3-D computer code for the Eulerian simulation of two-phase flows. This code, named ASTRID, is based on the six-equation two-fluid model. Boiling water flows, such as those encountered in nuclear reactors, are among the main applications of ASTRID. In order to provide ASTRID with closure laws and boundary conditions suitable for boiling flows, a boiling model has been developed by EDF and the Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse. In the fluid, the heat and mass transfer between a bubble and the liquid is being modelled. At the heating wall, the incipient boiling point is determined according to Hsu`s criterion and the boiling heat flux is split into three additive terms: a convective term, a quenching term and a vaporisation term. This model uses several correlations. EDF`s program in boiling two-phase flows also includes experimental studies, some of which are performed in collaboration with other laboratories. Refrigerant subcooled boiling both in tubular (DEBORA experiment, CEN Grenoble) and in annular geometry (Arizona State University Experiment) have been computed with ASTRID. The simulations show the satisfactory results already obtained on void fraction and liquid temperature. Ways of improvement of the model are drawn especially on the dynamical part.

  10. Experimental investigation and modelling of surface roughness and resultant cutting force in hard turning of AISI H13 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boy, M.; Yaşar, N.; Çiftçi, İ.

    2016-11-01

    In recent years, turning of hardened steels has replaced grinding for finishing operations. This process is compared to grinding operations; hard turning has higher material removal rates, the possibility of greater process flexibility, lower equipment costs, and shorter setup time. CBN or ceramic cutting tools are widely used hard part machining. For successful application of hard turning, selection of suitable cutting parameters for a given cutting tool is an important step. For this purpose, an experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effects of cutting tool edge geometry, feed rate and cutting speed on surface roughness and resultant cutting force in hard turning of AISI H13 steel with ceramic cutting tools. Machining experiments were conducted in a CNC lathe based on Taguchi experimental design (L16) in different levels of cutting parameters. In the experiments, a Kistler 9257 B, three cutting force components (Fc, Ff and Fr) piezoelectric dynamometer was used to measure cutting forces. Surface roughness measurements were performed by using a Mahrsurf PS1 device. For statistical analysis, analysis of variance has been performed and mathematical model have been developed for surface roughness and resultant cutting forces. The analysis of variance results showed that the cutting edge geometry, cutting speed and feed rate were the most significant factors on resultant cutting force while the cutting edge geometry and feed rate were the most significant factor for the surface roughness. The regression analysis was applied to predict the outcomes of the experiment. The predicted values and measured values were very close to each other. Afterwards a confirmation tests were performed to make a comparison between the predicted results and the measured results. According to the confirmation test results, measured values are within the 95% confidence interval.

  11. Electrostatic Properties of Polymers Subjected to Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment; Correlation of Experimental Results with Atomistic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigwell, S.; Boucher, D.; Calle, C. I.

    2007-01-01

    this study, PE, PTFE, PS and PMMA were exposed to a He+O2, APGD and pre and post treatment surface chemistries were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. Semi-empirical and ab-initio calculations were performed to correlate the experimental results with sonic plausible molecular and electronic structure features of the oxidation process. For the PE and PS, significant surface oxidation showing C-O, C=O, and O-C=O bonding, and a decrease in the surface contact angles was observed. For the PTFE and PM MA, little change in the surface composition was observed. The molecular modeling calculations were performed on single and multiple oligomers and showed regardless of oxidation mechanism, e.g. -OH, =O or a combination thereof, experimentally observed levels of surface oxidation were unlikely to lead to a significant change in the electronic structure of PE and PS, and that the increased hydrophilic properties are the primary reason for the observed changes in its electrostatic behavior. Calculations for PTFE and PMMA argue strongly against significant oxidation of those materials, as confirmed by the XPS results.

  12. Experimental results on evaporation waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grana Otero, Jose; Parra Fabian, Ignacio

    2010-11-01

    A liquid contained in a vertical glass tube is suddenly depressurized from a high initial pressure down to one for which the stable state is vapour, so vaporization sets off at the free surface. For large enough evaporation rates, the planar vapour-liquid interface is Darrieus-Landau unstable [1], leading to the interface surface rippling close to the instability threshold. Further increasing the initial to final pressure ratio brings about evaporation waves [2,3], in which a highly corrugated front propagates downwards into the liquid. A new experimental method is presented as well as some experimental results obtained by tracking the evolution of the front with a high speed camera. In addition, a number of new phenomena related to the dynamics of bubbles growth at the walls has been uncovered. In particular, a new mode of propagation of the evaporation front is found. In this mode the front originates from below the interface, so the propagation is upwards against gravity with a curved but smooth front.[4pt] [1] F. J. Higuera, Phys. Fluids, V. 30, 679 (1987).[0pt] [2] J.E.Shepherd and B.Sturtevant, J.Fluid Mech., V.121,379 (1982).[0pt] [3] P.Reinke and G.Yadigaroglu, Int.J.Multiph. Flow, V.27,1487 (2001).

  13. High-temperature thermo-mechanical behavior of functionally graded materials produced by plasma sprayed coating: Experimental and modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kang Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Su; Park, Chang Hyun; Kim, Gon-Ho; Baik, Kyoung Ho; Lee, Sung Ho; Kim, Taehyung; Kim, Hyoung Seop

    2016-09-01

    Thermal barrier coatings are widely used in aerospace industries to protect exterior surfaces from harsh environments. In this study, functionally graded materials (FGMs) were investigated with the aim to optimize their high temperature resistance and strength characteristics. NiCrAlY bond coats were deposited on Inconel-617 superalloy substrate specimens by the low vacuum plasma spraying technique. Functionally graded Ni-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) coatings with gradually varying amounts of YSZ (20%-100%) were fabricated from composite powders by vacuum plasma spraying. Heat shield performance tests were conducted using a high- temperature plasma torch. The temperature distributions were measured using thermocouples at the interfaces of the FGM layers during the tests. A model for predicting the temperature at the bond coating-substrate interface was established. The temperature distributions simulated using the finite element method agreed well with the experimental results.

  14. Fly's proprioception-inspired micromachined strain-sensing structure: idea, design, modeling and simulation, and comparison with experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicaksono, D. H. B.; Zhang, L.-J.; Pandraud, G.; French, P. J.; Vincent, J. F. V.

    2006-04-01

    A new strain-sensing structure inspired from insect's (especially the Fly) propricoception sensor is devised. The campaniform sensillum is a strain-sensing microstructure with very high sensitivity despite its small dimension (diameter ~10 µm in a relatively stiff material of insect's exocuticle (E = ~109 Pa). Previous work shows that the high sensitivity of this structure towards strain is due to its membrane-in-recess- and strainconcentrating- hole- features. Based on this inspiration, we built similar structure using silicon micromachining technology. Then a simple characterisation setup was devised. Here, we present briefly, finite-element modeling and simulation based on this actual sample preparation for the characterisation. As comparison and also to understand mechanical features responsible for the strain-sensitivity, we performed the modeling on different mechanical structures: bulk chunk, blind-hole, thorugh-hole, surface membrane, and membrane-in-recess. The actual experimental characterisation was performed previously using optical technique to membranein- recess micromachined Si structure. The FEM simulation results confirm that the bending stress and strain are concentrated in the hole-vicinity. The membrane inside the hole acts as displacement transducer. The FEM is in conformity with previous analytical results, as well as the optical characterisation result. The end goal is to build a new type MEMS strain sensor.

  15. Measurements of atmospheric mercury concentrations in Northwestern and Central Europe - comparison of experimental data and model results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebinghaus, R. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany); Kock, H.H. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany); Jennings, S.G. [University Coll., Galway (Ireland); McCartin, P. [University Coll., Galway (Ireland); Orren, M.J. [University Coll., Galway (Ireland)

    1995-12-31

    Field experiments were carried out at various sites in Europe to compare ambient air and precipitation concentrations of atmospheric mercury with model data. In addition, ozone and aerosol black carbon concentrations in air were measured simultaneously as input data for validation of the EMEP-based European long-range transport model. Data sets for mercury in air and precipitation, ozone and aerosol black carbon show that the selcted sites range from background conditions for Northwestern Europe to regionally influenced air masses from heavily industrialized Central Europe. Measured 12 h average mercury concentrations in air range from 2.1 ng m{sup -3} for Mace Head, Ireland to 8.2 ng m{sup -3} for the Halle/Leipzig/Bitterfeld area in former German Democratic Republic. Precipitation concentrations of total mercury from 17 to 460 ng l{sup -1} were measured from 1991 to 1993 for the same sites. Experimental data and model results for total geaseous mercury and mercury in precipitation are in good agreement. (orig.)

  16. HYDROïD humanoid robot head with perception and emotion capabilities :Modeling, Design and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer eAlfayad

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the HYDROïD humanoid robot project, this paper describes the modeling and design of an electrically actuated head mechanism. Perception and emotion capabilities are considered in the design process. Since HYDROïD humanoid robot is hydraulically actuated, the choice of electrical actuation for the head mechanism addressed in this paper is justified. Considering perception and emotion capabilities leads to a total number of 15 degrees of freedom for the head mechanism which are split on four main sub-mechanisms: the neck, the mouth, the eyes and the eyebrows. Biological data and kinematics performances of human head are taken as inputs of the design process. A new solution of uncoupled eyes is developed to possibly address the master-slave process that links the human eyes as well as vergence capabilities. Modeling each sub-system is carried out in order to get equations of motion, their frequency responses and their transfer functions. The neck pitch rotation is given as a study example. Then, the head mechanism performances are presented through a comparison between model and experimental results validating the hardware capabilities. Finally, the head mechanism is integrated on the HYDROïD upper-body. An object tracking experiment coupled with emotional expressions is carried out to validate the synchronization of the eye rotations with the body motions.

  17. Majorana Thermosyphon Prototype Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, James E.; Reid, Douglas J.; Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao

    2010-12-17

    Objective The Majorana demonstrator will operate at liquid Nitrogen temperatures to ensure optimal spectrometric performance of its High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector modules. In order to transfer the heat load of the detector module, the Majorana demonstrator requires a cooling system that will maintain a stable liquid nitrogen temperature. This cooling system is required to transport the heat from the detector chamber outside the shield. One approach is to use the two phase liquid-gas equilibrium to ensure constant temperature. This cooling technique is used in a thermosyphon. The thermosyphon can be designed so the vaporization/condensing process transfers heat through the shield while maintaining a stable operating temperature. A prototype of such system has been built at PNNL. This document presents the experimental results of the prototype and evaluates the heat transfer performance of the system. The cool down time, temperature gradient in the thermosyphon, and heat transfer analysis are studied in this document with different heat load applied to the prototype.

  18. Improving the sweeping efficiency of permanganate into low permeable zones to treat TCE: experimental results and model development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokejaroenrat, Chanat; Kananizadeh, Negin; Sakulthaew, Chainarong; Comfort, Steve; Li, Yusong

    2013-11-19

    The residual buildup and treatment of dissolved contaminants in low permeable zones (LPZs) is a particularly challenging issue for injection-based remedial treatments. Our objective was to improve the sweeping efficiency of permanganate into LPZs to treat dissolved-phase TCE. This was accomplished by conducting transport experiments that quantified the ability of xanthan-MnO4(-) solutions to penetrate and cover (i.e., sweep) an LPZ that was surrounded by transmissive sands. By incorporating the non-Newtonian fluid xanthan with MnO4(-), penetration of MnO4(-) into the LPZ improved dramatically and sweeping efficiency reached 100% in fewer pore volumes. To quantify how xanthan improved TCE removal, we spiked the LPZ and surrounding sands with (14)C-lableled TCE and used a multistep flooding procedure that quantified the mass of (14)C-TCE oxidized and bypassed during treatment. Results showed that TCE mass removal was 1.4 times greater in experiments where xanthan was employed. Combining xanthan with MnO4(-) also reduced the mass of TCE in the LPZ that was potentially available for rebound. By coupling a multiple species reactive transport model with the Brinkman equation for non-Newtonian flow, the simulated amount of (14)C-TCE oxidized during transport matched experimental results. These observations support the use of xanthan as a means of enhancing MnO4(-) delivery into LPZs for the treatment of dissolved-phase TCE.

  19. The influence of melatonin and agomelatine on urodynamic parameters in experimental overactive bladder model – preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Dobrek

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Overactive bladder (OAB is a common disease entity with complex pathogenesis that involves neurogenic, myogenic and abnormal paracrine urothelial activity mechanisms. Our objective was to estimate bladder functioning in urodynamic studies in experimental, both acute (AOAB and chronic (COAB cyclophosphamide (CYP-evoked OAB model in response to melatonin (MLT; antioxidant and MT receptor agonist or agomelatine (AMT; MT receptor agonist and 5HT2C receptor antagonist.Material/Methods:Seven groups were studied: 1 – control, 2–4 – MLT treated AOAB and COAB rats, 5–7 – AMT treated AOAB and COAB rats. AOAB model was evoked by single CYP administration (IP 200 mg/kg body weight, while COAB one was induced by a four-time administration of CYP (IP 75 mg/kg body weight. Each group underwent urethane anesthesia to perform urodynamic recordings in resting conditions and after administration 50 (group 2 or 5, 75 (group 3 or 6 or 100 mg/kg (group 4 or 7 of melatonin (groups 2–4 or agomelatine (groups 5–7, followed by classical urodynamic parameters assessment.Results:Neither melatonin nor agomelatine did not affect urodynamic parameters in the AOAB rats. In COAB model, after 75 and 100 mg/kg of MLT we revealed an improvement in urodynamic parameters. AMT (75 and 100 mg/kg administration caused deterioration of urodynamic findings suggesting bladder overactivity exacerbation.Disscussion:In summary, melatonin ameliorates bladder overactivity in cyclophosphamide-induced COAB. Agomelatine, contrary to melatonin, aggravates bladder dysfunction in this group. These findings suggest that the improvement in urodynamic parameters after melatonin administration may be due to its antioxidative profile and is not related to MT receptors activation. However, agomelatine’s unfavorable action on the bladder, resulting in its overactivity in COAB group, may not only be the result of MT receptor activation without the concomitant antioxidative

  20. Doppler method leak detection for LMFBR steam generators. Pt. 1. Experimental results of bubble detection using small models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab

    1999-05-01

    To prevent the expansion of the tube damage and to maintain structural integrity in the steam generators (SGs) of fast breeder reactors (FBRs), it is necessary to detect precisely and immediately the leakage of water from heat transfer tubes. Therefore, an active acoustic method was developed. Previous studies have revealed that in practical steam generators the active acoustic method can detect bubbles of 10 l/s within 10 seconds. To prevent the expansion of damage to neighboring tubes, it is necessary to detect smaller leakages of water from the heat transfer tubes. The Doppler method is designed to detect small leakages and to find the source of the leak before damage spreads to neighboring tubes. To evaluate the relationship between the detection sensitivity of the Doppler method and the bubble volume and bubble size, the structural shapes and bubble flow conditions were investigated experimentally, using a small structural model. The results show that the Doppler method can detect the bubbles under bubble flow conditions, and it is sensitive enough to detect small leakages within a short time. The doppler method thus has strong potential for the detection of water leakage in SGs. (author)

  1. Experimental results and a user-friendly model of heat transfer from a thin film resistance temperature detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, Julian W. [Smart Materials and MEMS Laboratory, Department of Applied Science, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University, ETAS 575, Little Rock, AR 72204-1099 (United States); Bhattacharyya, A. [Smart Materials and MEMS Laboratory, Department of Applied Science, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University, ETAS 575, Little Rock, AR 72204-1099 (United States)], E-mail: axbhattachar@ualr.edu; Imran, M. [Kohler Co., Sheridan, AR 72150 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    The research reported in this paper has focused on the different modes of heat transfer - conductive (to the substrate), conductive and convective (to the environment) and radiative (to the environment) - from an on-chip resistance temperature detector (RTD). The study has been carried out at various input voltages, various pressures ranging from atmospheric to vacuum, and for two classes of platforms for the device - thermal insulators (glass wool and ceramic), and a thermal conductor (aluminum block). The transient temperature-time response of the RTD under the various conditions stated above was recorded. A heat transfer model approximately accounting for all the modes of heat transfer was introduced. The calibration parameters of the model allowed us to quantify the different modes of heat transfer. The model uncovers the fact that the heat losses to the environment via conduction and convection are almost as much as the heat lost by radiation (radiative effects were unequivocally confirmed experimentally). Compared to these losses, conductive heat losses from the RTD to its underlying substructure are far more dominant (almost five times). We also give an analysis originating from the exact form of conservation of energy and demonstrate that the use of the simplified model has led to the most dominant heat transfer mode of conduction to the substrate being underestimated by no more than 7.89% (at the highest input power tested)

  2. Description of premixing with the MC3D code including molten jet behavior modeling. Comparison with FARO experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthoud, G.; Crecy, F. de; Meignen, R.; Valette, M. [CEA-G, DRN/DTP/SMTH, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    1998-01-01

    The premixing phase of a molten fuel-coolant interaction is studied by the way of mechanistic multidimensional calculation. Beside water and steam, corium droplet flow and continuous corium jet flow are calculated independent. The 4-field MC3D code and a detailed hot jet fragmentation model are presented. MC3D calculations are compared to the FARO L14 experiment results and are found to give satisfactory results; heat transfer and jet fragmentation models are still to be improved to predict better final debris size values. (author)

  3. Electrostatic Properties of PE and PTFE Subjected to Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Treatment; Correlation of Experimental Results with Atomistic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigwell, Steve; Boucher, Derrick; Calle, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    The use of an atmospheric pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasma was used at KSC to increase the hydrophilicity of spaceport materials to enhance their surface charge dissipation and prevent possible ESD in spaceport operations. Significant decreases in charge decay times were observed after tribocharging the materials using the standard KSC tribocharging test. The polarity and amount of charge transferred was dependent upon the effective work function differences between the respective materials. In this study, polyethylene (PE) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) were exposed to a He+O2 APGD. The pre and post treatment surface chemistry was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements. Semi-empirical and ab initio calculations were performed to correlate the experimental results with some plausible molecular and electronic structure features of the oxidation process. For the PE, significant surface oxidation was observed, as indicated by XPS showing C-O, C=O, and O-C=O bonding, and a decrease in the surface contact angle from 98.9 deg to 61.2 deg. For the PTFE, no C-O bonding appeared and the surface contact angle increased indicating the APGD only succeeded in cleaning the PTFE surface without affecting the surface structure. The calculations using the PM3 and DFT methods were performed on single and multiple oligomers to simulate a wide variety of oxidation scenarios. Calculated work function results suggest that regardless of oxidation mechanism, e.g. -OH, =0 or a combination thereof, the experimentally observed levels of surface oxidation are unlikely to lead to a significant change in the electronic structure of PE and that its increased hydrophilic properties are the primary reason for the observed changes in its electrostatic behavior. The calculations for PTFE argue strongly against significant oxidation of that material, as confirmed by the XPS results.

  4. Microwave radiometry for humanitarian demining: experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joel T.; Kim, Hyunjin; Wiggins, David R.; Cheon, Yonghun

    2002-08-01

    Previous modeling studies have indicated that a multi-frequency radiometer could prove advantageous for humanitarian demining due to the oscillatory patterns in brightness temperature versus frequency that would be observed in the presence of a sub-surface target. Initial experimental results are reported in this paper from a multi-frequency radiometer (MFRAD) system operating at 19 frequencies in the 2.1-6.5 GHz band. The basic design of MFRAD is reviewed, and the calibration and noise background removal procedures discussed. Experimental results with sub-surface metallic and styrofoam targets are then provided that demonstrate the predicted oscillatory behavior. An FFT-based detection algorithm is also described and applied to measured data. Further plans for experiments and tests with this system are also detailed.

  5. Rare earth element sorption by basaltic rock: Experimental data and modeling results using the “Generalised Composite approach”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tertre, E.; Hofmann, A.; Berger, G.

    2008-02-01

    Sorption of the 14 rare earth elements (REE) by basaltic rock is investigated as a function of pH, ionic strength and aqueous REE concentrations. The rock sample, originating from a terrestrial basalt flow (Rio Grande do Sul State, Brazil), is composed of plagioclase, pyroxene and cryptocrystalline phases. Small amounts of clay minerals are present, due to rock weathering. Batch sorption experiments are carried out under controlled temperature conditions of 20 °C with the XNa sites, and surface complexation at >SOH sites. Total site density (>XNa + >SOH) is determined by measuring the cation exchange capacity (CEC = 52 μmol/m 2). Specific concentrations of exchange sites and complexation sites are determined by fitting the Langmuir equation to sorption isotherms of REE and phosphate ions. Site densities of 22 ± 5 and 30 ± 5 μmol/m 2 are obtained for [>XNa] and [>SOH], respectively. The entire set of REE experimental data is modeled using a single exchange constant (log Kex = 9.7) and a surface complexation constant that progressively increases from log K = -1.15 for La(III) to -0.4 for Lu(III). The model proves to be fairly robust in describing other aluminosilicate systems. Maintaining the same set of sorption constants and only adjusting the site densities, we obtain good agreement with the literature data on REE/kaolinite and REE/smectite sorption. The Generalised Composite non-electrostatic model appears as an easy and efficient tool for describing sorption by complex aluminosilicate mineral assemblages.

  6. Competitive adsorption of arsenate and phosphate onto calcite; experimental results and modeling with CCM and CD-MUSIC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Dieke; Jakobsen, Rasmus;

    2012-01-01

    The competitive adsorption of arsenate and phosphate onto calcite was studied in batch experiments using calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions had circum-neutral pH (7–8.3) and covered a wide span in the activity of Ca2+ and View the MathML source. The results show that the adsorption...... that adsorption of arsenate onto calcite is of minor importance in most groundwater aquifers, as phosphate is often present at concentration levels sufficient to significantly reduce arsenate adsorption. The CD-MUSIC model for calcite was used successfully to model adsorption of arsenate and phosphate separately...

  7. Comparison of Model and Experimental Results for Material and Energy Flow in a Titanium Evaporation System with Deforming Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClelland, M A; Westerberg, K W; Meier, T C; Braun, D G; Frischknecht, K D; Anklam, T M

    2003-05-12

    Finite element calculations and measurements are compared for material and energy flow in a system to evaporate pure titanium. A 40 kW electron beam is used to heat the end of a 7.62 cm diameter cylindrical rod which is fed vertically through a water-cooled crucible. Vapor emanates from a liquid pool in which flow is driven strongly by buoyancy and capillary forces. At high evaporation rates, the vapor exerts strong shear and normal forces on the liquid-vapor interface. The MELT finite element code is used to calculate steady-state, axisymmetric flow and temperature fields along with liquid-solid and liquid-vapor interface locations. The influence of the vapor on the liquid top surface is treated using boundary conditions with parameters derived from Monte Carlo simulations. The upper and lower interfaces of the liquid pool are tracked using a mesh structured with rotating spines. Experimental evaporation rates are obtained from measured feed rates, and heat flow rates are determined from measured temperature rises in the cooling water. The finite element model provides a good representation of the measured evaporation rates, heat flows, and lower pool boundary locations.

  8. TransCom model simulations of hourly atmospheric CO2: Experimental overview and diurnal cycle results for 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, R. M.; Peters, W.; RöDenbeck, C.; Aulagnier, C.; Baker, I.; Bergmann, D. J.; Bousquet, P.; Brandt, J.; Bruhwiler, L.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Christensen, J. H.; Delage, F.; Denning, A. S.; Fan, S.; Geels, C.; Houweling, S.; Imasu, R.; Karstens, U.; Kawa, S. R.; Kleist, J.; Krol, M. C.; Lin, S.-J.; Lokupitiya, R.; Maki, T.; Maksyutov, S.; Niwa, Y.; Onishi, R.; Parazoo, N.; Patra, P. K.; Pieterse, G.; Rivier, L.; Satoh, M.; Serrar, S.; Taguchi, S.; Takigawa, M.; Vautard, R.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Zhu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    A forward atmospheric transport modeling experiment has been coordinated by the TransCom group to investigate synoptic and diurnal variations in CO2. Model simulations were run for biospheric, fossil, and air-sea exchange of CO2 and for SF6 and radon for 2000-2003. Twenty-five models or model varian

  9. Imaging of primary and secondary radiation-Modelling and experimental results of a radioactive source and a water phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage, K. A. A.; Taylor, G. C.; Joyce, M. J.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper the contribution of primary and secondary radiation from a water phantom to a pinhole volume, as a result of three neutron sources (Cf, AmBe and 5 MeV mono-energetic) and two gamma sources (Cs and Co), is separately estimated using the PTRAC particle tracking option available in MCNP. Also in this paper imaging of the mixed radiation field produced by a Van de Graaf accelerator (when a water phantom is present) is described. In the model, a spherical tally volume, 2 cm in diameter, was placed equidistantly from a radioactive source and 30×30×15 cm3 water phantom. Monte Carlo simulations have been carried out to investigate the level of primary and secondary radiation contributing to the pinhole volume directly from the source and from interactions in the phantom respectively. The spatial distribution of counts clearly discriminated the source and the phantom. The results have shown that the percentage of neutrons reflected from the phantom with energies above 1 MeV increases with mean energy of the source. This method has significant potential to characterise secondary radiation in proton therapy, where it would help to verify the location and the energy delivered during the treatment.

  10. Heat Transfer between Casting and Dieduring High Pressure Die Casting Process of AM50 Alloy-Modeling and Experimental Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A method based on die casting experiments and mathematic modeling is presented for the determination of the heat flow density (HFD) and interfacial heat transfer coefficient (IHTC) during the high pressure die casting (HPDC) process. Experiments were carried out using step shape casting and a commercial magnesium alloy, AM50. Temperature profiles were measured and recorded using thermocouples embedded inside the die.Based on these temperature readings, the HFD and IHTC were successfully determined and the calculation results show that the HFD and IHTC at the metal-die interface increases sharply right after the fast phase injection process until approaching their maximum values, after which their values decrease to a much lower level until the dies are opened. Different patterns of heat transler behavior were found between the die and the castingat different thicknesses. The thinner the casting was, the more quickly the HFD and IHTC reached their steady states. Also, the values for both the HFD and IHTC values were different between die and casting at different thicknesses.

  11. Validating a Modified Gagnean Concept-Acquisition Model: The Results of an Experimental Study Using Art-Related Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Robert J.

    This paper describes a study to determine whether students can, with appropriate instructional materials, develop and apply a knowledge of art concepts. An opening section reviews research on concept acquisition. This study utilized a concept acquisition model developed in 1970 by R. Gagne. Gagne's model proposed that concepts are learned through…

  12. A cellular automaton based model simulating HVAC fluid and heat transport in a building. Modeling approach and comparison with experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saiz, A. [Department of Applied Mathematics, Polytechnic University of Valencia, ETSGE School, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Urchueguia, J.F. [Department of Applied Physics, Polytechnic University of Valencia, ETSII School, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Martos, J. [Superior Technical School of Engineering, Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Valencia, Vicente Andres Estelles s/n, Burjassot 46100, Valencia (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    A discrete model characterizing heat and fluid flow in connection with thermal fluxes in a building is described and tested against experiment in this contribution. The model, based on a cellular automaton approach, relies on a set of a few quite simple rules and parameters in order to simulate the dynamic evolution of temperatures and energy flows in any water or brine based thermal energy distribution network in a building or system. Using an easy-to-record input, such as the instantaneous electrical power demand of the heating or cooling system, our model predicts time varying temperatures in characteristic spots and the related enthalpy flows whose simulation usually requires heavy computational tools and detailed knowledge of the network elements. As a particular example, we have applied our model to simulate an existing fan coil based hydronic heating system driven by a geothermal heat pump. When compared to the experimental temperature and thermal energy records, the outcome of the model coincides. (author)

  13. Kinetics modeling and interpretation of experimental results for XeF. Annual report, December 1985--November 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salesky, E.T. [North East Research Associates, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)

    1986-12-31

    In this report the author presents a detailed discussion of a computer model of the electron beam pumped XeF laser which was developed for Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY86. In its present form, it should provide useful modeling and scaling of XeF laser experiments currently of interest. Additional modifications will be required for long pulse (t{sub P}>5{mu}sec) simulations. The model includes all of the important energy transport processes which contribute to the formation and quenching of XeF in the B-state (upper laser level), X-state (lower laser level), C-state (which mixes with the B-state as a loss mechanism), and the unbound (repulsive) A-state to which the C-state decays. The gain of the B to X transition is resolved for the three most important laser (vibrational) lines: (0-3) at 353 nm, (0-2) and (1-4) at 351 nm. This report describes the kinetics model and computer code for electron beam pumped XeF lasers which use gas mixtures composed of argon (the buffer), xenon, and fluorine. The temperatures, energy flow, and chemistry (plasma and neutral) are calculated in a self-consistent manner; balances of energy, matter, and charge are tracked by the code and output with each print cycle. The model includes the time history of all of the important absorbers: Ar{sub 2}{sup +}, Xe{sub 2}{sup +}, Ar{sup *} and Xe{sup *} (s and p states), F{sub 2}, F{sup {minus}}, and Xe{sub 2}F{sup *}. Energy extraction in the form of lasing is computed using a modified Rigrod analysis which treats multiline lasing. This extraction model assumes a spatially uniform laser flux and is therefore a one dimensional (in time) treatment. The more general extraction model which treats non-uniform spatial effects (laser flux and pumping by a non-uniform electron beam) is being developed, and will be integrated with excimer model in the FY87 reporting period. The computer code was written in FORTRAN77 on a DEC MICROVAX II which uses the VAX/VMS operating system.

  14. Experimental results showing the internal three-component velocity field and outlet temperature contours for a model gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ,2]. These inconsistencies are especially great when combustion is simulated when there are already flow inconsistencies after modeling the flow in cold flow simulations. To enable the improvement of CFD modeling and techniques, a CFD test case has been created to aid.... [7], attempts have to be made to ensure that as many of the factors that influence the combustor flow should be included in the tests. The combustor in which these experiments were performed is a full, non-premixed, cylindrical, can-type combustor...

  15. Comparison of five in vitro digestion models to in vivo experimental results: Lead bioaccessibility in the human gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiele, T.R. van de; Oomen, A.G.; Wragg, J.; Cave, M.; Minekus, M.; Hack, A.; Cornelis, C.; Rompelberg, C.J.M.; Zwart, L.L. de; Klinck, B.; Wijnen, J. van; Verstraete, W.; Sips, A.J.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-laboratory comparison study of in vitro models assessing bioaccessibility of soil-bound lead in the human gastrointestinal tract under simulated fasted and fed conditions. Oral bioavailability data from a previous human in vivo study on the same soil served as a reference

  16. Ratios among atmospheric trace gases together with winds imply exploitable information for bird navigation: a model elucidating experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallraff, H. G.

    2013-11-01

    A model of avian goal-oriented navigation is described that is based on two empirical findings building a bridge from ornithology to atmospheric chemistry. (1) To orient their courses homeward from distant unfamiliar areas, homing pigeons require long-term exposure to undisturbed winds at the home site and olfactory access to the environmental air at home and abroad. (2) Above Germany, ratios among some atmospheric trace gases vary along differently oriented spatial gradients as well as depending on wind direction. The model emulates finding (1) by utilising the analysed air samples on which finding (2) is based. Starting with an available set of 46 omnipresent compounds, virtual pigeons determine the profile of relative weights among them at each of 96 sites regularly distributed around a central home site within a radius of 200 km and compare this profile with corresponding profiles determined at home under varying wind conditions. Referring to particular similarities and dissimilarities depending on home-wind direction, they try to estimate, at each site, the compass direction they should fly in order to approach home. To make the model work, an iterative algorithm imitates evolution by modifying sensitivity to the individual compounds stepwise at random. In the course of thousands of trial-and-error steps it gradually improves homeward orientation by selecting smaller sets of most useful and optimally weighted substances from whose proportional configurations at home and abroad it finally derives navigational performances similar to those accomplished by real pigeons. It is concluded that the dynamic chemical atmosphere most likely contains sufficient spatial information for home-finding over hundreds of kilometres of unfamiliar terrain. The underlying chemo-atmospheric processes remain to be clarified.

  17. Experimental Results that Question the Ramirez-Castaneda Model for Teaching Reading to First Grade Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S. Alan; Rodriquez, Samuel

    1980-01-01

    Results of a study conducted with first-grade Mexican American children indicate that direct reading instruction to precise behavioral objectives is more effective than teaching to Mexican American children's supposed "cultural learning styles" as recommended by Manuel Ramirez and Alfredo Castaneda in 1974. (GT)

  18. Experimental Results that Question the Ramirez-Castaneda Model for Teaching Reading to First Grade Mexican Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S. Alan; Rodriquez, Samuel

    1980-01-01

    Results of a study conducted with first-grade Mexican American children indicate that direct reading instruction to precise behavioral objectives is more effective than teaching to Mexican American children's supposed "cultural learning styles" as recommended by Manuel Ramirez and Alfredo Castaneda in 1974. (GT)

  19. Modeling of the Ionic Multi-Species Transport Phenomena in Electrokinetic Processes and Comparison with Experimental Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paz-Garcia, Juan Manuel; Johannesson, Björn; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2010-01-01

    in the transport process. As a modification of a previous work, water equilibrium was reestablished between iterations in the numerical method and the pH value monitored. Simulations were conducted in order to visualize the acid and basic fronts advance, and to evaluate the use of a buffer substance...... in the electrode compartments. Simulations were compared with lab scale results for desalination experiments, where an inert matrix of sandstone was used to minimize the effect of chemical reactions in the process....

  20. Analysis of the quench propagation along Nb3Sn Rutherford cables with the THELMA code. Part II: Model predictions and comparison with experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfreda, G.; Bellina, F.; Bajas, H.; Perez, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    To improve the technology of the new generation of accelerator magnets, prototypes are being manufactured and tested in several laboratories. In parallel, many numerical analyses are being carried out to predict the magnets behaviour and interpret the experimental results. This paper focuses on the quench propagation velocity, which is a crucial parameter as regards the energy dissipation along the magnet conductor. The THELMA code, originally developed for cable-in-conduit conductors for fusion magnets, has been used to study such quench propagation. To this purpose, new code modules have been added to describe the Rutherford cable geometry, the material non-linear thermal properties and to describe the thermal conduction problem in transient regime. THELMA can describe the Rutherford cable at the strand level, modelling both the electrical and thermal contact resistances between strands and enabling the analysis of the effects of local hot spots and quench heaters. This paper describes the model application to a sample of Short Model Coil tested at CERN: a comparison is made between the experimental results and the model prediction, showing a good agreement. A comparison is also made with the prediction of the most common analytical models, which give large inaccuracies when dealing with low n-index cables like Nb3Sn cables.

  1. Prediction of Heavy Metal Removal by Different Liner Materials from Landfill Leachate: Modeling of Experimental Results Using Artificial Intelligence Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Nurdan Gamze; Gümüşel, Emine Beril; Ozgonenel, Okan

    2013-01-01

    An intensive study has been made to see the performance of the different liner materials with bentonite on the removal efficiency of Cu(II) and Zn(II) from industrial leachate. An artificial neural network (ANN) was used to display the significant levels of the analyzed liner materials on the removal efficiency. The statistical analysis proves that the effect of natural zeolite was significant by a cubic spline model with a 99.93% removal efficiency. Optimization of liner materials was achieved by minimizing bentonite mixtures, which were costly, and maximizing Cu(II) and Zn(II) removal efficiency. The removal efficiencies were calculated as 45.07% and 48.19% for Cu(II) and Zn(II), respectively, when only bentonite was used as liner material. However, 60% of natural zeolite with 40% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Cu(II) removal (95%), and 80% of vermiculite and pumice with 20% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (61.24% and 65.09%). Similarly, 60% of natural zeolite with 40% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (89.19%), and 80% of vermiculite and pumice with 20% of bentonite combination was found to be the best for Zn(II) removal (82.76% and 74.89%). PMID:23844384

  2. Experimental results on quadratic assignment problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.P. Nikolov

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental results on quadratic assignment problem. The "scanning area" method formulated for radioelectronic equipment design is applied. For all more complex tests ours results are better or coincident with the ones known in literature. Conclusion concerning the effectiveness of method are given.

  3. Micro-scale finite element modeling of ultrasound propagation in aluminum trabecular bone-mimicking phantoms: A comparison between numerical simulation and experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaeian, B; Le, L H; Tran, T N H T; El-Rich, M; El-Bialy, T; Adeeb, S

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigated the accuracy of micro-scale finite element modeling for simulating broadband ultrasound propagation in water-saturated trabecular bone-mimicking phantoms. To this end, five commercially manufactured aluminum foam samples as trabecular bone-mimicking phantoms were utilized for ultrasonic immersion through-transmission experiments. Based on micro-computed tomography images of the same physical samples, three-dimensional high-resolution computational samples were generated to be implemented in the micro-scale finite element models. The finite element models employed the standard Galerkin finite element method (FEM) in time domain to simulate the ultrasonic experiments. The numerical simulations did not include energy dissipative mechanisms of ultrasonic attenuation; however, they expectedly simulated reflection, refraction, scattering, and wave mode conversion. The accuracy of the finite element simulations were evaluated by comparing the simulated ultrasonic attenuation and velocity with the experimental data. The maximum and the average relative errors between the experimental and simulated attenuation coefficients in the frequency range of 0.6-1.4 MHz were 17% and 6% respectively. Moreover, the simulations closely predicted the time-of-flight based velocities and the phase velocities of ultrasound with maximum relative errors of 20 m/s and 11 m/s respectively. The results of this study strongly suggest that micro-scale finite element modeling can effectively simulate broadband ultrasound propagation in water-saturated trabecular bone-mimicking structures.

  4. Statistical combination of experimental results in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Gadatsch, Stefan; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The combination of experimental results requires a careful statistical treatment. We review the methods and tools used in ATLAS for the statistical combination of measurements and of limits on new physics. We highlight the methods used in the recent combination of ATLAS and CMS measurements of the Higgs boson production/decay rates and the constraints on the Higgs coupling parameters.

  5. RESULTS OF AUTOMOBILE BIOGAS ENGINE EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramchuk, F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental study of automotive ICE running using biogas with different volume content of CO2 are presented. Recommendations for choosing the values of air-fuel ratios and ignition timings for different operating modes of the automotive biogas engine depending on fuel chemical composition are given.

  6. A partially static turbine - first experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassmann, H.; Bet, F.; Cabras, G.; Ceschia, M.; Cobai, D.; DelPapa, C. [Universitadi Udine (Italy). Dpto. di Fisica

    2003-09-01

    Recently it has been shown in a fluidodynamic simulation, that a wing-profiled structure of rather small size placed in the vicinity of a wind turbine augments the power of the wind turbine. In this paper we present the first experimental results from a prototype. (author)

  7. PEMFC modeling and experimental validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas, J.V.C. [Federal University of Parana (UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering], E-mail: jvargas@demec.ufpr.br; Ordonez, J.C.; Martins, L.S. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States). Center for Advanced Power Systems], Emails: ordonez@caps.fsu.edu, martins@caps.fsu.edu

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a simplified and comprehensive PEMFC mathematical model introduced in previous studies is experimentally validated. Numerical results are obtained for an existing set of commercial unit PEM fuel cells. The model accounts for pressure drops in the gas channels, and for temperature gradients with respect to space in the flow direction, that are investigated by direct infrared imaging, showing that even at low current operation such gradients are present in fuel cell operation, and therefore should be considered by a PEMFC model, since large coolant flow rates are limited due to induced high pressure drops in the cooling channels. The computed polarization and power curves are directly compared to the experimentally measured ones with good qualitative and quantitative agreement. The combination of accuracy and low computational time allow for the future utilization of the model as a reliable tool for PEMFC simulation, control, design and optimization purposes. (author)

  8. Degradation of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) using ZnO nanoparticles supported on zeolites and modeling of experimental results by artificial neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khatamian, Masumeh, E-mail: mkhatamian@yahoo.com [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, C.P. 51664 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Divband, Baharak [Inorganic Chemistry Department, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tabriz, C.P. 51664 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jodaei, Azadeh [Applied Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Sofian Branch, Sofian (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Graphical abstract: ZnO/Zeolites (HY, HZSM-5, and Clinoptilolite) nanocomposites are prepared by using poly acrylamide pyrolysis method for the first time. Among the catalysts, ZnO/HZSM-5 was the best in photocatalytic degradation of 4-nitrophenol and the time required for complete mineralization under ambient visible light was 75 min. These results are in good agreement with predicted results of the designed artificial neural networks (ANNs) model. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO/Zeolites (HY, HZSM-5, Clinoptiolite) are used for degradation of 4-nitrophenol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO/Zeolites nanocomposites are prepared by using poly acrylamide pyrolysis method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Among the catalysts, ZnO/HZSM-5 showed higher percentage of adsorption than others. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Predicted results of the designed ANN model and experimental data are in good agreements. - Abstract: In this paper, we report the synthesis of ZnO, ZnO/HZSM-5, ZnO/HY and ZnO/Clin by a poly acrylamide pyrolysis method for the first time. The presences of carbon network/cages in the poly acrylamide gel can effectively prevent particle agglomeration. The catalytic activity of all specimens was tested by carrying out the 4-nitrophenol degradation, used as a 'probe' reaction, in the aqueous medium under ambient visible light. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), specific surface area (BET) and porosity determination, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), visible-ultraviolet diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), to evaluate particle structure, size distribution and composition. The results revealed that among the catalysts, ZnO/HZSM-5 showed higher percentage of adsorption than others. The time required for complete mineralization of 4-NP under ambient visible light over ZnO/HZSM-5 was 75 min. The higher

  9. PDX experimental results in FY82

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaye, S.M.; Bell, M.; Bol, K.; Bitter, M.; Buchenauer, D.; Budny, R.; Brau, K.; Crowley, T.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.

    1983-08-01

    This report presents a detailed summary of the major experimental results of PDX in FY82 and represents the efforts of the entire PDX group. Topics covered include ..beta..-scaling and fishbone studies, fluctuations, disruptions, impurities and impurity transport, power handling, limiter conditioning, edge studies, plasma fueling, counter-injection, and diagnostic development. A less detailed version will appear as the FY82 PDX contribution to the PPPL Annual Report.

  10. Experimental models of epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojlović Olivera P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction An epileptic seizure is a clinical event and epilepsy is rather a group of symptoms than a disease. The main features all epilepsies have in common include: spontaneous occurrence, repetitiveness, and ictal correlation within the EEG. Epilepsies are manifested with distinct EEG changes, requiring exact clinical definition and consequential treatment. Current data show that 1% of the world's population (approximately 50 million people suffers from epilepsy, with 25% of patients being refractory to therapy and requiring search for new substances in order to decrease EEG and behavioral manifestations of epilepsies. Material and methods In regard to discovery and testing of anticonvulsant substances the best results were achieved by implementation of experi- mental models. Animal models of epilepsy are useful in acquiring basic knowledge regarding pathogenesis, neurotransmitters (glutamate, receptors (NMDA/AMPA/kainate, propagation of epileptic seizures and preclinical assessment of antiepileptics (competitive and non-competitive NMDA antagonists. Results and conclusions In our lab, we have developed a pharmacologic model of a (metaphit, NMDA and remacemide-cilastatin generalized, reflex, and audiogenic epilepsy. The model is suitable for testing various anticonvulsant substances (e.g. APH, APV, CPP, Mk-801 and potential antiepileptics (e.g. DSIP, its tetra- and octaanalogues.

  11. CONDUCTING AND ANALYZING THE RESULTS OF THE EXPERIMENTAL BOX TEST OF RETAINING WALL MODELS WITHOUT PILES AND ON THE PILE FOUNDATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Lisnevskyi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Taking into consideration that the bearing capacity of the foundation may be insufficient, in the study it is assumed that pile foundation can be used to reduce the impact of the construction of new retaining structures on roads and railways near the existing buildings or in areas of dense urban development and ensure the stability of the foundation. To reduce the volume of excavation it is necessary to choose the economic structure of the retaining wall. To do this, one should explore stress-strain state (SSS of the retaining walls, to develop methods to improve their strength and stability, as well as to choose the most appropriate method of their analysis. Methodology. In the design of retaining walls foundation mat and piles are considered as independent elements. Since the combined effect of the retaining wall, piles and foundation mat as well as the effect of soil or rock foundation on the structure are considered not fully, so there are some limitations in the existing design techniques. To achieve the purpose the box tests of retaining walls models without piles and with piles for studying their interaction with the surrounding soil massif were conducted. Findings. Laboratory simulation of complex systems «surrounding soil – retaining wall – pile» was carried out and on the basis of the box test results were analyzed strains and its main parameters of the stress-strain state. Analysis of the results showed that the structure of a retaining wall with piles is steady and stable. Originality. So far, in Ukraine has not been carried out similar experimental box tests with models of retaining walls in such combinations. In the article has been presented unique photos and test results, as well as their analysis. Practical value. Using the methodology of experimental tests of the retaining wall models with piles and without them gives a wider opportunity to study stress-strain state of such structures.

  12. Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

    2011-03-02

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU

  13. Pseudo-2D polarization model of polymer exchange membrane fuel cell including mass transport limitation due to flooding : numerical simulation and comparison with experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maranzana, G.; Chupin, S.; Colinart, T.; Lottin, O.; Didierjean, S. [Nancy-Univ., Vandoeuvre (France). Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee

    2007-07-01

    The electrodes of proton membrane exchange (PEM) fuel cells are fed by gases, whose properties are changing during their transition from the inlet to the outlet of the channels. For example, the reactant concentration decreases and the water concentration increases, the total pressure diminishes, the temperature is dependent on the local current density, and liquid water may appear or disappear. The electrode performances are not uniform, which can have impacts on the entire performances of the cell or on its durability. In order to observe and model these non-homogeneities, this paper presented an experimental study that involved designing, building, and testing a single PEM fuel cell that allowed measurement of both current density and temperature fields along the gas channels. The fuel cell was made of transparent polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) so that the location of liquid water appearance in the channels could be observed. The first experimental results were compared with the predictions of a pseudo-2D model which assumed mass transfer to occur in the direction perpendicular to the membrane, but took into account the variations in concentrations, in total pressure, and in temperatures along the gas channels. It was concluded that the current density distribution depended greatly on water management. 10 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Predictions of High Energy Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Eight predictions of high energy experimental results are presented. The predictions contain the $Sigma ^+$ charge radius and results of two kinds of experiments using energetic pionic beams. In addition, predictions of the failure to find the following objects are presented: glueballs, pentaquarks, Strange Quark Matter, magnetic monopoles searched by their direct interaction with charges and the Higgs boson. The first seven predictions rely on the Regular Charge-Monopole Theory and the last one relies on mathematical inconsistencies of the Higgs Lagrangian density.

  15. Predictions of High Energy Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comay E.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Eight predictions of high energy experimental results are presented. The predictions contain the + charge radius and results of two kinds of experiments using energetic pionic beams. In addition, predictions of the failure to find the following objects are presented: glueballs, pentaquarks, Strange Quark Matter, magnetic monopoles searched by their direct interaction with charges and the Higgs boson. The first seven predictions rely on the Regular Charge-Monopole Theory and the last one relies on mathematical inconsistencies of the Higgs Lagrangian density.

  16. THE EXPERIMENTAL MODEL OF OSTEONECROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Netylko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental investigation for the purpose of modeling of knee osteonecrosis were performed in 36 rats. The chronic renal insufficiency by means of left nephrectomy and electrocoagulation in 25% cortical substance of right kidney was induced before 6 months till experiment with subsequent introduction of 0,1% adrenalin solution and methylprednisolone in paraarticular structures. The results of experiment showed the polyetiologic feature of disease.

  17. Mechatronic Design, Dynamic Modeling and Results of a Satellite Flight Simulator for Experimental Validation of Satellite Attitude Determination and Control Schemes in 3-Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Mendoza-Bárcenas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the integration and implementation of a satellite flight simulator based on an air bearing system, which was designed and instrumented in our laboratory to evaluate and to perform research in the field of Attitude Determination and Control Systems for satellites, using the hardware-in-the-loop technique. The satellite flight simulator considers two main blocks: an instrumented mobile platform and an external computer executing costume-made Matlab® software. The first block is an air bearing system containing an FPGA based on-board computer with capabilities to integrate digital architectures for data acquisition from inertial navigation sensors, control of actuators and communications data handling. The second block is an external personal computer, which runs in parallel Matlab® based algorithms for attitude determination and control. Both blocks are linked by means of radio modems. The paper also presents the analysis of the satellite flight simulator dynamics in order to obtain its movement equation which allows a better understanding of the satellite flight simulator behavior. In addition, the paper shows experimental results about the automated tracking of the satellite flight simulator based a virtual reality model developed in Matlab®. It also depicts two different versions of FPGA based on-board computers developed in-house to integrate embedded and polymorphic digital architectures for spacecrafts applications. Finally, the paper shows successful experimental results for an attitude control test using the satellite flight simulator based on a linear control law.

  18. Role of soil-to-leaf tritium transfer in controlling leaf tritium dynamics: Comparison of experimental garden and tritium-transfer model results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Masakazu; Kwamena, Nana-Owusua A; Mihok, Steve; Korolevych, Volodymyr

    2017-09-11

    Environmental transfer models assume that organically-bound tritium (OBT) is formed directly from tissue-free water tritium (TFWT) in environmental compartments. Nevertheless, studies in the literature have shown that measured OBT/HTO ratios in environmental samples are variable and generally higher than expected. The importance of soil-to-leaf HTO transfer pathway in controlling the leaf tritium dynamics is not well understood. A model inter-comparison of two tritium transfer models (CTEM-CLASS-TT and SOLVEG-II) was carried out with measured environmental samples from an experimental garden plot set up next to a tritium-processing facility. The garden plot received one of three different irrigation treatments - no external irrigation, irrigation with low tritium water and irrigation with high tritium water. The contrast between the results obtained with the different irrigation treatments provided insights into the impact of soil-to-leaf HTO transfer on the leaf tritium dynamics. Concentrations of TFWT and OBT in the garden plots that were not irrigated or irrigated with low tritium water were variable, responding to the arrival of the HTO-plume from the tritium-processing facility. In contrast, for the plants irrigated with high tritium water, the TFWT concentration remained elevated during the entire experimental period due to a continuous source of high HTO in the soil. Calculated concentrations of OBT in the leaves showed an initial increase followed by quasi-equilibration with the TFWT concentration. In this quasi-equilibrium state, concentrations of OBT remained elevated and unchanged despite the arrivals of the plume. These results from the model inter-comparison demonstrate that soil-to-leaf HTO transfer significantly affects tritium dynamics in leaves and thereby OBT/HTO ratio in the leaf regardless of the atmospheric HTO concentration, only if there is elevated HTO concentrations in the soil. The results of this work indicate that assessment models

  19. Experimental Object-Oriented Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius

    This thesis examines object-oriented modelling in experimental system development. Object-oriented modelling aims at representing concepts and phenomena of a problem domain in terms of classes and objects. Experimental system development seeks active experimentation in a system development project...... through, e.g., technical prototyping and active user involvement. We introduce and examine “experimental object-oriented modelling” as the intersection of these practices. The contributions of this thesis are expected to be within three perspectives on models and modelling in experimental system...... and discuss techniques for handling and representing uncertainty when modelling in experimental system development. These techniques are centred on patterns and styles for handling uncertainty in object-oriented software architectures. Tools We present the Knight tool designed for collaborative modelling...

  20. Fly's proprioception-inspired micromachined strain-sensing structure: idea, design, modeling and simulation, and comparison with experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wicaksono, D H B [Department of Microelectronics, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 4, Delft, Zuid-Holland 2628CD (Netherlands); Zhang, L-J [Department of Microelectronics, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 4, Delft, Zuid-Holland 2628CD (Netherlands); Pandraud, G [Department of Microelectronics, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 4, Delft, Zuid-Holland 2628CD (Netherlands); French, P J [Department of Microelectronics, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 4, Delft, Zuid-Holland 2628CD (Netherlands); Vincent, J F V [Department of Mech. Engineering, Bath University Bath, BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)

    2006-04-01

    A new strain-sensing structure inspired from insect's (especially the Fly) propricoception sensor is devised. The campaniform sensillum is a strain-sensing microstructure with very high sensitivity despite its small dimension (diameter {approx}10 {mu}m in a relatively stiff material of insect's exocuticle (E = {approx}10{sup 9} Pa). Previous work shows that the high sensitivity of this structure towards strain is due to its membrane-in-recess- and strainconcentrating-hole-features. Based on this inspiration, we built similar structure using silicon micromachining technology. Then a simple characterisation setup was devised. Here, we present briefly, finite-element modeling and simulation based on this actual sample preparation for the characterisation. As comparison and also to understand mechanical features responsible for the strain-sensitivity, we performed the modeling on different mechanical structures: bulk chunk, blind-hole, through-hole, surface membrane, and membrane-in-recess. The actual experimental characterisation was performed previously using optical technique to membrane in-recess micromachined Si structure. The FEM simulation results confirm that the bending stress and strain are concentrated in the hole-vicinity. The membrane inside the hole acts as displacement transducer. The FEM is in conformity with previous analytical results, as well as the optical characterisation result. The end goal is to build a new type MEMS strain sensor.

  1. Active acoustic leak detection for LMFBR steam generators. Pt. 4. Experimental results for detection of bubble using the SG full sector model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.

    1996-06-01

    In order to prevent the expansion of tube damages and to maintain structural safety in steam generators (SG) of fast breeder reactor (FBR), it is necessary to detect precisely and immediately the leakage of water from tubes of heat exchangers. The active acoustic method, which detects the sound attenuation due to bubbles generated at the sodium-water reactions, is being developed. In this paper, the attenuation characteristics of sound attenuated by bubbles are investigated experimentally by using the SG full sector model simulating the actual SG. An emitter and a receiver sensor are attached to the SG shell, and the attenuation of sounds due to passing of bubbles through the sound field is detected and measured. As a experimental result, it is clarified that the received sound attenuates immediately upon injection of bubbles, and the attenuation of sound are 2-5 dB at after 10 seconds from bubble injection of 10 l/s. The attenuation of sound are least affected by bubble injection location. (author)

  2. Experimental results from a stepped frequency GPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Signore

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of a nationally funded project, a Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR has been developed by the Italian Consortium for Research on Advanced Remote Sensing Systems (CO.RI.S.T.A.. The system was described in a previous paper (Alberti et al., 2002. As new aspects, the system is a stepped frequency GPR that can work both in gated and ungated mode, and the antennas can be moved automatically in a controlled fashion. As aspects of geophysical interest, the system is exploitable in situations wherein a high resolution and a shallow penetration in the soil (a few meters are required. Possibly, this is an example of probing a landscape. This paper completes the results of Alberti et al. (2002, wherein laboratory tests where described, by providing the main results obtained during an outdoor experimental campaign, performed fi rst in a controlled site and then in an archaeological site.

  3. A Comparison of Experimental and Theoretical Results for Magnetic Bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbs, Robert I., Jr.; Scharrer, Joseph K.; Galvin, Bonnie A.; Galvin, Mark W.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive program was undertaken to experimentally characterize the static and dynamic characteristics of a heteropolar magnetic bearing and to develop nonlinear theoretical models capable of accurately predicting magnetic bearing performance. This paper presents the results for the static characteristics of the magnetic bearing and a comparison with the predictions from the analytical model. The results indicate that the nonlinear theoretical model can accurately predict the static characteristics of the magnetic bearing.

  4. The geochemical reactions resulting from CO{sub 2} injection into the Midale Formation, Weyburn oilfield : a laboratory experimental and modelling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azaroual, M.; Durst, P.; Czernichowski-Lauriol, I. [Bureau de Recherches Geologiques et Minieres, Orleans (France); Olsen, D.; Stentoft, N.; Springer, N. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (Denmark); Rochelle, C.A.; Pearce, J.; Bateman, K.; Birchall, D. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    One aspect of the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Weyburn CO2 Monitoring and Storage Project is the identification of geochemical changes that occur following the injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into the Midale Formation of the Weyburn Field in southern Saskatchewan. This paper summarized the fluid chemical and mineralogical changes noted during laboratory experiments on Midale core from the Weyburn Field. The reactions between injected CO{sub 2}, Midale lithologies and porewaters under temperatures and pressures representative of in-situ conditions were explored. The laboratory studies involved closed system batch experiments reacting samples of Midale reservoir rocks and cap rock with synthetic saline reservoir porewaters. Flow experiments were also performed based on both core flood approaches and column experiments. The duration of experiments ranged from 1 week to 6 months. Changes in fluid chemistry, mineralogy, porosity and permeability were measured. The results were then used to verify predictions from geochemical modelling activities. Experimental and theoretical studies of the effects of CO{sub 2} injection into the Midale lithologies showed variable amounts of carbonate mineral dissolution, some precipitation of gypsum, inhibition of anhydrite dissolution, and slow reactivity of alumino-silicate minerals. These indications helped develop an hypothesis and approaches to simulate the long term evolution of a one dimensional model representing CO{sub 2} injection into the host Midale Marly formation. . 3 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Comparison with Experimental Results of Models and Modelling with Fuzzy Logic of the Effect on Surface Roughness of Cutting Parameters in Machining of Co28Cr6Mowrought Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asilturk, Ilhan; AlperInce, Mehmet

    2017-06-01

    This study includes comparison with experimental results of models and modelling with fuzzy logic of the effect on surface roughness of cutting parameters (rotational speed (n), feed rate (f), depth of cut (a) and tool tip radius (r)) in CNC turning of Co28Cr6Mo wrought steels. Fuzzy logic modelswere established that can determine the optimum rotational speed, feed rate, depth of cut and tool tip radius for surface roughness (Ra) according to the hardness of material and type of cutting tool. In the model created using fuzzy logic, membership functions and foot widths of input parameters and output parameter were utilized. In the rule base, triangular (trim-f) membership functions were selected by the Mamdani approach. The results obtained using this fuzzymodel and experimental results were interpreted and compared with 2dimensional graphics.

  6. Experimental and modeling results on geochemical impacts of leaking CO2 from subsurface storage reservoirs to an unconfined oxidizing carbonate aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qafoku, N. P.; Bacon, D. H.; Shao, H.; Lawter, A.; Wang, G.; Brown, C. F.

    2013-12-01

    Deep subsurface storage and sequestration of CO2 has been identified as a potential mitigation technique for rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Sequestered CO2 represents a potential risk to overlying aquifers if the CO2 leaks from the deep storage reservoir. Experimental and modeling work is required to evaluate risks to groundwater quality and develop a systematic understanding on how CO2 leakage may cause important changes in aquifer chemistry and mineralogy by promoting dissolution/precipitation, adsorption/desorption, and redox reactions. Solid materials (rocks and slightly weathered rocks) from an unconfined aquifer, i.e., the Edwards Aquifer in Texas, were used in this investigation. The experimental part consisted of: 1) wet chemical acid extractions (8M HNO3 solution at 90 0C); 2) batch experiments conducted at low solid to solution ratios to study time-dependent releases of major, minor and trace elements during periodic or continuous exposure to CO2 gas; 3) hydraulically saturated column experiments conducted under continuous and stop-flow conditions using a CO2 gas saturated synthetic groundwater; 4) pre- and post-treatment solid phase characterization studies. Major variables tested included reaction time (0-336 hours), CO2 flow rate (50 to 350 ml/min), brine concentration (0.1 and 1 M NaCl), rock type and particle size fraction. We are currently investigating the solution composition effects (i.e., presence of contaminants in the initial solution) on the fate and behavior of potential contaminants (As, Pb and Cd) in these systems. Results from the solid phase characterization studies showed that the mineralogy of the Edwards aquifer materials was dominated by calcite. Quartz and montmorillonite were also present in some samples. Acid extractions confirmed that the solid phase had appreciable amounts of potential contaminants (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn). However, the results from the batch and column experiments demonstrated that these contaminants

  7. Experimental results on the Pygmy Dipole Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savran Deniz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The so-called Pygmy Dipole Resonance, an additional structure of low-lying electric dipole strength, has attracted strong interest in the last years. Different experimental approaches have been used in the last decade in order to investigate this new interesting nuclear excitation mode. In this contribution an overview on the available experimental data is given.

  8. The effect of a combination of gabapentin and donepezil in an experimental pain model in healthy volunteers: Results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Yvonne; Fernando, Disala; Kurz, Hazel; Miller, Sam R; Zucchetto, Mauro; Storey, James

    2014-12-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled, 3-period cross-over, 4-treatment option, incomplete block study (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT01485185), with an adaptive design for sample size re-estimation, was designed to evaluate gabapentin plus donepezil in an established experimental model of electrical hyperalgesia. Thirty healthy male subjects aged 18-55 years were randomized to receive gabapentin 900 mg or gabapentin 900 mg+donepezil 5mg for 2 of the 3 treatment periods, with 50% of subjects randomized to receive placebo (negative control) and 50% to gabapentin 1800 mg (positive control) for the remaining period. Each treatment period was 14 days. Gabapentin or corresponding placebo was administered on Day 13 and the morning of Day 14. Donepezil or corresponding placebo was administered nocturnally from Day 1-13 and the morning of Day 14. Co-primary endpoints were the area of pinprick hyperalgesia (260 mN von Frey filament) and allodynia (stroking by cotton bud) evoked by electrical hyperalgesia on Day 14. Gabapentin 1800 mg (n=14) significantly reduced the area of allodynia vs placebo (n=14; -12.83 cm(2); 95% confidence interval [CI] -23.14 to -2.53; P=0.015) with supportive results for hyperalgesia (-14.04 cm(2); 95% CI -28.49-0.41; P=0.057), validating the electrical hyperalgesia model. Gabapentin+donepezil (n=30) significantly reduced the area of hyperalgesia vs gabapentin 900 mg (n=30; -11.73 cm(2); 95% CI -21.04 to -2.42; P=0.014), with supportive results for allodynia (-6.62 cm(2); 95% CI -13.29-0.04; P=0.052). The adverse event profile for gabapentin+donepezil was similar to the same dose of gabapentin. Data are supportive of further clinical investigation of a gabapentin-and-donepezil combination in patients with an inadequate response to gabapentin.

  9. Superspreading: molecular dynamics simulations and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakis, Panagiotis; Kovalchuk, Nina; Starov, Victor; Muller, Erich; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    The intriguing ability of certain surfactant molecules to drive the superspreading of liquids to complete wetting on hydrophobic substrates is central to numerous applications that range from coating flow technology to enhanced oil recovery. Recently, we have observed that for superspreading to occur, two key conditions must be simultaneously satisfied: the adsorption of surfactants from the liquid-vapor surface onto the three-phase contact line augmented by local bilayer formation. Crucially, this must be coordinated with the rapid replenishment of liquid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces with surfactants from the interior of the droplet. Here, we present the structural characteristics and kinetics of the droplet spreading during the different stages of this process, and we compare our results with experimental data for trisiloxane and poly oxy ethylene surfactants. In this way, we highlight and explore the differences between surfactants, paving the way for the design of molecular architectures tailored specifically for applications that rely on the control of wetting. EPSRC Platform Grant MACIPh (EP/L020564/).

  10. Results of the AVATAR project for the validation of 2D aerodynamic models with experimental data of the DU95W180 airfoil with unsteady flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, C.; Gonzalez, A.; Baldacchino, D.; Aparicio, M.; Gómez, S.; Munduate, X.; Garcia, N. R.; Sørensen, J. N.; Jost, E.; Knecht, S.; Lutz, T.; Chassapogiannis, P.; Diakakis, K.; Papadakis, G.; Voutsinas, S.; Prospathopoulos, J.; Gillebaart, T.; van Zuijlen, A.

    2016-09-01

    The FP7 AdVanced Aerodynamic Tools for lArge Rotors - Avatar project aims to develop and validate advanced aerodynamic models, to be used in integral design codes for the next generation of large scale wind turbines (10-20MW). One of the approaches towards reaching rotors for 10-20MW size is the application of flow control devices, such as flaps. In Task 3.2: Development of aerodynamic codes for modelling of flow devices on aerofoils and, rotors of the Avatar project, aerodynamic codes are benchmarked and validated against the experimental data of a DU95W180 airfoil in steady and unsteady flow, for different angle of attack and flap settings, including unsteady oscillatory trailing-edge-flap motion, carried out within the framework of WP3: Models for Flow Devices and Flow Control, Task 3.1: CFD and Experimental Database. The aerodynamics codes are: AdaptFoil2D, Foil2W, FLOWer, MaPFlow, OpenFOAM, Q3UIC, ATEFlap. The codes include unsteady Eulerian CFD simulations with grid deformation, panel models and indicial engineering models. The validation cases correspond to 18 steady flow cases, and 42 unsteady flow cases, for varying angle of attack, flap deflection and reduced frequency, with free and forced transition. The validation of the models show varying degrees of agreement, varying between models and flow cases.

  11. Experimental modeling of the processes resulting from the introduction of the transgenic microorganism Escherichia coli Z905/pPHL7 (lux+) into aquatic microcosms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargatova, T.; Popova, L.; Pechurkin, N.

    The processes resulting from the introduction of the transgenic microorganism (TM) E. coli Z905/pPHL7 into aquatic microcosms have been modeled experimentally. It has been shown that the TM E. coli is able to adapt to a long co-existence with aboriginal heterotrophic microflora, whatever the structure of a microcosm. In more complex microcosms the numerical dynamics of the introduced E. coli Z905/pPHL7 population is more stable. In the TM populations staying in the microcosms for a prolonged time changes are recorded in the phenotypic expression of plasmid genes (ampicillin resistance and the luminescence level) and chromosome genes (morphological and physiological traits). However, in every study microcosm the recombinant plasmid persists in the TM cells during 6 years after the introduction, and as the population adapts to the conditions of the microcosms, the efficiency of the cloned gene expression in the cells is restored. In the microcosms with high microalgal counts (107 cells/ml), cells with a high threshold of sensitivity to ampicillin dominate in the population of the TM E. coli Z905/pPHL7.

  12. Chronic partial urethral obstruction in female rats: description of an experimental model and initial results Obstrução parcial uretral crônica em ratos: descrição de um modelo experimental e resultados iniciais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Tucci Jr

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop an experimental model of infravesical urinary obstruction in female rats. METHODS: After median caudal laparotomy, the urethra of 14 female rats was delicately separated from the vagina and loosely wrapped with cellophane tape measuring 0.4 x 1.0 cm. The animals were evaluated 4 (n=7 and 8 (n=7 weeks later. Five additional control animals were only subjected to separation of the urethra and vagina and monitored for 12 weeks. RESULTS: After four weeks, three rats presented vesical dilation associated with discrete ureteral ectasis in 2 animals, with the third presenting discrete hydronephrosis in one kidney. After eight weeks, five rats (71.4% presented vesical distension with bilateral ureterohydronephrosis. No significant changes (p>0.05 in serum urea or creatinine occurred in any group compared to preoperative values. CONCLUSION: We present here an inexpensive and simple method for the slow induction of urethral obstruction in adult female rats, with the development of progressive vesical hypertrophy and ureterohydronephrosis, which may be used as an experimental model for the study of different aspects of obstructive nephropathy.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver modelo experimental de obstrução urinária infravesical em ratas. MÉTODOS: Após laparotomia caudal mediana, as uretras de 14 ratas foram delicadamente separadas da vagina e frouxamente envoltas com fita de celofane medindo 0.4 x 1.0 cm. Os animais foram avaliados 4 (n=7 e 8 (n=7 semanas depois. Cinco animais adicionais (controle foram submetidos apenas à separação da uretra e da vagina e monitoradas por 12 semanas. RESULTADOS: Após quatro semanas, três ratas apresentaram dilatação vesical associada a discreta ectasia ureteral em 2 animais, com o terceiro apresentando discreta hidronefrose em um rim. Após oito semanas, cinco ratas (71.4% apresentaram distensão vesical com ureterohidronefrose bilateral. Não ocorreram alterações significativas (p>0.05 nos valores

  13. Comparison of calculated and experimental results of fragmenting cylinder experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WILSON,L.T.; REEDAL,D.R.; KIPP,MARLIN E.; MARTINEZ,REINA R.; GRADY,D.E.

    2000-06-02

    The Grady-Kipp fragmentation model provides a physically based method for determining the fracture and breakup of materials under high loading rates. Recently, this model has been implemented into the CTH Shock Physics Code and has been used to simulate several published experiments. Materials studied in this paper are AerMet 100 steel and a 90% tungsten alloy. The experimental geometry consists of a right circular cylinder filled with an explosive main charge that is initiated at its center. The sudden expansion of the resulting detonation products causes fracture of the cylinder. Strain rates seen in the cylinder are on the order of 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1}. The average fragment sizes calculated with the Grady-Kipp fragmentation model successfully replicate the mean fragment size obtained from the experimental fragment distribution. When Poisson statistics are applied to the calculated local average fragment sizes, good correlation is also observed with the shape of the experimental cumulative fragment distribution. The experimental fragmentation results, CTH numerical simulations, and correlation of these numerical results with the experimental data are described.

  14. Experimental Results and Theoretical Developments of Muon g-2

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, H; Bennett, G W; Bousquet, B; Brown, H N; Bunce, G; Carey, R M; Cushman, P; Danby, G T; Debevec, P T; Deile, M; Dhawan, S K; Druzhinin, V P; Duong, L; Farley, F J M; Fedotovich, G V; Gray, F E; Grigoriev, D; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Grossmann, A; Hare, M; Hertzog, D W; Huang, X; Hughes, V W; Iwasaki, M; Jungmann, Klaus; Kawall, D; Khazin, B I; Krienen, F; Kronkvist, I J; Lam, A; Larsen, R; Lee, Y Y; Logashenko, I; McNabb, R; Meng, W; Miller, J P; Morse, W M; Nikas, D; Onderwater, Gerco; Orlov, Y; Ozben; Paley, J M; Peng, Q; Polly, C C; Pretz, J; Prigl, R; zu Putlitz, Gisbert; Qian, T; Redin, S I; Rind, O; Roberts, B L; Ryskulov, N M; Semertzidis, Y K; Shagin, P; Shatunov, Yu M; Sichtermann, E P; Solodov, E; Sossong, M; Sulak, L R; Trofimov, A; Von Walter, P; Yamamoto, A

    2004-01-01

    The anomalous magnetic moments of both positive and negative muons are measured to the precision of 0.7 parts per million. Two values are in good agreement. The standard model calculations of muon g-2 are under further studies, especially the descrepancies between $e^+e^-$ and $\\tau$ data. The differences between experimental result and the standard model calculations are $2.4\\sigma$ for $e^+e^-$ data and $0.9\\sigma$ for $\\tau$ data.

  15. Results of the AVATAR project for the validation of 2D aerodynamic models with experimental data of the DU95W180 airfoil with unsteady flap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, C.; Gonzalez, A.; Baldacchino, D.;

    2016-01-01

    The FP7 AdVanced Aerodynamic Tools for lArge Rotors - Avatar project aims to develop and validate advanced aerodynamic models, to be used in integral design codes for the next generation of large scale wind turbines (10-20MW). One of the approaches towards reaching rotors for 10-20MW size...... is the application of flow control devices, such as flaps. In Task 3.2: Development of aerodynamic codes for modelling of flow devices on aerofoils and, rotors of the Avatar project, aerodynamic codes are benchmarked and validated against the experimental data of a DU95W180 airfoil in steady and unsteady flow......, for different angle of attack and flap settings, including unsteady oscillatory trailing-edge-flap motion, carried out within the framework of WP3: Models for Flow Devices and Flow Control, Task 3.1: CFD and Experimental Database. The aerodynamics codes are: AdaptFoil2D, Foil2W, FLOWer, MaPFlow, OpenFOAM, Q3UIC...

  16. Comparison of the Experimental and Numerical Results of Modelling a 32-Oscillating Water Column (OWC, V-Shaped Floating Wave Energy Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V. Ringwood

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Combining offshore wind and wave energy converting apparatuses presents a number of potentially advantageous synergies. To facilitate the development of a proposed floating platform combining these two technologies, proof of concept scale model testing on the wave energy converting component of this platform has been conducted. The wave energy component is based on the well-established concept of the oscillating water column. A numerical model of this component has been developed in the frequency domain, and the work presented here concerns the results of this modelling and testing. The results of both are compared to assess the validity and usefulness of the numerical model.

  17. Experimental natural circulation circuit - preliminaries results; Circuito experimental de circulacao natural - resultados experimentais preliminares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faccini, Jose Luiz H.; Botelho, David A.; Soares, Milton; Coutinho, Jorge A.; Freitas, Sergio Carlos [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). E-mail: faccini@cnen.gov.br

    2000-07-01

    These are the preliminaries results of the tests carried out at experimental natural circulation system of IEN/CNEN. The experimental system is a reduced scale similar model in power, pressure, and length of a passive residual heat removal prototype system. It enables studies of natural circulation phenomena in an advanced PWR. The experimental results refer to the steps of data acquisition system calibration, power control system calibration, and single-phase operational tests. The results of single-phase tests show temperature in time measured by the thermocouples placed along the natural circulation system. It is also presented a brief commentary on the experimental results, based on theory and preliminary computational simulations. (author)

  18. Design and Test of Mixed-flow Impellers IV : Experimental Results for Impeller Models MFI-1 and MFI-2 with Changes in Blade Height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrick, Joseph T; Beede, William L; Withee, Joseph R JR

    1954-01-01

    Modifications A and B of impeller model MFI-1 and A, B, and C of impeller model MFI-2 were investigated experimentally in an attempt to determine what allowance in blade height should be made for boundary layer and viscous losses in an impeller designed for isentropic compressible flow. A gradual increase in blade height was arbitrarily made from inlet to outlet in anticipation of a gradual build-up of boundary layer. Apparently there was a rapid build-up of boundary layer near the inlet in the experimental case rather than a gradual one. Therefore, the proper allowance for boundary layer cannot be described from the data obtained. Decreasing the pressure gradient along the shroud by reducing the blade height allowance apparently did little to increase the overall efficiency. At the design speed of 1400 feet per second, the overall adiabatic efficiency was increased from 0.83 for the MFI-1A to 0.85 for the MFI-1B with reduction in height; however, it is indicated from the theoretical velocity distribution and outlet surveys that the increase was due to a change from decelerating to accelerating flow along the hub rather than from any change along the shroud. It is further indicated that the consequences of a thickened or separated boundary layer depend not only on the design velocity gradients but also on the shape of the passage.

  19. Early changes in experimental osteoarthritis using the Pond-Nuki dog model: technical procedure and initial results of in vivo MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Libicher, Martin [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ivancic, Mate; Hoffmann, Volker; Wenz, Wolfram [University of Heidelberg, Department of Orthopaedics, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to prove the feasibility of combining in vivo MR imaging with the Pond-Nuki animal model for the evaluation of osteoarthritis. In an experimental study, 24 beagle dogs underwent transection of the anterior cruciate ligament of the left leg (modified Pond-Nuki model). The dogs were randomly assigned into four groups and examined by MRI after 6, 12, 24 and 48 weeks. MR imaging of both knees was performed under general anesthesia with the contralateral joint serving as control. In group 1 (6 weeks postoperatively), the first sign detected on MRI was subchondral bone marrow edema in the posteromedial tibia. After 12 weeks, erosion of the posteromedial tibial cartilage could be observed, followed by meniscus degeneration and osteophytosis after 24 and 48 weeks. The contralateral knee joint showed transient joint effusion, but no significant signs of internal derangement (P<0.001). By combining in vivo MR imaging with the Pond-Nuki model, it is possible to detect early signs of osteoarthritis. The first sign was posteromedial subchondral bone marrow edema in the tibia followed by progressive cartilage degeneration and joint derangement. The in vivo model therefore seems to be suitable for longitudinal studies or monitoring the therapeutic effects of osteoarthritis. (orig.)

  20. Mathematical modelling in Matlab of the experimental results shows the electrochemical potential difference - temperature of the WC coatings immersed in a NaCl solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benea, M. L.; Benea, O. D.

    2016-02-01

    The method used for purchasing the corrosion behaviour the WC coatings deposited by plasma spraying, on a martensitic stainless steel substrate consists in measuring the electrochemical potential of the coating, respectively that of the substrate, immersed in a NaCl solution as corrosive agent. The mathematical processing of the obtained experimental results in Matlab allowed us to make some correlations between the electrochemical potential of the coating and the solution temperature is very well described by some curves having equations obtained by interpolation order 4.

  1. Adaptive structures - Test hardware and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Ben K.; Fanson, James L.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Kuo, Chin-Po

    1990-01-01

    The facilities and procedures used at JPL to test adaptive structures such as the large deployable reflector (LDR) are described and preliminary results are reported. The applications of adaptive structures in future NASA missions are outlined, and the techniques which are employed to modify damping, stiffness, and isolation characteristics, as well as geometric changes, are listed. The development of adaptive structures is shown to be effective as a result of new actuators and sensors, and examples are listed for categories such as fiber optics, shape-memory materials, piezoelectrics, and electrorheological fluids. Some ground test results are described for laboratory truss structures and truss test beds, which are shown to be efficient and easy to assemble in space. Adaptive structures are shown to be important for precision space structures such as the LDR, and can alleviate ground test requirements.

  2. Simulation of ATPG Neural Network and Its Experimental Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张中

    1995-01-01

    This paper first establishes a neural network model for logic circuits from the truth tableby using linear equations theory,presents a kind of ATPG neural network model,and investigates energy local minima for the network.And then,it proposes the corresponding techniques to reduce the number of energy local minima as well as some approaches to escaping from local minimum of energy.Finally,two simulation systems,the binary ATPG neural network and the continuous ATPG neural network,are implemented on SUN 3/260 workstation in C language.The experimental results and their analysis and discussion are given.The preliminary experimental results show that this method is feasible and promising.

  3. Some recent experimental results from Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, H.E.

    1994-02-01

    The aim of this talk was to give an impression of the tremendous range and depth of the data being produced by experiments at Fermilab, both fixed target and collider. Despite the generous allotment of time it was not possible to do more than scratch the surface of some subjects. The collider experiments, using the measurements of the W mass and with top search and mass limits, are approaching the situation where a statement about the Higgs mass, or a sensitive test of the consistency of the standard model become a possibility. Subjects discussed were: (1) cross-sections, QCD measurements; (2) decay physics; (3) W/Z physics; (4) searches for new physics; and (5) search for top quark.

  4. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten Haack

    2006-01-01

    An engineering course, Simulation and Experimental Modeling, has been developed that is based on a method for direct estimation of physical parameters in dynamic systems. Compared with classical system identification, the method appears to be easier to understand, apply, and combine with physical...

  5. ANOVA parameters influence in LCF experimental data and simulation results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vercelli A.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The virtual design of components undergoing thermo mechanical fatigue (TMF and plastic strains is usually run in many phases. The numerical finite element method gives a useful instrument which becomes increasingly effective as the geometrical and numerical modelling gets more accurate. The constitutive model definition plays an important role in the effectiveness of the numerical simulation [1, 2] as, for example, shown in Figure 1. In this picture it is shown how a good cyclic plasticity constitutive model can simulate a cyclic load experiment. The component life estimation is the subsequent phase and it needs complex damage and life estimation models [3-5] which take into account of several parameters and phenomena contributing to damage and life duration. The calibration of these constitutive and damage models requires an accurate testing activity. In the present paper the main topic of the research activity is to investigate whether the parameters, which result to be influent in the experimental activity, influence the numerical simulations, thus defining the effectiveness of the models in taking into account of all the phenomena actually influencing the life of the component. To obtain this aim a procedure to tune the parameters needed to estimate the life of mechanical components undergoing TMF and plastic strains is presented for commercial steel. This procedure aims to be easy and to allow calibrating both material constitutive model (for the numerical structural simulation and the damage and life model (for life assessment. The procedure has been applied to specimens. The experimental activity has been developed on three sets of tests run at several temperatures: static tests, high cycle fatigue (HCF tests, low cycle fatigue (LCF tests. The numerical structural FEM simulations have been run on a commercial non linear solver, ABAQUS®6.8. The simulations replied the experimental tests. The stress, strain, thermal results from the thermo

  6. Microconfined equiviscous droplet deformation: Comparison of experimental and numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vananroye, Anja; Janssen, Pieter J. A.; Anderson, Patrick D.; Van Puyvelde, Peter; Moldenaers, Paula

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of confined droplets in shear flow is investigated using computational and experimental techniques for a viscosity ratio of unity. Numerical calculations, using a boundary integral method (BIM) in which the Green's functions are modified to include wall effects, are quantitatively compared with the results of confined droplet experiments performed in a counter-rotating parallel plate device. For a viscosity ratio of unity, it is experimentally seen that confinement induces a sigmoidal droplet shape during shear flow. Contrary to other models, this modified BIM model is capable of predicting the correct droplet shape during startup and steady state. The model also predicts an increase in droplet deformation and more orientation toward the flow direction with increasing degree of confinement, which is all experimentally confirmed. For highly confined droplets, oscillatory behavior is seen upon startup of flow, characterized by an overshoot in droplet length followed by droplet retraction. Finally, in the case of a viscosity ratio of unity, a minor effect of confinement on the critical capillary number is observed both numerically and experimentally.

  7. Smart Demand for Frequency Regulation: Experimental Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douglass, Philip James; Garcia-Valle, Rodrigo; Nyeng, Preben

    2013-01-01

    As renewable energy sources increase their penetration, the traditional providers of frequency regulation service, fossil fueled thermal power plants, will be displaced, motivating the search for novel providers such as demandside resources. This paper presents the results of field experiments......, industrial pump loads and relay-controlled loads were tested as DFCR. The tests show that a population of refrigerators was able to deliver frequency reserves approximately equal to their average power consumption. Electric space heaters were able to provide frequency reserves of over 90% their maximum power...

  8. Charmonium physics with heavy ions: experimental results

    CERN Document Server

    Scomparin, E

    2016-01-01

    Thirty years ago, the suppression of charmonium production in heavy-ion collisions was first proposed as an unambiguous signature for the formation of a Quark-Gluon Plasma. Since then, experiments at fixed-target accelerators (SPS) and hadronic colliders (RHIC, LHC) have investigated this observable and discovered a wide range of effects, that have been related to the original proposal but at the same time have also prompted a strong development in the underlying theory concepts. In this contribution, I will review the main achievements of this field, with emphasis on recent results obtained by LHC experiments.

  9. Experimental Test Results of the Energy Efficient Transport (EET) Flap-Edge Vortex Model in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Harry L., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    This report presents the results of a test conducted in the Langley Low-Turbulence Pressure Tunnel to measure the flow field properties of a flap-edge vortex. The model was the EET (Energy Efficient Transport) Flap-Edge Vortex Model, which consists of a main element and a part-span, single-slotted trailing-edge flap. The model surface was instrumented with several chordwise and spanwise rows of pressure taps on each element. The off-body flow field velocities were to be measured in several planes perpendicular to the flap edge with a laser velocimetry system capable of measuring all three components in coincidence. However, due to seeding difficulties, the preliminary laser data did not have sufficient accuracy to be suitable for presentation; therefore, this report presents only the tabulated and plotted surface pressure data. In addition, the report contains a detail description of the model which can be used to generate accurate CFD grid structures.

  10. The Enhancement of 226Ra in a Tidal Estuary due to the Operation of Fertilizer Factories and Redissolution from Sediments: Experimental Results and a Modelling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periáñez, R.

    2002-05-01

    The presence of 226Ra in a tidal estuary formerly affected by direct discharges from a phosphate fertilizer complex has been investigated. In general, activity levels are lower than those detected when direct discharges were carried out. However, there is still a clear contamination that can be attributed, presumably, to the disposal of Ra-containing phosphogypsum to the river and to the redissolution of radionuclides from the contaminated sediments. A numerical model of the estuary has been developed to investigate these hypothesis. The hydrodynamics are first calibrated and standard tidal analysis is carried out. The dispersion model computes instantaneous currents from the so obtained tidal constants to speed up simulations. The exchanges of 226Ra between water and the bottom sediment have been described in terms of kinetic transfer coefficients. Model results are, in general, in agreement with observations. The simulation results support the previous idea of sediments acting as a source of 226Ra to the water column.

  11. Computation accuracy of flow conditions around a very large floating structure using a multi-layer model. Comparison with experimental results; Taso model ni yoru choogata futai mawari no ryukyo keisan seido ni tsuite. Jikken tono hikaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyotsuka, Y. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Omori, H.; Nakagawa, H.; Kobayashi, M. [Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-04-10

    As one of the environmental problems in sea areas surrounding a very large floating structure (VLFS), change in flow condition is important, and it is one of the factors dominating the prediction of succeeding diffusion and ecosystems. Although a multi-layer model is in wide use for computation of flow condition and diffusion in one inner bay, its applicability should be reexamined because of no consideration of VLFSs. In this study, flow velocity profiles around a barge were then measured through the towing test of a barge in shallow water, and compared with computation results using a multi-layer model. The multi-layer model computed the flow velocity profiles by dividing the flow region to be computed into normal one and that under VLFS, and determined pressures under VLFS by 2-D Poisson`s equation. Slip condition was used as boundary condition at the bottom considering the number of layers under VLFS. Further numerical computation was conducted by 2-D MAC method, in particular, to compare flow around the wake of VLFS with experimental one. Both computation results well agreed with experimental one. 3 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. EFFECTS OF CONTINUOUS STEM-CELL FACTOR ADMINISTRATION ON NORMAL AND ERYTHROPOIETIN-STIMULATED MURINE HEMATOPOIESIS - EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS AND MODEL ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEHAAN, G; DONTJE, B; NIJHOF, W; LOEFFLER, M

    1995-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine how stem cell factor (SCF) modifies hemopoietic cell production. First we determined the effects of a prolonged SCP administration on murine hemopoiesis and analyzed the results by a mathematical simulation model of hemopoiesis in order to explain the data. Sub

  13. Mechanism of reaction in NaAlCl4 molten salt batteries with nickel felt cathodes and aluminum anodes. 2: Experimental results and comparison with model calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutz, B. C.; Berg, R. W.; Hjuler, H. A.; Bjerrum, N. J.

    1993-12-01

    The battery systems: Al/NaCl-AlCl3-Al2 X3/Ni-felt (X = S, Se, Te) and the corresponding system without chalcogen have been studied experimentally at 175 C. Charge/discharge experiments, performed on cells with NaCl saturated melts, show that advantages with regard to rate capability and cyclability can be obtained with systems containing dissolved chalcogen compared with the chalcogen-free system. Exchange of chalcogen between cathode and electrolyte during cycling was confirmed by performing gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy of the electrolytes. Cathode reactions were studied by coulometric titrations (performed on cells with slightly acidic NaCl-AlCl3 melts and small amounts of chalcogen) and compared with model calculations. Cells containing chalcogen revealed at least three voltage plateaus during cycling. The lowest plateau is associated with formation/decomposition of essentially Ni(y)S(z) an d Ni(y)Se(z) in the sulfide and selenide system, respectively. Cells containing selenide revealed extra capacity below the Ni(y) Se(z)-plateau, most probably associated with a Al(v)Ni(y)Se(z) compound. On the second plateau of sulfide systems NiCl2 or a Ni(y)S(z) Cl(2y - 2z) compound with y greater than (4.4 +/- 0.2), z is formed during charging. Reduction of the formed compound to Ni takes place via consumption of sodium chloride.

  14. Feedback control of a cupola - concepts and experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, K.L. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States); Abdelrahman, M.A. [Tenn. Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States); Larsen, E.; Clark, D. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); King, P. [US Dept. of Energy Albany Research Center, Albany, OR (United States)

    1998-10-01

    In this paper we present some final results from a research project focused on introducing automatic control to the operation of cupola iron furnaces. The main aim of this research is to improve the operational efficiency and performance of the cupola furnace, an important foundry process used to melt iron. Previous papers have described the development of appropriate control system architectures for the cupola. These results are summarized. Then we describe the experimental results obtained with the U.S. Department of Energy Albany Research Center`s research cupola. First, experimental data is used to calibrate the model, which is taken as a first-order multivariable system with time delay. Then relative gain analysis is used to select loop pairings to be used in a multi-loop controller. The resulting controller pairs meltrate with blast volume, iron temperature with oxygen addition, and carbon composition with percent coke. Special (nonlinear) filters are used to compute meltrate from actual scale readings of the amount of iron produced and to smooth the temperature measurement. The temperature and meltrate loops use single-loop PI control. The composition loop uses a Smith predictor to discount the deadtime associated with mass transport through the furnace. Experimental results validate the conceptual controller design and provide proof-of-concept of the idea of controlling a foundry cupola. Future research directions are discussed, including the concept of an integrated, intelligent industrial process controller, or I{sup 3}PC.

  15. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent Trypanosoma cruzi strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ágata Carolina Cevey

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Americas. Antiparasitic treatment mostly relies on benznidazole (Bzl due to Nifurtimox shortage or unavailability. Both induce adverse drug effects (ADE of varied severity in many patients, leading to treatment discontinuation or abandonment. Since dosage may influence ADE, we aimed to assess Bzl efficacy in terms of parasiticidal and anti-inflammatory activity, using doses lower than those previously reported. BALB/c mice infected with the T. cruzi RA strain were treated with different doses of Bzl. Parasitaemia, mortality and weight change were assessed. Parasite load, tissue infiltrates and inflammatory mediators were studied in the heart. Serum creatine kinase (CK activity was determined as a marker of heart damage. The infection-independent anti-inflammatory properties of Bzl were studied in an in vitro model of LPS-treated cardiomyocyte culture. Treatment with 25 mg/kg/day Bzl turned negative the parasitological parameters, induced a significant decrease in IL-1β, IL-6 and NOS2 in the heart and CK activity in serum, to normal levels. No mortality was observed in infected treated mice. Primary cultured cardiomyocytes treated with Bzl showed that inflammatory mediators were reduced via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. A Bzl dose lower than that previously reported for treatment of experimental Chagas disease exerts adequate antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory effects leading to parasite clearance and tissue healing. This may be relevant to reassess the dose currently used for the treatment of human Chagas disease, aiming to minimize ADE.

  16. Low-dose benznidazole treatment results in parasite clearance and attenuates heart inflammatory reaction in an experimental model of infection with a highly virulent Trypanosoma cruzi strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevey, Ágata Carolina; Mirkin, Gerardo Ariel; Penas, Federico Nicolás; Goren, Nora Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is the main cause of dilated cardiomyopathy in the Americas. Antiparasitic treatment mostly relies on benznidazole (Bzl) due to Nifurtimox shortage or unavailability. Both induce adverse drug effects (ADE) of varied severity in many patients, leading to treatment discontinuation or abandonment. Since dosage may influence ADE, we aimed to assess Bzl efficacy in terms of parasiticidal and anti-inflammatory activity, using doses lower than those previously reported. BALB/c mice infected with the T. cruzi RA strain were treated with different doses of Bzl. Parasitaemia, mortality and weight change were assessed. Parasite load, tissue infiltrates and inflammatory mediators were studied in the heart. Serum creatine kinase (CK) activity was determined as a marker of heart damage. The infection-independent anti-inflammatory properties of Bzl were studied in an in vitro model of LPS-treated cardiomyocyte culture. Treatment with 25 mg/kg/day Bzl turned negative the parasitological parameters, induced a significant decrease in IL-1β, IL-6 and NOS2 in the heart and CK activity in serum, to normal levels. No mortality was observed in infected treated mice. Primary cultured cardiomyocytes treated with Bzl showed that inflammatory mediators were reduced via inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. A Bzl dose lower than that previously reported for treatment of experimental Chagas disease exerts adequate antiparasitic and anti-inflammatory effects leading to parasite clearance and tissue healing. This may be relevant to reassess the dose currently used for the treatment of human Chagas disease, aiming to minimize ADE.

  17. Heat transport and solidification in the electromagnetic casting of aluminum alloys: Part II. Development of a mathematical model and comparison with experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasso, D. C.; Evans, J. W.; Wilson, I. J.

    1995-02-01

    In this second article of a two-part series, a mathematical model for heat transport and solidification of aluminum in electromagnetic casting is developed. The model is a three-dimensional one but involves a simplified treatment of convective heat transport in the liquid metal pool. Heat conduction in the solid was thought to play a dominant role in heat transport, and the thermal properties of the two alloys used in measurements reported in Part I (AA 5182 and 3104) were measured independently for input to the model. Heat transfer into the water sprays impacting the sides of the ingot was approximated using a heat-transfer coefficient from direct chill casting; because this heat-transfer step appears not to be rate determining for solidification and cooling of most of the ingot, there is little inaccuracy involved in this approximation. Joule heating was incorporated into some of the computations, which were carried out using the finite element software FIDAP. There was good agreement between the computed results and extensive thermocouple measurements (reported in Part I) made on a pilot-scale caster at Reynolds Metals Company (Richmond, VA).

  18. Experimental active control results from the SPICES smart structure demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamm, David S.; Toth, G. K.; Chou, Kenneth C.; Heck, Larry P.; Nowlin, William C.; Titterton, Paul J., Sr.

    1996-05-01

    The final demonstrations of the ARPA SPICES (Synthesis and Processing of Intelligent Cost Effective Structures) program test the control of two active vibration mounts manufactured from composites with embedded actuators and sensors. Both mount demonstrations address wide band control problems for real disturbances, one at low frequency and the other at high frequency. The control systems for both are two-level hierarchies, with an inner active damping augmentation loop and an outer vibration control loop. We first review the control design requirements for the demonstration and summarize our control design approach. Then we focus on presenting the experimental results of the final demonstrations. For the low frequency demonstration, two alternative control approaches were demonstrated, one involving finite impulse response modeling and the other state space modeling. For the high frequency demonstration only the finite impulse response modeling approach was used because of computational limitations due to the complex system dynamics.

  19. Genetic background can result in a marked or minimal effect of gene knockout (GPR55 and CB2 receptor in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Sisay

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids and some phytocannabinoids bind to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid one (TRPV1 receptor and the orphan G protein receptor fifty-five (GPR55. Studies using C57BL/10 and C57BL/6 (Cnr2 (tm1Zim CB2 cannabinoid receptor knockout mice have demonstrated an immune-augmenting effect in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE models of multiple sclerosis. However, other EAE studies in Biozzi ABH mice often failed to show any treatment effect of either CB2 receptor agonism or antagonism on inhibition of T cell autoimmunity. The influence of genetic background on the induction of EAE in endocannabinoid system-related gene knockout mice was examined. It was found that C57BL/6.GPR55 knockout mice developed less severe disease, notably in female mice, following active induction with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 peptide. In contrast C57BL/6.CB2 (Cnr2 (Dgen receptor knockout mice developed augmented severity of disease consistent with the genetically and pharmacologically-distinct, Cnr2 (tm1Zim mice. However, when the knockout gene was bred into the ABH mouse background and EAE induced with spinal cord autoantigens the immune-enhancing effect of CB2 receptor deletion was lost. Likewise CB1 receptor and transient receptor potential vanilloid one knockout mice on the ABH background demonstrated no alteration in immune-susceptibility, in terms of disease incidence and severity of EAE, in contrast to that reported in some C57BL/6 mouse studies. Furthermore the immune-modulating influence of GPR55 was marginal on the ABH mouse background. Whilst sedative doses of tetrahydrocannabinol could induce immunosuppression, this was associated with a CB1 receptor rather than a CB2 receptor-mediated effect. These data support the fact that non-psychoactive doses of medicinal cannabis have a marginal influence on the immune response in MS. Importantly, it adds a note of caution for the translational

  20. Cementless Titanium Mesh Fixation of Osteoporotic Burst Fractures of the Lumbar Spine Leads to Bony Healing: Results of an Experimental Sheep Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anica Eschler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Current treatment strategies for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (VCFs focus on cement-associated solutions. Complications associated with cement application are leakage, embolism, adjacent fractures, and compromise in bony healing. This study comprises a validated VCF model in osteoporotic sheep in order to (1 evaluate a new cementless fracture fixation technique using titanium mesh implants (TMIs and (2 demonstrate the healing capabilities in osteoporotic VCFs. Methods. Twelve 5-year-old Merino sheep received ovariectomy, corticosteroid injections, and a calcium/phosphorus/vitamin D-deficient diet for osteoporosis induction. Standardized VCFs (type AO A3.1 were created, reduced, and fixed using intravertebral TMIs. Randomly additional autologous spongiosa grafting (G1 or no augmentation was performed (G2, n=6 each. Two months postoperatively, macroscopic, micro-CT and biomechanical evaluation assessed bony consolidation. Results. Fracture reduction succeeded in all cases without intraoperative complications. Bony consolidation was proven for all cases with increased amounts of callus development for G2 (58.3%. Micro-CT revealed cage integration. Neither group showed improved results with biomechanical testing. Conclusions. Fracture reduction/fixation using TMIs without cement in osteoporotic sheep lumbar VCF resulted in bony fracture healing. Intravertebral application of autologous spongiosa showed no beneficial effects. The technique is now available for clinical use; thus, it offers an opportunity to abandon cement-associated complications.

  1. Experimental results on quantum chromo dynamics: what is next?

    CERN Document Server

    De Roeck, Albert

    2013-01-01

    This review gives a flavour of experimental quantum chromo dynamics (QCD) results obtained at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) during the first run period in the years 2010–2012. The results cover selected aspects of soft low-pT phenomena, typically described by phenomenological models, as well as high-pT processes which can be studied theoretically with perturbative techniques. In general the phenomenological models required tuning to describe the data in the new energy region of 7–8 TeV, while perturbative QCD (pQCD) is found to work generally quite well for most of the phase space currently studied. The strong force will remain a main topic of research at colliders such as the LHC also in future, with the large data samples allowing for more detailed studies and in particular when the next energy level of 13–14 TeV will be reached.

  2. Mercury methylation, export and bioaccumulation in rice agriculture - model results from comparative and experimental studies in 3 regions of the California Delta, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windham-Myers, L.; Fleck, J.; Eagles-Smith, C.; Ackerman, J.

    2013-12-01

    Seasonally flooded wetland ecosystems are often poised for mercury (Hg) methylation, thus becoming sources of methylmercury (MeHg) to in situ and downstream biota. The seasonal flooding associated with cultivation of rice (Oryza sativa) also generates MeHg, which may be stored in sediment or plants, bioaccumulated into fauna, degraded or exported, depending on hydrologic and seasonal conditions. While many U.S. waters are regulated for total Hg concentrations based on fish targets, California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) will soon implement the first MeHg total maximum daily load (TMDL) control program. Since 2007, a conceptual model (DRERIP-MCM) and several ecosystem-level studies have been advanced to better understand the mechanisms behind Hg methylation, export and bioaccumulation within Delta wetlands, including rice agriculture. Three Delta rice-growing regions (Yolo Bypass, Cosumnes River, Central Delta) of varied soil characteristics, mining influences and hydrology, were monitored over full crop years to evaluate annual MeHg dynamics. In addition to fish tissue Hg accumulation, a broad suite of biogeochemical and hydrologic indices were assessed and compared between wetland types, seasons, and regions. In general, Delta rice fields were found to export MeHg during the post-harvest winter season, and promote MeHg uptake in fish and rice grain during the summer growing season. As described in a companion presentation (Eagles-Smith et al., this session), the experimental Cosumnes River study suggests that rice-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fuels MeHg production and uptake into aquatic foodwebs. Explicit DRERIP-MCM linkages for the role of rice-DOC in MeHg production, export and bioaccumulation were verified across two summers (2011, 2012): rice biomass and root productivity influenced porewater DOC availability and microbial processes, which drove sediment MeHg production and flux to surface water, promoting MeHg bioaccumulation in fish

  3. Experimental Results on Charge Fluctuations in Heavy-Ion Collisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Mishra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a subset of experimental results on charge fluctuation from the heavy-ion collisions to search for phase transition and location of critical point in the QCD phase diagram. Measurements from the heavy-ion experiments at the SPS and RHIC energies observe that total charge fluctuations increase from central to peripheral collisions. The net-charge fluctuations in terms of dynamical fluctuation measure ν(+-,dyn are studied as a function of collision energy (sNN and centrality of the collisions. The product of ν(+-,dyn and 〈Nch〉 shows a monotonic decrease with collision energies, which indicates that at LHC energy the fluctuations have their origin in the QGP phase. The fluctuations in terms of higher moments of net-proton, net-electric charge, and net-kaon have been measured for various sNN. Deviations are observed in both Sσ and κσ2 for net-proton multiplicity distributions from the Skellam and hadron resonance gas model for sNN<39 GeV. Higher moment results of the net-electric charge and net-kaon do not observe any significant nonmonotonic behavior as a function of collision energy. We also discuss the extraction of the freeze-out parameters using particle ratios and experimentally measured higher moments of net-charge fluctuations. The extracted freeze-out parameters from experimentally measured moments and lattice calculations are found to be in agreement with the results obtained from the fit of particle ratios to the thermal model calculations.

  4. Mechanism of Reaction in NaAlCl4 Molten Salt Batteries with Nickel Felt Cathodes and Aluminum Anodes. Part II: Experimental Results and Comparison with Model Calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutz, B.C.; Berg, Rolf W.; Hjuler, Hans Aage

    1993-01-01

    The battery systems: Al/NaCl-AlCl3-Al(2)X(3)/Ni-felt (X = S, Se, Te) and the corresponding system without chalcogen have been studied experimentally at 175 degrees C. Charge/discharge experimental performed on cells with NaCl saturated melts, show that advantages with regard to rate capability....../decomposition of essentially NiySz and NiySez in the sulfide and selenide system, respectively. Cells containing selenide revealed extra capacity below the NiySez-plateau, most probably associated with a AlvNiySez compound. On the second plateau of sulfide systems NiCl2 or a NiySzCl2y-2z compound with y > (4.4 +/- 0.2). z...

  5. Dipole stabilizers for a four-vane high current RFQ: Theoretical analysis and experimental results on a real-scale model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grespan, F. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell' universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, PD (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, via Celoria, 16 I-20133 Milan (Italy)], E-mail: francesco.grespan@lnl.infn.it; Pisent, A.; Palmieri, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell' universita 2, 35020 Legnaro, PD (Italy)

    2007-11-21

    The Dipole Stabilizing Rods (DSRs) are devices used in order to reduce a priori the effect of perturbation on the operating mode of a four-vane RFQ caused by neighboring dipole modes by increasing the frequency spacing between the TE210 mode and dipole modes, without, in principle, affecting the quadrupole TE210 mode. They have proven to be particularly useful in the case of coupled RFQ's whose overall length is significantly greater than the operating wavelength. In this article we present a circuit model of such DSRs, that, used in combination with a Transmission Line Model of a four vane RFQ, has allowed us to predict the dimensioning of the DSRs in the case of the aluminium model of TRASCO RFQ. The DSR parameters and, in general, the accuracy of the model have been also confirmed by HFSS simulations and by RF measurements on the above-mentioned model.

  6. Modeling of Experimental Adsorption Isotherm Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunjun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption is considered to be one of the most effective technologies widely used in global environmental protection areas. Modeling of experimental adsorption isotherm data is an essential way for predicting the mechanisms of adsorption, which will lead to an improvement in the area of adsorption science. In this paper, we employed three isotherm models, namely: Langmuir, Freundlich, and Dubinin-Radushkevich to correlate four sets of experimental adsorption isotherm data, which were obtained by batch tests in lab. The linearized and non-linearized isotherm models were compared and discussed. In order to determine the best fit isotherm model, the correlation coefficient (r2 and standard errors (S.E. for each parameter were used to evaluate the data. The modeling results showed that non-linear Langmuir model could fit the data better than others, with relatively higher r2 values and smaller S.E. The linear Langmuir model had the highest value of r2, however, the maximum adsorption capacities estimated from linear Langmuir model were deviated from the experimental data.

  7. Dermal uptake directly from air under transient conditions: advances in modeling and comparisons with experimental results for human subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, G C; Weschler, Charles J.; Bekö, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the dermal exposure pathway, we enhance an existing mechanistic model of transdermal uptake by including skin surface lipids (SSL) and consider the impact of clothing. Addition of SSL increases the overall resistance to uptake of SVOCs from air but also allows for rapid...... transfer of SVOCs to sinks like clothing or clean air. We test the model by simulating di-ethyl phthalate (DEP) and di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP) exposures of six bare-skinned (Weschler et al. 2015, Environ. Health Perspect., 123, 928) and one clothed participant (Morrison et al. 2016, J. Expo. Sci. Environ...

  8. Intrabody application of eptotermin alpha enhances bone formation in osteoporotic fractures of the lumbar spine; however, fails to increase biomechanical stability - results of an experimental sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschler, Anica; Roepenack, Paula; Herlyn, Philipp Karl Ewald; Roesner, Jan; Martin, Heiner; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gradl, Georg

    2015-01-01

    This study analyses the effect of eptotermin α application into fractured vertebrae. It is hypothesized that eptotermin α is capable to enhance bony healing of the osteoporotic spine. In 10 Merino sheep osteoporosis induction was performed by ovariectomy, corticosteroid therapy and calcium/phosphorus/vitamin D-deficient diet; followed by standardized creation of lumbar vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) type A3.1 and consecutive fracture reduction/fixation using expandable mesh cages. Randomly, intravertebral eptotermin α (G1) or no augmentation was added (G2). Macroscopic, micro-CT, and biomechanical evaluation assessed bony consolidation two months postoperatively: Micro-CT data revealed bony consolidation for all cases with significant increased callus development for G2 (60%) and BV/TV (bone volume/total volume 73.45%, osteoporotic vertebrae 35.76%). Neither group showed improved biomechanical stability. Eptotermin α enhanced mineralisation in VCFs in an experimental setup with use of cementless augmentation via an expandable cage. However, higher bone mineral density did not lead to superior biomechanical properties.

  9. Internal wave emission from baroclinic jets: experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcia, Ion D.; Rodda, Costanza; Harlander, Uwe

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale balanced flows can spontaneously radiate meso-scale inertia-gravity waves (IGWs) and are thus in fact unbalanced. While flow-dependent parameterizations for the radiation of IGWs from orographic and convective sources do exist, the situation is less developed for spontaneously emitted IGWs. Observations identify increased IGW activity in the vicinity of jet exit regions. A direct interpretation of those based on geostrophic adjustment might be tempting. However, directly applying this concept to the parameterization of spontaneous imbalance is difficult since the dynamics itself is continuously re-establishing an unbalanced flow which then sheds imbalances by GW radiation. Examining spontaneous IGW emission in the atmosphere and validating parameterization schemes confronts the scientist with particular challenges. Due to its extreme complexity, GW emission will always be embedded in the interaction of a multitude of interdependent processes, many of which are hardly detectable from analysis or campaign data. The benefits of repeated and more detailed measurements, while representing the only source of information about the real atmosphere, are limited by the non-repeatability of an atmospheric situation. The same event never occurs twice. This argues for complementary laboratory experiments, which can provide a more focused dialogue between experiment and theory. Indeed, life cycles are also examined in rotating-annulus laboratory experiments. Thus, these experiments might form a useful empirical benchmark for theoretical and modeling work that is also independent of any sort of subgrid model. In addition, the more direct correspondence between experimental and model data and the data reproducibility makes lab experiments a powerful testbed for parameterizations. Here we show first results from a small rotating annulus experiments and we will further present our new experimental facility to study wave emission from jets and fronts.

  10. Selected Experimental Results from Heavy-Ion Collisions at LHC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranbir Singh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energy sNN=2.76 TeV for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements are compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.

  11. Doping highly ordered organic semiconductors: experimental results and fits to a self-consistent model of excitonic processes, doping, and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si-Guang; Stradins, Paul; Gregg, Brian A

    2005-07-21

    An in-depth study of n-type doping in a crystalline perylene diimide organic semiconductor (PPEEB) reveals that electrostatic attractions between the dopant electron and its conjugate dopant cation cause the free carrier density to be much lower than the doping density. Measurements of the dark currents as a function of field, doping density, electrode spacing, and temperature are reported along with preliminary Hall-effect measurements. The activation energy of the current, E(aJ), decreases with increasing field and with increasing dopant density, n(d). It is the measured change in E(aJ) with n(d) that accounts primarily for the variations between PPEEB films; the two adjustable parameters employed to fit the current-voltage data proved to be almost constants, independent of n(d) and temperature. The free electron density and the electron mobility are nonlinearly coupled through their shared dependences on both field and temperature. The data are fit to a modified Poole-Frenkel-like model that is shown to be valid for three important electronic processes in organic (excitonic) semiconductors: excitonic effects, doping, and transport. At room temperature, the electron mobility in PPEEB films is estimated to be 0.3 cm(2)/Vs; the fitted value of the mobility for an ideal PPEEB crystal is 3.4 +/- 2.7 cm(2)/Vs. The modified Poole-Frenkel factor that describes the field dependence of the current is 2 +/- 1 x 10(-4) eV (cm/V)(1/2). The analytical model is surprisingly accurate for a system that would require a coupled set of nonlinear tensor equations to describe it precisely. Being based on general electrostatic considerations, our model can form the requisite foundation for treatments of more complex systems. Some analogies to adventitiously doped materials such as pi-conjugated polymers are proposed.

  12. Experimental Results and Model Calculations of a Hybrid Adsorption-Compression Heat Pump Based on a Roots Compressor and Silica Gel-Water Sorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Pal, M.; De Boer, R.; Wemmers, A.K.; Smeding, S.F.; Veldhuis, J.B.J.; Lycklama a Nijeholt, J.A.

    2013-10-15

    Thermally driven sorption systems can provide significant energy savings, especially in industrial applications. The driving temperature for operation of such systems limits the operating window and can be a barrier for market-introduction. By adding a compressor, the sorption cycle can be run using lower waste heat temperatures. ECN has recently started the development of such a hybrid heat pump. The final goal is to develop a hybrid heat pump for upgrading lower (<100C) temperature industrial waste heat to above pinch temperatures. The paper presents the first measurements and model calculations of a hybrid heat pump system using a water-silica gel system combined with a Roots type compressor. From the measurements can be seen that the effect of the compressor is dependent on where in the cycle it is placed. When placed between the evaporator and the sorption reactor, it has a considerable larger effect compared to the compressor placed between the sorption reactor and the condenser. The latter hardly improves the performance compared to purely heat-driven operation. This shows the importance of studying the interaction between all components of the system. The model, which shows reasonable correlation with the measurements, could proof to be a valuable tool to determine the optimal hybrid heat pump configuration.

  13. Electrochemical desalination of bricks - Experimental and modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skibsted, Gry; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Jensen, Pernille Erland

    2015-01-01

    Chlorides, nitrates and sulfates play an important role in the salt-decay of porous materials in buildings and monuments. Electrochemical desalination is a technology able to remove salts from such porous materials in order to stop or prevent the decay. In this paper, experimental and numerical......-contaminated bricks with respect to the monovalent ions is discussed. Comparison between the experimental and the simulation results showed that the proposed numerical model is able to predict electrochemical desalination treatments with remarkable accuracy, and it can be used as a predictive tool...

  14. Electrical and thermal behavior of unsaturated soils: experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouveau, Marie; Grandjean, Gilles; Leroy, Philippe; Philippe, Mickael; Hedri, Estelle; Boukcim, Hassan

    2016-05-01

    When soil is affected by a heat source, some of its properties are modified, and in particular, the electrical resistivity due to changes in water content. As a result, these changes affect the thermal properties of soil, i.e., its thermal conductivity and diffusivity. We experimentally examine the changes in electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity for four soils with different grain size distributions and clay content over a wide range of temperatures, from 20 to 100 °C. This temperature range corresponds to the thermal conditions in the vicinity of a buried high voltage cable or a geothermal system. Experiments were conducted at the field scale, at a geothermal test facility, and in the laboratory using geophysical devices and probing systems. The results show that the electrical resistivity decreases and the thermal conductivity increases with temperature up to a critical temperature depending on soil types. At this critical temperature, the air volume in the pore space increases with temperature, and the resulting electrical resistivity also increases. For higher temperatures , the thermal conductivity increases sharply with temperature up to a second temperature limit. Beyond it, the thermal conductivity drops drastically. This limit corresponds to the temperature at which most of the water evaporates from the soil pore space. Once the evaporation is completed, the thermal conductivity stabilizes. To explain these experimental results, we modeled the electrical resistivity variations with temperature and water content in the temperature range 20 - 100°C, showing that two critical temperatures influence the main processes occurring during heating at temperatures below 100 °C.

  15. Development of a water leak detection system for LMFBR steam generator. Pt. 3. Experimental results for detection of bubbles using the SG sector model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumagai, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.

    1995-05-01

    In order to prevent the expansion of tube damages and to maintain structural safety in steam generators (SG) of liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), it is necessary to detect precisely and immediately the leakage of water from tubes of heat exchangers. The active acoustic detection method, which detects the sound attenuation due to bubbles generated at the sodium-water reactions, has drawn general interests owing to its short response time and reduction of the influence of background noise. Sound attenuation is also subjected to structures such as heat transfer tubes and shrouds. Accordingly, it is necessary to evaluate the sound attenuation due to structures. However, studies in these respects are very few. In this paper, using the water bath and SG sector model, the attenuation characteristics of sounds due to flat plates and heat transfer tubes are investigated under various conditions and discussed. (author).

  16. Potential of the aquatic fern Azolla filiculoides in biodegradation of an azo dye: modeling of experimental results by artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khataee, A R; Movafeghi, A; Vafaei, F; Lisar, S Y Salehi; Zarei, M

    2013-01-01

    The potential of an aquatic fern, Azolla filiculoides, in phytoremediation of a mono azo dye solution, C.I. Acid Blue 92 (AB92), was studied. The effects of operational parameters such as reaction time, initial dye concentration, fern fresh weight, pH, temperature and reusability of the fern on biodegradation efficiency were investigated. The intermediate compounds produced by biodegradation process were analyzed using GC-MS analysis. An artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed to predict the biodegradation efficiency. The findings indicated that ANN provides reasonable predictive performance (R2 = 0.961). The effects of AB92 solutions (10 and 20 mg L(-1)) on growth, chlorophylls and carotenoids content, activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and catalase and formation of malondialdehyde were analyzed. AB92 generally showed inhibitory effects on the growth. Moreover, photosynthetic pigments in the fronds significantly decreased in the treatments. An increase was detected for lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity, suggesting that AB92 caused reactive oxygen species production in Azolla fronds, which were scavenged by induced activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  17. Reinforcement learning accounts for moody conditional cooperation behavior: experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Yutaka; Takezawa, Masanori; Inukai, Keigo; Kita, Toshimasa; Masuda, Naoki

    2017-01-01

    In social dilemma games, human participants often show conditional cooperation (CC) behavior or its variant called moody conditional cooperation (MCC), with which they basically tend to cooperate when many other peers have previously cooperated. Recent computational studies showed that CC and MCC behavioral patterns could be explained by reinforcement learning. In the present study, we use a repeated multiplayer prisoner’s dilemma game and the repeated public goods game played by human participants to examine whether MCC is observed across different types of game and the possibility that reinforcement learning explains observed behavior. We observed MCC behavior in both games, but the MCC that we observed was different from that observed in the past experiments. In the present study, whether or not a focal participant cooperated previously affected the overall level of cooperation, instead of changing the tendency of cooperation in response to cooperation of other participants in the previous time step. We found that, across different conditions, reinforcement learning models were approximately as accurate as a MCC model in describing the experimental results. Consistent with the previous computational studies, the present results suggest that reinforcement learning may be a major proximate mechanism governing MCC behavior. PMID:28071646

  18. Reinforcement learning accounts for moody conditional cooperation behavior: experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Yutaka; Takezawa, Masanori; Inukai, Keigo; Kita, Toshimasa; Masuda, Naoki

    2017-01-10

    In social dilemma games, human participants often show conditional cooperation (CC) behavior or its variant called moody conditional cooperation (MCC), with which they basically tend to cooperate when many other peers have previously cooperated. Recent computational studies showed that CC and MCC behavioral patterns could be explained by reinforcement learning. In the present study, we use a repeated multiplayer prisoner's dilemma game and the repeated public goods game played by human participants to examine whether MCC is observed across different types of game and the possibility that reinforcement learning explains observed behavior. We observed MCC behavior in both games, but the MCC that we observed was different from that observed in the past experiments. In the present study, whether or not a focal participant cooperated previously affected the overall level of cooperation, instead of changing the tendency of cooperation in response to cooperation of other participants in the previous time step. We found that, across different conditions, reinforcement learning models were approximately as accurate as a MCC model in describing the experimental results. Consistent with the previous computational studies, the present results suggest that reinforcement learning may be a major proximate mechanism governing MCC behavior.

  19. Diffusion of hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe in the lung: a simplified model of {sup 129}Xe septal uptake and experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patz, Samuel; Muradyan, Iga; Dabaghyan, Mikayel; Washko, George R; Hatabu, Hiroto; Butler, James P [Center for Pulmonary Functional Imaging, Departments of Radiology and Pulmonary Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Hrovat, Mirko I, E-mail: patz@bwh.harvard.edu [Mirtech, Inc., Brockton, MA 02301 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    We used hyperpolarized {sup 129}Xe NMR to measure pulmonary alveolar surface area per unit gas volume S{sub A}/V{sub gas}, alveolar septal thickness h and capillary transit time {tau}, three critical determinants of the lung's primary role as a gas exchange organ. An analytical solution for a simplified diffusion model is described, together with a modification of the xenon transfer contrast imaging technique utilizing 90{sup 0} radio-frequency pulses applied to the dissolved phase, rather than traditional 180{sup 0} pulses. With this approach, three-dimensional (3D) maps of S{sub A}/V{sub gas} were obtained. We measured global S{sub A}/V{sub gas}, h and {tau} in four normal subjects, two subjects with mild interstitial lung disease (ILD) and two subjects with mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In normals, S{sub A}/V{sub gas} decreased with increasing lung volume from {approx}320 to 80 cm{sup -1}; both h{approx}13 {mu}m and {tau}{approx}1.5 s were relatively constant. For the two ILD subjects, h was, respectively, 36 and 97% larger than normal, quantifying an increased gas/blood tissue barrier; S{sub A}/V{sub gas} and {tau} were normal. The two COPD subjects had S{sub A}/V{sub gas} values {approx}25% that of normals, quantifying septal surface loss in emphysema; h and {tau} were normal. These are the first noninvasive, non-radiation-based, quantitative measurements of h and {tau} in patients with pulmonary disease.

  20. Review of experimental models: sinusitis in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Coura Perez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In order to better understand the pathophysiology of rhinosinusitis, several attempts have been made to create the disease in an animal model. Among the studied rodents each has its advantages and disadvantages. Rabbits are considered more appropriate for studies that require surgical manipulation or invasive procedures. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the most viable experimental model of rhinosinusitis in rabbits to be adopted in future studies. METHODS: An electronic search for studies with experimental models of rhinosinusitis in rabbits published in English and Portuguese between July of 1967 and January of 2013 was conducted in Medline, Pub Med, Cochrane, and CAPES databases, using the keywords "sinusitis", "rabbits", and "polyps". RESULTS: A total of 256 studies were retrieved, but in accordance with the inclusion and exclusion criteria, only ten studies were selected. Many different methods of response assessment were used in these studies. CONCLUSION: To date, there is no ideal experimental model for induction of acute or chronic rhinosinusitis in rabbits, but the rhinogenic model appears to be the most viable option for the continuity of studies of the disease.

  1. Experimental model of anal fistula in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Arakaki, Mariana Sousa; Santos,Carlos Henrique Marques dos; Falcão, Gustavo Ribeiro; Cassino,Pedro Carvalho; Nakamura, Ricardo Kenithi; Gomes,Nathália Favero; Santos,Ricardo Gasparin Coutinho dos

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: the management of anal fistula remains debatable. The lack of a standard treatment free of complications stimulates the development of new options. OBJECTIVE: to develop an experimental model of anal fistula in rats. METHODS: to surgically create an anal fistula in 10 rats with Seton introduced through the anal sphincter musculature. The animals were euthanized for histological fistula tract assessment. RESULTS: all ten specimens histologically assessed had a lumen and surroundi...

  2. Bolus-tracking arterial spin labelling: theoretical and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, M. E.; Blau, C. W.; Kerskens, C. M.

    2009-03-01

    Arterial spin labelling (ASL) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that can be used to provide a quantitative assessment of cerebral perfusion. Despite the development of a number of theoretical models to facilitate quantitative ASL, some key challenges still remain. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel quantitative ASL method based on a macroscopic model that reduces the number of variables required to describe the physiological processes involved. To this end, a novel Fokker-Planck equation consisting of stochastically varying macroscopic variables was derived from a general Langevin equation. ASL data from the rat brain was acquired using a bolus-tracking ASL protocol where a bolus of labelled spins flowing from an inversion plane in the neck into an imaging plane in the brain can be observed. Bolus durations of 1.5 s, 2.0 s and 3.0 s were used and the solution to the Fokker-Planck equation for the boundary conditions of bolus-tracking ASL was fitted to the experimental data using a least-squares fit. The mean transit time (MTT) and capillary transit time (CTT) were calculated from the first and second moments of the resultant curve respectively and the arterial transit time (ATT) was calculated by subtracting the CTT from the MTT. The average MTT, CTT and ATT values were 1.75 ± 0.22 s, 1.43 ± 0.12 s and 0.32 ± 0.04 s respectively. In conclusion, a new ASL protocol has been developed by combining the theoretical model with ASL experiments. The technique has the unique ability to provide solutions for varying bolus volumes and the generality of the new model is demonstrated by the derivation of additional solutions for the continuous and pulsed ASL (CASL and PASL) techniques.

  3. Summary of recent experimental results on strangeness production

    CERN Document Server

    Kalweit, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This article summarises the highlights of the recent experimental findings on strangeness production presented at the 16th edition of the {\\it International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter} in Berkeley. Results obtained by eight large experimental collaborations (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, HADES, LHCb, NA-61, PHENIX, STAR) spanning a large range in centre-of-mass energy and a variety of collision systems were presented at the conference. The article does not aim at being a complete review, but rather at connecting the experimental highlights of the different collaborations and at pointing towards questions which should be addressed by these experiments in future.

  4. Summary of recent experimental results on strangeness production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalweit, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    This article summarises the highlights of the recent experimental findings on strangeness production presented at the 16th edition of the International Conference on Strangeness in Quark Matter in Berkeley. Results obtained by eight large experimental collaborations (ALICE, ATLAS, CMS, HADES, LHCb, NA-61, PHENIX, STAR) spanning a large range in centre-of-mass energy and a variety of collision systems were presented at the conference. The article does not aim at being a complete review, but rather at connecting the experimental highlights of the different collaborations and at pointing towards questions which should be addressed by these experiments in future.

  5. Nonlinear random vibration experimental results and research needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, R. A.

    Experimental investigations of random excitation of dynamic systems are valuable but scarce. They are particularly important for nonlinear random vibration, since different approaches can lead to different results for the same problem. They are also useful in providing physical insight into a number of complex dynamic phenomena. The scarcity of random vibration testing is mainly due to a number of difficulties and errors encountered in generating the correct random excitation, and data acquisition. The purpose of this review article is to assess the recent experimental results reported in the literature by the author and others. An attempt will be made to correlate the experimental measurements qualitatively with those predicted analytically. In most cases, no quantitative comparisons have been made. New research directions based on recent analytical and experimental developments in the theory of nonlinear random vibration will also be outlined.

  6. Experimental Results from Railgun Firings Involving Magnetic Flux Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    report is unlimited KEYWORDS Railgun Accelerators Current Distribution Electromagnetic Launchers Magnetic Fields Plasma Armature COSATI GROUPS 2009 1906...series are presented. 2 3. EXPERIMENTAL DETAILS The power source for the RAPID railgun fi] used in the MRAP series consisted of a 2.0 mF capacitor bank...MEUKOURNE, VICTORIA TECHNICAL NOTE MRL-TN-509 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM RAILGUN FIRINGS INVOLVING MAGNETIC FLUX PROBES V. Kowalenko THE UNITED STATES

  7. Experimental results of an iodine plasma in PEGASES gridded thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondein, Pascaline; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-09-01

    In the electric gridded thruster PEGASES, both positive and negative ions are expelled after extraction from an ion-ion plasma. This ion-ion plasma is formed downstream a localized magnetic field placed a few centimeters from the ionization region, trapping and cooling down the electron to allow a better attachment to an electronegative gas. For this thruster concept, iodine has emerged as the most attractive option. Heavy, under diatomic form and therefore good for high thrust, its low ionization threshold and high electronegativity lead to high ion-ion densities and low RF power. After the proof-of-concept of PEGASES using SF6 as propellant, we present here experimental results of an iodine plasma studied inside PEGASES thruster. At solid state at standard temperature and pressure, iodine is heated to sublimate, then injected inside the chamber where the neutral gas is heated and ionized. The whole injection system is heated to avoid deposition on surfaces and a mass flow controller allows a fine control on the neutral gas mass flow. A 3D translation stage inside the vacuum chamber allows volumetric plasma studies using electrostatic probes. The results are also compared with the global model dedicated to iodine as propellant for electric gridded thrusters. This work has been done within the LABEX Plas@par project, and received financial state aid managed by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche, as part of the programme ``Investissements d'avenir.''

  8. New model systems for experimental evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sinéad

    2013-07-01

    Microbial experimental evolution uses a few well-characterized model systems to answer fundamental questions about how evolution works. This special section highlights novel model systems for experimental evolution, with a focus on marine model systems that can be used to understand evolutionary responses to global change in the oceans.

  9. Experimental study of the Timoshenko beam theory predictions: Further results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, G.; Díaz-de-Anda, A.; Flores, J.; Gutiérrez, L.; Morales, A.

    2016-08-01

    In a previous paper (2012) we presented experimental results proving that the critical frequency fC predicted by Timoshenko beam theory indeed exists. We also showed that for frequencies f smaller than fC the spectrum is formed by almost equally spaced levels whereas for f >fC the spectrum consists of pairs of eigenvalues very close to each other as predicted by numerical solutions of Timoshenko's equation: we shall refer to them as Timoshenko doublets. In this work we measure for the first time experimental dispersion relations. For this purpose it was necessary to obtain normal-mode amplitudes with a high precision, which was done with a new experimental setup developed by us. We found that experimental dispersion relations coincide very well with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, we provide an explanation of Timoshenko doublets.

  10. CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Francesco Corno

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION.Surgically induced, combined volume and pressure overload has been used in rabbits to create a simplified and reproducible model of acute left ventricular (LV failure.MATERIALS AND METHODS.New Zealand white male rabbits (n=24, mean weight 3.1±0.2kg were randomly assigned to either the Control group (n=10 or to the Heart Failure group (HF, n=14. Animals in the Control group underwent sham procedures. Animals in the HF group underwent procedures to induce LV volume overload by inducing severe aortic valve regurgitation with aortic cusp disruption and pressure overload using an occlusive silver clip positioned around the pre-renal abdominal aorta.RESULTS.Following Procedure-1 (volume overload echocardiography confirmed severe aortic regurgitation in all animals in the HF group, with increased mean pulse pressure difference from 18±3mmHg to 38±3mmHg (P

  11. Characterization and experimental results in PEM fuel cell electrical behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunusch, Cristian; Puleston, Paul F.; More, Jeronimo J. [LEICI, Departamento de Electrotecnia, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, calle 48 y 116 s/n (CC 91), La Plata B1900TAG (Argentina); CONICET, Consejo de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Av. Rivadavia 1917, Buenos Aires C1033AAJ (Argentina); Mayosky, Miguel A. [LEICI, Departamento de Electrotecnia, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, calle 48 y 116 s/n (CC 91), La Plata B1900TAG (Argentina); CICpBA, Comision de Investigaciones Cientificas de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Calle 526 entre 10 y 11, La Plata 1900 (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    A control oriented electrochemical static model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack is developed in this paper. Even though its validation is performed on a specific 7-cell PEMFC stack fed by humidified air and pure hydrogen, the methodology and fit parameters can be applied to different fuel cell systems with minor changes. The fuel cell model was developed combining theoretical considerations and semi-empirical analysis based on the experimental data. The proposed model can be successfully included into a larger dynamic subsystem to complete the power generation system. (author)

  12. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: Experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria. .

  13. Acoustic analysis in Mudejar-Gothic churches: experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Miguel; Zamarreño, Teófilo; Girón, Sara

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes the preliminary results of research work in acoustics, conducted in a set of 12 Mudejar-Gothic churches in the city of Seville in the south of Spain. Despite common architectural style, the churches feature individual characteristics and have volumes ranging from 3947 to 10 708 m3. Acoustic parameters were measured in unoccupied churches according to the ISO-3382 standard. An extensive experimental study was carried out using impulse response analysis through a maximum length sequence measurement system in each church. It covered aspects such as reverberation (reverberation times, early decay times), distribution of sound levels (sound strength); early to late sound energy parameters derived from the impulse responses (center time, clarity for speech, clarity, definition, lateral energy fraction), and speech intelligibility (rapid speech transmission index), which all take both spectral and spatial distribution into account. Background noise was also measured to obtain the NR indices. The study describes the acoustic field inside each temple and establishes a discussion for each one of the acoustic descriptors mentioned by using the theoretical models available and the principles of architectural acoustics. Analysis of the quality of the spaces for music and speech is carried out according to the most widespread criteria for auditoria.

  14. Experimental model updating using frequency response functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yu; Liu, Xi; Dong, Xinjun; Wang, Yang; Pu, Qianhui

    2016-04-01

    In order to obtain a finite element (FE) model that can more accurately describe structural behaviors, experimental data measured from the actual structure can be used to update the FE model. The process is known as FE model updating. In this paper, a frequency response function (FRF)-based model updating approach is presented. The approach attempts to minimize the difference between analytical and experimental FRFs, while the experimental FRFs are calculated using simultaneously measured dynamic excitation and corresponding structural responses. In this study, the FRF-based model updating method is validated through laboratory experiments on a four-story shear-frame structure. To obtain the experimental FRFs, shake table tests and impact hammer tests are performed. The FRF-based model updating method is shown to successfully update the stiffness, mass and damping parameters of the four-story structure, so that the analytical and experimental FRFs match well with each other.

  15. CP Violation in B Meson Decays: Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanceri, Livio; /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste

    2005-08-30

    CP violation is intimately connected with the puzzle of matter-antimatter asymmetry and baryogenesis. In the Standard Model of particle physics, the observed CP violation phenomena are accounted for by the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism involving a phase in the quark mixing matrix. This paper is devoted to a review of the experimental status of CP violation in the decays of B mesons.

  16. Volumetric, transport, and acoustic properties of binary mixtures of 2-methyl-1-propanol with hexadecane and squalane at T = (298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K: Experimental results, correlation, and prediction by the ERAS model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubey, Gyan Prakash [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119 (India)], E-mail: gyan.dubey@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Monika [Department of Chemistry, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra 136 119 (India); Oswal, Shantilal [R and D, Biochemistry, Span Diagnostics Ltd., 173-B, New Industrial Estate, Udhna, Surat 394 210 (India)], E-mail: oswalsl@yahoo.co.uk

    2009-07-15

    Density {rho}, speed of sound u, and viscosity {eta} of the binary systems 2-methyl-1-propanol + hexadecane and 2-methyl-1-propanol + squalane (2,6,10,15,19,23-hexamethyltetracosane) have been measured over the entire range of composition at T = (298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K and atmospheric pressure using a vibrating tube densimeter and sound analyzer Anton Paar model DSA-5000 and Ubbelohde suspended level viscometer. Excess molar volume V{sub m}{sup E}, excess molar isentropic compressibility K{sub S,m}{sup E}, and deviations of the speed of sound u{sup D} from their ideal values u{sup id} and excess thermal expansion coefficient {alpha}{sup E} were evaluated from the experimental results obtained. These derived properties were fitted to variable-degree polynomials. Further, the Extended Real Associated Solution (ERAS) model has been applied to V{sub m}{sup E} for the present binary mixtures along with (2-methyl-1-propanol + hexane, + octane and + decane) and the findings are compared with the experimental results.

  17. Injury Based on Its Study in Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mendes-Braz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review focuses on the numerous experimental models used to study the complexity of hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Although experimental models of hepatic I/R injury represent a compromise between the clinical reality and experimental simplification, the clinical transfer of experimental results is problematic because of anatomical and physiological differences and the inevitable simplification of experimental work. In this review, the strengths and limitations of the various models of hepatic I/R are discussed. Several strategies to protect the liver from I/R injury have been developed in animal models and, some of these, might find their way into clinical practice. We also attempt to highlight the fact that the mechanisms responsible for hepatic I/R injury depend on the experimental model used, and therefore the therapeutic strategies also differ according to the model used. Thus, the choice of model must therefore be adapted to the clinical question being answered.

  18. Design and experimental results for the S809 airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somers, D M [Airfoils, Inc., State College, PA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A 21-percent-thick, laminar-flow airfoil, the S809, for horizontal-axis wind-turbine applications, has been designed and analyzed theoretically and verified experimentally in the low-turbulence wind tunnel of the Delft University of Technology Low Speed Laboratory, The Netherlands. The two primary objectives of restrained maximum lift, insensitive to roughness, and low profile drag have been achieved. The airfoil also exhibits a docile stall. Comparisons of the theoretical and experimental results show good agreement. Comparisons with other airfoils illustrate the restrained maximum lift coefficient as well as the lower profile-drag coefficients, thus confirming the achievement of the primary objectives.

  19. Experimental results on chiral magnetic and vortical effects

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Various novel transport phenomena in chiral systems result from the interplay of quantum anomalies with magnetic field and vorticity in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, and could survive the expansion of the fireball and be detected in experiments. Among them are the chiral magnetic effect, the chiral vortical effect and the chiral magnetic wave, the experimental searches for which have aroused extensive interest. The goal of this review is to describe the current status of experimental studies at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and to outline the future work in experiment needed to eliminate the existing uncertainties in the interpretation of the data.

  20. 一种新的低周疲劳损伤累积模型及试验验证%New Low Cycle Fatigue Damage Accumulation Model and Experimental Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张磊; 杨自春; 曹跃云

    2011-01-01

    基于连续介质损伤力学理论,依据疲劳损伤的加载参数与损伤变量之间的不可分割性等特点,建立了一种新的低周疲劳损伤累积模型。经过对00Cr17Ni14Mo2钢和2.25Cr1Mo钢的低周疲劳试验数据的分析,得到了相应的疲劳损伤累积模型。将该模型与不同的损伤累积模型相比较,结果表明:该累积模型的计算结果与试验结果能更好地一致,能更真实地反映损伤的非线性累积过程。该累积模型考虑了损伤和应变的耦合作用以及平均应力、疲劳极限对其的影响,且物理意义明确,具有一定的实用价值。%Based on the theory of continuum damage mechanics,a new low cycle fatigue damage model was established,which combined the unseparable characteristics of the damage variables and loading parameters.Through the analysis of test data of the low cycle fatigue damage of steel 00Cr17Ni14Mo2 and 2.25Cr1Mo,the fatigue damage evolution equations under different plastic strain amplitudes were acquired,which are in good agreement with the experimental results.While the constants of new low cycle fatigue damage model were obtained by fitting,two fatigue damage evolution equations of steel 00Cr17Ni14Mo2 and 2.25Cr1Mo were given respectively.And comparing with several fatigue damage accumulation models,the results show that except linear damage accumulation model,the rest of the models could reflect the nonlinear damage accumulation process of material.The new model established herein accords the experimental results best,which truly reflects the nonlinear damage accumulation process,and takes the coupling of damage and strain,fatigue limit,mean pressure into consideration.Therefore,the new damage model has a clear physical meaning and practical value.

  1. Osteoarthritis and obesity: Experimental models

    OpenAIRE

    Gabay, Odile; Hall, David J.; Berenbaum, Francis; Henrotin, Yves; Sanchez, Christelle

    2008-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial disease. Different risk factors have been identified such as aging and obesity and different models have been used to study the impact of obesity and overweight in this pathology.

  2. Experimental osteoarthritis models in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Julia; Grässel, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a slowly progressing, degenerative disorder of synovial joints culminating in the irreversible destruction of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. It affects almost everyone over the age of 65 and influences life quality of affected individuals with enormous costs to the health care system. Current therapeutic strategies seek to ameliorate pain and increase mobility; however, to date none of them halts disease progression or regenerates damaged cartilage or bone. Thus, there is an ultimate need for the development of new, noninvasive treatments that could substitute joint replacement for late- or end-stage patients. Therefore, osteoarthritis animal models for mimicking of all OA features are important. Mice develop an OA pathology that is comparable to humans, rapidly develop OA due to the short lifetime and show reproducible OA symptoms. They provide a versatile and widely used animal model for analyzing molecular mechanisms of OA pathology. One major advantage over large animal models is the availability of knockout or transgenic mice strains to examine genetic predispositions/contributions to OA.In this chapter, we describe three widely used instability-inducing murine osteoarthritis models. The most common two methods for surgical induction are: (1) destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM) and (2) anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). In the DMM model, the medial meniscotibial ligament is transected while in the ACLT model the anterior cruciate ligament is destroyed. In the third, chemical induced instability method, intraarticular collagenase is injected into the knee joint. Intraarticular collagenase weakens articular ligaments which cause instability of the joint, and full-blown OA develops within 6 weeks. For morphological evaluation, we correspond mainly to the recommendations of OARSI for histological assessment of osteoarthritis in mouse. For statistical evaluation summed or mean scores of all four knee areas

  3. First experimental results on CMOS Integrated Nickel Electroplated Resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yalcinkaya, Arda Deniz; Hansen, Ole

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results on MEMS metallic add-on post-fabrication effects on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistors. Two versions of add-on processing, that use either e-beam evaporation or magnetron sputtering, are compared through investigation of the electri......This paper presents experimental results on MEMS metallic add-on post-fabrication effects on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) transistors. Two versions of add-on processing, that use either e-beam evaporation or magnetron sputtering, are compared through investigation...... of the electrical parameters of n-channel and p-channel transistors. The magnetron sputtering technique is shown to be compatible with standard CMOS electronics without any restriction of the metal types and annealing requirements....

  4. Experimental results on charge fluctuations in heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Mishra, D K; Netrakanti, P K; Pant, L M; Mohanty, A K

    2016-01-01

    We present a subset of experimental results on charge fluctuation from the heavy-ion collisions to search for phase transition and location of critical point in the QCD phase diagram. Measurements from the heavy-ion experiments at the SPS and RHIC energies observe that total charge fluctuations increase from central to peripheral collisions. The net-charge fluctuations in terms of dynamical fluctuation measure $\

  5. Experimental results for a novel rotary active magnetic regenerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Eriksen, Dan; Bahl, Christian

    2012-01-01

    in a solid refrigerant rather than the temperature change that occurs when a gas is compressed/expanded. This paper presents the general considerations for the design and construction of a high frequency rotary AMR device. Experimental results are presented at various cooling powers for a range of operating...... conditions near room temperature. The device exhibited a no-load temperature span of over 25 K and can absorb a 100 W cooling load at a 20.5 K temperature span....

  6. Optimal active vibration absorber - Design and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1993-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  7. Optimal active vibration absorber: Design and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  8. Experimental program on debris reflooding (PEARL) results on prelude facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repetto, G.; Garcin, T.; Eymery, S.; March, P.; Fichot, F., E-mail: georges.repetto@irsn.fr, E-mail: thierry.garcin@irsn.fr, E-mail: philippe.march@irsn.fr, E-mail: stephane.eymery@irsn.fr, E-mail: florian.fichot@irsn.fr [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Cadarache (France)

    2011-07-01

    The “Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire” is developing simulation tools to be used in the safety studies, for the optimization of the Severe Accident Management strategy and to assess the probabilities to stop the progress of In-vessel core degradation in a Nuclear Power Plant. The objective of the experimental program PEARL is to extend the validation of debris reflooding models in 2D and 3D situations. The aim is to predict the consequences of the water reflooding of a severely damaged reactor core where a significant part of the core has collapsed and formed a debris bed. (author)

  9. Physical and Mathematical Modeling in Experimental Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, Wolfram; Laan, Liedewij

    2015-12-17

    An increasing number of publications include modeling. Often, such studies help us to gain a deeper insight into the phenomena studied and break down barriers between experimental and theoretical communities. However, combining experimental and theoretical work is challenging for authors, reviewers, and readers. To help maximize the usefulness and impact of combined theoretical and experimental research, this Primer describes the purpose, usefulness, and different types of models and addresses the practical aspect of integrated publications by outlining characteristics of good modeling, presentation, and fruitful collaborations.

  10. On linear models and parameter identifiability in experimental biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamberton, Timothy O; Condon, Nicholas D; Stow, Jennifer L; Hamilton, Nicholas A

    2014-10-07

    A key problem in the biological sciences is to be able to reliably estimate model parameters from experimental data. This is the well-known problem of parameter identifiability. Here, methods are developed for biologists and other modelers to design optimal experiments to ensure parameter identifiability at a structural level. The main results of the paper are to provide a general methodology for extracting parameters of linear models from an experimentally measured scalar function - the transfer function - and a framework for the identifiability analysis of complex model structures using linked models. Linked models are composed by letting the output of one model become the input to another model which is then experimentally measured. The linked model framework is shown to be applicable to designing experiments to identify the measured sub-model and recover the input from the unmeasured sub-model, even in cases that the unmeasured sub-model is not identifiable. Applications for a set of common model features are demonstrated, and the results combined in an example application to a real-world experimental system. These applications emphasize the insight into answering "where to measure" and "which experimental scheme" questions provided by both the parameter extraction methodology and the linked model framework. The aim is to demonstrate the tools' usefulness in guiding experimental design to maximize parameter information obtained, based on the model structure.

  11. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  12. Developing Phenomena Models from Experimental Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Niels Rode; Madsen, Henrik; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2003-01-01

    A systematic approach for developing phenomena models from experimental data is presented. The approach is based on integrated application of stochastic differential equation (SDE) modelling and multivariate nonparametric regression, and it is shown how these techniques can be used to uncover...... unknown functionality behind various phenomena in first engineering principles models using experimental data. The proposed modelling approach has significant application potential, e.g. for determining unknown reaction kinetics in both chemical and biological processes. To illustrate the performance...... of the approach, a case study is presented, which shows how an appropriate phenomena model for the growth rate of biomass in a fed-batch bioreactor can be inferred from data....

  13. Guided wave modes in porous cylinders: experimental results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisse, C J; Smeulders, D M J; van Dongen, M E H; Chao, G

    2002-09-01

    In this paper guided wave modes in porous media are investigated. A water-saturated porous cylinder is mounted in the test section of a shock tube. Between the porous sample and the wall of the shock tube a water-filled annulus exists. For very small annulus width, bulk waves are generated and one-dimensional modeling is sufficient. Otherwise two-dimensional effects become important and multiple guided wave modes occur. Using a newly developed traversable positioning system in the shock tube, the frequency-dependent phase velocities and damping coefficients in the 1-120 kHz frequency range were measured. Prony's method was used for data processing. Agreement was found between the experimental data and the two-dimensional modeling of the shock tube which was based on Biot's theory.

  14. Model refinement for offshore platforms: Experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Chen, Zongli; Wu, Yanjian

    2017-08-01

    Offshore jacket platforms are widely used in offshore oil and gas exploitation. Finite element models of such structures need to have many degrees of freedom (DOFs) to represent the geometrical detail of complex structures, thereby leading to incompatibility in the number of DOFs of experimental models. To bring them both to the same order while ensuring that the essential eigen- properties of the refined model match those of experimental models, an extended model refinement procedure is presented in this paper. Vibration testing of an offshore jacket platform model is performed to validate the applicability of the proposed approach. A full-order finite element model of the platform is established and then tuned to meet the measured modal properties identified from the acceleration signals. Both model reduction and modal expansion methods are investigated, as well as various scenarios of sensor arrangements. Upon completion of the refinement, the updated jacket platform model matches the natural frequencies of the measured model well.

  15. Experimental Results on Chiral Magnetic and Vortical Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Various novel transport phenomena in chiral systems result from the interplay of quantum anomalies with magnetic field and vorticity in high-energy heavy-ion collisions and could survive the expansion of the fireball and be detected in experiments. Among them are the chiral magnetic effect, the chiral vortical effect, and the chiral magnetic wave, the experimental searches for which have aroused extensive interest. The goal of this review is to describe the current status of experimental studies at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider at BNL and the Large Hadron Collider at CERN and to outline the future work in experiment needed to eliminate the existing uncertainties in the interpretation of the data.

  16. OIL DECONTAMINATION OF BOTTOM SEDIMENTS EXPERIMENTAL WORK RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lushnikov Sergey V.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of experimental work during 2004-2005 on oil decontamination of bottom sediments of Lake Schuchye, situated in the Komi Republic (Northern Russia. The cause of thecontamination were huge oil spills occurred after a series of accidental ruptures on the Harjaga-Usinsk and Vozej-Usinsk oil-pipe lines in 1994. Flotation technology was used for the cleaning of bottom sediments.157 tons of crude oil were removed during the course of 2-year experimental work from an area of 4,1 ha.The content of aliphatic and alicyclic oil hydrocarbons was reduced from 53,3 g/kg to 2,2 g/kg, on average.Hydrobiological investigations revealed that bottom sediments started to be inhabited by benthos organisms, dominantly Oligochaeta. Besides Oligochaeta, Chironomidae maggots and Bivalvia were detected. Theappearance of Macrozoobenthos organisms can serve as a bioindicator of water quality.

  17. Experimental models of demyelination and remyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre-Fuentes, L; Moreno-Jiménez, L; Pytel, V; Matías-Guiu, J A; Gómez-Pinedo, U; Matías-Guiu, J

    2017-08-29

    Experimental animal models constitute a useful tool to deepen our knowledge of central nervous system disorders. In the case of multiple sclerosis, however, there is no such specific model able to provide an overview of the disease; multiple models covering the different pathophysiological features of the disease are therefore necessary. We reviewed the different in vitro and in vivo experimental models used in multiple sclerosis research. Concerning in vitro models, we analysed cell cultures and slice models. As for in vivo models, we examined such models of autoimmunity and inflammation as experimental allergic encephalitis in different animals and virus-induced demyelinating diseases. Furthermore, we analysed models of demyelination and remyelination, including chemical lesions caused by cuprizone, lysolecithin, and ethidium bromide; zebrafish; and transgenic models. Experimental models provide a deeper understanding of the different pathogenic mechanisms involved in multiple sclerosis. Choosing one model or another depends on the specific aims of the study. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. An experimental study of human birth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Alexa; Gossmann, Roseanna; Fauci, Lisa J.; Leftwich, Megan C.

    2016-11-01

    The laboring uterus is a complex and dynamic fluid system. Relatively little is known about the fluid properties in this system. However, the two primary fluids of interest, amniotic fluid and vernix caseosa, likely play integral roles in the force transferred to the fetus during the final stages of parturition. This investigation probes the role of fluid in the force transfer during delivery by considering physical models that determine the role of various components of the full system. The first experimental model represents the fetus passing through the birth canal as concentric cylinders with a fluid filled gap. The rigid, inner cylinder moves through the highly flexible outer cylinder at a prescribed velocity. The geometry of the inner cylinder is varied by aspect ratio and length. A total of five different inner geometries are used to fully investigate the parameter space. As the inner cylinder moves through the outer cylinder, strain measurements are taken. These measurements are converted to force measurements as a function of time and position in the outer cylinder. The results of these experiments are compared with numerical results to form a more complete picture of force transfer. This model can be used as the foundation for predicting the force needed to deliver a fetus in the final stages of parturition. Additionally, more complex models, that incorporate uterine contraction forces, are being developed.

  19. Experimental model of bladder instability in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasteghin K.T.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Propose a new experimental model of bladder instability in rabbits after partial bladder obstruction. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty North Folk male rabbits, weighting 1,700 to 2,820 g (mean: 2,162 g were studied. The animals were distributed in 2 experimental groups, formed by 15 rabbits each: Group 1 - clinical control. In this group there was no surgical intervention; Group 2 - bladder outlet obstruction. In this group, after anesthetizing the animal, urethral cannulation with Foley catheter 10F was performed and then an adjustable plastic bracelet was passed around the bladder neck. It was then adjusted in order to not constrict the urethra. The following parameters were studied in M1 - pre-operative period; M2 - 4 weeks post-operatively moments: 1- urine culture; 2- cystometric study; 3- serum creatinine and BUN. RESULTS: Bladder weight was 2.5 times larger in the group with obstruction than in the control group. Cystometric evaluation showed a significant increase in maximal vesical volume in the final moment at Group G2. However, there was no statistically significant difference among the groups studied. There was no statistically significant difference between maximal detrusor pressure and vesical compliance in the different moments or in the studied groups. There was an absence of uninhibited detrusor contractions in all the animals in group 1, and involuntary contractions were detected in 93% of group 2 animals. There was no significant variation in BUN and serum creatinine either among the groups or in the same group. CONCLUSIONS: We observed in the group with obstruction a bladder weight 2.5 higher than normal bladders. We detected involuntary contractions in 93% of the animals in group 2, establishing this experimental model as appropriate to secondary bladder instability and partial bladder outlet obstruction.

  20. Experimental and simulational result multipactors in 112 MHz QWR injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xin, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Belomestnykh, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States); Brutus, J. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Skaritka, J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wu, Q. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Xiao, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-03

    The first RF commissioning of 112 MHz QWR superconducting electron gun was done in late 2014. The coaxial Fundamental Power Coupler (FPC) and Cathode Stalk (stalk) were installed and tested for the first time. During this experiment, we observed several multipacting barriers at different gun voltage levels. The simulation work was done within the same range. The comparison between the experimental observation and the simulation results are presented in this paper. The observations during the test are consisted with the simulation predictions. We were able to overcome most of the multipacting barriers and reach 1.8 MV gun voltage under pulsed mode after several round of conditioning processes.

  1. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-06

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease.

  2. Experimental falsification of Leggett's nonlocal variable model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branciard, Cyril; Ling, Alexander; Gisin, Nicolas; Kurtsiefer, Christian; Lamas-Linares, Antia; Scarani, Valerio

    2007-11-23

    Bell's theorem guarantees that no model based on local variables can reproduce quantum correlations. Also, some models based on nonlocal variables, if subject to apparently "reasonable" constraints, may fail to reproduce quantum physics. In this Letter, we introduce a family of inequalities, which use a finite number of measurement settings, and which therefore allow testing Leggett's nonlocal model versus quantum physics. Our experimental data falsify Leggett's model and are in agreement with quantum predictions.

  3. CSI Flight Computer System and experimental test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Peri, F., Jr.; Schuler, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the CSI Computer System (CCS) and the experimental tests performed to validate its functionality. This system is comprised of two major components: the space flight qualified Excitation and Damping Subsystem (EDS) which performs controls calculations; and the Remote Interface Unit (RIU) which is used for data acquisition, transmission, and filtering. The flight-like RIU is the interface between the EDS and the sensors and actuators positioned on the particular structure under control. The EDS and RIU communicate over the MIL-STD-1553B, a space flight qualified bus. To test the CCS under realistic conditions, it was connected to the Phase-0 CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) at NASA Langley Research Center. The following schematic shows how the CCS is connected to the CEM. Various tests were performed which validated the ability of the system to perform control/structures experiments.

  4. Comparison of ATHENA/RELAP results against ice experimental data

    CERN Document Server

    Moore-Richard, L

    2002-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the adequacy of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor design from a safety stand point as well as investigating the behavior of two-phase flow phenomena during an ingress of coolant event, an integrated ICE test facility was constructed in Japan. The data generated from the ICE facility offers a valuable means to validate computer codes such as ATHENA /RELAP5, which is one of the codes used at the Idaho National Engineering And Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to evaluate the safety of various fusion reactor concepts. In this paper we compared numerical results generated by the ATHENA code with corresponding test data from the ICE facility. Overall we found good agreement between the test data and the predicted results.

  5. Experimental Validation of a Thermoelastic Model for SMA Hybrid Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2001-01-01

    This study presents results from experimental validation of a recently developed model for predicting the thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures, composite structures with an embedded SMA constituent. The model captures the material nonlinearity of the material system with temperature and is capable of modeling constrained, restrained, or free recovery behavior from experimental measurement of fundamental engineering properties. A brief description of the model and analysis procedures is given, followed by an overview of a parallel effort to fabricate and characterize the material system of SMAHC specimens. Static and dynamic experimental configurations for the SMAHC specimens are described and experimental results for thermal post-buckling and random response are presented. Excellent agreement is achieved between the measured and predicted results, fully validating the theoretical model for constrained recovery behavior of SMAHC structures.

  6. Endometriose: modelo experimental em ratas Endometriosis: experimental model in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Schor

    1999-06-01

    that the free portion of the endometrium was directed towards the lumen of the abdominal cavity. After 21 days the animals were again operated to observe the size of the implants and to remove the ectopic endometrium for microscopic analysis. Results: we macroscopically observed a significant growth of the endometrial implants. Microscopic examination showed presence of glandular epithelium and stroma similar to topic epithelium. Conclusion: this model reproduces endometriosis in the female rat allowing a better study of this pathology, mainly the action of drugs on these implants.

  7. Experimental Results on Statistical Approaches to Page Replacement Policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEUNG,VITUS J.; IRANI,SANDY

    2000-12-08

    This paper investigates the questions of what statistical information about a memory request sequence is useful to have in making page replacement decisions: Our starting point is the Markov Request Model for page request sequences. Although the utility of modeling page request sequences by the Markov model has been recently put into doubt, we find that two previously suggested algorithms (Maximum Hitting Time and Dominating Distribution) which are based on the Markov model work well on the trace data used in this study. Interestingly, both of these algorithms perform equally well despite the fact that the theoretical results for these two algorithms differ dramatically. We then develop succinct characteristics of memory access patterns in an attempt to approximate the simpler of the two algorithms. Finally, we investigate how to collect these characteristics in an online manner in order to have a purely online algorithm.

  8. Flashover Measurement On A Solar Array- Results of EMAGS3 Experimental Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguimbert, V.; Sarrailh, P.; Sarrail, D.; Baur, C.; Payan, D.; Gerhard, A.; Boulanger, B.; Pelissou, P.; Wuersching, C.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the results obtained during the experimental campaign conducted in the frame of the ESA EMAGS3 project "Flash-over evaluation on large solar panels". The objective of this experimental campaign was to understand the characteristics of the so-called flash-over phenomenon. Therefore, a real solar panel has been tested in a large vacuum chamber under representative conditions. The results of the conducted experiments as well as the modelling of the data are presented.

  9. Aromatic interactions impact ligand binding and function at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics results validated by experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania; Villa, Nancy; Fang, Lijuan; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-02-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT2 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family consists of types 2A, 2B, and 2C that share ∼75% transmembrane (TM) sequence identity. Agonists for 5-HT2C receptors are under development for psychoses; whereas, at 5-HT2A receptors, antipsychotic effects are associated with antagonists - in fact, 5-HT2A agonists can cause hallucinations and 5-HT2B agonists cause cardiotoxicity. It is known that 5-HT2A TM6 residues W6.48, F6.51, and F6.52 impact ligand binding and function; however, ligand interactions with these residues at the 5-HT2C receptor have not been reported. To predict and validate molecular determinants for 5-HT2C-specific activation, results from receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies were compared with experimental results for ligand binding and function at wild type and W6.48A, F6.51A, and F6.52A point-mutated 5-HT2C receptors.

  10. Automation in dairy cattle milking: experimental results and considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisanna Speroni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of two experimental programs financed to the Istituto Sperimentale per la Zootecnia are presented. The objective of the two Italian programs was the verify if automatic milking is a suitable practice for Italian dairy system. Results are summarised and compared to those obtained in other international projects. Results refer to animal behaviour, milk yield, milk quality an animal welfare. In a trial comparing cows milked with an automatic milking system and cows milked in a milking parlour, we observed that when the temperature and humidity are very high cows reduce their activity, have lower milking frequency and milk yield than in cold seasons. In comparison to milking parlour, automatic milking system did not increase milk yield which was affected significantly by season, stage of lactation, parity, season per treatment and parity per treatment. The causes of the negative results obtained by this group and by other international groups are discussed. We also presented the results obtained in four trials thereby four appetizers or flavourings were tested to improve efficiency of automatic milking system. Comparing the two milking systems, automatic milking determined a worsening of milk quality, but from these data is not possible to exclude the possibility to use automatic milking for Grana Padano and Parmigiano Reggiano-type cheeses. Animal welfare is not negatively influenced by automatic milking system, which has the potentiality to improve the control and care of cows.

  11. Experimental & Numerical Modeling of Non-combusting Model Firebrands' Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohidi, Ali; Kaye, Nigel

    2016-11-01

    Fire spotting is one of the major mechanisms of wildfire spread. Three phases of this phenomenon are firebrand formation and break-off from burning vegetation, lofting and downwind transport of firebrands through the velocity field of the wildfire, and spot fire ignition upon landing. The lofting and downwind transport phase is modeled by conducting large-scale wind tunnel experiments. Non-combusting rod-like model firebrands with different aspect ratios are released within the velocity field of a jet in a boundary layer cross-flow that approximates the wildfire velocity field. Characteristics of the firebrand dispersion are quantified by capturing the full trajectory of the model firebrands using the developed image processing algorithm. The results show that the lofting height has a direct impact on the maximum travel distance of the model firebrands. Also, the experimental results are utilized for validation of a highly scalable coupled stochastic & parametric firebrand flight model that, couples the LES-resolved velocity field of a jet-in-nonuniform-cross-flow (JINCF) with a 3D fully deterministic 6-degrees-of-freedom debris transport model. The validation results show that the developed numerical model is capable of estimating average statistics of the firebrands' flight. Authors would like to thank support of the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1200560. Also, the presenter (Ali Tohid) would like to thank Dr. Michael Gollner from the University of Maryland College Park for the conference participation support.

  12. Object impedance control for cooperative manipulation - Theory and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stanley A.; Cannon, Robert H., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents the dynamic control module of the Dynamic and Strategic Control of Cooperating Manipulators (DASCCOM) project at Stanford University's Aerospace Robotics Laboratory. First, the cooperative manipulation problem is analyzed from a systems perspective, and the desirable features of a control system for cooperative manipulation are discussed. Next, a control policy is developed that enforces a controlled impedance not of the individual arm endpoints, but of the manipulated object itself. A parallel implementation for a multiprocessor system is presented. The controller fully compensates for the system dynamics and directly controls the object internal forces. Most importantly, it presents a simple, powerful, intuitive interface to higher level strategic control modules. Experimental results from a dual two-link-arm robotic system are used to compare the object impedance controller with other strategies, both for free-motion slews and environmental contact.

  13. Integrated radar-camera security system: experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Palka, N.; Trzcinski, T.; Dulski, R.; Kastek, M.; Trzaskawka, P.

    2011-06-01

    The nature of the recent military conflicts and terrorist attacks along with the necessity to protect bases, convoys and patrols have made a serious impact on the development of more effective security systems. Current widely-used perimeter protection systems with zone sensors will soon be replaced with multi-sensor systems. Multi-sensor systems can utilize day/night cameras, IR uncooled thermal cameras, and millimeter-wave radars which detect radiation reflected from targets. Ranges of detection, recognition and identification for all targets depend on the parameters of the sensors used and of the observed scene itself. In this paper two essential issues connected with multispectral systems are described. We will focus on describing the autonomous method of the system regarding object detection, tracking, identification, localization and alarm notifications. We will also present the possibility of configuring the system as a stationary, mobile or portable device as in our experimental results.

  14. Beta decay and the origins of biological chirality - Experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidley, D. W.; Rich, A.; Van House, J.; Zitzewitz, P. W.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary experimental results are presented of an investigation of the possible role of preferential radiolysis by electrons emitted in the beta decay of radionuclides, a parity-nonconserving process, in the universal causation of the optical activity of biological compounds. Experiments were designed to measure the asymmetry in the production of triplet positronium upon the bombardment of an amino acid powder target by a collimated beam of positrons as positron helicity or target chirality is reversed. No asymmetry down to a level of 0.0007 is found in experiments on the D and L forms of cystine and tryptophan, indicating an asymmetry in positronium formation cross section of less than 0.01, while an asymmetry of 0.0031 is found for leucine, corresponding to a formation cross section asymmetry of about 0.04

  15. Robotic follower experimentation results: ready for FCS increment I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaczkowski, Jeffrey J.

    2003-09-01

    Robotics is a fundamental enabling technology required to meet the U.S. Army's vision to be a strategically responsive force capable of domination across the entire spectrum of conflict. The U. S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command (RDECOM) Tank Automotive Research, Development & Engineering Center (TARDEC), in partnership with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, is developing a leader-follower capability for Future Combat Systems. The Robotic Follower Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD) utilizes a manned leader to provide a highlevel proofing of the follower's path, which operates with minimal user intervention. This paper will give a programmatic overview and discuss both the technical approach and operational experimentation results obtained during testing conducted at Ft. Bliss, New Mexico in February-March 2003.

  16. Registration of multimodal brain images: some experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hua-mei; Varshney, Pramod K.

    2002-03-01

    Joint histogram of two images is required to uniquely determine the mutual information between the two images. It has been pointed out that, under certain conditions, existing joint histogram estimation algorithms like partial volume interpolation (PVI) and linear interpolation may result in different types of artifact patterns in the MI based registration function by introducing spurious maxima. As a result, the artifacts may hamper the global optimization process and limit registration accuracy. In this paper we present an extensive study of interpolation-induced artifacts using simulated brain images and show that similar artifact patterns also exist when other intensity interpolation algorithms like cubic convolution interpolation and cubic B-spline interpolation are used. A new joint histogram estimation scheme named generalized partial volume estimation (GPVE) is proposed to eliminate the artifacts. A kernel function is involved in the proposed scheme and when the 1st order B-spline is chosen as the kernel function, it is equivalent to the PVI. A clinical brain image database furnished by Vanderbilt University is used to compare the accuracy of our algorithm with that of PVI. Our experimental results show that the use of higher order kernels can effectively remove the artifacts and, in cases when MI based registration result suffers from the artifacts, registration accuracy can be improved significantly.

  17. Qualitative comparisons of experimental results on deterministic freak wave generation based on modulational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Karjanto, N

    2016-01-01

    A number of qualitative comparisons of experimental results on unidirectional freak wave generation in a hydrodynamic laboratory are presented in this paper. A nonlinear dispersive type of wave equation, the nonlinear Schr\\"{o}dinger equation, is chosen as the theoretical model. A family of exact solutions of this equation the so-called Soliton on Finite Background describing modulational instability phenomenon is implemented in the experiments. It is observed that all experimental results show an amplitude increase according to the phenomenon. Both the carrier wave frequency and the modulation period are preserved during the wave propagation. As predicted by the theoretical model, a phase singularity is also observed in the experiments. Due to frequency downshift phenomenon, the experimental signal and spectrum lose their symmetric property. Another qualitative comparison indicates that the Wessel curves for the experimental results are the perturbed version of the theoretical ones.

  18. Experimental and Modelling Studies of Biomass Pyrolysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ka Leung Lam; Adetoyese Olajire Oyedu~; Chi Wai Hui

    2012-01-01

    The analysis on the feedstock pyrolysis characteristic and the impacts of process parameters on pyrolysis outcomes can assist in the designing, operating and optimizing pyrolysis processes. This work aims to utilize both experimental and modelling approaches to perform the analysis on three biomass feedstocks--wood sawdust, bamboo shred and Jatropha Curcas seed cake residue, and to provide insights for the design_and operation of pyro-lysis processes. For the experimental part, the study investigated the effect of heating rate, final pyrolysis tempera- ture and sample size on pyrolysis using common thermal analysis techniques. For the modelling part, a transient mathematical model that integrates the feedstock characteristic from the experimental study was used to simulate the pyrolysis progress of selected biomass feedstock particles for reactor scenarios. The model composes of several sub-models that describe pyrolysis kinetic and heat flow, particle heat transfer, particle shrinking and reactor opera-tion. With better understanding of the effects of process conditions and feedstock characteristics on pyrolysis through both experimental and modelling studies, this work discusses on the considerations of and interrelation between feedstock size, pyrolysis energy usage, processing time and product quality for the design and operation of pyrolysis processes.

  19. PMWS: Experimental model and co-infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allan, G. M.; McNeilly, F.; Ellis, J;

    2004-01-01

    and pneumonia and typical histological lesions include lymphocytic depletion and multinucleated giant cell formation in lymph nodes, degeneration and necrosis of hepatocytes, and multifocal lymphohistocytic interstitial pneumonia. This communication will review the results of experimental infections...

  20. Construction of a WMR for Trajectory Tracking Control: Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Silva-Ortigoza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a solution for trajectory tracking control of a differential drive wheeled mobile robot (WMR based on a hierarchical approach. The general design and construction of the WMR are described. The hierarchical controller proposed has two components: a high-level control and a low-level control. The high-level control law is based on an input-output linearization scheme for the robot kinematic model, which provides the desired angular velocity profiles that the WMR has to track in order to achieve the desired position (x*,y* and orientation (φ*. Then, a low-level control law, based on a proportional integral (PI approach, is designed to control the velocity of the WMR wheels to ensure those tracking features. Regarding the trajectories, this paper provides the solution or the following cases: (1 time-varying parametric trajectories such as straight lines and parabolas and (2 smooth curves fitted by cubic splines which are generated by the desired data points x1*,y1*,…,xn*,yn*. A straightforward algorithm is developed for constructing the cubic splines. Finally, this paper includes an experimental validation of the proposed technique by employing a DS1104 dSPACE electronic board along with MATLAB/Simulink software.

  1. Experimental Concepts for Testing Seismic Hazard Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocchi, W.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic hazard analysis is the primary interface through which useful information about earthquake rupture and wave propagation is delivered to society. To account for the randomness (aleatory variability) and limited knowledge (epistemic uncertainty) of these natural processes, seismologists must formulate and test hazard models using the concepts of probability. In this presentation, we will address the scientific objections that have been raised over the years against probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Owing to the paucity of observations, we must rely on expert opinion to quantify the epistemic uncertainties of PSHA models (e.g., in the weighting of individual models from logic-tree ensembles of plausible models). The main theoretical issue is a frequentist critique: subjectivity is immeasurable; ergo, PSHA models cannot be objectively tested against data; ergo, they are fundamentally unscientific. We have argued (PNAS, 111, 11973-11978) that the Bayesian subjectivity required for casting epistemic uncertainties can be bridged with the frequentist objectivity needed for pure significance testing through "experimental concepts." An experimental concept specifies collections of data, observed and not yet observed, that are judged to be exchangeable (i.e., with a joint distribution independent of the data ordering) when conditioned on a set of explanatory variables. We illustrate, through concrete examples, experimental concepts useful in the testing of PSHA models for ontological errors in the presence of aleatory variability and epistemic uncertainty. In particular, we describe experimental concepts that lead to exchangeable binary sequences that are statistically independent but not identically distributed, showing how the Bayesian concept of exchangeability generalizes the frequentist concept of experimental repeatability. We also address the issue of testing PSHA models using spatially correlated data.

  2. Recent experimental results of KSTAR RF heating and current drive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S. J., E-mail: sjwang@nfri.re.kr; Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejoen, 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-10

    The overview of KSTAR activities on ICRH, LHCD and ECH/CD including the last experimental results and future plan aiming for long-pulse high-beta plasma will be presented. Recently we achieved reasonable coupling of ICRF power to H-mode plasma through several efforts to increase system reliability. Power balance will be discussed on this experiment. LHCD is still struggling in the low power regime. Review of antenna spectrum for the higher coupling in H-mode plasma will be tried. ECH/CD provides 41 sec, 0.8 MW of heating power to support high-performance long-pulse discharge. Also, 170 GHz ECH system is integrated with the Plasma Control System (PCS) for the feedback controlling of NTM. Status and plan of ECH/CD will be discussed. Finally, helicon current drive is being prepared for the next stage of KSTAR operation. The hardware preparation and the calculation results of helicon current drive in KSTAR plasma will be discussed.

  3. Multi-stage apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, L.; Venet, M.; Enya, K.; Kataza, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Tamura, M.

    2008-07-01

    Prolate (Pupil) Apodized Lyot Coronagraphs (PPALC) are known to offer optimal performances for a Lyot-type Coronagraph configuration, i.e. with an opaque occulting focal mask. One additional benefit of PPALC is its possible use in a multi-stage configuration. In theory, the coronagraphic performance can be QN, where Q is the energy rejection factor of one stage (the first one), and N the number of stages. Several ground-based telescopes are considering PPALC as an option for their high-contrast instrumentation (e.g. Gemini/GPI, EELT/EPICS, Subaru HiCIAO). Although the PPALC suffers from several limitations, several works are currently focused on fabricating entrance pupil apodizers and trying to find ways to overcome chromatism issues. In this work, we present the first experimental results from Multi-Stage PPALC (MS-PPALC) that was done in the context of the Japanese space telescope SPICA coronagraph project. Our entrance pupil apodizers use small diameter High Energy Beam Sensitive glass (HEBS-glass) from Canyon Materials Inc. The current results show modest coronagraphic performance due to uncompensated phase aberrations inherent to HEBS-glass material. In addition, and due to these uncompensated phase aberrations, the present optical configuration is an altered version of the originally planned set-up. However, we can demonstrate the validity the MS-PPALC concept and compare it to numerical simulations.

  4. Results of experimental investigations of cobalt beta decay rate variation

    CERN Document Server

    Baurov, Yu A; Nikitin, V A; Dunin, V B; Tihomirov, V V; Sergeev, S V; Demchuk, N A

    2013-01-01

    Results of long-term investigations of variation of cobalt beta decay rate from 28.12.2010 till 08.02.2012 are presented. The scintillation spectrometer with two LaBr3 detectors is used to register of gamma-quanta with energy 1.173 and 1.332 MeV accompanying cobalt beta decay. Counting rate of each detector and their gamma-quanta coincidence are collected in successive time intervals 10 s. The statistical Kolmogorov-Smirnov method for data analysis is used. Temperature influence on experimental results is also analyzed. Deviations of beta decay counting rate from constant distribution during the days were detected in those decades: from 11.03 to 21.03 with significance level a = 0.1; from 22.04 to 02.05 with a=0.0125; from 24.06 to 04.07 with a=0.05; from 04.08 to 14.08 with a=0.05.

  5. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it…

  6. A human experimental model of episodic pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrini, Laura; Hennings, Kristian; Li, Xi

    2014-01-01

    An experimental model of daily episodic pain was developed to investigate peripheral sensitization and cortical reorganization in healthy individuals. Two experiments (A and B) were conducted. Experiments A and B consisted of one and five consecutive days, respectively, in which the participants ...

  7. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS OF THE NEPHELINE PHASE III STUDY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Edwards, T.

    2009-11-09

    This study is the third phase in a series of experiments designed to reduce conservatism in the model that predicts the formation of nepheline, a crystalline phase that can reduce the durability of high level waste glass. A Phase I study developed a series of glass compositions that were very durable while their nepheline discriminator values were well below the current nepheline discriminator limit of 0.62, where nepheline is predicted to crystallize upon slow cooling. A Phase II study selected glass compositions to identify any linear effects of composition on nepheline crystallization and that were restricted to regions that fell within the validation ranges of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models. However, it was not possible to identify any linear effects of composition on chemical durability performance for this set of study glasses. The results of the Phase II study alone were not sufficient to recommend modification of the current nepheline discriminator. It was recommended that the next series of experiments continue to focus not only on compositional regions where the PCCS models are considered applicable (i.e., the model validation ranges), but also be restricted to compositional regions where the only constraint limiting processing is the current nepheline discriminator. Two methods were used in selecting glasses for this Phase III nepheline study. The first was based on the relationship of the current nepheline discriminator model to the other DWPF PCCS models, and the second was based on theory of crystallization in mineral and glass melts. A series of 29 test glass compositions was selected for this study using a combination of the two approaches. The glasses were fabricated and characterized in the laboratory. After reviewing the data, the study glasses generally met the target compositions with little issue. Product Consistency Test results correlated well with the crystallization analyses in

  8. Experimental and numerical results of a high frequency rotating active magnetic refrigerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano, Jaime; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Bahl, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Experimental results for a recently developed prototype magnetic refrigeration device at The Technical University of Denmark (DTU) were obtained and compared with numerical simulation results. A continuously rotating active magnetic regenerator (AMR) using 2.8 kg packed sphere regenerators...... experimentally and implemented in a one-dimensional numerical AMR model that includes also the parasitic losses from the prototype. The temperature span for a thermal load of 200 W as a function of frequency was measured and modelled. Moreover, the temperature span dependence on the cooling capacity...

  9. Comprehensive Evaluation of Algal Biofuel Production: Experimental and Target Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin M. Beal

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, algal biofuel research and development efforts have focused on increasing the competitiveness of algal biofuels by increasing the energy and financial return on investments, reducing water intensity and resource requirements, and increasing algal productivity. In this study, analyses are presented in each of these areas—costs, resource needs, and productivity—for two cases: (1 an Experimental Case, using mostly measured data for a lab-scale system, and (2 a theorized Highly Productive Case that represents an optimized commercial-scale production system, albeit one that relies on full-price water, nutrients, and carbon dioxide. For both cases, the analysis described herein concludes that the energy and financial return on investments are less than 1, the water intensity is greater than that for conventional fuels, and the amounts of required resources at a meaningful scale of production amount to significant fractions of current consumption (e.g., nitrogen. The analysis and presentation of results highlight critical areas for advancement and innovation that must occur for sustainable and profitable algal biofuel production can occur at a scale that yields significant petroleum displacement. To this end, targets for energy consumption, production cost, water consumption, and nutrient consumption are presented that would promote sustainable algal biofuel production. Furthermore, this work demonstrates a procedure and method by which subsequent advances in technology and biotechnology can be framed to track progress.

  10. Experimental results on V-M type pulse tube refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wei; Matsubara, Yoichi; Kobayashi, Hisayasu

    2002-06-01

    This article mainly introduces experimental results on a new type pulse tube refrigerator named as V-M type pulse tube refrigerator. The main difference from Stirling type or G-M type pulse tube refrigerator is that thermal compressor similar to that of a V-M cryocooler is used instead of mechanical compressor. By using temperature difference between room temperature and liquid nitrogen, pressure wave with high to low pressure ratio around 1.2 is obtained. This pressure wave is used to generate cooling effect at the cold end. With a 20 K pre-cooler, this machine reaches lowest temperature 5.25 K by using helium 4 at 0.77 Hz, 19 bar charge pressure. DC flow plays an important role in our system. It not only influences the final obtainable lowest temperature, but also is used to increase cold end cool-down speed. Total volume of the V-M type pulse tube refrigerator is around 3.3 l. However, dead volume inside rotor housing occupies about 2.8 l and can be much reduced.

  11. Experimental models for Murray’s law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Dai; Kunita, Itsuki; Fricker, Mark D.; Kuroda, Shigeru; Sato, Katsuhiko; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki

    2017-01-01

    Transport networks are ubiquitous in multicellular organisms and include leaf veins, fungal mycelia and blood vessels. While transport of materials and signals through the network plays a crucial role in maintaining the living system, the transport capacity of the network can best be understood in terms of hydrodynamics. We report here that plasmodium from the large, single-celled amoeboid Physarum was able to construct a hydrodynamically optimized vein-network when evacuating biomass from confined arenas of various shapes through a narrow exit. Increasingly thick veins developed towards the exit, and the network spanned the arena via repetitive bifurcations to give a branching tree. The Hausdorff distance from all parts of the plasmodium to the vein network was kept low, whilst the hydrodynamic conductivity from distal parts of the network to the exit was equivalent, irrespective of the arena shape. This combination of spatial patterning and differential vein thickening served to evacuate biomass at an equivalent rate across the entire arena. The scaling relationship at the vein branches was determined experimentally to be 2.53-3.29, consistent with predictions from Murray’s law. Furthermore, we show that mathematical models for self-organised, adaptive transport in Physarum simulate the experimental network organisation well if the scaling coefficient of the current-reinforcement rule is set to 3. In simulations, this resulted in rapid development of an optimal network that minimised the combined volume and frictional energy in comparison with other scaling coefficients. This would predict that the boundary shear forces within each vein are constant throughout the network, and would be consistent with a feedback mechanism based on a sensing a threshold shear at the vein wall.

  12. Macrophages and Uveitis in Experimental Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Mérida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resident and infiltrated macrophages play relevant roles in uveitis as effectors of innate immunity and inductors of acquired immunity. They are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis and are also considered to be potent antigen-presenting cells. In the last few years, experimental animal models of uveitis have enabled us to enhance our understanding of the leading role of macrophages in eye inflammation processes, including macrophage polarization in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and the major role of Toll-like receptor 4 in endotoxin-induced uveitis. This improved knowledge should guide advantageous iterative research to establish mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for human uveitis resolution.

  13. Experimental results for an experimental condensation heat exchanger with a spiral minichanel tube. Comparison to numerical imulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hrubý J.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes new results for an experimental heat exchanger equipped with a single corrugated capillary tube, basic information about the measurements and the experimental setup. Some of the results were compared with numerical simulations.

  14. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Zebadúa, P.; Lárraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; García-Garduño, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramírez, V.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Paz, C.; Celis, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  15. Modeling experimental findings on sorption and biodegradation of PAHs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rein, Arno; Smith, K. E. C.; Karlson, U. G.

    2011-01-01

    and kinetic data for growth and metabolism of PAH-degrading bacteria were obtained as input parameters. The model simulations were compared to existing solutions (such as the Best equation) and to experimental results. With this new model approach, a range of experimental observations available in literature...... could be simulated, encompassing various soil types and PAHs, and different bacterial strains. Own experiments are currently performed on phenantrene, fluoranthene and other PAHs and on ad/desorption as well as on biodegradation. The results shall be used to calibrate and verify the new model approach...... and biodegradation performance. The final goal is to optimize remediation options....

  16. Experimental models of melatonin-deficient hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simko, Fedor; Reiter, Russel J; Pechanova, Olga; Paulis, Ludovit

    2013-01-01

    Melatonin secreted by the pineal gland plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure (BP) and its administration reduces hypertension both in animals and humans. There are two experimental models of melatonin-deficient hypertension: one induced by pinealectomy and another by continuous 24 hour exposure to light. Both models cause melatonin deficiency and prevent darkness-mediated nocturnal melatonin secretion and are associated with increased BP and myocardial, vascular and renal dysfunction. These models also lead to neurohumoral activation of the renin-angiotensin system, sympathetic nervous system, adrenocorticotrophin-glucocorticoid axis and cause insulin resistance. Together, these alterations contribute to rise in blood pressure by vasoconstrictive or circulatory fluid volume overload. The light induced hypertension model mimics the melatonin deficiency in patients with insufficient nocturnal BP decline, in those who have night shift or who are exposed to environmental light pollution. For this reason, this model is useful in development of anti-hypertensive drugs.

  17. Early Results in Capella's Prior Learning Assessment Experimental Site Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jillian

    2017-01-01

    In July 2014, the U.S. Department of Education announced a new round of experimental sites focusing on competency-based education. Capella University was selected to participate in three of the Department of Education's competency-based education (CBE) experiments and began by implementing the prior learning assessment experiment, which allows…

  18. New experimental model for training in videosurgery Novo modelo experimental para treinamento em videocirurgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Malta Batista

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop a new experimental model of lower cost for training in videosurgery. METHODS: This project was performed at the Nucleus of Experimental Surgery of the Bahiana School of Medicine and Public Health, based on previous models described in the literature and under the supervision of the full professor of Operative Technique and Experimental Surgery II. It was made a model cube-shaped, made of wood, with holes distributed in various locations, rubber stoppers for the holes and lined externally with carpet, and internally with laminate. RESULTS: The new experimental model is of low cost and reproduces quite faithfully several videosurgical procedures. CONCLUSION: Medical schools interested in the subject may adopt the new model for training in videosurgery without the need of high costs for making and using these models.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um novo modelo experimental de baixo custo para treinamento em videocirurgia MÉTODOS: Este projeto foi conduzido no Núcleo de Cirurgia Experimental da Escola Bahiana de Medicina e Saúde Pública, baseado em modelos prévios descritos na literatura e sob a supervisão do professor titular de Técnica Operatória e Cirurgia Experimental II. Foi feito um modelo em formato de cubo, de madeira, com furos distribuídos em vários locais, tampas de borracha para os orifícios e forrado externamente com carpete e internamente com laminado. RESULTADOS: O novo modelo experimental desenvolvido é de baixo custo e reproduz de forma bastante fiel diversos procedimentos videocirúrgicos. CONCLUSÃO: Faculdades médicas interessadas no tema poderão adotar o novo modelo para o treinamento em videocirurgia sem que sejam necessários gastos elevados para a confecção e o uso desses modelos.

  19. Assessment of four experimental models of hyperlipidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madariaga, Yisel González; Cárdenas, María Boffill; Irsula, Maibia Tamayo; Alfonso, Orestes Castillo; Cáceres, Bennia Alfonso; Morgado, Emoe Betancourt

    2015-04-01

    Various animal models of hyperlipidemia are used in research. Four rodent hyperlipidemia experimental models are examined in this study: three chronic hyperlipidemia models based on dietary supplementation with lipid or sucrose for 3 months and one acute hyperlipidemia model based on administration of the nonionic surfactant poloxamer. Neither lipid supplementation nor sucrose supplementation in Wistar rats was effective for establishing hyperlipidemia. Combining both lipid and sucrose supplementation in BALB/c mice induced hypercholesterolemia, as reflected in a considerable increase in blood cholesterol concentration, but did not produce an increase in blood triglyceride concentration. Poloxamer administration in C57BL/J6 mice produced increases in blood cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. The authors conclude that supplementation of both lipid and sucrose in BALB/c mice was the most effective method for developing chronic hypercholesterolemia.

  20. Timelike Compton Scattering - New Theoretical Results and Experimental Possibilities

    CERN Document Server

    Pire, Bernard; Wagner, Jakub

    2012-01-01

    We review recent progress in the study of timelike Compton scattering (TCS), the crossed process of deeply virtual Compton scattering. We emphasize the need to include NLO corrections to any phenomenological program to extract Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) from near future experimental data. We point out that TCS at high energy should be available through a study of ultraperipheral collisions at RHIC and LHC, opening a window on quark and gluon GPDs at very small skewness.

  1. Model identification in computational stochastic dynamics using experimental modal data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batou, A.; Soize, C.; Audebert, S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the identification of a stochastic computational model using experimental eigenfrequencies and mode shapes. In the presence of randomness, it is difficult to construct a one-to-one correspondence between the results provided by the stochastic computational model and the experimental data because of the random modes crossing and veering phenomena that may occur from one realization to another one. In this paper, this correspondence is constructed by introducing an adapted transformation for the computed modal quantities. Then the transformed computed modal quantities can be compared with the experimental data in order to identify the parameters of the stochastic computational model. The methodology is applied to a booster pump of thermal units for which experimental modal data have been measured on several sites.

  2. Results of Experimental Investigations to Determine External Tank Protuberance Loads Using a 0.03-Scale Model of the Space Shuttle Launch Configuration (Model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA19OA/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA19OA) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA19OB). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline; (2) GO2 pressure line; (3) LO2 antigeyser line; (4) GH2 pressure line; (5) LH2 tank cable tray; (6) LO2 tank cable tray; (7) Bipod; (8) ET/SRB cable tray; and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above; 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements; Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures; and Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

  3. Results of experimental investigations to determine external tank protuberance loads using a 0.03-scale model of the Space Shuttle launch configuration (model 47-OTS) in the NASA/ARC unitary plan wind tunnel, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlihan, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    Data were obtained on a 3-percent model of the Space Shuttle launch vehicle in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11x11-foot and 9x7-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels. This test series has been identified as IA190A/B and was conducted from 7 Feb. 1980 to 19 Feb. 1980 (IA190A) and from 17 March 1980 to 19 March 1980 and from 8 May 1980 to 30 May 1980 (IA190B). The primary test objective was to obtain structural loads on the following external tank protuberances: (1) LO2 feedline, (2) GO2 pressure line, (3) LO2 antigeyser line, (4) GH2 pressure line, (5) LH2 tank cable tray, (6) LO2 tank cable tray, (7) Bipod, (8) ET/SRB cable tray, and (9) Crossbeam/Orbiter cable tray. To fulfill these objectives the following steps were taken: (1) Eight 3-component balances were used to measure forces on various sections of 1 thru 6 above. (2) 315 pressure orifices were distributed over all 9 above items. The LO2 feedline was instrumented with 96 pressure taps and was rotated to four positions to yield 384 pressure measurements. The LO2 antigeyser line was instrumented with 64 pressure taps and was rotated to two positions to yield 128 pressure measurements. (3) Three Chrysler miniature flow direction probes were mounted on a traversing mechanism on the tank upper surface centerline to obtain flow field data between the forward and aft attach structures. (4) Schlieren photographs and ultraviolet flow photographs were taken at all test conditions. Data from each of the four test phases are presented.

  4. Carbon dioxide solubility in aqueous solutions of sodium chloride at geological conditions: Experimental results at 323.15, 373.15, and 423.15 K and 150 bar and modeling up to 573.15 K and 2000 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Haining; Fedkin, Mark V.; Dilmore, Robert M.; Lvov, Serguei N.

    2015-01-01

    A new experimental system was designed to measure the solubility of CO2 at pressures and temperatures (150 bar, 323.15-423.15 K) relevant to geologic CO2 sequestration. At 150 bar, new CO2 solubility data in the aqueous phase were obtained at 323.15, 373.15, and 423.15 K from 0 to 6 mol kg-1 NaCl(aq) for the CO2-NaCl-H2O system. A γ - φ (activity coefficient - fugacity coefficient) type thermodynamic model is presented for the calculation of both the solubility of CO2 in the aqueous phase and the solubility of H2O in the CO2-rich phase for the CO2-NaCl-H2O system. Validation of the model calculations against literature data and other models (MZLL2013, AD2010, SP2010, DS2006, and OLI) show that the proposed model is capable of predicting the solubility of CO2 in the aqueous phase for the CO2-H2O and CO2-NaCl-H2O systems with a high degree of accuracy (AAD @gmail.com.

  5. Experimental animal modelling for TB vaccine development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere-Joan Cardona

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Research for a novel vaccine to prevent tuberculosis is an urgent medical need. The current vaccine, BCG, has demonstrated a non-homogenous efficacy in humans, but still is the gold standard to be improved upon. In general, the main indicator for testing the potency of new candidates in animal models is the reduction of the bacillary load in the lungs at the acute phase of the infection. Usually, this reduction is similar to that induced by BCG, although in some cases a weak but significant improvement can be detected, but none of candidates are able to prevent establishment of infection. The main characteristics of several laboratory animals are reviewed, reflecting that none are able to simulate the whole characteristics of human tuberculosis. As, so far, no surrogate of protection has been found, it is important to test new candidates in several models in order to generate convincing evidence of efficacy that might be better than that of BCG in humans. It is also important to investigate the use of “in silico” and “ex vivo” models to better understand experimental data and also to try to replace, or at least reduce and refine experimental models in animals.

  6. Experimental animal modelling for TB vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Pere-Joan; Williams, Ann

    2017-03-01

    Research for a novel vaccine to prevent tuberculosis is an urgent medical need. The current vaccine, BCG, has demonstrated a non-homogenous efficacy in humans, but still is the gold standard to be improved upon. In general, the main indicator for testing the potency of new candidates in animal models is the reduction of the bacillary load in the lungs at the acute phase of the infection. Usually, this reduction is similar to that induced by BCG, although in some cases a weak but significant improvement can be detected, but none of candidates are able to prevent establishment of infection. The main characteristics of several laboratory animals are reviewed, reflecting that none are able to simulate the whole characteristics of human tuberculosis. As, so far, no surrogate of protection has been found, it is important to test new candidates in several models in order to generate convincing evidence of efficacy that might be better than that of BCG in humans. It is also important to investigate the use of "in silico" and "ex vivo" models to better understand experimental data and also to try to replace, or at least reduce and refine experimental models in animals. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Rheological study of an hydrate slurry as secondary two-phase refrigerant. Experimental results and modelling; Etude rheologique d'une suspension d'hydrates en tant que fluide frigoporteur diphasique: resultats experimentaux et modelisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darbouret, M.

    2005-12-15

    Secondary two-phase fluids are suspensions of solid crystals. Thanks to the melting latent heat, they present a great interest for cold transportation. Moreover, they are a mean of reducing the amount of classical refrigerant. In the refrigeration field, ice slurries are already used. The goal is now to extend this technology to other temperature ranges suitable for other applications like freezing or air-conditioning. For an air-conditioning application, a TBAB (Tetra-Butyl-Ammonium Bromide) aqueous solution is studied. Under atmospheric pressure and for positive temperatures, this solution crystallizes into ice-like compounds named 'hydrates'. First, the physical properties of the aqueous solution and its crystallisation conditions were studied. Two different types of hydrates can appear. The goal of the experimental set-up is to study the rheological behaviour of two-phase fluids. Slurries are made in brushed-surface heat exchanger and pumped into pipes where flow rates and pressure drops are measured. The rheological behaviour of TBAB hydrates slurries can be described using a Bingham fluid model. We highlight that the two rheological parameters, which are the apparent viscosity and the yield shear stress, depend on the volume fraction of crystal of course, but also on the hydrate type, and on the initial concentration of the solution. The yield shear stress is interpreted as the consequence of the Van der Waals inter-particle interaction forces. Finally, possible stratification effects are modelled with a finite difference method. The principle is to calculate particle concentration and velocity profiles following the flow of the slurry. Calculations are validated with experimental velocity profiles published by P. Reghem (2002). This model underlines the influence of the particle distribution in the pipe on pressure drops. (author)

  8. Observer Based Sliding Mode Attitude Control: Theoretical and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Jørgensen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the design of a sliding mode controller for attitude control of spacecraft actuated by three orthogonal reaction wheels. The equilibrium of the closed loop system is proved to be asymptotically stable in the sense of Lyapunov. Due to cases where spacecraft do not have angular velocity measurements, an estimator for the generalized velocity is derived and asymptotic stability is proven for the observer. The approach is tested on an experimental platform with a sphere shaped Autonomous Underwater Vehicle SATellite: AUVSAT, developed at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

  9. Augmented dry cooling surface test program: analysis and experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, H.L.; MacGowan, L.J.; Kreid, D.K.; Wiles, L.E.; Faletti, D.W.; Johnson, B.M.

    1979-09-01

    Experiments were performed to assess the operating characteristics and potential performance of water-augmented dry cooling systems. The work was aimed at evaluating a deluged air-cooled HOETERV plate fin heat exchanger surface proposed for integrated dry/wet cooling systems and using test results to guide the development of a predictive analytical model. In the process, all-dry performance data were obtained for the HOETERV surface as well as for two Curtiss-Wright chipped fin surfaces. The dry heat transfer data indicate that a slotted Curtiss-Wright surface slightly outperforms the HOETERV and nonslotted Curtiss-Wright surfaces based on heat rejection rate per unit of fan power. However, all three surfaces are so close in performance that other factors, such as surface cost and piping and mounting costs, will probably determine which surface is preferred at a given installation. Comparisons of deluged HOETERV performance with dry HOETERV and Curtiss-Wright performance under prototypic conditions have established that deluging can provide considerable heat rejection enhancement, particularly at low ITD and low air humidity. A deluged HOETERV core operating at a 115/sup 0/F primary fluid temperature in 105/sup 0/F air at 10% relative humidity can reject over 7 times as much heat as a dry HOETERV core operating under the same conditions at the same air-side pressure drop. Deluged tests were performed to evaluate the effect of airflow rate, deluge flow rate and core tilt angle on performance. Both increased airflow and increased deluge flow increase both heat rejection rate and required fan power. Optimal airflow rate will thus be determined for a given location by the competing costs of heat exchanger surface area versus fan operation. Changes in core tilt angle from vertical to 16/sup 0/ from vertical have a negligible effect on performance.

  10. ANOVA parameters influence in LCF experimental data and simulation results

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The virtual design of components undergoing thermo mechanical fatigue (TMF) and plastic strains is usually run in many phases. The numerical finite element method gives a useful instrument which becomes increasingly effective as the geometrical and numerical modelling gets more accurate. The constitutive model definition plays an important role in the effectiveness of the numerical simulation [1, 2] as, for example, shown in Figure 1. In this picture it is shown how a good cyclic plasti...

  11. Biomass thermochemical gasification: Experimental studies and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay

    The overall goals of this research were to study the biomass thermochemical gasification using experimental and modeling techniques, and to evaluate the cost of industrial gas production and combined heat and power generation. This dissertation includes an extensive review of progresses in biomass thermochemical gasification. Product gases from biomass gasification can be converted to biopower, biofuels and chemicals. However, for its viable commercial applications, the study summarizes the technical challenges in the gasification and downstream processing of product gas. Corn stover and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a non-fermentable byproduct of ethanol production, were used as the biomass feedstocks. One of the objectives was to determine selected physical and chemical properties of corn stover related to thermochemical conversion. The parameters of the reaction kinetics for weight loss were obtained. The next objective was to investigate the effects of temperature, steam to biomass ratio and equivalence ratio on gas composition and efficiencies. DDGS gasification was performed on a lab-scale fluidized-bed gasifier with steam and air as fluidizing and oxidizing agents. Increasing the temperature resulted in increases in hydrogen and methane contents and efficiencies. A model was developed to simulate the performance of a lab-scale gasifier using Aspen Plus(TM) software. Mass balance, energy balance and minimization of Gibbs free energy were applied for the gasification to determine the product gas composition. The final objective was to optimize the process by maximizing the net energy efficiency, and to estimate the cost of industrial gas, and combined heat and power (CHP) at a biomass feedrate of 2000 kg/h. The selling price of gas was estimated to be 11.49/GJ for corn stover, and 13.08/GJ for DDGS. For CHP generation, the electrical and net efficiencies were 37 and 86%, respectively for corn stover, and 34 and 78%, respectively for DDGS. For

  12. Experimental results on spin physics at the AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makdisi, Y.I.

    1986-01-01

    The AGS ran with polarized protons towards the end of 1985 and through the first two months of 1986. This comprised commissioning periods interleaved with two runs for physics at 13.5 GeV/c with beam polarization of 50 to 60%, and 18.5 GeV/c with an average beam polarization of 40%. Later, the AGS polarized beam reached peak energy of 22 GeV/c and polarization of 46%. This article describes the various spin related experimental efforts since the VI Symposium at Marseille. These will be grouped into those using unpolarized beams and the rest are the polarized proton beam users. Afterwards the future of the program is described as extensions of current experiments in addition to other measurements that are yet to be proposed.

  13. Impact mechanics of ship collisions and validations with experimental results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Shengming; Villavicencio, R.; Zhu, L.;

    2017-01-01

    Closed-form analytical solutions for the energy released for deforming and crushing ofstructures and the impact impulse during ship collisions were developed and published inMarine Structures in 1998 [1]. The proposed mathematical models have been used bymany engineers and researchers although th...

  14. Graphical Models for Quasi-Experimental Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongnam; Steiner, Peter M.; Hall, Courtney E.; Su, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Experimental and quasi-experimental designs play a central role in estimating cause-effect relationships in education, psychology, and many other fields of the social and behavioral sciences. This paper presents and discusses the causal graphs of experimental and quasi-experimental designs. For quasi-experimental designs the authors demonstrate…

  15. Experimental Results of the Superluminescent Fiber Laser Sources for Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Pinzón-Escobar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting experimental work on an erbium-doped fiber operating in the superluminescent regime. Experimental results for different pump power levels and fiber length show that the theoretical and numerical model could render useful information for predicting the total output power as a function of fiber doped length and the input pump power. These types of sources could have direct application in wavelength multiplexed arrangements of fiber sensors, fiber gyroscopes or, in general, in any sensors in which a broad wavelength and stable light source is required.

  16. Parametric Evaluation of Absorption Losses and Comparison of Numerical Results to Boeing 707 Aircraft Experimental HIRF Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaygorsky, J.; Amburgey, C.; Elliott, J. R.; Fisher, R.; Perala, R. A.

    A broadband (100 MHz-1.2 GHz) plane wave electric field source was used to evaluate electric field penetration inside a simplified Boeing 707 aircraft model with a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method using EMA3D. The role of absorption losses inside the simplified aircraft was investigated. It was found that, in this frequency range, none of the cavities inside the Boeing 707 model are truly reverberant when frequency stirring is applied, and a purely statistical electromagnetics approach cannot be used to predict or analyze the field penetration or shielding effectiveness (SE). Thus it was our goal to attempt to understand the nature of losses in such a quasi-statistical environment by adding various numbers of absorbing objects inside the simplified aircraft and evaluating the SE, decay-time constant τ, and quality factor Q. We then compare our numerical results with experimental results obtained by D. Mark Johnson et al. on a decommissioned Boeing 707 aircraft.

  17. General Motors sulfate dispersion experiment: experimental procedures and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadle, S.H.; Chock, D.P.; Monson, P.R.; Heuss, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    A massive experiment was conducted at the General Motors Proving Ground to measure the dispersion of sulfates generated by catalyst equipped vehicles. 352 cars equipped with catalysts and air pumps were driven on a 10 kilometer test track to provide a simulated freeway situation with a traffic density of 5462 cars/hour. Experiments were conducted on 17 days in October 1975, providing sixty-six 30 min data sets. On most days, the experiment was carried out early in the morning in order to run under the most adverse meteorological conditions available. Samples of airborne sulfate and a gas tracer, sulfur hexafluoride, as well as extensive meteorological data were collected simultaneously at 20 sampling points under a wide variety of meteorological conditions. The maximum measured increase in sulfate from each 30 min data set was generally found next to the roadway at the lowest level and varied from 3 to 15 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/. This increase in sulfate over background fell off rapidly with height and distance. Sulfate increases in vehicles (2 hr averages) ranged from 0 to 20 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/, and averaged 4 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/. Within experimental uncertainty, the sulfate aerosol and the gas tracer were found to disperse in the same manner. The tracer data have also been used to calculate the sulfate emission rate of the vehicles.

  18. Recent Experimental Results in the VX-10 Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J. P.; Díaz, F. R. Chang; Jacobson, V. T.; McCaskill, G. E.; McCoy, J. E.; Petro, A. J.; Baity, F. W.; Bengtson, R. D.; Bering, E. A.; Garret, J. A.; Glover, T. W.

    2000-10-01

    In the VASIMR engine, neutral gas is ionized using a helicon type source and the ions are subsequently accelerated via ICRF power injection. The experimental device in the ASPL is targeting a total RF power level of 10 kW and is called VX-10. RF power is available with 3 kW at 25 MHz for the helicon source and 100 kW at 3 MHz for ICRF. Experiments with light gasses (hydrogen, deuterium, and helium) are performed. The VX-10 3-magnet system is capable of a maximum B field of 2 T and has flexible axial profile shaping capability. Diagnostics in the plasma exhaust include an RF compensated Langmuir probe, a Mach probe, Retarding Potential Analyzer (RPA), newly installed density interferometer and an ion gauge neutral pressure measurement. Parametric (e.g. magnetic field, gas flow, and RF power) studies are presented. Data indicate ion heating to more than 1 eV and acceleration by the magnetic exhaust with the helicon alone. ICRF experiments are beginning and initial data are presented.

  19. Modeling and experimentation of bone drilling forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuEun; Gozen, B Arda; Ozdoganlar, O Burak

    2012-04-05

    Prediction and control of bone drilling forces are critical to the success of many orthopaedic operations. Uncontrolled and large forces can cause drill-bit breakage, drill breakthrough, excessive heat generation, and mechanical damage to the bone. This paper presents a mechanistic model for prediction of thrust forces and torques experienced during bone drilling. The model incorporates the radially varying drill-bit geometry and cutting conditions analytically, while capturing the material and friction properties empirically through a specific energy formulation. The forces from the chisel edge are modeled by considering the indentation process that occurs in the vicinity of the drill-bit axis. A procedure is outlined to calibrate the specific energies, where only a small number of calibration experiments are required for a wide range of drilling conditions and drill-bit geometry. The calibration parameters for the cortical portions of bovine tibia are identified through drilling tests. Subsequently, a series of validation tests are conducted under different feed rates and spindle speeds. The thrust forces and torques were observed to vary considerably between bones from different animals. The forces from the model were seen to match well with those from the experimentation within the inherent variations from the bone characteristics. The model can be used to select favorable drilling conditions, to assist in robotic surgeries, and to design optimal orthopaedic drill bits. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Polymorphic transition of tin under shock wave compression: Experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinatti F.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the β-bct polymorphic transition in tin is investigated by means of plate impact experiments. The Sn target surface is observed in a partially released state obtained thanks to a transparent lithium fluoride (LiF anvil. We report both measurements of interface velocity and temperature obtained using Photon Doppler Velocimetry and IR optical pyrometer on shock-loaded tin from 8 to 16 GPa. We show that the Mabire Model EOS associated to the SCG plasticity model provides an overall good estimate of the velocity profiles. However, depnding on the shock amplitude, its prediction of the temperature profile may be less satisfactory, hence underlining the need for future improvements in terms of phase transition kinetics description.

  1. 空间能量传导通道模型的实验和理论成果%Conductive canal for energy delivery from space:Experimental and theoretical results of modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    APOLLONOV V; PLETNEV N V

    2011-01-01

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies on creation of a super-long conductive canal technology for energy delivery from the space are presented. A high repetition rate pulse-periodic laser system and the most important components for the project realization are analyzed. The optical system and dust plasma based the conductive canal idea for long range energy delivery is discussed in details,then, some experimental approaches to dust plasma conductivity tests and new data of measurements are investigated. Finally, new applications of "Impulsator" program suggested are highlighted.%给出了研制空间能量传递的超长传导通道技术的实验和理论工作结果.分析了高重频脉冲激光系统和这一项目中的最重要的组件.基于创建长距离能量传递传导通道的思想,讨论了光学系统和尘埃等离子体,研究了测试等离子体导电性的实验方法和新的测量数据.最后,阐述了"脉冲发生器"的新应用.

  2. Defining Dynamic Characteristics of Multilink Pendulum System with Comparison of the Calculated and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Gribkov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the multilink pendulum system consisting of six physical pendulums. A pendulum (carrier has inertia parameters, which significantly exceed the remaining (carried ones placed on the carrier. In addition to the system under analysis, in particular, the paper presents a design scheme for a two-stage liquid fuel rocket using pendulums as the analogues of fluctuating fuel. Pendulum models also find application to solve problems of stabilization of space tether systems. The objective of the study is to determine dynamic characteristics of the said sixmembered pendulum system, as well as to identify specific dynamic properties inherent in objects of this kind. Dynamic characteristics of the system are determined by calculations. A physical model of the pendulum allowed us to compare the calculated and experimental results. To conduct the frequency tests of the pendulum model three pilot units have been created. The first two units turned out to be inappropriate for fulfilling the experimental tasks for various reasons. The third unit enabled us to obtain desirable experimental results. The "calculation–experiment” discrepancy on the natural frequencies of the pendulum model for the majority of frequencies was less than 5%. We analyzed the dynamic features of multilink pendulum systems "carried by the carrier unit links". The analysis results are applicable to the above-noted object classes of rocket and space technology.

  3. A review of experimental results at the knee

    CERN Document Server

    Hörandel, J R

    2005-01-01

    Results of experiments investigating air showers in the energy region of the knee are summarized. The all-particle energy spectrum, the mean logarithmic mass, and the average depth of the shower maximum will be discussed. Spectra for groups of elements from air shower data are compared to results from direct measurements.

  4. Cooking Potatoes: Experimentation and Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Dong

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory activity involving a mathematical model of cooking potatoes that can be solved analytically. Highlights the microstructure aspects of the experiment. Provides the key aspects of the results, detailed background readings, laboratory procedures and data analyses. (MM)

  5. RESULTS OF EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE HERRING SALTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Shumanova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To the salting process of fish many studies are devoted, both in experimental and in theoretical terms. Study of features of fish salting in historical terms can be divided into 3 groups. One group of researchers believes that osmotic pressure has a major influence during the salting process. Another group attributed this process to the influence of molecular diffusion. The third group considers that during this process takes place both osmosis and diffusion. Determination of the main characteristics (salinity, diffusion coefficients, time of salting, etc. is a very time-consuming task. This leads to the idea of searching for innovative research methods. Current state of science, in addition to theoretical solutions points to the possibility to determine the basic characteristics of salting and applying methods associated with the interaction of ultrasound and electromagnetic radiation with matter. In our studies, we have been producing laser beam scanning of salt solution and fish meat thickness. Scattered radiation is determined by the salt concentration, diffusion coefficients, the size of the diffusing particles. This method is called a photon correlation spectroscopy. It has been applied in our work. The dependence of the scattered light intensity on the concentration of sodium chloride solution (brine has been investigated. According to diffusion coefficient a diffusion in solution to herring skin a conclusion was made that salt solution obtains fractal structure and its size was determined. Also we determined diffusion coefficients depending on the temperature in the layers. The layers are brine-leather, leather, and herring meat thickness. The process of diffusion-osmotic equilibrium revealed at temperatures of 10-12 ° C. Suggested the possibility of higher quality of fish salting at low temperatures. On the basis of the selfsimilar solution of the differential diffusion equation, a formula for calculating time salting fish was obtained

  6. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF SOME EXPERIMENTAL FATIGUE TESTS RESULTS

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Stere PARIS; Gheorghe AMZA; Claudiu BABIŞ; Dan Niţoi

    2012-01-01

    The paper details the results of processing the fatigue data experiments to find the regression function. Application software for statistical processing like ANOVA and regression calculi are properly utilized, with emphasis on popular software like MSExcel and CurveExpert

  7. Linking Experimental Characterization and Computational Modeling in Microstructural Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Melik Cumhar [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    It is known that by controlling microstructural development, desirable properties of materials can be achieved. The main objective of our research is to understand and control interface dominated material properties, and finally, to verify experimental results with computer simulations. In order to accomplish this objective, we studied the grain growth in detail with experimental techniques and computational simulations. We obtained 5170-grain data from an Aluminum-film (120μm thick) with a columnar grain structure from the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Experimentally obtained starting microstructure and grain boundary properties are input for the three-dimensional grain growth simulation. In the computational model, minimization of the interface energy is the driving force for the grain boundary motion. The computed evolved microstructure is compared with the final experimental microstructure, after annealing at 550 ºC. Two different measures were introduced as methods of comparing experimental and computed microstructures. Modeling with anisotropic mobility explains a significant amount of mismatch between experiment and isotropic modeling. We have shown that isotropic modeling has very little predictive value. Microstructural evolution in columnar Aluminum foils can be correctly modeled with anisotropic parameters. We observed a strong similarity between grain growth experiments and anisotropic three-dimensional simulations.

  8. Linking Experimental Characterization and Computational Modeling in Microstructural Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Melik Cumhur [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    It is known that by controlling microstructural development, desirable properties of materials can be achieved. The main objective of our research is to understand and control interface dominated material properties, and finally, to verify experimental results with computer simulations. In order to accomplish this objective, we studied the grain growth in detail with experimental techniques and computational simulations. We obtained 5170-grain data from an Aluminum-film (120μm thick) with a columnar grain structure from the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Experimentally obtained starting microstructure and grain boundary properties are input for the three-dimensional grain growth simulation. In the computational model, minimization of the interface energy is the driving force for the grain boundary motion. The computed evolved microstructure is compared with the final experimental microstructure, after annealing at 550 ºC. Two different measures were introduced as methods of comparing experimental and computed microstructures. Modeling with anisotropic mobility explains a significant amount of mismatch between experiment and isotropic modeling. We have shown that isotropic modeling has very little predictive value. Microstructural evolution in columnar Aluminum foils can be correctly modeled with anisotropic parameters. We observed a strong similarity between grain growth experiments and anisotropic three-dimensional simulations.

  9. Linking Experimental Characterization and Computational Modeling in Microstructural Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Melik Cumhur [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    It is known that by controlling microstructural development, desirable properties of materials can be achieved. The main objective of our research is to understand and control interface dominated material properties, and finally, to verify experimental results with computer simulations. In order to accomplish this objective, we studied the grain growth in detail with experimental techniques and computational simulations. We obtained 5170-grain data from an Aluminum-film (120μm thick) with a columnar grain structure from the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Experimentally obtained starting microstructure and grain boundary properties are input for the three-dimensional grain growth simulation. In the computational model, minimization of the interface energy is the driving force for the grain boundary motion. The computed evolved microstructure is compared with the final experimental microstructure, after annealing at 550 ºC. Two different measures were introduced as methods of comparing experimental and computed microstructures. Modeling with anisotropic mobility explains a significant amount of mismatch between experiment and isotropic modeling. We have shown that isotropic modeling has very little predictive value. Microstructural evolution in columnar Aluminum foils can be correctly modeled with anisotropic parameters. We observed a strong similarity

  10. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br, E-mail: dmoraes@dk8.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  11. Experimental and numerical results of a high frequency rotating active magnetic refrigerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano, Jaime; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Bahl, Christian R.H.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental results for a recently developed prototype magnetic refrigeration device at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) were obtained and compared with numerical simulation results. A continuously rotating active magnetic regenerator (AMR) using 2.8 kg packed sphere regenerators...... and implemented in a one-dimensional numerical AMR model that includes also the parasitic losses from the prototype. The temperature span for a thermal load of 200 W as a function of frequency was measured and modelled. Moreover, the temperature span dependence on the cooling capacity as a function of cycle...

  12. Experimental validation of flexible robot arm modeling and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulsoy, A. Galip

    1989-01-01

    Flexibility is important for high speed, high precision operation of lightweight manipulators. Accurate dynamic modeling of flexible robot arms is needed. Previous work has mostly been based on linear elasticity with prescribed rigid body motions (i.e., no effect of flexible motion on rigid body motion). Little or no experimental validation of dynamic models for flexible arms is available. Experimental results are also limited for flexible arm control. Researchers include the effects of prismatic as well as revolute joints. They investigate the effect of full coupling between the rigid and flexible motions, and of axial shortening, and consider the control of flexible arms using only additional sensors.

  13. Contact Modelling in Resistance Welding, Part II: Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Quanfeng; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Contact algorithms in resistance welding presented in the previous paper are experimentally validated in the present paper. In order to verify the mechanical contact algorithm, two types of experiments, i.e. sandwich upsetting of circular, cylindrical specimens and compression tests of discs...... with a solid ring projection towards a flat ring, are carried out at room temperature. The complete algorithm, involving not only the mechanical model but also the thermal and electrical models, is validated by projection welding experiments. The experimental results are in satisfactory agreement...

  14. Autofocus imaging: Experimental results in an anisotropic austenitic weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Drinkwater, B. W.; Wilcox, P. D.; Hunter, A.

    2012-05-01

    The quality of an ultrasonic array image, especially for anisotropic material, depends on accurate information about acoustic properties. Inaccuracy of acoustic properties causes image degradation, e.g., blurring, errors in locating of reflectors and introduction of artifacts. In this paper, for an anisotropic austenitic steel weld, an autofocus imaging technique is presented. The array data from a series of beacons is captured and then used to statistically extract anisotropic weld properties by using a Monte-Carlo inversion approach. The beacon and imaging systems are realized using two separated arrays; one acts as a series of beacons and the other images these beacons. Key to the Monte-Carlo inversion scheme is a fast forward model of wave propagation in the anisotropic weld and this is based on the Dijkstra algorithm. Using this autofocus approach a measured weld map was extracted from an austenitic weld and used to reduce location errors, initially greater than 6mm, to less than 1mm.

  15. Seismic techniques of enhanced oil recovery: experimental and field results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, O.L.; Simkin, E.M.; Chilingar, G.V.; Gorfunkel, M.V.; Robertson, J.O. Jr.

    2002-09-15

    Application of secondary and tertiary oil recovery techniques during late field development stages usually yields poor results. The reasons are principally due to the low efficiency of these technologies, probably because the gravity and capillary forces are not properly considered. Improved efficiency for hydrocarbon recovery produced by seismic vibration is discussed. (author)

  16. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF SOME EXPERIMENTAL FATIGUE TESTS RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Stere PARIS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper details the results of processing the fatigue data experiments to find the regression function. Application software for statistical processing like ANOVA and regression calculi are properly utilized, with emphasis on popular software like MSExcel and CurveExpert

  17. Overall Buckling and Wringkling of Debonded Sandwich Beams: Finite Element and Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang K. Hadi

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Overall buckling and wrinkling of debonded sandwich beams under compressive loads were analyzed by both finite element and experimental methods. In the finite element method, a quarter and a half models of the specimens were analyzed. It shows that a quarter model is not adequate to analyze buckling of debonded sandwich beams, since it will disregard overall buckling mode that may occur in sandwich beams having compressive loads. At least a half model should be used to analyze buckling of sandwich beams. A finite element program UNA was used extensively to analyze the buckling loads. Experimental buckling of sandwich beams was carried out using a compression testing machine. Two LVDTs were used to measure deflections of the specimen during experimental loading. The loads were measured using load cells available in the machine. Specimens having core thickness of 45 and 75 mm were tested to represent overall and wrinkling modes respectively. The delamination lengths were 20, 60 and 80 mm, which represent 10, 30 and 40% of the beam length. The results show that the differences between experimental and finite element methods were less than 10%. Both overall buckling and wrinkling modes were shown in these specimens.

  18. Wave Synchronizing Crane Control during Water Entry in Offshore Moonpool Operations - Experimental Results

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    A new strategy for active control in heavy-lift offshore crane operations is suggested, by introducing a new concept referred to as wave synchronization. Wave synchronization reduces the hydrodynamic forces by minimization of variations in the relative vertical velocity between payload and water using a wave amplitude measurement. Wave synchronization is combined with conventional active heave compensation to obtain accurate control. Experimental results using a scale model of a semi-submerge...

  19. Diamond mosaic crystals for neutron instrumentation: First experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, A.K., E-mail: kafreund@free.f [Via Cordis, 92 Rue Abbe de l' Epee, F-33000 Bordeaux (France); Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Gsell, S.; Fischer, M.; Schreck, M. [Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Andersen, K.H.; Courtois, P. [Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin, B.P. 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Borchert, G. [Forschungsneutronenquelle FRM2, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Skoulatos, M. [Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    Diamond single crystals were recently proposed as monochromators of unprecedented performance (Freund, 2009). In the present paper we describe how diamond crystals with a suitable mosaic spread can be produced using a specific plasma CVD technique. Up to 2 mm thick samples with an average mosaic spread of 0.2{sup o} have been produced. We report on X- and gamma-ray characterisation checking the uniformity of the mosaic structure and present the results of a first study regarding the neutron reflection properties of this outstanding material. These promising results show that the diamond diffraction properties are not too far from the theoretical expectations. For example, 34% peak reflectivity has been obtained for a 1 mm thick crystal at 1 A wavelength.

  20. Design and Experimental Results for the S407 Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    the drag coefficient within the laminar bucket is nearly constant. (See, for example, ref. 7.) This characteristic is related to the elimination of...with increasing (or decreasing) lift coefficient. This feature results in a leading edge that produces a suction peak at higher lift coefficients, which...distribution should look like sketch 3. Sketch 3 No suction spike exists at the leading edge. Instead, a rounded peak occurs aft of the leading edge, which

  1. Boston Community Information System 1986 Experimental Test Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    participants in the Boston CommnS. The questionnaire results showed a large interest in major corporations such as IBM, Digital Equipment, Data...DATA FROM THE FIS YEAR ’Computer, Electronic, Accounting’ - 1132 OIEEE Proceedings, Science, Communicatins of the ACM’ - 1137 ’American Political...higher if corporate . Since I moved it to the ofice to shape data with our [Oxfam Americal Press office and Ex. Dir. I have lez discretionary leisure

  2. Stress analysis of local blisters coupling Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Correlation between experimental results and continuous damage modelling for buckling in an iron oxide/phosphated iron system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panicaud, B., E-mail: benoit.panicaud@utt.fr [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), CNRS UMR 6279, 12 rue Marie Curie, 10010 Troyes (France); Grosseau-Poussard, J.L. [LEMMA, Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Av. M. Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex (France)

    2010-12-01

    In this present work, local stress development in the iron oxide layers growing on phosphated {alpha}-Fe at 400 deg. C in ambient air is investigated by Raman spectroscopy. Coupled with X-ray diffraction it enables to obtain directly local stresses' maps in the oxide layers. Use of Raman spectroscopy allows obtaining better accuracy on mechanical behaviour at local scale. This characterisation technique is very useful to study systems developing mechanical heterogeneities on surface, especially in case of buckling phenomenon. Investigations on particular local blisters have been done to measure some characteristic lengths at local scale. From local measurements, we are able to evaluate general effect of buckling from simplified scale transition. So, a macroscopic approach has been performed to calculate global stress evolution of the oxide layer, based on continuous damage mechanics. Consequently, it leads to good comparison between modelling and experimental values (global stresses versus oxidation time) in {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide.

  3. Potential for hot-dry-rock geothermal resources: Experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, J. C.; Heiken, G.; Murphy, H. D.; Kuriyagawa, M.

    Hot dry rock (HDR) contains insufficient permeability and fluid for natural hydrothermal development, but water pumped in a circulation loop through a HDR reservoir (hydraulically fractured between two drill holes) is being tested and evaluated. The formation of such in situ heat transfer systems, and subsequent testing of the man-made geothermal reservoirs in the Jemez volcanic field, New Mexico have already indicated the technical feasibility of the hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal concept. Documented production history and heat-extraction data obtained during the period from 1978 to 1980 have confirmed heat transfer, low water loss, and predictable thermal drawdown models for the HDR systems. During a nine month test of closed-loop heat extraction operations, 15 x 10 to the 6th power kWh of thermal energy were produced. The effective heat-transfer area and volume of the reservoir increased due to secondary fracturing caused by thermal contraction of the reservoir rock, and sustained pressurization. Drilling, fracturing, and testing of a larger, hotter reservoir system is now underway on a HDR geothermal reservoir of commercial size.

  4. Study of inhomogeneities in turbid media: experimental and numerical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, N. A.; di Rocco, Héctor O.; Iriarte, Daniela I.; Pomarico, Juan A.; Ranea-Sandoval, Héctor F.; Pardini, Pamela; Waks-Serra, M. Victoria

    2011-08-01

    Near Infrared diffuse transmission of light through tissue is a tool for noninvasive imaging for diagnostic purposes. Most of the research has been focused over breast cancer imaging; however, major efforts have been done in cerebral tomography and topography imaging, as well as small animal organs imaging systems. In this work, we investigate the transmitted light profiles when scattering and absorbing cylindrical inhomogeneities are submerged at different depths inside slabs of turbid media. We analyze the transilluminance profiles when the phantom is scanned using both, CW and time resolved detection. The study of the spatial profiles obtained with CW light, shows an apparently contradictory effect when the absorption coefficient of the inclusion is higher than that of the bulk. In this case, the intensity profiles displays a peak of higher intensity where the inclusion is located, as it would be expected for a less absorbing inclusion. The experiments were compared and analyzed with a theoretical model for cylindrical inclusions and Monte Carlo simulations implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU).

  5. Composite Failures: A Comparison of Experimental Test Results and Computational Analysis Using XFEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    availability of measurement techniques, experimental testing of composite materials has largely outpaced the computational modeling ability, forcing...Reinforced Composites Finite-Element Method Fracture Mechanics Physics- Based Modeling Extended Finite-Element...7 PHYSICS- BASED MODELING

  6. Wind slab formation in snow: experimental setup and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Christian; Lehning, Michael; Fierz, Charles

    2016-04-01

    The formation of wind-hardened surface layers, also known as wind slabs or wind crusts, is studied. Better knowledge about which processes and parameters are important will lead to an improved understanding of the mass balances in polar and alpine areas. It will also improve snow-cover models (i.e. SNOWPACK) as well as the forecast of avalanche danger. A ring-shaped wind tunnel has been built and instrumented. The facility is ring-shaped to simulate an infinitely long snow surface (infinite fetch). A SnowMicroPen (SMP) is used to measure the snow hardness. Other sensors measure environmental conditions such as wind velocity, air temperature, air humidity, the temperature of the snow and of the snow surface. A camera is used to detect drifting particles and to measure the Specific Surface Area (SSA) at the snow surface via near-infrared photography. First experiments indicate that mechanical fragmentation followed by sintering is the most efficient process to harden the surface. The hardness increased rapidly during drifting snow events, but only slowly or not at all when the wind speed was kept below the threshold for drifting snow. With drifting, the penetration resistance increased from the original 0.07 N to around 0.3 N in about an hour. Without drifting, a slow, further increase in resistance was observed. In about six hours, the hardness of the top 1-2 cm increased to 0.5 N. During this eight-hour experiment consisting of about two hours with intermittent drifting and six hours without drifting, the density at the surface increased from 66 kg/m3 to around 170 kg/m3. In the unaffected region close to the ground, the density increased from 100 kg/m3 to 110 kg/m3.

  7. A new method for nonlinear optimization - experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loskovska, S.; Percinkova, B.

    1994-12-31

    In this paper an application of a new method for nonlinear optimization problems suggested and presented by B. Percinkova is performed. The method is originally developed and applicated on nonlinear systems. Basis of the method is following: A system of n-nonlinear equations gives as F{sub i}(x{sub 1}, x{sub 2}, x{sub 3}, ..., x{sub n}) = 0; 1 = 1, 2, ..., n and solution domain x{sub pi} {<=} x{sub i} {<=} x{sub ki} i = 1, 2, ..., n is modified by introducing a new variable z. The new system is given by: F{sub i}(x{sub 1}, x{sub 2}, x{sub 3}, ..., x{sub n}) = z; i = 1, 2, ..., n. The system defines a curve in (n + 1) dimensional space. System`s point X = (x{sub i}, x{sub 2}, x{sub 3}, ..., x{sub n}, z) that, the solution of the system is obtained using an interative procedure moving along the curve until the point with z = 0 is reached. In order to applicate method on optimization problems, a basic optimization model given with (min, max)F{sub i}(x{sub 1}, x{sub 2}, x{sub 3}, ..., x{sub n}) with the following optimization space: F{sub i}(x{sub 1}, x{sub 2}, x{sub 3}, ..., x{sub n}) ({<=}{>=})0 : i = 1, 2, ..., n is transformed into a system equivalent to system (2) by (dF/dx{sub i}) = z; i - 1, 2, ..., n. The main purpose of this work is to make relevant evaluation of the method by standard test problems.

  8. Experimental models of autoimmune inflammatory ocular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Gasparin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Ocular inflammation is one of the leading causes of blindness and loss of vision. Human uveitis is a complex and heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by inflammation of intraocular tissues. The eye may be the only organ involved, or uveitis may be part of a systemic disease. A significant number of cases are of unknown etiology and are labeled idiopathic. Animal models have been developed to the study of the physiopathogenesis of autoimmune uveitis due to the difficulty in obtaining human eye inflamed tissues for experiments. Most of those models are induced by injection of specific photoreceptors proteins (e.g., S-antigen, interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein, rhodopsin, recoverin, phosducin. Non-retinal antigens, including melanin-associated proteins and myelin basic protein, are also good inducers of uveitis in animals. Understanding the basic mechanisms and pathogenesis of autoimmune ocular diseases are essential for the development of new treatment approaches and therapeutic agents. The present review describes the main experimental models of autoimmune ocular inflammatory diseases.

  9. Prediction of Catastrophes: an experimental model

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Randall D; Pomeau, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Catastrophes of all kinds can be roughly defined as short duration-large amplitude events following and followed by long periods of "ripening". Major earthquakes surely belong to the class of 'catastrophic' events. Because of the space-time scales involved, an experimental approach is often difficult, not to say impossible, however desirable it could be. Described in this article is a "laboratory" setup that yields data of a type that is amenable to theoretical methods of prediction. Observations are made of a critical slowing down in the noisy signal of a solder wire creeping under constant stress. This effect is shown to be a fair signal of the forthcoming catastrophe in both of two dynamical models. The first is an "abstract" model in which a time dependent quantity drifts slowly but makes quick jumps from time to time. The second is a realistic physical model for the collective motion of dislocations (the Ananthakrishna set of equations for creep). Hope thus exists that similar changes in the response to ...

  10. Experimental model of osteosarcomas in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasmin, C.; Allouche, M.; Jude, J.G.; Klein, B. (Institut de Cancerologie et d' Immunogenetique, Villejuif (France)); Thiery, J.P.; Perdereau, B.; Gongora, R.; Gongora, G.; Mazabraud, A. (Institut Curie, Paris (France))

    1982-07-08

    Satisfactory experimental models for preclinical prediction in cancerology must answer the following criteria: reproducibility of the method used for inducing tumors; clinical, pathological and kinetic similarity with the corresponding human tumors. We have developed a model of osteosarcoma locally induced by insoluble radioactive cerium chloride (/sup 144/Ce Cl/sub 3/) in Sprague Dawley rats. This method yields over 80% of bone tumors at the injection site, of which approximately half are histologically similar to human tumors. These tumors double their volume fairly slowly (in approximately 20 days); lung metastases occur both early and frequently (80% of animals). A transplantable tumor was developed from an induced osteosarcoma and adapted to the Curie strain. Transplantation in the bone, next to the bone, or under the skin is followed by widespread metastatic dissemination. The kinetics and histological features of the primary tumor are maintained. Tumor /sup 85/strontium uptake is similar to that seen in human osteosarcomas. These new models of osteosarcomas are being used for evaluating new cancer chemotherapeutic agents and interferon, etc.

  11. Silicon drift detector with reduced lateral diffusion: experimental results

    CERN Document Server

    Sonsky, J; Huizenga, John R; Hollander, R W; Eijk, C W E; Sarro, P M

    2000-01-01

    In a standard multi-anode silicon drift detector electron cloud broadening during the drifting towards the anode pixels deteriorates the energy and position resolution. This makes the detector less applicable for detection of low-energy X-rays. The signal charge sharing between several anodes can be eliminated by introducing sawtooth-shaped p sup + field strips. The sawtooth structure results in small electric fields directed parallel to the sensor surface and perpendicular to the drift direction which produce gutters. The drifting electrons are confined in these gutters of one saw tooth period wide. For a detector with a sawtooth period of 500 mu m, we have measured the maximum number of fully confined electrons as a function of the potential gutter depth induced by different sawtooth angles.

  12. M-I-S solar cell - Theory and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs, R.; Fortuna, J.; Geneczko, J.; Fonash, S. J.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents an operating-mode analysis of an MIS solar cell and discusses the advantages which can arise as a result of the use of transport control, field shaping (increased n factor), and zero bias barrier height modification. It is noted that for an n-type semiconductor, it is relatively easy to obtain an enhanced n factor using acceptor-like states without an increase in diode saturation current, the converse being true for p-type semiconductors. Several MIS configurations are examined: an acceptor-like, localized state configuration producing field shaping and no change in diode saturation current, and acceptor-like localized configurations producing field shaping, with a decrease of diode saturation current, in one case, and an increase in the other.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Micronozzles with Comparison to Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornber, B.; Chesta, E.; Gloth, O.; Brandt, R.; Schwane, R.; Perigo, D.; Smith, P.

    2004-10-01

    A numerical analysis of conical micronozzle flows has been conducted using the commercial software package CFD-RC FASTRAN [13]. The numerical results have been validated by comparison with direct thrust and mass flow measurements recently performed in ESTEC Propulsion Laboratory on Polyflex Space Ltd. 10mN Cold-Gas thrusters in the frame of ESA CryoSat mission. The flow is viscous dominated, with a throat Reynolds number of 5000, and the relatively large length of the nozzle causes boundary layer effects larger than usual for nozzles of this size. This paper discusses in detail the flow physics such as boundary layer growth and structure, and the effects of rarefaction. Furthermore a number of different domain sizes and exit boundary conditions are used to determine the optimum combination of computational time and accuracy.

  14. The Italsat network: A first analysis of the experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soccodato, G.; Saitto, A.; Melani, M.; Maritti, M.

    1991-10-01

    The Italsat system, after four years of development has reached is final phase. The satellite was launched at the beginning of 1991, the first traffic stations being installed at the end of the Summer of 1991. Considering that this is the first time that a regenerative payload will be used on a communications satellite, a long test campaign was carried out on the ground to integrate the different components of the network, using the satellite EM payload and three traffic stations, with one of them hosting the control center. This activity was very helpful in calibrating some parameters of the regenerative payload. The test environment and philosophy are described and the major results obtained are analyzed. All is seen as the first step to integrate a network of 64 stations in the Italian domestic telephone network.

  15. Experimental results of breakdown in "Dena" plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Shervin; Hoseinian, S. M.; Raeisdana, A.

    2014-06-01

    In spite of the intense research activities on Plasma Focus devices, the physics of the initial breakdown and surface discharge phase has not been realized completely. In this paper we have analyzed the surface discharge and initial breakdown phase in Filippov-type Plasma Focus Facility "Dena" (90 kJ, 25 kV) on the base of the current and current derivative measured signals by using Argon, Neon and Krypton as working gases at different discharge voltages and gas pressures, and the effects of working conditions (atomic weight, discharge voltage and gas pressure) on the breakdown and surface discharge phase have expressed. Also, on the base of these results, we have investigated about the relation of this phase with final pinch phase.

  16. Experimental Results on Low Alpha Electron-Storage Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, D.; Hama, H.; Nadji, A.

    1996-04-01

    We report on experiments performed in two synchrotron light sources, UVSOR and Super-ACO, where the momentum compaction factor is reduced in order to reduce the bunch length. By controlling the second-order momentum compaction factor, UVSOR and Super-ACO have managed to reduce the first-order momentum compaction factor by a a factor of 100. At low current the resulting bunch lengths are less than 10 ps, a factor of 10 smaller than normal. Measurements of current-dependent bunch lengthening in UVSOR are presented, and the cause of the bunch lengthening is determined to be potential-well distortion. We also show that by operating with a negative momentum compaction factor, Super-ACO has achieved shorter bunch lengthening and higher peak currents than at positive momentum compaction.

  17. Torsional Oscillations in Automotive Transmissions: Experimental Analysis and Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Galvagno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the torsional oscillations of an automotive transmission system by means of an experimental test bench used to validate the proposed lumped parameter model. The rig consists of a Dual Clutch Transmission (DCT and a Manual Transmission (MT connected through the respective output shafts, while the excitation is provided by two electric motors, which are controlled in speed or torque. The experimental analysis includes the measurement of the external torques, applied by the two electric motors to the mechanical system, and the measurement of the system response in terms of angular speeds at different positions along the transmission line. The frequency response of the system is estimated from the experimental data and compared with the results of a 5-degree-of-freedom lumped parameter model, which proves to be adequate to describe the dynamic behaviour of the system up to a frequency of 200 Hz. The comparison between simulated results and experimental data shows good agreement, so the model can be used to predict the torsional vibrations of the transmission system in the linear field. Moreover, the effects of the nonlinearities associated with the mean value of the excitations are shown. Finally the influence of the selected gear ratio on the experimental frequency response is discussed.

  18. First experimental results on the IShTAR testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Inca, R.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Morgal, I.; Fünfgelder, H.; Faugel, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Crombe, K.; Louche, F.; Van Eester, D. [LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Heuraux, S.; Devaux, S.; Moritz, J.; Faudot, E. [Institut Jean Lamour UMR 7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium)

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetized plasma test facility dedicated to the investigation of RF wave/plasma interaction [1] in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF). It provides a better accessibility for the instrumentation than tokamaks while being representative of the neighboring region of the wave emitter. It is equipped with a magnetized plasma source (1 m long, 0.4 m diameter) powered by a helical antenna up to 3 kW at 11 MHz. We present the results of the first analysis of the plasma characteristics (plasma density, electron temperature) in function of the operating parameters (injected power, neutral pressure and magnetic field) as measured with fixed and movable Langmuir probes, spectrometer and cameras. The plasma is presently produced only by the helical antenna (no ICRF). We show that the plasma exists in three regime depending on the power level: the first two ones are stable and separated by a jump in density; a first spatial profile of the plasma density has been established for these modes; The third mode is unstable, characterized by strong oscillations of the plasma tube position.

  19. OPERA and MINOS Experimental Result Prove Big Bang Theory Invalid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressler, David E.

    2012-03-01

    The greatest error in the history of science is the misinterpretation of the Michelson-Morley Experiment. The speed of light was measured to travel at the same speed in all three directions (x, y, z axis) in ones own inertial reference system; however, c will always be measured as having an absolute different speed in all other inertial frames at different energy levels. Time slows down due to motion or a gravity field. Time is the rate of physical process. Speed = Distance/Time. If the time changes the distance must change. Therefore, BOTH mirrors must move towards the center of the interferometer and space must contract in all-three-directions; C-Space. Gravity is a C-Space condition, and is the cause of redshift in our universe-not motion. The universe is not expanding. OPERA results are directly indicated; at the surface of earth, the strength of the gravity field is at maximum-below the earth's surface, time and space is less distorted, C-Space; therefore, c is faster. Newtonian mechanics dictate that a spherical shell of matter at greater radii, with uniform density, produces no net force on an observer located centrally. An observer located on the sphere's surface, like our Earth's or a large sphere, like one located in a remote galaxy, will construct a picture centered on himself to be identical to the one centered inside the spherical shell of mass. Both observers will view the incoming radiation, emitted by the other observer, as redshifted, because they lay on each others radial line. The Universe is static and very old.

  20. Experimental and Modeling Investigation of Coal Gasification in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CuiLin; ShenYouting; 等

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to study the process of coal gasification.Non-linear programming techniques are used to determine the value of the model parameters that depends on coal species and experimental conditions and thus minimize the difference between experimental results and model predictions.Model predictions being in good agreement with the experimental results show that this method of combining model with experiment is effective for modeling complex processes.

  1. Experimental results for optimal placement of piezoelectric plates for active vibration control of a cantilever beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Botta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The fatigue phenomena correlated to the gas turbine blades vibrations can lead to catastrophic failure. To damp the vibrations amplitude typically damping passive systems are used. In the last years the interest in the piezoelectric materials, and their use as damping elements, has received considerable attention by many researchers. Recently different research groups have started to study their use in blades of turbomachinery. Because of their effectiveness strongly depends on their position, some of the authors have proposed ([15], [17] a new model to find the optimal position to control the multimode vibrations. Such model has been corroborated by experimental results for different combinations of excited eigenmodes ([16], [18

  2. Experimental validation of a solar-chimney power plant model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, Nima; Wayne, Patrick; Trueba Monje, Ignacio; Vorobieff, Peter

    2016-11-01

    In a solar chimney power plant system (SCPPS), the energy of buoyant hot air is converted to electrical energy. SCPPS includes a collector at ground level covered with a transparent roof. Solar radiation heats the air inside and the ground underneath. There is a tall chimney at the center of the collector, and a turbine located at the base of the chimney. Lack of detailed experimental data for validation is one of the important issues in modeling this type of power plants. We present a small-scale experimental prototype developed to perform validation analysis for modeling and simulation of SCCPS. Detailed velocity measurements are acquired using particle image velocimetry (PIV) at a prescribed Reynolds number. Convection is driven by a temperature-controlled hot plate at the bottom of the prototype. Velocity field data are used to perform validation analysis and measure any mismatch of the experimental results and the CFD data. CFD Code verification is also performed, to assess the uncertainly of the numerical model with respect to our grid and the applied mathematical model. The dimensionless output power of the prototype is calculated and compared with a recent analytical solution and the experimental results.

  3. Experimental porcine model of complex fistula-in-ano

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Ba-Bai-Ke-Re, Ma-Mu-Ti-Jiang; Chen, Hui; Liu, Xue; Wang, Yun-Hai

    2017-01-01

    AIM To establish and evaluate an experimental porcine model of fistula-in-ano. METHODS Twelve healthy pigs were randomly divided into two groups. Under general anesthesia, the experimental group underwent rubber band ligation surgery, and the control group underwent an artificial damage technique. Clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathological evaluation were performed on the 38th d and 48th d after surgery in both groups, respectively. RESULTS There were no significant differences between the experimental group and the control group in general characteristics such as body weight, gender, and the number of fistula (P > 0.05). In the experimental group, 15 fistulas were confirmed clinically, 13 complex fistulas were confirmed by MRI, and 11 complex fistulas were confirmed by histopathology. The success rate in the porcine complex fistula model establishment was 83.33%. Among the 18 fistulas in the control group, 5 fistulas were confirmed clinically, 4 complex fistulas were confirmed by MRI, and 3 fistulas were confirmed by histopathology. The success rate in the porcine fistula model establishment was 27.78%. Thus, the success rate of the rubber band ligation group was significantly higher than the control group (P fistula-in-ano models. Large animal models of complex anal fistulas can be used for the diagnosis and treatment of anal fistulas. PMID:28348488

  4. Numerical and experimental study of local heat transfer enhancement in helically coiled pipes. Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzoli, F.; Cattani, L.; Rainieri, S.; Zachár, A.

    2015-11-01

    In the last years, the attention of heat transfer equipments manufacturers turned toward helically coiled-tube heat exchangers, especially with regards to applications for viscous and/or particulate products. The recent progress achieved in numerical simulation motivated many research groups to develop numerical models for this kind of apparatuses. These models, intended both to improve the knowledge of the fundamental heat transfer mechanisms in curved geometries and to support the industrial design of this kind of apparatuses, are usually validated throughout the comparison with either theoretical or experimental evidences by considering average heat transfer performances. However, this approach doesn't guarantee that the validated models are able to reproduce local effects in details, which are so important in this kind of non-standard geometries. In the present paper a numerical model of convective heat transfer in coiled tubes for laminar flow regime was formulated and discussed. Its goodness was checked throughout the comparison with the latest experimental outcomes of Bozzoli et al. [1] in terms of convective heat flux distribution along the boundary of the duct, by ensuring the effectiveness of the model also in the description of local behaviours. Although the present paper reports only preliminary results of this simulation/validation process, it could be of interest for the research community because it proposes a novel approach that could be useful to validate many numerical models for nonstandard geometries.

  5. Systematic integration of experimental data and models in systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeonidis Evangelos

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The behaviour of biological systems can be deduced from their mathematical models. However, multiple sources of data in diverse forms are required in the construction of a model in order to define its components and their biochemical reactions, and corresponding parameters. Automating the assembly and use of systems biology models is dependent upon data integration processes involving the interoperation of data and analytical resources. Results Taverna workflows have been developed for the automated assembly of quantitative parameterised metabolic networks in the Systems Biology Markup Language (SBML. A SBML model is built in a systematic fashion by the workflows which starts with the construction of a qualitative network using data from a MIRIAM-compliant genome-scale model of yeast metabolism. This is followed by parameterisation of the SBML model with experimental data from two repositories, the SABIO-RK enzyme kinetics database and a database of quantitative experimental results. The models are then calibrated and simulated in workflows that call out to COPASIWS, the web service interface to the COPASI software application for analysing biochemical networks. These systems biology workflows were evaluated for their ability to construct a parameterised model of yeast glycolysis. Conclusions Distributed information about metabolic reactions that have been described to MIRIAM standards enables the automated assembly of quantitative systems biology models of metabolic networks based on user-defined criteria. Such data integration processes can be implemented as Taverna workflows to provide a rapid overview of the components and their relationships within a biochemical system.

  6. Experimental evaluations of the microchannel flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, K J

    2015-06-07

    Recent advances have enabled a new wave of biomechanics measurements, and have renewed interest in selecting appropriate rheological models for soft tissues such as the liver, thyroid, and prostate. The microchannel flow model was recently introduced to describe the linear response of tissue to stimuli such as stress relaxation or shear wave propagation. This model postulates a power law relaxation spectrum that results from a branching distribution of vessels and channels in normal soft tissue such as liver. In this work, the derivation is extended to determine the explicit link between the distribution of vessels and the relaxation spectrum. In addition, liver tissue is modified by temperature or salinity, and the resulting changes in tissue responses (by factors of 1.5 or greater) are reasonably predicted from the microchannel flow model, simply by considering the changes in fluid flow through the modified samples. The 2 and 4 parameter versions of the model are considered, and it is shown that in some cases the maximum time constant (corresponding to the minimum vessel diameters), could be altered in a way that has major impact on the observed tissue response. This could explain why an inflamed region is palpated as a harder bump compared to surrounding normal tissue.

  7. Advanced Supersonic Nozzle Concepts: Experimental Flow Visualization Results Paired With LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Matthew; Magstadt, Andrew; Stack, Cory; Gaitonde, Datta; Glauser, Mark; Syracuse University Team; The Ohio State University Team

    2015-11-01

    Advanced supersonic nozzle concepts are currently under investigation, utilizing multiple bypass streams and airframe integration to bolster performance and efficiency. This work focuses on the parametric study of a supersonic, multi-stream jet with aft deck. The single plane of symmetry, rectangular nozzle, displays very complex and unique flow characteristics. Flow visualization techniques in the form of PIV and schlieren capture flow features at various deck lengths and Mach numbers. LES is compared to the experimental results to both validate the computational model and identify limitations of the simulation. By comparing experimental results to LES, this study will help create a foundation of knowledge for advanced nozzle designs in future aircraft. SBIR Phase II with Spectral Energies, LLC under direction of Barry Kiel.

  8. Automated detection of discourse segment and experimental types from the text of cancer pathway results sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Gully A P C; Dasigi, Pradeep; de Waard, Anita; Hovy, Eduard H

    2016-01-01

    Automated machine-reading biocuration systems typically use sentence-by-sentence information extraction to construct meaning representations for use by curators. This does not directly reflect the typical discourse structure used by scientists to construct an argument from the experimental data available within a article, and is therefore less likely to correspond to representations typically used in biomedical informatics systems (let alone to the mental models that scientists have). In this study, we develop Natural Language Processing methods to locate, extract, and classify the individual passages of text from articles' Results sections that refer to experimental data. In our domain of interest (molecular biology studies of cancer signal transduction pathways), individual articles may contain as many as 30 small-scale individual experiments describing a variety of findings, upon which authors base their overall research conclusions. Our system automatically classifies discourse segments in these texts into seven categories (fact, hypothesis, problem, goal, method, result, implication) with an F-score of 0.68. These segments describe the essential building blocks of scientific discourse to (i) provide context for each experiment, (ii) report experimental details and (iii) explain the data's meaning in context. We evaluate our system on text passages from articles that were curated in molecular biology databases (the Pathway Logic Datum repository, the Molecular Interaction MINT and INTACT databases) linking individual experiments in articles to the type of assay used (coprecipitation, phosphorylation, translocation etc.). We use supervised machine learning techniques on text passages containing unambiguous references to experiments to obtain baseline F1 scores of 0.59 for MINT, 0.71 for INTACT and 0.63 for Pathway Logic. Although preliminary, these results support the notion that targeting information extraction methods to experimental results could provide

  9. Numerical and experimental modelling of the radial compressor stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syka, Tomáš; Matas, Richard; LuÅáček, Ondřej

    2016-06-01

    This article deals with the description of the numerical and experimental model of the new compressor stage designed for process centrifugal compressors. It's the first member of the new stages family developed to achieve the state of the art thermodynamic parameters. This stage (named RTK01) is designed for high flow coefficient with 3D shaped impeller blades. Some interesting findings were gained during its development. The article is focused mainly on some interesting aspects of the development methodology and numerical simulations improvement, not on the specific stage properties. Conditions and experimental equipment, measured results and their comparison with ANSYS CFX and NUMECA FINE/Turbo CFD simulations are described.

  10. Ionisation clusters at DNA level: experimental modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pszona, S.; Kula, J

    2002-07-01

    The importance of initial clustered damage to DNA is a hypothesis, which has to be approached also from physical modelling of the initial products of single charged particle interaction with DNA. A new tool for such studies, presented here, is based on modelling of the ionisation patterns resulting from a single charged particle crossing a nitrogen cavity of nanometre size. The nanometre size sites equivalent in unit density to DNA and nucleosome, have been modelled in a device, called a Jet Counter, consisting of a pulse operated valve which inject nitrogen in the form of an expansion jet into a interaction chamber. The distributions of the number of ions in a cluster created by a single alpha particle of 4.6 MeV along 0.15 nm to 13 nm size in nitrogen have been measured. A new descriptor of radiation action at DNA level is proposed. (author)

  11. Computational Modeling and Experimental Facts of Mixed Self- Assembly Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Paula V; Besada-Porto, Jose Miguel; Rial, Ramón; González-Díaz, Humberto; Ruso, Juan M

    2016-01-01

    The formation of liposomes, nanoparticle micelles, and related systems by mixtures of drugs and/or surfactants is of major relevance for the design of drug delivery systems. We can design new systems using different compounds. Traditionally these systems are created by trial and error using experimental data. However, in most cases measuring all the possible combinations represents a extensive work and almost always unaffordable. In this sense, we can use theoretical concepts and develop computational models to predict different physicochemical properties of self-aggregation processes of mixed molecular systems. In a previous work, we developed a new PT-LFER model (Linear Free Energy Relationships, LFER, combined with Perturbation Theory, PT, ideas) for binary systems. The best PT-LFER model found predicted the effects of 25000 perturbations over nine different properties of binary systems. The present work has two parts. Firstly, we carry out an analysis on the new results on the applications and experimental-theoretical studies of binary selfassembled systems. In the second part, we report for the first time, a new experimental-theoretic study of the NaDC-DTAB binary system. For this purpose, we have combined experimental procedures plus physicochemical thermodynamic framework with the PT-LFER model reported in our previous work.

  12. Drilling forces model for lunar regolith exploration and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Ding, Xilun

    2017-02-01

    China's Chang'e lunar exploration project aims to sample and return lunar regolith samples at a minimum penetration depth of 2 m in 2017. Unlike such tasks on the Earth, automated drilling and sampling missions on the Moon are more complicated. Therefore, a delicately designed drill tool is required to minimize operational cost and enhance reliability. Penetration force and rotational torque are two critical parameters in designing the drill tool. In this paper, a novel numerical model for predicting penetration force and rotational torque in the drilling of lunar regolith is proposed. The model is based on quasi-static Mohr-Coulomb soil mechanics and explicitly describes the interaction between drill tool and lunar regolith. Geometric features of drill tool, mechanical properties of lunar regolith, and drilling parameters are taken into consideration in the model. Consequently, a drilling test bed was developed, and experimental penetration force and rotational torque were obtained in penetrating a lunar regolith simulant with different drilling parameters. Finally, theoretical and experimental results were compared to validate the proposed model. Experimental results indicated that the numerical model had good accuracy and was effective in predicting the penetration force and rotational torque in drilling the lunar regolith simulant.

  13. SIMULATION AND EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FOR THE CLOSED LOOP CONTROLLED DC TO DC FORWARD CONVERTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Palamalai VIJAYAKUMAR

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A Closed loop controlled DC to DC forward converter is a requisite for the server SMPS system. High efficiency, Isolation, Steady state voltage, Transient response, High switching frequency, reduced noises and range of steady state are all necessary requirements for the forward converter. In this paper, a 40 V forward converter for charging the battery of server SMPS is proposed. The proposed converter consists of a NPC-ARS circuit for soft switching on the primary side and an isolation transformer and a rectifier structure on the secondary side. With this modified NPC-ARS circuit topology, soft switching occurs during conversion and reduces the switching loss in this system. This paper proposed the simulation of closed loop controlled circuit, for the forward converter with RCD snubber, double forward converter and the Modified forward converter are analyzed and discussed in this paper. From comparison of performance in the closed loop model, a suitable converter is proposed for the sever SMPS system. The proposed circuit achieves steady state voltage, when the disturbance occurs. A 40 V proposed circuit is designed as experimental model to verify and compare the simulation and experimental results. This paper proposed the simulation and experimental results of the forward converter.

  14. Assessment of in-furnace dry sorbent injection experimental results burning low sulphur content coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, F.J. [Univ. de Zaragoza (Spain)

    1995-12-31

    In an effort to adjust the SO{sub 2} emissions of coal power stations to the current air pollutant standards, established by the EC, flue gas desulfurization tests with in-furnace dry sorbent injection technology in the Spanish coal power station ``Litoral`` (tangentially-fired) were performed. The measured retentions were lower than predicted through a one-dimensional model. Then, it was thought that a CFD 3D simulation of the injection would help to understand the complex relationships of the process. The simulation was divided in two stages: in the first one, the turbulent velocity and the temperature field were solved. In the second one, representative sorbent particles were injected in the turbulent field previously solved, the focus of this work being the global sulphur capture modeling and its validation through the experimental measurements obtained. After a revision of the models proposed in the specialized literature, a global sulfation model is chosen, being compared with the experimental data obtained in the power station. Because of the main results of this work, the authors can highlight the testing of the laboratory-scale correlations against full-scale results, and can mitigate the difficulty of estimating the actual temperature profile by experimenting with the particle and its residence time without the aid of a CFD code.

  15. Modeling Graves' Orbitopathy in Experimental Graves' Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banga, J P; Moshkelgosha, S; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, U; Eckstein, A

    2015-09-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO), also known as thyroid eye disease is an inflammatory disease of the orbital tissue of the eye that arises as a consequence of autoimmune thyroid disease. The central feature of the disease is the production of antibodies to the thyrotropin hormone receptor (TSHR) that modulate the function of the receptor leading to autoimmune hyperthyroidism and GO. Over the years, all viable preclinical models of Graves' disease have been incomplete and singularly failed to progress in the treatment of orbital complications. A new mouse model of GO based upon immunogenic presentation of human TSHR A-subunit plasmid by close field electroporation is shown to lead to induction of prolonged functional antibodies to TSHR resulting in chronic disease with subsequent progression to GO. The stable preclinical GO model exhibited pathologies reminiscent of human disease characterized by orbital remodeling by inflammation and adipogenesis. Inflammatory lesions characterized by CD3+ T cells and macrophages were localized in the orbital muscle tissue. This was accompanied by extensive adipogenesis of orbital fat in some immune animals. Surprisingly, other signs of orbital involvement were reminiscent of eyelid inflammation involving chemosis, with dilated and congested orbital blood vessels. More recently, the model is replicated in the author's independent laboratories. The pre-clinical model will provide the basis to study the pathogenic and regulatory roles of immune T and B cells and their subpopulations to understand the initiation, pathophysiology, and progression of GO.

  16. Experimental Models of Ocular Infection with Toxoplasma Gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukaczewska, Agata; Tedesco, Roberto; Liesenfeld, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Ocular toxoplasmosis is a vision-threatening disease and the major cause of posterior uveitis worldwide. In spite of the continuing global burden of ocular toxoplasmosis, many critical aspects of disease including the therapeutic approach to ocular toxoplasmosis are still under debate. To assist in addressing many aspects of the disease, numerous experimental models of ocular toxoplasmosis have been established. In this article, we present an overview on in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo models of ocular toxoplasmosis available to date. Experimental studies on ocular toxoplasmosis have recently focused on mice. However, the majority of murine models established so far are based on intraperitoneal and intraocular infection with Toxoplasma gondii. We therefore also present results obtained in an in vivo model using peroral infection of C57BL/6 and NMRI mice that reflects the natural route of infection and mimics the disease course in humans. While advances have been made in ex vivo model systems or larger animals to investigate specific aspects of ocular toxoplasmosis, laboratory mice continue to be the experimental model of choice for the investigation of ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:26716018

  17. Interpreting Results from the Multinomial Logit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    This article provides guidelines and illustrates practical steps necessary for an analysis of results from the multinomial logit model (MLM). The MLM is a popular model in the strategy literature because it allows researchers to examine strategic choices with multiple outcomes. However, there see...

  18. Experimental, statistical, and biological models of radon carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, F.T.

    1991-09-01

    Risk models developed for underground miners have not been consistently validated in studies of populations exposed to indoor radon. Imprecision in risk estimates results principally from differences between exposures in mines as compared to domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products. Uncertainties in extrapolating miner data to domestic exposures can be reduced by means of a broad-based health effects research program that addresses the interrelated issues of exposure, respiratory tract dose, carcinogenesis (molecular/cellular and animal studies, plus developing biological and statistical models), and the relationship of radon to smoking and other copollutant exposures. This article reviews experimental animal data on radon carcinogenesis observed primarily in rats at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Recent experimental and mechanistic carcinogenesis models of exposures to radon, uranium ore dust, and cigarette smoke are presented with statistical analyses of animal data. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Retained gas sampler extractor mixing and mass transfer rate study: Experimental and simulation results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recknagle, K.P.; Bates, J.M.; Shekarriz, A.

    1997-11-01

    Research staff at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted experimental testing and computer simulations of the impeller-stirred Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) gas extractor system. This work was performed to verify experimentally the effectiveness of the extractor at mixing viscous fluids of both Newtonian and non-Newtonian rheology representative of Hanford single- and double-shell wastes, respectively. Developing the computational models and validating their results by comparing them with experimental results would enable simulations of the mixing process for a range of fluid properties and mixing speeds. Five tests were performed with a full-scale, optically transparent model extractor to provide the data needed to compare mixing times for fluid rheology, mixer rotational direction, and mixing speed variation. The computer model was developed and exercised to simulate the tests. The tests demonstrated that rotational direction of the pitched impeller blades was not as important as fluid rheology in determining mixing time. The Newtonian fluid required at least six hours to mix at the hot cell operating speed of 3 rpm, and the non-Newtonian fluid required at least 46 hours at 3 rpm to become significantly mixed. In the non-Newtonian fluid tests, stagnant regions within the fluid sometimes required days to be fully mixed. Higher-speed (30 rpm) testing showed that the laminar mixing time was correlated to mixing speed. The tests demonstrated that, using the RGS extractor and current procedures, complete mixing of the waste samples in the hot cell should not be expected. The computer simulation of Newtonian fluid mixing gave results comparable to the test while simulation of non-Newtonian fluid mixing would require further development. In light of the laboratory test results, detailed parametric analysis of the mixing process was not performed.

  20. Target Soil Impact Verification: Experimental Testing and Kayenta Constitutive Modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broome, Scott Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flint, Gregory Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dewers, Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newell, Pania [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report details experimental testing and constitutive modeling of sandy soil deformation under quasi - static conditions. This is driven by the need to understand constitutive response of soil to target/component behavior upon impact . An experimental and constitutive modeling program was followed to determine elastic - plastic properties and a compressional failure envelope of dry soil . One hydrostatic, one unconfined compressive stress (UCS), nine axisymmetric compression (ACS) , and one uniaxial strain (US) test were conducted at room temperature . Elastic moduli, assuming isotropy, are determined from unload/reload loops and final unloading for all tests pre - failure and increase monotonically with mean stress. Very little modulus degradation was discernable from elastic results even when exposed to mean stresses above 200 MPa . The failure envelope and initial yield surface were determined from peak stresses and observed onset of plastic yielding from all test results. Soil elasto - plastic behavior is described using the Brannon et al. (2009) Kayenta constitutive model. As a validation exercise, the ACS - parameterized Kayenta model is used to predict response of the soil material under uniaxial strain loading. The resulting parameterized and validated Kayenta model is of high quality and suitable for modeling sandy soil deformation under a range of conditions, including that for impact prediction.

  1. Embryonated chicken eggs: An experimental model for Pythium insidiosum infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdi, Camila M; Jesus, Francielli P K; Kommers, Glaucia; Ledur, Pauline C; Azevedo, Maria I; Loreto, Erico S; Tondolo, Juliana S M; Andrade, Eduardo N C; Schlemmer, Karine B; Alves, Sydney H; Santurio, Janio M

    2017-10-03

    Pythiosis is a severe disease caused by Pythium insidiosum. Currently, the research on the treatment of pythiosis uses rabbits as an experimental infection model. To reduce the use of animals in scientific experimentation, alternative models are increasingly necessary options. The objective of this study was to establish a new experimental infection model for pythiosis using embryonated chicken eggs. First, we tested the inoculation of 4 zoospore concentrations into the egg allantoic cavity at 3 embryonic days. We observed that increased zoospore concentration causes a decrease in survival time, and at a later embryonic day (the 14th) of infection, embryos showed delayed mortality. To confirm the reproducibility of the model, we chose the 14th embryonic day for the inoculation of 50 zoospores/egg, and the experiment was repeated twice. Mortality began with 30% embryos 48 hours after inoculation, and 95% embryos died within 72 hours. There was no mortality in the uninfected control group. The infection was confirmed by culture, PCR and histopathology. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of hyphae in blood vessels in the umbilical cords in 95% of embryos and only 1 liver (5%). Our results suggest that embryonated eggs can be a very useful alternative infection model to study pythiosis. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Regression Model Optimization for the Analysis of Experimental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, N.

    2009-01-01

    A candidate math model search algorithm was developed at Ames Research Center that determines a recommended math model for the multivariate regression analysis of experimental data. The search algorithm is applicable to classical regression analysis problems as well as wind tunnel strain gage balance calibration analysis applications. The algorithm compares the predictive capability of different regression models using the standard deviation of the PRESS residuals of the responses as a search metric. This search metric is minimized during the search. Singular value decomposition is used during the search to reject math models that lead to a singular solution of the regression analysis problem. Two threshold dependent constraints are also applied. The first constraint rejects math models with insignificant terms. The second constraint rejects math models with near-linear dependencies between terms. The math term hierarchy rule may also be applied as an optional constraint during or after the candidate math model search. The final term selection of the recommended math model depends on the regressor and response values of the data set, the user s function class combination choice, the user s constraint selections, and the result of the search metric minimization. A frequently used regression analysis example from the literature is used to illustrate the application of the search algorithm to experimental data.

  3. Experimental and mathematical modeling of flow in headboxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Mohammad Reza

    The fluid flow patterns in a paper-machine headbox have a strong influence on the quality of the paper produced by the machine. Due to increasing demand for high quality paper there is a need to investigate the details of the fluid flow in the paper machine headbox. The objective of this thesis is to use experimental and computational methods of modeling the flow inside a typical headbox in order to evaluate and understand the mean flow patterns and turbulence created there. In particular, spatial variations of the mean flow and of the turbulence quantities and the turbulence generated secondary flows are studied. In addition to the flow inside the headbox, the flow leaving the slice is also modeled both experimentally and computationally. Comparison of the experimental and numerical results indicated that streamwise mean components of the velocities in the headbox are predicted well by all the turbulence models considered in this study. However, the standard k-epsilon model and the algebraic turbulence models fail to predict the turbulence quantities accurately. Standard k-epsilon-model also fails to predict the direction and magnitude of the secondary flows. Significant improvements in the k-epsilon model predictions were achieved when the turbulence production term was artificially set to zero. This is justified by observations of the turbulent velocities from the experiments and by a consideration of the form of the kinetic energy equation. A better estimation of the Reynolds normal stress distribution and the degree of anisotropy of turbulence was achieved using the Reynolds stress turbulence model. Careful examination of the measured turbulence velocity results shows that after the initial decay of the turbulence in the headbox, there is a short region close to the exit, but inside the headbox, where the turbulent kinetic energy actually increases as a result of the distortion imposed by the contraction. The turbulence energy quickly resumes its decay in the

  4. Experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Meirelles,Rafael Panisi de Campos; Hochman, Bernardo; Helene Junior,Americo; Lellis,Rute; Fraga, Murillo Francisco Pires; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe an experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. METHODS: On this study eight six-month-old New Zealand male rabbits, with an average weight of 2.5kg were used. They were distributed in four groups (n=2 per group). The control group did not receive radiotherapy and the others received one radiotherapy session of 2000, 3000 and 4500 cGy, respectively. Photographic analysis and histopathological evaluation of the irradiated areas were carried out. RESULTS: Af...

  5. Numerical and Experimental Models of the Thermally Stratified Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalcová Vladimíra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a change of selected turbulent variables in the surroundings of a flow around thermally loaded object. The problem is solved numerically in the software Ansys Fluent using a Transition SST model that is able to take into account the difference between high and low turbulence at the interface between the wake behind an obstacle and the free stream. The results are verified with experimental measurements in the wind tunnel.

  6. The rabbit as an experimental model in laryngology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carneiro, Christiano de Giacomo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the research in laryngology we normally use animal models. The animal experimentation may also contribute largely for this evolution, mainly for the easy access compared to human larynxes and for they are more easily controlled. Objective: The objective of this work is to analyze the laryngofissure with vocal cords graft as an experimental surgical technique in male adult rabbits. Method: We studied 46 New Zealand albino rabbits submitted to microsurgery in both vocal cords with autologous unilateral or bilateral graft of fat or fascia. Results: There were 4 losses of 3 animals until the first week of the postoperative period and another after 19 days after surgery. In the subsequent animals there were no infection, hematoma or sutures dehiscence. Conclusion: The study enables the conclusion that the experimental laryngofissure in rabbits is a safe method that may be used for laryngological studies.

  7. Selective experimental review of the Standard Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, E.D.

    1985-02-01

    Before disussing experimental comparisons with the Standard Model, (S-M) it is probably wise to define more completely what is commonly meant by this popular term. This model is a gauge theory of SU(3)/sub f/ x SU(2)/sub L/ x U(1) with 18 parameters. The parameters are ..cap alpha../sub s/, ..cap alpha../sub qed/, theta/sub W/, M/sub W/ (M/sub Z/ = M/sub W//cos theta/sub W/, and thus is not an independent parameter), M/sub Higgs/; the lepton masses, M/sub e/, M..mu.., M/sub r/; the quark masses, M/sub d/, M/sub s/, M/sub b/, and M/sub u/, M/sub c/, M/sub t/; and finally, the quark mixing angles, theta/sub 1/, theta/sub 2/, theta/sub 3/, and the CP violating phase delta. The latter four parameters appear in the quark mixing matrix for the Kobayashi-Maskawa and Maiani forms. Clearly, the present S-M covers an enormous range of physics topics, and the author can only lightly cover a few such topics in this report. The measurement of R/sub hadron/ is fundamental as a test of the running coupling constant ..cap alpha../sub s/ in QCD. The author will discuss a selection of recent precision measurements of R/sub hadron/, as well as some other techniques for measuring ..cap alpha../sub s/. QCD also requires the self interaction of gluons. The search for the three gluon vertex may be practically realized in the clear identification of gluonic mesons. The author will present a limited review of recent progress in the attempt to untangle such mesons from the plethora q anti q states of the same quantum numbers which exist in the same mass range. The electroweak interactions provide some of the strongest evidence supporting the S-M that exists. Given the recent progress in this subfield, and particularly with the discovery of the W and Z bosons at CERN, many recent reviews obviate the need for further discussion in this report. In attempting to validate a theory, one frequently searches for new phenomena which would clearly invalidate it. 49 references, 28 figures.

  8. Preliminary Results on the Experimental Investigation of the Structure Functions of Bound Nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodek, Arie [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-01

    We present preliminary results on an experimental study of the nuclear modification of the longitudinal ($\\sigma_L$) and transverse ($\\sigma_T$) structure functions of nucleons bound in nuclear targets. The origin of these modifications (commonly referred as as the EMC effect) is not fully understood. Our measurements of R= $\\sigma_L / \\sigma_T$ for nuclei ($R_A$) and for deuterium ($R_D$) indicate that nuclear modifications of the structure functions of bound nucleons are different for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and that contrary to expectation from several theoretical models, $R_A< R_D$.

  9. Preliminary Results on the Experimental Investigation of the Structure Functions of Bound Nucleons

    CERN Document Server

    Bodek, A

    2015-01-01

    We present preliminary results on an experimental study of the nuclear modification of the longitudinal ($\\sigma_L$) and transverse ($\\sigma_T$) structure functions of nucleons bound in nuclear targets. The origin of these modifications (commonly referred as as the EMC effect) is not fully understood. Our measurements of R= $\\sigma_L / \\sigma_T$ for nuclei ($R_A$) and for deuterium ($R_D$) indicate that nuclear modifications of the structure functions of bound nucleons are different for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and that contrary to expectation from several theoretical models, $R_A< R_D$.

  10. Simulation and experimental results of hybrid electric machine with a novel flux control strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paplicki Piotr

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents selected simulation and experimental results of a hybrid ECPMS-machine (Electric Controlled Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine. This permanent magnets (PMs excited machine offers an extended magnetic field control capability which makes it suitable for battery electric vehicle (BEV drives. Rotor, stator and the additional direct current control coil of the machine are analyzed in detail. The control system and strategy, the diagram of power supply system and an equivalent circuit model of the ECPMS-machine are presented. Influence of the additional excitation on the performance parameters of the machine, such as: torque, efficiency, speed limits and back-EMF have also been discussed.

  11. Dimethyl Ether: New Advances in Wear Testing: Theoretical and Experimental Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Sorenson, Spencer C; Jakobsen, J.;

    2003-01-01

    ) on the ball. Up to now, all analyses indicated that fuel viscosity influences the wear scar size and fuel performance in full-scale pumps. The wear scar size could then be a result of hydrodynamic lubrication (at least a significant part of it) and not of boundary lubrication as it was the original intention...... viscosity sensibility issue is seriously aggravated for this fuel. Molecular dynamics calculations involving straight alkanes with lengths from 3 to 14 carbon atoms have been performed. The model is based on simple inter-atomic and surface interactions and it simulates an asperity contact between curved...... surfaces with long-range elasticity. This last property has enabled the model to correlate well with experimental results. The outcome of the alkane calculations indicates that the longer ones lubricate better than the shorts ones but not necessarily because of viscosity differences. The reason is more...

  12. Hydraulic fracture model comparison study: Complete results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warpinski, N.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Abou-Sayed, I.S. [Mobil Exploration and Production Services (United States); Moschovidis, Z. [Amoco Production Co. (US); Parker, C. [CONOCO (US)

    1993-02-01

    Large quantities of natural gas exist in low permeability reservoirs throughout the US. Characteristics of these reservoirs, however, make production difficult and often economic and stimulation is required. Because of the diversity of application, hydraulic fracture design models must be able to account for widely varying rock properties, reservoir properties, in situ stresses, fracturing fluids, and proppant loads. As a result, fracture simulation has emerged as a highly complex endeavor that must be able to describe many different physical processes. The objective of this study was to develop a comparative study of hydraulic-fracture simulators in order to provide stimulation engineers with the necessary information to make rational decisions on the type of models most suited for their needs. This report compares the fracture modeling results of twelve different simulators, some of them run in different modes for eight separate design cases. Comparisons of length, width, height, net pressure, maximum width at the wellbore, average width at the wellbore, and average width in the fracture have been made, both for the final geometry and as a function of time. For the models in this study, differences in fracture length, height and width are often greater than a factor of two. In addition, several comparisons of the same model with different options show a large variability in model output depending upon the options chosen. Two comparisons were made of the same model run by different companies; in both cases the agreement was good. 41 refs., 54 figs., 83 tabs.

  13. VX hydrolysis by human serum paraoxonase 1: a comparison of experimental and computational results.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W Peterson

    Full Text Available Human Serum paraoxonase 1 (HuPON1 is an enzyme that has been shown to hydrolyze a variety of chemicals including the nerve agent VX. While wildtype HuPON1 does not exhibit sufficient activity against VX to be used as an in vivo countermeasure, it has been suggested that increasing HuPON1's organophosphorous hydrolase activity by one or two orders of magnitude would make the enzyme suitable for this purpose. The binding interaction between HuPON1 and VX has recently been modeled, but the mechanism for VX hydrolysis is still unknown. In this study, we created a transition state model for VX hydrolysis (VX(ts in water using quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations, and docked the transition state model to 22 experimentally characterized HuPON1 variants using AutoDock Vina. The HuPON1-VX(ts complexes were grouped by reaction mechanism using a novel clustering procedure. The average Vina interaction energies for different clusters were compared to the experimentally determined activities of HuPON1 variants to determine which computational procedures best predict how well HuPON1 variants will hydrolyze VX. The analysis showed that only conformations which have the attacking hydroxyl group of VX(ts coordinated by the sidechain oxygen of D269 have a significant correlation with experimental results. The results from this study can be used for further characterization of how HuPON1 hydrolyzes VX and design of HuPON1 variants with increased activity against VX.

  14. VX hydrolysis by human serum paraoxonase 1: a comparison of experimental and computational results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Matthew W; Fairchild, Steven Z; Otto, Tamara C; Mohtashemi, Mojdeh; Cerasoli, Douglas M; Chang, Wenling E

    2011-01-01

    Human Serum paraoxonase 1 (HuPON1) is an enzyme that has been shown to hydrolyze a variety of chemicals including the nerve agent VX. While wildtype HuPON1 does not exhibit sufficient activity against VX to be used as an in vivo countermeasure, it has been suggested that increasing HuPON1's organophosphorous hydrolase activity by one or two orders of magnitude would make the enzyme suitable for this purpose. The binding interaction between HuPON1 and VX has recently been modeled, but the mechanism for VX hydrolysis is still unknown. In this study, we created a transition state model for VX hydrolysis (VX(ts)) in water using quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations, and docked the transition state model to 22 experimentally characterized HuPON1 variants using AutoDock Vina. The HuPON1-VX(ts) complexes were grouped by reaction mechanism using a novel clustering procedure. The average Vina interaction energies for different clusters were compared to the experimentally determined activities of HuPON1 variants to determine which computational procedures best predict how well HuPON1 variants will hydrolyze VX. The analysis showed that only conformations which have the attacking hydroxyl group of VX(ts) coordinated by the sidechain oxygen of D269 have a significant correlation with experimental results. The results from this study can be used for further characterization of how HuPON1 hydrolyzes VX and design of HuPON1 variants with increased activity against VX.

  15. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, {Omega}{sub b}, remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that {Omega}{sub b} {approximately} 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming {Omega}{sub total} = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since {Omega}{sub visible} < {Omega}{sub b}. Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M{sub x} {approx gt} 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z{sup 0} coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for {nu}-masses may imply that the {nu}{sub {tau}} is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs.

  16. Dynamic Modeling of Wind Turbine Gearboxes and Experimental Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rune

    is presented. The model takes into account the effects of load and applied grinding corrections. The results are verified by comparing to simulated and experimental results reported in the existing literature. Using gear data loosely based on a 1 MW wind turbine gearbox, the gear mesh stiffness is expanded...... analysis in relation to gear dynamics. A multibody model of two complete 2.3MWwind turbine gearboxes mounted back-to-back in a test rig is built. The mean values of the proposed gear mesh stiffnesses are included. The model is validated by comparing with calculated and measured eigenfrequencies and mode...... shapes. The measured eigenfrequencies have been identified in accelerometer signals obtained during run-up tests. Since the calculated eigenfrequencies do not match the measured eigenfrequencies with sufficient accuracy, a model updating technique is applied to ensure a better match by adjusting...

  17. Performance results of HESP physical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanumolu, Anantha; Thirupathi, Sivarani; Jones, Damien; Giridhar, Sunetra; Grobler, Deon; Jakobsson, Robert

    2017-02-01

    As a continuation to the published work on model based calibration technique with HESP(Hanle Echelle Spectrograph) as a case study, in this paper we present the performance results of the technique. We also describe how the open parameters were chosen in the model for optimization, the glass data accuracy and handling the discrepancies. It is observed through simulations that the discrepancies in glass data can be identified but not quantifiable. So having an accurate glass data is important which is possible to obtain from the glass manufacturers. The model's performance in various aspects is presented using the ThAr calibration frames from HESP during its pre-shipment tests. Accuracy of model predictions and its wave length calibration comparison with conventional empirical fitting, the behaviour of open parameters in optimization, model's ability to track instrumental drifts in the spectrum and the double fibres performance were discussed. It is observed that the optimized model is able to predict to a high accuracy the drifts in the spectrum from environmental fluctuations. It is also observed that the pattern in the spectral drifts across the 2D spectrum which vary from image to image is predictable with the optimized model. We will also discuss the possible science cases where the model can contribute.

  18. SHEEP AS AN EXPERIMENTAL MODEL FOR BIOMATERIAL IMPLANT EVALUATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    SARTORETTO, SUELEN CRISTINA; UZEDA, MARCELO JOSÉ; MIGUEL, FÚLVIO BORGES; NASCIMENTO, JHONATHAN RAPHAELL; ASCOLI, FABIO; CALASANS-MAIA, MÔNICA DIUANA

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Based on a literature review and on our own experience, this study proposes sheep as an experimental model to evaluate the bioactive capacity of bone substitute biomaterials, dental implant systems and orthopedics devices. The literature review covered relevant databases available on the Internet from 1990 until to date, and was supplemented by our own experience. Methods: For its resemblance in size and weight to humans, sheep are quite suitable for use as an experimental model. However, information about their utility as an experimental model is limited. The different stages involving sheep experiments were discussed, including the care during breeding and maintenance of the animals obtaining specimens for laboratory processing, and highlighting the unnecessary euthanasia of animals at the end of study, in accordance to the guidelines of the 3Rs Program. Results: All experiments have been completed without any complications regarding the animals and allowed us to evaluate hypotheses and explain their mechanisms. Conclusion: The sheep is an excellent animal model for evaluation of biomaterial for bone regeneration and dental implant osseointegration. From an ethical point of view, one sheep allows for up to 12 implants per animal, permitting to keep them alive at the end of the experiments. Level of Evidence II, Retrospective Study. PMID:28149193

  19. CFD modeling of pharmaceutical isolators with experimental verification of airflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayan, N; Akay, H U; Walsh, M R; Bell, W V; Troyer, G L; Dukes, R E; Mohan, P

    2007-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been developed to predict the airflow in a transfer isolator using a commercial CFD code. In order to assess the ability of the CFD approach in predicting the flow inside an isolator, hot wire anemometry measurements and a novel experimental flow visualization technique consisting of helium-filled glycerin bubbles were used. The results obtained have been shown to agree well with the experiments and show that CFD can be used to model barrier systems and isolators with practical fidelity. This indicates that CFD can and should be used to support the design, testing, and operation of barrier systems and isolators.

  20. Modeling Malaysia's Energy System: Some Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Yusof

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The current dynamic and fragile world energy environment necessitates the development of new energy model that solely caters to analyze Malaysia’s energy scenarios. Approach: The model is a network flow model that traces the flow of energy carriers from its sources (import and mining through some conversion and transformation processes for the production of energy products to final destinations (energy demand sectors. The integration to the economic sectors is done exogeneously by specifying the annual sectoral energy demand levels. The model in turn optimizes the energy variables for a specified objective function to meet those demands. Results: By minimizing the inter temporal petroleum product imports for the crude oil system the annual extraction level of Tapis blend is projected at 579600 barrels per day. The aggregate demand for petroleum products is projected to grow at 2.1% year-1 while motor gasoline and diesel constitute 42 and 38% of the petroleum products demands mix respectively over the 5 year planning period. Petroleum products import is expected to grow at 6.0% year-1. Conclusion: The preliminary results indicate that the model performs as expected. Thus other types of energy carriers such as natural gas, coal and biomass will be added to the energy system for the overall development of Malaysia energy model.

  1. Experimental geothermal well at Bad Schinznach. First results; Geothermiebohrung Bad Schinznach. Erste Resultate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haering, M.O. [Haering Geo-Project, Steinmaur (Switzerland)

    1997-12-01

    The spa of Bad Schinznach (Canton Argovia, Switzerland) endeavours to cover its heating requirements with geothermal energy. A recently drilled well to a depth of 890 meters encountered the regional acquifer of thermal water (Oberer Muschelkalk, Triassic) in three levels. Preliminary results indicate a productive aquifer in the uppermost level with a wellhead temperature of 42 C. An additional exploitation of the bottomhole formation temperature of 63 C is envisaged. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Bad Schinznach (Kanton Aargau, Schweiz) moechte im Rahmen der wirtschaftlichen Moeglichkeiten seinen Waermebedarf mit der Nutzung des Thermalwassers aus dem Oberen Muschelkalk (Trias) decken. Eine neulich abgeteufte Bohrung bis auf 890 Meter Tiefe hat die Formation auf drei Niveaus angetroffen. Erste Resultate deuten auf ein nutzbares Vorkommen im obersten Horizont mit einer Austrittstemperatur von 42 C. Eine zusaetzliche Nutzung der hohen Formationstemperatur von 63 C auf Endtiefe wird erwogen. (orig.)

  2. A physiological production model for cacao : results of model simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, P.A.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    CASE2 is a physiological model for cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) growth and yield. This report introduces the CAcao Simulation Engine for water-limited production in a non-technical way and presents simulation results obtained with the model.

  3. A physiological production model for cacao : results of model simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, P.A.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    CASE2 is a physiological model for cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) growth and yield. This report introduces the CAcao Simulation Engine for water-limited production in a non-technical way and presents simulation results obtained with the model.

  4. Modelling rainfall erosion resulting from climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnell, Peter

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that soil erosion leads to agricultural productivity decline and contributes to water quality decline. The current widely used models for determining soil erosion for management purposes in agriculture focus on long term (~20 years) average annual soil loss and are not well suited to determining variations that occur over short timespans and as a result of climate change. Soil loss resulting from rainfall erosion is directly dependent on the product of runoff and sediment concentration both of which are likely to be influenced by climate change. This presentation demonstrates the capacity of models like the USLE, USLE-M and WEPP to predict variations in runoff and erosion associated with rainfall events eroding bare fallow plots in the USA with a view to modelling rainfall erosion in areas subject to climate change.

  5. CS model coil experimental log book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishijima, Gen; Sugimoto, Makoto; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2001-02-01

    Charging test of the ITER CS Model Coil which is the world's largest superconducting pulse coil and the CS Insert Coil had started at April 11, 2000 and had completed at August 18, 2000. In the campaign, total shot numbers were 356 and the size of the data file in the DAS (Data Acquisition System) was over 20 GB. This report is a database that consists of the log list and the log sheets of every shot. One can access the database, make a search, and browse results via Internet (http://1ogwww.naka.jaeri.go.jp). The database will be useful to quick search to choose necessary shots. (author)

  6. Experimental Investigation on Performance of Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiang; FAN Wei; YAN Chuan-jun; HU Cheng-qi; YE Bin

    2007-01-01

    The PDRE test model used in these experiments utilized kerosene as the fuel, oxygen as oxidizer, and nitrogen as purge gas. The solenoid valves were employed to control intermittent supplies of kerosene, oxygen and purge gas. PDRE test model was 50 mm in inner diameter by 1.2 m long. The DDT (defiagration to detonation transition) enhancement device Shchelkin spiral was used in the test model.The effects of detonation frequency on its time-averaged thrust and specific impulse were experimentally investigated. The obtained results showes that the time-averaged thrust of PDRE test model was approximately proportional to the detonation frequency. For the detonation frequency 20 Hz, the time-averaged thrust was around 107 N, and the specific impulse was around 125 s. The nozzle experiments were conducted using PDRE test model with three traditional nozzles. The experimental results obtained demonstrated that all of those nozzles could augment the thrust and specific impulse. Among those three nozzles, the convergent nozzle had the largest increased augmentation, which was approximately 18%, under the specific condition of the experiment.

  7. Simulation Modeling of Radio Direction Finding Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Pelikan

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available It is sometimes difficult to determine analytically error probabilities of direction finding results for evaluating algorithms of practical interest. Probalistic simulation models are described in this paper that can be to study error performance of new direction finding systems or to geographical modifications of existing configurations.

  8. Experimental design schemes for learning Boolean network models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atias, Nir; Gershenzon, Michal; Labazin, Katia; Sharan, Roded

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: A holy grail of biological research is a working model of the cell. Current modeling frameworks, especially in the protein–protein interaction domain, are mostly topological in nature, calling for stronger and more expressive network models. One promising alternative is logic-based or Boolean network modeling, which was successfully applied to model signaling regulatory circuits in human. Learning such models requires observing the system under a sufficient number of different conditions. To date, the amount of measured data is the main bottleneck in learning informative Boolean models, underscoring the need for efficient experimental design strategies. Results: We developed novel design approaches that greedily select an experiment to be performed so as to maximize the difference or the entropy in the results it induces with respect to current best-fit models. Unique to our maximum difference approach is the ability to account for all (possibly exponential number of) Boolean models displaying high fit to the available data. We applied both approaches to simulated and real data from the EFGR and IL1 signaling systems in human. We demonstrate the utility of the developed strategies in substantially improving on a random selection approach. Our design schemes highlight the redundancy in these datasets, leading up to 11-fold savings in the number of experiments to be performed. Availability and implementation: Source code will be made available upon acceptance of the manuscript. Contact: roded@post.tau.ac.il PMID:25161232

  9. Modelling of radiative transfer by the Monte Carlo method and solving the inverse problem based on a genetic algorithm according to experimental results of aerosol sensing on short paths using a femtosecond laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matvienko, G G; Oshlakov, V K; Sukhanov, A Ya [V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Stepanov, A N [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-28

    We consider the algorithms that implement a broadband ('multiwave') radiative transfer with allowance for multiple (aerosol) scattering and absorption by main atmospheric gases. In the spectral range of 0.6 – 1 μm, a closed numerical simulation of modifications of the supercontinuum component of a probing femtosecond pulse is performed. In the framework of the algorithms for solving the inverse atmospheric-optics problems with the help of a genetic algorithm, we give an interpretation of the experimental backscattered spectrum of the supercontinuum. An adequate reconstruction of the distribution mode for the particles of artificial aerosol with the narrow-modal distributions in a size range of 0.5 – 2 mm and a step of 0.5 mm is obtained. (light scattering)

  10. Experimental Damage Identification of a Model Reticulated Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The damage identification of a reticulated shell is a challenging task, facing various difficulties, such as the large number of degrees of freedom (DOFs, the phenomenon of modal localization and transition, and low modeling accuracy. Based on structural vibration responses, the damage identification of a reticulated shell was studied. At first, the auto-regressive (AR time series model was established based on the acceleration responses of the reticulated shell. According to the changes in the coefficients of the AR model between the damaged conditions and the undamaged condition, the damage of the reticulated shell can be detected. In addition, the damage sensitive factors were determined based on the coefficients of the AR model. With the damage sensitive factors as the inputs and the damage positions as the outputs, back-propagation neural networks (BPNNs were then established and were trained using the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm (L–M algorithm. The locations of the damages can be predicted by the back-propagation neural networks. At last, according to the experimental scheme of single-point excitation and multi-point responses, the impact experiments on a K6 shell model with a scale of 1/10 were conducted. The experimental results verified the efficiency of the proposed damage identification method based on the AR time series model and back-propagation neural networks. The proposed damage identification method can ensure the safety of the practical engineering to some extent.

  11. Solubility of water in fluorocarbons: Experimental and COSMO-RS prediction results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Mara G.; Carvalho, Pedro J. [CICECO, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Santos, Luis M.N.B.F. [CIQ, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, R. Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Gomes, Ligia R. [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, P-4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Marrucho, Isabel M. [CICECO, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Coutinho, Joao A.P., E-mail: jcoutinho@ua.p [CICECO, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade de Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2010-02-15

    This work aims at providing experimental and theoretical information about the water-perfluorocarbon molecular interactions. For that purpose, experimental solubility results for water in cyclic and aromatic perfluorocarbons (PFCs), over the temperature range between (288.15 and 318.15) K, and at atmospheric pressure, were obtained and are presented. From the experimental solubility dependence on temperature, the partial molar solution and solvation thermodynamic functions such as Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy were determined and are discussed. The process of dissolution of water in PFCs is shown to be spontaneous for cyclic and aromatic compounds. It is demonstrated that the interactions between the non-aromatic PFCs and water are negligible while those between aromatic PFCs and water are favourable. The COSMO-RS predictive capability was explored for the description of the water solubility in PFCs and others substituted fluorocompounds. The COSMO-RS is shown to be a useful model to provide reasonable predictions of the solubility values, as well as to describe their temperature and structural modifications dependence. Moreover, the molar Gibbs free energy and molar enthalpy of solution of water are predicted remarkably well by COSMO-RS while the main deviations appear for the prediction of the molar entropy of solution.

  12. Power-Based Setpoint Control : Experimental Results on a Planar Manipulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirksz, D. A.; Scherpen, J. M. A.

    2012-01-01

    In the last years the power-based modeling framework, developed in the sixties to model nonlinear electrical RLC networks, has been extended for modeling and control of a larger class of physical systems. In this brief we apply power-based integral control to a planar manipulator experimental setup.

  13. Experimental and modeling study of the oxidation of xylenes

    CERN Document Server

    Battin-Leclerc, F; Glaude, P A; Belmekki, N; Battin-Leclerc, Fr\\'{e}d\\'{e}rique; Bounaceur, Roda; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Belmekki, Najib

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental and modeling study of the oxidation of the three isomers of xylene (ortho-, meta- and para-xylenes). For each compound, ignition delay times of hydrocarbon-oxygen-argon mixtures with fuel equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 2 were measured behind reflected shock waves for temperatures from 1330 to 1800 K and pressures from 6.7 to 9 bar. The results show a similar reactivity for the three isomers. A detailed kinetic mechanism has been proposed, which reproduces our experimental results, as well as some literature data obtained in a plug flow reactor at 1155 K showing a clear difference of reactivity between the three isomers of xylene. The main reaction paths have been determined by sensitivity and flux analyses and have allowed the differences of reactivity to be explained.

  14. Escaping in couples facilitates evacuation: Experimental study and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Ning; Hu, Mao-Bin; Ding, Jian-Xun; Ding, Zhong-Jun

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the impact of escaping in couples on the evacuation dynamics has been investigated via experiments and modeling. Two sets of experiments have been implemented, in which pedestrians are asked to escape either in individual or in couples. The experiments show that escaping in couples can decrease the average evacuation time. Moreover, it is found that the average evacuation time gap is essentially constant, which means that the evacuation speed essentially does not depend on the number of pedestrians that have not yet escaped. To model the evacuation dynamics, an improved social force model has been proposed, in which it is assumed that the driving force of a pedestrian cannot be fulfilled when the composition of physical forces exceeds a threshold because the pedestrian cannot keep his/her body balance under this circumstance. To model the effect of escaping in couples, attraction force has been introduced between the partners. Simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental ones.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY AND COMPUTATIONAL MODELLING OF GAS FIRED PULSE COMBUSTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Smajevic

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some results of computational modelling of a gas-fired pulse combustor with aerodynamic valves. The development of the model followed experimental investigations during which the combustor geometry and operating conditions were defined. A simple 'tank and tube' approach was adopted by decomposing the combustor into several elements which were modelled separately, together with the interconnecting processes. The solution was obtained by marching integration in time over several cycles. The model reproduced reasonably well the recorded time history and averaged values of all basic parameters and is expected to complement the experiments aiming to develop a pulse combustor as a device for to cleaning the outer sides of power plants’ boiler heating surfaces during operation.

  16. Experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meirelles, Rafael Panisi de Campos [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Hochman, Bernardo [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina. Dept. de Cirurgia; Helene Junior, Americo; Fraga, Murillo Francisco Pires [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Cirurgia. Divisao de Cirurgia Plastica; Lellis, Rute [Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas da Santa Casa de Sao Paulo (FCMSCSP), SP (Brazil). Divisao de Patologia; Ferreira, Lydia Masako, E-mail: rpcmeirelles@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: lydia.dcir@epm.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Divisao de Cirugia Plastica

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: to describe an experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. Methods: on this study eight six-month-old New Zealand male rabbits, with an average weight of 2.5kg were used. They were distributed in four groups (n=2 per group). The control group did not receive radiotherapy and the others received one radiotherapy session of 2000, 3000 and 4500 cGy, respectively. Photographic analysis and histopathological evaluation of the irradiated areas were carried out. Results: after 30 days, the animals from the control group had all their hair grown. In spite of that, the animals from group 2000 cGy had a 60-day alopecia and from group 3000 cGy, a 90-day alopecia. After the 30th day, the 3000cGy group demonstrated 90-day cutaneous radiation injuries, graded 3 and 4. One of the animals from group 4500 cGy died on the 7th day with visceral necrosis. The other from the same group had total skin necrosis. A progressive reduction of glands and blood vessels count and an increase on collagen deposition was observed. Conclusion: The proposed experimental model is reproducible. This study suggests that the dosage 4500cGy is excessive and the 3000 cGy is the most effective for this experimental model of cutaneous radiation injury in rabbits. (author)

  17. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Radicella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available to the scientific community on the Internet. These data are important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work compares NeQuick and IRI models with the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of the ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos 1809 satellites. Experimental electron content from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above the peak have been compared under a wide range of different conditions. The analysis performed points out the behavior of the models and the improvements needed to be assessed to have a better reproduction of the experimental results. NeQuick topside is a modified Epstein layer, with thickness parameter determined by an empirical relation. It appears that its performance is strongly affected by this parameter, indicating the need for improvements of its formulation. IRI topside is based on Booker's approach to consider two parts with constant height gradients. It appears that this formulation leads to an overestimation of the electron density in the upper part of the profiles, and overestimation of TEC.

  18. An experimental and modeling study of diethyl carbonate oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Hisashi

    2015-04-01

    Diethyl carbonate (DEC) is an attractive biofuel that can be used to displace petroleum-derived diesel fuel, thereby reducing CO2 and particulate emissions from diesel engines. A better understanding of DEC combustion characteristics is needed to facilitate its use in internal combustion engines. Toward this goal, ignition delay times for DEC were measured at conditions relevant to internal combustion engines using a rapid compression machine (RCM) and a shock tube. The experimental conditions investigated covered a wide range of temperatures (660-1300K), a pressure of 30bar, and equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 in air. To provide further understanding of the intermediates formed in DEC oxidation, species concentrations were measured in a jet-stirred reactor at 10atm over a temperature range of 500-1200K and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0. These experimental measurements were used to aid the development and validation of a chemical kinetic model for DEC.The experimental results for ignition in the RCM showed near negative temperature coefficient (NTC) behavior. Six-membered alkylperoxy radical (RO˙2) isomerizations are conventionally thought to initiate low-temperature branching reactions responsible for NTC behavior, but DEC has no such possible 6- and 7-membered ring isomerizations. However, its molecular structure allows for 5-, 8- and 9-membered ring RO˙2 isomerizations. To provide accurate rate constants for these ring structures, ab initio computations for RO˙2⇌Q˙OOH isomerization reactions were performed. These new RO˙2 isomerization rate constants have been implemented in a chemical kinetic model for DEC oxidation. The model simulations have been compared with ignition delay times measured in the RCM near the NTC region. Results of the simulation were also compared with experimental results for ignition in the high-temperature region and for species concentrations in the jet-stirred reactor. Chemical kinetic insights into the

  19. Femtosecond laser for glaucoma treatment: the comparison between simulation and experimentation results on ocular tissue removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Dong Xia; Ngoi, Bryan K. A.; Hoh, Sek Tien; Koh, Lee Huat K.; Deng, Yuan Zi

    2005-04-01

    In ophthalmology, the use of femtosecond lasers is receiving more attention than ever due to its extremely high intensity and ultra short pulse duration. It opens the highly beneficial possibilities for minimized side effects during surgery process, and one of the specific areas is laser surgery in glaucoma treatment. However, the sophisticated femtosecond laser-ocular tissue interaction mechanism hampers the clinical application of femtosecond laser to treat glaucoma. The potential contribution in this work lies in the fact, that this is the first time a modified moving breakdown theory is applied, which is appropriate for femtosecond time scale, to analyze femtosecond laser-ocular tissue interaction mechanism. Based on this theory, energy deposition and corresponding thermal increase are studied by both simulation and experimentation. A simulation model was developed using Matlab software, and the simulation result was validated through in-vitro laser-tissue interaction experiment using pig iris. By comparing the theoretical and experimental results, it is shown that femtosecond laser can obtain determined ocular tissue removal, and the thermal damage is evidently reduced. This result provides a promising potential for femtosecond laser in glaucoma treatment.

  20. Pneumatic Adaptive Absorber: Mathematical Modelling with Experimental Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Mikułowski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Many of mechanical energy absorbers utilized in engineering structures are hydraulic dampers, since they are simple and highly efficient and have favourable volume to load capacity ratio. However, there exist fields of applications where a threat of toxic contamination with the hydraulic fluid contents must be avoided, for example, food or pharmacy industries. A solution here can be a Pneumatic Adaptive Absorber (PAA, which is characterized by a high dissipation efficiency and an inactive medium. In order to properly analyse the characteristics of a PAA, an adequate mathematical model is required. This paper proposes a concept for mathematical modelling of a PAA with experimental verification. The PAA is considered as a piston-cylinder device with a controllable valve incorporated inside the piston. The objective of this paper is to describe a thermodynamic model of a double chamber cylinder with gas migration between the inner volumes of the device. The specific situation considered here is that the process cannot be defined as polytropic, characterized by constant in time thermodynamic coefficients. Instead, the coefficients of the proposed model are updated during the analysis. The results of the experimental research reveal that the proposed mathematical model is able to accurately reflect the physical behaviour of the fabricated demonstrator of the shock absorber.

  1. Experimental and numerical results on the fluid flow driven by a traveling magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantzsch, R.; Galindo, V.; Grants, I.; Zhang, C.; Pätzold, O.; Gerbeth, G.; Stelter, M.

    2007-07-01

    A traveling magnetic field (TMF) driven flow and its transition from a laminar to a time-dependent flow is studied by means of ultrasonic Doppler velocimetry and numerical simulations. The experimental setup comprises a cylindrical cavity containing the electrically conducting model fluid GaInSn and a system of six equidistant coils, which are fed by an out-of-phase current to create an up- or downward directed TMF. Hence, a Lorentz force is induced in the melt which leads to meridional flow patterns. For numerical simulations commercial codes (Opera/Fidap) and a spectral code are used. The characteristic parameters of the magnetohydrodynamic model system are chosen close to the conditions used for vertical gradient freeze (VGF) crystal growth. The axisymmetric basic flow and its dependence on the dimensionless shielding parameter S are examined. It is shown that, for S>10, the flow velocity decreases significantly, whereas almost no influence is found for a smaller shielding parameter. The critical Reynolds number for the onset of instability is found in the range of 300-450. Good agreement between experimental results and the numerical simulations is achieved.

  2. EQUIVALENT EXCITATION METHOD FOR VIBRATION ISOLATION DESIGN:THEORETICAL ANALYSIS AND EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huo Rui; Shi Yin

    2005-01-01

    In view of difficulties concerned with direct measurement of excitations inside source equipments and their significant influence on vibration isolation effectiveness, a dynamical model, for vibration isolation of a rigid machine with six-degree-of-freedom mounted on a flexible foundation through multiple mounts, is analyzed, in which the complicated and multiple disturbances inside the machine are described as an equivalent excitation spectrum. And a method for the estimation of the equivalent excitation spectrum according to system dynamic responses is discussed for the quantitative prediction of isolation effectiveness.Both theoretical analysis and experimental results are demonstrated. Further work shows the quantitative prediction of transmitted power flow in a flexible vibration isolation experiment system using the proposed equivalent excitation spectrum method, by comparison with its testing results.

  3. Wave Synchronizing Crane Control during Water Entry in Offshore Moonpool Operations - Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tor A. Johansen

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A new strategy for active control in heavy-lift offshore crane operations is suggested, by introducing a new concept referred to as wave synchronization. Wave synchronization reduces the hydrodynamic forces by minimization of variations in the relative vertical velocity between payload and water using a wave amplitude measurement. Wave synchronization is combined with conventional active heave compensation to obtain accurate control. Experimental results using a scale model of a semi-submerged vessel with a moonpool shows that wave synchronization leads to significant improvements in performance. Depending on the sea state and payload, the results indicate that the reduction in the standard deviation of the wire tension may be up to 50

  4. Experimental comparison of models for ultrafast impact ionization is silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarekegne, Abebe Tilahun; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2016-01-01

    We compare experimentally the exponential and quadratic (Keldysh formula) impact ionization models using THz induced impact ionization in silicon. We demonstrate that the exponential model offers the best description of impact ionization process for ultrashort electric filed pulses.......We compare experimentally the exponential and quadratic (Keldysh formula) impact ionization models using THz induced impact ionization in silicon. We demonstrate that the exponential model offers the best description of impact ionization process for ultrashort electric filed pulses....

  5. Heat Transfer Enhancement for Finned-Tube Heat Exchangers with Vortex Generators: Experimental and Numerical Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, James Edward; Sohal, Manohar Singh; Huff, George Albert

    2002-08-01

    A combined experimental and numerical investigation is under way to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to large-scale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. The research is focused on whether air-side heat transfer can be improved through the use of finsurface vortex generators (winglets,) while maintaining low heat exchanger pressure drop. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique has been employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements have also been acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus. In addition, numerical modeling techniques have been developed to allow prediction of local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds-number flows with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results presented in this paper reveal quantitative details of local fin-surface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. The winglets were triangular (delta) with a 1:2 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface Nusselt-number results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (average enhancement ratio 35%) associated with the deployment of the winglets with oval tubes. Pressure drop measurements have also been obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that includes four tube rows in a staggered array. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results have been obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500.

  6. Wake redirection: comparison of analytical, numerical and experimental models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiangang; Bottasso, Carlo L.; Campagnolo, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    This paper focuses on wake redirection techniques for wind farm control. Two control strategies are investigated: yaw misalignment and cyclic pitch control. First, analytical formulas are derived for both techniques, with the goal of providing a simple physical interpretation of the behavior of the two methods. Next, more realistic results are obtained by numerical simulations performed with CFD and by experiments conducted with scaled wind turbine models operating in a boundary layer wind tunnel. Comparing the analytical, numerical and experimental models allows for a cross-validation of the results and a better understanding of the two wake redirection techniques. Results indicate that yaw misalignment is more effective than cyclic pitch control in displacing the wake laterally, although the latter may have positive effects on wake recovery.

  7. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C.; Cha, Chae Y.; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S.; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these

  8. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C.; Cha, Chae Y.; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S.; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A.; Jeneson, Jeroen A. L.

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these m

  9. Experimental Septic Shock: Models and Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-06-14

    abnormally affected, although respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis were regularly observed in both models. Significant differences in responses I...affected, although respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis were regularly observed in both models. Significant differences in responses between...evidence of respiratory depression although data indicate the presence of metabolic acidosis . Lowered pCO2 in baboons given live E. coli organisms was

  10. Comparison of dynamic analysis of a Schilling hydraulic manipulator with experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, C.P.; Lew, J.Y.; Evans, M.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Magee, D.P. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

    1993-07-01

    Two independent models of the dynamics of a Schilling Titan II hydraulic manipulator were developed and compared in order to obtain an accurate model of the manipulator dynamics. These models will be used in the development of feedback control laws and active damping algorithms. One of the model is an analytical model which was developed {open_quotes}by hand{close_quotes} with the assistance of computer symbolic manipulation. The other is a numerical model developed using a commercially available dynamics code. The data from these models were then compared with experimental data from an actual Titan II manipulator.

  11. Modelo de tumor experimental em rim de ratos Experimental tumor model in rats kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Flávio Gonzaga Silva

    2002-02-01

    cages, housed individually and allowed to eat and drink ad libitum. RESULTS: the post-operative average survival was 14 days. Tumor growth was encountered in all animals. The rats exhibited destruction of the kidney, invasion of the adjacent structures, but absence of metastasis. CONCLUSION: the kidney Walker tumor model proved to be an excellent tool for experimental studies on tumor behavior, due to its rapid growth and its easy reproduction.

  12. Experimental modelling of ground deformation associated with shallow magma intrusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galland, O.

    2012-04-01

    Active volcanoes experience ground deformation as a response to the dynamics of underground magmatic systems. The analysis of ground deformation patterns may provide important constraints on the dynamics and shape of the underlying volcanic plumbing systems. Nevertheless, these analyses usually take into account simplistic shapes (sphere, dykes, sills) and the results cannot be verified as the modelled systems are buried. In this contribution, I will present new results from experimental models of magma intrusion, in which both the evolution of ground deformation during intrusion and the shape of the underlying intrusion are monitored in 3D. The models consisted of a molten vegetable oil, simulating low viscosity magma, injected into cohesive fine-grained silica flour, simulating the brittle upper crust; oil injection resulted is sheet intrusions (dykes, sills and cone sheets). The initial topography in the models was flat. While the oil was intruding, the surface of the models slightly lifted up to form a smooth relief, which was mapped through time. After an initial symmetrical development, the uplifted area developed asymmetrically; at the end of the experiments, the oil always erupted at the steepest edge of the uplifted area. After the experiment, the oil solidified, the intrusion was excavated and the shape of its top surface mapped. The comparison between the uplifted zone and the underlying intrusions showed that (1) the complex shapes of the uplifted areas reflected the complex shapes of the underlying intrusions, (2) the time evolution of the uplifted zone was correlated with the evolution of the underlying intrusion, and (3) the early asymmetrical evolution of the uplifted areas can be used to predict the location of the eruption of the oil. The experimental results also suggest that complex intrusion shapes (inclined sheet, cone sheet, complex sill) may have to be considered more systematically in analyses of ground deformation patterns on volcanoes.

  13. Precisely parameterized experimental and computational models of tissue organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molitoris, Jared M; Paliwal, Saurabh; Sekar, Rajesh B; Blake, Robert; Park, JinSeok; Trayanova, Natalia A; Tung, Leslie; Levchenko, Andre

    2016-02-01

    Patterns of cellular organization in diverse tissues frequently display a complex geometry and topology tightly related to the tissue function. Progressive disorganization of tissue morphology can lead to pathologic remodeling, necessitating the development of experimental and theoretical methods of analysis of the tolerance of normal tissue function to structural alterations. A systematic way to investigate the relationship of diverse cell organization to tissue function is to engineer two-dimensional cell monolayers replicating key aspects of the in vivo tissue architecture. However, it is still not clear how this can be accomplished on a tissue level scale in a parameterized fashion, allowing for a mathematically precise definition of the model tissue organization and properties down to a cellular scale with a parameter dependent gradual change in model tissue organization. Here, we describe and use a method of designing precisely parameterized, geometrically complex patterns that are then used to control cell alignment and communication of model tissues. We demonstrate direct application of this method to guiding the growth of cardiac cell cultures and developing mathematical models of cell function that correspond to the underlying experimental patterns. Several anisotropic patterned cultures spanning a broad range of multicellular organization, mimicking the cardiac tissue organization of different regions of the heart, were found to be similar to each other and to isotropic cell monolayers in terms of local cell-cell interactions, reflected in similar confluency, morphology and connexin-43 expression. However, in agreement with the model predictions, different anisotropic patterns of cell organization, paralleling in vivo alterations of cardiac tissue morphology, resulted in variable and novel functional responses with important implications for the initiation and maintenance of cardiac arrhythmias. We conclude that variations of tissue geometry and topology

  14. An Experimentally Validated SOA Model for High-Bit Rate System Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hasan I. Saleheen

    2003-01-01

    A comprehensive model of the Semiconductor Optical Amplifier with experimental validation result is presented. This model accounts for various physical behavior of the device which is necessary for high bit-rate system application.

  15. Control of vibrations for a parallel manipulator with flexible links — concepts and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morlock, M.; Burkhardt, M.; Seifried, R.

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive control approach is presented to reduce the vibrations of a parallel manipulator with a kinematic loop and two flexible links whereof the longer one can show significant oscillations. The control objectives are end-effector trajectory tracking and active vibration control. The system is modeled as a flexible multibody system and exact feedforward control based on the full dynamic flexible multibody system is applied to improve the end-effector trajectory tracking performance. Furthermore, the effect of different position control concepts for the two linear drives, such as gain scheduling for the utilized cascade control and a model based friction compensation, on the movers themselves as well as on the end-effector are discussed, which can be conflicting. Experimental results are presented illustrating the achievable accuracy of the end-effector tracking for different trajectories while showing significant error reductions for a feedforward control based on an elastic model in contrast to a rigid one. Finally, a model based curvature controller is utilized which actively controls the occurring oscillations of the parallel manipulator. Here, a proportional controller as well as a linear-quadratic regulator are applied and the impact of an additional curvature control on the end-effector tracking performance is investigated.

  16. Experimental Diabetes Mellitus in Different Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Al-awar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have historically played a critical role in the exploration and characterization of disease pathophysiology and target identification and in the evaluation of novel therapeutic agents and treatments in vivo. Diabetes mellitus disease, commonly known as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood glucose levels for a prolonged time. To avoid late complications of diabetes and related costs, primary prevention and early treatment are therefore necessary. Due to its chronic symptoms, new treatment strategies need to be developed, because of the limited effectiveness of the current therapies. We overviewed the pathophysiological features of diabetes in relation to its complications in type 1 and type 2 mice along with rat models, including Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF rats, BB rats, LEW 1AR1/-iddm rats, Goto-Kakizaki rats, chemically induced diabetic models, and Nonobese Diabetic mouse, and Akita mice model. The advantages and disadvantages that these models comprise were also addressed in this review. This paper briefly reviews the wide pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, particularly focusing on the challenges associated with the evaluation and predictive validation of these models as ideal animal models for preclinical assessments and discovering new drugs and therapeutic agents for translational application in humans.

  17. Experimental validation of Swy-2 clay standard's PHREEQC model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Hegyfalvi, Csaba; Freiler, Ágnes; Udvardi, Beatrix; Kónya, Péter; Székely, Edit; Falus, György

    2017-04-01

    One of the challenges of the present century is to limit the greenhouse gas emissions for the mitigation of climate change which is possible for example by a transitional technology, CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) and, among others, by the increase of nuclear proportion in the energy mix. Clay minerals are considered to be responsible for the low permeability and sealing capacity of caprocks sealing off stored CO2 and they are also the main constituents of bentonite in high level radioactive waste disposal facilities. The understanding of clay behaviour in these deep geological environments is possible through laboratory batch experiments of well-known standards and coupled geochemical models. Such experimentally validated models are scarce even though they allow deriving more precise long-term predictions of mineral reactions and rock and bentonite degradation underground and, therefore, ensuring the safety of the above technologies and increase their public acceptance. This ongoing work aims to create a kinetic geochemical model of Na-montmorillonite standard Swy-2 in the widely used PHREEQC code, supported by solution and mineral composition results from batch experiments. Several four days experiments have been carried out in 1:35 rock:water ratio at atmospheric conditions, and with inert and CO2 supercritical phase at 100 bar and 80 ⁰C relevant for the potential Hungarian CO2 reservoir complex. Solution samples have been taken during and after experiments and their compositions were measured by ICP-OES. The treated solid phase has been analysed by XRD and ATR-FTIR and compared to in-parallel measured references (dried Swy-2). Kinetic geochemical modelling of the experimental conditions has been performed by PHREEQC version 3 using equations and kinetic rate parameters from the USGS report of Palandri and Kharaka (2004). The visualization of experimental and numerous modelling results has been automatized by R. Experiments and models show very fast

  18. Molecular hyperpolarizabilities of push–pull chromophores: A comparison between theoretical and experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capobianco, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica E.R. Caianiello, Università di Salerno, via ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Centore, R. [Dipartimento di Chimica P. Corradini, Università di Napoli, via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy); Noce, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica E.R. Caianiello, Università di Salerno, via ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy); Peluso, A., E-mail: apeluso@unisa.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Biologia, Università di Salerno, via ponte don Melillo, I-84084 Fisciano (Italy)

    2013-01-16

    Highlights: ► Electro-optical determined and MP2/DFT computed NLO properties have been compared. ► Significant dependence of dipole moments of elongated NLO chromophores on conformations has been found. ► A thorough comparison between MP2 and DFT/TD-DFT computational approaches has been carried out. ► The two-state model overestimates hyperpolarizability. - Abstract: Electric dipole moments and static first order hyperpolarizabilities of two push–pull molecules with an extended π electron systems have been evaluated at different computational levels and compared with the results of electro-optical absorption measurements, based on the two state model. Calculations show that: (i) the dipole moments of such elongated systems depend significantly on conformation, a thorough conformational search is necessary for a meaningful comparison between theoretical and experimental results; (ii) DFT methods, in particular CAM-B3LYP and M05-2X, yield dipole moments which compare well with those obtained by post Hartree–Fock methods (MP2) and by EOA measurements; (iii) theoretical first order hyperpolarizabilities are largely underestimated, both by MP2 and DFT methods, possibly because of the failure of two state model used in electro-optical measurements.

  19. Comparison of mixed layer models predictions with experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faggian, P.; Riva, G.M. [CISE Spa, Divisione Ambiente, Segrate (Italy); Brusasca, G. [ENEL Spa, CRAM, Milano (Italy)

    1997-10-01

    The temporal evolution of the PBL vertical structure for a North Italian rural site, situated within relatively large agricultural fields and almost flat terrain, has been investigated during the period 22-28 June 1993 by experimental and modellistic point of view. In particular, the results about a sunny day (June 22) and a cloudy day (June 25) are presented in this paper. Three schemes to estimate mixing layer depth have been compared, i.e. Holzworth (1967), Carson (1973) and Gryning-Batchvarova models (1990), which use standard meteorological observations. To estimate their degree of accuracy, model outputs were analyzed considering radio-sounding meteorological profiles and stability atmospheric classification criteria. Besides, the mixed layer depths prediction were compared with the estimated values obtained by a simple box model, whose input requires hourly measures of air concentrations and ground flux of {sup 222}Rn. (LN)

  20. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, N. A. S., E-mail: nadia.smith@npl.co.uk, E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk, E-mail: tatiana.correia@npl.co.uk; Correia, T. M., E-mail: nadia.smith@npl.co.uk, E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk, E-mail: tatiana.correia@npl.co.uk [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, TW11 0LW Middlesex (United Kingdom); Rokosz, M. K., E-mail: nadia.smith@npl.co.uk, E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk, E-mail: tatiana.correia@npl.co.uk [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, TW11 0LW Middlesex (United Kingdom); Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  1. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  2. Optimization of experimental human leukemia models (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Pankov

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Actual problem of assessing immunotherapy prospects including antigenpecific cell therapy using animal models was covered in this review.Describe the various groups of currently existing animal models and methods of their creating – from different immunodeficient mice to severalvariants of tumor cells engraftment in them. The review addresses the possibility of tumor stem cells studying using mouse models for the leukemia treatment with adoptive cell therapy including WT1. Also issues of human leukemia cells migration and proliferation in a mice withdifferent immunodeficiency degree are discussed. To assess the potential immunotherapy efficacy comparison of immunodeficient mouse model with clinical situation in oncology patients after chemotherapy is proposed.

  3. Experimental model to induce obesity in rats

    OpenAIRE

    von Diemen,Vinicius; Trindade, Eduardo Neubarth; Trindade, Manoel Roberto Maciel

    2006-01-01

    The etiology of obesity is multifactorial and is becoming a problem of public health, due to its increased prevalence and the consequent repercussion of its comorbidities on the health of the population. The great similarity and homology between the genomes of rodents and humans make these animal models a major tool to study conditions affecting humans, which can be simulated in rats. Obesity can be induced in animals by neuroendocrine, dietary or genetic changes. The most widely used models ...

  4. Experimental Animal Models in Periodontology: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Struillou, Xavier; Boutigny, Hervé; Soueidan, Assem; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In periodontal research, animal studies are complementary to in vitro experiments prior to testing new treatments. Animal models should make possible the validation of hypotheses and prove the safety and efficacy of new regenerating approaches using biomaterials, growth factors or stem cells. A review of the literature was carried out by using electronic databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Science). Numerous animal models in different species such as rats, hamsters, rabbits, ferrets, canines and pr...

  5. Electromechanical properties of smart aggregate: theoretical modeling and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Kong, Qingzhao; Shi, Zhifei; Song, Gangbing

    2016-09-01

    Smart aggregate (SA), as a piezoceramic-based multi-functional device, is formed by sandwiching two lead zirconate titanate (PZT) patches with copper shielding between a pair of solid-machined cylindrical marble blocks with epoxy. Previous researches have successfully demonstrated the capability and reliability of versatile SAs to monitor the structural health of concrete structures. However, the previous works concentrated mainly on the applications of SAs in structural health monitoring; no reasonable theoretical model of SAs was proposed. In this paper, electromechanical properties of SAs were investigated using a proposed theoretical model. Based on one dimensional linear theory of piezo-elasticity, the dynamic solutions of a SA subjected to an external harmonic voltage were solved. Further, the electric impedance of the SA was computed, and the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies were calculated based on derived equations. Numerical analysis was conducted to discuss the effects of the thickness of epoxy layer and the dimension of PZT patch on the fundamental resonance and anti-resonance frequencies as well as the corresponding electromechanical coupling factor. The dynamic solutions based on the proposed theoretical model were further experimentally verified with two SA samples. The fundamental resonance and anti-resonance frequencies of SAs show good agreements in both theoretical and experimental results. The presented analysis and results contribute to the overall understanding of SA properties and help to optimize the working frequencies of SAs in structural health monitoring of civil structures.

  6. Gear Windage Modeling Progress - Experimental Validation Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Rob; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    In the Subsonics Rotary Wing (SRW) Project being funded for propulsion work at NASA Glenn Research Center, performance of the propulsion system is of high importance. In current rotorcraft drive systems many gearing components operate at high rotational speed (pitch line velocity > 24000 ft/ min). In our testing of high speed helical gear trains at NASA Glenn we have found that the work done on the air - oil mist within the gearbox can become a significant part of the power loss of the system. This loss mechanism is referred to as windage. The effort described in this presentation is to try to understand the variables that affect windage, develop a good experimental data base to validate, the analytical project being conducted at Penn State University by Dr. Rob Kunz under a NASA SRW NRA. The presentation provides an update to the status of these efforts.

  7. Experimental Design and Multiplexed Modeling Using Titrimetry and Spreadsheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Peter De B.; Kolbrich, Erin; Cline, Jennifer

    2002-07-01

    The topics of experimental design and modeling are important for inclusion in the undergraduate curriculum. Many general chemistry and quantitative analysis courses introduce students to spreadsheet programs, such as MS Excel. Students in the laboratory sections of these courses use titrimetry as a quantitative measurement method. Unfortunately, the only model that students may be exposed to in introductory chemistry courses is the working curve that uses the linear model. A novel experiment based on a multiplex model has been devised for titrating several vinegar samples at a time. The multiplex titration can be applied to many other routine determinations. An experimental design model is fit to titrimetric measurements using the MS Excel LINEST function to estimate concentration from each sample. This experiment provides valuable lessons in error analysis, Class A glassware tolerances, experimental simulation, statistics, modeling, and experimental design.

  8. Modeling and experimental vibration analysis of nanomechanical cantilever active probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi-Khojin, Amin; Bashash, Saeid; Jalili, Nader

    2008-08-01

    Nanomechanical cantilever (NMC) active probes have recently received increased attention in a variety of nanoscale sensing and measurement applications. Current modeling practices call for a uniform cantilever beam without considering the intentional jump discontinuities associated with the piezoelectric layer attachment and the NMC cross-sectional step. This paper presents a comprehensive modeling framework for modal characterization and dynamic response analysis of NMC active probes with geometrical discontinuities. The entire length of the NMC is divided into three segments of uniform beams followed by applying appropriate continuity conditions. The characteristics matrix equation is then used to solve for system natural frequencies and mode shapes. Using an equivalent electromechanical moment of a piezoelectric layer, forced motion analysis of the system is carried out. An experimental setup consisting of a commercial NMC active probe from Veeco and a state-of-the-art microsystem analyzer, the MSA-400 from Polytec, is developed to verify the theoretical developments proposed here. Using a parameter estimation technique based on minimizing the modeling error, optimal values of system parameters are identified. Mode shapes and the modal frequency response of the system for the first three modes determined from the proposed model are compared with those obtained from the experiment and commonly used theory for uniform beams. Results indicate that the uniform beam model fails to accurately predict the actual system response, especially in multiple-mode operation, while the proposed discontinuous beam model demonstrates good agreement with the experimental data. Such detailed and accurate modeling framework can lead to significant enhancement in the sensitivity of piezoelectric-based NMC sensors for use in variety of sensing and imaging applications.

  9. Benchmark of Space Charge Simulations and Comparison with Experimental Results for High Intensity, Low Energy Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Cousineau, Sarah M

    2005-01-01

    Space charge effects are a major contributor to beam halo and emittance growth leading to beam loss in high intensity, low energy accelerators. As future accelerators strive towards unprecedented levels of beam intensity and beam loss control, a more comprehensive understanding of space charge effects is required. A wealth of simulation tools have been developed for modeling beams in linacs and rings, and with the growing availability of high-speed computing systems, computationally expensive problems that were inconceivable a decade ago are now being handled with relative ease. This has opened the field for realistic simulations of space charge effects, including detailed benchmarks with experimental data. A great deal of effort is being focused in this direction, and several recent benchmark studies have produced remarkably successful results. This paper reviews the achievements in space charge benchmarking in the last few years, and discusses the challenges that remain.

  10. Preliminary Results on the Experimental Investigation of the Structure Functions of Bound Nucleons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodek, Arie [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY

    2015-09-01

    We present preliminary results on an experimental study of the nuclear modification of the longitudinal (σL) and transverse (σT) structure functions of nucleons bound in nuclear targets. The origin of these modifications (commonly referred as as the EMC effect) is not fully understood. Our measurements of R= σLT for nuclei (RA) and for deuterium (RD) indicate that nuclear modifications of the structure functions of bound nucleons are different for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and that contrary to expectation from several theoretical models, RA < RD.

  11. Carbide Type Influence on Tribological Properties of Hard Faced Steel Layer Part II- Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lazic

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented a preceding procedure that should be conducted in order to successfully regenerate damaged forging dies by the hard facing process. After the tool damage types identification, as well as their causes, we have chosen the procedure and the parameters of hard facing that we further corrected by conducting the test hard facings on models. Thus, we were able to relate the experimental results outputs with the repair technology, taking as a criterion the quality of the surface layers wear resistance such as friction coefficient and width of hard faced zone, hardness and its distribution in cross section, then microstructure of characteristic of hard faced zones, etc. This research points out significancy of tribological properties of certain types of carbides and their effects on metal matrix, in which carbides are embedded. Our tribological investigations have shown that the working life of the hard faced tool can be longer than that of the new tool.

  12. THE FIRST DOMESTIC IMPLANTABLE AXIAL FLOW PUMP: RESULTS OF EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES IN CALVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. Itkin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of our experimental study was evaluation of the first domestic implantable axial pump as a left ventricle assist device in calves. Materials and methods. 18 calves 90–120 days of age, weighing 95 ± 5 kg were exposed to implantation of an axial pump under the scheme «left ventricular – aorta» in paracorporeal and implantable in chest cavity versions. Two models of the pump were tested. Model 1 is a pump with cylindrical bearings and elongated straightener, model 2 had ball bearings and modified design of impeller and straightener. Results. In the first series (n = 12 the pump model 1 was tested. The duration of experiments was 4,9 ± 5,3 days, maximal duration was 16 days. The experiments were finalized due to intraoperation cardiac fibrillation (n = 3, uncrop- ped acute bleeding (n = 3, lowering of blood flow through the pump of 60 ± 15% (n = 6 because of thrombo- sis of the pump (n = 5 and outlet line (n = 1, in 3 cases of 5, combined with mechanical wear of bearings. In the second series (n = 6 the pump model 2 was tested. In 4 experiments of 6 the duration was 74,5 ± 29 days. One experiment was finalized due to intraoperation cardiac fibrillation. Another one experiment was finalized on 8 day as planned. In 5 experiments there was absence of either thrombosis or mechanical wear of bearings. Morphological and histological examination of the kidneys, liver and lungs in the 5 experiments of second series did not reveal the presence of zones of ischemia or thromboembolia. Conclusion. The results of the second series can be treaded as preclinical testing of the first domestic implantable axial pump as a left ventricle assist device in calves. 

  13. Experimental model of arteriovenous malformation in vitro using biological grafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandu Aurelia Mihaela

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Brain arteriovenous malformations (AVMs represent a serious health problem all around the world. Experimental models help to better understand the pathophysiology of these lesions. Experiment: We performed an experimental model of AVM using biological grafts, arteries and veins harvested from chicken wings at the elbow joint. We used 14 vessels and we performed 20 end-to-end anastomoses to create a nidus with a single feeding artery and a single draining vein. The system was irrigated with colored solution. The experiment was done according with law in force regarding experimental research activity. Conclusions: Experimental models allow us to understand the hemodynamics and predict the outcome of brain AVMs in humans. This experimental model is a useful tool in understanding the hemodynamic properties of brain AVMs. It is very useful in vascular anastomosis training

  14. Experimental studies and modeling on concentration polarization in forward osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian-Jun; Chen, Sijie; Oo, Maung Htun; Kekre, Kiran A; Cornelissen, Emile R; Ruiken, Chris J

    2010-01-01

    Concentration polarization (CP) is an important issue in forward osmosis (FO) processes and it is believed that the coupled effect of dilutive internal CP (DICP) and concentrative external CP (CECP) limits FO flux. The objective of this study was to distinguish individual contribution of different types of DICP and CECP via modeling and to validate it by pilot studies. The influence of DICP/CECP on FO flux has been investigated in this study. The CP model presented in this work was derived from a previous study and evaluated by bench-scale FO experiments. Experiments were conducted with drinking water as the feed and NaCl/MgSO(4) as draw solutions at different concentrations and velocities. Modeling results indicated that DICP contributed to a flux reduction by 99.9% for 0.5 M NaCl as a draw solution although the flow pattern of both feed and draw solutions was turbulent. DICP could be improved via selection of the draw solution. The modeling results were well fit with the experimental data. It was concluded that the model could be used for selection of the draw solution and prediction of water flux under similar situation. A draw solution with greater diffusion coefficient or a thinner substrate of an asymmetric FO membrane resulted in a higher flux.

  15. Experimental characterisation of sprays resulting from impacts of liquid-containing projectiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hostikka, Simo, E-mail: simo.hostikka@aalto.fi [Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Silde, Ari; Sikanen, Topi; Vepsä, Ari; Paajanen, Antti [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd, Espoo (Finland); Honkanen, Markus [Pixact Oy, Tampere (Finland)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Detailed characterisation of sprays resulting from the impacts of water-filled metal projectiles on a hard wall. • Experimental measurements of spray speed, direction and droplet size. • Detailed analysis of overall spray evolution. • The spray characterisation information can be used in CFD analyses of aircraft impact fires. - Abstract: Modelling and analysing fires following aircraft impacts requires information about the behaviour of liquid fuel. In this study, we investigated sprays resulting from the impacts of water-filled metal projectiles on a hard wall. The weights of the projectiles were in the range of 38–110 kg, with 8.6–68 kg water, and the impact speeds varied between 96 and 169 m/s. The overall spray behaviour was observed with high-speed video cameras. Ultra-high-speed cameras were used in backlight configuration for measuring the droplet size and velocity distributions. The results indicate that the liquid leaves the impact position as a thin sheet of spray in a direction perpendicular to the projectile velocity. The initial spray speeds were 1.5–2.5 times the impact speed, and the Sauter mean diameters were in the 147–344 μm range. This data can be used as boundary conditions in CFD fire analyses, considering the two-phase fuel flow. The overall spray observations, including the spray deceleration rate, can be used for validating the model.

  16. Comparison Between Numerical and Experimental Results on Mechanical Stirrer and Bubbling in a Cylindrical Tank - 13047

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima da Silva, M.; Sauvage, E.; Brun, P. [CEA-Marcoule, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Gagnoud, A.; Fautrelle, Y. [SIMaP, Grenoble INP, UJF, CNRS, BP 75, 38402 Saint Martin D' Heres (France); Riva, R. [CEA-Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble (France)

    2013-07-01

    The process of vitrification in a cold crucible heated by direct induction is used in the fusion of oxides. Its feature is the production of high-purity materials. The high-level of purity of the molten is achieved because this melting technique excludes the contamination of the charge by the crucible. The aim of the present paper is to analyze the hydrodynamic of the vitrification process by direct induction, with the focus in the effects associated with the interaction between the mechanical stirrer and bubbling. Considering the complexity of the analyzed system and the goal of the present work, we simplified the system by not taking into account the thermal and electromagnetic phenomena. Based in the concept of hydraulic similitude, we performed an experimental study and a numerical modeling of the simplified model. The results of these two studies were compared and showed a good agreement. The results presented in this paper in conjunction with the previous work contribute to a better understanding of the hydrodynamics effects resulting from the interaction between the mechanical stirrer and air bubbling in the cold crucible heated by direct induction. Further works will take into account thermal and electromagnetic phenomena in the presence of mechanical stirrer and air bubbling. (authors)

  17. Process Model Construction and Optimization Using Statistical Experimental Design,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    Memo No. 88-442 ~LECTE March 1988 31988 %,.. MvAY 1 98 0) PROCESS MODEL CONSTRUCTION AND OPTIMIZATION USING STATISTICAL EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Emmanuel...Sachs and George Prueger Abstract A methodology is presented for the construction of process models by the combination of physically based mechanistic...253-8138. .% I " Process Model Construction and Optimization Using Statistical Experimental Design" by Emanuel Sachs Assistant Professor and George

  18. The Danish national passenger modelModel specification and results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Jeppe; Hansen, Christian Overgaard

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes the structure of the new Danish National Passenger model and provides on this basis a general discussion of large-scale model design, cost-damping and model validation. The paper aims at providing three main contributions to the existing literature. Firstly, at the general level......, the paper provides a description of a large-scale forecast model with a discussion of the linkage between population synthesis, demand and assignment. Secondly, the paper gives specific attention to model specification and in particular choice of functional form and cost-damping. Specifically we suggest...... a family of logarithmic spline functions and illustrate how it is applied in the model. Thirdly and finally, we evaluate model sensitivity and performance by evaluating the distance distribution and elasticities. In the paper we present results where the spline-function is compared with more traditional...

  19. Theoretical and experimental FUZZY modelling of building thermal dynamic response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skrjanc, Igor; Zupancic, Borut [Ljubljana Univ., Faculty of Electrical Engineering, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Furlan, Bostjan; Krainer, Ales [Ljubljana Univ., Faculty of Civil Engineering, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2001-11-01

    In this paper this main advantages and disadvantages of two different types of modelling: theoretical and experimental are presented and discussed. The theoretical modelling is based on energy balances, which gives the overall model described by differential equations. On the basis of developed theoretical model a complex simulator in the MATLAB-Simulink environment was implemented. The second part is devoted to experimental modelling. In this paper a fuzzy model represented by non-linear relations between input and output variables obtained by least-squares optimisation method is investigated. (Author)

  20. Spatiotemporal properties of microsaccades: Model predictions and experimental tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian-Fang; Yuan, Wu-Jie; Zhou, Zhao

    2016-10-01

    Microsaccades are involuntary and very small eye movements during fixation. Recently, the microsaccade-related neural dynamics have been extensively investigated both in experiments and by constructing neural network models. Experimentally, microsaccades also exhibit many behavioral properties. It’s well known that the behavior properties imply the underlying neural dynamical mechanisms, and so are determined by neural dynamics. The behavioral properties resulted from neural responses to microsaccades, however, are not yet understood and are rarely studied theoretically. Linking neural dynamics to behavior is one of the central goals of neuroscience. In this paper, we provide behavior predictions on spatiotemporal properties of microsaccades according to microsaccade-induced neural dynamics in a cascading network model, which includes both retinal adaptation and short-term depression (STD) at thalamocortical synapses. We also successfully give experimental tests in the statistical sense. Our results provide the first behavior description of microsaccades based on neural dynamics induced by behaving activity, and so firstly link neural dynamics to behavior of microsaccades. These results indicate strongly that the cascading adaptations play an important role in the study of microsaccades. Our work may be useful for further investigations of the microsaccadic behavioral properties and of the underlying neural dynamical mechanisms responsible for the behavioral properties.

  1. Folding and necking across the scales: a review of theoretical and experimental results and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markus Schmalholz, Stefan; Mancktelow, Neil Sydney

    2016-10-01

    The shortening and extension of mechanically layered ductile rock generates folds and pinch-and-swell structures (also referred to as necks or continuous boudins), which result from mechanical instabilities termed folding and necking, respectively. Folding and necking are the preferred deformation modes in layered rock because the corresponding mechanical work involved is less than that associated with a homogeneous deformation. The effective viscosity of a layered rock decreases during folding and necking, even when all material parameters remain constant. This mechanical softening due to viscosity decrease is solely the result of fold and pinch-and-swell structure development and is hence termed structural softening (or geometric weakening). Folding and necking occur over the whole range of geological scales, from microscopic up to the size of lithospheric plates. Lithospheric folding and necking are evidence for significant deformation of continental plates, which contradicts the rigid-plate paradigm of plate tectonics. We review here some theoretical and experimental results on folding and necking, including the lithospheric scale, together with a short historical overview of research on folding and necking. We focus on theoretical studies and analytical solutions that provide the best insight into the fundamental parameters controlling folding and necking, although they invariably involve simplifications. To first order, the two essential parameters to quantify folding and necking are the dominant wavelength and the corresponding maximal amplification rate. This review also includes a short overview of experimental studies, a discussion of recent developments involving mainly numerical models, a presentation of some practical applications of theoretical results, and a summary of similarities and differences between folding and necking.

  2. Computational Model Of Fiber Optic, Arc Fusion Splicing; Experimental Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffin, Paul; Frost, Walter; Long, Wayne

    1989-02-01

    Acknowledgement: The assistance and support of the MICOM Army Missile Command is gratefully appreciated. An analytical tool to investigate the arc fusion splicing of optical fibers is developed. The physical model incorporates heat transfer and thermal, visco elastic strain. The heat transfer equations governing radiation, conduction and convection during arc heating are formulated. The radiation heat flux impinging on the fiber optics is modeled based on reported experimental analysis of a generic type arc discharge. The fusion process considers deformation of the fiber due to thermal, viscous and elastic strain. A Maxwell stress-strain relationship is assumed. The model assumes an initial gap at the beginning of the arc which is closed by a press-stroke during the heating cycle. All physical properties of the fused silica glass fibers are considered as functions of temperature based on available experimental data. A computer algorithm has been developed to solve the system of governing equations and parametric studies carried out. An experiment using a FSM-20 arc fusion splicer manufactured by Fujikura Ltd. was carried out to provide experimental verification of the analytical model. In the experiment a continuous fiber was positioned in the arc and cyclic heating and cooling was carried out. One end of the fiber was clamped and the other was free to move. The fiber was heated for 6 seconds and cooled for 3 minutes for several cycles. At the end of each cooling process, photographs of the deformation of the fiber were taken. The results showed that the fiber necked down on the free end and buldged up on the fixed end. With repeated heating and cooling cycles, the optical fiber eventually necked down to the point that it melted in two. The analytical model was run for the conditions of the experiment. Comparisons of the predicted deformation of the optical fiber with those measured is given. The analytical model displays all of the physical phenomenon of fiber

  3. Model selection in systems biology depends on experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Daniel; Kirk, Paul D W; Barnes, Chris P; Toni, Tina; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2014-06-01

    Experimental design attempts to maximise the information available for modelling tasks. An optimal experiment allows the inferred models or parameters to be chosen with the highest expected degree of confidence. If the true system is faithfully reproduced by one of the models, the merit of this approach is clear - we simply wish to identify it and the true parameters with the most certainty. However, in the more realistic situation where all models are incorrect or incomplete, the interpretation of model selection outcomes and the role of experimental design needs to be examined more carefully. Using a novel experimental design and model selection framework for stochastic state-space models, we perform high-throughput in-silico analyses on families of gene regulatory cascade models, to show that the selected model can depend on the experiment performed. We observe that experimental design thus makes confidence a criterion for model choice, but that this does not necessarily correlate with a model's predictive power or correctness. Finally, in the special case of linear ordinary differential equation (ODE) models, we explore how wrong a model has to be before it influences the conclusions of a model selection analysis.

  4. Nonlinear system modeling based on experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PAEZ,THOMAS L.; HUNTER,NORMAN F.

    2000-02-02

    The canonical variate analysis technique is used in this investigation, along with a data transformation algorithm, to identify a system in a transform space. The transformation algorithm involves the preprocessing of measured excitation/response data with a zero-memory-nonlinear transform, specifically, the Rosenblatt transform. This transform approximately maps the measured excitation and response data from its own space into the space of uncorrelated, standard normal random variates. Following this transform, it is appropriate to model the excitation/response relation as linear since Gaussian inputs excite Gaussian responses in linear structures. The linear model is identified in the transform space using the canonical variate analysis approach, and system responses in the original space are predicted using inverse Rosenblatt transformation. An example is presented.

  5. Hepatoprotective activity of Musa paradisiaca on experimental animal models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nirmala M; Girija K; Lakshman K; Divya T

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the hepatoprotective activity of stem of Musa paradisiaca (M. paradisiaca) in CCl4 and paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity models in rats. Methods:Hepatoprotective activity of alcoholic and aqueous extracts of stem of M. paradisiaca was demonstrated by using two experimentally induced hepatotoxicity models. Results:Administration of hepatotoxins (CCl4 and paracetamol) showed significant biochemical and histological deteriorations in the liver of experimental animals. Pretreatment with alcoholic extract (500 mg/kg), more significantly and to a lesser extent the alcoholic extract (250 mg/kg) and aqueous extract (500 mg/kg), reduced the elevated levels of the serum enzymes like serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bilirubin levels and alcoholic and aqueous extracts reversed the hepatic damage towards the normal, which further evidenced the hepatoprotective activity of stem of M.paradisiaca. Conclusions: The alcoholic extract at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg, p.o. and aqueous extract at a dose of 500 mg/kg, p.o. of stem of M. paradisiaca have significant effect on the liver of CCl4 and paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity animal models.

  6. Dynamic modelling and experimental study of asymmetric optothermal microactuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuying; Chun, Qin; You, Qingyang; Wang, Yingda; Zhang, Haijun

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports the dynamic modelling and experimental study of an asymmetric optothermal microactuator (OTMA). According to the principle of thermal flux, a theoretical model for instantaneous temperature distribution of an expansion arm is established and the expression of expansion increment is derived. Dynamic expansion properties of the arm under laser pulse irradiation are theoretically analyzed indicating that both of the maximum expansion and expansion amplitude decrease with the pulse frequency increasing. Experiments have been further carried out on an OTMA fabricated by using an excimer laser micromachining system. It is shown that the OTMA deflects periodically with the same frequency of laser pulse irradiation. Experimental results also prove that both OTMA's maximum deflection and deflection amplitude (related to maximum expansion and expansion amplitude of the arm) decrease as frequency increases, matching with the theoretical model quite well. Even though the OTMA's deflection decrease at higher frequency, it is still capable of generating 8.2 μm maximum deflection and 4.2 μm deflection amplitude under 17 Hz/2 mW laser pulse irradiation. This work improves the potential applications of optothermal microactuators in micro-opto-electro-mechanical system (MOEMS) and micro/nano-technology fields.

  7. Neuroinflammatory targets and treatments for epilepsy validated in experimental models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronica, Eleonora; Bauer, Sebastian; Bozzi, Yuri; Caleo, Matteo; Dingledine, Raymond; Gorter, Jan A; Henshall, David C; Kaufer, Daniela; Koh, Sookyong; Löscher, Wolfgang; Louboutin, Jean-Pierre; Mishto, Michele; Norwood, Braxton A; Palma, Eleonora; Poulter, Michael O; Terrone, Gaetano; Vezzani, Annamaria; Kaminski, Rafal M

    2017-07-01

    A large body of evidence that has accumulated over the past decade strongly supports the role of inflammation in the pathophysiology of human epilepsy. Specific inflammatory molecules and pathways have been identified that influence various pathologic outcomes in different experimental models of epilepsy. Most importantly, the same inflammatory pathways have also been found in surgically resected brain tissue from patients with treatment-resistant epilepsy. New antiseizure therapies may be derived from these novel potential targets. An essential and crucial question is whether targeting these molecules and pathways may result in anti-ictogenesis, antiepileptogenesis, and/or disease-modification effects. Therefore, preclinical testing in models mimicking relevant aspects of epileptogenesis is needed to guide integrated experimental and clinical trial designs. We discuss the most recent preclinical proof-of-concept studies validating a number of therapeutic approaches against inflammatory mechanisms in animal models that could represent novel avenues for drug development in epilepsy. Finally, we suggest future directions to accelerate preclinical to clinical translation of these recent discoveries. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. SSI on the Dynamic Behaviour of a Historical Masonry Building: Experimental versus Numerical Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Ceroni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A reliable procedure to identify the dynamic behaviour of existing masonry buildings is described in the paper, referring to a representative case study: a historical masonry palace located in Benevento (Italy. Since the building has been equipped with a permanent dynamic monitoring system by the Department of Civil Protection, some of the recorded data, acquired in various operating conditions, have been analysed with basic instruments of the Operational Modal Analysis in order to identify the main eigenfrequencies and vibration modes of the structure. The obtained experimental results have been compared to the numerical outcomes provided by three detailed Finite Element (FE models of the building. The influence of Soil-Structure Interaction (SSI has been also introduced in the FE model by a sub-structure approach where concentrated springs were placed at the base of the building to simulate the effect of soil and foundation on the global dynamic behaviour of the structure. The obtained results evidence that subsoil cannot a priori be disregarded in identifying the dynamic response of the building.

  9. Seismoelectric interface response: Experimental results and forward model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schakel, M.D.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Slob, E.C.; Heller, H.K.J.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the seismoelectric interface response is important for developing seismoelectric field methods for oil exploration and environmental/engineering geophysics. The existing seismoelectric theory has never been validated systematically by controlled experiments. We have designed and

  10. ANALYS OF EXPERIMENTAL HYBRID CAR TESTING RESULTS ON URBAN DRIVING CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Serikov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The experimental hybrid car testing results are presented. The estimation of hybrid car draft-speed characteristics, energy and ecological indicators on urban driving cycle are given.

  11. CMS standard model Higgs boson results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Abia Pablo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In July 2012 CMS announced the discovery of a new boson with properties resembling those of the long-sought Higgs boson. The analysis of the proton-proton collision data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 fb−1 at √s = 7 TeV and 19.6 fb−1 at √s = 8 TeV, confirm the Higgs-like nature of the new boson, with a signal strength associated with vector bosons and fermions consistent with the expectations for a standard model (SM Higgs boson, and spin-parity clearly favouring the scalar nature of the new boson. In this note I review the updated results of the CMS experiment.

  12. Experimental modeling hernia of anterior abdominal wall with abdomino-visceral obesity

    OpenAIRE

    KHAYITOV ILKHOM

    2016-01-01

    Improve the results of treatment of patients with postoperative ventral hernias, and based on the study of changes in the anterior abdominal wall of the experimental method of modeling To achieve this goal the first objective of the study was to develop an adequate experimental model of postoperative ventral hernias.

  13. Noninvasive surface measurement of corrosion impedance of reinforcing bar in concrete - part 1: experimental results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jieying; Monteiro, Paulo J.M.; Morrison, H. Frank

    2000-11-01

    The corrosion state of a reinforcing steel bar in concrete can be characterized by the electrical impedance of the interface between the steel bar and the concrete. The experimental part of this study, has shown that changes in the interfacial impedance that are diagnostic of the rate and extent of the corrosion can be measured indirectly with an array of current and voltage electrodes on the concrete surface. The measured impedance, however depends on the electrical resistivity of the concrete, and the depth and diameter of the steel reinforcing bar as well as the interfacial properties. To relate the measured impedance directly to the interfacial properties, a closed-form solution to the governing Poisson's equation was developed and programmed for the potentials from arbitrary, current sources in the vicinity of the reinforcing bar. The solution uses an impedance boundary, condition for the complex impedance at the steel-concrete interface. The response of an arbitrary corrosion state can be simulated in this model by embedding the appropriate complex, frequency-dependent impedance at the interface and computing the voltage/current response that would be measured for an arbitrary placement of electrodes on the concrete surface. To simulate the experimental findings, this paper presents the modeling results by various interfacial impedances but constant concrete resistivity and constant geometry of the steel reinforcing bar This simulation confirms that important parameters of the interfacial impedance controlling corrosion kinetics such as polarization resistance and double layer capacitance are clearly, observed in the measured surface data. [References: 10

  14. An experimental and modeling study of n-octanol combustion

    KAUST Repository

    Cai, Liming

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the first investigation on the combustion chemistry of n-octanol, a long chain alcohol. Ignition delay times were determined experimentally in a high-pressure shock tube, and stable species concentration profiles were obtained in a jet stirred reactor for a range of initial conditions. A detailed kinetic model was developed to describe the oxidation of n-octanol at both low and high temperatures, and the model shows good agreement with the present dataset. The fuel\\'s combustion characteristics are compared to those of n-alkanes and to short chain alcohols to illustrate the effects of the hydroxyl moiety and the carbon chain length on important combustion properties. Finally, the results are discussed in detail. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  15. Astrocyte regulation of sleep circuits: experimental and modeling perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso eFellin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Integrated within neural circuits, astrocytes have recently been shown to modulate brain rhythms thought to mediate sleep function. Experimental evidence suggests that local impact of astrocytes on single synapses translates into global modulation of neuronal networks and behavior. We discuss these findings in the context of current conceptual models of sleep generation and function, each of which have historically focused on neural mechanisms. We highlight the implications and the challenges introduced by these results from a conceptual and computational perspective. We further provide modeling directions on how these data might extend our knowledge of astrocytic properties and sleep function. Given our evolving understanding of how local cellular activities during sleep lead to functional outcomes for the brain, further mechanistic and theoretical understanding of astrocytic contribution to these dynamics will undoubtedly be of great basic and translational benefit.

  16. Statistical approach for uncertainty quantification of experimental modal model parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luczak, M.; Peeters, B.; Kahsin, M.

    2014-01-01

    estimates obtained from vibration experiments. Modal testing results are influenced by numerous factors introducing uncertainty to the measurement results. Different experimental techniques applied to the same test item or testing numerous nominally identical specimens yields different test results...

  17. Hybrid Electric Vehicle Experimental Model with CAN Network Real Time Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RATOI, M.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an experimental model with a distributed control system of a hybrid electrical vehicle is presented. A communication CAN network of high speed (1 Mbps assures a distributed control of the all components. The modeling and the control of different operating regimes are realized on an experimental test-bench of a hybrid electrical vehicle. The experimental results concerning the variations of the mains variables (currents, torques, speeds are presented.

  18. MELCOR model for an experimental 17x17 spent fuel PWR assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoni, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    A MELCOR model has been developed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack cell undergoing severe accident conditions. To the extent possible, the MELCOR model reflects the actual geometry, materials, and masses present in the experimental arrangement for the Sandia Fuel Project (SFP). The report presents an overview of the SFP experimental arrangement, the MELCOR model specifications, demonstration calculation results, and the input model listing.

  19. Rabbit as an animal model for experimental research

    OpenAIRE

    Manjeet Mapara; Betsy Sara Thomas; Bhat, K. M.

    2012-01-01

    Animal experimentation is carried out in consultation with the veterinary wing but it is essential that be familiar with experimental protocols of animal model to be able to design an approriate study. This is more so in place where the veterinary facilities are not easily available.Span Rabbits are commonly used as subjects for screening implant material. They have gained favour for their numerous advantages even though they should be ideally used prior to testing in a larger animal model. T...

  20. Rabbit as an animal model for experimental research

    OpenAIRE

    Manjeet Mapara; Betsy Sara Thomas; Bhat, K. M.

    2012-01-01

    Animal experimentation is carried out in consultation with the veterinary wing but it is essential that be familiar with experimental protocols of animal model to be able to design an approriate study. This is more so in place where the veterinary facilities are not easily available.Span Rabbits are commonly used as subjects for screening implant material. They have gained favour for their numerous advantages even though they should be ideally used prior to testing in a larger animal model. T...

  1. The Second Las Cruces Trench Experiment: Experimental Results and Two-Dimensional Flow Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, R. G.; Wierenga, P. J.; Hudson, D. B.; Kirkland, M. R.

    1991-10-01

    As part of a comprehensive field study designed to provide data to test stochastic and deterministic models of water flow and contaminant transport in the vadose zone, several trench experiments were performed in the semiarid region of southern New Mexico. The first trench experiment is discussed by Wierenga et al. (this issue). During the second trench experiment, a 1.2 m wide by 12 m long area on the north side of and parallel to a 26.4 m long by 4.8 m wide by 6m deep trench was irrigated with water containing tracers using a carefully controlled drip irrigation system. The irrigated area was heavily instrumented with tensiometers and neutron probe access tubes to monitor water movement, and with suction samplers to monitor solute transport. Water containing tritium and bromide was. applied during the first 11.5 days of the study. Thereafter, water was applied without tracers for an additional 64 days. Both water movement and tracer movement were monitored in the subsoil during infiltration and redistribution. The experimental results indicate that water and bromide moved fairly uniformly during infiltration and the bromide moved ahead of the tritium due to anion exclusion during redistribution. Comparisons between measurements and predictions made with a two-dimensional model show qualitative agreement for two of the three water content measurement planes. Model predictions of tritium and bromide transport were not as satisfactory. Measurements of both tritium and bromide show localized areas of high relative concentrations and a large downward motion of bromide relative to tritium during redistribution. While the simple deterministic model does show larger downward motions for bromide than for tritium during redistribution, it does not predict the high concentrations of solute observed during infiltration, nor can it predict the heterogeneous behavior observed for tritium during infiltration and for bromide during redistribution.

  2. Comparative analysis of results from experimental and numerical studies on concrete strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mkrtychev Oleg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Some results of numerical experiments of testing concrete cubes and prisms on unconfined compression, and the comparison of results obtained with experimental and specified data, are presented in the article. When performing calculations of structures in a nonlinear setting, it is very important to choose adequate deformation diagrams or material models. Because of the fact that there are no instructions how to use the diagrams of concrete and armature deformation in collaboration of steel and concrete, the simulation of reinforced concrete structures by finite elements of the same type without any assumptions is impossible. Numerical experiments have been performed in the LS-DYNA software package. This software package allows simulating the collaboration of concrete and steeling with the help of three-dimensional (for concrete and rod (for the reinforcement finite elements. As samples, a cube and a prism with dimensions of 150×150×150 mm and 150×150×600 mm, respectively, have been taken. The samples are simulated by solid finite elements. For the simulation of concrete, the non-linear CSCM (Continuous Surface Cap Model material is used. The tests were carried out with samples of the following classes of concrete as for cylinder compressive strength: C12, C16, C20, C25, C30, C35. This corresponds to the following classes of cube compression strength: B15, B20, B25, B30, B37, B45. The tests have been carried out considering the friction coefficients between the plates of a testing machine, and a sample. The performed researches have shown that the destruction nature of the samples in a numerical experiment corresponds to the failure nature in real tests. The investigated model of CSCM concrete can be used in the calculation of concrete and reinforced concrete structures with acceptable accuracy for main classes of concrete.

  3. Experimental Results of High Pressure and High Strain Rate Tantalum Flow Stress on Omega and NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sook; Arsenlis, A.; Barton, N.; Benedetti, L.; Huntington, C.; McNaney, J.; Orlikowski, D.; Prisbrey, S.; Remington, B.; Rudd, R.; Swift, D.; Weber, S.; Wehrenberg, C.; Comley, A.

    2015-11-01

    Understanding the high pressure, high strain rate plastic deformation dynamics of materials is an area of research of high interest to planetary formation dynamics, meteor impact dynamics, and inertial confinement fusion designs. Developing predictive theoretical and computational descriptions of such systems, however, has been a difficult undertaking. We have performed many experiments on Omega, LCLS and NIF to test Ta strength models at high pressures (~ up to 4 Mbar), high strain rates (~ 107 s-1) and high strains (>30%) under ramped compression conditions using Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability properties. These experiments use plasma drive to ramp compress the sample to higher pressure without shock-melting. We also studied lattice level strength mechanisms under shocked compression using a diffraction-based technique. Our studies show that the strength mechanisms from macro to micro scales are different from the traditional strength model predictions and that they are loading path dependent. We will report the experimental results. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA273.

  4. Modeling simulation and experimental validation for mold filling process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Hua; JU Dong-ying; MAO Hong-kui; D. SAITO

    2006-01-01

    Based on the continuum equation, momentum conservation and energy conservation equations, the numerical model of turbulent flow filling was introduced; the 3-D free surface vof method was improved. Whether or not the numerical simulation results are reasonable, it needs corresponding experimental validations. General experimental techniques for casting fluid flow process include: thermocouple tracking location method, hydraulic simulating method, heat-resistant glass window method and X-ray observation etc. The hydraulic analogue experiment with DPIV technique is arranged to validate the fluent flow program for low-pressure casting with 0.1×105 Pa and 0.6×105 Pa pressure visually. By comparing the flow head, liquid surface, flow velocity, it is found that the filling pressure value influences the flow state strongly. With the increase of the filling pressure, the fluid flow state becomes unstable, the flow head becomes higher, and the filling time is reduced. The simulated results are accordant with the observed results approximately, which can prove the reasonability of our numerical program for filling process further.

  5. Cadaver as an experimental model to study abdominal wall tension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahas Fábio Xerfan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of cadaver as an experimental model to evaluate tension of the abdominal wall after aponeurotic incisions and muscular undermining is described on this article. The tension required to pull the anterior and the posterior rectus sheaths towards the midline was studied in fresh cadavers at two levels: 3 cm above and 2 cm below the umbilicus. Traction measurement was assessed with a dynamometer attached to suture loops on the anterior and posterior recti sheaths, close to the midline, above and below the umbilicus. The quotient of the force used to mobilize the aponeurotic site to the midline and its resulting displacement was called the traction index. These indices were compared in three situations: 1 prior to any aponeurotic undermining; 2 after the incision of the anterior rectus sheath and the undermining of the rectus muscle from its posterior sheath; and 3 after additionally releasing and undermining of the external oblique muscle. The experimental model described showed to be feasible to demonstrate the effects on tension of the abdominal wall after incisions and undermining of its muscles and aponeurosis.

  6. Experimental Investigation and Theoretical Modeling of Nanosilica Activity in Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Seung Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental investigations and theoretical modeling of the hydration reaction of nanosilica blended concrete with different water-to-binder ratios and different nanosilica replacement ratios. The developments of chemically bound water contents, calcium hydroxide contents, and compressive strength of Portland cement control specimens and nanosilica blended specimens were measured at different ages: 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, and 28 days. Due to the pozzolanic reaction of nanosilica, the contents of calcium hydroxide in nanosilica blended pastes are considerably lower than those in the control specimens. Compared with the control specimens, the extent of compressive strength enhancement in the nanosilica blended specimens is much higher at early ages. Additionally, a blended cement hydration model that considers both the hydration reaction of cement and the pozzolanic reaction of nanosilica is proposed. The properties of nanosilica blended concrete during hardening were evaluated using the degree of hydration of cement and the reaction degree of nanosilica. The calculated chemically bound water contents, calcium hydroxide contents, and compressive strength were generally consistent with the experimental results.

  7. Cardiac lymphatic dynamics after ischemia and reperfusion - experimental model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, A.C. E-mail: cristina@imagem.ibili.uc.pt; Lima, J.J.P. de; Botelho, M.F.; Pacheco, M.F.; Sousa, P.; Bernardo, J.; Ferreira, N.; Goncalves, L.; Aguiar, J.; Providencia, L.A.; Pauwels, E.K.J

    1998-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the lymphatic cardiac circulation in an experimental model of ischemia plus reperfusion in mongrel dogs (Canis familiaris L). As radiotracer we used 0.2-0.25 ml (111 MBq) of {sup 99m}Tc-Re{sub 2}S{sub 7} colloid ({+-}10 {mu}m), injected subcapsullary below the second diagonal of the descending anterior ligated coronary artery with a special needle. A {gamma}-camera/Starport + DecStation were used for data acquisition. Four experimental groups with five animals each were established: G I = controls; G II = immediately after acute myocardial infarction (AMI); G III = late infarction (5 days after AMI); G IV = ischemia (90 min) + reperfusion. Four regions of interest (ROIs) were chosen: injection area (ZA), above (ZB), near right (ZD), and far right (ZC) from ZA. Mean disappearance times in ZA and dynamic parameters in the other ROIs were determined from activity/time curves drawn in each area, using homemade software. The results obtained seem to indicate that the methodology is appropriate to a detailed study of lymphatic drainage in pathological situations in animal models.

  8. Revisiting Runoff Model Calibration: Airborne Snow Observatory Results Allow Improved Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, B. J.; Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Deterministic snow accumulation and ablation simulation models are widely used by runoff managers throughout the world to predict runoff quantities and timing. Model fitting is typically based on matching modeled runoff volumes and timing with observed flow time series at a few points in the basin. In recent decades, sparse networks of point measurements of the mountain snowpacks have been available to compare with modeled snowpack, but the comparability of results from a snow sensor or course to model polygons of 5 to 50 sq. km is suspect. However, snowpack extent, depth, and derived snow water equivalent have been produced by the NASA/JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) mission for spring of 20013 and 2014 in the Tuolumne River basin above Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. These high-resolution snowpack data have exposed the weakness in a model calibration based on runoff alone. The U.S. Geological Survey's Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) calibration that was based on 30-years of inflow to Hetch Hetchy produces reasonable inflow results, but modeled spatial snowpack location and water quantity diverged significantly from the weekly measurements made by ASO during the two ablation seasons. The reason is that the PRMS model has many flow paths, storages, and water transfer equations, and a calibrated outflow time series can be right for many wrong reasons. The addition of a detailed knowledge of snow extent and water content constrains the model so that it is a better representation of the actual watershed hydrology. The mechanics of recalibrating PRMS to the ASO measurements will be described, and comparisons in observed versus modeled flow for both a small subbasin and the entire Hetch Hetchy basin will be shown. The recalibrated model provided a bitter fit to the snowmelt recession, a key factor for water managers as they balance declining inflows with demand for power generation and ecosystem releases during the final months of snow melt runoff.

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation of a simplified exhaust model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Vehovszky

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A simplified experimental equipment was built to investigate heat radiation and free convection around hot exhaust pipe. Temperatures were measured on the surface of the pipe as like as on heat insulating and -reflecting aluminum shield. Special care was taken to the temperature measuring method: result proved that inappropriate fixing of measuring thermocouples lead to an error of up to 30 % in the temperature-increase values. A detailed 1D numerical model was set up and parametrized so as to the calculation results can be fitted to measured temperature values. In this way thermal properties of the surfaces – as emissivities, absorption coefficients and convective heat transfer coefficients – were determined for temperature sweeps and stationary state cases. The used methods are to be further improved for real automotive parts and higher temperatures.

  10. Properties of $^{152}$Gd Collective States (Comparison of Experimental and Theoretical Results)

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, J; Honusek, M; Kalinnikov, V G; Mrazek, J; Pronskikh, V S; Caloun, P; Lebedev, N A; Stegailov, V I; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V M

    2002-01-01

    The experimental level energies and reduced probabilities of the transitions decoupling the ^{152}Gd excited states are compared with the calculations using a number of phenomenological formulae, as well as the Q-phonon model, IBA-2, phase transitions U(5)-SO(6) and U(5)-SU(3). A comparison with the calculations made by other authors is also given.

  11. An experimental simulation model for coated paper drying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hallajisani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of information regarding the phenomena of mass, heat, and momentum transfer in coated paper drying, substantial research work still needs to be done. A simulation model for coated paper drying is introduced which integrates heat and mass transfer mechanisms. In the model, the coated paper was assumed to have 3 layers (coated layer, wet and dry layers of the base paper, in which the thickness of each layer is a function of drying time and condition. The thickness of the wet layer of the base paper was considered to be a function of water permeability rate that in turn is a function of the moisture diffusion coefficient, time and drying rate. Movement of vapor resulting from evaporation in the middle layer was assumed to be a combination of laminar bulk flow and molecular diffusion. Radiation absorption was used as a diminishing exponential model, which depends on moisture content. Hot air and super heated vapor were used as drying fluids. Functional variables were temperature, drying fluid velocity and delay time. To verify the simulation results two compositions were applied for the coating suspension. The simulation results matched well with experimental outcomes.

  12. Analysis and presentation of experimental results with examples, problems and programs

    CERN Document Server

    Christodoulides, Costas

    2017-01-01

    This book is intended as a guide to the analysis and presentation of experimental results. It develops various techniques for the numerical processing of experimental data, using basic statistical methods and the theory of errors. After presenting basic theoretical concepts, the book describes the methods by which the results can be presented, both numerically and graphically. The book is divided into three parts, of roughly equal length, addressing the theory, the analysis of data, and the presentation of results. Examples are given and problems are solved using the Excel, Origin, Python and R software packages. In addition, programs in all four languages are made available to readers, allowing them to use them in analyzing and presenting the results of their own experiments. Subjects are treated at a level appropriate for undergraduate students in the natural sciences, but this book should also appeal to anyone whose work involves dealing with experimental results.

  13. Modeling Malaysia's Energy System: Some Preliminary Results

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad M. Yusof

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The current dynamic and fragile world energy environment necessitates the development of new energy model that solely caters to analyze Malaysias energy scenarios. Approach: The model is a network flow model that traces the flow of energy carriers from its sources (import and mining) through some conversion and transformation processes for the production of energy products to final destinations (energy demand sectors). The integration to the economic sectors is done exogene...

  14. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  15. Comparison of Simulation and Experimental Results of Class - D Inverter Fed Induction Heater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rama Reddy

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This research deals w ith simulation and experimentation of closed loop controlled class-D inverter fed induction heater system. This converter has reduced switching losses, stress and increased power density. The inverter system is designed and the simulation is done using Matlab. The results of simulation and experimentation are presented. The induction heater system uses embedded controller to generate driving pulses. The objective is to develop an induction heater system with minimum hardware.

  16. Experimental results from the CEA Reactor Physics Programme on MARIUS III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosser, R.; Langlet, G.; Morier, F.

    1971-01-15

    A programme of experimental studies on the physics of HTR lattices was proposed in 1968. Under the authority of the EDF-CEA joint comittee, decision to achieve this programmes was taken in Jyly 1969. Less than one year after, MARIUS III had its first divergence in its new configuration and the experiments began in August 1970. After preliminary experiments, phase one of the programme was achieved in October, November and December 1970. Experimental results are presented.

  17. Metabolic alterations in experimental models of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria G. Puiu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Major depressive disorder is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders and is associated with a severe impact on the personal functioning, thus with incurring significant direct and indirect costs. The presence of depression in patients with medical comorbidities increases the risks of myocardial infarction and decreases diabetes control, and adherence to treatment. The mechanism through which these effects are produced is still uncertain. Objectives of this study were to evaluate the metabolic alterations in female Wistar rats with induced depression, with and without administration of Agomelatine. The methods included two experiments. All data were analyzed by comparison with group I (control, and with each other. In the first experiment we induced depression by: exposure to chronic mild stress-group II; olfactory bulbectomy-group III; and exposure to chronic mild stress and hyperlipidic/ hyper caloric dietgroup IV. The second experiment was similar with the first but the rats received Agomelatine (0.16mg/ animal: group V (depression induced through exposure to chronic mild stress, VI (depression induced through olfactory bulbectomy and VII (depression induced through exposure to chronic mild stressing hyperlipidic/ hypercaloric diet. Weight, cholesterol, triglycerides and glycaemia were measured at day 0 and 28, and leptin value was measured at day 28. The results in the 1st experiment revealed significant differences (p<0.01 for weight and cholesterol in Group IV, for triglycerides in groups III and IV (p<0.001, and for glycaemia in group II. The 2nd experiment revealed significant differences (p<0.001 in group VII for weight and triglycerides, and in groups V and VI for triglycerides (p<0.01. In conclusion, significant correlations were found between high level of triglycerides and depression induced by chronic stress and olfactory bulbectomy. Agomelatine groups had a lower increase of triglycerides levels.

  18. Role of breathing in cardiac performance: experimental and mathematical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Binh Q.; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1999-05-01

    Due to the close proximity of the heart and lungs within a closed chest environment, we expect breathing to affect various cardiac performance parameters and hence cardiac output. We present an integrative approach to study heart-lung interactions, combining a mathematical formulation of the circulation system with imaging techniques using echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) and dynamic x-ray CT (EBCT). We hypothesize that appropriate synchronization of mechanical ventilation to cardiac-cycle specific events can improve cardiac function, i.e. stroke volume (SV) and cardiac output (CO). Computational and experimental results support the notion that heart-lung interaction, leading to altered cardiac output associated with inspiration/expiration, is not directly associated with lung inflation/deflation and thus is felt to be more influenced by pleural pressure changes. The mathematical model of the circulation demonstrates the importance of cardiac-cycle specific timing of ventilation on cardiac function and matches with experimentally observed relationships found in animal models studied via EBCT and human studies using EPI. Results show that positive pressure mechanical ventilation timed to systolic events may increase SV and CO by up to 30%, mainly by increased filling of the ventricles during diastole. Similarly, negative pressure (spontaneous) respiration has its greatest effect on ventricular diastolic filling. Cardiac-gated mechanical ventilation may provide sufficient cardiac augmentation to warrant further investigation as a minimally-invasive technique for temporary cardiac assist. Through computational modeling and advanced imaging protocols, we were able to uniquely study heart-lung interactions within the intact milieu of the never-invaded thorax.

  19. Anti-granuloma activity of Coriandrum sativum in experimental models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Nair

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coriandrum sativum has been used in the traditional systems of medicine for management of arthritis and other inflammatory disorders. Objectives: In this study, we have evaluated the anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activities of Coriandrum sativum hydroalcoholic extract (CSHE in experimental models. Materials and Methods: The anti-inflammatory activity of CSHE was evaluated using carrageenan-induced paw edema model and the anti-granuloma activity of CSHE was evaluated using the subcutaneous cotton pellet implantation-induced granuloma formation and stimulation of peritoneal macrophages with complete Freund′s adjuvant. Serum tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1 β levels, and peritoneal macrophage expression of TNF-R1 were evaluated as markers of global inflammation. Results: CSHE at the highest dose tested (32 mg/kg produced a significant reduction (P < 0.05 in paw edema after carrageenan administration. CSHE treatment also reduced dry granuloma weight in all treated animals. Serum IL-6 and IL-1 β levels were significantly ( P < 0.05 lower in the CSHE (32 mg/kg-treated group as compared to control. Although there was an increase in serum TNF-α level in the CSHE-treated group as compared to control, TNF-R1 expression on peritoneal macrophages was found to be reduced. Conclusion: Thus, the result of this study demonstrates the anti-inflammatory and anti-granuloma activities of CSHE in experimental models, and validates its traditional use for the management of arthritis and other inflammatory disorders.

  20. The use of Alloxan and Streptozotocin in Experimental Diabetes Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Kurçer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease which leads to several acute and chronic complications, morbidity and mortality, and decreased lifespan and quality of life. Therefore, in research studies that aim to enlighten the pathogenesis of diabetes and investigate possible treatment strategies, experimental animal models of diabetes provide many advantages to the investigator. Models of diabetes obtained by chemical induction, diet, surgical manipulations or combination thereof and also new genetically modified animal models are some of the experimental models. Alloxan and streptozotocin (STZ, which are toxic glucose analogues that preferentially accumulate in pancreatic beta cells, are widely used toxic agents to induce experimental diabetes in animals. This review gives an overview on the use of alloxan and STZ to induce chemical diabetes models with reference to their mechanisms, utilizable doses, advantages and disadvantages in diabetes research. Turk Jem 2012; 16: 34-40

  1. Rabbit as an animal model for experimental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapara, Manjeet; Thomas, Betsy Sara; Bhat, K M

    2012-01-01

    Animal experimentation is carried out in consultation with the veterinary wing but it is essential that be familiar with experimental protocols of animal model to be able to design an approriate study. This is more so in place where the veterinary facilities are not easily available.Span Rabbits are commonly used as subjects for screening implant material. They have gained favour for their numerous advantages even though they should be ideally used prior to testing in a larger animal model. Though experimentation on rabbits seems to be easy there are many pitfalls. Our endeavor in this article is to integrate all the data about maintaining rabbits as a model and to critically analyze it on the basis of our experimentation.

  2. An experimental methodology for a fuzzy set preference model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turksen, I. B.; Willson, Ian A.

    1992-01-01

    A flexible fuzzy set preference model first requires approximate methodologies for implementation. Fuzzy sets must be defined for each individual consumer using computer software, requiring a minimum of time and expertise on the part of the consumer. The amount of information needed in defining sets must also be established. The model itself must adapt fully to the subject's choice of attributes (vague or precise), attribute levels, and importance weights. The resulting individual-level model should be fully adapted to each consumer. The methodologies needed to develop this model will be equally useful in a new generation of intelligent systems which interact with ordinary consumers, controlling electronic devices through fuzzy expert systems or making recommendations based on a variety of inputs. The power of personal computers and their acceptance by consumers has yet to be fully utilized to create interactive knowledge systems that fully adapt their function to the user. Understanding individual consumer preferences is critical to the design of new products and the estimation of demand (market share) for existing products, which in turn is an input to management systems concerned with production and distribution. The question of what to make, for whom to make it and how much to make requires an understanding of the customer's preferences and the trade-offs that exist between alternatives. Conjoint analysis is a widely used methodology which de-composes an overall preference for an object into a combination of preferences for its constituent parts (attributes such as taste and price), which are combined using an appropriate combination function. Preferences are often expressed using linguistic terms which cannot be represented in conjoint models. Current models are also not implemented an individual level, making it difficult to reach meaningful conclusions about the cause of an individual's behavior from an aggregate model. The combination of complex aggregate

  3. Integral Reactor Containment Condensation Model and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiao [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Corradini, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-05-02

    This NEUP funded project, NEUP 12-3630, is for experimental, numerical and analytical studies on high-pressure steam condensation phenomena in a steel containment vessel connected to a water cooling tank, carried out at Oregon State University (OrSU) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW-Madison). In the three years of investigation duration, following the original proposal, the planned tasks have been completed: (1) Performed a scaling study for the full pressure test facility applicable to the reference design for the condensation heat transfer process during design basis accidents (DBAs), modified the existing test facility to route the steady-state secondary steam flow into the high pressure containment for controllable condensation tests, and extended the operations at negative gage pressure conditions (OrSU). (2) Conducted a series of DBA and quasi-steady experiments using the full pressure test facility to provide a reliable high pressure condensation database (OrSU). (3) Analyzed experimental data and evaluated condensation model for the experimental conditions, and predicted the prototypic containment performance under accidental conditions (UW-Madison). A film flow model was developed for the scaling analysis, and the results suggest that the 1/3 scaled test facility covers large portion of laminar film flow, leading to a lower average heat transfer coefficient comparing to the prototypic value. Although it is conservative in reactor safety analysis, the significant reduction of heat transfer coefficient (50%) could under estimate the prototypic condensation heat transfer rate, resulting in inaccurate prediction of the decay heat removal capability. Further investigation is thus needed to quantify the scaling distortion for safety analysis code validation. Experimental investigations were performed in the existing MASLWR test facility at OrST with minor modifications. A total of 13 containment condensation tests were conducted for pressure

  4. Experimental investigation and modeling of diesel engine fuel spray

    OpenAIRE

    Kolodnytska, R. V.; Karimi, K; Crua, C.; Heikal, M. R.; Sazhina, E. M.

    2008-01-01

    A model for spray penetration in diesel engines is suggested. It is based on momentum conservation for a realistic mass flow rate transient profile. The modelling approach is based on tracking of centre-of-fuel-mass (COFM) of injected diesel fuel. The model was validated for Bosch and Delphi injectors using the data obtained at Sir Harry Ricardo automotive centre, University of Brighton, UK. The model is shown to produce a good agreement with the experimental data until ...

  5. Parameter Estimation and Experimental Design in Groundwater Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ne-zheng

    2004-01-01

    This paper reviews the latest developments on parameter estimation and experimental design in the field of groundwater modeling. Special considerations are given when the structure of the identified parameter is complex and unknown. A new methodology for constructing useful groundwater models is described, which is based on the quantitative relationships among the complexity of model structure, the identifiability of parameter, the sufficiency of data, and the reliability of model application.

  6. Integral Reactor Containment Condensation Model and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qiao [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Corradini, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-05-02

    This NEUP funded project, NEUP 12-3630, is for experimental, numerical and analytical studies on high-pressure steam condensation phenomena in a steel containment vessel connected to a water cooling tank, carried out at Oregon State University (OrSU) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW-Madison). In the three years of investigation duration, following the original proposal, the planned tasks have been completed: (1) Performed a scaling study for the full pressure test facility applicable to the reference design for the condensation heat transfer process during design basis accidents (DBAs), modified the existing test facility to route the steady-state secondary steam flow into the high pressure containment for controllable condensation tests, and extended the operations at negative gage pressure conditions (OrSU). (2) Conducted a series of DBA and quasi-steady experiments using the full pressure test facility to provide a reliable high pressure condensation database (OrSU). (3) Analyzed experimental data and evaluated condensation model for the experimental conditions, and predicted the prototypic containment performance under accidental conditions (UW-Madison). A film flow model was developed for the scaling analysis, and the results suggest that the 1/3 scaled test facility covers large portion of laminar film flow, leading to a lower average heat transfer coefficient comparing to the prototypic value. Although it is conservative in reactor safety analysis, the significant reduction of heat transfer coefficient (50%) could under estimate the prototypic condensation heat transfer rate, resulting in inaccurate prediction of the decay heat removal capability. Further investigation is thus needed to quantify the scaling distortion for safety analysis code validation. Experimental investigations were performed in the existing MASLWR test facility at OrST with minor modifications. A total of 13 containment condensation tests were conducted for pressure

  7. DoSSiER: Database of Scientific Simulation and Experimental Results

    CERN Document Server

    Wenzel, Hans; Genser, Krzysztof; Elvira, Daniel; Pokorski, Witold; Carminati, Federico; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Ribon, Alberto; Folger, Gunter; Dotti, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The Geant4, GeantV and GENIE collaborations regularly perform validation and regression tests for simulation results. DoSSiER (Database of Scientific Simulation and Experimental Results) is being developed as a central repository to store the simulation results as well as the experimental data used for validation. DoSSiER can be easily accessed via a web application. In addition, a web service allows for programmatic access to the repository to extract records in json or xml exchange formats. In this article, we describe the functionality and the current status of various components of DoSSiER as well as the technology choices we made.

  8. Psychoneuroimmunology: an interpretation of experimental and case study evidence towards a paradigm for predictable results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalt, H W

    2000-07-01

    This paper surveys a number of key experiments and case studies relating to psychoneuroimmunology. It finds that most techniques to influence or even direct the immune system via the mind fall into a series of theoretical categories called passive, active and targeted effects. By examining the results of experiments and studies in the light of these categories a number of important conclusions are drawn. These conclusions explain differences in experimental results, describe those variables that appear to be central to obtaining results, and describe in detail where experimentation should be concentrated to further knowledge of psychoneuroimmunology.

  9. Modeling Results for the ITER Cryogenic Fore Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongsheng

    The work presented here is the analysis and modeling of the ITER-Cryogenic Fore Pump (CFP), also called Cryogenic Viscous Compressor (CVC). Unlike common cryopumps that are usually used to create and maintain vacuum, the cryogenic fore pump is designed for ITER to collect and compress hydrogen isotopes during the regeneration process of the torus cryopumps. Different from common cryopumps, the ITER-CFP works in the viscous flow regime. As a result, both adsorption boundary conditions and transport phenomena contribute unique features to the pump performance. In this report, the physical mechanisms of cryopumping are studied, especially the diffusion-adsorption process and these are coupled with the standard equations of species, momentum and energy balance, as well as the equation of state. Numerical models are developed, which include highly coupled non-linear conservation equations of species, momentum, and energy and equation of state. Thermal and kinetic properties are treated as functions of temperature, pressure, and composition of the gas fluid mixture. To solve such a set of equations, a novel numerical technique, identified as the Group-Member numerical technique is proposed. This document presents three numerical models: a transient model, a steady state model, and a hemisphere (or molecular flow) model. The first two models are developed based on analysis of the raw experimental data while the third model is developed as a preliminary study. The modeling results are compared with available experiment data for verification. The models can be used for cryopump design, and can also benefit problems, such as loss of vacuum in a cryomodule or cryogenic desublimation. The scientific and engineering investigation being done here builds connections between Mechanical Engineering and other disciplines, such as Chemical Engineering, Physics, and Chemistry.

  10. Modelling human actions on lightweight structures: experimental and numerical developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živanović S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents recent, numerical and experimental, developments in modelling dynamic loading generated by humans. As modern structures with exposure to human-induced loading, such as footbridges, building floors and grandstands, are becoming ever lighter and more slender, they are increasingly susceptible to vibration under human-induced dynamic excitation, such as walking, jumping, running and bobbing, and their vibration serviceability assessment is often a deciding factor in the design process. While simplified modelling of the human using a harmonic force was sufficient for assessment of vibration performance of more robust structures a few decades ago, the higher fidelity models are required in the contemporary design. These models are expected not only to describe both temporal and spectral features of the force signal more accurately, but also to capture the influence, psychological and physiological, of human-structure and human-human interaction mechanisms on the human kinematics, and consequently on the force generated and the resulting vibration response. Significant advances have been made in both the research studies and design guidance. This paper reports the key developments and identifies the scope for further research.

  11. Esophageal aerodynamics in an idealized experimental model of tracheoesophageal speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erath, Byron D.; Hemsing, Frank S.

    2016-03-01

    Flow behavior is investigated in the esophageal tract in an idealized experimental model of tracheoesophageal speech. The tracheoesophageal prosthesis is idealized as a first-order approximation using a straight, constant diameter tube. The flow is scaled according to Reynolds, Strouhal, and Euler numbers to ensure dynamic similarity. Flow pulsatility is produced by a driven orifice that approximates the kinematics of the pharyngoesophageal segment during tracheoesophageal speech. Particle image velocimetry data are acquired in three orthogonal planes as the flow exits the model prosthesis and enters the esophageal tract. Contrary to prior investigations performed in steady flow with the prosthesis oriented in-line with the flow direction, the fluid dynamics are shown to be highly unsteady, suggesting that the esophageal pressure field will be similarly complex. A large vortex ring is formed at the inception of each phonatory cycle, followed by the formation of a persistent jet. This vortex ring appears to remain throughout the entire cycle due to the continued production of vorticity resulting from entrainment between the prosthesis jet and the curved esophageal walls. Mean flow in the axial direction of the esophagus produces significant stretching of the vortex throughout the phonatory cycle. The stagnation point created by the jet impinging on the esophageal wall varies throughout the cycle due to fluctuations in the jet trajectory, which most likely arises due to flow separation within the model prosthesis. Applications to tracheoesophageal speech, including shortcomings of the model and proposed future plans, are discussed.

  12. Experimental Research and Mathematical Modelling for Coal Reburning in Furnace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Jun; SU Sheng; SUN Lu-shi; SUN Xue-xin; ZHANG Zhong-xiao; ZHU Ji-mu

    2006-01-01

    Reburning technology is one of the most cost-effective NOx reduction strategies for coal combustion systems. In this paper, a nitric oxide submodel incorporated into a comprehensive coal combustion model was developed for predicting NOx reduction in a 93 kW laboratory-scale coal combustion furnace by reburning. This NO submodel, including reburning mechanism, requires the solution of only two transport equations to model the behavior of NO reduction in the reburning process. A number of experiments have been performed in the same furnace, and the experimental data obtained from the optimized reburn configuration was used to validate the model. Measurements and predictions both show above 50% reduction of NO emissions for the optimized reburning process. Profile comparisons show that the predicted temperature and oxygen concentration match well with the measurements, and the general trend of predicted NO concentration is very similar to that measured. The results of this study show that the present nitric oxide submodel depicts quite well the observed behaviour of NO annihilation in the reburning process. It is expected that this usable and computationally economic model represents a useful tool to simulate the gaseous fuel reburning process for the researchers concerned with practical combustors.

  13. A comparison between numerical predictions and theoretical and experimental results for laminar core-annular flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beerens, J.C.; Ooms, G.; Pourquie, M.J.B.M.; Westerweel, J.

    2014-01-01

    high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a laminar low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a vertical pipe. The numerical results are compared with theoretical results from linear stability calculations and with experimental data. The comparison is good and the general conclusion of our study is

  14. Quantitative magnetospheric models: results and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, M.; Hesse, M.; Gombosi, T.; Csem Team

    Global magnetospheric models are indispensable tool that allow multi-point measurements to be put into global context Significant progress is achieved in global MHD modeling of magnetosphere structure and dynamics Medium resolution simulations confirm general topological pictures suggested by Dungey State of the art global models with adaptive grids allow performing simulations with highly resolved magnetopause and magnetotail current sheet Advanced high-resolution models are capable to reproduced transient phenomena such as FTEs associated with formation of flux ropes or plasma bubbles embedded into magnetopause and demonstrate generation of vortices at magnetospheric flanks On the other hand there is still controversy about the global state of the magnetosphere predicted by MHD models to the point of questioning the length of the magnetotail and the location of the reconnection sites within it For example for steady southwards IMF driving condition resistive MHD simulations produce steady configuration with almost stationary near-earth neutral line While there are plenty of observational evidences of periodic loading unloading cycle during long periods of southward IMF Successes and challenges in global modeling of magnetispheric dynamics will be addessed One of the major challenges is to quantify the interaction between large-scale global magnetospheric dynamics and microphysical processes in diffusion regions near reconnection sites Possible solutions to controversies will be discussed

  15. Experimental characterization and modeling of an ethanol steam reformer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandø, Matthias; Bovo, Mirko; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2006-01-01

    (ethanol, bio-diesel etc.) represents sustainable sources of hydrogen for micro Combined Heat and Power (CHP) production as well as Auxiliary Power Units (APUs). The system was experimentally characterized and theoretically modelled using a 1-dimensional system model implemented in MATLAB/Simulink...

  16. A model of the mammalian optic nerve fibre based on experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oozeer, M; Veraart, C; Legat, V; Delbeke, J

    2006-08-01

    Several experimental data about membrane dynamics and pharmacological sensitivities of optic nerve axons have been published. The present work summarizes these data and computer simulations have been used to develop a model of the mammalian optic nerve fibre. The ionic currents description were derived from existing membrane models and particularly from a model of the somatic retinal ganglion cell (RGC) impulse generation. However, original equations had to be modified to match experimental data, which suggests that in RGCs, axonal and somatic ion channel expression are different. The new model is consistent with recent experimental results about optic nerve axonal excitability.

  17. Autonomous learning derived from experimental modeling of physical laws.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabec, Igor

    2013-05-01

    This article deals with experimental description of physical laws by probability density function of measured data. The Gaussian mixture model specified by representative data and related probabilities is utilized for this purpose. The information cost function of the model is described in terms of information entropy by the sum of the estimation error and redundancy. A new method is proposed for searching the minimum of the cost function. The number of the resulting prototype data depends on the accuracy of measurement. Their adaptation resembles a self-organized, highly non-linear cooperation between neurons in an artificial NN. A prototype datum corresponds to the memorized content, while the related probability corresponds to the excitability of the neuron. The method does not include any free parameters except objectively determined accuracy of the measurement system and is therefore convenient for autonomous execution. Since representative data are generally less numerous than the measured ones, the method is applicable for a rather general and objective compression of overwhelming experimental data in automatic data-acquisition systems. Such compression is demonstrated on analytically determined random noise and measured traffic flow data. The flow over a day is described by a vector of 24 components. The set of 365 vectors measured over one year is compressed by autonomous learning to just 4 representative vectors and related probabilities. These vectors represent the flow in normal working days and weekends or holidays, while the related probabilities correspond to relative frequencies of these days. This example reveals that autonomous learning yields a new basis for interpretation of representative data and the optimal model structure.

  18. Mass spectrometry analysis of hepcidin peptides in experimental mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Tjalsma

    Full Text Available The mouse is a valuable model for unravelling the role of hepcidin in iron homeostasis, however, such studies still report hepcidin mRNA levels as a surrogate marker for bioactive hepcidin in its pivotal function to block ferroportin-mediated iron transport. Here, we aimed to assess bioactive mouse Hepcidin-1 (Hep-1 and its paralogue Hepcidin-2 (Hep-2 at the peptide level. To this purpose, Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR and tandem-MS was used for hepcidin identification, after which a time-of-flight (TOF MS-based methodology was exploited to routinely determine Hep-1 and -2 levels in mouse serum and urine. This method was biologically validated by hepcidin assessment in: i 3 mouse strains (C57Bl/6; DBA/2 and BABL/c upon stimulation with intravenous iron and LPS, ii homozygous Hfe knock out, homozygous transferrin receptor 2 (Y245X mutated mice and double affected mice, and iii mice treated with a sublethal hepatotoxic dose of paracetamol. The results showed that detection of Hep-1 was restricted to serum, whereas Hep-2 and its presumed isoforms were predominantly present in urine. Elevations in serum Hep-1 and urine Hep-2 upon intravenous iron or LPS were only moderate and varied considerably between mouse strains. Serum Hep-1 was decreased in all three hemochromatosis models, being lowest in the double affected mice. Serum Hep-1 levels correlated with liver hepcidin-1 gene expression, while acute liver damage by paracetamol depleted Hep-1 from serum. Furthermore, serum Hep-1 appeared to be an excellent indicator of splenic iron accumulation. In conclusion, Hep-1 and Hep-2 peptide responses in experimental mouse agree with the known biology of hepcidin mRNA regulators, and their measurement can now be implemented in experimental mouse models to provide novel insights in post-transcriptional regulation, hepcidin function, and kinetics.

  19. An efficient approach to bioconversion kinetic model generation based on automated microscale experimentation integrated with model driven experimental design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, B. H.; Micheletti, M.; Baganz, F.;

    2009-01-01

    design. It incorporates a model driven approach to the experimental design that minimises the number of experiments to be performed, while still generating accurate values of kinetic parameters. The approach has been illustrated with the transketolase mediated asymmetric synthesis of L...... experimental design.]it comparison with conventional methodology, the modelling approach enabled a nearly 4-fold decrease in the number of experiments while the microwell experimentation enabled a 45-fold decrease in material requirements and a significant increase in experimental throughput. The approach......Reliable models of enzyme kinetics are required for the effective design of bioconversion processes. Kinetic expressions of the enzyme-catalysed reaction rate however, are frequently complex and establishing accurate values of kinetic parameters normally requires a large number of experiments...

  20. Laser melting of carbide tool surface: Model and experimental studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilbas, B.S., E-mail: bsyilbas@kfupm.edu.sa [ME Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Shuja, S.Z.; Khan, S.M.A.; Aleem, A. [ME Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1913, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-09-15

    Laser controlled melting is one of the methods to achieve structural integrity in the surface region of the carbide tools. In the present study, laser heating of carbide cutting tool and temperature distribution in the irradiated region are examined. The phase change process during the heating is modeled using the enthalpy-porosity method. The influence of laser pulse intensity distribution across the irradiated surface ({beta}) on temperature distribution and melt formation is investigated. An experiment is carried out and the microstructural changes due to laser consecutive pulse heating is examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is found that melt depth predicted agrees with the experimental results. The maximum depth of the melt layer moves away from the symmetry axis with increasing {beta}.

  1. Laser melting of carbide tool surface: Model and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilbas, B. S.; Shuja, S. Z.; Khan, S. M. A.; Aleem, A.

    2009-09-01

    Laser controlled melting is one of the methods to achieve structural integrity in the surface region of the carbide tools. In the present study, laser heating of carbide cutting tool and temperature distribution in the irradiated region are examined. The phase change process during the heating is modeled using the enthalpy-porosity method. The influence of laser pulse intensity distribution across the irradiated surface ( β) on temperature distribution and melt formation is investigated. An experiment is carried out and the microstructural changes due to laser consecutive pulse heating is examined using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). It is found that melt depth predicted agrees with the experimental results. The maximum depth of the melt layer moves away from the symmetry axis with increasing β.

  2. Modeling, Robust Control, and Experimental Validation of a Supercavitating Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar Sanabria, David

    This dissertation considers the mathematical modeling, control under uncertainty, and experimental validation of an underwater supercavitating vehicle. By traveling inside a gas cavity, a supercavitating vehicle reduces hydrodynamic drag, increases speed, and minimizes power consumption. The attainable speed and power efficiency make these vehicles attractive for undersea exploration, high-speed transportation, and defense. However, the benefits of traveling inside a cavity come with difficulties in controlling the vehicle dynamics. The main challenge is the nonlinear force that arises when the back-end of the vehicle pierces the cavity. This force, referred to as planing, leads to oscillatory motion and instability. Control technologies that are robust to planing and suited for practical implementation need to be developed. To enable these technologies, a low-order vehicle model that accounts for inaccuracy in the characterization of planing is required. Additionally, an experimental method to evaluate possible pitfalls in the models and controllers is necessary before undersea testing. The major contribution of this dissertation is a unified framework for mathematical modeling, robust control synthesis, and experimental validation of a supercavitating vehicle. First, we introduce affordable experimental methods for mathematical modeling and controller testing under planing and realistic flow conditions. Then, using experimental observations and physical principles, we create a low-order nonlinear model of the longitudinal vehicle motion. This model quantifies the planing uncertainty and is suitable for robust controller synthesis. Next, based on the vehicle model, we develop automated tools for synthesizing controllers that deliver a certificate of performance in the face of nonlinear and uncertain planing forces. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the proposed controllers ensure higher performance when the uncertain planing dynamics are

  3. Numerical Modeling and Experimental Testing of a Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zurkinden, Andrew Stephen; Kramer, Morten; Ferri, Francesco;

    numerical values for comparison with the experimental test results which were carried out in the same time. It is for this reason why Chapter 4 does consist exclusively of numerical values. Experimental values and measured time series of wave elevations have been used throughout the report in order to a...

  4. Error Modelling and Experimental Validation for a Planar 3-PPR Parallel Manipulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guanglei; Bai, Shaoping; Kepler, Jørgen Asbøl

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the positioning error of a 3-PPR planar parallel manipulator is studied with an error model and experimental validation. First, the displacement and workspace are analyzed. An error model considering both configuration errors and joint clearance errors is established. Using...... this model, the maximum positioning error was estimated for a U-shape PPR planar manipulator, the results being compared with the experimental measurements. It is found that the error distributions from the simulation is approximate to that of themeasurements....

  5. Error Modelling and Experimental Validation for a Planar 3-PPR Parallel Manipulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Guanglei; Bai, Shaoping; Kepler, Jørgen Asbøl

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the positioning error of a 3-PPR planar parallel manipulator is studied with an error model and experimental validation. First, the displacement and workspace are analyzed. An error model considering both configuration errors and joint clearance errors is established. Using...... this model, the maximum positioning error was estimated for a U-shape PPR planar manipulator, the results being compared with the experimental measurements. It is found that the error distributions from the simulation is approximate to that of themeasurements....

  6. Modelling and Experimental Investigation of an Active Damper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Luís Teixeira

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a validation methodology of the dynamic behavior of an active viscous damper. The damper has two flexible metallic bellows connected to a rigid reservoir filled with fluid. When one of the bellows is connected to a vibrating structure a periodic flow passes through a variable internal orifice and the damping effect is produced. The size of the orifice is adjusted by a controlled linear piezoelectric actuator that positions the conical core into a conical cavity. The device finite element structural model consists of the valve body and its conical core that are assumed rigid and the flexible bellows are represented by two pistons with elastic suspensions. The flow developed inside the damper is modeled considering the fluid-structure interation, using the Lagrangean-Eulerian formulation. To validate the proposed model a prototype was constructed and experimental tests and numerical simulations are accomplished in the time domain, applying harmonic excitations. The results are compared using curves that relate the damping coefficient with the orifice size and with the input velocity applied at the bellows face. However, for the proper control design and system operation, the direct use of the finite element model becomes unviable due to its high computational time. Then, a reduced second order discrete dynamic model for the damper was developed. The model parameters are identified by analysis in the frequency domain, using impulsive excitation force, for constant and variable orifice sizes. At low excitation frequencies, the damper prototype behaves like a single degree of freedom system which damping factor changes with the orifice size A fuzzy controller was designed and it generates the orifice reference size associated to the desired damping factor. The active system presented better performance when compared to the passive one.

  7. Armature reaction effects on a high temperature superconducting field winding of an synchronous machine: experimental results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results from the Superwind laboratory setup. Particular focus in the paper has been placed on describing and quantifying the influence of armature reaction on performance of the HTS filed winding. Presented experimental results have confirmed the HTS field winding...... sensitivity to both armature reaction intensity and angular position with respect to the HTS coils. Furthermore, the characterization of the HTS field winding has been correlated to the electromagnetic torque of the machine where the maximal Ic reduction of 21% has been observed for the maximum torque....

  8. Armature reaction effects on a high temperature superconducting field winding of an synchronous machine: experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents experimental results from the Superwind laboratory setup. Particular focus in the paper has been placed on describing and quantifying the influence of armature reaction on performance of the HTS filed winding. Presented experimental results have confirmed the HTS field winding sensitivity to both armature reaction intensity and angular position with respect to the HTS coils. Furthermore, the characterization of the HTS field winding has been correlated to the electromagnetic torque of the machine where the maximal Ic reduction of 21% has been observed for the maximum torque.

  9. Calcium Intervention Ameliorates Experimental Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariush Haghmorad

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Multiple sclerosis (MS is the most common inflammatory disease of the CNS. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE is a widely used model for MS. In the present research, our aim was to test the therapeutic efficacy of Calcium (Ca in an experimental model of MS. Methods: In this study the experiment was done on C57BL/6 mice. EAE was induced using 200 μg of the MOG35-55 peptide emulsified in CFA and injected subcutaneously on day 0 over two flank areas. In addition, 250 ng of pertussis toxin was injected on days 0 and 2. In the treatment group, 30 mg/kg Ca was administered intraperitoneally four times at regular 48 hour intervals. The mice were sacrificed 21 days after EAE induction and blood samples were taken from their hearts. The brains of mice were removed for histological analysis and their isolated splenocytes were cultured. Results: Our results showed that treatment with Ca caused a significant reduction in the severity of the EAE. Histological analysis indicated that there was no plaque in brain sections of Ca treated group of mice whereas 4 ± 1 plaques were detected in brain sections of controls. The density of mononuclear infiltration in the CNS of Ca treated mice was lower than in controls. The serum level of Nitric Oxide in the treatment group was lower than in the control group but was not significant. Moreover, the levels of IFN-γ in cell culture supernatant of splenocytes in treated mice were significantly lower than in the control group. Conclusion: The data indicates that Ca intervention can effectively attenuate EAE progression.

  10. Experimental results from a preclinical X-ray phase-contrast CT scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Velroyen, Astrid; Meiser, Jan; Mohr, Jürgen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pauwels, Bart; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Liu, Xuan; Sasov, Alexander; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-01-01

    To explore the future clinical potential of improved soft-tissue visibility with grating-based X-ray phase contrast (PC), we have developed a first preclinical computed tomography (CT) scanner featuring a rotating gantry. The main challenge in the transition from previous bench-top systems to a preclinical scanner are phase artifacts that are caused by minimal changes in the grating alignment during gantry rotation. In this paper, we present the first experimental results from the system together with an adaptive phase recovery method that corrects for these phase artifacts. Using this method, we show that the scanner can recover quantitatively accurate Hounsfield units in attenuation and phase. Moreover, we present a first tomography scan of biological tissue with complementary information in attenuation and phase contrast. The present study hence demonstrates the feasibility of grating-based phase contrast with a rotating gantry for the first time and paves the way for future in vivo studies on small animal disease models (in the mid-term future) and human diagnostics applications (in the long-term future). PMID:23019354

  11. Experimental results on a wall interference correction method with interface measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. F.; Ulbrich, N.

    1992-01-01

    A wall interference assessment and correction method for subsonic two-dimensional wind tunnel testing is presented. This method calculates a pressure coefficient and angle of attack correction based on velocity measurements on interfaces inside of the wind tunnel. A mathematical representation of the test article is not required. An experimental verification of the suggested technique is given. A NACA 0012 airfoil is tested at a Mach number of 0.70 and at two different angles of attack. Calculated blockage corrections show reasonable agreement with results based on Hackett's method. Corrected surface pressures compare favorably to free-air flow field data if the tunnel flow field is subsonic. The present wall interference correction method can be applied to transonic tunnel flow fields with some restrictions. Errors are estimated and it is shown that the expected error in calculating the pressure coefficient correction on the model surface is in the order of the error of pressure coefficient measurement on interfaces. Necessary testing equipment in existing tunnels can easily be modified if the present method is applied.

  12. Sparse view Compton scatter tomography with energy resolved data: experimental and simulation results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmal, Abdulla; Tracey, Brian H.; Rezaee, Hamideh; Miller, Eric L.; Schubert, Jeffrey R.; Denker, Jeff; Couture, Aaron

    2017-05-01

    X-ray inspection systems play a critical role in many non-destructive testing and security applications, with systems typically measuring attenuation during transmission along straight-line paths connecting sources and detectors. Computed tomography (CT) systems can provide higher-quality images than single- or dual-view systems, but the need to measure many projections through the scene increases system complexity and cost. We seek to maximize the image quality of sparse-view (few-view) systems by combining attenuation data with measurements of Compton-scattered photons, that deflect after scattering and arrive at detectors via broken ray paths that provide additional sampling of the scene. The work below presents experimental validation of a singlescatter forward model for Compton-scatter data measured with energy-resolving detectors, and demonstrates a reconstruction algorithm that combines both attenuation and scatter measurements. The results suggest that including Compton-scattered data in the reconstruction process can improve image quality for few-view systems.

  13. Experimental study of heat pump thermodynamic cycles using CO2 based mixtures - Methodology and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouteiller, Paul; Terrier, Marie-France; Tobaly, Pascal

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this work is to study heat pump cycles, using CO2 based mixtures as working fluids. Since adding other chemicals to CO2 moves the critical point and generally equilibrium lines, it is expected that lower operating pressures as well as higher global efficiencies may be reached. A simple stage pure CO2 cycle is used as reference, with fixed external conditions. Two scenarios are considered: water is heated from 10 °C to 65 °C for Domestic Hot Water scenario and from 30 °C to 35 °C for Central Heating scenario. In both cases, water at the evaporator inlet is set at 7 °C to account for such outdoor temperature conditions. In order to understand the dynamic behaviour of thermodynamic cycles with mixtures, it is essential to measure the fluid circulating composition. To this end, we have developed a non intrusive method. Online optical flow cells allow the recording of infrared spectra by means of a Fourier Transform Infra Red spectrometer. A careful calibration is performed by measuring a statistically significant number of spectra for samples of known composition. Then, a statistical model is constructed to relate spectra to compositions. After calibration, compositions are obtained by recording the spectrum in few seconds, thus allowing for a dynamic analysis. This article will describe the experimental setup and the composition measurement techniques. Then a first account of results with pure CO2, and with the addition of propane or R-1234yf will be given.

  14. An experimental study of a VVER reactor's steam generator model operating in the condensing mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A. V.; Remizov, O. V.

    2012-05-01

    Results obtained from an experimental study of a VVER reactor's steam generator model operating in the condensing mode are presented. The obtained empirical dependence for calculating the power of heat exchangers operating in the steam condensation mode is presented.

  15. Model-Based Optimal Experimental Design for Complex Physical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-03

    an open-loop behavior , where no feedback is involved , and the observations from any experiment do not affect the design of other experiments...developing and refining models of physical systems. Yet experimental observations can be difficult, time- consuming , and expensive to acquire. In this...improve design and decision-making under uncertainty. Yet experimental observations can be difficult, time- consuming , and expensive to acquire. In this

  16. Effects of tenoxicam in experimental corrosive esophagitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbaş, M; Kiraz, H A; Küçük, A; Topaloğlu, N; Erdem, H; Şahin, H; Toman, H; Ozkan, M Turgut Alper

    2015-04-01

    Esophageal stricture, one of the important complications of corrosive esophagus, develops following edema and granulation tissue that forms during and after the inflammatory reactions. Tenoxicam, a non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug with a long half-life, prevents various leukocyte functions including phagocyte and histamine secretion by inhibiting prostaglandin synthesis and removes various oxygen radicals in the region of inflammation. We designed this as a histopathological study using tenoxicam in rats for which we created a corrosive esophagus model. After necessary authorizations were obtained, the study was performed in Çanakkale 18 Mart University experimental animal laboratory. Twenty-four Wistar albino rats, weighing 220-240 g, were used for the experiment. Experimental animals were randomized into three groups: tenoxicam group (group T, n:8), control group (group C, n:8), and sham group (group S, n:8). Tenoxicam 0.5 mg/kg/day was administered to animals in group T, where esophageal burn was developed experimentally, 5 mg/kg 0.9% NaCL was administered i.p. to rats in group C for 15 days, once in 24 hours. No procedure was applied to rats in group S. After 15 days, all animals were sacrificed under general anesthesia and their esophagi were extracted. As a result of histopathological evaluation, inflammation and fibroblast proliferation was not observed in rats in the sham group (group S). Intense inflammation was observed in six rats (6+/2-) in the control group, and fibroblast proliferation was observed as 5+/3-. And in treatment groups, inflammation was evaluated as 3+/5-, and fibroblast proliferation as 3+/5-. In our study, histopathologic damage score was higher in the control group (P < 0.005). We deduce that tenoxicam can be useful in the treatment of caustic esophageal injuries in the acute phase, but think that these drugs require further researches and clinical studies before routine clinical use.

  17. Nonequilibrium stage modelling of dividing wall columns and experimental validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Christoph; Buck, Christina; Ehlers, Christoph; Fieg, Georg

    2010-11-01

    Dealing with complex process units like dividing wall columns pushes the focus on the determination of suitable modelling approaches. For this purpose a nonequilibrium stage model is developed. The successful validation is achieved by an experimental investigation of fatty alcohol mixtures under vacuum condition at pilot scale. Aim is the recovery of high purity products. The proposed model predicts the product qualities and temperature profiles very well.

  18. Experimental determination of a LMFBR seismic equivalent core model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buland, P.; Fegeant, O.; Fontaine, B.; Gantenbein, F.

    1995-12-31

    Seismic analysis of pool type LMFBR requires to perform a finite element calculation of the reactor. Because of fluid structure interaction and non-linearities due to the presence of gaps between subassemblies, it is impossible to include in the reactor vessel finite elements model the real behaviour of the core. It is therefore required to find a linear equivalent core model (LECM) which will give for the reactor vessel the same results. The design of the LECM is based on an experimental test program conducted with the core mock-up RAPSODIE on Vesuve shaking table located at CEA/Saclay center. The tests permitted to validate a linear equivalent model, which characteristics correspond to the modal parameters of the mock-up (masses, elevations, frequencies...). These characteristics were estimated in air and in water, for different level of excitation. They permitted to quantify the added mass ratio (about 15%) which is in a rather good agreement with the computation when the free surface effect is correctly taken into account. (authors). 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 photo.

  19. Standardised Models for Inducing Experimental Peritoneal Adhesions in Female Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Kraemer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models for adhesion induction are heterogeneous and often poorly described. We compare and discuss different models to induce peritoneal adhesions in a randomized, experimental in vivo animal study with 72 female Wistar rats. Six different standardized techniques for peritoneal trauma were used: brushing of peritoneal sidewall and uterine horns (group 1, brushing of parietal peritoneum only (group 2, sharp excision of parietal peritoneum closed with interrupted sutures (group 3, ischemic buttons by grasping the parietal peritoneum and ligating the base with Vicryl suture (group 4, bipolar electrocoagulation of the peritoneum (group 5, and traumatisation by electrocoagulation followed by closure of the resulting peritoneal defect using Vicryl sutures (group 6. Upon second look, there were significant differences in the adhesion incidence between the groups (P<0.01. Analysis of the fraction of adhesions showed that groups 2 (0% and 5 (4% were significantly less than the other groups (P<0.01. Furthermore, group 6 (69% was significantly higher than group 1 (48% (P<0.05 and group 4 (47% (P<0.05. There was no difference between group 3 (60% and group 6 (P=0.2. From a clinical viewpoint, comparison of different electrocoagulation modes and pharmaceutical adhesion barriers is possible with standardised models.

  20. A mechanical experimental setup to simulate vocal folds vibrations. Preliminary results

    CERN Document Server

    Ruty, Nicolas; Pelorson, Xavier; Lopez-Arteaga, Ines; Hirschberg, Avraham

    2005-01-01

    This paper contributes to the understanding of vocal folds oscillation during phonation. In order to test theoretical models of phonation, a new experimental set-up using a deformable vocal folds replica is presented. The replica is shown to be able to produce self sustained oscillations under controlled experimental conditions. Therefore different parameters, such as those related to elasticity, to acoustical coupling or to the subglottal pressure can be quantitatively studied. In this work we focused on the oscillation fundamental frequency and the upstream pressure in order to start (on-set threshold) either end (off-set threshold) oscillations in presence of a downstream acoustical resonator. As an example, it is shown how this data can be used in order to test the theoretical predictions of a simple one-mass model.