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Sample records for models exercise capacity

  1. Antioxidant capacity and physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Marciniak

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is a presentation of current knowledge regarding the changes of plasma antioxidant capacity observed in response to physical exercise. Human body created the enzymatic and non-enzymatic systems, which play a protective role in the harmful impact of free radicals. Those two systems constitute what is known as the plasma total antioxidant capacity. The amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS and reactive nitrogen species (NOS in combination with oxidation processes increases in some tissues during physiological response to physical exercise. These changes are observed after single bout of exercise as well as after regular training. The response of human body to physical exercise can be analysed using various models of exercise test. Application of repeated type of exhaustion allows for characterizing the ability of human body to adjust to the increased energy loss and increased oxygen consumption. This article presents the characteristics of components of plasma antioxidant capacity, the mechanisms of free radicals production and their role in human body. It discusses also the currently used methods of detecting changes in total antioxidant capacity and its individual elements in response to single bout of exercise and regular training. It presents the review of literature about research performed in groups of both regularly training and low exercise activity individuals as well as in group of healthy subjects and patients with circulation diseases.

  2. Predictors of exercise capacity in heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranvera Ibrahimi

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: In patients with HF, the limited exercise capacity assessed by 6-MWT, is multifactorial being related both to the severity of right ventricular systolic dysfunction as well as to raised LV filling pressures and global dyssynchrony.

  3. Effects of exercise training on exercise capacity in patients with non-small cell lung cancer receiving targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chueh-Lung; Yu, Chong-Jen; Shih, Jin-Yuan; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Wu, Ying-Tai

    2012-12-01

    Peak oxygen consumption (VO(2peak)) is an important predictive factor for long-term prognosis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether 8 weeks of exercise training improves exercise capacity, as assessed by VO(2peak), and other related factors in patients with NSCLC receiving targeted therapy. A total of 24 participants with adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned to either the control group (n = 11) or the exercise group (n = 13). Subjects in the exercise group participated in individualized, high-intensity aerobic interval training of exercise. The outcome measures assessed at baseline and after 8 weeks were as follows: VO(2peak) and the percentage of predicted VO(2peak) (%predVO(2peak)), muscle strength and endurance of the right quadriceps, muscle oxygenation during exercise, insulin resistance as calculated by the homeostasis model, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and quality of life (QoL) questionnaire inventory. No exercise-related adverse events were reported. After exercise training, VO(2peak) and %predVO(2peak) increased by 1.6 mL kg(-1) min(-1) and 5.3% (p fatigue (p = 0.05) than baseline. Patients with NSCLC receiving targeted therapy have quite a low exercise capacity, even with a relatively high QoL. Exercise training appears to improve exercise capacity and alleviate some cancer-related symptoms.

  4. Identification of exercise capacity QTL using association mapping in inbred mice.

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    Courtney, Sean M; Massett, Michael P

    2012-10-02

    There are large interindividual differences in exercise capacity. It is well established that there is a genetic basis for these differences. However, the genetic factors underlying this variation are undefined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify novel putative quantitative trait loci (QTL) for exercise capacity by measuring exercise capacity in inbred mice and performing genome-wide association mapping. Exercise capacity, defined as run time and work, was assessed in male mice (n = 6) from 34 strains of classical and wild-derived inbred mice performing a graded treadmill test. Genome-wide association mapping was performed with an efficient mixed-model association (EMMA) algorithm to identify QTL. Exercise capacity was significantly different across strains. Run time varied by 2.7-fold between the highest running strain (C58/J) and the lowest running strain (A/J). These same strains showed a 16.5-fold difference in work. Significant associations were identified for exercise time on chromosomes 1, 2, 7, 11, and 13. The QTL interval on chromosome 2 (~168 Mb) contains one gene, Nfatc2, and overlaps with a suggestive QTL for training responsiveness in humans. These results provide phenotype data on the widest range of inbred strains tested thus far and indicate that genetic background significantly influences exercise capacity. Furthermore, the novel QTLs identified in the current study provide new targets for investigating the underlying mechanisms for variation in exercise capacity.

  5. Peak exercise capacity prediction from a submaximal exercise test in coronary artery disease patients

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    Arto J Hautala

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether a rating of perceived exertion scale (RPE obtained during submaximal exercise could be used to predict peak exercise capacity (METpeak in coronary artery disease (CAD patients. Angiographically documented CAD patients (n = 124, 87% on β blockade completed a symptom-limited peak exercise test on a bicycle ergometer, reporting RPE values at every second load on a scale of 6 to 20. Regression analysis was used to develop equations for predicting METpeak. We found that submaximal METs at a workload of 60/75 W (for women and men, respectively and the corresponding RPE (METs/RPE ratio was the most powerful predictor of METpeak (r = 0.67, p < 0.0001. The final model included the submaximal METs/RPE ratio, body mass index, sex, resting heart rate, smoking history, age, and use of a β blockade (r = 0.86, p < 0.0001, SEE 0.98 METs. These data suggest that RPE at submaximal exercise intensity is related to METpeak in CAD patients. The model based on easily measured variables at rest and during warm-up exercise can reasonably predict absolute METpeak in patients with CAD.

  6. Proportional assist ventilation improves exercise capacity in patients with obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreher, Michael; Kabitz, Hans-Joachim; Burgardt, Verena; Walterspacher, Stephan; Windisch, Wolfram

    2010-01-01

    Exercise capacity is reduced in obese patients due to disadvantageous respiratory mechanics that lead to dyspnea. Proportional assist ventilation (PAV) has the potential to unload resistive and elastic burdens of the ventilatory system. The present study aimed to test if PAV can increase endurance and reduce exercise-related dyspnea in obese patients. Two symptom-limited exercise tests were performed at 75% of V.O(2max): (1) without PAV and (2) with PAV. Exercise endurance, blood gases, dyspnea and limb discomfort (Borg scale) were assessed. Responders to PAV were defined as those increasing their exercise duration by more than 20%. Eighteen male obese patients (body mass index 35 +/- 5 kg/m(2)) were investigated. Overall, PAV increased exercise duration by 13% (p = 0.037) and improved exercise-induced dyspnea (p = 0.004). In responders (n = 10), PAV increased the exercise duration by 31% from 721 +/- 300 to 1,041 +/- 454 s (p PAV can only be predicted from total lung capacity (p = 0.02), considering total lung capacity, V.O(2max) and body mass index. PAV applied during exercise led to an overall prolongation in exercise endurance and a reduction in dyspnea in obese patients. There was a broad spectrum of response to PAV, with more than 50% of patients increasing their exercise endurance by a mean of 31%. Therefore, PAV might serve as a novel treatment option to enhance exercise capacity in a subgroup of obese patients in rehabilitation programs. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Predictors of exercise capacity and symptoms in severe aortic stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Morten; Kjaergaard, Jesper; Pecini, Redi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS).......This study investigated the association between invasive and non-invasive estimates of left ventricular (LV) filling pressure and exercise capacity, in order to find new potential candidates for risk markers in severe aortic valve stenosis (AS)....

  8. Exercise Capacity in Type 2 Diabetes Patients: A Preliminary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To enhance glycaemic control and improve general well being, physical exercises, in addition to drugs and/or diet are usually prescribed to patients with Type 2 Diabetes mellitus (T2D). Assessment of the capacity of these patients to exercise based on the simple Six Minute Walk Test (6MWT) is however not sufficiently ...

  9. Clinical experience of a new reference material for exercise capacity in exercise stress testing in Sweden.

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    Lindow, Thomas; Mosén, Henrik; Engblom, Henrik

    2017-09-21

    In 2014, the Swedish Association of Clinical Physiology recommended the use of a new reference material for exercise capacity in bicycle exercise stress testing, 'the Kalmar material'. Compared to the formerly used reference material, 'the Kristianstad material', an increase in the amount of patients being classified as having decreased exercise capacity was expected, but the extent of this in clinical practice is not known. Results of exercise capacity from 1449 bicycle exercise tests, in patients aged ≥20 years (656 women, 793 men) performed at two departments of Clinical Physiology before and after change of reference materials, were collected. Maximal workload was related to the predicted values of both reference materials. If made, recommendations for supplemental nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging study by the attending physician were noted. Using the new reference material, 31% of all patients were classified as having a decreased exercise capacity, compared to 17% using the formerly used reference material. The difference between the two reference materials was largest in the older age groups. In one of the departments, an increase in recommendations of supplemental myocardial perfusion studies was seen after introduction of the new reference material, whereas the opposite was seen at the other department. A large amount of patients are being classified as having decreased exercise capacity and very few as having good exercise capacity using the new reference material for exercise capacity. © 2017 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Submaximal exercise capacity and maximal power output in polio subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nollet, F.; Beelen, A.; Sargeant, A. J.; de Visser, M.; Lankhorst, G. J.; de Jong, B. A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the submaximal exercise capacity of polio subjects with postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) and without (non-PPS) with that of healthy control subjects, to investigate the relationship of this capacity with maximal short-term power and quadriceps strength, and to evaluate

  11. Community Capacity Building Exercise Maintenance Program for Frail Elderly Women.

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    Hong, Sun Yi; Jun, Soo Young

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of community capacity building exercise maintenance program for frail elderly women. A quasiexperimental pretest-posttest design was used with nonequivalent control group. The experimental group (n = 22) received community capacity building exercise maintenance program, whereas the control group (n = 23) received health physical exercise program for 16 sessions over 8 weeks. The data of physical fitness, body compositions, self-efficacy, and health-related quality of life were collected three times for both group: before the intervention, immediately after the intervention, and 8 weeks after the intervention. Analyses were conducted using χ 2 test, t test, Fisher's exact test, and repeated measures analysis of variance. Compared to the control group, muscular strength (p = .002), static balance (p = .013), muscular endurance (p = .003), self-efficacy (p building exercise maintenance program. Theses results indicated that a community capacity building exercise maintenance program is feasible, and associated with exercise maintenance among frail elderly women. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Effects of arotinolol on exercise capacity and humoral factors during exercise in normal subjects.

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    Mori, T; Handa, K; Terao, Y; Tanaka, H; Kiyonaga, A; Shindo, M; Matsunaga, A; Sasaki, J; Arakawa, K

    1992-08-01

    A placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study was undertaken in 10 normal subjects to examine the effects of arotinolol (10 mg bid), a nonselective beta blocker with alpha-blocking activity, on exercise capacity and hormone levels during exercise after a 2-week treatment period. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) and blood lactic acid concentration (LA) were measured during progressive exercise testing. An exercise intensity equivalent to 4 mmol/l of LA was used for the constant workload exercise test. Humoral factors were measured after 20 minutes of constant workload exercise. The administration of arotinolol significantly decreased systolic blood pressure and heart rate at rest and during exercise, but diastolic blood pressure did not change. No significant difference was found between arotinolol and placebo with regard to VO2 max and maximal workload. Plasma renin activity (PRA), aldosterone (PAC), and norepinephrine (NE) levels at rest and during exercise did not differ between the two treatments. In contrast, plasma epinephrine (EN) levels at rest and during exercise were significantly greater with arotinolol. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) at rest did not differ between the two treatments. However, exercise caused a significant increase in ANP after arotinolol treatment. These findings suggest that arotinolol decreases blood pressure and heart rate without affecting exercise capacity.

  13. The predictors of exercise capacity impairment in diabetic patients

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    Florina Frîngu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background. The exercise capacity is a key issue in a diabetic patient’s management, due to its well-known beneficial effects in terms of glycemic control, cardiovascular risk reduction and quality of life improvement. However the exercise capacity of diabetic patients is decreased many times and its determinants are sometimes less known. Our study aimed to assess the effort capacity in a cohort of diabetic patients and to find the main causative factors of its impairment. Method: 61 patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled and underwent and transthoracic echocardiography and a cycloergometer exercise testing. Exercise performance was calculated and the influence of clinical data and ultrasound parameters was assessed. Sedentary status of each patient was established from total time/week of at least moderate physical activity. Results: the study group consisted of 48.4 % women, mean age 61.4 (±8.4 years. Disease median duration was 5 years and 21.3 % of the patients presented neuropathy, 4.5 % retinopathy and 6.5 % nephropathy. Exercise capacity was moderately and severe decreased (<5 METs in 37.7 % of patients and in this subgroup the diastolic dysfunction, sedentary behavior and old age has a significantly higher prevalence. Interestingly, by multivariate regression, the sedentary lifestyle was the main determinant of decreased effort capacity (beta-coefficient 1.37, p<0.001, suggesting the potential benefits of physical training in these patients. Conclusion. Our study found a decreased effort capacity in at least one third of the patients and this is mainly due to sedentary lifestyle and deconditioning, the diastolic dysfunction also contributes to decreased effort capacity in diabetic patients.

  14. Effect of metformin on exercise capacity in metabolic syndrome.

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    Paul, Abi Albon; Dkhar, Steven Aibor; Kamalanathan, Sadishkumar; Thabah, Molly Mary; George, Melvin; Chandrasekaran, Indumathi; Gunaseelan, Vikneswaran; Selvarajan, Sandhiya

    2017-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a constellation of risk factors with increased predilection towards occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. Currently physical exercise and management with metformin are the prevailing treatment modalities for metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome have been found to have reduced exercise capacity over a period of time. Likewise metformin has been shown to decrease exercise capacity among healthy volunteers. Hence this study aims to evaluate the effect of metformin on the exercise capacity of patients with metabolic syndrome. Prospective study with 6 weeks follow up. Newly diagnosed patients with metabolic syndrome and to be started on Table Metformin 500mg twice a day were recruited for the study after obtaining written informed consent. Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing (CPET) was done at baseline before the subjects were started on metformin and after 6 weeks of treatment using cardiopulmonary exercise testing apparatus (ZAN600). Fifteen treatment naïve patients with metabolic syndrome completed six weeks of therapy with metformin. In these patients oxygen uptake [VO2] showed statistically significant decrease from 1.10±0.44 at baseline to 0.9±0.39 (l/min) after six weeks of treatment with metformin [mean difference of -0.20 (-0.31 to -0.09); P=0.001]. Similarly oxygen uptake/kg body weight [VO2/Kg] showed a significant decrease from 14.10±4.73 to 11.44±3.81 (mlkg -1 min -1 ) at the end of six weeks of treatment [mean difference of -2.66 (-4.06 to -1.26); P=0.001]. Six weeks of treatment with metformin significantly decreases exercise capacity in newly diagnosed patients with metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Deterioration of exercise capacity after neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.M. van der Cammen-van Zijp (Monique); S.J. Gischler (Saskia); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); D. Tibboel (Dick); H. IJsselstijn (Hanneke)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractExtracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides life support in acute reversible cardiorespiratory failure. Assessment of long-term morbidity is essential to confirm survival advantage. This study aimed to assess exercise capacity in the first 12 yrs of life after neonatal ECMO, and

  16. Effect Of Interval Training On Blood Pressure And Exercise Capacity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect Of Interval Training On Blood Pressure And Exercise Capacity In Hypertension: A Randomized Controlled Study. ... Tropical Journal of Health Sciences ... The primary purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of interval training program on MAP in black African subjects with hypertension. Two hundred ...

  17. Predictors of exercise capacity following exercise-based rehabilitation in patients with coronary heart disease and heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uddin, Jamal; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Lewinter, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to undertake a comprehensive assessment of the patient, intervention and trial-level factors that may predict exercise capacity following exercise-based rehabilitation in patients with coronary heart disease and heart failure. DESIGN: Meta-analysis and meta...... of improvement in exercise capacity following exercise-based rehabilitation compared to control among patients with coronary heart disease or heart failure. Whilst higher exercise intensities were associated with a greater level of post-rehabilitation exercise capacity, there was no strong evidence to support...

  18. Relationship between daily physical activity and exercise capacity in patients with COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerink, Marlies; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; van der Valk, P.; Brusse-Keizer, M.G.J.; Effing, T.W.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exercise training programmes for patients with COPD are effective in improving exercise capacity. The few trials that have investigated the effects of exercise programmes on daily physical activity show contradictory results. AIM: To investigate the relation between daily physical

  19. Exercise training programs to improve hand rim wheelchair propulsion capacity: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwinkels, M.; Verschuren, O.; Janssen, T.W.J.; Ketelaar, M.; Takken, T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: An adequate wheelchair propulsion capacity is required to perform daily life activities. Exercise training may be effective to gain or improve wheelchair propulsion capacity. This review investigates whether different types of exercise training programs are effective in improving

  20. Exercise training programs to improve hand rim wheelchair propulsion capacity: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwinkels, M.G.J.; Verschuren, O.W.; Janssen, T.; Ketelaar, M.; Takken, T.; Backx, F.J.G.; Groot, J.F. de; Smits, D.W.; Volman, MJM

    2014-01-01

    Objective: An adequate wheelchair propulsion capacity is required to perform daily life activities. Exercise training may be effective to gain or improve wheelchair propulsion capacity. This review investigates whether different types of exercise training programs are effective in improving

  1. Exercise capacity, muscle strength and fatigue in sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellis, R G J; Lenssen, A F; Elfferich, M D P; De Vries, J; Kassim, S; Foerster, K; Drent, M

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to investigate the prevalence of exercise intolerance, muscle weakness and fatigue in sarcoidosis patients. Additionally, we evaluated whether fatigue can be explained by exercise capacity, muscle strength or other clinical characteristics (lung function tests, radiographic stages, prednisone usage and inflammatory markers). 124 sarcoidosis patients (80 males) referred to the Maastricht University Medical Centre (Maastricht, the Netherlands) were included (mean age 46.6±10.2 yrs). Patients performed a 6-min walk test (6MWT) and handgrip force (HGF), elbow flexor muscle strength (EFMS), quadriceps peak torque (QPT) and hamstring peak torque (HPT) tests. Maximal inspiratory pressure (P(I,max)) was recorded. All patients completed the Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS) questionnaire. The 6MWT was reduced in 45% of the population, while HGF, EFMS, QPT and HPT muscle strength were reduced in 15, 12, 27 and 18%, respectively. P(I,max) was reduced in 43% of the population. The majority of the patients (81%) reported fatigue (FAS ≥22). Patients with reduced peripheral muscle strength of the upper and/or lower extremities were more fatigued and demonstrated impaired lung functions, fat-free mass, P(I,max), 6MWT and quality of life. Fatigue was neither predicted by exercise capacity, nor by muscle strength. Besides fatigue, exercise intolerance and muscle weakness are frequent problems in sarcoidosis. We therefore recommend physical tests in the multidisciplinary management of sarcoidosis patients, even in nonfatigued patients.

  2. Loss of Adipocyte VEGF Impairs Endurance Exercise Capacity in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachwieja, Nicole J; O'Connell, Grant C; Stricker, Janelle C; Allen, Jessica; Vona-Davis, Linda; Bryner, Randall; Mandler, William; Olfert, I Mark

    2015-11-01

    Reducing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in adipose tissue alters adipose vascularity and metabolic homeostasis. We hypothesized that this would also affect metabolic responses during exercise-induced stress and that adipocyte-specific VEGF-deficient (adipoVEGF-/-) mice would have impaired endurance capacity. Endurance exercise capacity in adipoVEGF-/- (n = 10) and littermate control (n = 11) mice was evaluated every 4 wk between 6 and 24 wk of age using a submaximal endurance run to exhaustion at 20 m·min(-1) at 10° incline. Maximal running speed, using incremental increases in speed at 30-s intervals, was tested at 25 and 37 wk of age. White and brown adipose tissue capillarity were reduced by 40% in adipoVEGF-/-, and no difference in skeletal muscle capillarity was observed. Endurance run time to exhaustion was 30% lower in adipoVEGF-/- compared with that in controls at all time points (P speed was observed between the groups. After exercise (1 h at 50% maximum running speed), adipoVEGF-/- mice displayed lower circulating insulin (P endurance exercise, which likely reduced endurance performance. Surprisingly, we also found an unchanged basal blood glucose despite lower circulating insulin in adipoVEGF-/- mice, suggesting that loss of adipocyte VEGF can blunt insulin release and/or increase basal insulin sensitivity.

  3. Impaired cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in patients with hyperthyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, G; Hellermann, J; Mohr-Kahaly, S; Treese, N

    1996-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism (H) has been implicated as a primary cause of decreased exercise tolerance. To our knowledge, analysis of respiratory gas exchange, an efficient noninvasive method in evaluating cardiopulmonary capacity, has not been performed in patients with H. Using cardiopulmonary exercise testing, 12 consecutive women with Graves' H were examined and controlled in euthyroidism (E). Eighteen women with E, in whom cardiac catheterization had ruled out heart disease, served as control subjects (C). The ventilatory anaerobic threshold was determined by means of the V-slope method. Ergometry was performed with patients in a semisupine position using a continuous ramp protocol of 20 W/min. Echocardiography at rest was performed in all patients. In patients with H, heart rate at rest was higher than in patients with E (p lower increase between rest and anaerobic threshold compared with E patients (p = 0.007) and C (p = 0.009). Work rate was reduced (H, 50% vs E, 70%; p = 0.038). In H patients, the anaerobic threshold occurred at 59.6% of maximal oxygen uptake and 72% in E patients, respectively (p = 0.024). In H patients, the linear regression of the heart rate to oxygen uptake ratio showed a reduced slope in comparison with E patients (p = 0.001) and C (p = 0.004). In patients with H, a reduced tidal volume (p = 0.021) and an increased respiratory rate (p = 0.003) in comparison to patients with E were demonstrated. Echocardiographically, H patients had an increased ejection fraction (p = 0.008) and a higher cardiac index (p = 0.008) in comparison with E patients. Analysis of respiratory gas exchange showed marked alterations of cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in H patients, which are reversible in E patients. The impaired chronotropic response during exercise might be the primary limiting factor of reduced work capacity in patients with H.

  4. Benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD and normal exercise capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chou-Chin; Chu, Wen-Hua; Yang, Mei-Chen; Lee, Chih-Hsin; Wu, Yao-Kuang; Wu, Chin-Pyng

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is beneficial for patients with COPD, with improvement in exercise capacity and health-related quality of life. Despite these overall benefits, the responses to PR vary significantly among different individuals. It is not clear if PR is beneficial for patients with COPD and normal exercise capacity. We aimed to investigate the effects of PR in patients with normal exercise capacity on health-related quality of life and exercise capacity. Twenty-six subjects with COPD and normal exercise capacity were studied. All subjects participated in 12-week, 2 sessions per week, hospital-based, out-patient PR. Baseline and post-PR status were evaluated by spirometry, the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire, cardiopulmonary exercise test, respiratory muscle strength, and dyspnea scores. The mean FEV1 in the subjects was 1.29 ± 0.47 L/min, 64.8 ± 23.0% of predicted. After PR there was significant improvement in maximal oxygen uptake and work rate. Improvements in St George's Respiratory Questionnaire scores of total, symptoms, activity, and impact were accompanied by improvements of exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, maximum oxygen pulse, and exertional dyspnea scores (all P exercise after PR. Exercise training can result in significant improvement in health-related quality of life, exercise capacity, respiratory muscle strength, and exertional dyspnea in subjects with COPD and normal exercise capacity. Exercise training is still indicated for patients with normal exercise capacity.

  5. The Paroxetine Effect on Exercise Performance Depends on the Aerobic Capacity of Exercising Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Teixeira-Coelho, João Paulo Uendeles-Pinto, Ana Cláudia Alves Serafim, Samuel Penna Wanner, Márcio de Matos Coelho, Danusa Dias Soares

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of aerobic capacity on the activation of the central serotonergic system and exercise fatigue in young men that ingested a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and were then subjected to moderate-intensity physical exercise. The maximal oxygen consumption of sixteen volunteers was measured during an incremental test. The volunteers were divided into two groups: subjects with higher (HAC and lower (LAC aerobic capacities. The volunteers were subjected to four experimental trials in which they ingested either placebo or paroxetine (10, 20 or 40 mg and, 4.5 h later, cycled at 60% of their maximal power output until reaching fatigue. None of the three paroxetine doses influenced the total exercise time in the LAC group. However, for the HAC group, the time to fatigue in the 20 mg paroxetine condition was 15% less than that in the placebo condition (76.3 ± 5.1 min vs. 90.0 ± 7.9 min; p < 0.05. The time to fatigue was higher in the HAC group than in the LAC group for all treatments. Our results provide additional evidence that aerobic capacity modulates the activity of the serotonergic system. However, contrary to what would be expected considering previous reports, the activation of the serotonergic system in exercising subjects in the HAC group was not less than that in the LAC group.

  6. Correlation between exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with cardiac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karoline Stentoft Rybjerg; Laustsen, Sussie; Petersen, Annemette Krintel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Patients are referred to exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (ECR) to increase exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and thereby reduce risk of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine the correlation between exercise capacity and HRQOL...... changes in VO2peak and changes in PF, RP, VT, and MH. Changes in VO2 peak explained 4% of the changes in the PF and VT scores. Conclusion: The correlations between exercise capacity and HRQOL were weak and varied considerably among patients. The ECR program improved both exercise capacity and HRQOL...

  7. Physical exercises, functional capacity and depressive symptoms in Brazilian elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Manuela Crispim Nascimento

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of our study was to investigate the effects of 16 weeks of multimodal exercise on functional capacity components, general functional fitness and depressive symptoms in the elderly. Fifty-five elderly (67.3 ± 5.8 years participated inthe study. The groups were distributed according to the participation on the proposed protocol: a trained group (TG composed of 27 participants who attended at least 75% of the total generalized physical exercise sessions for16 weeks; and b control group (CG, participants who did not attend any regular physical activity program. Functional capacity was assessed using theAAHPERD battery of motor tests for elderly, which consists of five tests: coordination, flexibility, muscular resistance, agility/dynamic balance, and overall aerobic endurance. Depressive symptoms were measured using the short version of the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15. The results showed that elderly on TG had better performance on motor tests. Depressive symptoms did not change for both groups. Thus, our results indicate that 16 weeks is sufficient to improve general functional fitness in elderly, while those who remain sedentary tend to decrease their overall physical fitness. The proposed program could not induce significant changes in the elderly with low levels ofdepressive symptoms reported for this variable. The evidence of this study allows the prediction that a generalized program can help prevent chronic diseases, reduce functional decline and produce positive effects on quality oflife.

  8. Exercise training in older patients with systolic heart failure: Adherence, exercise capacity, inflammation and glycemic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, Eva; Hjardem-Hansen, Rasmus; Dela, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. Training improves exercise capacity in patients with heart failure (CHF) but most evidence is on selected younger patients with systolic CHF. Design. All patients diagnosed with CHF over 3 years were screened for inclusion and exclusion criteria. Fifty two patients with systolic CHF...... (LVEFtraining twice weekly for 8 weeks. Results. Mean age was 68.2 (+/-SD 11.3) years. Despite marked improvements in physical fitness (workload, 6 minute walk test, incremental shuttle walk test and sit to stand test), there were no changes in serological......). There were no changes in quality of life. Conclusions. The effect of exercise training in these older CHF-patients was not as impressive as reported in younger and more selected patients. More studies on the efficiency of exercise training that reflect the age- and co-morbidity of the majority of CHF...

  9. Effect of ventricular function and volumes on exercise capacity in adults with repaired Tetralogy of Fallot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Dłużniewska

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: Exercise intolerance in adults with repaired ToF is markedly depressed. The decreased exercise capacity is correlated with impaired RV function and may be associated also with LV dysfunction, which suggests right-to-left ventricular interaction.

  10. Therapeutic validity and effectiveness of supervised physical exercise training on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vooijs, Martijn; Siemonsma, Petra C; Heus, Inge; Sont, Jacob K; Rövekamp, Ton Ajm; van Meeteren, Nico Lu

    2016-11-01

    Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of supervised physical exercise training on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease taken into consideration indices such as therapeutic validity of interventions, methodological quality of studies, and exercise volume. MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PEDro databases were searched from inception until 17 July 2015 for randomized controlled trials comparing the effect of supervised exercise training vs. usual care in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The references of included studies and review articles were hand searched for additional references and key authors of included trials were crosschecked in PubMed for any missed references. Two reviewers independently assessed therapeutic validity of exercise training and methodological quality of included studies. Overall effects were calculated using a random effects model. A total of 13 studies involving 756 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were included. Significant differences in maximal exercise capacity (standardized mean difference 0.52, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.74) and endurance exercise capacity (standardized mean difference 0.73, 95% CI 0.50 to 0.96) in favor of physical exercise training were found. The volume of physical exercise per week, the total volume of physical exercise, or their associations did not significantly influence the effect of training. Effects of supervised physical exercise was not significantly altered by therapeutic validity. A combination of aerobic exercise and strength training was found to be more effective than strength training or endurance training alone in increasing the 6-minute walking distance.

  11. Iron Status in Chronic Heart Failure: Impact on Symptoms, Functional Class and Submaximal Exercise Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enjuanes, Cristina; Bruguera, Jordi; Grau, María; Cladellas, Mercé; Gonzalez, Gina; Meroño, Oona; Moliner-Borja, Pedro; Verdú, José M; Farré, Nuria; Comín-Colet, Josep

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of iron deficiency and anemia on submaximal exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure. We undertook a single-center cross-sectional study in a group of stable patients with chronic heart failure. At recruitment, patients provided baseline information and completed a 6-minute walk test to evaluate submaximal exercise capacity and exercise-induced symptoms. At the same time, blood samples were taken for serological evaluation. Iron deficiency was defined as ferritin < 100 ng/mL or transferrin saturation < 20% when ferritin is < 800 ng/mL. Additional markers of iron status were also measured. A total of 538 heart failure patients were eligible for inclusion, with an average age of 71 years and 33% were in New York Heart Association class III/IV. The mean distance walked in the test was 285 ± 101 meters among those with impaired iron status, vs 322 ± 113 meters (P=.002). Symptoms during the test were more frequent in iron deficiency patients (35% vs 27%; P=.028) and the most common symptom reported was fatigue. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that increased levels of soluble transferrin receptor indicating abnormal iron status were independently associated with advanced New York Heart Association class (P < .05). Multivariable analysis using generalized additive models, soluble transferrin receptor and ferritin index, both biomarkers measuring iron status, showed a significant, independent and linear association with submaximal exercise capacity (P=.03 for both). In contrast, hemoglobin levels were not significantly associated with 6-minute walk test distance in the multivariable analysis. In patients with chronic heart failure, iron deficiency but not anemia was associated with impaired submaximal exercise capacity and symptomatic functional limitation. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Determinants of exercise capacity in school-aged esophageal atresia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint-Duyster, Leontien C C; van der Cammen-van Zijp, Monique H M; Spoel, Marjolein; Lam, Mhanfei; Wijnen, Rene M H; de Jongste, Johan C; Tibboel, Dick; van Rosmalen, Joost; IJsselstijn, Hanneke

    2017-09-01

    Data on long-term outcome of exercise capacity in school-aged children with esophageal atresia (EA) are scarce. We evaluated maximal exercise capacity and its relation to lung function. Moreover, we studied other possible determinants of exercise capacity and lung function. Exercise capacity of 63 children with EA born 1999-2007 was evaluated at the age of 8 years with the Bruce-protocol. Dynamic and static lung volumes, bronchodilator response and diffusion capacity were measured. Furthermore, perinatal characteristics, hospital admissions for lower respiratory tract infections (RTIs), RTIs treated with antibiotics in the past year, symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, weight-for-height, and sports participation were evaluated as other potential determinants. Exercise capacity was significantly below normal: mean (SD) SDS -0.91 (0.97); P Exercise capacity was positively associated with total lung capacity and negatively with SDS weight-for-height. Spirometric parameters were negatively associated with congenital cardiac malformation, duration of ventilation, and persistent respiratory morbidity. Eight-year-old children with EA had reduced exercise capacity which was only associated with the reduction in TLC he and higher SDS weight-for-height. We speculate that diminished physical activity with recurrent respiratory tract infections may also play a role in reduced exercise capacity. This should be subject to further research to optimize appropriate intervention. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Exercise capacity and all-cause mortality in male veterans with hypertension aged ≥70 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faselis, Charles; Doumas, Michael; Pittaras, Andreas; Narayan, Puneet; Myers, Jonathan; Tsimploulis, Apostolos; Kokkinos, Peter

    2014-07-01

    Aging, even in otherwise healthy subjects, is associated with declines in muscle mass, strength, and aerobic capacity. Older individuals respond favorably to exercise, suggesting that physical inactivity plays an important role in age-related functional decline. Conversely, physical activity and improved exercise capacity are associated with lower mortality risk in hypertensive individuals. However, the effect of exercise capacity in older hypertensive individuals has not been investigated extensively. A total of 2153 men with hypertension, aged ≥70 years (mean, 75 ± 4) from the Washington, DC, and Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Medical Centers, underwent routine exercise tolerance testing. Peak workload was estimated in metabolic equivalents (METs). Fitness categories were established based on peak METs achieved, adjusted for age: very-low-fit, 2.0 to 4.0 METs (n=386); low-fit, 4.1 to 6.0 METs (n=1058); moderate-fit, 6.1 to 8.0 METs (n=495); high-fit >8.0 METs (n=214). Cox proportional hazard models were applied after adjusting for age, body mass index, race, cardiovascular disease, cardiovascular medications, and risk factors. All-cause mortality was quantified during a mean follow-up period of 9.0 ± 5.5 years. There were a total of 1039 deaths or 51.2 deaths per 1000 person-years of follow-up. Mortality risk was 11% lower (hazard ratio, 0.89; 95% confidence interval, 0.86-0.93; Pexercise capacity. When compared with those achieving ≤4.0 METs, mortality risk was 18% lower (hazard ratio, 0.82; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.95; P=0.011) for the low-fit, 36% for the moderate-fit (hazard ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-0.78; Pexercise capacity is associated with lower mortality risk in elderly men with hypertension. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. The effects of a pilates-aerobic program on maximum exercise capacity of adult women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Mikalački

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Physical exercise such as the Pilates method offers clinical benefits on the aging process. Likewise, physiologic parameters may be improved through aerobic exercise. Methods: In order to compare the differences of a Pilates-Aerobic intervention program on physiologic parameters such as the maximum heart rate (HRmax, relative maximal oxygen consumption (relative VO2max and absolute (absolute VOmax, maximum heart rate during maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max-HRmax, maximum minute volume (VE and forced vital capacity (FVC, a total of 64 adult women (active group = 48.1 ± 6.7 years; control group = 47.2 ± 7.4 years participated in the study. The physiological parameters, the maximal speed and total duration of test were measured by maximum exercise capacity testing through Bruce protocol. The HRmax was calculated by a cardio-ergometric software. Pulmonary function tests, maximal speed and total time during the physical test were performed in a treadmill (Medisoft, model 870c. Likewise, the spirometry analyzed the impact on oxygen uptake parameters, including FVC and VE. Results: The VO2max (relative and absolute, VE (all, P<0.001, VO2max-HRmax (P<0.05 and maximal speed of treadmill test (P<0.001 showed significant difference in the active group after a physical exercise interventional program. Conclusion: The present study indicates that the Pilates exercises through a continuous training program might significantly improve the cardiovascular system. Hence, mixing strength and aerobic exercises into a training program is considered the optimal mechanism for healthy aging.

  15. Patterns of Changes in Wheelchair Exercise Capacity After Spinal Cord Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koppenhagen, Casper F.; de Groot, Sonja; Post, Marcel W.; Hoekstra, Trynke; van Asbeck, Floris W.; Bongers, Helma; Lindeman, Eline; van der Woude, Luc H.

    Objectives: (1) To identify different patterns of changes in wheelchair exercise capacity in the period between the start of active spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation and 5 years after discharge; (2) to examine the pattern determinants of the change in wheelchair exercise capacity. Design:

  16. Aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, M.; Lelieveld, O. T. H. M.; van der Net, J.; Engelbert, R. H. H.; Helders, P. J. M.; Takken, T.

    2007-01-01

    To compare the aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) with healthy controls, to determine if there were differences based on disease onset type, and to examine the relationship between aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in children with JIA.

  17. Aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Brussel, Marco; Lelieveld, O T H M; van der Net, J; Engelbert, R H H; Helders, P J M; Takken, T

    2007-01-01

    Objective. To compare the aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) with healthy controls, to determine if there were differences based on disease onset type, and to examine the relationship between aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in

  18. Aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lelieveld, Otto; van Brussel, Marco; Takken, Tim; van Weert, Ellen; van Leeuwen, Miek A.; Armbrust, Wineke

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity in adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) compared with age- and sex-matched healthy individuals, and to assess associations between disease-related variables and aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity. METHODS: Of 25

  19. Therapeutic validity and effectiveness of supervised physical exercise training on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vooijs, M.; Siemonsma, P.C.; Heus, I.; Sont, J.K.; Rövekamp, T.A.; Meeteren, N.L. van

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our aim was to determine the effectiveness of supervised physical exercise training on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease taken into consideration indices such as therapeutic validity of interventions, methodological quality of studies, and exercise

  20. Patient-Reported Dyspnea Correlates Poorly with Aerobic Exercise Capacity Measured During Cardiopulmonary Exercise Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspard, Dany; Kass, Jonathan; Akers, Stephen; Hunter, Krystal; Pratter, Melvin

    2017-10-01

    Patient-reported dyspnea plays a central role in assessing cardiopulmonary disease. There is little evidence, however, that dyspnea correlates with objective exercise capacity measurements. If the correlation is poor, dyspnea as a proxy for objective assessment may be misleading. To compare patient's perception of dyspnea with maximum oxygen uptake (MaxVO2) during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). Fifty patients undergoing CPET for dyspnea evaluation were studied prospectively. Dyspnea assessment was measured by a metabolic equivalent of task (METs) table, Mahler Dyspnea Index, Borg Index, number of blocks walked, and flights of stairs climbed before stopping due to dyspnea. These descriptors were compared to MaxVO2. MaxVO2 showed low correlation with METs table (r = 0.388, p = 0.005) and no correlation with Mahler Index (r = 0.24, p = 0.093), Borg Index (r = -0.017, p = 0.905), number of blocks walked (r = 0.266, p = 0.077) or flights of stairs climbed (r = 0.188, p = 0.217). When adjusted for weight (maxVO2/kg), there was significant correlation between MaxVO2 and METs table (r = 0.711, p  30 had moderate correlation between MaxVO2 and METs table (r = 0.568, p = 0.002). Patient-reported dyspnea correlates poorly with MaxVO2 and fails to predict exercise capacity. Reliance on reported dyspnea may result in suboptimal categorization of cardiopulmonary disease severity.

  1. Acute vitamin C improves cardiac function, not exercise capacity, in adults with type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Scalzo, Rebecca L.; Bauer, Timothy A.; Harrall, Kylie; Moreau, Kerrie; Ozemek, Cemal; Herlache, Leah; McMillin, Shawna; Huebschmann, Amy G.; Dorosz, Jennifer; Reusch, Jane E. B.; Regensteiner, Judith G.

    2018-01-01

    Background People with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have impaired exercise capacity, even in the absence of complications, which is predictive of their increased cardiovascular mortality. Cardiovascular dysfunction is one potential cause of this exercise defect. Acute infusion of vitamin C has been separately shown to improve diastolic and endothelial function in prior studies. We hypothesized that acute vitamin C infusion would improve exercise capacity and that these improvements would be associat...

  2. Exercise capacity is associated with endothelin-1 release during emotional excitement in coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulppo, Mikko P; Piira, Olli-Pekka; Hautala, Arto J; Kiviniemi, Antti M; Miettinen, Johanna A; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2014-08-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor, IL-6, and catecholamines are increased and heart rate variability [SD of normal to normal R-R intervals (SDNN)] decreased during emotional excitement, but individual responses vary. We tested the hypothesis that exercise capacity is associated with physiological responses caused by real-life emotional excitement. We measured the plasma levels of ET-1, IL-6, catecholamines, heart rate, and SDNN in enthusiastic male ice hockey spectators (n = 51; age, 59 ± 9 years) with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) at baseline and during the Finnish National Ice Hockey League's final play-off matches. Maximal exercise capacity (METs) by bicycle exercise test and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were measured on a separate day. ET-1 response from baseline to emotional excitement correlated with maximal METs (r = -0.30; P = 0.040). In a linear stepwise regression analysis age, body mass index (BMI), METs, LVEF, basal ET-1, and subjective experience of excitement were entered the model as independent variables to explain ET-1 response. This model explained 27% of ET-1 response (P = 0.003). Maximal METs were most strongly correlated with ET-1 response (β = -0.45; partial correlation r = -0.43; P = 0.002), followed by BMI (β = -0.31; partial correlation r = -0.31; P = 0.033) and LVEF (β = -0.30; partial correlation r = -0.33; P = 0.023). Exercise capacity may protect against further cardiovascular events in CAD patients, because it is associated with reduced ET-1 release during emotional excitement. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Prognostic value of exercise capacity in patients with coronary artery disease: the FIT (Henry Ford ExercIse Testing) project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Rupert K; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; McEvoy, John W; Whelton, Seamus P; Blumenthal, Roger S; Nasir, Khurram; Schairer, John R; Brawner, Clinton; Alam, Mohsen; Keteyian, Steven J; Blaha, Michael J

    2014-12-01

    To examine the prognostic value of exercise capacity in patients with nonrevascularized and revascularized coronary artery disease (CAD) seen in routine clinical practice. We analyzed 9852 adults with known CAD (mean ± SD age, 61±12 years; 69% men [n=6836], 31% black race [n=3005]) from The Henry Ford ExercIse Testing (FIT) Project, a retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent physician-referred stress testing at a single health care system between January 1, 1991, and May 31, 2009. Patients were categorized by revascularization status (nonrevascularized, percutaneous coronary intervention [PCI], or coronary artery bypass graft [CABG] surgery) and by metabolic equivalents (METs) achieved on stress testing. Using Cox regression models, hazard ratios for mortality, myocardial infarction (MI), and downstream revascularizations were calculated after adjusting for potential confounders, including cardiac risk factors, pertinent medications, and stress testing indication. There were 3824 all-cause deaths during median follow-up of 11.5 years. In addition, 1880 MIs, and 1930 revascularizations were ascertained. Each 1-MET increment in exercise capacity was associated with a hazard ratio (95% CI) of 0.87 (0.85-0.89), 0.87 (0.85-0.90), and 0.86 (0.84-0.89) for mortality; 0.98 (0.96-1.01), 0.88 (0.84-0.92), and 0.93 (0.90-0.97) for MI; and 0.94 (0.92-0.96), 0.91 (0.88-0.95), and 0.96 (0.92-0.99) for downstream revascularizations in the nonrevascularized, PCI, and CABG groups, respectively. In each MET category, the nonrevascularized group had similar mortality risk as and higher MI and downstream revascularization risk than the PCI and CABG surgery groups (PExercise capacity was a strong predictor of mortality, MI, and downstream revascularizations in this cohort. Furthermore, patients with similar exercise capacities had an equivalent mortality risk, irrespective of baseline revascularization status. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and

  4. [EXERCISE CAPACITY AND AEROBIC PHYSICAL FITNESS ASSESSMENT AMONG ADOLESCENTS AND ADULTS WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS BY A QUESTIONNAIRE AND EXERCISE TESTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenstadt, Iris; Nice, Shachar; Constantini, Naama; Kerem, Eitan; Calderon-Margalit, Ronit

    2016-06-01

    Physical exercise has been shown to improve lung condition or to slow deterioration in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and improves their quality of life. This study analyzes the physical exercise capacity and the level of aerobic fitness of adolescents and adults with CF who are patients at the CF Center at Hadassah Medical Center Mount Scopus in Jerusalem, Israel. To assess physical exercise capacity and aerobic capacity levels among CF patients by a physical activity questionnaire in comparison to assessment by exercise tests. The participants completed a physical activity questionnaire, performed the "6 minute walk test" and a cardio-pulmonary test on a treadmill. The study group included 36 patients, ages 12-43 years, who completed a physical activity questionnaire. Most patients (92%) reported engaging in physical exercise. Most of those who exercised (61%) did so at a low intensity, as described in CF research literature. The average weekly exercise time was 177 minutes; 35 patients completed a cardio-pulmonary exercise test and a "6 minute walk test". The cardio-pulmonary exercise tests showed that 34% of the participants had 'good to excellent' aerobic fitness, 26% had 'moderate' aerobic fitness and 40% had "poor to very poor" fitness. Males achieved significantly higher maximal oxygen uptake than females, even when there were no differences in the severity of disease. Similar to the differences in the general population, these differences showed that male patients had higher aerobic fitness and exercise capacities than female CF patients. A significant correlation was found between self-reported exercise time and exercise intensity in the questionnaire and maximal oxygen uptake in the cardio-pulmonary test (r = 0.5, P < 0.01). The physical activity questionnaire had 85% sensitivity for the identification of patients with low aerobic exercise capacity and specificity of only 50%. The physical activity questionnaire showed a good correlation with the

  5. Heart Rate Variability Is Associated with Exercise Capacity in Patients with Cardiac Syndrome X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hao-Min; Yu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Chen-Huan

    2016-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) reflects the healthiness of autonomic nervous system, which is associated with exercise capacity. We therefore investigated whether HRV could predict the exercise capacity in the adults with cardiac syndrome X (CSX). A total of 238 subjects (57±12 years, 67.8% men), who were diagnosed as CSX by the positive exercise stress test and nearly normal coronary angiogram were enrolled. Power spectrum from the 24-hour recording of heart rate was analyzed in frequency domain using total power (TP) and spectral components of the very low frequency (VLF), low frequency (LF) and high frequency (HF) ranges. Among the study population, 129 subjects with impaired exercise capacity during the treadmill test had significantly lower HRV indices than those with preserved exercise capacity (≥90% of the age predicted maximal heart rate). After accounting for age, sex, and baseline SBP and heart rate, VLF (odds ratio per 1SD and 95% CI: 2.02, 1.19–3.42), LF (1.67, 1.10–2.55), and TP (1.82, 1.17–2.83) remained significantly associated with preserved exercise capacity. In addition, increased HRV indices were also associated with increased exercise duration, rate-pressure product, and heart rate recovery, independent of age, body mass index, and baseline SBP and heart rate. In subgroup analysis, HRV indices demonstrated similar predictive values related to exercise capacity across various subpopulations, especially in the young. In patients with CSX, HRV was independently associated with exercise capacity, especially in young subjects. The healthiness of autonomic nervous system may have a role in modulating the exercise capacity in patients with CSX. PMID:26812652

  6. ERRICCA radon model intercomparison exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.E.; Albarracín, D.; Csige, I.

    1999-01-01

    transport of radon, flux calculations, and partitioning of radon between air and water in soilpores. Seven groups participated in the intercomparison. All groups submitted results without knowing the results of others. For these results, relatively large group-to-group discrepancies were observed. Because......, still remain. All in all, it seems that the exercise has served its purpose and stimulated improvements relating to the quality of numerical modelling of radon transport. To maintain a high quality of modelling, it is recommendedthat additional exercises are carried out.......Numerical models based on finite-difference or finite-element methods are used by various research groups in studies of radon-222 transport through soil and building materials. Applications range from design of radon remediation systems to morefundamental studies of radon transport. To ascertain...

  7. Motor Skills and Exercise Capacity Are Associated with Objective Measures of Cognitive Functions and Academic Performance in Preadolescent Children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svend Sparre Geertsen

    Full Text Available To investigate associations between motor skills, exercise capacity and cognitive functions, and evaluate how they correlate to academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension using standardised, objective tests.This cross-sectional study included 423 Danish children (age: 9.29±0.35 years, 209 girls. Fine and gross motor skills were evaluated in a visuomotor accuracy-tracking task, and a whole-body coordination task, respectively. Exercise capacity was estimated from the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 children's test (YYIR1C. Selected tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB were used to assess different domains of cognitive functions, including sustained attention, spatial working memory, episodic and semantic memory, and processing speed. Linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate associations between these measures and the relationship with standard tests of academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension.Both fine and gross motor skills were associated with better performance in all five tested cognitive domains (all P<0.001, whereas exercise capacity was only associated with better sustained attention (P<0.046 and spatial working memory (P<0.038. Fine and gross motor skills (all P<0.001, exercise capacity and cognitive functions such as working memory, episodic memory, sustained attention and processing speed were all associated with better performance in mathematics and reading comprehension.The data demonstrate that fine and gross motor skills are positively correlated with several aspects of cognitive functions and with academic performance in both mathematics and reading comprehension. Moreover, exercise capacity was associated with academic performance and performance in some cognitive domains. Future interventions should investigate associations between changes in motor skills, exercise capacity, cognitive functions, and academic performance to elucidate the

  8. Improvement of exercise capacity and left ventricular diastolic function with metoprolol XL after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, S H; Jensen, S E; Egstrup, K

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Left ventricular (LV) diastolic function predicts and correlates with exercise capacity. Beta-blockers improve exercise capacity and LV diastolic function in patients with severe LV systolic dysfunction in dilated cardiomyopathy. However, information on the effect of metoprolol XL...... dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction were given metoprolol XL (n = 29) or placebo (n = 30). The effects of metoprolol XL on exercise capacity in relation to effects on LV diastolic filling were studied. Two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography and maximal symptom limited bicycle test were performed...... on days 5 through 7 and after 3 months. RESULTS: Maximal exercise capacity increased in the metoprolol XL group (124 +/- 30 W vs 135 +/- 29 W) compared with placebo (125 +/- 31 W vs 126 +/- 34 W) (P

  9. Improvement of exercise capacity and left ventricular diastolic function with metoprolol XL after acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, S H; Jensen, S E; Egstrup, K

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Left ventricular (LV) diastolic function predicts and correlates with exercise capacity. Beta-blockers improve exercise capacity and LV diastolic function in patients with severe LV systolic dysfunction in dilated cardiomyopathy. However, information on the effect of metoprolol XL...... on exercise capacity in relation to LV diastolic function in patients with mild to moderate LV systolic dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction is limited. METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 77 patients, a subgroup of 59 patients with mild to moderate LV systolic...... dysfunction after acute myocardial infarction were given metoprolol XL (n = 29) or placebo (n = 30). The effects of metoprolol XL on exercise capacity in relation to effects on LV diastolic filling were studied. Two-dimensional Doppler echocardiography and maximal symptom limited bicycle test were performed...

  10. The AMPK activator R419 improves exercise capacity and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in obese mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Marcinko

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Treatment of obese mice with R419 improved skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity through a mechanism that is independent of skeletal muscle AMPK. R419 also increases exercise capacity and improves mitochondrial function in obese WT mice; effects that are diminished in the absence of skeletal muscle AMPK. These findings suggest that R419 may be a promising therapy for improving whole-body glucose homeostasis and exercise capacity.

  11. Cardiopulmonary exercise capacity, muscle strength, and physical activity in children and adolescents with achondroplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, Tim; van Bergen, Monique W. M.; Sakkers, Ralph J. B.; Helders, Paul J. M.; Engelbert, Raoul H. H.

    2007-01-01

    To study in children with achondroplasia the response to exercise and muscle strength compared with healthy peers and to describe the relation between exercise capacity, anthropometric factors, and physical activity. Patients (7 boys and 10 girls; mean age, 11.8 +/- 3.3 years) with achondroplasia

  12. Echinochrome A Improves Exercise Capacity during Short-Term Endurance Training in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Yun Seo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Echinochrome A (Echi A improves mitochondrial function in the heart; however, its effects on skeletal muscle are still unclear. We hypothesized that Echi A administration during short-term exercise may improve exercise capacity. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the following groups: control group (CG, Echi A-treated group (EG, aerobic exercise group (AG, and aerobic exercise treated with Echi A group (AEG (n = 6 per group. Echi A was administered intra-peritoneally (0.1 mg/kg of Echi A in 300 µL phosphate-buffered saline daily 30 min before each exercise training. The AG and AEG groups performed treadmill running (20 m/min, 60 min/day five days/week for two weeks. The exercise capacity was significantly higher in the AG and AEG groups compared to other groups. Interestingly, the exercise capacity increased more effectively in the AEG group. The body weight in the EG tended to be slightly lower than that in the other groups. There were no significant changes in the plasma lipids among the groups. However, the gastrocnemius muscle mitochondria content was greater in the EG and AEG groups. These findings show that Echi A administration after short-term endurance training enhances exercise capacity, which was associated with an increase in skeletal muscle mitochondrial content.

  13. Preliminary Study of Exercise Capacity in Post-acute Stroke Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June-Kai Chen

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and exercise capacity of cycle ergometry exercise testing and exercise performance in patients with post-acute stroke. Nineteen male patients (mean age, 62.7 ± 9.2 years with a post stroke interval of 9.9 ± 2.0 days underwent symptom- limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Peak exercise capacity was measured by open-circuit spirometry during standard upright ergometer cycling. The mean peak oxygen uptake was 11.8 mL/kg/min, peak heart rate with age-predicted maximal heart rate was 67.9 ± 3.4%, and peak oxygen pulse was 7.5 mL/beat. The anaerobic threshold was achieved with a mean peak oxygen uptake of 73.4%. Mean peak minute ventilation was 42.1 L/min, and ventilatory reserve was 48.1 ± 16.8%. Our findings confirm that cycle ergometry exercise testing is feasible and exercise capacity is compromised in post-acute stroke survivors within 2 weeks after stroke. Respiratory impairments do not appear to contribute to the reduced exercise capacity post stroke.

  14. The functional exercise capacity in patients with bipolar disorder versus healthy controls: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Wyckaert, Sabine; Sienaert, Pascal; De Hert, Marc; Stubbs, Brendon; Buys, Roselien; Schueremans, Ans; Probst, Michel

    2015-09-30

    The aim of the current study was to compare the functional exercise capacity of patients with bipolar disorder with age-, gender- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. Thirty patients (16 ♂, 40.8±11.6 years) and healthy controls (16 ♂, 40.5±10.8 years) were included. All participants performed a 6-min walk test to assess the functional exercise capacity and completed the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Patients were screened for psychiatric symptoms using the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology and Hypomania Checklist-32. Results demonstrated that patients with bipolar disorder demonstrated a significantly poorer functional exercise capacity (590.8±112.6 versus 704.2±94.3m). A backward stepwise regression analyses showed that the level of depression and existing foot or ankle static problems and back pain before the test explained 70.9% of the variance in the distance achieved on the 6-min walk test (functional exercise capacity). The current study demonstrates that foot and back pain appear to be important negative predictors of functional exercise capacity in patients with bipolar disorder. Physical activity interventions delivered by physical therapists may help ameliorate pain symptoms and improve functional exercise capacity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of oral sucrose shortly before exercise on work capacity in McArdle disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.T.; Haller, R.G.; Vissing, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oral sucrose (75 g) ingested 40 minutes before exercise improves exercise tolerance in McArdle disease. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a lower dose of sucrose administered closer in time to exercise could have a similar beneficial effect on exercise capacity in patients with Mc......Ardle disease. DESIGN: Placebo-controlled crossover. SETTING: Neuromuscular Research Unit at the Department of Neurology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. PATIENTS: Six patients with biochemically and genetically diagnosed McArdle disease. INTERVENTIONS: On separate days, the patients were tested after...... the intestine and correspondingly higher circulating glucose levels later during exercise. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that 37 g of sucrose ingested shortly before exercise has a marked and prolonged effect on exercise tolerance in patients with McArdle disease. This treatment is more convenient...

  16. Relationships between respiratory parameters, exercise capacity and psychosocial factors in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awotidebe, T O; Awopeju, O F; Bisiriyu, L A; Ativie, R N; Oke, K I; Adedoyin, R A; Olusola, O D; Erhabor, G E

    2017-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affects respiratory functioning and psychosocial factors. However, little is known about perceived ability of people with COPD to engage in a regular exercise program. This study assessed respiratory parameters, exercise capacity, psychosocial factors and their relations in people with COPD. This cross-sectional study involved patients with COPD recruited from a Nigerian university teaching hospital. Respiratory parameters including forced expiratory volume in 1sec (FEV 1 ) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were assessed by using a spirometer and FEV 1 /FVC ratio was calculated. Participants were sitting upright in a comfortable chair and wearing a nose clip for measurements. The procedure was performed in accordance with the American Thoracic Society criteria. Exercise capacity was assessed by the 6-min walk test (6MWT). Gait speed was assessed by the distance covered in 6min. Perceived exercise self-efficacy (PESE) and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were assessed by exercise self-efficacy and Borg scales, respectively. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Alpha level was set at Pcapacity was correlated with mean values for the respiratory parameters FEV 1 (r=0.29; P=0.035), FVC (r=0.32; P=0.045) and FEV 1 /FVC ratio (r=0.37; P=0.007), and both exercise capacity and PESE were correlated with gait speed (r=0.96, P=0.001 and r=0.57; P=0.042) and RPE (r=0.42, P=0.050 and r=-0.44; P=0.032), but PESE was not correlated with respiratory parameter values (P>0.05). Participants with COPD demonstrated reduced respiratory parameter values and low exercise capacity but moderate PESE. We found significant correlations between exercise capacity and respiratory parameter values, but PESE was correlated with only gait speed and RPE. The study has implications for respiratory health promotion and exercise adherence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. The relationship between exercise capacity and masked hypertension in sedentary patients with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akilli, Hakan; Kayrak, Mehmet; Arıbas, Alpay; Tekinalp, Mehmet; Ayhan, Selim Suzi; Gündüz, Mehmet; Alibasic, Hajrudin; Altunbas, Gokhan; Yazıcı, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Although exaggerated blood pressure responses (EBPR) to exercise have been related to future hypertension and masked hypertension (MHT), the relationship between exercise capacity and MHT remains unclear. A sedentary life style has been related to increased cardiovascular mortality, diabetes mellitus (DM), and hypertension. In this study, we aimed to examine the relationship between exercise capacity and MHT in sedentary patients with DM. This study included 85 sedentary and normotensive patients with DM. Each patient's daily physical activity level was assessed according to the INTERHEART study. All patients underwent an exercise treadmill test, and exercise duration and capacity were recorded. Blood pressure (BP) was recorded during all exercise stages and BP values ≥ 200/110 mmHg were accepted as EBPR. MHT was diagnosed in patients having an office BP 135/85 mmHg. Patients were divided into two groups according to their ambulatory BP monitoring (MHT and normotensive group). The prevalence of MHT was 28.2%. Exercise duration and capacity were lower in the MHT group than in the normotensive group (psedentary subjects with DM.

  18. Nonparetic knee extensor strength is the determinant of exercise capacity of community-dwelling stroke survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Te; Huang, Ling-Tzu; Chou, Ya-Hui; Wei, Ta-Sen; Lin, Chung-Che

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the relationship among walking speed, exercise capacity, and leg strength in community dwelling stroke subjects and to evaluate which one was the leading determinant factor of them. This is a descriptive, cross-sectional study. Thirty-five chronic stroke patients who were able to walk independently in their community were enrolled. Walking speed was evaluated by using the 12-meter walking test. A maximal exercise test was used to determine the stroke subjects' exercise capacity. Knee extensor strength, measured as isokinetic torque, was assessed by isokinetic dynamometer. The main walking speed of our subjects was 0.52 m/s. Peak oxygen uptake (VO₂ peak) was 1.21 ± 0.43 L/min. Knee extensor strength, no matter whether paretic or nonparetic side, was significantly correlated to 12-meter walking speed and exercise capacity. Linear regression also showed the strength of the affected knee extensor was the determinant of walking speed and that of the nonparetic knee extensor was the determinant of exercise capacity in community dwelling stroke subjects. Walking speed and peak oxygen uptake were markedly decreased after stroke. Knee extensor strength of nonparetic leg was the most important determinant of exercise capacity of the community-dwelling stroke subjects. Knee extensor strengthening should be emphasized to help stroke patient to achieve optimal community living.

  19. Myogenin regulates exercise capacity but is dispensable for skeletal muscle regeneration in adult mdx mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Meadows

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is the most prevalent inherited childhood muscle disorder in humans. mdx mice exhibit a similar pathophysiology to the human disorder allowing for an in-depth investigation of DMD. Myogenin, a myogenic regulatory factor, is best known for its role in embryonic myogenesis, but its role in adult muscle maintenance and regeneration is still poorly understood. Here, we generated an mdx:Myog(flox/flox mouse harboring a tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase transgene, which was used to conditionally delete Myog during adult life. After tamoxifen treatment, three groups of mice were created to study the effects of Myog deletion: mdx:Myog(flox/flox mice (mdx, Myog(flox/flox mice (wild-type, and mdx:Myog(floxΔ/floxΔ:Cre-ER mice (mdx:Myog-deleted. mdx:Myog-deleted mice exhibited no adverse phenotype and behaved normally. When run to exhaustion, mdx:Myog-deleted mice demonstrated an enhanced capacity for exercise compared to mdx mice, running nearly as far as wild-type mice. Moreover, these mice showed the same signature characteristics of muscle regeneration as mdx mice. Unexpectedly, we found that myogenin was dispensable for muscle regeneration. Factors associated with muscle fatigue, metabolism, and proteolysis were significantly altered in mdx:Myog-deleted mice, and this might contribute to their increased exercise capacity. Our results reveal novel functions for myogenin in adult muscle and suggest that reducing Myog expression in other muscle disease models may partially restore muscle function.

  20. [Assessment of exercise capacity in congenital heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzo-López, Raquel; González-Represas, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    For many years, the treatment of congenital heart diseases has been a field in which, based on the seriousness of these conditions, treatment options were viewed with the greatest deference. This has conditioned, in many cases, the interventions to be undertaken in each. In this sense, exercise was thought to have a negative impact and thus the practise of almost any physical activity was limited. Although there has recently been a change in the paradigm with respect to exercise, this idea continues to hold sway. For many cardiopathies, the information obtained through a stress test is essential in order to implement and supervise an exercise program. The aim of this study is to analyze the parameters within the stress test which allow for an adequate stratification of the risk to subjects with congenital heart diseases who undertake exercise, as well as their values in accordance with the type of pathology, the gravity of such, and the age of the patients. Furthermore, these parameters will be analyzed for both their survival markers and the protocols that can best be adjusted for patients with these characteristic. Copyright © 2015 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of altitude/hypoxic training on oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity in elite athletes - a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hun-Young; Hwang, Hyejung; Park, Jonghoon; Lee, Seongno; Lim, Kiwon

    2016-03-31

    This study was designed as a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing effectiveness of altitude/hypoxic training (experimental) versus sea-level training (control) on oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity of elite athletes in Korea. Databases (Research Information Service System, Korean studies Information Service System, National Assembly Library) were for randomized controlled trials comparing altitude/hypoxic training versus sea-level training in elite athletes. Studies published in Korea up to December 2015 were eligible for inclusion. Oxygen delivery capacity of the blood was quantified by red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), erythropoietin (EPO); and aerobic exercise capacity was quantified by maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). RBC, Hb, Hct, VO2max represented heterogeneity and compared post-intervention between altitude/hypoxic training and sea-level training in elite athletes by a random effect model meta-analysis. EPO represented homogeneity and meta-analysis performed by a fixed effect model. Eight independent studies with 156 elite athletes (experimental: n = 82, control: n = 74) were included in the metaanalysis. RBC (4.499×10(5) cell/ul, 95 % CI: 2.469 to 6.529), Hb (5.447 g/dl, 95 % CI: 3.028 to 7.866), Hct (3.639 %, 95 % CI: 1.687 to 5.591), EPO (0.711 mU/mL, 95% CI: 0.282 to 1.140), VO2max (1.637 ml/kg/min, 95% CI: 0.599 to 1.400) showed significantly greater increase following altitude/hypoxic training, as compared with sea-level training. For elite athletes in Korea, altitude/ hypoxic training appears more effective than sea-level training for improvement of oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity.

  2. The effects of altitude/hypoxic training on oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity in elite athletes – a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hun-young; Hwang, Hyejung; Park, Jonghoon; Lee, Seongno; Lim, Kiwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was designed as a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing effectiveness of altitude/hypoxic training (experimental) versus sea-level training (control) on oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity of elite athletes in Korea. [Methods] Databases (Research Information Service System, Korean studies Information Service System, National Assembly Library) were for randomized controlled trials comparing altitude/hypoxic training versus sea-level training in elite athletes. Studies published in Korea up to December 2015 were eligible for inclusion. Oxygen delivery capacity of the blood was quantified by red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin (Hb), hematocrit (Hct), erythropoietin (EPO); and aerobic exercise capacity was quantified by maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). RBC, Hb, Hct, VO2max represented heterogeneity and compared post-intervention between altitude/hypoxic training and sea-level training in elite athletes by a random effect model meta-analysis. EPO represented homogeneity and meta-analysis performed by a fixed effect model. Eight independent studies with 156 elite athletes (experimental: n = 82, control: n = 74) were included in the metaanalysis. [Results] RBC (4.499×105 cell/ul, 95 % CI: 2.469 to 6.529), Hb (5.447 g/dl, 95 % CI: 3.028 to 7.866), Hct (3.639 %, 95 % CI: 1.687 to 5.591), EPO (0.711 mU/mL, 95% CI: 0.282 to 1.140), VO2max (1.637 ml/kg/min, 95% CI: 0.599 to 1.400) showed significantly greater increase following altitude/hypoxic training, as compared with sea-level training. [Conclusion] For elite athletes in Korea, altitude/ hypoxic training appears more effective than sea-level training for improvement of oxygen delivery capacity of the blood and aerobic exercise capacity. PMID:27298808

  3. Motor Skills and Exercise Capacity Are Associated with Objective Measures of Cognitive Functions and Academic Performance in Preadolescent Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Thomas, Richard; Larsen, Malte Nejst; Dahn, Ida Marie; Andersen, Josefine Needham; Krause-Jensen, Matilde; Korup, Vibeke; Nielsen, Claus Malta; Wienecke, Jacob; Ritz, Christian; Krustrup, Peter; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    To investigate associations between motor skills, exercise capacity and cognitive functions, and evaluate how they correlate to academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension using standardised, objective tests. This cross-sectional study included 423 Danish children (age: 9.29±0.35 years, 209 girls). Fine and gross motor skills were evaluated in a visuomotor accuracy-tracking task, and a whole-body coordination task, respectively. Exercise capacity was estimated from the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 children's test (YYIR1C). Selected tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were used to assess different domains of cognitive functions, including sustained attention, spatial working memory, episodic and semantic memory, and processing speed. Linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate associations between these measures and the relationship with standard tests of academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension. Both fine and gross motor skills were associated with better performance in all five tested cognitive domains (all Pperformance in mathematics and reading comprehension. The data demonstrate that fine and gross motor skills are positively correlated with several aspects of cognitive functions and with academic performance in both mathematics and reading comprehension. Moreover, exercise capacity was associated with academic performance and performance in some cognitive domains. Future interventions should investigate associations between changes in motor skills, exercise capacity, cognitive functions, and academic performance to elucidate the causality of these associations.

  4. Motor Skills and Exercise Capacity Are Associated with Objective Measures of Cognitive Functions and Academic Performance in Preadolescent Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Richard; Larsen, Malte Nejst; Dahn, Ida Marie; Andersen, Josefine Needham; Krause-Jensen, Matilde; Korup, Vibeke; Nielsen, Claus Malta; Wienecke, Jacob; Ritz, Christian; Krustrup, Peter; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate associations between motor skills, exercise capacity and cognitive functions, and evaluate how they correlate to academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension using standardised, objective tests. Methods This cross-sectional study included 423 Danish children (age: 9.29±0.35 years, 209 girls). Fine and gross motor skills were evaluated in a visuomotor accuracy-tracking task, and a whole-body coordination task, respectively. Exercise capacity was estimated from the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 children's test (YYIR1C). Selected tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were used to assess different domains of cognitive functions, including sustained attention, spatial working memory, episodic and semantic memory, and processing speed. Linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate associations between these measures and the relationship with standard tests of academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension. Results Both fine and gross motor skills were associated with better performance in all five tested cognitive domains (all Pperformance in mathematics and reading comprehension. Conclusions The data demonstrate that fine and gross motor skills are positively correlated with several aspects of cognitive functions and with academic performance in both mathematics and reading comprehension. Moreover, exercise capacity was associated with academic performance and performance in some cognitive domains. Future interventions should investigate associations between changes in motor skills, exercise capacity, cognitive functions, and academic performance to elucidate the causality of these associations. PMID:27560512

  5. Model of clinker capacity expansion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Stylianides, T

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available to be introduced each year during a given planning horizon. The optimal solution is defined as the one which maximises the net present value (NPV) of the cash flow generated by the introduction and operation of new kilns subject to capacity and demand constraints...

  6. Does peripheral arterial occlusive disease influence muscle strength and exercise capacity in COPD patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Angélica da Fonseca Miranda

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is complex and understanding of it has been changing in recent years, with regard to its multisystemic manifestations, especially peripheral dysfunction and its influence on intolerance to exercise. Objectives To evaluate the relationship between peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD and peripheral muscle strength and exercise capacity in COPD patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study of 35 patients with COPD who were evaluated with the Ankle-Brachial Index, handgrip strength test, 1 repetition maximum (1RM of knee extensors and flexors, and distance covered in the incremental shuttle walking test (dISWT. Results COPD patients with coexisting PAOD had lower dominant handgrip strength test results (33.00 vs. 26.66 kgf, p = 0.02 and worse performance in the dISWT (297.32 vs. 219.41 m, p = 0.02 when compared to the COPD patients without PAOD. Strong correlations were found between the result of the handgrip strength test and both the dISWT (r = 0.78; p < 0.001 and the 1RM/knee extension (r = 0.71; p = 0.03; and also between the dISWT and both the 1RM/knee extension (r = 0.72; p = 0.02 and the 1RM/knee flexion (r = 0.92; p < 0.001. The linear regression model showed that the dISWT variable alone explains 15.3% of the Ankle-Brachial Index result (p = 0.01. Conclusion COPD patients with PAOD exhibit reduced muscle strength and lower exercise capacity than COPD patients without PAOD.

  7. ERRICCA radon model intercomparison exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, C.E.; Albarracin, D.; Csige, I.; Graaf, E.R. van der; Jiranek, M.; Rehs, B.; Svoboda, Z.; Toro, L.

    1999-04-01

    Numerical models based on finite-difference or finite-element methods are used by various research groups in studies of radon-222 transport through soil and building materials. Applications range from design of radon remediation systems to more fundamental studies of radon transport. To ascertain that results obtained with these models are of good quality, it is necessary that such models are tested. This document reports on a benchmark test organized by the EU project ERRICCA: European Research into Radon in Construction Concerted Action. The test comprises the following cases: 1) Steady-state diffusive radon profiles in dry and wet soils, 2) steady-state entry of soil gas and radon into a house, 3) time-dependent radon exhalation from a building-material sample. These cases cover features such as: soil heterogeneity, anisotropy, 3D-effects, time dependency, combined advective and diffusive transport of radon, flux calculations, and partitioning of radon between air and water in soil pores. Seven groups participated in the intercomparison. All groups submitted results without knowing the results of others. For these results, relatively large group-to-group discrepancies were observed. Because of this, all groups scrutinized their computations (once more) and engaged in follow-up discussions with others. During this debugging process, problems were indeed identified (and eliminated). The accordingly revised results were in better agreement than those reported initially. Some discrepancies, however, still remain. All in all, it seems that the exercise has served its purpose and stimulated improvements relating to the quality of numerical modelling of radon transport. To maintain a high quality of modelling, it is recommended that additional exercises are carried out. (au)

  8. β-alanine supplementation to improve exercise capacity and performance: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Bryan; Elliott-Sale, Kirsty; Artioli, Guilherme G; Swinton, Paul A; Dolan, Eimear; Roschel, Hamilton; Sale, Craig; Gualano, Bruno

    2017-04-01

    To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence on the effects of β-alanine supplementation on exercise capacity and performance. This study was designed in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. A 3-level mixed effects model was employed to model effect sizes and account for dependencies within data. 3 databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, Web of Science) were searched using a number of terms ('β-alanine' and 'Beta-alanine' combined with 'supplementation', 'exercise', 'training', 'athlete', 'performance' and 'carnosine'). Inclusion/exclusion criteria limited articles to double-blinded, placebo-controlled studies investigating the effects of β-alanine supplementation on an exercise measure. All healthy participant populations were considered, while supplementation protocols were restricted to chronic ingestion. Cross-over designs were excluded due to the long washout period for skeletal muscle carnosine following supplementation. A single outcome measure was extracted for each exercise protocol and converted to effect sizes for meta-analyses. 40 individual studies employing 65 different exercise protocols and totalling 70 exercise measures in 1461 participants were included in the analyses. A significant overall effect size of 0.18 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.28) was shown. Meta-regression demonstrated that exercise duration significantly (p=0.004) moderated effect sizes. Subgroup analyses also identified the type of exercise as a significant (p=0.013) moderator of effect sizes within an exercise time frame of 0.5-10 min with greater effect sizes for exercise capacity (0.4998 (95% CI 0.246 to 0.753)) versus performance (0.1078 (95% CI -0.201 to 0.416)). There was no moderating effect of training status (p=0.559), intermittent or continuous exercise (p=0.436) or total amount of β-alanine ingested (p=0.438). Co-supplementation with sodium bicarbonate resulted in the largest effect size when compared with placebo (0.43 (95% CI 0.22 to 0.64)). β-alanine had a

  9. Impact of diabetes and diastolic dysfunction on exercise capacity in normotensive patients without coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürdal, Ahmet; Kasikcioglu, Erdem; Yakal, Sertac; Bugra, Zehra

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of diabetes and diastolic dysfunction on exercise capacity in asymptomatic, normotensive patients with type 2 diabetes without coronary artery disease. A total of 43 type 2 diabetes patients (age: 50 ± 5 years) and 20 healthy controls (age: 48 ± 4 years) were enrolled. Diastolic function was investigated by conventional pulsed-wave (PW) Doppler and tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). Exercise capacity was evaluated with cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). In patients with type 2 diabetes, increase in resting heart rate (HR-rest) (p = 0.013), decrease in maximum heart rate during exercise (HR-max) (p volume (VE)/maximum carbon dioxide discharge (VCO2) ratio (p discharge (VCO2) (p < 0.001) compared to controls indicating significantly reduced exercise capacity. HbA1c was inversely correlated with VO2-max (r = -0.456, p < 0.01) independent of the absence or presence of mild diastolic dysfunction. Exercise capacity was found to be significantly decreased in normotensive patients with type 2 diabetes without coronary artery disease, and this decrease was independent of diastolic dysfunction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Effect of caffeine on exercise capacity and function in prostate cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Rahchell S; Bolam, Kate A; Skinner, Tina L

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to examine the acute effect of caffeine on exercise capacity, exercise-related fatigue, and functional performance in prostate cancer survivors. In this randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover study, 30 prostate cancer survivors (age, 70.3 ± 7.7 yr; body mass, 80.5 ± 13.0 kg; mean ± SD) consumed 6.04 ± 0.16 mg·kg(-1) of anhydrous caffeine or a placebo 1 h before completing a battery of exercise capacity and functional performance tests. Testing sessions were separated by 3-4 wk. Immediate fatigue and perceived exertion were measured directly pre- and postexercise at both testing sessions. Caffeine increased exercise capacity by 7.93 s (+3.0%; P = 0.010); however, postexercise fatigue and perception of exertion were comparable with the placebo session (P = 0.632 and P = 0.902, respectively). Increases in isometric grip strength trended toward significance in both dominant (+2.9%; P = 0.053) and nondominant (+2.1%; P = 0.061) hands in the caffeine trial compared with placebo. Caffeine ingestion did not result in improvements in performance for any of the remaining functional measures, including the timed up-and-go test, repeated chair stands, 6-m fast walk, and 6-m backward tandem walk. Systolic blood pressure and HR were significantly increased (P = 0.006 and P = 0.040, respectively) upon completion of the testing battery when compared with placebo. Consumption of caffeine 1 h before exercise induced improvements in exercise capacity and muscular strength in prostate cancer survivors. However, there was no change in exercise-related fatigue when compared with placebo despite reduction in timed performance of the 400-m walk. Caffeine seems to enhance exercise tolerance through improved performance with no subsequent increase in fatigue or perception of exertion and may be an appropriate strategy to promote exercise participation in prostate cancer survivors.

  11. Functional exercise capacity, lung function and chest wall deformity in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Fornias Sperandio

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction The adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS causes changes on the compliance of the chest. These changes may be associated with impaired lung function and reduced functional exercise capacity of these adolescents. We aimed to evaluate the correlation between functional exercise capacity, lung function and geometry of the chest at different stages of AIS.Materials and methods The study was carried out in a cross-sectional design which were evaluated 27 AIS patients at different stages of the disease. For chest wall evaluation, were created geometry angles/distances (A/D, which were quantified by Software Postural Assessment. The functional exercise capacity was assessed by a portable gas analyzer during the incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT. Besides that, manovacuometry and spirometry were also performed.Results Linear regressions showed that oxygen uptake (peak VO2 was correlated with distance travelled in the ISWT (R2 = 0.52, maximal respiratory pressures, cough peak flow (R2 = 0.59 and some thoracic deformity markers (D1, D2 and A6.Discussion We observed that the chest wall alterations, lung function and respiratory muscle strength are related to the functional exercise capacity and may impair the physical activity performance in AIS patients.Final considerations There is correlation between functional exercise capacity, lung function and geometry of the chest in AIS patients. Our results point to the possible impact of the AIS in the physical activities of these adolescents. Therefore, efforts to prevent the disease progression are extremely important.

  12. Aerobic exercise capacity in post-polio syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorn, E.L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to expand the body of knowledge on the diminished aerobic capacity of individuals with post-polio syndrome (PPS). The studies described in this thesis were based on the assumption that, besides a reduced muscle mass, deconditioning contributes to the severely diminished

  13. High Intensity Exercise in Multiple Sclerosis: Effects on Muscle Contractile Characteristics and Exercise Capacity, a Randomised Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inez Wens

    Full Text Available Low-to-moderate intensity exercise improves muscle contractile properties and endurance capacity in multiple sclerosis (MS. The impact of high intensity exercise remains unknown.Thirty-four MS patients were randomized into a sedentary control group (SED, n = 11 and 2 exercise groups that performed 12 weeks of a high intensity interval (HITR, n = 12 or high intensity continuous cardiovascular training (HCTR, n = 11, both in combination with resistance training. M.vastus lateralis fiber cross sectional area (CSA and proportion, knee-flexor/extensor strength, body composition, maximal endurance capacity and self-reported physical activity levels were assessed before and after 12 weeks.Compared to SED, 12 weeks of high intensity exercise increased mean fiber CSA (HITR: +21 ± 7%, HCTR: +23 ± 5%. Furthermore, fiber type I CSA increased in HCTR (+29 ± 6%, whereas type II (+23 ± 7% and IIa (+23 ± 6%, CSA increased in HITR. Muscle strength improved in HITR and HCTR (between +13 ± 7% and +45 ± 20% and body fat percentage tended to decrease (HITR: -3.9 ± 2.0% and HCTR: -2.5 ± 1.2%. Furthermore, endurance capacity (Wmax +21 ± 4%, time to exhaustion +24 ± 5%, VO2max +17 ± 5% and lean tissue mass (+1.4 ± 0.5% only increased in HITR. Finally self-reported physical activity levels increased 73 ± 19% and 86 ± 27% in HCTR and HITR, respectively.High intensity cardiovascular exercise combined with resistance training was safe, well tolerated and improved muscle contractile characteristics and endurance capacity in MS.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01845896.

  14. Changes in the lipid composition of blood under the influence of a single submaximal exercise capacity (experimental research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermolaeva E.N.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In acute physical exercise, there is a change in oxygen delivery working tissues, blood gas transport function and efficiency of the use of oxygen by cells in the process of metabolism, which is the basis for compensation for physical activities. Lipid metabolism plays an important role in the energy supply of muscle activity. The aim of our research is to study the effect of a single submaximal exercise capacity by changing the lipid profile of peripheral blood. Materials and Methods. The study was performed on 18 white rats. Model of acute exercise: animals swam 4 minutes with a load weighing 20% of body weight. Blood sampling was performed by intracardiac way, right after exercise. The blood lipid profile was determined. Results. In the experiment reported an increase in triglycerides, total cholesterol, very low-density lipoproteins, but the atherogenic ratio is maintained at the control values, due to a significant increase in the level of high-density lipoprotein. Conclusion. Acute submaximal exercise capacity by untrained body has an atherogenic effect. Working muscles during physical activity is a major consumer of free fatty acids, which are the source of atherogenic lipoprotein form of the very low and low density.

  15. Branched-chain amino acids supplementation enhances exercise capacity and lipid oxidation during endurance exercise after muscle glycogen depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualano, A B; Bozza, T; Lopes De Campos, P; Roschel, H; Dos Santos Costa, A; Luiz Marquezi, M; Benatti, F; Herbert Lancha Junior, A

    2011-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) transaminase activation occurs simultaneously with exercise-induced muscle glycogen reduction, suggesting that BCAA supplementation might play an energetic role in this condition. This study aimed to test whether BCAA supplementation enhances exercise capacity and lipid oxidation in glycogen-depleted subjects. Using a double-blind cross-over design, volunteers (N.=7) were randomly assigned to either the BCAA (300 mg . kg . day -1) or the placebo (maltodextrine) for 3 days. On the second day, subjects were submitted to an exercise-induced glycogen depletion protocol. They then performed an exhaustive exercise test on the third day, after which time to exhaustion, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), plasma glucose, free fatty acids (FFA), blood ketones and lactate were determined. BCAA supplementation promoted a greater resistance to fatigue when compared to the placebo (+17.2%). Moreover, subjects supplemented with BCAA showed reduced RER and higher plasma glucose levels during the exhaustive exercise test. In conclusion, BCAA supplementation increases resistance to fatigue and enhances lipid oxidation during exercise in glycogen-depleted subjects.

  16. Oral amino acid supplements improve exercise capacities in elderly patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilani, Roberto; Viglio, Simona; Iadarola, Paolo; Opasich, Cristina; Testa, Amidio; Dioguardi, Francesco S; Pasini, Evasio

    2008-06-02

    We investigated whether 30 days of oral supplementation with a special mixture of amino acids (AAs), together with conventional therapy, could improve exercise capacity in elderly outpatients with chronic heart failure (CHF). A group of 95 outpatients (12 women and 83 men; New York Heart Association class II-III) aged 65-74 years were studied. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The patients performed a basal exercise test and were then randomly assigned to a special oral nutritional mixture of AAs 4 g twice daily (n = 43) or placebo (n = 42). After 30 days we repeated the exercise test. In both tests we measured the following: oxygen consumption (VO2), CO2 production (VCO2), minute ventilation (VE), oxygen cost of ventilation (VO2/VE), CO2 elimination per liter of ventilation (VCO2/VE), respiratory exchange ratio (RER; calculated as VCO2/VO2), oxygen pulse (VO2/heart rate [HR]) and anaerobic metabolism during exercise (ANA-VO2). At day 30, exercise capacity in the AA group had improved (+11 +/- 8 W, p 50% in patients on AAs (from 20.2 +/- 10 mL/kg at day 0 to 10.9 +/- 5 mL/kg at day 30; p patients who received placebo. In conclusion, the study showed that oral AA supplementation, in conjunction with standard pharmacologic therapy, appears to increase exercise capacity by improving circulatory function, muscle oxygen consumption, and aerobic production of energy in elderly outpatients with CHF.

  17. A Capacity Supply Model for Virtualized Servers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander PINNOW

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with determining the capacity supply for virtualized servers. First, a server is modeled as a queue based on a Markov chain. Then, the effect of server virtualization on the capacity supply will be analyzed with the distribution function of the server load.

  18. Pulmonary capillary reserve and exercise capacity at high altitude in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Bryan J; Coffman, Kirsten E; Summerfield, Douglas T; Issa, Amine N; Kasak, Alex J; Johnson, Bruce D

    2016-02-01

    We determined whether well-acclimatized humans have a reserve to recruit pulmonary capillaries in response to exercise at high altitude. At sea level, lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (DmCO), and pulmonary capillary blood volume (V c) were measured at rest before maximal oxygen consumption ([Formula: see text]) was determined in seven adults. Then, DLCO, DmCO and V c were measured pre- and post-exhaustive incremental exercise at 5150 m after ~40 days of acclimatization. Immediately after exercise at high altitude, there was an increase in group mean DmCO (14 ± 10%, P = 0.040) with no pre- to post-exercise change in group mean DLCO (46.9 ± 5.8 vs. 50.6 ± 9.6 ml/min/mmHg, P = 0.213) or V c (151 ± 28 vs. 158 ± 37 ml, P = 0.693). There was, however, a ~20% increase in DLCO from pre- to post-exercise at high altitude (51.2 ± 0.2 vs. 61.1 ± 0.2 ml/min/mmHg) with a concomitant increase in DmCO (123 ± 2 vs. 156 ± 4 ml/min/mmHg) and V c (157 ± 3 vs. 180 ± 8 ml) in 2 of the 7 participants. There was a significant positive relationship between the decrease in [Formula: see text] from sea level to high altitude and the change in DLCO and lung diffusing capacity for nitric oxide (DLNO) from rest to end-exercise at high altitude. These data suggest that recruitment of the pulmonary capillaries in response to exercise at high altitude is limited in most well-acclimatized humans but that any such a reserve may be associated with better exercise capacity.

  19. Relationship of exercise capacity and left ventricular dimensions in patients with a normal ejection fraction. An exploratory study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Meyer

    Full Text Available Extreme endurance exercise is known to be associated with an enlargement of the left ventricular (LV chamber, whereas inactivity results in inverse changes. It is unknown if these dimensional relationships exist in patients.We analyzed the relationship of exercise capacity and LV dimension in a cohort of sequential patients with a normal ejection fraction undergoing stress echocardiography. In a total of 137 studies the following questions were addressed: (a is there a difference in LV dimensions of patients with an excellent exercise capacity versus patients with a poor exercise capacity, (b how is LV dimension and exercise capacity affected by LV wall thickness and (c how do LV dimensions of patients who are unable to walk on a treadmill compare to the above groups.Patients with a poor exercise capacity or who are unable to physically exercise have a 34 percent smaller LV cavity size when compared to patients with an excellent exercise capacity (p<0.001. This reduction in LV chamber size is associated with concentric LV hypertrophy and a reciprocal increase in resting heart rate. In addition, cardiac output reserve is further blunted by chronotropic incompetence and a tachycardia-induced LV volume reduction. In conclusion the relationship of exercise capacity and cardiac dimensions described in extreme athletes also applies to patients. Our exploratory analysis suggests that patients who cannot sufficiently exercise have small LV cavities.

  20. Restrictive Mitral Annuloplasty Does Not Limit Exercise Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deja, Marek A; Żak, Aleksandra; Malinowski, Marcin; Pysz, Piotr; Gaszewska-Żurek, Ewa; Turski, Maciej; Janusiewicz, Piotr; Wita, Krystian; Chudek, Jerzy

    2015-10-01

    Restrictive mitral annuloplasty is the preferred method of treating secondary mitral regurgitation. The use of small annuloplasty rings to reduce the high recurrence rates may result in mitral stenosis. Thirty-six patients who underwent restrictive mitral annuloplasty with Carpentier-Edwards classic 26 size ring underwent exercise echocardiography and ergospirometry. Resting catecholamines and N-terminal pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels were measured. At the time of study, the median time from operation was 16.6 months (interquartile range, 8.5 to 43.3 months). Left ventricular end-systolic volume index (LVESVI) was 67 mL/m(2) (interquartile range, 25 to 92 mL/m(2)), and ejection fraction (EF) was 38.8% (interquartile range, 28.3% to 59.0%). Mitral gradients were higher at the leaflet tips than at the annular level. Continuous wave (CW) Doppler gradients at rest were 3.4 mmHg (interquartile range, 2.4 to 4.9 mmHg) mean and 9.5 mmHg (interquartile range, 7.0 to 14.7 mmHg) maximal. On exertion, they increased to 6.8 mmHg (interquartile range, 5.4 to 8.8 mmHg) (p = 0.001) and 19.7 mmHg (interquartile range, 12.8 to 23.3 mmHg) (p = 0.001), respectively. Maximal VO2 was 18.2 mL/kg/min (interquartile range, 16.3 to 21.5 mL/kg/min), VE/VCO2 slope was 31.1 (interquartile range, 26 to 34). Epinephrine level was 0.024 ng/mL (interquartile range, 0.0098 to 0.043 ng/mL), norepinephrine was 0.61 ng/mL (interquartile range, 0.41 to 0.95 ng/mL), and NT-proBNP was 303 pg/mL (interquartile range, 155 to 553 pg/mL). Maximal VO2 negatively correlated with resting norepinephrine level (r = -0.50, p = 0.003). VE/VCO2 slope positively correlated with NT-proBNP (r = 0.36, p = 0.004) and epinephrine (r = 0.36, p = 0.04) levels and with LV volumes (r = 0.51, p = 0.006) and was negatively correlated with LVEF (r = -0.52, p = 0.004). Neither maximal VO2 nor VE/VCO2 slope correlated with the highest mean (r = 0.24, p = 0.2, and r = -0.20, p = 0.3, respectively) and maximal (r

  1. Anemia and hemoglobin serum levels are associated with exercise capacity and quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Marcello; Manea, Lorenzo; Anton, Kamel; Bruzzone, Paola; Meneghello, Mara; Zamboni, Francesco; Purgato, Luigi; Cazzoletti, Lucia; Ferrari, Pietro; Testi, Renato

    2015-05-08

    Little is known about the relationship between hemoglobin concentrations, functional status and health related quality of life (HRQL) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our aim was to investigate the prevalence of anemia and the association of hemoglobin with shortness of breath, exercise capacity, muscle strength and HRQL, in COPD patients. A total of 105 COPD patients (77 males, 71.6 ± 9.2 years) were studied. Patients were classified as anemic and non anemic using the WHO criteria. We used the Medical Research Council Dyspnoea scale (MRCs) to measure shortness of breath. Exercise capacity was assessed using the six minute walking distance (6MWD) and the peak of VO2 during the maximal cycle ergometer test (VO2max). We used the Quadriceps and Handgrip strength assessment to determine muscle strength. The Saint George Respiratory Questionnaire was used to investigate HRQL. The physiological/functional characteristics of the two groups were compared. Regression models adjusting for confounders examined the independent association of anemia and of hemoglobin levels with clinical and functional outcomes. Anemic patients (12.3%) showed a significantly higher MRCs, a lower 6MWD, VO2max, and a worse quality of life. On the contrary, there was no difference in muscle strength between the two groups. In the regression models, hemoglobin was independently associated with reduced exercise capacity and HRQL. Anemia in COPD was a risk factor for poorer exercise capacity and quality of life, and these outcomes were linearly associated with hemoglobin. Our results should stimulate further research into exploring whether increasing hemoglobin has a beneficial effect on the outcomes in COPD.

  2. Aerobic exercise capacity at long-term follow-up after paediatric allogeneic haematopoietic SCT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, S; Uhlving, H H; Buchvald, F

    2014-01-01

    Peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), a measure of aerobic exercise capacity, predicts mortality and morbidity in healthy and diseased individuals. Our aim was to determine VO2peak years after paediatric allogeneic haematopoietic SCT (HSCT) and to identify associations with baseline patient and donor...

  3. Effect of lifelong resveratrol supplementation and exercise training on skeletal muscle oxidative capacity in aging mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringholm, Stine; Olesen, Jesper; Pedersen, Jesper Thorhauge

    2013-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that lifelong resveratrol (RSV) supplementation counteracts an age-associated decrease in skeletal muscle oxidative capacity through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α and that RSV combined with lifelong exercise training (ET...

  4. Motor performance in children with generalized hypermobility: the influence of muscle strength and exercise capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanewinkel-van Kleef, Yvonne B.; Helders, Paul J. M.; Takken, Tim; Engelbert, Raoul H.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether muscle strength and functional exercise capacity (FEC) influence motor performance in children with generalized joint hypermobility. Forty-one children (mean age: 8.1 years) with symptomatic generalized hypermobility were included. Motor performance

  5. Exercise capacity in Dutch children : New reference values for the Bruce treadmill protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.M. van der Cammen-van Zijp (Monique); R.J.G. van den Berg-Emons (Rita); S.P. Willemsen (Sten); H.J. Stam (Henk); D. Tibboel (Dick); H. IJsselstijn (Hanneke)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe Bruce treadmill protocol is suitable for children 4 years of age and older. Dutch reference values were established in 1987. We considered that children's exercise capacity has deteriorated due to changes in physical activity patterns and eating habits. We determined new reference

  6. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Slooten, Ymkje J.; Melle, van Joost P.; Freling, Hendrik G.; Bouma, Berto J.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Jongbloed, Monique R. M.; Post, Martijn C.; Sieswerda, Gertjan T.; in 't Veld, Anna Huis; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A.; Pieper, Petronella G.

    Objectives To report the prevalence of aortic valve prosthesis patient mismatch (PPM) in an adult population with congenital heart disease (CHD) and its impact on exercise capacity. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) with a history of aortic valve replacement may outgrow their prosthesis

  7. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Slooten, Ymkje J.; van Melle, Joost P.; Freling, Hendrik G.; Bouma, Berto J.; van Dijk, Arie Pj; Jongbloed, Monique Rm; Post, Martijn C.; Sieswerda, Gertjan T.; Huis In 't Veld, Anna; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A.; Pieper, Petronella G.

    2016-01-01

    To report the prevalence of aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) in an adult population with congenital heart disease (CHD) and its impact on exercise capacity. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) with a history of aortic valve replacement may outgrow their prosthesis later in

  8. Aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch and exercise capacity in adult patients with congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Slooten, Ymkje J; van Melle, Joost P; Freling, Hendrik G; Bouma, Berto J; van Dijk, Arie Pj; Jongbloed, Monique Rm; Post, Martijn C; Sieswerda, Gertjan T; Huis In 't Veld, Anna; Ebels, Tjark; Voors, Adriaan A; Pieper, Petronella G

    2016-01-01

    To report the prevalence of aortic valve prosthesis-patient mismatch (PPM) in an adult population with congenital heart disease (CHD) and its impact on exercise capacity. Adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD) with a history of aortic valve replacement may outgrow their prosthesis later in life. However, the prevalence and clinical consequences of aortic PPM in ACHD are presently unknown. From the national Dutch Congenital Corvitia (CONCOR) registry, we identified 207 ACHD with an aortic valve prosthesis for this cross-sectional cohort study. Severe PPM was defined as an indexed effective orifice area ≤0.65 cm2/m2 and moderate PPM as an indexed orifice area ≤0.85 cm2/m2 measured using echocardiography. Exercise capacity was reported as percentage of predicted exercise capacity (PPEC). Of the 207 patients, 68% was male, 71% had a mechanical prosthesis and mean age at inclusion was 43.9 years ±11.4. The prevalence of PPM was 42%, comprising 23% severe PPM and 19% moderate PPM. Prevalence of PPM was higher in patients with mechanical prostheses (preport a high prevalence (42%) of PPM in ACHD with an aortic valve prosthesis and an independent association of PPM with diminished exercise capacity. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. Relationship between dyspnoea, pulmonary function and exercise capacity in patients with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deJong, W; vanderSchans, CP; Mannes, GPM; vanAalderen, WMC; Grevink, RG; Koeter, GH

    The median age of survival in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has improved considerably. Despite this improvement, deterioration of pulmonary function and decrease in exercise capacity are still the main problems for many patients. Although dyspnoea is a common complaint in CF patients,

  10. Relationship between dyspnoea, pulmonary function and exercise capacity in patients with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, W.; van der Schans, C. P.; Mannes, G. P.; van Aalderen, W. M.; Grevink, R. G.; Koëter, G. H.

    1997-01-01

    The median age of survival in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has improved considerably. Despite this improvement, deterioration of pulmonary function and decrease in exercise capacity are still the main problems for many patients. Although dyspnoea is a common complaint in CF patients,

  11. Effects of Exercise Therapy on Balance Capacity in Chronic Stroke: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijnhoven, H.J.R. van; Heeren, A.; Peters, M.A.; Veerbeek, J.M.; Kwakkel, G.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Weerdesteyn, V.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the effects of exercise training on balance capacity in people in the chronic phase after stroke. Furthermore, we aimed to identify which training regimen was most effective. METHODS: Electronic

  12. Association Between Exercise Capacity and Late Onset of Dementia, Alzheimer Disease, and Cognitive Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Jan; Chan, Khin; Myers, Jonathan N

    2017-02-01

    To address the association between exercise capacity and the onset of dementia, Alzheimer disease, and cognitive impairment. For 6104 consecutive veteran patients (mean ± SD age: 59.2±11.4 years) referred for treadmill exercise testing, the combined end point of dementia, Alzheimer disease, and cognitive impairment was abstracted from the Veterans Affairs computerized patient record system. After mean ± SD follow-up of 10.3±5.5 years, 353 patients (5.8%) developed the composite end point at a mean ± SD age of 76.7±10.3 years. After correction for confounders in multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression, higher age at exercise testing (hazard ratio [HR]=1.08; 95% CI, 1.07-1.09; Pexercise capacity (HR=0.92; 95% CI, 0.89-0.96; Pexercise capacity conferred a nearly 8% reduction in the incidence of cognitive impairment. Meeting the recommendations for daily activity was not associated with a delay in onset of cognitive impairment (HR=1.07; 95% CI, 0.86-1.32; P=.55). Exercise capacity is strongly associated with cognitive function; the inverse association between fitness and cognitive impairment provides an additional impetus for health care providers to promote physical activity. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Legal Capacity for Exercise to Rights and the Backing Decision Making

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Iara Pereira

    2016-01-01

    considering the brazilian law of inclusion, the article introduces the change in legal capacity for exercise and examine new institute of backing decision making in relation of the support administrator institute italian of law n 6, 2004 january 09 and the article 43 of support system of code civil and commercial argentine of 2015 and project for changing the brazilian law of inclusion.

  14. Functional Exercise Capacity in Children With Electrical Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foncerrada, Guillermo; Capek, Karel D; Wurzer, Paul; Herndon, David N; Mlcak, Ronald P; Porter, Craig; Suman, Oscar E

    Electrical burns are a severe form of thermal injury extending deep into tissue. Here, we investigated the effect of electrical burns on metabolic rate, body composition, and aerobic capacity. We prospectively studied a cohort of 24 severely burned children. Twelve patients had a combination of electrical and flame burns and 12 matched controls had only flame burns. Endpoints were cardiopulmonary fitness (maximal oxygen consumption [VO2]), muscle strength (peak torque per body weight), body mass index, lean body mass index, and days of myoglobinemia (≥500 mg/dl). Demographics of both the groups were comparable. The electrical burn group had more days of myoglobinemia during acute hospitalization than the flame burn group (3.6 ± 1.8 days vs 0.3 ± 0.5 days, P < .0001). Maximal VO2 was significantly lower in the electrical burn group than in the flame burn group at intensive care unit discharge (27 ± 6 ml/kg/min vs 34 ± 5 ml/kg/min, P < .0014). Electrical burns are associated with myoglobinemia and decreased cardiopulmonary fitness.

  15. Quadriceps isometric strength as a predictor of exercise capacity in coronary artery disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Kentaro; Mezzani, Alessandro; Hotta, Kazuki; Shimizu, Ryosuke; Kamekawa, Daisuke; Noda, Chiharu; Yamaoka-Tojo, Minako; Matsunaga, Atsuhiko; Masuda, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Quadriceps strength is related to exercise capacity in normal subjects and different patient populations, but the relationship between maximal quadriceps isometric strength (QIS) and different exercise capacity levels in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients has not been systematically evaluated yet. We studied 621 patients (60.6 ± 9.9 years, 538 males) with recent coronary artery bypass grafting or myocardial infarction, who underwent treadmill exercise testing, maximal QIS measurement (hand-held dynamometry), and coronary arteriography. Maximal QIS was expressed as absolute value (kg), %bodyweight, and %predicted maximum. Logistic regression was used to assess the relationship of maximal QIS, age, sex, number of diseased coronary vessels, peak systolic blood pressure, peak heart rate, brain natriuretic peptide, and left ventricular ejection fraction with 5, 7, and 10 estimated metabolic equivalents (eMETs) exercise capacity levels. Maximal QIS %bodyweight was the strongest predictor of exercise capacity in each eMETs category. Receiver-operating characteristics curves identified maximal QIS of 46, 51, and 59 % bodyweight as the best predictive cut offs for 5, 7 and 10 eMETs, respectively, with positive predictive values of 0.72, 0.66, and 0.67, respectively. Maximal QIS is related with eMETs levels reached at exercise testing in CAD patients, and identified maximal QIS cut-off values for eMETs prediction may be used to set strength training goals according to patients' needs with regard to habitual physical activity level. Hand-held dynamometry may meet the need of easiness of use and low cost required for strength evaluation in large-scale clinical trials. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013 Reprints and permissions sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  16. Effect of contrasting physical exercise interventions on rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars L; Andersen, Jesper L; Suetta, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    Rapid force capacity of chronically painful muscles is inhibited markedly more than maximal force capacity and is therefore relevant to assess in rehabilitation settings. Our objective was to investigate the effect of two contrasting types of physical exercise on rapid force capacity, as well......-bicycling; or a reference intervention without physical activity. Maximal voluntary shoulder abductions were performed at static angles of 35 degrees and 115 degrees with simultaneous recording of electromyography (EMG) in the trapezius and deltoid. Maximal muscle strength and activation (peak torque and peak EMG) as well...

  17. The association between right ventricular free wall strain and exercise capacity for health check-up subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei-Ting; Liu, Yen-Wen; Liu, Ping-Yen; Hsu, Chih-Hsin; Tsai, Wei-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Right ventricular (RV) function has been found to be a major factor of exercise capacity in patients with heart failure. However, the role of RV function in exercise capacity in healthy subjects has not been well studied. This study aims to validate the role of RV strain derived from speckle tracking echocardiography for exercise capacity for health check-up subjects. This study prospectively recruited subjects from a routine health examination. All of them were symptom free. RV function represented by RV strain was derived from speckle tracking echocardiography in addition to traditional echocardiography parameters. Functional capacity was determined by a symptom limited treadmill exercise test with the Bruce protocol. Among 164 recruited subjects (age 52.2 ±9.2 years, 66.4% male), 32 subjects represented impaired functional capacity (METexercise capacity for health check-up subjects. RV function is an important factor for functional capacity.

  18. Polyphenols: well beyond the antioxidant capacity: polyphenol supplementation and exercise-induced oxidative stress and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Antoni; Tejada, Silvia; Bibiloni, Maria del Mar; Tur, Josep Antoni; Pons, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Moderate physical exercise leads the organism to adapt to this stressful situation. However, when exercise is exhaustive, it is also known to induce an overproduction of reactive species which can result in oxidative damage to macromolecules and tissues. Many studies have been carried out to evaluate the validity of dietary strategies or micronutrients in order to attenuate exercise-induced oxidative stress. Polyphenols are a large group of compounds widely distributed throughout the plant kingdom. This review summarizes recent evidence in relation to the effects of polyphenols as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agents, using exercise as a model of study.

  19. Estimated Aerobic Capacity Changes in Adolescents with Obesity Following High Intensity Interval Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke E. Starkoff

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Vigorous aerobic exercise may improve aerobic capacity (VO2max and cardiometabolic profiles in adolescents with obesity, independent of changes to weight. Our aim was to assess changes in estimated VO2max in obese adolescents following a 6-week exercise program of varying intensities. Adolescents with obesity were recruited from an American mid-west children’s hospital and randomized into moderate exercise (MOD or high intensity interval exercise (HIIE groups for a 6-week exercise intervention, consisting of cycle ergometry for 40 minutes, 3 days per week. Heart rate was measured every two minutes during each exercise session.  Estimated VO2max measured via Åstrand cycle test, body composition, and physical activity (PA enjoyment evaluated via questionnaire were assessed pre/post-intervention. Twenty-seven adolescents (age 14.7±1.5; 17 female, 10 male completed the intervention. Estimated VO2max increased only in the HIIE group (20.0±5.7 to 22.7±6.5 ml/kg/min, p=0.015. The HIIE group also demonstrated increased PA enjoyment, which was correlated with average heart rate achieved during the intervention (r=0.55; p=0.043. Six weeks of HIIE elicited improvements to estimated VO2max in adolescents with obesity. Furthermore, those exercising at higher heart rates demonstrated greater PA enjoyment, implicating enjoyment as an important determinant of VO2max, specifically following higher intensity activities.

  20. CFTR Genotype and Maximal Exercise Capacity in Cystic Fibrosis: A Cross-sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Thomas; Hebestreit, Helge; Gallati, Sabina; Schneiderman, Jane E; Braun, Julia; Stevens, Daniel; Hulzebos, Erik Hj; Takken, Tim; Boas, Steven R; Urquhart, Don S; Lands, Larry C; Tejero, Sergio; Sovtic, Aleksandar; Dwyer, Tiffany; Petrovic, Milos; Harris, Ryan A; Karila, Chantal; Savi, Daniela; Usemann, Jakob; Mei-Zahav, Meir; Hatziagorou, Elpis; Ratjen, Felix; Kriemler, Susi

    2018-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is expressed in human skeletal muscle cells. Variations of CFTR dysfunction among patients with cystic fibrosis may be an important determinant of maximal exercise capacity in cystic fibrosis. Previous studies on the relationship between CFTR genotype and maximal exercise capacity are scarce and contradictory. This study was designed to explore factors influencing maximal exercise capacity, expressed as peak oxygen uptake (V.O2peak), with a specific focus on CFTR genotype in children and adults with cystic fibrosis. In an international, multicenter, cross-sectional study, we collected data on CFTR genotype and cardiopulmonary exercise tests in patients with cystic fibrosis who were ages 8 years and older. CFTR mutations were classified into functional classes I–V. The final analysis included 726 patients (45% females; age range, 8–61 yr; forced expiratory volume in 1 s, 16 to 123% predicted) from 17 cystic fibrosis centers in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia, all of whom had both valid maximal cardiopulmonary exercise tests and complete CFTR genotype data. Overall, patients exhibited exercise intolerance (V.O2peak, 77.3 ± 19.1% predicted), but values were comparable among different CFTR classes. We did not detect an association between CFTR genotype functional classes I–III and either V.O2peak (percent predicted) (adjusted β = −0.95; 95% CI, −4.18 to 2.29; P = 0.57) or maximum work rate (Wattmax) (adjusted β = −1.38; 95% CI, −5.04 to 2.27; P = 0.46) compared with classes IV–V. Those with at least one copy of a F508del-CFTR mutation and one copy of a class V mutation had a significantly lower V.O2peak (β = −8.24%; 95% CI, −14.53 to −2.99; P = 0.003) and lower Wattmax (adjusted β = −7.59%; 95% CI, −14.21 to −0.95; P = 0.025) than those with two copies of a class II mutation. On the basis of linear regression analysis adjusted for

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with impaired exercise capacity: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitler, Jeremy R; Awad, Karim M; Bakker, Jessie P; Edwards, Bradley A; DeYoung, Pam; Djonlagic, Ina; Forman, Daniel E; Quan, Stuart F; Malhotra, Atul

    2014-11-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with increased risk of adverse cardiovascular events. Because cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) aids in prognostic assessment of heart disease, there is rising interest in its utility for cardiovascular risk stratification of patients with OSA. However, the relationship between OSA and exercise capacity is unclear. This study was conducted to test the hypothesis that OSA is associated with impaired exercise capacity. Fifteen subjects with moderate-to-severe OSA (apnea-hypopnea index [AHI] ≥15 events/h) and 19 controls with mild or no OSA (AHI sleep disorders. Resting metabolic rate was measured via indirect calorimetry, followed by maximum, symptom-limited CPET. Subjects completed a sleep diary and physical activity questionnaire characterizing behaviors in the week prior to testing. Percent predicted peak oxygen uptake (V˙O2) was significantly lower in OSA subjects than controls (70.1%±17.5% vs 83.8%±13.9%; p = 0.02). Each 1-unit increase in log-transformed AHI was associated with a decrease in percent predicted peak V˙O2 of 3.20 (95% CI 0.53-5.88; p = 0.02). After adjusting for baseline differences, this association remained significant (p exercise capacity. Further study is needed to evaluate the utility of CPET for prognostic assessment of patients with OSA. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  2. The Influence of Various Types of Water Gymnastics Upon the Exercise Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana BADAU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Between the components of the physiological capacity and the practice degree of the physical exercise is a direct interrelation, which is influenced by a number of factors, out of which deployment environment with its features has a leading role. Determining the relationship between the effort capacity by heart rate changes during recovery after exercise, determining the body aerobic resistance level, as a result of the entertaining and recreational activities, specifically, performed in different environments: terrestrial and aquatic, using adapted exercises and innovative materials, that require various and specific efforts. The study was conducted during the academic year 2012-2013, with the female students in the first year of the non-profile faculties and comprised two experimental groups of 24 subjects each, from UMF Tg. Mures, who carried out specific water gymnastics activities, during physical education classes and a control group composed of 47 female students from Transilvania University of Brasov, who carried out the following: entertaining and recreational activities, application exercises, overall physical development free exercises or with portable objects. During the research, the Ruffier test was applied with target on the body aerobic resistance level. Following the research performance, the Ruffier index recorded the biggest difference of the averages of 1.75, after practicing aqua-pullpush-gym activities.

  3. Exercise capacity in patients 3 days after acute, uncomplicated myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burek, K.A.; Kirscht, J.; Topol, E.J.

    1989-01-01

    In a randomized, controlled trial of early hospital discharge after acute myocardial infarction (MI), a heart rate, symptom-limited exercise thallium test was performed after the onset of MI. Patients' exercise capacity was evaluated by the exercise treadmill with accompanying thallium scintigraphy. Of 507 consecutive patients screened, the condition of 179 was classified as uncomplicated, which is defined as the absence of angina, heart failure, or serious arrhythmias at 72 hours from admission. Of the patients with uncomplicated conditions, 126 had an exercise test on day 3 and 53 did not exercise on day 3. Of the 126 patients who exercised on day 3, 36 had a positive test and 90 had a negative test for ischemia. The 36 patients with a positive test result exercised a mean time of 6.71 +/- 2.8 minutes, achieved a mean peak heart rate of 120.9 +/- 21.4 beats/min, reached a peak systolic blood pressure of 144.7 +/- 33.3 mm Hg, and achieved a double product (rate-pressure product) of 183.4 +/- 67.6. The 90 patients with a negative test result for ischemia exercised 9.45 +/- 12.7 minutes, achieved a peak heart rate of 130.2 +/- 14.4 beats/min, reached a mean systolic blood pressure of 155.5 +/- 29.4 mm Hg, and achieved a rate-pressure product of 210.5 +/- 44.0. Of the 90 patients with uncomplicated conditions who had a negative exercise test for ischemia, 85 patients received reperfusion therapy, which included thrombolysis or coronary angioplasty or both

  4. Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement on Peripheral Muscle and Exercise Capacity in Severe Growth Hormone Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Gonzalez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of growth hormone therapy (rGH on mitochondrial function on peripheral muscle and to correlate with exercise capacity in subjects with severe adult growth hormone deficiency (GHD.DesignSix months, double-blind, randomized, crossover, placebo-controlled trial of subcutaneous rGH in 17 patients with GHD.MeasurementsQuadriceps muscle biopsies were obtained at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months to measure succinate dehydrogenase (SDH to assess mitochondrial activity. Exercise capacity was measured with cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Lipids, glycemic parameters, and body fat levels were also measured.ResultsSerum insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1 levels reduced fat mass by 3.2% (p < 0.05 and normalized with rGH in the active phase (p < 0.005. Patients showed an increase in SDH (p < 0.01 from base line that differed between placebo and rGH therapy treatment groups (p < 0.05: those treated by rGH followed by placebo showed a significant increase in SDH (p < 0.001 followed by a decrease, with a significant between group difference at the end of 6 months (p < 0.05. No significant improvements or correlation with exercise capacity was found.ConclusionShort-term rGH for 3 months normalized IGF1 levels, reduced fat mass, and had a significant effect on mitochondrial function, but exercise capacity was unchanged.Clinical Trial RegistrationNumber ISRCTN94165486.

  5. Does recombinant human Epo increase exercise capacity by means other than augmenting oxygen transport?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundby, C; Robach, P; Boushel, R

    2008-01-01

    exercise in eight subjects before and after 13 wk of rHuEpo treatment and after isovolemic hemodilution to the same hemoglobin concentration observed before the start of rHuEpo administration. At peak exercise, leg oxygen delivery was increased from 1,777.0+/-102.0 ml/min before rHuEpo treatment to 2...... before rHuEpo treatment). Blood buffer capacity remained unaffected by rHuEpo treatment and hemodilution. The augmented hematocrit did not compromise peak cardiac output. In summary, in healthy humans, rHuEpo increases maximal oxygen consumption due to augmented systemic and muscular peak oxygen delivery....

  6. Exercise capacity in the Bidirectional Glenn physiology: Coupling cardiac index, ventricular function and oxygen extraction ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallecilla, Carolina; Khiabani, Reza H; Trusty, Phillip; Sandoval, Néstor; Fogel, Mark; Briceño, Juan Carlos; Yoganathan, Ajit P

    2015-07-16

    In Bi-directional Glenn (BDG) physiology, the superior systemic circulation and pulmonary circulation are in series. Consequently, only blood from the superior vena cava is oxygenated in the lungs. Oxygenated blood then travels to the ventricle where it is mixed with blood returning from the lower body. Therefore, incremental changes in oxygen extraction ratio (OER) could compromise exercise tolerance. In this study, the effect of exercise on the hemodynamic and ventricular performance of BDG physiology was investigated using clinical patient data as inputs for a lumped parameter model coupled with oxygenation equations. Changes in cardiac index, Qp/Qs, systemic pressure, oxygen extraction ratio and ventricular/vascular coupling ratio were calculated for three different exercise levels. The patient cohort (n=29) was sub-grouped by age and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at rest. It was observed that the changes in exercise tolerance are significant in both comparisons, but most significant when sub-grouped by PVR at rest. Results showed that patients over 2 years old with high PVR are above or close to the upper tolerable limit of OER (0.32) at baseline. Patients with high PVR at rest had very poor exercise tolerance while patients with low PVR at rest could tolerate low exercise conditions. In general, ventricular function of SV patients is too poor to increase CI and fulfill exercise requirements. The presented mathematical model provides a framework to estimate the hemodynamic performance of BDG patients at different exercise levels according to patient specific data. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Capacity Expansion Modeling for Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, Elaine; Stoll, Brady; Mai, Trieu

    2017-04-03

    The Resource Planning Model (RPM) is a capacity expansion model designed for regional power systems and high levels of renewable generation. Recent extensions capture value-stacking for storage technologies, including batteries and concentrating solar power with storage. After estimating per-unit capacity value and curtailment reduction potential, RPM co-optimizes investment decisions and reduced-form dispatch, accounting for planning reserves; energy value, including arbitrage and curtailment reduction; and three types of operating reserves. Multiple technology cost scenarios are analyzed to determine level of deployment in the Western Interconnection under various conditions.

  8. Error propagation in energetic carrying capacity models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearse, Aaron T.; Stafford, Joshua D.

    2014-01-01

    Conservation objectives derived from carrying capacity models have been used to inform management of landscapes for wildlife populations. Energetic carrying capacity models are particularly useful in conservation planning for wildlife; these models use estimates of food abundance and energetic requirements of wildlife to target conservation actions. We provide a general method for incorporating a foraging threshold (i.e., density of food at which foraging becomes unprofitable) when estimating food availability with energetic carrying capacity models. We use a hypothetical example to describe how past methods for adjustment of foraging thresholds biased results of energetic carrying capacity models in certain instances. Adjusting foraging thresholds at the patch level of the species of interest provides results consistent with ecological foraging theory. Presentation of two case studies suggest variation in bias which, in certain instances, created large errors in conservation objectives and may have led to inefficient allocation of limited resources. Our results also illustrate how small errors or biases in application of input parameters, when extrapolated to large spatial extents, propagate errors in conservation planning and can have negative implications for target populations.

  9. The effect of core stability exercises on functional capacity and fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Shahrokhi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background : Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic progressive disease on the central nervous system with signs and symptoms such as fatigue and reduced functional capacity. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of core stability exercises on functional capacity and fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis. Materials and Methods: The present quasi-experimental study used a pretest-posttest design. The subjects with the age of 20-40, expanded disability status scale (EDSS 1-4 and purposefully and voluntarily selected and randomly allocated to the experimental and control groups. Training program for groups were carried out in eight weeks, three sessions per week and each session one hour. Functional reach test (FR was used to measure functional capacity and Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS was used to measure fatigue. The data were analyzed by paired and independent sample t-test at a significance level of 0.05. Results: The results showed that core stability training led to a significant increase in functional capacity and a significant reduction in fatigue (P≤ 0.05. Also significant differences observed in functional capacity and fatigue scale in post-test between experimental and control groups (P≤ 0.05. Conclusion: According to research findings, the core stability exercises can be factor for considerable improvement in functional capacity and reduced fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis.   . Furthermore, the respective specialists can use these exercise as a complementary treatment along with the drug therapy for patients with multiple sclerosis.

  10. Diminished exercise capacity and mitochondrial bc1 complex deficiency in tafazzin-knockdown mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey ePowers

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The phospholipid, cardiolipin, is essential for maintaining mitochondrial structure and optimal function. Cardiolipin-deficiency in humans, Barth syndrome, is characterized by exercise intolerance, dilated cardiomyopathy, neutropenia and 3-methyl-glutaconic aciduria. The causative gene is the mitochondrial acyl-transferase, tafazzin that is essential for remodeling acyl chains of cardiolipin. We sought to determine metabolic rates in tafazzin-deficient mice during resting and exercise, and investigate the impact of cardiolipin deficiency on mitochondrial respiratory chain activities. Tafazzin knockdown in mice markedly impaired oxygen consumption rates during an exercise, without any significant effect on resting metabolic rates. CL-deficiency resulted in significant reduction of mitochondrial respiratory reserve capacity in neonatal cardiomyocytes that is likely to be caused by diminished activity of complex-III, which requires CL for its assembly and optimal activity. Our results may provide mechanistic insights of Barth syndrome pathogenesis.

  11. The effect of aerobic interval training and continuous training on exercise capacity and its determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattyn, Nele; Beckers, Paul J; Cornelissen, Véronique A; Coeckelberghs, Ellen; De Maeyer, Catherine; Frederix, Geert; Goetschalckx, Kaatje; Possemiers, Nadine; Schepers, Dirk; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M; Wuyts, Kurt; Conraads, Viviane M; Vanhees, Luc

    2017-06-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate (1) the effects of aerobic interval training (AIT) and aerobic continuous training (ACT) on (sub)maximal exercise measures and its determinants including endothelial function, muscle strength and cardiac autonomic function, and (2) the relationship between exercise capacity and these determinants. Methods Two-hundred coronary artery disease (CAD) patients (58.4 ± 9.1 years) were randomized to AIT or ACT for 12 weeks. All patients performed a cardiopulmonary exercise test and endothelial function measurements before and after the intervention; a subpopulation underwent muscle strength and heart rate variability (HRV) assessments. Results The VO 2 , heart rate and workload at peak and at first and second ventilatory threshold increased (P-time training methods seem to be insufficient to improve muscle strength and HRV. Changes in peak VO 2 were linked to changes in all underlying parameters.

  12. Effects of solar radiation on endurance exercise capacity in a hot environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Hidenori; Kaya, Mitsuharu; Tamaki, Akira; Watson, Phillip; Maughan, Ronald J

    2016-04-01

    The present study investigated the effects of variations in solar radiation on endurance exercise capacity and thermoregulatory responses in a hot environment. Eight male volunteers performed four cycle exercise trials at 70 % maximum oxygen uptake until exhaustion in an environmental chamber maintained at 30 °C and 50 % relative humidity. Volunteers were tested under four solar radiation conditions: 800, 500, 250 and 0 W/m(2). Exercise time to exhaustion was less on the 800 W/m(2) trial (23 ± 4 min) than on all the other trials (500 W/m(2) 30 ± 7 min; P 0.05). Mean skin temperature was higher on the 800 W/m(2) trial than the 250 and 0 W/m(2) trials (P solar radiation increases.

  13. Relationship Between Reverse Remodeling and Cardiopulmonary Exercise Capacity in Heart Failure Patients Undergoing Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mastenbroek, Mirjam H; Sant, Jetske Van't; Versteeg, Henneke

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on the relationship between left ventricular reverse remodeling and cardiopulmonary exercise capacity in heart failure patients undergoing cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) are scarce and inconclusive. METHODS AND RESULTS: Eighty-four patients with a 1st-time CRT......-defibrillator (mean age 65 ± 11; 73% male) underwent echocardiography and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX) before implantation (baseline) and 6 months after implantation. At baseline, patients also completed a set of questionnaires measuring mental and physical health. The association between echocardiographic...... response (left ventricular end-systolic volume decrease ≥15%) and a comprehensive set of CPX results was examined. Echocardiographic responders (54%) demonstrated higher peak oxygen consumption and better exercise performance than nonresponders at baseline and at 6-month follow-up. Furthermore, only...

  14. Carbohydrate- and protein-rich diets in McArdle disease: Effects on exercise capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.T.; Vissing, J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two single-case studies suggest that a protein-rich diet may be beneficial for patients with McArdle disease, based on improvements in either endurance, or muscle energetics assessed by phosphorous MR spectroscopy. In healthy subjects, proteins contribute very little to energy...... capacity and exercise tolerance to submaximal workloads by maintaining a diet high in carbohydrate instead of protein. The carbohydrate diet not only improves tolerance to every-day activities, but will likely also help to prevent exercise-induced episodes of muscle injury in McArdle disease Udgivelsesdato...... metabolism during exercise, which questions the effect of protein in McArdle disease. METHODS: In a crossover, open design, we studied 7 patients with McArdle disease, who were randomised to follow either a carbohydrate- or protein-rich diet for three days before testing. Caloric intake on each diet...

  15. Reduced satellite cell numbers and myogenic capacity in aging can be alleviated by endurance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shefer, Gabi; Rauner, Gat; Yablonka-Reuveni, Zipora; Benayahu, Dafna

    2010-10-12

    Muscle regeneration depends on satellite cells, myogenic stem cells that reside on the myofiber surface. Reduced numbers and/or decreased myogenic aptitude of these cells may impede proper maintenance and contribute to the age-associated decline in muscle mass and repair capacity. Endurance exercise was shown to improve muscle performance; however, the direct impact on satellite cells in aging was not yet thoroughly determined. Here, we focused on characterizing the effect of moderate-intensity endurance exercise on satellite cell, as possible means to attenuate adverse effects of aging. Young and old rats of both genders underwent 13 weeks of treadmill-running or remained sedentary. Gastrocnemius muscles were assessed for the effect of age, gender and exercise on satellite-cell numbers and myogenic capacity. Satellite cells were identified in freshly isolated myofibers based on Pax7 immunostaining (i.e., ex-vivo). The capacity of individual myofiber-associated cells to produce myogenic progeny was determined in clonal assays (in-vitro). We show an age-associated decrease in satellite-cell numbers and in the percent of myogenic clones in old sedentary rats. Upon exercise, there was an increase in myofibers that contain higher numbers of satellite cells in both young and old rats, and an increase in the percent of myogenic clones derived from old rats. Changes at the satellite cell level in old rats were accompanied with positive effects on the lean-to-fat Gast muscle composition and on spontaneous locomotion levels. The significance of these data is that they suggest that the endurance exercise-mediated boost in both satellite numbers and myogenic properties may improve myofiber maintenance in aging.

  16. Reduced satellite cell numbers and myogenic capacity in aging can be alleviated by endurance exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi Shefer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Muscle regeneration depends on satellite cells, myogenic stem cells that reside on the myofiber surface. Reduced numbers and/or decreased myogenic aptitude of these cells may impede proper maintenance and contribute to the age-associated decline in muscle mass and repair capacity. Endurance exercise was shown to improve muscle performance; however, the direct impact on satellite cells in aging was not yet thoroughly determined. Here, we focused on characterizing the effect of moderate-intensity endurance exercise on satellite cell, as possible means to attenuate adverse effects of aging. Young and old rats of both genders underwent 13 weeks of treadmill-running or remained sedentary.Gastrocnemius muscles were assessed for the effect of age, gender and exercise on satellite-cell numbers and myogenic capacity. Satellite cells were identified in freshly isolated myofibers based on Pax7 immunostaining (i.e., ex-vivo. The capacity of individual myofiber-associated cells to produce myogenic progeny was determined in clonal assays (in-vitro. We show an age-associated decrease in satellite-cell numbers and in the percent of myogenic clones in old sedentary rats. Upon exercise, there was an increase in myofibers that contain higher numbers of satellite cells in both young and old rats, and an increase in the percent of myogenic clones derived from old rats. Changes at the satellite cell level in old rats were accompanied with positive effects on the lean-to-fat Gast muscle composition and on spontaneous locomotion levels. The significance of these data is that they suggest that the endurance exercise-mediated boost in both satellite numbers and myogenic properties may improve myofiber maintenance in aging.

  17. Effects of erythropoietin administration on cerebral metabolism and exercise capacity in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Foged, Eva M; Krogh-Madsen, Rikke

    2010-01-01

    exercise capacity independent of erythropoiesis. To test this hypothesis, 15 healthy young males (18-34 yo., 74 +/- 7 kg) received either 3 days of high dose (30,000 IU day(-1), N=7) double-blinded placebo controlled or 3 months of low dose (5,000 IU week(-1), N=8) counter-balanced open but controlled...... administration of EPO. We recorded exercise capacity, transcranial ultrasonography-derived middle cerebral artery blood velocity, and arterial-internal jugular venous concentration differences of glucose and lactate. In addition, cognitive function, ratings of perceived exertion, ventilation and voluntary...... activation by transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced twitch force were evaluated. Although EPO in a high dose increased cerebrospinal fluid EPO concentration ~20-fold and affected ventilation and cerebral glucose and lactate metabolism (Padministration had no effect...

  18. Resistance training improves cardiac output, exercise capacity and tolerance to positive airway pressure in Fontan physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordina, Rachael L; O'Meagher, Shamus; Karmali, Alia; Rae, Caroline L; Liess, Carsten; Kemp, Graham J; Puranik, Raj; Singh, Nalin; Celermajer, David S

    2013-09-30

    Subjects with Fontan-type circulation have no sub-pulmonary ventricle and thus depend exquisitely on the respiratory bellows and peripheral muscle pump for cardiac filling. We hypothesised that resistance training to augment the peripheral muscle pump might improve cardiac filling, reduce inspiratory-dependence of IVC return to the heart and thus improve exercise capacity and cardiac output on constant positive airway pressure (CPAP). Eleven Fontan subjects (32+/-2 years, mean+/-SEM) had cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and exercise testing (CPET); six underwent 20 weeks of high-intensity resistance training; others were non-exercising controls. After training, CPET was repeated. Four trainers had MRI with real-time flow measurement at rest, exercise and on CPAP in the trained state and following a 12-month detrain. In the trained state, muscle strength increased by 43% (p=0.002), as did total muscle mass (by 1.94 kg, p=0.003) and peak VO2 (by 183 ml/min, p=0.02). After detraining, calf muscle mass and peak workload had fallen significantly (pexercise (by 16 ml, p=0.04); inspiratory-dependent IVC blood return during exercise was 40% higher (p=0.02). On CPAP, cardiac output was lower in the detrained state (101 vs. 77 ml/s, p=0.03). Resistance muscle training improves muscle mass, strength and is associated with improved cardiac filling, stroke volume, exercise capacity and cardiac output on CPAP, in adults with Fontan-type circulation. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of abdominal muscle activity and peak expiratory flow between forced vital capacity and fast expiration exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Suehiro, Tadanobu; Watanabe, Susumu

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this investigation was to compare the activities of the abdominal muscles and peak expiratory flow between forced vital capacity and fast expiration exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen healthy male participated in this study. Peak expiratory flow and electromyographic activities of the rectus abdominis, external oblique, and internal oblique/transversus abdominis muscles were measured during forced vital capacity and fast expiration exercise and then peak amplitude and its appearance time were obtained. [Results] Peak expiratory flow values were significantly higher during fast expiration exercise than during forced vital capacity. The internal oblique/transversus abdominis muscles showed significantly higher peak amplitude during fast expiration exercise than during forced vital capacity. However, there were no significant differences between forced vital capacity and fast expiration exercise in the rectus abdominis and external oblique muscles. There was no difference in the appearance time of the peak amplitude between forced vital capacity and fast expiration exercise in any muscle. [Conclusion] Fast expiration exercise might be beneficial for increasing expiratory speed and neuromuscular activation of the internal oblique/transversus abdominis muscles compared to forced vital capacity. These findings could be considered when recommending a variation of expiratory muscle strength training as part of pulmonary rehabilitation programs.

  20. Special Training of Inspiratory Muscles in Fitness Activities and Exercise Capacity in Young Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishchenko Viktor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of the study was to determine if an 8-week-long endurance fitness training with elastic belts would increase the strength-endurance of the inspiratory muscles and lung function characteristics, and to assess whether these changes were consistent with an increase in aerobic power and exercise capacity in healthy young women. Methods. Twenty-two females aged 20-25 years were randomly allocated into 2 groups. The experimental group preformed 8-week-long exercises on stationary bikes with an elastic belt on the lower part of the chest. The control group underwent the same workout, without elastic belts. Vital capacity, forced vital capacity, maximal voluntary ventilation, maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressure, sustained maximal inspiratory pressure, physical activity status, and perceived exertion scores were measured. In the incremental exercise test, work capacity and maximal oxygen uptake were assessed. Tidal volume, minute ventilation (VE, oxygen uptake (VO2, VE/VO2, heart rate (HR, and VO2/HR were continuously monitored. The cycle performance at the power of the ventilatory threshold was evaluated on the following day. Results. The fitness training with elastic belts significantly improved the strength and strength-endurance of the inspiratory muscles, the functional cardio-respiratory capabilities, and aerobic work output. In the control group, the studied parameters were not significantly increased. Conclusions. Applying elastic belts to fitness endurance exercises improves the strength and strength-endurance of inspiratory muscles, cardio-respiratory capabilities, and aerobic power, which additionally raises aerobic work output in fitness training of young women.

  1. Sleep characteristics, exercise capacity and physical activity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerenhouts, Dirk; Ickmans, Kelly; Clarys, Peter; Zinzen, Evert; Meersdom, Geert; Lambrecht, Luc; Nijs, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Unrefreshing sleep and lowered physical activity are commonly observed in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) patients, but how they might influence each other remains unexplored. Therefore, this study simultaneously examined the exercise capacity, sleep characteristics and physical activity in CFS patients. Handgrip strength and cycle exercise capacity were assessed in 42 female CFS patients and 24 inactive control subjects. During four consecutive days and nights, energy expenditure, activity and sleep-wake pattern were objectively registered using a Sensewear Armband. Exercise capacity was significantly lower in CFS patients. In both groups VO2peak correlated with the time subjects were physically active. In CFS patients only, VO2peak correlated negatively with sleeping during the day whilst physical activity level and energy expenditure correlated negatively with sleep latency and lying awake at night. In the present study, CFS patients with higher VO2peak tend to sleep less over day. Occupation in physical activities was negatively associated with sleep latency and lying awake at night. Increased physical activity potentially has beneficial effects on sleep quality in CFS. However, a close monitoring of the effects of increasing physical activity is essential to avoid negative effects on the health status of patients. Female patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) have normal sleep latency and sleep efficiency, but sleep more and spent more time in bed as compared to healthy inactive women. Female CFS patients have lower exercise capacity, and a lower physical activity level as compared to healthy inactive women. CFS patients appear to be more sensitive for sleep quality (sleep latency and lying awake at night), which is associated with a low physical activity level.

  2. Effect of individualized exercise during maintenance haemodialysis on exercise capacity and health-related quality of life in patients with uraemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongyao; He, Qiang; Yin, Xiaohong; He, Qien; Cao, Shengsheng; Ying, Guanghui

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the effect of individualized exercise on exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in uraemic patients during maintenance haemodialysis (MHD). Patients receiving MHD were divided randomly into a test group, who underwent recumbent cycling exercise during dialysis, and a control group, who performed simple stretching exercises. The same dialysis protocol was used for all study participants. At study start and after 12 weeks, exercise capacity was measured using tests of physical ability; HRQoL was measured using the kidney disease quality of life score (KDQOL-SF™). A total of 65 patients were included in the study: 33 in the control group and 32 in the test group. There were no significant differences in patient characteristics between the two groups at baseline. After 12 weeks, there were significant improvements in exercise capacity and in many of the items of the KDQOL-SF™ in the test group compared with the control group. Individualized exercise during MHD significantly improved the exercise capacity and HRQoL for uraemic patients within a short time period, and could therefore be used as a simple, cost-effective therapeutic approach. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. The relationship of aerobic capacity, anaerobic peak power and experience to performance in in CrossFit exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Bellar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available CrossFit is becoming increasingly popular as a method to increase fitness and as a competitive sport in both the Unites States and Europe. However, little research on this mode of exercise has been performed to date. The purpose of the present investigation involving experienced CrossFit athletes and naïve healthy young men was to investigate the relationship of aerobic capacity and anaerobic power to performance in two representative CrossFit workouts: the first workout was 12 minutes in duration, and the second was based on the total time to complete the prescribed exercise. The participants were 32 healthy adult males, who were either naïve to CrossFit exercise or had competed in CrossFit competitions. Linear regression was undertaken to predict performance on the first workout (time with age, group (naïve or CrossFit athlete, VO 2 max and anaerobic power, which were all significant predictors (p<0.05 in the model. The second workout (repetitions, when examined similarly using regression, only resulted in CrossFit experience as a significant predictor (p<0.05. The results of the study suggest that a history of participation in CrossFit competition is a key component of performance in CrossFit workouts which are representative of those performed in CrossFit, and that, in at least one these workouts, aerobic capacity and anaerobic power are associated with success.

  4. The role of exercise capacity in the health and longevity of centenarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturelli, Massimo; Schena, Federico; Richardson, Russell S

    2012-10-01

    Ageing is a continuum of biological processes characterized by progressive adaptations which can be influenced by both genetic and physiological factors. In terms of human maturation, physically and cognitively functional centenarians certainly represent an impressive example of successful healthy ageing. However, even in these unique individuals, with the passage of time, declining lung function and sarcopenia lead to a progressive fall in maximal strength, maximal oxygen uptake, and therefore reduced exercise capacity. The subsequent mobility limitation can initiate a viscous downward spiral of reduced physical function and health. Emerging literature has shed some light on this multi-factorial decline in function associated with aging and the positive role that exercise and physical capacity can play in the elderly. Recognizing the multiple factors that influence ageing, the aim of this review is to highlight the recently elucidated limitations to physical function of the extremely old and therefore evaluate the role of exercise capacity in the health and longevity of centenarians. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Improved exercise capacity in the heat followed by coconut water consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Laitano

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the effects of prior ingestion of coconut water on fluid retention and exercise capacity in the heat as well as signs of gastrointestinal distress. Eight physically active men were recruited (age 23 ± 3 years, height 176 ± 6 cm, body mass 78 ± 7 kg and performed three exercise capacity trials on a cycle ergometer in the heat (34 ± 1°C after the ingestion of one of the following drinks: a plain water (PW, b flavored drink (FD, and c coconut water (CW. Ingestion of CWresulted in a longer time to exhaustion (p=0.029. Likewise, participants achieved a higher heart rate in the CW session when compared to the other trials (PW 183 ± 5 bpm, FD 184 ± 8 bpm, and CW 189 ± 8 bpm, p<0.05 and a reduced urine output after the coconut water ingestion (PW 214 ± 85 ml, FD 267 ± 90 ml, and CW 161 ± 73 ml, p<0.05 indicating a higher fluid retention of coconut water in comparison to plain water and the flavored drink. These results demonstrate that previous ingestion of coconut water improves exercise capacity in the heat and provide a reduced urine output in comparison to plain water and flavored drink. Also there is no evidence for GI distress.

  6. Physical exercise improves the functional capacity and quality of life in patients with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Sales Bocalini

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of physical exercise on the functional capacity and quality of life in heart failure patients. METHODS: Forty-two patients of both sexes with heart failure of NYHA class II and III with different etiologies were randomly divided into untrained or trained groups. The six-month exercise program consisted of aerobic training, muscle strength training, agility and joint flexibility activities. Physical fitness was evaluated by testing the performance on these trained components. Quality of life was evaluated by scored answers to a standardized questionnaire involving multiple domains. RESULTS: Baseline values did not differ between groups. Improvement in the trained group was identified in all components of functional capacity when compared to the untrained group (p < 0.001. Quality of life improved in the trained patients concerning physical, psychological, social and environmental domains (p < 0.001, whereas no significant change was found in the untrained patients. CONCLUSIONS: Guided and monitored physical exercise is safe and has the potential to improve functional capacity and quality of life in heart failure patients with multiple etiologies.

  7. The relationship between sleep quality and functional exercise capacity in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Tian, Jing-Wei; Zhou, Lu-Qian; Chen, Xin; Yan, Hai-Yan; Zeng, Bin; Zhang, Ming-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Poor sleep is often associated with a series of health problems in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), but the relationship between sleep quality and functional exercise capacity has not been previously investigated. To evaluate the relationship between quality of sleep and functional exercise capacity in clinically stable COPD. One hundred three consecutive subjects with stable COPD were recruited. The subjects were assessed with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and divided into poor sleep group (PSQI >5) and good sleep group (PSQI ≤5). Subjects were also assessed with spirometry, 6-min walk distance (6MWD), oxygen saturation (SP O2 ), the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, COPD Assessment Test (CAT), Modified Medical Research Council dyspnea scale and quadriceps muscle function. Poor sleep was present in 43.69% of the patients with COPD. Subjects with poor sleep had shorter 6MWD (t = -3.588, P quality of life (t = 5.487, P sleep quality and functional exercise capacity in patients with COPD. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Exercise Training Improves Exercise Capacity and Quality of Life in Patients with Inoperable or Residual Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herb, Jochen; Ehlken, Nicola; Fischer, Christine; Reichenberger, Frank; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Seyfarth, Hans-Juergen; Mayer, Eckhard

    2012-01-01

    Background Aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the effects of exercise training in patients with inoperable or residual chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). Methods Thirty-five consecutive patients with invasively confirmed inoperable or residual CTEPH (16 women;19 men; mean age 61±15 years, mean pulmonary artery pressure, 63±20 mmHg; primary inoperable n = 33, persisting pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary endarterectomy n = 2) on stable disease-targeted medication received exercise training in-hospital for 3 weeks and continued at home for 15 weeks. Medication remained unchanged during the study period. Efficacy parameters have been evaluated at baseline, after 3 and 15 weeks by blinded-observers. Survival rate has been evaluated in a follow-up period of median 36.4 months (interquartile range 26.6–46.6 months). Results All patients tolerated exercise training without severe adverse events. Patients significantly improved the mean distance walked in 6 minutes compared to baseline by 61±54 meters after 3 weeks (p<0.001) and by 71±70 meters after 15 weeks (p = 0.001), as well as scores of quality-of-life questionnaire, peak oxygen consumption and maximal workload. NT-proBNP improved significantly after 3 weeks of exercise training (p = 0.046). The 1-year survival rate was 97%, 2-year survival rate was 94% and the 3-year-survival 86% respectively. Conclusion Training as add-on to medical therapy may be effective in patients with CTEPH to improve work capacity, quality of life and further prognostic relevant parameters and possibly improves the 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rate. Further multicentric randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm these promising results. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01398345 PMID:22848542

  9. Motor skills and exercise capacity are associated with objective measures of cognitive functions and academic performance in preadolescent children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Thomas, Richard; Larsen, Malte Nejst

    2016-01-01

    sustained attention (Pmemory (Pmemory, episodic memory, sustained attention and processing speed were all associated with better performance in mathematics and reading......OBJECTIVE: To investigate associations between motor skills, exercise capacity and cognitive functions, and evaluate how they correlate to academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension using standardised, objective tests. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 423 Danish...... the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were used to assess different domains of cognitive functions, including sustained attention, spatial working memory, episodic and semantic memory, and processing speed. Linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate associations between...

  10. Nocturnal mechanical ventilation improves exercise capacity in kyphoscoliotic patients with respiratory impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuschillo, S; De Felice, A; Gaudiosi, C; Balzano, G

    2003-01-01

    Patients with severe kyphoscoliosis, with or without stable respiratory failure, frequently experience oxyhaemoglobin desaturation during sleep, exercise, or both. Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation (NIPPV) applied during sleep has been demonstrated to be able to control nocturnal desaturations and also improve diurnal respiratory failure, if this is present, in this group of patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a seven-day treatment with nocturnal NIPPV on exercise tolerance in a group of 6 patients with severe kyphoscoliosis and significant nocturnal and exercise-induced oxyhaemoglobin desaturation. NIPPV was applied each night for a week by means of a volume cycled pressure ventilator set in assisted/controlled mode. In each patient lung function, daytime arterial blood gas analysis, overnight non invasive recording of arterial saturation, and 6-minutes walking test were carried out initially and at the end of the NIPPV course. During nocturnal NIPPV, as compared to baseline, the percent of night time spent below 90% of oxyhaemoglobin saturation significantly fell from 20 +/- 12.8 to 2.3 +/- 1.9 (Student t-test: p = 0.017). The 6-minute walking distance significantly increased from 244.7 +/- 132.2 to 340 +/- 122.3 m (p = 0.0097). Spirometry, daytime arterial blood gas analysis, and exercise-induced oxyhaemoglobin desaturation were unaffected by treatment. A one-week course of treatment with nocturnal NIPPV improves exercise capacity in patients with severe kyphoscoliosis.

  11. Effect of individualized worksite exercise training on aerobic capacity and muscle strength among construction workers - a randomized controlled intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Bibi; Holtermann, Andreas; Søgaard, Karen

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The combination of high physical work demands and low physical capacity has been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular disease and musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to assess the physical capacity of construction workers and evaluate the effect of individually...... tailored exercise programs on their physical fitness and muscular capacity. METHOD: The study was a randomized controlled trial of male constructions workers allocated to either an exercise or control group. The intervention lasted 12 weeks, and the exercise group trained 3 x 20 minutes a week...

  12. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Amlôt

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS. The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit.

  13. Modelling Mass Casualty Decontamination Systems Informed by Field Exercise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Joseph R.; Amlôt, Richard

    2012-01-01

    In the event of a large-scale chemical release in the UK decontamination of ambulant casualties would be undertaken by the Fire and Rescue Service (FRS). The aim of this study was to track the movement of volunteer casualties at two mass decontamination field exercises using passive Radio Frequency Identification tags and detection mats that were placed at pre-defined locations. The exercise data were then used to inform a computer model of the FRS component of the mass decontamination process. Having removed all clothing and having showered, the re-dressing (termed re-robing) of casualties was found to be a bottleneck in the mass decontamination process during both exercises. Computer simulations showed that increasing the capacity of each lane of the re-robe section to accommodate 10 rather than five casualties would be optimal in general, but that a capacity of 15 might be required to accommodate vulnerable individuals. If the duration of the shower was decreased from three minutes to one minute then a per lane re-robe capacity of 20 might be necessary to maximise the throughput of casualties. In conclusion, one practical enhancement to the FRS response may be to provide at least one additional re-robe section per mass decontamination unit. PMID:23202768

  14. Systems-level computational modeling demonstrates fuel selection switching in high capacity running and low capacity running rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Nathan R.

    2018-01-01

    High capacity and low capacity running rats, HCR and LCR respectively, have been bred to represent two extremes of running endurance and have recently demonstrated disparities in fuel usage during transient aerobic exercise. HCR rats can maintain fatty acid (FA) utilization throughout the course of transient aerobic exercise whereas LCR rats rely predominantly on glucose utilization. We hypothesized that the difference between HCR and LCR fuel utilization could be explained by a difference in mitochondrial density. To test this hypothesis and to investigate mechanisms of fuel selection, we used a constraint-based kinetic analysis of whole-body metabolism to analyze transient exercise data from these rats. Our model analysis used a thermodynamically constrained kinetic framework that accounts for glycolysis, the TCA cycle, and mitochondrial FA transport and oxidation. The model can effectively match the observed relative rates of oxidation of glucose versus FA, as a function of ATP demand. In searching for the minimal differences required to explain metabolic function in HCR versus LCR rats, it was determined that the whole-body metabolic phenotype of LCR, compared to the HCR, could be explained by a ~50% reduction in total mitochondrial activity with an additional 5-fold reduction in mitochondrial FA transport activity. Finally, we postulate that over sustained periods of exercise that LCR can partly overcome the initial deficit in FA catabolic activity by upregulating FA transport and/or oxidation processes. PMID:29474500

  15. Effects of exercise on functional aerobic capacity in adults with fibromyalgia syndrome: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hermoso, Antonio; Saavedra, Jose M; Escalante, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Patients with fibromyalgia present a reduced capacity of upper and lower limb physical performance and affect their independence in performing everyday activities. The purpose of the present systematic review was to summarize evidence for the effectiveness and structure of exercise programs on functional aerobic capacity in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. Keyword searches were made of seven databases. The systematic review was limited to English language studies of people with FM that evaluated the effects of exercise programs on functional aerobic capacity (6-minute walk test). The criteria for inclusion were satisfied by 12 randomized controlled trial (RCT) studies. The main cumulative evidence indicates that the programs based on aerobic exercise alone and on aquatic exercises have large (effect size = 0.85) and moderate (effect size = 0.44) effects. Aerobic and aquatic exercises at the proper intensity favour the increased functional aerobic capacity of fibromyalgia patients; however, most works do not adequately detail the intensity of the exercises. Moderate intensity exercise (aerobic and aquatic exercise) performed at least two times per week and 30-60 minutes a day is effective for increasing functional aerobic capacity, favouring the daily activities of daily living in this population.

  16. [Effects of aerobic exercise combined with resistance training on the cardiorespiratory fitness and exercise capacity of patients with stable coronary artery disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S X; Chen, Y Y; Xie, K L; Zhang, W L

    2017-12-24

    Objective: To observe the effects of aerobic exercise combined with resistance training on the cardiorespiratory fitness and exercise capacity of patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) . Methods: From June 2014 to December 2015, 73 patients with stable CAD in our department were recruited and randomly assigned to two groups: the control group ( n= 38) and the exercise group ( n= 35) . Patients in both groups received conventional medical treatment for CAD and related cardiac health education. While for patients in exercise group, a twelve-week aerobic exercise combined with resistance training program were applied on top of conventional treatment and health education. Cardiorespiratory fitness and exercise capacity were evaluated by cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Results: (1) The exercise capacity was significantly increased in the exercise group after 12 weeks training as compared to baseline level: peak oxygen uptake per kilogram ( (26.25±5.14) ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) vs. (20.88±4.59) ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) , anaerobic threshold ( (15.24±2.75) ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) vs. (13.52±2.92) ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)], peak oxygen pulse ( (11.91±2.89) ml/beat vs. (9.77±2.49) ml/beat) , peak Watts ( (113.2±34.0) W vs. (103.7±27.9) W) , peak metabolic equivalent ( (7.57±1.46) METs vs. (6.00±1.32) METs) (all Pexercise group than in control group (all Pcoronary artery disease. This combined exercise program can significantly improve the cardiorespiratory fitness and exercise capacity of patients with stable coronary artery disease.

  17. Association of Exercise Capacity with Physical Functionality and Various Aspects of Fatigue in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Alexandra; Szabados, Eszter; Simon, Attila; Mezey, Béla; Sándor, Barbara; Tiringer, István; Tóth, Kálmán; Bencsik, Krisztina; Csathó, Árpád

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine associations between exercise capacity-indexed as the metabolic equivalent of the task-and various aspects of subjective fatigue, physical functionality, and depression in patients with coronary artery disease. A cross-sectional design was used. Patients with stable coronary artery disease (N = 240) underwent an exercise stress test and completed self-report assessments of depression, subjective physical limitations, vital exhaustion, and the impact of fatigue on physical, social, and cognitive functions. Associations between exercise capacity and these self-report variables were assessed using bivariate correlations and a series of multivariate regressions. Exercise capacity was negatively associated with vital exhaustion, physical limitations, and impact of fatigue on physical and social functioning but not on cognitive functioning. There was a marginal association between exercise capacity and depression. The associations between exercise capacity and fatigue remained significant even after controlling for effects of age, body mass index, gender, education, and comorbid diabetes mellitus. The main conclusion of the study is that in patients with coronary artery disease, exercise capacity has the strongest predictability for physical fatigue, but, importantly, it also independently predicts the feeling of loss of energy and malaise.

  18. Restoration of Muscle Glycogen and Functional Capacity: Role of Post-Exercise Carbohydrate and Protein Co-Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah F. Alghannam

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The importance of post-exercise recovery nutrition has been well described in recent years, leading to its incorporation as an integral part of training regimes in both athletes and active individuals. Muscle glycogen depletion during an initial prolonged exercise bout is a main factor in the onset of fatigue and so the replenishment of glycogen stores may be important for recovery of functional capacity. Nevertheless, nutritional considerations for optimal short-term (3–6 h recovery remain incompletely elucidated, particularly surrounding the precise amount of specific types of nutrients required. Current nutritional guidelines to maximise muscle glycogen availability within limited recovery are provided under the assumption that similar fatigue mechanisms (i.e., muscle glycogen depletion are involved during a repeated exercise bout. Indeed, recent data support the notion that muscle glycogen availability is a determinant of subsequent endurance capacity following limited recovery. Thus, carbohydrate ingestion can be utilised to influence the restoration of endurance capacity following exhaustive exercise. One strategy with the potential to accelerate muscle glycogen resynthesis and/or functional capacity beyond merely ingesting adequate carbohydrate is the co-ingestion of added protein. While numerous studies have been instigated, a consensus that is related to the influence of carbohydrate-protein ingestion in maximising muscle glycogen during short-term recovery and repeated exercise capacity has not been established. When considered collectively, carbohydrate intake during limited recovery appears to primarily determine muscle glycogen resynthesis and repeated exercise capacity. Thus, when the goal is to optimise repeated exercise capacity following short-term recovery, ingesting carbohydrate at an amount of ≥1.2 g kg body mass−1·h−1 can maximise muscle glycogen repletion. The addition of protein to carbohydrate during post-exercise

  19. Restoration of Muscle Glycogen and Functional Capacity: Role of Post-Exercise Carbohydrate and Protein Co-Ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghannam, Abdullah F; Gonzalez, Javier T; Betts, James A

    2018-02-23

    The importance of post-exercise recovery nutrition has been well described in recent years, leading to its incorporation as an integral part of training regimes in both athletes and active individuals. Muscle glycogen depletion during an initial prolonged exercise bout is a main factor in the onset of fatigue and so the replenishment of glycogen stores may be important for recovery of functional capacity. Nevertheless, nutritional considerations for optimal short-term (3-6 h) recovery remain incompletely elucidated, particularly surrounding the precise amount of specific types of nutrients required. Current nutritional guidelines to maximise muscle glycogen availability within limited recovery are provided under the assumption that similar fatigue mechanisms (i.e., muscle glycogen depletion) are involved during a repeated exercise bout. Indeed, recent data support the notion that muscle glycogen availability is a determinant of subsequent endurance capacity following limited recovery. Thus, carbohydrate ingestion can be utilised to influence the restoration of endurance capacity following exhaustive exercise. One strategy with the potential to accelerate muscle glycogen resynthesis and/or functional capacity beyond merely ingesting adequate carbohydrate is the co-ingestion of added protein. While numerous studies have been instigated, a consensus that is related to the influence of carbohydrate-protein ingestion in maximising muscle glycogen during short-term recovery and repeated exercise capacity has not been established. When considered collectively, carbohydrate intake during limited recovery appears to primarily determine muscle glycogen resynthesis and repeated exercise capacity. Thus, when the goal is to optimise repeated exercise capacity following short-term recovery, ingesting carbohydrate at an amount of ≥1.2 g kg body mass -1 ·h -1 can maximise muscle glycogen repletion. The addition of protein to carbohydrate during post-exercise recovery may be

  20. Exercise capacity in left ventricular assist device patients with full and partial support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresiello, Libera; Buys, Roselien; Jacobs, Steven; Van Puyvelde, Joeri; Droogne, Walter; Rega, Filip; Meyns, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Background In the present work, we investigated the exercise capacities of patients with partial flow left ventricular assist devices and its evolution over time. We then compared the exercise capacities of these patients with those of full support ventricular assist device patients. Methods We retrospectively analysed the data of maximal cardiopulmonary exercise tests of ten partial support patients (CircuLite Synergy® Micropump) collected before (PS0), at 3 (PS3) and 6 months (PS6) after implantation. The data were then compared with those of 17 patients (FS6) treated with a full support device (HeartMate II, Thoratec©). For this analysis, we considered the exercise tests performed at 6 months after pump implantation for both groups. Results Peak oxygen uptake evolved in the PS0, PS3 and PS6 groups from 11.5 ± 2.3 to 12.6 ± 2.8 and 12.0 ± 2.7 mL/kg/min, respectively. Heart rate peak increased from PS0 to PS6 (100 ± 17 bpm and 107 ± 22 bpm, p = 0.05). The comparative analysis between PS6 and FS6 groups showed no difference in terms of exercise performance (12.0 ± 2.7 and 13.5 ± 3.0 mL/kg/min, respectively), fatigue perception, ventilation efficiency slope, anaerobic threshold and oxygen uptake efficiency slope. The chronotropic response was also similar in both PS6 and FS6 groups. However, PS6 patients were more often treated with β-blockers and therefore had lower heart rates at rest and at peak exercise than FS6 patients. Conclusions Exercise performance does not change after partial support implantation and stays stable over time. Partial and full support patients show similar exercise performances that attain 41% and 46% of the expected values, respectively.

  1. Diurnal effects of prior heat stress exposure on sprint and endurance exercise capacity in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Hidenori; Kaya, Mitsuharu; Tamaki, Akira; Goto, Heita; Goto, Takayuki; Shirato, Minayuki

    2018-03-21

    Active individuals often perform exercises in the heat following heat stress exposure (HSE) regardless of the time-of-day and its variation in body temperature. However, there is no information concerning the diurnal effects of a rise in body temperature after HSE on subsequent exercise performance in a hot environnment. This study therefore investigated the diurnal effects of prior HSE on both sprint and endurance exercise capacity in the heat. Eight male volunteers completed four trials which included sprint and endurance cycling tests at 30 °C and 50% relative humidity. At first, volunteers completed a 30-min pre-exercise routine (30-PR): a seated rest in a temperate environment in AM (AmR) or PM (PmR) (Rest trials); and a warm water immersion at 40 °C to induce a 1 °C increase in core temperature in AM (AmW) or PM (PmW) (HSE trials). Volunteers subsequently commenced exercise at 0800 h in AmR/AmW and at 1700 h in PmR/PmW. The sprint test determined a 10-sec maximal sprint power at 5 kp. Then, the endurance test was conducted to measure time to exhaustion at 60% peak oxygen uptake. Maximal sprint power was similar between trials (p = 0.787). Time to exhaustion in AmW (mean±SD; 15 ± 8 min) was less than AmR (38 ± 16 min; p temperature was higher from post 30-PR to 6 min into the endurance test in AmW and PmW than AmR and PmR (p temperature during the endurance test was greater in AmR than AmW and PmW (p Mean skin temperature was higher from post 30-PR to 6 min into the endurance test in HSE trials than Rest trials (p Mean body temperature was higher from post 30-PR to 6 min into the endurance test in AmW and PmW than AmR and PmR (p radiant, dry and evaporative heat losses were greater on HSE trials than on Rest trials (p temperature by prior HSE has the diurnal effects on endurance exercise capacity but not on sprint exercise capacity in the heat. Moreover, prior HSE reduces endurance exercise capacity in AM, but not in PM. This

  2. Exercise training improves aerobic capacity, muscle strength, and quality of life in renal transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riess, Kenneth James; Haykowsky, Mark; Lawrance, Richard; Tomczak, Corey R; Welsh, Robert; Lewanczuk, Richard; Tymchak, Wayne; Haennel, Robert G; Gourishankar, Sita

    2014-05-01

    Renal transplant recipients (RTR) have reduced peak aerobic capacity, muscle strength, arterial function and an unfavorable cardiovascular disease risk (CVD) profile. This study compared the effects of 12 weeks of supervised endurance and strength training (EST, n = 16) versus usual care (UC, n = 15) on peak aerobic capicity, cardiovascular and skeletal muscle function, CVD risk profile, and quality of life (QOL) in RTR (55 ± 13 years). Peak aerobic capacity and exercise hemodynamics, arterial compliance, 24-h blood pressure, muscle strength, lean body mass, CVD risk score, and QOL were assessed before and after 12 weeks. The change in peak aerobic capacity (EST: 2.6 ± 3.1 vs. UC: -0.5 ± 2.5 mL/(kg·min)), cardiac output (EST: 1.7 ± 2.6 vs. UC: -0.01 ± 0.8 L/min), leg press (EST: 48.7 ± 34.1 vs. UC: -10.5 ± 37.7 kg) and leg extension strength (EST: 9.5 ± 10.3 vs. UC: 0.65 ± 5.5 kg) improved significantly after EST compared with UC. The overall change in QOL improved significantly after 12 weeks of EST compared with UC. No significant difference was found between groups for lean body mass, arterial compliance, 24-h blood pressure or CVD risk score. Supervised EST is an effective intervention to improve peak exercise aerobic capacity and cardiac output, muscle strength and QOL in clinically stable RTR.

  3. Interval and continuous exercise enhances aerobic capacity and hemodynamic function in CHF rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro B. Nunes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of continuous versus interval aerobic exercise training on hemodynamic parameters, cardiac remodeling, and maximal exercise capacity (MEC in chronic heart failure (CHF rats.METHOD: Twenty-four male Wistar rats were subjected to myocardial infarction (MI surgery. Five weeks post MI, the animals were assigned to one of three groups: sedentary group (CHF-Sed, n=8, aerobic continuous training group (CHF-ACT, n=8, and aerobic interval training group (CHF-AIT, n=8. Treadmill training was performed five times a week for 8 weeks (ACT: 50 min/day at 15 m/min and AIT: 40 min/day with 8 min of warm-up at 10 m/min and exercise at 15 m/min 4×4 min interspersed with 4×4 min at 23 m/min. MEC was evaluated pre and post exercise program.RESULTS: Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP, left ventricular mass/body mass ratio (LVM:BM, and total collagen volume fraction were lower in the trained groups compared with the sedentary group, but no difference was found between the trained groups. Systolic ventricular pressure (SVP and maximum positive derivative of LV pressure (+dP/dtmax were higher in the trained groups, but CHF-ACT showed higher +dP/dtmax compared to CHF-AIT. Both training regimens were able to increase MEC. However, the aerobic interval training was superior for improving MEC.CONCLUSION: Aerobic training is an important intervention to improve cardiac function and remodeling and physical capacity in CHF rats. Interval training is a potential strategy to maximize the results, but exercise type and intensity are still topics to be explored.

  4. Short term effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gain Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in the understanding and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension have enabled earlier diagnosis and improved prognosis. However, despite best available therapy, symptoms of exertional dyspnoea and fatigue are commonly reported and result in a reduced capacity to perform daily activities and impaired quality of life. Exercise training has demonstrated efficacy in individuals with other respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Historically, however, exercise training has not been utilised as a form of therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension due to the perceived risk of sudden cardiac death and the theoretical possibility that exercise would lead to worsening pulmonary vascular haemodynamics and deterioration in right heart function. Now, with the advances in pharmaceutical management, determining the safety and benefits of exercise training in this population has become more relevant. Only three studies of supervised exercise training in pulmonary arterial hypertension have been published. These studies demonstrated improvements in exercise capacity and quality of life, in the absence of adverse events or clinical deterioration. However, these studies have not utilised an outpatient-based, whole body exercise training program, the most common format for exercise programs within Australia. It is uncertain whether this form of training is beneficial and capable of producing sustained benefits in exercise capacity and quality of life in this population. Design/Methods This randomised controlled trial will determine whether a 12 week, outpatient-based, supervised, whole body exercise training program, followed by a home-based exercise program, is safe and improves exercise capacity and quality of life in individuals with pulmonary arterial hypertension. This study aims to recruit 34 subjects who will be randomly allocated to the exercise group (supervised exercise training 3 times a week for 12 weeks, followed by

  5. Combination of exercise training and diet restriction normalizes limited exercise capacity and impaired skeletal muscle function in diet-induced diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Tadashi; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Takada, Shingo; Kadoguchi, Tomoyasu; Fukushima, Arata; Homma, Tsuneaki; Masaki, Yoshihiro; Furihata, Takaaki; Takahashi, Masashige; Sobirin, Mochamad A; Ono, Taisuke; Hirabayashi, Kagami; Yokota, Takashi; Tanaka, Shinya; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Exercise training (EX) and diet restriction (DR) are essential for effective management of obesity and insulin resistance in diabetes mellitus. However, whether these interventions ameliorate the limited exercise capacity and impaired skeletal muscle function in diabetes patients remains unexplored. Therefore, we investigated the effects of EX and/or DR on exercise capacity and skeletal muscle function in diet-induced diabetic mice. Male C57BL/6J mice that were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) for 8 weeks were randomly assigned for an additional 4 weeks to 4 groups: control, EX, DR, and EX+DR. A lean group fed with a normal diet was also studied. Obesity and insulin resistance induced by a HFD were significantly but partially improved by EX or DR and completely reversed by EX+DR. Although exercise capacity decreased significantly with HFD compared with normal diet, it partially improved with EX and DR and completely reversed with EX+DR. In parallel, the impaired mitochondrial function and enhanced oxidative stress in the skeletal muscle caused by the HFD were normalized only by EX+DR. Although obesity and insulin resistance were completely reversed by DR with an insulin-sensitizing drug or a long-term intervention, the exercise capacity and skeletal muscle function could not be normalized. Therefore, improvement in impaired skeletal muscle function, rather than obesity and insulin resistance, may be an important therapeutic target for normalization of the limited exercise capacity in diabetes. In conclusion, a comprehensive lifestyle therapy of exercise and diet normalizes the limited exercise capacity and impaired muscle function in diabetes mellitus.

  6. Resistin, exercise capacity, and inducible ischemia in patients with stable coronary heart disease: data from the Heart and Soul study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mary H; Na, Beeya; Schiller, Nelson B; Whooley, Mary A

    2010-12-01

    Resistin is an adipocytokine involved in insulin resistance, inflammation, and atherosclerosis. Its role in the development and progression of coronary heart disease (CHD) is not yet well-characterized. We performed a cross-sectional study to evaluate the association between serum resistin levels, exercise capacity, and exercise-induced cardiac ischemia among patients with stable CHD. We measured serum resistin concentrations and determined treadmill exercise capacity and inducible ischemia by stress echocardiography in 899 outpatients with documented CHD. Of these, 215 (24%) had poor exercise capacity (<5 metabolic equivalent tasks), and 217 (24%) had inducible ischemia. As compared with participants who had resistin levels in the lowest quartile, those with resistin levels in the highest quartile were more likely to have poor exercise capacity (33% versus 16%, odds ratio [OR] 2.68, P<0.0001) and inducible ischemia (30% versus 17%, OR 2.08, P=0.001). Both associations remained robust after adjusting for numerous clinical risk factors, metabolic variables, and markers of insulin resistance (poor exercise capacity adjusted OR 1.73, P=0.04; inducible ischemia adjusted OR 1.82, P=0.01). However, further adjustments for C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α eliminated the association with poor exercise capacity (adjusted OR 1.50, P=0.14) and substantially weakened the association with inducible ischemia (adjusted OR 1.72, P=0.03). Elevated serum resistin is associated with poor exercise capacity and exercise-induced cardiac ischemia in patients with stable coronary disease. Adjustment for inflammatory markers attenuated these associations, suggesting a possible role for resistin in inflammation and CHD pathophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Effects of Therapeutic Exercises on Functional Capacities of Patient with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Haji Zadeh

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic and systemic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology. It is characterized by symmetric joint involvement with progressive deformities. This leads to limitation of motion and reduction of activity daily living (ADL. Previous reports showed the beneficial effects of therapeutic exercises in these patients in the remission phase. Methods and Materials: A clinical trial as a self-control sequential control study was designed to determine the effectiveness of a range of motion (ROM exercise program in patients with RA, referring to Rheumatology Research Center between 1994-1995. ROM of the selected joints by Goniometer, and ADL by a questionnaire was assessed in all patients in 3 phases: when entering the program, after 6 weeks of observation, and then after another 6 weeks with the therapeutic exercises. The mean difference in these 2 period were compared by student paired t test. The analysis of differences between different subgroups (job, education, etc. was done by one way variance analysis. Results: Forty patients completed the program. The mean ADL increased from 0437±0.252 before exercise to 6.69±3.06 after exercise (P<0.001, and the mean scores of ROM increased from 0.278±0.28 to 8±3.57 (P<0.0001, both statistically significant. This was more pronounced in women and in those with ankle joints involvement. The type of disease onset and duration of the disease did not influence the effects of treatment. No increase in disease activity was seen. Conclusion: This study showed the effectiveness of our ROM exercises in increasing functional capacities of patients with RA in remission phase.

  8. Changes in exercise capacity, quality of life and fatigue in cancer patients during an intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzer, W; Bernhörster, M; Schmidt, K; Niederer, D; Lungwitz, A; Thiel, C; Jäger, E; Vogt, L

    2014-09-01

    The study explored the interdependence of changes in oxygen uptake, quality of life and cancer-related side-effect fatigue during a 4-month exercise intervention. Participants were during adjuvant (curative) or palliative therapy and post-adjuvant therapy (finished within the previous 12 months). Aerobic exercise capacity (VO2 peak), quality of life and fatigue symptom (EORTC QLQ-C30) were obtained in 101 cancer patients (30-77 years). After initial examination, patients participated in supervised and/or home-based training interventions. Patients were re-examined after 16-20 weeks and stratified into 3 subgroups (terciles) with respect to the absolute change in VO2 peak. The ANCOVA, with significant covariate effect for pretest fatigue score (F(5,101) = 8.150, P cancer-related fatigue reduction (-6.1 ± 30.7; -11.5 ± 20.9; -21.2 ± 21.4 points) between upper and lower tercile. The findings point towards a relationship of exercise capacity enhancement, quality of life improvement and fatigue symptom reduction during and shortly after cancer treatment. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The relationship between exercise capacity and different functional markers in pulmonary rehabilitation for COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerti M

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Maria Kerti, Zsuzsanna Balogh, Krisztina Kelemen, Janos T Varga Department of Pulmonary Rehabilitation, National Koranyi Institute for Pulmonology, Budapest, Hungary Rationale: The relationship of functional parameters such as lung mechanics, chest kinematics, metabolism and peripheral and respiratory muscle function with the level of exercise tolerance remains a controversial subject. While it has been previously shown that pulmonary rehabilitation is capable of improving exercise tolerance in patients afflicted by COPD, as expressed by values of 6-minute walking test (6MWT, the degree of contribution to this change by each of the aforementioned parameters remains unclear.Aims: To investigate the correlation between changes in exercise capacity and other functional markers following pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD and to determine which parameters are more closely related to improvements of exercise tolerance.Materials and methods: Three hundred and twenty-seven patients with COPD (with average, 95% CI for forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1]: 45% [25%–83%] predicted, age: 64 [48–80] years, and BMI: 27 [13.5–40.4] kg/m2 participated in this study. Thirty percent of the patients had pulmonary hypertension as comorbidity. Patients underwent a pulmonary rehabilitation program with 20–30 minutes sessions two to three times per day for 4 weeks. The program was composed of chest wall-stretching, controlled breathing exercises, and a personalized training schedule for cycling and treadmill use. Measurements of 6MWT, lung function, chest wall expansion, grip strength, maximal inspiratory pressure, and breath holding time were taken. The Body mass index, airflow Obstruction, Dyspnea and Exercise capacity (BODE-index, body mass index [BMI], FEV1, 6MWT, modified Medical Research Dyspnea Scale score, and an alternative scale score (for BMI, FEV1, 6MWT, and COPD Assessment Test were calculated.Results: Rehabilitation resulted in a

  10. Coronary flow reserve as a link between diastolic and systolic function and exercise capacity in heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoer, Martin; Monk-Hansen, Tea; Olsen, Rasmus Huan

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: In heart failure, a reduced exercise capacity is the prevailing symptom and an important prognostic marker of future outcome. The purpose of the study was to assess the relation of coronary flow reserve (CFR) to diastolic and systolic function in heart failure and to determine which...... are the limiting factors for exercise capacity. METHODS AND RESULTS: Forty-seven patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF)...

  11. Individualized vs. group exercise in improving quality of life and physical activity in patients with cardiac disease and low exercise capacity: results from the DOPPELHERZ trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christle, Jeffrey Wilcox; Schlumberger, Anna; Haller, Bernhard; Gloeckl, Rainer; Halle, Martin; Pressler, Axel

    2017-12-01

    Important goals of cardiac rehabilitation maintenance programs (CMP) are to increase leisure time physical activity (LTPA) and improve health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Elderly patients with cardiac disease and low exercise capacity are simultaneously the most severely affected and have the most to gain from exercise-based rehabilitation. Individualized combined exercise (ICE) may be an effective modality to achieve these goals. We compared six months of ICE to CMP in their effects on LTPA and HRQoL. Sixty patients (70 ± 9 years, 39% female) with cardiac disease and low exercise capacity (machines, based on intensities from individual peak exercise testing. Patients in CMP performed weekly sessions of calisthenics, flexibility, coordination and relaxation activities. LTPA and HRQoL were assessed with accelerometry and questionnaires at baseline and six months. Sixty patients completed the trial. ICE increased vigorous PA (ICE: Δ + 12 MET-min/d, CMP: Δ -5 MET-min/d, p = .02) and steps per day (ICE: +1586 steps/d, CMP: -838 steps/d, p rehabilitation Relatively low volumes and intensities of exercise may lead to substantial improvements in both physical activity levels and health-related quality of life Exercise modes in cardiac rehabilitation maintenance programs should not be limited to calisthenics and large group-based exercise Supplemental resistance exercise may improve health-related quality of life and increase physical activity levels in patients with low exercise capacity Moderate to high-risk elderly patients also benefit from individualized endurance-resistance exercise.

  12. Survey the effect of aerobic exercise on aerobic capacity in patients with coronary artery disease (cad)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalyani, M. N.; Ebadi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Increased aerobic exercise capacity appears to reduce both all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality. Physical exercise to improve maximal oxygen consumption (VO/sub 2max/) is thus strongly recommended, however evidence regarding the most efficient training intensity for patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) is still lacking. The purpose of this randomized study was to assess the effects of aerobic exercise for increasing VO/sub 2max/ in stable CAD-patients. Thirty stable CAD-patients were randomized to supervised walking 30 min three times a week for 10 weeks. Before and after training VO/sub 2max/ was predicted from Bruce treadmill test. Before training VO/sub 2max/ was 35.2+-4.32 ml/kg/min and after training the mean VO/sub 2max/ was 43.1+-3.4 ml/kg/min. This difference was significant (p<0.05). Aerobic exercise is effective for increasing VO/sub 2max/ in stable CAD-patients. As VO/sub 2max/ seems to reflect a continuum between health and cardiovascular disease and death, the present data may be useful in designing effective training programmes for improved health in the future. (author)

  13. Effects of cardiac rehabilitation in diabetic patients: both cardiac and noncardiac factors determine improvement in exercise capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Clair, Mitchell; Mehta, Hardik; Sacrinty, Matthew; Johnson, Dominic; Robinson, Killian

    2014-04-01

    Diabetic patients have a worse prognosis than nondiabetic patients after myocardial infarction. Although exercise improves risk factors, exercise capacity, and mortality, it is still unclear if these benefits are the same as in nondiabetics. Furthermore, although exercise tolerance is predicted by systolic and diastolic dysfunction in nondiabetics, its role as a predictor of exercise capacity in diabetics remains unclear. Diabetics and nondiabetics see a similar improvement in their cardiac risk factors and exercise parameters from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR). A series of 370 diabetics and 942 nondiabetics entered a 36-session outpatient CR program after interventions for coronary heart disease or after bypass or cardiac valve surgery. The program consisted of physical exercise, lifestyle modification, and pharmacotherapy. Quality of life, weight, blood pressure, and lipid profiles improved significantly in both groups during the 12-week program. Baseline metabolic equivalents (METs) were lower in diabetics vs nondiabetics at the start of CR (2.4 vs 2.7, P diabetics had less improvement (change in METs 1.7 vs 2.6, P diabetes remained a significant predictor of reduced improvement in exercise capacity. Diabetics saw a significant benefit in quality of life, weight, exercise tolerance, and cardiac risk factors, but to a lesser extent when compared with nondiabetics. The mechanisms for poorer improvement in diabetics following CR also include noncardiac factors and require further study. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. PREDICTIVE CAPACITY OF ARCH FAMILY MODELS

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    Raphael Silveira Amaro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the last decades, a remarkable number of models, variants from the Autoregressive Conditional Heteroscedastic family, have been developed and empirically tested, making extremely complex the process of choosing a particular model. This research aim to compare the predictive capacity, using the Model Confidence Set procedure, than five conditional heteroskedasticity models, considering eight different statistical probability distributions. The financial series which were used refers to the log-return series of the Bovespa index and the Dow Jones Industrial Index in the period between 27 October 2008 and 30 December 2014. The empirical evidences showed that, in general, competing models have a great homogeneity to make predictions, either for a stock market of a developed country or for a stock market of a developing country. An equivalent result can be inferred for the statistical probability distributions that were used.

  15. Influence of physical exercise on the functional capacity in institutionalized elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Covolo Scarabottolo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: With the rapid increase in life expectancy, systematic physical exercise programs can have a good influence on the functional capacity of the elderly, especially in relation to institutionalization. Objective: To analyze the association between a systematic physical exercise program and functional capacity in institu-tionalized elderly. Methods: The sample included 30 elderly subjects (16 women and 14 men aged 60 years or older (mean age = 74.43, divided into a control group (n=16 and a training group (n=14, residents in a long-stay institution. A training protocol of 12 weeks, two weekly sessions, was applied, and functional capa-city was assessed before and after the intervention, through chair lift tests (lower limb strength, upper limb strength, timed up and go and handgrip dynamometry. The analysis pre and post-training of intervention and control groups was performed using paired Student t test and the ANOVA test for repeated measures. The level of significance was set at 5%. Results: The main statistical significance were found for the following functional tests: upper limb strength (training 15.6±4.1 x control 10.7±6.6 rep, p<0.05 and chair lift test (training 11.0±4.0 x control 8.0±3.1 rep, p<0.05. Conclusion: The protocol used proved to be effective in improving some of the functional capabilities of the institutionalized elderly.

  16. Insulin resistance, exercise capacity and body composition in subjects with two hypertensive parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, U B; Dige-Petersen, H; Ibsen, H

    1999-01-01

    -ray absorptiometry; (4) an exercise test with gas exchange analysis; and (5) investigation of composition of usual diet by diet registration for 5 days. RESULTS: The 24-h diastolic blood pressure was higher in subjects predisposed to hypertension compared with the controls: 78.1 versus 74.0 mmHg (confidence interval......OBJECTIVE: To study insulin resistance in subjects with strong genetic predisposition to essential hypertension, compared with non-disposed subjects. SUBJECTS: Thirty normotensive subjects aged 18-35 years whose parents both had essential hypertension, and 30 age- and sex matched subjects whose...... for the difference between the means; -0.5; -7.9), but the insulin sensitivity index was similar: 312 versus 362 I(2) min(-1) pmol(-1) kg(-1) (28; -129). The two groups were similar in terms of body composition, exercise capacity and composition of usual diet. Resting and 24-h diastolic blood pressures were...

  17. Metformin improves performance in high-intensity exercise, but not anaerobic capacity in healthy male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learsi, S K; Bastos-Silva, V J; Lima-Silva, A E; Bertuzzi, R; De Araujo, G G

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the ergogenic effects of metformin in high-intensity exercise, as well as its effects on anaerobic capacity, in healthy and physically active men. Ten subjects (mean (± standard deviation) maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max ) 38.6 ± 4.5 mL/kg per min) performed the following tests in a cycle ergometer: (i) an incremental test; (ii) six submaximal constant workload tests at 40%-90% (V˙O2max ); and (iii) two supramaximal tests (110% (V˙O2max ). Metformin (500 mg) or placebo was ingested 60 min before the supramaximal test. There were no significant differences between the placebo and metformin groups in terms of maximum accumulated oxygen deficit (2.8 ± 0.6 vs 3.0 ± 0.8 L, respectively; P = 0.08), lactate concentrations (7.8 ± 2.6 vs 7.5 ± 3.0 mmol/L, respectively; P = 0.75) or O2 consumed in either the last 30 s of exercise (40.4 ± 4.4 vs 39.9 ± 4.0 mL/kg per min, respectively; P = 0.35) or the first 110 s of exercise (29.0 ± 2.5 vs 29.5 ± 3.0 mL/kg per min, respectively; P = 0.42). Time to exhaustion was significantly higher after metformin than placebo ingestion (191 ± 33 vs 167 ± 32 s, respectively; P = 0.001). The fast component of V˙O2 recovery was higher in the metformin than placebo group (12.71 vs 12.18 mL/kg per min, respectively; P = 0.025). Metformin improved performance and anaerobic alactic contribution during high-intensity exercise, but had no effect on overall anaerobic capacity in healthy subjects. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Effectiveness of an educational intervention and physical exercise on the functional capacity of patients on haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Robles, Esmeralda; Colomer-Codinachs, Marta; Roquet-Bohils, Marta; Chirveches-Pérez, Emilia; Ortiz-Jurado, Pep; Subirana-Casacuberta, Mireia

    2018-03-02

    To describe the impact of a standard hospital educational intervention including active physical exercises on personal well-being, functional capacity and knowledge of the benefits of prescribed physical activity for patients undergoing haemodialysis. An uncontrolled, quasi-experimental, before-and-after study with repeated measures of response variables at 4, 8 and 12 weeks after participating in an educational and physical exercise hospital intervention. It was performed at the Nephrology Unit at the Hospital Complex in Vic within september and december 2014. The patients' well-being, functional capacity and knowledge were assessed. Assessment tools: NOC nursing indicators, Barthel index scale, FAC Holden, Timed Get Up and Go test and Daniels scale. We included 68 (80.0%) patients and 58 (85.3%) completed, with a mean age of 70.16±13.5 years; 62.1% were males. After 12 weeks, the patients had better scores of personal well-being (2.33±1.2, 3.88±0.8), more autonomy to perform activities of daily living (Barthel: 92.8±12.8; 93.5±13.9), more muscle strength (Daniels Scale: 3.81±0.7, 4.19±0.6) and walked more briskly (Get Up and Go test: 14.98±8.5; 15.65±10.5). All of the score differences were statistically significant (P<05) except the Barthel Index. The standard educational intervention and active exercise performed at hospital level improved the personal well-being, knowledge and functional capacity of patients on haemodialysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Extrapulmonary features of bronchiectasis: muscle function, exercise capacity, fatigue, and health status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozalp Ozge

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are limited number of studies investigating extrapulmonary manifestations of bronchiectasis. The purpose of this study was to compare peripheral muscle function, exercise capacity, fatigue, and health status between patients with bronchiectasis and healthy subjects in order to provide documented differences in these characteristics for individuals with and without bronchiectasis. Methods Twenty patients with bronchiectasis (43.5 ± 14.1 years and 20 healthy subjects (43.0 ± 10.9 years participated in the study. Pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength (maximal expiratory pressure – MIP - and maximal expiratory pressure - MEP, and dyspnea perception using the Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale (MMRC were determined. A six-minute walk test (6MWT was performed. Quadriceps muscle, shoulder abductor, and hand grip strength (QMS, SAS, and HGS, respectively using a hand held dynamometer and peripheral muscle endurance by a squat test were measured. Fatigue perception and health status were determined using the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS and the Leicester Cough Questionnaire (LCQ, respectively. Results Number of squats, 6MWT distance, and LCQ scores as well as lung function testing values and respiratory muscle strength were significantly lower and MMRC and FSS scores were significantly higher in patients with bronchiectasis than those of healthy subjects (p p p p p  Conclusions Peripheral muscle endurance, exercise capacity, fatigue and health status were adversely affected by the presence of bronchiectasis. Fatigue was associated with dyspnea and health status. Respiratory muscle strength was related to peripheral muscle strength and health status, but not to fatigue, peripheral muscle endurance or exercise capacity. These findings may provide insight for outcome measures for pulmonary rehabilitation programs for patients with bronchiectasis.

  20. Physical Activity and Exercise Capacity in Severe Asthma: Key Clinical Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova-Rivera, Laura; Gibson, Peter G; Gardiner, Paul A; Powell, Heather; McDonald, Vanessa M

    2017-11-10

    Physical inactivity and sedentary time are distinct behaviors that may be more prevalent in severe asthma, contributing to poor disease outcomes. Physical activity and sedentary time in severe asthma however have not been extensively examined. We aimed to objectively measure physical activity and sedentary time in people with severe asthma compared with age-matched control participants, describing the associations of these behaviors with clinical and biological outcomes. We hypothesized that people with severe asthma would be less active and more sedentary. In addition, more activity and less sedentary time would be associated with better clinical outcomes and markers of systemic and airway inflammation in people with severe asthma. Adults with severe asthma (n = 61) and sex- and age-matched controls (n = 61) underwent measurement of lung function, exercise capacity, asthma control, health status, and airway and systemic inflammation. Physical activity and sedentary time were measured using an accelerometer. The severe asthma and control groups were matched in terms of age and sex (32 [53%] females in each group). Individuals with severe asthma accumulated less minutes per day in moderate and higher intensity activity, median (IQR) 21.9 (12.9-36.0) versus 41.7 (29.5-65.2) (P exercise capacity in participants with severe asthma (coefficient, 0.0169; 95% CI, 0.008-0.025; P asthma perform less moderate and vigorous activity than do controls. Higher levels of activity and lower levels of sedentary time are associated with better exercise capacity, asthma control, and lower levels of systemic inflammation. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. All rights reserved.

  1. Benefits of short inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity, dyspnea, and inspiratory fraction in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Barakat; Germain, Michele; Kazem, Alzahouri; Annat, Guy

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Static lung hyperinflation has important clinical consequences in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Given that most of these patients have respiratory and peripheral muscle weakness, dyspnea and functional exercise capacity may improve as a result of inspiratory muscle training (IMT). The present study is designed to investigate the benefits of a short outpatient program of IMT on inspiratory muscle performance, exercise capacity, perception of dyspnea, and the inspiratory fraction (IF). Thirty patients (24 males, 6 females) with significant COPD (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] = 46.21% +/- 6.7% predicted, FEV1 = 33.6% +/- 8.04% predicted) were recruited for this study and had 3 months of IMT (30 minutes/day for 6 days/week) in an outpatient clinic. Following IMT, there was a statistically significant increase in inspiratory muscle performance (an increase of the maximal inspiratory pressure from 59% +/- 19.1% to 79% +/- 21.85% predicted; p = 0.0342), a decrease in dyspnea (from 5.8 +/- 0.78 to 1.9 +/- 0.57; p = 0.0001), an increase in the distance walked during the 6 minute walk test, from 245 +/- 52.37 m to 302 +/- 41.30 m, and finally an increase in the IF (the new prognostic factor in COPD) from 27.6 +/- 9.7% to 31.4% +/- 9.8%. The present study concludes that in patients with significant COPD, IMT results in improvement in performance, exercise capacity, sensation of dyspnea, and moreover an improvement in the IF prognostic factor.

  2. Longer-term effects of home-based exercise interventions on exercise capacity and physical activity in coronary artery disease patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claes, Jomme; Buys, Roselien; Budts, Werner; Smart, Neil; Cornelissen, Véronique A

    2017-02-01

    Background Exercise-based cardiovascular rehabilitation (CR) improves exercise capacity (EC), lowers cardiovascular risk profile and increases physical functioning in the short term. However, uptake of and adherence to a physically active lifestyle in the long run remain problematic. Home-based (HB) exercise programmes have been introduced in an attempt to enhance long-term adherence to recommended levels of physical activity (PA). The current systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare the longer-term effects of HB exercise programmes with usual care (UC) or centre-based (CB) CR in patients referred for CR. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods Non-randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or randomised trials comparing the effects of HB exercise programmes with UC or CB rehabilitation on EC and/or PA, with a follow-up period of ≥12 months and performed in coronary artery disease patients, were searched in four databases (PubMed, EMBASE, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled trials (CENTRAL)) from their inception until September 7, 2016. Standardised mean differences (SMDs) were calculated and pooled by means of random effects models. Risk of bias, publication bias and heterogeneity among trials were also assessed. Results Seven studies could be included in the meta-analysis on EC, but only two studies could be included in the meta-analysis on PA (total number of 1440 patients). The results showed no significant differences in EC between HB rehabilitation and UC (SMD 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.13 to 0.33). There was a small but significant difference in EC in favour of HB compared to CB rehabilitation (SMD 0.25, 95% CI 0.02-0.48). No differences were found for PA (SMD 0.37, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.92). Conclusions HB exercise is slightly more effective than CB rehabilitation in terms of maintaining EC. The small number of studies warrants the need for more

  3. Predictors and Association With Clinical Outcomes of the Changes in Exercise Capacity After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Jawad Altisent, Omar; Puri, Rishi; Regueiro, Ander; Chamandi, Chekrallah; Rodriguez-Gabella, Tania; Del Trigo, Maria; Campelo-Parada, Francisco; Couture, Thomas; Marsal, Josep Ramon; Côté, Mélanie; Paradis, Jean-Michel; DeLarochellière, Robert; Doyle, Daniel; Mohammadi, Siamak; Dumont, Eric; Rodés-Cabau, Josep

    2017-08-15

    At present, there are no objective data specifically examining the clinical impact of variations in exercise capacity post-transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). We describe the changes in exercise capacity between baseline and 6 months post-TAVR, and ascertain factors associated with and clinical implications of a lack of improvement in exercise capacity post-TAVR. A total of 305 patients (mean age, 79±9 years; 44% men; Society of Thoracic Surgeons predicted risk mortality score, 6.7±4.2%) undergoing TAVR completed both baseline and follow-up exercise capacity assessments at 6 months post-TAVR. Exercise capacity was evaluated by the 6-minute walk test (6MWT). Clinical outcomes were compared between patients displaying greater than (n=152; improving group) versus less than (n=153; nonimproving group) the median percentage change in distance walked between baseline and 6-month follow-up examinations. The primary outcome measure was clinical event rates, measured from the 6-month post-TAVR period onward. Further dichotomization according to baseline 6MWT distance (less than versus more than median walking distance, or slow walker versus fast walker) was also assessed. The mean overall distances walked pre- and post-TAVR (6 months post-TAVR) were 204±119 and 263±116 m, respectively (Δ6MWT=60±106 m), with 219 (72%) patients demonstrating an increase in their walking distance (median percentage increase of the entire population was 20% [interquartile range, 0%-80%]). Factors independently correlated with reduced exercise capacity improvement included a range of baseline clinical characteristics (older age, female sex, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; P capacity postprocedure. The lack of functional improvement post-TAVR was predicted by a mix of baseline and periprocedural factors translating into poorer clinical outcomes. These results suggest that systematically implementing exercise capacity assessment pre- and post-TAVR may help to improve

  4. FVB/NJ Mice Are a Useful Model for Examining Cardiac Adaptations to Treadmill Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibb, Andrew A; McNally, Lindsey A; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Hill, Bradford G

    2016-01-01

    Mice are commonly used to examine the mechanisms by which exercise improves cardiometabolic health; however, exercise compliance and adaptations are often strain-dependent or are variable due to inconsistency in exercise training protocols. In this study, we examined nocturnal/diurnal behavior, treadmill exercise compliance, and systemic as well as cardiac-specific exercise adaptations in two commonly used mouse strains, C57BL/6J, and FVB/NJ mice. Metabolic cage analysis indicated a strong nocturnal nature of C57BL/6J mice, whereas FVB/NJ mice showed no circadian element to activity, food or water intake, VO 2 , or VCO 2 . Initial exercise capacity tests revealed that, compared with C57BL/6J mice, FVB/NJ mice are capable of achieving nearly 2-fold higher workloads prior to exhaustion. FVB/NJ mice tested during the day were capable of achieving significantly more work compared with their night-tested counterparts. Following 4 weeks of training, FVB/NJ mice showed significant increases in exercise capacity as well as physiologic cardiac growth characterized by enlarged myocytes and higher mitochondrial DNA content. C57BL/6J mice showed no increases in exercise capacity or cardiac growth regardless of whether they exercised during the day or the night. This lack of adaptation in C57BL/6J mice was attributable, at least in part, to their progressive loss of compliance to the treadmill training protocol. We conclude that the FVB/NJ strain is a useful and robust mouse model for examining cardiac adaptations to treadmill exercise and that treadmill training during daytime hours does not negatively affect exercise compliance or capacity.

  5. Effects of a multimodal exercise program on the functional capacity of Parkinson's disease patients considering disease severity and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Orcioli-Silva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a multimodal exercise program (MEP on the functional capacity of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD according to disease severity and gender. Fourteen patients with PD participated in the study and were distributed into groups according to 1 stage of disease and 2 gender. Functional capacity was evaluated before and after 6 months of intervention. The overall PD patient group improved their coordination and strength. Men and women improved in strength performance after exercise. Men also improved on coordination. For severity of disease, the unilateral group improved in strength, while the bilateral group improved in strength, balance, coordination and the UPDRS-functional score. In conclusion, a MEP is efficient in improving components of functional capacity in patients with PD, especially in strength. Gender may be considered in the exercise program. Individuals in the bilateral disease group appeared to benefit more from exercise.

  6. Whole body hyperthermia, but not skin hyperthermia, accelerates brain and locomotor limb circulatory strain and impairs exercise capacity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Kalsi, Kameljit K

    2017-01-01

    with exercise capacity, blood temperature (TB), oxygen uptake (V̇O2), brain perfusion (MCA Vmean), locomotor limb hemodynamics, and hematological parameters were assessed during incremental cycling exercise with elevated skin (mild hyperthermia; HYPmild), combined core and skin temperatures (moderate...... conditions, whereas only TB was greater in HYPmod At exhaustion, oxygen uptake and exercise capacity were reduced in HYPmod in association with lower leg blood flow, MCA Vmean and mean arterial pressure (MAP), but similar maximal heart rate and TB The attenuated brain and leg perfusion with hyperthermia......-body hyperthermia, but not skin hyperthermia, compromises exercise capacity in heat-stressed humans through the early attenuation of brain and active muscle blood flow....

  7. Coronary microvascular function, insulin sensitivity and body composition in predicting exercise capacity in overweight patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürs, Anders; Pedersen, Lene Rørholm; Olsen, Rasmus Huan

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a negative impact on exercise capacity. The aim of this study was to determine how coronary microvascular function, glucose metabolism and body composition contribute to exercise capacity in overweight patients with CAD and without diabetes. METHODS...... by a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Body composition was determined by whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan and magnetic resonance imaging. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) assessed by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography was used as a measure of microvascular function. RESULTS: Median BMI was 31.3 and 72......: Sixty-five non-diabetic, overweight patients with stable CAD, BMI 28-40 kg/m(2) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) above 35 % were recruited. A 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test was used to evaluate glucose metabolism. Peak aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak) was assessed...

  8. Association of exercise capacity and the heart rate profile during exercise stress testing with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis: data from the Heinz Nixdorf Recall study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möhlenkamp, Stefan; Lehmann, Nils; Schmermund, Axel; Roggenbuck, Ulla; Moebus, Susanne; Dragano, Nico; Bauer, Marcus; Kälsch, Hagen; Hoffmann, Barbara; Stang, Andreas; Bröcker-Preuss, Martina; Böhm, Michael; Mann, Klaus; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Erbel, Raimund

    2009-10-01

    Exercise capacity and heart rate profile parameters obtained from exercise stress testing as well as the subclinical coronary atherosclerosis burden from cardiac CT have been suggested to improve cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification beyond traditional risk factors (RF) in persons at risk of CV events. To study the association of exercise stress-test variables with the coronary artery calcium (CAC) burden in relation to age, sex and traditional RF in subjects without known coronary artery disease from the general population. In 3,163 subjects, CV and RF were measured, a bicycle stress test was performed and the electron beam CT-based CAC-Agatston score was quantified. Exercise capacity, chronotropic response and an abnormal HR recovery were significantly and inversely related to CAC scores in men and women in univariate unadjusted analysis. This association was diminished after adjustment for age and sex and further after adjustment for traditional risk factors. In multivariate analysis, chronotropic response in men [estimate (95% CI): 0.94 (0.91-0.97), P = 0.0005] and an abnormal HR recovery (<15 bpm after 1 min) in women [estimate: 1.34 (1.07-1.70), P = 0.013] but not exercise capacity remained associated with CAC independent of traditional RF. In subjects not taking lipid-lowering, antiarrhythmic or antihypertensive drugs, estimates for the observed associations were essentially unchanged. The clinical ability of these variables to predict a high CAC score was limited. The strong inverse association of exercise capacity, chronotropic response and abnormal HR recovery during exercise stress testing with the CAC burden in unadjusted univariate analysis is largely influenced by age, sex and cardiovascular RFs. The degree, to which exercise stress-test variables and the CAC burden independently contribute to the prediction of cardiovascular events, remains to be shown.

  9. Brain Activation Patterns at Exhaustion in Rats That Differ in Inherent Exercise Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Teresa E.; Brooks, Leah R.; Gilligan, Lori J.; Burghardt, Paul R.; Koch, Lauren G.; Britton, Steven L.; Fleshner, Monika

    2012-01-01

    In order to further understand the genetic basis for variation in inherent (untrained) exercise capacity, we examined the brains of 32 male rats selectively bred for high or low running capacity (HCR and LCR, respectively). The aim was to characterize the activation patterns of brain regions potentially involved in differences in inherent running capacity between HCR and LCR. Using quantitative in situ hybridization techniques, we measured messenger ribonuclease (mRNA) levels of c-Fos, a marker of neuronal activation, in the brains of HCR and LCR rats after a single bout of acute treadmill running (7.5–15 minutes, 15° slope, 10 m/min) or after treadmill running to exhaustion (15–51 minutes, 15° slope, initial velocity 10 m/min). During verification of trait differences, HCR rats ran six times farther and three times longer prior to exhaustion than LCR rats. Running to exhaustion significantly increased c-Fos mRNA activation of several brain areas in HCR, but LCR failed to show significant elevations of c-Fos mRNA at exhaustion in the majority of areas examined compared to acutely run controls. Results from these studies suggest that there are differences in central c-Fos mRNA expression, and potential brain activation patterns, between HCR and LCR rats during treadmill running to exhaustion and these differences could be involved in the variation in inherent running capacity between lines. PMID:23028992

  10. Impact of prematurity on exercise capacity and agility of children and youth aged 8 to 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robič Pikel, Tatjana; Starc, Gregor; Strel, Janko; Kovač, Marjeta; Babnik, Janez; Golja, Petra

    2017-07-01

    Preterm (PT) birth and low birth mass (LBW) can impair growth and development of children and may therefore affect their physical performance up to adulthood. Our aim was to evaluate long-term consequences of prematurity, especially (an)aerobic exercise capacity and agility up to adulthood, by comparing premature and full-term (FT) individuals. From 474 subjects born in 1987, who were enrolled into a longitudinal study, 396 (178 PT and 218 FT (with 127 of them LBW)) were followed-up into their early adulthood. Their mass, respiratory status at birth, and results of SLOfit monitoring system (i.e. results of exercise capacity and agility) were monitored on a yearly basis from their age of 8 to 18years. Data were compared statistically with Student t-test or ANOVA. PT (or LBW) individuals performed aerobic (time of 600-meter run of females) and the majority of anaerobic tests (sit-ups, standing broad jump, and time of 60-meter run, but not bent arm hang) worse (pagility and fine motor tests (arm plate tapping, polygon backwards, and standing reach touch) were performed better (pagility on the long-term scale, therefore, PT children should be encouraged towards more regular participation in physical activities from early childhood onwards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Exercise capacity and physical fitness in pediatric dialysis and kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Patricia; Krasnoff, Joanne; Mathias, Robert

    2007-07-01

    Studies of exercise capacity in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are limited. We tested 25 pediatric kidney transplant (TX) recipients and 15 pediatric dialysis (DX) patients. Nine children in the DX group received kidney transplants and were retested 3 months following surgery (pre/post). Testing involved treadmill testing with measurement of peak oxygen uptake (VO(2peak)), muscle strength, body composition (percent fat), and "field" tests of physical fitness using the FITNESSGRAM, which included the PACER test. Values obtained were compared with gender- and age-based criterion-referenced standards [healthy fitness zone (HFZ)]. The previous day physical activity recall (PDPAR) was used to assess physical activity participation. There were no differences between TX and DX subjects for VO(2peak) and muscle strength measurements, and all values were below the normative values. The TX group achieved significantly higher PACER scores, but only one TX and no DX subjects achieved the HFZ for the PACER test. No improvement in any measures were observed from pre- to post-TX in the nine subjects tested, except for a significant increase in percent fat, which negatively affected the change in muscle strength and VO(2peak). All subjects were physically inactive, with less than 10% of nonschool time being physical activity participation. Pediatric patients with CKD had low exercise capacity, were physically inactive, and gained significant fat weight following TX. Counseling and encouragement for more physical activity is warranted as a part of routine medical care in these children.

  12. Mechanisms for decreased exercise capacity after bed rest in normal middle-aged men

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    Hung, J.; Goldwater, D.; Convertino, V.A.; McKillop, J.H.; Goris, M.L.; DeBusk, R.F.

    1983-01-15

    The mechanisms responsible for the decrease in exercise capacity after bed rest were assessed in 12 apparently healthy men aged 50 +/- 4 years who underwent equilibrium gated blood pool scintigraphy during supine and upright multistage bicycle ergometry before and after 10 days of bed rest. After bed rest, echocardiographically measured supine resting left ventricular end-diastolic volume decreased by 16% (p less than 0.05). Peak oxygen uptake during supine effort after bed rest was diminished by 6% (p . not significant (NS)), whereas peak oxygen uptake during upright effort declined by 15% (p less than 0.05). After bed rest, increases in heart rate were also greater during exercise in the upright than in the supine position (p less than 0.05). Values of left ventricular ejection fraction increased normally during both supine and upright effort after bed rest and were higher than corresponding values before bed rest (p less than 0.05). After bed rest, increased left ventricular ejection fraction and heart rate largely compensated for the reduced cardiac volume during supine effort, but these mechanisms were insufficient to maintain oxygen transport capacity at levels during upright effort before bed rest. These results indicate that orthostatically induced cardiac underfilling, not physical deconditioning or left ventricular dysfunction, is the major cause of reduced effort tolerance after 10 days of bed rest in normal middle-aged men.

  13. A Cycle Ergometer Exercise Program Improves Exercise Capacity and Inspiratory Muscle Function in Hospitalized Patients Awaiting Heart Transplantation: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Forestieri

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a cycle ergometer exercise program on exercise capacity and inspiratory muscle function in hospitalized patients with heart failure awaiting heart transplantation with intravenous inotropic support. Methods: Patients awaiting heart transplantation were randomized and allocated prospectively into two groups: 1 Control Group (n=11 - conventional protocol; and 2 Intervention Group (n=7 - stationary cycle ergometer exercise training. Functional capacity was measured by the six-minute walk test and inspiratory muscle strength assessed by manovacuometry before and after the exercise protocols. Results: Both groups demonstrated an increase in six-minute walk test distance after the experimental procedure compared to baseline; however, only the intervention group had a significant increase (P =0.08 and P =0.001 for the control and intervention groups, respectively. Intergroup comparison revealed a greater increase in the intervention group compared to the control (P <0.001. Regarding the inspiratory muscle strength evaluation, the intragroup analysis demonstrated increased strength after the protocols compared to baseline for both groups; statistical significance was only demonstrated for the intervention group, though (P =0.22 and P <0.01, respectively. Intergroup comparison showed a significant increase in the intervention group compared to the control (P <0.01. Conclusion: Stationary cycle ergometer exercise training shows positive results on exercise capacity and inspiratory muscle strength in patients with heart failure awaiting cardiac transplantation while on intravenous inotropic support.

  14. Skeletal muscle-specific expression of PGC-1α-b, an exercise-responsive isoform, increases exercise capacity and peak oxygen uptake.

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    Miki Tadaishi

    Full Text Available Maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2max predicts mortality and is associated with endurance performance. Trained subjects have a high VO(2max due to a high cardiac output and high metabolic capacity of skeletal muscles. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α, a nuclear receptor coactivator, promotes mitochondrial biogenesis, a fiber-type switch to oxidative fibers, and angiogenesis in skeletal muscle. Because exercise training increases PGC-1α in skeletal muscle, PGC-1α-mediated changes may contribute to the improvement of exercise capacity and VO(2max. There are three isoforms of PGC-1α mRNA. PGC-1α-b protein, whose amino terminus is different from PGC-1α-a protein, is a predominant PGC-1α isoform in response to exercise. We investigated whether alterations of skeletal muscle metabolism by overexpression of PGC-1α-b in skeletal muscle, but not heart, would increase VO(2max and exercise capacity.Transgenic mice showed overexpression of PGC-1α-b protein in skeletal muscle but not in heart. Overexpression of PGC-1α-b promoted mitochondrial biogenesis 4-fold, increased the expression of fatty acid transporters, enhanced angiogenesis in skeletal muscle 1.4 to 2.7-fold, and promoted exercise capacity (expressed by maximum speed by 35% and peak oxygen uptake by 20%. Across a broad range of either the absolute exercise intensity, or the same relative exercise intensities, lipid oxidation was always higher in the transgenic mice than wild-type littermates, suggesting that lipid is the predominant fuel source for exercise in the transgenic mice. However, muscle glycogen usage during exercise was absent in the transgenic mice.Increased mitochondrial biogenesis, capillaries, and fatty acid transporters in skeletal muscles may contribute to improved exercise capacity via an increase in fatty acid utilization. Increases in PGC-1α-b protein or function might be a useful strategy for sedentary subjects to perform exercise

  15. Effect of exercise-induced dehydration on circulatory markers of oxidative damage and antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Vincent P; de Souza Junior, Tacito P; Behrens, Christian; Barros, Marcelo P; Bueno, Carlos Alves; Utter, Alan C; McAnulty, Lisa S; McAnulty, Steven R

    2017-07-01

    Dehydration is a common event associated with exercise. However, few studies have examined the effects of dehydration on plasma redox status in humans. Eighty-two athletes were recruited and baseline anthropometrics and blood samples were obtained. Athletes then engaged in a dehydration protocol, training until 3% of preweight body mass was lost. Athletes returned to the lab and had postdehydration blood collected. Athletes then consumed an isotonic drink until pre-exercise body weight was reestablished. Blood was then recollected (1 h post full rehydration (PFR)). Samples were centrifuged and the plasma snap frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at -80 °C. Lipid and protein oxidative stress was determined by measuring F 2 -isoprostanes and protein carbonyls (PC), respectively. Antioxidant capacity was determined by the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assays. Plasma osmolality was determined using an osmometer. Statistical analysis utilized a 1-way ANOVA with posthoc testing. Values are reported as mean ± SD. Plasma osmolality was significantly elevated immediately postdehydration (p ≤ 0.001) but decreased to baseline at PFR. Plasma TEAC increased immediately postdehydration and at PFR (p ≤ 0.001). FRAP increased immediately postdehydration (p ≤ 0.001) and decreased to below baseline at PFR (p ≤ 0.05). Conversely, F 2 -isoprostanes declined significantly from baseline to immediately postdehydration and then significantly rose at PFR (p ≤ 0.001), whereas PC declined at PFR (p ≤ 0.01). This study indicates that dehydration and exercise cause a significant increase in plasma osmolality and antioxidant potential immediately postexercise. We propose dehydration significantly elevates antioxidant concentration which suppresses F 2 -isoprostanes and PC.

  16. Building groundwater modeling capacity in Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valder, Joshua F.; Carter, Janet M.; Anderson, Mark T.; Davis, Kyle W.; Haynes, Michelle A.; Dorjsuren Dechinlhundev,

    2016-06-16

    Ulaanbaatar, the capital city of Mongolia (fig. 1), is dependent on groundwater for its municipal and industrial water supply. The population of Mongolia is about 3 million people, with about one-half the population residing in or near Ulaanbaatar (World Population Review, 2016). Groundwater is drawn from a network of shallow wells in an alluvial aquifer along the Tuul River. Evidence indicates that current water use may not be sustainable from existing water sources, especially when factoring the projected water demand from a rapidly growing urban population (Ministry of Environment and Green Development, 2013). In response, the Government of Mongolia Ministry of Environment, Green Development, and Tourism (MEGDT) and the Freshwater Institute, Mongolia, requested technical assistance on groundwater modeling through the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Scientists from the USGS and USACE provided two workshops in 2015 to Mongolian hydrology experts on basic principles of groundwater modeling using the USGS groundwater modeling program MODFLOW-2005 (Harbaugh, 2005). The purpose of the workshops was to bring together representatives from the Government of Mongolia, local universities, technical experts, and other key stakeholders to build in-country capacity in hydrogeology and groundwater modeling.A preliminary steady-state groundwater-flow model was developed as part of the workshops to demonstrate groundwater modeling techniques to simulate groundwater conditions in alluvial deposits along the Tuul River in the vicinity of Ulaanbaatar. ModelMuse (Winston, 2009) was used as the graphical user interface for MODFLOW for training purposes during the workshops. Basic and advanced groundwater modeling concepts included in the workshops were groundwater principles; estimating hydraulic properties; developing model grids, data sets, and MODFLOW input files; and viewing and evaluating MODFLOW output files. A key to success was

  17. Oxidative stress in skeletal muscle impairs mitochondrial respiration and limits exercise capacity in type 2 diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Takashi; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Hirabayashi, Kagami; Matsushima, Shouji; Inoue, Naoki; Ohta, Yukihiro; Hamaguchi, Sanae; Sobirin, Mochamad A; Ono, Taisuke; Suga, Tadashi; Kuroda, Satoshi; Tanaka, Shinya; Terasaki, Fumio; Okita, Koichi; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2009-09-01

    Insulin resistance or diabetes is associated with limited exercise capacity, which can be caused by the abnormal energy metabolism in skeletal muscle. Oxidative stress is involved in mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes. We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress could cause mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle and make contribution to exercise intolerance in diabetes. C57/BL6J mice were fed on normal diet or high fat diet (HFD) for 8 wk to induce obesity with insulin resistance and diabetes. Treadmill tests with expired gas analysis were performed to determine the exercise capacity and whole body oxygen uptake (Vo(2)). The work (vertical distance x body weight) to exhaustion was reduced in the HFD mice by 36%, accompanied by a 16% decrease of peak Vo(2). Mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiration, electron transport chain complex I and III activities, and mitochondrial content in skeletal muscle were decreased in the HFD mice. Furthermore, superoxide production and NAD(P)H oxidase activity in skeletal muscle were significantly increased in the HFD mice. Intriguingly, the treatment of HFD-fed mice with apocynin [10 mmol/l; an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase activation] improved exercise intolerance and mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle without affecting glucose metabolism itself. The exercise capacity and mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle were impaired in type 2 diabetes, which might be due to enhanced oxidative stress. Therapies designed to regulate oxidative stress and maintain mitochondrial function could be beneficial to improve the exercise capacity in type 2 diabetes.

  18. Benefits of short inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity, dyspnea, and inspiratory fraction in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barakat Shahin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Barakat Shahin1, Michele Germain2, Alzahouri Kazem3, Guy Annat41Department of Physiology, University of Claude Bernard Lyon I, Lyon, France; 2Chef of the Service of EFR, Hospital of the Croix-Rousse at Lyon, France; 3Department of Medical Informatics, Hospital of St. Julien, Nancy, France; 4Department of Physiology, UFR Médecine Lyon Grange-Blanche Université Claude Bernard Lyon I, INSERM ESPRI ERI 22, Lyon, FranceAbstract: Static lung hyperinflation has important clinical consequences in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Given that most of these patients have respiratory and peripheral muscle weakness, dyspnea and functional exercise capacity may improve as a result of inspiratory muscle training (IMT. The present study is designed to investigate the benefits of a short outpatient program of IMT on inspiratory muscle performance, exercise capacity, perception of dyspnea, and the inspiratory fraction (IF. Thirty patients (24 males, 6 females with significant COPD (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] = 46.21% ± 6.7% predicted, FEV1 = 33.6% ± 8.04% predicted were recruited for this study and had 3 months of IMT (30 minutes/day for 6 days/week in an outpatient clinic. Following IMT, there was a statistically significant increase in inspiratory muscle performance (an increase of the maximal inspiratory pressure from 59% ± 19.1% to 79% ± 21.85% predicted; p = 0.0342, a decrease in dyspnea (from 5.8 ± 0.78 to 1.9 ± 0.57; p = 0.0001, an increase in the distance walked during the 6 minute walk test, from 245 ± 52.37 m to 302 ± 41.30 m, and finally an increase in the IF (the new prognostic factor in COPD from 27.6 ± 9.7% to 31.4% ± 9.8%. The present study concludes that in patients with significant COPD, IMT results in improvement in performance, exercise capacity, sensation of dyspnea, and moreover an improvement in the IF prognostic factor.Keywords: inspiratory muscle training, dyspnea, inspiratory

  19. The RAdiation transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinty, B.; Widlowski, J.-L.; Gobron, N.; Verstraete, M. M.; Taberner, M.; Rami-Participants, .

    2003-04-01

    The community involved in modeling radiation transfer over terrestrial surfaces has implemented the RAdiation transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise. This benchmarking activity parallels a similar activity in the cloud radiation field known as I3RC. The purpose for such a model intercomparison is to provide benchmark cases and solutions which will be useful in the development and testing of models. The intercomparison exercise can also help to simply identify existing models and their respective regimes of applicability. The detailed RAMI Protocol has been designed as a series of precisely defined conditions under which the various models should be executed. These have been selected to represent a broad set of well-defined remote sensing problems for which the problem solutions can be easily compared. Specifically, two major series of experiments are currently scheduled: one for so-called homogeneous canopies, and the other for heterogeneous ones. In either case, the scene to be simulated is precisely described, and model results have been seeked for a limited number of conditions, such as two spectral wavelengths or a small number of radiation scattering conditions. This presentation will provide a general overview of RAMI and outline the results obtained during phase 2 which has just been completed.

  20. The association between right ventricular free wall strain and exercise capacity for health check-up subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ting Chang

    Full Text Available Right ventricular (RV function has been found to be a major factor of exercise capacity in patients with heart failure. However, the role of RV function in exercise capacity in healthy subjects has not been well studied. This study aims to validate the role of RV strain derived from speckle tracking echocardiography for exercise capacity for health check-up subjects.This study prospectively recruited subjects from a routine health examination. All of them were symptom free. RV function represented by RV strain was derived from speckle tracking echocardiography in addition to traditional echocardiography parameters. Functional capacity was determined by a symptom limited treadmill exercise test with the Bruce protocol.Among 164 recruited subjects (age 52.2 ±9.2 years, 66.4% male, 32 subjects represented impaired functional capacity (MET<8, which was significantly correlated with age, left ventricular mass index, left ventricular filling pressure (E/e', global longitudinal strain of the left ventricle (LVGLS (-16.0±2.5% vs. -18.9±3.8%, p < 0.001 and RV free wall strain (RVLS_FW (-17.0±4.9% vs. -21.9±3.2%, p <0.001. After multivariate logistic regression, RVS_FW was an independent predictor for impaired functional capacity (OR 1.62, CI 1.32-1.98; p <0.001.In conclusion, RV strain is independently associated with exercise capacity for health check-up subjects. RV function is an important factor for functional capacity.

  1. Associations between exercise capacity, physical activity, and psychosocial functioning in children with congenital heart disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulfer, Karolijn; Helbing, Willem A; Duppen, Nienke; Utens, Elisabeth M W J

    2014-10-01

    Children and adolescents operated upon for congenital heart disease (ConHD) may show reduced exercise capacity and physical activity, possibly associated with lowered self-esteem and quality of life (QoL). The studies into associations between these parameters have not been reviewed before. Review of studies into associations between exercise capacity, physical activity, respectively exercise training, and psychosocial functioning of ConHD youngsters. PubMed, Embase and reference lists of related articles. Articles published between January 2000 and December 2012 into exercise capacity and/or physical activity, and a measure of psychosocial functioning in children with ConHD. Two investigators independently reviewed the identified articles for eligibility, and one author extracted the data. Although exercise capacity was strongly related to physical domains of parent-reported and self-reported QoL, it was almost never associated with psychosocial domains of QoL. Physical activity was rarely associated with physical or psychosocial domains of QoL. Remarkably, self-reported depressive symptoms were associated with both physical and psychosocial QoL. The few studies into exercise-training programmes showed promising results in QoL and emotional and behavioral problems, but they contained methodological flaws. No clear relationships were found between exercise capacity, physical activity, and QoL in children and adolescents with ConHD. Therefore we recommend assessing QoL separately, preferably both self-reported and parent-reported. Since depressive symptoms were associated with reduced physical and psychosocial QoL, screening on these symptoms is also recommended. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  2. THE EFFECT OF A 12-WEEK PHYSIOTHERAPY PROGRAM WITH RESPIRATORY EXERCISES ON THE VITAL CAPACITY AND FORCED VITAL CAPACITY IN ADULT MALES AND FEMALES WITH CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitsios A

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine if breathing exercises can improve specific respiratoryparameters in adult males and females with cerebral palsy. 18 adults (11males/7 females with spastic cerebralpalsy consisted the experimental group and 18 (11males/7 females serving as control group took part in thestudy. A spirometer was used to measure vital capacity (VC and the forced vital capacity (FVC before and afterthe exercising protocol. The breathing exercises selected, emphasized strengthening of the muscles of inspirationand the muscles of expiration. The study revealed that a breathing exercise program can increase the VC andFVC in people with cerebral palsy. The pre-test and post-test examined variables of both groups were withinnormal limits The VC of the experimental group was increased by 0.20 litres and this of FVC increased by 0,25litres after exercising for five to seven minutes each day for a period of twelve weeks. The mean increase of theVC and FVC was 6% and 7% respectively over the baseline values. The control group showed no change in VCneither in FVC. The results support application and development of the treatment concept with respiratoryexercises and highlight that physical activity at its simple status can improve function and quality of life in adultswith cerebral palsy when added to standard care.

  3. Comparison of Watermelon and Carbohydrate Beverage on Exercise-Induced Alterations in Systemic Inflammation, Immune Dysfunction, and Plasma Antioxidant Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Andrew Shanely

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Consuming carbohydrate- and antioxidant-rich fruits during exercise as a means of supporting and enhancing both performance and health is of interest to endurance athletes. Watermelon (WM contains carbohydrate, lycopene, l-citrulline, and l-arginine. WM may support exercise performance, augment antioxidant capacity, and act as a countermeasure to exercise-induced inflammation and innate immune changes. Trained cyclists (n = 20, 48 ± 2 years participated in a randomized, placebo controlled, crossover study. Subjects completed two 75 km cycling time trials after either 2 weeks ingestion of 980 mL/day WM puree or no treatment. Subjects drank either WM puree containing 0.2 gm/kg carbohydrate or a 6% carbohydrate beverage every 15 min during the time trials. Blood samples were taken pre-study and pre-, post-, 1 h post-exercise. WM ingestion versus no treatment for 2-weeks increased plasma l-citrulline and l-arginine concentrations (p < 0.0125. Exercise performance did not differ between WM puree or carbohydrate beverage trials (p > 0.05, however, the rating of perceived exertion was greater during the WM trial (p > 0.05. WM puree versus carbohydrate beverage resulted in a similar pattern of increase in blood glucose, and greater increases in post-exercise plasma antioxidant capacity, l-citrulline, l-arginine, and total nitrate (all p < 0.05, but without differences in systemic markers of inflammation or innate immune function. Daily WM puree consumption fully supported the energy demands of exercise, and increased post-exercise blood levels of WM nutritional components (l-citrulline and l-arginine, antioxidant capacity, and total nitrate, but without an influence on post-exercise inflammation and changes in innate immune function.

  4. "Weighing" the effects of exercise and intrinsic aerobic capacity: are there beneficial effects independent of changes in weight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyfault, John P; Wright, David C

    2016-09-01

    It has been known for centuries that regularly performed exercise has beneficial effects on metabolic health. Owing to its central role in locomotion and the fact that it accounts for a large majority of whole-body glucose disposal and fatty acid oxidation, the effects of exercise on skeletal muscle has been a central focus in exercise physiology research. With this being said it is becoming increasingly well recognized that both adipose tissue and liver metabolism are robustly modified by exercise, especially in conditions of obesity and insulin resistance. One of the difficult questions to address is if the effects of exercise are direct or occur secondary to exercise-induced weight loss. The purpose of this review is to highlight recent work that has attempted to tease out the protective effects of exercise, or intrinsic aerobic capacity, against metabolic and inflammatory challenges as it relates to the treatment and prevention of obesity and insulin resistance. Recent studies reporting improvements in liver and adipose tissue insulin action following a single bout of exercise will also be discussed. The research highlighted in this review sheds new insight into protective, anti-inflammatory effects of exercise that occur largely independent of changes in adiposity and body weight.

  5. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves exercise capacity and quality of life in underweight patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chou-Chin; Yang, Mei-Chen; Lee, Chih-Hsin; Huang, Yi-Chih; Huang, Chun-Yao; Huang, Kuo-Liang; Wu, Yao-Kuang

    2011-02-01

    An estimated 20-40% of COPD patients are underweight. We sought to confirm the physiological and psychosocial benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation programmes (PRP) in underweight compared with non-underweight patients with COPD. Twenty-two underweight COPD patients with BMI patients, who were matched for FEV(1) and age, were studied. All patients had moderate-to-very severe COPD. All patients participated in 12-week, hospital-based outpatient PRP consisting of two sessions per week. Baseline and post-PRP status were evaluated by spirometry, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, ventilatory muscle strength and the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). At baseline, the age distribution and airflow obstruction were similar in underweight and non-underweight patients with COPD. Baseline exercise capacity, inspiratory muscle strength and SGRQ total and symptoms scores were significantly lower in the underweight patients (all P patients (mean increase 0.8 kg, P = 0.01). There were also significant improvements in peak oxygen uptake, peak workload and the SGRQ total, symptoms, activity and impact scores in both underweight and non-underweight patients with COPD (all P patients with COPD have impaired exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQL). Exercise training with supplemental oxygen may result in significant weight gains and improvements in exercise capacity and HRQL. Exercise training is indicated for underweight patients with COPD. © 2011 The Authors. Respirology © 2011 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  6. A Mathematical Model of Cardiovascular Response to Dynamic Exercise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Magosso, E

    2001-01-01

    A mathematical model of cardiovascular response to dynamic exercise is presented, The model includes the pulsating heart, the systemic and pulmonary, circulation, a functional description of muscle...

  7. Whole body hyperthermia, but not skin hyperthermia, accelerates brain and locomotor limb circulatory strain and impairs exercise capacity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Kalsi, Kameljit K; Secher, Niels H; González-Alonso, José

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular strain and hyperthermia are thought to be important factors limiting exercise capacity in heat-stressed humans, however, the contribution of elevations in skin (T sk ) versus whole body temperatures on exercise capacity has not been characterized. To ascertain their relationships with exercise capacity, blood temperature (T B ), oxygen uptake (V̇O 2 ), brain perfusion (MCA V mean ), locomotor limb hemodynamics, and hematological parameters were assessed during incremental cycling exercise with elevated skin (mild hyperthermia; HYP mild ), combined core and skin temperatures (moderate hyperthermia; HYP mod ), and under control conditions. Both hyperthermic conditions increased T sk versus control (6.2 ± 0.2°C; P conductance (VC). Mechanistically, the falling MCA VC was coupled to reductions in PaCO 2 , whereas the plateau in leg vascular conductance was related to markedly elevated plasma [NA] and a plateau in plasma ATP These findings reveal that whole-body hyperthermia, but not skin hyperthermia, compromises exercise capacity in heat-stressed humans through the early attenuation of brain and active muscle blood flow. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits exercise-induced increase of circulating stem cells with endothelial progenitor capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvorava, Tatsiana; Kumpf, Stephanie; Rauch, Bernhard H; Dao, Vu Thao-Vi; Adams, Volker; Kojda, Georg

    2010-02-01

    The number of circulating stem cells with endothelial progenitor capacity (EPCs) inversely correlates with the number of cardiovascular risk factors. In this study we sought to investigate the effects of vascular H(2)O(2) on circulating EPC levels. In C57BL/6 mice 3 weeks of freely moving or forced physical activity or voluntary exercise failed to increase circulating EPCs defined as double positive for Flk-1 and CD34, CD133 or Sca-1. Likewise, neither insertion of additional genes encoding for catalase (cat(++)) or eNOS nor eNOS knock-out changed EPCs in resting mice. In striking contrast, inhibition of catalase by aminotriazole strongly reduced circulating EPCs in sedentary cat(++) and their transgen-negative littermates (cat(n)), while forced or voluntary exercise training of cat(++) mice significantly increased the number of circulating EPCs. The latter effect was completely inhibitable by aminotriazole. These data suggest that endogenous vascular H(2)O(2) likely contributes to the impairment of important stem cell-induced vascular repair mechanisms in cardiovascular disease.

  9. Supine Treadmill Exercise in Lower Body Negative Pressure Combined with Resistive Exercise Counteracts Bone Loss, Reduced Aerobic Upright Exercise Capacity and Reduced Muscle Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuche, Sabine; Schneider, S. M.; Lee, S. M. C.; Macias, B. R.; Smith, S. M.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term exposure to weightlessness leads to cardiovascular and musculoskeletal deconditioning. In this report, the effectiveness of combined supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (LBNPex) and flywheel resistive exercise (Rex) countermeasures was determined to prevent bone loss, reduced aerobic upright exercise capacity and reduced muscle strength. We hypothesized that exercise subjects would show less decrease in bone mineral density (BMD), peak oxygen consumption (VO2pk) and knee extensor strength (KES) than control subjects. Sixteen healthy female subjects participated in a 60-d 6(sup 0) head-down tilt bed rest (BR) study after providing written informed consent. Subjects were assigned to one of two groups: a non-exercising control group CON or an exercise group EX performing LBNPex 2-4 d/wk and Rex every 3rd-d. VO2pk was measured with a maximal, graded, upright treadmill test performed pre-BR and on 3-d after BR. BMD was assessed before and 3-d after BR. Isokinetic KES was measured before and 5-d after BR. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA were performed. Statistical significance was set at p less than 0.05. CON experienced a significant decrease in BMD in the trochanter (PRE: 0.670 plus or minus 0.045; POST: 0.646 plus or minus 0.352 g (raised dot) per square centimeter) and in the whole hip (PRE=0.894 plus or minus 0.059; POST: 0.858 plus or minus 0.057 g (raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD also decreased significantly in EX in the trochanter (PRE: 0.753 plus or minus 0.0617; POST: 0.741 plus or minus 0.061 g (raised dot) per square centimeter) and whole hip (PRE: 0.954 plus or minus 0.067; POST: 0.935 plus or minus 0.069 g (raised dot) per square centimeter). BMD losses were significantly less in EX than in CON subjects. VO2pk was significantly decreased in the CON after BR (PRE: 38.0 plus or minus 4.8; POST: 29.9 plus or minus 4.2 ml (raised dot) per kilogram per minute), but not in the EX (PRE: 39.0 plus or minus 2.0; POST

  10. Exercise capacity and heart rate responses to exercise as predictors of short-term outcome among patients with stable coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Antti M; Lepojärvi, Samuli; Kenttä, Tuomas V; Junttila, M Juhani; Perkiömäki, Juha S; Piira, Olli-Pekka; Ukkola, Olavi; Hautala, Arto J; Tulppo, Mikko P; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2015-11-15

    Although exercise capacity (EC) and autonomic responses to exercise predict clinical outcomes in various populations, they are not routinely applied in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). We hypothesized that the composite index of EC and exercise heart rate responses would be a powerful determinant of short-term risk in CAD. Patients with angiographically documented stable CAD and treated with β blockers (n = 1,531) underwent exercise testing to allow the calculation of age- and gender-adjusted EC, maximal chronotropic response index (CRI), and 2-minute postexercise heart rate recovery (HRR, percentage of maximal heart rate). Cardiovascular deaths and hospitalization due to heart failure, registered during a 2-year follow-up (n = 39, 2.5%), were defined as the composite primary end point. An exercise test risk score was calculated as the sum of hazard ratios related to abnormal (lowest tertile) EC, CRI, and HRR. Abnormal EC, CRI, and HRR predicted the primary end point, involving 4.5-, 2.2-, and 6.2-fold risk, respectively, independently of each other. The patients with intermediate and high exercise test risk score had 11.1-fold (95% confidence interval 2.4 to 51.1, p = 0.002) and 25.4-fold (95% confidence interval 5.5 to 116.8, p exercise and recovery is a powerful predictor of short-term outcome in patients with stable CAD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Changes in iron levels, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation in race horses, before and after of physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Abramovitc

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Abramovitc G., Parra A.C. & Fernandes W.R. [Changes in iron levels, total iron binding capacity, transferrin saturation in race horses, before and after of physical exercise]. Variação de níveis séricos de ferro, da capacidade total de ligação do ferro e da saturação da transferrina em equinos de corrida, antes e após exercício físico. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 36(3:289-293, 2014. Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia, Universidade de São Paulo, Rua Prof. Dr. Orlando Marques de Paiva 87, Cidade Universitária, Butantã, São Paulo, SP 05508-270, Brasil. Email: wilsonrf@usp.br The preparation of the horse for physical activities in competition is directly related to important factors such as nutrition, muscle adaptation and blood profile, related to the concentration of serum iron, total capacity total iron binding capacity (TIBC and saturation of transferrin. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of exercise in iron levels, the total iron and transferrin saturation in race horses. One hundred and eleven samples of blood serum were collected from Thoroughbred horses, from the Jockey Club of São Paulo, aged between 3 and 4 years old, male and female, clinically healthy, practitioners turf competition, in sand or grass. The samples were obtained before exercise (control time and 30 minutes after exercise (post exercise. These animals were submitted to gallop training, of high intensity and short duration for this research. As a result, it was observed that the serum concentration of iron (Fe showed a statistically significant lowering post-exercise, due to organic re-balance of iron, while TIBC (total iron binding capacity showed a clear and significant increase in their serum levels due to increased needs of iron during and after exercise. The percentage of transferrin saturation in serum was shown to be lower post-exercise, probably due to the recruitment of

  12. Effect of Nigella sativa supplementation to exercise training in a novel model of physiological cardiac hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Asoom, L I; Al-Shaikh, B A; Bamosa, A O; El-Bahai, M N

    2014-09-01

    Exercise training is employed as supplementary therapy to patients with heart failure due to its multiple beneficial cardiac effects including physiological remodeling of the heart. However, precautions might be taken for the concomitant high oxidant release. Nigella sativa (NS) has been found to induce cardiac hypertrophy and enhance cardiac function. Combination of NS supplementation and exercise training might induce a safer model of cardiac hypertrophy. Our aim was to study biomarkers associated with cardiac hypertrophy induced by NS supplementation of exercise-trained rats. Forty-five adult male Wistar rats (body weight 150-220 g) were divided equally into three groups: control, exercise-trained (ET) and NS-treated-exercise-trained (NSET) groups. Daily 800 mg/kg NS was administered orally to NSET group for 8 weeks. Rats of the ET and NSET groups were subjected to treadmill running sessions for 2 h/day for 8 weeks. By the end of the experiment, the following were recorded: body, heart and left ventricular weights (BW, HW, LVW), cardiomyocyte diameter, serum growth hormone, insulin growth factor-I (IGF-I), thyroid hormones, catecholamines, total nitrate, ICAM and antioxidant capacity. A homogenous cardiac hypertrophy was evidenced by increased HW/BW, LVW/BW ratios and cardiomyocyte diameter in the two groups of exercise-trained compared with control rats. Rats of ET group had higher growth hormone. Those of NSET group developed higher IGF-I and total antioxidant capacity, as well as lower serum thyroxin level. Simultaneous NS supplementation to an exercise training program preserves and augments exercise-induced physiological cardiac hypertrophy with step-forward adaptive signs of increased IGF-I and reduced thyroxin level, and with an added advantage of elevation of total serum antioxidant capacity. Thus, the novel model of NSET-induced cardiac hypertrophy might be introduced as a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of heart failure with superior

  13. Fine mapping of a QTL on chromosome 13 for submaximal exercise capacity training response: the HERITAGE Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Treva K; Sarzynski, Mark A; Sung, Yun Ju; Argyropoulos, George; Stütz, Adrian M; Teran-Garcia, Margarita; Rao, D C; Bouchard, Claude; Rankinen, Tuomo

    2012-08-01

    Although regular exercise improves submaximal aerobic capacity, there is large variability in its response to exercise training. While this variation is thought to be partly due to genetic differences, relatively little is known about the causal genes. Submaximal aerobic capacity traits in the current report include the responses of oxygen consumption (ΔVO(2)60), power output (ΔWORK60), and cardiac output (ΔQ60) at 60% of VO2max to a standardized 20-week endurance exercise training program. Genome-wide linkage analysis in 475 HERITAGE Family Study Caucasians identified a locus on chromosome 13q for ΔVO(2)60 (LOD = 3.11). Follow-up fine mapping involved a dense marker panel of over 1,800 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a 7.9-Mb region (21.1-29.1 Mb from p-terminus). Single-SNP analyses found 14 SNPs moderately associated with both ΔVO(2)60 at P ≤ 0.005 and the correlated traits of ΔWORK60 and ΔQ60 at P < 0.05. Haplotype analyses provided several strong signals (P < 1.0 × 10(-5)) for ΔVO(2)60. Overall, association analyses narrowed the target region and included potential biological candidate genes (MIPEP and SGCG). Consistent with maximal heritability estimates of 23%, up to 20% of the phenotypic variance in ΔVO(2)60 was accounted for by these SNPs. These results implicate candidate genes on chromosome 13q12 for the ability to improve submaximal exercise capacity in response to regular exercise. Submaximal exercise at 60% of maximal capacity is an exercise intensity that falls well within the range recommended in the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans and thus has potential public health relevance.

  14. Longitudinal associations between exercise identity and exercise motivation: A multilevel growth curve model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntoumanis, N; Stenling, A; Thøgersen-Ntoumani, C; Vlachopoulos, S; Lindwall, M; Gucciardi, D F; Tsakonitis, C

    2018-02-01

    Past work linking exercise identity and exercise motivation has been cross-sectional. This is the first study to model the relations between different types of exercise identity and exercise motivation longitudinally. Understanding the dynamic associations between these sets of variables has implications for theory development and applied research. This was a longitudinal survey study. Participants were 180 exercisers (79 men, 101 women) from Greece, who were recruited from fitness centers and were asked to complete questionnaires assessing exercise identity (exercise beliefs and role-identity) and exercise motivation (intrinsic, identified, introjected, external motivation, and amotivation) three times within a 6 month period. Multilevel growth curve modeling examined the role of motivational regulations as within- and between-level predictors of exercise identity, and a model in which exercise identity predicted exercise motivation at the within- and between-person levels. Results showed that within-person changes in intrinsic motivation, introjected, and identified regulations were positively and reciprocally related to within-person changes in exercise beliefs; intrinsic motivation was also a positive predictor of within-person changes in role-identity but not vice versa. Between-person differences in the means of predictor variables were predictive of initial levels and average rates of change in the outcome variables. The findings show support to the proposition that a strong exercise identity (particularly exercise beliefs) can foster motivation for behaviors that reinforce this identity. We also demonstrate that such relations can be reciprocal overtime and can depend on the type of motivation in question as well as between-person differences in absolute levels of these variables. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [Assessment of functional capacity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: implications for recommending exercise].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Santana, Frederico Santos; Nascimento, Dahan da Cunha; de Freitas, João Paulo Marques; Miranda, Raphaela Franco; Muniz, Luciana Feitosa; Santos Neto, Leopoldo; da Mota, Licia Maria Henrique; Balsamo, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic symmetric polyarthritis of large and small joints and by morning stiffness that may lead to musculoskeletal impairment, with functional impotence. The concept of functionality relates to the ability of an individual to perform effectively and independently daily activities and tasks of everyday life. The aim of this review is to familiarize the rheumatologist with the concept of functional capacity evaluation and with the tests that can be applied in this population, as these are important steps for a proper exercise prescription. From functional tests already used in the elderly population, the Physical Fitness and Rheumatology Laboratory - LAR - Brasilia, which is accompanying patients from Brasilia Cohort of Early Rheumatoid Arthritis, describes in this article a protocol of tests to assess functional capacity for application in patients with RA, including the description of tests: 1) Sit and Reach; 2) Agility/Dynamic Balance; 3) Manual Dynamometry; 4) Sit Back and Lift; 5) Biceps Curl and 6) Six-minute Walk Test. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Exercise capacity of Saudi with symptoms suggestive of cardiovascular disease in a military hospital in Western Saudi Arabia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, T.; Mohammad, Kazim H.; Abdel-Fattah, Moataz M.; Abbasi, Abdul H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to analyze the results of exercise tolerance test ETT of Saudi women and assess their exercise capacity. A hospital based retrospective cohort analysis was carried out on all Saudi women referred to the Cardiology Department for ETT from February 2005 to June 2007. They underwent symptom limited treadmill test according to the standard Bruce protocol with exercise electrocardiogram monitoring. One hundred and seventy-six women were included in the study. Fifty-one 31.9% patients did not achieve target heart rate. The mean age +/- SD was 48.3+-9.3 years. There was no association of age, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, positive family history of ischemic heart disease IHD and hyperlipidemia to achieve target heart rate p>0.05. Exercise time was influenced by diabetes mellitus p=0.054 and hyperlipidemia p=0.044. The mean exercise time +/- SD was 5.15+/-2.63 minutes and the mean exercise capacity +/-SD was 6.29+/-2.52 metabolic equivalent. Sensitivity was 36.4%, 95% CI 29.3-44.6, specificity 92.3%, 95% CI 80.5-96.8, positive predictive value 26.7%, 95% CI 21.3-31.4, negative predictive value 95.4%, 95% CI 90.9-98.3, likelihood ratio for positive result was 4.7, 95%CI 3.1-6.2 and likelihood ratio for negative result was 0.69, 95% CI 0.48-0.81. Exercise capacity of Saudi women is less compared to similar studies in women from other regions. Exercise tolerance test can be used to rule out presence of IHD in Saudi women, but value of a positive test is less likely to predict the presence of IHD. (author)

  17. Aerobic Exercise for Reducing Migraine Burden: Mechanisms, Markers, and Models of Change Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irby, Megan B; Bond, Dale S; Lipton, Richard B; Nicklas, Barbara; Houle, Timothy T; Penzien, Donald B

    2016-02-01

    Engagement in regular exercise routinely is recommended as an intervention for managing and preventing migraine, and yet empirical support is far from definitive. We possess at best a weak understanding of how aerobic exercise and resulting change in aerobic capacity influence migraine, let alone the optimal parameters for exercise regimens as migraine therapy (eg, who will benefit, when to prescribe, optimal types, and doses/intensities of exercise, level of anticipated benefit). These fundamental knowledge gaps critically limit our capacity to deploy exercise as an intervention for migraine. Clear articulation of the markers and mechanisms through which aerobic exercise confers benefits for migraine would prove invaluable and could yield insights on migraine pathophysiology. Neurovascular and neuroinflammatory pathways, including an effect on obesity or adiposity, are obvious candidates for study given their role both in migraine as well as the changes known to accrue with regular exercise. In addition to these biological pathways, improvements in aerobic fitness and migraine alike also are mediated by changes in psychological and sociocognitive factors. Indeed a number of specific mechanisms and pathways likely are operational in the relationship between exercise and migraine improvement, and it remains to be established whether these pathways operate in parallel or synergistically. As heuristics that might conceptually benefit our research programs here forward, we: (1) provide an extensive listing of potential mechanisms and markers that could account for the effects of aerobic exercise on migraine and are worthy of empirical exploration and (2) present two exemplar conceptual models depicting pathways through which exercise may serve to reduce the burden of migraine. Should the promise of aerobic exercise as a feasible and effective migraine therapy be realized, this line of endeavor stands to benefit migraineurs (including the many who presently remain

  18. Effects of respiratory muscle and endurance training using an individualized training device on the pulmonary function and exercise capacity in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, JinHong; Park, Jun Hyuck; Yim, Jongeun

    2014-12-05

    Because respiratory muscle function plays a strong role in exercise capacity and cardiopulmonary response to exercise, systematic training and measurement of respiratory muscle function should be considered in stroke patients. The purpose of this study was to determine whether an individualized respiratory muscle training device combined with conventional physical therapy exercise can improve the pulmonary function and exercise capacity of stroke patients. Twenty stroke patients were randomly assigned to an exercise group (n=10) or a control group (n=10). Over 4 weeks, each group participated in exercise training interventions 3 times per week. In each session, the control group received basic exercise treatments for 30 min, followed by an automated full-body workout for 20 min. The exercise group performed the same exercise regimen as the control group, as well as an additional respiratory muscle training regimen using a respiratory exercise device for 20 min. Pulmonary function of forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume at 1 s (FEV1), FEV1/FVC, and peak expiratory flow (PEF) and exercise capacity of a 6-min walking test and Shortness of Breath Modified Borg Dyspnea Scale (SBMBDS) scores were assessed before and after the training. A significant intergroup difference was observed in the FVC, FEV1, PEF, 6MWT, and SBMBDS scores (prespiratory muscles using an individualized respiratory device had a positive effect on pulmonary function and exercise capacity and may be used for breathing rehabilitation in stroke patients.

  19. Sustained effects of integrated COPD management on health status and exercise capacity in primary care patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarije L Kruis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Annemarije L Kruis1, Joan van Adrichem2, Magda R Erkelens2, Huub Scheepers3, Hans in ’t Veen4, Jean WM Muris5, Niels H Chavannes11Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, 2Physiotherapy Center De Beweging, Rotterdam, 3Well-being Medical Center, Bocholtz-Simpelveld, 4Department of Pulmonary Diseases, Sint Franciscus Gasthuis, Rotterdam, 5Department of General Practice, Maastricht University Medical Center, The NetherlandsBackground: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD constitutes a growing health care problem worldwide. Integrated disease management (IDM of mild to moderate COPD patients has been demonstrated to improve exercise capacity and health status after one year, but long-term results are currently lacking in primary care.Methods: Long-term data from the Bocholtz study, a controlled clinical trial comparing the effects of IDM versus usual care on health status in 106 primary care COPD patients during 24 months of follow-up, were analyzed using the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ. In addition, the Kroonluchter IDM implementation program has treated 216 primary care patients with mild to moderate COPD since 2006. Longitudinal six-minute walking distance (6MWD results for patients reaching 24 months of follow-up were analyzed using paired-sample t-tests. In prespecified subgroup analyses, the differential effects of baseline CCQ score, Medical Research Council (MRC dyspnea score, and 6MWD were investigated.Results: In the Bocholtz study, subjects were of mean age 64 years, with an average postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 of 63% predicted and an FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC ratio of 0.56. No significant differences existed between groups at baseline. CCQ improved significantly and in a clinically relevant manner by 0.4 points over 24 months; effect sizes were doubled in patients with CCQ > 1 at baseline and tripled in patients with MRC dyspnea score

  20. Dyspnea, pulmonary function and exercise capacity in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alameri, Hatem F.; Alem, A.; Al-Momen, A.; Kardas, W.; Owais, M.; Jehangir, A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to examine pulmonary function, dyspnea, and exercise capacity in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. The patients were recruited from the hematology clinic at King Khalid University Hospital in Riyadh from January to December 2005. The study involved 39 patients with stable SCD 20 women and 19 men, with a mean age of 22.7+/- 7.1 years, hemoglobin level of 95.5+/-14.6g/L and hemoglobin F level of 13.7+/08.6. Patients underwent pulmonary function tests PFT forced expiratory volume in first second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide [DLco] data are presented as a percentage of the normal prediction, a 6- minute walk test 6MWT and echocardiography. Dyspnea was assessed using the Borg score. The 6MWT data were compared to body mass index matched healthy controls. Forty-one percent of SCD patients had mild dyspnea at rest and this increased to 61% at the end of the 6MWT. Pulmonary function tests were abnormal in 51%, 36% of patients had a restrictive pattern, 10% had isolated decrease in DLco and 5% had a mixed restrictive-obstrutive pattern. The 6MWD was shorter in SCD patients compared to the controls 368+/-67 versus 407+/-47m, p=0.005. No hematological variables correlated with outcome variables. Chronic pulmonary complications in adult Saudi SCD patients are relatively mild but common. Pulmonary function in these patients differs from that published for African-origin SCD patients. The difference may reflect a different natural history of SCD in the 2 populations. (author)

  1. Ex vivo measures of muscle mitochondrial capacity reveal quantitative limits of oxygen delivery by the circulation during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, Robert; Saltin, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity measured ex vivo provides a physiological reference to assess cellular oxidative capacity as a component in the oxygen cascade in vivo. In this article, the magnitude of muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake during exercise involving a small-to-large fracti...... capacity measured ex vivo underestimates the maximal in vivo oxygen uptake of muscle by up to ∼2-fold. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Bioenergetic dysfunction, adaptation and therapy.......Muscle mitochondrial respiratory capacity measured ex vivo provides a physiological reference to assess cellular oxidative capacity as a component in the oxygen cascade in vivo. In this article, the magnitude of muscle blood flow and oxygen uptake during exercise involving a small-to-large fraction...... of the body mass will be discussed in relation to mitochondrial capacity measured ex vivo. These analyses reveal that as the mass of muscle engaged in exercise increases from one-leg knee extension, to 2-arm cranking, to 2-leg cycling and x-country skiing, the magnitude of blood flow and oxygen delivery...

  2. Representation of Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigrin, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sullivan, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ibanez, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-03-01

    An important issue for electricity system operators is the estimation of renewables' capacity contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to the resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly assessment of the Effective Load-Carrying Capacity, are considered to be the most robust and widely-accepted techniques for addressing this resource variability. This report compares estimates of solar PV capacity value by the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model against two sources. The first comparison is against values published by utilities or other entities for known electrical systems at existing solar penetration levels. The second comparison is against a time-series ELCC simulation tool for high renewable penetration scenarios in the Western Interconnection. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons, despite being resolved at a super-hourly temporal resolution. Two results are relevant for other capacity-based models that use a super-hourly resolution to model solar capacity value. First, solar capacity value should not be parameterized as a static value, but must decay with increasing penetration. This is because -- for an afternoon-peaking system -- as solar penetration increases, the system's peak net load shifts to later in the day -- when solar output is lower. Second, long-term planning models should determine system adequacy requirements in each time period in order to approximate LOLP calculations. Within the ReEDS model we resolve these issues by using a capacity value estimate that varies by time-slice. Within each time period the net load and shadow price on ReEDS's planning reserve constraint signals the relative importance of additional firm capacity.

  3. [Effect of exhaustive weightlifting exercise on EMG, biochemical markers of muscle damage and performance capacity in young male subjects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minigalin, A D; Shumakov, A R; Novozhilov, A V; Samsonova, A V; Kos'mina, E A; Kalinskiĭ, M I; Baranova, T I; Kubasov, I V; Morozov, V I

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of exhaustive weightlifting exercise on electrical and biochemical variables and performance capacity in young male subjects. The onset of exercise (80-50% 1RM) was associated with a decrease in the amount of work performed, which was followed by a steady performance capacity at 40-10% 1RM. There were no significant changes of m. rectus femoris EMG maximal amplitude though it tended to be increased during the first half of exercise. A significant blood lactate concentration increase indicated that an anaerobic metabolism was a predominant mechanism of muscle contraction energy-supply. CK level in blood plasma did not change but plasma myoglobin concentration doubled immediately post-exercise. The data presented here suggest that decrease in performance capacity was likely due to progressive "refusal of work" of the fast motor units and work prolongation of weaker, intermediate and slow motor units. Unchangeable CK activity and relatively small increase in myoglobin concentration in plasma suggest that used weightlifting exercise did not induced substantial damage in myocytes' membranes in our subjects.

  4. Heart rate response to graded exercise correlates with aerobic and ventilatory capacity in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallebona, Alessandro; Gigli, Guido; Orlandi, Sandro; Reggiardo, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    Autonomic dysfunction and reduced exercise tolerance are typical features of patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). Baro-chemoreflex balance and organ response may have a common role in conditioning exercise tolerance, ventilation, and chronotropic competence in patients with CHF. We tested the hypothesis that there is a relationship between functional capacity and chronotropic competence to exercise in CHF. In all, 48 stable outpatients with CHF (age 65 +/- 10 years, 41 men, NYHA class 2.1 +/- 0, ejection fraction 31 +/- 7%, peak VO2 16 +/- 4 ml/kg/min) performed cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX). Heart rate (HR) response to exercise was assessed by the chronotropic index (CRI). The CRI was calculated by the following formula: CRI = peak HR - rest HR/220 - age - rest HR x 100 (normal value > 80%). The relationship of CRI to peak oxygen consumption (VO2) and ventilation/carbon dioxide production (VE/VCO2) ratio was examined. A group of 33 healthy controls underwent CPX as well. The CRI correlated directly with peak VO2 (r = 0.638, p exercise hyperventilation in CHF (AUROC: 0.71 for VE/VCO2 > 30, 95% CI 0.53-0.88). The CRI was not significantly related either to peak VO2 or to VE/VCO2 in the control group. In patients with mild to moderate CHF, CRI correlates with functional capacity. This relationship adds new data on pathophysiologic grounds and supports the routine incorporation of CRI into CPX interpretation.

  5. INFLUENCE OF CHRONIC EXERCISE ON RED CELL ANTIOXIDANT DEFENSE, PLASMA MALONDIALDEHYDE AND TOTAL ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY IN HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIC RABBITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Alipour

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the knowledge on the antiatherogenic effects of exercise, the mechanism by which exercise reduces atherogenic risk remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that chronic exercise-induced oxidative stress may increase plasma total antioxidant capacity and antioxidant defense in the red cells. For 8 weeks, 60 male Dutch rabbits were fed rabbit chow with or without the addition of 2% cholesterol. The animals were further divided into rest and exercise groups (n = 15 for each group. Animals in exercise groups ran on a rodent treadmill at 15 m/min for 10 to 60 minutes gradually for 5 days per week for a total of 8 weeks. At the end of experiments, blood samples were collected and glutathione peroxidase (GPX, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and catalase (CAT activities were determined in red blood cells. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC, malondialdehyde (MDA and total thiol (T-SH levels were measured in plasma. Thoracic aorta and carotid arteries were isolated for histological examination to evaluate atherosclerosis. Eight weeks of chronic exercise reduced atherogenic diet-induced atherosclerotic lesions in all the arteries studied, along with positive changes in cholesterol profile, especially increase of serum HDL-C level. Plasma MDA, TAC and T-SH concentrations were enhanced by exercise in both control and hypercholesterolemic diet groups. Erythrocyte catalase activity was significantly increased by chronic exercise (p < 0.05, whereas total SOD activity rose with exercise only in the control group. Surprisingly, GPX activity was significantly reduced (P < 0.05 in response to exercise in the control group and also in the high cholesterol diet group. Exercise is a useful tool for the prevention and regression of atherosclerosis which is evident by our findings of the enhancement of plasma TAC and positive change in serum cholesterol profile. However, the effect of exercise on red cell antioxidant activities is limited in the

  6. Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Idorn, Manja; thor Straten, Eivind Per

    2016-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that voluntary exercise leads to an influx of immune cells in tumors and a greater than 60% reduction in tumor incidence and growth across several mouse models. Improved immunological control of tumor progression may have important clinical implications in the prevention...

  7. Badminton Specific Testing and Development of Physical On-Court Exercise Capacity in Elite Youth Badminton Players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Ole Møller

    specific on-court actions. It can distinguish between groups of players with different badminton skills, but similar sprint abilities The badminton-specific endurance test (B-ENDURANCE) is applicable for evaluation of badminton-specific endurance. Previous studies have tended to examine exercise capacity...

  8. Cardiac protein expression patterns are associated with distinct inborn exercise capacity in non-selectively bred rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, L P; Freitas-Lima, L C; Naumann, G B; Meyrelles, S S; Lunz, W; Pires, S F; Andrade, H M; Carnielli, J B T; Figueiredo, S G

    2018-01-11

    In the present study, we successfully demonstrated for the first time the existence of cardiac proteomic differences between non-selectively bred rats with distinct intrinsic exercise capacities. A proteomic approach based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry was used to study the left ventricle (LV) tissue proteome of rats with distinct intrinsic exercise capacity. Low running performance (LRP) and high running performance (HRP) rats were categorized by a treadmill exercise test, according to distance run to exhaustion. The running capacity of HRPs was 3.5-fold greater than LRPs. Protein profiling revealed 29 differences between HRP and LRP rats (15 proteins were identified). We detected alterations in components involved in metabolism, antioxidant and stress response, microfibrillar and cytoskeletal proteins. Contractile proteins were upregulated in the LVs of HRP rats (α-myosin heavy chain-6, myosin light chain-1 and creatine kinase), whereas the LVs of LRP rats exhibited upregulation in proteins associated with stress response (aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, α-crystallin B chain and HSPβ-2). In addition, the cytoskeletal proteins desmin and α-actin were upregulated in LRPs. Taken together, our results suggest that the increased contractile protein levels in HRP rats partly accounted for their improved exercise capacity, and that proteins considered risk factors to the development of cardiovascular disease were expressed in higher amounts in LRP animals.

  9. Cardiac protein expression patterns are associated with distinct inborn exercise capacity in non-selectively bred rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.P. Ribeiro

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we successfully demonstrated for the first time the existence of cardiac proteomic differences between non-selectively bred rats with distinct intrinsic exercise capacities. A proteomic approach based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry was used to study the left ventricle (LV tissue proteome of rats with distinct intrinsic exercise capacity. Low running performance (LRP and high running performance (HRP rats were categorized by a treadmill exercise test, according to distance run to exhaustion. The running capacity of HRPs was 3.5-fold greater than LRPs. Protein profiling revealed 29 differences between HRP and LRP rats (15 proteins were identified. We detected alterations in components involved in metabolism, antioxidant and stress response, microfibrillar and cytoskeletal proteins. Contractile proteins were upregulated in the LVs of HRP rats (α-myosin heavy chain-6, myosin light chain-1 and creatine kinase, whereas the LVs of LRP rats exhibited upregulation in proteins associated with stress response (aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, α-crystallin B chain and HSPβ-2. In addition, the cytoskeletal proteins desmin and α-actin were upregulated in LRPs. Taken together, our results suggest that the increased contractile protein levels in HRP rats partly accounted for their improved exercise capacity, and that proteins considered risk factors to the development of cardiovascular disease were expressed in higher amounts in LRP animals.

  10. Internet Program for Physical Activity and Exercise Capacity in Children With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis : A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armbrust, Wineke; Bos, G.J.F. Joyce; Wulffraat, Nico M; van Brussel, Marco; Cappon, Jeannette; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Geertzen, Jan H B; Legger, G Elizabeth; van Rossum, Marion A J; Sauer, Pieter J J; Lelieveld, Otto T H M

    Objective. To determine the effects of Rheumates@Work, an internet-based program supplemented with 4 group sessions, aimed at improving physical activity, exercise capacity, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and participation in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Methods. Patients

  11. Associations between exercise capacity, physical activity, and psychosocial functioning in children with congenital heart disease: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulfer, Karolijn; Helbing, Willem A.; Duppen, Nienke; Utens, Elisabeth M. W. J.

    2014-01-01

    Children and adolescents operated upon for congenital heart disease (ConHD) may show reduced exercise capacity and physical activity, possibly associated with lowered self-esteem and quality of life (QoL). The studies into associations between these parameters have not been reviewed before. Review

  12. Impact of the DASH diet on endothelial function, exercise capacity, and quality of life in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, Luay; Pisano, Carol; Hayden, Janel; Sulo, Suela; Silver, Marc A

    2015-04-01

    Endothelial dysfunction has been recognized as a pathophysiologic mechanism in the progression of heart failure (HF). However, little attention has been given to the ability of dietary approaches to improve endothelial function. This study examined the effects of the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet on endothelial function, exercise capacity, and quality of life in patients with chronic symptomatic (stage C) HF. Forty-eight patients were randomized to follow the DASH diet (n = 24) or the general HF dietary recommendations (n = 24). Endothelial function was assessed by measuring large and small arterial elasticity (LAE and SAE) at rest. Exercise capacity (measured with the 6-minute walk test) and quality of life (measured with the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire) at baseline and 3 months were also evaluated. Patients were older adults with an average HF duration of 5 years. LAE at 1 month improved significantly in the DASH diet group (P DASH group had better exercise capacity (292 m vs 197 m; P = 0.018) and quality of life scores (21 vs 39; P = 0.006) over time, while sodium intake levels at 1, 2, and 3 months were comparable between the groups. Adhering to the DASH diet improved arterial compliance initially and improved exercise capacity and quality of life scores at 3 months. The DASH diet may be an important adjunctive therapy for patients with symptomatic HF.

  13. Exercise capacity and ventricular function in patients treated for isolated pulmonary valve stenosis or tetralogy of Fallot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luijnenburg, Saskia E.; de Koning, Wilfred B.; Romeih, Soha; van den Berg, Jochem; Vliegen, Hubert W.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.; Helbing, Willem A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We hypothesized 1) that long-term ventricular outcome and exercise capacity would be better in patients with isolated pulmonary valve stenosis (PS) treated with balloon pulmonary valvuloplasty (BPV) than in patients operated for tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), and 2) that ventricular outcome

  14. The relationship between examination-related academic stress, salivary antioxidant capacity and exercise patterns of final-year Saudi dental students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, S C; Al Khabbaz, H J; Bin Enayeg, S H; Bin Zouman, A H

    2017-11-01

    To study the impact of examination stress on the total antioxidant capacity (TAC) of senior dental students and compare changes in TAC between students who exercise regularly and those who do not. A questionnaire designed to evaluate physical activity levels, body mass index (BMI) and academic performance was distributed to 325 senior dental students. Of the 312 who responded, a total of 70 were enrolled in the study, of whom 60 completed the study. The students were composed of a low-activity group (n = 30), who had a Goddard-Sheppard (GS) exercise score of 60. Dental Environment Stress (DES) questionnaires and salivary samples were collected at the first week of the semester and at the week of the examinations. Salivary TAC was measured using a commercially available Radical Absorbance Antioxidant Assay measurement kit (Zen-Bio ORAC™, AMS Biotechnology, Abington UK). A total of 60 students completed the study. A significant increase in DES values and a significant reduction in salivary TAC values were observed in the week of the examination compared to baseline scores. Although no differences were observed in the DES scores between the high-exercise and low-exercise groups, the high-exercise group showed a significantly lower reduction in examination week salivary TAC compared to their counterparts in the low-exercise group. Regression models showed a significant association between the TAC, exercise scores and DES scores in the week of the examinations. Regular exercise may help protect students against the oxidative stress associated with academic stress. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Relation of physical activity, cardiac function, exercise capacity, and quality of life in patients with a systemic right ventricle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Michiel M; Bouma, Berto J; van Dijk, Arie P J; Groenink, Maarten; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T; van der Plas, Mart N; Sieswerda, Gertjan T; Konings, Thelma C; Mulder, Barbara J M

    2008-11-01

    Exercise is recommended in patients with left ventricular failure. Although right ventricular failure is common in patients with a systemic right ventricle (RV), no data are available on the effect of physical activity in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation of physical activity and cardiac function, exercise capacity, and quality of life in patients with a systemic RV. Forty-seven patients (64% men, mean age 35 years, range 21 to 69) with a systemic RV (31 with an atrially switched transposition of the great arteries and 16 with a congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries) were included. Cardiac function was assessed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance or computed tomography, exercise tests, and serum N-terminal prohormone brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) levels. Habitual physical activity was assessed using the Short Questionnaire to Assess Health-Enhancing Physical Activity (SQUASH) and quality of life using the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36-Item Health Survey. Mean systemic right ventricular ejection fraction was impaired (36.8 +/- 7.8%), as was maximal exercise capacity (78.5 +/- 23.9% of predicted). NT-pro-BNP level was increased (median 269 ng/L, range 34 to 4,476). Mean SQUASH score was 6,808 +/- 3,241, indicating a decreased level of habitual physical activity. Although patients' scores on mental quality-of-life domains were comparable to the general population, scores on most physical quality-of-life domains were significantly lower. SQUASH scores were found to be a significant predictor for exercise capacity (p life (p right ventricular ejection fraction or NT-pro-BNP. In conclusion, physical activity in patients with a systemic RV is positively associated with exercise capacity and quality of life, irrespective of cardiac performance.

  16. Alveolar gas exchange and tissue oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise, and their associations with blood O2 carrying capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti-Pekka E. Rissanen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude and timing of oxygenation responses in highly active leg muscle, less active arm muscle, and cerebral tissue, have not been studied with simultaneous alveolar gas exchange measurement during incremental treadmill exercise. Nor is it known, if blood O2 carrying capacity affects the tissue-specific oxygenation responses. Thus, we investigated alveolar gas exchange and tissue (m. vastus lateralis, m. biceps brachii, cerebral cortex oxygenation during incremental treadmill exercise until volitional fatigue, and their associations with blood O2 carrying capacity in 22 healthy men. Alveolar gas exchange was measured, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS was used to monitor relative concentration changes in oxy- (Δ[O2Hb], deoxy- (Δ[HHb] and total hemoglobin (Δ[tHb], and tissue saturation index (TSI. NIRS inflection points (NIP, reflecting changes in tissue-specific oxygenation, were determined and their coincidence with ventilatory thresholds (anaerobic threshold (AT, respiratory compensation point (RC; V-slope method was examined. Blood O2 carrying capacity (total hemoglobin mass (tHb-mass was determined with the CO-rebreathing method. In all tissues, NIPs coincided with AT, whereas RC was followed by NIPs. High tHb-mass associated with leg muscle deoxygenation at peak exercise (e.g., Δ[HHb] from baseline walking to peak exercise vs. tHb-mass: r = 0.64, p < 0.01, but not with arm muscle- or cerebral deoxygenation. In conclusion, regional tissue oxygenation was characterized by inflection points, and tissue oxygenation in relation to alveolar gas exchange during incremental treadmill exercise resembled previous findings made during incremental cycling. It was also found out, that O2 delivery to less active m. biceps brachii may be limited by an accelerated increase in ventilation at high running intensities. In addition, high capacity for blood O2 carrying was associated with a high level of m. vastus lateralis deoxygenation at peak

  17. Internet Program for Physical Activity and Exercise Capacity in Children With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbrust, Wineke; Bos, G J F Joyce; Wulffraat, Nico M; van Brussel, Marco; Cappon, Jeannette; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Geertzen, Jan H B; Legger, G Elizabeth; van Rossum, Marion A J; Sauer, Pieter J J; Lelieveld, Otto T H M

    2017-07-01

    To determine the effects of Rheumates@Work, an internet-based program supplemented with 4 group sessions, aimed at improving physical activity, exercise capacity, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), and participation in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Patients were recruited from 3 pediatric rheumatology centers in The Netherlands for an observer-blinded, randomized controlled multicenter trial. Physical activity level, time spent in rest, light, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were recorded in a diary and with an accelerometer, before intervention, after intervention, and at followup after 3 and 12 months (intervention group only). Exercise capacity was assessed using the Bruce treadmill protocol, HRQoL was assessed with the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory generic core scale, and participation in school and in physical education classes were assessed by questionnaire. The intervention group consisted of 28 children, and there were 21 children in the control group. MVPA , exercise capacity, and participating in school and physical education classes improved significantly in the intervention group. HRQoL improved in the control group. No significant differences were found between groups. The effect of Rheumates@Work on physical activity and exercise capacity lasted during the 12 months of followup. Improvements in physical activity were significantly better for the cohort starting in winter compared to the summer cohort. Rheumates@Work had a positive, albeit small, effect on physical activity, exercise capacity, and participation in school and physical education class in the intervention group. Improvements lasted for 12 months. Participants who started in winter showed the most improvement. Rheumates@Work had no effect on HRQoL. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  18. Effects of the Fitkids exercise therapy program on health-related fitness, walking capacity, and health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotte, Elles M W; de Groot, Janke F; Winkler, Alexander M F; Huijgen, Barbara C H; Takken, Tim

    2014-09-01

    Children with disabilities have an increased risk for reduced fitness and reduced health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Fitkids, a nationwide exercise therapy program in the Netherlands, was developed to improve fitness and HRQoL in children with disabilities. The study objective was to determine the effects of the Fitkids program on health-related fitness, walking capacity, and HRQoL in children with disabilities or chronic conditions. This was a quasi-experimental single-group longitudinal study. Fifty-two children and adolescents who were referred to the Fitkids program participated in this study. Participants received a graded exercise training program for 6 months, with frequencies of 1 hour 2 times per week in the first 3 months and 1 hour per week during months 4 to 6. Health-related fitness (aerobic fitness, anaerobic fitness, and muscle strength), walking capacity, and HRQoL were evaluated at baseline and after 3 and 6 months of training. Multilevel modeling was used to quantify the contributions of repeated measures, participants, and Fitkids centers to variations in health-related fitness, walking capacity, and HRQoL during the intervention period. The models were adjusted for sex, height, and weight. After 6 months of training, significant intervention effects were found for aerobic fitness, anaerobic fitness, and muscle strength. A significant effect also was found for walking capacity. On the HRQoL measure, significant improvements were found for the self-reported and parent-reported physical and emotion domains and for the parent-reported total score for HRQoL. No control group was included in this study. The Fitkids exercise therapy program has significantly improved health-related fitness, walking capacity, and HRQoL in children and adolescents with chronic conditions or disabilities. © 2014 American Physical Therapy Association.

  19. Time course of change in vasodilator function and capacity in response to exercise training in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinken, Toni M; Thijssen, Dick H J; Black, Mark A; Cable, N Timothy; Green, Daniel J

    2008-10-15

    Studies of the impact of exercise training on arterial adaptation in healthy subjects have produced disparate results. It is possible that some studies failed to detect changes because functional and structural adaptations follow a different time course and may therefore not be detected at discrete time points. To gain insight into the time course of training-induced changes in artery function and structure, we examined conduit artery flow mediated dilatation (FMD), an index of nitric oxide (NO)-mediated artery function, and conduit dilator capacity (DC), a surrogate marker for arterial remodelling, in the brachial and popliteal arteries of 13 healthy male subjects (21.6 +/- 0.6 years) and seven non-active controls (22.8 +/- 0.2 years) studied at 2-week intervals across an 8-week cycle and treadmill exercise training programme. Brachial and popliteal artery FMD and DC did not change in control subjects at any time point. FMD increased from baseline (5.9 +/- 0.5%) at weeks 2 and 4 (9.1 +/- 0.6, 8.5 +/- 0.6%, respectively, P < 0.01), but returned towards baseline levels again by week 8 (6.9 +/- 0.7%). In contrast, brachial artery DC progressively increased from baseline (8.1 +/- 0.4%) at weeks 2, 4, 6 and 8 (9.2 +/- 0.6, 9.9 +/- 0.6, 10.0 +/- 0.5, 10.5 +/- 0.8%, P < 0.05). Similarly, popliteal artery FMD increased from baseline (6.2 +/- 0.7%) at weeks 2, 4 and 6 (9.1 +/- 0.6, 9.5 +/- 0.6, 7.8 +/- 0.5%, respectively, P < 0.05), but decreased again by week 8 (6.5 +/- 0.6%), whereas popliteal DC progressively increased from baseline (8.9 +/- 0.4%) at week 4 and 8 (10.5 +/- 0.7, 12.2 +/- 0.6%, respectively, P < 0.05). These data suggest that functional changes in conduit arteries occur rapidly and precede arterial remodelling in vivo. These data suggest that complimentary adaptations occur in arterial function and structure and future studies should adopt multiple time point assessments to comprehensively assess arterial adaptations to interventions such as exercise

  20. Feasibility and Validity of a Graded One-Legged Cycle Exercise Test to Determine Peak Aerobic Capacity in Older People With a Lower-Limb Amputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wezenberg, Daphne; de Haan, Arnold; van der Woude, Lucas H.; Houdijk, Han

    Background. Information concerning exercise tolerance and aerobic capacity is imperative for generating effective and safe exercise programs. However, for older people with a lower-limb amputation, a standard exercise test is not available. Objective. The primary aim of the present study was to

  1. Radiation transfer model intercomparison (RAMI) exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinty, Bernard; Gobron, Nadine; Widlowski, Jean-Luc; Gerstl, Sigfried A. W.; Verstraete, Michel M.; Antunes, Mauro; Bacour, CéDric; Gascon, Ferran; Gastellu, Jean-Philippe; Goel, Narendra; Jacquemoud, StéPhane; North, Peter; Qin, Wenhan; Thompson, Richard

    2001-06-01

    The community involved in modeling radiation transfer over terrestrial surfaces designed and implemented the first phase of a radiation transfer model intercomparison (RAMI) exercise. This paper discusses the rationale and motivation for this endeavor, presents the intercomparison protocol as well as the evaluation procedures, and describes the principal results. Participants were asked to simulate the transfer of radiation for a variety of precisely defined terrestrial environments and illumination conditions. These were abstractions of typical terrestrial systems and included both homogeneous and heterogeneous scenes. The differences between the results generated by eight different models, including both one-dimensional and three-dimensional approaches, were then documented and analyzed. RAMI proposed a protocol to quantitatively assess the consequences of the model discrepancies with respect to application, such as those motivating the development of physically based inversion procedures. This first phase of model intercomparison has already proved useful in assessing the ability of the modeling community to generate similar radiation fields despite the large panoply of models that were tested. A detailed analysis of the results also permitted to identify apparent "outliers" and their main deficiencies. Future undertakings in this intercomparison framework must be oriented toward an expansion of RAMI into other and more complex geophysical systems as well as the focusing on actual inverse problems.

  2. Representation of the Solar Capacity Value in the ReEDS Capacity Expansion Model: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigrin, B.; Sullivan, P.; Ibanez, E.; Margolis, R.

    2014-08-01

    An important emerging issue is the estimation of renewables' contributions to reliably meeting system demand, or their capacity value. While the capacity value of thermal generation can be estimated easily, assessment of wind and solar requires a more nuanced approach due to resource variability. Reliability-based methods, particularly, effective load-carrying capacity (ELCC), are considered to be the most robust techniques for addressing this resource variability. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) capacity expansion model and other long-term electricity capacity planning models require an approach to estimating CV for generalized PV and system configurations with low computational and data requirements. In this paper we validate treatment of solar photovoltaic (PV) capacity value by ReEDS capacity expansion model by comparing model results to literature for a range of energy penetration levels. Results from the ReEDS model are found to compare well with both comparisons--despite not being resolved at an hourly scale.

  3. Effect of physical exercise training on muscle strength and body composition, and their association with functional capacity and quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osbak, Philip Samuel; Mourier, Malene; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    2012-01-01

    at 70% of maximal exercise capacity vs control. Muscle strength, exercise capacity, 6-minute walk test, lean body mass, fat percentage, and quality of life were assessed. Results: Muscle strength increased in the training group (p = 0.01), but no change was observed in controls. Lean body mass......Objective: Atrial fibrillation diminishes cardiac function, exercise tolerance and quality of life. The objective of this study was to determine whether exercise training in atrial fibrillation affects muscle strength, body composition, maximal exercise capacity and walking capacity positively......, thus improving quality of life. Design: Randomized clinical trial. Twelve weeks of physical exercise training or control. Patients: Forty-nine patients in permanent atrial fibrillation were randomized to training or control. Methods: Intervention consisted of aerobic training for 1 h 3 times per week...

  4. Association of Cystatin C With Poor Exercise Capacity and Heart Rate Recovery: Data From the Heart and Soul Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, David; Shlipak, Michael; Ix, Joachim H.; Ali, Sadia; Whooley, Mary A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Cystatin C, an alternative serum measure of kidney function, is a stronger predictor of cardiovascular events than creatinine or estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). We hypothesized that serum cystatin C concentration would have a stronger more linear association with cardiovascular functional status than creatinine-based measures in outpatients with established coronary heart disease (CHD). Methods We measured serum cystatin C, serum creatinine, and eGFR in 906 outpatients with established CHD. We examined the association of these 3 measures of kidney function with treadmill exercise capacity (metabolic equivalent tasks achieved) and heart rate recovery (HRR) between peak and 1 minute after exercise by using linear and logistic regression. Results Higher cystatin C concentrations were associated linearly with worse treadmill exercise capacity and HRR. The proportion of participants with poor exercise capacity (metabolic equivalent tasks achieved 1.30 mg/L) compared with 12% (29 of 241 participants) among those with cystatin C levels in the lowest quartile (<0.92 mg/L; adjusted odds ratio, 3.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.6 to 6.5; P = 0.001). The proportion of participants with poor HRR (<16 beats/min) was 42% (92 of 214 participants) among those with cystatin C levels in the highest quartile compared with 16% (37 of 238 participants) among those with cystatin C levels in the lowest quartile (adjusted odds ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 4.0; P = 0.01). The lowest quartile of eGFR (<61.8 mL/min [<1.03 mL/s]) was associated with decreased exercise capacity and prolonged HRR, but no difference was observed across the upper 3 quartiles of eGFR. Conclusion In patients with established CHD, cystatin C concentrations are associated linearly with worse exercise capacity and HRR. Cystatin C detects an association of impaired kidney function with decreased HRR and exercise capacity that is not fully captured using creatinine-based measurements

  5. Novel assessment of haemodynamic kinetics with acute exercise in a rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Mary Beth; Chingombe, Tsungai J; Zinn, Abigail B; Reddy, Jagadeshwar G; Novack, Rachel A; Cooney, Sean A; Fisher, Amanda J; Presson, Robert G; Lahm, Tim; Petrache, Irina

    2015-06-01

    What is the central question of this study? The acute effect of exercise at moderately high intensity on already-elevated pulmonary arterial pressures and right ventricular wall stress in a rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. What is the main finding and its importance? We show, for the first time, that in a rat model of PAH, exercise induces an acute reduction in pulmonary artery pressure associated with lung endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation, without evidence of acute right ventricular inflammation or myocyte apoptosis. Haemodynamic measures obtained with traditional invasive methodology as well as novel implantable telemetry reveal an exercise-induced 'window' of pulmonary hypertension alleviation, supporting future investigations of individualized exercise as therapy in PAH. Exercise improves outcomes of multiple chronic conditions, but controversial results, including increased pulmonary artery (PA) pressure, have prevented its routine implementation in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), an incurable disease that drastically reduces exercise tolerance. Individualized, optimized exercise prescription for PAH requires a better understanding of disease-specific exercise responses. We investigated the acute impact of exercise on already-elevated PA pressure and right ventricular (RV) wall stress and inflammation in a rat model of PAH (PAH group, n = 12) induced once by monocrotaline (50 mg kg(-1) , i.p.; 2 weeks), compared with healthy control animals (n = 8). Single bouts of exercise consisted of a 45 min treadmill run at 75% of individually determined aerobic capacity (V̇O2max). Immediately after exercise, measurements of RV systolic pressure and systemic pressure were made via jugular and carotid cannulation, and were followed by tissue collection. Monocrotaline induced moderate PAH, evidenced by RV hypertrophy, decreased V̇O2max, PA muscularization, and RV and skeletal muscle cytoplasmic glycolysis detected by

  6. Effects of Combined Aerobic and Resistance Exercise on Exercise Capacity, Muscle Strength and Quality of Life in HIV-Infected Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Mansueto; Conceição, Cristiano Sena; Oliveira Carvalho, Vitor; Brites, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Many HIV-infected patients demonstrate disability and lower aerobic capacity. The inclusion of resistance training combined with aerobic exercise in a single program is known as combined aerobic and resistance exercise (CARE) and seems to be an effective strategy to improve muscle weakness, as well as aerobic capacity in HIV-infected patients. We performed a meta-analysis to investigate the effects of CARE in HIV-infected patients. We searched MEDLINE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, EMBASE, CINAHL (from the earliest date available to august 2014) for controlled trials that evaluated the effects of CARE in HIV-infected patients. Weighted mean differences (WMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated, and heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 test. Seven studies met the study criteria. CARE resulted in improvement in Peak VO2 WMD (4.48 mL·kg-1·min-1 95% CI: 2.95 to 6.0), muscle strength of the knee extensors WMD (25.06 Kg 95% CI: 10.46 to 39.66) and elbow flexors WMD (4.44 Kg 95% CI: 1.22 to 7.67) compared with no exercise group. The meta-analyses also showed significant improvement in Health status, Energy/Vitality and physical function domains of quality of life for participants in the CARE group compared with no exercise group. A nonsignificant improvement in social function domain of quality of life was found for participants in the CARE group compared with no exercise group. Combined aerobic and resistance exercise may improve peak VO2, muscle strength and health status, energy and physical function domains of quality of life and should be considered as a component of care of HIV-infected individuals.

  7. Educational program promoting regular physical exercise improves functional capacity and daily living physical activity in subjects with knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues da Silva, José Messias; de Rezende, Márcia Uchoa; Spada, Tânia Carvalho; da Silva Francisco, Lucila; Sabine de Farias, Fabiane Elize; Clemente da Silva, Cleidnéia Aparecida; Cernigoy, Claudia Helena de Azevedo; Greve, Júlia Maria D'Andréa; Ciolac, Emmanuel Gomes

    2017-12-27

    Physical exercise and educational programs promote several benefits for patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, little is known about the effects of educational programs promoting the regular practice of physical exercise. The purpose of the present study was to assess the effect of an interdisciplinary educational program, emphasizing the recommendation for regular practice of physical exercise, on functional capacity and daily living physical activity in individuals with knee OA. Two hundred and thirty-nine individuals (50 men) with an established diagnosis of knee OA (degree I to IV in the Kelgreen and Lawrence scale) were randomly allocated into a multidisciplinary educational program (EDU; n = 112) or control group (CON; n = 127). Functional capacity (sit and reach, 6-min walking test (6MWT), timed up and down stairs test, timed up and go test (TUGT), and five times sit-to-stand test (FTSST)) and daily living physical activity (IPAQ, short version) were measured before, during (6 months) and after 12 months of follow-up. Body mass index reduced significantly (P sit and reach and 6MWT performance during follow-up in both groups. The results suggest that an educational program emphasizing the recommendation for regular practice of physical exercise may be an effective tool for improving functional capacity and daily physical activity in individuals with knee OA. NCT 02335034 , December 22, 2014.

  8. The effect of home-based inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity, exertional dyspnea and pulmonary function in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavarsad, Maryam Bakhshandeh; Shariati, Abdolali; Eidani, Esmaeil; Latifi, Mahmud

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently the fourth cause of mortality worldwide. Patients with COPD experience periods of dyspnea, fatigue, and disability, which impact on their life. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of short-term inspiratory muscle training on exercise capacity, exertional dyspnea, and pulmonary lung function. A randomized, controlled trial was performed. Thirty patients (27 males, 3 females) with mild to very severe COPD were randomly assigned to a training group (group T) or to a control group (group C). Patients in group T received training for 8 weeks (15 min/day for 6 days/week) with flow-volumetric inspiratory exerciser named (Respivol). Each patient was assessed before and after 8 weeks of training for the following clinical parameters: exercise capacity by 6-min walking test (6MWT), exertional dyspnea by Borg scale, and pulmonary lung function by spirometry. Patients used training together with medical treatment. The data were analyzed using paired t-test and independent t-test. Results showed statistically significant increase in 6MWT at the end of the training from 445.6 ± 22.99 to 491.06 ± 17.67 meters? (P training group but not in the control group. The values for exercise capacity and dyspnea improved after 8 weeks in group T in comparison with group C (P = 0.001 and P = 0.0001, respectively). No changes were observed in any measure of pulmonary function in both groups. Short-term inspiratory muscle training has beneficial effects on exercise capacity and exertional dyspnea in COPD patients.

  9. Coronary microvascular function, insulin sensitivity and body composition in predicting exercise capacity in overweight patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jürs, Anders; Pedersen, Lene Rørholm; Olsen, Rasmus Huan; Snoer, Martin; Chabanova, Elizaveta; Haugaard, Steen Bendix; Prescott, Eva

    2015-11-27

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a negative impact on exercise capacity. The aim of this study was to determine how coronary microvascular function, glucose metabolism and body composition contribute to exercise capacity in overweight patients with CAD and without diabetes. Sixty-five non-diabetic, overweight patients with stable CAD, BMI 28-40 kg/m(2) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) above 35 % were recruited. A 3-hour oral glucose tolerance test was used to evaluate glucose metabolism. Peak aerobic exercise capacity (VO2peak) was assessed by a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Body composition was determined by whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan and magnetic resonance imaging. Coronary flow reserve (CFR) assessed by transthoracic Doppler echocardiography was used as a measure of microvascular function. Median BMI was 31.3 and 72 % had impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose. VO2peak adjusted for fat free mass was correlated with CFR (r = 0.41, p = 0.0007), LVEF (r = 0.33, p = 0.008) and left ventricular end-diastolic volume (EDV) (r = 0.32, p = 0.01) while it was only weakly linked to measures of glucose metabolism and body composition. CFR, EDV and LVEF remained independent predictors of VO2peak in multivariable regression analysis. The study established CFR, EDV and LVEF as independent predictors of VO2peak in overweight CAD patients with no or only mild functional symptoms and a LVEF > 35 %. Glucose metabolism and body composition had minor impact on VO2peak. The findings suggest that central hemodynamic factors are important in limiting exercise capacity in overweight non-diabetic CAD patients.

  10. The effect of aging and cardiorespiratory fitness on the lung diffusing capacity response to exercise in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffman, Kirsten E; Carlson, Alex R; Miller, Andrew D; Johnson, Bruce D; Taylor, Bryan J

    2017-06-01

    Aging is associated with deterioration in the structure and function of the pulmonary circulation. We characterized the lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DL CO ), alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (Dm CO ), and pulmonary-capillary blood volume (Vc) response to discontinuous incremental exercise at 25, 50, 75, and 90% of peak work (W peak ) in four groups: 1 ) Young [27 ± 3 yr, maximal oxygen consumption (V̇o 2max ): 110 ± 18% age predicted]; 2) Young Highly Fit (27 ± 3 yr, V̇o 2max : 147 ± 8% age predicted); 3 ) Old (69 ± 5 yr, V̇o 2max : 116 ± 13% age predicted); and 4 ) Old Highly Fit (65 ± 5 yr, V̇o 2max : 162 ± 18% age predicted). At rest and at 90% W peak , DL CO , Dm CO , and Vc were decreased with age. At 90% W peak , DL CO , Dm CO , and Vc were greater in Old Highly Fit vs. Old adults. The slope of the DL CO -cardiac output (Q̇) relationship from rest to end exercise at 90% W peak was not different between Young, Young Highly Fit, Old, and Old Highly Fit (1.35 vs. 1.44 vs. 1.10 vs. 1.35 ml CO ·mmHg -1 ·liter blood -1 , P = 0.388), with no evidence of a plateau in this relationship during exercise; this was also true for Dm CO -Q̇ and Vc-Q̇. V̇o 2max was positively correlated with 1 ) DL CO , Dm CO , and Vc at rest; and 2 ) the rest to end exercise change in DL CO , Dm CO , and Vc. In conclusion, these data suggest that despite the age-associated deterioration in the structure and function of the pulmonary circulation, expansion of the pulmonary capillary network does not become limited during exercise in healthy individuals regardless of age or cardiorespiratory fitness level. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Healthy aging is a crucial area of research. This article details how differences in age and cardiorespiratory fitness level affect lung diffusing capacity, particularly during high-intensity exercise. We conclude that highly fit older adults do not experience a limit in lung diffusing capacity during

  11. Assessing the effect of high-repetitive single limb exercises (HRSLE) on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): study protocol for randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Nyberg, Andre; Lindström, Britta; Wadell, Karin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Single-limb knee extension exercises have been found to be effective at improving lower extremity exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Since the positive local physiological effects of exercise training only occur in the engaged muscle(s), should upper extremity muscles also be included to determine the effect of single limb exercises in COPD patients. Methods/design Trial design: a prospective, assessor-blind, block randomized c...

  12. Deconditioning, fatigue and impaired quality of life in long-term survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation : Altered exercise capacity in allo-HSCT survivors

    OpenAIRE

    Dirou, Stéphanie; Chambellan, Arnaud; Chevallier, Patrice; Germaud, Patrick; Guillaume, Guillaume; Gourraud, Antoine; Perrot, Bastien; Delasalle, Béatrice; Forestier, Bastien; Guillaume, Thierry; Peterlin, Pierre; Garnier, Alice; Magnan, Antoine; Blanc, François-Xavier; Lemarchand, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Long-term survivors after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) are at high risk for treatment-related adverse events, that may worsen physical capacity and may induce fatigue and disability. The aims of this prospective study were to evaluate exercise capacity in allotransplant survivors and its relationship with fatigue and disability. Patient-reported outcomes and exercise capacity were evaluated in 71 non-relapse patients 1 year after allo-...

  13. Computational Modeling Using OpenSim to Simulate a Squat Exercise Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, C. A.; Thompson, W. K.; Lewandowski, B. E.; Humphreys, B. T.; Funk, J. H.; Funk, N. H.; Weaver, A. S.; Perusek, G. P.; Sheehan, C. C.; Mulugeta, L.

    2015-01-01

    Long duration space travel to destinations such as Mars or an asteroid will expose astronauts to extended periods of reduced gravity. Astronauts will use an exercise regime for the duration of the space flight to minimize the loss of bone density, muscle mass and aerobic capacity that occurs during exposure to a reduced gravity environment. Since the area available in the spacecraft for an exercise device is limited and gravity is not present to aid loading, compact resistance exercise device prototypes are being developed. Since it is difficult to rigorously test these proposed devices in space flight, computational modeling provides an estimation of the muscle forces, joint torques and joint loads during exercise to gain insight on the efficacy to protect the musculoskeletal health of astronauts.

  14. High-intensity intermittent exercise training with chlorella intake accelerates exercise performance and muscle glycolytic and oxidative capacity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, Naoki; Hasegawa, Natsuki; Fujie, Shumpei; Uchida, Masataka; Miyamoto-Mikami, Eri; Hashimoto, Takeshi; Tabata, Izumi; Iemitsu, Motoyuki

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of chronic chlorella intake alone or in combination with high-intensity intermittent exercise (HIIE) training on exercise performance and muscle glycolytic and oxidative metabolism in rats. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the four groups: sedentary control, chlorella intake (0.5% chlorella powder in normal feed), HIIE training, and combination of HIIE training and chlorella intake for 6 wk ( n = 10 each group). HIIE training comprised 14 repeats of a 20-s swimming session with a 10-s pause between sessions, while bearing a weight equivalent to 16% of body weight, 4 days/week. Exercise performance was tested after the interventions by measuring the maximal number of HIIE sessions that could be completed. Chlorella intake and HIIE training significantly increased the maximal number of HIIE sessions and enhanced the expression of monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)1, MCT4, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α concomitantly with the activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), phosphofructokinase, citrate synthase (CS), and cytochrome- c oxidase (COX) in the red region of the gastrocnemius muscle. Furthermore, the combination further augmented the increased exercise performance and the enhanced expressions and activities. By contrast, in the white region of the muscle, MCT1 expression and LDH, CS, and COX activities did not change. These results showed that compared with only chlorella intake and only HIIE training, chlorella intake combined with HIIE training has a more pronounced effect on exercise performance and muscle glycolytic and oxidative metabolism, in particular, lactate metabolism. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. An Empirical Investigation into a Subsidiary Absorptive Capacity Process Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleimer, Stephanie; Pedersen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    and empirically test a process model of absorptive capacity. The setting of our empirical study is 213 subsidiaries of multinational enterprises and the focus is on the capacity of these subsidiaries to successfully absorb best practices in marketing strategy from their headquarters. This setting allows us...... to explore the process model in its entirety, including different drivers of subsidiary absorptive capacity (organizational mechanisms and contextual drivers), the three original dimensions of absorptive capacity (recognition, assimilation, application), and related outcomes (implementation...... and internalization of the best practice). The study’s findings reveal that managers have discretion in promoting absorptive capacity through the application of specific organizational mechanism and that the impact of contextual drivers on subsidiary absorptive capacity is not direct, but mediated...

  16. Ecology of Exercise in Wild Fish: Integrating Concepts of Individual Physiological Capacity, Behavior, and Fitness Through Diverse Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownscombe, Jacob W; Cooke, Steven J; Algera, Dirk A; Hanson, Kyle C; Eliason, Erika J; Burnett, Nicholas J; Danylchuk, Andy J; Hinch, Scott G; Farrell, Anthony P

    2017-08-01

    Wild animals maximize fitness through certain behaviors (e.g., foraging, mating, predator avoidance) that incur metabolic costs and often require high levels of locomotor activity. Consequently, the ability of animals to achieve high fitness often relies on their physiological capacity for exercise (aerobic scope) and/or their ability to acquire and utilize energy judiciously. Here, we explore how environmental factors and physiological limitations influence exercise and metabolism in fish while foraging, migrating to spawning grounds, and providing parental care. We do so with three case studies that use a number of approaches to studying exercise in wild fish using biologging and biotelemetry platforms. Bonefish (Albula vulpes) selectively use shallow water tropical marine environments to forage when temperatures are near optimal for aerobic scope and exercise capacity. Bonefish energy expenditure at upper thermal extremes is maximal while activity levels diminish, likely caused by reduced aerobic scope. Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) reproductive migrations frequently involve passage through hydraulically challenging areas, and their ability to successfully pass these regions is constrained by their physiological capacity for exercise. Aerobic scope and swim performance are correlated with migration difficulty among sockeye salmon (O. nerka) populations; however, depletion of endogenous energy stores can also limit migration success. In another example, male smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) allocate a significant amount of energy to nest-guarding behaviors to protect their developing brood. Smallmouth bass body size, endogenous energy reserves, and physiological state influence nest-guarding behaviors and reproductive success. We suggest that in some scenarios (e.g., bonefish foraging, Pacific salmon dam passage) metabolic capacity for exercise may be the strongest determinant of biological fitness, while in others (e.g., long distance salmon migration

  17. The effects of cardiac rehabilitation program on exercise capacity and coronary risk factors in CABG Patients aged 45-65

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    rahim Mirnasuri

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Cardiovascular diseases (CVD are the most common cause of mortalily and inability. In Iran, one third of mortality causes are coronary heart diseases. So, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of a Cardiac Rehabilitation program (CR on exercise capacity (VO2max and coronary risk factors in CABG patients aged 45-65 . Materials and Methods: Of 36 CABG patients randomly selected from Hamadan Shahid Beheshti hospital, 18 subjects as experimental group (with mean age 54.57±6.26 years and weight 72.14±10.83 kg participated in CR program, and 18 subjects as control group (with mean age 57.64±4.75 years and weight 76.5±12 kg without participation in any exercise and CR program participated in this study based on inclusion and exclusion criteria. CR program was an eight-week involving warm-up, aerobic exercises and cool-down. Variables including: anthropometrics measurements and exercise capacity (VO2max, and also coronary risk factors such as body mass index (BMI, waist-hip ratio (WHR, systolic blood pressure (SBP, diastolic blood pressure (DBP, fasting blood sugar (FBS, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, LDL-HDL ratio (LHR, body fat percent (BFP were determined at the first and the last week of CR program in both groups. Results: Statistical analysis by independent t-test indicated that after program, there was a significant difference between 2 groups in VO2max, BMI, WHR, SBP, DBP, TC, TG, LDL, LHR (P<0.05, but there was no significant difference between the 2 groups in FBS, HDL, BFP. Conclusion: The CR program of the present study indicated a significant effect on exercise capacity and some coronary risk factors profile in CABG patients of 45-65 and can it be considered as a suitable program for CABG patients.

  18. Beneficial effects of dark chocolate on exercise capacity in sedentary subjects: Underlying mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Pam R.; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Patel, Minal; Higginbotham, Erin; Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Román-Pintos, Luis Miguel; Phillips, Paul; Perkins, Guy; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    In heart failure patients the consumption of (-)-epicatechin ((-)-Epi)-rich cocoa can restore skeletal muscle (SkM) mitochondrial structure and decrease biomarkers of oxidative stress. However, nothing is known about its effects on exercise capacity and underlying mechanisms in normal, sedentary subjects. Twenty normal, sedentary subjects (∼50 years old) were randomized to placebo or dark chocolate (DC) groups and consumed 20 g of the products for 3 months. Subjects underwent before and after treatment, bicycle ergometry to assess VO2 max and work, SkM biopsy to assess changes in mitochondrial density, function and oxidative stress and blood sampling to assess metabolic endpoints. Seventeen subjects completed the trial. In the DC group (n=9), VO2 max increased (17% increase, p=0.056) as well as maximum work (watts) achieved (p=0.026) with no changes with placebo (n=8). The DC group evidenced increases in HDL levels (p=0.005) and decreased triglycerides (p=0.07). With DC, SkM evidenced significant increases in protein levels for LKB1, AMPK and PGC1α and in their active forms (phosphorylated AMPK and LKB1) as well as in citrate synthase activity while no changes were observed in mitochondrial density. With DC, significant increases in SkM reduced glutathione levels and decreases in protein carbonylation were observed. Improvements in maximum work achieved and VO2 max may be due to DC activation of upstream control systems and enhancement of SkM mitochondria efficiency. Larger clinical studies are warranted to confirm these observations. PMID:27491778

  19. Relationship of health-related quality of life with fatigue and exercise capacity in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniute, Margarita; Bunevicius, Adomas; Brozaitiene, Julija; Bunevicius, Robertas

    2014-08-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the relationship of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) with fatigue and exercise capacity in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients. A total of 1072 consecutive CAD patients on admission to a cardiac rehabilitation program were evaluated for HRQoL (36-item Short Form Medical Outcome Questionnaire; SF-36), body mass index, clinical characteristics (New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, angina pectoris class, coronary interventions, treatment with beta blockers, hypertension and diabetes), symptoms of depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), fatigue (Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory-20; MFI-20), and exercise capacity (bicycle ergometer test). In univariate regression analyses lower scores on all SF-36 domains were associated with greater scores on all MFI-20 subscales. Exercise capacity was associated with all SF-36 domains, except for social functioning and mental health domains. In multivariate regression analyses, after adjusting for age, gender, body mass index, NYHA class, angina pectoris class, hypertension, diabetes, coronary interventions, treatment with betablockers, and symptoms of depression and anxiety, greater limitation due to physical and due to emotional problems, poor social functioning, decreased energy/vitality, worse general health perception, reduced mental component summary and lower global SF-36 score were independently associated with higher MFI-20 general fatigue score. Reduced physical functioning, greater pain, and reduced physical component summary SF-36 scores were associated with greater MFI-20 physical fatigue score. Lower SF-36 mental health score was associated, with greater MFI-20 mental fatigue score. In CAD patients undergoing rehabilitation, poor HRQoL is associated with greater fatigue and decreased exercise capacity independently from mental distress and CAD severity score. © The European Society of Cardiology 2013.

  20. Increased Left Ventricular Stiffness Impairs Exercise Capacity in Patients with Heart Failure Symptoms Despite Normal Left Ventricular Ejection Fraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sinning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Several mechanisms can be involved in the development of exercise intolerance in patients with heart failure despite normal left ventricular ejection fraction (HFNEF and may include impairment of left ventricular (LV stiffness. We therefore investigated the influence of LV stiffness, determined by pressure-volume loop analysis obtained by conductance catheterization, on exercise capacity in HFNEF. Methods and Results. 27 HFNEF patients who showed LV diastolic dysfunction in pressure-volume (PV loop analysis performed symptom-limited cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET and were compared with 12 patients who did not show diastolic dysfunction in PV loop analysis. HFNEF patients revealed a lower peak performance (=.046, breathing reserve (=.006, and ventilation equivalent for carbon dioxide production at rest (=.002. LV stiffness correlated with peak oxygen uptake (=−0.636, <.001, peak oxygen uptake at ventilatory threshold (=−0.500, =.009, and ventilation equivalent for carbon dioxide production at ventilatory threshold (=0.529, =.005. Conclusions. CPET parameters such as peak oxygen uptake, peak oxygen uptake at ventilatory threshold, and ventilation equivalent for carbon dioxide production at ventilatory threshold correlate with LV stiffness. Increased LV stiffness impairs exercise capacity in HFNEF.

  1. Magnitude of exercise capacity and quality of life improvement following repeat pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Jacqueline S; Roberts, Mary M; Cho, Jin-Gun; Wheatley, John R

    2017-01-01

    Maintenance and repeated pulmonary rehabilitation programs (PRPs) for patients with COPD have attempted to prolong PRP benefits beyond 12-24 months. However, there is limited evidence as to the magnitude of benefit or the ideal interval between repeating the program under "real-world" conditions in which patients are referred based on clinical necessity. Therefore, we reviewed the effects of repeating PRP in a physician-referred cohort of patients with COPD. A total of 141 individuals with COPD completed PRP twice and 35 completed PRP three times over a 12-year period. We used linear mixed-effects models to quantify the magnitude and change in 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) for each PRP. One-way analysis of variance with Tukey's post hoc analysis compared the effects of different time intervals on 6MWD, SGRQ, and HADS between PRPs. Despite 39 mL/year average decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 second, overall 6MWD improved following each PRP (PRP1=58 m, P patients who underwent repeat PRP as clinically required, there were clear benefits in functional exercise capacity following each repeat PRP, which was not affected by the time interval between PRPs. Health-related quality of life and mood improved after the first two PRPs, but not after a third.

  2. The functional exercise capacity and its correlates in obese treatment-seeking people with binge eating disorder: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; De Herdt, Amber; Vanderlinden, Johan; Lannoo, Matthias; Adriaens, An; De Hert, Marc; Stubbs, Brendon; Soundy, Andrew; Probst, Michel

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim was to compare the functional exercise capacity between obese treatment-seeking people with and without binge eating disorder (BED) and non-obese controls. The secondary aim was to identify clinical variables including eating and physical activity behaviour, physical complaints, psychopathology and physical self-perception variables in obese people with BED that could explain the variability in functional exercise capacity. Forty people with BED were compared with 20 age-, gender- and body mass index (BMI)-matched obese persons without BED and 40 age and gender matched non-obese volunteers. A 6-minute walk test (6MWT), the Baecke physical activity questionnaire, the Symptom Checklist-90, the Physical Self-Perception Profile and the Eating Disorder Inventory were administered. Physical complaints before and after the 6MWT were also documented. The distance achieved on the 6MWT was significantly lower in obese participants with BED (512.1 ± 75.8 m versus 682.7 ± 98.4, p eating disorder should incorporate a functional exercise capacity assessment. Clinicians involved in the rehabilitation of people with binge eating disorder should consider depression and lower self-esteem as potential barriers. Clinicians should take into account the frequently observed physical discomfort when developing rehabilitation programmes for people with binge eating disorder.

  3. An Empirical Investigation into a Subsidiary Absorptive Capacity Process Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schleimer, Stephanie; Pedersen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    and empirically test a process model of absorptive capacity. The setting of our empirical study is 213 subsidiaries of multinational enterprises and the focus is on the capacity of these subsidiaries to successfully absorb best practices in marketing strategy from their headquarters. This setting allows us...

  4. Capacity allocation in wireless communication networks - models and analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litjens, Remco

    2003-01-01

    This monograph has concentrated on capacity allocation in cellular and Wireless Local Area Networks, primarily with a network operator’s perspective. In the introduc- tory chapter, a reference model has been proposed for the extensive suite of capacity allocation mechanisms that can be applied at

  5. Pulmonary gas exchange efficiency during exercise breathing normoxic and hypoxic gas in adults born very preterm with low diffusion capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Joseph W; Elliott, Jonathan E; Laurie, Steven S; Beasley, Kara M; Mangum, Tyler S; Hawn, Jerold A; Gladstone, Igor M; Lovering, Andrew T

    2014-09-01

    Adults with a history of very preterm birth (breathing hypoxic gas because of a reduced O2 driving gradient and pulmonary capillary transit time. We hypothesized that PRET would have significantly worse pulmonary gas exchange efficiency [i.e., increased alveolar-to-arterial Po2 difference (AaDO2)] during exercise breathing room air or hypoxic gas (FiO2 = 0.12) compared with CONT. To test this hypothesis, we compared the AaDO2 in PRET (n = 13) with a clinically mild reduction in DLCO (72 ± 7% of predicted) and CONT (n = 14) with normal DLCO (105 ± 10% of predicted) pre- and during exercise breathing room air and hypoxic gas. Measurements of temperature-corrected arterial blood gases, and direct measure of O2 saturation (SaO2), were made prior to and during exercise at 25, 50, and 75% of peak oxygen consumption (V̇o2peak) while breathing room air and hypoxic gas. In addition to DLCO, pulmonary function and exercise capacity were significantly less in PRET. Despite PRET having low DLCO, no differences were observed in the AaDO2 or SaO2 pre- or during exercise breathing room air or hypoxic gas compared with CONT. Although our findings were unexpected, we conclude that reduced pulmonary function and low DLCO resulting from very preterm birth does not cause a measureable reduction in pulmonary gas exchange efficiency. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Effect of fuels on exercise capacity in muscle phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, John; Quistorff, Bjørn; Haller, Ronald G

    2005-01-01

    Hospital, University of Copenhagen, and Neuromuscular Center, Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine.Patients Two unrelated men (21 and 26 years old) with PGAMD who since their teens had experienced muscle cramps, muscle pain, and episodes of myoglobinuria provoked by brief vigorous exercise, 4...

  7. Effect of changes in fat availability on exercise capacity in McArdle disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.T.; Jeppesen, T.D.; Taivassalo, T.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The major fuel for exercising muscle at low exercise intensities is fat. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of fat metabolism in McArdle disease (also known as glycogen storage disease type V), an inborn error of muscle glycogenolysis, by manipulating free fatty acid availability...

  8. N-terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Exercise Capacity in Chronic Heart Failure: Data from the HF-ACTION Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker, G. Michael; Whellan, David; Kraus, William E.; Clare, Robert; Zannad, Faiez; Donahue, Mark; Adams, Kirkwood; McKelvie, Robert; Piña, Ileana L; O’Connor, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and exercise capacity in a large contemporary cohort of patients with chronic heart failure. Background Natriuretic peptides such as NT-proBNP are important biomarkers in heart failure. The relationship between NT-proBNP and exercise capacity has not been well studied. Methods We analyzed the relationship between baseline NT-proBNP and peak VO2 or distance in the 6 minute walk test in 1383 subjects enrolled in the HF-ACTION study. Linear regression models were used to analyze the relationship between NT-proBNP and peak VO2 or distance in the 6 minute walk test in the context of other clinical variables. Receiver operator curve (ROC) analysis was used to evaluate the ability of NT-proBNP to accurately predict a peak VO2 < 12 mL/kg/min. Results NT-proBNP was the most powerful predictor of peak VO2 (partial R2=0.13, p<0.0001) out of 35 candidate variables. Although NT-proBNP was also a predictor of distance in the 6 minute walk test, this relationship was weaker than that for peak VO2 (partial R2 = 0.02, p<0.0001). For both peak VO2 and distance in the 6 minute walk test, much of the variability in exercise capacity remained unexplained by the variables tested. ROC analysis suggested NT-proBNP had moderate ability to identify patients with peak VO2 < 12 mL/kg/min (c-index=0.69). Conclusions In this analysis of baseline data from HF-ACTION, NT-proBNP was the strongest predictor of peak VO2 and a significant predictor of distance in the 6 minute walk test. Despite these associations, NT-proBNP demonstrated only modest performance in identifying patients with a low peak VO2 who might be considered for cardiac transplantation. These data suggest that, while hemodynamic factors are important determinants of exercise capacity, much of the variability in exercise performance in heart failure remains unexplained by traditional clinical and demographic variables. PMID:19782787

  9. The effect of a multicomponent dual-modality exercise program targeting osteoporosis on bone health status and physical function capacity of postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolomio, Silvia; Ermolao, Andrea; Lalli, Alberto; Zaccaria, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Exercise is important for the prevention of osteoporosis and the reduction of fracture risk because it improves muscle mass and strength, besides improving balance. We evaluated the effect of a specific exercise program on bone mass and quality and physical function capacity in postmenopausal women with low bone mineral density. Participants (N = 125) underwent a bone mass (Dual X-ray Absorptiometry), bone quality (osteosonography), and physical functional capacity assessment. Fifty-eight of them took part in an 11-month exercise program (E), that included a multicomponent (strength, aerobic capacity, balance, joint mobility) dual-modality (on ground and in the water; alternating group and home-based exercise periods) exercise regimen. The others represented a control group (C) that did not exercise. After the exercise program all participants were reevaluated. After the training program: femoral neck T-score significantly improved in E; C significantly decreased all bone quality (osteosonography) parameters, whereas E showed no differences; E significantly improved all the physical function capacity parameters, while most of them decreased or did not change in C. A specific exercise program targeting osteoporosis improves physical function capacity, reduces physiological bone loss, and maintains bone quality in low bone mineral density postmenopausal women.

  10. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and exercise capacity in chronic heart failure: data from the Heart Failure and a Controlled Trial Investigating Outcomes of Exercise Training (HF-ACTION) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felker, G Michael; Whellan, David; Kraus, William E; Clare, Robert; Zannad, Faiez; Donahue, Mark; Adams, Kirkwood; McKelvie, Robert; Piña, Ileana L; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2009-10-01

    To examine the relationship between N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and exercise capacity in a large contemporary cohort of patients with chronic heart failure. Natriuretic peptides such as NT-proBNP are important biomarkers in heart failure. The relationship between NT-proBNP and exercise capacity has not been well studied. We analyzed the relationship between baseline NT-proBNP and peak oxygen uptake (peak VO(2)) or distance in the 6-minute walk test in 1383 subjects enrolled in the HF-ACTION study. Linear regression models were used to analyze the relationship between NT-proBNP and peak Vo(2) or distance in the 6-minute walk test in the context of other clinical variables. Receiver operator curve analysis was used to evaluate the ability of NT-proBNP to accurately predict a peak VO(2) <12 mL/kg per minute. NT-proBNP was the most powerful predictor of peak VO(2) (partial R(2) = 0.13, P < .0001) of 35 candidate variables. Although NT-proBNP was also a predictor of distance in the 6-minute walk test, this relationship was weaker than that for peak VO(2) (partial R(2) = 0.02, P < .0001). For both peak VO(2) and distance in the 6-minute walk test, much of the variability in exercise capacity remained unexplained by the variables tested. Receiver operator curve analysis suggested NT-proBNP had moderate ability to identify patients with peak VO(2) <12 mL/kg per minute (c-index, 0.69). In this analysis of baseline data from HF-ACTION, NT-proBNP was the strongest predictor of peak VO(2) and a significant predictor of distance in the 6-minute walk test. Despite these associations, NT-proBNP demonstrated only modest performance in identifying patients with a low peak VO(2) who might be considered for cardiac transplantation. These data suggest that, although hemodynamic factors are important determinants of exercise capacity, much of the variability in exercise performance in heart failure remains unexplained by traditional clinical and demographic

  11. Right ventricular outflow tract systolic function correlates with exercise capacity in patients with severe right ventricle dilatation after repair of tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuhua; Li, Jianhua; Yang, Dan; Zhou, Yaxin; An, Qi; Chen, Yucheng

    2017-05-01

    The relationship between exercise capacity and right ventricular (RV) components function in repaired tetralogy of Fallot patients with severely dilated right ventricles is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to characterize the exercise capacity and its relationship to RV global and components function in repaired tetralogy of Fallot patients with RV end-diastolic volume index  >150 ml/m 2 , a currently accepted threshold for pulmonary valve replacement. The medical records and results of cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and cardiopulmonary exercise testing of 25 consecutive eligible patients were reviewed. Twenty age- and gender-matched normal subjects were enrolled as cardiac magnetic resonance control. End-diastolic, end-systolic and stroke volumes, and ejection fraction (EF) were determined for the total RV and its components. Of the 25 patients, 44% maintained normal exercise capacity. RV outlet EF was higher ( P  = 0.02) and RV incisions smaller ( P  = 0.04) in patients with normal exercise capacity than those with subnormal exercise capacity. Predicted peak oxygen consumption correlated better with the RV outflow tract EF than with the EF of other components of the RV or the global EF ( r  = 0.59; P  = 0.002). Multivariate analysis showed the RV outflow tract EF to be the only independent predictor of exercise capacity (ß = 0.442; P  = 0.02). Exercise capacity is preserved in some tetralogy of Fallot patients with severe RV dilatation. RV outflow tract EF is independently associated with exercise capacity in such patients, and could be a reliable determinant of intrinsic RV performance. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  12. Eight weeks of exercise training increases aerobic capacity and muscle mass and reduces fatigue in patients with cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenith, Laura; Meena, Neha; Ramadi, Ailar; Yavari, Milad; Harvey, Andrea; Carbonneau, Michelle; Ma, Mang; Abraldes, Juan G; Paterson, Ian; Haykowsky, Mark J; Tandon, Puneeta

    2014-11-01

    Patients with cirrhosis have reduced exercise tolerance, measured objectively as decreased peak exercise oxygen uptake (peak VO2). Reduced peak VO2 is associated with decreased survival time. The effect of aerobic exercise training on peak VO2 has not been well studied in patients with cirrhosis. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of 8 weeks of supervised exercise on peak VO2, quadriceps muscle thickness, and quality of life. In a prospective pilot study, stable patients (79% male, 57.6 ± 6.7 years old) with Child-Pugh class A or B cirrhosis (mean Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score, 10 ± 2.2) were randomly assigned to groups that received exercise training (n = 9) or usual care (controls, n = 10) at the University of Alberta Hospital in Canada from February through June 2013. Supervised exercise was performed on a cycle ergometer 3 days/week for 8 weeks at 60%-80% of baseline peak VO2. Peak VO2, quadriceps muscle thickness (measured by ultrasound), thigh circumference, answers from Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaires, EQ-visual analogue scales, 6-minute walk distance, and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores were evaluated at baseline and at week 8. Analysis of covariance was used to compare variables. At week 8, peak VO2 was 5.3 mL/kg/min higher in the exercise group compared with controls (95% confidence interval, 2.9-7.8; P = .001). Thigh circumference (P = .001), thigh muscle thickness (P = .01), and EQ-visual analogue scale determined self-perceived health status (P = .01) was also significantly higher in the exercise group compared with controls at week 8; fatigue subscores of the Chronic Liver Disease Questionnaires were lower in the exercise group compared with controls (P = .01). No adverse events occurred during cardiopulmonary exercise testing or training. In a controlled prospective pilot trial, 8 weeks of supervised aerobic exercise training increased peak VO2 and muscle mass and reduced fatigue in patients with cirrhosis. No

  13. The effects of an exercise training program on body composition and aerobic capacity parameters in Tunisian obese children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofien Regaieg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of children obesity is rising alarmingly in both developed and developing countries. Developing effective exercise programs is a strategy for decreasing this prevalence and limiting obesity-associated long-term comorbidities. Objectives: To determine whether a 16-week training program; in addition to the school physical education and without dietary intervention; could have beneficial effects on body composition and aerobic capacity of obese children. Materials and Methods: Twenty-eight obese children (16 boys, 12 girls; aged 12-14 years were enrolled and were divided into either the exercise group (EG, n = 14 or the control group (CG, n = 14. EG participated in a 16-week aerobic exercises (four 60-min sessions per week at 70-85% of HRmax (maximum heart rate, in addition to the school physical education. Fat-Free Mass (FFM and Fat Mass (FM were assessed with bioelectrical impedance equipment. To assess aerobic capacity, maximal metabolic equivalent of task (METmax and maximal workload (Wmax were estimated with an electronically braked cycle ergometer (type Ergoline 500® . Results: At baseline, there were no differences between the two groups. After the training program, only the EG showed significant reduction in BMI (body mass index and waist circumference compared with the baseline values (P < 0.001. Exercise training significantly decreased FM only in the EG. A significant increase in FFM was seen in both groups; more marked in the EG. There was a significant increase in METmax (P < 0.05 and Wmax (P = 0.02 in the EG, and no significant changes in these parameters were seen in the CG. HRmax significantly decreased only in the EG (P < 0.05. Conclusion: This training program has beneficial effects on body composition and aerobic capacity parameters in obese children. Our intervention has the advantage of providing a sustainable and reproducible school and community approach for the management of children obesity.

  14. Low-Volume Whole-Body Vibration Training Improves Exercise Capacity in Subjects With Mild to Severe COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielmanns, Marc; Boeselt, Tobias; Gloeckl, Rainer; Klutsch, Anja; Fischer, Henrike; Polanski, Henryk; Nell, Christoph; Storre, Jan H; Windisch, Wolfram; Koczulla, Andreas R

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the benefits of a low-volume out-patient whole-body vibration training (WBVT) program on exercise capacity in comparison with a calisthenics training program in subjects with COPD. In this single-center randomized controlled trial, 29 subjects with mild to severe COPD were randomized to WBVT or to calisthenics training, including relaxation and breathing retraining in combination with calisthenics exercises. Both groups equally exercised for a duration of 3 months with 2 sessions of 30 min/week. Outcome parameters were 6-min walk distance (6MWD, primary outcome), 5-repetition sit-to-stand test, leg press peak force, Berg balance scale, St George Respiratory Questionnaire, and COPD assessment test. Twenty-seven subjects completed the study (WBVT, n = 14; calisthenics training program, n = 13). Baseline characteristics between groups were comparable. Subjects in the WBVT group significantly improved median (interquartile range) 6MWD (+105 [45.5-133.5] m, P = .001), sit-to-stand test (-2.3 [-3.1 to -1.3] s, P = .001), peak force (28.7 [16.7-33.3] kg, P = .001), and Berg balance scale (1.5 [0.0-4.0] points, P = .055). Changes in 6MWD, sit-to-stand test, and leg press peak force were also found to be significantly different between groups in favor of the WBVT group. Only the between-group difference of the COPD assessment test score was in favor of the calisthenics training group ( P = .02). A low-volume WBVT program resulted in significantly and clinically relevant larger improvements in exercise capacity compared with calisthenics exercises in subjects with mild to severe COPD. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration DRKS9706.). Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  15. Using molecular classification to predict gains in maximal aerobic capacity following endurance exercise training in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Steen; Rankinen, Tuomo; Koch, Lauren G.; Sarzynski, Mark; Jensen, Thomas; Keller, Pernille; Scheele, Camilla; Vollaard, Niels B. J.; Nielsen, Søren; Åkerström, Thorbjörn; MacDougald, Ormond A.; Jansson, Eva; Greenhaff, Paul L.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Pedersen, Bente K.; Sundberg, Carl Johan; Wahlestedt, Claes; Britton, Steven L.; Bouchard, Claude

    2010-01-01

    A low maximal oxygen consumption (V̇o2max) is a strong risk factor for premature mortality. Supervised endurance exercise training increases V̇o2max with a very wide range of effectiveness in humans. Discovering the DNA variants that contribute to this heterogeneity typically requires substantial sample sizes. In the present study, we first use RNA expression profiling to produce a molecular classifier that predicts V̇o2max training response. We then hypothesized that the classifier genes would harbor DNA variants that contributed to the heterogeneous V̇o2max response. Two independent preintervention RNA expression data sets were generated (n = 41 gene chips) from subjects that underwent supervised endurance training: one identified and the second blindly validated an RNA expression signature that predicted change in V̇o2max (“predictor” genes). The HERITAGE Family Study (n = 473) was used for genotyping. We discovered a 29-RNA signature that predicted V̇o2max training response on a continuous scale; these genes contained ∼6 new single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with gains in V̇o2max in the HERITAGE Family Study. Three of four novel candidate genes from the HERITAGE Family Study were confirmed as RNA predictor genes (i.e., “reciprocal” RNA validation of a quantitative trait locus genotype), enhancing the performance of the 29-RNA-based predictor. Notably, RNA abundance for the predictor genes was unchanged by exercise training, supporting the idea that expression was preset by genetic variation. Regression analysis yielded a model where 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms explained 23% of the variance in gains in V̇o2max, corresponding to ∼50% of the estimated genetic variance for V̇o2max. In conclusion, combining RNA profiling with single-gene DNA marker association analysis yields a strongly validated molecular predictor with meaningful explanatory power. V̇o2max responses to endurance training can be predicted by measuring a ∼30

  16. The effects of water-based exercise in combination with blood flow restriction on strength and functional capacity in post-menopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Joamira P; Neto, Gabriel R; Loenneke, Jeremy P; Bemben, Michael G; Laurentino, Gilberto C; Batista, Gilmário; Silva, Júlio C G; Freitas, Eduardo D S; Sousa, Maria S C

    2015-12-01

    Water-based exercise and low-intensity exercise in combination with blood flow restriction (BFR) are two methods that have independently been shown to improve muscle strength in those of advancing age. The objective of this study was to assess the long-term effect of water-based exercise in combination with BFR on maximum dynamic strength and functional capacity in post-menopausal women. Twenty-eight women underwent an 8-week water-based exercise program. The participants were randomly allocated to one of the three groups: (a) water exercise only, (b) water exercise + BFR, or (c) a non-exercise control group. Functional capacity (chair stand test, timed up and go test, gait speed, and dynamic balance) and strength testing were tested before and after the 8-week aquatic exercise program. The main findings were as follows: (1) water-based exercise in combination with BFR significantly increased the lower limb maximum strength which was not observed with water-based exercise alone and (2) water-based exercise, regardless of the application of BFR, increased functional performance measured by the timed up and go test over a control group. Although we used a healthy population in the current study, these findings may have important implications for those who may be contraindicated to using traditional resistance exercise. Future research should explore this promising modality in these clinical populations.

  17. Effect of changes in fat availability on exercise capacity in McArdle disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, S.T.; Jeppesen, T.D.; Taivassalo, T.

    2009-01-01

    for oxidation during exercise. DESIGN: Randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. SETTING: Hospitalized care. PATIENTs: Ten patients (8 men and 2 women) with McArdle disease. INTERVENTIONS: Patients cycled at a constant workload corresponding to 70% of their maximum oxygen consumption. In random order......Ardle disease, but maximal rates of fat oxidation seem limited and cannot be increased above physiologically normal rates during exercise. This limitation is probably caused by a metabolic bottleneck in the tricarboxylic acid cycle due to impaired glycolytic flux in McArdle disease. Therapies aimed at enhancing......BACKGROUND: The major fuel for exercising muscle at low exercise intensities is fat. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the role of fat metabolism in McArdle disease (also known as glycogen storage disease type V), an inborn error of muscle glycogenolysis, by manipulating free fatty acid availability...

  18. Capacity expansion model of wind power generation based on ELCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Zong, Jin; Wu, Shengyu

    2018-02-01

    Capacity expansion is an indispensable prerequisite for power system planning and construction. A reasonable, efficient and accurate capacity expansion model (CEM) is crucial to power system planning. In most current CEMs, the capacity of wind power generation is considered as boundary conditions instead of decision variables, which may lead to curtailment or over construction of flexible resource, especially at a high renewable energy penetration scenario. This paper proposed a wind power generation capacity value(CV) calculation method based on effective load-carrying capability, and a CEM that co-optimizes wind power generation and conventional power sources. Wind power generation is considered as decision variable in this model, and the model can accurately reflect the uncertainty nature of wind power.

  19. The effects of a pilates-aerobic program on maximum exercise capacity of adult women

    OpenAIRE

    Mikalački, Milena; Čokorilo, Nebojša; Ruiz-Montero, Pedro Jesús

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Physical exercise such as the Pilates method offers clinical benefits on the aging process. Likewise, physiologic parameters may be improved through aerobic exercise. Methods: In order to compare the differences of a Pilates-Aerobic intervention program on physiologic parameters such as the maximum heart rate (HRmax), relative maximal oxygen consumption (relative VO2max) and absolute (absolute VOmax), maximum heart rate during maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max-HRmax)...

  20. [Non-invasive coronary flow reserve is an independent predictor of exercise capacity after acute anterior myocardial infarction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meimoun, P; Clerc, J; Ghannem, M; Neykova, A; Tzvetkov, B; Germain, A-L; Elmkies, F; Zemir, H; Luycx-Bore, A

    2012-11-01

    After acute myocardial infarction (MI) coronary microvascular impairment and reduced exercise capacity are both determinant of prognosis. We tested whether non-invasive coronary flow reserve (CFR) performed after MI predicts post-MI exercise capacity (EC). Fifty consecutive patients (pts) (mean age 56.5±11years, 30% women) with a first reperfused ST-elevation anterior MI, and sustained TIMI 3 flow after mechanical reperfusion, underwent prospectively non-invasive CFR in the distal part of the left anterior descending artery (LAD), using intravenous adenosine infusion (0.14mg/kg per minute, within 2min), within 24h after successful primary coronary angioplasty (CFR 1), and 4±1.6months later after a period of convalescence and a cardiac rehabilitation program (CFR 2). CFR was defined as peak hyperaemic LAD flow velocity divided by baseline flow velocity. All pts also underwent semi-supine exercise stress echocardiography (ESE) the same day of CFR 2. ESE was performed at an initial workload of 25-30watts with a 20watts increase at 2-minute intervals. Beta-blockers were withheld 24h before ESE. The mean CFR 2 increased significantly when compared to CFR 1 (2.9±0.65 versus 1.9±0.4, Paptitude after MI. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  1. The relationship of aerobic capacity, anaerobic peak power and experience to performance in CrossFit exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellar, D; Hatchett, A; Judge, L W; Breaux, M E; Marcus, L

    2015-11-01

    CrossFit is becoming increasingly popular as a method to increase fitness and as a competitive sport in both the Unites States and Europe. However, little research on this mode of exercise has been performed to date. The purpose of the present investigation involving experienced CrossFit athletes and naïve healthy young men was to investigate the relationship of aerobic capacity and anaerobic power to performance in two representative CrossFit workouts: the first workout was 12 minutes in duration, and the second was based on the total time to complete the prescribed exercise. The participants were 32 healthy adult males, who were either naïve to CrossFit exercise or had competed in CrossFit competitions. Linear regression was undertaken to predict performance on the first workout (time) with age, group (naïve or CrossFit athlete), VO2max and anaerobic power, which were all significant predictors (p CrossFit experience as a significant predictor (p CrossFit competition is a key component of performance in CrossFit workouts which are representative of those performed in CrossFit, and that, in at least one these workouts, aerobic capacity and anaerobic power are associated with success.

  2. Effects of caffeine on endurance capacity and psychological state in young females and males exercising in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvi, Silva; Timpmann, Saima; Tamm, Maria; Aedma, Martin; Kreegipuu, Kairi; Ööpik, Vahur

    2017-01-01

    Acute caffeine ingestion is considered effective in improving endurance capacity and psychological state. However, current knowledge is based on the findings of studies that have been conducted on male subjects mainly in temperate environmental conditions, but some physiological and psychological effects of caffeine differ between the sexes. The purpose of this study was to compare the physical performance and psychological effects of caffeine in young women and men exercising in the heat. Thirteen male and 10 female students completed 2 constant-load walks (60% of thermoneutral peak oxygen consumption on a treadmill until volitional exhaustion) in a hot-dry environment (air temperature, 42 °C; relative humidity, 20%) after caffeine (6 mg·kg -1 ) and placebo (wheat flour) ingestion in a double-blind, randomly assigned, crossover manner. Caffeine, compared with placebo, induced greater increases (p Caffeine decreased (p caffeine was associated with a shorter time to exhaustion. In conclusion, acute caffeine ingestion increases HR and blood lactate levels during exercise in the heat, but it has no impact on thermoregulation or endurance capacity in either gender. Under exercise-heat stress, caffeine reduces ratings of perceived exertion and fatigue in males but not in females.

  3. Tissue Taurine Depletion Alters Metabolic Response to Exercise and Reduces Running Capacity in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Ito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid found in very high concentration in skeletal muscle. Taurine deficient mice engineered by knocking out the taurine transporter gene exhibit skeletal muscle wasting, structural defects, and exercise intolerance. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the development of metabolic abnormalities and exercise intolerance in muscle of the TauTKO phenotype. Running speed and endurance time of TauTKO mice were lower than those of control mice. Blood lactate level was elevated by >3-fold during treadmill running in TauTKO mice but remained largely unaltered by exercise in WT mice. Blood glucose was cleared faster during treadmill running in TauTKO mice than WT mice. AMP-activated kinase (AMPK β-2 subunit was reduced in TauTKO muscle concomitant with a reduction in α1 and α2 subunits of AMPK. The level of PPARα and its targets, Gpx3, Cpt2, and Echs1, were also decreased in TauTKO muscle. Collectively, taurine depletion impairs metabolic adaptation to exercise in skeletal muscle, a phenomenon associated with a downregulation of AMPK and diminished NADH utilization by the mitochondrial respiratory chain. These findings suggest a crucial role of taurine in regulating energy metabolism in skeletal muscle of exercising TauTKO mice, changes that contribute to impaired exercise endurance.

  4. The Effect of Colostrum along with Aerobic and Anaerobic Exercise on Lipid Peroxidation and Total Antioxidant Capacity of Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mogharnasi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: The consumption of food supplements in order to eliminate oxidative damages induced by exercise are common among athletes. Previous studies have shown that bovine colostrum has antioxidant properties, but no study has ever been done to evaluate its effectiveness on Oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity. The aim of study was to investigate the effects of bovine colostrum along with aerobic and anaerobic exercise on Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant capacity in male Wistar rats.   Methods: In the present experimental study, 48 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into six groups (control, colostrum supplement, aerobic exercise, anaerobic exercise, colostrum supplements and aerobic exercise, colostrum supplements and anaerobic exercise. Colostrum group received daily for ten weeks dosing 300 mg /kg bovine colostrum powder orally. Exercising groups worked out three times a week for a period of 10 weeks on a custom-made treadmill for rodents. Blood samples were taken before and 24 hours after the last exercise session on an empty stomach. Data were analyzed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, One Way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey at α<0.05.   Results: The plasma levels of oxidative stress index (MDA in all groups except colostrum supplement and anaerobic exercise compared with the control group was significantly reduced (p<0.05. The antioxidant capacity in all groups except anaerobic exercise group compared with the control group was significant increased (p<0.05.   Conclusions: The results indicated that colostrum supplementation with ten weeks of aerobic exercise had better effect on the control of oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity compared to anaerobic exercise.    

  5. Spreadsheet Decision Support Model for Training Exercise Material Requirements Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tringali, Arthur

    1997-01-01

    ... associated with military training exercises. The model combines the business practice of Material Requirements Planning and the commercial spreadsheet software capabilities of Lotus 1-2-3 to calculate the requirements for food, consumable...

  6. On a Model of Associative Memory with Huge Storage Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircigil, Mete; Heusel, Judith; Löwe, Matthias; Upgang, Sven; Vermet, Franck

    2017-07-01

    In Krotov et al. (in: Lee (eds) Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems, Curran Associates, Inc., Red Hook, 2016) Krotov and Hopfield suggest a generalized version of the well-known Hopfield model of associative memory. In their version they consider a polynomial interaction function and claim that this increases the storage capacity of the model. We prove this claim and take the "limit" as the degree of the polynomial becomes infinite, i.e. an exponential interaction function. With this interaction we prove that model has an exponential storage capacity in the number of neurons, yet the basins of attraction are almost as large as in the standard Hopfield model.

  7. On the Einstein-Stern model of rotational heat capacities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jens Peder

    1998-01-01

    The Einstein-Stern model for the rotational contribution to the heat capacity of a diatomic gas has recently been resuscitated. In this communication, we show that the apparent success of the model is illusory, because it is based on what has turned out to be an unfortunate comparison with experi......The Einstein-Stern model for the rotational contribution to the heat capacity of a diatomic gas has recently been resuscitated. In this communication, we show that the apparent success of the model is illusory, because it is based on what has turned out to be an unfortunate comparison...

  8. Beneficial Effects of Physical Exercise on Functional Capacity and Skeletal Muscle Oxidative Stress in Rats with Aortic Stenosis-Induced Heart Failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Janini Gomes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We evaluated the influence of exercise on functional capacity, cardiac remodeling, and skeletal muscle oxidative stress, MAPK, and NF-κB pathway in rats with aortic stenosis- (AS- induced heart failure (HF. Methods and Results. Eighteen weeks after AS induction, rats were assigned into sedentary control (C-Sed, exercised control (C-Ex, sedentary AS (AS-Sed, and exercised AS (AS-Ex groups. Exercise was performed on treadmill for eight weeks. Statistical analyses were performed with Goodman and ANOVA or Mann-Whitney. HF features frequency and mortality did not differ between AS groups. Exercise improved functional capacity, assessed by maximal exercise test on treadmill, without changing echocardiographic parameters. Soleus cross-sectional areas did not differ between groups. Lipid hydroperoxide concentration was higher in AS-Sed than C-Sed and AS-Ex. Activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase was changed in AS-Sed and restored in AS-Ex. NADPH oxidase activity and gene expression of its subunits did not differ between AS groups. Total ROS generation was lower in AS-Ex than C-Ex. Exercise modulated MAPK in AS-Ex and did not change NF-κB pathway proteins. Conclusion. Exercise improves functional capacity in rats with AS-induced HF regardless of echocardiographic parameter changes. In soleus, exercise reduces oxidative stress, preserves antioxidant enzyme activity, and modulates MAPK expression.

  9. Effects of aerobic training combined with respiratory muscle stretching on the functional exercise capacity and thoracoabdominal kinematics in patients with COPD: a randomized and controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Juliano T; Borges-Santos, Erickson; Porras, Desiderio Cano; Paisani, Denise M; Cukier, Alberto; Lunardi, Adriana C; Carvalho, Celso Rf

    2016-01-01

    Patients with COPD present a major recruitment of the inspiratory muscles, predisposing to chest incoordination, increasing the degree of dyspnea and impairing their exercise capacity. Stretching techniques could decrease the respiratory muscle activity and improve their contractile capacity; however, the systemic effects of stretching remain unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic training combined with respiratory muscle stretching on functional exercise capacity and thoracoabdominal kinematics in patients with COPD. This study was a randomized and controlled trial. A total of 30 patients were allocated to a treatment group (TG) or a control group (CG; n=15, each group). The TG was engaged in respiratory muscle stretching and the CG in upper and lower limb muscle stretching. Both groups performed 24 sessions (twice a week, 12 weeks) of aerobic training. Functional exercise capacity (6-minute walk test), thoracoabdominal kinematics (optoelectronic plethysmography), and respiratory muscle activity (surface electromyography) were evaluated during exercise. Analysis of covariance was used to compare the groups at a significance level of 5%. After the intervention, the TG showed improved abdominal (ABD) contribution, compartmental volume, mobility, and functional exercise capacity with decreased dyspnea when compared with the CG ( P stretching increases the functional exercise capacity with decreased dyspnea in patients with COPD. These effects are associated with an increased efficacy of the respiratory muscles and participation of the ABD compartment.

  10. GASCAP: Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model documentation, June 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Wellhead Gas Productive Capacity Model (GASCAP) has been developed by EIA to provide a historical analysis of the monthly productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead and a projection of monthly capacity for 2 years into the future. The impact of drilling, oil and gas price assumptions, and demand on gas productive capacity are examined. Both gas-well gas and oil-well gas are included. Oil-well gas productive capacity is estimated separately and then combined with the gas-well gas productive capacity. This documentation report provides a general overview of the GASCAP Model, describes the underlying data base, provides technical descriptions of the component models, diagrams the system and subsystem flow, describes the equations, and provides definitions and sources of all variables used in the system. This documentation report is provided to enable users of EIA projections generated by GASCAP to understand the underlying procedures used and to replicate the models and solutions. This report should be of particular interest to those in the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas

  11. Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Departments Clinical Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) COPD: Overview COPD: Lifestyle Management COPD: Exercises COPD: Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a Question Reviewed by Barry J. Make, ...

  12. Effects of blood transfusion on exercise capacity in thalassemia major patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Benedetto

    Full Text Available Anemia has an important role in exercise performance. However, the direct link between rapid changes of hemoglobin and exercise performance is still unknown.To find out more on this topic, we studied 18 beta-thalassemia major patients free of relevant cardiac dysfunction (age 33.5±7.2 years,males = 10. Patients performed a maximal cardiopulmolmonary exercise test (cycloergometer, personalized ramp protocol, breath-by-breath measurements of expired gases before and the day after blood transfusion (500 cc of red cell concentrates. After blood transfusion, hemoglobin increased from 10.5±0.8 g/dL to 12.1±1.2 (p<0.001, peak VO2 from 1408 to 1546mL/min (p<0.05, and VO2 at anaerobic threshold from 965 to 1024mL/min (p<0.05. No major changes were observed as regards heart and respiratory rates either at peak exercise or at anaerobic threshold. Similarly, no relevant changes were observed in ventilation efficiency, as evaluated by the ventilation vs. carbon dioxide production relationship, or in O2 delivery to the periphery as analyzed by the VO2 vs. workload relationship. The relationship between hemoglobin and VO2 changes showed, for each g/dL of hemoglobin increase, a VO2 increase = 82.5 mL/min and 35 mL/min, at peak exercise and at anaerobic threshold, respectively. In beta-thalassemia major patients, an acute albeit partial anemia correction by blood transfusion determinates a relevant increase of exercise performance, observed both at peak exercise and at anaerobic threshold.

  13. Online mindfulness as a promising method to improve exercise capacity in heart disease: 12-month follow-up of a randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinske A Gotink

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that mindfulness can reduce stress, and thereby affect other psychological and physiological outcomes as well. Earlier, we reported the direct 3-month results of an online modified mindfulness-based stress reduction training in patients with heart disease, and now we evaluate the effect at 12-month follow-up. 324 patients (mean age 43.2 years, 53.7% male were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to additional 3-month online mindfulness training or to usual care alone. The primary outcome was exercise capacity measured with the 6 minute walk test (6MWT. Secondary outcomes were blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, NT-proBNP, cortisol levels (scalp hair sample, mental and physical functioning (SF-36, anxiety and depression (HADS, perceived stress (PSS, and social support (PSSS12. Differences between groups on the repeated outcome measures were analyzed with linear mixed models. At 12-months follow-up, participants showed a trend significant improvement exercise capacity (6MWT: 17.9 meters, p = 0.055 compared to UC. Cohen's D showed significant but small improvement on exercise capacity (d = 0.22; 95%CI 0.05 to 0.39, systolic blood pressure (d = 0.19; 95%CI 0.03 to 0.36, mental functioning (d = 0.22; 95%CI 0.05 to 0.38 and depressive symptomatology (d = 0.18; 95%CI 0.02 to 0.35. All other outcome measures did not change statistically significantly. In the as-treated analysis, systolic blood pressure decreased significantly with 5.5 mmHg (p = 0.045; d = 0.23 (95%CI 0.05-0.41. Online mindfulness training shows favorable albeit small long-term effects on exercise capacity, systolic blood pressure, mental functioning, and depressive symptomatology in patients with heart disease and might therefore be a beneficial addition to current clinical care.www.trialregister.nl NTR3453.

  14. 8760-Based Method for Representing Variable Generation Capacity Value in Capacity Expansion Models: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frew, Bethany A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cole, Wesley J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sun, Yinong [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mai, Trieu T [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Richards, James [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Capacity expansion models (CEMs) are widely used to evaluate the least-cost portfolio of electricity generators, transmission, and storage needed to reliably serve demand over the evolution of many years or decades. Various CEM formulations are used to evaluate systems ranging in scale from states or utility service territories to national or multi-national systems. CEMs can be computationally complex, and to achieve acceptable solve times, key parameters are often estimated using simplified methods. In this paper, we focus on two of these key parameters associated with the integration of variable generation (VG) resources: capacity value and curtailment. We first discuss common modeling simplifications used in CEMs to estimate capacity value and curtailment, many of which are based on a representative subset of hours that can miss important tail events or which require assumptions about the load and resource distributions that may not match actual distributions. We then present an alternate approach that captures key elements of chronological operation over all hours of the year without the computationally intensive economic dispatch optimization typically employed within more detailed operational models. The updated methodology characterizes the (1) contribution of VG to system capacity during high load and net load hours, (2) the curtailment level of VG, and (3) the potential reductions in curtailments enabled through deployment of storage and more flexible operation of select thermal generators. We apply this alternate methodology to an existing CEM, the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS). Results demonstrate that this alternate approach provides more accurate estimates of capacity value and curtailments by explicitly capturing system interactions across all hours of the year. This approach could be applied more broadly to CEMs at many different scales where hourly resource and load data is available, greatly improving the representation of challenges

  15. Capacity building for tropical coastal ecosystems management using a dynamic teaching model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Annika Büchert; Nielsen, Thomas; Macintosh, Donald

    2008-01-01

    This learning opportunity illustrates effective capacity building through a dynamic teaching model that involves you and gives you personal experiences. The teaching model is easy to adapt to local environments and the learning opportunity is relevant to everyone working in coastal natural resource...... management (students, managers, consultants and organizers of capacity building). After an introduction to ecosystems ecology and project management tools, you will analyze and solve problems in relation to natural resource management using a specific case study. The exercises give you experience...... in combining knowledge and methods and applying these in a real life situation. Objectives: The participants will apply the acquired knowledge of ecosystems and project management tools when describing ecosystem services and when planning a project The participants will act as different stakeholders during...

  16. Lagrange multiplier for perishable inventory model considering warehouse capacity planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amran, Tiena Gustina; Fatima, Zenny

    2017-06-01

    This paper presented Lagrange Muktiplier approach for solving perishable raw material inventory planning considering warehouse capacity. A food company faced an issue of managing perishable raw materials and marinades which have limited shelf life. Another constraint to be considered was the capacity of the warehouse. Therefore, an inventory model considering shelf life and raw material warehouse capacity are needed in order to minimize the company's inventory cost. The inventory model implemented in this study was the adapted economic order quantity (EOQ) model which is optimized using Lagrange multiplier. The model and solution approach were applied to solve a case industry in a food manufacturer. The result showed that the total inventory cost decreased 2.42% after applying the proposed approach.

  17. [Evolvement of ecological footprint model representing ecological carrying capacity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shu-yan; Xie, Gao-di

    2007-06-01

    Ecological footprint (EF) is an important index of ecological carrying capacity. The original EF model is excellent in simplicity, aggregation, comparability, and lifelikeness in presenting results, but short in predictability, configuration, and applicability. To overcome these shortcomings, many researches were conducted to modify and promote the EF model, and developed it from static with single time scale to diversified ones, which included: 1) time series EF model, 2) input-output analysis based EF model, 3) integrated assessment incorporated EF model, 4) land disturbance degree based EF model, and 5) life cycle analysis based EF model, or component EF model. The function of EF as a measurement of ecological carrying capacity was significantly improved, but its accuracy and integrality still need to be advanced.

  18. Using molecular classification to predict gains in maximal aerobic capacity following endurance exercise training in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timmons, James A; Knudsen, Steen; Rankinen, Tuomo

    2010-01-01

    A low maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) is a strong risk factor for premature mortality. Supervised endurance exercise training increases VO2max with a very wide range of effectiveness in humans. Discovering the DNA variants that contribute to this heterogeneity typically requires substantial...... Study were confirmed as RNA predictor genes (i.e., "reciprocal" RNA validation of a quantitative trait locus genotype), enhancing the performance of the 29-RNA-based predictor. Notably, RNA abundance for the predictor genes was unchanged by exercise training, supporting the idea that expression...

  19. Modeling Coevolution between Language and Memory Capacity during Language Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tao; Shuai, Lan

    2015-01-01

    Memory is essential to many cognitive tasks including language. Apart from empirical studies of memory effects on language acquisition and use, there lack sufficient evolutionary explorations on whether a high level of memory capacity is prerequisite for language and whether language origin could influence memory capacity. In line with evolutionary theories that natural selection refined language-related cognitive abilities, we advocated a coevolution scenario between language and memory capacity, which incorporated the genetic transmission of individual memory capacity, cultural transmission of idiolects, and natural and cultural selections on individual reproduction and language teaching. To illustrate the coevolution dynamics, we adopted a multi-agent computational model simulating the emergence of lexical items and simple syntax through iterated communications. Simulations showed that: along with the origin of a communal language, an initially-low memory capacity for acquired linguistic knowledge was boosted; and such coherent increase in linguistic understandability and memory capacities reflected a language-memory coevolution; and such coevolution stopped till memory capacities became sufficient for language communications. Statistical analyses revealed that the coevolution was realized mainly by natural selection based on individual communicative success in cultural transmissions. This work elaborated the biology-culture parallelism of language evolution, demonstrated the driving force of culturally-constituted factors for natural selection of individual cognitive abilities, and suggested that the degree difference in language-related cognitive abilities between humans and nonhuman animals could result from a coevolution with language.

  20. Exercise capacity and muscle strength and risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia in 1.1 million young Swedish men: cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kasper; Rasmussen, Finn; Held, Claes; Neovius, Martin; Tynelius, Per; Sundström, Johan

    2015-09-16

    To investigate the associations of exercise capacity and muscle strength in late adolescence with risk of vascular disease and arrhythmia. Cohort study. General population in Sweden. 1.1 million men who participated in mandatory military conscription between 1 August 1972 and 31 December 1995, at a median age of 18.2 years. Participants were followed until 31 December 2010. Associations between exercise capacity and muscle strength with risk of vascular disease and subgroups (ischaemic heart disease, heart failure, stroke, and cardiovascular death) and risk of arrhythmia and subgroups (atrial fibrillation or flutter, bradyarrhythmia, supraventricular tachycardia, and ventricular arrhythmia or sudden cardiac death). Maximum exercise capacity was estimated by the ergometer bicycle test, and muscle strength was measured as handgrip strength by a hand dynamometer. High exercise capacity or muscle strength was deemed as above the median level. During a median follow-up of 26.3 years, 26 088 vascular disease events and 17 312 arrhythmia events were recorded. Exercise capacity was inversely associated with risk of vascular disease and its subgroups. Muscle strength was also inversely associated with vascular disease risk, driven by associations of higher muscle strength with lower risk of heart failure and cardiovascular death. Exercise capacity had a U shaped association with risk of arrhythmia, driven by a direct association with risk of atrial fibrillation and a U shaped association with bradyarrhythmia. Higher muscle strength was associated with lower risk of arrhythmia (specifically, lower risk of bradyarrhythmia and ventricular arrhythmia). The combination of high exercise capacity and high muscle strength was associated with a hazard ratio of 0.67 (95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.70) for vascular events and 0.92 (0.88 to 0.97) for arrhythmia compared with the combination of low exercise capacity and low muscle strength. Exercise capacity and muscle strength

  1. Magnitude of exercise capacity and quality of life improvement following repeat pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandoz JS

    2017-04-01

    ; P=0.63. Conclusion: In physician-referred patients who underwent repeat PRP as clinically required, there were clear benefits in functional exercise capacity following each repeat PRP, which was not affected by the time interval between PRPs. Health-related quality of life and mood improved after the first two PRPs, but not after a third. Keywords: exercise therapy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, quality of life, exercise test

  2. Study Design of VESUTO®: Efficacy of Tiotropium/Olodaterol on Lung Hyperinflation, Exercise Capacity, and Physical Activity in Japanese Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Masakazu; Minakata, Yoshiaki; Motegi, Takashi; Ueki, Jun; Seki, Tetsuo; Anzai, Tatsuhiko; Takizawa, Ayako; Grönke, Lars; Hirata, Kazuto

    2017-07-01

    The superiority of tiotropium/olodaterol is demonstrated in improvement of lung function, dyspnea, lung hyperinflation, and quality of life compared with either monotherapy in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Japanese Respiratory Society Guidelines for COPD management include improvement of exercise tolerance and daily physical activity as the treatment goals; however, there is limited evidence in Japanese patients with COPD. A protocol is developed for the VESUTO ® study that investigates the efficacy of tiotropium/olodaterol fixed-dose combination (FDC) compared with tiotropium alone on inspiratory capacity (IC, volume from functional residual capacity to total lung capacity), exercise capacity, and daily physical activity in Japanese patients with COPD. A total of 180 Japanese patients with COPD, aged ≥40 years will be enrolled into the double-blind, multicenter, active-controlled, crossover study (NCT02629965) and will be randomized to receive either tiotropium/olodaterol FDC or tiotropium for 6 weeks each [two puffs via RESPIMAT ® (Boehringer Ingelheim, Ingelheim, Germany) inhaler in the morning]. The primary endpoint is IC at rest measured at 60 min post-dose after 6 weeks treatment. The secondary endpoints include the 6-min walk distance (6MWD) at 90 min post-dose and physical activity measured by the activity monitor in the last 2 weeks of the 6-week treatment periods. Lung function tests will also be assessed after 6 weeks treatment. A mixed-effects model repeated measures approach will be used for the primary and secondary endpoints. The VESUTO ® study is the first randomized interventional study to investigate exercise capacity (6MWD) and physical activity measured by a 3-axis accelerometer in Japanese patients with COPD. The study could provide additional evidence of long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA) + long-acting β 2 -agonist (LABA) combination therapy on patients' physical activities as well as lung

  3. Protein synthesis and antioxidant capacity in aging mice : Effects of long-term voluntary exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaanholt, Lobke M.; Speakman, John R.; Garland, Theodore; Lobley, Gerald E.; Visser, G. Henk

    2008-01-01

    Exercise increases metabolic rate and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) but also elevates protein turnover. ROS cause damage to macromolecules (e. g., proteins) and thereby contribute to aging. Protein turnover removes and replaces damaged proteins. The balance between these two

  4. A Classroom Exercise to Examine the Trade-off between Mission Capacity and Life Cycle Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Keebom; Doerr, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a classroom exercise, centered on a simulation that has been used for 4 years in an MBA program to help students develop an understanding of the trade-offs involved in managing capital assets in the public sector. Though often ignored in business schools, "mission" is a key criterion that must be considered when…

  5. Time course of change in vasodilator function and capacity in response to exercise training in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tinken, T.M.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Black, M.A.; Cable, N.T.; Green, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of the impact of exercise training on arterial adaptation in healthy subjects have produced disparate results. It is possible that some studies failed to detect changes because functional and structural adaptations follow a different time course and may therefore not be detected at discrete

  6. Exercise capacity, muscle strength, and fatigue in sarcoidosis : A follow-up study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marcellis, R.G.; Lenssen, A.F.; Kleynen, S.; de Vries, J.; Drent, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine changes in the prevalence of exercise intolerance, reduced muscle strength, and fatigue and the changes in these parameters in individual patients during a 2-year follow-up study. Methods Ninety sarcoidosis patients (62 males and 28 females; mean age:

  7. Effects of the Nordic Hamstring exercise on sprint capacity in male football players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ishøi, Lasse; Hölmich, Per; Aagaard, Per

    2018-01-01

    This assessor-blinded, randomized controlled superiority trial investigated the efficacy of the 10-week Nordic Hamstring exercise (NHE) protocol on sprint performance in football players. Thirty-five amateur male players (age: 17–26 years) were randomized to a do-as-usual control group (CG; n = 17...

  8. Exercise capacity in non-specific chronic low back pain patients : A lean body mass-based Astrand bicycle test; Reliability, validity and feasibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodselmans, Audy P.; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; van der Schans, Cees P.

    Objective Measurement of exercise capacity is essential in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (CLBP). However, the conventional Astrand bicycle test is not feasible in patients with a very poor aerobic capacity. Therefore the Astrand bicycles test for non-specific CLBP patients based

  9. Modeling the oxygen uptake kinetics during exercise testing of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases using nonlinear mixed models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baty, Florent; Ritz, Christian; van Gestel, Arnoldus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The six-minute walk test (6MWT) is commonly used to quantify exercise capacity in patients with several cardio-pulmonary diseases. Oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]O2) kinetics during 6MWT typically follow 3 distinct phases (rest, exercise, recovery) that can be modeled by nonlinear...... regression. Simultaneous modeling of multiple kinetics requires nonlinear mixed models methodology. To the best of our knowledge, no such curve-fitting approach has been used to analyze multiple [Formula: see text]O2 kinetics in both research and clinical practice so far. METHODS: In the present study, we...... describe functionality of the R package medrc that extends the framework of the commonly used packages drc and nlme and allows fitting nonlinear mixed effects models for automated nonlinear regression modeling. The methodology was applied to a data set including 6MWT [Formula: see text]O2 kinetics from 61...

  10. Effects of drug and exercise intervention on functional capacity and quality of life in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Goto, Toshihiko; Wakami, Kazuaki; Ohte, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) are often elderly and their primary chronic symptom is severe exercise intolerance that results in a reduced quality of life (QOL).Thus, improvement of exercise capacity and QOL presents an important clinical outcome in HFpEF patients. Although the effects of interventions such as cardiovascular drugs and exercise training on exercise capacity and QOL in HFpEF patients have been examined in a number of clinical trials, the results are inconsistent due in part to limited power with small sample sizes. We aimed to conduct a meta-analysis of the randomized controlled trial (RCT)s on the effect of drug or exercise intervention on exercise capacity and QOL in HFpEF patients. The search of electronic databases identified five RCTs on exercise (245 patients) and eight RCTs on cardiovascular drugs (1080 patients). The pooled analysis showed that exercise training improved peak exercise oxygen uptake (VO2) (weighted mean difference (WMD) 2.283, 95% confidence interval (CI)) (1.318-3.248) ml/min/kg), six-minute walk distance (6MWD) (30.275 m (4.315-56.234)), and Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) total score (8.974 points (3.321-14.627)) compared with usual care. In contrast, drug intervention did not improve peak VO2 (WMD (95% CI), -0.393 (-1.005-0.220) ml/min/kg), 6MWD (-9.463 (-21.455-2.530) m), or MLHFQ total score (1.042 (-0.982-3.066) point) compared with placebo or no treatment. Our meta-analysis indicates that exercise training may be a therapeutic option to improve functional capacity and QOL in HFpEF patients. © The European Society of Cardiology 2014.

  11. Comparison of functional exercise capacity, pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength in patients with multiple sclerosis with different disability levels and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosnak-Guclu, Meral; Gunduz, Arzu Guclu; Nazliel, Bijen; Irkec, Ceyla

    2012-01-01

    To compare functional exercise capacity, pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength in fully ambulatory patients with multiple sclerosis with different disability levels and healthy controls, and to elucidate the determinant factors of functional exercise capacity. Forty-three fully ambulatory patients with multiple sclerosis and 30 healthy controls were included in the study. Patients were grouped according to Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS); Group I (EDSS 0-2), Group II (EDSS 2.5-4.5). Functional exercise capacity was evaluated using a six-minute walk test, and measurement of pulmonary function, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures (MIP, MEP). The Pulmonary Index was used as a clinical predictor of respiratory dysfunction. Respiratory muscle strength was lower in multiple sclerosis groups compared with controls, but the difference in MIP and %MIP did not reach statistical significance in Group I. The six-minute walk test distance was significantly shorter and peak expiratory flow was lower in multiple sclerosis groups (p Respiratory muscles are weakened, functional exercise capacity is reduced and pulmonary function is affected even in the early phase of multiple sclerosis. Ambulatory patients with multiple sclerosis who have a higher level of disability have lower pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength and functional capacity than less disabled ones and controls. Neurological disability level, age, gender and heart rate difference on exertion are the determinants of functional exercise capacity.

  12. Effect of thyme extract supplementation on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant capacity, PGC-1α content and endurance exercise performance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khani, Mostafa; Motamedi, Pezhman; Dehkhoda, Mohammad Reza; Dabagh Nikukheslat, Saeed; Karimi, Pouran

    2017-01-01

    Athletes have a large extent of oxidant agent production. In the current study, we aimed to determine the influence of thyme extract on the endurance exercise performance, mitochondrial biogenesis, and antioxidant status in rats. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into two groups receiving either normal drinking water (non-supplemented group, n  = 10) or thyme extract, 400 mg/kg, (supplemented group, n  = 10). Rats in both groups were subjected to endurance treadmill training (27 m/min, 10% grade, 60 min, and 5 days/week for 8 weeks). Finally, to determine the endurance capacity, time to exhaustion treadmill running at 36 m/min speed was assessed. At the end of the endurance capacity test, serum and soleus muscle samples were collected and their superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, as well as malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration were measured. Protein expression of PGC-1α, as a marker of mitochondrial biogenesis, was also determined in the soleus muscle tissue by immunoblotting assay. Findings revealed that the exhaustive running time in the treatment group was significantly ( p  endurance exercise tolerance in intact animals, although decrease of oxidative stress and regulation of the PGC-1α protein expression are not considered as underlying molecular mechanisms.

  13. Use of a consumer market activity monitoring and feedback device improves exercise capacity and activity levels in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Brian; Kaljo, Indira; Donnelly, Seamas

    2014-01-01

    COPD is associated with a gradual decline in physical activity, which itself contributes to a worsening of the underlying condition. Strategies that improve physical activity levels are critical to halt this cycle. Wearable sensor based activity monitoring and persuasive feedback might offer a potential solution. However it is not clear just how much intervention might be needed in this regard - i.e. whether programmes need to be tailored specifically for the target clinical population or whether more simple activity monitoring and feedback solutions, such as that offered in consumer market devices, might be sufficient. This research was carried out to investigate the impact of 4 weeks of using an off the shelf consumer market activity monitoring and feedback application on measures of physical activity, exercise capacity, and health related quality of life in a population of 10 Stage I and II COPD patients. Results demonstrate a significant and positive effect on exercise capacity (measured using a 6-minute walk test) and activity levels (measured in terms of average number of steps per hour) yet no impact on health related quality of life (St Georges Respiratory Disease Questionnaire).

  14. Maximal exercise test is a useful method for physical capacity and oxygen consumption determination in streptozotocin-diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irigoyen Maria-Cláudia

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between speed during maximum exercise test (ET and oxygen consumption (VO2 in control and STZ-diabetic rats, in order to provide a useful method to determine exercise capacity and prescription in researches involving STZ-diabetic rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: control (CG, n = 10 and diabetic (DG, n = 8. The animals were submitted to ET on treadmill with simultaneous gas analysis through open respirometry system. ET and VO2 were assessed 60 days after diabetes induction (STZ, 50 mg/Kg. Results VO2 maximum was reduced in STZ-diabetic rats (72.5 ± 1 mL/Kg/min-1 compared to CG rats (81.1 ± 1 mL/Kg/min-1. There were positive correlations between ET speed and VO2 (r = 0.87 for CG and r = 0.8 for DG, as well as between ET speed and VO2 reserve (r = 0.77 for CG and r = 0.7 for DG. Positive correlations were also obtained between measured VO2 and VO2 predicted values (r = 0.81 for CG and r = 0.75 for DG by linear regression equations to CG (VO2 = 1.54 * ET speed + 52.34 and DG (VO2 = 1.16 * ET speed + 51.99. Moreover, we observed that 60% of ET speed corresponded to 72 and 75% of VO2 reserve for CG and DG, respectively. The maximum ET speed was also correlated with VO2 maximum for both groups (CG: r = 0.7 and DG: r = 0.7. Conclusion These results suggest that: a VO2 and VO2 reserve can be estimated using linear regression equations obtained from correlations with ET speed for each studied group; b exercise training can be prescribed based on ET in control and diabetic-STZ rats; c physical capacity can be determined by ET. Therefore, ET, which involves a relatively simple methodology and low cost, can be used as an indicator of cardio-respiratory capacity in future studies that investigate the physiological effect of acute or chronic exercise in control and STZ-diabetic male rats.

  15. Maximal exercise test is a useful method for physical capacity and oxygen consumption determination in streptozotocin-diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Bruno; Figueroa, Diego M; Mostarda, Cristiano T; Heeren, Marcelo V; Irigoyen, Maria-Cláudia; De Angelis, Kátia

    2007-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between speed during maximum exercise test (ET) and oxygen consumption (VO2) in control and STZ-diabetic rats, in order to provide a useful method to determine exercise capacity and prescription in researches involving STZ-diabetic rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: control (CG, n = 10) and diabetic (DG, n = 8). The animals were submitted to ET on treadmill with simultaneous gas analysis through open respirometry system. ET and VO2 were assessed 60 days after diabetes induction (STZ, 50 mg/Kg). Results VO2 maximum was reduced in STZ-diabetic rats (72.5 ± 1 mL/Kg/min-1) compared to CG rats (81.1 ± 1 mL/Kg/min-1). There were positive correlations between ET speed and VO2 (r = 0.87 for CG and r = 0.8 for DG), as well as between ET speed and VO2 reserve (r = 0.77 for CG and r = 0.7 for DG). Positive correlations were also obtained between measured VO2 and VO2 predicted values (r = 0.81 for CG and r = 0.75 for DG) by linear regression equations to CG (VO2 = 1.54 * ET speed + 52.34) and DG (VO2 = 1.16 * ET speed + 51.99). Moreover, we observed that 60% of ET speed corresponded to 72 and 75% of VO2 reserve for CG and DG, respectively. The maximum ET speed was also correlated with VO2 maximum for both groups (CG: r = 0.7 and DG: r = 0.7). Conclusion These results suggest that: a) VO2 and VO2 reserve can be estimated using linear regression equations obtained from correlations with ET speed for each studied group; b) exercise training can be prescribed based on ET in control and diabetic-STZ rats; c) physical capacity can be determined by ET. Therefore, ET, which involves a relatively simple methodology and low cost, can be used as an indicator of cardio-respiratory capacity in future studies that investigate the physiological effect of acute or chronic exercise in control and STZ-diabetic male rats. PMID:18078520

  16. 8760-Based Method for Representing Variable Generation Capacity Value in Capacity Expansion Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frew, Bethany A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-08-03

    Capacity expansion models (CEMs) are widely used to evaluate the least-cost portfolio of electricity generators, transmission, and storage needed to reliably serve load over many years or decades. CEMs can be computationally complex and are often forced to estimate key parameters using simplified methods to achieve acceptable solve times or for other reasons. In this paper, we discuss one of these parameters -- capacity value (CV). We first provide a high-level motivation for and overview of CV. We next describe existing modeling simplifications and an alternate approach for estimating CV that utilizes hourly '8760' data of load and VG resources. We then apply this 8760 method to an established CEM, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model (Eurek et al. 2016). While this alternative approach for CV is not itself novel, it contributes to the broader CEM community by (1) demonstrating how a simplified 8760 hourly method, which can be easily implemented in other power sector models when data is available, more accurately captures CV trends than a statistical method within the ReEDS CEM, and (2) providing a flexible modeling framework from which other 8760-based system elements (e.g., demand response, storage, and transmission) can be added to further capture important dynamic interactions, such as curtailment.

  17. Onset of exercise and diet program in obese women: metabolic and anorexigenic responses related to weight loss and physical capacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgorces, F D; Le Page, C; Police, C; Neveux, N; Cottart, C H; Blanc, M C; Raison, J; Toussaint, J F; Noirez, P

    2015-06-01

    Perturbations of energy balance induce compensatory processes that may alter expected weight loss. In obese patients, our aim was to investigate the relationships that occurred between fasting plasma concentrations of anorexigenic peptides and metabolic parameters, appetite, physical capacity, and weight loss in the 5 first days of a program associating exercise and caloric reduction. Thirteen obese women were monitored from day 1 to day 5 with 2 exercise sessions in day 2 and day 4. We measured, in a fasted state, changes in body weight, hunger ratings, and plasma concentrations of fatty acids, triglycerides, leptin, insulin, amylin, peptide YY, and insulin-resistance index. Physical performance was assessed by a 6-min walking test. The program resulted in significantly reduced body weight (0.75±0.4 kg; p=0.001), of plasma concentrations of triglycerides, insulin, amylin, peptide YY, and the insulin-resistance index, and also increased fatty acids (pphysical performance (r(2)=0.45, 0.59, and 0.52; pweight loss (r(2)=0.65, 0.57, 0.55; pweight loss, improved lipid profile, and decreased insulin resistance while hunger ratings increased. Subjects with higher physical capacity lost more weight, presented higher increases in fatty acids and lower changes of leptin and insulin concentrations suggesting a better metabolic flexibility. To reduce the compensatory responses that can occur with energy imbalances, our study supports to account for individual activity level before prescribing weight-loss program associating diet and exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Impact of anaemia on lung function and exercise capacity in patients with stable severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian; Zheng, Cong; Xiao, Qiang; Gong, Sugang; Zhao, Qinhua; Wang, Lan; He, Jing; Yang, Wenlan; Shi, Xue; Sun, Xingguo; Liu, Jinming

    2015-10-08

    This study intended to search for potential correlations between anaemia in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; GOLD stage III) and pulmonary function at rest, exercise capacity as well as ventilatory efficiency, using pulmonary function test (PFT) and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET). The study was undertaken at Shanghai Pulmonary Hospital, a tertiary-level centre affiliated to Tongji University. It caters to a large population base within Shanghai and referrals from centres in other cities as well. 157 Chinese patients with stable severe COPD were divided into 2 groups: the anaemia group (haemoglobin (Hb) patients. (1) Diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) corrected by Hb was significantly lower in the anaemia group ((15.3±1.9) mL/min/mm Hg) than in the non-anaemia group ((17.1±2.1) mL/min/mm Hg) (p0.05). (2) Peak Load, Peak oxygen uptake (VO2), Peak VO2%pred, Peak VO2/kg, Peak O2 pulse and the ratio of VO2 increase to WR increase (ΔVO2/ΔWR) were significantly lower in the anaemia group (p0.05). (3) A strong positive correlation was found between Hb concentration and Peak VO2 in patients with anaemia (r=0.702, pexercise tolerance during exercise in patients with severe COPD. The decrease in amplitude of Hb levels is related to the quantity of oxygen uptake. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. Impaired exercise capacity, but unaltered mitochondrial respiration in skeletal or cardiac muscle of mice lacking cellular prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nico, Patrícia Barreto Costa; Lobão-Soares, Bruno; Landemberger, Michele Christine; Marques, Wilson; Tasca, Carla I; de Mello, Carlos Fernando; Walz, Roger; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Brentani, Ricardo R; Sakamoto, Américo C; Bianchin, Marino Muxfeldt

    2005-11-04

    The studies of physiological roles for cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) have focused on possible functions of this protein in the CNS, where it is largely expressed. However, the observation that PrP(c) is expressed also in muscle tissue suggests that the physiological role of PrP(c) might not be limited to the central nervous system. In the present study, we investigated possible functions of PrP(c) in muscle using PrP(c) gene (Prnp) null mice (Prnp(0/0)). For this purpose, we submitted Prnp(0/0) animals to different protocols of exercise, and compared their performance to that of their respective wild-type controls. Prnp(0/0) mice showed an exercise-dependent impairment of locomotor activity. In searching for possible mechanisms associated with the impairment observed, we evaluated mitochondrial respiration (MR) in skeletal or cardiac muscle from these mice during resting or after different intensities of exercise. Baseline MR (states 3 and 4), respiratory control ratio (RCR) and mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi) were evaluated and were not different in skeletal or cardiac muscle tissue of Prnp(0/0) mice when compared with wild-type animals. We concluded that Prnp(0/0) mice show impairment of swimming capacity, perhaps reflecting impairment of muscular activity under more extreme exercise conditions. In spite of the mitochondrial abnormalities reported in Prnp(0/0) mice, our observation seems not to be related to MR. Our results indicate that further investigations should be conducted in order to improve our knowledge about the function of PrP(c) in muscle physiology and its possible role in several different neuromuscular pathologies.

  20. Feasibility, physical capacity, and health benefits of a multidimensional exercise program for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Midtgaard, Julie; Rorth, Mikael

    2003-01-01

    ) participated in groups of seven to nine patients for 9 h weekly for 6 weeks. Physical capacity in terms of repetition maximum (RM) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO(2)max), physical activity level and psychosocial wellbeing (EORTC QLQ-C30, SF-36, HAD) were compared prior to and after completion of the program....... The program was safe and well tolerated. The completion rate was 85.2%. Highly significant increases in physical capacity (1RM, VO(2)max) and an improved level of physical activity were achieved. Quality of life and general wellbeing assessments indicated improvements in several measures, but without reaching...

  1. Effects of Upper Limb Exercises on Physical Capacity and Heart Function in Quadriplegics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanupriya Arora

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Wheelchairs are the prime mobility aid of persons with spinal cord injuries. Manual wheelchair propulsion puts a lot of demand on the cardiopulmonary as well as the skeletal system. The main purpose of the study was to compare the effects of both arm ergometry training and progressive resistance exercise training of upper limbs on resting heart rate and distance covered during wheelchair propulsion in paraplegics. Methods: A convenience sample of 30 male subjects took were randomly assigned to two groups. Participants were spinal cord injured patients recruited from the Indian Spinal Injuries Centre, New Delhi. Each group consisted of 15 subjects. Group 1 received arm ergometrytraining and group 2 received progressive resistance exercise training. The resting heart rate and distance covered during wheelchair propulsion in a 3 minutes task ofthe wheelchair circuit was measured before and after 4 weeks of training. Results: The post intervention resting heart rate and distance covered during wheelchair propulsion after 4 weeks between the two groups showed significant differences. In group 1, resting heart rate was 77.53±3.52 beats/min and in group 2 resting heart rate was 82.33±3.69 beats/min (mean±SD. In group 1, the distance covered during wheelchair propulsion was 305.19±17.21 meters and in group 2 it was 250.71+20.59 meters. Discussion: The arm ergometry training may be a better choice of exercise for improving the cardiovascular and functional aspect of spinal cord injury patients who are dependent on wheelchairs for mobility.

  2. Depression and its relationship with poor exercise capacity, BODE index and muscle wasting in COPD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-shair, Khaled; Dockry, Rachel; Mallia-Milanes, Brendan

    2009-01-01

    = depression scales. Wasted patients appeared to have higher depression scores, but the difference was statistically insignificant. CONCLUSION: The administration of different depression scales may......BACKGROUND: The prevalence of depression in stable COPD patients varies markedly, possibly because of use of different scales. We aimed to assess depression using 2 different depression scales and to examine the association between depression and poor exercise performance, BODE index and muscle...... wasting in clinically stable COPD patients. METHODS: 122 stable COPD patients were assessed with the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and the Brief Assessment Schedule Depression Cards (BASDEC). We also assessed patients with spirometry, bioelectrical impedance analysis, 6-minute...

  3. Physical exercise modifies the functional capacity of elderly patients on hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moane Marchesan

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Patients on hemodialysis (HD improve functional capacity after physical training. However, little is discussed about these effects in elderly patients, since these are usually excluded of studies, due to their physical disabilities and other deficits. Objective To analyze the effects of aerobic and resistance training in the functional capacity of elderly patients submitted to HD. Methods Studied participants were 15 patients, of both genders, and aged over 60 years. Aerobic and resistance training was carried out during the hemodialysis session, three times per week, during four months. Patients were distributed into control (CG and experimental (EG groups. Functional capacity was assessed by six-minute walk (6MW, sit-to-stand (STS and respiratory muscle strength tests. Results After the physical training, EG presented a significant increase in the distance covered in 6MW (Z = 2.521, p < .012, respiratory muscle strength (inspiratory pressure: Z = 2.533, p < .011; expiratory pressure: Z = 2.536, p < .011; and in number of STS repetitions (2.54; p <.001. Conclusion The training modified the functional capacity of the HD patients, contributing to their rehabilitation.

  4. Comparison of Models for Ball Bearing Dynamic Capacity and Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pradeep K.; Oswald, Fred B.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    2015-01-01

    Generalized formulations for dynamic capacity and life of ball bearings, based on the models introduced by Lundberg and Palmgren and Zaretsky, have been developed and implemented in the bearing dynamics computer code, ADORE. Unlike the original Lundberg-Palmgren dynamic capacity equation, where the elastic properties are part of the life constant, the generalized formulations permit variation of elastic properties of the interacting materials. The newly updated Lundberg-Palmgren model allows prediction of life as a function of elastic properties. For elastic properties similar to those of AISI 52100 bearing steel, both the original and updated Lundberg-Palmgren models provide identical results. A comparison between the Lundberg-Palmgren and the Zaretsky models shows that at relatively light loads the Zaretsky model predicts a much higher life than the Lundberg-Palmgren model. As the load increases, the Zaretsky model provides a much faster drop off in life. This is because the Zaretsky model is much more sensitive to load than the Lundberg-Palmgren model. The generalized implementation where all model parameters can be varied provides an effective tool for future model validation and enhancement in bearing life prediction capabilities.

  5. [The relationship between pulmonary function and exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with ankylosing spondylitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyol, Gonca; Özalevli, Sevgi; Uçan, Eyüp Sabri

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis causes restrictive respiratory disorder by limiting the expansion of the chest because of the costosternal and costovertebral joints. Our study is planned to evaluate the respiratory functions of the ankylosing spondylitis patients who have a high rate of pulmonary involvement, and to compare the results with the exercise capacity and life quality of these patients. There were 27 (18 male, 9 female) Norvegian patients who came to Turkey and had ankylosing spondylitis diagnose according to Modified New York criterias, to have a routine physical therapy and rehabilitation programme with an average age of 50.6 ± 6.6 years. The patients' clinical histories were taken. Pulmonary function tests were performed with spirometry and pulmonary muscle strength was measured with mouth pressure measure. 6 minute walk test was performed to determine exercise capacity and Short Form-36 Life Quality Questionairre was used to evaluate life quality of the patients. The patients had 18.85 ± 10.64 average diagnose duration and the expected FEV1 value of the patients was 3.75 ± 0.88 L/sec, FEV1/FVC ratio was 80.44 ± 6.42, MIP was 62.96 ± 20.61 and MEP was 80.22 ± 21.12. 40.7% of the patients had positive smoking history while 14.8 % had dyspnea and 11.1% had symptoms of caughing-sputum. Walking distance was 595.50 ± 83.20 metre. Life quality category scores were 42.82 ± 16.78 minimally, 83.58 ± 23.06 maximally. Pulmonary function and pulmonary muscle strength values were similar in smoking and non-smoking patients. But in smoking patients, physical function and social function categories of quality of life survey scores were found lower than non-smoking patients. Respiratory and other parameters were high related to high standarts in treatment and following and exercise habit of the patients in Norway. Accordingly, it is thought that an appropriate medical treatment and exercise as a lifestyle habits of the patients reduce the negative effects of

  6. Computer model of cardiovascular control system responses to exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croston, R. C.; Rummel, J. A.; Kay, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    Approaches of systems analysis and mathematical modeling together with computer simulation techniques are applied to the cardiovascular system in order to simulate dynamic responses of the system to a range of exercise work loads. A block diagram of the circulatory model is presented, taking into account arterial segments, venous segments, arterio-venous circulation branches, and the heart. A cardiovascular control system model is also discussed together with model test results.

  7. The strengh model of self-control in sport and exercise psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Englert, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The strength model of self-control assumes that all acts of self-control (e.g., emotion regulation, persistence) are empowered by a single global metaphorical strength that has limited capacity. This strength can become temporarily depleted after a primary self-control act, which, in turn, can impair performance in subsequent acts of self-control. Recently, the assumptions of the strength model of self-control also have been adopted and tested in the field of sport and exercise psychology. Th...

  8. Introducing Earth Sciences Students to Modeling Using MATLAB Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. S.

    2003-12-01

    While we subject our students to math and physics and chemistry courses to complement their geological studies, we rarely allow them to experience the joys of modeling earth systems. Given the degree to which modern earth sciences relies upon models of complex systems, it seems appropriate to allow our students to develop some experience with this activity. In addition, as modeling is an unforgivingly logical exercise, it demands the student absorb the fundamental concepts, the assumptions behind them, and the means of constraining the relevant parameters in a problem. These concepts commonly include conservation of some quantity, the fluxes of that quantity, and careful prescription of the boundary and initial conditions. I have used MATLAB as an entrance to this world, and will illustrate the products of the exercises we have worked. This software is platform-independent, and has a wonderful graphics package (including movies) that is embedded intimately as one-to-several line calls. The exercises should follow a progression from simple to complex, and serve to introduce the many discrete tasks within modeling. I advocate full immersion in the first exercise. Example exercises include: growth of spatter cones (summation of parabolic trajectories of lava bombs); response of thermal profiles in the earth to varying surface temperature (thermal conduction); hillslope or fault scarp evolution (topographic diffusion); growth and subsidence of volcanoes (flexure); and coral growth on a subsiding platform in the face of sealevel fluctuations (coral biology and light extinction). These exercises can be motivated by reading a piece in the classical or modern literature that either describes a model, or better yet serves to describe the system well, but does not present a model. I have found that the generation of movies from even the early simulation exercises serves as an additional motivator for students. We discuss the models in each class meeting, and learn that there

  9. [Improvement in quality of life and exercise capacity without muscular biology changes after general training in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Guardia, Sergio; Wodja, Emil; Gorostiza, Amaya; López de Santamaría, Elena; Gea, Joaquim; Gáldiz, Juan B; Sliwinski, Pawel; Barreiro, Esther

    2013-03-02

    Despite the beneficial effects of exercise training in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, several studies have revealed functional and biological abnormalities in their peripheral muscles. The objective was to determine whether exercise training of high intensity and long duration modifies oxidative stress levels and structure of respiratory and peripheral muscles of severe COPD patients, while also improving their exercise capacity and quality of life. Multicenter study (Warsaw and Barakaldo) in which 25 severe COPD out-patients were recruited from the COPD clinics. In all patients, lung and muscle functions, exercise capacity (walking test and cycloergometer) and quality of life (QoL) were assessed, and open muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis and external intercostals (n=14) were obtained before and after an exercise training program of high intensity (respiratory rehabilitation area, 70% maximal tolerated load in a cycloergometer) and long duration (10 weeks). Oxidative stress and muscle structural modifications were evaluated in all muscle biopsies using immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. In all patients, after the training program, without any drop-outs, exercise capacity and QoL improved significantly, whereas oxidative stress, muscle damage and structure were not modified in their respiratory or limb muscles compared to baseline. In patients with severe COPD, exercise training of high intensity and long duration significantly improves their exercise capacity and QoL, without inducing significant modifications on oxidative stress levels or muscle structure in their respiratory or peripheral muscles. These results may have future clinical therapeutic implications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. The effects of centre-based rehabilitation after acute myocardial infarction on exercise capacity and risk factors for coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Polona Mlakar; Barbara Salobir; Borut Jug; Nusret Čobo; Marjeta Terčelj; Mišo Šabovič

    2014-01-01

    Background Rehabilitation following acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a crucial part of secondary prevention for coronary heart disease. The aim of our study was to determine the efficiency of our national in-patient rehabilitation program in improving exercise capacity and lowering risk factors for coronary heart disease.Methods 25 patients 3-9 weeks after AMI, undergoing 2 week in-patient cardiac rehabilitation, were included in our study. We performed exercise stress testing and measure...

  11. Exercise Prevents Enhanced Postoperative Neuroinflammation and Cognitive Decline and Rectifies the Gut Microbiome in a Rat Model of Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomei Feng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionPostoperative cognitive decline (PCD can affect in excess of 10% of surgical patients and can be considerably higher with risk factors including advanced age, perioperative infection, and metabolic conditions such as obesity and insulin resistance. To define underlying pathophysiologic processes, we used animal models including a rat model of metabolic syndrome generated by breeding for a trait of low aerobic exercise tolerance. After 35 generations, the low capacity runner (LCR rats differ 10-fold in their aerobic exercise capacity from high capacity runner (HCR rats. The LCR rats respond to surgical procedure with an abnormal phenotype consisting of exaggerated and persistent PCD and failure to resolve neuroinflammation. We determined whether preoperative exercise can rectify the abnormal surgical phenotype.Materials and methodsFollowing institutional approval of the protocol each of male LCR and male HCR rats were randomly assigned to four groups and subjected to isoflurane anesthesia and tibia fracture with internal fixation (surgery or anesthesia alone (sham surgery and to a preoperative exercise regimen that involved walking for 10 km on a treadmill over 6 weeks (exercise or being placed on a stationary treadmill (no exercise. Feces were collected before and after exercise for assessment of gut microbiome. Three days following surgery or sham surgery the rats were tested for ability to recall a contextual aversive stimulus in a trace fear conditioning paradigm. Thereafter some rats were euthanized and the hippocampus harvested for analysis of inflammatory mediators. At 3 months, the remainder of the rats were tested for memory recall by the probe test in a Morris Water Maze.ResultsPostoperatively, LCR rats exhibited exaggerated cognitive decline both at 3 days and at 3 months that was prevented by preoperative exercise. Similarly, LCR rats had excessive postoperative neuroinflammation that was normalized by

  12. A Capacity Forecast Model for Volatile Data in Maintenance Logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkholz, Daniel

    2009-05-01

    Maintenance, repair and overhaul processes (MRO processes) are elaborate and complex. Rising demands on these after sales services require reliable production planning and control methods particularly for maintaining valuable capital goods. Downtimes lead to high costs and an inability to meet delivery due dates results in severe contract penalties. Predicting the required capacities for maintenance orders in advance is often difficult due to unknown part conditions unless the goods are actually inspected. This planning uncertainty results in extensive capital tie-up by rising stock levels within the whole MRO network. The article outlines an approach to planning capacities when maintenance data forecasting is volatile. It focuses on the development of prerequisites for a reliable capacity planning model. This enables a quick response to maintenance orders by employing appropriate measures. The information gained through the model is then systematically applied to forecast both personnel capacities and the demand for spare parts. The improved planning reliability can support MRO service providers in shortening delivery times and reducing stock levels in order to enhance the performance of their maintenance logistics.

  13. Feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise to assess and influence aerobic capacity early after stroke: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Oliver; Schindelholz, Matthias; Bichsel, Lukas; Schuster, Corina; de Bie, Rob A; de Bruin, Eling D; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2014-07-01

    The majority of post-stroke individuals suffer from low exercise capacity as a secondary reaction to immobility. The aim of this study was to prove the concept of feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (RATE) to assess aerobic capacity and guide cardiovascular exercise in severely impaired individuals early after stroke. Subjects underwent constant load and incremental exercise testing using a human-in-the-loop feedback system within a robotics-assisted exoskeleton (Lokomat, Hocoma AG, CH). Inclusion criteria were: stroke onset ≤8 weeks, stable medical condition, non-ambulatory status, moderate motor control of the lower limbs and appropriate cognitive function. Outcome measures included oxygen uptake kinetics, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), gas exchange threshold (GET), peak heart rate (HRpeak), peak work rate (Ppeak) and accuracy of reaching target work rate (P-RMSE). Three subjects (18-42 d post-stroke) were included. Oxygen uptake kinetics during constant load ranged from 42.0 to 60.2 s. Incremental exercise testing showed: VO2peak range 19.7-28.8 ml/min/kg, GET range 11.6-12.7 ml/min/kg, and HRpeak range 115-161 bpm. Ppeak range was 55.2-110.9 W and P-RMSE range was 3.8-7.5 W. The concept of feedback-controlled RATE for assessment of aerobic capacity and guidance of cardiovascular exercise is feasible. Further research is warranted to validate the method on a larger scale. Aerobic capacity is seriously reduced in post-stroke individuals as a secondary reaction to immobility. Robotics-assisted walking devices may have substantial clinical relevance regarding assessment and improvement of aerobic capacity early after stroke. Feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise represents a new concept for cardiovascular assessment and intervention protocols for severely impaired individuals.

  14. Modeling the capacity of riverscapes to support beaver dams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, William W.; Wheaton, Joseph M.; Bouwes, Nicolaas; Jensen, Martha L.; Gilbert, Jordan T.; Hough-Snee, Nate; Shivik, John A.

    2017-01-01

    The construction of beaver dams facilitates a suite of hydrologic, hydraulic, geomorphic, and ecological feedbacks that increase stream complexity and channel-floodplain connectivity that benefit aquatic and terrestrial biota. Depending on where beaver build dams within a drainage network, they impact lateral and longitudinal connectivity by introducing roughness elements that fundamentally change the timing, delivery, and storage of water, sediment, nutrients, and organic matter. While the local effects of beaver dams on streams are well understood, broader coverage network models that predict where beaver dams can be built and highlight their impacts on connectivity across diverse drainage networks are lacking. Here we present a capacity model to assess the limits of riverscapes to support dam-building activities by beaver across physiographically diverse landscapes. We estimated dam capacity with freely and nationally-available inputs to evaluate seven lines of evidence: (1) reliable water source, (2) riparian vegetation conducive to foraging and dam building, (3) vegetation within 100 m of edge of stream to support expansion of dam complexes and maintain large colonies, (4) likelihood that channel-spanning dams could be built during low flows, (5) the likelihood that a beaver dam is likely to withstand typical floods, (6) a suitable stream gradient that is neither too low to limit dam density nor too high to preclude the building or persistence of dams, and (7) a suitable river that is not too large to restrict dam building or persistence. Fuzzy inference systems were used to combine these controlling factors in a framework that explicitly also accounts for model uncertainty. The model was run for 40,561 km of streams in Utah, USA, and portions of surrounding states, predicting an overall network capacity of 356,294 dams at an average capacity of 8.8 dams/km. We validated model performance using 2852 observed dams across 1947 km of streams. The model showed

  15. High-intensity exercise training increases the diversity and metabolic capacity of the mouse distal gut microbiota during diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denou, Emmanuel; Marcinko, Katarina; Surette, Michael G; Steinberg, Gregory R; Schertzer, Jonathan D

    2016-06-01

    Diet and exercise underpin the risk of obesity-related metabolic disease. Diet alters the gut microbiota, which contributes to aspects of metabolic disease during obesity. Repeated exercise provides metabolic benefits during obesity. We assessed whether exercise could oppose changes in the taxonomic and predicted metagenomic characteristics of the gut microbiota during diet-induced obesity. We hypothesized that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) would counteract high-fat diet (HFD)-induced changes in the microbiota without altering obesity in mice. Compared with chow-fed mice, an obesity-causing HFD decreased the Bacteroidetes-to-Firmicutes ratio and decreased the genetic capacity in the fecal microbiota for metabolic pathways such as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. After HFD-induced obesity was established, a subset of mice were HIIT for 6 wk, which increased host aerobic capacity but did not alter body or adipose tissue mass. The effects of exercise training on the microbiota were gut segment dependent and more extensive in the distal gut. HIIT increased the alpha diversity and Bacteroidetes/Firmicutes ratio of the distal gut and fecal microbiota during diet-induced obesity. Exercise training increased the predicted genetic capacity related to the TCA cycle among other aspects of metabolism. Strikingly, the same microbial metabolism indexes that were increased by exercise were all decreased in HFD-fed vs. chow diet-fed mice. Therefore, exercise training directly opposed some of the obesity-related changes in gut microbiota, including lower metagenomic indexes of metabolism. Some host and microbial pathways appeared similarly affected by exercise. These exercise- and diet-induced microbiota interactions can be captured in feces. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  16. A Novel Exercise Thermophysiology Comfort Prediction Model with Fuzzy Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Jia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Participation in a regular exercise program can improve health status and contribute to an increase in life expectancy. However, exercise accidents like dehydration, exertional heatstroke, syncope, and even sudden death exist. If these accidents can be analyzed or predicted before they happen, it will be beneficial to alleviate or avoid uncomfortable or unacceptable human disease. Therefore, an exercise thermophysiology comfort prediction model is needed. In this paper, coupling the thermal interactions among human body, clothing, and environment (HCE as well as the human body physiological properties, a human thermophysiology regulatory model is designed to enhance the human thermophysiology simulation in the HCE system. Some important thermal and physiological performances can be simulated. According to the simulation results, a human exercise thermophysiology comfort prediction method based on fuzzy inference system is proposed. The experiment results show that there is the same prediction trend between the experiment result and simulation result about thermophysiology comfort. At last, a mobile application platform for human exercise comfort prediction is designed and implemented.

  17. Effects of Running Shoes with Abrasion Resistant Rubber Sole on the Exercise Capacity of the Human Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available With the development of industrialization, rubber has been gradually used in the manufacture of sports equipment for its favourable properties. This study involved the addition of C5 petroleum resin into brominated isobutylene-isoprene rubber (BIIR and butadiene rubber (BR while manufacturing the sole of running shoes. The effects of running shoes with abrasion resistant rubber sole on the exercise capacity of the human body were investigated by analysing the skid resistance and abrasion resistance of the running shoes, and conducting biomechanical study on naked feet and feet wearing the shoes. The results demonstrated that the rubber sole had favourable slip resistance property and mechanical properties such as stretching, abrasion resistance, and hardness. Compared to naked feet, the peak pressure intensity of the whole step of feet wearing the newly developed shoes, was significantly lower than that of feet wearing ordinary shoes. In the future, rubber can bring more comfortable experience because of its favourable properties.

  18. Insulin resistance, exercise capacity and body composition in subjects with two hypertensive parents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, U B; Dige-Petersen, H; Ibsen, H

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study insulin resistance in subjects with strong genetic predisposition to essential hypertension, compared with non-disposed subjects. SUBJECTS: Thirty normotensive subjects aged 18-35 years whose parents both had essential hypertension, and 30 age- and sex matched subjects whose...... parents were both normotensive, were studied. Subjects or parents with diabetes and morbid obesity were excluded. METHODS: The study comprised (1) a frequent sampling oral glucose tolerance test; (2) an isoglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study; (3) an analysis of body composition by dual-energy X......-ray absorptiometry; (4) an exercise test with gas exchange analysis; and (5) investigation of composition of usual diet by diet registration for 5 days. RESULTS: The 24-h diastolic blood pressure was higher in subjects predisposed to hypertension compared with the controls: 78.1 versus 74.0 mmHg (confidence interval...

  19. Bosentan Improves Exercise Capacity in Adolescents and Adults After Fontan Operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebert, Anders; Mikkelsen, Ulla Ramer; Thilen, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    of this study was therefore to examine the efficacy and safety of bosentan in Fontan patients. METHODS AND RESULTS: Seventy-five adolescents and adults were randomized 1:1 to 14 weeks of treatment with bosentan or placebo. Cardiopulmonary exercise test, functional class, blood samples, and quality......-of-life questionnaires were evaluated at baseline and at the end of treatment. Sixty-nine patients (92%) completed the study. Peak oxygen consumption increased 2.0 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) (from 28.7 to 30.7 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) in the bosentan group compared with 0.6 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) (from 28.4 to 29.0 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1...

  20. The third RAdiation transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise: Documenting progress in canopy reflectance models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widlowski, J.L.; Taberner, M.; Pinty, B.; Bruniquel-Pinel, V.; Disney, M.I.; Fernandes, R.; Gastellu-Etchegorry, J.P.; Gobron, N.; Kuusk, A.; Lavergne, T.; LeBlanc, S.; Lewis, P.E.; Martin, E.; Mõttus, M.; North, P.R.J.; Qin, W.; Robustelli, M.; Rochdi, N.; Ruiloba, R.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Verstraete, M.M.; Xie, D.

    2007-01-01

    [1] The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison ( RAMI) initiative benchmarks canopy reflectance models under well-controlled experimental conditions. Launched for the first time in 1999, this triennial community exercise encourages the systematic evaluation of canopy reflectance models on a

  1. Effectiveness of inspiratory muscle training on sleep and functional capacity to exercise in obstructive sleep apnea: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Adília Karoline Ferreira; Dornelas de Andrade, Armèle; de Medeiros, Ana Irene Carlos; de Aguiar, Maria Inês Remígio; Rocha, Taciano Dias de Souza; Pedrosa, Rodrigo Pinto; de Lima, Anna Myrna Jaguaribe

    2017-11-09

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) on sleep and functional capacity to exercise in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). This is a controlled, randomized, double-blind study conducted in 16 OSA patients divided into two groups: training (IMT: n = 8) and placebo-IMT (P-IMT: n = 8). IMT was conducted during 12 weeks with a moderate load (50-60% of maximal inspiratory pressure-MIP), while P-IMT used a load training for lung function (p > 0.05) and respiratory muscle strength (p > 0.05). Maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2Max ) was not significantly different between IMT and P-IMT group (mean difference - 1.76, confidence interval (CI) - 7.93 to 4.41, p = 0.71). The same was observed for the other ventilatory and cardiometabolic variables measured (p > 0.05). A significant improvement in sleep quality was found when Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) values of IMT and P-IMT group after training were compared (mean difference: 3.7, confidence interval 95% (CI95%) 0.6 to 6.9, p = 0.02) but no significant changes were seen in daytime sleepiness between both groups after the intervention (mean difference: 3.4, CI 95%: - 3.3 to 10.0; p = 0.29). According to these results, 12 weeks of moderate load IMT resulted in improved sleep quality, but there were no significant repercussions on functional capacity to exercise or excessive daytime sleepiness.

  2. Sarcopenia in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: Impact on muscle strength, exercise capacity and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekfani, Tarek; Pellicori, Pierpaolo; Morris, Daniel A; Ebner, Nicole; Valentova, Miroslava; Steinbeck, Lisa; Wachter, Rolf; Elsner, Sebastian; Sliziuk, Veronika; Schefold, Joerg C; Sandek, Anja; Doehner, Wolfram; Cleland, John G; Lainscak, Mitja; Anker, Stefan D; von Haehling, Stephan

    2016-11-01

    To describe the prevalence of sarcopenia in ambulatory patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and its relation to reduced exercise capacity, muscle strength, and quality of life (QoL). A total of 117 symptomatic outpatients with HFpEF were prospectively enrolled in Germany, England, and Slovenia as part of the Studies Investigating Co-morbidities Aggravating Heart Failure (SICA-HF). Appendicular skeletal muscle (ASM) mass (the sum of muscle mass in both arms and legs) was assessed by DEXA. Echocardiography, 6-minute walk testing (6-MWT), muscle strength assessment, spiroergometry and QoL evaluation using EQ-5D Questionnaire were performed. Sarcopenia was defined as ASM 2 standard deviations below the mean of a healthy reference group aged 18-40years. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the E/e' value: ≤8, 9-14, and ≥15. Sarcopenia was detected in 19.7% of all patients. These patients performed worse during 6-MWT (404±116 vs. 307±145m, p=0.003) and showed lower absolute peak oxygen consumption (1579±474 vs. 1211±442mL/min, p15 (p<0.05). Higher values of muscle strength/ASM were associated with a better QoL (r=0.5, p<0.0005). Logistic regression showed ASM to be independently associated with reduced distance walked during the 6-MWT adjusted for NYHA, height, left atrium diameter, ferritin and forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV1) (odds ratio 1.2, p=0.02). Sarcopenia affects a clinically relevant proportion of patients with HFpEF. Low ASM is strongly linked to reduced muscle strength, exercise capacity and QoL in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sildenafil increased exercise capacity during hypoxia at low altitudes and at Mount Everest base camp: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghofrani, Hossein A; Reichenberger, Frank; Kohstall, Markus G; Mrosek, Eike H; Seeger, Timon; Olschewski, Horst; Seeger, Werner; Grimminger, Friedrich

    2004-08-03

    Alveolar hypoxia causes pulmonary hypertension and enhanced right ventricular afterload, which may impair exercise tolerance. The phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor sildenafil has been reported to cause pulmonary vasodilatation. To investigate the effects of sildenafil on exercise capacity under conditions of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. University Hospital Giessen, Giessen, Germany, and the base camp on Mount Everest. 14 healthy mountaineers and trekkers. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure, cardiac output, and peripheral arterial oxygen saturation at rest and during assessment of maximum exercise capacity on cycle ergometry 1) while breathing a hypoxic gas mixture with 10% fraction of inspired oxygen at low altitude (Giessen) and 2) at high altitude (the Mount Everest base camp). Oral sildenafil, 50 mg, or placebo. At low altitude, acute hypoxia reduced arterial oxygen saturation to 72.0% (95% CI, 66.5% to 77.5%) at rest and 60.8% (CI, 56.0% to 64.5%) at maximum exercise capacity. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure increased from 30.5 mm Hg (CI, 26.0 to 35.0 mm Hg) at rest to 42.9 mm Hg (CI, 35.6 to 53.5 mm Hg) during exercise in participants taking placebo. Sildenafil, 50 mg, significantly increased arterial oxygen saturation during exercise (P = 0.005) and reduced systolic pulmonary artery pressure at rest (P < 0.001) and during exercise (P = 0.031). Of note, sildenafil increased maximum workload (172.5 W [CI, 147.5 to 200.0 W]) vs. 130.6 W [CI, 108.8 to 150.0 W]); P < 0.001) and maximum cardiac output (P < 0.001) compared with placebo. At high altitude, sildenafil had no effect on arterial oxygen saturation at rest and during exercise compared with placebo. However, sildenafil reduced systolic pulmonary artery pressure at rest (P = 0.003) and during exercise (P = 0.021) and increased maximum workload (P = 0.002) and cardiac output (P = 0.015). At high altitude, sildenafil exacerbated existing headache

  4. Benefits of exercise training and the correlation between aerobic capacity and functional outcomes and quality of life in elderly patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hsin Chen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cardiopulmonary exercise training is beneficial to people with coronary artery disease (CAD. Nevertheless, the correlation between aerobic capacity, and functional mobility and quality of life in elderly CAD patients is less addressed. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the beneficial effects of exercise training in elderly people with CAD, integrating exercise stress testing, functional mobility, handgrip strength, and health-related quality of life. Elderly people with CAD were enrolled from the outpatient clinic of a cardiac rehabilitation unit in a medical center. Participants were assigned to the exercise training group (N = 21 or the usual care group (N = 15. A total of 36 sessions of exercise training, completed in 12 weeks, was prescribed. Echocardiography, exercise stress testing, the 6-minute walking test, Timed Up and Go test, and handgrip strength testing were performed, and the Short-Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36 was administered at baseline and at 12-week follow-up. Peak oxygen consumption improved significantly after training. The heart rate recovery improved from 13.90/minute to 16.62/minute after exercise training. Functional mobility and handgrip strength also improved after training. Significant improvements were found in SF-36 physical function, social function, role limitation due to emotional problems, and mental health domains. A significant correlation between dynamic cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters, the 6-minute walking test, Timed Up and Go test, handgrip strength, and SF-36 physical function and general health domains was also detected. Twelve-week, 36-session exercise training, including moderate-intensity cardiopulmonary exercise training, strengthening exercise, and balance training, is beneficial to elderly patients with CAD, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters correlate well with balance and quality of life.

  5. Benefits of exercise training and the correlation between aerobic capacity and functional outcomes and quality of life in elderly patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Hsin; Chen, Yi-Jen; Tu, Hung-Pin; Huang, Mao-Hsiung; Jhong, Jing-Hui; Lin, Ko-Long

    2014-10-01

    Cardiopulmonary exercise training is beneficial to people with coronary artery disease (CAD). Nevertheless, the correlation between aerobic capacity, and functional mobility and quality of life in elderly CAD patients is less addressed. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the beneficial effects of exercise training in elderly people with CAD, integrating exercise stress testing, functional mobility, handgrip strength, and health-related quality of life. Elderly people with CAD were enrolled from the outpatient clinic of a cardiac rehabilitation unit in a medical center. Participants were assigned to the exercise training group (N = 21) or the usual care group (N = 15). A total of 36 sessions of exercise training, completed in 12 weeks, was prescribed. Echocardiography, exercise stress testing, the 6-minute walking test, Timed Up and Go test, and handgrip strength testing were performed, and the Short-Form 36 questionnaire (SF-36) was administered at baseline and at 12-week follow-up. Peak oxygen consumption improved significantly after training. The heart rate recovery improved from 13.90/minute to 16.62/minute after exercise training. Functional mobility and handgrip strength also improved after training. Significant improvements were found in SF-36 physical function, social function, role limitation due to emotional problems, and mental health domains. A significant correlation between dynamic cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters, the 6-minute walking test, Timed Up and Go test, handgrip strength, and SF-36 physical function and general health domains was also detected. Twelve-week, 36-session exercise training, including moderate-intensity cardiopulmonary exercise training, strengthening exercise, and balance training, is beneficial to elderly patients with CAD, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing parameters correlate well with balance and quality of life. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  6. An age-structured extension to the vectorial capacity model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliy N Novoseltsev

    Full Text Available Vectorial capacity and the basic reproductive number (R(0 have been instrumental in structuring thinking about vector-borne pathogen transmission and how best to prevent the diseases they cause. One of the more important simplifying assumptions of these models is age-independent vector mortality. A growing body of evidence indicates that insect vectors exhibit age-dependent mortality, which can have strong and varied affects on pathogen transmission dynamics and strategies for disease prevention.Based on survival analysis we derived new equations for vectorial capacity and R(0 that are valid for any pattern of age-dependent (or age-independent vector mortality and explore the behavior of the models across various mortality patterns. The framework we present (1 lays the groundwork for an extension and refinement of the vectorial capacity paradigm by introducing an age-structured extension to the model, (2 encourages further research on the actuarial dynamics of vectors in particular and the relationship of vector mortality to pathogen transmission in general, and (3 provides a detailed quantitative basis for understanding the relative impact of reductions in vector longevity compared to other vector-borne disease prevention strategies.Accounting for age-dependent vector mortality in estimates of vectorial capacity and R(0 was most important when (1 vector densities are relatively low and the pattern of mortality can determine whether pathogen transmission will persist; i.e., determines whether R(0 is above or below 1, (2 vector population growth rate is relatively low and there are complex interactions between birth and death that differ fundamentally from birth-death relationships with age-independent mortality, and (3 the vector exhibits complex patterns of age-dependent mortality and R(0 ∼ 1. A limiting factor in the construction and evaluation of new age-dependent mortality models is the paucity of data characterizing vector mortality

  7. Application of Transtheoretical Model to Exercise in Office Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodabab, Saied Saeed Mazloomy; Mohammadi, Maryam; Abad, Mohammad Ali Morowati Sharif

    2013-01-01

    Transtheoretical model is identified as a comprehensive model for behavior exercise. The aim of this study was to check the situation of stage of change in exercise behavior of office personnel of Yazd city using transtheoretical model. In a cross-sectional study, 220 office personnel selected from administrative offices of Yazd through two-stage cluster-sampling method. The instrument for data collection was a questionnaire that included demographic variables and constructs of transtheoretical model. The reliability and validity of the instruments were examined and approved by experts. The data was analyzed using SPSS soft ware. 152 males (69.1%) and 68 females (30.9%) with an average age of 34±8.68 years were selected. Sixty percent of the subjects were in precontemplation and contemplation stages and only 7.3% were in action stages. Significant differences were found between TTM constructs and stages of change (P=0.000). The results also showed significant differences between components of decisional balance and behavioral process and cognitive process with the stages of change. We found that behavioral process of change and self efficacy were the most important variables for improving levels of exercise. Most of the participants were in the precontemplation and contemplation stages and most problems were related to behavioral process and self efficacy. Therefore, strategies and programs are needed to be taken into account to improve exercise among the staff.

  8. Nutritional status is related to fat-free mass, exercise capacity and inspiratory strength in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Pollyane Galinari; Silva, Bruno Moreira; Brunetto, Antonio Fernando

    2010-06-01

    Being overweight or obese is associated with a higher rate of survival in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This paradoxical relationship indicates that the influence of nutritional status on functional parameters should be further investigated. To investigate the impact of nutritional status on body composition, exercise capacity and respiratory muscle strength in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Thirty-two patients (nine women) were divided into three groups according to their body mass indices (BMI): overweight/obese (25 exercise capacity (90+/-8 vs. 79+/-6 vs. 57+/-8 m, p=0.02) and maximal inspiratory pressure (63+/-7 vs. 57+/-5 vs. 35+/-8 % predicted, p=0.03) in comparison to normal weight and underweight patients, respectively. In addition, on backward multiple regression analysis, FFMI was the unique independent predictor of exercise capacity (partial r=0.52, pexercise capacity and inspiratory muscle strength than patients with the same degree of airflow obstruction who were of normal weight or underweight, and higher FFM was independently associated with higher exercise capacity. These characteristics of overweight or obese patients might counteract the drawbacks of excess weight and lead to an improved prognosis in COPD.

  9. Modeling Climate-Water Impacts on Electricity Sector Capacity Expansion: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, S. M.; Macknick, J.; Averyt, K.; Meldrum, J.

    2014-05-01

    Climate change has the potential to exacerbate water availability concerns for thermal power plant cooling, which is responsible for 41% of U.S. water withdrawals. This analysis describes an initial link between climate, water, and electricity systems using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) electricity system capacity expansion model. Average surface water projections from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 3 (CMIP3) data are applied to surface water rights available to new generating capacity in ReEDS, and electric sector growth is compared with and without climate-influenced water rights. The mean climate projection has only a small impact on national or regional capacity growth and water use because most regions have sufficient unappropriated or previously retired water rights to offset climate impacts. Climate impacts are notable in southwestern states that purchase fewer water rights and obtain a greater share from wastewater and other higher-cost water resources. The electric sector climate impacts demonstrated herein establish a methodology to be later exercised with more extreme climate scenarios and a more rigorous representation of legal and physical water availability.

  10. Continuous positive airway pressure improves exercise capacity and heart rate recovery in obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Micha T; Ammann, Peter; Münzer, Thomas; Schoch, Otto D; Korte, Wolfgang; Hürny, Christoph; Myers, Jonathan; Rickli, Hans

    2009-02-06

    There is a relationship between obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and heart failure (HF). Peak oxygen consumption (peak VO(2)), heart rate recovery, and N-terminal-pro-BNP (NT-proBNP) are strong prognostic predictors in HF. The effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on these parameters in OSA patients are not well defined. Forty patients with newly diagnosed OSA [apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) 37 (20-65) h(-1)] underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing for assessment of peak VO(2) and heart rate recovery at one (HRR-1) and two (HRR-2) minutes after exercise termination as well as NT-proBNP measurement at baseline and after 7.9+/-1.4 months of effective nCPAP (nightly usage>3.5 h). The effects of nCPAP were compared in patients with mild-to-moderate (AHIor=30 h(-1); n=24) OSA. In the group as a whole, peak VO(2) (baseline: 31.9+/-9.3 vs. follow-up: 33.7+/-9.0 ml/kg/min; p=0.02) and HRR-2 [38 (32-43) vs. 42 (32-47) bpm; p=0.01] but not HRR-1 [22 (15-26) vs. 22 (16-27) bpm; p=0.16] improved from baseline to follow-up. The effect on peak VO(2) was mainly driven by a trend towards an increase in patients with mild-to-moderate OSA (31.8+/-10.7 vs. 33.9+/-10.2 ml/kg/min; p=0.08), whereas an effect on HRR-1 [20 (15-23) vs. 21 (16-26) bpm; p=0.03] and HRR-2 [38 (29-42) vs. 42 (33-47) bpm; p=0.004] was observed only in those with severe OSA. NT-proBNP levels remained unchanged [21 (11-45) vs. 26 (5-52) pg/ml; p=0.6]. Treatment with nCPAP is associated with an improvement in peak VO(2) and heart rate recovery in patients with OSA.

  11. The effect of chlorpyrifos on thermogenic capacity of bank voles selected for increased aerobic exercise metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheyongera, Geoffrey; Grzebyk, Katherine; Rudolf, Agata M; Sadowska, Edyta T; Koteja, Paweł

    2016-04-01

    Agro-chemicals potentially cause adverse effects in non-target organisms. The rate of animal energy metabolism can influence their susceptibility to pesticides by influencing food consumption, biotransformation and elimination rates of toxicants. We used experimental evolution to study the effects of inherent differences in energy metabolism rate and exposure to the organophosphate insecticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF) on thermogenic capacity in a wild rodent, the bank vole (Myodes = Clethrionomys glareolus). The voles were sampled from four replicate lines selected for high swim-induced aerobic metabolism (A) and four unselected control (C) lines. Thermogenic capacity, measured as the maximum cold-induced rate of oxygen consumption (VO2cold), was higher in the A - than C lines, and it decreased after continuous exposure to CPF via food or after a single dose administered via oral gavage, but only when measured shortly after exposure. VO2cold measured 24 h after repeated exposure was not affected. In addition, gavage with a single dose led to decreased food consumption and loss in body mass. Importantly, the adverse effects of CPF did not differ between the selected and control lines. Therefore, exposure to CPF has adverse effects on thermoregulatory performance and energy balance in this species. The effects are short-lived and their magnitude is not associated with the inherent level of energy metabolism. Even without severe symptoms of poisoning, fitness can be compromised under harsh environmental conditions, such as cold and wet weather. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. An Experimental Model for Resistance Exercise in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Nicastro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop an equipment and system of resistance exercise (RE, based on squat-type exercise for rodents, with control of training variables. We developed an operant conditioning system composed of sound, light and feeding devices that allowed optimized RE performance by the animal. With this system, it is not necessary to impose fasting or electric shock for the animal to perform the task proposed (muscle contraction. Furthermore, it is possible to perform muscle function tests in vivo within the context of the exercise proposed and control variables such as intensity, volume (sets and repetitions, and exercise session length, rest interval between sets and repetitions, and concentric strength. Based on the experiments conducted, we demonstrated that the model proposed is able to perform more specific control of other RE variables, especially rest interval between sets and repetitions, and encourages the animal to exercise through short-term energy restriction and “disturbing” stimulus that do not promote alterations in body weight. Therefore, despite experimental limitations, we believe that this RE apparatus is closer to the physiological context observed in humans.

  13. Common Exercises in Whole Building HAM Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Woloszyn, Monika

    2009-01-01

    Subtask 1 of the IEA ECBCS Annex 41 (IEA 2007) project had the purpose to advance development in modelling of integral Heat, Air and Moisture (HAM) transfer processes that take place in “whole buildings”. Such modelling considers all relevant elements of buildings: The indoor air, building envelope...

  14. Common Exercises in Whole Building HAM Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Woloszyn, Monika

    2008-01-01

    Subtask 1 of the IEA Annex 41 project had the purpose to advance the development in modelling the integral heat, air and moisture transfer processes that take place in “whole buildings”. Such modelling comprises all relevant elements of buildings: The indoor air, the building envelope, the inside...

  15. Effects of high altitude training on exercise capacity: fact or myth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paula, Paula; Niebauer, Josef

    2012-03-01

    High altitude training has become a mainstay in endurance sports, with live high-train low as the current protocol of choice. Athletes either live or sleep in artificial or natural hypoxic conditions with the aim to increase serum erythropoietin concentrations, which are thought to improve maximum oxygen uptake and thus exercise performance. Changes, however, are not very striking and only apparent in so-called responders, who are not a well-defined group and may be as little as 50% of the trained study population. Whereas some studies show minor improvement, others report no change or even worsening. Furthermore, the mechanisms behind the proposed beneficial changes remain obscure and are far from being proven. There is an evident lack of sufficiently powered randomized, double-blinded studies, with training protocols that are identical for all groups and groups that are indeed comparable. Several studies discriminate between responders and non-responders, without clearly assessing the characteristics of the so-called responders. Until this has been done, it remains unclear if such a group really exists and how these subjects are characterized. This, however, would be of immense value, so protocols could be tailored to athletes' needs. Taken together, the current literature on natural or artificial hypoxia somewhat documents improved performance at high but not low altitude.

  16. Anxiety in Patients with Chronic Cor Pulmonale and Its Effect on Exercise Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenxin; Yao, Jiwei; Chen, Longfei

    2016-08-01

    Chronic cor pulmonale (CCP) is a disease of increasing frequency in Chinese people and profoundly influences their health. CCP is often accompanied by anxiety and other psychological problems, and patients may show signs of motor function decline. However, little attention has been paid to the impact of CCP-related psychological problems on motor function. Patients with CCP receiving in- or outpatient treatment in the Respiratory Department of Xiangya Hospital of Central South University and the Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University in Hunan Province between January and July 2015 were investigated. A total of 167 questionnaires were distributed, with 160 valid questionnaires ultimately collected from 95 male and 65 female participants of mean age (± standard deviation) of 68.2 ± 12.3 yr. Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS) scoring was adopted to evaluate anxiety in the participants, and heart rate, blood pressure, breathing rate, 6-minute walk test and Borg index score were combined to detect the exercise capability of the participants. Anxiety was present in 48.8% of patients. Heart rate, systolic blood pressure, breathing rate and the Borg score of CCP patients with anxiety were higher than in CCP patients without anxiety ( P < 0.05), while mean walking distance was shorter ( P < 0.05). The rate of anxiety in patients with CCP is relatively high. Anxiety reduces motor function in CCP patients; therefore, in the process of treating patients with CCP, effort should be made to engage simultaneously patients in psychotherapy.

  17. Comparison of exercise capacity with resting left ventricular function evaluated by various non-invasive methods in patients with old myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamabe, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Katsuya; Tajiri, Eiichi; Hayakawa, Masanori; Minamiji, Katsumi

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between exercise capacity and resting left ventricular function assessed by several non-invasive methods in patients with old myocardial infarction was investigated. Subjects were 25 male patients whose endpoint was either dyspnea or general fatigue at the symptom-limited maximal graded treadmill exercise test according to Bruce protocol. The indices obtained by non-invasive cardiac examinations included left ventricular fractional shortening (% FS), scintigraphic infact size (% SIS) by 201 Tl myocardial scintigraphy and PEP/ET. A significant correlation of exercise duration with % FS (r = 0.67, p < 0.001) or with % SIS (r = -0.55, p < 0.02) indicated that the more impaired resting left ventricular function, the more was decreased exercise capacity. Also, a significant correlation of systolic blood pressure at the endpoint in exercise test with % FS (r = 0.58, p < 0.005) or with % SIS (r = 0.69, p < 0.001) indicated that inadequate blood pressure response might be partially attributed to impaired left ventricular function during exercise. The response of heart rate at the Bruce protocol stage I correlated with % FS (r = -0.67, p < 0.001) and with % SIS (r = 0.53, p < 0.02), respectively. These findings may be interpreted as chronotropic compensatory mechanism for limited stroke volume during exercise in patients with impaired left ventricular function. Thus, it was concluded that resting left ventricular function assessed by non-invasive cardiac examinations may predict exercise capacity prior to the test to some extent. These informations can be utilized for the decision of the planning at cardiac rehabilitation and also for the guidance in daily activities. (J.P.N.)

  18. Optimization Model for Capacity Management and Bed Scheduling for Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitepu, Suryati; Mawengkang, Herman; Husein, Ismail

    2018-01-01

    Hospital is a very important institution to provide health care for people. It is not surprising that nowadays the people’s demands for hospital is increasing.. However, due to the rising cost of healthcare services, hospitals need to consider efficiencies in order to overcome these two problems. This paper deals with an integrated strategy of staff capacity management and bed allocation planning to tackle these problems. Mathematically, the strategy can be modeled as an integer linear programming problem. We solve the model using a direct neighborhood search approach, based on the notion of superbasic variables.

  19. An Improved Dynamic Model for the Respiratory Response to Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leidy Y. Serna

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory system modeling has been extensively studied in steady-state conditions to simulate sleep disorders, to predict its behavior under ventilatory diseases or stimuli and to simulate its interaction with mechanical ventilation. Nevertheless, the studies focused on the instantaneous response are limited, which restricts its application in clinical practice. The aim of this study is double: firstly, to analyze both dynamic and static responses of two known respiratory models under exercise stimuli by using an incremental exercise stimulus sequence (to analyze the model responses when step inputs are applied and experimental data (to assess prediction capability of each model. Secondly, to propose changes in the models' structures to improve their transient and stationary responses. The versatility of the resulting model vs. the other two is shown according to the ability to simulate ventilatory stimuli, like exercise, with a proper regulation of the arterial blood gases, suitable constant times and a better adjustment to experimental data. The proposed model adjusts the breathing pattern every respiratory cycle using an optimization criterion based on minimization of work of breathing through regulation of respiratory frequency.

  20. Exercise and older adults: changing behavior with the transtheoretical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Patricia M; Reibe, Deborah; Padula, Cynthia A; Nigg, Claudio

    2002-01-01

    The loss of muscle strength, decreased flexibility and range of motion, and decreased sense of balance that frequently accompany aging contribute to falls and functional decline. Even in advanced old age, one can improve strength, decrease the risk of falls, improve cardiorespiratory fitness, and improve ability to live independently. The Transtheoretical Model (TTM) of behavior change is an internationally recognized model that holds much promise for health behavior changes of all types. This article outlines the effects of exercise on age-related changes in the musculoskeletal system and describes the TTM as a model useful to help older adults change their exercise behavior. Research studies are documented that support the effectiveness of the TTM in changing behavior. Application of the model is described with specific examples illustrated in two case studies.

  1. Bayesian structural equation modeling in sport and exercise psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenling, Andreas; Ivarsson, Andreas; Johnson, Urban; Lindwall, Magnus

    2015-08-01

    Bayesian statistics is on the rise in mainstream psychology, but applications in sport and exercise psychology research are scarce. In this article, the foundations of Bayesian analysis are introduced, and we will illustrate how to apply Bayesian structural equation modeling in a sport and exercise psychology setting. More specifically, we contrasted a confirmatory factor analysis on the Sport Motivation Scale II estimated with the most commonly used estimator, maximum likelihood, and a Bayesian approach with weakly informative priors for cross-loadings and correlated residuals. The results indicated that the model with Bayesian estimation and weakly informative priors provided a good fit to the data, whereas the model estimated with a maximum likelihood estimator did not produce a well-fitting model. The reasons for this discrepancy between maximum likelihood and Bayesian estimation are discussed as well as potential advantages and caveats with the Bayesian approach.

  2. Cross-sectional and longitudinal examination of exercise capacity in elite youth badminton players

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Møller; Badault, Benjamin; Nybo, Lars

    2018-01-01

    Badminton-specific speed and endurance performance was evaluated in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of elite youth players and compared to the physiological capacities of world top-50 singles players.The cross-sectional study involved ten males in the category U15 (..., nine U19 and four senior elite players. They performed 30-m sprint, counter-movement jump (CMJ) and badminton-specific speed (B-SPEED) and endurance (B-ENDURANCE) tests. The longitudinal data were collected for ten U15 players with 1- and 2-year follow-up measures.Compared to seniors, B-SPEED...... that B-SPEED performance improved from a 19±5 % (P

  3. Exercise Capacity and Selected Physiological Factors by Ancestry and Residential Altitude: Cross-Sectional Studies of 9–10-Year-Old Children in Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, Sveinung; Andersen, Lars Bo; Stigum, Hein; Ouzhuluobu; Nafstad, Per; Wu, Tianyi; Bjertness, Espen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bianba, Sveinung Bernsten, Lars Bo Andersen, Hein Stegum, Ouzhuluobu, Per Nafstad, Tianyi Wu, and Espen Bjertness. Exercise capacity and selected physiological factors by ancestry and residential altitude—Cross-sectional studies of 9–10-year-old children in Tibet. High Alt Med Biol. 15:162–169, 2014.—Aim: Several physiological compensatory mechanisms have enabled Tibetans to live and work at high altitude, including increased ventilation and pulmonary diffusion capacity, both of which serve to increase oxygen transport in the blood. The aim of the present study was to compare exercise capacity (maximal power output) and selected physiological factors (arterial oxygen saturation and heart rate at rest and during maximal exercise, resting hemoglobin concentration, and forced vital capacity) in groups of native Tibetan children living at different residential altitudes (3700 vs. 4300 m above sea level) and across ancestry (native Tibetan vs. Han Chinese children living at the same altitude of 3700 m). Methods: A total of 430 9–10-year-old native Tibetan children from Tingri (4300 m) and 406 native Tibetan- and 406 Han Chinese immigrants (77% lowland-born and 33% highland-born) from Lhasa (3700 m) participated in two cross-sectional studies. The maximal power output (Wmax) was assessed using an ergometer cycle. Results: Lhasa Tibetan children had a 20% higher maximal power output (watts/kg) than Tingri Tibetan and 4% higher than Lhasa Han Chinese. Maximal heart rate, arterial oxygen saturation at rest, lung volume, and arterial oxygen saturation were significantly associated with exercise capacity at a given altitude, but could not fully account for the differences in exercise capacity observed between ancestry groups or altitudes. Conclusions: The superior exercise capacity in native Tibetans vs. Han Chinese may reflect a better adaptation to life at high altitude. Tibetans at the lower residential altitude of 3700 m demonstrated a better

  4. Antioxidant Capacity: Experimental Determination by EPR Spectroscopy and Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Justyna; Bartoszek, Mariola; Chorążewski, Mirosław

    2015-07-22

    A new method of determining antioxidant capacity based on a mathematical model is presented in this paper. The model was fitted to 1000 data points of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy measurements of various food product samples such as tea, wine, juice, and herbs with Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) values from 20 to 2000 μmol TE/100 mL. The proposed mathematical equation allows for a determination of TEAC of food products based on a single EPR spectroscopy measurement. The model was tested on the basis of 80 EPR spectroscopy measurements of herbs, tea, coffee, and juice samples. The proposed model works for both strong and weak antioxidants (TEAC values from 21 to 2347 μmol TE/100 mL). The determination coefficient between TEAC values obtained experimentally and TEAC values calculated with proposed mathematical equation was found to be R(2) = 0.98. Therefore, the proposed new method of TEAC determination based on a mathematical model is a good alternative to the standard EPR method due to its being fast, accurate, inexpensive, and simple to perform.

  5. Biomechanical Modeling of the Deadlift Exercise on the HULK Device to Improve the Efficacy of Resistive Exercise Microgravity Countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagodnik, K. M.; Thompson, W. K.; Gallo, C. A.; Crentsil, L.; Funk, J. H.; Funk, N. W.; Perusek, G. P.; Sheehan, C. C.; Lewandowski, B. E.

    2016-01-01

    Extended spaceflight typically results in the loss of muscular strength and bone density due to exposure to microgravity. Resistive exercise countermeasures have been developed to maintain musculoskeletal health during spaceflight. The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) is the "gold standard" of available devices; however, its footprint and volume are too large for use in space capsules employed in exploration missions. The Hybrid Ultimate Lifting Kit (HULK) device, with its smaller footprint, is a prototype exercise device for exploration missions. This work models the deadlift exercise being performed on the HULK device using biomechanical simulation, with the long-term goal to improve and optimize astronauts' exercise prescriptions, to maximize the benefit of exercise while minimizing time and effort invested.

  6. Physical activity levels in children and adolescents are reduced after the Fontan procedure, independent of exercise capacity, and are associated with lower perceived general health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrindle, Brian W; Williams, Richard V; Mital, Seema; Clark, Bernard J; Russell, Jennifer L; Klein, Gloria; Eisenmann, Joey C

    2007-06-01

    To determine physical activity levels in paediatric patients who underwent the Fontan procedure, and their relationship to functional status and exercise capacity. We studied 147 patients (ages 7-18 years) at a median of 8.1 years after Fontan, as part of the Pediatric Heart Network cross-sectional study of Fontan survivors. Assessment included medical history, self-reported physical activity, parent-completed Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ), cardiopulmonary exercise testing and physical activity level measured by accelerometry (MTI Actigraph). Measured time spent in moderate and vigorous activity was markedly below normal at all ages, particularly in females, and was not significantly related to self-reported activity levels, or to maximum Vo2, Vo2 at anaerobic threshold or maximum work rate on exercise testing. Lower measured activity levels were significantly related to lower perceived general health but not to self-esteem, physical functioning, social impact of physical limitations or overall physical or psychosocial health summary scores. Reduced exercise capacity was more strongly related than measured activity levels to lower scores in general health, self-esteem and physical functioning. Physical activity levels are reduced after Fontan, independent of exercise capacity, and are associated with lower perceived general health but not other aspects of functional status.

  7. Potential effect of 6 versus 12-weeks of physical training on cardiac autonomic function and exercise capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi-Silva, A; Mendes, R G; Trimer, R; Oliveira, C R; Fregonezi, G A; Resqueti, V R; Arena, R; Sampaio-Jorge, L M; Costa, D

    2015-04-01

    Exercise is an important part of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) treatment. However, it is not know about the minimum effective time of physical training that could beneficially modify the cardiac autonomic modulation (CAM) and exercise capacity in these patients. To contrast the potential effects of a physical training program (PTP), for 6 versus 12 weeks, on CAM by linear and nonlinear heart rate variability (HRV) indices and exercise capacity in COPD patients. Prospective randomized controlled trial. Outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation. Twenty moderate-to-severe COPD patients were randomly assigned to either a training group (N.=10) or a control group (N.=10). HRV at rest and during submaximal test was determined by linear (rMSSD and SDNN) and non-linear indices (SD1, SD2 and sample entropy [SE]). In addition, key responses were obtained during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET), the walking distance (WD) during the six minute walking test and submaximal constant speed testing (CST). PTP consisted of 30 minutes of aerobic exercise training on a treadmill, 3 times per week at 70% of CPET peak speed rate. Patients were evaluated on baseline, 6 and 12 weeks. Significant improvements in HRV indices, WD, as well as, other physiological responses were observed after 6 weeks of the PTP and maintained until 12 weeks (Pexercise capacity in COPD patients.

  8. The effect of a short-term pulmonary rehabilitation on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients hospitalised with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mir Shad; Talwar, Deepak; Jain, S K

    2014-01-01

    Recent research shows that pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) programmes in patients with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), reduced dyspnoea, improved exercise capacity, and prevented occurrence of further exacerbations. To evaluate the utility of a 3-week PR programme in patients with AECOPD. Patients admitted with AECOPD, following clinical stabilisation in the respiratroy intensive care unit (RICU), were alternately assigned to intervention (n=15); and control groups (n=15), respectively. Baseline assessment included spirometry, six-minute walk test (6MWT), symptom limited cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET), health-related quality of life (HRQoL) assessment by generic questionnaire medical outcomes study short form (S-F 36) questionnaire and dyspnoea evaluation by Borg score. The intervention group patients were treated with usual care plus PR exercises in the form of 20 minutes each of walking, bicycle ergometry and resistance exercises, thrice-weekly for three weeks. The control group patients were treated with only the usual care. After discharge from hospital the treatment regimens were continued on alternate days on outpatient basis, for a total of three weeks. The assessment was repeated in both the groups after three weeks. Nine sessions of PR exercises produced statistically significant improvement in general well-being, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), 6MWT parameters, exercise capacity, peak oxygen uptake and volume of oxygen consumption (VO2)/Watts slope on CPET in patients with AECOPD. Short duration PR programmes appear to be helpful in the management of AECOPD.

  9. Longitudinal relationship between wheelchair exercise capacity and life satisfaction in patients with spinal cord injury : A cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koppenhagen, Casper Floris; Post, Marcel; de Groot, Sonja; van Leeuwen, Christel; van Asbeck, Floris; Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke; van der Woude, Lucas; Lindeman, Eline

    Objective: To examine the relationship between wheelchair exercise capacity and life satisfaction in persons with spinal cord injury from the start of active inpatient rehabilitation up to 5 years after discharge. Design: Prospective cohort study. Subjects: Persons with spinal cord injury, aged

  10. The effect of a multidimensional exercise intervention on physical capacity, well-being and quality of life in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamsen, Lis; Quist, Morten; Midtgaard, Julie

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of a multidimensional exercise intervention focusing on physical capacity; one-repetition maximum (1RM) and maximum oxygen uptake (VO2Max), activity level, general well-being and quality of life in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy...

  11. Physical exercise for functional capacity, blood immune function, fatigue, and quality of life in high-risk prostate cancer patients during radiotherapy: a prospective, randomized clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojan, Katarzyna; Kwiatkowska-Borowczyk, Eliza; Leporowska, Ewa; Górecki, Maciej; Ozga-Majchrzak, Owidia; Milecki, Tomasz; Milecki, Piotr

    2016-08-01

    During radiotherapy (RT), prostate cancer (PCa) patients may report cancer related fatigue (CRF), which impairs functional capacity, psychological status, and quality of life (QoL). RT can induce cytokine responses that could play a role in mediating radiation toxicity by increasing inflammation. While it is known that physical exercise plays an important anti-inflammatory role in healthy adults, its specific anti-inflammatory effects in PCa patients with CRF have not yet been determined. Previous studies have shown that physical exercise in cancer patients undergoing RT improves cardiac fitness, muscle strength, and QoL, however it is still unknown how physical exercise affects inflammation and its specific consequences in PCa patients. Therefore, the purpose of this trial was to examine the effect of supervised physical exercise on inflammatory blood markers, as well as the relationship of these parameters with functional capacity, fatigue, and QoL in high-risk PCa patients undergoing RT. This was a prospective, two-arm randomized controlled clinical trial. The study was performed in our outpatients center. Fifty-four high-risk PCa men were randomly allocated to two groups prior to undergoing RT. Twenty-seven patients performed supervised, moderate-intensity physical exercise (exercise group; EG) and the other 27 formed a control group that carried out normal daily physical activity (usual group; UG). The following parameters were assessed before and after RT: functional capacity, changes in blood count variables and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α), fatigue, and QoL (using FACT-F score and EORTC questionnaires). No significant differences existed between the study groups at baseline assessment. After RT, there was a significant improvement in functional capacity (P0.05) and fatigue (PFatigue level was significantly higher in the UG (F[2.126]; Pfatigue scores provided by study participants

  12. Endurance exercise promotes cardiorespiratory rehabilitation without neurorestoration in the chronic mouse model of parkinsonism with severe neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarrah, M; Pothakos, K; Novikova, L; Smirnova, I V; Kurz, M J; Stehno-Bittel, L; Lau, Y-S

    2007-10-12

    Physical rehabilitation with endurance exercise for patients with Parkinson's disease has not been well established, although some clinical and laboratory reports suggest that exercise may produce a neuroprotective effect and restore dopaminergic and motor functions. In this study, we used a chronic mouse model of Parkinsonism, which was induced by injecting male C57BL/6 mice with 10 doses of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (25 mg/kg) and probenecid (250 mg/kg) over 5 weeks. This chronic parkinsonian model displays a severe and persistent loss of nigrostriatal neurons, resulting in robust dopamine depletion and locomotor impairment in mice. Following the induction of Parkinsonism, these mice were able to sustain an exercise training program on a motorized rodent treadmill at a speed of 18 m/min, 0 degrees of inclination, 40 min/day, 5 days/week for 4 weeks. At the end of exercise training, we examined and compared their cardiorespiratory capacity, behavior, and neurochemical changes with that of the probenecid-treated control and sedentary parkinsonian mice. The resting heart rate after 4 weeks of exercise in the chronic parkinsonian mice was significantly lower than the rate before exercise, whereas the resting heart rate at the beginning and 4 weeks afterward in the control or sedentary parkinsonian mice was unchanged. Exercised parkinsonian mice also recovered from elevated electrocardiogram R-wave amplitude that was detected in the parkinsonian mice without exercise for 4 weeks. The values of oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and body heat generation in the exercised parkinsonian mice before and during the Bruce maximal exercise challenge test were all significantly lower than that of their sedentary counterparts. Furthermore, the exercised parkinsonian mice demonstrated a greater mass in the left ventricle of the heart and an increased level of citrate synthase activity in the skeletal muscles. The amphetamine-induced, dopamine

  13. Modeling nutrient filtering capacities and export fluxes in macrotidal estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnier, P.; Arndt, S.; Savenije, H.; Vanderborght, J.-P.

    2009-04-01

    A fully transient model of a macrotidal estuary (The Scheldt) has been used to quantify silica and nitrogen filtering capacities and export fluxes to the coastal zone over a period of one year. Results show that in macrotidal estuaries, the seasonally-resolved nutrient fluxes are not only affected by in-situ biogeochemical transformations, but also by nutrient flux imbalances, which result from the time-lagged response of the scalar fields to hydrological perturbations. The estuarine nutrient retention reveals also a strong temporal variability, which is driven by the complex interplay between reaction and transport. As a result, the estuarine filtering capacities cannot be constrained by the freshwater residence alone and, thus, by empirical relationships that have been established between these two parameters. Furthermore, at the seasonal scale, the nutrient export fluxes to the coastal zone cannot be quantified from the riverine loads and the estuarine filtering capacities. More sophisticated approaches to estimate the functioning and response of macrotidal estuaries are thus needed and an alternative methodology, established on the premise that physical forcing mechanisms are the dominant controls on estuarine biogeochemistry at a series of hierarchically related system levels, is briefly outlined.

  14. Effects of an Exercise Programme on Functional Capacity, Body Composition and Risk of Falls in Patients with Cirrhosis: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Román

    Full Text Available Patients with cirrhosis often have functional limitations, decreased muscle mass, and a high risk of falls. These variables could improve with exercise. The aim was to study the effects of moderate exercise on functional capacity, body composition and risk of falls in patients with cirrhosis. Twenty-three cirrhotic patients were randomized to an exercise programme (n = 14 or to a relaxation programme (n = 9. Both programmes consisted of a one-hour session 3 days a week for 12 weeks. At the beginning and end of the study, we measured functional capacity using the cardiopulmonary exercise test, evaluated body composition using anthropometry and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, and estimated risk of falls using the Timed Up&Go test. In the exercise group, cardiopulmonary exercise test showed an increase in total effort time (p<0.001 and ventilatory anaerobic threshold time (p = 0.009. Upper thigh circumference increased and mid-arm and mid-thigh skinfold thickness decreased. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry showed a decrease in fat body mass (-0.94 kg, 95%CI -0.48 to -1.41, p = 0.003 and an increase in lean body mass (1.05 kg, 95%CI 0.27 to 1.82, p = 0.01, lean appendicular mass (0.38 kg, 95%CI 0.06 to 0.69, p = 0.03 and lean leg mass (0.34 kg, 95%CI 0.10 to 0.57, p = 0.02. The Timed Up&Go test decreased at the end of the study compared to baseline (p = 0.02. No changes were observed in the relaxation group. We conclude that a moderate exercise programme in patients with cirrhosis improves functional capacity, increases muscle mass, and decreases body fat and the Timed Up&Go time.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01447537.

  15. Asymptomatic peripheral artery disease can limit maximal exercise capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients regardless of airflow obstruction and lung hyperinflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisafulli, Ernesto; Scelfo, Chiara; Tzani, Panagiota; Aiello, Marina; Bertorelli, Giuseppina; Chetta, Alfredo

    2017-06-01

    Background Silent/asymptomatic peripheral artery disease may occur in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but it is poorly investigated. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients the impact of asymptomatic/silent peripheral artery disease on maximal exercise capacity; the secondary aim was to search for predictors of peripheral artery disease. Methods We prospectively enrolled chronic obstructive pulmonary disease outpatients. Data on anthropometric characteristics, lung function, cardiopulmonary exercise test and ankle-brachial index were recorded. The cut-off of ankle-brachial index used to define patients with peripheral artery disease was ≤0.90. Results We studied 47 patients and found 24 patients (51%) who showed peripheral artery disease. As compared to patients without peripheral artery disease, patients with peripheral artery disease had lower values of peak oxygen uptake, peak workload, energy expenditure (metabolic equivalents) and heart rate recovery, but showed the same degree of airflow obstruction and static and dynamic hyperinflation. In a multivariate linear regression model performed to identify variables predicting metabolic equivalents, ankle-brachial index (β 2.59; 95% confidence interval 0.51-4.67; p = 0.016) was an independent variable. In the search for predictors of peripheral artery disease, heart rate recovery (odds ratio 8.80; 95% confidence interval 1.30-59.35; p = 0.026) increased the risk of peripheral artery disease, whereas metabolic equivalents (odds ratio 0.50; 95% confidence interval 0.26-0.94, p = 0.033) and inhaled corticosteroids+long-acting β 2 agonists (odds ratio 0.13; 95% confidence interval 0.02-0.83; p = 0.030) reduced this risk. Conclusions In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease outpatients, asymptomatic/silent peripheral artery disease affects the maximal exercise capacity regardless of airflow obstruction and lung

  16. Effects of interval aerobic training combined with strength exercise on body composition, glycaemic and lipid profile and aerobic capacity of obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coll-Risco, Irene; Aparicio, Virginia A; Nebot, Elena; Camiletti-Moirón, Daniel; Martínez, Rosario; Kapravelou, Garyfallia; López-Jurado, María; Porres, Jesús M; Aranda, Pilar

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of interval aerobic training combined with strength exercise in the same training session on body composition, and glycaemic and lipid profile in obese rats. Sixteen lean Zucker rats and sixteen obese Zucker rats were randomly divided into exercise and sedentary subgroups (4 groups, n = 8). Exercise consisted of interval aerobic training combined with strength exercise in the same training session. The animals trained 60 min/day, 5 days/week for 8 weeks. Body composition, lipid and glycaemic profiles and inflammatory markers were assessed. Results showed that fat mass was reduced in both lean and obese rats following the exercise training (effect size (95% confidence interval (CI)) = 1.8 (0.5-3.0)). Plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and fasting glucose were lower in the exercise compared to the sedentary groups (d = 2.0 (0.7-3.2) and 1.8 (0.5-3.0), respectively). Plasma insulin was reduced in exercise compared to sedentary groups (d = 2.1 (0.8-3.4)). Some exercise × phenotype interactions showed that the highest decreases in insulin, homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance, fasting and postprandial glucose were observed in the obese + exercise group (all, P interval aerobic training combined with strength exercise would improve body composition, and lipid and glycaemic profiles, especially in obese rats.

  17. The Impact of a Multidimensional Exercise Intervention on Physical and Functional Capacity, Anxiety, and Depression in Patients With Advanced-Stage Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quist, Morten; Adamsen, Lis; Rørth, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    was measured with one repetition maximum test (1RM). HRQoL, anxiety, and depression were assessed using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Lung (FACT-L) scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). RESULTS: One hundred and forthteen patients with advanced stage lung cancer were recruited......INTRODUCTION: Patients with advanced-stage lung cancer face poor survival and experience co-occurring chronic physical and psychosocial symptoms. Despite several years of research in exercise oncology, few exercise studies have targeted advanced lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. The aim...... of the present study was to investigate the benefits of a 6-week supervised group exercise intervention and to outline the effect on aerobic capacity, strength, health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety, and depression. METHODS: VO2peak was assessed using an incremental exercise test. Muscle strength...

  18. Negative heat capacity in the microcanonical lattice gas model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulminelli, G.; Duflot, V.; Chomaz, Ph.; Duflot, V.

    2000-02-01

    In this paper we study a microcanonical lattice gas model with different boundary conditions. Only if the partitions volume is let free to fluctuate and is not constrained by an external box the phase transition region is characterized by a negative branch for the heat capacity. We show that the caloric curve is not the proper way to look for the phase transition because it directly depends on the considered transformation. Conversely, kinetic energy fluctuations are shown to be a direct measure of the equation of state. The presence of abnormal fluctuations is a robust signature of the liquid gas phase transition. (authors)

  19. Assessing the effect of high-repetitive single limb exercises (HRSLE) on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): study protocol for randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyberg, Andre; Lindström, Britta; Wadell, Karin

    2012-07-23

    Single-limb knee extension exercises have been found to be effective at improving lower extremity exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Since the positive local physiological effects of exercise training only occur in the engaged muscle(s), should upper extremity muscles also be included to determine the effect of single limb exercises in COPD patients. a prospective, assessor-blind, block randomized controlled, parallel-group multicenter trial. stage II-IV COPD patients, > 40 years of age, ex-smokers, with stable medical treatment will be included starting May 2011. Recruitment at three locations in Sweden. 1) high-repetitive single limb exercise (HRSLE) training with elastic bands, 60 minutes, three times/week for 8 weeks combined with four sessions of 60 minutes patient education, or 2) the same patient education alone. Primary: determine the effects of HRSLE on local muscle endurance capacity (measured as meters walked during 6-minute walk test and rings moved on 6-minute ring and pegboard test) and quality of life (measured as change on the Swedish version of the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire). Secondary: effects on maximal strength, muscular endurance, dyspnea, self-efficacy, anxiety and depression. The relationship between changes in health-related variables and changes in exercise capacity, sex-related differences in training effects, feasibility of the program, strategies to determine adequate starting resistance and provide accurate resistance for each involved movement and the relationship between muscle fatigue and dyspnea in the different exercise tests will also be analyzed. Randomization: performed by a person independent of the recruitment process and using a computer random number generator. Stratification by center and gender with a 1:1 allocation to the intervention or control using random block sizes. Blinding: all outcome assessors will be blinded to group assignment. The results of

  20. Modelling of Rotational Capacity in Reinforced Linear Elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbech, Lars; Hagsten, Lars German; Fisker, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The Capacity Design Method forms the basis of several seismic design codes. This design philosophy allows plastic deformations in order to decrease seismic demands in structures. However, these plastic deformations must be localized in certain zones where ductility requirements can be documented...... in order to ensure the assumed mechanism. Furthermore, according to Eurocode 2 it is allowed, within certain limits, to utilise moment redistributions in continuous concrete beams at the ultimate limit state. To ensure that full moment redistribution is possible it is important to have knowledge...... reinforced concrete elements. The model is taking several important parameters into account. Empirical values is avoided which is considered an advantage compared to previous models. Furthermore, the model includes force variations in the reinforcement due to moment distributions and shear as well...

  1. An Experimental Protocol to Model Recovery of Anaerobic Work Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Sarthy M. Sreedhara

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Models of fatigue are based on physiological parameters such as Critical Power (CP and Anaerobic Work Capacity (AWC. CP is a theoretical threshold value that a human can generate for an indefinite amount of time and AWC represents a finite expendable amount of anaerobic energy at intensities above CP. There is an increasing interest in developing mathematical models of energy expenditure and recovery for athletic training and human performance. The objective of this research is to propose and validate a model for recovery of AWC during a post exertion recovery interval of cycling. A cycling ergometer study is proposed which involves a VO2max ramp test to determine gas exchange threshold, a 3-min all-out intensity test to determine CP and AWC, and exertion-recovery interval tests to understand recovery of AWC. The results will be used to build a human in the loop control system to optimize cycling performance.

  2. Improving Power System Modeling. A Tool to Link Capacity Expansion and Production Cost Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diakov, Victor [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cole, Wesley [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sullivan, Patrick [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brinkman, Gregory [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Capacity expansion models (CEM) provide a high-level long-term view at the prospects of the evolving power system. In simulating the possibilities of long-term capacity expansion, it is important to maintain the viability of power system operation in the short-term (daily, hourly and sub-hourly) scales. Production-cost models (PCM) simulate routine power system operation on these shorter time scales using detailed load, transmission and generation fleet data by minimizing production costs and following reliability requirements. When based on CEM 'predictions' about generating unit retirements and buildup, PCM provide more detailed simulation for the short-term system operation and, consequently, may confirm the validity of capacity expansion predictions. Further, production cost model simulations of a system that is based on capacity expansion model solution are 'evolutionary' sound: the generator mix is the result of logical sequence of unit retirement and buildup resulting from policy and incentives. The above has motivated us to bridge CEM with PCM by building a capacity expansion - to - production cost model Linking Tool (CEPCoLT). The Linking Tool is built to onset capacity expansion model prescriptions onto production cost model inputs. NREL's ReEDS and Energy Examplar's PLEXOS are the capacity expansion and the production cost models, respectively. Via the Linking Tool, PLEXOS provides details of operation for the regionally-defined ReEDS scenarios.

  3. Intradialytic aerobic exercise training ameliorates symptoms of restless legs syndrome and improves functional capacity in patients on hemodialysis: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkas, Giorgos K; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Karatzaferi, Christina; Maridaki, Maria D; Giannaki, Christoforos D; Mertens, Peter R; Rountas, Christos; Vlychou, Marianna; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    We present the first study on the influence of exercise training on restless legs syndrome (RLS) in patients on hemodialysis (HD). Restless legs syndrome has been treated pharmacologically with satisfactory results; however, side effects and rebound phenomena have been reported. Intradialytic exercise training effectively counteracts uremia-induced catabolism; nevertheless, it remains unknown whether patients with RLS undergoing HD benefit from such programs. The aims of the current study were to evaluate the effect of 16-weeks aerobic exercise training in the severity of RLS and in the functional capacity and the quality of life of patients with RLS on HD. Fourteen patients on HD (four female, mean age 59 +/- 16 years) with untreated RLS were assigned, according to their will, to either the exercise group (Ex-group, n = 7), and participated in a 16-week supervised intradialytic aerobic exercise training, or to the control group (Con-group, n = 7), and continued usual activities. Primary aim was to compare the International RLS (IRLS) study group rating scale, functional ability, and quality of life in baseline and the end of the 16 weeks. Exercise training reduced IRLS score by 42% (p = 0.02). Furthermore, it significantly improved indices of functional ability (p = 0.02), exercise capacity (p = 0.01), quality of life (p = 0.03), and sleep quality (p = 0.01). In the Con-group no changes were observed. In conclusion, aerobic exercise training is safe and efficacious in reducing RLS symptoms and improving quality of life in patients with RLS on HD.

  4. Intraspecific correlations of basal and maximal metabolic rates in birds and the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, David L; Thomas, Nathan E; Liknes, Eric T; Cooper, Sheldon J

    2012-01-01

    The underlying assumption of the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy is that basal (BMR) and maximal aerobic metabolic rates are phenotypically linked. However, because BMR is largely a function of central organs whereas maximal metabolic output is largely a function of skeletal muscles, the mechanistic underpinnings for their linkage are not obvious. Interspecific studies in birds generally support a phenotypic correlation between BMR and maximal metabolic output. If the aerobic capacity model is valid, these phenotypic correlations should also extend to intraspecific comparisons. We measured BMR, M(sum) (maximum thermoregulatory metabolic rate) and MMR (maximum exercise metabolic rate in a hop-flutter chamber) in winter for dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis), American goldfinches (Carduelis tristis; M(sum) and MMR only), and black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus; BMR and M(sum) only) and examined correlations among these variables. We also measured BMR and M(sum) in individual house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in both summer, winter and spring. For both raw metabolic rates and residuals from allometric regressions, BMR was not significantly correlated with either M(sum) or MMR in juncos. Moreover, no significant correlation between M(sum) and MMR or their mass-independent residuals occurred for juncos or goldfinches. Raw BMR and M(sum) were significantly positively correlated for black-capped chickadees and house sparrows, but mass-independent residuals of BMR and M(sum) were not. These data suggest that central organ and exercise organ metabolic levels are not inextricably linked and that muscular capacities for exercise and shivering do not necessarily vary in tandem in individual birds. Why intraspecific and interspecific avian studies show differing results and the significance of these differences to the aerobic capacity model are unknown, and resolution of these questions will require additional studies of potential mechanistic

  5. Intraspecific correlations of basal and maximal metabolic rates in birds and the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Swanson

    Full Text Available The underlying assumption of the aerobic capacity model for the evolution of endothermy is that basal (BMR and maximal aerobic metabolic rates are phenotypically linked. However, because BMR is largely a function of central organs whereas maximal metabolic output is largely a function of skeletal muscles, the mechanistic underpinnings for their linkage are not obvious. Interspecific studies in birds generally support a phenotypic correlation between BMR and maximal metabolic output. If the aerobic capacity model is valid, these phenotypic correlations should also extend to intraspecific comparisons. We measured BMR, M(sum (maximum thermoregulatory metabolic rate and MMR (maximum exercise metabolic rate in a hop-flutter chamber in winter for dark-eyed juncos (Junco hyemalis, American goldfinches (Carduelis tristis; M(sum and MMR only, and black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus; BMR and M(sum only and examined correlations among these variables. We also measured BMR and M(sum in individual house sparrows (Passer domesticus in both summer, winter and spring. For both raw metabolic rates and residuals from allometric regressions, BMR was not significantly correlated with either M(sum or MMR in juncos. Moreover, no significant correlation between M(sum and MMR or their mass-independent residuals occurred for juncos or goldfinches. Raw BMR and M(sum were significantly positively correlated for black-capped chickadees and house sparrows, but mass-independent residuals of BMR and M(sum were not. These data suggest that central organ and exercise organ metabolic levels are not inextricably linked and that muscular capacities for exercise and shivering do not necessarily vary in tandem in individual birds. Why intraspecific and interspecific avian studies show differing results and the significance of these differences to the aerobic capacity model are unknown, and resolution of these questions will require additional studies of potential

  6. Living Without Creatine: Unchanged Exercise Capacity and Response to Chronic Myocardial Infarction in Creatine-Deficient Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygate, Craig A.; Aksentijevic, Dunja; Dawson, Dana; Hove, Michiel ten; Phillips, Darci; de Bono, Joseph P.; Medway, Debra J.; Sebag-Montefiore, Liam; Hunyor, Imre; Channon, Keith M.; Clarke, Kieran; Zervou, Sevasti; Watkins, Hugh; Balaban, Robert S.; Neubauer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Creatine is thought to be involved in the spatial and temporal buffering of ATP in energetic organs such as heart and skeletal muscle. Creatine depletion affects force generation during maximal stimulation, while reduced levels of myocardial creatine are a hallmark of the failing heart, leading to the widely held view that creatine is important at high workloads and under conditions of pathological stress. Objective We therefore hypothesised that the consequences of creatine-deficiency in mice would be impaired running capacity, and exacerbation of heart failure following myocardial infarction. Methods and Results Surprisingly, mice with whole-body creatine deficiency due to knockout of the biosynthetic enzyme (guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase – GAMT) voluntarily ran just as fast and as far as controls (>10km/night) and performed the same level of work when tested to exhaustion on a treadmill. Furthermore, survival following myocardial infarction was not altered, nor was subsequent LV remodelling and development of chronic heart failure exacerbated, as measured by 3D-echocardiography and invasive hemodynamics. These findings could not be accounted for by compensatory adaptations, with no differences detected between WT and GAMT−/− proteomes. Alternative phosphotransfer mechanisms were explored; adenylate kinase activity was unaltered, and although GAMT−/− hearts accumulated the creatine pre-cursor guanidinoacetate, this had negligible energy-transfer activity, while mitochondria retained near normal function. Conclusions Creatine-deficient mice show unaltered maximal exercise capacity and response to chronic myocardial infarction, and no obvious metabolic adaptations. Our results question the paradigm that creatine is essential for high workload and chronic stress responses in heart and skeletal muscle. PMID:23325497

  7. Exploring harmonization between integrated assessment and capacity expansion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, G.; Brown, M.; Cohen, S.; Macknick, J.; Patel, P.; Wise, M. A.; Horing, J.

    2017-12-01

    Forward-looking quantitative models of the electric sector are extensively used to provide science-based strategic decision support to national, international and private-sector entities. Given that these models are used to inform a wide-range of stakeholders and influence policy decisions, it is vital to examine how the models' underlying data and structure influence their outcomes. We conduct several experiments harmonizing key model characteristics between ReEDS—an electric sector only model, and GCAM—an integrated assessment model—to understand how different degrees of harmonization impact model outcomes. ReEDS has high spatial, temporal, and process detail but lacks electricity demand elasticity and endogenous representations of other economic sectors, while GCAM has internally consistent representations of energy (including the electric sector), agriculture, and land-use systems but relatively aggregate representations of the factors influencing electric sector investments . We vary the degree of harmonization in electricity demand, fuel prices, technology costs and performance, and variable renewable energy resource characteristics. We then identify the prominent sources of divergence in key outputs (electricity capacity, generation, and price) across the models and study how the convergence between models can be improved with permutations of harmonized characteristics. The remaining inconsistencies help to establish how differences in the models' underlying data, construction, perspective, and methodology play into each model's outcome. There are three broad contributions of this work. First, our study provides a framework to link models with similar scope but different resolutions. Second, our work provides insight into how the harmonization of assumptions contributes to a unified and robust portrayal of the US electricity sector under various potential futures. Finally, our study enhances the understanding of the influence of structural uncertainty

  8. Data mining with SPSS modeler theory, exercises and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Wendler, Tilo

    2016-01-01

    Introducing the IBM SPSS Modeler, this book guides readers through data mining processes and presents relevant statistical methods. There is a special focus on step-by-step tutorials and well-documented examples that help demystify complex mathematical algorithms and computer programs. The variety of exercises and solutions as well as an accompanying website with data sets and SPSS Modeler streams are particularly valuable. While intended for students, the simplicity of the Modeler makes the book useful for anyone wishing to learn about basic and more advanced data mining, and put this knowledge into practice.

  9. NAFLD, Estrogens, and Physical Exercise: The Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Lavoie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One segment of the population that is particularly inclined to liver fat accumulation is postmenopausal women. Although nonalcoholic hepatic steatosis is more common in men than in women, after menopause there is a reversal in gender distribution. At the present time, weight loss and exercise are regarded as first line treatments for NAFLD in postmenopausal women, as it is the case for the management of metabolic syndrome. In recent years, there has been substantial evidence coming mostly from the use of the animal model, that indeed estrogens withdrawal is associated with modifications of molecular markers favouring the activity of metabolic pathways ultimately leading to liver fat accumulation. In addition, the use of the animal model has provided physiological and molecular evidence that exercise training provides estrogens-like protective effects on liver fat accumulation and its consequences. The purpose of the present paper is to present information relative to the development of a state of NAFLD resulting from the absence of estrogens and the role of exercise training, emphasizing on the contribution of the animal model on these issues.

  10. MIMO capacity for deterministic channel models: sublinear growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentosela, Francois; Cornean, Horia; Marchetti, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    This is the second paper by the authors in a series concerned with the development of a deterministic model for the transfer matrix of a MIMO system. In our previous paper, we started from the Maxwell equations and described the generic structure of such a deterministic transfer matrix. In the cu......This is the second paper by the authors in a series concerned with the development of a deterministic model for the transfer matrix of a MIMO system. In our previous paper, we started from the Maxwell equations and described the generic structure of such a deterministic transfer matrix....... In the current paper, we apply those results in order to study the (Shannon-Foschini) capacity behavior of a MIMO system as a function of the deterministic spread function of the environment and the number of transmitting and receiving antennas. The antennas are assumed to fill in a given fixed volume. Under...

  11. Effects of exercise training program on functional capacity and quality of life in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Evaluation of a pilot project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartenmann, Ch; Kirchberger, I; Herzig, M; Baumgartner, I; Saner, H; Mahler, F; Meyer, K

    2002-02-01

    In patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) stage II, exercise training seems to be important to reduce symptoms and improve functional capacity. We evaluated the effects of an out-patient treatment program on walking distance (standardized treadmill testing), training exercise capacity, and disease specific quality of life (PAVK-86 questionnaire). Thirty-one patients aged 70 +/- 2 with intermittent claudicatio in stage IIa/IIb according to Fontaine (n = 18/13) underwent a supervised 12 week exercise training and education outpatient program. During course of intervention, patients demonstrated improvements in pain-free training walking distance (p 364 +/- 53 m; p 546 +/- 63 m; p training, mean subscale scores of the PAVK-86 demonstrated distinct impairments concerning pain and functional status. After 12 weeks of intervention, with exception of the subscale complaints, all dimensions of quality of life assessed have improved significantly. The highest effect size was observed for the subscales pain, mood, and functional status. Improvement in the subscale anxiety and pain-free walking distance (treadmill test) correlated significantly (r = 0.46) as well as improvement in the subscale mood and maximum walking distance (r = 0.45). In patients with PAOD stage II considerable effects on functional capacity and important dimensions of quality of life can be achieved by a short exercise and education program.

  12. The effect of sesamine and aerobic exercise on plasma levels of total antioxidant capacity and glutathione peroxidase in athlete men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Saberi

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Aerobic exercise and supplementation of sesamin is an effective method to improve the health of mens athlete's immune system. In addition, combining supplementation with aerobic exercise can increase some of the beneficial effects of exercise during a 10-week period.

  13. The effects of centre-based rehabilitation after acute myocardial infarction on exercise capacity and risk factors for coronary heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Mlakar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Rehabilitation following acute myocardial infarction (AMI is a crucial part of secondary prevention for coronary heart disease. The aim of our study was to determine the efficiency of our national in-patient rehabilitation program in improving exercise capacity and lowering risk factors for coronary heart disease.Methods 25 patients 3-9 weeks after AMI, undergoing 2 week in-patient cardiac rehabilitation, were included in our study. We performed exercise stress testing and measurement of classic risk factors before and after the rehabilitation. Classic risk factors were compared with 25 age matched adults without known risk factors for coronary heart disease.Results Patients after AMI had lower exercise capacity than healthy adults (p≤0.002 for double product, maximal load, systolic blood pressure, heart rate and time of load. Patients recieved appropriate drug therapy after myocardial infarction, which presented as lower diastolic and a trend to lower systolic blood pressure (p=0.002 and 0.080, lower total and LDL cholesterol values (both p<0.001 than healthy adults, but higher values of metabolic syndrome parameters (higher waist cifcumference p=0.045, higher hip-waist ratio, lower HDL cholesterol, both p<0.001, and a trend to higher body mass index. Although we observed significant increases in exercise capacity (higher, maximal load, systolic blood pressure,double product and time of load, all p≤0.003, no changes in classic risk factors during rehabilitaiton were demonstrated.Conclusions In-patient program of cardiac rehabilitation efficiently elevates exercise capacity in patients after AMI, but fails to influence classic risk factors for coronary heart disease, which might be due to lack of controlled cardioprotective diet during rehabilitation.

  14. Does an Exercise Intervention Improving Aerobic Capacity Among Construction Workers Also Improve Musculoskeletal Pain, Work Ability, Productivity, Perceived Physical Exertion, and Sick Leave?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Bibi; Holtermann, Andreas; Bültmann, Ute

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: To investigate whether an exercise intervention shown to increase aerobic capacity, would also lead to less musculoskeletal pain; improved work ability, productivity, and perceived physical exertion; and less sick leave. METHODS:: Sixty-seven construction workers were randomized...... into an exercise group training 3 × 20 minutes per week and a control group. Questionnaires and text messages were completed before and after the 12-week intervention. RESULTS:: No significant changes were found in musculoskeletal pain, work ability, productivity, perceived physical exertion, and sick leave...... multifaceted intervention, larger sample size, or longer follow-up. Text messages may be a convenient data-collection method in future studies....

  15. The Effect of Aerobic or Aerobic-Strength Exercise on Body Composition and Functional Capacity in Patients with BMI ≥35 after Bariatric Surgery: a Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassannejad, Alireza; Khalaj, Alireza; Mansournia, Mohammad Ali; Rajabian Tabesh, Mastaneh; Alizadeh, Zahra

    2017-11-01

    Although previous studies suggested that bariatric surgery is the most effective and sustainable treatment method for morbid obesity in long term, but without changing in lifestyle, maintaining optimal weight loss is almost impossible. Sixty morbid obese patients (BMI ≥ 35) were evaluated before and after 12 weeks of bariatric surgery in order to compare the impact of two different exercise programs on body composition and functional capacity outcomes. Participants were divided into three groups: aerobic (A), aerobic-strength (AS), and control (C) group. Aerobic capacity was assessed with 12-min walk-run test (12MWRT). One-repetition maximum (1RM) test was performed to evaluation upper limb muscle strength. Lower extremity functional capacity was assessed by sit-to-stand test. Weight, percent body fat (PBF), and fat mass (FM) reduced greater in the trial groups in comparison to the C group (P exercise on weight and PBF decrease after surgery, and it leads to significant improvement on aerobic capacity. Moreover, doing resisted exercise caused greater preserving of lean mass.

  16. Effects of aerobic training combined with respiratory muscle stretching on the functional exercise capacity and thoracoabdominal kinematics in patients with COPD: a randomized and controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wada JT

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Juliano T Wada,1 Erickson Borges-Santos,1 Desiderio Cano Porras,1 Denise M Paisani,1 Alberto Cukier,2 Adriana C Lunardi,1 Celso RF Carvalho1 1Department of Physical Therapy, 2Department of Cardiopneumology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Background: Patients with COPD present a major recruitment of the inspiratory muscles, predisposing to chest incoordination, increasing the degree of dyspnea and impairing their exercise capacity. Stretching techniques could decrease the respiratory muscle activity and improve their contractile capacity; however, the systemic effects of stretching remain unknown.Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of aerobic training combined with respiratory muscle stretching on functional exercise capacity and thoracoabdominal kinematics in patients with COPD.Design: This study was a randomized and controlled trial.Participants: A total of 30 patients were allocated to a treatment group (TG or a control group (CG; n=15, each group.Intervention: The TG was engaged in respiratory muscle stretching and the CG in upper and lower limb muscle stretching. Both groups performed 24 sessions (twice a week, 12 weeks of aerobic training.Evaluations: Functional exercise capacity (6-minute walk test, thoracoabdominal kinematics (optoelectronic plethysmography, and respiratory muscle activity (surface electromyography were evaluated during exercise. Analysis of covariance was used to compare the groups at a significance level of 5%.Results: After the intervention, the TG showed improved abdominal (ABD contribution, compartmental volume, mobility, and functional exercise capacity with decreased dyspnea when compared with the CG (P<0.01. The TG also showed a decreased respiratory muscle effort required to obtain the same pulmonary volume compared to the CG (P<0.001.Conclusion: Our results suggest that aerobic training combined with respiratory muscle stretching increases the functional

  17. The effects of exercise training in addition to energy restriction on functional capacities and body composition in obese adults during weight loss: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Clint T; Fraser, Steve F; Levinger, Itamar; Straznicky, Nora E; Dixon, John B; Reynolds, John; Selig, Steve E

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with impairments of physical function, cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength and the capacity to perform activities of daily living. This review examines the specific effects of exercise training in relation to body composition and physical function demonstrated by changes in cardiovascular fitness, and muscle strength when obese adults undergo energy restriction. Electronic databases were searched for randomised controlled trials comparing energy restriction plus exercise training to energy restriction alone. Studies published to May 2013 were included if they used multi-component methods for analysing body composition and assessed measures of fitness in obese adults. Fourteen RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity of study characteristics prevented meta-analysis. Energy restriction plus exercise training was more effective than energy restriction alone for improving cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, and increasing fat mass loss and preserving lean body mass, depending on the type of exercise training. Adding exercise training to energy restriction for obese middle-aged and older individuals results in favourable changes to fitness and body composition. Whilst weight loss should be encouraged for obese individuals, exercise training should be included in lifestyle interventions as it offers additional benefits.

  18. The effects of exercise training in addition to energy restriction on functional capacities and body composition in obese adults during weight loss: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clint T Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with impairments of physical function, cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength and the capacity to perform activities of daily living. This review examines the specific effects of exercise training in relation to body composition and physical function demonstrated by changes in cardiovascular fitness, and muscle strength when obese adults undergo energy restriction. METHODS: Electronic databases were searched for randomised controlled trials comparing energy restriction plus exercise training to energy restriction alone. Studies published to May 2013 were included if they used multi-component methods for analysing body composition and assessed measures of fitness in obese adults. RESULTS: Fourteen RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity of study characteristics prevented meta-analysis. Energy restriction plus exercise training was more effective than energy restriction alone for improving cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, and increasing fat mass loss and preserving lean body mass, depending on the type of exercise training. CONCLUSION: Adding exercise training to energy restriction for obese middle-aged and older individuals results in favourable changes to fitness and body composition. Whilst weight loss should be encouraged for obese individuals, exercise training should be included in lifestyle interventions as it offers additional benefits.

  19. The Effects of Exercise Training in Addition to Energy Restriction on Functional Capacities and Body Composition in Obese Adults during Weight Loss: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Clint T.; Fraser, Steve F.; Levinger, Itamar; Straznicky, Nora E.; Dixon, John B.; Reynolds, John; Selig, Steve E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with impairments of physical function, cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength and the capacity to perform activities of daily living. This review examines the specific effects of exercise training in relation to body composition and physical function demonstrated by changes in cardiovascular fitness, and muscle strength when obese adults undergo energy restriction. Methods Electronic databases were searched for randomised controlled trials comparing energy restriction plus exercise training to energy restriction alone. Studies published to May 2013 were included if they used multi-component methods for analysing body composition and assessed measures of fitness in obese adults. Results Fourteen RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Heterogeneity of study characteristics prevented meta-analysis. Energy restriction plus exercise training was more effective than energy restriction alone for improving cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength, and increasing fat mass loss and preserving lean body mass, depending on the type of exercise training. Conclusion Adding exercise training to energy restriction for obese middle-aged and older individuals results in favourable changes to fitness and body composition. Whilst weight loss should be encouraged for obese individuals, exercise training should be included in lifestyle interventions as it offers additional benefits. PMID:24409219

  20. Three minutes of all-out intermittent exercise per week increases skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and improves cardiometabolic health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna B Gillen

    Full Text Available We investigated whether a training protocol that involved 3 min of intense intermittent exercise per week--within a total training time commitment of 30 min including warm up and cool down--could increase skeletal muscle oxidative capacity and markers of health status. Overweight/obese but otherwise healthy men and women (n = 7 each; age = 29±9 y; BMI = 29.8±2.7 kg/m2 performed 18 training sessions over 6 wk on a cycle ergometer. Each session began with a 2 min warm-up at 50 W, followed by 3×20 s "all-out" sprints against 5.0% body mass (mean power output: ∼450-500 W interspersed with 2 min of recovery at 50 W, followed by a 3 min cool-down at 50 W. Peak oxygen uptake increased by 12% after training (32.6±4.5 vs. 29.1±4.2 ml/kg/min and resting mean arterial pressure decreased by 7% (78±10 vs. 83±10 mmHg, with no difference between groups (both p<0.01, main effects for time. Skeletal muscle biopsy samples obtained before and 72 h after training revealed increased maximal activity of citrate synthase and protein content of cytochrome oxidase 4 (p<0.01, main effect, while the maximal activity of β-hydroxy acyl CoA dehydrogenase increased in men only (p<0.05. Continuous glucose monitoring measured under standard dietary conditions before and 48-72 h following training revealed lower 24 h average blood glucose concentration in men following training (5.4±0.6 vs. 5.9±0.5 mmol/L, p<0.05, but not women (5.5±0.4 vs. 5.5±0.6 mmol/L. This was associated with a greater increase in GLUT4 protein content in men compared to women (138% vs. 23%, p<0.05. Short-term interval training using a 10 min protocol that involved only 1 min of hard exercise, 3x/wk, stimulated physiological changes linked to improved health in overweight adults. Despite the small sample size, potential sex-specific adaptations were apparent that warrant further investigation.

  1. Modeling trajectories of perceived leg exertion during maximal cycle ergometer exercise in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebner, Marianne; Zhang, Zhen; Therneau, Terry; McGrath, Patrick; Pianosi, Paolo

    2014-01-09

    between ratings of perceived exertion and work capacity normalized across individuals. Models including a delay term, a linear component, or a power function can describe these individual trajectories of perceived leg exertion during incremental exercise to voluntary exhaustion.

  2. Effects of Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation During Hemodialysis on Peripheral Muscle Strength and Exercise Capacity: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüggemann, Ana Karla; Mello, Carolina Luana; Dal Pont, Tarcila; Hizume Kunzler, Deborah; Martins, Daniel Fernandes; Bobinski, Franciane; Pereira Yamaguti, Wellington; Paulin, Elaine

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation of high and low frequency and intensity, performed during hemodialysis, on physical function and inflammation markers in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Randomized clinical trial. Hemodialysis clinic. Patients with CKD (N=51) were randomized into blocks of 4 using opaque sealed envelopes. They were divided into a group of high frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation and a group of low frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation. The high frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group was submitted to neuromuscular electrical stimulation at a frequency of 50Hz and a medium intensity of 72.90mA, and the low frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group used a frequency of 5Hz and a medium intensity of 13.85mA, 3 times per week for 1 hour, during 12 sessions. Peripheral muscle strength, exercise capacity, levels of muscle trophism marker (insulin growth factor 1) and levels of proinflammatory (tumor necrosis factor α) and anti-inflammatory (interleukin 10) cytokines. The high frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group showed a significant increase in right peripheral muscle strength (155.35±65.32Nm initial vs 161.60±68.73Nm final; P=.01) and left peripheral muscle strength (156.60±66.51Nm initial vs 164.10±69.76Nm final; P=.02) after the training, which did not occur in the low frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group for both right muscle strength (109.40±32.08Nm initial vs 112.65±38.44Nm final; P=.50) and left muscle strength (113.65±37.79Nm initial vs 116.15±43.01Nm final; P=.61). The 6-minute walk test distance (6MWTD) increased in both groups: high frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group (435.55±95.81m initial vs 457.25±90.64m final; P=.02) and low frequency and intensity neuromuscular electrical stimulation group (403.80

  3. The strength model of self-control in sport and exercise psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris eEnglert

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The strength model of self-control assumes that all acts of self-control (e.g., emotion regulation, persistence are empowered by a single global metaphorical strength that has limited capacity. This strength can become temporarily depleted after a primary self-control act, which, in turn, can impair performance in subsequent acts of self-control. Recently, the assumptions of the strength model of self-control also have been adopted and tested in the field of sport and exercise psychology. The present review paper aims to give an overview of recent developments in self-control research based on the strength model of self-control. Furthermore, recent research on interventions on how to improve and revitalize self-control strength will be presented. Finally, the strength model of self-control has been criticized lately, as well as expanded in scope, so the present paper will also discuss alternative explanations of why previous acts of self-control can lead to impaired performance in sport and exercise.

  4. Exercise-induced TBC1D1 Ser237 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 protein binding capacity in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøsig, Christian; Pehmøller, Christian; Birk, Jesper Bratz

    2010-01-01

    increasing 60 - 250% (Pprotein kinase (AMPK) induced both Ser237 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 binding properties on human TBC1D1 when evaluated in vitro. To further characterize the role of AMPK as an upstream kinase regulating TBC1D1, extensor digitorum longus......TBC1D1 is a Rab-GTPase activating protein involved in regulation of GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle. We here evaluated exercise-induced regulation of TBC1D1 Ser237 phosphorylation and 14-3-3 protein binding capacity in human skeletal muscle. In separate experiments healthy men performed all......-out cycle exercise lasting either 30 sec, 2 min or 20 min. After all exercise protocols, TBC1D1 Ser237 phosphorylation increased (~70 - 230%, Pprotein showed a similar pattern of regulation...

  5. Longitudinal relationship between wheelchair exercise capacity and life satisfaction in patients with spinal cord injury: A cohort study in the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Koppenhagen, Casper Floris; Post, Marcel; de Groot, Sonja; van Leeuwen, Christel; van Asbeck, Floris; Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke; van der Woude, Lucas; Lindeman, Eline

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the relationship between wheelchair exercise capacity and life satisfaction in persons with spinal cord injury from the start of active inpatient rehabilitation up to 5 years after discharge. Design Prospective cohort study. Subjects Persons with spinal cord injury, aged 18–65 years, and wheelchair dependent at least for long distances. Method Measurements at the start of active rehabilitation, after 3 months, at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation, and 1 and 5 years after discharge. A peak wheelchair exercise test was performed to record peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and peak power output (POpeak). Life satisfaction was measured as current life satisfaction and change of life satisfaction in comparison with life after spinal cord injury. Relationships between (changes in) exercise capacity and (changes in) life satisfaction were analyzed random coefficient analysis, corrected for possible confounders (age, gender, level of lesion, functional status, secondary impairments, pain, and sports activity) if necessary. Results Of 225 persons included, 130 attended two or more peak exercise tests, who were include in the analyses. Mean age at start was 39 years, 75% were male, 73% had paraplegia, and 76% had a traumatic lesion. Mean POpeak increased during the study from 32.9 to 55.9 Watts, mean VO2peak from 1.02  to 1.38 l/minute, and mean life satisfaction from 5.7 to 7.8. An increase of POpeak with 10 W was associated with a 0.3-point increase of life satisfaction (P = 0.01). An increase of VO2peak with 0.1 l/minute was associated with a 0.1-point increase of life satisfaction (P = 0.049). Conclusion High(er) wheelchair exercise capacity is related to high(er) life satisfaction in spinal cord injury patients. PMID:24621019

  6. Longitudinal relationship between wheelchair exercise capacity and life satisfaction in patients with spinal cord injury: A cohort study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Koppenhagen, Casper Floris; Post, Marcel; de Groot, Sonja; van Leeuwen, Christel; van Asbeck, Floris; Stolwijk-Swüste, Janneke; van der Woude, Lucas; Lindeman, Eline

    2014-05-01

    To examine the relationship between wheelchair exercise capacity and life satisfaction in persons with spinal cord injury from the start of active inpatient rehabilitation up to 5 years after discharge. Prospective cohort study. Persons with spinal cord injury, aged 18-65 years, and wheelchair dependent at least for long distances. Measurements at the start of active rehabilitation, after 3 months, at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation, and 1 and 5 years after discharge. A peak wheelchair exercise test was performed to record peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) and peak power output (POpeak). Life satisfaction was measured as current life satisfaction and change of life satisfaction in comparison with life after spinal cord injury. Relationships between (changes in) exercise capacity and (changes in) life satisfaction were analyzed random coefficient analysis, corrected for possible confounders (age, gender, level of lesion, functional status, secondary impairments, pain, and sports activity) if necessary. Of 225 persons included, 130 attended two or more peak exercise tests, who were include in the analyses. Mean age at start was 39 years, 75% were male, 73% had paraplegia, and 76% had a traumatic lesion. Mean POpeak increased during the study from 32.9 to 55.9 Watts, mean VO2peak from 1.02 to 1.38 l/minute, and mean life satisfaction from 5.7 to 7.8. An increase of POpeak with 10 W was associated with a 0.3-point increase of life satisfaction (P = 0.01). An increase of VO2peak with 0.1 l/minute was associated with a 0.1-point increase of life satisfaction (P = 0.049). Conclusion High(er) wheelchair exercise capacity is related to high(er) life satisfaction in spinal cord injury patients.

  7. Maximal exercise capacity is related to cardiovascular structure in patients with longstanding hypertension. A LIFE substudy. Losartan Intervention For Endpoint-Reduction in Hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, M H; Wachtell, K; Hermann, K L

    2001-01-01

    the predicted maximal workload. This impaired exercise capacity was associated with lower common carotid distensibility and lower oxygen reserve. The latter was independently related to LV hypertrophy, low systemic vascular compliance and peripheral vascular remodeling, suggesting that cardiovascular......BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular hypertrophy and remodeling in patients with never-treated hypertension has been associated with impaired exercise capacity, but whether this relationship remains in patients with longstanding hypertension and target organ damage is less elucidated. METHODS: In 43...... unmedicated patients with essential hypertension and electrocardiographic left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, we measured maximal workload and oxygen reserve by bicycle test, 24-h ambulatory blood pressure (BP), LV mass index by magnetic resonance imaging (LVMI(MRI), n = 31), LVMI(echo) and systemic vascular...

  8. Mild asthma and chronic bronchitis seem to influence functional exercise capacity: a multi-case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alessandro; Girardi, Paolo; Ferrari, Marcello; Olivieri, Mario; Accordini, Simone; Bombieri, Cristina; Bortolami, Oscar; Braggion, Marco; Cappa, Veronica; Cazzoletti, Lucia; Locatelli, Francesca; Nicolis, Morena; Perbellini, Luigi; Sembeni, Silvia; Verlato, Giuseppe; Zanolin, Maria Elisabetta; de Marco, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    In the Genes Environment Interaction in Respiratory Diseases population-based multi-case control study, we investigated whether asthma, chronic bronchitis (CB) and rhinitis were associated with a reduced 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), and whether the 6MWD determinants were similar for subjects with/without respiratory diseases. Cases of asthma (n = 360), CB (n = 120), rhinitis (n = 203) and controls (no respiratory diseases: n = 302) were recruited. The variation in the 6MWD across the groups was analyzed by ANCOVA, adjusting for gender, age, height, weight and comorbidity. The 6MWD determinants were studied by linear regression, and heterogeneity across the cases and controls was investigated. The 6MWD differed across cases and controls (p = 0.01). It was shorter for cases of asthma (-17.1, 95% CI -28.3 to -5.8 m) and CB (-20.7, 95% CI: -36.6 to -4.8 m) than for controls (604 ± 68 m on average), but not for cases of rhinitis. The negative association between age and the 6MWD was significant for cases of CB, but not for the other groups (p = 0.001). Even at the level of severity found in the general population, asthma and CB could influence the 6MWD, which seems to reflect the functional exercise level for daily physical activities. The negative association between ageing and the 6MWD was particularly strong in subjects with CB. Our report adds to the mounting evidence that CB is not a trivial condition, especially in the ageing adult population, and it supports the importance of monitoring functional capacity and of physical reconditioning in mild asthma. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Beneficial effects of dark chocolate on exercise capacity in sedentary subjects: underlying mechanisms. A double blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Pam R; Ramirez-Sanchez, Israel; Patel, Minal; Higginbotham, Erin; Moreno-Ulloa, Aldo; Román-Pintos, Luis Miguel; Phillips, Paul; Perkins, Guy; Ceballos, Guillermo; Villarreal, Francisco

    2016-09-14

    In heart failure patients the consumption of (-)-epicatechin ((-)-Epi)-rich cocoa can restore skeletal muscle (SkM) mitochondrial structure and decrease biomarkers of oxidative stress. However, nothing is known about its effects on exercise capacity and underlying mechanisms in normal, sedentary subjects. Twenty normal, sedentary subjects (∼50 years old) were randomized to placebo or dark chocolate (DC) groups and consumed 20 g of the products for 3 months. Subjects underwent before and after treatment, bicycle ergometry to assess VO2 max and work, SkM biopsy to assess changes in mitochondrial density, function and oxidative stress and blood sampling to assess metabolic endpoints. Seventeen subjects completed the trial. In the DC group (n = 9), VO2 max increased (17% increase, p = 0.056) as well as maximum work (watts) achieved (p = 0.026) with no changes with placebo (n = 8). The DC group evidenced increases in HDL levels (p = 0.005) and decreased triglycerides (p = 0.07). With DC, SkM evidenced significant increases in protein levels for LKB1, AMPK and PGC1α and in their active forms (phosphorylated AMPK and LKB1) as well as in citrate synthase activity while no changes were observed in mitochondrial density. With DC, significant increases in SkM reduced glutathione levels and decreases in protein carbonylation were observed. Improvements in maximum work achieved and VO2 max may be due to DC activation of upstream control systems and enhancement of SkM mitochondria efficiency. Larger clinical studies are warranted to confirm these observations.

  10. The Effects of Exercise Training in Addition to Energy Restriction on Functional Capacities and Body Composition in Obese Adults during Weight Loss: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Clint T.; Fraser, Steve F.; Levinger, Itamar; Straznicky, Nora E.; Dixon, John B.; Reynolds, John; Selig, Steve E.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with impairments of physical function, cardiovascular fitness, muscle strength and the capacity to perform activities of daily living. This review examines the specific effects of exercise training in relation to body composition and physical function demonstrated by changes in cardiovascular fitness, and muscle strength when obese adults undergo energy restriction. METHODS: Electronic databases were searched for randomised controlled trials comparing energy ...

  11. Effectiveness of nocturnal home oxygen therapy to improve exercise capacity, cardiac function and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure and central sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Takuji; Seki, Ryotaro; Kasama, Shu; Isobe, Naoki; Sakurai, Shigeki; Adachi, Hitoshi; Hoshizaki, Hiroshi; Oshima, Shigeru; Taniguchi, Koichi

    2009-02-01

    Central sleep apnea, often found in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), has a high risk of poor prognosis. This study involved 20 patients with CHF (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 5 times/h who were divided into 2 groups: 10 patients treated with nocturnal home oxygen therapy (HOT) and 10 patients without HOT (non-HOT). All patients had dilated cardiomyopathy and underwent overnight polysomnography, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and nuclear cardiac examinations to evaluate AHI, exercise capacity according to the specific activity scale and oxygen uptake at anaerobic threshold and peak exercise (peak VO(2)). Cardiac function according to (99m)Tc-MIBI QGS, and the total defect score (TDS), H/M ratio and the washout rate (WR) on (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging were calculated for all patients. As compared with the non-HOT group, the HOT group demonstrated a greater reduction in AHI (26.1+/-9.1 to 5.1+/-3.4), (123)I-MIBG TDS (31+/-8 to 25+/-9), and (123)I-MIBG WR (48+/-8% to 41+/-5%) and a greater increase in the specific activity scale (4.0+/-0.9 to 5.8+/-1.2 Mets), peak VO(2) (16.0+/-3.8 to 18.3+/-4.7 ml . min(-1) . kg(-1)), and LVEF (27+/-9% to 37+/-10%). HOT improves exercise capacity, cardiac function, and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with CHF and central sleep apnea.

  12. Water Constraints in an Electric Sector Capacity Expansion Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cohen, Stuart [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Newmark, Robin [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Martinez, Andrew [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sullivan, Patrick [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tidwell, Vince [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-07-17

    This analysis provides a description of the first U.S. national electricity capacity expansion model to incorporate water resource availability and costs as a constraint for the future development of the electricity sector. The Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model was modified to incorporate water resource availability constraints and costs in each of its 134 Balancing Area (BA) regions along with differences in costs and efficiencies of cooling systems. Water resource availability and cost data are from recently completed research at Sandia National Laboratories (Tidwell et al. 2013b). Scenarios analyzed include a business-as-usual 3 This report is available at no cost from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at www.nrel.gov/publications. scenario without water constraints as well as four scenarios that include water constraints and allow for different cooling systems and types of water resources to be utilized. This analysis provides insight into where water resource constraints could affect the choice, configuration, or location of new electricity technologies.

  13. Functional outcome in contemporary children with total cavopulmonary connection - Health-related physical fitness, exercise capacity and health-related quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Julia; Reiner, Barbara; Neidenbach, Rhoia C; Oberhoffer, Renate; Hager, Alfred; Ewert, Peter; Müller, Jan

    2018-03-15

    Children and adolescents with an univentricular heart after total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC) have functional impairments. This study assesses health-related physical fitness (HRPF) and exercise capacity, as well as their relation to health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with an univentricular heart after total-pulmonary connection (TCPC). Between July 2014 and October 2016 a total of 78 children and adolescents with TCPC (12.0±3.2years, 21 female) performed a motor test including five tasks for strength and flexibility during their routine follow-up appointment. They also underwent a symptom limited cardio-pulmonary exercise test and filled in a HRQoL questionnaire (KINDL-R). Patients' data were compared to a recent sample of healthy children (n=1650, 12.6±2.4years, 49% female). Multivariable regressions corrected for sex, age and BMI showed that TCPC patients achieved 12.4 repetitions of curl-ups (phealthy counterparts. They had impairments in trunk (-8.5cm; phealthy: 27.5±2.9 vs. TCPC: 31.6±3.3; pexercise capacity whereas HRQoL is similar to healthy peers. Since low HRPF may yield to worse motor competence and exercise capacity, early screening for HRPF and early treatment, if indicated, is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Adaptive servo-ventilation therapy improves cardiac sympathetic nerve activity, cardiac function, exercise capacity, and symptom in patients with chronic heart failure and Cheyne-Stokes respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Takuji; Hoshizaki, Hiroshi; Kasama, Shu; Miyaishi, Yusuke; Kan, Hakuken; Yamashita, Eiji; Kawaguti, Ren; Adachi, Hitoshi; Ohsima, Shigeru

    2017-12-01

    Adaptive servo-ventilation (ASV) therapy has been reported to be effective for improving central sleep apnea (CSA) and chronic heart failure (CHF). The purpose of this study was to clarify whether ASV is effective for CSA, cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA), cardiac symptoms/function, and exercise capacity in CHF patients with CSA and Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR-CSA). In this study, 31 CHF patients with CSR-CSA and a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 40% were randomized into an ASV group and a conservative therapy (non-ASV) group for 6 month. Nuclear imagings with 123 I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and 99m Tc-Sestamibi were performed. Exercise capacity using a specific activity scale (SAS) and the New York Heart Association (NYHA) class were evaluated. CSNA was evaluated by 123 I-MIBG imaging, with the delayed heart/mediastinum activity ratio (H/M), delayed total defect score (TDS), and washout rate (WR). The ASV group had significantly better (P improvement of CSR-CSA, CSNA, cardiac symptoms/function, and exercise capacity in CHF patients with CSR-CSA.

  15. Mathematical finance theory review and exercises from binomial model to risk measures

    CERN Document Server

    Gianin, Emanuela Rosazza

    2013-01-01

    The book collects over 120 exercises on different subjects of Mathematical Finance, including Option Pricing, Risk Theory, and Interest Rate Models. Many of the exercises are solved, while others are only proposed. Every chapter contains an introductory section illustrating the main theoretical results necessary to solve the exercises. The book is intended as an exercise textbook to accompany graduate courses in mathematical finance offered at many universities as part of degree programs in Applied and Industrial Mathematics, Mathematical Engineering, and Quantitative Finance.

  16. Saturated-liquid heat capacity of organic compounds: new empirical correlation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DUSAN K. GROZDANIC

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A new saturated-liquid heat capacity model is recommended. This model is tested and compared with the known polynomial and quasi-polynomial models on 39 sets with 1453 experimental heat capacity data. The obtained results indicate that the new model is better then the existing models, especially near the critical point.

  17. A randomized trial of the effects of an aquatic exercise program on depression, anxiety levels, and functional capacity in of people who suffered an ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidar, Felipe J; Jacó de Oliveira, Ricardo; Gama de Matos, Dihogo; Chilibeck, Philip D; de Souza, Raphael F; Carneiro, André L; Machado Reis, Victor

    2017-05-09

    Aquatic exercise programs are used in rehabilitation and might help to reduce disability after stroke. This was a randomized intervention trial to assess the influence of an aquatic exercise program on people suffering from depression and anxiety after ischemic stroke. Participants were randomized to an experimental group (EG) composed of 19 individuals (51.8 ± 8.5 years; ten males and nine females), and a control group (CG) composed of 17 people (52.7 ± 6.7 years; nine males and eight females). The aquatic exercise program consisted of two sessions per week, each lasting between 45 and 60 minutes and divided into 5 to 10 minutes exercise sections during 12 weeks. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used to determine anxiety levels while the Beck Depression Inventory was used as a self-assessment of depression. EG improved measures of depression, anxiety trait and anxiety state between pre- and post-treatment, with no changes in CG. EG improved in all tests related to functional capacity compared to CG. The practice of aquatic exercises promotes improvements in the levels of depression and anxiety in people who suffered an ischemic stroke.

  18. Managing Creativity for Absorptive Capacity: The NIH Syndrome and the Implementation of Open Innovation Business Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cokpekin, Özge

    The benefits of the open innovation business model and the absorptive capacity necessary to acquire and utilize external knowledge have been discussed extensively. An emerging literature stream has identified certain intra-organizational antecedents of absorptive capacity. However how firms...

  19. A research and evaluation capacity building model in Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Roanna; Crawford, Gemma; Hallett, Jonathan; Laing, Sue; Mak, Donna B; Jancey, Jonine; Rowell, Sally; McCausland, Kahlia; Bastian, Lisa; Sorenson, Anne; Tilley, P J Matt; Yam, Simon; Comfort, Jude; Brennan, Sean; Doherty, Maryanne

    2016-12-27

    Evaluation of public health programs, services and policies is increasingly required to demonstrate effectiveness. Funding constraints necessitate that existing programs, services and policies be evaluated and their findings disseminated. Evidence-informed practice and policy is also desirable to maximise investments in public health. Partnerships between public health researchers, service providers and policymakers can help address evaluation knowledge and skills gaps. The Western Australian Sexual Health and Blood-borne Virus Applied Research and Evaluation Network (SiREN) aims to build research and evaluation capacity in the sexual health and blood-borne virus sector in Western Australia (WA). Partners' perspectives of the SiREN model after 2 years were explored. Qualitative written responses from service providers, policymakers and researchers about the SiREN model were analysed thematically. Service providers reported that participation in SiREN prompted them to consider evaluation earlier in the planning process and increased their appreciation of the value of evaluation. Policymakers noted benefits of the model in generating local evidence and highlighting local issues of importance for consideration at a national level. Researchers identified challenges communicating the services available through SiREN and the time investment needed to develop effective collaborative partnerships. Stronger engagement between public health researchers, service providers and policymakers through collaborative partnerships has the potential to improve evidence generation and evidence translation. These outcomes require long-term funding and commitment from all partners to develop and maintain partnerships. Ongoing monitoring and evaluation can ensure the partnership remains responsive to the needs of key stakeholders. The findings are applicable to many sectors. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  20. Assessing the effect of high-repetitive single limb exercises (HRSLE on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD: study protocol for randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyberg Andre

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-limb knee extension exercises have been found to be effective at improving lower extremity exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Since the positive local physiological effects of exercise training only occur in the engaged muscle(s, should upper extremity muscles also be included to determine the effect of single limb exercises in COPD patients. Methods/design Trial design: a prospective, assessor-blind, block randomized controlled, parallel-group multicenter trial. Participants: stage II-IV COPD patients, > 40 years of age, ex-smokers, with stable medical treatment will be included starting May 2011. Recruitment at three locations in Sweden. Interventions: 1 high-repetitive single limb exercise (HRSLE training with elastic bands, 60 minutes, three times/week for 8 weeks combined with four sessions of 60 minutes patient education, or 2 the same patient education alone. Outcomes: Primary: determine the effects of HRSLE on local muscle endurance capacity (measured as meters walked during 6-minute walk test and rings moved on 6-minute ring and pegboard test and quality of life (measured as change on the Swedish version of the Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire. Secondary: effects on maximal strength, muscular endurance, dyspnea, self-efficacy, anxiety and depression. The relationship between changes in health-related variables and changes in exercise capacity, sex-related differences in training effects, feasibility of the program, strategies to determine adequate starting resistance and provide accurate resistance for each involved movement and the relationship between muscle fatigue and dyspnea in the different exercise tests will also be analyzed. Randomization: performed by a person independent of the recruitment process and using a computer random number generator. Stratification by center and gender with a 1:1 allocation to the intervention or control using random

  1. Nutritional status is related to fat-free mass, exercise capacity and inspiratory strength in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollyane Galinari Sabino

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Being overweight or obese is associated with a higher rate of survival in patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. This paradoxical relationship indicates that the influence of nutritional status on functional parameters should be further investigated. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of nutritional status on body composition, exercise capacity and respiratory muscle strength in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. METHODS: Thirty-two patients (nine women were divided into three groups according to their body mass indices (BMI: overweight/obese (25 < BMI < 34.9 kg/m², n=8, normal weight (18.5 < BMI < 24.9 kg/m², n=17 and underweight (BMI <18.5 kg/m², n=7. Spirometry, bioelectrical impedance, a six-minute walking distance test and maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures were assessed. RESULTS: Airway obstruction was similar among the groups (p=0.30; however, overweight/obese patients had a higher fat-free mass (FFM index [FFMI=FFM/body weight² (mean±SEM: 17±0.3 vs. 15±0.3 vs. 14±0.5 m/kg², p<0.01], exercise capacity (90±8 vs. 79±6 vs. 57±8 m, p=0.02 and maximal inspiratory pressure (63±7 vs. 57±5 vs. 35±8 % predicted, p=0.03 in comparison to normal weight and underweight patients, respectively. In addition, on backward multiple regression analysis, FFMI was the unique independent predictor of exercise capacity (partial r=0.52, p<0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients who were overweight or obese had a greater FFM, exercise capacity and inspiratory muscle strength than patients with the same degree of airflow obstruction who were of normal weight or underweight, and higher FFM was independently associated with higher exercise capacity. These characteristics of overweight or obese patients might counteract the drawbacks of excess weight and lead to an improved prognosis in COPD.

  2. Ghrelin mediates exercise endurance and the feeding response post-exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath K. Mani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Exercise training has several well-established health benefits, including many related to body weight, appetite control, and blood glucose homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms and, in particular, the hormonal systems that mediate and integrate these beneficial effects are poorly understood. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the role of the hormone ghrelin and its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR; ghrelin receptor, in mediating the effects of exercise on food intake and blood glucose following exercise as well as in regulating exercise endurance capacity. Methods: We used two mouse models of treadmill running to characterize the changes in plasma ghrelin with exercise. We also assessed the role of the ghrelin system to influence food intake and blood glucose after exercise, exercise endurance, and parameters potentially linked to responses to exercise. Mice lacking GHSRs (GHSR-null mice and wild-type littermates were studied. Results: An acute bout of exercise transiently elevated plasma acyl-ghrelin. Without the action of this increased ghrelin on GHSRs (as in GHSR-null mice, high intensity interval exercise markedly reduced food intake compared to control mice. The effect of exercise to acutely raise blood glucose remained unmodified in GHSR-null mice. Exercise-induced increases in plasma ghrelin positively correlated with endurance capacity, and time to exhaustion was reduced in GHSR-null mice as compared to wild-type littermates. In an effort to mechanistically explain their reduced exercise endurance, exercised GHSR-null mice exhibited an abrogated sympathoadrenal response, lower overall insulin-like growth factor-1 levels, and altered glycogen utilization. Conclusions: Exercise transiently increases plasma ghrelin. GHSR-null mice exhibit decreased food intake following high intensity interval exercise and decreased endurance when submitted to an exercise endurance protocol. These data

  3. Effects of Aerobic Exercise Applied Early After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting on Pulmonary Function, Respiratory Muscle Strength, and Functional Capacity: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Daniel L; Silva, Mayara Gabrielle; Silva, Luan Nascimento; Fortes, João Vyctor; Costa, Erika Thalita; Assunção, Rebeca Pessoa; Lima, Carlos Magno; da Silva Nina, Vinícius José; Bernardo-Filho, Mário; Caputo, Danúbia Sá

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity is beneficial in several clinical situations and recommended for patients with ischemic heart disease, as well as for those undergoing cardiac surgery. In a randomized controlled trial, 34 patients underwent coronary artery bypass grafting. A randomized control group (n = 15) submitted to conventional physiotherapy. The intervention group (n = 19) received the same protocol plus additional aerobic exercise with cycle ergometer. Pulmonary function by spirometry, respiratory muscle strength by manovacuometry, and functional capacity through 6-minute walking test was assessed before surgery and at hospital discharge. There was significant reduction in pulmonary function in both groups. In both groups, inspiratory muscle strength was maintained while expiratory muscle strength significantly decreased. Functional capacity was maintained in the intervention group (364.5 [324.5 to 428] vs. 348 [300.7 to 413.7] meters, P = .06), but it decreased significantly in control group patients (320 [288.5 to 393.0] vs. 292 [237.0 to 336.0] meters, P = .01). A significant difference in functional capacity was also found in intergroup analyses at hospital discharge (P = .03). Aerobic exercise applied early on coronary artery bypass grafting patients may promote maintenance of functional capacity, with no impact on pulmonary function and respiratory muscle strength when compared with conventional physiotherapy.

  4. Design of a dual-hormone model predictive control for artificial pancreas with exercise model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resalat, Navid; El Youssef, Joseph; Reddy, Ravi; Jacobs, Peter G

    2016-08-01

    The Artificial Pancreas (AP) is a new technology for helping people with type 1 diabetes to better control their glucose levels through automated delivery of insulin and optionally glucagon in response to sensed glucose levels. In a dual hormone AP, insulin and glucagon are delivered automatically to the body based on glucose sensor measurements using a control algorithm that calculates the amount of hormones to be infused. A dual-hormone MPC may deliver insulin continuously; however, it must avoid continuous delivery of glucagon because nausea can occur from too much glucagon. In this paper, we propose a novel dual-hormone (DH) switching model predictive control and compare it with a single-hormone (SH) MPC. We extended both MPCs by integrating an exercise model and compared performance with and without the exercise model included. Results were obtained on a virtual patient population undergoing a simulated exercise event using a mathematical glucoregulatory model that includes exercise. Time spent in hypoglycemia is significantly less with the DH-MPC than the SH-MPC (p=0.0022). Additionally, including the exercise model in the DH-MPC can help prevent hypoglycemia (p <; 0.001).

  5. Effects of yoga versus hydrotherapy training on health-related quality of life and exercise capacity in patients with heart failure: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Ewa; Hagerman, Inger; Dencker, Kerstin; Strömberg, Anna

    2017-06-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether yoga and hydrotherapy training had an equal effect on the health-related quality of life in patients with heart failure and to compare the effects on exercise capacity, clinical outcomes, and symptoms of anxiety and depression between and within the two groups. The design was a randomized controlled non-inferiority study. A total of 40 patients, 30% women (mean±SD age 64.9±8.9 years) with heart failure were randomized to an intervention of 12 weeks, either performing yoga or training with hydrotherapy for 45-60 minutes twice a week. Evaluation at baseline and after 12 weeks included self-reported health-related quality of life, a six-minute walk test, a sit-to-stand test, clinical variables, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Yoga and hydrotherapy had an equal impact on quality of life, exercise capacity, clinical outcomes, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Within both groups, exercise capacity significantly improved (hydrotherapy p=0.02; yoga p=0.008) and symptoms of anxiety decreased (hydrotherapy p=0.03; yoga p=0.01). Patients in the yoga group significantly improved their health as rated by EQ-VAS ( p=0.004) and disease-specific quality of life in the domains symptom frequency ( p=0.03), self-efficacy ( p=0.01), clinical summary as a combined measure of symptoms and social factors ( p=0.05), and overall summary score ( p=0.04). Symptoms of depression were decreased in this group ( p=0.005). In the hydrotherapy group, lower limb muscle strength improved significantly ( p=0.01). Yoga may be an alternative or complementary option to established forms of exercise training such as hydrotherapy for improvement in health-related quality of life and may decrease depressive symptoms in patients with heart failure.

  6. Effects of aerobic interval training versus continuous moderate exercise programme on aerobic and anaerobic capacity, somatic features and blood lipid profile in collegate females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzystof Mazurek

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available introduction. Regular physical activity has many positive health benefits, including reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases, metabolic diseases and some cancers, as well as improving the quality of life. objectives. The aim of the study was to examine the effects of 8-week aerobic interval cycle exercise training (AIT compared to continuous cycle exercises of moderate intensity (CME on the aerobic and anaerobic capacity, somatic features and lipid profile. material and methods. The research was conducted in 88 volunteers aged 19.5±0.6 years, who were randomized to three groups of organized physical activity (OPA, who exercised 3 times per week in 47 min sessions: (I AIT (n=24 comprising 2 series of 6x10 s sprinting with maximal pedalling cadence and active rest pedalling with intensity 65%–75% HRmax, (II CME (n=22 corresponding to 65%-75% HRmax, (III regular collegiate physical education classes of programmed exercises (CON; n=42. Before and after OPA anthropometrics, aero- and anaerobic capacity and lipid profile indices were measured. results. In AIT, a significantly greater decrease of waist circumference and WHR was noted when compared to CON, and a significantly greater reduction of sum of skinfolds than in CON and CME. Improvement in relative and absolute VO2max (L/min and ml/kg/min was significantly higher in AIT than CON. Work output and peak power output in the anaerobic test improved significantly in AIT, CME and CON, but independently of training type. OPA was effective only in reducing triglyceride concentrations in CME and CON groups, without interaction effects in relation to training type. conclusion. It was found that 8 weeks of OPA was beneficial in improving somatic and aerobic capacity indices, but AIT resulted in the greatest improvement in somatic indices (waist circumference, WHR, sum of skinfolds and in VO[sub]2[/sub]max, compared to CME and CON programmes.

  7. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis by T1-mapping in children with subclinical anthracycline cardiotoxicity: relationship to exercise capacity, cumulative dose and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Edythe B; Haykowsky, Mark J; Chow, Kelvin; Spavor, Maria; Kaneko, Sachie; Khoo, Nee S; Pagano, Joseph J; Mackie, Andrew S; Thompson, Richard B

    2013-06-10

    The late cardiotoxic effects of anthracycline chemotherapy influence morbidity and mortality in the growing population of childhood cancer survivors. Even with lower anthracycline doses, evidence of adverse cardiac remodeling and reduced exercise capacity exist. We aim to examine the relationship between cardiac structure, function and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) tissue characteristics with chemotherapy dose and exercise capacity in childhood cancer survivors. Thirty patients (15 ± 3 years), at least 2 years following anthracycline treatment, underwent CMR, echocardiography, and cardiopulmonary exercise testing (peak VO(2)). CMR measured ventricular function, mass, T(1) and T(2) values, and myocardial extracellular volume fraction, ECV, a measure of diffuse fibrosis based on changes in myocardial T1 values pre- and post-gadolinium. Cardiac function was also assessed with conventional and speckle tracking echocardiography. Patients had normal LVEF (59 ± 7%) but peak VO(2) was 17% lower than age-predicted normal values and were correlated with anthracycline dose (r = -0.49). Increased ECV correlated with decreased mass/volume ratio (r = -0.64), decreased LV wall thickness/height ratio (r = -0.72), lower peak VO(2)(r = -0.52), and higher cumulative dose (r = 0.40). Echocardiographic measures of systolic and diastolic function were reduced compared to normal values (p < 0.01), but had no relation to ECV, peak VO(2) or cumulative dose. Myocardial T1 and ECV were found to be early tissue markers of ventricular remodeling that may represent diffuse fibrosis in children with normal ejection fraction post anthracycline therapy, and are related to cumulative dose, exercise capacity and myocardial wall thinning.

  8. The effect of tai chi on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a pilot randomised study of lung function, exercise capacity and diaphragm strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Ruichao; He, Ruoxi; Luo, Bai-Ling; Hu, Chengping

    2014-04-01

    Although the benefits of exercise on the health of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have been widely reported, the effect of Tai Chi as an alternative exercise has not been thoroughly evaluated in patients with COPD. This study reported a randomised controlled trial, which investigated the effects of Tai Chi on lung function, exercise capacity, and diaphragm strength in patients with COPD. Single blind randomised controlled study. Department of Respiratory Medicine, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University. Forty patients with COPD were randomised into either a control group or Tai Chi intervention group. Participants in the control group received only routine care, while participants in the Tai Chi group received routine care and completed a six-month Tai Chi exercise program. Lung function parameters, blood gas parameters, 6-min walking distance (6MWD), and diaphragm strength parameters. Lung function parameters (FEV1: 1.43 ± 0.08 and FEV1 (%) predicted: 47.6 ± 4.76), 6MWD (476 ± 15) and diaphragm strength parameters (TwPes: 1.17 ± 0.07, TwPga: -1.12 ± 0.06, and TwPdi: 1.81 ± 0.09) were found to be significantly increased in participants who successfully completed the six-month Tai Chi program compared to participants in the control group who only received routine care (pexercise program compared to the baseline (p0.05). Tai Chi enhances lung function, exercise capacity, and diaphragm strength. However, this is only preliminary research data and a larger trial is needed for more detailed results. Copyright © 2013 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of right ventricular dysfunction on exercise capacity and quality of life and associations with serum NT-proBNP levels in COPD: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemirel, Tuğce Sahin; Ulaşli, Sevinç Sarinç; Yetiş, Begüm; Karaçağlar, Emir; Bayraktar, Nilüfer; Ulubay, Gaye

    2014-06-01

    During the course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary hypertension (PH) and right ventricular (RV) failure may develop due to elevated afterload of the RV. In those patients, exercise capacity is reduced due to pulmonary and cardiac limitations. We investigated relationships between serum N-terminal of proB-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and RV functions with exercise capacity and quality of life in patients COPD. An observational case-control study was conducted. We enrolled 31 moderate and severe COPD patients, and 20 subjects without chronic diseases as control group. Parameters reflecting the right ventricular diastolic and systolic functions by echocardiography along with serum NT-proBNP levels were assessed. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing and Short Form-36 (SF-36) were applied. Serum NT-proBNP levels were higher in COPD patients than control group (p=0.003). Serum NT-proBNP level was found to be related with pulmonary arterial pressure. Serum NT-proBNP levels were negatively correlated with anaerobic threshold oxygen uptake (AT VO2) and peak oxygen uptake (PVO2) values. Early ventricular filling velocity (Em) was lower in COPD patients. Em wave was significantly correlated with O2 pulse. There was a positive relationship between tricuspid E/A ratio and VO2 value at AT. SF-36 domains of physical functioning, general health and role limitation due to physical disorder were significantly correlated with AT VO2, PVO2 and O2 pulse. Exercise limitation may be predicted by assessment of right ventricule functions and NT-proBNP levels and exercise limitation impairs quality of life in COPD patients.

  10. Effects of renal sympathetic denervation on exercise blood pressure, heart rate, and capacity in patients with resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Sebastian; Mahfoud, Felix; Linz, Dominik; Pöss, Janine; Cremers, Bodo; Kindermann, Ingrid; Laufs, Ulrich; Ukena, Christian; Böhm, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Renal denervation reduces office blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension. This study investigated the effects of renal denervation on blood pressure, heart rate, and chronotropic index at rest, during exercise, and at recovery in 60 patients (renal denervation group=50, control group=10) with resistant hypertension using a standardized bicycle exercise test protocol performed 6 and 12 months after renal denervation. After renal denervation, exercise blood pressure at rest was reduced from 158±3/90±2 to 141±3/84±4 mm Hg (Pblood pressure/P=0.007 for diastolic blood pressure) after 6 months and 139±3/83±4 mm Hg (Pblood pressure tended to be lower at all stages of exercise at 6- and 12-month follow-up in patients undergoing renal denervation, although reaching statistical significance only at mild-to-moderate exercise levels (75-100 W). At recovery after 1 minute, blood pressure decreased from 201±4/95±2 to 177±4/88±2 (Pblood pressure and heart rate during exercise, improved mean workload, and increased exercise time without impairing chronotropic competence.

  11. Laser cutting of laminated sheet material: a modeling exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Roelof F.; Meijer, Johan

    1997-08-01

    Laser cutting has been investigated for a number of aluminum-synthetic laminates, newly developed materials for the aeronautic and automotive industry. The materials consist of alternating aluminum and synthetic layers. It is shown that these materials can be cut at rates comparable to those of homogeneous aluminum alloys. The cuts show little dross attachment. Also some damage on the synthetic layers has to be accepted. These results initiated a modeling exercise, which resulted in a numerical simulation code. The applied cutting model is based on describing the material in several horizontal layers, each with its own specific thermophysical and optical properties. The separate layers are coupled by known mass, energy and force balanced equations.

  12. Modeling arson - An exercise in qualitative model building

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heineke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed example is given of the role of von Neumann and Morgenstern's 1944 'expected utility theorem' (in the theory of games and economic behavior) in qualitative model building. Specifically, an arsonist's decision as to the amount of time to allocate to arson and related activities is modeled, and the responsiveness of this time allocation to changes in various policy parameters is examined. Both the activity modeled and the method of presentation are intended to provide an introduction to the scope and power of the expected utility theorem in modeling situations of 'choice under uncertainty'. The robustness of such a model is shown to vary inversely with the number of preference restrictions used in the analysis. The fewer the restrictions, the wider is the class of agents to which the model is applicable, and accordingly more confidence is put in the derived results. A methodological discussion on modeling human behavior is included.

  13. Designing and Validating a Model for Measuring Innovation Capacity Construct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Doroodian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In today’s rapid changing and highly competitive business environment, innovation is broadly recognized as a powerful competitive weapon. Innovation is a dynamic process that needs continuous, evolving, and mastered management. Thus, companies need to monitor and measure their innovation capacity to manage the innovation process. Yet, there is lack of a psychometrically valid scale for innovation capacity construct in the current innovation literature. The purpose of this paper is to develop a reliable and valid scale of measurement for innovation capacity. To test its unidimensionality, reliability, and several components of validity, we used data collected from 175 small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs in Iran and performed a series of analyses. The reliability measures, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, and several components of validity tests strongly support a four-dimensional scale for measuring innovation capacity. The dimensions are knowledge and technology management, idea management, project development, and commercialization capabilities.

  14. EFFECTS OF EXERCISE AND CAFFEIC ACID PHENETHYL ESTER AFTER CHRONIC EXERCISE RAT MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Alp

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand whether exercise and caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE has an effect on obesity and weight control, we investigated the effects of CAPE, and exercise on lipid parameters (triglyceride, total cholesterol, HDL-C, LDL-C, and adipokine substances such as leptin and resistin in rats. 40 male rat were randomly assigned into 4 groups. It was determined that CAPE does not have any significant effect on these parameters but that lipid parameters and leptin values in exercise groups decreased considerably, while no significant change occurred in resistin levels. In order to understand whether diet has an effect on exercise, body weights of all animal groups in pre and post-exercise were compared. A significant weight gain was observed (p = 0.005 in all groups. This study concluded that exercise has a considerable effect on leptin and lipid parameters; however, exercise alone was not sufficient for weight control and could be effective in weight control only when accompanied by a restricted diet.

  15. Impact of exercise capacity on dyspnea and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Ramune; Frølich, Anne; Godtfredsen, Nina S

    2012-01-01

    To assess the impact of the amount of exercise training during pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) program for improvements in dyspnea and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)....

  16. The Physiology of Exercise in Free-Living Vertebrates: What Can We Learn from Current Model Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Kang Nian; Serota, Mitchell W; Williams, Tony D

    2017-08-01

    Many behaviors crucial for survival and reproductive success in free-living animals, including migration, foraging, and escaping from predators, involve elevated levels of physical activity. However, although there has been considerable interest in the physiological and biomechanical mechanisms that underpin individual variation in exercise performance, to date, much work on the physiology of exercise has been conducted in laboratory settings that are often quite removed from the animal's ecology. Here we review current, laboratory-based model systems for exercise (wind or swim tunnels for migration studies in birds and fishes, manipulation of exercise associated with non-migratory activity in birds, locomotion in lizards, and wheel running in rodents) to identify common physiological markers of individual variation in exercise capacity and/or costs of increased activity. Secondly, we consider how physiological responses to exercise might be influenced by (1) the nature of the activity (i.e., voluntary or involuntary, intensity, and duration), and (2) resource acquisition and food availability, in the context of routine activities in free-living animals. Finally, we consider evidence that the physiological effects of experimentally-elevated activity directly affect components of fitness such as reproduction and survival. We suggest that developing more ecologically realistic laboratory systems, incorporating resource-acquisition, functional studies across multiple physiological systems, and a life-history framework, with reproduction and survival end-points, will help reveal the mechanisms underlying the consequences of exercise, and will complement studies in free-living animals taking advantage of new developments in wildlife-tracking. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Multicomponent Exercise Improves Hemodynamic Parameters and Mobility, but Not Maximal Walking Speed, Transfer Capacity, and Executive Function of Older Type II Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio José Coelho Junior

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the effects of a 6-month multicomponent exercise program (MCEP on functional, cognitive, and hemodynamic parameters of older Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM patients. Moreover, additional analyses were performed to evaluate if T2DM patients present impaired adaptability in response to physical exercise when compared to nondiabetic volunteers. A total of 72 T2DM patients and 72 age-matched healthy volunteers (CG were recruited and submitted to functional, cognitive, and hemodynamic evaluations before and after six months of a MCEP. The program of exercise was performed twice a week at moderate intensity. Results indicate T2DM and nondiabetic patients present an increase in mobility (i.e., usual walking speed after the MCEP. However, improvements in maximal walking speed, transfer capacity, and executive function were only observed in the CG. On the other hand, only T2DM group reveals a marked decline in blood pressure. In conclusion, data of the current study indicate that a 6-month MCEP improves mobility and reduce blood pressure in T2DM patients. However, maximal walking speed, transfer capacity, and executive function were only improved in CG, indicating that T2DM may present impaired adaptability in response to physical stimulus.

  18. Ghrelin mediates exercise endurance and the feeding response post-exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Bharath K; Castorena, Carlos M; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Vijayaraghavan, Prasanna; Metzger, Nathan P; Elmquist, Joel K; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2018-03-01

    Exercise training has several well-established health benefits, including many related to body weight, appetite control, and blood glucose homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms and, in particular, the hormonal systems that mediate and integrate these beneficial effects are poorly understood. In the current study, we aimed to investigate the role of the hormone ghrelin and its receptor, the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR; ghrelin receptor), in mediating the effects of exercise on food intake and blood glucose following exercise as well as in regulating exercise endurance capacity. We used two mouse models of treadmill running to characterize the changes in plasma ghrelin with exercise. We also assessed the role of the ghrelin system to influence food intake and blood glucose after exercise, exercise endurance, and parameters potentially linked to responses to exercise. Mice lacking GHSRs (GHSR-null mice) and wild-type littermates were studied. An acute bout of exercise transiently elevated plasma acyl-ghrelin. Without the action of this increased ghrelin on GHSRs (as in GHSR-null mice), high intensity interval exercise markedly reduced food intake compared to control mice. The effect of exercise to acutely raise blood glucose remained unmodified in GHSR-null mice. Exercise-induced increases in plasma ghrelin positively correlated with endurance capacity, and time to exhaustion was reduced in GHSR-null mice as compared to wild-type littermates. In an effort to mechanistically explain their reduced exercise endurance, exercised GHSR-null mice exhibited an abrogated sympathoadrenal response, lower overall insulin-like growth factor-1 levels, and altered glycogen utilization. Exercise transiently increases plasma ghrelin. GHSR-null mice exhibit decreased food intake following high intensity interval exercise and decreased endurance when submitted to an exercise endurance protocol. These data suggest that an intact ghrelin system limits the capacity

  19. N-Acetylcysteine Supplementation Controls Total Antioxidant Capacity, Creatine Kinase, Lactate, and Tumor Necrotic Factor-Alpha against Oxidative Stress Induced by Graded Exercise in Sedentary Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donrawee Leelarungrayub

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of short-term (7 days N-acetylcysteine (NAC at 1,200 mg daily supplementation on muscle fatigue, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, total antioxidant capacity (TAC, lactate, creatine kinase (CK, and tumor necrotic factor-alpha (TNF-α. Twenty-nine sedentary men (13 controls; 16 in the supplement group from a randomized control were included. At before and after supplementation, fatigue index (FI was evaluated in the quadriceps muscle, and performed a graded exercise treadmill test to induce oxidative stress, and as a measure of VO2max. Blood samples were taken before exercise and 20 minutes after it at before and after supplementation, to determine TAC, CK, lactate, and TNF-α levels. Results showed that FI and VO2max increased significantly in the supplement group. After exercise decreased the levels of TAC and increased lactate, CK, and TNF-α of both groups at before supplementation. After supplementation, lactate, CK, and TNF-α levels significantly increased and TAC decreased after exercise in the control group. Whereas the TAC and lactate levels did not change significantly, but CK and TNF-α increased significantly in the supplement group. Therefore, this results showed that NAC improved the muscle fatigue, VO2max, maintained TAC, controlled lactate production, but had no influence on CK and TNF-α.

  20. Transtheoretical Model Based Exercise Counseling Combined with Music Skipping Rope Exercise on Childhood Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ok Kyung Ham, RN, PhD, MCHES

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Our study partially supports the hypothesis that a TTM-based exercise intervention is effective in maintaining BMI and improving self-efficacy of overweight/obese children. The TTM-based counseling combined with exercise classes has potential to control weight among overweight/obese children, while involvement of parents and children in the development of the theory-based intervention may generate further benefits regarding health and well-being of overweight/obese children.

  1. Complex network models reveal correlations among network metrics, exercise intensity and role of body changes in the fatigue process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vanessa Helena; Gama, Maria Carolina Traina; Sousa, Filipe Antônio Barros; Lewis, Theodore Gyle; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre; Manchado-Gobatto, Fúlvia Barros

    2015-05-21

    The aims of the present study were analyze the fatigue process at distinct intensity efforts and to investigate its occurrence as interactions at distinct body changes during exercise, using complex network models. For this, participants were submitted to four different running intensities until exhaustion, accomplished in a non-motorized treadmill using a tethered system. The intensities were selected according to critical power model. Mechanical (force, peak power, mean power, velocity and work) and physiological related parameters (heart rate, blood lactate, time until peak blood lactate concentration (lactate time), lean mass, anaerobic and aerobic capacities) and IPAQ score were obtained during exercises and it was used to construction of four complex network models. Such models have both, theoretical and mathematical value, and enables us to perceive new insights that go beyond conventional analysis. From these, we ranked the influences of each node at the fatigue process. Our results shows that nodes, links and network metrics are sensibility according to increase of efforts intensities, been the velocity a key factor to exercise maintenance at models/intensities 1 and 2 (higher time efforts) and force and power at models 3 and 4, highlighting mechanical variables in the exhaustion occurrence and even training prescription applications.

  2. Complex network models reveal correlations among network metrics, exercise intensity and role of body changes in the fatigue process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Vanessa Helena; Gama, Maria Carolina Traina; Sousa, Filipe Antônio Barros; Lewis, Theodore Gyle; Gobatto, Claudio Alexandre; Manchado-Gobatto, Fúlvia Barros

    2015-05-01

    The aims of the present study were analyze the fatigue process at distinct intensity efforts and to investigate its occurrence as interactions at distinct body changes during exercise, using complex network models. For this, participants were submitted to four different running intensities until exhaustion, accomplished in a non-motorized treadmill using a tethered system. The intensities were selected according to critical power model. Mechanical (force, peak power, mean power, velocity and work) and physiological related parameters (heart rate, blood lactate, time until peak blood lactate concentration (lactate time), lean mass, anaerobic and aerobic capacities) and IPAQ score were obtained during exercises and it was used to construction of four complex network models. Such models have both, theoretical and mathematical value, and enables us to perceive new insights that go beyond conventional analysis. From these, we ranked the influences of each node at the fatigue process. Our results shows that nodes, links and network metrics are sensibility according to increase of efforts intensities, been the velocity a key factor to exercise maintenance at models/intensities 1 and 2 (higher time efforts) and force and power at models 3 and 4, highlighting mechanical variables in the exhaustion occurrence and even training prescription applications.

  3. Combined simulation-analytical model of aerodrome airspace Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to the problem of estimating an aerodrome airspace capacity based on the idea of airspace «quantization» and transition to discrete time while imposing restrictions on the filling of quantum states by aircrafts has been developed in this paper. It is shown that such a formalism can significantly reduce the complexity of aircrafts movement simulation in the airfield zone, to take into account the restrictions imposed on the aerodrome airspace capacity by intersections of arrival and departure routes. The paper presents the results of the simulation experiment, illustrating the dependence of the aerodrome airspace capacity upon the number of aircraft routes intersections, v.kuznetsov@mstuca.aero.

  4. Four weeks of speed endurance training reduces energy expenditure during exercise and maintains muscle oxidative capacity despite a reduction in training volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iaia, F. Marcello; Hellsten, Ylva; Nielsen, Jens Jung

    2009-01-01

    as maximal oxygen uptake and 10-km performance time, remained unaltered in both groups. In SET, the capillary-to-fiber ratio was the same before and after the IT period. The present study showed that speed endurance training reduces energy expenditure during submaximal exercise, which is not mediated......We studied the effect of an alteration from regular endurance to speed endurance training on muscle oxidative capacity, capillarization, as well as energy expenditure during submaximal exercise and its relationship to mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) in humans. Seventeen endurance......-trained runners were assigned to either a speed endurance training (SET; n = 9) or a control (Con; n = 8) group. For a 4-wk intervention (IT) period, SET replaced the ordinary training ( approximately 45 km/wk) with frequent high-intensity sessions each consisting of 8-12 30-s sprint runs separated by 3 min...

  5. Application of the health promotion model to predict stages of exercise behaviour in Iranian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taymoori, P; Niknami, S; Berry, T; Ghofranipour, F; Kazemnejad, A

    2009-01-01

    A cluster random sample of 1073 students in the Islamic Republic of Iran (mean age 14.37 years) completed a self-report questionnaire consisting of an exercise measure, selected constructs of Pender's health promotion model and an assessment of stages of behaviour change in exercise. In multivariate discriminant analysis, exercise self-efficacy, perceived barriers to exercise, perceived benefits of exercise and exercise behaviour were significant predictors of the stage of exercise behaviour change for both female and male adolescents. The findings support the importance of self-efficacy for engaging in physical activity for both sexes of Iranian adolescents. The barriers faced by Iranian girls should be considered in interventions to increase physical activity rates.

  6. The single-bout forearm critical force test: a new method to establish forearm aerobic metabolic exercise intensity and capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mikhail Kellawan

    Full Text Available No non-invasive test exists for forearm exercise that allows identification of power-time relationship parameters (W', critical power and thereby identification of the heavy-severe exercise intensity boundary and scaling of aerobic metabolic exercise intensity. The aim of this study was to develop a maximal effort handgrip exercise test to estimate forearm critical force (fCF; force analog of power and establish its repeatability and validity. Ten healthy males (20-43 years completed two maximal effort rhythmic handgrip exercise tests (repeated maximal voluntary contractions (MVC; 1 s contraction-2 s relaxation for 600 s on separate days. Exercise intensity was quantified via peak contraction force and contraction impulse. There was no systematic difference between test 1 and 2 for fCF(peak force (p = 0.11 or fCF(impulse (p = 0.76. Typical error was small for both fCF(peak force (15.3 N, 5.5% and fCF(impulse (15.7 N ⋅ s, 6.8%, and test re-test correlations were strong (fCF(peak force, r = 0.91, ICC = 0.94, pfCF(peak force. TTE predicted by W' showed good agreement with actual TTE during the TTE tests (r = 0.97, ICC = 0.97, P<0.01; typical error 0.98 min, 12%; regression fit slope = 0.99 and y intercept not different from 0, p = 0.31. MVC did not predict fCF(peak force (p = 0.37, fCF(impulse (p = 0.49 or W' (p = 0.15. In conclusion, the poor relationship between MVC and fCF or W' illustrates the serious limitation of MVC in identifying metabolism-based exercise intensity zones. The maximal effort handgrip exercise test provides repeatable and valid estimates of fCF and should be used to normalize forearm aerobic metabolic exercise intensity instead of MVC.

  7. Effectiveness of nocturnal home oxygen therapy to improve exercise capacity, cardiac function and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure and central sleep apnea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Takuji; Seki, Ryotaro; Isobe, Naoki; Sakurai, Shigeki; Adachi, Hitoshi; Hoshizaki, Hiroshi; Oshima, Shigeru; Taniguchi, Koichi; Kasama, Shu

    2009-01-01

    Central sleep apnea, often found in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), has a high risk of poor prognosis. This study involved 20 patients with CHF (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 5 times/h who were divided into 2 groups: 10 patients treated with nocturnal home oxygen therapy (HOT) and 10 patients without HOT (non-HOT). All patients had dilated cardiomyopathy and underwent overnight polysomnography, cardiopulmonary exercise testing, and nuclear cardiac examinations to evaluate AHI, exercise capacity according to the specific activity scale and oxygen uptake at anaerobic threshold and peak exercise (peak VO 2 ). Cardiac function according to 99m Tc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) QGS, and the total defect score (TDS), H/M ratio and the washout rate (WR) on 123 I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging were calculated for all patients. As compared with the non-HOT group, the HOT group demonstrated a greater reduction in AHI (26.1±9.1 to 5.1±3.4), 123 I-MIBG TDS (31±8 to 25±9), and 123 I-MIBG WR (48±8% to 41±5%) and a greater increase in the specific activity scale (4.0±0.9 to 5.8±1.2 Mets), peak VO 2 (16.0±3.8 to 18.3±4.7 ml·min -1 ·kg -1 ), and LVEF (27±9% to 37±10%). HOT improves exercise capacity, cardiac function, and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with CHF and central sleep apnea. (author)

  8. Dynamic heat capacity of the east model and of a bead-spring polymer model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, John Dwane (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM); Brown, Jonathan R. (New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM); Adolf, Douglas Brian

    2011-10-01

    In this report we have presented a brief review of the glass transition and one means of characterizing glassy materials: linear and nonlinear thermodynamic oscillatory experiments to extract the dynamic heat capacity. We have applied these methods to the east model (a variation of the Ising model for glass forming systems) and a simple polymeric system via molecular dynamics simulation, and our results match what is seen in experiment. For the east model, since the dynamics are so simple, a mathematical model is developed that matches the simulated dynamics. For the polymeric system, since the system is a simulation, we can instantaneously 'quench' the system - removing all vibrational energy - to separate the vibrational dynamics from dynamics associated with particle rearrangements. This shows that the long-time glassy dynamics are due entirely to the particle rearrangements, i.e. basin jumping on the potential energy landscape. Finally, we present an extension of linear dynamic heat capacity to the nonlinear regime.

  9. Effects of whole body vibration on pulmonary function, functional exercise capacity and quality of life in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaotian; Zhou, Yujing; Wang, Pu; He, Chengqi; He, Hongchen

    2016-05-01

    To examine the effect of whole-body vibration in enhancing pulmonary function, functional exercise capacity and quality of life in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and examine its safety. Randomized controlled trials examining the effects of whole body vibration among people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were identified by two independent researchers. Articles were excluded if they were studies on people with other primary diagnosis, abstracts published in the conferences or books. PEDro scale was used to assess the methodological quality of the selected studies. We evaluated the level of evidence by using the GRADE approach. The results were extracted by two researchers and confirmed by the third researcher if disagreement existed. Sources included Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, CINAHL, EMBASE, PEDro, AMED, PsycINFO, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials and reference lists of all relevant articles. Four studies involving 206 participants were included in this systematic review. Methodological quality was rated as good for two studies. No great benefits on pulmonary function were found in whole body vibration treatment group. Two studies showed that quality of life was improved in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Whole body vibration led to significant improvements in functional exercise capacity measured with six minutes walking test. Nearly no adverse events were observed. Whole body vibration may improve functional exercise capacity and quality of life in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. There was insufficient evidence to prove the effects of whole body vibration on pulmonary function. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. A Comparison of Freeway Work Zone Capacity Prediction Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, N.; Hegyi, A.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.; Van Zuylen, H.J.; Peters, D.

    2011-01-01

    To keep the freeway networks in a good condition, road works such as maintenance and reconstruction are carried out regularly. The resulting work zones including the related traffic management measures, give different traffic capacities of the infrastructures, which determines the travel time for

  11. Modelling Effluent Assimilative Capacity of Ikpoba River, Benin City ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sheer display of reprehensible propensity on the part of public hospitals, abattoirs, breweries and city dwellers at large to discharge untreated waste, debris, scum and, in particular, municipal and industrial effluents into Ikpoba River has morphed into a situation whereby the assimilative capacity of the river has reached ...

  12. Integrated capacity assessment and timetabling models for dense railway networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besinovic, Nikola

    2017-01-01

    Mainline railways in Europe are experiencing increasing use as the worldwide demand for passenger and freight transport is growing across all transport modes. At the same time, much of the existing railway network is reaching its capacity and has become susceptible to disturbances. This thesis

  13. Model study on steady heat capacity in driven stochastic systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pešek, Jiří; Boksenbojm, E.; Netočný, Karel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2012), 692-701 ISSN 1895-1082 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : nonequilibrium steady state * quasistatic process * heat capacity Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.905, year: 2012

  14. Verification, Validation and Credibility Assessment of a Computational Model of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C. R.; Humphreys, B. T.; Mulugeta, L.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED) is the resistive exercise device used by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) to mitigate bone loss and muscle atrophy due to extended exposure to microgravity (micro g). The Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a multi-body dynamics model of biomechanics models for use in spaceflight exercise physiology research and operations. In an effort to advance model maturity and credibility of the ARED model, the DAP performed verification, validation and credibility (VV and C) assessment of the analyses of the model in accordance to NASA-STD-7009 'Standards for Models and Simulations'.

  15. Animal models of resistance exercise and their application to neuroscience research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Justin C; Smith, Mark A

    2016-11-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that participation in regular resistance exercise (e.g., strength training) is associated with improvements in mental health, memory, and cognition. However, less is known about the neurobiological mechanisms mediating these effects. The goal of this mini-review is to describe and evaluate the available animal models of resistance exercise that may prove useful for examining CNS activity. Various models have been developed to examine resistance exercise in laboratory animals. Resistance exercise models vary in how the resistance manipulation is applied, either through direct stimulation of the muscle (e.g., in situ models) or through behavior maintained by operant contingencies (e.g., whole organism models). Each model presents distinct advantages and disadvantages for examining central nervous system (CNS) activity, and consideration of these attributes is essential for the future investigation of underlying neurobiological substrates. Potential neurobiological mechanisms mediating the effects of resistance exercise on pain, anxiety, memory, and drug use have been efficiently and effectively investigated using resistance exercise models that minimize stress and maximize the relative contribution of resistance over aerobic factors. Whole organism resistance exercise models that (1) limit the use of potentially stressful stimuli and (2) minimize the contribution of aerobic factors will be critical for examining resistance exercise and CNS function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Outcomes of an aquatic exercise program including aerobic capacity, lactate threshold, and fatigue in two individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariser, Gina; Madras, Diane; Weiss, Elizabeth

    2006-06-01

    Fatigue in individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be exacerbated by poor cardiovascular fitness. Although aqua aerobic exercise is often recommended, little research has been conducted on the efficacy of aqua aerobic exercise in improving cardiovascular fitness in patients with MS. The purpose of this case report is to describe changes in cardiovascular fitness and fatigue for 2 people with MS following an aqua aerobics class. The participants were 2 females, both with MS for over 10 years and mild disability. Participant A (40 years old and EDSS = 2.5/10) reported fatigue, numbness in her hands and feet, and occasional blurred vision. Participant B (51 years old and EDSS = 3.0/10) reported the same problems as Participant A plus stiffness in her right lower extremity. The participants performed aqua aerobics at an intensity equivalent to their lactate threshold twice a week for 8 weeks. Lactate threshold is the exercise intensity just prior to the accumulation of blood lactate during graded exercise. A graded exercise test (with measurements of gas exchange) and a test of fatigue were administered before and after the intervention. Initially, both participants had poor cardiovascular fitness as demonstrated by their low peak oxygen consumption (VO2peak) and low lactate threshold (LT). After the intervention, both participants achieved a higher peak workload (their VO2peak increased) and they could sustain a higher submaximal workload without accumulation of acid substances causing fatigue (their LT increased). Changes in fatigue following the intervention were equivocal with Participant A reporting decreased fatigue and Participant B reporting no change. This report describes the use of exercise testing to guide clinical decision making for dosing of an aqua aerobic fitness intervention and illustrates positive effects of the intervention on cardiovascular fitness in 2 people with MS.

  17. Smoking status and its relationship with exercise capacity, physical activity in daily life and quality of life in physically independent, elderly individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, R; Gonçalves, C G; Hayashi, D; Costa, V de S P; Teixeira, D de C; de Freitas, E R F S; Felcar, J M; Pitta, F; Molari, M; Probst, V S

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the relationship between smoking status and exercise capacity, physical activity in daily life and health-related quality of life in physically independent, elderly (≥60 years) individuals. Cross-sectional, observational study. Community-dwelling, elderly individuals. One hundred and fifty-four elderly individuals were categorised into four groups according to their smoking status: never smokers (n=57), passive smokers (n=30), ex-smokers (n=45) and current smokers (n=22). Exercise capacity [6-minute walk test (6MWT)], physical activity in daily life (step counting) and health-related quality of life [36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) questionnaire] were assessed. Current and ex-smokers had lower mean exercise capacity compared with never smokers: 90 [standard deviation (SD) 10] % predicted, 91 (SD 12) % predicted and 100 (SD 13) % predicted distance on 6MWT, respectively [mean differences -9.8%, 95% confidence intervals (CI) -17.8 to -1.8 and -9.1%, 95% CI -15.4 to -2.7, respectively; Pphysical activity did not differ between the groups, but was found to correlate negatively with the level of nicotine dependence in current smokers (r=-0.47, P=0.03). The median score for the mental health dimension of SF-36 was worse in passive {72 [interquartile range (IQR) 56 to 96] points} and current [76 (IQR 55 to 80) points] smokers compared with ex-smokers [88 (IQR 70 to 100) points] (median differences -16 points, 95% CI -22.2 to -3.0 and -12 points, 95% CI -22.8 to -2.4, respectively; Pelderly individuals, current smokers had lower exercise capacity than never smokers. Although the level of physical activity did not differ between the groups, an association was found with smoking. Tobacco exposure was associated with worse scores for the mental health dimension of SF-36 in physically independent, elderly individuals. Copyright © 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Regular exercise and related factors in patients with Parkinson's disease: Applying zero-inflated negative binomial modeling of exercise count data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuHee; Park, Chang Gi; Choi, Moonki

    2016-05-01

    This study was conducted to identify risk factors that influence regular exercise among patients with Parkinson's disease in Korea. Parkinson's disease is prevalent in the elderly, and may lead to a sedentary lifestyle. Exercise can enhance physical and psychological health. However, patients with Parkinson's disease are less likely to exercise than are other populations due to physical disability. A secondary data analysis and cross-sectional descriptive study were conducted. A convenience sample of 106 patients with Parkinson's disease was recruited at an outpatient neurology clinic of a tertiary hospital in Korea. Demographic characteristics, disease-related characteristics (including disease duration and motor symptoms), self-efficacy for exercise, balance, and exercise level were investigated. Negative binomial regression and zero-inflated negative binomial regression for exercise count data were utilized to determine factors involved in exercise. The mean age of participants was 65.85 ± 8.77 years, and the mean duration of Parkinson's disease was 7.23 ± 6.02 years. Most participants indicated that they engaged in regular exercise (80.19%). Approximately half of participants exercised at least 5 days per week for 30 min, as recommended (51.9%). Motor symptoms were a significant predictor of exercise in the count model, and self-efficacy for exercise was a significant predictor of exercise in the zero model. Severity of motor symptoms was related to frequency of exercise. Self-efficacy contributed to the probability of exercise. Symptom management and improvement of self-efficacy for exercise are important to encourage regular exercise in patients with Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Geometric Brownian Motion, Option Pricing, and Simulation: Some Spreadsheet-Based Exercises in Financial Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D. Brewer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some Excel-based simulation exercises that are suitable for use in financial modeling courses. Such exercises are based on a stochastic process of stock price movements, called geometric Brownian motion, that underlies the derivation of the Black-Scholes option pricing model. Guidance is provided in assigning appropriate values of the drift parameter in the stochastic process for such exercises. Some further simulation exercises are also suggested. As the analytical underpinning of the materials involved is provided, this paper is expected to be of interest also to instructors and students of investment courses.

  20. Effect of exercise-induced enhancement of the leg-extensor muscle-tendon unit capacities on ambulatory mechanics and knee osteoarthritis markers in the elderly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiros Karamanidis

    Full Text Available Leg-extensor muscle weakness could be a key component in knee joint degeneration in the elderly because it may result in altered muscular control during locomotion influencing the mechanical environment within the joint. This work aimed to examine whether an exercise-induced enhancement of the triceps surae (TS and quadriceps femoris (QF muscle-tendon unit (MTU capacities would affect mechanical and biological markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly.Twelve older women completed a 14-week TS and QF MTU exercise intervention, which had already been established as increasing muscle strength and tendon stiffness. Locomotion mechanics and serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP levels were examined during incline walking. MTU mechanical properties were assessed using simultaneously ultrasonography and dynamometry.Post exercise intervention, the elderly had higher TS and QF contractile strength and tendon-aponeurosis stiffness. Regarding the incline gait task, the subjects demonstrated a lower external knee adduction moment and lower knee adduction angular impulse during the stance phase post-intervention. Furthermore, post-intervention compared to pre-intervention, the elderly showed lower external hip adduction moment, but revealed higher plantarflexion pushoff moment. The changes in the external knee adduction moment were significantly correlated with the improvement in ankle pushoff function. Serum COMP concentration increased in response to the 0.5-h incline walking exercise with no differences in the magnitude of increment between pre- and post-intervention.This work emphasizes the important role played by the ankle pushoff function in knee joint mechanical loading during locomotion, and may justify the inclusion of the TS MTU in prevention programs aiming to positively influence specific mechanical markers for knee osteoarthritis in the elderly. However, the study was unable to show that COMP is amenable to change in the elderly

  1. Are substrate use during exercise and mitochondrial respiratory capacity decreased in arm and leg muscle in type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Ara, I; Rabøl, R

    2009-01-01

    AIM/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of the study was to investigate mitochondrial function, fibre type distribution and substrate oxidation in arm and leg muscle during exercise in patients with type 2 diabetes and in obese and lean controls. METHODS: Indirect calorimetry was used to calculate fat and carboh...

  2. Relation of Physical Activity, Cardiac Function, Exercise Capacity, and Quality of Life in Patients With a Systemic Right Ventricle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, Michiel M.; Bouma, Berto J.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Groenink, Maarten; Nieuwkerk, Pythia T.; van der Plas, Mart N.; Sieswerda, Gertjan T.; Konings, Thelma C.; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise is recommended in patients with left ventricular failure. Although right ventricular failure is common in patients with a systemic right ventricle (RV), no data are available on the effect of physical activity in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation of physical

  3. Relation of physical activity, cardiac function, exercise capacity, and quality of life in patients with a systemic right ventricle.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, M.M.; Bouma, B.J.; Dijk, A.P.J. van; Groenink, M.; Nieuwkerk, P.T.; Plas, M.N. van der; Sieswerda, G.T.; Konings, T.C.; Mulder, B.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Exercise is recommended in patients with left ventricular failure. Although right ventricular failure is common in patients with a systemic right ventricle (RV), no data are available on the effect of physical activity in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation of physical

  4. Robustness indicators and capacity models for railway networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Wittrup

    In a world continuous striving for higher mobility and the use of more sustainable modes of transport, there is a constant pressure on utilising railway capacity better and, at the same time, obtaining a high robustness against delays. During the planning of railway operations and infrastructure...... this can be assisted by improving decision support systems to enable planners to use their time more efficiently. In the context of strategic (long-term) planning, efficient decision-support tools translate into being able to evaluate infrastructure and timetable scenarios fast with little data input....... This has motivated the research conducted and described in this thesis, where the objective has been to develop and improve existing methods to achieve timetable and infrastructure plans with robust capacity utilisation aimed at the strategic and early tactical planning phases....

  5. Emerging concept: 'central benefit model' of exercise in falls prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S; Hsu, Chun Liang; Bolandzadeh, Niousha

    2013-01-01

    Falls are a common geriatric syndrome and are the third leading cause of chonic disability worldwide. Falls are not random events and occur, at least in part, due to impaired physiological function, such as impaired balance, and cognitive impairment. The clinical syndrome of falls is important for Sports and Exercise Medicine Clinicians as there is Level 1 evidence that targeted exercise prescription is an effective intervention strategy. The widely accepted dogma is that improved physical function, balance and muscle strength, underlies the effectiveness of the exercise in reducing falls. However, findings from randomised controlled trials suggest that exercise reduce falls via mechanisms other than improved physiological function. The authors propose that improved cognitive function - specifically, executive functions - and associated functional plasticity may be an important yet underappreciated mechanism by which the exercise reduces falls in older adults.

  6. An EMG-driven biomechanical model that accounts for the decrease in moment generation capacity during a dynamic fatigued condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Guillaume; Berton, Eric; Amarantini, David; Vigouroux, Laurent; Buchanan, Thomas S

    2010-07-01

    Although it is well known that fatigue can greatly reduce muscle forces, it is not generally included in biomechanical models. The aim of the present study was to develop an electromyographic-driven (EMG-driven) biomechanical model to estimate the contributions of flexor and extensor muscle groups to the net joint moment during a nonisokinetic functional movement (squat exercise) performed in nonfatigued and in fatigued conditions. A methodology that aims at balancing the decreased muscle moment production capacity following fatigue was developed. During an isometric fatigue session, a linear regression was created linking the decrease in force production capacity of the muscle (normalized force/EMG ratio) to the EMG mean frequency. Using the decrease in mean frequency estimated through wavelet transforms between dynamic squats performed before and after the fatigue session as input to the previous linear regression, a coefficient accounting for the presence of fatigue in the quadriceps group was computed. This coefficient was used to constrain the moment production capacity of the fatigued muscle group within an EMG-driven optimization model dedicated to estimate the contributions of the knee flexor and extensor muscle groups to the net joint moment. During squats, our results showed significant increases in the EMG amplitudes with fatigue (+23.27% in average) while the outputs of the EMG-driven model were similar. The modifications of the EMG amplitudes following fatigue were successfully taken into account while estimating the contributions of the flexor and extensor muscle groups to the net joint moment. These results demonstrated that the new procedure was able to estimate the decrease in moment production capacity of the fatigued muscle group.

  7. A Conceptual Neurocognitive Affect-Related Model for the Promotion of Exercise Among Obese Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Meghan K; Addoh, Ovuokerie; Herod, Skyla M; Rhodes, Ryan E; Loprinzi, Paul D

    2017-03-01

    Obesity remains a prominent societal threat and burden despite well-promoted prevention and treatment strategies, such as regular engagement in physical activity. Obese individuals, in particular, may be prone to inactivity as a result of a variety of displeasure-related parameters resulting from exercise, such as dyspnea, for instance. This brief conceptual review discusses the integral roles of exercise-induced affective responses within a novel conceptual-based neurocognitive affect-related model. Specifically, this model includes three pathways: (1) pathway A proposes that neurocognition, and especially, executive function-based cognition, may play an influential role in fostering exercise-induced affective responses, (2) pathway B connects an individual's affective response from exercise to their future exercise behavior, and (3) pathway C suggests a cyclical, bi-directional relationship with executive function indirectly influencing future exercise behavior via affective responses to exercise, and exercise itself playing an important role in executive functioning. Future studies should empirically test this model, which may have utility for promoting exercise among the obese population.

  8. a Mathematical Model for Training Impulse and Lactate Influx and Outflux during Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxnes, John F.; Hausken, Kjell

    This paper provides a mathematical description based on the theory of differential equations, for the dynamics of lactate production and removal. Analytical and numerical results for training/exercise of endurance of athletes are presented based on the common concept of training impulse (Trimp). The relationships between activity, production rate, and removal strategies of lactate are studied. Parameters are estimated from published data. A model for optimum removal of lactate after exercise is developed. The model provides realistic predictions when compared with experimental results. We show some specific examples for the usefulness of the mathematical model by studying some recent problems discussed in the literature. (a) Is interval exercise more beneficial than steady-state exercise? (b) What is the optimum aerobic power during recovery? We discuss whether steady-state exercise gives higher Trimp than interval exercise, when imposing an upper boundary for the lactate concentration as a constraint. The model allows for testing all imaginable kinds of steady-state and interval exercises in search of the optimal exercise regime for individuals with various kinds of characteristics. In general, the dynamic model constitute a powerful tool describing the processes by which the concentration of lactate can be studied and controlled to decrease fatigue and increase endurance.

  9. Randomized Controlled Trial to Examine the Impact of Aquatic Exercise Training on Functional Capacity, Balance, and Perceptions of Fatigue in Female Patients With Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargarfard, Mehdi; Shariat, Ardalan; Ingle, Lee; Cleland, Joshua A; Kargarfard, Mina

    2018-02-01

    To assess the effects of an 8-week aquatic exercise training program on functional capacity, balance, and perceptions of fatigue in women with multiple sclerosis (MS). Randomized controlled design. Referral center of an MS society. Women (N=32; mean age ± SD, 36.4±8.2y) with diagnosed relapsing-remitting MS. After undergoing baseline testing by a neurologist, participants were allocated to either an intervention (aquatic training program, n=17) or a control group (n=15). The intervention consisted of an 8-week aquatic training program (3 supervised training sessions per week; session duration, 45-60min; 50%-75% estimated maximum heart rate). Six-minute walk test (6-MWT), balance (Berg Balance Scale [BBS]), and perceptions of fatigue (Modified Fatigue Impact Scale; [MFIS]) at baseline and after the 8-week intervention. Differences over time between the experimental and control groups were assessed by a 2×2 (group by time) repeated-measures analysis of variance. Thirty-two women completed the 8-week aquatic training intervention (experimental group, n=17; control group, n=15). All outcome measures improved in the experimental group: 6-MWT performance (pretest mean ± SD, 451±58m; posttest mean ± SD, 503±57m; PAquatic exercise training improved functional capacity, balance, and perceptions of fatigue in women with MS. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Prediction of lithium-ion battery capacity with metabolic grey model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Lin; Lin, Weilong; Li, Junzi; Tian, Binbin; Pan, Haihong

    2016-01-01

    Given the popularity of Lithium-ion batteries in EVs (electric vehicles), predicting the capacity quickly and accurately throughout a battery's full life-time is still a challenging issue for ensuring the reliability of EVs. This paper proposes an approach in predicting the varied capacity with discharge cycles based on metabolic grey theory and consider issues from two perspectives: 1) three metabolic grey models will be presented, including MGM (metabolic grey model), MREGM (metabolic Residual-error grey model), and MMREGM (metabolic Markov-residual-error grey model); 2) the universality of these models will be explored under different conditions (such as various discharge rates and temperatures). Furthermore, the research findings in this paper demonstrate the excellent performance of the prediction depending on the three models; however, the precision of the MREGM model is inferior compared to the others. Therefore, we have obtained the conclusion in which the MGM model and the MMREGM model have excellent performances in predicting the capacity under a variety of load conditions, even using few data points for modeling. Also, the universality of the metabolic grey prediction theory is verified by predicting the capacity of batteries under different discharge rates and different temperatures. - Highlights: • The metabolic mechanism is introduced in a grey system for capacity prediction. • Three metabolic grey models are presented and studied. • The universality of these models under different conditions is assessed. • A few data points are required for predicting the capacity with these models.

  11. Whole-body fat oxidation determined by graded exercise and indirect calorimetry: a role for muscle oxidative capacity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordby, P; Saltin, B; Helge, J W

    2006-01-01

    During whole-body exercise, peak fat oxidation occurs at a moderate intensity. This study investigated whole-body peak fat oxidation in untrained and trained subjects, and the presence of a relation between skeletal muscle oxidative enzyme activity and whole-body peak fat oxidation. Healthy male...... subjects were recruited and categorized into an untrained (N=8, VO(2max) 3.5+/-0.1 L/min) and a trained (N=8, VO(2max) 4.6+/-0.2 L/min) group. Subjects performed a graded exercise test commencing at 60 W for 8 min followed by 35 W increments every 3 min. On a separate day, muscle biopsies were ob