WorldWideScience

Sample records for models examined associations

  1. Distributed Lag Models: Examining Associations Between the Built Environment and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jonggyu; Sánchez, Brisa N; Berrocal, Veronica J; Sanchez-Vaznaugh, Emma V

    2016-01-01

    Built environment factors constrain individual level behaviors and choices, and thus are receiving increasing attention to assess their influence on health. Traditional regression methods have been widely used to examine associations between built environment measures and health outcomes, where a fixed, prespecified spatial scale (e.g., 1 mile buffer) is used to construct environment measures. However, the spatial scale for these associations remains largely unknown and misspecifying it introduces bias. We propose the use of distributed lag models (DLMs) to describe the association between built environment features and health as a function of distance from the locations of interest and circumvent a-priori selection of a spatial scale. Based on simulation studies, we demonstrate that traditional regression models produce associations biased away from the null when there is spatial correlation among the built environment features. Inference based on DLMs is robust under a range of scenarios of the built environment. We use this innovative application of DLMs to examine the association between the availability of convenience stores near California public schools, which may affect children's dietary choices both through direct access to junk food and exposure to advertisement, and children's body mass index z scores.

  2. Examining individual and school characteristics associated with child obesity using a multilevel growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yasuo; Stack, Maria

    2015-03-01

    The childhood obesity epidemic continues to be a serious concern in the U.S., disproportionately affecting low socioeconomic and minority groups. Because many interventions are based in schools, both individual and school factors contributing to obesity were examined in this study. Employing data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K), a three level hierarchical linear model was used to estimate children's body mass index (BMI) growth trajectories within their school contexts. Results indicated an inverse relationship between BMI and socioeconomic status (SES), except for black males. Additionally, results showed that low school SES and rural locality of the school were school-level risk factors of obesity. Lastly, a major portion of the between-schools variance was explained by aggregated student characteristics, indicating that students were more likely to attend schools with peers of similar BMI who had similar SES and race/ethnicity, supporting a school-level compositional effect associated with obesity.

  3. Is murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68) a suitable immunotoxicological model for examining immunomodulatory drug-associated viral recrudescence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aligo, Jason; Walker, Mindi; Bugelski, Peter; Weinstock, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Immunosuppressive agents are used for treatment of a variety of autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE), and psoriasis, as well as for prevention of tissue rejection after organ transplantation. Recrudescence of herpesvirus infections, and increased risk of carcinogenesis from herpesvirus-associated tumors are related with immunosuppressive therapy in humans. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD), a condition characterized by development of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV)-associated B-lymphocyte lymphoma, and Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS), a dermal tumor associated with Kaposi Sarcoma-associated virus (KSHV), may develop in solid organ transplant patients. KS also occurs in immunosuppressed Acquired Immunodeficiency (AIDS) patients. Kaposi Sarcoma-associated virus (KSHV) is a herpes virus genetically related to EBV. Murine gammaherpes-virus-68 (MHV-68) is proposed as a mouse model of gammaherpesvirus infection and recrudescence and may potentially have relevance for herpesvirus-associated neoplasia. The pathogenesis of MHV-68 infection in mice mimics EBV/KSHV infection in humans with acute lytic viral replication followed by dissemination and establishment of persistent latency. MHV-68-infected mice may develop lymphoproliferative disease that is accelerated by disruption of the immune system. This manuscript first presents an overview of gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis and immunology as well as factors involved in viral recrudescence. A description of different types of immunodeficiency then follows, with particular focus on viral association with lymphomagenesis after immunosuppression. Finally, this review discusses different gammaherpesvirus animal models and describes a proposed MHV-68 model to further examine the interplay of immunomodulatory agents and gammaherpesvirus-associated neoplasia.

  4. A Multi-Level Examination of the Association between Older Social Models in the School Environment and Overweight and Obesity among Younger Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherdale, Scott T.; Papadakis, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined how school characteristics are associated with obesity. The purpose of this study was to examine the student- and school-level characteristics associated with being overweight and obese among 12,049 students in grades 9 and 10 ("junior students") attending 76 secondary schools in Ontario, Canada. The sample was…

  5. A Multi-Level Examination of the Association between Older Social Models in the School Environment and Overweight and Obesity among Younger Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatherdale, Scott T.; Papadakis, Sophia

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have examined how school characteristics are associated with obesity. The purpose of this study was to examine the student- and school-level characteristics associated with being overweight and obese among 12,049 students in grades 9 and 10 ("junior students") attending 76 secondary schools in Ontario, Canada. The sample was…

  6. Subjective Response to Alcohol and Associated Craving in Heavy Drinkers vs. Alcohol Dependents: An Examination of Koob's Allostatic Model in Humans*

    OpenAIRE

    Bujarski, S; Ray, LA

    2014-01-01

    Background: Koob's allostatic model of addiction emphasizes the transition from positive reinforcement to negative reinforcement as dependence develops. This study seeks to extend this well-established neurobiological model to humans by examining subjective response to alcohol (SR) as a biobehavioral marker of alcohol reinforcement. Specifically, this study examines (a) differential SR in heavy drinkers (HDs) vs. alcohol dependent individuals (ADs) and (b) whether HDs and ADs differ in terms ...

  7. Weight-related actual and ideal self-states, discrepancies, and shame, guilt, and pride: examining associations within the process model of self-conscious emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castonguay, Andree L; Brunet, Jennifer; Ferguson, Leah; Sabiston, Catherine M

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the associations between women's actual:ideal weight-related self-discrepancies and experiences of weight-related shame, guilt, and authentic pride using self-discrepancy (Higgins, 1987) and self-conscious emotion (Tracy & Robins, 2004) theories as guiding frameworks. Participants (N=398) completed self-report questionnaires. Main analyses involved polynomial regressions, followed by the computation and evaluation of response surface values. Actual and ideal weight self-states were related to shame (R2 = .35), guilt (R2 = .25), and authentic pride (R2 = .08). When the discrepancy between actual and ideal weights increased, shame and guilt also increased, while authentic pride decreased. Findings provide partial support for self-discrepancy theory and the process model of self-conscious emotions. Experiencing weight-related self-discrepancies may be important cognitive appraisals related to shame, guilt, and authentic pride. Further research is needed exploring the relations between self-discrepancies and a range of weight-related self-conscious emotions.

  8. Examining Elementary Social Studies Marginalization: A Multilevel Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitchett, Paul G.; Heafner, Tina L.; Lambert, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing data from the National Center for Education Statistics Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS), a multilevel model (Hierarchical Linear Model) was developed to examine the association of teacher/classroom and state level indicators on reported elementary social studies instructional time. Findings indicated that state testing policy was a…

  9. Structured physical examination data: a modeling challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doupi, P; van Ginneken, A M

    2001-01-01

    The success of systems facilitating collection of structured data by clinicians is largely dependent on the flexibility of the interface. The Open Record for CAre (ORCA) makes use of a generic model to support knowledge-based structured data entry for a variety of medical domains. An endeavor undertaken recently aimed to cover the broader area of Physical Examination by expanding the contents of the knowledge base. The model was found to be adequately expressive for supporting this task. Maintaining the balance between flexibility of the interface and constraints dictated by reliable retrieval, however, proved to be a considerable challenge. In this paper we illustrate through specific examples the effect of this trade off on the modeling process, together with the rationale for the chosen solutions and suggestions for future research focus.

  10. Examining the association between oral health and oral HPV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thanh Cong; Markham, Christine M; Ross, Michael Wallis; Mullen, Patricia Dolan

    2013-09-01

    Oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of 40% to 80% of oropharyngeal cancers; yet, no published study has examined the role of oral health in oral HPV infection, either independently or in conjunction with other risk factors. This study examined the relation between oral health and oral HPV infection and the interactive effects of oral health, smoking, and oral sex on oral HPV infection. Our analyses comprised 3,439 participants ages 30 to 69 years for whom data on oral HPV and oral health were available from the nationally representative 2009-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Results showed that higher unadjusted prevalence of oral HPV infection was associated with four measures of oral health, including self-rated oral health as poor-to-fair [prevalence ratio (PR) = 1.56; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.25-1.95], indicated the possibility of gum disease (PR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.13-2.01), reported use of mouthwash to treat dental problems in the past week (PR = 1.28; 95% CI, 1.07-1.52), and higher number of teeth lost (Ptrend = 0.035). In multivariable logistic regression models, oral HPV infection had a statistically significant association with self-rated overall oral health (OR = 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15-2.09), independent of smoking and oral sex. In conclusion, poor oral health was an independent risk factor of oral HPV infection, irrespective of smoking and oral sex practices. Public health interventions may aim to promote oral hygiene and oral health as an additional measure to prevent HPV-related oral cancers.

  11. Examination of tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) changes associated with vascular pedicle occlusion in a rat Island flap model using near-Infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagaya, Yu; Ohura, Norihiko; Kurita, Masakazu; Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform continuous StO(2) monitoring of rat island flaps during pedicle vessel occlusion using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) in order to collect experimental data for StO(2) flap monitoring under optimized conditions. Twenty rats were used in this study. The 3 × 3 cm(2) epigastric skin island flaps were elevated on either side. The animals were randomly assigned to two groups; an arterial occlusion group (n = 10) and a venous occlusion group (n = 10). The StO(2) values of the flaps were observed for over 30 min for the pedicle artery or venous occlusion, followed by an additional 30 min release. The baseline StO(2) value was 78.4% ± 3.2% in the arterial occlusion group, compared to 78.5% ± 5.8% in the venous occlusion group, with no significant differences (P > 0.05). The StO(2) values decreased immediately after arterial occlusion, whereas a temporal StO(2) increase was initially observed after venous occlusion, followed by a StO(2) decrease. The StO(2) values decreased 27.3% ± 7.1% after arterial occlusion and 28.4% ± 19.1% after venous occlusion at 30 min after pedicle vessel clamping (P > 0.05). The StO(2) values were 0.4% ± 5.8% lower than baseline 30 min after arterial release (P > 0.05), while 18.9% ± 11.3% lower than baseline 30 min after venous release (P StO(2) changes in flaps with the pedicle vessel occlusion and differentiate between pedicle artery and vein occlusion. Further investigations are needed to obtain definitive evidence associated with predicting the degree of flap viability and determine the practical use of this technique. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Examining the Association Between Temperature and Mental Health in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, R.; Gavin, L.; Pearson, D.; Malig, B. J.; Ebisu, K.

    2016-12-01

    Background: The association between temperature and morbidity from some specific causes has been well established. However, the association between temperature and mental health effects has not been examined closely, although those with mental illnesses may be susceptible to temperature. Methods: We obtained daily counts of emergency room visits and hospitalizations (ICD-9 codes) from the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development from 16 California climate zones from 2005 - 2013. Mean apparent temperature was determined by combining monitored temperature and humidity data from the US EPA, California Irrigation Management Information System, and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration and weighting monitor values by distance to zip code tabulation areas (ZCTA) and ZCTA populations in the same climate zone as each monitor. We used a two-stage hierarchical model to analyze this data, adjusted by the following independent variables: mean daily apparent temperature, holiday, day of the week, and a natural spline smoothing function of time. The regression was performed for both warm (5/1 - 10/31) and cold (11/1 - 4/30) seasons. Results were stratified by race/ethnicity and age group. Results: We observed an association between same-day mean apparent temperature and mental health outcomes during the warm and cold seasons. We also observed associations between temperature and suicide/self-injury and homicide/assault injury. A 10°F increase in mean apparent temperature was associated with a 4.98% [95% confidence interval, 3.73-6.23], 5.82% [4.34-7.30], and 7.43% [6.75-8.12], increase in mental health events, suicide, and homicide events during the warm season, respectively. Similar results were observed during the cold season. Effect modification by race/ethnic and age groups was observed for some outcomes for both seasons. Conclusions: Increase in mean apparent temperature was found to have same-day associations with several mental health

  13. Alternative models of DSM-5 PTSD: Examining diagnostic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Siobhan; Hansen, Maj; Elklit, Ask; Yong Chen, Yoke; Raudzah Ghazali, Siti; Shevlin, Mark

    2017-09-09

    The factor structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been extensively debated with evidence supporting the recently proposed seven-factor Hybrid model. However, despite myriad studies examining PTSD symptom structure few have assessed the diagnostic implications of these proposed models. This study aimed to generate PTSD prevalence estimates derived from the 7 alternative factor models and assess whether pre-established risk factors associated with PTSD (e.g., transportation accidents and sexual victimisation) produce consistent risk estimates. Seven alternative models were estimated within a confirmatory factor analytic framework using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Data were analysed from a Malaysian adolescent community sample (n = 481) of which 61.7% were female, with a mean age of 17.03 years. The results indicated that all models provided satisfactory model fit with statistical superiority for the Externalising Behaviours and seven-factor Hybrid models. The PTSD prevalence estimates varied substantially ranging from 21.8% for the DSM-5 model to 10.0% for the Hybrid model. Estimates of risk associated with PTSD were inconsistent across the alternative models, with substantial variation emerging for sexual victimisation. These findings have important implications for research and practice and highlight that more research attention is needed to examine the diagnostic implications emerging from the alternative models of PTSD. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Alternative models of DSM-5 PTSD: Examining diagnostic implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, Siobhan; Hansen, Maj; Elklit, Ask

    2017-01-01

    The factor structure of DSM-5 posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been extensively debated with evidence supporting the recently proposed seven-factor Hybrid model. However, despite myriad studies examining PTSD symptom structure few have assessed the diagnostic implications of these proposed...... estimated within a confirmatory factor analytic framework using the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Data were analysed from a Malaysian adolescent community sample (n=481) of which 61.7% were female, with a mean age of 17.03 years. The results indicated that all models provided satisfactory model fit...... with statistical superiority for the Externalizing Behaviours and seven-factor Hybrid models. The PTSD prevalence estimates varied substantially ranging from 21.8% for the DSM-5 model to 10.0% for the Hybrid model. Estimates of risk associated with PTSD were inconsistent across the alternative models...

  15. Cultural Conceptions of Morality: Examining Laypeople's Associations of Moral Character

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauclair, Christin-Melanie; Wilson, Marc; Fischer, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Whether moral conceptions are universal or culture-specific is controversial in moral psychology. One option is to refrain from imposing theoretical constraints and to ask laypeople from different cultures how "they" conceptualize morality. Our article adopts this approach by examining laypeople's associations of moral character in…

  16. An Examination of Extended a-Rescaling Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Zhan-Yuan; DUAN Chun-Gui; HE Zhen-Min

    2001-01-01

    The extended x-rescaling model can explain the quark's nuclear effect very well. Weather it can also explain the gluon's nuclear effect should be investigated further. Associated J/ψ and γ production with large PT is a very clean channel to probe the gluon distribution in proton or nucleus. In this paper, using the extended x-rescaling model, the PT distribution of the nuclear effect factors of p + Fe → J/Ψ + γ+ X process is calculated and discussed. Comparing our theoretical results with the future experimental data, the extended x-rescaling model can be examined.``

  17. Lost in Translation: Examining Translation Errors Associated with Mathematical Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu-Gyamfi, Kwaku; Stiff, Lee V.; Bosse, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Translation errors and conceptual misunderstandings made by students translating among graphical, tabular, and symbolic representations of linear functions were examined. The study situated student errors in the context of the "Translation-Verification Model" developed specifically for the purpose of explaining student behavior during the process…

  18. Examination of Alternative Models of Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldag, Ramon J.; Brief, Arthur P.

    1978-01-01

    Researchers have generally assumed overall job satisfaction to be an additive function of weighted job satisfaction facet scores. This paper considers the linear compensatory model as well as two nonlinear alternatives. Available from: Ramon J. Aldag, University of Wisconsin, 1155 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706. (Author)

  19. Common susceptibility variants examined for association with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampersaud, Evadnie; Kinnamon, Daniel D; Hamilton, Kara; Khuri, Sawsan; Hershberger, Ray E; Martin, Eden R

    2010-03-01

    Rare mutations in more than 20 genes have been suggested to cause dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), but explain only a small percentage of cases, mainly in familial forms. We hypothesised that more common variants may also play a role in increasing genetic susceptibility to DCM, similar to that observed in other common complex disorders. To test this hypothesis, we performed case-control analyses on all DNA polymorphic variation identified in a resequencing study of six candidate DCM genes (CSRP3, LDB3, MYH7, SCN5A, TCAP, and TNNT2) conducted in 289 unrelated white probands with DCM of unknown cause and 188 unrelated white controls. In univariate analyses, we identified associated common variants at LDB3 site 10779, LDB3 site 57877, MYH7 sites 16384 and 17404, and TCAP sites 140 and 1735. Multivariate analyses to examine the joint effects of multiple gene variants confirmed univariate results for MYH7 and TCAP and identified a block of nine variants in MYH7 that was strongly associated with DCM. Common variants in genes known to be causative of DCM may play a role in genetic susceptibility to DCM. Our results suggest that examination of common genetic variants may be warranted in future studies of DCM and other Mendelian-like disorders.

  20. Association of the pre-internship objective structured clinical examination in final year medical students with comprehensive written examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhar, Hasan; Labaf, Ali; Anvari, Pasha; Jamali, Arsia; Sheybaee-Moghaddam, Farshad

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association of the pre-internship Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in final year medical students with comprehensive written examinations. SUBJECTS AND MATERIAL: All medical students of October 2004 admission who took part in the October 2010 National Comprehensive Pre-internship Examination (NCPE) and pre-internship OSCE were included in the study (n = 130). OSCE and NCPE scores and medical grade point average (GPA) were collected. GPA was highly correlated with NCPE (r = 0.76 and P<0.001) and moderately with OSCE (r = 0.68 and P < 0.001). Similarly a moderate correlation was observed between NCPE and OSCE scores(r = 0.6 and P < 0.001).Linear stepwise regression shows r(2) of a model applying GPA as predictor of OSCE score is 0.46 (β = 0.68 and P < 0.001), while addition of gender to the model increases r(2) to 0.59 (β = 0.61 and 0.36, for GPA and male gender, respectively and P < 0.001). Logistic forward regression models shows male gender and GPA are the only dependent predictors of high score in OSCE. OR of GPA and male gender for high OSCE score are 4.89 (95% CI = 2.37-10.06) and 6.95 (95% CI = 2.00-24.21), respectively (P < 0.001). Our findings indicate OSCE and examination which mainly evaluate knowledge, judged by GPA and NCPE are moderately to highly correlated. Our results illustrate the interwoven nature of knowledge and clinical skills. In other words, certain level of knowledge is crucial for appropriate clinical performance. Our findings suggest neither OSCE nor written forms of assessments can replace each other. They are complimentary and should also be combined by other evaluations to cover all attributes of clinical competence efficiently.

  1. Examining an important urban transportation management tool: subarea modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueming CHEN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available At present, customized subarea models have been widely used in local transportation planning throughout the United States. The biggest strengths of a subarea model lie in its more detailed and accurate modeling outputs which better meet local planning requirements. In addition, a subarea model can substantially reduce database size and model running time. In spite of these advantages, subarea models remain quite weak in maintaining consistency with a regional model, modeling transit projects, smart growth measures, air quality conformity, and other areas. Both opportunities and threats exist for subarea modeling. In addition to examining subarea models, this paper introduces the decision-making process in choosing a proper subarea modeling approach (windowing versus focusing and software package. This study concludes that subarea modeling will become more popular in the future. More GIS applications, travel surveys, transit modeling, microsimulation software utilization, and other modeling improvements are expected to be incorporated into the subarea modeling process.

  2. Examining a Model of Life Satisfaction among Unemployed Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Ryan D.; Bott, Elizabeth M.; Allan, Blake A.; Torrey, Carrie L.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined a model of life satisfaction among a diverse sample of 184 adults who had been unemployed for an average of 10.60 months. Using the Lent (2004) model of life satisfaction as a framework, a model was tested with 5 hypothesized predictor variables: optimism, job search self-efficacy, job search support, job search…

  3. APPLYING LOGISTIC REGRESSION MODEL TO THE EXAMINATION RESULTS DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goutam Saha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The binary logistic regression model is used to analyze the school examination results(scores of 1002 students. The analysis is performed on the basis of the independent variables viz.gender, medium of instruction, type of schools, category of schools, board of examinations andlocation of schools, where scores or marks are assumed to be dependent variables. The odds ratioanalysis compares the scores obtained in two examinations viz. matriculation and highersecondary.

  4. An Examination of Need-Satisfaction Models of Job Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salancik, Gerald R.; Pfeffer, Jeffrey

    1977-01-01

    An examination of need-satisfaction models indicates that they are frequently formulated so as to be almost impossible to refute, and the research testing them has been beset with consistency and priming artifacts. (Author/IRT)

  5. Examining Factors Associated with Heavy Episodic Drinking Among College Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholly, Kristen; Katz, Alan R; Kehl, Lisa

    2014-04-26

    Heavy episodic drinking among college students is a serious health concern. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with heavy episodic drinking behaviors amongst a predominately Asian undergraduate college student population in the United States. A survey measuring alcohol use behaviors was completed by a random sample of 18-24 year old undergraduates during April, 2011. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine factors associated with students' heavy episodic drinking behavior. Independent factors associated with heavy episodic drinking included living on campus, ethnicity, perceived drinking behavior among peers, and a belief that alcohol is a central part of one's social life. Heavy episodic drinking was also associated with poor academic performance. Campus-wide educational strategies to reduce heavy episodic drinking among college undergraduates should incorporate accurate information regarding alcohol use norms to correct students' perceived over estimation of their peers alcohol consumption rates and the under estimation of students protective alcohol use behaviors. These efforts should focus in on-campus residence halls where a higher occurrence of heavy episodic drinking is often found.

  6. Examining the association between music lessons and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2011-08-01

    Although links between music training and cognitive abilities are relatively well-established, unresolved issues include the generality of the association, the direction of causation, and whether the association is mediated by executive function. Musically trained and untrained 9- to 12-year olds were compared on a measure of IQ and five measures of executive function. IQ and executive function were correlated. The musically trained group had higher IQs than their untrained counterparts and the advantage extended across the IQ subtests. The association between music training and executive function was negligible. These results provide no support for the hypothesis that the association between music training and IQ is mediated by executive function. When considered jointly with the available literature, the findings suggest that children with higher IQs are more likely than their lower-IQ counterparts to take music lessons, and to perform well on a variety of tests of cognitive ability except for those measuring executive function. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  7. Examining factors associated with heavy episodic drinking among college undergraduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Scholly

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Heavy episodic drinking among college students is a serious health concern. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with heavy episodic drinking behaviors amongst a predominately Asian undergraduate college student population in the United States. A survey measuring alcohol use behaviors was completed by a random sample of 18-24 year old undergraduates during April, 2011. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine factors associated with students’ heavy episodic drinking behavior. Independent factors associated with heavy episodic drinking included living on campus, ethnicity, perceived drinking behavior among peers, and a belief that alcohol is a central part of one’s social life. Heavy episodic drinking was also associated with poor academic performance. Campus-wide educational strategies to reduce heavy episodic drinking among college undergraduates should incorporate accurate information regarding alcohol use norms to correct students’ perceived over estimation of their peers alcohol consumption rates and the under estimation of students protective alcohol use behaviors. These efforts should focus in on-campus residence halls where a higher occurrence of heavy episodic drinking is often found.

  8. Examining the association between childhood asthma and parent and grandparent asthma status: Implications for Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Valerio, Melissa A.; Andreski, Patricia M.; Schoeni, Robert F.; McGonagle, Katherine A.

    2010-01-01

    Examination of intergenerational asthma beyond maternal asthma has been limited. The association between childhood asthma and intergenerational asthma status among a national cohort of children was examined.

  9. Examining the Nelson-Siegel Class of Term Structure Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D. de Pooter (Michiel)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper I examine various extensions of the Nelson and Siegel (1987) model with the purpose of fitting and forecasting the term structure of interest rates. As expected, I find that using more flexible models leads to a better in-sample fit of the term structure. However, I show th

  10. Association of Fellowship Training With Otolaryngology Training Examination Scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinboyewa, Ibukun; Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    No prior studies have evaluated whether residents who pursue fellowship training achieve higher performance on the Otolaryngology Training Examination (OTE) and whether a specific fellowship will demonstrate a correlation with the corresponding specialty-specific OTE score. To determine whether residents pursuing fellowship training achieve higher performance on the OTE and whether fellowship choice is correlated with higher scores on the related subspecialty section of the OTE. This retrospective analysis included 35 residents training in an academic otolaryngology residency program from July 1, 2003, to June 30, 2014. The OTE scores for postgraduate years 2 through 5 and the type of fellowship were collected for all residents meeting inclusion criteria. Data were collected from September 1 to October 15, 2014, and analyzed from October 16 to December 1, 2014. Residents were divided by whether they pursued fellowship training and by the type of fellowship chosen. Outcome measures included comparison of scores between residents who pursued vs those who did not pursue fellowship training and comparison of subspecialty OTE scores between residents who pursued the corresponding fellowship and those who did not. Of the 35 residents who met the inclusion criteria (24 men and 11 women), 17 (49%) pursued fellowship training. The 3 most common fellowship choices were facial plastic and reconstructive surgery, pediatric otolaryngology, and rhinology (4 residents each [24%]). For all residents, mean scores on the OTE improved each subsequent training year, but this difference was only significant between postgraduate years 2 and 3 (from 60.9% to 68.6% correct; P otolaryngology, 72.9% vs 71.3% [P = .79]; and for rhinology, 72.2% vs 71.2% [P = .91]). Residents who pursued fellowship training did not achieve higher scores on the OTE in any examination year compared with residents who did not pursue fellowship training and did not achieve higher scores within the OTE

  11. Identification and examination of a novel 9-bp insert/deletion polymorphism on porcine SFTPA1 exon 2 associated with acute lung injury using an oleic acid-acute lung injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuebo; Zhang, Longchao; Wang, Ligang; Qiao, Lijuan; Liang, Jing; Yan, Hua; Zhao, Kebin; Liu, Xin; Wang, Lixian

    2015-06-01

    The pulmonary surfactant-associated protein (SFTPA1, SP-A) gene has been studied as a candidate gene for lung disease resistance in humans and livestock. The objective of the present study was to identify polymorphisms of the porcine SFTPA1 gene coding region and its association with acute lung injury (ALI). Through DNA sequencing and the PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism method, a novel 9-bp nucleotide insertion (+) or deletion (-) was detected on exon 2 of SFTPA1, which causes a change in three amino acids, namely, alanine (Ala), glycine (Gly) and proline (Pro). Individuals of three genotypes (-/-, +/- and +/+) were divided into equal groups from 60 Rongchang pigs that were genotyped. These pigs were selected for participation in the oleic acid (OA)-ALI model by 1-h and 3-h injections of OA, and there were equal numbers of pigs in the control and injection groups. The lung water content, a marker for acute lung injury, was measured in this study; there is a significant correlation between high lung water content and the presence of the 9-bp indel polymorphism (P polymorphism causing altered expression of the gene. The individuals with the -/- genotype showed lower lung water content than the +/+ genotype pigs, which suggests that polymorphism could be a potential marker for lung disease-resistant pig breeding and that pig can be a potential animal model for human lung disease resistance in future studies.

  12. Radiographic examination of mesiodens and their associated complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaumi, J I; Shibata, Y; Yanagi, Y; Hisatomi, M; Matsuzaki, H; Konouchi, H; Kishi, K

    2004-03-01

    To examine mesiodens with regard to their status, their influence on adjacent teeth and their alteration during the follow-up period. From retrospective reviews of all patients who visited our institution from 1990-2001, we identified 200 patients (256 mesiodentes) who were shown to have mesiodentes on the basis of a periapical radiograph, a panoramic radiograph or an axial radiograph. The number of supernumerary teeth was one in 146 cases (73%), two in 52 cases (26%) and three in 2 cases (1%). Of 256 mesiodentes, the direction of the crown of the mesiodens was inverted in 172 (67%), in a normal direction in 69 (27%) and in a horizontal direction with regard to the tooth axis in 15 (6%). Of the 147 mesiodentes for which axial radiography was performed, 131 (89%) were located at a palatal site against the dental arch, 16 (11%) overlapped the dental arch and none were at a labial site. Of our 200 cases, a delay of eruption of the permanent central incisor was seen in 12 (6%), malposition or rotation of the central incisor in 5 (2.5%) and dentigerous cyst formation arising from mesiodens in 22 (11%). Marked movement of the mesiodens was seen in 10 cases during the follow-up period of 5-7 years. Some complication arising from mesiodens was seen in 19.5% of all cases in our research. Although mesiodentes are not caused by malocclusion, they may cause it. A long period of impaction of mesiodentes may bring about dentigerous cyst formation or movement of the mesiodentes.

  13. Examining Learning Through Modeling in K-6 Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louca, Loucas T.; Zacharia, Zacharias C.

    2015-04-01

    Despite the abundance of research in Modeling-based Learning (MbL) in science education, to date there is only limited research on MbL practices among K-6 novice modelers. More specifically, there is no information on how young/novice modelers' modeling enactments look so that researchers and educators have an idea of what should be expected from these novice/young modelers while engaged in MbL. Our purpose in this study was to investigate the ways in which K-6 novice modelers can engage in MbL in science, in rich modeling contexts, which feature various modeling media and tools. Using data from a variety of contexts, modeling means and tools and different student ages, we seek to develop, from the ground up, detailed descriptions of the modeling practices that K-6 students follow when involved in MbL. While using the modeling phases (e.g., construction of a model, evaluation of a model), along with their associated practices, as described in the literature for older learners and expert modelers as our basis, we followed ground research approaches to develop the descriptions of student-centered MbL. Our findings revealed that novice modelers enact certain MbL phases in a different manner than those described in the literature for older learners and/or expert modelers. We found that not only do the content and context of the various modeling phases differ, but also the sequence of these modeling phases and their associated practices, are different from those already described in the literature. Finally, we discuss how rich descriptions of MbL discourse can ultimately inform teachers and researchers about ways in which learning in science through MbL can be supported.

  14. A New Model for Training in Periodontal Examinations Using Manikins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heym, Richard; Krause, Sebastian; Hennessen, Till; Pitchika, Vinay; Ern, Christina; Hickel, Reinhard

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and test models for training dental students in periodontal examinations using manikins that had distinct anatomical designs but were indistinguishable in external appearance. After four models were tested for inter- and intra-examiner reliability by two experienced dentists, 26 additional models were produced. The models were tested by 35 dental students at a dental school in Germany in 2014. The testing involved completing a periodontal examination that included probing depths, gingival recessions, and furcation involvements. The primary purpose of the study was to determine whether the models could be used as a tool for periodontal examination training by the students. Levels of agreement (students and dentists) and Kappa statistics (dentists) were calculated using absolute (±0 mm) and tolerable difference (±1 mm). Over the span of two weeks, the dentists' reliability with preset values for probing depths, gingival recessions, and furcation involvements ranged from 0.29 to 0.38, 0.52 to 0.61, and 0.54 to 0.57, respectively, under absolute difference and from 0.86 to 0.90, 0.96 to 0.99, and 0.62 to 0.73, respectively, under tolerable difference. The students' proportions of agreement for probing depths and gingival recessions under absolute vs. tolerable difference were 34.8% vs. 79.9% and 71.9% vs. 94.4%, respectively. The students frequently scored values higher than the preset values, overestimated furcation involvements, and failed to differentiate the levels of furcations. The models used did not pose any systematic or technical difficulties in the pilot study. Students were unable to measure furcation involvements with acceptable agreement. Thus, these models could be used for student periodontal examination training.

  15. National Association of Medical Examiners position paper on the medical examiner release of organs and tissues for transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinckard, J Keith; Wetli, Charles V; Graham, Michael A

    2007-09-01

    The medical examiner community plays a key role in the organ and tissue procurement process for transplantation. Since many, if not most, potential organ or tissue donors fall under medicolegal jurisdiction, the medical examiner bears responsibility to authorize or deny the procurement of organs or tissues on a case-by-case basis. This responsibility engenders a basic dichotomy for the medical examiner's decision-making process. In cases falling under his/her jurisdiction, the medical examiner must balance the medicolegal responsibility centered on the decedent with the societal responsibility to respect the wishes of the decedent and/or next of kin to help living patients. Much has been written on this complex issue in both the forensic pathology and the transplantation literature. Several studies and surveys of medical examiner practices, as well as suggested protocols for handling certain types of cases, are available for reference when concerns arise that procurement may potentially hinder medicolegal death investigation. It is the position of the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) that the procurement of organs and/or tissues for transplantation can be accomplished in virtually all cases, without detriment to evidence collection, postmortem examination, determination of cause and manner of death, or the conducting of criminal or civil legal proceedings. The purpose of this position paper is to review the available data, the arguments for and against medical examiner release, and to encourage the release of organs and tissues in all but the rarest of circumstances.

  16. Where are weather-suicide associations valid? An examination of nine US counties with varying seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, P. Grady; Kalkstein, Adam J.

    2016-11-01

    There has been much research on the associations between weather variables and suicide rates. However, the state of understanding has remained rather stagnant due to many contradictory findings. The purpose of this project is to examine a larger database of suicides that includes a longer and more recent period of record (1975-2010) across numerous locations in the USA. In all, we examine nine total counties (and the primary city associated with them) with a special effort made to compare locations with varying degrees of temperature seasonality: Cook (Chicago), Fulton (Atlanta), King (Seattle), Los Angeles (Los Angeles), Maricopa (Phoenix), Miami-Dade (Miami), Philadelphia (Philadelphia), Salt Lake (Salt Lake City), and St. Louis (St. Louis). We first examine the unique seasonal cycle in suicides evident in each locale and then use distributed lag nonlinear modeling (DLNM) to relate the suicide data to daily surface temperatures. Results suggest that a late spring/summer peak generally exists in suicide rates, and above average temperatures are associated with increased suicide risk in almost all study counties. Further, it appears that these associations can be found in both mid-latitude and sub-tropical climate types.

  17. Examination of Self-Determination within the Sport Education Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlman, Dana J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of the Sport Education Model (SEM) on students' self-determined motivation and underlying psychological need(s) in physical education. A total of 182 Year-9 students were engaged in 20 lesson units of volleyball, using either the SEM or a traditional approach. Data was collected using a…

  18. Examining Response to Intervention (RTI) Models in Secondary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epler, Pam, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    Response to Intervention (RTI) is an intervention model designed to assist all students regardless of their academic ability. It seeks to assist students who are struggling in academics by providing them with targeted assistance in the form of tutoring, pull-out services, and differentiated classroom instruction. "Examining Response to…

  19. Examining the Factors Associated with Paid Employment of Clients Enrolled in First Episode of Psychosis Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn S. Dewa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is one of the most debilitating mental disorders. For a significant portion of individuals who suffer from this disorder, onset occurs in young adulthood, arresting important social and educational development that is necessary for future successful labor force participation. The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature about clients enrolled in first episode psychosis programs and psychosocial outcomes by examining the factors associated with paid employment among young adults who have experienced their first psychotic episodes. In this paper, we consider the association of socioeconomic factors to employment. Our results suggest that in addition to treatment, socioeconomic factors such as receipt of public disability benefits and educational attainment are associated with employment status. These results can help to inform future directions for the enhancement of psychosocial programs in FEP models to promote paid employment.

  20. Examining Associations between Negative Urgency and Key Components of Objective Binge Episodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, Sarah E.; Burt, S. Alexandra; Keel, Pamela K.; Sisk, Cheryl L.; Neale, Michael C.; Boker, Steven; Klump, Kelly L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Negative urgency (NU; tendency to act impulsively when experiencing negative emotions) is a risk factor for binge eating, although few studies have examined interviewer-assessed objective binge episodes (OBEs). Moreover, research has not investigated how NU relates to the core components of OBEs: loss of control (LOC) eating and objective overeating (OO). Understanding the relationship between NU and these core components will enhance etiologic models of eating disorder development. Thus, the current study examined associations between NU, OBEs, and the components of OBEs by comparing levels of NU in women with OBEs, LOC eating only, and OO only to women with no pathological eating. Method Participants were 612 women who endorsed lifetime OBEs (5.4%), LOC eating outside of OBEs (5.7%), OO only (2.8%), or none of these eating episodes (85.9%). Results Women with OBEs, LOC only, and OO only had significantly higher levels of NU than women without these episodes, suggesting that NU is associated with both the LOC and OO components of OBEs. Discussion NU relates to the spectrum of pathology present in women with OBEs. Future research should examine the mechanisms underlying these associations, including impaired behavioral/psychological control and/or increased reward sensitivity in response to negative affect. PMID:25865091

  1. Examining subgrid models of supermassive black holes in cosmological simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Sutter, P M

    2010-01-01

    While supermassive black holes (SMBHs) play an important role in galaxy and cluster evolution, at present they can only be included in large-scale cosmological simulation via subgrid techniques. However, these subgrid models have not been studied in a systematic fashion. Using a newly-developed fast, parallel spherical overdensity halo finder built into the simulation code FLASH, we perform a suite of dark matter-only cosmological simulations to study the effects of subgrid model choice on relations between SMBH mass and dark matter halo mass and velocity dispersion. We examine three aspects of SMBH subgrid models: the choice of initial black hole seed mass, the test for merging two black holes, and the frequency of applying the subgrid model. We also examine the role that merging can play in determining the relations, ignoring the complicating effects of SMBH-driven accretion and feedback. We find that the choice of subgrid model can dramatically affect the black hole merger rate, the cosmic SMBH mass densit...

  2. Transactional Models Between Personality and Alcohol Involvement: A Further Examination

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Although correlated changes between personality and alcohol involvement have been shown, the functional relation between these constructs is also of theoretical and clinical interest. Using bivariate latent difference score models, we examined transactional relations (i.e., personality predicting changes in alcohol involvement, which in turn predicts changes in personality) across two distinct but overlapping developmental time frames (i.e., across college and during young adulthood) using tw...

  3. Examining the Self-Reported Health Behaviors and the Importance of Role Modeling among Resident Directors Affiliated with the Association of College and University Housing Officers-International (ACUHO-I) Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldana, Maylen Lizeth

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine self-reported health behaviors (health responsibility, physical activity, nutrition, spiritual growth, interpersonal relations and stress management) of Resident Directors who self-reported being affiliated with ACUHO-I. The second purpose of the study was to examine which areas of health behaviors, do…

  4. Examining of the Collision Breakup Model between Geostationary Orbit Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Hidehiro; Hanada, Toshiya; Akahoshi, Yasuhiro; Yasaka, Tetsuo; Harada, Shoji

    This paper will examine the applicability of the hypervelocity collision model included in the NASA standard breakup model 2000 revision to low-velocity collisions possible in space, especially in the geosynchronous regime. The analytic method used in the standard breakup model will be applied to experimental data accumulated through low-velocity impact experiments performed at Kyushu Institute of Technology at a velocity about 300m/s and 800m/s. The projectiles and target specimens used were aluminum solid balls and aluminum honeycomb sandwich panels with face sheets of carbon fiber reinforced plastic, respectively. Then, we have found that a kind of lower boundary exists on fragment area-to-mass distribution at a smaller characteristic length range. This paper will describe the theoretical derivation of lower boundary and propose another modification on fragment area-to-mass distribution and it will conclude that the hypervelocity collision model in the standard breakup model can be applied to low-velocity collisions possible with some modifications.

  5. Examination of 1D Solar Cell Model Limitations Using 3D SPICE Modeling: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, W. E.; Olson, J. M.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    To examine the limitations of one-dimensional (1D) solar cell modeling, 3D SPICE-based modeling is used to examine in detail the validity of the 1D assumptions as a function of sheet resistance for a model cell. The internal voltages and current densities produced by this modeling give additional insight into the differences between the 1D and 3D models.

  6. Examining a model of dispositional mindfulness, body comparison, and body satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the links between dispositional mindfulness, body comparison, and body satisfaction. It was expected that mindfulness would be associated with less body comparison and more body satisfaction. Two models were tested: one exploring body comparison as a mediator between mindf

  7. Does Model Matter? Examining Change across Time for Youth in Group Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Elizabeth M. Z.; Seifert, Heather; Wagner, H. Ryan; Burns, Barbara J.; Murray, Maureen

    2017-01-01

    Group homes are a frequently used but controversial treatment setting for youth with mental health problems. Within the relatively sparse literature on group homes, there is some evidence that some models of treatment may be associated with more positive outcomes for youth. This article explores this possibility by examining differences across…

  8. Examining a model of dispositional mindfulness, body comparison, and body satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the links between dispositional mindfulness, body comparison, and body satisfaction. It was expected that mindfulness would be associated with less body comparison and more body satisfaction. Two models were tested: one exploring body comparison as a mediator between mindf

  9. College Students Coping with Interpersonal Stress: Examining a Control-Based Model of Coping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiro, Mary Jo; Bettis, Alexandra H.; Compas, Bruce E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The ways that college students cope with stress, particularly interpersonal stress, may be a critical factor in determining which students are at risk for impairing mental health disorders. Using a control-based model of coping, the present study examined associations between interpersonal stress, coping strategies, and symptoms.…

  10. Examining a model of dispositional mindfulness, body comparison, and body satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Pieternel; Barelds, Dick P. H.

    The present study examined the links between dispositional mindfulness, body comparison, and body satisfaction. It was expected that mindfulness would be associated with less body comparison and more body satisfaction. Two models were tested: one exploring body comparison as a mediator between

  11. The language of worry: examining linguistic elements of worry models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geronimi, Elena M C; Woodruff-Borden, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Despite strong evidence that worry is a verbal process, studies examining linguistic features in individuals with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) are lacking. The aim of the present study is to investigate language use in individuals with GAD and controls based on GAD and worry theoretical models. More specifically, the degree to which linguistic elements of the avoidance and intolerance of uncertainty worry models can predict diagnostic status was analysed. Participants were 19 women diagnosed with GAD and 22 control women and their children. After participating in a diagnostic semi-structured interview, dyads engaged in a free-play interaction where mothers' language sample was collected. Overall, the findings provided evidence for distinctive linguistic features of individuals with GAD. That is, after controlling for the effect of demographic variables, present tense, future tense, prepositions and number of questions correctly classified those with GAD and controls such that a considerable amount of the variance in diagnostic status was explained uniquely by language use. Linguistic confirmation of worry models is discussed.

  12. Baseline Examination Factors Associated With Clinical Improvement After Dry Needling in Individuals With Low Back Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppenhaver, Shane L; Walker, Michael J; Smith, Ryan W; Booker, Jacquelynn M; Walkup, Isaac D; Su, Jonathan; Hebert, Jeffrey J; Flynn, Timothy

    2015-08-01

    Quasi-experimental. To explore for associations between demographic, patient history, and physical examination variables and short-term improvement in self-reported disability following dry needling therapy performed on individuals with low back pain (LBP). Dry needling is an intervention used with increasing frequency in patients with LBP; however, the characteristics of patients who are most likely to respond are not known. Seventy-two volunteers with mechanical LBP participated in the study. Potential prognostic factors were collected from baseline questionnaires, patient history, and physical examination tests. Treatment consisted of dry needling to the lumbar multifidus muscles bilaterally, administered during a single treatment session. Improvement was based on percent change on the Oswestry Disability Index at 1 week. The univariate and multivariate associations between 33 potential prognostic factors and improved disability were assessed with correlation coefficients and multivariate linear regression. Increased LBP with the multifidus lift test (rpb = 0.31, P = .01) or during passive hip flexion performed with the patient supine (rpb = 0.23, P = .06), as well as positive beliefs about acupuncture/dry needling (rho = 0.22, P = .07), demonstrated univariate associations with Oswestry Disability Index improvement. Aggravation of LBP with standing (rpb = -0.27, P = .03), presence of leg pain (rpb = -0.29, P = .02), and any perception of hypermobility in the lumbar spine (rpb = -0.21, P = .09) were associated with less improvement. The multivariate model identified 2 predictors of improved disability with dry needling: pain with the multifidus lift test and no aggravation with standing (R(2) = 0.16, P = .01). Increased LBP with the multifidus lift test was the strongest predictor of improved disability after dry needling, suggesting that the finding of pain during muscle contraction should be studied in future dry needling studies. Prognosis, level 1b.

  13. Examination of HFE associations with childhood leukemia risk and extension to other iron regulatory genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Amy E; Kamdar, Kala Y; Lupo, Philip J; Okcu, M Fatih; Scheurer, Michael E; Baum, Marianna K; Dorak, M Tevfik

    2014-09-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis (HFE) variants correlating with body iron levels have shown associations with cancer risk, including childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Using a multi-ethnic sample of cases and controls from Houston, TX, we examined two HFE variants (rs1800562 and rs1799945), one transferrin receptor gene (TFRC) variant (rs3817672) and three additional iron regulatory gene (IRG) variants (SLC11A2 rs422982; TMPRSS6 rs855791 and rs733655) for their associations with childhood ALL. Being positive for either of the HFE variants yielded a modestly elevated odds ratio (OR) for childhood ALL risk in males (1.40, 95% CI=0.83-2.35), which increased to 2.96 (95% CI=1.29-6.80) in the presence of a particular TFRC genotype for rs3817672 (P interaction=0.04). The TFRC genotype also showed an ethnicity-specific association, with increased risk observed in non-Hispanic Whites (OR=2.54, 95% CI=1.05-6.12; P interaction with ethnicity=0.02). The three additional IRG SNPs all showed individual risk associations with childhood ALL in males (OR=1.52-2.60). A polygenic model based on the number of variant alleles in five IRG SNPs revealed a linear increase in risk among males with the increasing number of variants possessed (OR=2.0 per incremental change, 95% CI=1.29-3.12; P=0.002). Our results replicated previous HFE risk associations with childhood ALL in a US population and demonstrated novel associations for IRG SNPs, thereby strengthening the hypothesis that iron excess mediated by genetic variants contributes to childhood ALL risk.

  14. Examining Asymmetrical Relationships of Organizational Learning Antecedents: A Theoretical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ery Tri Djatmika

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Global era is characterized by highly competitive advantage market demand. Responding to the challenge of rapid environmental changes, organizational learning is becoming a strategic way and solution to empower people themselves within the organization in order to create a novelty as valuable positioning source. For research purposes, determining the influential antecedents that affect organizational learning is vital to understand research-based solutions given for practical implications. Accordingly, identification of variables examined by asymmetrical relationships is critical to establish. Possible antecedent variables come from organizational and personal point of views. It is also possible to include a moderating one. A proposed theoretical model of asymmetrical effects of organizational learning and its antecedents is discussed in this article.

  15. Understanding child directed caregiver aggression: An examination of characteristics and predictors associated with perpetration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkout, Olga V; Kolko, David J

    2016-06-01

    Child physical abuse presents a substantial public health concern with lasting negative consequences for victims. Understanding the variables associated with perpetration can help inform prevention and intervention efforts. The current study examined background and clinical variables in a sample of 195 help-seeking caregivers who were at risk for or had been identified as having engaged in child directed aggression or abuse. We found that caregivers who did (vs. did not) report severe child directed aggression had poorer parenting and reported more drug use. Having a recent allegation of child physical abuse (vs. no allegation) based on official child welfare records was unrelated to parenting, drug and alcohol use, negative affect, parenting stress, or neglect. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the influence of parenting stress on child directed aggression and its effects through negative affect and positive parenting. We found that parenting stress predicted higher negative affect, which was related to greater child directed aggression. Additionally, parenting stress predicted lower positive parenting, which in turn predicted lower child directed aggression. A model including drug and alcohol use did not add to the prediction of child directed aggression. Prediction of neglect using similar variables found that only positive parenting was of import and that parenting stress and negative affect did not contribute to neglect. Implications for future prevention and treatment development efforts with abusive/aggressive caregivers are discussed.

  16. Examining Associations between Narcissism, Behavior Problems, and Anxiety in Non-Referred Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Katherine S. L.; Marsee, Monica A.; Kunimatsu, Melissa M.; Fassnacht, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined associations between narcissism (total, adaptive, and maladaptive), self-esteem, and externalizing and internalizing problems in 157 non-referred adolescents (aged 14 to 18). Consistent with previous research, narcissism was positively associated with self-reported delinquency, overt aggression, and relational…

  17. Examining Associations between Narcissism, Behavior Problems, and Anxiety in Non-Referred Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Katherine S. L.; Marsee, Monica A.; Kunimatsu, Melissa M.; Fassnacht, Gregory M.

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined associations between narcissism (total, adaptive, and maladaptive), self-esteem, and externalizing and internalizing problems in 157 non-referred adolescents (aged 14 to 18). Consistent with previous research, narcissism was positively associated with self-reported delinquency, overt aggression, and relational…

  18. An Examination of the Associations between ADHD, Homework Behavior and Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Callie W.; Hart, Sara A.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Taylor, Jeanette

    2015-01-01

    Previous literature has indicated an important association between reading comprehension and both ADHD and homework habits. This investigation sought to extend previous knowledge by providing information about how ADHD and homework behavior (i.e., completing homework regularly) may jointly influence reading comprehension. Using a genetically sensitive design, this study examined the genetic and environmental influences on and between ADHD, homework behavior and reading comprehension. Participants for this study included 691 twin pairs (351 monozygotic, 340 same-sex dizygotic) from the Florida Twin Project on Behavior and Environment (FTP-BE) and 2647 twin pairs (865 monozygotic, 1782 dizygotic) from the larger Florida Twin Project on Reading (FTP-R) in grades 3 through 7. Three separate models, each representing a different definition of ADHD (full ADHD, Inattention only, and Hyperactivity/Impulsivity only), showed similar patterns of results, therefore, results of the full ADHD model are discussed. Overlapping genetic influences were found between ADHD, homework behavior and reading comprehension, but no shared environmental influences among all three. However, shared environmental influences overlapped between homework behavior and reading comprehension. Although the sources of this environmental overlap are unknown, these results have implications for improving homework practices and their subsequent influence on literacy skills through homework environments. PMID:25349092

  19. Association of Health-related Quality of Life with Health Examination and Lifestyles of Government Managers in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Changrong; L(U) Bin; LU Zuxun; QIN Shilong

    2007-01-01

    In order to study the association of each item of a health examination and lifestyles with health-related quality of life (HRQoL), a cross-sectional survey by a self-administered questionnaire using the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12, version 1) was conducted on 145 government managers that took health examinations in Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China during 2005. The results showed that the determinations of organic functions including BMI, hemoglobin, blood platelet count,urine protein, urine WBC and lipid metabolism (LDL) were associated with HRQoL. The lifestyle items including age, sex, life satisfaction, drinking alcohol and kind of alcohol drunk, drinking tea,sleep quality and adhering to bedtime, working overtime, work stress were associated with HRQoL in the multiple regression models. Sex, age and life satisfaction were the lifestyle items most closely associated with HRQoL, while LDL, hemoglobin and urine protein were the health examination items most closely associated HRQoL. This study revealed that both lifestyle and health examination items were associated with HRQoL.

  20. The Association Between Vestibular Physical Examination, Vertigo Questionnaires, and the Electronystagmography in Patients With Vestibular Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gofrit, Shany G; Mayler, Yulia; Eliashar, Ron; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Ilan, Ophir; Gross, Menachem

    2017-04-01

    Dizziness makes up a diagnostic and treatment challenge. The diagnostic accuracy of the medical history and vestibular physical examination in cases of vestibular symptoms is not clear. The aim of this study is to determine the association between vestibular physical examination, vestibular questionnaires, and electronystagmography (ENG) test in patients with vestibular symptoms. This is a prospective study of 135 adults with vestibular symptoms. The subjects underwent targeted physical examination and filled vestibular questionnaires, including the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), before ENG testing. The results of the physical examination and questionnaires were compared with the final ENG findings. Of patients who had normal ENG results, 32.1% (17/52) showed abnormal physical examination, and 48.8% (40/82) of the patient who had normal physical examination showed abnormal ENG results ( P = .46). Among patients with severe disability by DHI, 46.4% (13/28) had an abnormal ENG, and 42.9% (12/28) had a normal ENG ( P = .39). This study did not demonstrate association between vestibular physical examination, vestibular questionnaires, and ENG results. Although history (augmented by questionnaires) and physical examination are the initial steps in the evaluation of vertigo, the current study suggests that they should be complemented by objective testing for evaluation of inner ear origin of vertigo.

  1. Internet banking acceptance model: Cross-market examination

    OpenAIRE

    Alsajjan, B; Dennis, C.

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes a revised technology acceptance model to measure consumers’ acceptance of Internet banking, the Internet Banking Acceptance Model (IBAM). Data was collected from 618 university students in the United Kingdom and Saudi Arabia. The results suggest the importance of attitude, such that attitude and behavioral intentions emerge as a single factor, denoted as “attitudinal intentions” (AI). Structural equation modeling confirms the fit of the model, in which per...

  2. Majoring in Information Systems: An Examination of Role Model Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbulut, Asli Y.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of role models on individuals' academic and career development and success has been widely acknowledged in the literature. The purpose of this study was to understand the influence of role models on students' decisions to major in information systems (IS). Utilizing a model derived from the social cognitive career theory, we…

  3. Construct Validity of an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) in Psychiatry: Associations with the Clinical Skills Examination and Other Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Robin S.; Chibnall, John T.; Blaskiewicz, Robert J.; Furman, Gail E.; Powell, Jill K.; Mohr, Clinton J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The construct validity of checklist and global process scores for an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) in psychiatry was assessed. Multiple regression analysis was used to predict psychiatry OSCE scores from the clinical skills examination, an obstetrics/gynecology (OB/GYN) OSCE, and the National Board of Medical…

  4. Modern statistical models for forensic fingerprint examinations: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Joshua; Champod, Christophe; Lennard, Chris; Roux, Claude

    2013-10-10

    Over the last decade, the development of statistical models in support of forensic fingerprint identification has been the subject of increasing research attention, spurned on recently by commentators who claim that the scientific basis for fingerprint identification has not been adequately demonstrated. Such models are increasingly seen as useful tools in support of the fingerprint identification process within or in addition to the ACE-V framework. This paper provides a critical review of recent statistical models from both a practical and theoretical perspective. This includes analysis of models of two different methodologies: Probability of Random Correspondence (PRC) models that focus on calculating probabilities of the occurrence of fingerprint configurations for a given population, and Likelihood Ratio (LR) models which use analysis of corresponding features of fingerprints to derive a likelihood value representing the evidential weighting for a potential source.

  5. Examining the Fidelity of Climate model via Shadowing Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, H.; Smith, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    Fully fledged climate models provide the best available simulations for reflecting the future, yet we have scant insight into their fidelity, in particular as to the duration into the future at which the real world should be expected to evolve in a manner today's models cannot foresee. We know now that our best available models are not adequate for many sought after purposes. To throw some light on the maximum fidelity expected from a given generation of models, and thereby aid both policy making and model development, we can test the weaknesses of a model as a dynamical system to get an informed idea of its potential applicability at various lead times. Shadowing times reflect the duration on which a GCM reflects the observations; extracting the shortcomings of the model which limit shadowing times allows informed speculation regarding the fidelity of the model in the future. More specifically, the relevant phenomena limiting model fidelity can be learned by identifying the reasons models cannot shadow; the time scales on which feedbacks on the system (which are not active in the model) are likely to result in model irrelevance can be discerned. The methodology is developed in the "low dimensional laboratory" of relatively simple dynamical systems, for example Lorenz 95 systems. The results are presented in Lorenz 95 systems, high dimensional fluid dynamical simulations of rotating annulus and GCMs. There are severe limits on the light shadowing experiments can shine on GCM predictions. Never the less, they appear to be one of the brightest lights we can shine to illuminate the likely fidelity of GCM extrapolations into the future.

  6. Examining Pedestrian Injury Severity Using Alternative Disaggregate Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abay, Kibrom Araya

    2013-01-01

    to the choice of these models. The empirical analysis reveals that detailed road user characteristics such as crime history of drivers and momentary activities of road users at the time of the accident provides an interesting insight in the injury severity analysis. Likewise, the alternative analytical...... specification of the models reveals that some of the conventionally employed fixed parameters injury severity models could underestimate the effect of some important behavioral attributes of the accidents. For instance, the standard ordered logit model underestimated the marginal effects of some...

  7. Integrate models of ultrasonics examination for NDT expertise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, P.; Lhemery, A.; Lecoeur-Taibi, I.; Raillon, R.

    1996-12-31

    For several years, the French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has developed a system called CIVA for multiple-technique NDE data acquisition and processing. Modeling tools for ultrasonic non-destructive testing have been developed and implemented within this allowing direct comparison between measured and predicted results. These models are not only devoted to laboratory uses bus also must be usable by ultrasonic operators without special training in simulation techniques. Therefore, emphasis has been on finding the best compromise between as accurate as possible quantitative predictions and ease, simplicity and speed, crucial requirements in the industrial context. This approach has led us to develop approximate models for the different phenomena involved in ultrasonic inspections: radiation, transmission through interfaces, propagation, scattering by defects and boundaries, reception etc. Two main models have been implemented, covering the most commonly encountered NDT configurations. At first, these two models are shortly described. Then, two examples of their applications are shown. Based on the same underlying theories, specific modeling tools are proposed to industrial partners to answer special requirements. To illustrate this, an example is given of a software used a tool to help experts`s interpretation during on-site french PWR vessel inspections. Other models can be implemented in CIVA when some assumptions made in the previous models Champ-Sons and Mephisto are not fulfilled, e. g., when less-conventional testing configurations are concerned. We briefly presents as an example a modeling study of echoes arising from cladded steel surfaces achieved in the laboratory. (authors). 13 refs.

  8. Examination of the New Tech Model as a Holistic Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley-Levine, Jill; Mosier, Gina

    2017-01-01

    Using the Degrees of Democracy Framework (Woods & Woods, 2012), we examined eight New Tech (NT) high schools to determine the extent to which they demonstrated characteristics of holistic democracy. We collected qualitative data, including observations and interviews during the fourth year of implementation. Findings indicated that the eight…

  9. Examining Tatooine: Atmospheric Models of Neptune-Like Circumbinary Planets

    CERN Document Server

    May, E M

    2016-01-01

    Circumbinary planets experience a time varying irradiation pattern as they orbit their two host stars. In this work, we present the first detailed study of the atmospheric effects of this irradiation pattern on known and hypothetical gaseous circumbinary planets. Using both a one-dimensional Energy Balance Model and a three-dimensional General Circulation Model, we look at the temperature differences between circumbinary planets and their equivalent single-star cases in order to determine the nature of the atmospheres of these planets. We find that for circumbinary planets on stable orbits around their host stars, temperature differences are on average no more than 1.0% in the most extreme cases. Based on detailed modeling with the General Circulation Model, we find that these temperature differences are not large enough to excite circulation differences between the two cases. We conclude that gaseous circumbinary planets can be treated as their equivalent single-star case in future atmospheric modeling effor...

  10. Examining Associations between Reading Motivation and Inference Generation beyond Reading Comprehension Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between reading motivation and inference generation while reading. Undergraduate participants (N = 69) read two science articles while thinking aloud, completed a standardized reading comprehension assessment, and self reported their habitual reading motivation. Findings indicate that…

  11. Fraternity Membership and Sexual Aggression: An Examination of Mediators of the Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingree, Jeffrey B.; Thompson, Martie P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This prospective study examined attitudes (ie, hostility toward women, acceptance of rape myths), peer influences (ie, peer pressure to have sex, peer approval of forced sex), and risky behaviors (ie, high-risk alcohol use, number of sexual partners) as possible mediators of the association between fraternity membership and sexual…

  12. Effectiveness of the Gynecology Teaching Associate in Teaching Pelvic Examination Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Susan M.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    The effectiveness of using gynecology teaching associates is compared with training by gynecology residents on clinic patients for teaching the gynecologic examination. Sophomore medical students at the University of Iowa participated in the instruction and an evaluation session with a simulated patient trained to rate the students' examination…

  13. Examining Associations between Reading Motivation and Inference Generation beyond Reading Comprehension Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between reading motivation and inference generation while reading. Undergraduate participants (N = 69) read two science articles while thinking aloud, completed a standardized reading comprehension assessment, and self reported their habitual reading motivation. Findings indicate that…

  14. Examining Pedestrian Injury Severity Using Alternative Disaggregate Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abay, Kibrom Araya

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the injury severity of pedestrians considering detailed road user characteristics and alternative model specification using a high-quality Danish road accident data. Such detailed and alternative modeling approach helps to assess the sensitivity of empirical inferences...... to the choice of these models. The empirical analysis reveals that detailed road user characteristics such as crime history of drivers and momentary activities of road users at the time of the accident provides an interesting insight in the injury severity analysis. Likewise, the alternative analytical...

  15. Examination of a Theoretical Model of Streaming Potential Coupling Coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. T. Luong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismoelectric effects and streaming potentials play an important role in geophysical applications. The key parameter for those phenomena is the streaming potential coupling coefficient, which is, for example, dependent on the zeta potential of the interface of the porous rocks. Comparison of an existing theoretical model to experimental data sets from available published data for streaming potentials has been performed. However, the existing experimental data sets are based on samples with dissimilar fluid conductivity, pH of pore fluid, temperature, and sample compositions. All those dissimilarities may cause the observed deviations. To critically assess the models, we have carried out streaming potential measurement as a function of electrolyte concentration and temperature for a set of well-defined consolidated samples. The results show that the existing theoretical model is not in good agreement with the experimental observations when varying the electrolyte concentration, especially at low electrolyte concentration. However, if we use a modified model in which the zeta potential is considered to be constant over the electrolyte concentration, the model fits the experimental data well in a whole range of concentration. Also, for temperature dependence, the comparison shows that the theoretical model is not fully adequate to describe the experimental data but does describe correctly the increasing trend of the coupling coefficient as function of temperature.

  16. Examination of a sociocultural model of excessive exercise among male and female adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, James; Halliwell, Emma

    2010-06-01

    There is substantial evidence that sociocultural pressures and body image disturbances can lead to disordered eating, yet few studies have examined their impact on excessive exercise. The study adapted a sociocultural model for disordered eating to predict excessive exercise using data from boys and girls in early adolescence (N=421). Perceived sociocultural pressures to lose weight and build muscle, body image disturbance and appearance investment were associated with a compulsive need to exercise. Adolescents' investment in appearance and body image disturbance fully mediated the relationship between sociocultural pressures and a compulsive need for exercise. There was no support for the meditational model in predicting adolescents' frequency or duration of exercise. Results support the sociocultural model as an explanatory model for excessive exercise, but suggest appearance investment and body image disturbance are important mediators of sociocultural pressures. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. An Examination of Operational Availability in Life Cycle Cost Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    Systems. Kenneth E. Marks, H. Garrison Massey, and Brent D. Bradley. Rand No. R-2287-AF. Santa Monica CA: The Rand Corporation, October 1978. AD...AFB OH, September 1982. AD A123045. Bryan, Noreen S.; Jacqueline J. Rosen; and Nancey T. Marland. "A New Life Cycle Cost Model: Flexible, Interactive

  18. An Examination of a Model of Anti-Pollution Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Osamu

    1981-01-01

    Reports results of a study in which Japanese female undergraduates (N=118) responded to an environmental concern scale based upon a model of anti-pollution behavior focusing on: approach to information, confidence in science and technology, appreciation of natural beauty, causes, consequences, and purchasing and coping behaviors. (DC)

  19. Examining associations among obesity and per capita farmers' markets, grocery stores/supermarkets, and supercenters in US counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilcott, Stephanie B; Keyserling, Thomas; Crawford, Thomas; McGuirt, Jared T; Ammerman, Alice S

    2011-04-01

    Fruit and vegetable consumption is an important component of a healthful diet, yet fruits and vegetables are underconsumed, especially among low-income groups with high prevalence rates of obesity. This study used data from the US Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service Food Environment Atlas to examine county-level associations among obesity prevalence and per capita farmers' markets, grocery stores/supermarkets, and supercenters, adjusted for natural amenities, percent black, percent Hispanic, median age, and median household income, stratified by county metropolitan status. In models that included all three of the food venues, supercenters and grocery stores per capita were inversely associated with obesity in the combined (metro and nonmetro) and metro counties. Farmers' markets were not significant in the model for combined (metro and nonmetro) or for metro counties alone, but were significantly inversely related to obesity rates in the model for nonmetro counties. In this ecologic study, density of food venues was inversely associated with county-level obesity prevalence. Thus, future research should examine similar associations at the individual-level.

  20. Examination of outcome after mild traumatic brain injury: the contribution of injury beliefs and Leventhal's common sense model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Deborah L; Hay-Smith, E Jean C; Surgenor, Lois J; Siegert, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Associations between components of Leventhal's common sense model of health behaviour (injury beliefs, coping, distress) and outcome after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) were examined. Participants (n = 147) were recruited within three months following MTBI and assessed six months later, completing study questionnaires at both visits (Illness Perceptions Questionnaire Revised, Brief COPE, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Outcome measures included the Rivermead Post-Concussion Symptoms Questionnaire and Rivermead Head Injury Follow-Up Questionnaire. Univariate and multivariate (logistic regression) analyses examined associations between injury beliefs, coping and distress at baseline, and later outcome. Participants endorsing stronger injury identity beliefs (p model. Consistent with Leventhal's model, participant beliefs about their injury and recovery had significant associations with outcome over time. Coping also appeared to have important associations with outcome but more research is required to examine these. Current reassurance-based interventions may be improved by targeting variables such as injury beliefs, coping and adjustment soon after injury.

  1. The Rasch Model: Its Use by the National Board of Medical Examiners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Paul R.; Schumacher, Charles F.

    1984-01-01

    The National Board of Medical Examiners uses the Rasch model to calibrate test items, maintain item banks, equate scores, and monitor the consistency of examiner item response patterns. The model is also being used in the study of patient management problems examinations, standard-setting, and computer-based examinations. (Author/BS)

  2. Examining the Relationship between Physical Models and Students' Science Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alison Riley

    Scientists engage with practices like model development and use, data analysis and interpretation, explanation construction, and argumentation in order to expand the frontiers of science, so it can be inferred that students' engagement with science practices may help them deepen their own science understanding. As one of three dimensions on which the Next Generation Science Standards is built, science practices are recognized as an important component of science instruction. However, the contexts in which these practices happen are under-researched. Furthermore, research on science practices among students tends to focus on one or two practices in isolation when, in reality, students and scientists tend to engage with multiple overlapping practices. This study focused on identifying and characterizing multiple science practices as eighth and ninth-grade Earth Science students participated in a small group collaborative problem solving activity both with and without the use of a physical model. This study found a range of sophistication in the observed science practices as well as a relationship between the frequency of those practices and the accuracy of the groups' outcomes. Based on this relationship, groups were assigned to one of three categories. Further analysis revealed that model use varied among the three categories of groups. Comparisons across these three group categories suggest that there may be a bootstrapping relationship between students' engagement with science practices and the development of their content understanding. This metaphor of bootstrapping is used to represent how students may develop deeper science content understanding through engagement with science practices and concurrently develop greater facility with science practices as they learn science content. Implications are presented for curriculum designers, teachers and teacher educators. These include recommendations for curriculum design that encourage structured opportunities for

  3. Association between Patient History and Physical Examination and Osteoarthritis after Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ochten, John M; de Vries, Anja D; van Putte, Nienke; Oei, Edwin H G; Bindels, Patrick J E; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2017-09-01

    Structural abnormalities on MRI are frequent after an ankle sprain. To determine the association between patient history, physical examination and early osteoarthritis (OA) in patients after a previous ankle sprain, 98 patients with persistent complaints were selected from a cross-sectional study. Patient history taking and physical examination were applied and MRI was taken. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to test possible associations. Signs of OA (cartilage loss, osteophytes and bone marrow edema) were seen in the talocrural joint (TCJ) in 40% and the talonavicular joint (TNJ) in 49%. Multivariable analysis showed a significant positive association between swelling (OR 3.58, 95%CI 1.13;11.4), a difference in ROM of passive plantar flexion (OR 1.09, 95%CI 1.01;1.18) and bone edema in the TCJ. A difference in ROM of passive plantar flexion (OR 1.07, 95%CI 1.00;1.15) and pain at the end range of dorsiflexion/plantar flexion (OR 5.23, 95%CI 1.88;14.58) were associated with osteophytes in the TNJ. Pain at the end of dorsiflexion/plantar flexion, a difference in ROM of passive plantar flexion and swelling seem to be associated with features of OA (bone marrow edema, osteophytes) in the TCJ and TNJ. Our findings may guide physicians to predict structural joint abnormalities as signs of osteoarthritis. 1b. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Examining associations between adolescent binge eating and binge eating in parents and friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldschmidt, Andrea B.; Wall, Melanie M.; Choo, Tse-Hwei J.; Bruening, Meg; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2014-01-01

    Objective Binge eating is prevalent among adolescents, but little is known about how parents and friends may influence such behaviors. This study examined associations between adolescent binge eating behaviors, and similar behaviors in their parents and friends. Method Participants were 2,770 target adolescent boys and girls who had at least one friend and/or parent who also participated. Logistic regression, stratified by gender, examined associations between parents’ and friends’ self-reported binge eating, and similar behaviors in target adolescents. Results Girls’ binge eating was associated with their male friends’ (odds ratio=2.33; p=.03) and fathers’ binge eating (odds ratio=3.38; p=.02), but not with their female friends’ or mothers’ binge eating (p>.05). For boys, binge eating was not associated with parents’ or friends’ behavior. Discussion Adolescent girls’ binge eating is associated with similar behaviors in their other-sex parents and friends. Results should be replicated, and mechanisms explaining this relation should be further explored. PMID:24105696

  5. Associations between family characteristics and public health nurses' concerns at children's health examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poutiainen, Hannele; Hakulinen-Viitanen, Tuovi; Laatikainen, Tiina

    2014-06-01

    The family and the way it functions have a key role for the health and well-being of children and adolescents. Approximately 10-30% of children grow up in families where their health and well-being may be endangered or weakened. There is very little research data on public health nurses' concerns in connection with children's health examinations related to family characteristics. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations of children's gender, age, family structure, mother's employment status and parents' perception on the sufficiency of income with public health nurses' concerns on physical and psychosocial health at children's health examinations. In 2007-2009, information about children's health and well-being and their background factors was collected from the health examinations of altogether 6506 children in Finland using a cross-sectional design. Associations between family characteristics and nurses concern related to physical and psychosocial health and development of children were assessed using logistic regression analysis. Physical health and psychosocial issues of school-age children raised most concern in public health nurses. Especially, public health nurses felt concern for the psychosocial development of boys both under and of school age. Family structure and the family's financial situation were associated with public health nurses' concern for children's physical health, psychosocial development and the presence of at least one concern. The fact that public health nurses found cause for concern during health examinations was associated with the child's gender, development stage and family characteristic. The research findings may be utilised in planning and targeting health counselling and services in child and school health care. Understanding the role of family characteristics in health and well-being challenges in children is useful in promoting multidisciplinary work in health care. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  6. Examining rainfall and cholera dynamics in Haiti using statistical and dynamic modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Marisa C; Kujbida, Gregory; Tuite, Ashleigh R; Fisman, David N; Tien, Joseph H

    2013-12-01

    Haiti has been in the midst of a cholera epidemic since October 2010. Rainfall is thought to be associated with cholera here, but this relationship has only begun to be quantitatively examined. In this paper, we quantitatively examine the link between rainfall and cholera in Haiti for several different settings (including urban, rural, and displaced person camps) and spatial scales, using a combination of statistical and dynamic models. Statistical analysis of the lagged relationship between rainfall and cholera incidence was conducted using case crossover analysis and distributed lag nonlinear models. Dynamic models consisted of compartmental differential equation models including direct (fast) and indirect (delayed) disease transmission, where indirect transmission was forced by empirical rainfall data. Data sources include cholera case and hospitalization time series from the Haitian Ministry of Public Health, the United Nations Water, Sanitation and Health Cluster, International Organization for Migration, and Hôpital Albert Schweitzer. Rainfall data was obtained from rain gauges from the U.S. Geological Survey and Haiti Regeneration Initiative, and remote sensing rainfall data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission. A strong relationship between rainfall and cholera was found for all spatial scales and locations examined. Increased rainfall was significantly correlated with increased cholera incidence 4-7 days later. Forcing the dynamic models with rainfall data resulted in good fits to the cholera case data, and rainfall-based predictions from the dynamic models closely matched observed cholera cases. These models provide a tool for planning and managing the epidemic as it continues.

  7. Academic predictors of success on the NCLEX-RN examination for associate degree nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengacher, C A; Keller, R

    1990-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between selected admission variables (entrance GPA, ACT subtests scores in English and mathematics, composite ACT scores), age, perception of role strain, achievement in clinical and nursing courses, achievement on NLN examinations, exit GPA, and performance on NCLEX-RN examination. Data were attained from records of 146 associate degree graduates who were admitted to a specially-designed associate degree program in nursing and on those graduates who wrote the NCLEX-RN examination in July 1987 and July 1988. Pearson product moment correlations and stepwise multiple regression analyses were used to identify the relationship between the predictor variables (admission criteria, age, perception of role strain, achievement in clinical and nursing courses), achievement on NLN examinations, exit GPA, and the criterion variable (scores on the NCLEX-RN examination). The best predictor for performance on the NCLEX-RN of the selected admission variables, age, perception of role strain, and exit GPA, were exit GPA (R = .71) and ACT composite scores (R = .75). The ACT math, ACT English scores, entrance GPA, age, and perception of role strain, had no predictive value. The best predictor for performance on the NCLEX-RN of nursing theory course and clinical course grades were the two theory courses in the second year of the program NUR 2712 (R = .77) and NUR 2713 (R = .79). NUR 2711 and 2711L, NUR 2712L, 2713L, and 2813 had no predictive value for success on the NCLEX-RN.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Revisiting the Leadership Scale for Sport: Examining Factor Structure Through Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Weisheng; Rodriguez, Fernando M; Won, Doyeon

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the factor structure of the shortened version of the Leadership Scale for Sport, through a survey of 201 collegiate swimmers at National Collegiate Athletic Association Division II and III institutions, using both exploratory structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis. Both exploratory structural equation modeling and confirmatory factor analysis showed that a five-factor solution fit the data adequately. The sizes of factor loadings on target factors substantially differed between the confirmatory factor analysis and exploratory structural equation modeling solutions. In addition, the inter-correlations between factors of the Leadership Scale for Sport and the correlations with athletes' satisfaction were found to be inflated in the confirmatory factor analysis solution. Overall, the findings provide evidence of the factorial validity of the shortened Leadership Scale for Sport.

  9. Factors associated with breast self-examination among Malaysian women teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsa, P; Kandiah, M; Parsa, N

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine factors related to breast self-examination (BSE) among teachers in Selangor, Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 425 female teachers in 20 randomly selected secondary schools. A self-administered questionnaire based on the health belief model was randomly selected secondary schools. A self-administered questionnaire based on the health belief model was used, including sociodemographic background and knowledge, beliefs and practices about breast cancer and BSE. Only 19% of the women performed BSE on a regular basis. Higher knowledge about breast cancer, greater confidence in performing BSE and regular visits to a physician were significant predictors for practising BSE. To promote BSE practice among Malaysian women, tailored health education and health promotion programmes should be developed based on a specific understanding of women's health beliefs.

  10. Alcoholism, associated risk factors, and harsh parenting among fathers: Examining the role of marital aggression

    OpenAIRE

    Finger, Brent; Kachadourian, Lorig K.; Molnar, Danielle S.; Eiden, Rina D.; Edwards, Ellen P.; Leonard, Kenneth E.

    2010-01-01

    This study utilized a longitudinal design to examine relations between paternal alcoholism, paternal psychopathology, marital aggression and fathers’ harsh parenting behavior in a sample of children with alcoholic (n=89) and non-alcoholic (n=94) fathers. Structural Equation Modeling revealed that paternal alcoholism, depression, and antisocial behavior at 12 months of child age each predicted higher levels of marital aggression at 36 months. Moreover, after controlling for prior parenting, ma...

  11. Examination of associations between early life victimisation and alcohol's harm from others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Lauren M; Greenfield, Thomas K; Karriker-Jaffe, Katherine J

    2017-08-21

    Study aims were to examine: (i) how physical and sexual victimisation in early life are associated with alcohol's harm from others; and (ii) whether respondents' current drinking is a mediator of the association between early life victimisation and alcohol's harm from others among men and women. Data were from national computer-assisted telephone interviews, using the landline sample (3335 men and 3520 women ages ≥18) from the 2010 US National Alcohol Survey. Harms from someone else's drinking included family/marital problems, financial troubles, assault and vandalism in the past 12 months. Victimisation was measured with severe physical abuse or sexual assault before age 18. Severe physical or sexual victimisation before age 18 was reported by 3.4% of men and 8.1% of women. Significantly more men (5.2%) than women (2.4%) reported assault by other drinkers, and significantly more women reported family/marital (5.3%) and financial problems (2.8%) than did men (2.6 and 1% respectively). Severe early life victimisation was robustly associated with a greater likelihood of experiencing past-year harms from other drinkers for both men and women. Men's drinking partially mediated associations between early life victimisation and recent assaults and vandalism by other drinkers. Early life victimisation may increase risk of harms from someone else's drinking. Health services and interventions that screen for histories of victimisation may help decrease risk of later harms from others' drinking. Reductions in drinking among men with histories of victimisation also could help reduce their exposure to such harms. [Kaplan LM, Greenfield TK, Karriker-Jaffe KJ. Examination of associations between early life victimisation and alcohol's harm from others. Drug Alcohol Rev 2017;00:000-000]. © 2017 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  12. Association of classroom participation and examination performance in a first-year medical school course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millis, Richard M; Dyson, Sharon; Cannon, Dawn

    2009-09-01

    The advent of internet-based delivery of basic medical science lectures may unintentionally lead to decreased classroom attendance and participation, thereby creating a distance learning paradigm. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that classroom attendance/participation may be positively correlated with performance on a written examination for first-year medical school instruction. The study subjects consisted of 115 first-year medical students. The introductory respiratory structure-function instruction was designed to include one noncompulsory pretest, four short postinstruction noncompulsory self-evaluation tests that were unannounced as to date and time, and one compulsory comprehensive examination. The relationship between attendance/participation, measured by the number of noncompulsory tests taken, and performance on the comprehensive examination was determined by Pearson's correlation coefficient, one-way ANOVA, and a chi(2)-test of significance. The average score on the pretest was 28%; for the same items on the comprehensive examination (posttest), the average score was 73%. For the 80 students who took the pretest, this translated to an overall score increase of 161%. Attendance/participation in four or five of the noncompulsory tests resulted in an 83.3% pass rate on the comprehensive exam compared with a rate of 52.9% for attendance/participation in three, two, one, or none of the five noncompulsory tests; the overall pass rate was 60.9%. There was a significant association between a high rate of classroom attendance/participation and a high score on the comprehensive examination (Pearson's chi(2) = 8.599, P attendance/participation may be a significant determinant of performance of medical students on comprehensive examinations in first-year basic medical science courses. It is concluded that a substantial number of first-year medical students in this study could be at risk for poor performance because they may believe that there is an

  13. Association between sleep quality and C-reactive protein: results from national health and nutrition examination survey, 2005-2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to explore the association between poor sleep quality and hs_CRP in an adult U.S. population. METHODS: This study focused on 9,317 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES from 2005-2008 who were aged 20-85 years, completed a sleep disorder questionnaire, and had available information on serum hs_CRP. Sleep quality was classified into three categories (good, moderate, poor based on the responses of participants to the NHANES sleep disorder questionnaire. High CRP was defined as hs-CRP >1 md/dL. Linear regression model was applied to investigate the association between poor sleep quality and log-transformed hs_CRP. And logistic regression model was fitted to evaluate the association between sleep quality and the risk of high CRP. RESULTS: Females were more likely to report poor sleep quality than males (26% vs. 19%, p<0.0001. Each sleep disorder was significantly associated with increased hs_CRP and correlative to other sleep disorders. In fully-adjusted linear regression model, poor sleep quality was significantly associated with elevated hs_CRP (log transformed among the overall sample and in females only (β = 0.10, se = 0.03, p<0.01 and β = 0.13, se = 0.04, p<0.01, respectively. In fully-adjusted logistics regression model, poor sleep quality was linked with risk of high CRP(OR: 1.42, 95%CI: 1.15-1.76 in overall sample and OR: 1.59, 95%CI: 1.18-2.14 in females, respectively. CONCLUSION: We found that poor sleep quality was independently associated with elevated hs_CRP in females but not in males in a U.S. adult population.

  14. Examining CAM use disclosure using the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Jennifer; Thorburn, Sheryl; Tippens, Kimberly M

    2013-10-01

    To improve understanding of factors that may influence disclosure of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in the U.S. Cross-sectional survey. Data are from the 2001 Health Care Quality Survey (HCQS), a nationally representative study of adults aged 18 and older living in the continental United States. Using the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use, we conducted multivariate logistic regressions to identify factors associated with disclosing CAM use among the sub-sample of recent CAM users (n=1995). Disclosure of CAM use. Most CAM users (71.0%) disclosed their use of CAM to their doctors. Contextual, individual, and health behavior factors were associated with CAM use disclosure. Of particular interest, disclosure was significantly more likely among those who perceived high quality relationships with their providers (AOR=1.59, CI: 1.01, 2.49) and among those who had a regular source of medical care (AOR=1.54, CI: 1.03, 2.29). The odds of disclosure were also higher among those who used practitioner-provided CAM, with (AOR=2.02, CI: 1.34, 3.06) or without (AOR=1.52, CI: 1.05, 2.20) concurrent herbal medicine use, compared to those who used herbal medicines only. The Behavioral Model of Health Services Use is a useful framework for examining factors that may influence disclosure of CAM use. Further research should examine these relationships using more comprehensive measures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Sociocultural factors associated with breast self-examination among Iranian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naghibi, Seyed Abolhasan; Shojaizadeh, Davood; Montazeri, Ali; Yazdani Cherati, Jamshid

    2015-01-01

    Of the ways to fight breast cancer and reduce deaths hazard due to early detection is one of early detection programs in women's breast self- examination. Examining breast by oneself increase individuals knowledge of her breast health that helps in detecting breast cancer early. Different cultural, social, family and individual factors play roles in women's behavior about breast self- examination applying PEN-3 model in this study is to analyze factors influencing on breast self-examination. The research is a descriptive- analytical, cross-sectional type. Research community consists of women at fertility age of 20-49 in sari. Sample volume is 415 individuals and sampling method is cluster method. In this study, a 50-item questionnaire based on PEN-3 was used. Questions were answered by Likert scoring method. Questionnaire was gathered by personal presence of questioners. Data was analyzed via descriptive statistics and logistic regression methods. Based on the study findings, the most significant positive behaviors related to perceptual factors included effectiveness of disease background in family and relatives (73%), believing in breast self- examination for pursuing health (93%) and the most important negative behaviors were shyness and modesty (83.9%) and increased worry (78.9%). The most remarkable positive behaviors regarding enabling factors covered the skill to do breast examination oneself (35.2%), the availability of health and therapeutic centers (80.7%) and the most significant negative behavior was being busy and lack of time (85.3%). The most important positive behavior about nurturing factors included family consent (68.9%) and the most significant negative one was the inappropriate treatment of health and therapeutic personnel (61.8%). In this study, there is a meaningful difference between employment ages, education with PEN-3 model constituents. Since behaviors due to enabling and nurturing perceptual factors have been important in doing or not

  16. Molecular Thermodynamic Model for Associated Polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG,Chang-Jun(彭昌军); LIU,Hong-Lai(刘洪来); HU,Ying(胡英)

    2001-01-01

    A molecular thermedynmnic model for homopolyrner and copolymer systems with association segments was establishedby adopting the molecular thermodynamic model for hard-sphere-chain fluid as a reference,a perturbation term contributed by the square-well potential and a contribution of as sociation terms.The latter considers the multi-associated-seg-ments in a chain-like molecule based on the shield-sticky model of chemical association.The model can be used to correlate the pVT of melten homopolymer and copolymer.Good agree-ments with experimental data have been obtained.

  17. Parallel models of associative memory

    CERN Document Server

    Hinton, Geoffrey E

    2014-01-01

    This update of the 1981 classic on neural networks includes new commentaries by the authors that show how the original ideas are related to subsequent developments. As researchers continue to uncover ways of applying the complex information processing abilities of neural networks, they give these models an exciting future which may well involve revolutionary developments in understanding the brain and the mind -- developments that may allow researchers to build adaptive intelligent machines. The original chapters show where the ideas came from and the new commentaries show where they are going

  18. A Longitudinal Examination of the Associations Between Shyness, Drinking Motives, Alcohol Use, and Alcohol-Related Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Chelsie M; DiBello, Angelo M; Traylor, Zachary K; Zvolensky, Michael J; Neighbors, Clayton

    2015-09-01

    The current study evaluated the roles of drinking motives and shyness in predicting problem alcohol use over 2 years. First-year college student drinkers (n = 818) completed assessments of alcohol use and related problems, shyness, and drinking motives every 6 months over a 2-year period. Generalized linear mixed models indicated that shyness was associated with less drinking, but more alcohol-related problems. Further, shyness was associated with coping, conformity, and enhancement drinking motives, but was not associated with social drinking motives. However, when examining coping motives, moderation analyses revealed that social drinking motives were more strongly associated with coping motives among individuals higher in shyness. In addition, coping, conformity, and enhancement motives, but not social motives, mediated associations between shyness and alcohol-related problems over time. Finally, coping motives mediated the association between the interaction of shyness and social motives and alcohol-related problems. Together, the results suggest that shy individuals may drink to reduce negative affect, increase positive affect, and fit in with others in social situations, which may then contribute to greater risk for subsequent alcohol-related problems. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  19. Factors associated with medical student test anxiety in objective structured clinical examinations: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate attributes of medical students associated with their test anxiety on Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). Methods A cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted of all Year 3 and 4 students at a private medical school in South Korea in 2014. This 53-item questionnaire consisted of factors pertaining to test anxiety on the OSCE identified from a review of relevant literature, which included students’ motivational beliefs and achievement emotions, perceived values of the OSCE, and attitude and orientation towards patients. Participants’ test anxiety levels were measured using the Korean Achievement Emotions Questionnaire. Participants rated their responses using a five-point Likert-type scale. Univariate analysis was performed to examine relationships between the variables. Results A total of 94 students completed the questionnaire (a 93% response rate). No differences in the participants’ test anxiety scores were observed across genders, entry-levels, or years in medical school. Participants’ test anxiety on the OSCE showed moderate association with their class-related achievement emotions (i.e., anxiety and boredom), where r = 0.46 and 0.32, p OSCE (r = -0.21, p OSCE. These findings have implications for developing effective educational interventions for helping students cope with such a stress by enhancing our understanding of the various factors that influence their test anxiety in OSCEs. PMID:28035056

  20. Factors associated with medical student test anxiety in objective structured clinical examinations: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee

    2016-12-29

    To investigate attributes of medical students associated with their test anxiety on Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCEs). A cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire was conducted of all Year 3 and 4 students at a private medical school in South Korea in 2014. This 53-item questionnaire consisted of factors pertaining to test anxiety on the OSCE identified from a review of relevant literature, which included students' motivational beliefs and achievement emotions, perceived values of the OSCE, and attitude and orientation towards patients. Participants' test anxiety levels were measured using the Korean Achievement Emotions Questionnaire. Participants rated their responses using a five-point Likert-type scale. Univariate analysis was performed to examine relationships between the variables. A total of 94 students completed the questionnaire (a 93% response rate). No differences in the participants' test anxiety scores were observed across genders, entry-levels, or years in medical school. Participants' test anxiety on the OSCE showed moderate association with their class-related achievement emotions (i.e., anxiety and boredom), where r = 0.46 and 0.32, p anxiety on the OSCE. These findings have implications for developing effective educational interventions for helping students cope with such a stress by enhancing our understanding of the various factors that influence their test anxiety in OSCEs.

  1. Association models for petroleum applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamics plays an important role in many applications in the petroleum industry, both upstream and downstream, ranging from flow assurance, (enhanced) oil recovery and control of chemicals to meet production and environmental regulations. There are many different applications in the oil & gas...... industry, thus thermodynamic data (phase behaviour, densities, speed of sound, etc) are needed to study a very diverse range of compounds in addition to the petroleum ones (CO2, H2S, water, alcohols, glycols, mercaptans, mercury, asphaltenes, waxes, polymers, electrolytes, biofuels, etc) within a very...... extensive range of conditions, up to very high pressures. Actually, the petroleum industry was one of the first industrial sectors which used extensively thermodynamic models and even contributed to the development of several of the most popular and still widely used approaches. While traditional...

  2. Nursing students' attitudes toward statistics: Effect of a biostatistics course and association with examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiekkas, Panagiotis; Panagiotarou, Aliki; Malja, Alvaro; Tahirai, Daniela; Zykai, Rountina; Bakalis, Nick; Stefanopoulos, Nikolaos

    2015-12-01

    Although statistical knowledge and skills are necessary for promoting evidence-based practice, health sciences students have expressed anxiety about statistics courses, which may hinder their learning of statistical concepts. To evaluate the effects of a biostatistics course on nursing students' attitudes toward statistics and to explore the association between these attitudes and their performance in the course examination. One-group quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test design. Undergraduate nursing students of the fifth or higher semester of studies, who attended a biostatistics course. Participants were asked to complete the pre-test and post-test forms of The Survey of Attitudes Toward Statistics (SATS)-36 scale at the beginning and end of the course respectively. Pre-test and post-test scale scores were compared, while correlations between post-test scores and participants' examination performance were estimated. Among 156 participants, post-test scores of the overall SATS-36 scale and of the Affect, Cognitive Competence, Interest and Effort components were significantly higher than pre-test ones, indicating that the course was followed by more positive attitudes toward statistics. Among 104 students who participated in the examination, higher post-test scores of the overall SATS-36 scale and of the Affect, Difficulty, Interest and Effort components were significantly but weakly correlated with higher examination performance. Students' attitudes toward statistics can be improved through appropriate biostatistics courses, while positive attitudes contribute to higher course achievements and possibly to improved statistical skills in later professional life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Association between leisure time physical activity and smoking in adolescence: an examination of potential mediating and moderating factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verkooijen, Kirsten; Nielsen, Gert A; Kremers, Stef P J

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although physical activity has been associated negatively with smoking in adolescence, the association is not well understood. PURPOSE: This study examines the relationship between adolescents' leisure time physical activity and smoking behavior, while considering BMI, weight concern,...

  4. The association between leisure time physical activity and smoking in adolescence: an examination of potential mediating and moderating factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, K.T.; Nielsen, G.A.; Kremers, S.P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Although physical activity has been associated negatively with smoking in adolescence, the association is not well understood. Purpose: This study examines the relationship between adolescents' leisure time physical activity and smoking behavior, while considering BMI, weight concern, sense of coher

  5. Alcoholism, associated risk factors, and harsh parenting among fathers: Examining the role of marital aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Brent; Kachadourian, Lorig K; Molnar, Danielle S; Eiden, Rina D; Edwards, Ellen P; Leonard, Kenneth E

    2010-06-01

    This study utilized a longitudinal design to examine relations between paternal alcoholism, paternal psychopathology, marital aggression and fathers' harsh parenting behavior in a sample of children with alcoholic (n = 89) and non-alcoholic (n = 94) fathers. Structural Equation Modeling revealed that paternal alcoholism, depression, and antisocial behavior at 12 months of child age each predicted higher levels of marital aggression at 36 months. Moreover, after controlling for prior parenting, marital aggression was predictive of harsher parenting at kindergarten. Alcoholism and psychopathology were not directly predictive of harsh parenting with marital aggression included in the model, thus indicating that marital aggression is mediating the relation between paternal risk factors and parenting outcome. Results of this study suggest that one pathway linking fathers' alcohol diagnosis to harsh parenting is via marital aggression.

  6. Examining Fluoroquinolone Claims Among Gonorrhea-Associated Prescription Drug Claims, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu-Edusei, Kwame; Carroll, Danya S; Gift, Thomas L

    2015-11-01

    After the release of CDC's revised gonorrhea treatment guidelines in April 2007, a study reported the declining use of fluoroquinolones to treat gonorrhea among health departments participating in the Sexually Transmitted Disease Surveillance Network. In this study, we examine the proportion of fluoroquinolone claims among gonorrhea-associated prescription drug claims from a large insurance database from 2000 through 2010. We extracted drug claims associated with gonorrhea diagnosis claims from the MarketScan database for 2000-2010 and calculated the proportion of the drug claims for fluoroquinolones on a monthly basis. We then used an interrupted time series analysis to investigate trend characteristics of fluoroquinolone claims before and after the gonorrhea treatment guidelines were revised in April 2007. Although there was a monthly decline in the proportion of fluoroquinolone claims before April 2007 (-0.11 percentage points, pfluoroquinolones after April 2007, implying a gradual permanent decline over the analytic period. Our results are consistent with the findings of the previous study and indicate a gradual and permanent decline (over the analytic period) in the proportion of fluoroquinolone claims among gonorrhea-associated prescription drug claims. However, because this is a convenience sample of claims data, these findings cannot be generalized to the entire privately insured population in the U.S. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Prenatal particulate air pollution and neurodevelopment in urban children: Examining sensitive windows and sex-specific associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu Mathilda; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien Leon; Coull, Brent A; Bellinger, David C; Kloog, Itai; Schwartz, Joel; Wright, Robert O; Wright, Rosalind J

    2016-02-01

    Brain growth and structural organization occurs in stages beginning prenatally. Toxicants may impact neurodevelopment differently dependent upon exposure timing and fetal sex. We implemented innovative methodology to identify sensitive windows for the associations between prenatal particulate matter with diameter ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5) and children's neurodevelopment. We assessed 267 full-term urban children's prenatal daily PM2.5 exposure using a validated satellite-based spatio-temporally resolved prediction model. Outcomes included IQ (WISC-IV), attention (omission errors [OEs], commission errors [CEs], hit reaction time [HRT], and HRT standard error [HRT-SE] on the Conners' CPT-II), and memory (general memory [GM] index and its components - verbal [VEM] and visual [VIM] memory, and attention-concentration [AC] indices on the WRAML-2) assessed at age 6.5±0.98 years. To identify the role of exposure timing, we used distributed lag models to examine associations between weekly prenatal PM2.5 exposure and neurodevelopment. Sex-specific associations were also examined. Mothers were primarily minorities (60% Hispanic, 25% black); 69% had ≤12 years of education. Adjusting for maternal age, education, race, and smoking, we found associations between higher PM2.5 levels at 31-38 weeks with lower IQ, at 20-26 weeks gestation with increased OEs, at 32-36 weeks with slower HRT, and at 22-40 weeks with increased HRT-SE among boys, while significant associations were found in memory domains in girls (higher PM2.5 exposure at 18-26 weeks with reduced VIM, at 12-20 weeks with reduced GM). Increased PM2.5 exposure in specific prenatal windows may be associated with poorer function across memory and attention domains with variable associations based on sex. Refined determination of time window- and sex-specific associations may enhance insight into underlying mechanisms and identification of vulnerable subgroups. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Examining Factors Affecting Science Achievement of Hong Kong in PISA 2006 Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Terence Yuk Ping; Lau, Kwok Chi

    2014-10-01

    This study uses hierarchical linear modeling to examine the influence of a range of factors on the science performances of Hong Kong students in PISA 2006. Hong Kong has been consistently ranked highly in international science assessments, such as Programme for International Student Assessment and Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study; therefore, an exploration of the factors that affect science performances of Hong Kong students can give a lens to examine how science education can be improved in Hong Kong and other countries. The analyses reveal that student backgrounds as male, at higher grade levels, and born in mainland (when in the same grade) are associated with better science performance. Among the attitudinal factors, enjoyment of science and self-efficacy in science play important roles in scientific achievements. Most of the parental factors, on the other hand, are not having significant impacts on achievement after student attitudes are taken into account, with only parents' value of science having a small effect. School student intake is found to be a strong predictor of school average achievement, as well as a major mediator of the effects of school enrollment size and school socio-economic status. The findings differ from recently reported results, which suggested that school enrollment size was associated with achievement. This study also points out the problems of the use of science instruction time as a school-level variable to explain science achievement in Hong Kong.

  9. Respiratory symptoms were associated with lower spirometry results during the first examination of WTC responders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udasin, Iris; Schechter, Clyde; Crowley, Laura; Sotolongo, Anays; Gochfeld, Michael; Luft, Benjamin; Moline, Jacqueline; Harrison, Denise; Enright, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Determine if World Trade Center (WTC) disaster responders had lower lung function and higher bronchodilator responsiveness than those with respiratory symptoms and conditions. We evaluated cardinal respiratory symptoms (dyspnea, wheezing, dry cough, productive cough) and determined the difference in FEV1, FVC, and bronchodilator responsiveness. All respiratory symptoms were associated with a lower FEV1 and FVC, and a larger bronchodilator response. Responders reporting chronic productive cough, starting during WTC work and persisting, had a mean FEV1 109 mL lower than those without chronic persistent cough; their odds of having abnormally low FEV1 was 1.40 times higher; and they were 1.65 times as likely to demonstrate bronchodilator responsiveness. Responders reporting chronic persistent cough, wheezing or dyspnea at first medical examination were more likely to have lower lung function and bronchodilator responsiveness.

  10. Examining Equity Sensitivity: An Investigation Using the Big Five and HEXACO Models of Personality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Hayden J R; Bourdage, Joshua S; Ogunfowora, Babatunde; Nguyen, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    The construct of equity sensitivity describes an individual's preference about his/her desired input to outcome ratio. Individuals high on equity sensitivity tend to be more input oriented, and are often called "Benevolents." Individuals low on equity sensitivity are more outcome oriented, and are described as "Entitleds." Given that equity sensitivity has often been described as a trait, the purpose of the present study was to examine major personality correlates of equity sensitivity, so as to inform both the nature of equity sensitivity, and the potential processes through which certain broad personality traits may relate to outcomes. We examined the personality correlates of equity sensitivity across three studies (total N = 1170), two personality models (i.e., the Big Five and HEXACO), the two most common measures of equity sensitivity (i.e., the Equity Preference Questionnaire and Equity Sensitivity Inventory), and using both self and peer reports of personality (in Study 3). Although results varied somewhat across samples, the personality variables of Conscientiousness and Honesty-Humility, followed by Agreeableness, were the most robust predictors of equity sensitivity. Individuals higher on these traits were more likely to be Benevolents, whereas those lower on these traits were more likely to be Entitleds. Although some associations between Extraversion, Openness, and Neuroticism and equity sensitivity were observed, these were generally not robust. Overall, it appears that there are several prominent personality variables underlying equity sensitivity, and that the addition of the HEXACO model's dimension of Honesty-Humility substantially contributes to our understanding of equity sensitivity.

  11. Analysis of Breast Self-Examination Practice Using Fishbein's Model of Behavioral Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Deborah A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which Fishbein's Model of Behavioral Intentions was able to predict breast self-examination behavior. A questionnaire was administered to 350 women who were classified according to frequency of breast self-examination. Results are set forth. Implications for health educators are considered. (MT)

  12. A Statistical Model of Skewed Associativity

    OpenAIRE

    Michaud, Pierre

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a statistical model of set-associativity, victim caching and skewed-associativity, with an emphasis on skewed-associativity. We show that set-associativity is not efficient when the working-set size is close to the cache size. We refer to this as the unit working-set problem. We show that victim-caching is not a practical solution to the unit working-se- t problem either, although victim caching emulates full associativity for working-sets much larger than the victim buffe...

  13. Prevalence of Abnormity of Blood Lipid and Associated Factors in Health Examination Population in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ming Kang; Jie-shi Zhang; Xin-xin Liu; Min-shan Wang; Ming-li Zhao; Jian-chun Yu

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of abnormity of blood lipid and associated factors in healthy population in Beijing.Methods Totally,38462 individuals who received health examination were enrolled in our study.We divided them into eight groups according to their ages.The levels of serum total cholesterol,triglyceride,high density lipoprotein cholesterol,and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were tested,and the relationship of blood lipid abnormity with body mass index(BMI)and fasting blood glucose was analyzed.Results The incidences of hypercholesterolemia,hyperglyceridemia,low high-density lipoprotein cholesterolemia,and hyper low-density lipoprotein cholesterolemia presented increasing trend in this population.The incidence rate of abnormity of blood lipid in health examination population increased with BMI increase.The incidence of abnormity of blood lipid in overweight and obesity population was significantly higher than that in low weight and normal weight populations(P<0.05).Meanwhile,the trend of abnormal blood lipid incidence coincided with that of abnormal fasting blood glucose.Conclusions The prevalence of overweight,obesity,and abnormity of blood lipid in Beijing presents increasing trend.The incidence of abnormity of blood lipid increases with BMI increase,in coincidence with that of fasting blood glucose.

  14. Practices of Breast Self-Examination and Associated Factors among Female Debre Berhan University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhane, Kalayu; Alemayehu, Miskir; Anawte, Belayneh; Gebremariyam, Gebru; Daniel, Ruth; Addis, Semeneh; Worke, Teshome; Mohammed, Abdurrahman; Negash, Wassie

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent form of cancer in Ethiopia of all female cancers. It is considered to be a progressive disease with a poor prognosis if detected late. Breast self-examination is an important prevention method of breast cancer. This study was aimed at assessing practice and associated factors of breast self-examination (BSE) among female Debre Berhan University students in Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015 among 420 using self-administrated questionnaire. Multistage sampling technique was used to select the study participants. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were done. Majority of the study participants, 338 (84.5%), were between 20 and 24 years old with the mean age of 21.1 ± 1.65. Only 14 (3.5%) had family history of breast cancer. Two hundred fifty-six (64%) of the participants had heard about BSE and 30.25% had good knowledge about BSE. Mass media were the most common source of information about breast cancer. Few of the participants (28.3%) had performed BSE. Lack of knowledge on how to perform BSE was cited as the main reason for not practicing BSE. Knowing how to perform, when to perform, and position to perform BSE and having a perception that BSE is important and useful to detect breast cancer were significant predictors of practices of BSE. This study revealed that most of the participants had low knowledge and practice of BSE. Therefore, it important to develop health educational programs in the university to raise awareness about BSE and breast cancer so as to practice self-breast examination.

  15. A general model for bidirectional associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, H; Zhao, Y; Zhuang, X

    1998-01-01

    This paper proposes a general model for bidirectional associative memories that associate patterns between the X-space and the Y-space. The general model does not require the usual assumption that the interconnection weight from a neuron in the X-space to a neuron in the Y-space is the same as the one from the Y-space to the X-space. We start by defining a supporting function to measure how well a state supports another state in a general bidirectional associative memory (GBAM). We then use the supporting function to formulate the associative recalling process as a dynamic system, explore its stability and asymptotic stability conditions, and develop an algorithm for learning the asymptotic stability conditions using the Rosenblatt perceptron rule. The effectiveness of the proposed model for recognition of noisy patterns and the performance of the model in terms of storage capacity, attraction, and spurious memories are demonstrated by some outstanding experimental results.

  16. The development of a competency-based group health teaching performance examination model for BSN graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Chun-Yi; Chung, Ue-Lin

    2008-12-01

    Under the current nursing education system in Taiwan, a fair and objective evaluation of group health teaching competency has been lacking for a long time. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to establish a competency-based group health teaching performance examination model for baccalaureate graduates. Action research was the main research methodology used in this study. The research consisted of two phases. In the first phase, a development committee was established. Based on routine discussions, literature reviews and realistic cases, a draft examination model with quasi-clinical situation model content and procedure was developed. Examination Facility Preparations, Simulated Scenarios and Client Recruitments, Examination Result Evaluation (evaluated by teachers) and Learning Guidelines were also prepared. This draft was reviewed twice for expert opinion, a pilot test was done and both the draft and pilot testing were reviewed again before the draft was finalized. The second phase involved refining the examination model by actually practicing the completed draft examination model in a simulated group-teaching setting in order to examine the model's reliability and validity. Fifteen people were involved in this experiment: three nursing personnel each having at least two years' clinical and teaching experience; three nursing students who did not have actual clinical experience and had not taken the course of teaching principles; three senior teachers; and six virtual patients. The responses from the nursing personnel, nursing students, teachers, and virtual patients who participated in the testing were gathered and integrated to refine the model. The model has content, expert and discriminative validity. The reliability of the model was proven by the high consistency in administration and scoring of the model by clinical examiners. This examination model is not only applicable for the proof of students' credit point exemption, but also as an alternative

  17. Prenatal particulate air pollution exposure and body composition in urban preschool children: Examining sensitive windows and sex-specific associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yueh-Hsiu Mathilda; Hsu, Hsiao-Hsien Leon; Wilson, Ander; Coull, Brent A; Pendo, Mathew P; Baccarelli, Andrea; Kloog, Itai; Schwartz, Joel; Wright, Robert O; Taveras, Elsie M; Wright, Rosalind J

    2017-10-01

    Evolving animal studies and limited epidemiological data show that prenatal air pollution exposure is associated with childhood obesity. Timing of exposure and child sex may play an important role in these associations. We applied an innovative method to examine sex-specific sensitive prenatal windows of exposure to PM2.5 on anthropometric measures in preschool-aged children. Analyses included 239 children born ≥ 37 weeks gestation in an ethnically-mixed lower-income urban birth cohort. Prenatal daily PM2.5 exposure was estimated using a validated satellite-based spatio-temporal model. Body mass index z-score (BMI-z), fat mass, % body fat, subscapular and triceps skinfold thickness, waist and hip circumferences and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) were assessed at age 4.0 ± 0.7 years. Using Bayesian distributed lag interaction models (BDLIMs), we examined sex differences in sensitive windows of weekly averaged PM2.5 levels on these measures, adjusting for child age, maternal age, education, race/ethnicity, and pre-pregnancy BMI. Mothers were primarily Hispanic (55%) or Black (26%), had ≤ 12 years of education (66%) and never smoked (80%). Increased PM2.5 exposure 8-17 and 15-22 weeks gestation was significantly associated with increased BMI z-scores and fat mass in boys, but not in girls. Higher PM2.5 exposure 10-29 weeks gestation was significantly associated with increased WHR in girls, but not in boys. Prenatal PM2.5 was not significantly associated with other measures of body composition. Estimated cumulative effects across pregnancy, accounting for sensitive windows and within-window effects, were 0.21 (95%CI = 0.01-0.37) for BMI-z and 0.36 (95%CI = 0.12-0.68) for fat mass (kg) in boys, and 0.02 (95%CI = 0.01-0.03) for WHR in girls, all per µg/m(3) increase in PM2.5. Increased prenatal PM2.5 exposure was more strongly associated with indices of increased whole body size in boys and with an indicator of body shape in girls. Methods to better characterize

  18. Examining the association between perceived discrimination and heart rate variability in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, LaBarron K; Hoggard, Lori S; Richmond, Ashley S; Gray, DeLeon L; Williams, Dewayne P; Thayer, Julian F

    2017-01-01

    Previous research attempting to delineate the role of discrimination in racial/ethnic disparities in hypertension has focused largely on blood pressure, which is chiefly governed by the sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system. Consequently, few studies have considered the role of the parasympathetic branch and particularly its regulation of the heart via the vagus nerve. In the present cross-sectional study, we employed hierarchical linear regressions to examine associations between perceived ethnic discrimination and resting heart rate variability (HRV), an important biomarker of parasympathetic cardiac modulation and overall health, in a sample (N = 103) of young, healthy African American participants (58% female, Mage = 19.94 years, SD = 2.84). After accounting for demographic factors and health status characteristics, lifetime discrimination emerged as an inverse predictor of HRV. When subdomains of discrimination were considered, discrimination attributable to threats or actual acts of aggression was also predictive of lower HRV. Our findings suggest that a greater lifetime burden of discrimination and discriminatory harassment and/or assault is associated with lower resting HRV in African Americans. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of past, present and emerging research emphasizing biological linkages between discrimination and health. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Examining the Association between Vitamin B12 Deficiency and Dementia in High-Risk Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswanto, O; Smeall, K; Watson, T; Donnelly-Vanderloo, M; O'Connor, C; Foley, N; Madill, J

    2015-12-01

    To explore the association between vitamin B12 deficiency and dementia in patients at high risk for vitamin B12 deficiency. Chart review. Emergency, critical care/ trauma, neurology, medicine, and rehabilitation units of two hospitals in Southwestern Ontario, Canada. Adult patients (n = 666) admitted from 2010 to 2012. Data collection included: reason for admission, gender, age, clinical signs and symptoms of B12 deficiency, serum B12 concentration, and B12 supplementation. Patients with dementia were identified based on their medication profile and medical history. Vitamin B12 deficiency (pmol/L) was defined as serum B12 concentration 220. Comparisons between B12-deficient patients with and without dementia were examined using parametric and non-parametric tests. Serum B12 values were available for 60% (399/666) of the patients, of whom 4% (16/399) were B12-deficient and 14% (57/399) were marginally deficient. Patients with dementia were not more likely to be B12-deficient or marginally deficient [21% (26/121)] compared to those with no dementia [17% (47/278), p=0.27)]. Based on documentation, 34% (25/73) of the B12-deficient and marginally-deficient patients did not receive B12 supplementation, of whom 40% (10/25) had dementia. In this sample of patients, there was no association between B12 deficiency and dementia. However, appropriate B12 screening protocols are necessary for high risk patient to identify deficiency and then receive B12 supplementation as needed.

  20. Examination of the potential association of stress with morbidity and mortality outcomes in patient with heart failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah S Alhurani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The high mortality and morbidity rates associated with heart failure are still not well explained. A few psychosocial factors have been studied and explain some of this risk, but other factors, like stress, remain largely unexplored in heart failure. This study aimed to (1 examine the association of stress with 6-month cardiac event-free survival, (2 examine the relationship of stress with salivary cortisol, and (3 examine the association of salivary cortisol level with 6-month cardiac event-free survival. Method: A total of 81 heart failure patients participated. Stress was measured using the brief Perceived Stress Scale. Cortisol was measured from unstimulated whole expectorated saliva. Cox regression analyses were used to determine whether stress predicted event-free survival, and if salivary cortisol predicted event-free survival. Linear and multiple regressions were used to determine the association of stress with salivary cortisol. Results: Stress was not a significant predictor of event-free survival in heart failure (heart rate = 1.06; 95% confidence interval = 0.95–1.81; p = 0.32. Salivary cortisol was a significant predictor of event-free survival in the unadjusted model (heart rate = 2.30; 95% confidence interval = 0.99–5.927; p = 0.05, but not in the adjusted model. Stress (β 1.06; 95% confidence interval = 0.95–1.18; p = 0.32 was not a significant predictor of salivary cortisol level. Conclusion: Stress is a complex phenomenon, and our measure of stress may not have captured it well. Alternatively, the physical stressors acting in heart failure produce levels of neurohormonal activation that mask the effects of psychosocial stressors or an indirect association of stress with outcomes that is mediated through another construct. Future studies are needed to investigate stress in patients with heart failure to provide definitive answers.

  1. An examination of the perceptions of social network characteristics associated with grandiose and vulnerable narcissism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamkin, Joanna; Clifton, Allan; Campbell, W Keith; Miller, Joshua D

    2014-04-01

    Two dimensions of narcissism exist, grandiose and vulnerable, which are thought to be associated with distinctly different patterns of interpersonal behavior. Social network analysis is a way of quantifying and analyzing interpersonal interactions that may prove useful for characterizing the networks associated with these narcissism dimensions. In the current study, participants (N = 148) completed scales assessing both narcissism dimensions and a measure of the five-factor model of personality. Egocentric network information about participants' 30 closest friends and family members (i.e., "alters") was also obtained. Both narcissism dimensions were characterized by negative perceptions of the individuals who comprise one's social networks, and many of these relations were mediated by individuals' higher levels of antagonism. Grandiose narcissism also interacted with alter centrality (i.e., importance to the network) such that individuals low on grandiose narcissism were less likely to perceive central alters in a negative light and were more attuned to central alters than were individuals high on grandiose narcissism. Overall, both narcissism dimensions were associated with perceiving one's overall social environment negatively because of the high levels of antagonism that characterize both narcissism dimensions. Individuals high on grandiose narcissism, however, appear to be more insensitive to the relative importance of individuals in their social networks.

  2. Re-examining the membership and origin of the {\\epsilon} Cha association

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Simon J; Bessell, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    We present a comprehensive investigation of the {\\epsilon} Chamaeleontis association ({\\epsilon} Cha), one of several stellar groups in the southern sky kinematically linked to the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association (Sco-Cen). We reassess the putative membership of {\\epsilon} Cha using the best-available proper motions (Hipparcos, Tycho-2 and SPM4) with radial velocity and lithium data from the literature and new ANU 2.3-m/WiFeS spectroscopy. After applying a convergence analysis our final membership comprises 35-41 stars from B9 to mid-M spectral types, with a mean distance of 110+/-7 pc and a mean space motion of (U,V,W)=(-10.9,-20.4,-9.9) km/s. Theoretical evolutionary models suggest {\\epsilon} Cha is 3-5 Myr old, distinguishing it as the youngest association in the solar neighbourhood. Considering all the available evidence we reject several stars proposed as members in the literature and suggest they may belong to the background Cha I and II clouds or other nearby young groups. Our analysis underscores th...

  3. The Association Between Barium Examination and Subsequent Appendicitis: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao-Ming; Yeh, Lee-Ren; Huang, Ying-Kai; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2017-01-01

    The incidence and association between appendicitis and barium examination (BE) remain unclear. Such potential risk may be omitted. We conducted a longitudinal, nationwide, population-based cohort study to investigate the association between BE and appendicitis risk. From the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, a total of 24,885 patients who underwent BE between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2010 were enrolled in a BE cohort; an additional 98,384 subjects without BE exposure were selected as a non-BE cohort, matched by age, sex, and index date. The cumulative incidences of subsequent appendicitis in the BE and non-BE cohorts were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank test. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were employed to calculate the appendicitis risk between the groups. The cumulative incidence of appendicitis was higher in the BE cohort than in the non-BE cohort (P = .001). The overall incidence rates of appendicitis for the BE and non-BE cohorts were 1.19 and 0.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively. After adjustment for sex, age, and comorbidities, the risk of appendicitis was higher in the BE cohort (adjusted hazard ratio = 1.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.23-1.73) compared with the non-BE cohort, especially in the first 2 months (adjusted hazard ratio = 9.72, 95% confidence interval = 4.65-20.3). BE was associated with an increased, time-dependent appendicitis risk. Clinicians should be aware of this potential risk to avoid delayed diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Examining the profile of high-potency cannabis and its association with severity of cannabis dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, T P; Winstock, A R

    2015-11-01

    Cannabis use is decreasing in England and Wales, while demand for cannabis treatment in addiction services continues to rise. This could be partly due to an increased availability of high-potency cannabis. Adults residing in the UK were questioned about their drug use, including three types of cannabis (high potency: skunk; low potency: other grass, resin). Cannabis types were profiled and examined for possible associations between frequency of use and (i) cannabis dependence, (ii) cannabis-related concerns. Frequent use of high-potency cannabis predicted a greater severity of dependence [days of skunk use per month: b = 0.254, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.161-0.357, p cannabis was not associated with dependence (days of other grass use per month: b = 0.020, 95% CI -0.029 to 0.070, p = 0.436; days of resin use per month: b = 0.025, 95% CI -0.019 to 0.067, p = 0.245). Frequency of cannabis use (all types) did not predict severity of cannabis-related concerns. High-potency cannabis was clearly distinct from low-potency varieties by its marked effects on memory and paranoia. It also produced the best high, was preferred, and most available. High-potency cannabis use is associated with an increased severity of dependence, especially in young people. Its profile is strongly defined by negative effects (memory, paranoia), but also positive characteristics (best high, preferred type), which may be important when considering clinical or public health interventions focusing on cannabis potency.

  5. Examining the Association Between the NAPLEX, Pre-NAPLEX, and Pre- and Post-admission Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Spivey, Christina A; Byrd, Debbie C; McDonough, Sharon L K; Phelps, Stephanie J

    2017-06-01

    Objective. To examine the relationship between the NAPLEX and Pre-NAPLEX among pharmacy graduates, as well as determine effects of pre-pharmacy, pharmacy school, and demographic variables on NAPLEX performance. Methods. A retrospective review of pharmacy graduates' NAPLEX scores, Pre-NAPLEX scores, demographics, pre-pharmacy academic performance factors, and pharmacy school academic performance factors was performed. Bivariate (eg, ANOVA, independent samples t-test) and correlational analyses were conducted, as was stepwise linear regression to examine the significance of Pre-NAPLEX score and other factors as related to NAPLEX score. Results. One hundred fifty graduates were included, with the majority being female (60.7%) and white (72%). Mean NAPLEX score was 104.7. Mean Pre-NAPLEX score was 68.6. White students had significantly higher NAPLEX scores compared to Black/African American students. NAPLEX score was correlated to Pre-NAPLEX score, race/ethnicity, PCAT composite and section scores, undergraduate overall and science GPAs, pharmacy GPA, and on-time graduation. The regression model included pharmacy GPA and Pre-NAPLEX score. Conclusion. The findings provide evidence that, although pharmacy GPA is the most critical determinant, the Pre-NAPLEX score is also a significant predictor of NAPLEX score.

  6. Examining the impacts of increased corn production on groundwater quality using a coupled modeling system

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset was used to create graphics associated with manuscript: Garcia et al., Examining the impacts of increased corn production on groundwater quality using a...

  7. Modeling using clinical examination indicators predicts interstitial lung disease among patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yao; Song, Wuqi; Wu, Jing; Li, Zhangming; Mu, Fengyun; Li, Yang; Huang, He; Zhu, Wenliang

    2017-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a severe extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that is well-defined as a chronic systemic autoimmune disease. A proportion of patients with RA-associated ILD (RA-ILD) develop pulmonary fibrosis (PF), resulting in poor prognosis and increased lifetime risk. We investigated whether routine clinical examination indicators (CEIs) could be used to identify RA patients with high PF risk. A total of 533 patients with established RA were recruited in this study for model building and 32 CEIs were measured for each of them. To identify PF risk, a new artificial neural network (ANN) was built, in which inputs were generated by calculating Euclidean distance of CEIs between patients. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that the ANN performed well in predicting the PF risk (Youden index = 0.436) by only incorporating four CEIs including age, eosinophil count, platelet count, and white blood cell count. A set of 218 RA patients with healthy lungs or suffering from ILD and a set of 87 RA patients suffering from PF were used for independent validation. Results showed that the model successfully identified ILD and PF with a true positive rate of 84.9% and 82.8%, respectively. The present study suggests that model integration of multiple routine CEIs contributes to identification of potential PF risk among patients with RA.

  8. Sarcopenia exacerbates obesity-associated insulin resistance and dysglycemia: findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preethi Srikanthan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sarcopenia often co-exists with obesity, and may have additive effects on insulin resistance. Sarcopenic obese individuals could be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. We performed a study to determine whether sarcopenia is associated with impairment in insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis in obese and non-obese individuals. METHODOLOGY: We performed a cross-sectional analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III data utilizing subjects of 20 years or older, non-pregnant (N = 14,528. Sarcopenia was identified from bioelectrical impedance measurement of muscle mass. Obesity was identified from body mass index. Outcomes were homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA IR, glycosylated hemoglobin level (HbA1C, and prevalence of pre-diabetes (6.0≤ HbA1C<6.5 and not on medication and type 2 diabetes. Covariates in multiple regression were age, educational level, ethnicity and sex. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sarcopenia was associated with insulin resistance in non-obese (HOMA IR ratio 1.39, 95% confidence interval (CI 1.26 to 1.52 and obese individuals (HOMA-IR ratio 1.16, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.18. Sarcopenia was associated with dysglycemia in obese individuals (HbA1C ratio 1.021, 95% CI 1.011 to 1.043 but not in non-obese individuals. Associations were stronger in those under 60 years of age. We acknowledge that the cross-sectional study design limits our ability to draw causal inferences. CONCLUSIONS: Sarcopenia, independent of obesity, is associated with adverse glucose metabolism, and the association is strongest in individuals under 60 years of age, which suggests that low muscle mass may be an early predictor of diabetes susceptibility. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, further research is urgently needed to develop interventions to prevent sarcopenic obesity and its metabolic consequences.

  9. Examining Accumulated Emotional Traits in Suicide Blogs With an Emotion Topic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Fuji; Kang, Xin; Quan, Changqin

    2016-09-01

    Suicide has been a major cause of death throughout the world. Recent studies have proved a reliable connection between the emotional traits and suicide. However, detection and prevention of suicide are mostly carried out in the clinical centers, which limit the effective treatments to a restricted group of people. To assist detecting suicide risks among the public, we propose a novel method by exploring the accumulated emotional information from people's daily writings (i.e., Blogs), and examining these emotional traits that are predictive of suicidal behaviors. A complex emotion topic model is employed to detect the underlying emotions and emotion-related topics in the Blog streams, based on eight basic emotion categories and five levels of emotion intensities. Since suicide is caused through an accumulative process, we propose three accumulative emotional traits, i.e., accumulation, covariance, and transition of the consecutive Blog emotions, and employ a generalized linear regression algorithm to examine the relationship between emotional traits and suicide risk. Our experiment results suggest that the emotion transition trait turns to be more discriminative of the suicide risk, and that the combination of three traits in linear regression would generate even more discriminative predictions. A classification of the suicide and nonsuicide Blog articles in our additional experiment verifies this result. Finally, we conduct a case study of the most commonly mentioned emotion-related topics in the suicidal Blogs, to further understand the association between emotions and thoughts for these authors.

  10. An examination of the bleeding complications associated with herbal supplements, antiplatelet and anticoagulant medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spolarich, A E; Andrews, L

    2007-01-01

    Dental professionals routinely treat patients taking prescription, nonprescription, and herbal medications that are known or have the potential to alter bleeding. Prescription anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications, as well as over-the-counter drugs such as aspirin, are typically taken to reduce the risk of thromboembolic events, including stroke. Herbal supplements are widely used for a variety of indications, and both patients and health care practitioners are often unaware of the anticoagulant and antiplatelet effects that occur as either predictable pharmacologic effects or adverse side effects of herbal medicines. In addition, patient use of these herbal supplements is usually undisclosed to health care providers. The purpose of this literature review is to examine the mechanisms of action of drugs and herbs that alter bleeding, and to educate dental professionals as to the proper care and management of patients using these medications. Decision-making strategies, including interpretation of laboratory tests, and when to discontinue the use of these medications are discussed. Patients undergoing routine dental and dental hygiene procedures do not need to discontinue the use of anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications. However, alterations in drug use may be required for those patients undergoing invasive surgical procedures. It is recommended that herbal supplements must be discontinued 2 weeks prior to receiving invasive surgical procedures. Dental practitioners must learn to weigh the risks of discontinuing drug therapy against the potential risks to patients, and implement risk reduction strategies to minimize adverse bleeding complications associated with dental treatment.

  11. Association of soil organic matter with metal phases examined by selective dissolution approach: limitations and advantages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagai, R.; Mayer, L. M.

    2014-12-01

    Positive co-variation of organic matter (OM) with iron and aluminum phases has been known for decades in soil and, in case of OM-Fe, in marine sediments. More recent studies point to the metal control on the mean residence time of organic carbon in soils, suggesting that better understanding of the role of these metal phases and the nature of these organo-metal associations would help to improve the models of soil OM dynamics. We developed a selective dissolution approach to assess these associations (Wagai and Mayer, 2007; Wagai et al., 2013). By taking advantage of well-established extraction techniques that were targeted to dissolve specific metal and aluminosilicate phases in soil, we quantified the amounts of OM co-dissolved by the selective dissolution of these inorganic phases. The inherent limitations in this conceptually simple approach include the presence of C-based compounds (often as complexing agent for metal) in the extractants and the lack of selectivity when dissolving specific inorganic phases. The former was resolved by using nitrogen (N), instead of C, as a surrogate for OM because (i) soil N is mostly present as soil OM with relatively narrow C:N ratio, and (ii) the extractants are N free. We were able to partially overcome the lack of selectivity problem by comparing the co-dissolution of OM from a variety of extractants that use reductive, complexation, and acid/alkaline dissolutions. The potential advantages of our approach include the ability (i) to estimate the contribution of specific inorganic phases to OM stabilization, and (ii) to infer the possible modes of the organo-mineral associations that were extracted from field soils (e.g., adsorptive association vs. coprecipitation of organo-metallic complexes). In this presentation, we will further consider the advantages and limitations of this approach (e.g., methodological cautions), present some of the previous and new findings gained from this approach (including its application to

  12. Examining the Associations of Racism, Sexism, and Stressful Life Events on Psychological Distress among African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Perry, Brea; Pullen, Erin; Jewell, Jennifer; Oser, Carrie B.

    2013-01-01

    African American women may be susceptible to stressful events and adverse health outcomes as a result of their distinct social location at the intersection of gender and race. Here, racism and sexism are examined concurrently using survey data from 204 African American women residing in a southeastern U.S. urban city. Associations between racism, sexism, and stressful events across social roles and contexts (i.e., social network loss, motherhood and childbirth, employment and finances, personal illness and injury, and victimization) are investigated. Then, the relationships among these stressors on psychological distress are compared, and a moderation model is explored. Findings suggest that racism and sexism are a significant source of stress in the lives of African American women, and are correlated both with one another and with other stressful events. Implications for future research and clinical considerations are discussed. PMID:25313434

  13. Examining the associations of racism, sexism, and stressful life events on psychological distress among African-American women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Perry, Brea; Pullen, Erin; Jewell, Jennifer; Oser, Carrie B

    2014-10-01

    African-American women may be susceptible to stressful events and adverse health outcomes as a result of their distinct social location at the intersection of gender and race. Here, racism and sexism are examined concurrently using survey data from 204 African-American women residing in a southeastern U.S. urban city. Associations among racism, sexism, and stressful events across social roles and contexts (i.e., social network loss, motherhood and childbirth, employment and finances, personal illness and injury, and victimization) are investigated. Then, the relationships among these stressors on psychological distress are compared, and a moderation model is explored. Findings suggest that racism and sexism are a significant source of stress in the lives of African-American women and are correlated with one another and with other stressful events. Implications for future research and clinical considerations are discussed.

  14. International note: what factors are associated with reading, mathematics, and science literacy of Indian adolescents? A multilevel examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areepattamannil, Shaljan

    2014-06-01

    A sample of 15-year-olds in India took part in the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) for the first time in 2010. The PISA reading, mathematics, and science literacy scores of Indian adolescents were considerably lower than their counterparts in most PISA participating countries. In order to explore potential reasons for this, the present study, therefore, drawing on data from the fourth cycle of PISA and employing multilevel modeling, examined the relations of student- and school-level factors to reading, mathematics, and science literacy among 4826 15-year-old students from 213 schools in India. Gender, metacognitive learning strategies, students' positive attitudes toward school, and students' positive perceptions of classroom climate were found to be significantly associated with Indian adolescents' performance on the PISA assessment.

  15. Longitudinal examination of the exercise and self-esteem model in middle-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavsky, Steriani

    2010-12-01

    This 2-year prospective study examined the exercise and self-esteem model in middle-aged women (N = 143) previously enrolled in a randomized controlled exercise trial. Across the 2-year period, increases in physical activity (PA) and self-efficacy and reductions in body mass index (BMI) were associated with improved subdomain self-perceptions relative to physical condition, and reductions in BMI were associated with improved subdomain self-perceptions relative to physical condition and body attractiveness. The effects of PA, self-efficacy, and BMI on changes in physical self-worth and global self-esteem were mediated by changes in self-perceptions relative to physical condition and body attractiveness. The results of this longitudinal analysis support the hierarchical and multidimensional structure of self-esteem and indicate that middle-aged women can enhance how they perceive their condition and body attractiveness by continued participation in physical activity, increasing their self-efficacy, and maintaining healthy BMI levels.

  16. Extension of association models to complex chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avlund, Ane Søgaard

    Summary of “Extension of association models to complex chemicals”. Ph.D. thesis by Ane Søgaard Avlund The subject of this thesis is application of SAFT type equations of state (EoS). Accurate and predictive thermodynamic models are important in many industries including the petroleum industry....... The SAFT EoS was developed 20 years ago, and a large number of papers on the subject has been published since, but many issues still remain unsolved. These issues are both theoretical and practical. The SAFT theory does not account for intramolecular association, it can only treat flexible chains, and does...... not account for steric self-hindrance for tree-like structures. An important practical problem is how to obtain optimal and consistent parameters. Moreover, multifunctional associating molecules represent a special challenge. In this work two equations of state using the SAFT theory for association are used...

  17. Longitudinal Examination of Resilience after Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwitz, Jennifer H; Sima, Adam P; Kreutzer, Jeffrey S; Dreer, Laura E; Bergquist, Thomas F; Zafonte, Ross; Johnson-Greene, Douglas; Felix, Elizabeth R

    2017-07-19

    To evaluate the trajectory of resilience during the first year following a moderate-severe TBI, factors associated with resilience at 3, 6 and 12-months post-injury, and changing relationships over time between resilience and other factors. Longitudinal analysis of an observational cohort. Five inpatient rehabilitation centers. Patients with TBI (N = 195) enrolled in the resilience module of the TBI Model Systems study with data collected at 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up. Not applicable. Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Initially, resilience levels appeared to be stable during the first year post-injury. Individual growth curve models were used to examine resilience over time in relation to demographic, psychosocial, and injury characteristics. After adjusting for these characteristics, resilience actually declined over time. Higher levels of resilience were related to non-minority status, absence of pre-injury substance abuse, lower anxiety and disability level, and greater life satisfaction. Resilience is a construct that is relevant to understanding brain injury outcomes and has potential value in planning clinical interventions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Examining the association between surface bioburden and frequently touched sites in intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, C E; Smith, J; Watson, V; Robertson, C; Dancer, S J

    2017-01-01

    Critical care patients are at increased risk of infection. Near-patient surfaces act as reservoirs of microbial soil, which may contain pathogens. To correlate soil levels with hand-touch frequency of near-patient sites in an intensive care unit (ICU). Five sites around each bed in a 10-bed ICU were screened for total microbial soil (cfu/cm(2)) and Staphylococcus aureus every month for 10 months. Selected sites were infusion pump and cardiac monitor, left and right bedrails, and bed table. Ten 1 h covert audits of hand-touch frequency of these sites were performed in order to provide an average hand-touch count, which was modelled against soil levels obtained from microbiological screening. Seven of 10 staphylococci were found in conjunction with gross contamination of a specific site (P=0.005) and the same proportion from three most frequently touched sites (bedrails and bed table). There was a linear association between four sites demonstrating gross microbial contamination (>12 cfu/cm(2)) and mean number of hand-touch counts (P=0.08). The bed table was handled most but was not the most contaminated site. We suspected that customary placement of alcohol gel containers on bed tables may have reduced microbiological yield. Removing the gel container from one table confirmed its inhibitory effect on microbial contamination after rescreening (19% vs 50% >12 cfu/cm(2): P=0.007). Surface bioburden at near-patient sites in ICU is associated with hand-contact frequencies by staff and visitors. This supports the need for targeted hygienic cleaning in a high-risk healthcare environment. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Predicting Examination Performance Using an Expanded Integrated Hierarchical Model of Test Emotions and Achievement Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putwain, Dave; Deveney, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine an expanded integrative hierarchical model of test emotions and achievement goal orientations in predicting the examination performance of undergraduate students. Achievement goals were theorised as mediating the relationship between test emotions and performance. 120 undergraduate students completed…

  20. A comprehensive examination of the model underlying acceptance and commitment therapy for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vowles, Kevin E; Sowden, Gail; Ashworth, Julie

    2014-05-01

    The therapeutic model underlying Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is reasonably well-established as it applies to chronic pain. Several studies have examined measures of single ACT processes, or subsets of processes, and have almost uniformly indicated reliable relations with patient functioning. To date, however, no study has performed a comprehensive examination of the entire ACT model, including all of its component processes, as it relates to functioning. The present study performed this examination in 274 individuals with chronic pain presenting for an assessment appointment. Participants completed a battery of self-report questionnaires, assessing multiple aspects of the ACT model, as well as pain intensity, disability, and emotional distress. Initial exploratory factor analyses examined measures of the ACT model and measures of patient functioning separately with each analysis identifying three factors. Next, the fit of a model including ACT processes on the one hand and patient functioning on the other was examined using Structural Equation Modeling. Overall model fit was acceptable and indicated moderate correlations among the ACT processes themselves, as well as significant relations with pain intensity, emotional distress, and disability. These analyses build on the existing literature by providing, to our knowledge, the most comprehensive evaluation of the ACT theoretical model in chronic pain to date. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Modeling reconsolidation in kernel associative memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Nowicki

    Full Text Available Memory reconsolidation is a central process enabling adaptive memory and the perception of a constantly changing reality. It causes memories to be strengthened, weakened or changed following their recall. A computational model of memory reconsolidation is presented. Unlike Hopfield-type memory models, our model introduces an unbounded number of attractors that are updatable and can process real-valued, large, realistic stimuli. Our model replicates three characteristic effects of the reconsolidation process on human memory: increased association, extinction of fear memories, and the ability to track and follow gradually changing objects. In addition to this behavioral validation, a continuous time version of the reconsolidation model is introduced. This version extends average rate dynamic models of brain circuits exhibiting persistent activity to include adaptivity and an unbounded number of attractors.

  2. Examining the interaction of apo E and neurotoxicity on a murine model of ALS-PDC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J M B; Petrik, M S; Moghadasian, M H; Shaw, C A

    2005-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown a positive relationship between cycad flour consumption and the development of the neurodegenerative disorder, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis - parkinsonism - dementia complex (ALS-PDC). Apolipoprotein E (apo E) allele variations have been associated with genetic susceptibility in neurodegenerative diseases, including ALS-PDC. We have studied cycad toxicity in a mouse model of ALS-PDC with a particular interest in its impact on the central nervous system (CNS) in both apo E knock-out (KO) mice and their wild-type (WT) counterparts. Behavioral motor tests, motor neuron counts, and immunohistochemical staining in brain and spinal cord, as well as routine histological examinations on internal organs, were performed to evaluate cycad toxicity. Plasma cholesterol levels were also measured before and during the study. Cycad treatment was associated with higher levels of plasma cholesterol only in apo E KO mice; increased levels of plasma cholesterol did not result in increased athero genesis. Cycad-fed wild-type mice developed progressive behavioral deficits including ALS-PDC-like pathological outcomes, while cycad-fed apo E KO mice were not significantly affected. Cycad-fed wild-type mice had shorter gait length measurements along with higher active caspase-3 levels in the striatum, substantia nigra, primary motor cortex, and spinal cord as compared with corresponding controls. These changes were associated with decreased labeling for glutamate transporter 1B and tyrosine hydroxylase activity levels. No evidence of cycad toxicity was observed in internal organs of either wild-type or apo E KO mice. Our data demonstrate that apo E KO mice are less susceptible to cycad toxicity, suggesting a role for apo E as a possible genetic susceptibility factor for some forms of toxin-induced neurodegeneration.

  3. Examining a conceptual model of parental nurturance, parenting practices and physical activity among 5–6 year olds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebire, Simon J.; Jago, Russell; Wood, Lesley; Thompson, Janice L.; Zahra, Jezmond; Lawlor, Deborah A.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Parenting is an often-studied correlate of children's physical activity, however there is little research examining the associations between parenting styles, practices and the physical activity of younger children. Objective This study aimed to investigate whether physical activity-based parenting practices mediate the association between parenting styles and 5–6 year-old children's objectively-assessed physical activity. Methods 770 parents self-reported parenting style (nurturance and control) and physical activity-based parenting practices (logistic and modeling support). Their 5–6 year old child wore an accelerometer for five days to measure moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA). Linear regression was used to examine direct and indirect (mediation) associations. Data were collected in the United Kingdom in 2012/13 and analyzed in 2014. Results Parent nurturance was positively associated with provision of modeling (adjusted unstandardized coefficient, β = 0.11; 95% CI = 0.02, 0.21) and logistic support (β = 0.14; 0.07, 0.21). Modeling support was associated with greater child MVPA (β = 2.41; 0.23, 4.60) and a small indirect path from parent nurturance to child's MVPA was identified (β = 0.27; 0.04, 0.70). Conclusions Physical activity-based parenting practices are more strongly associated with 5–6 year old children's MVPA than parenting styles. Further research examining conceptual models of parenting is needed to understand in more depth the possible antecedents to adaptive parenting practices beyond parenting styles. PMID:26647364

  4. The Association between Medical Education Accreditation and Examination Performance of Internationally Educated Physicians Seeking Certification in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zanten, Marta; Boulet, John R.

    2013-01-01

    The purposes of this research were to examine medical education accreditation practices around the world, with special focus on the Caribbean, and to explore the association between medical school accreditation and graduates' examination performance. In addition to other requirements, graduates of international medical schools seeking to…

  5. Resident clinical duties while preparing for the ABR core examination: position statement of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStigter, Kristen K; Mainiero, Martha B; Janower, Murray L; Resnik, Charles S

    2012-11-01

    Historically, diagnostic radiology residents have been allowed time off from clinical duties to study for the ABR oral board examination. This practice has resulted in a disruptive "board frenzy" at many programs. The new ABR examination structure gives programs an opportunity to evaluate this practice. This position statement of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology describes the rationale behind a recommendation of no time off from clinical service before the ABR core examination.

  6. Which factors are associated with OB/GYN trainees' confidence in performing ultrasound examinations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin Grønnebæk; Rasmussen, Morten; Tappert, C

    2014-01-01

    To explore the association between clinical training characteristics and trainees' level of confidence in performing ultrasound scans independently.......To explore the association between clinical training characteristics and trainees' level of confidence in performing ultrasound scans independently....

  7. Investigating models for associating fluids using spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Solms, Nicolas; Michelsen, Michael Locht; Passos, Claudia Pereira;

    2005-01-01

    Two equations of state (PC-SAFT and CPA) are used to predict the monomer fraction of pure associating fluids. The models each require five pure-component parameters usually obtained by fitting to experimental liquid density and vapor pressure data. Here we also incorporate monomer fractions...

  8. A new model of neural associative memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, J; Vandewalle, J

    1994-03-01

    In this paper, we present a new model of discrete neural associative memories and its design rule. The most important feature of this new model is that a static mapping instead of the dynamic convergent process is used to retrieve the stored messages. The new model features a two-layer structure, with feedforward connections only and uses two kinds of neurons which implement different output functions. Another important feature is that this new model employs an extremely simple weight setup rule and all the resulted weights can only assume two different values, -1 and +1, which facilitates the VLSI implementation. Compared to the famous discrete Hopfield model designed with the well-known Hebbian rule or any other rule, the new model can guarantee all the given patterns to be stored as fixed points. Moreover, each fixed point is surrounded by an attraction basin (which is a ball in the Hamming distance sense) with the maximal possible radius. The performances of the new model are compared through some illustrative examples with those of the Hopfield associative memory designed using different methods.

  9. Re-examining the membership and origin of the ɛ Cha association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Simon J.; Lawson, Warrick A.; Bessell, Michael S.

    2013-10-01

    We present a comprehensive investigation of the ɛ Chamaeleontis association (ɛ Cha), one of several young moving groups spread across the southern sky. We re-assess the putative membership of ɛ Cha using the best available proper motion and spectroscopic measurements, including new ANU 2.3-m/Wide Field Spectrograph observations. After applying a kinematic analysis, our final membership comprises 35-41 stars from B9 to mid-M spectral types, with a mean distance of 110 ± 7 pc and a mean space motion of (U, V, W) = (-10.9 ± 0.8, -20.4 ± 1.3, -9.9 ± 1.4) km s-1. Theoretical evolutionary models suggest ɛ Cha is 3-5 Myr old, distinguishing it as the youngest moving group in the solar neighbourhood. 15 members show 3-22 μm spectral energy distributions attributable to circumstellar discs, including 11 stars which appear to be actively accreting. ɛ Cha's disc and accretion fractions (29^{+8}_{-6} and 32^{+9}_{-7} per cent, respectively) are both consistent with a typical 3-5 Myr old population. Multi-epoch spectroscopy reveals three M-type members with broad and highly variable Hα emission as well as several new spectroscopic binaries. We reject 11 stars proposed as members in the literature and suggest they may belong to the background Cha I and II clouds or other nearby young groups. Our analysis underscores the importance of a holistic and conservative approach to assigning young stars to kinematic groups, many of which have only subtly different properties and ill-defined memberships. We conclude with a brief discussion of ɛ Cha's connection to the young open cluster η Cha and the Scorpius-Centaurus OB association (Sco-Cen). Contrary to earlier studies which assumed η and ɛ Cha are coeval and were born in the same location, we find the groups were separated by ˜30 pc when η Cha formed 4-8 Myr ago in the outskirts of Sco-Cen, 1-3 Myr before the majority of ɛ Cha members.

  10. Association between performance on Neurology In-Training and Certification Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Frederick G.; Gutmann, Laurie; Pascuzzi, Robert M.; Webb, Lynn; Massey, Janice M.; DeKosky, Steven T.; Foertsch, Mary; Faulkner, Larry R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This study analyzed the relationship between performance on the American Academy of Neurology Residency In-Service Training Examination (RITE) and subsequent performance on the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology (ABPN) Certification Examination. Methods: Pearson correlation coefficients were used to examine the relationship between performance on the RITE and the Certification Examination for 2 cohorts of adult neurologists and 2 cohorts of child neurologists. The 2 cohorts represented test takers for 2008 and 2009. Results: For adult neurologists, the correlation between the total RITE and the Certification Examination scores was 0.77 (p < 0.01) in 2008 and 0.65 (p < 0.01) in 2009. For child neurologists, it was 0.74 (p < 0.01) in 2008 and 0.56 (p < 0.01) in 2009. Discussion: For 2 consecutive years, there was a significant correlation between performance on the RITE and performance on the ABPN Certification Examination for both adult and child neurologists. The RITE is a self-assessment examination, and performance on the test is a positive predictor of future performance on the ABPN Certification Examination. PMID:23296130

  11. Examining the Longitudinal Biliterate Trajectory of Emerging Bilingual Learners in a Paired Literacy Instructional Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Wendy; Butvilofsky, Sandra; Escamilla, Kathy; Hopewell, Susan; Tolento, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the biliteracy results of Spanish-English emerging bilingual students who participated in a K-5 paired literacy model in a large school district in Oregon. Spanish and English reading and writing data show longitudinal gains in students' biliterate development, demonstrating the potential of the model in developing…

  12. An Examination of Pre-Service Mathematics Teachers' Approaches to Construct and Solve Mathematical Modelling Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukova-Guzel, Esra

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the approaches displayed by pre-service mathematics teachers in their experiences of constructing mathematical modelling problems and the extent to which they perform the modelling process when solving the problems they construct. This case study was carried out with 35 pre-service teachers taking the Mathematical Modelling…

  13. Examining the Bifactor IRT Model for Vertical Scaling in K-12 Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepfler, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, educational policy trends have shifted to a focus on examining students' growth from kindergarten through twelfth grade (K-12). One way states can track students' growth is with a vertical scale. Presently, every state that uses a vertical scale bases the scale on a unidimensional IRT model. These models make a…

  14. Simultaneous and Delayed Video Modeling: An Examination of System Effectiveness and Student Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber-Doughyt, Teresa; Patton, Scott E.; Brennan, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of simultaneous and delayed video modeling when used by three middle-school students with moderate intellectual disabilities was examined. Alternating between modeling systems, students were taught to use the public library computer to locate specific book call numbers and use the Dewey Decimal Classification System to locate…

  15. Association between Chronic Laryngitis and Particulate Matter Based on the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Hoon Joo

    Full Text Available Chronic laryngitis (CL has been described as chronic inflammation of the larynx. CL have various causes such as long-term smoking, acid reflux, voice overuse, bronchitis, allergies, pneumonia, excessive exposure to toxic chemicals and complications from the flu or a chronic cold. However, the prevalence of CL and role of air pollution in the etiology is uncertain.The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between CL and particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than 10 μm (PM10 in South Korea using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES during 2008-2012.KNHANES is a cross-sectional survey of the civilian, non-institutionalized population of South Korea (n = 21,116. A field survey team that included an otolaryngologist moved with a mobile examination unit and performed interviews and physical examinations. The mean annual concentrations of ambient PM10, SO2, O3, NO2, and CO levels in Korea were determined from monitoring station data. Multiple logistic regression was used to examine the relationship of air pollution to CL.Among the population ≥ 19 years of age, the weighted prevalence of CL was 3.37 ± 0.30% (95% confidence interval, 2.79-3.95%. CL was more prevalent in men, current smokers, and those with lower household income and prevalence increased with age. A significant decrease over time was observed in the prevalence of CL (P for trend = 0.0049 and the annual average concentrations of PM10 (P for trend < 0.0001 from 2008 to 2012. In a multivariate model, the factors associated with CL included PM10 (odds ratio [OR], 1.378, p = 0.0457, age (OR, 1.020, p<0.0001, sex (OR, 0.734, p = 0.0179, and smoking status (OR, 1.438, p = 0.0054.Elevated PM10 exposures could be associated with increased risk of CL in South Koreans. Further epidemiological and experimental studies are necessary to clarify the impact of chronic PM10 exposure on CL.

  16. Modeling an integrative physical examination program for the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Scott G

    2006-10-01

    Current policies governing the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs physical examination programs are out of step with current evidence-based medical practice. Replacing periodic and other routine physical examination types with annual preventive health assessments would afford our service members additional health benefit at reduced cost. Additionally, the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs repeat the physical examination process at separation and have been unable to reconcile their respective disability evaluation systems to reduce duplication and waste. A clear, coherent, and coordinated strategy to improve the relevance and utility of our physical examination programs is long overdue. This article discusses existing physical examination programs and proposes a model for a new integrative physical examination program based on need, science, and common sense.

  17. The cognitive reserve hypothesis: a longitudinal examination of age-associated declines in reasoning and processing speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker-Drob, Elliot M; Johnson, Kathy E; Jones, Richard N

    2009-03-01

    The term cognitive reserve is frequently used to refer to the ubiquitous finding that, during later life, those higher in experiential resources (e.g., education, knowledge) exhibit higher levels of cognitive function. This observation may be the result of either experiential resources playing protective roles with respect to the cognitive declines associated with aging or the persistence of differences in functioning that have existed since earlier adulthood. These possibilities were examined by applying accelerated longitudinal structural equation (growth curve) models to 5-year reasoning and speed data from the no-contact control group (N = 690; age 65-89 years at baseline) of the Advanced Cognitive Training for Independent and Vital Elderly study. Vocabulary knowledge and years of education, as markers of cognitive reserve, were related to levels of cognitive functioning but unrelated to rates of cognitive change, both before and after the (negative) relations between levels and rates were controlled for. These results suggest that cognitive reserve reflects the persistence of earlier differences in cognitive functioning rather than differential rates of age-associated cognitive declines.

  18. Application of model bread baking in the examination of arabinoxylan-protein complexes in rye bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buksa, Krzysztof

    2016-09-01

    The changes in molecular mass of arabinoxylan (AX) and protein caused by bread baking process were examined using a model rye bread. Instead of the normal flour, the dough contained starch, water-extractable AX and protein which were isolated from rye wholemeal. From the crumb of selected model breads, starch was removed releasing AX-protein complexes, which were further examined by size exclusion chromatography. On the basis of the research, it was concluded that optimum model mix can be composed of 3-6% AX and 3-6% rye protein isolate at 94-88% of rye starch meaning with the most similar properties to low extraction rye flour. Application of model rye bread allowed to examine the interactions between AX and proteins. Bread baked with a share of AX, rye protein and starch, from which the complexes of the highest molar mass were isolated, was characterized by the strongest structure of the bread crumb.

  19. Examining Equity Sensitivity: An Investigation Using the Big Five and HEXACO Models of Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayden J. R. Woodley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The construct of equity sensitivity describes an individual’s preference about his/her desired input to outcome ratio. Individuals high on equity sensitivity tend to be more input oriented, and are often called Benevolents. Individuals low on equity sensitivity are more outcome oriented, and are described as Entitleds. Given that equity sensitivity has often been described as a trait, the purpose of the present study was to examine major personality correlates of equity sensitivity, so as to inform both the nature of equity sensitivity, and the potential processes through which certain broad personality traits may relate to outcomes. We examined the personality correlates of equity sensitivity across three studies (total N = 1170, two personality models (i.e., the Big Five and HEXACO, the two most common measures of equity sensitivity (i.e., the Equity Preference Questionnaire and Equity Sensitivity Inventory, and using both self and peer reports of personality (in Study 3. Although results varied somewhat across samples, the personality variables of Conscientiousness and Honesty-Humility, followed by Agreeableness, were the most robust predictors of equity sensitivity. Individuals higher on these traits were more likely to be Benevolents, whereas those lower on these traits were more likely to be Entitleds. Although some associations between Extraversion, Openness, and Neuroticism and equity sensitivity were observed, these were generally not robust. Overall, it appears that there are several prominent personality variables underlying equity sensitivity, and that the addition of the HEXACO model’s dimension of Honesty-Humility substantially contributes to our understanding of equity sensitivity.

  20. Examining the impacts of increased corn production on groundwater quality using a coupled modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study demonstrates the value of a coupled chemical transport modeling system for investigating groundwater nitrate contamination responses associated with nitrogen (N) fertilizer application and increased corn production. The coupled Community Multiscale Air Quality Bidirect...

  1. Racial and Ethnic Minority College Students' Stigma Associated with Seeking Psychological Help: Examining Psychocultural Correlates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hsiu-Lan; Kwan, Kwong-Liem Karl; Sevig, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Many college students underuse professional psychological help for mental health difficulties. The stigma associated with seeking such help appears to be one of the reasons for this underuse. Levels of psychological distress and past use of counseling/psychotherapy have been found to be important correlates of stigma associated with seeking…

  2. Interrelated harms: Examining the associations between victimization, accidents, and criminal behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junger, Marianne; van der Heijden, Peter; Keane, Carl

    2001-01-01

    Problem. This study investigated the existence of positive associations between criminal behavior (‘offending’), traffic accidents, falls and tripping, and being the victim of a crime. The motivation for the study was that the finding of positive associations would support the thesis that there may

  3. Interrelated harms: Examining the associations among victimization, accidental injuries, and criminal offending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junger, M.; Keane, C.; Van der Heijden, P.G.M.

    2001-01-01

    Problem. This study investigated the existence of positive associations between criminal behavior (‘offending’), traffic accidents, falls and tripping, and being the victim of a crime. The motivation for the study was that the finding of positive associations would support the thesis that there may

  4. Examination of Solubility Models for the Determination of Transition Metals within Liquid Alkali Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Isler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The experimental solubility of transition metals in liquid alkali metal was compared to the modeled solubility calculated using various equations for solubility. These equations were modeled using the enthalpy calculations of the semi-empirical Miedema model and various entropy calculations. The accuracy of the predicted solubility compared to the experimental data is more dependent on which liquid alkali metal is being examined rather than the transition metal solute examined. For liquid lithium the calculated solubility by the model was generally larger than experimental values, while for liquid cesium the modeling solubility was significantly smaller than the experimental values. For liquid sodium, potassium, and rubidium the experimental solubilities were within the range calculated by this study. Few data approached the predicted temperature dependence of solubility and instead most data exhibited a less pronounced temperature dependence.

  5. Utilization of Positive and Negative Controls to Examine Comorbid Associations in Observational Database Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Craig L.; Kabadi, Shaum; St Louis, Matthew; Bonato, Vinicius; Katrina Loomis, A.; Galaznik, Aaron; Berger, Marc L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Opportunities to leverage observational data for precision medicine research are hampered by underlying sources of bias and paucity of methods to handle resulting uncertainty. We outline an approach to account for bias in identifying comorbid associations between 2 rare genetic disorders and type 2 diabetes (T2D) by applying a positive and negative control disease paradigm. Research Design: Association between 10 common and 2 rare genetic disorders [Hereditary Fructose Intolerance (HFI) and α-1 antitrypsin deficiency] and T2D was compared with the association between T2D and 7 negative control diseases with no established relationship with T2D in 4 observational databases. Negative controls were used to estimate how much bias and variance existed in datasets when no effect should be observed. Results: Unadjusted association for common and rare genetic disorders and T2D was positive and variable in magnitude and distribution in all 4 databases. However, association between negative controls and T2D was 200% greater than expected indicating the magnitude and confidence intervals for comorbid associations are sensitive to systematic bias. A meta-analysis using this method demonstrated a significant association between HFI and T2D but not for α-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Conclusions: For observational studies, when covariate data are limited or ambiguous, positive and negative controls provide a method to account for the broadest level of systematic bias, heterogeneity, and uncertainty. This provides greater confidence in assessing associations between diseases and comorbidities. Using this approach we were able to demonstrate an association between HFI and T2D. Leveraging real-world databases is a promising approach to identify and corroborate potential targets for precision medicine therapies. PMID:27787351

  6. Cerebral white matter changes are associated with abnormalities on neurological examination in non-disabled elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poggesi, Anna; Gouw, Alida; van der Flier, Wiesje

    2013-01-01

    age 74.1 ± 5.0, M/F: 288/351). Severe WMC at baseline were associated with gait and stance abnormalities, upper motor signs, and fingertap slowing. This effect was independent of age, sex, lacunar and non-lacunar infarcts. The occurrence of stance abnormalities, upper motor signs, primitive reflexes...... and fingertap slowing during the 3-year follow-up period was associated with both baseline WMC load and their progression. The occurrence of the same abnormalities plus extrapyramidal and primitive reflexes was associated with incident lacunar infarcts. In our cohort of non-disabled elders, severe WMC were...

  7. Examination of a climate stabilization pathway via zero-emissions using Earth system models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, Daisuke; Tsutsui, J.; Watanabe, S.; Tachiiri, K.; Hajima, T.; Okajima, H.; Matsuno, T.

    2015-09-01

    Long-term climate experiments up to the year 2300 have been conducted using two full-scale complex Earth system models (ESMs), CESM1(BGC) and MIROC-ESM, for a CO2 emissions reduction pathway, termed Z650, where annual CO2 emissions peak at 11 PgC in 2020, decline by 50% every 30 years, and reach zero in 2160. The results have been examined by focusing on the approximate linear relationship between the temperature increase and cumulative CO2 emissions. Although the temperature increase is nearly proportional to the cumulative CO2 emissions in both models, this relationship does not necessarily provide a robust basis for the restriction of CO2 emissions because it is substantially modulated by non-CO2 forcing. CO2-induced warming, estimated from the atmospheric CO2 concentrations in the models, indicates an approximate compensation of nonlinear changes between fast-mode responses to concentration changes at less than 10 years and slow-mode response at more than 100 years due to the thermal inertia of the ocean. In this estimate, CESM1(BGC) closely approximates a linear trend of 1.7 °C per 1000 PgC, whereas MIROC-ESM shows a deviation toward higher temperatures after the emissions peak, from 1.8 °C to 2.4 °C per 1000 PgC over the range of 400-850 PgC cumulative emissions corresponding to years 2000-2050. The evolution of temperature under zero emissions, 2160-2300, shows a slight decrease of about 0.1 °C per century in CESM1(BGC), but remains almost constant in MIROC-ESM. The fast-mode response toward the equilibrium state decreases with a decrease in the airborne fraction owing to continued CO2 uptake (carbon cycle inertia), whereas the slow-mode response results in more warming owing to continued heat uptake (thermal inertia). Several specific differences are noted between the two models regarding the degree of this compensation and in some key regional aspects associated with sustained warming and long-term climate risks. Overall, elevated temperatures continue

  8. Association Between Flexible Duty Hour Policies and General Surgery Resident Examination Performance: A Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blay, Eddie; Hewitt, D Brock; Chung, Jeanette W; Biester, Thomas; Fiore, James F; Dahlke, Allison R; Quinn, Christopher M; Lewis, Frank R; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2017-02-01

    Concerns persist about the effect of current duty hour reforms on resident educational outcomes. We investigated whether a flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policy (Flexible Policy) was associated with differential general surgery examination performance compared with current ACGME duty hour policy (Standard Policy). We obtained examination scores on the American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination, Qualifying Examination (written boards), and Certifying Examination (oral boards) for residents in 117 general surgery residency programs that participated in the Flexibility in Duty Hour Requirements for Surgical Trainees (FIRST) Trial. Using bivariate analyses and regression models, we compared resident examination performance across study arms (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) for 2015 and 2016, and 1 year of the Qualifying Examination and Certifying Examination. Adjusted analyses accounted for program-level factors, including the stratification variable for randomization. In 2016, FIRST trial participants were 4,363 general surgery residents. Mean American Board of Surgery In-Training Examination scores for residents were not significantly different between study groups (Flexible Policy vs Standard Policy) overall (Flexible Policy: mean [SD] 502.6 [100.9] vs Standard Policy: 502.7 [98.6]; p = 0.98) or for any individual postgraduate year level. There was no difference in pass rates between study arms for either the Qualifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 90.4% vs Standard Policy: 90.5%; p = 0.99) or Certifying Examination (Flexible Policy: 86.3% vs Standard Policy: 88.6%; p = 0.24). Results from adjusted analyses were consistent with these findings. Flexible, less-restrictive duty hour policies were not associated with differences in general surgery resident performance on examinations during the FIRST Trial. However, more years under flexible duty hour policies might be needed to observe an effect. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons

  9. EXAMINING THE MOVEMENTS OF MOBILE NODES IN THE REAL WORLD TO PRODUCE ACCURATE MOBILITY MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TANWEER ALAM

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available All communication occurs through a wireless median in an ad hoc network. Ad hoc networks are dynamically created and maintained by the individual nodes comprising the network. Random Waypoint Mobility Model is a model that includes pause times between changes in destination and speed. To produce a real-world environment within which an ad hoc network can be formed among a set of nodes, there is a need for the development of realistic, generic and comprehensive mobility models. In this paper, we examine the movements of entities in the real world and present the production of mobility model in an ad hoc network.

  10. The Educational Dean: An Examination of Behaviors Associated with Special Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends, Richard I.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    The role of the dean in directing a federally funded change project (Dean's Grant project) in schools of education is examined. Categories of specific behaviors of deans include: (1) choreographic behavior; (2) resource allocation; (3) conflict negotiation; (4) advocacy and support behavior; and (5) communication. (JN)

  11. Trust but Verify: Examining the Association between Students' Sourcing Behaviors and Ratings of Text Trustworthiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Alexandra; Alexander, Patricia A.; Stephens, Lori A.

    2017-01-01

    Three indicators of undergraduate students' (n = 197) source evaluation were investigated as students completed an academic task requiring the use of multiple texts. The source evaluation metrics examined were students' (1) accessing of document information, (2) trustworthiness ratings, and (3) citation in written responses. All three indicators…

  12. Factors Associated with Success in a Calculus Course: An Examination of Personal Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubuz, Behiye

    2011-01-01

    This study examined relationships between students' personal variables (gender, prior achievements, age and academic major) and their success in the first year undergraduate calculus course. The study sample consisted of 59 first year undergraduate students taking Math 154 Calculus II course. A written test about integral, sequence and series…

  13. Examining the Association between Explicit Mathematics Instruction and Student Mathematics Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doabler, Christian T.; Baker, Scott K.; Kosty, Derek B.; Smolkowski, Keith; Clarke, Ben; Miller, Saralyn J.; Fien, Hank

    2015-01-01

    Explicit instruction is a systematic instructional approach that facilitates frequent and meaningful instructional interactions between teachers and students around critical academic content. This study examined the relationship between student mathematics outcomes and the rate and quality of explicit instructional interactions that occur during…

  14. Mutually Dependent Health Beliefs Associated with Breast Self-Examination in British Female University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, Kanayo; Jones, Leonnie

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Whereas research suggests young women's beliefs about breast cancer (susceptibility/severity) and its early detection (barriers/benefits) reliably distinguish breast self-examiners from nonexaminers, this study assessed whether these impressions are interreliant, especially in the context of familial risk. Participants: The sample…

  15. Association of Blood Pressure with Exposure to Lead and Cadmium: Analysis of Data from the 2008-2013 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung-Kook; Ahn, Jaeouk; Kim, Nam-Soo; Lee, Chan Boo; Park, Jungsun; Kim, Yangho

    2016-11-01

    We examined the association of blood pressure with blood levels of cadmium, lead, and their combination in a representative sample of adults from South Korea (Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008-2013). This cross-sectional study enrolled subjects who were at least 19 years-old, completed a health examination survey, and had blood measurements of lead and cadmium. We estimated the adjusted mean differences in diastolic and systolic blood pressure associated with doubling of blood lead and cadmium by regression of blood pressure against log2-transformed blood metals and their tertiles after covariate adjustment. Adjusted odds ratios for hypertension and prehypertension were calculated for log2-transformed blood levels of lead and cadmium and their tertiles. In the general population of Korea, blood lead level was associated with increased BP and risk of hypertension. Blood cadmium levels had a stronger association with elevated blood pressure and risk of hypertension than blood lead levels, and these associations remained significant after statistical adjustment for blood lead. The combination of blood lead and cadmium was more strongly associated with elevated blood pressure than exposure to each individual metal. In females, there was a stronger relationship between blood pressure and blood levels of these metals by analyzing interaction model. After adjustment for confounding factors, there were significant associations of blood pressure with the level of blood lead, cadmium, and their combination in adults from South Korea.

  16. An examination of the tripartite model of anxiety and depression and its application to youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, J; Ettelson, R

    2001-09-01

    The ability to differentiate anxiety and depression has been a topic of discussion in the adult and youth literatures for several decades. The tripartite model of anxiety and depression proposed by L. A. Clark and D. Watson (1991) has helped focus the discussion. In the tripartite model, anxiety is characterized by elevated levels of physiological hyperarousal (PH), depression is characterized by low levels of positive affect (PA), and negative affect (NA) or generalized emotional distress is common to both. The advent of the model led to the development of measures of tripartite constructs and subsequent validity studies. The tripartite model and resultant activity concerning the model was largely devoted to adult samples. However. those interested in anxiety and depression among youth are now incorporating the tripartite model in their work. This paper examines the current influence of the tripartite model in the youth literature, especially with regard to measuring anxiety and depression.

  17. The Trauma Outcome Process Assessment Model: A Structural Equation Model Examination of Adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borja, Susan E.; Callahan, Jennifer L.

    2009-01-01

    This investigation sought to operationalize a comprehensive theoretical model, the Trauma Outcome Process Assessment, and test it empirically with structural equation modeling. The Trauma Outcome Process Assessment reflects a robust body of research and incorporates known ecological factors (e.g., family dynamics, social support) to explain…

  18. Examining the relationship between affect and implicit associations: implications for risk perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohle, Simone; Keller, Carmen; Siegrist, Michael

    2010-07-01

    It has been suggested that affect may play an important role in risk perception. Slovic et al. argued that people make use of the "affect heuristic" when assessing risks because it is easier and more efficient to rely on spontaneous affective reactions than to analyze all available information. In the present studies, a single category implicit association test (SC-IAT) to measure associations evoked by different hazards was employed. In the first study, we tested the extent to which the SC-IAT corresponds to the theoretical construct of affect in a risk framework. Specifically, we found that the SC-IAT correlates with other explicit measures that claim to measure affect, as well as with a measure of trust, but not with a measure that captures a different construct (subjective knowledge). In the second study, we addressed the question of whether hazards that vary along the dread dimension of the psychometric paradigm also differ in the affect they evoke. The results of the SC-IAT indicated that a high-dread hazard (nuclear power) elicits negative associations. Moreover, the high-dread hazard evoked more negative associations than a medium-dread hazard (hydroelectric power). In contrast, a nondread hazard (home appliances) led to positive associations. The results of our study highlight the importance of affect in shaping attitudes and opinions toward risks. The results further suggest that implicit measures may provide valuable insight into people's risk perception above and beyond explicit measures.

  19. A model inter-comparison study to examine limiting factors in modelling Australian tropical savannas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Whitley

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Savanna ecosystems are one of the most dominant and complex terrestrial biomes that derives from a distinct vegetative surface comprised of co-dominant tree and grass populations. While these two vegetation types co-exist functionally, demographically they are not static, but are dynamically changing in response to environmental forces such as annual fire events and rainfall variability. Modelling savanna environments with the current generation of terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs has presented many problems, particularly describing fire frequency and intensity, phenology, leaf biochemistry of C3 and C4 photosynthesis vegetation, and root water uptake. In order to better understand why TBMs perform so poorly in savannas, we conducted a model inter-comparison of 6 TBMs and assessed their performance at simulating latent energy (LE and gross primary productivity (GPP for five savanna sites along a rainfall gradient in northern Australia. Performance in predicting LE and GPP was measured using an empirical benchmarking system, which ranks models by their ability to utilise meteorological driving information to predict the fluxes. On average, the TBMs performed as well as a multi-linear regression of the fluxes against solar radiation, temperature and vapour pressure deficit, but were outperformed by a more complicated nonlinear response model that also included the leaf area index (LAI. This identified that the TBMs are not fully utilising their input information effectively in determining savanna LE and GPP, and highlights that savanna dynamics cannot be calibrated into models and that there are problems in underlying model processes. We identified key weaknesses in a model's ability to simulate savanna fluxes and their seasonal variation, related to the representation of vegetation by the models and root water uptake. We underline these weaknesses in terms of three critical areas for development. First, prescribed tree-rooting depths must be

  20. A model inter-comparison study to examine limiting factors in modelling Australian tropical savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Rhys; Beringer, Jason; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Abramowitz, Gab; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Duursma, Remko; Evans, Bradley; Haverd, Vanessa; Li, Longhui; Ryu, Youngryel; Smith, Benjamin; Wang, Ying-Ping; Williams, Mathew; Yu, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    The savanna ecosystem is one of the most dominant and complex terrestrial biomes, deriving from a distinct vegetative surface comprised of co-dominant tree and grass populations. While these two vegetation types co-exist functionally, demographically they are not static but are dynamically changing in response to environmental forces such as annual fire events and rainfall variability. Modelling savanna environments with the current generation of terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) has presented many problems, particularly describing fire frequency and intensity, phenology, leaf biochemistry of C3 and C4 photosynthesis vegetation, and root-water uptake. In order to better understand why TBMs perform so poorly in savannas, we conducted a model inter-comparison of six TBMs and assessed their performance at simulating latent energy (LE) and gross primary productivity (GPP) for five savanna sites along a rainfall gradient in northern Australia. Performance in predicting LE and GPP was measured using an empirical benchmarking system, which ranks models by their ability to utilise meteorological driving information to predict the fluxes. On average, the TBMs performed as well as a multi-linear regression of the fluxes against solar radiation, temperature and vapour pressure deficit but were outperformed by a more complicated nonlinear response model that also included the leaf area index (LAI). This identified that the TBMs are not fully utilising their input information effectively in determining savanna LE and GPP and highlights that savanna dynamics cannot be calibrated into models and that there are problems in underlying model processes. We identified key weaknesses in a model's ability to simulate savanna fluxes and their seasonal variation, related to the representation of vegetation by the models and root-water uptake. We underline these weaknesses in terms of three critical areas for development. First, prescribed tree-rooting depths must be deep enough

  1. Examining the Support Peer Supporters Provide Using Structural Equation Modeling: Nondirective and Directive Support in Diabetes Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowitt, Sarah D; Ayala, Guadalupe X; Cherrington, Andrea L; Horton, Lucy A; Safford, Monika M; Soto, Sandra; Tang, Tricia S; Fisher, Edwin B

    2017-04-17

    Little research has examined the characteristics of peer support. Pertinent to such examination may be characteristics such as the distinction between nondirective support (accepting recipients' feelings and cooperative with their plans) and directive (prescribing "correct" choices and feelings). In a peer support program for individuals with diabetes, this study examined (a) whether the distinction between nondirective and directive support was reflected in participants' ratings of support provided by peer supporters and (b) how nondirective and directive support were related to depressive symptoms, diabetes distress, and Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Three hundred fourteen participants with type 2 diabetes provided data on depressive symptoms, diabetes distress, and HbA1c before and after a diabetes management intervention delivered by peer supporters. At post-intervention, participants reported how the support provided by peer supporters was nondirective or directive. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), correlation analyses, and structural equation modeling examined the relationships among reports of nondirective and directive support, depressive symptoms, diabetes distress, and measured HbA1c. CFA confirmed the factor structure distinguishing between nondirective and directive support in participants' reports of support delivered by peer supporters. Controlling for demographic factors, baseline clinical values, and site, structural equation models indicated that at post-intervention, participants' reports of nondirective support were significantly associated with lower, while reports of directive support were significantly associated with greater depressive symptoms, altogether (with control variables) accounting for 51% of the variance in depressive symptoms. Peer supporters' nondirective support was associated with lower, but directive support was associated with greater depressive symptoms.

  2. An examination of the impact of maladaptive coping on the association between stressor type and alcohol use in college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Isha W; Blevins, Claire; Calhoun, Casey D; Ritchwood, Tiarney D; Gilmore, Amanda K; Stewart, Regan; Bountress, Kaitlin E

    2017-07-14

    Examine the impact of maladaptive coping style on the association between source of stress (academic, interpersonal, intrapersonal, environmental) and alcohol use (consumption, heavy episodic drinking, driving under the influence) among college students. 1,027 college students completed an online survey in April 2014. To test the mediating effects of maladaptive coping on the association between academic stress and alcohol use variables, indirect effects were examined using the PROCESS analytical framework for SPSS. Maladaptive coping and academic stress were associated with alcohol use outcomes. Moreover, maladaptive coping mediated the relationship between academic stress and two of three alcohol use outcomes (consumption, heavy episodic drinking). Among college students, the association between academic stress and alcohol use may be driven by maladaptive coping. College students may benefit from interventions that seek to improve coping skills, potentially alleviating the burden of academic stress and decreasing problematic alcohol use.

  3. Examination of Modeling Languages to Allow Quantitative Analysis for Model-Based Systems Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    model of the system (Friendenthal, Moore and Steiner 2008, 17). The premise is that maintaining a logical and consistent model can be accomplished...Standard for Exchange of Product data (STEP) subgroup of ISO, and defines a standard data format for certain types of SE information ( Johnson 2006...search.credoreference.com/content/entry/encyccs/formal_languages/0. Friedenthal, Sanford, Alan Moore, and Rick Steiner . 2008. A Practical Guide to SysML

  4. The Association of Social Work Boards' Licensure Examinations: A Review of Reliability and Validity Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson, Stephen M.; DeAngelis, Donna; Mittal, Nisha

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this article is to create transparency for the psychometric methods employed for the development of the Association of Social Work Boards' (ASWB) exams. Results: The article includes an assessment of the macro (political) and micro (statistical) environments of testing social work competence. The seven-step process used…

  5. The Association of Social Work Boards' Licensure Examinations: A Review of Reliability and Validity Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson, Stephen M.; DeAngelis, Donna; Mittal, Nisha

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this article is to create transparency for the psychometric methods employed for the development of the Association of Social Work Boards' (ASWB) exams. Results: The article includes an assessment of the macro (political) and micro (statistical) environments of testing social work competence. The seven-step process used…

  6. Phase II Examination of Principal's Perceptions in Identifying Instructional Stages Associated with Teacher Output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMoulin, Donald F.; Guyton, John

    Research previous to this study suggested that the efficiency of teachers increases to a zenith and from there decreases to a degree of inefficiency. This research led to a hypothesis that teaching characteristics can be associated with career development stages. In phase I of this study (conducted in 1983) 145 principals from 2 midwestern states…

  7. Self-Association of N-Methylacetamide Examined by Infrared and NMR Spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Heather L.; Hui, KaWai

    2011-01-01

    These spectroscopic experiments investigate polarity and concentration effects on self-association behavior in N-methylacetamide. Inquiry can be limited to the concentration dependence of hydrogen bonding and estimation of dimerization constant (NMR studies) or to the effect of solvent polarity on extent of hydrogen bonding (IR studies). The…

  8. Self-Association of N-Methylacetamide Examined by Infrared and NMR Spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Heather L.; Hui, KaWai

    2011-01-01

    These spectroscopic experiments investigate polarity and concentration effects on self-association behavior in N-methylacetamide. Inquiry can be limited to the concentration dependence of hydrogen bonding and estimation of dimerization constant (NMR studies) or to the effect of solvent polarity on extent of hydrogen bonding (IR studies). The…

  9. Examining the Association between the "Imagination Library" Early Childhood Literacy Program and Kindergarten Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiei, Shahin; Bush, Andrew J.; Sell, Marie; Imig, Doug

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated participation in the "Imagination Library" early childhood literacy enrichment program and children's pre-literacy and pre-numeracy skills at kindergarten entry in an urban school district. Previous studies have demonstrated that program participation is associated with greater early childhood reading practices.…

  10. An Examination of the Association between Demographic and Educational Factors and African American Achievement in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottledge, Michael Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Objective of the Study: The objective of this research study was to investigate whether an association exists between teacher demographic factors (years of teaching experience and gender), 2 educational factors (certification type and certification pathway) and the percent passing rate of tenth grade African American male students on the 2010…

  11. Examining Associations among ADHD, Homework Behavior, and Reading Comprehension: A Twin Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Callie W.; Hart, Sara A.; Schatschneider, Christopher; Taylor, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    Previous literature has indicated an important association between reading comprehension and both attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and homework habits. This investigation sought to extend previous knowledge by providing information about how ADHD and homework behavior (i.e., completing homework regularly) may jointly influence…

  12. Exploring Narcissism, Psychopathy, and Machiavellianism in Youth: Examination of Associations with Antisocial Behavior and Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Katherine S. L.; Marsee, Monica A.

    2013-01-01

    We sought to explore the differential associations of callous-unemotional (CU) traits, narcissistic traits, and Machiavellian traits with overt aggression, relational aggression, delinquency, behavioral dysregulation, and emotional dysregulation in a community sample of boys and girls (ages 11-17). Results indicated that the three personality…

  13. Examining the causal association of fasting glucose with blood pressure in healthy children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goharian, T S; Andersen, Lars Bo; Franks, P W

    2015-01-01

    of this study could not support a causal association between FG and BP in healthy children and adolescents; however, it is possible that rs560887 has pleiotropic effects on unknown factors with a BP lowering effect or that these results were due to a lack of statistical power.Journal of Human Hypertension...

  14. Identifying an appropriate measurement modeling approach for the Mini-Mental State Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubright, Jonathan D; Nandakumar, Ratna; Karlawish, Jason

    2016-02-01

    The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) is a 30-item, dichotomously scored test of general cognition. A number of benefits could be gained by modeling the MMSE in an item response theory (IRT) framework, as opposed to the currently used classical additive approach. However, the test, which is built from groups of items related to separate cognitive subdomains, may violate a key assumption of IRT: local item independence. This study aimed to identify the most appropriate measurement model for the MMSE: a unidimensional IRT model, a testlet response theory model, or a bifactor model. Local dependence analysis using nationally representative data showed a meaningful violation of the local item independence assumption, indicating multidimensionality. In addition, the testlet and bifactor models displayed superior fit indices over a unidimensional IRT model. Statistical comparisons showed that the bifactor model fit MMSE respondent data significantly better than the other models considered. These results suggest that application of a traditional unidimensional IRT model is inappropriate in this context. Instead, a bifactor model is suggested for future modeling of MMSE data as it more accurately represents the multidimensional nature of the scale. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. A cross-sectional examination of school characteristics associated with overweight and obesity among grade 1 to 4 students

    OpenAIRE

    Leatherdale, Scott T

    2013-01-01

    Background Excessive weight gain among youth is an ongoing public health concern. Despite evidence linking both policies and the built environment to adolescent and adult overweight, the association between health policies or the built environment and overweight are often overlooked in research with children. The purpose of this study was to examine if school-based physical activity policies and the built environment surrounding a school are associated with weight status among children. Metho...

  16. Developing an Innovative Customer Relationship Management Model for Better Health Examination Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu JrJung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available People emphasize on their own health and wish to know more about their conditions. Chronic diseases now take up to 50 percent of top 10 causes of death. As a result, the health-care industry has emerged and kept thriving. This work adopts an innovative customer-oriented business model since most clients are proactive and spontaneous in taking the “distinguished” health examination programs. We adopt the soft system dynamics methodology (SSDM to develop and to evaluate the steps of introducing customer relationship management model into a case health examination organization. Quantitative results are also presented for a case physical examination center and to assess the improved efficiency. The case study shows that the procedures developed here could provide a better service.

  17. Developing a Customer Relationship Management Model for Better Health Examination Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu Jr-Jung

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available People emphasize on their own health and wish to know more about their conditions. Chronic diseases now take up to 50 percent of top 10 causes of death. As a result, the health-care industry has emerged and kept thriving. This work adopts a customer-oriented business model since most clients are proactive and spontaneous in taking the “distinguished” health examination programs. We adopt the soft system dynamics methodology (SSDM to develop and to evaluate the steps of introducing customer relationship management model into a case health examination organization. Quantitative results are also presented for a case physical examination center and to assess the improved efficiency. The case study shows that the procedures developed here could provide a better service.

  18. Examination of a lumbar spine biomechanical model for assessing axial compression, shear, and bending moment using selected Olympic lifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltoukhy, Moataz; Travascio, Francesco; Asfour, Shihab; Elmasry, Shady; Heredia-Vargas, Hector; Signorile, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Loading during concurrent bending and compression associated with deadlift, hang clean and hang snatch lifts carries the potential for injury to the intervertebral discs, muscles and ligaments. This study examined the capacity of a newly developed spinal model to compute shear and compressive forces, and bending moments in lumbar spine for each lift. Five male subjects participated in the study. The spine was modeled as a chain of rigid bodies (vertebrae) connected via the intervertebral discs. Each vertebral reference frame was centered in the center of mass of the vertebral body, and its principal directions were axial, anterior-posterior, and medial-lateral. The results demonstrated the capacity of this spinal model to assess forces and bending moments at and about the lumbar vertebrae by showing the variations among these variables with different lifting techniques. These results show the model's potential as a diagnostic tool.

  19. Using the Kaleidoscope Career Model to Examine Generational Differences in Work Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sherry E.; Forret, Monica L.; Carraher, Shawn M.; Mainiero, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine, utilising the Kaleidoscope Career Model, whether members of the Baby Boom generation and Generation X differ in their needs for authenticity, balance, and challenge. Design/methodology/approach: Survey data were obtained from 982 professionals located across the USA. Correlations, t-tests, and…

  20. Sport Education and Extracurricular Sport Participation: An Examination Using the Trans-Contextual Model of Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Tristan L.; Hagger, Martin; Smith, Derek T.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we used the trans-contextual model of motivation (TCM) to examine the effect of Sport Education (SE) on students' participation in a voluntary lunch recess sport club. A total of 192 participants (ages 9-14 years) completed measures of the TCM constructs before and after a 12-week SE intervention period. Participants had the…

  1. Educational productivity in higher education : An examination of part of the Walberg Educational Productivity Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, M.; Jansen, E. P. W. A.

    Several factors in the H. J. Walberg Educational Productivity Model, which assumes that 9 factors affect academic achievement, were examined with a limited sample of 1st-year students in the University of Groningen. Information concerning 8 of these factors - grades, motivation, age, prior

  2. Structure of Anxiety and Depression in Urban Youth: An Examination of the Tripartite Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Sharon F.; McCreary, Beth T.; Joiner, Thomas E.; Schmidt, Norman B.; Ialongo, Nicolas S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the validity of the tripartite model of anxiety and depression (L. A. Clark & D. Watson, 1991) in a community epidemiological sample of 467 urban African American youth. Participants completed the Baltimore How I Feel (N. S. Ialongo, S. G. Kellam, & J. Poduska, 1999), a measure of anxiety and depressive…

  3. Examining Factors Affecting Science Achievement of Hong Kong in PISA 2006 Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Terence Yuk Ping; Lau, Kwok Chi

    2014-01-01

    This study uses hierarchical linear modeling to examine the influence of a range of factors on the science performances of Hong Kong students in PISA 2006. Hong Kong has been consistently ranked highly in international science assessments, such as Programme for International Student Assessment and Trends in International Mathematics and Science…

  4. Sport Education and Extracurricular Sport Participation: An Examination Using the Trans-Contextual Model of Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallhead, Tristan L.; Hagger, Martin; Smith, Derek T.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we used the trans-contextual model of motivation (TCM) to examine the effect of Sport Education (SE) on students' participation in a voluntary lunch recess sport club. A total of 192 participants (ages 9-14 years) completed measures of the TCM constructs before and after a 12-week SE intervention period. Participants had the…

  5. Educational productivity in higher education : An examination of part of the Walberg Educational Productivity Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruinsma, M.; Jansen, E. P. W. A.

    2007-01-01

    Several factors in the H. J. Walberg Educational Productivity Model, which assumes that 9 factors affect academic achievement, were examined with a limited sample of 1st-year students in the University of Groningen. Information concerning 8 of these factors - grades, motivation, age, prior achieveme

  6. An Examination of Family Communication within the Core and Balance Model of Family Leisure Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin M.; Freeman, Patti A.; Zabriskie, Ramon B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine family communication within the core and balance model of family leisure functioning. The study was conducted from a youth perspective of family leisure and family functioning. The sample consisted of youth (N= 95) aged 11 - 17 from 25 different states in the United States. Path analyses indicated that…

  7. Using the Kaleidoscope Career Model to Examine Generational Differences in Work Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Sherry E.; Forret, Monica L.; Carraher, Shawn M.; Mainiero, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine, utilising the Kaleidoscope Career Model, whether members of the Baby Boom generation and Generation X differ in their needs for authenticity, balance, and challenge. Design/methodology/approach: Survey data were obtained from 982 professionals located across the USA. Correlations, t-tests, and…

  8. Examining the associations between DSM-5 section III antisocial personality disorder traits and psychopathy in community and university samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Jaime L; Sellbom, Martin; Wygant, Dustin B; Salekin, Randall T; Krueger, Robert F

    2014-10-01

    The current investigation examined the associations between personality traits representing DSM-5 Section III Antisocial Personality Disorder (ASPD), its psychopathy specifier, and contemporary models of psychopathic personality disorder. We used two samples consisting of university students (n = 463) and community-dwelling participants (n = 148) recruited for subclinical psychopathic proclivities. Both samples were administered the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (Krueger et al., 2012), Triarchic Psychopathy Measure (Patrick, 2010), and versions of the Psychopathic Personality Inventory (PPI; Lilienfeld & Widows, 2005). University students also completed the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Disorders-Personality Questionnaire (First, Gibbon, Spitzer, Williams, & Benjamin, 1997). Across both samples, the Section III ASPD traits were moderately strongly correlated with psychopathy measures, except the fearless-dominance/boldness domain. However, as would be expected, traits representing the Section III psychopathy specifier accounted for a substantial amount of variance within this domain. Furthermore, additional DSM-5 Section III personality traits augmented the characterization of psychopathy from the PPI and Triarchic perspectives.

  9. Examining the association of olmesartan and other angiotensin receptor blockers with overall and cause-specific mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jou-Wei; Chang, Chia-Hsuin; Caffrey, James L; Wu, Li-Chiu; Lai, Mei-Shu

    2014-05-01

    Concerns about an increased cardiovascular risk with the angiotensin receptor blocker, olmesartan, prompted the current study to examine associations between olmesartan and other angiotensin receptor blockers with overall and cause-specific mortalities. We collected patients who started to use losartan, valsartan, irbesartan, candesartan, telmisartan, and olmesartan between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2009, from Taiwan's National Health Insurance claims database. Prescribed drug types, dosage, and other clinical information were collected. Overall mortality and cause-specific mortality were ascertained through linkages with Taiwan's National Death Registry. Two follow-up analyses, labeled intention-to-treat and as-treated, were conducted. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) using losartan as the reference group. A total of 690 463 subjects were included, with a mean follow-up ranging from a low of 2.8 years for olmesartan to a high of 4.1 years for irbesartan. Subjects who began with valsartan had a modest but significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.06) compared with losartan. Irbesartan (HR, 0.96; 95% CI, 0.94-0.99), candesartan (HR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.99), telmisartan (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.90-0.96), and olmesartan (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.88-0.97) were associated with a slightly lower overall mortality risk than losartan. The analysis indicates that the differences in mortality risk among individual angiotensin receptor blockers were only marginal and thus less likely to be clinically important. Although uncontrolled confounding might still exist, olmesartan does not seem to increase cardiovascular risk compared with losartan.

  10. Examining brain structures associated with dispositional envy and the mediation role of emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yanhui; Zhao, Sasa; Wang, Hanlin; Wu, Qihan; Kong, Feng; Mo, Lei

    2017-02-08

    Dispositional envy is distinguished by definition and neurally from episodic envy. While the neural correlates of episodic envy have been evaluated by specific tasks in previous studies, little is known about the structural neural basis of dispositional envy. In this study, we investigated the structural neural basis of dispositional envy underlying individual differences across two independent samples comprising a total of 100 young healthy adults. Firstly, 73 subjects' data (sample 1) was analyzed, and we assessed the association between regional gray matter volume (rGMV) and dispositional envy using voxel-based morphometry (VBM). Furthermore, we explored the role of emotional intelligence in the association between GMV and dispositional envy. VBM indicated that dispositional envy was positively correlated with GMV in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and superior temporal gyrus (STG). We also found that emotional intelligence partially mediated the association between DLPFC volume and dispositional envy. These results were replicated in another independent sample (Sample 2, n = 27). These results provide the first evidence that dispositional envy exhibits a structural neural correlation with the DLPFC and STG, and give a neutral explanation for why individuals with high emotional intelligence exhibit less envy.

  11. Examining Human Behavior in Video Games: The Development of a Computational Model to Measure Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Richard; Annetta, Leonard; Hoston, Douglas; Shapiro, Marina; Matthews, Benjamin

    2017-04-11

    Video games with violent content have raised considerable concern in popular media and within academia. Recently, there has been considerable attention regarding the claim of the relationship between aggression and video game play. The authors of this study propose the use of a new class of tools developed via computational models to allow examination of the question; is there is a relationship between violent video games and aggression. The purpose of this study is to computationally model and compare the General Aggression Model with the Diathesis Mode of Aggression related to the play of violent content in video games. A secondary purpose is to provide a method of measuring and examining individual aggression arising from video game play. Total participants examined for this study are N=1065. This study occurs in three phases. Phase 1 is the development and quantification of the profile combination of traits via latent class profile analysis. Phase 2 is the training of the artificial neural network. Phase 3 is the comparison of each model as a computational model with and without the presence of video game violence. Results suggest that a combination of environmental factors and genetic predispositions trigger aggression related to video games.

  12. National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement: Preparticipation physical examinations and disqualifying conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Kevin M; Bolin, Delmas J; Carek, Peter J; Konin, Jeff G; Neal, Timothy L; Violette, Danielle

    2014-01-01

    To present athletic trainers with recommendations for the content and administration of the preparticipation physical examination (PPE) as well as considerations for determining safe participation in sports and identifying disqualifying conditions. Preparticipation physical examinations have been used routinely for nearly 40 years. However, considerable debate exists as to their efficacy due to the lack of standardization in the process and the lack of conformity in the information that is gathered. With the continuing rise in sports participation at all levels and the growing number of reported cases of sudden death in organized athletics, the sports medicine community should consider adopting a standardized process for conducting the PPE to protect all parties. Recommendations are provided to equip the sports medicine community with the tools necessary to conduct the PPE as effectively and efficiently as possible using available scientific evidence and best practices. In addition, the recommendations will help clinicians identify those conditions that may threaten the health and safety of participants in organized sports, may require further evaluation and intervention, or may result in potential disqualification.

  13. The Application of Strength of Association Statistics to the Item Analysis of an In-Training Examination in Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, James J.; McCormick, Janet

    1986-01-01

    Using item responses from an in-training examination in diagnostic radiology, the application of a strength of association statistic to the general problem of item analysis is illustrated. Criteria for item selection, general issues of reliability, and error of measurement are discussed. (Author/LMO)

  14. An Indirect Examination of the Function of Problem Behavior Associated with Fragile X Syndrome and Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langthorne, Paul; McGill, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) and Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) are associated with a number of specific topographies of problem behavior. Very few studies have examined the function served by problem behavior in these groups. Using the Questions About Behavioral Function scale Matson and Vollmer (User's guide: questions about behavioral function…

  15. The Application of Strength of Association Statistics to the Item Analysis of an In-Training Examination in Diagnostic Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, James J.; McCormick, Janet

    1986-01-01

    Using item responses from an in-training examination in diagnostic radiology, the application of a strength of association statistic to the general problem of item analysis is illustrated. Criteria for item selection, general issues of reliability, and error of measurement are discussed. (Author/LMO)

  16. Examination of the Nonlinear Dynamic Systems Associated with Science Student Cognition While Engaging in Science Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Richard; Cavagnetto, Andy; Akmal, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    A critical problem with the examination of learning in education is that there is an underlying assumption that the dynamic systems associated with student information processing can be measured using static linear assessments. This static linear approach does not provide sufficient ability to characterize learning. Much of the modern research…

  17. Adolescent Peer Victimization, Peer Status, Suicidal Ideation, and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury Examining Concurrent and Longitudinal Associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heilbron, N.; Prinstein, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined concurrent and longitudinal associations among peer victimization, peer status, and self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (i.e., suicidal ideation and nonsuicidal self-injury [NSSI]) over a 2-year period. A community sample of 493 adolescents (51% girls) in Grades 6-8 participate

  18. Adolescent Peer Victimization, Peer Status, Suicidal Ideation, and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: Examining Concurrent and Longitudinal Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbron, Nicole; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined concurrent and longitudinal associations among peer victimization, peer status, and self-injurious thoughts and behaviors (i.e., suicidal ideation and nonsuicidal self-injury [NSSI]) over a 2-year period. A community sample of 493 adolescents (51% girls) in Grades 6-8 participated in the study. Participants completed measures…

  19. An examination of the relationship between hotspots and recombination associated with chromosome 21 nondisjunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany Renee Oliver

    Full Text Available Trisomy 21, resulting in Down Syndrome (DS, is the most common autosomal trisomy among live-born infants and is caused mainly by nondisjunction of chromosome 21 within oocytes. Risk factors for nondisjunction depend on the parental origin and type of meiotic error. For errors in the oocyte, increased maternal age and altered patterns of recombination are highly associated with nondisjunction. Studies of normal meiotic events in humans have shown that recombination clusters in regions referred to as hotspots. In addition, GC content, CpG fraction, Poly(A/Poly(T fraction and gene density have been found to be significant predictors of the placement of sex-averaged recombination in the human genome. These observations led us to ask whether the altered patterns of recombination associated with maternal nondisjunction of chromosome 21 could be explained by differences in the relationship between recombination placement and recombination-related genomic features (i.e., GC content, CpG fraction, Poly(A/Poly(T fraction or gene density on 21q or differential hot-spot usage along the nondisjoined chromosome 21. We found several significant associations between our genomic features of interest and recombination, interestingly, these results were not consistent among recombination types (single and double proximal or distal events. We also found statistically significant relationships between the frequency of hotspots and the distribution of recombination along nondisjoined chromosomes. Collectively, these findings suggest that factors that affect the accessibility of a specific chromosome region to recombination may be altered in at least a proportion of oocytes with MI and MII errors.

  20. A case-control study examining association between infectious agents and acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunanda N Shrikhande

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary heart disease is multi-factorial in origin and its burden is expected to rise in developing countries, including India. Evidence suggests that the inflammation caused by infection is associated with the development of atherosclerosis and heart disease. An increasing number of clinical and experimental studies point to a contribution of various infectious organisms to the development of atherosclerosis in humans. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI is associated with atherosclerosis. Objectives: The objective of the following study is to study the association between Helicobacter pylori, Chlamydia pneumoniae and C-reactive protein (CRP with AMI. Materials and Methods: This group-matched case-control study was carried out in Government Medical College, Nagpur, Maharashtra, India. The study compared the risk of occurrence of AMI (outcome if subjects were ever-infected with H. pylori or C. pneumoniae; and their CRP positivity (exposure. Incident cases of myocardial infarctions in a tertiary care hospital were included as cases. Results: The study recruited 265 cases and 265 controls and detected an odds ratio (OR of 2.50 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.69-3.70 and an OR of 2.50 (95% CI: 1.71-3.65 for C. pneumoniae and H. pylori, respectively. Raised CRP levels had an OR of 3.85 (95% CI: 2.54-5.87. Conclusion: Although our study indicates the role of infections in the etiology of AMI in study population, the relative public health impact of these agents in the overall prevalence of AMI needs urgent research attention.

  1. Discrete Event Simulation Models for CT Examination Queuing in West China Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Li; Liu, Hangjiang; Liao, Huchang; Tang, Shijun; Shi, Yingkang; Guo, Huili

    2016-01-01

    In CT examination, the emergency patients (EPs) have highest priorities in the queuing system and thus the general patients (GPs) have to wait for a long time. This leads to a low degree of satisfaction of the whole patients. The aim of this study is to improve the patients' satisfaction by designing new queuing strategies for CT examination. We divide the EPs into urgent type and emergency type and then design two queuing strategies: one is that the urgent patients (UPs) wedge into the GPs' queue with fixed interval (fixed priority model) and the other is that the patients have dynamic priorities for queuing (dynamic priority model). Based on the data from Radiology Information Database (RID) of West China Hospital (WCH), we develop some discrete event simulation models for CT examination according to the designed strategies. We compare the performance of different strategies on the basis of the simulation results. The strategy that patients have dynamic priorities for queuing makes the waiting time of GPs decrease by 13 minutes and the degree of satisfaction increase by 40.6%. We design a more reasonable CT examination queuing strategy to decrease patients' waiting time and increase their satisfaction degrees.

  2. Examining temptation to drink from an existential perspective: Associations among temptation, purpose in life, and drinking outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Corey R; Kirouac, Megan; Pearson, Matthew R; Fink, Brandi C; Witkiewitz, Katie

    2015-09-01

    Temptation to drink (TTD), defined as the degree to which one feels compelled to drink in the presence of internal or external alcohol-related cues, has been shown to predict alcohol-treatment outcomes among individuals with alcohol-use disorders (AUDs). Research examining TTD from an existential perspective is lacking and little is known about how existential issues such as purpose in life (PIL) relate to TTD, which is surprising given the role of existential issues in many treatments and mutual help approaches for AUDs. In the current study, we examined the longitudinal associations in a sample of 1726 among TTD, PIL, and drinking outcomes using data from Project MATCH (1997, 1998). Parallel process latent growth curve analyses indicated that PIL and TTD were significantly associated across time, such that higher initial levels of PIL and increases in PIL over time were associated with lower initial levels of TTD and decreases in TTD over time. Higher initial levels of TTD, lower initial levels of PIL, increases in TTD, and decreases in PIL were significantly associated with greater intensity and frequency of drinking and greater drinking-related consequences at the 15-month follow-up. Accordingly, TTD and PIL may be important constructs for clinicians to consider throughout the course of treatment. Future studies should examine if and how various kinds of treatments for AUDs are associated with increases in PIL, and whether these increases are related to decreased TTD and reduced drinking. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Animal Models of Colitis-Associated Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manasa Kanneganti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is a group of chronic inflammatory disorders that affect individuals throughout life. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of IBD are largely unknown, studies with animal models of colitis indicate that dysregulation of host/microbial interactions are requisite for the development of IBD. Patients with long-standing IBD have an increased risk for developing colitis-associated cancer (CAC, especially 10 years after the initial diagnosis of colitis, although the absolute number of CAC cases is relatively small. The cancer risk seems to be not directly related to disease activity, but is related to disease duration/extent, complication of primary sclerosing cholangitis, and family history of colon cancer. In particular, high levels and continuous production of inflammatory mediators, including cytokines and chemokines, by colonic epithelial cells (CECs and immune cells in lamina propria may be strongly associated with the pathogenesis of CAC. In this article, we have summarized animal models of CAC and have reviewed the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlining the development of carcinogenic changes in CECs secondary to the chronic inflammatory conditions in the intestine. It may provide us some clues in developing a new class of therapeutic agents for the treatment of IBD and CAC in the near future.

  4. Predictors of breast self - examination among female teachers in Ethiopia using health belief model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birhane, Negussie; Mamo, Abebe; Girma, Eshetu; Asfaw, Shifera

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is by far the most frequent cancer of women. It is the second leading cause of death in women worldwide. Approximately one out of eight women develops breast cancer all over the world. Majority of cases of cancer of the breast are detected by women themselves, stressing the importance of breast self-examination. The main objective of this study was to assess predictors of breast self-examination among female teachers in Kafa Zone, South West part of Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted among randomly selected 315 female teachers. Self administered a structured questionnaire including socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge about breast cancer and perception of teachers on breast self examination using the Champion's revised Health Belief Model sub scales used as data collection instrument. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to identify independent predictors of breast self -examination performance. Three hundred and fifteen female teachers were participated in this study. Their mean age was 33 SD [±7] years. Only 52 (16.5 %) participants ever heard about breast self examination and from those who heard about breast self examination 38 (73.07 %) of them ever performed breast self examination. After controlling for possible confounding factors, the result showed that knowledge towards breast self examination, perceived susceptibility, perceived severity and the net perceived benefit were found to be the major predictors of breast self examination. This study revealed that breast self examination performance among female teachers was very low. Therefore, behavior change communication and interventions that emphasize different domains that increase the perceived threat to breast cancer as well as on the benefits of breast self-examination to increase the perception of the teachers in an integrated manner may be the most effective strategies that should be considered by the health offices and educational offices. These

  5. The Association of Polar Faculae with Polar Magnetic Patches Examined with Hinode Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Kaithakkal, Anjali John; Kubo, M; Shiota, D; Tsuneta, S

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic properties of the Sun's polar faculae are investigated with spectropolarimetric observations of the north polar region obtained by the Hinode satellite in 2007 September. Polar faculae are embedded in nearly all magnetic patches with fluxes greater than $10^{18}$ Mx, while magnetic patches without polar faculae dominate in the flux range below $10^{18}$ Mx. The faculae are considerably smaller than their parent patches, and single magnetic patches contain single or multiple faculae. The faculae in general have higher intrinsic magnetic field strengths than the surrounding regions within their parent patches. Less than 20% of the total magnetic flux contributed by the large (${\\ge}10^{18}$ Mx) concentrations, which are known to be modulated by the solar cycle, is accounted for by the associated polar faculae.

  6. Examining Mechanisms Underlying Fear-Control in the Extended Parallel Process Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Brian L; LaVoie, Nicole R; Reynolds-Tylus, Tobias; Martinez-Gonzalez, Andrea; Skurka, Chris

    2017-01-17

    This investigation sought to advance the extended parallel process model in important ways by testing associations among the strengths of efficacy and threat appeals with fear as well as two outcomes of fear-control processing, psychological reactance and message minimization. Within the context of print ads admonishing against noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) and the fictitious Trepidosis virus, partial support was found for the additive model with no support for the multiplicative model. High efficacy appeals mitigated freedom threat perceptions across both contexts. Fear was positively associated with both freedom threat perceptions within the NIHL context and favorable attitudes for both NIHL and Trepidosis virus contexts. In line with psychological reactance theory, a freedom threat was positively associated with psychological reactance. Reactance, in turn, was positively associated with message minimization. The models supported reactance preceding message minimization across both message contexts. Both the theoretical and practical implications are discussed with an emphasis on future research opportunities within the fear-appeal literature.

  7. Hierarchical multiple informants models: examining food environment contributions to the childhood obesity epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jonggyu; Sánchez, Brisa N; Sanchez-Vaznaugh, Emma V

    2014-02-20

    Methods for multiple informants help to estimate the marginal effect of each multiple source predictor and formally compare the strength of their association with an outcome. We extend multiple informant methods to the case of hierarchical data structures to account for within cluster correlation. We apply the proposed method to examine the relationship between features of the food environment near schools and children's body mass index z-scores (BMIz). Specifically, we compare the associations between two different features of the food environment (fast food restaurants and convenience stores) with BMIz and investigate how the association between the number of fast food restaurants or convenience stores and child's BMIz varies across distance from a school. The newly developed methodology enhances the types of research questions that can be asked by investigators studying effects of environment on childhood obesity and can be applied to other fields.

  8. Examination of type IV pilus expression and pilus-associated phenotypes in Kingella kingae clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Porsch, Eric A; Yagupsky, Pablo; Grass, Elizabeth A; Obert, Caroline; Benjamin, Daniel K; St Geme, Joseph W

    2010-04-01

    Kingella kingae is a gram-negative bacterium that is being recognized increasingly as a cause of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in young children. Previous work established that K. kingae expresses type IV pili that mediate adherence to respiratory epithelial and synovial cells. PilA1 is the major pilus subunit in K. kingae type IV pili and is essential for pilus assembly. To develop a better understanding of the role of K. kingae type IV pili during colonization and invasive disease, we examined a collection of clinical isolates for pilus expression and in vitro adherence. In addition, in a subset of isolates we performed nucleotide sequencing to assess the level of conservation of PilA1. The majority of respiratory and nonendocarditis blood isolates were piliated, while the majority of joint fluid, bone, and endocarditis blood isolates were nonpiliated. The piliated isolates formed either spreading/corroding or nonspreading/noncorroding colonies and were uniformly adherent, while the nonpiliated isolates formed domed colonies and were nonadherent. PilA1 sequence varied significantly from strain to strain, resulting in substantial variability in antibody reactivity. These results suggest that type IV pili may confer a selective advantage on K. kingae early in infection and a selective disadvantage on K. kingae at later stages in the pathogenic process. We speculate that PilA1 is immunogenic during natural infection and undergoes antigenic variation to escape the immune response.

  9. Examination of Type IV Pilus Expression and Pilus-Associated Phenotypes in Kingella kingae Clinical Isolates▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl-Fie, Thomas E.; Porsch, Eric A.; Yagupsky, Pablo; Grass, Elizabeth A.; Obert, Caroline; Benjamin, Daniel K.; St. Geme, Joseph W.

    2010-01-01

    Kingella kingae is a gram-negative bacterium that is being recognized increasingly as a cause of septic arthritis and osteomyelitis in young children. Previous work established that K. kingae expresses type IV pili that mediate adherence to respiratory epithelial and synovial cells. PilA1 is the major pilus subunit in K. kingae type IV pili and is essential for pilus assembly. To develop a better understanding of the role of K. kingae type IV pili during colonization and invasive disease, we examined a collection of clinical isolates for pilus expression and in vitro adherence. In addition, in a subset of isolates we performed nucleotide sequencing to assess the level of conservation of PilA1. The majority of respiratory and nonendocarditis blood isolates were piliated, while the majority of joint fluid, bone, and endocarditis blood isolates were nonpiliated. The piliated isolates formed either spreading/corroding or nonspreading/noncorroding colonies and were uniformly adherent, while the nonpiliated isolates formed domed colonies and were nonadherent. PilA1 sequence varied significantly from strain to strain, resulting in substantial variability in antibody reactivity. These results suggest that type IV pili may confer a selective advantage on K. kingae early in infection and a selective disadvantage on K. kingae at later stages in the pathogenic process. We speculate that PilA1 is immunogenic during natural infection and undergoes antigenic variation to escape the immune response. PMID:20145101

  10. Evaluation of a skin self examination attitude scale using an item response theory model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaja, Ngadiman; Youl, Pip; Aitken, Joanne; Janda, Monika

    2014-12-24

    The Skin Self-Examination Attitude Scale (SSEAS) is a brief measure that allows for the assessment of attitudes in relation to skin self-examination. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the SSEAS using Item Response Theory (IRT) methods in a large sample of men ≥ 50 years in Queensland, Australia. A sample of 831 men (420 intervention and 411 control) completed a telephone assessment at the 13-month follow-up of a randomized-controlled trial of a video-based intervention to improve skin self-examination (SSE) behaviour. Descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation, item-total correlations, and Cronbach's alpha) were compiled and difficulty parameters were computed with Winsteps using the polytomous Rasch Rating Scale Model (RRSM). An item person (Wright) map of the SSEAS was examined for content coverage and item targeting. The SSEAS have good psychometric properties including good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.80), fit with the model and no evidence for differential item functioning (DIF) due to experimental trial grouping was detected. The present study confirms the SSEA scale as a brief, useful and reliable tool for assessing attitudes towards skin self-examination in a population of men 50 years or older in Queensland, Australia. The 8-item scale shows unidimensionality, allowing levels of SSE attitude, and the item difficulties, to be ranked on a single continuous scale. In terms of clinical practice, it is very important to assess skin cancer self-examination attitude to identify people who may need a more extensive intervention to allow early detection of skin cancer.

  11. An Examination of Personality Traits Associated with Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredborg, Beverley; Clark, Jim; Smith, Stephen D.

    2017-01-01

    Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response (ASMR) is a perceptual condition in which the presentation of particular audio-visual stimuli triggers intense, pleasurable tingling sensations in the head and neck regions, which may spread to the periphery of the body. These triggering stimuli are often socially intimate in nature, and usually involve repetition of movements and/or sounds (e.g., hearing whispering, watching someone brush her hair). Reports of ASMR experiences first appeared in online communities in 2010; since this time, these communities have expanded, with some groups consisting of over 100,000 members. However, despite the apparent prevalence of ASMR, there is currently no research on the personality characteristics that co-occur with this condition. In the current study, 290 individuals with ASMR and 290 matched controls completed the Big Five Personality Inventory (BFI; John et al., 1991); participants with ASMR also completed a questionnaire related to their ASMR phenomenology. Individuals with ASMR demonstrated significantly higher scores on Openness-to-Experience and Neuroticism, and significantly lower levels of Conscientiousness, Extraversion, and Agreeableness compared to matched controls. Further, ratings of subjective ASMR intensity in response to 14 common ASMR stimuli were positively correlated with the Openness-to-Experience and Neuroticism dimensions of the BFI. These results provide preliminary evidence that ASMR is associated with specific personality traits and suggest avenues for further investigation. PMID:28280478

  12. An examination of the proteolytic activity for bovine pregnancy-associated glycoproteins 2 and 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telugu, Bhanu Prakash V L; Palmier, Mark O; Van Doren, Steven R; Green, Jonathan A

    2010-01-01

    The pregnancy-associated glycoproteins (PAGs) represent a complex group of putative aspartic peptidases expressed exclusively in the placentas of species in the Artiodactyla order. The ruminant PAGs segregate into two classes: the 'ancient' and 'modern' PAGs. Some of the modern PAGs possess alterations in the catalytic center that are predicted to preclude their ability to act as peptidases. The ancient ruminant PAGs in contrast are thought to be peptidases, although no proteolytic activity has been described for these members. The aim of the present study was to investigate (1) if the ancient bovine PAGs (PAG-2 and PAG-12) have proteolytic activity, and (2) if there are any differences in activity between these two closely related members. Recombinant bovine PAG-2 and PAG-12 were expressed in a baculovirus expression system and the purified proteins were analyzed for proteolytic activity against a synthetic fluorescent cathepsin D/E substrate. Both proteins exhibited proteolytic activity with acidic pH optima. The k(cat)/K(m) for bovine PAG-2 was 2.7x10(5) m(-1) s(-1) and for boPAG-12 it was 6.8x10(4) m(-1) s(-1). The enzymes were inhibited by pepstatin A with a K(i) of 0.56 and 7.5 nm for boPAG-2 and boPAG-12, respectively. This is the first report describing proteolytic activity in PAGs from ruminant ungulates.

  13. White Matter Abnormalities and Animal Models Examining a Putative Role of Altered White Matter in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyun Xu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder affecting about 1% of the population worldwide. Although the dopamine (DA hypothesis is still keeping a dominant position in schizophrenia research, new advances have been emerging in recent years, which suggest the implication of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. In this paper, we will briefly review some of recent human studies showing white matter abnormalities in schizophrenic brains and altered oligodendrocyte-(OL- and myelin-related genes in patients with schizophrenia and will consider abnormal behaviors reported in patients with white matter diseases. Following these, we will selectively introduce some animal models examining a putative role of white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia. The emphasis will be put on the cuprizone (CPZ model. CPZ-fed mice show demyelination and OLs loss, display schizophrenia-related behaviors, and have higher DA levels in the prefrontal cortex. These features suggest that the CPZ model is a novel animal model of schizophrenia.

  14. Cross-cultural examination of the tripartite model with children: data from the Barretstown studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, G; Laurent, J; Joiner, T E; Catanzaro, S J; MacLachlan, M

    2001-10-01

    The Positive and Negative Affect Scale for Children (PANAS-C) and the Physiological Hyperarousal Scale for Children (PH-C) were administered to a group of 240 children from European countries to determine their utility in examining the tripartite model of anxiety and depression in a cross-cultural sample. Most of the children (n = 196) had been diagnosed with a medical illness; the remainder were siblings of these youngsters (n = 44). Only slight variations were noted in items between this sample and samples from the United States. Despite these minor differences, 3 distinct scales measuring the positive affect, negative affect, and physiological hyperarousal constructs of the tripartite model were identified. These findings illustrate that the PH-PANAS-C provides a useful measure of the tripartite model in a cross-cultural sample of youth. The findings also demonstrate that the tripartite model is generalizable to a cross-cultural milieu.

  15. Examining the dimensional structure models of secondary traumatic stress based on DSM-5 symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordeno, Imelu G; Go, Geraldine P; Yangson-Serondo, April

    2017-02-01

    Latent factor structure of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) has been examined using Diagnostic Statistic Manual-IV (DSM-IV)'s Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) nomenclature. With the advent of Diagnostic Statistic Manual-5 (DSM-5), there is an impending need to reexamine STS using DSM-5 symptoms in light of the most updated PTSD models in the literature. The study investigated and determined the best fitted PTSD models using DSM-5 PTSD criteria symptoms. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to examine model fit using the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale in 241 registered and practicing Filipino nurses (166 females and 75 males) who worked in the Philippines and gave direct nursing services to patients. Based on multiple fit indices, the results showed the 7-factor hybrid model, comprising of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behavior, anxious arousal, and dysphoric arousal factors has excellent fit to STS. This model asserts that: (1) hyperarousal criterion needs to be divided into anxious and dysphoric arousal factors; (2) symptoms characterizing negative and positive affect need to be separated to two separate factors, and; (3) a new factor would categorize externalized, self-initiated impulse and control-deficit behaviors. Comparison of nested and non-nested models showed Hybrid model to have superior fit over other models. The specificity of the symptom structure of STS based on DSM-5 PTSD criteria suggests having more specific interventions addressing the more elaborate symptom-groupings that would alleviate the condition of nurses exposed to STS on a daily basis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A theoretical model for the associative nature of conference participation

    CERN Document Server

    Smiljanić, Jelena; Kauppinen, Tomi; Dankulov, Marija Mitrović

    2015-01-01

    Participation in conferences is an important part of every scientific career. Conferences provide an opportunity for a fast dissemination of latest results, discussion and exchange of ideas, and broadening of scientists' collaboration network. The decision to participate in a conference depends on several factors like the location, cost, popularity of keynote speakers, and the scientists' association with the community. Here we discuss and formulate the problem of discovering how a scientists' previous participation affects her/his future participations in the same conference series. We develop a stochastic model to examine scientists' participation patterns in conferences and compare our model with data from six conferences across various scientific fields and communities. Our model shows that the probability for a scientist to participate in a given conference series strongly depends on the balance between the number of participations and non-participations during his/her early connections with the communit...

  17. An examination of the cross-cultural validity of the Identity Capital Model: American and Japanese students compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, James E; Mizokami, Shinichi; Roberts, Sharon E; Nakama, Reiko

    2016-01-01

    The Identity Capital Model proposes that forms of personal agency are associated with identity development as part of the transition to adulthood. This model was examined in two cultural contexts, taking into account age and gender, among college and university students aged 18 to 24 (N = 995). Confirmatory Factor Analyses verified cultural, age, and gender invariance of the two key operationalizations of the model. A Structural Equation Model path analysis confirmed that the model applies in both cultures with minor variations-types of personal agency are associated with the formation of adult- and societal-identities as part of the resolution of the identity stage. It was concluded that forms of personal agency providing the most effective ways of dealing with "individualization" (e.g., internal locus of control) are more important in the transition to adulthood among American students, whereas types of personal agency most effective in dealing with "individualistic collectivism" (e.g., ego strength) are more important among Japanese students.

  18. Utilizing interview and self-report assessment of the Five-Factor Model to examine convergence with the alternative model for personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helle, Ashley C; Trull, Timothy J; Widiger, Thomas A; Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N

    2017-07-01

    An alternative model for personality disorders is included in Section III (Emerging Models and Measures) of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, (5th ed.; DSM-5). The DSM-5 dimensional trait model is an extension of the Five-Factor Model (FFM; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). The Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) assesses the 5 domains and 25 traits in the alternative model. The current study expands on recent research to examine the relationship of the PID-5 with an interview measure of the FFM. The Structured Interview for the Five Factor Model of Personality (SIFFM) assesses the 5 bipolar domains and 30 facets of the FFM. Research has indicated that the SIFFM captures maladaptive aspects of personality (as well as adaptive). The SIFFM, NEO PI-R, and PID-5 were administered to participants to examine their respective convergent and discriminant validity. Results provide evidence for the convergence of the 2 models using self-report and interview measures of the FFM. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed, particularly a call for the development of a structured interview for the assessment of the DSM-5 dimensional trait model. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Collapsing Factors in Multitrait-Multimethod Models: Examining Consequences of a Mismatch Between Measurement Design and Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eGeiser

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Models of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA are frequently applied to examine the convergent validity of scores obtained from multiple raters or methods in so-called multitrait-multimethod (MTMM investigations. Many applications of CFA-MTMM and similarly structured models result in solutions in which at least one method (or specific factor shows non-significant loading or variance estimates. Eid et al. (2008 distinguished between MTMM measurement designs with interchangeable (randomly selected versus structurally different (fixed methods and showed that each type of measurement design implies specific CFA-MTMM measurement models. In the current study, we hypothesized that some of the problems that are commonly seen in applications of CFA-MTMM models may be due to a mismatch between the underlying measurement design and fitted models. Using simulations, we found that models with M method factors (where M is the total number of methods and unconstrained loadings led to a higher proportion of solutions in which at least one method factor became empirically unstable when these models were fit to data generated from structurally different methods. The simulations also revealed that commonly used model goodness-of-fit criteria frequently failed to identify incorrectly specified CFA-MTMM models. We discuss implications of these findings for other complex CFA models in which similar issues occur, including nested (bifactor and latent state-trait models.

  20. Collapsing factors in multitrait-multimethod models: examining consequences of a mismatch between measurement design and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Christian; Bishop, Jacob; Lockhart, Ginger

    2015-01-01

    Models of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) are frequently applied to examine the convergent validity of scores obtained from multiple raters or methods in so-called multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) investigations. Many applications of CFA-MTMM and similarly structured models result in solutions in which at least one method (or specific) factor shows non-significant loading or variance estimates. Eid et al. (2008) distinguished between MTMM measurement designs with interchangeable (randomly selected) vs. structurally different (fixed) methods and showed that each type of measurement design implies specific CFA-MTMM measurement models. In the current study, we hypothesized that some of the problems that are commonly seen in applications of CFA-MTMM models may be due to a mismatch between the underlying measurement design and fitted models. Using simulations, we found that models with M method factors (where M is the total number of methods) and unconstrained loadings led to a higher proportion of solutions in which at least one method factor became empirically unstable when these models were fit to data generated from structurally different methods. The simulations also revealed that commonly used model goodness-of-fit criteria frequently failed to identify incorrectly specified CFA-MTMM models. We discuss implications of these findings for other complex CFA models in which similar issues occur, including nested (bifactor) and latent state-trait models. PMID:26283977

  1. Associations Between the Periodontal Disease in Women Before Menopause and Menstrual Cycle Irregularity: The 2010-2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyungdo; Ko, Youngkyung; Park, Yong Gyu; Park, Jun-Beom

    2016-02-01

    The association between menstrual cycle irregularities and system disease has been evaluated in previous studies. However, the association between periodontal disease and menstrual cycle irregularity has not been fully investigated. The study aimed to evaluate the relationship between periodontal disease and tooth loss in women before menopause and menstrual cycle irregularity using nationally representative data.This study performed a cross-sectional analysis and used hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analysis models. Data from Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) between 2010 and 2012 were analyzed. The analysis in this study was confined to a total of 1553 respondents over 19 years old who had not gone through menopause and had no missing values for the reproductive factors and outcome variables. A community periodontal index was greater than or equal to code 3 was used to define periodontal treatment needs.The risk of periodontal treatment needs tended to increase in the presence of menstrual cycle irregularity after adjustment for potential confounders (P for trend in the odds ratios = .0481 in model 1; 0.0613 in model 2; 0.0369 in model 3; 0.0456 in model 4). The number of natural teeth of 28 did not reach statistically significant differences (P for trend in the odds ratios = 0.2204 in model 1; 0.2373 in model 2; 0.2814 in model 3; 0.2609 in model 4).Menstrual cycle irregularity was positively associated with the risk of periodontal treatment needs in Korean women before menopause. However, there was no significant association between tooth loss and menstrual cycle irregularity. Menstrual cycle irregularity may be considered to be a potential risk indicator for periodontal treatment needs in Korean women before menopause.

  2. An Examination of Concussion Injury Rates in Various Models of Football Helmets in NCAA Football Athletes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ryan Moran; Tracey Covassin

    2015-01-01

    While newer, advanced helmet models have been designed with the intentions of decreasing concussions, very little research exists on injury rates in various football helmets at the collegiate level. The aim of this study was to examine concussion injury rates in various models of football helmets in collegiate football athletes. In addition, to compare injury rates of newer, advanced football helmets to older, traditional helmets among collegiate football athletes, a total of 209 concussions and 563,701 AEs (athlete-exposures) among 2,107 collegiate football athletes in seven helmet models were included in the analyses. Concussion injury rates revealed that the Riddell Revolution~ had the highest rate of 0.41 concussions per 1,000 AEs. The Schutt ION 4DTM helmet had the lowest rate of 0.25 concussions per 1,000 AEs. These newer helmet models did not significantly differ from one another (P = 0.74), however, all models significantly differed from the older, traditional helmet model (P 〈 0.001). The findings of this study suggest that concussion rates do not differ between newer and more advanced helmet models. More importantly, there are currently no helmets available to prevent concussions from occurring in football athletes.

  3. Ethnic identity development and ethnic discrimination: examining longitudinal associations with adjustment for Mexican-origin adolescent mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toomey, Russell B; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J; Updegraff, Kimberly A; Jahromi, Laudan B

    2013-10-01

    Few studies examine normative developmental processes among teenage mothers. Framed from a risk and resilience perspective, this prospective study examined the potential for ethnic identity status (e.g., diffuse, achieved), a normative developmental task during adolescence, to buffer the detrimental effects of discrimination on later adjustment and self-esteem in a sample of 204 Mexican-origin adolescent mothers. Ethnic discrimination was associated with increases in depressive symptoms and decreases in self-esteem over time, regardless of ethnic identity status. However, ethnic discrimination was only associated with increases in engagement in risky behavior among diffuse adolescents, suggesting that achieved or foreclosed identities buffered the risk of ethnic discrimination on later risky behavior. Findings suggest that ethnic identity resolution (i.e., the component shared by those in foreclosed and achieved statuses) may be a key cultural factor to include in prevention and intervention efforts aimed to reduce the negative effects of ethnic discrimination on later externalizing problems.

  4. Meaning made of stress among veterans transitioning to college: examining unique associations with suicide risk and life-threatening behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Jason M; Malott, Jesse; Currier, Joseph M

    2014-04-01

    Meaning made of stress has been shown to be a unique predictor of mental and physical health. In this study, we examined the unique associations between two facets of meaning made of stress (comprehensibility and footing in the world) and suicide risk and life-threatening behavior among military veterans who have transitioned to college were examined, controlling for demographic factors, religiousness, combat-related physical injury, combat exposure, depressive symptoms, and posttraumatic stress symptoms. Findings suggest that comprehensibility (having “made sense” of a stressor) is uniquely associated with lower suicide risk and a lower likelihood of driving under the influence of drugs or alcohol and engaging in self-mutilating behaviors.

  5. A snapshot of patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations at an Australian radiology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N; Mohacsy, A; Connell, D A; Schneider, M E

    2017-05-01

    Cumulative radiation exposure is linked to increasing the lifetime attributable risk of cancer. To avoid unnecessary radiation exposure and facilitate shared decision making, patients should be aware of these issues. This paper examines patients' awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging examinations. Consecutive patients attending a private radiology clinic over a nine week period in 2014 in Metropolitan Melbourne were surveyed while waiting to undergo an imaging examination. Patients who were under 18 years of age, did not speak English and/or were referred for interventional imaging procedures were excluded from participation. Survey questions addressed patients' awareness of radiation dose associated with various imaging modalities' and patients' experience and preferences regarding communication of information about radiation. Data was analysed using SPSS (Ver 20.1). A total of 242 surveys were completed. Most participants were male (143/239, 59.8%) and aged between 33 and 52 years (109/242, 45%). Over half of participants were not concerned about radiation from medical imaging (130/238, 54.6%). Only a third of participants (80/234, 34.2%) correctly reported that CT has a higher radiation dose than X-ray. Very few participants correctly identified mammography, DEXA, PET and PET/CT as radiation emitting examinations. The majority of participants (202/236, 85.6%) indicated that they were not informed about radiation dose and risks by their referring doctor in advance. This paper provides information relevant to a single private radiology clinic in Australia. Nevertheless, our results have shown that patients presenting for medical imaging have little awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with these examinations and received little information by their referring physicians or staff at the radiology clinic. Copyright © 2016 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. What a Team Brand Means to Youth: An Examination of Team Brand Associations Held by Youth Fans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Walsh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding team brand associations is important as they can contribute to the team’s awareness, image, ability to generate revenue, and a fan’s overall loyalty. While previous conceptualizations of team brand associations have added considerably to the study of brand associations in sport, they do not take into account the associations that may exist for varying target segments. One market segment that has grown in consumer sophistication and thus is important for teams to understand is that of youth consumers. It has also been suggested that we should not be assume that research on adult buying behavior and branding is applicable to this market segment. Therefore, this study utilized a free-thought listing technique with children ranging from 4 to 14 years of age in order to examine the specific team brand associations held by youth fans. The results suggest that brand associations that children hold for sport teams are not as well-developed as those of their adult counterparts and children tend to focus on product related attributes as the most common associations mentioned were the team’s star players, brand marks, the way the team plays, or simply that they mention the sport itself.

  7. Selection of asset investment models by hospitals: examination of influencing factors, using Switzerland as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, Bernhard

    2016-10-01

    Hospitals are responsible for a remarkable part of the annual increase in healthcare expenditure. This article examines one of the major cost drivers, the expenditure for investment in hospital assets. The study, conducted in Switzerland, identifies factors that influence hospitals' investment decisions. A suggestion on how to categorize asset investment models is presented based on the life cycle of an asset, and its influencing factors defined based on transaction cost economics. The influence of five factors (human asset specificity, physical asset specificity, uncertainty, bargaining power, and privacy of ownership) on the selection of an asset investment model is examined using a two-step fuzzy-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis. The research shows that outsourcing-oriented asset investment models are particularly favored in the presence of two combinations of influencing factors: First, if technological uncertainty is high and both human asset specificity and bargaining power of a hospital are low. Second, if assets are very specific, technological uncertainty is high and there is a private hospital with low bargaining power, outsourcing-oriented asset investment models are favored too. Using Qualitative Comparative Analysis, it can be demonstrated that investment decisions of hospitals do not depend on isolated influencing factors but on a combination of factors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Being mum's confidant, a boon or bane? Examining gender differences in the association of maternal disclosure with adolescents' depressive feelings

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a longitudinal study investigating gender differences in the association between maternal disclosure and adolescents’ depressive symptoms. Little research has examined the relationship of parental disclosure to adolescents’ depressive symptoms and research on sex differences is particularly lacking. In a sample of 428 families with a mean age of 13.36 (52% female) of the target adolescents, maternal and children’s disclosure and depressive symptoms were assessed twice ...

  9. Examining the Associations Among Home–School Dissonance, Amotivation, and Classroom Disruptive Behavior for Urban High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Brown-Wright, Lynda; Tyler, Kenneth M.; Graves, Scott L.; Thomas, Deneia; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Mulder, Shambra

    2011-01-01

    The current study examined the association among home–school dissonance, amotivation, and classroom disruptive behavior among 309 high school juniors and seniors at two urban high schools in the Southern region of the country. Students completed two subscales of the Patterns of Learning Activities Scales (PALS) and one subscale of the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). ANCOVA analyses revealed significant differences in classroom disruptive behaviors for the gender independent variable. Control...

  10. Conditional recall and the frequency effect in the serial recall task: an examination of item-to-item associativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Leonie M; Roodenrys, Steven

    2012-11-01

    The frequency effect in short-term serial recall is influenced by the composition of lists. In pure lists, a robust advantage in the recall of high-frequency (HF) words is observed, yet in alternating mixed lists, HF and low-frequency (LF) words are recalled equally well. It has been argued that the preexisting associations between all list items determine a single, global level of supportive activation that assists item recall. Preexisting associations between items are assumed to be a function of language co-occurrence; HF-HF associations are high, LF-LF associations are low, and mixed associations are intermediate in activation strength. This account, however, is based on results when alternating lists with equal numbers of HF and LF words were used. It is possible that directional association between adjacent list items is responsible for the recall patterns reported. In the present experiment, the recall of three forms of mixed lists-those with equal numbers of HF and LF items and pure lists-was examined to test the extent to which item-to-item associations are present in serial recall. Furthermore, conditional probabilities were used to examine more closely the evidence for a contribution, since correct-in-position scoring may mask recall that is dependent on the recall of prior items. The results suggest that an item-to-item effect is clearly present for early but not late list items, and they implicate an additional factor, perhaps the availability of resources at output, in the recall of late list items.

  11. Framing patient consent for student involvement in pelvic examination: a dual model of autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson-Stevens, Andrew; Davies, Myfanwy M; Jones, Rhiain; Chik, Aiman D Pawan; Robbé, Iain J; Fiander, Alison N

    2013-11-01

    Patient consent has been formulated in terms of radical individualism rather than shared benefits. Medical education relies on the provision of patient consent to provide medical students with the training and experience to become competent doctors. Pelvic examination represents an extreme case in which patients may legitimately seek to avoid contact with inexperienced medical students particularly where these are male. However, using this extreme case, this paper will examine practices of framing and obtaining consent as perceived by medical students. This paper reports findings of an exploratory qualitative study of medical students and junior doctors. Participants described a number of barriers to obtaining informed consent. These related to misunderstandings concerning student roles and experiences and insufficient information on the nature of the examination. Participants reported perceptions of the negative framing of decisions on consent by nursing staff where the student was male. Potentially coercive practices of framing of the decision by senior doctors were also reported. Participants outlined strategies they adopted to circumvent patients' reasons for refusal. Practices of framing the information used by students, nurses and senior doctors to enable patients to decide about consent are discussed in the context of good ethical practice. In the absence of a clear ethical model, coercion appears likely. We argue for an expanded model of autonomy in which the potential tension between respecting patients' autonomy and ensuring the societal benefit of well-trained doctors is recognised. Practical recommendations are made concerning information provision and clear delineations of student and patient roles and expectations.

  12. Confirmatory factor analysis for the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire: Evidence supporting a three-factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jennifer; Prescott, Tim; Muncer, Steven

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the goodness-of-fit of a one factor model with the four factor model proposed by Fairburn (2008) and the three factor model proposed by Peterson and colleagues (2007) for the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q 6.0) (Fairburn and Beglin, 1994). Using a cross-sectional design, the EDE-Q was completed by 569 adults recruited from universities and eating disorder charities in the UK. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was carried out for both the student and non-student groups. CFA indicated that Peterson et al.'s (2007) three factor model was the best fit for both groups within the current data sample. Acceptable levels of internal reliability were observed and there was clear evidence for a hierarchical factor of eating disorder. The results of this study provide support for the three factor model of the EDE-Q suggested by Peterson and colleagues (2007) in that this model was appropriate for both the student and non-student sample populations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluating mepindolol in a test model of examination anxiety in students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krope, P; Kohrs, A; Ott, H; Wagner, W; Fichte, K

    1982-03-01

    The effect of a single dose of beta-blocker (5 or 10 mg mepindolol) during a written examination was investigated in two double-blind studies (N : 49 and 55 students, respectively). The question was whether the beta-blocker would in comparison to placebo diminish examination anxiety and improve the performance of highly complex tasks, while leaving the performance of less complex tasks unchanged. A reduction in examination anxiety after beta-blocker intake could not be demonstrated with a multi-level test model (which included the parameters self-rated anxiety, motor behaviour, task performance and physiology), although pulse rates were lowered significantly. An improvement in performance could not be observed, while - by the same token - the performance was not impaired by the beta-blocker. A hypothesis according to which a beta-blocker has an anxiolytic effect and improves performance, dependent on the level of habitual examination anxiety, was tested post hoc, but could not be confirmed. Ten of the subjects treated with 10 mg mepindolol, complained of different side effects, including dizziness, fatigue and headache.

  14. Association Between Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels and Dry Eye in Korean Adults: A Study Based on Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2010–2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Ji; Kim, Yun-Jin; Lee, Sang-Yeoup; Lee, Jeong-Gyu; Jeong, Dong-Wook; Kim, Yun Hee

    2017-01-01

    Background Dry eye is a common disease. Many patients continue to experience residual symptoms despite optimal treatment. Thus, new treatment options are required. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and dry eye. Methods This study was performed using data from the fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which is a cross-sectional study of the Korean population that was conducted from 2010 to 2011. We included adults aged >19 years who underwent ophthalmologic interviews and examinations. We excluded subjects who had comorbid conditions (rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, chronic kidney disease, or depression) that are associated with dry eye. The subjects were divided into normal and dry eye groups. The dry eye group consisted of those who had clinically diagnosed dry eye syndrome or symptoms. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted to determine the association between serum 25(OH)D levels and dry eye. Results In the univariate model, the 25(OH)D levels were lower in the dry eye group than in the normal group (P=0.01). A significant association was found between severe vitamin D deficiency (<10 ng/mL) and dry eye (P=0.04). However, after multivariate adjustment, the statistical significance of the association disappeared (P-values= 0.49, vitamin D insufficiency; P=0.33, vitamin D deficiency; P=0.18, severe vitamin D deficiency). Conclusion Severe vitamin D deficiency was associated with dry eye in an unadjusted model, but the association was not statistically significant after adjustment. PMID:28360983

  15. The Association of Metabolic Syndrome with Diabetic Retinopathy: The Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008-2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Kyong Kim

    Full Text Available To explore gender differences and associations between metabolic syndrome (MetS and its components, and diabetic retinopathy (DR in Korean adults aged 40 years and older with diabetes.We analyzed data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (2008-2012. In total, 2,576 type 2 diabetic participants, aged 40 and older, were evaluated. Seven standard retinal fundus photographs were obtained after pupil dilation in both eyes. DR was graded using the modified Airlie House classification system. Vision-threatening diabetic retinopathy (VTDR included proliferative diabetic retinopathy and clinically significant macular edema. MetS was defined according to the Joint Interim Statement, proposed in 2009, by the International Diabetes Federation and the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between MetS and its individual components with DR and VTDR.After controlling for confounders, MetS was not associated with DR in men or women. Moreover, the risk for DR or VTDR did not increase with increasing MetS components. However, high waist circumference was significantly inversely associated with VTDR (adjusted odds ratio = 0.36; 95% confidence interval = 0.14-0.93 only in men.MetS was not associated with DR or VTDR in a Korean diabetic population. However, among MetS components, it seems that abdominal obesity was inversely associated with VTDR in Korean diabetic men.

  16. The effectiveness of gynaecology teaching associates in teaching pelvic examination to medical students: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjua, Aisha; Smith, P; Chu, J; Raut, N; Malick, S; Gallos, I; Singh, R; Irani, S; Gupta, J K; Parle, J; Clark, T J

    2017-03-01

    To assess whether teaching female pelvic examinations using gynaecological teaching associates (GTAs); women who are trained to give instruction and feedback on gynaecological examination technique, improves the competence, confidence and communication skills of medical students compared to conventional teaching. Randomised controlled trial. Ten University of Birmingham (UoB) affiliated teaching hospitals in the UK. 492 final year medical students. GTA teaching of gynaecological examination compared with conventional pelvic manikin based teaching at the start of a five week clinical placement in obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G). Student's perception of their confidence was measured on a 10cm visual analogue scale (VAS). Domains of competence were measured by a senior clinical examiner using a standardised assessment tool which utilised 10cm VAS and by a GTA using a four point Likert scale. Assessors were blinded to the allocated teaching intervention. 407/492 (83%) students completed both the intervention and outcome assessment. Self-reported confidence was higher in students taught by GTAs compared with those taught on manikins (median score GTA 6.3; vs. conventional 5.8; p=0.03). Competence was also higher in those taught by GTAs when assessed by an examiner (median global score GTA 7.1 vs. conventional 6.0; pteaching of female pelvic examination at the start of undergraduate medical student O&G clinical placements improves their confidence and competence compared with conventional pelvic manikin based teaching. GTAs should be introduced into undergraduate medical curricula to teach pelvic examination. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Association of vegetables and fruits consumption with sarcopenia in older adults: the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhee; Lee, Yunhwan; Kye, Seunghee; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Kwang-Min

    2015-01-01

    several studies have found nutrients, including antioxidants, to be associated with sarcopenia. However, whether specific foods, such as vegetables and fruits, are associated with sarcopenia has not been studied. to examine the association of the frequency of vegetables and fruits consumption with sarcopenia in older people. this study used cross-sectional data from the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2008-09. Subjects were community-dwelling 823 men and 1,089 women aged ≥65 years. Frequency of food group consumption was obtained by using the food frequency questionnaire. Body composition was measured with the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and sarcopenia was defined as appendicular lean mass adjusted for height and fat mass. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of the frequency of food group consumption with sarcopenia, controlling for sociodemographics and health-related variables. dietary intake of vegetables, fruits and both vegetables and fruits was associated with a significantly reduced risk of sarcopenia after controlling for covariates in men (P = 0.026 for trend, P = 0.012 for trend, P = 0.003 for trend, respectively). Men in the highest quintile, compared with those in the lowest quintile, of vegetables [odds ratio (OR) = 0.48; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.24-0.95], fruits (OR = 0.30; 95% CI: 0.13-0.70) and vegetables and fruits consumption (OR = 0.32; 95% CI: 0.16-0.67) demonstrated a lower risk of sarcopenia. In women, high consumption of fruits demonstrated a lower risk of sarcopenia (OR = 0.39; 95% CI: 0.18-0.83). frequent vegetables and fruits consumption was inversely associated with sarcopenia in older adults. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Using the Single Prolonged Stress Model to Examine the Pathophysiology of PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rimenez R. Souza

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The endurance of memories of emotionally arousing events serves the adaptive role of minimizing future exposure to danger and reinforcing rewarding behaviors. However, following a traumatic event, a subset of individuals suffers from persistent pathological symptoms such as those seen in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Despite the availability of pharmacological treatments and evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy, a considerable number of PTSD patients do not respond to the treatment, or show partial remission and relapse of the symptoms. In controlled laboratory studies, PTSD patients show deficient ability to extinguish conditioned fear. Failure to extinguish learned fear could be responsible for the persistence of PTSD symptoms such as elevated anxiety, arousal, and avoidance. It may also explain the high non-response and dropout rates seen during treatment. Animal models are useful for understanding the pathophysiology of the disorder and the development of new treatments. This review examines studies in a rodent model of PTSD with the goal of identifying behavioral and physiological factors that predispose individuals to PTSD symptoms. Single prolonged stress (SPS is a frequently used rat model of PTSD that involves exposure to several successive stressors. SPS rats show PTSD-like symptoms, including impaired extinction of conditioned fear. Since its development by the Liberzon lab in 1997, the SPS model has been referred to by more than 200 published papers. Here we consider the findings of these studies and unresolved questions that may be investigated using the model.

  19. Sharing, caring, and surveilling: an actor-partner interdependence model examination of Facebook relational maintenance strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Bree

    2013-12-01

    Abstract Relational maintenance is connected to high quality friendships. Friendship maintenance behaviors may occur online via social networking sites. This study utilized an Actor-Partner Interdependence Model to examine how Facebook maintenance and surveillance affect friendship quality. Bryant and Marmo's (2012) Facebook maintenance scale was evaluated, revealing two factors: sharing and caring. Facebook surveillance was also measured. For friendship satisfaction and liking, significant positive actor and partner effects emerged for caring; significant negative actor, partner, and interaction effects emerged for sharing; and significant positive actor effects emerged for surveillance. For friendship closeness, significant positive actor effects emerged for caring and surveillance.

  20. Examining faking on personality inventories using unfolding item response theory models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherbaum, Charles A; Sabet, Jennifer; Kern, Michael J; Agnello, Paul

    2013-01-01

    A concern about personality inventories in diagnostic and decision-making contexts is that individuals will fake. Although there is extensive research on faking, little research has focused on how perceptions of personality items change when individuals are faking or responding honestly. This research demonstrates how the delta parameter from the generalized graded unfolding item response theory model can be used to examine how individuals' perceptions about personality items might change when responding honestly or when faking. The results indicate that perceptions changed from honest to faking conditions for several neuroticism items. The direction of the change varied, indicating that faking can operate to increase or decrease scores within a personality factor.

  1. Management of Associations in the IRBAC 2000 Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Junguo; HONG Fan; ZHANG Zhaoli; LIU Ming

    2006-01-01

    Secure interaction and interoperability between two or more administrative domains is a major concern. The IRBAC 2000 model accomplishes secure interaction and interoperability by flexibly dynamic inter-domain role translations. Associations are the key element of the IRBAC 2000 model, which have a great impact on security and efficiency of dynamic role translations. Therefore, it is a crucial problem how to manage the associations in the IRBAC 2000 model. There are two cases under which some matters will emerge. One is where conflicting associations may result in a security hazard. Another is where redundant associations may reduce the efficiency of dynamic role translations and increase the difficulty of management of associations. The formal definitions on conflicting associations and redundant associations are given, and the methods are discusses to judge whether there are conflicting associations or redundant associations in IRBAC 2000 model. The protective mechanism is presented, which utilizes prerequisite conditions to prevent conflicting or redundant associations from appearing in IRBAC 2000 model.

  2. Vitamin D status and its associations with rheumatoid arthritis in Korean women: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taeck-Hyun; Jin, Woo Sung; Park, Juwon; Choi, Hyun-Hee; Bae, Eun Jin

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, vitamin D status and its associations with rheumatoid arthritis in Korean women were investigated. Total 2,162 women’s data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 2008–2014 ware analyzed by complex sampling design logistic regression analysis and complex sampling design general linear model. Women who over 19 years old were included, and who has osteoporosis or abnormal parathyroid hormone or renal failure or liver cirrhosis or abnormal creatinine were excluded. Age and body mass index were used as covariate. In the present study, we have shown that vitamin D status were not associated with development of rheumatoid arthritis in Korean women as well were not associated with pain and quality of life in Korean women with rheumatoid arthritis. Based on the present study and considering the effects of vitamin D on fracture and osteoporosis, it can be suggested that additional cohort study and cost-effectiveness analysis are needed. PMID:28119885

  3. Does Visuomotor Adaptation Proceed in Stages? An Examination of the Learning Model by Chein and Schneider (2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Anja; Bock, Otmar

    2015-01-01

    A new 3-stage model based on neuroimaging evidence is proposed by Chein and Schneider (2012). Each stage is associated with different brain regions, and draws on cognitive abilities: the first stage on creativity, the second on selective attention, and the third on automatic processing. The purpose of the present study was to scrutinize the validity of this model for 1 popular learning paradigm, visuomotor adaptation. Participants completed tests for creativity, selective attention and automated processing before attending in a pointing task with adaptation to a 60° rotation of visual feedback. To examine the relationship between cognitive abilities and motor learning at different times of practice, associations between cognitive and adaptation scores were calculated repeatedly throughout adaptation. The authors found no benefit of high creativity for adaptive performance. High levels of selective attention were positively associated with early adaptation, but hardly with late adaptation and de-adaptation. High levels of automated execution were beneficial for late adaptation, but hardly for early and de-adaptation. From this we conclude that Chein and Schneider's first learning stage is difficult to confirm by research on visuomotor adaptation, and that the other 2 learning stages rather relate to workaround strategies than to actual adaptive recalibration.

  4. Interpersonal Proximity and Impression Formation: A Partial Examination of Hall's Proxemic Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesch, Frederick E

    1979-02-01

    Interpersonal proximity was examined as a cue in impression formation by varying factorially four interpersonal distances (2', 3 1/4', 5 1/2', 9 1/2'), sex of S (48 male and 48 female American college students), and sex of C (three male and three female students). Interpersonal proximity in the interview situation did not directly affect Ss' impressions of the Cs as measured by the Gough and Heilbrun Adjective Check List and Schutz's FIRO-B test. Although the four distances operationalized two of the interpersonal distance zones in Hall's normative model of human spatial behavior, Ss did not report the expected differences in the experiences of these two zones. The implications of the present findings for the limited role of interpersonal proximity as a cue in impression formation and for Hall's model are discussed.

  5. Examining Teacher Outcomes of the School-Wide Positive Behavior Support Model in Norway

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    Mari-Anne Sørlie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Research on teacher outcomes of the School-Wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS model has been scarce. The present study adds to the knowledge base by examining the effects of the Norwegian version of SWPBS (N-PALS on school staffs’ behavior management practices and on their individual and collective efficacy. Questionnaire data were collected from staff and students (Grades 4-7 at four measurement points across four successive school years in 28 intervention schools and 20 comparison schools. Using longitudinal multilevel analyses, indications of positive 3-year main effects of the N-PALS model were observed for staff-reported collective efficacy, self-efficacy, and positive behavior support practices. The intervention effects as measured by Cohen’s d ranged from .14 to .91. The effects on student perceptions of teachers’ behavior management strategies were, however, not consistent with the positive staff ratings. Results are discussed in relation to prior research, future research, and study limitations.

  6. Inverse association between insulin resistance and gait speed in nondiabetic older men: results from the U.S. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 1999-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yau-Hua

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have revealed the associations between insulin resistance (IR and geriatric conditions such as frailty and cognitive impairment. However, little is known about the relation of IR to physical impairment and limitation in the aging process, eg. slow gait speed and poor muscle strength. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of IR in performance-based physical function, specifically gait speed and leg strength, among nondiabetic older adults. Methods Cross-sectional data were from the population-based National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999-2002. A total of 1168 nondiabetic adults (≥ 50 years with nonmissing values in fasting measures of insulin and glucose, habitual gait speed (HGS, and leg strength were analyzed. IR was assessed by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR, whereas HGS and peak leg strength by the 20-foot timed walk test and an isokinetic dynamometer, respectively. We used multiple linear regression to examine the association between IR and performance-based physical function. Results IR was inversely associated with gait speed among the men. After adjusting demographics, body mass index, alcohol consumption, smoking status, chronic co-morbidities, and markers of nutrition and cardiovascular risk, each increment of 1 standard deviation in the HOMA-IR level was associated with a 0.04 m/sec decrease (p = 0.003 in the HGS in men. We did not find such association among the women. The IR-HGS association was not changed after further adjustment of leg strength. Last, HOMA-IR was not demonstrated in association with peak leg strength. Conclusion IR is inversely associated with HGS among older men without diabetes. The results suggest that IR, an important indicator of gait function among men, could be further investigated as an intervenable target to prevent walking limitation.

  7. Modeling pubertal timing and tempo and examining links to behavior problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltz, Adriene M; Corley, Robin P; Bricker, Josh B; Wadsworth, Sally J; Berenbaum, Sheri A

    2014-12-01

    Research on the role of puberty in adolescent psychological development requires attention to the meaning and measurement of pubertal development. Particular questions concern the utility of self-report, the need for complex models to describe pubertal development, the psychological significance of pubertal timing vs. tempo, and sex differences in the nature and psychological significance of pubertal development. We used longitudinal self-report data to model linear and logistic trajectories of pubertal development, and used timing and tempo estimates from these models, and from traditional approaches (age at menarche and time from onset of breast development to menarche), to predict psychological outcomes of internalizing and externalizing behavior problems, and early sexual activity. Participants (738 girls, 781 boys) reported annually from ages 9 through 15 on their pubertal development, and they and their parents reported on their behavior in mid-to-late adolescence and early adulthood. Self-reports of pubertal development provided meaningful data for both boys and girls, producing good trajectories, and estimates of individuals' pubertal timing and tempo. A logistic model best fit the group data. Pubertal timing was estimated to be earlier in the logistic compared to linear model, but linear, logistic, and traditional estimates of pubertal timing correlated highly with each other and similarly with psychological outcomes. Pubertal tempo was not consistently estimated, and associations of tempo with timing and with behavior were model dependent. Advances in modeling facilitate the study of some questions about pubertal development, but assumptions of the models affect their utility in psychological studies. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  8. The Association between Food Insecurity and Obesity in Children-The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasbir; Lamb, Molly M; Ogden, Cynthia L

    2015-05-01

    Food insecurity can put children at greater risk of obesity because of altered food choices and nonuniform consumption patterns. We examined the association between obesity and both child-level food insecurity and personal food insecurity in US children. Data from 9,701 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2001-2010, aged 2 to 11 years were analyzed. Child-level food insecurity was assessed with the US Department of Agriculture's Food Security Survey Module based on eight child-specific questions. Personal food insecurity was assessed with five additional questions. Obesity was defined, using physical measurements, as body mass index (calculated as kg/m²) greater than or equal to the age- and sex-specific 95th percentile of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention growth charts. Logistic regressions adjusted for sex, race/ethnic group, poverty level, and survey year were conducted to describe associations between obesity and food insecurity. Obesity was significantly associated with personal food insecurity for children aged 6 to 11 years (odds ratio=1.81; 95% CI 1.33 to 2.48), but not in children aged 2 to 5 years (odds ratio=0.88; 95% CI 0.51 to 1.51). Child-level food insecurity was not associated with obesity among 2- to 5-year-olds or 6- to 11-year-olds. Personal food insecurity is associated with an increased risk of obesity only in children aged 6 to 11 years. Personal food-insecurity measures may give different results than aggregate food-insecurity measures in children. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Association of polychlorinated biphenyls with hypertension in the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Charles J; Mainous, Arch G; Frithsen, Ivar L; Player, Marty S; Matheson, Eric M

    2008-09-01

    The association of 11 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with hypertension was investigated using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), 1999-2002. The unweighted number of participants assessed for hypertension ranged from 2074 to 2556 depending on the chemical(s) being analyzed. In unadjusted logistic regressions all 11 PCBs were associated with hypertension. After adjustment for age, gender, race, smoking status, body mass index, exercise, total cholesterol, and family history of coronary heart disease, seven of the 11 PCBs (PCBs 126, 74, 118, 99, 138/158, 170, and 187) were significantly associated with hypertension. The strongest adjusted associations with hypertension were found for dioxin-like PCBs 126 and 118. PCB 126>59.1 pg/g lipid adjusted had an odds ratio of 2.45 (95% CI 1.48-4.04) compared to PCB 126PCB 118>27.5 ng/g lipid adjusted had an odds ratio of 2.30 (95% CI 1.29-4.08) compared to PCB 118or=20 years old in the non-institutionalized US population. We hypothesize that association of seven PCBs with hypertension indicates elevated PCBs are a risk factor for hypertension. What clinicians can do, given the results of this study, is limited unless the appropriate laboratory methods can be made more widely available for testing patients.

  10. A correlation between low back pain and associated factors: a study involving 772 patients who had undergone general physical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Min A; Shim, Woo Seok; Kim, Myung Hee; Gwak, Mi Sook; Hahm, Tae Soo; Kim, Gaab Soo; Kim, Chung Su; Choi, Yoon Ho; Park, Jeong Heon; Cho, Hyun Sung; Kim, Tae Hyeong

    2006-12-01

    Many factors are associated with the development of low back pain. Among them, exercise, obesity, smoking, age, educational level and stress are the most common. This study examined the association of these factors with low back pain. An additional aim was to determine a procedure for preventing low back pain. This study analyzed the responses to a questionnaire sent to 772 individuals who had undergone a medical examination at this hospital in 2003 and excluded the individuals who had shown symptoms or their test results indicated a particular disease. Assuming that there were no variables, individuals who exercised regularly 3-4 times per week would have a lower chance of having low back pain than those who did not exercise regularly. The analysis revealed that individuals with a college degree or higher education have a lower chance of experiencing low back pain than those with only a high school education or even college drop-outs. When the other variables were constant, age, extent of obesity (body mass index), smoking and level of stress were not found to affect the development of low back pain. The level of education was associated with the development of low back pain. However, regular exercise 3-4 times per week or more would be most effective in reducing the incidence and duration of low back pain.

  11. Genetic variants associated with fasting blood lipids in the U.S. population: Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

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    Mueller Patricia W

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of genetic variants related to blood lipid levels within a large, population-based and nationally representative study might lead to a better understanding of the genetic contribution to serum lipid levels in the major race/ethnic groups in the U.S. population. Methods Using data from the second phase (1991-1994 of the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III, we examined associations between 22 polymorphisms in 13 candidate genes and four serum lipids: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, total cholesterol (TC, and triglycerides (TG. Univariate and multivariable linear regression and within-gene haplotype trend regression were used to test for genetic associations assuming an additive mode of inheritance for each of the three major race/ethnic groups in the United States (non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Mexican American. Results Variants within APOE (rs7412, rs429358, PON1 (rs854560, ITGB3 (rs5918, and NOS3 (rs2070744 were found to be associated with one or more blood lipids in at least one race/ethnic group in crude and adjusted analyses. In non-Hispanic whites, no individual polymorphisms were associated with any lipid trait. However, the PON1 A-G haplotype was significantly associated with LDL-C and TC. In non-Hispanic blacks, APOE variant rs7412 and haplotype T-T were strongly associated with LDL-C and TC; whereas, rs5918 of ITGB3 was significantly associated with TG. Several variants and haplotypes of three genes were significantly related to lipids in Mexican Americans: PON1 in relation to HDL-C; APOE and NOS3 in relation to LDL-C; and APOE in relation to TC. Conclusions We report the significant associations of blood lipids with variants and haplotypes in APOE, ITGB3, NOS3, and PON1 in the three main race/ethnic groups in the U.S. population using a large, nationally representative and population-based sample

  12. Quantifying the Increase in Radiation Exposure Associated with SPECT/CT Compared to SPECT Alone for Routine Nuclear Medicine Examinations

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    Ann M. Larkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We quantify the additional radiation exposure in terms of effective dose incurred by patients in the CT portion of SPECT/CT examinations. Methods. The effective dose from a variety of common nuclear medicine procedures is calculated and summarized. The extra exposure from the CT portion of the examination is summarized by examination and body part. Two hundred forty-eight scans from 221 patients are included in this study. The effective dose from the CT examination is also compared to average background radiation. Results. We found that the extra effective dose is not sufficient to cause deterministic effects. However, the stochastic effects may be significant, especially in patients undergoing numerous follow-up studies. The cumulative effect might increase the radiation exposure compared to patient management with SPECT alone. Conclusions. While the relative increase in radiation exposure associated with SPECT/CT is generally considered acceptable when compared with the benefits to the patient, physicians should make every effort to minimize this effect by using proper technical procedures and educating patients about the exposure they will receive.

  13. A preliminary model of work during initial examination and treatment planning appointments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, J Y; Torres-Urquidy, M H; Schleyer, T; Monaco, V

    2009-01-10

    Objective This study's objective was to formally describe the work process for charting and treatment planning in general dental practice to inform the design of a new clinical computing environment.Methods Using a process called contextual inquiry, researchers observed 23 comprehensive examination and treatment planning sessions during 14 visits to 12 general US dental offices. For each visit, field notes were analysed and reformulated as formalised models. Subsequently, each model type was consolidated across all offices and visits. Interruptions to the workflow, called breakdowns, were identified.Results Clinical work during dental examination and treatment planning appointments is a highly collaborative activity involving dentists, hygienists and assistants. Personnel with multiple overlapping roles complete complex multi-step tasks supported by a large and varied collection of equipment, artifacts and technology. Most of the breakdowns were related to technology which interrupted the workflow, caused rework and increased the number of steps in work processes.Conclusion Current dental software could be significantly improved with regard to its support for communication and collaboration, workflow, information design and presentation, information content, and data entry.

  14. "Just how graphic are graphic novels?" An examination of aggression portrayals in manga and associations with aggressive behavior in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyne, Sarah M; Callister, Mark; Stockdale, Laura; Coutts, Holly; Collier, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    Manga, a type of graphic novel, represent a widely popular literary genre worldwide and are one of the fastest growing areas of the publishing arena aimed at adolescents in the United States. However, to our knowledge, there has been almost no empirical research examining content or effects of reading manga. This article consists of 2 studies. Study 1 represents a content analysis of aggressive behavior in best-selling manga aimed at adolescents. Results revealed that aggression was common and was often portrayed in ways that may influence subsequent behavior. Study 2 examined the relationship between reading manga and aggressive behavior in 223 adolescents. Manga readers were more physically aggressive than non-manga readers and also reported more peer relationships with lonely individuals and smaller groups. In addition, reading manga with particularly high levels of aggression was associated with physical aggression even after controlling for media violence exposure in other media. Implications regarding these findings are discussed.

  15. A bifactor model of disgust proneness: examination of the Disgust Emotion Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Ebesutani, Chad; Reise, Steven P

    2015-04-01

    The current research evaluated a bifactor model for the Disgust Emotion Scale (DES) in three samples: N = 1,318 nonclinical participants, N = 152 clinic-referred patients, and N = 352 nonclinical participants. The primary goals were to (a) use bifactor modeling to examine the latent structure of the DES and in turn (b) evaluate whether the DES should be scored as a unidimensional scale or whether subscales should also be interpreted. Results suggested that a bifactor model fit the DES data well and that all DES items were strongly influenced by a general disgust proneness dimension and by five content dimensions. Moreover, model-based reliability analyses suggested that scoring a general disgust dimension is justified despite the confirmed multidimensional structure. However, subscales were found to be unreliable after controlling for the general disgust factor with the potential exception of the Mutilation/Death and Animals subscale. Subsequent analysis also showed that only the general disgust factor robustly predicted an obsessive-compulsive disorder symptom latent factor-a clinical condition closely related to disgust proneness; latent variables representing DES domains displayed weak relations with an obsessive-compulsive disorder factor above and beyond the general disgust factor. Implications for better understanding the structure of DES responses and its use in clinical research are discussed.

  16. Examining the multifactorial nature of a cognitive process using Bayesian brain-behavior modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Herskovits, Edward H

    2015-04-01

    Establishing relationships among brain structures and cognitive functions is a central task in cognitive neuroscience. Existing methods to establish associations among a set of function variables and a set of brain regions, such as dissociation logic and conjunction analysis, are hypothesis-driven. We propose a new data-driven approach to structure-function association analysis. We validated it by analyzing a simulated atrophy study. We applied the proposed method to a study of aging and dementia. We found that the most significant age-related and dementia-related volume reductions were in the hippocampal formation and the supramarginal gyrus, respectively. These findings suggest a multi-component brain-aging model.

  17. Factors associated with negative direct sputum examination in Asian and African HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis (ANRS 1260.

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    Loïc Chartier

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with negative direct sputum examination among African and Cambodian patients co-infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV. DESIGN: Prospective multicenter study (ANRS1260 conducted in Cambodia, Senegal and Central African Republic. METHODS: Univariate and multivariate analyses (logistic regression were used to identify clinical and radiological features associated with negative direct sputum examination in HIV-infected patients with positive M. tuberculosis culture on Lowenstein-Jensen medium. RESULTS: Between September 2002 and December 2005, 175 co-infected patients were hospitalized with at least one respiratory symptom and pulmonary radiographic anomaly. Acid-fast bacillus (AFB examination was positive in sputum samples from 110 subjects (63% and negative in 65 patients (37%. Most patients were at an advanced stage of HIV disease (92% at stage III or IV of the WHO classification with a median CD4 cell count of 36/mm³. In this context, we found that sputum AFB negativity was more frequent in co-infected subjects with associated respiratory tract infections (OR = 2.8 [95%CI:1.1-7.0], dyspnea (OR = 2.5 [95%CI:1.1-5.6], and localized interstitial opacities (OR = 3.1 [95%CI:1.3-7.6], but was less frequent with CD4 ≤ 50/mm³ (OR = 0.4 [95%CI:0.2-0.90, adenopathies (OR = 0.4 [95%CI:0.2-0.93] and cavitation (OR = 0.1 [95%CI:0.03-0.6]. CONCLUSIONS: One novel finding of this study is the association between concomitant respiratory tract infection and negative sputum AFB, particularly in Cambodia. This finding suggests that repeating AFB testing in AFB-negative patients should be conducted when broad spectrum antibiotic treatment does not lead to complete recovery from respiratory symptoms. In HIV-infected patients with a CD4 cell count below 50/mm3 without an identified cause of pneumonia, systematic AFB direct sputum examination is justified because of atypical clinical

  18. Factors associated with negative direct sputum examination in Asian and African HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis (ANRS 1260).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Loïc; Leng, Chanthy; Sire, Jean-Marie; Le Minor, Odile; Saman, Manil; Bercion, Raymond; Rahalison, Lila; Fontanet, Arnaud; Germany, Yves; L'her, Pierre; Mayaud, Charles; Vray, Muriel

    2011-01-01

    To identify factors associated with negative direct sputum examination among African and Cambodian patients co-infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis and HIV. Prospective multicenter study (ANRS1260) conducted in Cambodia, Senegal and Central African Republic. Univariate and multivariate analyses (logistic regression) were used to identify clinical and radiological features associated with negative direct sputum examination in HIV-infected patients with positive M. tuberculosis culture on Lowenstein-Jensen medium. Between September 2002 and December 2005, 175 co-infected patients were hospitalized with at least one respiratory symptom and pulmonary radiographic anomaly. Acid-fast bacillus (AFB) examination was positive in sputum samples from 110 subjects (63%) and negative in 65 patients (37%). Most patients were at an advanced stage of HIV disease (92% at stage III or IV of the WHO classification) with a median CD4 cell count of 36/mm³. In this context, we found that sputum AFB negativity was more frequent in co-infected subjects with associated respiratory tract infections (OR = 2.8 [95%CI:1.1-7.0]), dyspnea (OR = 2.5 [95%CI:1.1-5.6]), and localized interstitial opacities (OR = 3.1 [95%CI:1.3-7.6]), but was less frequent with CD4 ≤ 50/mm³ (OR = 0.4 [95%CI:0.2-0.90), adenopathies (OR = 0.4 [95%CI:0.2-0.93]) and cavitation (OR = 0.1 [95%CI:0.03-0.6]). One novel finding of this study is the association between concomitant respiratory tract infection and negative sputum AFB, particularly in Cambodia. This finding suggests that repeating AFB testing in AFB-negative patients should be conducted when broad spectrum antibiotic treatment does not lead to complete recovery from respiratory symptoms. In HIV-infected patients with a CD4 cell count below 50/mm3 without an identified cause of pneumonia, systematic AFB direct sputum examination is justified because of atypical clinical features (without cavitation) and high pulmonary mycobacterial

  19. A Theoretical Model for the Associative Nature of Conference Participation.

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    Jelena Smiljanić

    Full Text Available Participation in conferences is an important part of every scientific career. Conferences provide an opportunity for a fast dissemination of latest results, discussion and exchange of ideas, and broadening of scientists' collaboration network. The decision to participate in a conference depends on several factors like the location, cost, popularity of keynote speakers, and the scientist's association with the community. Here we discuss and formulate the problem of discovering how a scientist's previous participation affects her/his future participations in the same conference series. We develop a stochastic model to examine scientists' participation patterns in conferences and compare our model with data from six conferences across various scientific fields and communities. Our model shows that the probability for a scientist to participate in a given conference series strongly depends on the balance between the number of participations and non-participations during his/her early connections with the community. An active participation in a conference series strengthens the scientist's association with that particular conference community and thus increases the probability of future participations.

  20. Examining the Associations Among Home-School Dissonance, Amotivation, and Classroom Disruptive Behavior for Urban High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Wright, Lynda; Tyler, Kenneth M; Graves, Scott L; Thomas, Deneia; Stevens-Watkins, Danelle; Mulder, Shambra

    2013-01-01

    The current study examined the association among home-school dissonance, amotivation, and classroom disruptive behavior among 309 high school juniors and seniors at two urban high schools in the Southern region of the country. Students completed two subscales of the Patterns of Learning Activities Scales (PALS) and one subscale of the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS). ANCOVA analyses revealed significant differences in classroom disruptive behaviors for the gender independent variable. Controlling for gender in the multiple hierarchical regression analyses, it was revealed that home-school dissonance significantly predicted both amotivation and classroom disruptive behavior. In addition, a Sobel mediation analysis showed that amotivation was a significant mediator of the association between home-school dissonance and classroom disruptive behavior. Findings and limitations are discussed.

  1. Examining the genetic and environmental associations among spelling, reading fluency, reading comprehension and a high stakes reading test in a combined sample of third and fourth grade students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Callie W.

    2015-01-01

    The present study is an examination of the genetic and environmental effects on the associations among reading fluency, spelling and earlier reading comprehension on a later reading comprehension outcome (FCAT) in a combined sample of 3rd and 4th grade students using data from the 2011-2012 school year of the Florida Twin project on Reading (Taylor et al., 2013). A genetically sensitive model was applied to the data with results indicating a common genetic component among all four measures, along with shared and non-shared environmental influences common between reading fluency, spelling and FCAT. PMID:26770052

  2. Gender differences in the associations between urinary bisphenol A and body composition among American children: The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003–2006

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    Ji Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: As an endocrine disruptor, bisphenol A (BPA exposure has been implicated as a potential risk factor in childhood obesity, which is defined using percentiles of body mass index for age. We aimed to examine the associations between BPA exposure, reflected by urinary BPA concentration, and body composition in American children. Methods: Data of 1860 children aged 8–19 years who participated in the 2003–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES were analyzed in this study. Urinary BPA concentration (ng/mL was used to indicate BPA status in the body. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA. Multivariate linear regression models were fitted using survey procedures to investigate the associations between urinary BPA level and body composition separately for boys and girls. Results: After adjusting for demographic and lifestyle covariates, higher quartiled and log-transformed urinary BPA levels were significantly associated with elevated lean body mass index (LBMI z-scores in boys (p < 0.05, and significantly associated with elevated fat mass index (FMI z-scores in girls (p < 0.05. Lower urinary BPA concentration was associated with lower percentage of trunk fat in girls (compared to 1st quartile, 2nd-quartile: β = 2.85, 95% CI, 0.92–4.78; 3rd-quartile: β = 2.57, 95% CI, 0.28–4.85; 4th-quartile: β = 2.79, 95% CI, 0.44–5.14; all p < 0.05. Such patterns were not observed in boys. Conclusions: Higher BPA levels may be associated with elevated LBM in boys, but not in girls, while higher BPA levels may be associated with elevated FM in girls, but not in boys.

  3. Gender differences in the association between food insecurity and insulin resistance among U.S. adults: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junxiu; Park, Yong-Moon Mark; Berkowitz, Seth A; Hu, Qingwei; Han, Kyungdo; Ortaglia, Andrew; McKeown, Robert E; Liese, Angela D

    2015-09-01

    To examine gender-specific associations between food insecurity and insulin resistance in a representative U.S. Data on 5533 adults of 20 years of age or more (2742 men and 2791 women) without diabetes from the 2005-2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. Respondents were categorized as having full, marginal, low, or very low food security using a validated scale. Insulin-resistant individuals were defined as those with a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance value 2.5 or more. Insulin resistance was higher in both normal-weight (P = .001) and overweight or obese (P insulin resistance in normal-weight men (odds ratio, 3.99; 95% confidence interval, 1.71-9.33), and marginal food insecurity was associated with insulin resistance in overweight or obese men (odds ratio, 2.07; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-3.64) after adjusting for potential confounders. In women, the association between food insecurity and insulin resistance was no longer significant after adjustment. Food insecurity is associated with insulin resistance in adults without diabetes, and this effect varies by gender in normal-weight and overweight or obese populations. Improving food security status may help reduce insulin resistance, an underlying risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The association of parent's outcome expectations for child TV viewing with parenting practices and child TV viewing: an examination using path analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lauren; Chen, Tzu-An; Hughes, Sheryl O; O'Connor, Teresia M

    2015-05-28

    Television (TV) viewing has been associated with many undesirable outcomes for children, such as increased risk of obesity, but TV viewing can also have benefits. Although restrictive parenting practices are effective in reducing children's TV viewing, not all parents use them and it is currently unclear why. The current study examined parenting practices related to TV viewing in the context of social- cognitive theory. Specifically, we hypothesized that positive and negative Parental Outcome Expectations for child's TV Viewing (POETV) would be associated with social co-viewing and restrictive parenting practices, and that POETV and parenting practices influence the amount of TV viewed by child. Data were collected from an internet survey of 287 multi-ethnic parents and their 6-12 year old children on participants' sociodemographic information, parenting practices related to TV use, POETV, and parent and child TV viewing. Path analysis was used to examine the relationship amongst variables in separate models for weekday and weekend TV viewing. controlling for child age, household education, and parental TV viewing. The results provided partial support for the hypotheses, with notable differences between weekday and weekend viewing. The models explained 13.6% and 23.4% of the variance in children's TV viewing on weekdays and weekends respectively. Neither positive nor negative POETV were associated with restrictive TV parenting in either model. One subscale each from positive and negative POETV were associated with social co-viewing parenting on both weekends and weekdays in the expected direction. Restrictive parenting practices were directly negatively associated with children's TV viewing on weekdays, but not weekends. Social co-viewing parenting was directly positively associated with children's TV viewing on weekends, but not weekdays. The strongest influence on children's TV viewing was having a TV in the child's bedroom. Negative POETV was weakly associated

  5. Association between age at menarche and diabetes in Korean post-menopausal women: results from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2007-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eunjung; Lee, Kyong Won; Cho, Yoonsu; Chung, Hye Kyung; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Early menarche is known to be associated with diabetes, however this association remains controversial. Our study aimed to investigate the possible association between age at menarche and diabetes prevalence in post-menopausal Korean women. This study included 3,254 post-menopausal Korean women aged 50-85 years from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV (KNHANES 2007-2009). Logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for diabetes prevalence. Levels of biochemical markers were compared according to groups by age at menarche. Women in the earlier menarche age group (10-12 years) showed higher levels of fasting blood glucose (FBG) and scores of homeostatic model assessment in the insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index than other groups (p <0.05). After adjusting for potential confounding factors, early age at menarche was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes (OR 1.86, 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.07-3.23). The observed association remained significant despite additional adjustment for body mass index and waist circumference (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.03-3.23) and despite further adjustments for FBG levels and HOMA-IR index (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.11-4.55). Our findings strengthen the hypothesis that younger age at menarche is associated with increased diabetes prevalence in the Korean population.

  6. Examining the Efficiency of Models Using Tangent Coordinates or Principal Component Scores in Allometry Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigirli, Deniz; Ercan, Ilker

    2015-09-01

    Most of the studies in medical and biological sciences are related to the examination of geometrical properties of an organ or organism. Growth and allometry studies are important in the way of investigating the effects of diseases and the environmental factors effects on the structure of the organ or organism. Thus, statistical shape analysis has recently become more important in the medical and biological sciences. Shape is all geometrical information that remains when location, scale and rotational effects are removed from an object. Allometry, which is a relationship between size and shape, plays an important role in the development of statistical shape analysis. The aim of the present study was to compare two different models for allometry which includes tangent coordinates and principal component scores of tangent coordinates as dependent variables in multivariate regression analysis. The results of the simulation study showed that the model constructed by taking tangent coordinates as dependent variables is more appropriate than the model constructed by taking principal component scores of tangent coordinates as dependent variables, for all sample sizes.

  7. Modelling of food intake in Brazil and Germany: Examining the effects of self-construals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Elizabeth; Kühnen, Ulrich; Hermans, Roel C J; Lippke, Sonia

    2015-12-01

    The current research focused on the influence of informational eating norms on people's food intake, and examined whether this influence was moderated by participants' self-construal levels. In two experiments, a two (intake norm manipulation: low vs. high) by two (self-construal manipulation: interdependent versus independent) between-participant factorial design was used. The studies were conducted in Brazil (Experiment 1) and in Germany (Experiment 2) as participants' self-construal levels differ between these countries. In Experiment 1, results indicated that participants exposed to a high-intake norm ate more than participants exposed to a low-intake norm. However, self-construal was not found to moderate the influence of food intake norms on participants' intake. In Experiment 2, replicating the results of Experiment 1, exposure to a high-intake norm increased participants' food intake, but self-construals again did not moderate modelling effects on food intake. Although differences in individuals' self-construal were found between both countries, they did not affect the magnitude of modelling effects on eating. Our studies provide evidence for cross-cultural similarity in the extent to which Brazilian and German female young adults are vulnerable to modelling effects on food intake, independent on their self-construal.

  8. Modeling of Phase Equilibria Containing Associating Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derawi, Samer; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    glycol + heptane, methylcyclohexane, hexane, propylene glycol + heptane, diethylene glycol + heptane, triethylene glycol + heptane, and tetraethylene glycol + heptane. The data obtained were correlated with the NRTL model and two different versions of the UNIQUAC equation. The NRTL model and one...

  9. Assessment of Factors Associated with Breast Self-Examination among Health Extension Workers in West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia

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    Muluken Azage

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Early detection of breast cancer using breast self-examination (BSE plays an important role in decreasing its morbidity and mortality. Objective. To identify factors associated with BSE among health extension workers in Northwest Ethiopia. Methods. Cross-sectional study design was employed from October to November, 2012 in West Gojjam Zone of Amhara region. Simple random sampling technique was used to recruit a total of 390 health extension workers (HEWs. A structured Amharic questionnaire was used to collect the data. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS statistical package version 16.0. Result. This study found that 37% of HEWs had ever practiced BSE and 14.4% practiced it regularly. The three main reasons for not doing regular BSE were no breast problem (53.2%, not knowing the technique of BSE (30.6%, and not knowing the importance of BSE (21.4%. Discussion with families on BSE and history of breast examination by health professionals were found significantly associated with ever practice of BSE. Conclusion. BSE practice was found low in this study. Having information on the importance of BSE was predictor of BSE practice. Therefore, it is important to give training on BSE techniques and its role on breast cancer prevention for HEWs.

  10. Assessment of Factors Associated with Breast Self-Examination among Health Extension Workers in West Gojjam Zone, Northwest Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azage, Muluken; Abeje, Gedefaw; Mekonnen, Alemtsehay

    2013-01-01

    Background. Early detection of breast cancer using breast self-examination (BSE) plays an important role in decreasing its morbidity and mortality. Objective. To identify factors associated with BSE among health extension workers in Northwest Ethiopia. Methods. Cross-sectional study design was employed from October to November, 2012 in West Gojjam Zone of Amhara region. Simple random sampling technique was used to recruit a total of 390 health extension workers (HEWs). A structured Amharic questionnaire was used to collect the data. Data were entered and analyzed using SPSS statistical package version 16.0. Result. This study found that 37% of HEWs had ever practiced BSE and 14.4% practiced it regularly. The three main reasons for not doing regular BSE were no breast problem (53.2%), not knowing the technique of BSE (30.6%), and not knowing the importance of BSE (21.4%). Discussion with families on BSE and history of breast examination by health professionals were found significantly associated with ever practice of BSE. Conclusion. BSE practice was found low in this study. Having information on the importance of BSE was predictor of BSE practice. Therefore, it is important to give training on BSE techniques and its role on breast cancer prevention for HEWs.

  11. Associations between the Five-Factor Model of Personality and Health Behaviors among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynor, Douglas A.; Levine, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In fall 2006, the authors examined associations between the five-factor model of personality and several key health behaviors. Methods: College students (N = 583) completed the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment and the International Personality Item Pool Big Five short-form questionnaire. Results:…

  12. Modeling Time-Dependent Association in Longitudinal Data: A Lag as Moderator Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, James P.; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Little, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a straightforward, yet novel, approach to examine time-dependent association between variables. The approach relies on a measurement-lag research design in conjunction with statistical interaction models. We base arguments in favor of this approach on the potential for better understanding the associations between variables by…

  13. Modeling Fan Effects on the Time Course of Associative Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Darryl W.; Anderson, John R.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the time course of associative recognition using the response signal procedure, whereby a stimulus is presented and followed after a variable lag by a signal indicating that an immediate response is required. More specifically, we examined the effects of associative fan (the number of associations that an item has with other items…

  14. An examination of the association of selected toxic metals with total and central obesity indices: NHANES 99-02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, Miguel A; Elobeid, Mai; Ruden, Douglas M; Allison, David B

    2010-09-01

    It is conceivable that toxic metals contribute to obesity by influencing various aspects of metabolism, such as by substituting for essential micronutrients and vital metals, or by inducing oxidative stress. Deficiency of the essential metal zinc decreases adiposity in humans and rodent models, whereas deficiencies of chromium, copper, iron, and magnesium increases adiposity. This study utilized the NHANES 99-02 data to explore the association between waist circumference and body mass index with the body burdens of selected toxic metals (barium, cadmium, cobalt, cesium, molybdenum, lead, antimony, thallium, and tungsten). Some of the associations were significant direct relationships (barium and thallium), and some of the associations were significant inverse relationships (cadmium, cobalt, cesium, and lead). Molybdenum, antimony, and tungsten had mostly insignificant associations with waist circumference and body mass index. This is novel result for most of the toxic metals studied, and a surprising result for lead because high stored lead levels have been shown to correlate with higher rates of diabetes, and obesity may be a key risk factor for developing diabetes. These associations suggest the possibility that environmental exposure to metals may contribute to variations in human weight gain/loss. Future research, such as prospective studies rather than the cross-sectional studies presented here, is warranted to confirm these findings.

  15. An Examination of the Association of Selected Toxic Metals with Total and Central Obesity Indices: NHANES 99-02

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M. Ruden

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available It is conceivable that toxic metals contribute to obesity by influencing various aspects of metabolism, such as by substituting for essential micronutrients and vital metals, or by inducing oxidative stress. Deficiency of the essential metal zinc decreases adiposity in humans and rodent models, whereas deficiencies of chromium, copper, iron, and magnesium increases adiposity. This study utilized the NHANES 99-02 data to explore the association between waist circumference and body mass index with the body burdens of selected toxic metals (barium, cadmium, cobalt, cesium, molybdenum, lead, antimony, thallium, and tungsten. Some of the associations were significant direct relationships (barium and thallium, and some of the associations were significant inverse relationships (cadmium, cobalt, cesium, and lead. Molybdenum, antimony, and tungsten had mostly insignificant associations with waist circumference and body mass index. This is novel result for most of the toxic metals studied, and a surprising result for lead because high stored lead levels have been shown to correlate with higher rates of diabetes, and obesity may be a key risk factor for developing diabetes. These associations suggest the possibility that environmental exposure to metals may contribute to variations in human weight gain/loss. Future research, such as prospective studies rather than the cross-sectional studies presented here, is warranted to confirm these findings.

  16. Examining diurnal cycle influences on convective intensity in idealized cloud resolving model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Z.; Back, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    There is a large observed contrast in the lightning flash rate per unit precipitation between land and ocean in the tropics. Higher lightning flash rates are associated with faster updraft velocities, and thus greater lightning flash rate per unit precipitation is associated with faster updrafts per unit precipitation, a clear measure of convective intensity. As it is the land regions exhibiting the greater lightning flash rate per unit precipitation, there is an expectation that tropical land areas exhibit greater convective intensity than tropical oceans. Using a cloud resolving model (CRM) we tested whether the application of a diurnal cycle in sea surface temperature (SST) over a portion of the domain would result in faster updrafts per unit precipitation over that domain. We applied a Bernoulli sampling technique to the area of oscillating SST to give it the same effective mean precipitation as the fixed SST area. Once the mean precipitation values were equal, it was found that there were no differences in high intensity updraft velocity that could be associated with lightning flash rate per unit precipitation variations in the real world.

  17. Using the Stereotype Content Model to examine group depictions in Fascism: An Archival Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Federica; Volpato, Chiara; Fiske, Susan T

    2010-04-01

    The Stereotype Content Model (SCM) suggests potentially universal intergroup depictions. If universal, they should apply across history in archival data. Bridging this gap, we examined social groups descriptions during Italy's Fascist era. In Study 1, articles published in a Fascist magazine- La Difesa della Razza -were content analyzed, and results submitted to correspondence analysis. Admiration prejudice depicted ingroups; envious and contemptuous prejudices depicted specific outgroups, generally in line with SCM predictions. No paternalistic prejudice appeared; historical reasons might explain this finding. Results also fit the recently developed BIAS Map of behavioral consequences. In Study 2, ninety-six undergraduates rated the content-analysis traits on warmth and competence, without knowing their origin. They corroborated SCM's interpretations of the archival data.

  18. A critical examination of the maximum velocity of shortening used in simulation models of human movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2010-12-01

    The maximum velocity of shortening of a muscle is an important parameter in musculoskeletal models. The most commonly used values are derived from animal studies; however, these values are well above the values that have been reported for human muscle. The purpose of this study was to examine the sensitivity of simulations of maximum vertical jumping performance to the parameters describing the force-velocity properties of muscle. Simulations performed with parameters derived from animal studies were similar to measured jump heights from previous experimental studies. While simulations performed with parameters derived from human muscle were much lower than previously measured jump heights. If current measurements of maximum shortening velocity in human muscle are correct, a compensating error must exist. Of the possible compensating errors that could produce this discrepancy, it was concluded that reduced muscle fibre excursion is the most likely candidate.

  19. Association between smoking and latent tuberculosis in the U.S. population: an analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Horne

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence of an association between cigarette smoking and latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI is based on studies in special populations and/or from high prevalence settings. We sought to evaluate the association between LTBI and smoking in a low prevalence TB setting using population-based data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES. METHODS: In 1999-2000, NHANES assessed LTBI (defined as a tuberculin skin test measurement ≥10 mm in participants, and those ≥20 years of age were queried regarding their tobacco use and serum cotinine was measured. We evaluated the association of LTBI with self-reported smoking history and smoking intensity in multivariable logistic regression models that adjusted for known confounders (gender, age, birthplace, race/ethnicity, poverty, education, history of BCG vaccination, and history of household exposure to tuberculosis disease. RESULTS: Estimated LTBI prevalence was 5.3% among those ≥20 years of age. The LTBI prevalence among never smokers, current smokers, and former smokers was 4.1%, 6.6%, and 6.2%, respectively. In a multivariable model, current smoking was associated with LTBI (OR 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1-2.9. The association between smoking and LTBI was strongest for Mexican-American and black individuals. In multivariate analysis stratified by race/ethnicity, cigarette packs per day among Mexican-American smokers and cotinine levels among black smokers, were significantly associated with LTBI. CONCLUSIONS: In the large, representative, population-based NHANES sample, smoking was independently associated with significantly increased risks of LTBI. In certain populations, a greater risk of LTBI corresponded with increased smoking exposure.

  20. The active learning hypothesis of the job-demand-control model: an experimental examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusser, Jan Alexander; Schulz-Hardt, Stefan; Mojzisch, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The active learning hypothesis of the job-demand-control model [Karasek, R. A. 1979. "Job Demands, Job Decision Latitude, and Mental Strain: Implications for Job Redesign." Administration Science Quarterly 24: 285-307] proposes positive effects of high job demands and high job control on performance. We conducted a 2 (demands: high vs. low) × 2 (control: high vs. low) experimental office workplace simulation to examine this hypothesis. Since performance during a work simulation is confounded by the boundaries of the demands and control manipulations (e.g. time limits), we used a post-test, in which participants continued working at their task, but without any manipulation of demands and control. This post-test allowed for examining active learning (transfer) effects in an unconfounded fashion. Our results revealed that high demands had a positive effect on quantitative performance, without affecting task accuracy. In contrast, high control resulted in a speed-accuracy tradeoff, that is participants in the high control conditions worked slower but with greater accuracy than participants in the low control conditions.

  1. Examining school-based bullying interventions using multilevel discrete time hazard modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Stephanie L; Wagaman, M Alex; Geiger, Jennifer Mullins; Bermudez-Parsai, Monica; Hedberg, E C

    2012-10-01

    Although schools have been trying to address bullying by utilizing different approaches that stop or reduce the incidence of bullying, little remains known about what specific intervention strategies are most successful in reducing bullying in the school setting. Using the social-ecological framework, this paper examines school-based disciplinary interventions often used to deliver consequences to deter the reoccurrence of bullying and aggressive behaviors among school-aged children. Data for this study are drawn from the School-Wide Information System (SWIS) with the final analytic sample consisting of 1,221 students in grades K - 12 who received an office disciplinary referral for bullying during the first semester. Using Kaplan-Meier Failure Functions and Multi-level discrete time hazard models, determinants of the probability of a student receiving a second referral over time were examined. Of the seven interventions tested, only Parent-Teacher Conference (AOR = 0.65, p connection between the students' mesosystems as well as utilizing disciplinary strategies that take into consideration student's microsystem roles.

  2. Examining School-Based Bullying Interventions Using Multilevel Discrete Time Hazard Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagaman, M. Alex; Geiger, Jennifer Mullins; Bermudez-Parsai, Monica; Hedberg, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    Although schools have been trying to address bulling by utilizing different approaches that stop or reduce the incidence of bullying, little remains known about what specific intervention strategies are most successful in reducing bullying in the school setting. Using the social-ecological framework, this paper examines school-based disciplinary interventions often used to deliver consequences to deter the reoccurrence of bullying and aggressive behaviors among school-aged children. Data for this study are drawn from the School-Wide Information System (SWIS) with the final analytic sample consisting of 1,221 students in grades K – 12 who received an office disciplinary referral for bullying during the first semester. Using Kaplan-Meier Failure Functions and Multi-level discrete time hazard models, determinants of the probability of a student receiving a second referral over time were examined. Of the seven interventions tested, only Parent-Teacher Conference (AOR=0.65, pbullying and aggressive behaviors. By using a social-ecological framework, schools can develop strategies that deter the reoccurrence of bullying by identifying key factors that enhance a sense of connection between the students’ mesosystems as well as utilizing disciplinary strategies that take into consideration student’s microsystem roles. PMID:22878779

  3. Emergency department documentation templates: variability in template selection and association with physical examination and test ordering in dizziness presentations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meurer William J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical documentation systems, such as templates, have been associated with process utilization. The T-System emergency department (ED templates are widely used but lacking are analyses of the templates association with processes. This system is also unique because of the many different template options available, and thus the selection of the template may also be important. We aimed to describe the selection of templates in ED dizziness presentations and to investigate the association between items on templates and process utilization. Methods Dizziness visits were captured from a population-based study of EDs that use documentation templates. Two relevant process outcomes were assessed: head computerized tomography (CT scan and nystagmus examination. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the probability of each outcome for patients who did or did not receive a relevant-item template. Propensity scores were also used to adjust for selection effects. Results The final cohort was 1,485 visits. Thirty-one different templates were used. Use of a template with a head CT item was associated with an increase in the adjusted probability of head CT utilization from 12.2% (95% CI, 8.9%-16.6% to 29.3% (95% CI, 26.0%-32.9%. The adjusted probability of documentation of a nystagmus assessment increased from 12.0% (95%CI, 8.8%-16.2% when a nystagmus-item template was not used to 95.0% (95% CI, 92.8%-96.6% when a nystagmus-item template was used. The associations remained significant after propensity score adjustments. Conclusions Providers use many different templates in dizziness presentations. Important differences exist in the various templates and the template that is used likely impacts process utilization, even though selection may be arbitrary. The optimal design and selection of templates may offer a feasible and effective opportunity to improve care delivery.

  4. Associations Between Periodontitis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: The 2010 to 2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jae Ho; Hwang, Hee-Jin; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Tae Ho

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to examine whether oral hygiene and self-care, particularly in periodontal health, are associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in the Korean population. Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2010 to 2012 were used to assess the community periodontal index (CPI) of 5,878 participants (normal lung function: n = 5,181; obstructive spirometric pattern: n = 697) aged ≥40 years, who underwent spirometry. Participants with COPD brushed their teeth less frequently and used the following less frequently: 1) dental floss and/or interdental brush; 2) mouthwash; and 3) electric toothbrush (P <0.001). Prevalence of periodontitis in patients with COPD (58.1%) was significantly higher than in those without COPD (34.0%, P <0.001). Number of teeth was significantly lower in patients with COPD compared with controls. Decayed-missing-filled tooth index was significantly lower in patients with COPD. This study shows risk of COPD by periodontal severity. Periodontitis (CPI 3 and 4) was associated in males with COPD after adjustment for: 1) age; 2) income; 3) education; 4) smoking; 5) alcohol consumption; 6) exercise; 7) body mass index; 8) toothbrushing frequency; 9) diabetes mellitus; and 10) number of teeth (CPI 3: relative risk [RR] = 1.38, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.12 to 2.05; CPI 4: RR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.56). Findings of this cross-sectional study suggest that COPD in males may be associated with severe periodontitis and indicates the importance of promoting dental care in patients with COPD.

  5. Non-practice of breast self examination and marital status are associated with delayed presentation with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazali, Sumarni Mohd; Othman, Zabedah; Cheong, Kee Chee; Hock, Lim Kuang; Wan Mahiyuddin, Wan Rozita; Kamaluddin, Muhammad Amir; Yusoff, Ahmad Faudzi; Mustafa, Amal Nasir

    2013-01-01

    Delay in seeking treatment for breast cancer is a barrier to the early diagnosis and management of the disease, resulting in a poorer prognosis. We here estimated the prevalence of delayed presentation for breast cancer and identified possible influential sociodemographic factors in a cross-sectional study of 250 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer at the Radiotherapy and Oncology Clinic in Kuala Lumpur Hospital. Data were collected by face-to-face interview using a structured questionnaire and from medical records. We examined associations between delayed presentation (presenting to a physician more than 3 months after self-discovery of a symptom) and sociodemographic characteristics, practice of breast self examination (BSE), history of benign breast disease, family history of breast cancer and type of symptom, symptom disclosure and advice from others to seek treatment using multiple logistic regression. Time from self-discovery of symptom to presentation ranged from tghe same day to 5 years. Prevalence of delayed presentation was 33.1% (95%CI: 27.4, 39.3). A significantly higher proportion of delayers presented with late stages (stage III/IV) (58.3% vs. 26.9%, p<0.001). Divorced or widowed women (OR: 2.23, 95% CI: 1.11, 4.47) had a higher risk of delayed presentation than married women and women who never performed breast self examination were more likely to delay presentation compared to those who regularly performed BSE (OR: 2.74, 95% CI: 1.33, 5.64). Our findings indicate that delayed presentation for breast cancer symptoms among Malaysian women is high and that marital status and breast self examination play major roles in treatment-seeking for breast cancer symptoms.

  6. Association Between Serum Antibodies to Periodontal Bacteria and Rheumatoid Factor in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Charlene E; Kopp, Jacob; Papapanou, Panos N; Molitor, Jerry A; Demmer, Ryan T

    2016-10-01

    Alterations in the microbiome, including the periodontal microbiome, may be a risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most studies that have analyzed this association are relatively small, focus primarily on a single periodontal pathogen (Porphyromonas gingivalis), and are not population based. This study was undertaken to investigate the association between elevated serum levels of IgG antibodies to 19 periodontal species and the prevalence of rheumatoid factor (RF) in a large nationally representative sample of adults. The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES-III) is a cross-sectional sample of the noninstitutionalized US population (n = 33,994). Our study population included all dentate participants who were 60 years and older, did not have RA as defined by a modified version of the American College of Rheumatology 1987 criteria, and had complete data for both serum IgG antibodies against periodontal bacteria and serum RF antibody titer (n = 2,461). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) summarizing the relationship between the 19 periodontal serum IgG antibodies and RF seropositivity ranged from 0.53 (95% CI 0.29-0.97) to 1.27 (95% CI 0.79-2.06), and 17 of the 19 observed ORs were periodontal bacteria are mostly unassociated with RF seropositivity in the nationally representative NHANES-III. Elevated levels of antibodies to P intermedia and C ochracea are associated with lower odds of RF seropositivity. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Low Rice Intake Is Associated with Proteinuria in Participants of Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se Jin; Lee, So Young; Sung, Su Ah; Chin, Ho Jun; Lee, Sung Woo

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the risk factors of proteinuria in the Asian population. On the basis of the association between rice intake patterns and chronic diseases, we hypothesized that rice intake patterns are associated with proteinuria in the Asian population. Data, including data regarding rice intake frequency and dipstick urinalysis results, from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 1998, 2001, 2005, and 2007 were analyzed. The study involved 19,824 participants who were older than 20 years of age. Low rice intake was defined as consumption of rice ≤ 1 time/day. Proteinuria was defined as dipstick urinalysis protein ≥ 1 positive. Among the 19,824 participants, the prevalence of low rice intake and proteinuria were 17.3% and 2.9%, respectively. The low rice intake group showed a higher rate of proteinuria than the non-low rice intake group did (3.8% vs. 2.7%, P proteinuria was 1.54 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25-1.89; P proteinuria in the Asian population, which might have been affected by the associations of low rice intake with high blood pressure and diabetes. Future prospective studies are needed to confirm the results of this study.

  8. Contemporary model fidelity over the Maritime Continent: Examination of the diurnal cycle, synoptic, intraseasonal and seasonal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Dariusz

    2017-04-01

    One of the key challenges in subseasonal weather forecasting is the fidelity in representing the propagation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) across the Maritime Continent (MC). In reality both propagating and non-propagating MJO events are observed, but in numerical forecast the latter group largely dominates. The fact that models still struggle to realistically represent the MJO over MC is generally attributed to its complex terrain and associated vigorous diurnal cycle of convection, multi-scale interactions between local and propagating modes of convection and regional air-sea interactions. In this study, multi-model simulations from the GEWEX Atmospheric System Study (GASS) / Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) MJO Project are analyzed to quantify contemporary model performance in representing the MC mean climate and its variability, including the diurnal cycle, synoptic, intraseasonal, and seasonal variability. This dataset has been shown to be useful in such multi-model evaluation studies over different regions and/or focusing on different physical processes (e.g. Jiang et al., JGR, 2015; Mani et al., Clim. Dyn, 2016) For this study, comprehensive model performances are evaluated using metrics that utilize the mean precipitation pattern and the amplitude and phase of the diurnal cycle, with a particular focus on the linkage between a model's local MC variability and its fidelity in representing propagation of the MJO and equatorial Kelvin waves across the MC. Subseasonal to seasonal variability of mean precipitation and its diurnal cycle in 20 year long climate simulations from over 20 general circulation models (GCMs) is examined to benchmark model performance. Furthermore, we utilize cross model differences to gain insight into which processes are most critical to realistically represent multi-scale interactions over the MC region. This includes distinguishing the behavior between a number of land (Sumatra, Borneo, New Guinea and Southeast Asia) and

  9. Aerosol penetration of leak pathways : an examination of the available data and models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Dana Auburn

    2009-04-01

    Data and models of aerosol particle deposition in leak pathways are described. Pathways considered include capillaries, orifices, slots and cracks in concrete. The Morewitz-Vaughan criterion for aerosol plugging of leak pathways is shown to be applicable only to a limited range of particle settling velocities and Stokes numbers. More useful are sampling efficiency criteria defined by Davies and by Liu and Agarwal. Deposition of particles can be limited by bounce from surfaces defining leak pathways and by resuspension of particles deposited on these surfaces. A model of the probability of particle bounce is described. Resuspension of deposited particles can be triggered by changes in flow conditions, particle impact on deposits and by shock or vibration of the surfaces. This examination was performed as part of the review of the AP1000 Standard Combined License Technical Report, APP-GW-GLN-12, Revision 0, 'Offsite and Control Room Dose Changes' (TR-112) in support of the USNRC AP1000 Standard Combined License Pre-Application Review.

  10. Examining the justification of superposition model of FePc ; A DMC study

    CERN Document Server

    Ichibha, Tom; Hongo, Kenta; Maezono, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    We have applied CASSCF-DMC to evaluate relative stabilities of the possible electronic configurations of an isolated FePc under $D_{4h}$ symmetry. It predicts $A_{2g}$ ground state, supporting preceding DFT studies,[J. Chem. Phys. 114, 9780 (2001), Appl. Phys. 95, 165 (2009), Phys. Rev. B 85, 235129 (2012)] with confidence overcoming the ambiguity about exchange-correlation (XC) functionals. By comparing DMC with several XC, we clarified the importance of the short range exchange to describe the relative stability. We examined why the predicted $A_{2g}$ is excluded from possible ground states in the recent ligand field based model.[J. Chem. Phys. 138, 244308 (2013)] Simplified assumptions made in the superposition model [Rep. Prog. Phys. 52, 699 (1989)] are identified to give unreasonably less energy gain for $A_{2g}$ when compared with the reality. The state is found to have possible reasons for the stabilization, reducing the occupations from an unstable anti-bonding orbital, preventing double occupancies i...

  11. Examining the psychological factors associated with involvement in fantasy sports: An analysis of participants’ motivations and constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Ik Suh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined how fantasy sport participants’ motives and constraints influence their attitudes toward fantasy sports participation. Furthermore, the study attempted to develop a reliable and valid model through which researchers can measure fantasy sports participation-related motivations and constraints. The proposed model for motivations consisted of 21 items with seven dimensions (i.e., economic, social interaction, escape, fantasy, achievement, knowledge, and pass time and the model for constraints consisted of 15 items with five dimensions (i.e., time, accessibility, lack of interest, lack of partners, and lack of knowledge for fantasy sports participants. The Structural Equation Modeling (SEM method with a convenience sample of 161 participants was employed to analyze the conceptual framework and psychometric property of the scale. Motivations for fantasy sports participants were positively and significantly related to and constraints for fantasy sports participants were negatively and significantly related to their attitude toward fantasy sports participation. These results and future implications for practical and theoretical research are also discussed.

  12. Association of Plasma Homocysteine with Self-Reported Sleep Apnea Is Confounded by Age: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar P. Thakre

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High levels of plasma homocysteine are implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases especially if accompanied by sleep apnea, but a direct pathogenetic link between plasma homocysteine levels and obstructive sleep apnea is debatable. This association can have far-reaching public health implications considering the inverse association between folate and plasma homocysteine. We used data from the 2005-2006 cycle of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES to test the hypothesized associations. Of the 4490 subjects included in analysis, 177 reported sleep apnea. Age-standardized and design-effect-corrected prevalence rates were differential across gender, plasma homocysteine, and red cell folate status. Plasma homocysteine was positively correlated with age (r=0.38, P<0.0001. Multivariate analyses using sociodemographic and clinical covariates demonstrated that plasma homocysteine levels retained their respective associations with self-reported sleep apnea in all models except when age was included as a covariate. Our results demonstrate that the claimed association of plasma homocysteine with sleep apnea may be confounded by age.

  13. The association of hypertension with periodontitis is highlighted in female adults: results from the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yoo-Been; Shin, Myung-Seop; Byun, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hyun-Duck

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the association of hypertension and high systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP) with periodontitis in a nationally representative Korean adult population. Total of 14,625 participants of Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES IV) aged over 19 years were cross-sectionally surveyed. Periodontitis was defined as CPI score of 3 or 4. Hypertension was categorized as: normotensive (SBP hypertensive (120 hypertensive (SBP ≥ 140 mmHg or DBP ≥ 90 mmHg or taking antihypertensive medication). Multivariate Poisson regression analyses were performed controlling for age, sex, household income, drinking, smoking, physical activity, obesity, hypercholesterolaemia and diabetes mellitus. Stratified analyses were performed to identify specific risk groups. Hypertension showed a significant positive association with periodontitis in the fully adjusted model in female adults with a dose-response relationship. This association was highlighted in females aged 30-59 years (prevalence ratio = 1.25; 95% confidence interval: 1.11-1.40). The strength of the association was highest in females aged 30-39 years and decreased with increasing age. Among females aged 30-59 years, high-risk groups of this link were lower middle income quartile, never drinker and non-diabetes groups for both pre-hypertension and hypertension. Our data showed that hypertension was associated with periodontitis in Korean female adults independent of known confounders. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Lipid trait-associated genetic variation is associated with gallstone disease in the diverse Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodloe, Robert; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Gillani, Niloufar B; Jin, Hailing; Mayo, Ping; Allen, Melissa; McClellan, Bob; Boston, Jonathan; Sutcliffe, Cara; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie; Dilks, Holli H; Crawford, Dana C

    2013-11-21

    Gallstone disease is one of the most common digestive disorders, affecting more than 30 million Americans. Previous twin studies suggest a heritability of 25% for gallstone formation. To date, one genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been performed in a population of European-descent. Several candidate gene studies have been performed in various populations, but most have been inconclusive. Given that gallstones consist of up to 80% cholesterol, we hypothesized that common genetic variants associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), and triglycerides (TG) would also be associated with gallstone risk. To test this hypothesis, the Epidemiologic Architecture for Genes Linked to Environment (EAGLE) study as part of the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study performed tests of association between 49 GWAS-identified lipid trait SNPs and gallstone disease in non-Hispanic whites (446 cases and 1,962 controls), non-Hispanic blacks (179 cases and 1,540 controls), and Mexican Americans (227 cases and 1,478 controls) ascertained for the population-based Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). At a liberal significance threshold of 0.05, five, four, and four SNP(s) were associated with disease risk in non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and Mexican Americans, respectively. No one SNP was associated with gallstone disease risk in all three racial/ethnic groups. The most significant association was observed for ABCG5 rs6756629 in non-Hispanic whites [odds ratio (OR) = 1.89; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.44-2.49; p = 0.0001). ABCG5 rs6756629 is in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs11887534 (D19H), a variant previously associated with gallstone disease risk in populations of European-descent. We replicated a previously associated variant for gallstone disease risk in non-Hispanic whites. Further discovery and fine-mapping efforts in

  15. Association of Periodontitis With Urinary Albumin Excretion in Korean Adults With Diabetes: The 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyungdo; Nam, Ga Eun; Kim, Do Hoon; Park, Jun-Beom; Ko, Youngkyung; Roh, Yong Kyun; Cho, Kyung Hwan; Park, Yong Gyu

    2015-10-01

    Albuminuria and periodontitis are both commonly associated with systemic inflammation. However, the association between urinary albumin excretion (UAE) and periodontitis in patients with type 2 diabetes has not been fully investigated. This study aimed to investigate the association between UAE and periodontitis in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes.This study performed a cross-sectional analysis and used hierarchical multivariable logistic regression analysis models. Data from the 2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. A total of 547 patients, with type 2 diabetes without renal impairment, were included in this study. UAE was assessed using the urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR). A community periodontal index greater than or equal to code 3 was used to define periodontitis.The risk of periodontitis tended to increase as UACR increased even after adjustment for potential confounders (P for trend in the odds ratios = 0.05 in model 1; 0.02 in model 2; and 0.01 in model 3). In a subgroup analysis, the prevalence of periodontitis was significantly higher in the patients with albuminuria (UACR >30 mg/g) than in those without albuminuria among patients younger than 65 years (P = 0.03), those with newly diagnosed diabetes (P = 0.04), or those without obesity (P = .04).UAE was positively associated with the risk of periodontitis in Korean adults with type 2 diabetes. In the patients who were younger, were newly diagnosed with diabetes, or had normal body mass index, individuals with albuminuria were more likely to have a higher prevalence of periodontitis. Early identification of periodontitis may be helpful in Korean diabetic adults with increased UAE.

  16. The Association Between Shift Work and Health Behavior: Findings from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Myung-Ji; Shin, Jin-Young; Choi, Bo-Young; Keum, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Eun-Ae

    2017-01-01

    Background Shift workers are increasing worldwide, and various negative health effects of shift work have been reported. This study aimed to evaluate the relationship between shift work and health behavior. Methods This cross-sectional study included a total of 11,680 Korean adults (6,061 men and 5,619 women) aged ≥20 years old who participated in the Fifth Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2010–2012. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to evaluate the association between shift work and health behavior after adjusting for covariates. Results In men, shift work was associated with an increased risk of inadequate sleep (odds ratio [OR], 1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.00 to 1.40) compared to day work. In women, shift work was associated with an increased risk of smoking (OR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.34 to 2.22) and inadequate sleep (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.47) compared to day work. In an age-stratified subgroup analysis, female shift workers aged ≥50 years old demonstrated an increased risk of smoking (OR, 5.55; 95% CI, 3.60 to 8.55), alcohol consumption (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.53 to 3.23), and inadequate sleep (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.05) compared to female day workers. Conclusion Shift work is associated with worse health behavior, and this is most evident in women aged ≥50 years. Targeted strategies to reduce the negative health effects of shift work should be implemented, with consideration of shift workers' demographic characteristics. PMID:28360984

  17. Cohort profile for the Nurture Observational Study examining associations of multiple caregivers on infant growth in the Southeastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin Neelon, Sara E; Østbye, Truls; Bennett, Gary G; Kravitz, Richard M; Clancy, Shayna M; Stroo, Marissa; Iversen, Edwin; Hoyo, Cathrine

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Childcare has been associated with obesity in children in cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, although some observed no association. Few studies have focused on care during infancy, a period when children may be especially vulnerable. Participants The Nurture Study is an observational birth cohort designed to assess longitudinal associations of childcare and the presence of multiple caregivers on infant adiposity and weight trajectories throughout the first year of life. We examine as potential mediators feeding, physical activity, sleep and stress. We completed recruitment in 2015. Of the 860 women who enrolled during pregnancy, 799 delivered a single live infant who met our inclusion criteria. Of those, 666 mothers (77.4%) agreed to participate in the study for themselves and their infants. Findings to date Among the 666 women in the study, 472 (71%) identified as black, 127 (19%) as white, 7 (1%) as Asian or Asian American, 6 (1%) as Native American and 49 (7%) as other race or more than one race; 43 (7%) identified as Hispanic/Latina. Just under half (48%) had a high school diploma or less, 61% had household incomes <$20 000/year and 59% were married or living with a partner. The mean (SD) infant gestational age was 41.28 weeks (2.29) and birth weight for gestational age z-score was −0.31 (0.93). Just under half (49%) of infants were females, 69% received some human milk and 40% were exclusively breast fed at hospital discharge. Data collection began in 2013, is currently underway, and is scheduled to conclude in late 2016. Future plans Results will help assess the magnitude of associations between childcare in infancy and subsequent obesity. Findings will also inform intervention and policy efforts to improve childcare environments and help prevent obesity in settings where many infants spend time. Trial registration number Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01788644. PMID:28179416

  18. Examining Impact of Global warming on the summer monsoon system using regional Climate Model (PRECIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patwardhan, S. K.; Kundeti, K.; Krishna Kumar, K.

    2011-12-01

    Every year, southwest monsoon arrives over Indian region with remarkable regularity. It hits the southern state of Kerala first by the end of May or the early June. More than 70% of the annual precipitation is received during the four monsoon months viz. June to September. This monsoon rainfall is vital for the agriculture as well as for the yearly needs of Indian population. The performance of the monsoon depends on the timely onset over southern tip of India and its progress along the entire country. This northward progression of monsoon to cover the entire Indian landmass, many times, is associated with the formation of synoptic scale system in the Bay of Bengal region and their movement along the monsoon trough region. The analysis of the observed cyclonic disturbances show that their frequency has reduced in recent decades. It is, therefore, necessary to assess the effect of global warming on the monsoon climate of India. A state-of-art regional climate modelling system, known as PRECIS (Providing REgional Climates for Impacts Studies) developed by the Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, U.K. is applied over the South Asian domain to investigate the impact of global warming on the cyclonic disturbances. The PRECIS simulations at 50 km x 50 km horizontal resolution are made for two time slices, present (1961-1990) and the future (2071-2100), for two socio-economic scenarios A2 and B2. The model skills are evaluated using observed precipitation and surface air temperature. The model has shown reasonably good skill in simulating seasonal monsoon rainfall, whereas cold bias is seen in surface air temperature especially in post-monsoon months. The typical monsoon features like monsoon trough, precipitation maxima over west coast and northeast India are well simulated by the model. The model simulations under the scenarios of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations and sulphate aerosols are analysed to study the likely changes in the quasi

  19. Cumulative Incidence Association Models for Bivariate Competing Risks Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu; Fine, Jason P

    2012-03-01

    Association models, like frailty and copula models, are frequently used to analyze clustered survival data and evaluate within-cluster associations. The assumption of noninformative censoring is commonly applied to these models, though it may not be true in many situations. In this paper, we consider bivariate competing risk data and focus on association models specified for the bivariate cumulative incidence function (CIF), a nonparametrically identifiable quantity. Copula models are proposed which relate the bivariate CIF to its corresponding univariate CIFs, similarly to independently right censored data, and accommodate frailty models for the bivariate CIF. Two estimating equations are developed to estimate the association parameter, permitting the univariate CIFs to be estimated either parametrically or nonparametrically. Goodness-of-fit tests are presented for formally evaluating the parametric models. Both estimators perform well with moderate sample sizes in simulation studies. The practical use of the methodology is illustrated in an analysis of dementia associations.

  20. Gender Difference in the Epidemiological Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Olfactory Dysfunction: The Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-Hwan Hwang

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is associated with a higher risk of morbidity and/or mortality for various chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships of MetS and its components with olfactory dysfunction in a representative Korean population. We analyzed the data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2008-2010. A total of 11,609 adults who underwent otolaryngological examination were evaluated. The olfactory function was classified as normosmia or hyposmia by a self-report questionnaire according to the sense problems of smell during the past 3 months. MetS was diagnosed if a participant had at least three of the following: (1 WC ≥90 cm in men and ≥80 cm in women; (2 fasting blood sugar ≥ 100 mg/dL or medication use for elevated glucose; (3 fasting triglyceride ≥ 150 mg/dL or cholesterol-lowering medication use; (4 HDL-cholesterol <40 mg/dL in men and <50 mg/dL in women or cholesterol-lowering medication use; and (5 SBP ≥ 130 mmHg and/or DBP ≥ 85 mmHg or antihypertensive drug use for patients with a history of hypertension. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction in the study population was 6.3%. The prevalence of olfactory dysfunction was significantly higher in older people with MetS than in those without MetS in both sexes (male, 42.0 ± 3.4% vs. 34.7 ± 0.9%, p = 0.0354; female, 46.2 ± 2.8% vs. 37.8 ± 0.8%, p = 0.0026. However, elevated waist circumference, elevated fasting glucose, elevated triglycerides, reduced HDL cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, severe stress, depressed mood, and suicidal ideation were significantly associated with olfactory dysfunction only in women. After controlling for confounders, olfactory dysfunction was significantly associated with MetS (odds ratio, 1.352; 95% confidence interval, 1.005-1.820 only in women. MetS are associated with olfactory dysfunction only in Korean women.

  1. Examining whether the information–motivation–behavioral skills model predicts medication adherence for patients with a rare disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Dayna S; Hogan, Susan L; Jordan, Joanne M; DeVellis, Robert F; Carpenter, Delesha M

    2017-01-01

    The information–motivation–behavioral skills (IMB) model has been used to explain and promote medication adherence among patients with diabetes and HIV. The objective of this study was to examine whether the IMB model predicted medication adherence among vasculitis patients. Adult vasculitis patients (n=228) completed online questionnaires at baseline and 3-month follow-up. Linear regressions were calculated to determine the direct effects of information and motivation on medication adherence (P<0.05). A mediation analysis using a bootstrapping approach was used to test whether behavioral skills significantly mediated the effect of information and motivation on medication adherence. Participants reported high levels of information (M=4.0; standard deviation [SD]=0.68), moderate levels of motivation (M=2.7; SD=1.00), and high levels of behavioral skills (M=4.1; SD=0.74). In the regression model, only behavioral skills (B=0.38; P<0.001) were significantly associated with medication adherence; however, mediation analysis revealed that behavioral skills significantly mediated the effects of information and motivation on medication adherence. The results support the IMB-hypothesized relationships between information, motivation, behavioral skills, and medication adherence in our sample. Findings suggest that providers should work with vasculitis patients to increase their medication-related skills to improve medication adherence. PMID:28138225

  2. Examining Socio-Cultural and Neighborhood Factors Associated with Trajectories of Mexican-Origin Mothers' Education-Related Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Sakshi; Bámaca-Colbert, Mayra Y; Witherspoon, Dawn P; Pomerantz, Eva M; Robins, Richard W

    2017-01-03

    Parental involvement in education is an important determinant of youth's academic success. Yet, there is limited knowledge on how Latino parents' education-related involvement changes over time. Using data from a longitudinal study of 674 Mexican-origin families (mother-adolescent dyad; M age of child at Wave 1=10.4, SD = 0.60), we examined trajectories of parental involvement from 5(th) to 11(th) grade and the effects of socio-cultural (e.g., family SES and acculturation) and contextual (e.g., neighborhood) factors on these trajectories. Results showed that mothers reduced two aspects of the educational involvement: home-based involvement and academic aspirations, but increased on a third aspect of involvement, resource seeking. Furthermore, family SES, acculturation, and neighborhood context were differentially associated with mothers' involvement at 5(th) grade and predicted changes in involvement across elementary and high school.

  3. Succession of root-associated fungi in Pisum sativum during a plant growth cycle as examined by 454 pyrosequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, L.; Nicolaisen, M.; Larsen, J.

    2012-01-01

    was to examine succession patterns of root-associated fungi in pea during a full plant growth cycle. Methods Plants were grown in pots with field soil in a growth chamber under controlled conditions. Fungal communities in pea roots were analyzed at different plant growth stages including the vegetative growth......Purpose Roots are inhabited by a broad range of fungi, including pathogens and mycorrhizal fungi, with functional traits related to plant health and nutrition. Management of these fungi in agroecosystems requires profound knowledge about their ecology. The main objective of this study......, flowering and senescence, using 454 pyrosequencing. Results One hundred and twenty one non-singleton operational taxonomic units (OTUs) representing fungal species were detected. Pathogenic and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi dominated during the vegetative growth stage, whereas saprotrophic fungi dominated...

  4. Quantitative and semi-quantitative histopathological examination of renal biopsies in healthy individuals, and associations with kidney function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Yael; Barregard, Lars; Sallsten, Gerd; Wallin, Maria; Mölne, Johan

    2016-05-01

    This study assesed the prevalence of histopathological changes in renal biopsies from healthy individuals, and the association with age, sex and smoking. Donor biopsies from 109 subjects were obtained from living kidney donors, and blood and urine samples were collected together with medical history. All biopsies were scored according to the Banff '97 classification with some modifications. The parameters included in this study were tubular atrophy, interstitial fibrosis, glomerulosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, arteriolohyalinosis and a sclerosis score. An alternative scoring system for tubular atrophy was examined (using ≤5% rather than kidney donors around 50 years of age with normal kidney function. We propose that a cut-off of ≤5% yields a better definition of grade 0 tubular atrophy compared with the established cut-off of >0%.

  5. Examining the association between social cognition and functioning in individuals at ultra-high risk for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Jack; Bartholomeusz, Cali; Papas, Alicia; Allott, Kelly; Nelson, Barnaby; Yung, Alison R; Thompson, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Social and role functioning are compromised for the majority of individuals at ultra-high risk of psychosis, and it is important to identify factors that contribute to this functional decline. This study aimed to investigate social cognitive abilities, which have previously been linked to functioning in schizophrenia, as potential factors that impact social, role and global functioning in ultra-high risk patients. A total of 30 ultra-high risk patients were recruited from an established at-risk clinical service in Melbourne, Australia, and completed a battery of social cognitive, neurocognitive, clinical and functioning measures. We examined the relationships between all four core domains of social cognition (emotion recognition, theory of mind, social perception and attributional style), neurocognitive, clinical and demographic variables with three measures of functioning (the Global Functioning Social and Role scales and the Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale) using correlational and multiple regression analyses. Performance on a visual theory of mind task (visual jokes task) was significantly correlated with both concurrent role ( r = 0.425, p = 0.019) and global functioning ( r = 0.540, p = 0.002). In multivariate analyses, it also accounted for unique variance in global, but not role functioning after adjusting for negative symptoms and stress. Social functioning was not associated with performance on any of the social cognition tasks. Among specific social cognitive abilities, only a test of theory of mind was associated with functioning in our ultra-high risk sample. Further longitudinal research is needed to examine the impact of social cognitive deficits on long-term functional outcome in the ultra-high risk group. Identifying social cognitive abilities that significantly impact functioning is important to inform the development of targeted intervention programmes for ultra-high risk individuals.

  6. Association between dental pain and depression in Korean adults using the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, S E; Park, Y G; Han, K; Min, J A; Kim, S Y

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationships between the prevalence of depression and dental pain using a well characterised, nationally representative, population-based study. This study analysed data from the 2012 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 4886). Oral health status was assessed using the oral health questionnaire, and oral examination was performed by trained dentists. Depression was defined as the participant having been diagnosed as depression during the previous year. Logistic regression was applied to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), controlling for a range of covariates. Results demonstrated that participants included in 'root canal treatment is necessary' showed higher prevalence of self-reported dental pain; in particular, participants with depression presented more dental pain than those without depression. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, self-reported dental pain increased in participants with depression. The AOR (95% CI) for having self-reported dental pain was 1·58 (1·08-2·33) in dentists' diagnosis of no dental pain/depression group, 1·62 (1·32-1·98) in dentists' diagnosis of dental pain/no depression group and 2·84 (1·10-7·37) in dentists' diagnosis of dental pain/depression group. It was concluded that depression was associated with dental pain after adjustment for potential confounders in Korean adults. Thus, dentists should consider the possible presence of psychopathology when treating patients with dental pain.

  7. PALM KERNEL OIL SOLUBITY EXAMINATION AND ITS MODELING IN EXTRACTION PROCESS USING SUPERCRITICAL CARBON DIOXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Bahari Setianto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Application of  supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 to vegetable oil extraction became an attractive technique due to its high solubility, short extraction time and simple purification. The method is considered as earth friendly technology due to the absence of chemical usage. Solubility of solute-SC-CO2 is an important data for application of the SC-CO2 extraction. In this work, the equilibrium solubility of the palm kernel oil (PKO in SC-CO2 has been examined using extraction curve analysis. The examinations were performed at temperature and pressure ranges of  323.15 K to 353.15 K and 20.7 to 34.5 MPa respectively. It was obtained that the experimental solubility were from 0.0160 to 0.0503 g oil/g CO2 depend on the extraction condition. The experimental solubility data was well correlated with a solvent density based model with absolute percent deviation of 0.96. PENENTUAN KELARUTAN MINYAK INTI KELAPA SAWIT DAN PEMODELAN EKSTRAKSI DENGAN KARBON DIOKSIDA SUPERKRITIK. Sehubungan dengan kelarutan yang tinggi, waktu ekstraksi yang pendek dan pemurnian hasil yang mudah, aplikasi karbon dioksida superkritis (SC-CO2 pada ekstraksi minyak nabati menjadi sebuah teknik ekstraksi yang menarik. Karena tanpa penggunaan bahan kimia, metode ekstraksi ini dianggap sebagai teknologi yang ramah lingkungan. Kelarutan zat terlarut pada SC-CO2 merupakan data yang penting dalam aplikasi SC-CO2 pada proses ekstraksi.  Pada penelitian ini,  kelarutan kesetimbangan dari minyak biji sawit (PKO dalam SC-CO2 telah diuji dengan mengunakan analisa kurva proses ekstraksi. Pengujian kelarutan tersebut dilakukan pada rentang suhu 323,15 K sampai 353,15 K dan rentang tekanan 20,7 MPa sampai 34,5 MPa. Hasil analisa menunjukkan bahwa kelarutan kesetimbangan hasil percobaan  PKO pada SC-CO2 adalah 0.0160 g minyak/g CO2 sampai 0,0503 g minyak/g CO2 tergantung pada kondisi ekstraksi. Data kelarutan kesetimbangan hasil percobaan  telah dikorelasaikan dengan baik menggunakan

  8. On the association between adolescent autonomy and psychosocial functioning: examining decisional independence from a self-determination theory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Petegem, Stijn; Beyers, Wim; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Soenens, Bart

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, we focus on the concept of adolescent autonomy and its relation with psychosocial functioning. Specifically, we aim to differentiate between 2 prevailing conceptualizations of autonomy, that is, (a) autonomy defined as independence versus dependence and (b) autonomy defined as self-endorsed versus controlled functioning. A 2nd goal is to examine the relative contribution of each autonomy operationalization in the prediction of adolescents' adjustment (i.e., well-being, problem behavior, and intimacy). Data were gathered in a sample of 707 Belgian adolescents. Using a newly developed questionnaire, we assessed both the degree of independent decision making per se and the self-endorsed versus controlled motives underlying both independent and dependent decision making. The degree of independent decision making could clearly be differentiated from the underlying motives for doing so. Moreover, independent decision making as such showed unique associations with more problem behavior. Further, as expected, self-endorsed motives for both independent and dependent decision making generally related to an adaptive pattern of psychosocial functioning, and controlled motives were associated with maladjustment. The discussion focuses on the difference between the 2 perspectives on autonomy and on the different meaning of the motives underlying independent, relative to dependent, decision making.

  9. Association between Obesity and Chronic Laryngitis in Women - Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Hoon Joo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to investigate the relationship between obesity and chronic laryngitis in South Korea using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES collected during 2008-2010. Methods: KNHANES was a cross-sectional survey of the civilian, non-institutionalized population of South Korea (n = 13,819. Obesity status was measured by using BMI and waist circumference. Results: Among the population over 19 years of age, the prevalence of chronic laryngitis was 4.0 ± 0.4%. Chronic laryngitis was significantly associated with age, BMI, waist circumference, fat proportion, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, triglycerides, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in women. Old age and current smoking were significantly associated with chronic laryngitis in men. Obese women were at a higher risk for chronic laryngitis than women without obesity (odds ratio (OR 2.022, 95% confidence interval (95% CI 1.412-2.895 after further adjustment for confounders. Women with abdominal obesity were also at higher risk for chronic laryngitis (OR 1.475, 95% CI 1.024-2.126. Conclusion: Obese women in Korea have an elevated risk for developing chronic laryngitis. Further epidemiological and experimental studies are necessary to clarify the impact of obesity on this condition.

  10. Examining the Role of Voluntary Associations in Environmental Management: The Case of the Sam Houston National Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jiaying; Schuett, Michael A.

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of voluntary associations involved in forest management. The specific areas examined in this study include organizational attributes, membership profile, attitudes toward forest-management priorities, and concerns about forest-management issues. To achieve this purpose, data were collected using a case study approach with mixed-methods (document reviews, personal interviews, and a Web survey) at a national forest in Texas, USA. Overall, the voluntary associations in this study can be described as place-based, small to moderate in scale, activity-oriented, and active groups that are adaptive to sociopolitical and environmental changes. General group members placed high importance on aesthetic, ecological, and recreation management of the national forest. In addition, this study showed five key forest management issues: (1) limited recreation access; (2) financial challenges for forest management; (3) conflict among recreation user groups; (4) inadequate communication by the United States Forest Service to the general public, and (5) sustainability of the forest. Theoretical and managerial implications of the results are discussed.

  11. Examining Nock and Prinstein's four-function model with offenders who self-injure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Jenelle; Smith, Hayden P; Beaudette, Janelle N

    2016-07-01

    Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is the deliberate bodily harm or disfigurement without suicidal intent and for purposes not socially sanctioned (e.g., cutting, burning, head banging). Nock and Prinstein (2004) proposed a 4-function model (FFM) of NSSI, in which the functions of NSSI are categorized by two dichotomous factors: (a) positive (i.e., involves the addition of a favorable stimulus) or negative (i.e., involves the removal of an aversive stimulus; and (b) automatic (i.e., intrapersonal) or social (i.e., interpersonal). This study examined the validity of this model with incarcerated populations. In-depth semistructured interviews with 201 incarcerated offenders were analyzed and categorized based on the FFM. Participants' descriptions of functions of NSSI were most commonly categorized as automatic negative reinforcement (25.0%; e.g., coping with negative emotions), followed by automatic positive reinforcement (31.3%; e.g., self-punishment), social positive reinforcement (31.3%; e.g., to communicate with others), and social negative reinforcement (12.5%; e.g., to avoid hurting someone else). While the uniqueness of the correctional environment affects some of the specific functions evident in offenders, FFM can be used to adequately organize the functions of NSSI in offenders, providing a useful tool for explaining this complex behavior. Clinically, NSSI in offenders can be viewed has having the same underlying motivations, although automatic positive reinforcement is more prevalent in offenders and social positive reinforcement is more prevalence in nonoffenders. Given that the motivations underlying nonsuicidal self-injury are similar for offender and nonoffender populations, similar treatment approaches may be effective with both populations. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. An Examination of Bullying in Georgia Schools: Demographic and School Climate Factors Associated with Willingness to Intervene in Bullying Situations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Goldammer

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Research dedicated to identification of precursors to cases of aggravated bullying in schools has led to enhanced knowledge of risk factors for both victimization and perpetration. However, characteristics among those who are more likely to intervene in such situations are less understood. The purpose of this study is to examine the associations between demographic characteristics, school climate and psychosocial factors, and willingness to intervene in a bullying situation among middle and high school students in Georgia.Methods: We computed analyses using cross-sectional data from the Georgia Student Health Survey II (GSHS 2006 administered to public school students in grades 6, 8, 10, and 12 (n=175,311. We used logistic regression analyses to determine the demographic, school climate and psychosocial factors associated with a willingness to intervene in a bullying situation.Results: Students who were white and who were girls were most likely to report willingness to intervene in bullying situations. Several school-climate factors, such as feeling safe at school, liking school, feeling successful at school and perceiving clear rules at school, were associated with willingness to intervene, while youth who reported binge drinking were less willing to intervene.Conclusion: These findings, while preliminary, indicate that girls, students who are white, and students who experience a relatively positive school climate and adaptive psychosocial factors are more likely to report that they would intervene in bullying situations. These findings may guide how bullying is addressed in schools and underscore the importance of safe school climates. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(4:324–328.

  13. Misery loves company? A meta-regression examining aggregate unemployment rates and the unemployment-mortality association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelfs, David J; Shor, Eran; Blank, Aharon; Schwartz, Joseph E

    2015-05-01

    Individual-level unemployment has been consistently linked to poor health and higher mortality, but some scholars have suggested that the negative effect of job loss may be lower during times and in places where aggregate unemployment rates are high. We review three logics associated with this moderation hypothesis: health selection, social isolation, and unemployment stigma. We then test whether aggregate unemployment rates moderate the individual-level association between unemployment and all-cause mortality. We use six meta-regression models (each using a different measure of the aggregate unemployment rate) based on 62 relative all-cause mortality risk estimates from 36 studies (from 15 nations). We find that the magnitude of the individual-level unemployment-mortality association is approximately the same during periods of high and low aggregate-level unemployment. Model coefficients (exponentiated) were 1.01 for the crude unemployment rate (P = .27), 0.94 for the change in unemployment rate from the previous year (P = .46), 1.01 for the deviation of the unemployment rate from the 5-year running average (P = .87), 1.01 for the deviation of the unemployment rate from the 10-year running average (P = .73), 1.01 for the deviation of the unemployment rate from the overall average (measured as a continuous variable; P = .61), and showed no variation across unemployment levels when the deviation of the unemployment rate from the overall average was measured categorically. Heterogeneity between studies was significant (P unemployment experiences change when macroeconomic conditions change. Efforts to ameliorate the negative social and economic consequences of unemployment should continue to focus on the individual and should be maintained regardless of periodic changes in macroeconomic conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A model-based examination of multivariate physical modes in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, A. J.; Ladd, C.; Cheng, W.; Curchitser, E. N.; Hedstrom, K.

    2016-10-01

    We use multivariate output from a hydrodynamic model of the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) to explore the covariance among its physical state and air/sea fluxes. We attempt to summarize this coupled variability using a limited set of patterns, and examine their correlation to three large-scale climate indices relevant to the Northeast Pacific. This analysis is focused on perturbations from monthly climatology of the following attributes of the GOA: sea surface temperature, sea surface height, mixed layer depth, sea surface salinity, latent heat flux, sensible heat flux, shortwave irradiance, net long wave irradiance, currents at 40 m depth, and wind stress. We identified two multivariate modes, both substantially correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and Multivariate El Nino (MEI) indices on interannual timescales, which together account for ~30% of the total normalized variance of the perturbation time series. These two modes indicate the following covarying events during periods of positive PDO/MEI: (1) anomalously warm, wet and windy conditions (typically in winter), with elevated coastal SSH, followed 2-5 months later by (2) reduced cloud cover, with emerging shelf-break eddies. Similar modes are found when the analysis is performed separately on the eastern and western GOA; in general, modal amplitudes appear stronger in the western GOA.

  15. Examining a comprehensive model of disaster-related posttraumatic stress disorder in systematically studied survivors of 10 disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Carol S; Oliver, Julianne; Pandya, Anand

    2012-10-01

    Using a comprehensive disaster model, we examined predictors of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in combined data from 10 different disasters. The combined sample included data from 811 directly exposed survivors of 10 disasters between 1987 and 1995. We used consistent methods across all 10 disaster samples, including full diagnostic assessment. In multivariate analyses, predictors of PTSD were female gender, younger age, Hispanic ethnicity, less education, ever-married status, predisaster psychopathology, disaster injury, and witnessing injury or death; exposure through death or injury to friends or family members and witnessing the disaster aftermath did not confer additional PTSD risk. Intentionally caused disasters associated with PTSD in bivariate analysis did not independently predict PTSD in multivariate analysis. Avoidance and numbing symptoms represented a PTSD marker. Despite confirming some previous research findings, we found no associations between PTSD and disaster typology. Prospective research is needed to determine whether early avoidance and numbing symptoms identify individuals likely to develop PTSD later. Our findings may help identify at-risk populations for treatment research.

  16. Examining the association between language, expository discourse and offending behaviour: an investigation of direction, strength and independence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Thomas; Clegg, Judy; Stackhouse, Joy

    2017-07-10

    A high prevalence of Developmental Language Disorder (DLD) is reported in the population of Young Offenders (YO). However, little is known about the extent of the association between language and offending behaviour relative to social disadvantage, education attendance and non-verbal intelligence (IQ), and neither has this association been investigated with particular reference to the expository discourse abilities of YOs on community orders in the UK. This study aimed to examine the direction and strength of the association between language and offending behaviour by comparing the receptive and expressive language and expository discourse abilities of male and female YOs and non-offenders in the UK, relative to the confounds of social disadvantage, years of education attended and non-verbal IQ. Examining expository discourse provided a measure of the YOs. ability to verbally communicate complex information; a communication ability that is fundamental to engaging effectively in youth offending services and secondary education. An opportunity sample of 52 YOs was recruited from a youth offending service. The YO group was matched on years of education, social disadvantage and non-verbal IQ to a purpose selected comparison group of 25 non-offenders. All participants had English as their first language and were not currently receiving any speech and language intervention. Participants completed standardised measures of receptive and expressive language and an expository discourse measure. The incidence of DLD was identified and compared across offender group using scores from the language and expository discourse measures and gender differences were also explored. Finally, logistical regression analysis was used to test the association between language performance and offending status relative to the confounds of social disadvantage, education attendance and non-verbal IQ. A large proportion of YOs scored below test norms for the language and expository discourse

  17. The Use of Kernel Density Estimation to Examine Associations between Neighborhood Destination Intensity and Walking and Physical Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania L King

    Full Text Available Local destinations have previously been shown to be associated with higher levels of both physical activity and walking, but little is known about how the distribution of destinations is related to activity. Kernel density estimation is a spatial analysis technique that accounts for the location of features relative to each other. Using kernel density estimation, this study sought to investigate whether individuals who live near destinations (shops and service facilities that are more intensely distributed rather than dispersed: 1 have higher odds of being sufficiently active; 2 engage in more frequent walking for transport and recreation.The sample consisted of 2349 residents of 50 urban areas in metropolitan Melbourne, Australia. Destinations within these areas were geocoded and kernel density estimates of destination intensity were created using kernels of 400m (meters, 800m and 1200m. Using multilevel logistic regression, the association between destination intensity (classified in quintiles Q1(least-Q5(most and likelihood of: 1 being sufficiently active (compared to insufficiently active; 2 walking≥4/week (at least 4 times per week, compared to walking less, was estimated in models that were adjusted for potential confounders.For all kernel distances, there was a significantly greater likelihood of walking≥4/week, among respondents living in areas of greatest destinations intensity compared to areas with least destination intensity: 400m (Q4 OR 1.41 95%CI 1.02-1.96; Q5 OR 1.49 95%CI 1.06-2.09, 800m (Q4 OR 1.55, 95%CI 1.09-2.21; Q5, OR 1.71, 95%CI 1.18-2.48 and 1200m (Q4, OR 1.7, 95%CI 1.18-2.45; Q5, OR 1.86 95%CI 1.28-2.71. There was also evidence of associations between destination intensity and sufficient physical activity, however these associations were markedly attenuated when walking was included in the models.This study, conducted within urban Melbourne, found that those who lived in areas of greater destination intensity walked

  18. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors: a model for examining the effects of pathology versus seizures on cognitive dysfunction in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxendale, Sallie; Donnachie, Elizabeth; Thompson, Pamela; Sander, Josemir W

    2013-12-01

    Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNTs) provide a unique model for studying the effects of seizures on cognitive development. Epilepsy and antiepileptic medications are prominent features in the lives and schooling of people who develop seizures in childhood. People with an adult onset share the same underlying brain pathology, but their childhood development is unaffected by seizures. Therefore, DNTs provide a model to examine the specific influence of seizures and their treatment on cognitive development, over and above the effects of the underlying pathology in epilepsy. We examined the neuropsychological characteristics of 56 adults with DNT and medically intractable epilepsy (mean age 32.7 years). Twenty-two adults (39%) had an age of onset of epilepsy before the age of 12 years (childhood-onset group). Scores on tests of intelligence (Verbal IQ and Performance IQ), reading, working memory, verbal learning, verbal recall, visual learning, and expressive and receptive language ability were analyzed. There were no significant localization effects (right vs. left vs. extratemporal) on any of the neuropsychological test scores. In the group as a whole, the neuropsychological test scores were significantly lower than healthy, age-matched controls on measures of Verbal IQ (p memory (p older. The traditional pattern of lateralized memory deficits seen in people with hippocampal sclerosis may not be present in people with temporal lobe epilepsy associated with a DNT. The presence of seizures and their treatment in early childhood may adversely influence the development of these core cognitive abilities, resulting in patterns of cognitive deficits that remain apparent in adulthood. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. Examining Social Adaptations in a Volatile Landscape in Northern Mongolia via the Agent-Based Model Ger Grouper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia K. Clark

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The environment of the mountain-steppe-taiga of northern Mongolia is often characterized as marginal because of the high altitude, highly variable precipitation levels, low winter temperatures, and periodic droughts coupled with severe winter storms (known as dzuds. Despite these conditions, herders have inhabited this landscape for thousands of years, and hunter-gatherer-fishers before that. One way in which the risks associated with such a challenging and variable landscape are mitigated is through social networks and inter-family cooperation. We present an agent-based simulation, Ger Grouper, to examine how households have mitigated these risks through cooperation. The Ger Grouper simulation takes into account locational decisions of households, looks at fission/fusion dynamics of households and how those relate to environmental pressures, and assesses how degrees of relatedness can influence sharing of resources during harsh winters. This model, coupled with the traditional archaeological and ethnographic methods, helps shed light on the links between early Mongolian pastoralist adaptations and the environment. While preliminary results are promising, it is hoped that further development of this model will be able to characterize changing land-use patterns as social and political networks developed.

  20. Towards a Better Experience: Examining Student Needs in the Online Classroom through Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karen L. Milheim

    2012-01-01

    .... Using Maslow's hierarchy of needs model as a conceptual framework, the paper examines how student needs can be addressed at various levels in online courses, from basic needs to the ultimate goal of self-actualization...

  1. Examining HPV threat-to-efficacy ratios in the Extended Parallel Process Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcioppolo, Nick; Jensen, Jakob D; Wilson, Steven R; Collins, W Bart; Carrion, Melissa; Linnemeier, Georgiann

    2013-01-01

    The Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) posits that an effective fear appeal includes both threat and efficacy components; however, research has not addressed whether there is an optimal threat-to-efficacy ratio. It is possible that varying levels of threat and efficacy in a persuasive message could yield different effects on attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. In a laboratory experiment, women (n = 442) were exposed to human papilloma virus (HPV) prevention messages containing one of six threat-to-efficacy ratios and one of two message frames (messages emphasizing the connection between HPV and cervical cancer or HPV and genital warts). Multiple mediation analysis revealed that a 1-to-1 ratio of threat to efficacy was most effective at increasing prevention intentions, primarily because it caused more fear and risk susceptibility than other message ratios. Response efficacy significantly mediated the relationship between message framing and intentions, such that participants exposed to a genital warts message reported significantly higher intentions, and this association can be explained in part through response efficacy. Implications for future theoretical research as well as campaigns and intervention research are discussed.

  2. Associative Models for Storing and Retrieving Concept Lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Acevedo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-beta bidirectional associative memories are implemented for storing concept lattices. We use Lindig's algorithm to construct a concept lattice of a particular context; this structure is stored into an associative memory just as a human being does, namely, associating patterns. Bidirectionality and perfect recall of Alpha-Beta associative model make it a great tool to store a concept lattice. In the learning phase, objects and attributes obtained from Lindig's algorithm are associated by Alpha-Beta bidirectional associative memory; in this phase the data is stored. In the recalling phase, the associative model allows to retrieve objects from attributes or vice versa. Our model assures the recalling of every learnt concept.

  3. Mining multilevel spatial association rules with cloud models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Bin; ZHU Zhong-ying

    2005-01-01

    The traditional generalization-based knowledge discovery method is introduced. A new kind of multilevel spatial association of the rules mining method based on the cloud model is presented. The cloud model integrates the vague and random use of linguistic terms in a unified way. With these models, spatial and nonspatial attribute values are well generalized at multiple levels, allowing discovery of strong spatial association rules.Combining the cloud model based method with Apriori algorithms for mining association rules from a spatial database shows benefits in being effective and flexible.

  4. Evaluation of breast self-examination program using Health Belief Model in female students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Moodi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Breast cancer has been considered as a major health problem in females, because of its high incidence in recent years. Due to the role of breast self-examination (BSE in early diagnosis and prevention of morbidity and mortality rate of breast cancer, promoting student knowledge, capabilities and attitude are required in this regard. This study was conducted to evaluation BSE education in female University students using Health Belief Model. Methods: In this semi-experimental study, 243 female students were selected using multi-stage randomized sampling in 2008. The data were collected by validated and reliable questionnaire (43 questions before intervention and one week after intervention. The intervention program was consisted of one educational session lasting 120 minutes by lecturing and showing a film based on HBM constructs. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS (version11.5 using statistical paired t-test and ANOVA at the significant level of α = 0.05. Results: 243 female students aged 20.6 ± 2.8 years old were studied. Implementing the educational program resulted in increased knowledge and HBM (perceived susceptibility, severity, benefit and barrier scores in the students (p ≤ 0.01. Significant increases were also observed in knowledge and perceived benefit after the educational program (p ≤ 0.05. ANOVA statistical test showed significant difference in perceived benefit score in students of different universities (p = 0.05. Conclusions: Due to the positive effects of education on increasing knowledge and attitude of university students about BSE, the efficacy of the HBM in BSE education for female students was confirmed.

  5. Understanding Knowledge Sharing Behavior: An Examination of the Extended Model of Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina O. Sihombing

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Knowledge is recognized as one valuable asset for many organizations. Thus, knowledge-sharing is one of important activities in many organizations, including university. Knowledge sharing is defined as activities of transferring or disseminating organizationally relevant information, ideas, suggestions, and expertise with one another. This research applied Christian values as a moderating variable in the framework of theory of planned behavior. The aims of this research to assess applicability of the theory of planned behavior to predict knowledge sharing and to examine the effects of Christian values in the relationship between attitude and intention to share knowledge. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data for this study. The data was then analyzed using structural equation modeling. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  6. Evaluation of breast self-examination program using Health Belief Model in female students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodi, Mitra; Mood, Mahdi Baladi; Sharifirad, Gholam Reza; Shahnazi, Hossein; Sharifzadeh, Gholamreza

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer has been considered as a major health problem in females, because of its high incidence in recent years. Due to the role of breast self-examination (BSE) in early diagnosis and prevention of morbidity and mortality rate of breast cancer, promoting student knowledge, capabilities and attitude are required in this regard. This study was conducted to evaluation BSE education in female University students using Health Belief Model. In this semi-experimental study, 243 female students were selected using multi-stage randomized sampling in 2008. The data were collected by validated and reliable questionnaire (43 questions) before intervention and one week after intervention. The intervention program was consisted of one educational session lasting 120 minutes by lecturing and showing a film based on HBM constructs. The obtained data were analyzed by SPSS (version11.5) using statistical paired t-test and ANOVA at the significant level of α = 0.05. 243 female students aged 20.6 ± 2.8 years old were studied. Implementing the educational program resulted in increased knowledge and HBM (perceived susceptibility, severity, benefit and barrier) scores in the students (p ≤ 0.01). Significant increases were also observed in knowledge and perceived benefit after the educational program (p ≤ 0.05). ANOVA statistical test showed significant difference in perceived benefit score in students of different universities (p = 0.05). Due to the positive effects of education on increasing knowledge and attitude of university students about BSE, the efficacy of the HBM in BSE education for female students was confirmed.

  7. Gene-based multiple regression association testing for combined examination of common and low frequency variants in quantitative trait analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Joo eYoo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Multi-marker methods for genetic association analysis can be performed for common and low frequency SNPs to improve power. Regression models are an intuitive way to formulate multi-marker tests. In previous studies we evaluated regression-based multi-marker tests for common SNPs, and through identification of bins consisting of correlated SNPs, developed a multi-bin linear combination (MLC test that is a compromise between a 1df linear combination test and a multi-df global test. Bins of SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium (LD are identified, and a linear combination of individual SNP statistics is constructed within each bin. Then association with the phenotype is represented by an overall statistic with df as many or few as the number of bins. In this report we evaluate multi-marker tests for SNPs that occur at low frequencies. There are many linear and quadratic multi-marker tests that are suitable for common or low frequency variant analysis. We compared the performance of the MLC tests with various linear and quadratic statistics in joint or marginal regressions. For these comparisons, we performed a simulation study of genotypes and quantitative traits for 85 genes with many low frequency SNPs based on HapMap Phase III. We compared the tests using 1 set of all SNPs in a gene, 2 set of common SNPs in a gene (MAF≥5%, 3 set of low frequency SNPs (1%≤MAF

  8. Dual Trajectories of Gang Affiliation and Delinquent Peer Association During Adolescence: An Examination of Long-Term Offending Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Beidi; Krohn, Marvin D

    2016-04-01

    Prior research has demonstrated that both adolescent gang affiliation and perceived delinquent peer association are important predictors of individual offending. A crucial question is whether and how youth gang affiliation contributes to a spectrum of criminal acts above and beyond the influence of associating with delinquent peers. Using 14 waves of data from the Rochester Youth Developmental Study, an ongoing longitudinal panel study aimed at understanding the causes and consequences of delinquency and drug use in an urban sample of adolescents, the current study employs a relatively new modeling technique-dual trajectory analysis-to illustrate the dynamic relationship between these two measures among 666 male youth. The results suggest that the two measures, while overlapping, may constitute distinct concepts that operate in different ways. The most convincing evidence of gang effects, above and beyond the influence of perceived peer delinquency, is for violent behavior and by extension police arrest. Our findings contribute to developmental research and provide information that informs future gang control efforts.

  9. Examining the association between patient-centered communication and provider avoidance, CAM use, and CAM-use disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faith, Jennifer; Thorburn, Sheryl; Tippens, Kimberly M

    2015-01-01

    Patients' perceptions of the quality of their relationships with health care providers may influence their health care-seeking behaviors and future interactions with providers, including use of conventional health care, use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and disclosure of CAM use. The study examined the associations between perceived patient-centered communication and provider avoidance, CAM use, and CAM-use disclosure. This study used cross-sectional survey data from the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) 3, a nationally representative survey of US adults collected between January 2008 and May 2008. Two questions asked about CAM use and CAM-use disclosure, and another asked about avoidance of doctors. For the independent variable, responses from 6 questions on patient-centered communication were averaged to create a scale score ranging from 1-4. The research team conducted multiple logistic regressions of the 3 primary outcome measures, adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, presence or absence of a regular source of care, insurance status, frequency of visits to providers, and health status. All analyses were weighted to make the results representative of the US population aged ≥18 y. Approximately one-third of respondents (36%) had avoided seeing their doctors within the 12 mo prior to the survey. Approximately 24% had used CAM within the prior 12 mo, and 51.7% of CAM users had discussed their CAM use with their doctors. Higher levels of patient-centered communication were significantly associated with lower odds of provider avoidance (AOR=0.63; 95% CI=0.52, 0.76) and CAM use (AOR=0.60; 95% CI=0.46, 0.78) but were not associated with CAM-use disclosure. Findings suggest that patients may be more likely to avoid seeing their doctors and more likely to use CAM when they perceive low levels of patient-centered communication. Further research to understand the role of the characteristics of patient-provider relationships

  10. Tracking membrane protein association in model membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Reffay

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins are essential in the exchange processes of cells. In spite of great breakthrough in soluble proteins studies, membrane proteins structures, functions and interactions are still a challenge because of the difficulties related to their hydrophobic properties. Most of the experiments are performed with detergent-solubilized membrane proteins. However widely used micellar systems are far from the biological two-dimensions membrane. The development of new biomimetic membrane systems is fundamental to tackle this issue.We present an original approach that combines the Fluorescence Recovery After fringe Pattern Photobleaching technique and the use of a versatile sponge phase that makes it possible to extract crucial informations about interactions between membrane proteins embedded in the bilayers of a sponge phase. The clear advantage lies in the ability to adjust at will the spacing between two adjacent bilayers. When the membranes are far apart, the only possible interactions occur laterally between proteins embedded within the same bilayer, whereas when membranes get closer to each other, interactions between proteins embedded in facing membranes may occur as well.After validating our approach on the streptavidin-biotinylated peptide complex, we study the interactions between two membrane proteins, MexA and OprM, from a Pseudomonas aeruginosa efflux pump. The mode of interaction, the size of the protein complex and its potential stoichiometry are determined. In particular, we demonstrate that: MexA is effectively embedded in the bilayer; MexA and OprM do not interact laterally but can form a complex if they are embedded in opposite bilayers; the population of bound proteins is at its maximum for bilayers separated by a distance of about 200 A, which is the periplasmic thickness of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We also show that the MexA-OprM association is enhanced when the position and orientation of the protein is restricted by the

  11. Development of Web-Based Examination System Using Open Source Programming Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abass, Olalere A.; Olajide, Samuel A.; Samuel, Babafemi O.

    2017-01-01

    The traditional method of assessment (examination) is often characterized by examination questions leakages, human errors during marking of scripts and recording of scores. The technological advancement in the field of computer science has necessitated the need for computer usage in majorly all areas of human life and endeavors, education sector…

  12. FAMULATUR PLUS - A successful model for improving students' physical examination skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerg, Achim; Öchsner, Wolfgang; Traue, Harald; Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction/Project description: Several studies have revealed insufficient physical examination skills among medical students, both with regard to the completeness of the physical examination and the accuracy of the techniques used. FAMULATUR PLUS was developed in response to these findings. As part of this practice-oriented instructional intervention, physical examination skills should be taught through examination seminars and problem-oriented learning approaches. In order to ensure practical relevance, all courses are integrated into a 30-day clinical traineeship in the surgery or internal medicine department of a hospital (FAMULATUR PLUS). Research question: Does participation in the FAMULATUR PLUS project lead to a more optimistic self-assessment of examination skills and/or improved performance of the physical examination? Methodology: A total of 49 medical students participated in the study. The inclusion criteria were as follows: enrollment in the clinical studies element of their degree program at the University of Ulm and completion of the university course in internal medicine examinations. Based on their personal preferences, students were assigned to either the intervention (surgery/internal medicine; n=24) or the control group (internal medicine; n=25). All students completed a self-assessment of their physical examination skills in the form of a questionnaire. However, practical examination skills were only assessed in the students in the intervention group. These students were asked to carry out a general physical examination of the simulation patient, which was recorded and evaluated in a standardized manner. In both instances, data collection was carried out prior to and after the intervention. Results: The scores arising from the student self-assessment in the intervention (IG) and control groups (CG) improves significantly in the pre-post comparison, with average scores increasing from 3.83 (±0.72; IG) and 3.54 (±0.37; CG) to 1.92 (±0

  13. FAMULATUR PLUS – A successful model for improving students' physical examination skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerg, Achim; Öchsner, Wolfgang; Traue, Harald; Jerg-Bretzke, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Introduction/Project description: Several studies have revealed insufficient physical examination skills among medical students, both with regard to the completeness of the physical examination and the accuracy of the techniques used. FAMULATUR PLUS was developed in response to these findings. As part of this practice-oriented instructional intervention, physical examination skills should be taught through examination seminars and problem-oriented learning approaches. In order to ensure practical relevance, all courses are integrated into a 30-day clinical traineeship in the surgery or internal medicine department of a hospital (FAMULATUR PLUS). Research question: Does participation in the FAMULATUR PLUS project lead to a more optimistic self-assessment of examination skills and/or improved performance of the physical examination? Methodology: A total of 49 medical students participated in the study. The inclusion criteria were as follows: enrollment in the clinical studies element of their degree program at the University of Ulm and completion of the university course in internal medicine examinations. Based on their personal preferences, students were assigned to either the intervention (surgery/internal medicine; n=24) or the control group (internal medicine; n=25). All students completed a self-assessment of their physical examination skills in the form of a questionnaire. However, practical examination skills were only assessed in the students in the intervention group. These students were asked to carry out a general physical examination of the simulation patient, which was recorded and evaluated in a standardized manner. In both instances, data collection was carried out prior to and after the intervention. Results: The scores arising from the student self-assessment in the intervention (IG) and control groups (CG) improves significantly in the pre-post comparison, with average scores increasing from 3.83 (±0.72; IG) and 3.54 (±0.37; CG) to 1.92 (±0

  14. A simple capacitor model for radio emission associated with earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ares de Parga Gonzalo; Ram(I)rez-Rojas Alejandro

    2004-01-01

    In this brief report we propose a simple model based on the properties of an electric capacitor under short-circuit conditions as a possible mechanism of radio emissions associated with earthquakes. This model can be considered as complementary to other models concerning the same problem.

  15. AOM/DSS Model of Colitis-Associated Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parang, Bobak; Barrett, Caitlyn W; Williams, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of colitis-associated carcinoma (CAC) has benefited substantially from mouse models that faithfully recapitulate human CAC. Chemical models, in particular, have enabled fast and efficient analysis of genetic and environmental modulators of CAC without the added requirement of time-intensive genetic crossings. Here we describe the Azoxymethane (AOM)/Dextran Sodium Sulfate (DSS) mouse model of inflammatory colorectal cancer.

  16. Personality, negative affect coping, and drinking alone: a structural equation modeling approach to examine correlates of adolescent solitary drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Kasey G; Chung, Tammy; Wright, Aidan G C; Clark, Duncan B; Black, Jessica J; Martin, Christopher S

    2015-05-01

    This study examined the personality traits of negative emotionality and constraint and the ability to resist drinking during negative affective states as correlates of solitary drinking in adolescence. We hypothesized that higher levels of negative emotionality and lower levels of constraint would predict solitary drinking and that these relationships would be mediated by the ability to resist drinking in response to negative emotions. Structural equation modeling was used to fit a path model from the personality traits of negative emotionality and constraint to solitary drinking status through intermediate effects on the ability to resist drinking during negative emotions using cross-sectional data. Clinical and community settings in Pennsylvania, USA. The sample included 761 adolescent drinkers (mean age = 17.1). Adolescents completed the Lifetime Drinking History, the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire, the Constructive Thinking Inventory and the Situational Confidence Questionnaire. The path model provided a good fit to the data. The association between trait negative emotionality and solitary drinking was fully mediated by adolescents' ability to resist drinking during negative affective states (b = 0.05, P = 0.01). In contrast, constraint had a direct effect on solitary drinking (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, b = -0.23, P<0.01), as well as an indirect effect through the ability to resist drinking during negative affective states (b = -0.03, P = 0.02). The ability to resist drinking while experiencing negative feelings or emotions may be an important underlying mechanism linking trait negative emotionality (a tendency toward depression, anxiety and poor reaction to stress) and constraint (lack of impulsiveness) to adolescent solitary drinking. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  17. Is There an Association Between Study Materials and Scores on the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgeons Part 1 Examination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Sharkey PF, Hilibrand AS. Passing the boards: can USMLE and orthopaedic in training examination scores predict passage of the ABOS part 1 examination. J... USMLE Step 1 and OITE correlate with the ABOS part I certifying examination?: a multicenter study. Clin Orthop Relat Res. 2010;468(10):2797 2802. 16...examination and scores on USMLE steps 1 and 2. Acad Med. 2009;84:S21 S24. 17. Drystad BW, Pope D, Milbrandt JC, Beck RT, Weinhoeft AL, Idusuyi OB. Predictive

  18. Phenotyping chronic pelvic pain based on latent class modeling of physical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, B W; Grey, S F; Reichenbach, M; McCarroll, M; Von Gruenigen, V

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Defining clinical phenotypes based on physical examination is required for clarifying heterogeneous disorders such as chronic pelvic pain (CPP). The objective of this study was to determine the number of classes within 4 examinable regions and then establish threshold and optimal exam criteria for the classes discovered. Methods. A total of 476 patients meeting the criteria for CPP were examined using pain pressure threshold (PPT) algometry and standardized numeric scale (NRS) pain ratings at 30 distinct sites over 4 pelvic regions. Exploratory factor analysis, latent profile analysis, and ROC curves were then used to identify classes, optimal examination points, and threshold scores. Results. Latent profile analysis produced two classes for each region: high and low pain groups. The optimal examination sites (and high pain minimum thresholds) were for the abdominal wall region: the pair at the midabdomen (PPT threshold depression of > 2); vulvar vestibule region: 10:00 position (NRS > 2); pelvic floor region: puborectalis (combined NRS > 6); vaginal apex region: uterosacral ligaments (combined NRS > 8). Conclusion. Physical examination scores of patients with CPP are best categorized into two classes: high pain and low pain. Standardization of the physical examination in CPP provides both researchers and general gynecologists with a validated technique.

  19. Phenotyping Chronic Pelvic Pain Based on Latent Class Modeling of Physical Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Fenton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Defining clinical phenotypes based on physical examination is required for clarifying heterogeneous disorders such as chronic pelvic pain (CPP. The objective of this study was to determine the number of classes within 4 examinable regions and then establish threshold and optimal exam criteria for the classes discovered. Methods. A total of 476 patients meeting the criteria for CPP were examined using pain pressure threshold (PPT algometry and standardized numeric scale (NRS pain ratings at 30 distinct sites over 4 pelvic regions. Exploratory factor analysis, latent profile analysis, and ROC curves were then used to identify classes, optimal examination points, and threshold scores. Results. Latent profile analysis produced two classes for each region: high and low pain groups. The optimal examination sites (and high pain minimum thresholds were for the abdominal wall region: the pair at the midabdomen (PPT threshold depression of > 2; vulvar vestibule region: 10:00 position (NRS > 2; pelvic floor region: puborectalis (combined NRS > 6; vaginal apex region: uterosacral ligaments (combined NRS > 8. Conclusion. Physical examination scores of patients with CPP are best categorized into two classes: high pain and low pain. Standardization of the physical examination in CPP provides both researchers and general gynecologists with a validated technique.

  20. Dynamic examination of the femur in a rat model of osteoporosis after injection of CPC containing ABK and PLLA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, A.; Kusaka, T.; Sasaki, S.; Takano, I.; Tahara, Y.; Ishii, Y. [Kyorin Univ. School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery

    2001-07-01

    We developed calcium phosphate cement containing antibiotics and poly lactic acid, and examined the effects on bone strength by injecting the cement into the medullary space of the femur in model rats with osteoporosis. A good strength of bone was obtained over 6 months by injecting bone paste into the medullary space of the femur in model rats with bone formation. (orig.)

  1. Testicular Self-Examination: A Test of the Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenahan, Carol; Shevlin, Mark; Adamson, Gary; Bennett, Cara; O'Neill, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the utility and efficiency of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and the health belief model (HBM) in predicting testicular self-examination (TSE) behaviour. A questionnaire was administered to an opportunistic sample of 195 undergraduates aged 18-39 years. Structural equation modelling indicated that, on the…

  2. Integrating Social Activity Theory and Critical Discourse Analysis: A Multilayered Methodological Model for Examining Knowledge Mediation in Mentoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becher, Ayelet; Orland-Barak, Lily

    2016-01-01

    This study suggests an integrative qualitative methodological framework for capturing complexity in mentoring activity. Specifically, the model examines how historical developments of a discipline direct mentors' mediation of professional knowledge through the language that they use. The model integrates social activity theory and a framework of…

  3. Testicular Self-Examination: A Test of the Health Belief Model and the Theory of Planned Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenahan, Carol; Shevlin, Mark; Adamson, Gary; Bennett, Cara; O'Neill, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the utility and efficiency of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) and the health belief model (HBM) in predicting testicular self-examination (TSE) behaviour. A questionnaire was administered to an opportunistic sample of 195 undergraduates aged 18-39 years. Structural equation modelling indicated that, on the…

  4. Attitude Scales an Congeneric Tests: A Re-Examination of an Attitude-Behavior Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwin, Duane F.

    1976-01-01

    A structural equation model for attitude-behavior relationships is presented which conceptualizes attitude scales as congeneric measurements. The model represents a re-parameterization of an earlier one. (Author/RC)

  5. Century‐scale variability in global annual runoff examined using a water balance model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCabe, Gregory J; Wolock, David M

    2011-01-01

    A monthly water balance model (WB model) is used with CRUTS2.1 monthly temperature and precipitation data to generate time series of monthly runoff for all land areas of the globe for the period 1905 through 2002...

  6. Ion Association versus Ion Interaction Models in Examining Electrolyte Solutions: Application to Calcium Hydroxide Solubility Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, M. Isabel; Borge, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The heterogeneous equilibrium of the solubility of calcium hydroxide in water is used to predict both its solubility product from solubility and solubility values from solubility product when inert salts, in any concentration, are present. Accepting the necessity of including activity coefficients to treat the saturated solution of calcium…

  7. ANALYTICAL EXAMINATION OF METHODS FOR MODELING BUSINESS PROCESSES IN E-COMMERCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Shkil

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available n this article the theoretical aspects of modeling business-processes are considered, the characteristic of business modeling methods is given, their merits and demerits are determined, the comparative analysis of methods of modeling business-processes in e-commerce is performed.

  8. Comparative examination of cats with feline leukemia virus-associated enteritis and other relevant forms of feline enteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipar, A; Kremendahl, J; Jackson, M L; Reinacher, M

    2001-07-01

    Cats with feline leukemia virus (FeLV)-associated enteritis (FAE), enteritis of other known viral etiology (parvovirus [PV], enteric coronavirus [CoV]), and enteritis of unknown etiology with histologic features similar to those of FAE and PV enteritis (EUE) and FeLV-negative and FeLV-positive cats without enterocyte alterations were examined. Amount and types of infiltrating leukocytes in the jejunum and activity and cellular constituents of mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and bone marrow were determined. PV and CoV infections were confirmed by immunohistologic demonstration of PV and CoV antigen, ultrastructural demonstration of viral particles in the intestinal content, and in situ hybridization for PV genome. FeLV infection was detected by immunohistology for gp70, p27, and p15E. Latent FeLV infection was excluded by polymerase chain reaction methods for exogenous FeLV DNA. Enterocyte lesions involved the crypts in cats with PV enteritis, FAE, and EUE and the villous tips in cats with CoV enteritis. Inflammatory infiltration was generally dominated by mononuclear cells and was moderate in the unaltered intestine and in cats with PV enteritis and marked in cats with FAE, CoV enteritis, and EUE. In cats with EUE, myeloid/histiocyte antigen-positive macrophages were relatively numerous, suggesting recruitment of peripheral blood monocytes. Lymphoid tissues were depleted in cats with PV enteritis and with EUE but were normal or hyperplastic in cats with FAE. Bone marrow activity was decreased in cats with PV enteritis; in cats with FAE or EUE and in FeLV-positive cats without enterocyte alterations, activity was slightly increased. In cats with FAE and PV enteritis, a T-cell-dominated response prevailed. EUE showed some parallels to human inflammatory bowel disease, indicating a potential harmful effect of infiltrating macrophages on the intestinal epithelium.

  9. Examining the Effects of Video Modeling and Prompts to Teach Activities of Daily Living Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldi, Catarina; Crigler, Alexandra; Kates-McElrath, Kelly; Long, Brian; Smith, Hillary; Rehak, Kim; Wilkinson, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    Video modeling has been shown to be effective in teaching a number of skills to learners diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In this study, we taught two young men diagnosed with ASD three different activities of daily living skills (ADLS) using point-of-view video modeling. Results indicated that both participants met criterion for all ADLS. Participants did not maintain mastery criterion at a 1-month follow-up, but did score above baseline at maintenance with and without video modeling. • Point-of-view video models may be an effective intervention to teach daily living skills. • Video modeling with handheld portable devices (Apple iPod or iPad) can be just as effective as video modeling with stationary viewing devices (television or computer). • The use of handheld portable devices (Apple iPod and iPad) makes video modeling accessible and possible in a wide variety of environments.

  10. The reasoned/reactive model: A new approach to examining eating decisions among female college dieters and nondieters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhl, Holly; Holub, Shayla C; Dolan, Elaine A

    2016-12-01

    Female college students are prone to unhealthy eating patterns that can impact long-term health. This study examined female students' healthy and unhealthy eating behaviors with three decision-making models. Specifically, the theory of reasoned action, prototype/willingness model, and new reasoned/reactive model were compared to determine how reasoned (logical) and reactive (impulsive) factors relate to dietary decisions. Females (N=583, Mage=20.89years) completed measures on reasoned cognitions about foods (attitudes, subjective norms, nutrition knowledge, intentions to eat foods), reactive cognitions about foods (prototypes, affect, willingness to eat foods), dieting, and food consumption. Structural equation modeling (SEM) revealed the new reasoned/reactive model to be the preeminent model for examining eating behaviors. This model showed that attitudes were related to intentions and willingness to eat healthy and unhealthy foods. Affect was related to willingness to eat healthy and unhealthy foods, whereas nutrition knowledge was related to intentions and willingness to eat healthy foods only. Intentions and willingness were related to healthy and unhealthy food consumption. Dieting status played a moderating role in the model and revealed mean-level differences between dieters and nondieters. This study highlights the importance of specific factors in relation to female students' eating decisions and unveils a comprehensive model for examining health behaviors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Examining angler behavior using contingent behavior modeling: A case study of water quality change at a Wisconsin lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiswerth, Mark E.; Kashian, Russell D.; Skidmore, Mark

    2008-11-01

    We use contingent behavior (CB) analysis to examine the potential impacts of a hypothetical change in the clarity of a lake. We collect and use both CB and revealed preference data to estimate a pooled negative binomial count data travel cost model. From this analysis we calculate the consumer surplus per angling party day for our case study lake to be about $104, or a total annual consumer surplus of $1.4 million. Using this consumer surplus measure and changes in the intended number of visits obtained from the CB survey, we estimate the loss in consumer surplus associated with a decline in water clarity from 10 to 3 feet (1 foot = 0.3048 m) to be about $522,000 annually (a 38% decrease). Since this is the first such application of CB analysis to estimate the effects of a water clarity change, the study may illustrate a method well suited to analyzing changes in water quality attributes that are easily observable and well understood by recreators.

  12. Generalized memory associativity in a network model for the neuroses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemann, Roseli S.; Donangelo, Raul; de Carvalho, Luís A. V.

    2009-03-01

    We review concepts introduced in earlier work, where a neural network mechanism describes some mental processes in neurotic pathology and psychoanalytic working-through, as associative memory functioning, according to the findings of Freud. We developed a complex network model, where modules corresponding to sensorial and symbolic memories interact, representing unconscious and conscious mental processes. The model illustrates Freud's idea that consciousness is related to symbolic and linguistic memory activity in the brain. We have introduced a generalization of the Boltzmann machine to model memory associativity. Model behavior is illustrated with simulations and some of its properties are analyzed with methods from statistical mechanics.

  13. Generalized memory associativity in a network model for the neuroses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemann, Roseli S; Donangelo, Raul; de Carvalho, Luís A V

    2009-03-01

    We review concepts introduced in earlier work, where a neural network mechanism describes some mental processes in neurotic pathology and psychoanalytic working-through, as associative memory functioning, according to the findings of Freud. We developed a complex network model, where modules corresponding to sensorial and symbolic memories interact, representing unconscious and conscious mental processes. The model illustrates Freud's idea that consciousness is related to symbolic and linguistic memory activity in the brain. We have introduced a generalization of the Boltzmann machine to model memory associativity. Model behavior is illustrated with simulations and some of its properties are analyzed with methods from statistical mechanics.

  14. The Associative Basis of Scientific Creativity: A Model Proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Kanli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Creativity is accepted as an important part of scientific skills. Scientific creativity proceeds from a need or urge to solve a problem, and in-volves the production of original and useful ideas or products. Existing scientific creativity theories and tests do not feature the very im-portant thinking processes, such as analogical and associative thinking, which can be consid-ered crucial in creative scientific problem solv-ing. Current study’s aim is to provide an alter-native model and explicate the associative basis of scientific creativity. Emerging from the re-viewed theoretical framework, Scientific Asso-ciations Model is proposed. This model claims that, similarity and mediation constitutes the basis of creativity and focuses on three compo-nents namely; associative thinking, analogical thinking (analogical reasoning & analogical problem solving and insight which are consid-ered to be main elements of scientific associa-tive thinking.

  15. Examining Screening-Level Multimedia Models Through a Comparison Framework for Landfill Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Zunaira; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Two models for evaluating transport and fate of benzene were studied and compared in this paper. A fugacity model and an analytical environmental multimedia model (AEMM) were used to reconcile fate and mass transfer of benzene observed in a landfill site. The comparison of two models were based on average concentrations and partition behavior of benzene among three different phases i.e., air, soil, and groundwater. In the study of fugacity method about 99.6 % of the total benzene flux was distributed into air from landfill source. According to AEMM the diffusion gas flux was also predominant mechanism for benzene released from landfill and advection of gas and liquid was second dominant transport mechanism at steady-state conditions. Overall study of fugacity modeling (Level I and II) confirms the fate and transport mechanism of benzene released from landfill by comparing it with AEMM. However, the values of predicted concentrations, advection, and diffusion flux of benzene using fugacity model were different from AEMM results due to variation in input parameters. In comparison with experimental observations, fugacity model showed more error difference as compared to AEMM as fugacity model is treated as a single unit box model. This study confirms that fugacity model is a screening level tool to be used in conjunction with detailed remediation followed by AEMM that can be evolved as strategic decision-making stage.

  16. Consumption of whole grains is associated with improved diet quality and nutrient intake in children and adolescents: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to examine the association of consumption of whole grains (WG) with diet quality and nutrient intake in children and adolescents by a secondary analysis of cross-sectional data. The 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used to study children ...

  17. Examining Interior Grid Nudging Techniques Using Two-Way Nesting in the WRF Model for Regional Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study evaluates interior nudging techniques using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for regional climate modeling over the conterminous United States (CONUS) using a two-way nested configuration. NCEP–Department of Energy Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Pro...

  18. A critical examination of the dendrite growth models Comparison of theory with experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, S. N.; Laxmanan, V.

    1987-01-01

    Three dendrite growth models for directionally solidified succinonitrile-acetone, succinonitrile-salol, aluminum-copper, and lead-paladium alloys are evaluated. The characteristics of the Burden and Hunt (1974) model, the Laxmanan (1985) model, and the Trivedi (1980) model are described. The dendrite tip temperature, tip radius, liquid composition, and primary arm spacing for the alloys are analyzed in terms of growth speed, alloy composition, and temperature gradient. It is observed that the Burden and Hunt model accurately predicts the proper behavior of the parameters, but does not provide good quantitative predictions. A good fit between the experimental data and the Trivedi and Laxmanan models is detected. The advantages of the Trivedi marginal stability analysis and the Laxmanan minimum dendrite tip undercooling approaches are discussed.

  19. Predictors of breast self - examination among female teachers in Ethiopia using health belief model

    OpenAIRE

    Birhane, Negussie; Mamo, Abebe; Girma, Eshetu; Asfaw, Shifera

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is by far the most frequent cancer of women. It is the second leading cause of death in women worldwide. Approximately one out of eight women develops breast cancer all over the world. Majority of cases of cancer of the breast are detected by women themselves, stressing the importance of breast self-examination. The main objective of this study was to assess predictors of breast self-examination among female teachers in Kafa Zone, South West part of Ethiopia. Methods ...

  20. Evaluation of a skin self examination attitude scale using an item response theory model approach

    OpenAIRE

    Djaja, Ngadiman; Youl, Pip; Aitken, Joanne; Janda, Monika

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Skin Self-Examination Attitude Scale (SSEAS) is a brief measure that allows for the assessment of attitudes in relation to skin self-examination. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the SSEAS using Item Response Theory (IRT) methods in a large sample of men???50 years in Queensland, Australia. Methods A sample of 831 men (420 intervention and 411 control) completed a telephone assessment at the 13-month follow-up of a randomized-controlled trial of a video-bas...

  1. Examining Competing Models of Transformational Leadership, Leadership Trust, Change Commitment, and Job Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi-Feng

    2016-08-01

    This study discusses the influence of transformational leadership on job satisfaction through assessing six alternative models related to the mediators of leadership trust and change commitment utilizing a data sample (N = 341; M age = 32.5 year, SD = 5.2) for service promotion personnel in Taiwan. The bootstrap sampling technique was used to select the better fitting model. The tool of hierarchical nested model analysis was applied, along with the approaches of bootstrapping mediation, PRODCLIN2, and structural equation modeling comparison. The results overall demonstrate that leadership is important and that leadership role identification (trust) and workgroup cohesiveness (commitment) form an ordered serial relationship.

  2. Examining secular trend  and seasonality in count data using dynamic generalized linear modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbye-Christensen, Søren; Dethlefsen, Claus; Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders;

    series regression model for Poisson counts. It differs in allowing the regression coefficients to vary gradually over time in a random fashion. Data  In the period January 1980 to 1999, 17,989 incidents of acute myocardial infarction were recorded in the county of Northern Jutland, Denmark. Records were...... updated daily. Results  The model with a seasonal pattern and an approximately linear trend was fitted to the data, and diagnostic plots indicate a good model fit. The analysis with the dynamic model revealed peaks coinciding with influenza epidemics. On average the peak-to-trough ratio is estimated...

  3. Examination of evaporative fraction diurnal behaviour using a soil-vegetation model coupled with a mixed-layer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Lhomme

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In many experimental conditions, the evaporative fraction, defined as the ratio between evaporation and available energy, has been found stable during daylight hours. This constancy is investigated over fully covering vegetation by means of a land surface scheme coupled with a mixed-layer model, which accounts for entrainment of overlying air. The evaporation rate follows the Penman-Monteith equation and the surface resistance is given by a Jarvis type parameterization involving solar radiation, saturation deficit and leaf water potential. The diurnal course of the evaporative fraction is examined, together with the influence of environmental factors (soil water availability, solar radiation input, wind velocity, saturation deficit above the well-mixed layer. In conditions of fair weather, the curves representing the diurnal course of the evaporative fraction have a typical concave-up shape. Around midday (solar time these curves appear as relatively constant, but always lower that the daytime mean value. Evaporative fraction decreases when soil water decreases or when solar energy increases. An increment of saturation deficit above the mixed-layer provokes only a slight increase of evaporative fraction, and wind velocity has almost no effect. The possibility of estimation daytime evaporation from daytime available energy multiplied by the evaporative fraction at a single time of the day is also investigated. It appears that it is possible to obtain fairly good estimates of daytime evaporation by choosing adequately the time of the measurement of the evaporative fraction. The central hours of the day, and preferably about 3 hr before or after noon, are the most appropriate to provide good estimates. The estimation appears also to be much better when soil water availability (or evaporation is high than when it is low.

  4. Fuzzy Association Degree with Delayed Time in Temporal Data Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘惟一; 郭陵芝; 宋宁

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an expression of the semantic proximity. Based on the temporal data model, a method of the temporal approximation is given. Using these concepts, this paper provides an evaluated method of fuzzy and dynamic association degree with delayed time and a superposition method of association degrees. Particularly, by means of the fuzzy and dynamic association degree, the connection between the weather data of two regions can be discovered.

  5. Examining the mediating effect of work-to-family conflict on the associations between job stressors and employee psychological distress: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshio, Takashi; Inoue, Akiomi; Tsutsumi, Akizumi

    2017-08-03

    The mediating effect of work-to-family conflict (WFC) on the associations between eight types of job stressors (measured based on the job demands-control, effort-reward imbalance and organisational justice models) and psychological distress in employees was examined. This study employed a prospective design. An occupational cohort study in Japan (Japanese Study of Health, Occupation, and Psychosocial Factors Related Equity; J-HOPE). 5859 men and 1560 women who were working for 11 firms and participated at three consecutive waves of J-HOPE, at 1-year intervals, from 2010 to 2013. Psychological distress, as measured by Kessler 6 scores. Mediation analysis using data on job stressors at baseline, WFC at 1-year follow-up and psychological distress at 2-year follow-up showed that WFC mediated 39.1% (95% CI 29.1% to 49.1%) and 44.5% (95% CI 31.4% to 51.7%) of the associations of psychological distress with job demands and effort, respectively, for men. The mediating effect of WFC was smaller for job stressors indicating reduced job resources, compared with job demands and effort. The mediating effect of WFC was somewhat larger for women than it was for men, with WFC mediating 47.5% (95% CI 22.5% to 72.6%) and 64.0% (95% CI 24.3% to 100.0%) of the associations of psychological distress with job demands and effort, respectively. WFC was a key mediator in the associations between most job stressors and employee psychological distress. Results suggest that policy measures and support from supervisors, to prevent job stressors from adding to WFC, are needed to reduce employee psychological distress. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. An Effective School Autonomy Model: Examining Headteachers' Job Satisfaction and Work-Related Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidou Solomou, Galatia; Pashiardis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although school autonomy has been a matter of great interest during the last decades and several relevant measures have been implemented toward this end, the relation between school autonomy and school effectiveness has not been examined thoroughly. The purpose of this paper is to explore this relation and to propose an effective school…

  7. Examining the Effects of Differential Instructional Methods on the Model of Foreign Language Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pae, Tae-Il; Shin, Sang-Keun

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of differential instructional methods on the relationships between intrinsic and extrinsic motivations (IM and EM, respectively), self-confidence, motivation, and English as a foreign language (EFL) achievement for a sample of Korean university students and their teachers. To this end,…

  8. A Model for Intervention and Predicting Success on the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heupel, Carol

    1994-01-01

    The relationship of selected academic variables to National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) performance was studied and a "best set" of indicators predictive of NCLEX-RN success was identified. Results indicated that selected nursing theory courses and the junior year grade point average could be used to…

  9. An Effective School Autonomy Model: Examining Headteachers' Job Satisfaction and Work-Related Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaidou Solomou, Galatia; Pashiardis, Petros

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Although school autonomy has been a matter of great interest during the last decades and several relevant measures have been implemented toward this end, the relation between school autonomy and school effectiveness has not been examined thoroughly. The purpose of this paper is to explore this relation and to propose an effective school…

  10. The Marginalized "Model" Minority: An Empirical Examination of the Racial Triangulation of Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we propose a shift in race research from a one-dimensional hierarchical approach to a multidimensional system of racial stratification. Building upon Claire Kim's (1999) racial triangulation theory, we examine how the American public rates Asians relative to blacks and whites along two dimensions of racial stratification: racial…

  11. Examining the Consulting Physician Model to Enhance the School Nurse Role for Children with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristin D.; Moonie, Sheniz; Sterling, David A.; Gillespie, Kathleen N.; Kurz, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's "Strategies for Addressing Asthma Within a Coordinated School Health Program" recommends a consulting physician for schools to help manage asthma. The literature examines the effects when a school nurse is present, but the addition of a consulting physician is not well understood. The…

  12. Determining a Model to Predict Hispanic Preservice Teachers' Success on the Texas Examination of Educator Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhidong; Telese, James

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we report the regression relations between preservice teachers' academic characteristics and their performance on the Texas Examination of Educator Standards. These academic characteristics include grade point average, reading ability, and critical thinking. The studies indicate that the critical thinking was the best predictor…

  13. Response to Intervention for English Learners: Examining Models for Determining Response and Nonresponse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards-Tutor, Catherine; Solari, Emily J.; Leafstedt, Jill M.; Gerber, Michael M.; Filippini, Alexis; Aceves, Terese C.

    2013-01-01

    Using extant data, the purpose of this study is to examine methods for determining response to intervention (RTI) in a sample of kindergarten English Learners (ELs). Three commonly used methods for determining RTI--(a) benchmark criteria, (b) slope discrepancy, and (c) dual discrepancy--are investigated. Participants included 117 ELs. Students…

  14. Examining the Consulting Physician Model to Enhance the School Nurse Role for Children with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristin D.; Moonie, Sheniz; Sterling, David A.; Gillespie, Kathleen N.; Kurz, Richard S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's "Strategies for Addressing Asthma Within a Coordinated School Health Program" recommends a consulting physician for schools to help manage asthma. The literature examines the effects when a school nurse is present, but the addition of a consulting physician is not well understood. The…

  15. The Marginalized "Model" Minority: An Empirical Examination of the Racial Triangulation of Asian Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Lee, Jennifer C.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we propose a shift in race research from a one-dimensional hierarchical approach to a multidimensional system of racial stratification. Building upon Claire Kim's (1999) racial triangulation theory, we examine how the American public rates Asians relative to blacks and whites along two dimensions of racial stratification: racial…

  16. Examining Technology Perception of Social Studies Teachers with Rogers' Diffusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Özkan; Koçoglu, Erol

    2017-01-01

    Mobile learning has started to take place in education literature with the developing technology, and this technology started to have an increasing spread along with its advantages. This study examines the responses of social studies teachers to the innovations in the field of mobile learning. The study was designed within the framework of theory…

  17. Developing a Model for an Innovative Culinary Competency Curriculum and Examining Its Effects on Students' Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Meng-Lei I-Chen Monica; Horng, Jeou-Shyan; Teng, Chih-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The present study designs and develops an innovative culinary competency curriculum (ICCC) model comprising seven sections: innovative culture, aesthetics, techniques, service, product, management, and creativity. The model is formulated based on culinary concept, creativity, innovation, and competency theory. The four elements of curriculum…

  18. Behavioral Change as a Result of Videotaped Playback: An Examination of Two Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchi, Don; Ripple, Richard E.

    The literature on the behavior effects of videotaped playback reveals that little theoretical formulation has been offered to explain the positive results which have been reported. Two theoretical models are considered in regard to these results. The first, a reinforcement model, suggests that some behaviors are reinforced positively and some…

  19. An examination of the tripartite model of anxiety and depression in an outpatient sample of adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dia, David A; Harrington, Donna; Silverman, Wendy K

    2010-07-01

    Anxiety and depressive disorders are the most common mental health problems for adolescents; understanding their etiology and course is necessary for developing effective prevention and treatment programs. The tripartite model of anxiety and depression was evaluated in a random, clinical sample of 185 adolescents, with an average age of 15.09 years (SD = 1.9), with 58.4% males (n = 108). Survey packets were mailed to participants (61% response rate). Two models were evaluated: (a) Model one fit adequately, however, modification indices and prior research and theory suggested adding paths between anxiety and depression. (b) Model two tested paths between anxiety and depression; this revised model fit the data well, suggesting a relationship from anxiety to depression. Further, physiological hyperarousal may be a distinct component for anxiety and negative affectivity may be a general risk factor for anxiety and depression in adolescents. The findings that different factors contribute to the cause of anxiety and depression have implications for practice.

  20. Examining the Role of Social Relationships in the Association between Neuroticism and Test Anxiety--Results from a Study with German Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoferichter, Frances; Raufelder, Diana

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigates the mediating role of student-student relationships (SSRs) and teacher-student relationships (TSRs) in the association between neuroticism and test anxiety. Gender differences in these associations were examined. A total of 513 adolescent girls and boys from secondary schools in Berlin, Germany completed…

  1. Chickpeas and hummus are associated with better nutrient intake, diet quality, and levels of some cardiovascular risk factors: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epidemiologic studies assessing chickpea/hummus consumption and the association with nutrient intake, diet quality, and health biomarkers are lacking. The association between chickpea/hummus consumption and nutrient intake, dietary quality, and health biomarkers was examined in adults using data fro...

  2. Whole-grain consumption is associated with diet quality and nutrient intake in adults: the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    The consumption of whole grains and its association with nutrient intake has not been assessed in a recent nationally representative population. The objective was to examine the association of consumption of whole grains, using the new whole-grain definition, with diet quality and nutrient intake in...

  3. Geochemical and geophysical examination of submarine groundwater discharge and associated nutrient loading estimates into Lynch Cove, Hood Canal, WA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, P.W.; Simonds, F.W.; Paulson, A.J.; Kruse, S.; Reich, C.

    2007-01-01

    Geochemical tracer data (i.e., 222Rn and four naturally occurring Ra isotopes), electromagnetic (EM) seepage meter results, and high-resolution, stationary electrical resistivity images were used to examine the bi-directional (i.e., submarine groundwater discharge and recharge) exchange of a coastal aquifer with seawater. Our study site for these experiments was Lynch Cove, the terminus of Hood Canal, WA, where fjord-like conditions dramatically limit water column circulation that can lead to recurring summer-time hypoxic events. In such a system a precise nutrient budget may be particularly sensitive to groundwater-derived nutrient loading. Shore-perpendicular time-series subsurface resistivity profiles show clear, decimeter-scale tidal modulation of the coastal aquifer in response to large, regional hydraulic gradients, hydrologically transmissive glacial terrain, and large (4-5 m) tidal amplitudes. A 5-day 222Rn time-series shows a strong inverse covariance between 222Rn activities (0.5−29 dpm L-1) and water level fluctuations, and provides compelling evidence for tidally modulated exchange of groundwater across the sediment/water interface. Mean Rn-derived submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) rates of 85 ± 84 cm d-1 agree closely in the timing and magnitude with EM seepage meter results that showed discharge during low tide and recharge during high tide events. To evaluate the importance of fresh versus saline SGD, Rn-derived SGD rates (as a proxy of total SGD) were compared to excess 226Ra-derived SGD rates (as a proxy for the saline contribution of SGD). The calculated SGD rates, which include a significant (>80%) component of recycled seawater, are used to estimate associated nutrient (NH4+, Si, PO43-, NO3 + NO2, TDN) loads to Lynch Cove. The dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = NH4 + NO2 + NO3) SGD loading estimate of 5.9 × 104 mol d-1 is 1−2 orders of magnitude larger than similar estimates derived from atmospheric deposition and surface water runoff

  4. Geochemical and geophysical examination of submarine groundwater discharge and associated nutrient loading estimates into Lynch Cove, Hood Canal, WA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarzenski, Peter W; Simonds, F William; Paulson, Anthony J; Kruse, Sarah; Reich, Chris

    2007-10-15

    Geochemical tracer data (i.e., 222Rn and four naturally occurring Ra isotopes), electromagnetic (EM) seepage meter results, and high-resolution, stationary electrical resistivity images were used to examine the bi-directional (i.e., submarine groundwater discharge and recharge) exchange of a coastal aquifer with seawater. Our study site for these experiments was Lynch Cove, the terminus of Hood Canal, WA, where fjord-like conditions dramatically limit water column circulation that can lead to recurring summer-time hypoxic events. In such a system a precise nutrient budget may be particularly sensitive to groundwater-derived nutrient loading. Shore-perpendicular time-series subsurface resistivity profiles show clear, decimeter-scale tidal modulation of the coastal aquifer in response to large, regional hydraulic gradients, hydrologically transmissive glacial terrain, and large (4-5 m) tidal amplitudes. A 5-day 222Rn time-series shows a strong inverse covariance between 222Rn activities (0.5-29 dpm L(-1)) and water level fluctuations, and provides compelling evidence for tidally modulated exchange of groundwater across the sediment/water interface. Mean Rn-derived submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) rates of 85 +/- 84 cm d(-1) agree closely in the timing and magnitude with EM seepage meter results that showed discharge during low tide and recharge during high tide events. To evaluate the importance of fresh versus saline SGD, Rn-derived SGD rates (as a proxy of total SGD) were compared to excess 226Ra-derived SGD rates (as a proxy for the saline contribution of SGD). The calculated SGD rates, which include a significant (>80%) component of recycled seawater, are used to estimate associated nutrient (NH4+, Si, PO4(3-), NO3 + NO2, TDN) loads to Lynch Cove. The dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN = NH4 + NO2 + NO3) SGD loading estimate of 5.9 x 10(4) mol d(-1) is 1-2 orders of magnitude larger than similar estimates derived from atmospheric deposition and surface water

  5. Examining the Genetic and Environmental Associations between Autistic Social and Communication Deficits and Psychopathic Callous-Unemotional Traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth O'Nions

    Full Text Available Difficulties in appropriate social interaction are characteristic of both children with autism spectrum disorders and children with callous-unemotional traits (who are at risk of developing psychopathy. Extant experimental studies suggest that the nature of atypical social cognition that characterises these two profiles is not identical. However, 'empathizing' difficulties have been hypothesised for both groups, raising questions about the degree of aetiological separation between social impairments that characterize each disorder. This study explored the relative contribution of independent vs. shared aetiological influences to social and communication impairments associated with autistic traits and callous-unemotional traits, indexed by parent-report in a population-based cohort of twins.Participants were over 5,000 twin pairs from a UK cohort (the Twins Early Development Study; TEDS, assessed for callous-unemotional traits at 7 years and autistic social and communication impairments at 8 years. Multivariate model-fitting was used to explore the relative contribution of independent vs. overlapping genetic/environmental influences on these traits.Both social and communication impairments and callous-unemotional traits were highly heritable, although the genetic and environmental influences accounting for individual differences on each domain were predominantly independent.Extant evidence from experimental and neuro-imaging studies has suggested that, despite some superficially overlapping behaviours, the social difficulties seen in children with autism spectrum disorders and callous-unemotional traits are largely distinct. The current study is the first to demonstrate considerable aetiological independence of the social interaction difficulties seen in children with autism spectrum disorders and those with callous-unemotional traits.

  6. Examining the Conditions Under Which Internalized Homophobia Is Associated with Substance Use and Condomless Sex in Young MSM: the Moderating Role of Impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Jae A; Newcomb, Michael E; Garofalo, Robert; Mustanski, Brian

    2017-01-25

    Internalized homophobia (IH) is the internalization of homophobic attitudes by sexual minorities due to social bias. IH has been inconsistently related to substance use and condomless sex for young men who have sex with men (YMSM). We examined negative urgency (the tendency to act impulsively in response to negative emotional experiences), positive urgency (the tendency to act impulsively in response to positive emotional experiences), and sensation seeking as independent moderators of the association of IH with binge drinking, drug use, and condomless anal sex. Data were collected from 450 YMSM (mean age = 18.9) over the course of 18 months (baseline, 6-, 12-, and 18-month follow-up). Hierarchical generalized linear modeling revealed that there was a significant moderation for binge drinking and receptive condomless anal sex, with the association between IH and these risk behaviors increased for those with higher levels of negative urgency and positive urgency. IH is important to the negative health outcomes of binge drinking and condomless anal sex for individuals high in negative and/or positive urgency, who may act impulsively to avoid subjective negative experiences or in the face of positive emotional experiences. Future research is needed to further establish additional conditions under which IH may be important to understanding risk behaviors in YMSM, which is essential to developing targeted prevention and intervention efforts.

  7. Updating prediction models by dynamical relaxation - An examination of the technique. [for numerical weather forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, H. C.; Turner, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    A dynamical relaxation technique for updating prediction models is analyzed with the help of the linear and nonlinear barotropic primitive equations. It is assumed that a complete four-dimensional time history of some prescribed subset of the meteorological variables is known. The rate of adaptation of the flow variables toward the true state is determined for a linearized f-model, and for mid-latitude and equatorial beta-plane models. The results of the analysis are corroborated by numerical experiments with the nonlinear shallow-water equations.

  8. An Object Extraction Model Using Association Rules and Dependence Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Extracting objects from legacy systems is a basic step insystem's obje ct-orientation to improve the maintainability and understandability of the syst e ms. A new object extraction model using association rules an d dependence analysis is proposed. In this model data are classified by associat ion rules and the corresponding operations are partitioned by dependence analysis.

  9. Animal models of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody-associated vasculitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salama, Alan D

    2012-01-01

    To provide an update on the experimental models that have been developed recapitulating clinical antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody (ANCA) associated vasculitis. The application of the models in the study of pathogenesis, and the therapeutic implications of this, are covered in the article by van Timmeren and Heeringa in this issue.

  10. One of Us: Multilevel Models Examining the Impact of Descriptive Representation on Civic Engagement

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, Pippa; Krook, Mona Lena

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of descriptive representation in comparative perspective. The goals are to establish (1) whether descriptive representation mobilizes attitudinal and behavioral indicators of civic engagement; (2) whether the strength of any such relationship differs for women and young people; and (3) whether this relationship is evident cross-nationally. The first section provides an overview of existing research on descriptive representation and the civic engagement of women ...

  11. Modeling and experimental examination of water level effects on radon exhalation from fragmented uranium ore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yong-Jun; Dai, Xin-Tao; Ding, De-Xin; Zhao, Ya-Li

    2016-12-01

    In this study, a one-dimensional steady-state mathematical model of radon transport in fragmented uranium ore was established according to Fick's law and radon transfer theory in an air-water interface. The model was utilized to obtain an analytical solution for radon concentration in the air-water, two-phase system under steady state conditions, as well as a corresponding radon exhalation rate calculation formula. We also designed a one-dimensional experimental apparatus for simulating radon diffusion migration in the uranium ore with various water levels to verify the mathematical model. The predicted results were in close agreement with the measured results, suggesting that the proposed model can be readily used to determine radon concentrations and exhalation rates in fragmented uranium ore with varying water levels. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Examining the Possibilities of Identifying and Modeling Correlations between Product Families and Business Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Allan Dam; Hvam, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Variant Master (PVM) modeling technique and Process Flow Charts in combination, to analyze the correlation between complexity in product families and business processes. The approach is based on a visual modeling of the product assortment and the business processes. It is hypothesized that the combined......In order for companies to make well founded decisions on the product family makeup, an understanding of the correlation between the complexity of the product family and business processes is required, though it is often not available. This paper investigates the potential of using the Product...... use of the modeling techniques can allow for analysis and communication of the product family and business processes; as well as the connections between the two, with the potential of creating a single combined model. A case from a Danish industrial company is used for the purpose of the investigation...

  13. Examining Antecedents and Consequences of Tourist Satisfaction: A Structural Modeling Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xia; ZHANG Jie; GU Chaolin; ZHEN Feng

    2009-01-01

    While the importance of tourist satisfaction has been recognized by academic researchers for at least four decades, adequate tourist satisfaction models have not been developed or validated. This study presents a tourist satisfaction model for a destination and explores the antecedents (tourist expectations, destination image, perceived quality, and perceived value) and the consequences (tourist complaints and tourist loyalty) of tourist satisfaction using Guilin for the case study. Structural equation modeling results support the tourist satisfaction model of tourist expectations, destination image, perceived quality, and per-ceived value as four key antecedents of tourist satisfaction, with tourist satisfaction having a negative effect on tourist complaints and a positive effect on tourist loyalty. Managerial implications are drawn from the study findings and suggestions are given for future work.

  14. Exploration in free word association networks: models and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludueña, Guillermo A; Behzad, Mehran Djalali; Gros, Claudius

    2014-05-01

    Free association is a task that requires a subject to express the first word to come to their mind when presented with a certain cue. It is a task which can be used to expose the basic mechanisms by which humans connect memories. In this work, we have made use of a publicly available database of free associations to model the exploration of the averaged network of associations using a statistical and the adaptive control of thought-rational (ACT-R) model. We performed, in addition, an online experiment asking participants to navigate the averaged network using their individual preferences for word associations. We have investigated the statistics of word repetitions in this guided association task. We find that the considered models mimic some of the statistical properties, viz the probability of word repetitions, the distance between repetitions and the distribution of association chain lengths, of the experiment, with the ACT-R model showing a particularly good fit to the experimental data for the more intricate properties as, for instance, the ratio of repetitions per length of association chains.

  15. A flexible architecture for modeling and simulation of diffusional association

    CERN Document Server

    Haack, Fiete; Uhrmacher, Adelinde M; 10.4204/EPTCS.19.5

    2010-01-01

    Up to now, it is not possible to obtain analytical solutions for complex molecular association processes (e.g. Molecule recognition in Signaling or catalysis). Instead Brownian Dynamics (BD) simulations are commonly used to estimate the rate of diffusional association, e.g. to be later used in mesoscopic simulations. Meanwhile a portfolio of diffusional association (DA) methods have been developed that exploit BD. However, DA methods do not clearly distinguish between modeling, simulation, and experiment settings. This hampers to classify and compare the existing methods with respect to, for instance model assumptions, simulation approximations or specific optimization strategies for steering the computation of trajectories. To address this deficiency we propose FADA (Flexible Architecture for Diffusional Association) - an architecture that allows the flexible definition of the experiment comprising a formal description of the model in SpacePi, different simulators, as well as validation and analysis methods....

  16. A Linked Hydro-Economic Model to Examine the Effects of Water Policy on Rural Poverty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maneta, M. P.; Torres, M.; Vosti, S. A.; Wallender, W. W.; Howitt, R.; Rodrigues, L. N.; Bassoi, L. H.; Pfeiffer, L.; Young, J.

    2006-12-01

    The sustainable intensification of small-scale agriculture is a necessary condition for reducing rural poverty in developing countries. Increasing the amount of irrigated cropland and the economic efficiency of irrigation are two key components of most intensification strategies. Improved access to water generally increases farm income but richer farmers use a disproportionate share of the available water, decreasing the chances of poor farmers to meet their water needs. Furthermore, water and poverty have strong spatial components that have so far been neglected in water planning. In that sense, too little is known about the short and long term hydrological effects, especially the externality effects of changes in on-farm water use and its implications to nearby farmers. To address this gap in knowledge, a spatially distributed and transient description of changes in surface and groundwater allocation under different agricultural management scenarios is needed. We propose a hydro-economic model providing a realistic spatio-temporal description of the linkages between the economic and hydrologic subsystems. This hydro-economic model is composed of a basin-level 3D spatially distributed transient hydrologic model (MOD-HMS) and a farm-level, spatially distributed agricultural production model. Both models are explicitly linked through the boundary conditions of the hydrologic model. The linkage will account for the spatial and temporal impact of different crop mixes, irrigation techniques and groundwater pumpage on water availability at farm level to assess the effects of policy action on the hydro-economic components of the system.

  17. Gender and racial/ethnic differences in the associations of urinary phthalate metabolites with markers of diabetes risk: national health and nutrition examination survey 2001–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Phthalates are ubiquitous endocrine disrupting chemicals associated with diabetes. Although women and minorities are more likely to be exposed to phthalates, no prior studies have examined phthalate exposure and markers of diabetes risk evaluating effect modification by gender and race/ethnicity. Methods We analyzed CDC data for 8 urinary phthalate metabolites from 3,083 non-diabetic, non-pregnant participants aged 12- < 80 years in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2001–2008. We used median regression to assess the associations between urinary phthalate metabolites and fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting insulin and Homeostatic Model Assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), controlling for urinary creatinine as well as several sociodemographic and behavioral factors. Stratified analyses were conducted to compare the gender- and race/ethnicity-specific patterns for the associations. Results Urinary levels of several phthalate metabolites, including MBzP, MnBP, MiBP, MCPP and ∑DEHP showed significant positive associations with FBG, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR. No clear difference was noted between men and women. Mexican-Americans and non-Hispanic blacks had stronger dose–response relationships for MnBP, MiBP, MCPP and ∑DEHP compared to non-Hispanic whites. For example, the highest quartile of MiBP relative to its lowest quartile showed a median FBG increase of 5.82 mg/dL (95% CI: 3.77, 7.87) in Mexican-Americans, 3.63 mg/dL (95% CI: 1.23, 6.03) in blacks and 1.79 mg/dL (95% CI: -0.29, 3.87) in whites. Conclusions The findings suggest that certain populations may be more vulnerable to phthalates with respect to disturbances in glucose homeostasis. Whether endocrine disrupting chemicals contribute to gender and racial/ethnic differences in diabetes risk will be an important area for further study. PMID:24499162

  18. Pigs as animal model for low-birth-weight babies. Developing cognitive tests and examining neuroprotection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieling, E.T.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis the cognitive performance of piglets with low birth weight (LBW) caused by intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR), and the effects of a possible therapy to prevent IUGR-related brain damage and associated cognitive impairments were studied. To achieve these goals, several conditions

  19. Predicting risky sexual behavior in emerging adulthood: examination of a moderated mediation model among child sexual abuse and adult sexual assault victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, Heather L; Grills, Amie E; Drum, Katherine B

    2014-01-01

    Although having a sexual victimization history is associated with engaging in sexual risk behavior, the mechanisms whereby sexual victimization increases risk behavior are unclear. This study examined use of sex as an affect regulation strategy as a mediator of the relationship between depressive symptoms and sexual risk behavior among 1,616 sexually active college women as well as examined having a history of child sexual abuse (CSA), adolescent/adult sexual assault (ASA), or both (CSA/ASA) as moderators. Results supported the mediated model as well as moderated mediation, where depressive symptoms were more strongly associated with use of sex as an affect regulation strategy among ASA victims, and sex as an affect regulation strategy was more strongly related to sexual risk behavior for CSA/ASA victims.

  20. Associations between Young Adult Romantic Relationship Quality and Problem Behaviors: An Examination of Personality-Environment Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Rongqin; Branje, Susan; Keijsers, Loes; Meeus, Wim

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined person-environment interplay by testing interaction effects between adolescent personality type (i.e., overcontrollers, undercontrollers, and resilients) and young adult romantic relationship quality on young adult delinquency and anxiety. The study employed six wave

  1. Associations between Young Adult Romantic Relationship Quality and Problem Behaviors: An Examination of Personality-Environment Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Rongqin; Branje, Susan; Keijsers, Loes; Meeus, Wim

    2015-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined person-environment interplay by testing interaction effects between adolescent personality type (i.e., overcontrollers, undercontrollers, and resilients) and young adult romantic relationship quality on young adult delinquency and anxiety. The study employed six

  2. Associations between young adult romantic relationship quality and problem behaviors : An examination of personality-environment interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Rongqin; Branje, Susan; Keijsers, Loes; Meeus, W.H.J.

    This longitudinal study examined person–environment interplay by testing interaction effects between adolescent personality type (i.e., overcontrollers, undercontrollers, and resilients) and young adult romantic relationship quality on young adult delinquency and anxiety. The study employed six

  3. Web Pre-fetching Model Based on Concept Association Network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUHuanqing; WANGYongcheng

    2004-01-01

    With the enormous growth of information on the web, Internet has become one of the most important information sources. However, limited by the network bandwidth, users always suffer from long time waiting. Web pre-fetching is one of the most popular strategies,which are proposed for reducing the perceived access delay and improving the service quality of web server. This paper presents a pre-fetching model based on concept as sociation network, which mines concept association relationships that are implied in user access patterns and employs online learning and oitiine mining algorithm to construct the user-oriented concept association network. Using concept association network, pre-fetching model makes semantics-based pre-fetching decisions in the client side.This model implements the concept-based analysis on user access patterns and improves the prediction accuracy. Experimental results show that the proposed pre-fetching model has better general performance.

  4. Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors: A model for examining the effects of pathology versus seizures on cognitive dysfunction in epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Baxendale, S.; Thompson, P.; Sander, J W; Donnachie, E

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Dysembryoplastic neuroepithelial tumors (DNTs) provide a unique model for studying the effects of seizures on cognitive development. Epilepsy and antiepileptic medications are prominent features in the lives and schooling of people who develop seizures in childhood. People with an adult onset share the same underlying brain pathology, but their childhood development is unaffected by seizures. Therefore, DNTs provide a model to examine the specific influence of seizures and their treat...

  5. A New Model to Facilitate Individualized Case Conceptualization and Treatment of Social Phobia: An Examination and Reaction to Moscovitch's Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimberg, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Moscovitch's (2009) model of social phobia is put forth as an integration and extension of previous cognitive-behavioral models. The author asserts that his approach overcomes a number of shortcomings of previous models and will serve to better guide case conceptualization, treatment planning, and intervention implementation for clients with…

  6. Examination of Interaction Spring and Damping Model connecting Ground and Piled Foundations in Liqueaction Ground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Yoshihisa; Ogawa, Yoshimi

    There are many bridges in lowland areas in East Tokyo and soft ground in Tokyo Bay Coast. A bare possibility is that these structures might suffer disastrous damage due to liquefaction when the area is hit by a large earthquake. In this paper, interaction spring and damping model considering a process of liquefaction and relationship between natural period of ground and pier are proposed, and it is verified by using the dynamic centrifugal model test in level 2 earthquake motion. As the result, it is verified that the response of pier and footing behaviors of the test and the analysis can be well corresponded, the interaction spring and damping model considering the process of liquefaction and the relationship between natural period of ground and pier is suitable for the purpose.

  7. Cigarette Smoking in Indonesia: Examination of a Myopic Model of Addictive Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Hidayat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Using aggregated panel data taken from three waves of the Indonesian Family Life Survey (1993–2000, this article tests the myopic addiction behaviour of cigarette demand. Sensitivity analysis is done by examining a rational addiction behavior of cigarette demand. The results provide support for myopic addiction. The short- and long-run price elasticities of cigarette demand are estimated at −0.28 and −0.73 respectively. Excise taxes are more likely to act as an effective tobacco control in the long-run rather than a major source of government revenue.

  8. Examining the Linear Regimes of the Community Earth System Model (CESM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S.; Brizius, A.; Du, H.; Foster, I.; Smith, L.

    2015-12-01

    In ensemble prediction, Gilmour et al. (2001) proposed measures of relative nonlinearity to quantify the duration of the linear regime from "twin" pairs of ensemble members. The duration of the "linear regime" is useful in forming and interpreting ensembles in numerical weather prediction. Here this method is applied to the state-of-the-art climate model CESM, focusing on how its linear durations will change as the perturbations imposed on one location differ spatially and temporally. The spatial and temporal propagations of point perturbations provide insights into model physics and facilitate interpretation of model projections in future climate scenarios. They provide insight into chaos-like behavior on short time scales, and an indication of the sensitivity and saturation (mixing) times of CESM. Starting from the same initial state, we add relatively small "twin" perturbations (that is, positive and negative perturbations of the same magnitudes) to surface variables, with the locations of the perturbations spanning from the tropics to the poles. As the location changes, the model evolves differently in terms of how the point perturbation extends out of its origin and spreads globally, indicating that different physical mechanisms have played roles in different cases. Repeating the same set of experiments by changing only the perturbation magnitudes insures the linear regime is sampled without constructing an adjoint. Further, how uncertainty growth varies with location in the model state space can be explored by repeating the experiment for different initial states. We compare the responses of the linear regime durations in terms of locations, initial states and magnitudes of the perturbations systematically, and the implications for ensemble experiments and sensitivity studies are discussed. This work is a first step towards treating state-of-the-art climate models with the tools of nonlinear dynamics.

  9. Examining the Relationship between Forces During Stereolithography 3D Printing and Geometric Parameters of the Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalenko Iaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the case of stereolithography 3D printing technology, detaching formed model from the tank with photopolymer is a lengthy process. Forces, which appear during removing of solid photopolymer layerformed in stereolithography 3D DLP printer, can destroy the built model. In this article the detachment force is measured, obtained results arestatistically analyzed and relation between detach force, area of produced layer and thickness of the layer are verified. Linear dependence between detach force and built area is determined. On the other hand, relation between detach force and thickness of the layer is not confirmed.

  10. A discrimination-association model for decomposing component processes of the implicit association test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanutti, Luca; Robusto, Egidio; Vianello, Michelangelo; Anselmi, Pasquale

    2013-06-01

    A formal model is proposed that decomposes the implicit association test (IAT) effect into three process components: stimuli discrimination, automatic association, and termination criterion. Both response accuracy and reaction time are considered. Four independent and parallel Poisson processes, one for each of the four label categories of the IAT, are assumed. The model parameters are the rate at which information accrues on the counter of each process and the amount of information that is needed before a response is given. The aim of this study is to present the model and an illustrative application in which the process components of a Coca-Pepsi IAT are decomposed.

  11. An Examination of the Dual Model of Perfectionism and Adolescent Athlete Burnout: A Short-Term Longitudinal Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lung Hung; Kee, Ying Hwa; Tsai, Ying-Mei

    2009-01-01

    The dual model of perfectionism (Slade and Owens, Behav Modificat 22(3):372-390, 1998) is adopted to examine the influence of adaptive and maladaptive perfectionism on adolescent athlete burnout in Taiwan. Participants were 188 high school adolescent student-athletes (M = 16.48, SD = 0.59). They were administered the Multidimensional Inventory of…

  12. An Examination of Growth in Vocabulary and Phonological Awareness in Early Childhood: An Individual Growth Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Christina Marie

    2013-01-01

    The present study used individual growth modeling to examine the role of specific forms (i.e., receptive, expressive, and definitional vocabulary and grammatical skill) and levels of oral vocabulary skill (i.e., 25th, 50th, or 75th percentile) in phonological awareness growth during the preschool and kindergarten years. Sixty-one,…

  13. Toward a Social Conflict Evolution Model: Examining the Adverse Power of Conflictual Social Interaction in Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kui; Miller, Nicole C.; Allison, Justin R.

    2013-01-01

    This case study examined an authentic online learning phenomenon where social conflict, including harsh critique and negative tone, weaved throughout peer-moderated online discussions in an online class. Opening coding and content analysis were performed on 1306 message units and course artifacts. The results revealed that a model of social…

  14. Rat Models of Cardiometabolic Diseases: Baseline Clinical Chemistries, and Rationale for their Use in Examining Air Pollution Health Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is the first of a series of 8 papers examining susceptibility of various rodent cardiometabolic disease models to ozone induced health effects. Individuals with cardiovascular and metabolic diseases (CVD) are shown to be more susceptible to adverse health effects o...

  15. Researching Holistic Democracy in Schools. A Response to "Examination of the New Tech Model as a holistic Democracy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Philip A.

    2017-01-01

    Bradley-Levine reported in her article how she created an opportunity to explore research data with the aim of examining the degree to which New Tech schools were democratic in the sense conceptualized by the notion of holistic democracy. My response is in three parts. The first sets out my understanding of the significance of the model of…

  16. An Examination of College and University Athletic Directors' Perception of Management Models Utilized to Operate Intercollegiate Athletic Arenas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Mauro R.

    2010-01-01

    Demands for enhanced accountability and effectiveness in higher education have also affected athletic departments, requiring a more cost-efficient managerial approach to the administration of athletic facilities, especially arenas. The purpose of this study was to examine athletic directors' perceptions towards the arena management models they…

  17. Commitment to Sport and Exercise: Re-examining the Literature for a Practical and Parsimonious Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A commitment to physical activity is necessary for personal health, and is a primary goal of physical activity practitioners. Effective practitioners rely on theory and research as a guide to best practices. Thus, sound theory, which is both practical and parsimonious, is a key to effective practice. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature in search of such a theory - one that applies to and explains commitment to physical activity in the form of sport and exercise for youths and adults. The Sport Commitment Model has been commonly used to study commitment to sport and has more recently been applied to the exercise context. In this paper, research using the Sport Commitment Model is reviewed relative to its utility in both the sport and exercise contexts. Through this process, the relevance of the Investment Model for study of physical activity commitment emerged, and a more parsimonious framework for studying of commitment to physical activity is suggested. Lastly, links between the models of commitment and individuals' participation motives in physical activity are suggested and practical implications forwarded. PMID:23412904

  18. An Alternative Theoretical Model: Examining Psychosocial Identity Development of International Students in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunyoung

    2012-01-01

    Despite the plethora of college student identity development research, very little attention has been paid to the identity formation of international students. Rather than adopting existing identity theories in college student development, this exploratory qualitative study proposes a new psychosocial identity development model for international…

  19. An examination of disparities in cancer incidence in Texas using Bayesian random coefficient models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey Sparks

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Disparities in cancer risk exist between ethnic groups in the United States. These disparities often result from differential access to healthcare, differences in socioeconomic status and differential exposure to carcinogens. This study uses cancer incidence data from the population based Texas Cancer Registry to investigate the disparities in digestive and respiratory cancers from 2000 to 2008. A Bayesian hierarchical regression approach is used. All models are fit using the INLA method of Bayesian model estimation. Specifically, a spatially varying coefficient model of the disparity between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic incidence is used. Results suggest that a spatio-temporal heterogeneity model best accounts for the observed Hispanic disparity in cancer risk. Overall, there is a significant disadvantage for the Hispanic population of Texas with respect to both of these cancers, and this disparity varies significantly over space. The greatest disparities between Hispanics and Non-Hispanics in digestive and respiratory cancers occur in eastern Texas, with patterns emerging as early as 2000 and continuing until 2008.

  20. Commitment to sport and exercise: re-examining the literature for a practical and parsimonious model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lavon

    2013-01-01

    A commitment to physical activity is necessary for personal health, and is a primary goal of physical activity practitioners. Effective practitioners rely on theory and research as a guide to best practices. Thus, sound theory, which is both practical and parsimonious, is a key to effective practice. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature in search of such a theory - one that applies to and explains commitment to physical activity in the form of sport and exercise for youths and adults. The Sport Commitment Model has been commonly used to study commitment to sport and has more recently been applied to the exercise context. In this paper, research using the Sport Commitment Model is reviewed relative to its utility in both the sport and exercise contexts. Through this process, the relevance of the Investment Model for study of physical activity commitment emerged, and a more parsimonious framework for studying of commitment to physical activity is suggested. Lastly, links between the models of commitment and individuals' participation motives in physical activity are suggested and practical implications forwarded.

  1. Further Examining Berry's Model: The Applicability of Latent Profile Analysis to Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Rina S.; Merz, Erin L.; Solórzano, Martha T.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    This study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify acculturation profiles. A three-profile solution fit the data best, and comparisons on demographic and psychosocial outcomes as a function of profile yielded expected results. The findings support using LPA as a parsimonious way to model acculturation without anticipating profiles in…

  2. Further Examining Berry's Model: The Applicability of Latent Profile Analysis to Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Rina S.; Merz, Erin L.; Solórzano, Martha T.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    This study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify acculturation profiles. A three-profile solution fit the data best, and comparisons on demographic and psychosocial outcomes as a function of profile yielded expected results. The findings support using LPA as a parsimonious way to model acculturation without anticipating profiles in…

  3. In situ examination of microbial populations in a model drinking water distribution system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Adam Camillo; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Arvin, Erik

    2002-01-01

    A flow cell set-up was used as a model drinking water distribution system to analyze the in situ microbial population. Biofilm growth was followed by transmission light microscopy for 81 days and showed a biofilm consisting of microcolonies separated by a monolayer of cells. Protozoans (ciliates...

  4. Testing a Dual Process Model of Gender-Based Violence: A Laboratory Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Danielle S; Zeichner, Amos

    2016-01-01

    The dire impact of gender-based violence on society compels development of models comprehensive enough to capture the diversity of its forms. Research has established hostile sexism (HS) as a robust predictor of gender-based violence. However, to date, research has yet to link men's benevolent sexism (BS) to physical aggression toward women, despite correlations between BS and HS and between BS and victim blaming. One model, the opposing process model of benevolent sexism (Sibley & Perry, 2010), suggests that, for men, BS acts indirectly through HS to predict acceptance of hierarchy-enhancing social policy as an expression of a preference for in-group dominance (i. e., social dominance orientation [SDO]). The extent to which this model applies to gender-based violence remains untested. Therefore, in this study, 168 undergraduate men in a U. S. university participated in a competitive reaction time task, during which they had the option to shock an ostensible female opponent as a measure of gender-based violence. Results of multiple-mediation path analyses indicated dual pathways potentiating gender-based violence and highlight SDO as a particularly potent mechanism of this violence. Findings are discussed in terms of group dynamics and norm-based violence prevention.

  5. Beyond Teachers' Sight Lines: Using Video Modeling to Examine Peer Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsopoulos, Donna

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces readers to various examples of discourse analysis in mathematics education. Highlighted is interactional sociolinguistics, used in a present study to investigate peer discourse in a middle-school setting. Key findings from this study include the benefits of video modeling as a mechanism for fostering inclusive peer group…

  6. An Econometric Examination of the Behavioral Perspective Model in the Context of Norwegian Retailing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Kahamseh, Saeed; Gunnarsson, Didrik; Larsen, Nils Magne; Foxall, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral perspective model's (BPM; Foxall, 1990) retailing literature is built on extensive empirical research and techniques that were originally refined in choice experiments in behavioral economics and behavior analysis, and then tested mostly on British consumer panel data. We test the BPM in the context of Norwegian retailing. This…

  7. Examining the Relationship between Role Models and Leadership Growth during the Transition to Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, Jill R.; Rosch, David M.; Collier, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Leadership and developmental scholars have highlighted the need to enhance youth leadership skills. Yet, research that explains youths' perceptions of how and when role models influences their leadership growth processes is limited. To address these gaps and begin to develop an understanding of youths' perspectives, we employed a qualitative,…

  8. Examination of Scale-Awareness of Convective Transport for Parameterization Development in Mesoscale and Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Fan, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, K.

    2013-12-01

    Cumulus convection plays a key role in atmospheric circulation. The results of global climate models, which have been widely used in climate research, are highly sensitive to cumulus parameterizations used for modeling cumulus clouds. Existing parameterization schemes have relied upon a number of assumptions whose validity is questionable at high spatial resolutions. In this study, we intended to develop a scale-aware cumulus parameterization based on the conventional Zhang-McFarlane scheme which is suitable for a broad range of uses, ranging from meso-scale to climate models. We conduct analyses from cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations, including two cases from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), to understand scale-dependencies of convective cloud properties following the unified parameterization framework of Arakawa and Wu (2013), but with a more complete set of considerations such as including downdrafts and at different convective stages for eddy flux approximations. Our preliminary results show that downdrafts could make a significant contribution to eddy flux transport at the developed stage of convection. The eddy transported by updrafts and downdrafts with respect to the environmental background increased with the increasing of grid-spacing, but do not change with fraction. There are large differences between the explicit calculation of eddy flux and that from approximations used in cumulus parameterization at grid-spacings of less than 64 km. Much of this difference is due to the sub-grid inhomogeneity of updrafts and downdrafts.

  9. Introducing a Model for Optimal Design of Sequential Objective Structured Clinical Examinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortaz Hejri, Sara; Yazdani, Kamran; Labaf, Ali; Norcini, John J.; Jalili, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    In a sequential OSCE which has been suggested to reduce testing costs, candidates take a short screening test and who fail the test, are asked to take the full OSCE. In order to introduce an effective and accurate sequential design, we developed a model for designing and evaluating screening OSCEs. Based on two datasets from a 10-station…

  10. Further Examining Berry's Model: The Applicability of Latent Profile Analysis to Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Rina S.; Merz, Erin L.; Solórzano, Martha T.; Roesch, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    This study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to identify acculturation profiles. A three-profile solution fit the data best, and comparisons on demographic and psychosocial outcomes as a function of profile yielded expected results. The findings support using LPA as a parsimonious way to model acculturation without anticipating profiles in…

  11. Examining Engineering & Technology Students' Acceptance of Network Virtualization Technology Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Wael K.

    2010-01-01

    This causal and correlational study was designed to extend the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and to test its applicability to Valencia Community College (VCC) Engineering and Technology students as the target user group when investigating the factors influencing their decision to adopt and to utilize VMware as the target technology. In…

  12. A Further Examination of Operational Availability in Life Cycle Cost Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    supportabil i t/, where opePational availability acti: as a measurable surrogate for supportabil ’ty. The modified model uses the DOD’s fAIG approved...of Opep ational I Availabiiity in Life Cycle Cost Modelsthe orientatisn process was greatly simpi ified. in that earl i er ef ort the ku thor had

  13. Examination of Bond Properties through Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csizmar, Clifford M.; Force, Dee Ann; Warner, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    A concerted effort has been made to increase the opportunities for undergraduate students to address scientific problems employing the processes used by practicing chemists. As part of this effort, an infrared (IR) spectroscopy and molecular modeling experiment was developed for the first-year general chemistry laboratory course. In the…

  14. An Econometric Examination of the Behavioral Perspective Model in the Context of Norwegian Retailing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Kahamseh, Saeed; Gunnarsson, Didrik; Larsen, Nils Magne; Foxall, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    The behavioral perspective model's (BPM; Foxall, 1990) retailing literature is built on extensive empirical research and techniques that were originally refined in choice experiments in behavioral economics and behavior analysis, and then tested mostly on British consumer panel data. We test the BPM in the context of Norwegian retailing. This…

  15. Examining the Simple View of Reading Model for United States High School Spanish Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Richard; Patton, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The Simple View of Reading (SVR) model, which posits that reading comprehension is the product of word decoding and language comprehension that make independent contributions to reading skill, has been found to explain the acquisition of first language (L1) reading and second language (L2) reading in young English language learners (ELLs).…

  16. Examination of Bond Properties through Infrared Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling in the General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csizmar, Clifford M.; Force, Dee Ann; Warner, Don L.

    2012-01-01

    A concerted effort has been made to increase the opportunities for undergraduate students to address scientific problems employing the processes used by practicing chemists. As part of this effort, an infrared (IR) spectroscopy and molecular modeling experiment was developed for the first-year general chemistry laboratory course. In the…

  17. Examining the Factors That Contribute to Successful Database Application Implementation Using the Technology Acceptance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nworji, Alexander O.

    2013-01-01

    Most organizations spend millions of dollars due to the impact of improperly implemented database application systems as evidenced by poor data quality problems. The purpose of this quantitative study was to use, and extend, the technology acceptance model (TAM) to assess the impact of information quality and technical quality factors on database…

  18. Stigma in the Area of Intellectual Disabilities: Examining a Conceptual Model of Public Stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Shirli

    2015-09-01

    Studies in the area of intellectual disability (ID) stigma are few and atheoretical. This study examined the adequacy of the conceptual framework of stigma from the mental illness field regarding ID. Telephone interviews were conducted with a nationally representative sample of 304 adults in Israel. Participants were read a vignette describing a man with ID and answered items related to cognitive, emotional, and behavioral reactions. Behavioral dimensions included: Withdrawal, Social distance, and Helping behaviors. The stigma process leading to Withdrawal was drawn through Negative affect, whereas the process to Social distance was drawn through Calm affect. One unique aspect of the stigma process in ID is the importance of Calm affect, which helped reduce Social distance.

  19. Examination of indentation geometry-constitutive behaviour relations with confocal microscopy and finite element modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, C. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Environmental Engineering]|[California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering; Yamamoto, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research

    1998-10-01

    Microhardness measurements have been of general interest in irradiated materials testing as a monitor of strength changes, and the geometry of the pile-up of material around the indentation has been found to be related to the work-hardening behavior. This relationship has been further examined here. Vickers microhardness tests were performed on a variety of metal alloys including low alloy, high Cr, and austenitic stainless steels and a Nb-Ti alloy. The pile-ups around the identations were quantified using confocal microscopy techniques. In addition, the indentation process and pile-up geometry was simulated using finite element techniques and the corresponding constitutive equations for each of the test materials. The results from these methods have been used to develop an improved understanding and quantification between the pile-up geometry and the constitutive behavior of the test material. (orig.) 10 refs.

  20. A case-control study to examine HLA haplotype associations in patients with posttreatment chronic Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klempner, Mark S; Wormser, Gary H; Wade, Karen; Trevino, Richard P; Tang, Jianming; Kaslow, Richard A; Schmid, Christopher

    2005-09-15

    In a comparison of 95 patients with systemic symptoms that persisted after antibiotic treatment for acute Lyme disease (posttreatment chronic Lyme disease) and 104 control subjects without such symptoms after antibiotic treatment, we sought associations between human leukocyte antigen class II (DRB1 and DQB1) markers and posttreatment chronic Lyme disease. No strong association between posttreatment chronic Lyme disease and any class II allele or genotype was found.

  1. Re-examining concepts of occupation and occupation-based models: occupational therapy and community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Leanne L

    2010-02-01

    A growing body of literature supports the role of occupational therapists in community development. Using a community development approach, occupational therapists respond to community-identified occupational needs. They work to build local resources and capacities and self-sustaining programs that foster change within the community and potentially beyond. The purpose of this paper is to highlight some key issues related to occupational therapy practice in community development. The definitions and classifications of occupation focus primarily on the individual and fail to elaborate on the shared occupations of a community. As well, occupation-based models of practice are not easily applied to occupational therapy practice in community development. In order for occupational therapy to articulate its role in community development, greater heed needs to be given to the definition and categorization of occupation, occupation-based models of practice, and their application to communities.

  2. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of the Structure of Statistics Anxiety Measure: An Examination of Four Alternative Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bevrani, PhD

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to explore the confirmatory factor analysis results of the Persian adaptation of Statistics Anxiety Measure (SAM, proposed by Earp.Method: The validity and reliability assessments of the scale were performed on 298 college students chosen randomly from Tabriz University in Iran. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA was carried out to determine the factor structures of the Persian adaptation of SAM.Results: As expected, the second order model provided a better fit to the data than the three alternative models. Conclusions: Hence, SAM provides an equally valid measure for use among college students. The study both expands and adds support to the existing body of math anxiety literature.

  3. An Epidemiological Model for Examining Marijuana Use over the Life Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Paddock

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trajectories of drug use are usually studied empirically by following over time persons sampled from either the general population (most often youth and young adults or from heavy or problematic users (e.g., arrestees or those in treatment. The former, population-based samples, describe early career development, but miss the years of use that generate the greatest social costs. The latter, selected populations, help to summarize the most problematic use, but cannot easily explain how people become problem users nor are they representative of the population as a whole. This paper shows how microsimulation can synthesize both sorts of data within a single analytical framework, while retaining heterogeneous influences that can impact drug use decisions over the life course. The RAND Marijuana Microsimulation Model is constructed for marijuana use, validated, and then used to demonstrate how such models can be used to evaluate alternative policy options aimed at reducing use over the life course.

  4. Examining the antecedents of Facebook acceptance via structural equation modeling: A case of CEGEP students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenzin Doleck

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the last decade has witnessed social networking sites of varied flavors, Facebook’s user growth continues to balloon, and relatedly, Facebook remains popular among the college populace. While there has been a growing body of work on ascertaining antecedents of Facebook use among college students, Collège d'enseignement général et professionnel (CEGEP students’ acceptance of Facebook remains underexplored. The purpose of this study was to analyze CEGEP students’ acceptance of Facebook using the technology acceptance model (TAM. Structural equation modeling was conducted on data from a survey of 214 CEGEP students. We find that Facebook use is motivated by the core TAM constructs as well as the added factors of peer influence, perceived enjoyment, perceived self-efficacy, relative advantage, risk, and trust.

  5. Examining the Factors Affecting PDA Acceptance among Physicians: An Extended Technology Acceptance Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Ecem; Gumussoy, Cigdem Altin; Calisir, Fethi

    2015-01-01

    This study aims at identifying the factors affecting the intention to use personal digital assistant (PDA) technology among physicians in Turkey using an extended Technology Acceptance Model (TAM). A structural equation-modeling approach was used to identify the variables that significantly affect the intention to use PDA technology. The data were collected from 339 physicians in Turkey. Results indicated that 71% of the physicians' intention to use PDA technology is explained by perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. On comparing both, the perceived ease of use has the strongest effect, whereas the effect of perceived enjoyment on behavioral intention to use is found to be insignificant. This study concludes with the recommendations for managers and possible future research.

  6. Examining the Possibilities of Identifying and Modeling Correlations between Product Families and Business Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Jepsen, Allan Dam; Hvam, Lars

    2010-01-01

    In order for companies to make well founded decisions on the product family makeup, an understanding of the correlation between the complexity of the product family and business processes is required, though it is often not available. This paper investigates the potential of using the Product Variant Master (PVM) modeling technique and Process Flow Charts in combination, to analyze the correlation between complexity in product families and business processes. The approach is based on a visual...

  7. On line contribution functions and examining spectral line formation in 3D model stellar atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Amarsi, Anish Mayur

    2015-01-01

    Line contribution functions are useful diagnostics for studying spectral line formation in stellar atmospheres. I derive an expression for the contribution function to the abso- lute flux depression that emerges from three-dimensional box-in-a-star model stellar atmospheres. I illustrate the result by comparing the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) spectral line formation of the high-excitation permitted OI777nm lines with the non-LTE case.

  8. Model selection approach suggests causal association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D and colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Zgaga

    Full Text Available Vitamin D deficiency has been associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC, but causal relationship has not yet been confirmed. We investigate the direction of causation between vitamin D and CRC by extending the conventional approaches to allow pleiotropic relationships and by explicitly modelling unmeasured confounders.Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD, genetic variants associated with 25-OHD and CRC, and other relevant information was available for 2645 individuals (1057 CRC cases and 1588 controls and included in the model. We investigate whether 25-OHD is likely to be causally associated with CRC, or vice versa, by selecting the best modelling hypothesis according to Bayesian predictive scores. We examine consistency for a range of prior assumptions.Model comparison showed preference for the causal association between low 25-OHD and CRC over the reverse causal hypothesis. This was confirmed for posterior mean deviances obtained for both models (11.5 natural log units in favour of the causal model, and also for deviance information criteria (DIC computed for a range of prior distributions. Overall, models ignoring hidden confounding or pleiotropy had significantly poorer DIC scores.Results suggest causal association between 25-OHD and colorectal cancer, and support the need for randomised clinical trials for further confirmations.

  9. Psychological and physical dimensions explaining life satisfaction among the elderly: a structural model examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meléndez, Juan Carlos; Tomás, José Manuel; Oliver, Amparo; Navarro, Esperanza

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to analyze the effects of psychological well-being, physical functioning and socio-demographic factors on life satisfaction. Both a bivariate and a multivariate level of analyses have been used. Finally, a structural model explaining life satisfaction has been developed and validated. With respect to bivariate relations, there was evidence of significant positive relations between psychological well-being dimensions and life satisfaction and between physical conditions and life satisfaction as well. Also, as age increased there was a slow decrease in life satisfaction. Educational level was positively related to life satisfaction. A structural model gave valuable information about the pattern of multivariate relationships among the variables. A first result of the model was the large effect of physical and psychological well-being on life satisfaction, albeit it was psychological well-being the major predictor of life satisfaction. A second result was that the effects of socio-demographic variables on life satisfaction were low and they operated through the effects that maintain either on psychological well-being (or its individual indicators) or on physical conditions. The role gender or age played was indirect rather than direct.

  10. Examining global electricity supply vulnerability to climate change using a high-fidelity hydropower dam model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Sean W D; Ng, Jia Yi; Galelli, Stefano

    2017-07-15

    An important and plausible impact of a changing global climate is altered power generation from hydroelectric dams. Here we project 21st century global hydropower production by forcing a coupled, global hydrological and dam model with three General Circulation Model (GCM) projections run under two emissions scenarios. Dams are simulated using a detailed model that accounts for plant specifications, storage dynamics, reservoir bathymetry and realistic, optimized operations. We show that the inclusion of these features can have a non-trivial effect on the simulated response of hydropower production to changes in climate. Simulation results highlight substantial uncertainty in the direction of change in globally aggregated hydropower production (~-5 to +5% change in mean global production by the 2080s under a high emissions scenario, depending on GCM). Several clearly impacted hotspots are identified, the most prominent of which encompasses the Mediterranean countries in southern Europe, northern Africa and the Middle East. In this region, hydropower production is projected to be reduced by approximately 40% on average by the end of the century under a high emissions scenario. After accounting for each country's dependence on hydropower for meeting its current electricity demands, the Balkans countries emerge as the most vulnerable (~5-20% loss in total national electricity generation depending on country). On the flipside, a handful of countries in Scandinavia and central Asia are projected to reap a significant increase in total electrical production (~5-15%) without investing in new power generation facilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Early stages of insulin fibrillogenesis examined with ion mobility mass spectrometry and molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Harriet; Porrini, Massimiliano; Morris, Ryan; Smith, Tom; Kalapothakis, Jason; Weidt, Stefan; Mackay, C Logan; MacPhee, Cait E; Barran, Perdita E

    2015-10-21

    A prevalent type of protein misfolding causes the formation of β-sheet-rich structures known as amyloid fibrils. Research into the mechanisms of fibril formation has implications for both disease prevention and nanoscale templating technologies. This investigation into the aggregation of insulin utilises ion mobility mass spectrometry coupled with molecular modelling to identify and characterise oligomers formed during the 'lag' phase that precedes fibril growth. High resolution mass spectrometry and collision induced dissociation is used to unequivocally assign species as m/z coincident multimers or confomers, providing a robust analytical approach that supports the use of molecular dynamics to atomistically resolve the observed oligomers. We show that insulin oligomerises to form species In where 2 ≤ n ≤ 12 and within this set of oligomers we delineate over 60 distinct conformations, the most dominant of which are compact species. Modelling trained with experimental data suggests that the dominant compact dimers are enriched in β-sheet secondary structure and dominated by hydrophobic interactions, and provides a linear relationship between Rg and collision cross section. This approach provides detailed insight to the early stages of assembly of this much studied amyloidogenic protein, and can be used to inform models of nucleation and growth.

  12. Examining the Impact of Prandtl Number and Surface Convection Models on Deep Solar Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, B. D.; Augustson, K.; Featherstone, N. A.; Miesch, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulent motions within the solar convection zone play a central role in the generation and maintenance of the Sun's magnetic field. This magnetic field reverses its polarity every 11 years and serves as the source of powerful space weather events, such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections, which can affect artificial satellites and power grids. The structure and inductive properties are linked to the amplitude (i.e. speed) of convective motion. Using the NASA Pleiades supercomputer, a 3D fluids code simulates these processes by evolving the Navier-Stokes equations in time and under an anelastic constraint. This code simulates the fluxes describing heat transport in the sun in a global spherical-shell geometry. Such global models can explicitly capture the large-scale motions in the deep convection zone but heat transport from unresolved small-scale convection in the surface layers must be parameterized. Here we consider two models for heat transport by surface convection, including a conventional turbulent thermal diffusion as well as an imposed flux that carries heat through the surface in a manner that is independent of the deep convection and the entropy stratification it establishes. For both models, we investigate the scaling of convective amplitude with decreasing diffusion (increasing Rayleigh number). If the Prandtl number is fixed, we find that the amplitude of convective motions increases with decreasing diffusion, possibly reaching an asymptotic value in the low diffusion limit. However, if only the thermal diffusion is decreased (keeping the viscosity fixed), we find that the amplitude of convection decreases with decreasing diffusion. Such a high-Prandtl-number, high-Peclet-number limit may be relevant for the Sun if magnetic fields mix momentum, effectively acting as an enhanced viscosity. In this case, our results suggest that the amplitude of large-scale convection in the Sun may be substantially less than in current models that employ an

  13. Spare the Rod, Destroy the Child: Examining the Speculative Association of Corporal Punishment and Deviant Behavior among Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to examine the relationship between the utilization of corporal punishment and its relationship to subsequent deviant behavior among youth. Fundamental aspects regarding corporal punishment (e.g. definition of corporal punishment, supportive and opposing arguments, etc.) are discussed. Socio-demographic factors…

  14. Understanding the Association between Maltreatment History and Adolescent Risk Behavior by Examining Popularity Motivations and Peer Group Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Wendy E.; Wolfe, David A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how peer group processes of pressure and control and individual motivations for popularity would add to, and moderate the relationship between, childhood maltreatment and risky behavior in adolescence. A total of 1558 youth (804 girls) from three high schools in Ontario, Canada (M age = 15.02 years,…

  15. Examining Factors Associated with (In)Stability in Social Information Processing among Urban School Children: A Latent Transition Analytic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldweber, Asha; Bradshaw, Catherine P.; Goodman, Kimberly; Monahan, Kathryn; Cooley-Strickland, Michele

    2011-01-01

    There is compelling evidence for the role of social information processing (SIP) in aggressive behavior. However, less is known about factors that influence stability versus instability in patterns of SIP over time. Latent transition analysis was used to identify SIP patterns over one year and examine how community violence exposure, aggressive…

  16. The associations of race/ethnicity and suicidal ideation among college students: a latent class analysis examining precipitating events and disclosure patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Susan; Yan, Yueqi; Lytle, Megan; Brownson, Chris

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to examine precipitating events for suicidal ideation and how these experiences relate to disclosure in a diverse sample of college students were examined. Among non-Hispanic White students, relationship/academic problems were most associated with ideation. A romantic break-up increased the odds of getting help. Among racial/ethnic minority students, family/academic problems were most associated with ideation and students who reported multiple events were less likely to get help compared with those not reporting events. Future research should examine the reasons for interpersonal conflict among this high-risk group and their attitudes about help-seeking, and identify cultural norms associated with disclosure.

  17. Cross species association examination of UCN3 and CRHR2 as potential pharmacological targets for antiobesity drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity now constitutes a leading global public health problem. Studies have shown that insulin resistance affiliated with obesity is associated with intramyocellular lipid (IMCL accumulation. Therefore, identification of genes associated with the phenotype would provide a clear target for pharmaceutical intervention and care for the condition. We hypothesized that urocortin 3 (UCN3 and corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 2 (CRHR2 are associated with IMCL and subcutaneous fat depth (SFD, because the corticotropin-releasing hormone family of peptides are capable of strong anorectic and thermogenic effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We annotated both bovine UCN3 and CRHR2 genes and identified 12 genetic mutations in the former gene and 5 genetic markers in the promoter region of the latter gene. Genotyping of these 17 markers on Wagyu times Limousin F(2 progeny revealed significant associations between promoter polymorphisms and SFD (P = 0.0203-0.0685 and between missense mutations of exon 2 and IMCL (P = 0.0055-0.0369 in the bovine UCN3 gene. The SFD associated promoter SNPs caused a gain/loss of 12 potential transcription regulatory binding sites, while the IMCL associated coding SNPs affected the secondary structure of UCN3 mRNA. However, none of five polymorphisms in CRHR2 gene clearly co-segregated with either trait in the population (P>0.6000. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Because UCN3 is located on human chromosome 10p15.1 where quantitative trait loci for obesity have been reported, our cross species study provides further evidence that it could be proposed as a potential target for developing antiobesity drugs. None of the markers in CRHR2 was associated with obesity-type traits in cattle, which is consistent with findings in human. Therefore, CRHR2 does not lend itself to the development of antiobesity drugs.

  18. Analysis models for variables associated with breastfeeding duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos S Neto, Edson Theodoro; Zandonade, Eliana; Emmerich, Adauto Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the factors associated with breastfeeding duration by two statistical models. METHODS A population-based cohort study was conducted with 86 mothers and newborns from two areas primary covered by the National Health System, with high rates of infant mortality in Vitória, Espírito Santo, Brazil. During 30 months, 67 (78%) children and mothers were visited seven times at home by trained interviewers, who filled out survey forms. Data on food and sucking habits, socioeconomic and maternal characteristics were collected. Variables were analyzed by Cox regression models, considering duration of breastfeeding as the dependent variable, and logistic regression (dependent variables, was the presence of a breastfeeding child in different post-natal ages). RESULTS In the logistic regression model, the pacifier sucking (adjusted Odds Ratio: 3.4; 95%CI 1.2-9.55) and bottle feeding (adjusted Odds Ratio: 4.4; 95%CI 1.6-12.1) increased the chance of weaning a child before one year of age. Variables associated to breastfeeding duration in the Cox regression model were: pacifier sucking (adjusted Hazard Ratio 2.0; 95%CI 1.2-3.3) and bottle feeding (adjusted Hazard Ratio 2.0; 95%CI 1.2-3.5). However, protective factors (maternal age and family income) differed between both models. CONCLUSIONS Risk and protective factors associated with cessation of breastfeeding may be analyzed by different models of statistical regression. Cox Regression Models are adequate to analyze such factors in longitudinal studies.

  19. Novel associative-memory-based self-learning neurocontrol model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ke

    1992-09-01

    Intelligent control is an important field of AI application, which is closely related to machine learning, and the neurocontrol is a kind of intelligent control that controls actions of a physical system or a plant. Linear associative memory model is a good analytic tool for artificial neural networks. In this paper, we present a novel self-learning neurocontrol on the basis of the linear associative memory model to support intelligent control. Using our self-learning neurocontrol model, the learning process is viewed as an extension of one of J. Piaget's developmental stages. After a particular linear associative model developed by us is presented, a brief introduction to J. Piaget's cognitive theory is described as the basis of our self-learning style control. It follows that the neurocontrol model is presented, which usually includes two learning stages, viz. primary learning and high-level learning. As a demonstration of our neurocontrol model, an example is also presented with simulation techniques, called that `bird' catches an aim. The tentative experimental results show that the learning and controlling performance of this approach is surprisingly good. In conclusion, future research is pointed out to improve our self-learning neurocontrol model and explore other areas of application.

  20. A comparison of ordinal regression models in an analysis of factors associated with periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javali Shivalingappa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aimed to determine the factors associated with periodontal disease (different levels of severity by using different regression models for ordinal data. Design: A cross-sectional design was employed using clinical examination and ′questionnaire with interview′ method. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted during June 2008 to October 2008 in Dharwad, Karnataka, India. It involved a systematic random sample of 1760 individuals aged 18-40 years. The periodontal disease examination was conducted by using Community Periodontal Index for Treatment Needs (CPITN. Statistical Analysis Used: Regression models for ordinal data with different built-in link functions were used in determination of factors associated with periodontal disease. Results: The study findings indicated that, the ordinal regression models with four built-in link functions (logit, probit, Clog-log and nlog-log displayed similar results with negligible differences in significant factors associated with periodontal disease. The factors such as religion, caste, sources of drinking water, Timings for sweet consumption, Timings for cleaning or brushing the teeth and materials used for brushing teeth were significantly associated with periodontal disease in all ordinal models. Conclusions: The ordinal regression model with Clog-log is a better fit in determination of significant factors associated with periodontal disease as compared to models with logit, probit and nlog-log built-in link functions. The factors such as caste and time for sweet consumption are negatively associated with periodontal disease. But religion, sources of drinking water, Timings for cleaning or brushing the teeth and materials used for brushing teeth are significantly and positively associated with periodontal disease.

  1. Coupling Longitudinal Data and Multilevel Modeling to Examine the Antecedents and Consequences of Jealousy Experiences in Romantic Relationships: A Test of the Relational Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiss, Jennifer A.; Solomon, Denise Haunani

    2006-01-01

    We used longitudinal data and multilevel modeling to examine how intimacy, relational uncertainty, and failed attempts at interdependence influence emotional, cognitive, and communicative responses to romantic jealousy, and how those experiences shape subsequent relationship characteristics. The relational turbulence model (Solomon & Knobloch,…

  2. Mining Environmental Data from a Coupled Modelling System to Examine the Impact of Agricultural Management Practices on Groundwater and Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, V.; Cooter, E. J.; Hayes, B.; Murphy, M. S.; Bash, J. O.

    2014-12-01

    Excess nitrogen (N) resulting from current agricultural management practices can leach into sources of drinking water as nitrate, increasing human health risks of 'blue baby syndrome', hypertension, and some cancers and birth defects. Nitrogen also enters the atmosphere from land surfaces forming air pollution increasing human health risks of pulmonary and cardio-vascular disease. Characterizing and attributing nitrogen from agricultural management practices is difficult due to the complex and inter-related chemical and biological reactions associated with the nitrogen cascade. Coupled physical process-based models, however, present new opportunities to investigate relationships among environmental variables on new scales; particularly because they link emission sources with meteorology and the pollutant concentration ultimately found in the environment. In this study, we applied a coupled meteorology (NOAA-WRF), agricultural (USDA-EPIC) and air quality modelling system (EPA-CMAQ) to examine the impact of nitrogen inputs from corn production on ecosystem and human health and wellbeing. The coupled system accounts for the nitrogen flux between the land surface and air, and the soil surface and groundwater, providing a unique opportunity to examine the effect of management practices such as type and timing of fertilization, tilling and irrigation on both groundwater and air quality across the conterminous US. In conducting the study, we first determined expected relationships based on literature searches and then identified model variables as direct or surrogate variables. We performed extensive and methodical multi-variate regression modelling and variable selection to examine associations between agricultural management practices and environmental condition. We then applied the regression model to predict and contrast pollution levels between two corn production scenarios (Figure 1). Finally, we applied published health functions (e.g., spina bifida and cardio

  3. Examining the link between patient satisfaction and adherence to HIV care: a structural equation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Bich N; Westbrook, Robert A; Black, William C; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Giordano, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Analogous to the business model of customer satisfaction and retention, patient satisfaction could serve as an innovative, patient-centered focus for increasing retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, and ultimately HIV suppression. To test, through structural equation modeling (SEM), a model of HIV suppression in which patient satisfaction influences HIV suppression indirectly through retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. We conducted a cross-sectional study of adults receiving HIV care at two clinics in Texas. Patient satisfaction was based on two validated items, one adapted from the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey ("Would you recommend this clinic to other patients with HIV?) and one adapted from the Delighted-Terrible Scale, ("Overall, how do you feel about the care you got at this clinic in the last 12 months?"). A validated, single-item question measured adherence to HAART over the past 4 weeks. Retention in HIV care was based on visit constancy in the year prior to the survey. HIV suppression was defined as plasma HIV RNA survey. We used SEM to test hypothesized relationships. The analyses included 489 patients (94% of eligible patients). The patient satisfaction score had a mean of 8.5 (median 9.2) on a 0- to 10- point scale. A total of 46% reported "excellent" adherence, 76% had adequate retention, and 70% had HIV suppression. In SEM analyses, patient satisfaction with care influences retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART, which in turn serve as key determinants of HIV suppression (all psatisfaction may have direct effects on retention in HIV care and adherence to HAART. Interventions to improve the care experience, without necessarily targeting objective clinical performance measures, could serve as an innovative method for optimizing HIV outcomes.

  4. Multiscale examination and modeling of electron transport in nanoscale materials and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banyai, Douglas R.

    For half a century the integrated circuits (ICs) that make up the heart of electronic devices have been steadily improving by shrinking at an exponential rate. However, as the current crop of ICs get smaller and the insulating layers involved become thinner, electrons leak through due to quantum mechanical tunneling. This is one of several issues which will bring an end to this incredible streak of exponential improvement of this type of transistor device, after which future improvements will have to come from employing fundamentally different transistor architecture rather than fine tuning and miniaturizing the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) in use today. Several new transistor designs, some designed and built here at Michigan Tech, involve electrons tunneling their way through arrays of nanoparticles. We use a multi-scale approach to model these devices and study their behavior. For investigating the tunneling characteristics of the individual junctions, we use a first-principles approach to model conduction between sub-nanometer gold particles. To estimate the change in energy due to the movement of individual electrons, we use the finite element method to calculate electrostatic capacitances. The kinetic Monte Carlo method allows us to use our knowledge of these details to simulate the dynamics of an entire device---sometimes consisting of hundreds of individual particles---and watch as a device 'turns on' and starts conducting an electric current. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the closely related scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) are a family of powerful experimental techniques that allow for the probing and imaging of surfaces and molecules at atomic resolution. However, interpretation of the results often requires comparison with theoretical and computational models. We have developed a new method for calculating STM topographs and STS spectra. This method combines an established method for approximating the

  5. Multilevel modeling and panel data analysis in educational research (Case study: National examination data senior high school in West Java)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulvia, Pepi; Kurnia, Anang; Soleh, Agus M.

    2017-03-01

    Individual and environment are a hierarchical structure consist of units grouped at different levels. Hierarchical data structures are analyzed based on several levels, with the lowest level nested in the highest level. This modeling is commonly call multilevel modeling. Multilevel modeling is widely used in education research, for example, the average score of National Examination (UN). While in Indonesia UN for high school student is divided into natural science and social science. The purpose of this research is to develop multilevel and panel data modeling using linear mixed model on educational data. The first step is data exploration and identification relationships between independent and dependent variable by checking correlation coefficient and variance inflation factor (VIF). Furthermore, we use a simple model approach with highest level of the hierarchy (level-2) is regency/city while school is the lowest of hierarchy (level-1). The best model was determined by comparing goodness-of-fit and checking assumption from residual plots and predictions for each model. Our finding that for natural science and social science, the regression with random effects of regency/city and fixed effects of the time i.e multilevel model has better performance than the linear mixed model in explaining the variability of the dependent variable, which is the average scores of UN.

  6. Examination of the U.S. EPA's vapor intrusion database based on models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yijun; Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-02-05

    In the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA)'s vapor intrusion (VI) database, there appears to be a trend showing an inverse relationship between the indoor air concentration attenuation factor and the subsurface source vapor concentration. This is inconsistent with the physical understanding in current vapor intrusion models. This article explores possible reasons for this apparent discrepancy. Soil vapor transport processes occur independently of the actual building entry process and are consistent with the trends in the database results. A recent EPA technical report provided a list of factors affecting vapor intrusion, and the influence of some of these are explored in the context of the database results.

  7. Examining hydrogen transitions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

    2007-03-01

    This report describes the results of an effort to identify key analytic issues associated with modeling a transition to hydrogen as a fuel for light duty vehicles, and using insights gained from this effort to suggest ways to improve ongoing modeling efforts. The study reported on here examined multiple hydrogen scenarios reported in the literature, identified modeling issues associated with those scenario analyses, and examined three DOE-sponsored hydrogen transition models in the context of those modeling issues. The three hydrogen transition models are HyTrans (contractor: Oak Ridge National Laboratory), MARKAL/DOE* (Brookhaven National Laboratory), and NEMS-H2 (OnLocation, Inc). The goals of these models are (1) to help DOE improve its R&D effort by identifying key technology and other roadblocks to a transition and testing its technical program goals to determine whether they are likely to lead to the market success of hydrogen technologies, (2) to evaluate alternative policies to promote a transition, and (3) to estimate the costs and benefits of alternative pathways to hydrogen development.

  8. A suggested model for physical examination and conservative treatment of athletic pubalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedus, Eric J; Stern, Ben; Reiman, Michael P; Tarara, Dan; Wright, Alexis A

    2013-02-01

    Athletic pubalgia (AP) is a chronic debilitating syndrome that affects many athletes. As a syndrome, AP is difficult to diagnose both with clinical examination and imaging. AP is also a challenge for conservative intervention with randomized controlled trials showing mixed success rates. In other syndromes where clinical diagnosis and conservative treatment have been less than clear, a paradigm has been suggested as a framework for clinical decision making. To propose a new clinical diagnostic and treatment paradigm for the conservative management of AP. Relevant studies were viewed with regard to diagnosis and intervention and where a gap in evidence existed, clinical expertise was used to fill that gap and duly noted. A new paradigm is proposed to assist with clinical diagnosis and non-surgical intervention in patients suffering with AP. The level of evidence supporting this paradigm, according to the SORT taxonomy, is primarily level 2B. Further testing is warranted but following the suggested paradigm should lead to a clearer diagnosis of AP and allow more meaningful research into homogeneous patient populations within the AP diagnostic cluster. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): 2B. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Examining the addictive-like properties of binge eating using an animal model of sugar dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avena, Nicole M

    2007-10-01

    The increase in the incidence of obesity and eating disorders has encouraged research efforts aimed at understanding the etiology of abnormal eating behaviors. Clinical reports have led to the suggestion that some individuals may develop addictive-like behaviors when consuming palatable foods. Binge eating is a behavioral component of bulimia and obesity and has also become increasingly common in nonclinical populations in our society. This review summarizes the behavioral and neurochemical similarities between binge eating of palatable foods and the administration of drugs of abuse. An animal model of bingeing on sugar is used to illustrate behaviors found with some drugs of abuse, such as opiate-like withdrawal signs, enhanced intake following abstinence, and cross-sensitization. Related neurochemical changes commonly observed with drugs of abuse, including changes in dopamine and acetylcholine release in the nucleus accumbens, can also be found with bingeing on sugar. These neurochemical alterations are exacerbated when animals binge on sugar while at a low body weight or when the food they ingest is purged. Drawing on other animal models and the clinical literature, parallels between drug abuse and binge-eating behavior are discussed.

  10. Enhancing empowerment in eating disorder prevention: Another examination of the REbeL peer education model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breithaupt, Lauren; Eickman, Laura; Byrne, Catherine E; Fischer, Sarah

    2016-06-11

    Previously validated eating disorder (ED) prevention programs utilize either a targeted or universal approach. While both approaches have shown to be efficacious, implementing either style of program within a school setting remains a challenge. The current study describes an enhanced version of REbeL, a module based, continuous ED prevention program which utilizes a self-selection model of prevention in high school settings. The purpose of this study was to determine if an enhanced empowerment model of REbeL could increase feelings of empowerment and reduce eating disorder risk. We also aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. High school peer-educators self-selected into the semi-manualized dissonance based intervention. Following feedback from a pilot trailed, enhanced peer-led group activities, designed to critique the thin ideal and designed to empower macro-changes in societal structures that emphasize the thin ideal, were added. The study (N=83) indicates that the program appears to be effective at reducing eating disorder risk factors and increasing empowerment. Participants reported reductions in body checking and internalization of the thin ideal.

  11. The relation between social anxiety and audience perception: Examining Clark and Wells’ (1995) model among adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöte, Anke W.; Miers, Anne C.; Heyne, David A.; Clark, David M.; Westenberg, P. Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Background Clark and Wells’ (1995; Clark, 2001) cognitive model of social anxiety proposes that socially anxious individuals have negative expectations of performance prior to a social event, focus their attention predominantly on themselves and on their negative self-evaluations during an event, and use this negative self processing to infer that other people are judging them harshly. Aims The present study tested these propositions. Method The study used a community sample of 161 adolescents aged 14-18 years. The participants gave a speech in front of a pre-recorded audience acting neutrally, and participants were aware that the projected audience was pre-recorded. Results As expected, participants with higher levels of social anxiety had more negative performance expectations, higher self-focused attention, and more negative perceptions of the audience. Negative performance expectations and self-focused attention were found to mediate the relationship between social anxiety and audience perception. Conclusion The findings support Clark and Wells’ cognitive model of social anxiety which poses that socially anxious individuals have distorted perceptions of the responses of other people because their perceptions are colored by their negative thoughts and feelings. PMID:23635882

  12. A spatial generalized ordered response model to examine highway crash injury severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marisol; Paleti, Rajesh; Bhat, Chandra R

    2013-03-01

    This paper proposes a flexible econometric structure for injury severity analysis at the level of individual crashes that recognizes the ordinal nature of injury severity categories, allows unobserved heterogeneity in the effects of contributing factors, as well as accommodates spatial dependencies in the injury severity levels experienced in crashes that occur close to one another in space. The modeling framework is applied to analyze the injury severity sustained in crashes occurring on highway road segments in Austin, Texas. The sample is drawn from the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) crash incident files from 2009 and includes a variety of crash characteristics, highway design attributes, driver and vehicle characteristics, and environmental factors. The results from our analysis underscore the value of our proposed model for data fit purposes as well as to accurately estimate variable effects. The most important determinants of injury severity on highways, according to our results, are (1) whether any vehicle occupant is ejected, (2) whether collision type is head-on, (3) whether any vehicle involved in the crash overturned, (4) whether any vehicle occupant is unrestrained by a seat-belt, and (5) whether a commercial truck is involved. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Examining the impact of multi-layer graphene using cellular and amphibian models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzi, Laura; Mouchet, Florence; Cadarsi, Stéphanie; Janowska, Izabela; Russier, Julie; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Risuleo, Gianfranco; Soula, Brigitte; Galibert, Anne-Marie; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Pinelli, Eric; Gauthier, Laury; Bianco, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    In the last few years, graphene has been defined as the revolutionary material showing an incredible expansion in industrial applications. Different graphene forms have been applied in several contexts, spreading from energy technologies and electronics to food and agriculture technologies. Graphene showed promises also in the biomedical field. Hopeful results have been already obtained in diagnostic, drug delivery, tissue regeneration and photothermal cancer ablation. In view of the enormous development of graphene-based technologies, a careful assessment of its impact on health and environment is demanded. It is evident how investigating the graphene toxicity is of fundamental importance in the context of medical purposes. On the other hand, the nanomaterial present in the environment, likely to be generated all along the industrial life-cycle, may have harmful effects on living organisms. In the present work, an important contribution on the impact of multi-layer graphene (MLG) on health and environment is given by using a multifaceted approach. For the first purpose, the effect of the material on two mammalian cell models was assessed. Key cytotoxicity parameters were considered such as cell viability and inflammatory response induction. This was combined with an evaluation of MLG toxicity towards Xenopus laevis, used as both in vivo and environmental model organism.

  14. Examination of cocaine dose in a preclinical model of natural reward devaluation by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer L; Dykstra, Linda A; Carelli, Regina M

    2015-06-01

    In a preclinical model of natural reward devaluation by cocaine, taste cues elicit aversive taste reactivity when they predict impending but delayed cocaine self-administration. Here, we investigated this negative affective state as a function of cocaine dose. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were given 45 brief intraoral infusions of a 0.15% saccharin solution before 2 h cocaine self-administration for 14 days. Rats were video recorded; taste reactivity and patterns of self-administration were quantified on the first and last days. On day 14, a significant decrease in appetitive taste reactivity and increase in aversive taste reactivity was observed (compared with day 1) that did not vary as a function of cocaine dose. In contrast, patterns of cocaine self-administration (i.e. the total number of lever presses and load-up behavior) varied as a function of dose across days. Further, load-up behavior was positively correlated with aversive taste reactivity (i.e. gapes) on day 14 across all doses tested. Collectively, these findings indicate that the emergence of negative affect in this preclinical model is not dependent on cocaine dose.

  15. An Examination of Perceptions of the Use of Virtual Conferences in Organizations: The Organizational Systems Research Association (OSRA) and the Association for Business Communication (ABC) Members Speak Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Kelly L.; Hemby, K. Virginia

    2000-01-01

    A survey of 183 members of the Association for Business Communication and 33 members of the Organizational Systems Research Association found that, although virtual conferences reduce costs, professional isolation and lack of human contact are disadvantages. They should supplement but not replace traditional conferences. (Contains 18 references.)…

  16. Associations of Undergoing a Routine Medical Examination or Not with Prevalence Rates of Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Lingling; Tian, Danping; Li, Li; Deng, Xin; Deng, Jing; Ning, Peishan; Hu, Guoqing

    2016-06-23

    Undergoing a routine medical examination may be associated with the prevalence rate of chronic diseases from a population-based household interview survey. However, this important issue has not been examined so far. Data came from the first health service household interview of Hunan province, China, in 2013. A Rao-Scott chi-square test was performed to examine the difference in prevalence rates between subgroups. Adjusted odds ratio (OR) was calculated using the PROC SURVEYLOGISTIC procedure of SAS9.1 statistical software. In total, 24,282 residents of 8400 households were surveyed. A higher proportion of elderly adults had undergone a medical examination within the prior 12 months compared with young adults (≥65 years, 60%; 45-64 years, 46%; 18-44 years, 37%). After controlling for location, sex, and household income per capita, undergoing a medical examination was significantly associated with high prevalence rates of hypertension (adjusted OR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.1-3.5) and of diabetes mellitus (adjusted OR: 3.3, 95% CI: 1.7-6.5) for young adults aged 18-44 years. The associations were not statistically significant for age groups 45-64 years and 65 years or older. The prevalence rates of hypertension and diabetes mellitus may be seriously underestimated for young adults not undergoing a routine medical examination in a health household interview survey.

  17. Associations of Undergoing a Routine Medical Examination or Not with Prevalence Rates of Hypertension and Diabetes Mellitus: A Cross-Sectional Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Zhang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Undergoing a routine medical examination may be associated with the prevalence rate of chronic diseases from a population-based household interview survey. However, this important issue has not been examined so far. Methods: Data came from the first health service household interview of Hunan province, China, in 2013. A Rao–Scott chi-square test was performed to examine the difference in prevalence rates between subgroups. Adjusted odds ratio (OR was calculated using the PROC SURVEYLOGISTIC procedure of SAS9.1 statistical software. Results: In total, 24,282 residents of 8400 households were surveyed. A higher proportion of elderly adults had undergone a medical examination within the prior 12 months compared with young adults (≥65 years, 60%; 45–64 years, 46%; 18–44 years, 37%. After controlling for location, sex, and household income per capita, undergoing a medical examination was significantly associated with high prevalence rates of hypertension (adjusted OR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.1–3.5 and of diabetes mellitus (adjusted OR: 3.3, 95% CI: 1.7–6.5 for young adults aged 18–44 years. The associations were not statistically significant for age groups 45–64 years and 65 years or older. Conclusion: The prevalence rates of hypertension and diabetes mellitus may be seriously underestimated for young adults not undergoing a routine medical examination in a health household interview survey.

  18. Group B Streptococcal Septic Arthritis of the Shoulder and Potential Association with Pelvic Examination and PAP Smear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Daner

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Group B streptococcal (GBS infection of a native joint in a nonpregnant adult is uncommon. While many women are colonized with this flora, it rarely becomes pathogenic in its adult host. GBS associated joint infections have been reported, most of which have been related to hematogenous seeding from unknown sources. To our knowledge, there are no published case reports of a GBS joint infection in association with a pelvic exam and Papanicolaou (PAP smear. In this case report, we present a case of GBS sepsis of a native shoulder, possibly resulting from a routine pelvic exam and PAP smear.

  19. Never blame the umpire - a review of Situation Awareness models and methods for examining the performance of officials in sport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Timothy J; Salmon, Paul M

    2016-07-01

    As sport becomes more complex, there is potential for ergonomics concepts to help enhance the performance of sports officials. The concept of Situation Awareness (SA) appears pertinent given the requirement for officials to understand what is going on in order to make decisions. Although numerous models exist, none have been applied to examine officials, and only several recent examples have been applied to sport. This paper examines SA models and methods to identify if any have applicability to officials in sport (OiS). Evaluation of the models and methods identified potential applications of individual, team and systems models of SA. The paper further demonstrates that the Distributed Situation Awareness model is suitable for studying officials in fastball sports. It is concluded that the study of SA represents a key area of multidisciplinary research for both ergonomics and sports science in the context of OiS. Practitioner Summary: Despite obvious synergies, applications of cognitive ergonomics concepts in sport are sparse. This is especially so for Officials in Sport (OiS). This article presents an evaluation of Situation Awareness models and methods, providing practitioners with guidance on which are the most suitable for OiS system design and evaluation.

  20. Somatic Expression of Psychological Problems (Somatization: Examination with Structural Equation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugba Seda Çolak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the research is to define which psychological symptoms (somatization, depression, obsessive ‐ compulsive, hostility, interpersonal sensitivity, anxiety, phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation and psychoticism cause somatic reactions at most. Total effect of these psychological symptoms on somatic symptoms had been investigated. Study was carried out with structural equation model to research the relation between the psychological symptoms and somatization. The main material of the research is formed by the data obtained from 492 people. SCL‐90‐R scale was used in order to obtain the data. As a result of the structural equation analysis, it has been found that 1Psychoticism, phobic anxiety, and paranoid ideation do not predict somatic symptoms.2There is a negative relation between interpersonal sensitivity level mand somatic reactions.3Anxiety symptoms had been found as causative to occur the highest level of somatic reactions.