WorldWideScience

Sample records for models dynamical cores

  1. Application of Core Dynamics Modeling to Core-Mantle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia

    2003-01-01

    Observations have demonstrated that length of day (LOD) variation on decadal time scales results from exchange of axial angular momentum between the solid mantle and the core. There are in general four core-mantle interaction mechanisms that couple the core and the mantle. Of which, three have been suggested likely the dominant coupling mechanism for the decadal core-mantle angular momentum exchange, namely, gravitational core-mantle coupling arising from density anomalies in the mantle and in the core (including the inner core), the electromagnetic coupling arising from Lorentz force in the electrically conducting lower mantle (e.g. D-layer), and the topographic coupling arising from non-hydrostatic pressure acting on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) topography. In the past decades, most effort has been on estimating the coupling torques from surface geomagnetic observations (kinematic approach), which has provided insights on the core dynamical processes. In the meantime, it also creates questions and concerns on approximations in the studies that may invalidate the corresponding conclusions. The most serious problem is perhaps the approximations that are inconsistent with dynamical processes in the core, such as inconsistencies between the core surface flow beneath the CMB and the CMB topography, and that between the D-layer electric conductivity and the approximations on toroidal field at the CMB. These inconsistencies can only be addressed with numerical core dynamics modeling. In the past few years, we applied our MoSST (Modular, Scalable, Self-consistent and Three-dimensional) core dynamics model to study core-mantle interactions together with geodynamo simulation, aiming at assessing the effect of the dynamical inconsistencies in the kinematic studies on core-mantle coupling torques. We focus on topographic and electromagnetic core-mantle couplings and find that, for the topographic coupling, the consistency between the core flow and the CMB topography is

  2. A semi-analytic dynamical friction model for cored galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Petts, James A; Gualandris, Alessia

    2016-01-01

    We present a dynamical friction model based on Chandrasekhar's formula that reproduces the fast inspiral and stalling experienced by satellites orbiting galaxies with a large constant density core. We show that the fast inspiral phase does not owe to resonance. Rather, it owes to the background velocity distribution function for the constant density cores being dissimilar from the usually-assumed Maxwellian distribution. Using the correct background velocity distribution function and the semi-analytic model from Petts et al. (2015), we are able to correctly reproduce the infall rate in both cored and cusped potentials. However, in the case of large cores, our model is no longer able to correctly capture core-stalling. We show that this stalling owes to the tidal radius of the satellite approaching the size of the core. By switching off dynamical friction when rt(r) = r (where rt is the tidal radius at the satellite's position) we arrive at a model which reproduces the N-body results remarkably well. Since the...

  3. Nonlinear Dynamic Model of PMBLDC Motor Considering Core Losses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fasil, Muhammed; Mijatovic, Nenad; Jensen, Bogi Bech

    2017-01-01

    The phase variable model is used commonly when simulating a motor drive system with a three-phase permanent magnet brushless DC (PMBLDC) motor. The phase variable model neglects core losses and this affects its accuracy when modelling fractional-slot machines. The inaccuracy of phase variable model...... on the detailed analysis of the flux path and the variation of flux in different components of the machine. A prototype of fractional slot axial flux PMBLDC in-wheel motor is used to assess the proposed nonlinear dynamic model....

  4. Dynamical Models to Infer the Core Mass Fraction of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Elisa V.; Barclay, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    The uncompressed density of Venus is just a few percent lower than Earth's, however the nature of the interior core structure of Venus remains unclear. Employing state-of-the-art dynamical formation models that allow both accretion and collisional fragmentation, we perform hundreds of simulations of terrestrial planet growth around the Sun in the presence of the giant planets. For both Earth and Venus analogs, we quantify the iron-silicate ratios, water/volatile abundances and specific impact energies of all collisions that lead to their formation. Preliminary results suggest that the distributions of core mass fraction and water content are comparable among the Earth and Venus analogs, suggesting that Earth and Venus may indeed have formed with similar structures and compositions.

  5. Particle-core model for transverse dynamics of beam halo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Wangler

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The transverse motion of beam halo particles is described by a particle-core model which uses the space-charge field of a continuous cylindrical oscillating beam core in a uniform linear focusing channel to provide the force that drives particles to large amplitudes. The model predicts a maximum amplitude for the resonantly-driven particles as a function of the initial mismatch. We have calculated these amplitude limits and have estimated the growth times for extended-halo formation as a function of both the space-charge tune-depression ratio and a mismatch parameter. We also present formulas for the scaling of the maximum amplitudes as a function of the beam parameters. The model results are compared with multiparticle simulations and we find very good agreement for a variety of initial particle distributions.

  6. Evolution dynamics modeling and simulation of logistics enterprise's core competence based on service innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Tong, Yuting

    2017-04-01

    With the rapid development of economy, the development of logistics enterprises in China is also facing a huge challenge, especially the logistics enterprises generally lack of core competitiveness, and service innovation awareness is not strong. Scholars in the process of studying the core competitiveness of logistics enterprises are mainly from the perspective of static stability, not from the perspective of dynamic evolution to explore. So the author analyzes the influencing factors and the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises, using the method of system dynamics to study the cause and effect of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, construct a system dynamics model of evolution of core competence logistics enterprises, which can be simulated by vensim PLE. The analysis for the effectiveness and sensitivity of simulation model indicates the model can be used as the fitting of the evolution process of the core competence of logistics enterprises and reveal the process and mechanism of the evolution of the core competence of logistics enterprises, and provide management strategies for improving the core competence of logistics enterprises. The construction and operation of computer simulation model offers a kind of effective method for studying the evolution of logistics enterprise core competence.

  7. Comparison of dynamical cores for NWP models: comparison of COSMO and Dune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brdar, Slavko; Baldauf, Michael; Dedner, Andreas; Klöfkorn, Robert

    2013-06-01

    We present a range of numerical tests comparing the dynamical cores of the operationally used numerical weather prediction (NWP) model COSMO and the university code Dune, focusing on their efficiency and accuracy for solving benchmark test cases for NWP. The dynamical core of COSMO is based on a finite difference method whereas the Dune core is based on a Discontinuous Galerkin method. Both dynamical cores are briefly introduced stating possible advantages and pitfalls of the different approaches. Their efficiency and effectiveness is investigated, based on three numerical test cases, which require solving the compressible viscous and non-viscous Euler equations. The test cases include the density current (Straka et al. in Int J Numer Methods Fluids 17:1-22, 1993), the inertia gravity (Skamarock and Klemp in Mon Weather Rev 122:2623-2630, 1994), and the linear hydrostatic mountain waves of (Bonaventura in J Comput Phys 158:186-213, 2000).

  8. Dynamics of core accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Andrew F.; Ruffert, Maximilian

    2013-02-01

    We perform three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of gas flowing around a planetary core of mass Mpl = 10M⊕ embedded in a near Keplerian background flow, using a modified shearing box approximation. We assume an ideal gas behaviour following an equation of state with a fixed ratio of the specific heats, γ = 1.42, consistent with the conditions of a moderate-temperature background disc with solar composition. No radiative heating or cooling is included in the models. We employ a nested grid hydrodynamic code implementing the `Piecewise Parabolic Method' with as many as six fixed nested grids, providing spatial resolution on the finest grid comparable to the present-day diameters of Neptune and Uranus. We find that a strongly dynamically active flow develops such that no static envelope can form. The activity is not sensitive to plausible variations in the rotation curve of the underlying disc. It is sensitive to the thermodynamic treatment of the gas, as modelled by prescribed equations of state (either `locally isothermal' or `locally isentropic') and the temperature of the background disc material. The activity is also sensitive to the shape and depth of the core's gravitational potential, through its mass and gravitational softening coefficient. Each of these factors influences the magnitude and character of hydrodynamic feedback of the small-scale flow on the background, and we conclude that accurate modelling of such feedback is critical to a complete understanding of the core accretion process. The varying flow pattern gives rise to large, irregular eruptions of matter from the region around the core which return matter to the background flow: mass in the envelope at one time may not be found in the envelope at any later time. No net mass accretion into the envelope is observed over the course of the simulation and none is expected, due to our neglect of cooling. Except in cases of very rapid cooling however, as defined by locally isothermal or

  9. Highlights from the 2016 Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP-2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonowski, Christiane; Ullrich, Paul A.; Reed, Kevin A.; Zarzycki, Colin M.; Kent, James; Lauritzen, Peter H.; Nair, Ramachandran D.

    2017-04-01

    The 2016 Dynamical Core Model Intercomparison Project (DCMIP-2016) shed light on the newest modeling techniques for global weather and climate and models with particular focus on the newest non-hydrostatic atmospheric dynamical cores, their physics-dynamics coupling, and variable-resolution aspects. As part of a two-week summer school held in June 2016 at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), a main objective of DCMIP-2016 was to establish an open-access database via the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) that hosts DCMIP-2016 simulations for community use from over 12 international modeling groups. In addition, DCMIP-2016 established new atmospheric model test cases of intermediate complexity that incorporated simplified physical parameterizations. The paper presents the results of the three DCMIP-2016 test cases which assess the evolution of an idealized moist baroclinic wave, a tropical cyclone and a supercell. All flow scenarios start from analytically-prescribed moist reference states in gradient-wind and hydrostatic balance which are overlaid by localized perturbations. The simple moisture feedbacks are represented by a warm-rain Kessler-type parameterization without any cloud stage. The tropical cyclone test case also utilizes surface fluxes and turbulent mixing in the boundary layer. The paper highlights the characteristics of the DCMIP-2016 dynamical cores and reveals the impact of the moisture processes on the flow fields over 5-15-day forecast periods. In addition, the coupling between the dynamics, physics and the tracer advection schemes is assessed via a "Terminator" tracer test. The work demonstrates how idealized test cases are part of a model hierarchy that helps distinguish between causes and effects in atmospheric models and their physics-dynamics interplay. This characterizes and informs the design of atmospheric dynamical cores.

  10. Mean-field dynamic criticality and geometric transition in the Gaussian core model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coslovich, Daniele; Ikeda, Atsushi; Miyazaki, Kunimasa

    2016-04-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate dynamic heterogeneities and the potential energy landscape of the Gaussian core model (GCM). Despite the nearly Gaussian statistics of particles' displacements, the GCM exhibits giant dynamic heterogeneities close to the dynamic transition temperature. The divergence of the four-point susceptibility is quantitatively well described by the inhomogeneous version of the mode-coupling theory. Furthermore, the potential energy landscape of the GCM is characterized by large energy barriers, as expected from the lack of activated, hopping dynamics, and display features compatible with a geometric transition. These observations demonstrate that all major features of mean-field dynamic criticality can be observed in a physically sound, three-dimensional model.

  11. A decision tree algorithm for investigation of model biases related to dynamical cores and physical parameterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soner Yorgun, M; Rood, Richard B

    2016-12-01

    An object-based evaluation method using a pattern recognition algorithm (i.e., classification trees) is applied to the simulated orographic precipitation for idealized experimental setups using the National Center of Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) with the finite volume (FV) and the Eulerian spectral transform dynamical cores with varying resolutions. Daily simulations were analyzed and three different types of precipitation features were identified by the classification tree algorithm. The statistical characteristics of these features (i.e., maximum value, mean value, and variance) were calculated to quantify the difference between the dynamical cores and changing resolutions. Even with the simple and smooth topography in the idealized setups, complexity in the precipitation fields simulated by the models develops quickly. The classification tree algorithm using objective thresholding successfully detected different types of precipitation features even as the complexity of the precipitation field increased. The results show that the complexity and the bias introduced in small-scale phenomena due to the spectral transform method of CAM Eulerian spectral dynamical core is prominent, and is an important reason for its dissimilarity from the FV dynamical core. The resolvable scales, both in horizontal and vertical dimensions, have significant effect on the simulation of precipitation. The results of this study also suggest that an efficient and informative study about the biases produced by GCMs should involve daily (or even hourly) output (rather than monthly mean) analysis over local scales.

  12. A Semi-Analytic dynamical friction model that reproduces core stalling

    CERN Document Server

    Petts, James A; Read, Justin I

    2015-01-01

    We present a new semi-analytic model for dynamical friction based on Chandrasekhar's formalism. The key novelty is the introduction of physically motivated, radially varying, maximum and minimum impact parameters. With these, our model gives an excellent match to full N-body simulations for isotropic background density distributions, both cuspy and shallow, without any fine-tuning of the model parameters. In particular, we are able to reproduce the dramatic core-stalling effect that occurs in shallow/constant density cores, for the first time. This gives us new physical insight into the core-stalling phenomenon. We show that core stalling occurs in the limit in which the product of the Coulomb logarithm and the local fraction of stars with velocity lower than the infalling body tends to zero. For cuspy backgrounds, this occurs when the infalling mass approaches the enclosed background mass. For cored backgrounds, it occurs at larger distances from the centre, due to a combination of a rapidly increasing minim...

  13. Non-Equilibrium Chemistry of Dynamically Evolving Prestellar Cores: I. Basic Magnetic and Non-Magnetic Models and Parameter Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Tassis, Konstantinos; Yorke, Harold W; Turner, Neal

    2011-01-01

    We combine dynamical and non-equilibrium chemical modeling of evolving prestellar molecular cloud cores, and explore the evolution of molecular abundances in the contracting core. We model both magnetic cores, with varying degrees of initial magnetic support, and non-magnetic cores, with varying collapse delay times. We explore, through a parameter study, the competing effects of various model parameters in the evolving molecular abundances, including the elemental C/O ratio, the temperature, and the cosmic-ray ionization rate. We find that different models show their largest quantitative differences at the center of the core, whereas the outer layers, which evolve slower, have abundances which are severely degenerate among different dynamical models. There is a large range of possible abundance values for different models at a fixed evolutionary stage (central density), which demonstrates the large potential of chemical differentiation in prestellar cores. However, degeneracies among different models, compou...

  14. Design of a new dynamical core for global atmospheric models based on some efficient numerical methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Bin; WAN Hui; JI Zhongzhen; ZHANG Xin; YU Rucong; YU Yongqiang; LIU Hongtao

    2004-01-01

    A careful study on the integral properties of the primitive hydrostatic balance equations for baroclinic atmosphere is carried out, and a new scheme todesign the global adiabatic model of atmospheric dynamics ispresented. This scheme includes a method of weighted equal-areamesh and a fully discrete finite difference method with quadraticand linear conservations for solving the primitive equationsystem. Using this scheme, we established a new dynamical corewith adjustable high resolution acceptable to the availablecomputer capability, which can be very stable without anyfiltering and smoothing. Especially, some important integralproperties are kept unchanged, such as the anti-symmetries of thehorizontal advection operators and the vertical convectionoperator, the mass conservation, the effective energy conservationunder the standard stratification approximation, and so on. Somenumerical tests on the new dynamical core, respectively regardingits global conservations and its integrated performances inclimatic modeling, incorporated with the physical packagesfrom the Community Atmospheric Model Version 2 (CAM2) of NationalCenter for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), are included.

  15. A moist aquaplanet variant of the Held-Suarez test for atmospheric model dynamical cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Diana R.; Jablonowski, Christiane

    2016-04-01

    A moist idealized test case (MITC) for atmospheric model dynamical cores is presented. The MITC is based on the Held-Suarez (HS) test that was developed for dry simulations on "a flat Earth" and replaces the full physical parameterization package with a Newtonian temperature relaxation and Rayleigh damping of the low-level winds. This new variant of the HS test includes moisture and thereby sheds light on the nonlinear dynamics-physics moisture feedbacks without the complexity of full-physics parameterization packages. In particular, it adds simplified moist processes to the HS forcing to model large-scale condensation, boundary-layer mixing, and the exchange of latent and sensible heat between the atmospheric surface and an ocean-covered planet. Using a variety of dynamical cores of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), this paper demonstrates that the inclusion of the moist idealized physics package leads to climatic states that closely resemble aquaplanet simulations with complex physical parameterizations. This establishes that the MITC approach generates reasonable atmospheric circulations and can be used for a broad range of scientific investigations. This paper provides examples of two application areas. First, the test case reveals the characteristics of the physics-dynamics coupling technique and reproduces coupling issues seen in full-physics simulations. In particular, it is shown that sudden adjustments of the prognostic fields due to moist physics tendencies can trigger undesirable large-scale gravity waves, which can be remedied by a more gradual application of the physical forcing. Second, the moist idealized test case can be used to intercompare dynamical cores. These examples demonstrate the versatility of the MITC approach and suggestions are made for further application areas. The new moist variant of the HS test can be considered a test case of intermediate complexity.

  16. DYNAMICO, an atmospheric dynamical core for high-performance climate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubos, Thomas; Meurdesoif, Yann; Spiga, Aymeric; Millour, Ehouarn; Fita, Lluis; Hourdin, Frédéric; Kageyama, Masa; Traore, Abdoul-Khadre; Guerlet, Sandrine; Polcher, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Institut Pierre Simon Laplace has developed a very scalable atmospheric dynamical core, DYNAMICO, based on energy-conserving finite-difference/finite volume numerics on a quasi-uniform icosahedral-hexagonal mesh. Scalability is achieved by combining hybrid MPI/OpenMP parallelism to asynchronous I/O. This dynamical core has been coupled to radiative transfer physics tailored to the atmosphere of Saturn, allowing unprecedented simulations of the climate of this giant planet. For terrestrial climate studies DYNAMICO is being integrated into the IPSL Earth System Model IPSL-CM. Preliminary aquaplanet and AMIP-style simulations yield reasonable results when compared to outputs from IPSL-CM5. The observed performance suggests that an order of magnitude may be gained with respect to IPSL-CM CMIP5 simulations either on the duration of simulations or on their resolution. Longer simulations would be of interest for the study of paleoclimate, while higher resolution could improve certain aspects of the modeled climate such as extreme events, as will be explored in the HighResMIP project. Following IPSL's strategic vision of building a unified global-regional modelling system, a fully-compressible, non-hydrostatic prototype of DYNAMICO has been developed, enabling future convection-resolving simulations. Work supported by ANR project "HEAT", grant number CE23_2014_HEAT Dubos, T., Dubey, S., Tort, M., Mittal, R., Meurdesoif, Y., and Hourdin, F.: DYNAMICO-1.0, an icosahedral hydrostatic dynamical core designed for consistency and versatility, Geosci. Model Dev., 8, 3131-3150, doi:10.5194/gmd-8-3131-2015, 2015.

  17. Verification of GRAPES unified global and regional numerical weather prediction model dynamic core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG XueSheng; HU JiangLin; CHEN DeHui; ZHANG HongLiang; SHEN XueShun; CHEN JiaBin; JI LiRen

    2008-01-01

    During the past few years, most of the new developed numerical weather prediction models adopt the strategy of multi-scale technique. Therefore, China Meteorological Administration has devoted to de-veloping a new generation of global and regional multi-scale model since 2003. In order to validate the performance of the GRAPES (Global and Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System) model both for its scientific design and program coding, a suite of idealized tests has been proposed and conducted, which includes the density flow test, three-dimensional mountain wave and the cross-polar flow test. The density flow experiment indicates that the dynamic core has the ability to simulate the fine scale nonlinear flow structures and its transient features. While the three-dimensional mountain wave test shows that the model can reproduce the horizontal and vertical propagation of internal gravity waves quite well. Cross-polar flow test demonstrates the rationality of both for the semi-Lagrangian departure point calculation and the discretization of the model near the poles. The real case forecasts reveal that the model has the ability to predict the large-scale weather regimes in summer such as the subtropical high, and to capture the major synoptic patterns in the mid and high latitudes.

  18. Effects of different per translational kinetics on the dynamics of a core circadian clock model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula S Nieto

    Full Text Available Living beings display self-sustained daily rhythms in multiple biological processes, which persist in the absence of external cues since they are generated by endogenous circadian clocks. The period (per gene is a central player within the core molecular mechanism for keeping circadian time in most animals. Recently, the modulation PER translation has been reported, both in mammals and flies, suggesting that translational regulation of clock components is important for the proper clock gene expression and molecular clock performance. Because translational regulation ultimately implies changes in the kinetics of translation and, therefore, in the circadian clock dynamics, we sought to study how and to what extent the molecular clock dynamics is affected by the kinetics of PER translation. With this objective, we used a minimal mathematical model of the molecular circadian clock to qualitatively characterize the dynamical changes derived from kinetically different PER translational mechanisms. We found that the emergence of self-sustained oscillations with characteristic period, amplitude, and phase lag (time delays between per mRNA and protein expression depends on the kinetic parameters related to PER translation. Interestingly, under certain conditions, a PER translation mechanism with saturable kinetics introduces longer time delays than a mechanism ruled by a first-order kinetics. In addition, the kinetic laws of PER translation significantly changed the sensitivity of our model to parameters related to the synthesis and degradation of per mRNA and PER degradation. Lastly, we found a set of parameters, with realistic values, for which our model reproduces some experimental results reported recently for Drosophila melanogaster and we present some predictions derived from our analysis.

  19. Vorticity-divergence semi-Lagrangian global atmospheric model SL-AV20: dynamical core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstykh, Mikhail; Shashkin, Vladimir; Fadeev, Rostislav; Goyman, Gordey

    2017-05-01

    SL-AV (semi-Lagrangian, based on the absolute vorticity equation) is a global hydrostatic atmospheric model. Its latest version, SL-AV20, provides global operational medium-range weather forecast with 20 km resolution over Russia. The lower-resolution configurations of SL-AV20 are being tested for seasonal prediction and climate modeling. The article presents the model dynamical core. Its main features are a vorticity-divergence formulation at the unstaggered grid, high-order finite-difference approximations, semi-Lagrangian semi-implicit discretization and the reduced latitude-longitude grid with variable resolution in latitude. The accuracy of SL-AV20 numerical solutions using a reduced lat-lon grid and the variable resolution in latitude is tested with two idealized test cases. Accuracy and stability of SL-AV20 in the presence of the orography forcing are tested using the mountain-induced Rossby wave test case. The results of all three tests are in good agreement with other published model solutions. It is shown that the use of the reduced grid does not significantly affect the accuracy up to the 25 % reduction in the number of grid points with respect to the regular grid. Variable resolution in latitude allows us to improve the accuracy of a solution in the region of interest.

  20. Flow Dynamic Analysis of Core Shooting Process through Experiment and Multiphase Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjiang Ni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Core shooting process is the most widely used technique to make sand cores and it plays an important role in the quality of sand cores as well as the manufacture of complicated castings in metal casting industry. In this paper, the flow behavior of sand particles in the core box was investigated synchronously with transparent core box, high-speed camera, and pressure measuring system. The flow pattern of sand particles in the shooting head of the core shooting machine was reproduced with various colored core sand layers. Taking both kinetic and frictional stress into account, a kinetic-frictional constitutive correlation was established to describe the internal momentum transfer in the solid phase. Two-fluid model (TFM simulations with turbulence model were then performed and good agreement was achieved between the experimental and simulation results on the flow behavior of sand particles in both the shooting head and the core box. Based on the experimental and simulation results, the flow behavior of sand particles in the core box, the formation of “dead zone” in the shooting head, and the effect of drag force were analyzed in terms of sand volume fraction (αs, sand velocity (Vs, and pressure variation (P.

  1. Modeled and Measured Dynamics of a Composite Beam with Periodically Varying Foam Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph H.; Cano, Roberto J.; Schiller, Noah H.; Roberts Gary D.

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of a sandwich beam with carbon fiber composite facesheets and foam core with periodic variations in material properties are studied. The purpose of the study is to compare finite element predictions with experimental measurements on fabricated beam specimens. For the study, three beams were fabricated: one with a compliant foam core, a second with a stiffer core, and a third with the two cores alternating down the length of the beam to create a periodic variation in properties. This periodic variation produces a bandgap in the frequency domain where vibrational energy does not readily propagate down the length of the beam. Mode shapes and natural frequencies are compared, as well as frequency responses from point force input to velocity response at the opposite end of the beam.

  2. A new multi-tracer transport scheme for the dynamical core of NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erath, C.

    2012-04-01

    The integration of a conservative semi-Lagrangian multi-tracer transport scheme (CSLAM) in NCAR's High-Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME) is considered here. HOMME is a highly scalable atmospheric modeling framework, and its current horizontal discretization relies on spectral element (SE) and/or discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods on the cubed-sphere. It is one dynamical core of NCAR's Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). The main advantage of CSLAM is that the upstream cell (trajectories) information and computation of weights of integrals can be reused for each additional tracer. This makes CSLAM particularly interesting for global atmospheric modeling with growing number of tracers, e.g. more than 100 tracers for the chemistry version of CAM. An algorithm specifically designed for multiple processors and on the cubed-sphere grid for CSLAM in HOMME is a challenging task. HOMME is running on an element ansatz on the six cube faces. Inside these elements we create an Eulerian finite volume grid of equiangular gnomonic type, which represents the arrival grid in the scheme. But CSLAM relies on backward trajectories, which entails a departure grid. That means departure and arrival grid don't necessary have to be on the same element and certainly not on the same cube face. Also the reconstruction for higher order modeling needs a patch of tracer values which extend the element. Here we consider a third order reconstruction method. Therefore, we introduce a halo for the tracer values in the cell centers of a cube-element. The size of this halo depends on the Courant number (CFL condition) and the reconstruction type. Note that for a third order scheme and CFL number communication can be limited to one per time step. This data structure allows us to consider an element with its halo as one task where we have to be extra carful for elements which share a cube edge due to projection and orientation reasons. We stress that the reconstruction coefficients for elements

  3. Thermodynamic properties of Fe-S alloys from molecular dynamics modeling: Implications for the lunar fluid core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuskov, Oleg L.; Belashchenko, David K.

    2016-09-01

    Density and sound velocity of Fe-S liquids for the P-T parameters of the lunar core have not been constrained well. From the analysis of seismic wave travel time, Weber et al. (2011) proposed that the lunar core is composed of iron alloyed with ⩽6 wt% of light elements, such as S. A controversial issue in models of planetary core composition concerns whether Fe-S liquids under high pressure - temperature conditions provide sound velocity and density data, which match the seismic model. Here we report the results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of iron-sulfur alloys based on Embedded Atom Model (EAM). The results of calculations include caloric, thermal and elastic properties of Fe-S alloys at concentrations of sulfur 0-18 at.%, temperatures up to 2500 K and pressures up to 14 GPa. The effect of sulfur on the elastic properties of Fe-rich melts is most evident in the notably decreased density with added S content. In the MD simulation, the density and bulk modulus KT of liquid Fe-S decrease with increasing sulfur content, while the bulk modulus KS decreases as a whole but has some fluctuations with increasing sulfur content. The sound velocity increases with increasing pressure, but depends weakly on temperature and the concentration of sulfur. For a fluid Fe-S core of the Moon (∼5 GPa/2000 K) with 6-16 at.% S (3.5-10 wt%), the sound velocity and density may be estimated at the level of 4000 m s-1 and 6.25-7.0 g cm-3. Comparison of thermodynamic calculations with the results of interpretation of seismic observations shows good agreement of P-wave velocities in the liquid outer core, while the core density does not match the seismic models. At such concentrations of sulfur and a density by 20-35% higher than the model seismic density, a radius for the fluid outer core should be less than about 330 km found by Weber et al. because at the specified mass and moment of inertia values of the Moon an increase of the core density leads to a decrease of the core

  4. Models of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Combined inferences from seismology, high-pressure experiment and theory, geomagnetism, fluid dynamics, and current views of terrestrial planetary evolution lead to models of the earth's core with five basic properties. These are that core formation was contemporaneous with earth accretion; the core is not in chemical equilibrium with the mantle; the outer core is a fluid iron alloy containing significant quantities of lighter elements and is probably almost adiabatic and compositionally uniform; the more iron-rich inner solid core is a consequence of partial freezing of the outer core, and the energy release from this process sustains the earth's magnetic field; and the thermodynamic properties of the core are well constrained by the application of liquid-state theory to seismic and labroatory data.

  5. Downscale cascades in tracer transport test cases: an intercomparison of the dynamical cores in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kent

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The accurate modelling of cascades to unresolved scales is an important part of the tracer transport component of dynamical cores of weather and climate models. This paper aims to investigate the ability of the advection schemes in the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5 to model this cascade. In order to quantify the effects of the different advection schemes in CAM5, four two-dimensional tracer transport test cases are presented. Three of the tests stretch the tracer below the scale of coarse resolution grids to ensure the downscale cascade of tracer variance. These results are compared with a high resolution reference solution, which is simulated on a resolution fine enough to resolve the tracer during the test. The fourth test has two separate flow cells, and is designed so that any tracer in the Western Hemisphere should not pass into the Eastern Hemisphere. This is to test whether the diffusion in transport schemes, often in the form of explicit hyper-diffusion terms or implicit through monotonic limiters, contains unphysical mixing.

    An intercomparison of three of the dynamical cores of the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 is performed. The results show that the finite-volume (CAM-FV and spectral element (CAM-SE dynamical cores model the downscale cascade of tracer variance better than the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme of the Eulerian spectral transform core (CAM-EUL. Each scheme tested produces unphysical mass in the Eastern Hemisphere of the separate cells test.

  6. Downscale cascades in tracer transport test cases: an intercomparison of the dynamical cores in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kent

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The accurate modeling of cascades to unresolved scales is an important part of the tracer transport component of dynamical cores of weather and climate models. This paper aims to investigate the ability of the advection schemes in the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5 to model this cascade. In order to quantify the effects of the different advection schemes in CAM5, four two-dimensional tracer transport test cases are presented. Three of the tests stretch the tracer below the scale of coarse resolution grids to ensure the downscale cascade of tracer variance. These results are compared with a high resolution reference solution, which is simulated on a resolution fine enough to resolve the tracer during the test. The fourth test has two separate flow cells, and is designed so that any tracer in the western hemisphere should not pass into the eastern hemisphere. This is to test whether the diffusion in transport schemes, often in the form of explicit hyper-diffusion terms or implicit through monotonic limiters, contains unphysical mixing.

    An intercomparison of three of the dynamical cores of the National Center for Atmospheric Research's Community Atmosphere Model version 5 is performed. The results show that the finite-volume (CAM-FV and spectral element (CAM-SE dynamical cores model the downscale cascade of tracer variance better than the semi-Lagrangian transport scheme of the Eulerian spectral transform core (CAM-EUL. Each scheme tested produces unphysical mass in the eastern hemisphere of the separate cells test.

  7. Constraints on geomagnetic secular variation modeling from electromagnetism and fluid dynamics of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1986-01-01

    A spherical harmonic representation of the geomagnetic field and its secular variation for epoch 1980, designated GSFC(9/84), is derived and evaluated. At three epochs (1977.5, 1980.0, 1982.5) this model incorporates conservation of magnetic flux through five selected patches of area on the core/mantle boundary bounded by the zero contours of vertical magnetic field. These fifteen nonlinear constraints are included like data in an iterative least squares parameter estimation procedure that starts with the recently derived unconstrained field model GSFC (12/83). Convergence is approached within three iterations. The constrained model is evaluated by comparing its predictive capability outside the time span of its data, in terms of residuals at magnetic observatories, with that for the unconstrained model.

  8. The Cusp/Core problem: supernovae feedback versus the baryonic clumps and dynamical friction model

    CERN Document Server

    Del Popolo, A

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we compare the predictions of two well known mechanisms considered able to solve the cusp/core problem (a. supernova feedback; b. baryonic clumps-DM interaction) by comparing their theoretical predictions to recent observations of the inner slopes of galaxies with masses ranging from dSphs to normal spirals. We compare the $\\alpha$-$V_{\\rm rot}$ and the $\\alpha$-$M_{\\ast}$ relationships, predicted by the two models with high resolution data coming from \\cite{Adams2014}, \\cite{Simon2005}, LITTLE THINGS \\citep{Oh2014}, THINGS dwarves \\citep{Oh2011a,Oh2011b}, THINGS spirals \\citep{Oh2014}, Sculptor, Fornax and the Milky Way. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with the complete set of data shows that the two models perform similarly, while when we restrict the analysis to a smaller subsample of higher quality, we show that the method presented in this paper (baryonic clumps-DM interaction) performs better than the one based on supernova feedback. We also show that, contrarily to t...

  9. Technical report series on global modeling and data assimilation. Volume 5: Documentation of the AIRES/GEOS dynamical core, version 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Max J. (Editor); Takacs, Lawrence L.

    1995-01-01

    A detailed description of the numerical formulation of Version 2 of the ARIES/GEOS 'dynamical core' is presented. This code is a nearly 'plug-compatible' dynamics for use in atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs). It is a finite difference model on a staggered latitude-longitude C-grid. It uses second-order differences for all terms except the advection of vorticity by the rotation part of the flow, which is done at fourth-order accuracy. This dynamical core is currently being used in the climate (ARIES) and data assimilation (GEOS) GCMs at Goddard.

  10. Developments in the Gung Ho dynamical core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Gung Ho is the new dynamical core being developed for the next generation Met Office weather and climate model, suitable for meeting the exascale challenge on emerging computer architectures. It builds upon the earlier collaborative project between the Met Office, NERC and STFC Daresbury of the same name to investigate suitable numerical methods for dynamical cores. A mixed-finite element approach is used, where different finite element spaces are used to represent various fields. This method provides a number of beneficial improvements over the current model, such a compatibility and inherent conservation on quasi-uniform unstructured meshes, whilst maintaining the accuracy and good dispersion properties of the staggered grid currently used. Furthermore, the mixed finite element approach allows a large degree of flexibility in the type of mesh, order of approximation and discretisation, providing a simple way to test alternative options to obtain the best model possible.

  11. Modeling Core Collapse Supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacappa, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae, or the death throes of massive stars, are general relativistic, neutrino-magneto-hydrodynamic events. The core collapse supernova mechanism is still not in hand, though key components have been illuminated, and the potential for multiple mechanisms for different progenitors exists. Core collapse supernovae are the single most important source of elements in the Universe, and serve other critical roles in galactic chemical and thermal evolution, the birth of neutron stars, pulsars, and stellar mass black holes, the production of a subclass of gamma-ray bursts, and as potential cosmic laboratories for fundamental nuclear and particle physics. Given this, the so called ``supernova problem'' is one of the most important unsolved problems in astrophysics. It has been fifty years since the first numerical simulations of core collapse supernovae were performed. Progress in the past decade, and especially within the past five years, has been exponential, yet much work remains. Spherically symmetric simulations over nearly four decades laid the foundation for this progress. Two-dimensional modeling that assumes axial symmetry is maturing. And three-dimensional modeling, while in its infancy, has begun in earnest. I will present some of the recent work from the ``Oak Ridge'' group, and will discuss this work in the context of the broader work by other researchers in the field. I will then point to future requirements and challenges. Connections with other experimental, observational, and theoretical efforts will be discussed, as well.

  12. Developing Fully Coupled Dynamical Reactor Core Isolation System Models in RELAP-7 for Extended Station Black-Out Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; David Andrs; Richard Martineau

    2014-04-01

    The reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides makeup water to the reactor vessel for core cooling when the main steam lines are isolated and the normal supply of water to the reactor vessel is lost. It was one of the very few safety systems still available during the Fukushima Daiichi accidents after the tsunamis hit the plants and the system successfully delayed the core meltdown for a few days for unit 2 & 3. Therefore, detailed models for RCIC system components are indispensable to understand extended station black-out accidents (SBO) for BWRs. As part of the effort to develop the new generation reactor system safety analysis code RELAP-7, major components to simulate the RCIC system have been developed. This paper describes the models for those components such as turbine, pump, and wet well. Selected individual component test simulations and a simplified SBO simulation up to but before core damage is presented. The successful implementation of the simplified RCIC and wet well models paves the way to further improve the models for safety analysis by including more detailed physical processes in the near future.

  13. A Computational Fluid Dynamic and Heat Transfer Model for Gaseous Core and Gas Cooled Space Power and Propulsion Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, S.; Chen, G.

    1996-01-01

    A computational model based on the axisymmetric, thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations is developed to predict the convective, radiation and conductive heat transfer in high temperature space nuclear reactors. An implicit-explicit, finite volume, MacCormack method in conjunction with the Gauss-Seidel line iteration procedure is utilized to solve the thermal and fluid governing equations. Simulation of coolant and propellant flows in these reactors involves the subsonic and supersonic flows of hydrogen, helium and uranium tetrafluoride under variable boundary conditions. An enthalpy-rebalancing scheme is developed and implemented to enhance and accelerate the rate of convergence when a wall heat flux boundary condition is used. The model also incorporated the Baldwin and Lomax two-layer algebraic turbulence scheme for the calculation of the turbulent kinetic energy and eddy diffusivity of energy. The Rosseland diffusion approximation is used to simulate the radiative energy transfer in the optically thick environment of gas core reactors. The computational model is benchmarked with experimental data on flow separation angle and drag force acting on a suspended sphere in a cylindrical tube. The heat transfer is validated by comparing the computed results with the standard heat transfer correlations predictions. The model is used to simulate flow and heat transfer under a variety of design conditions. The effect of internal heat generation on the heat transfer in the gas core reactors is examined for a variety of power densities, 100 W/cc, 500 W/cc and 1000 W/cc. The maximum temperature, corresponding with the heat generation rates, are 2150 K, 2750 K and 3550 K, respectively. This analysis shows that the maximum temperature is strongly dependent on the value of heat generation rate. It also indicates that a heat generation rate higher than 1000 W/cc is necessary to maintain the gas temperature at about 3500 K, which is typical design temperature required to achieve high

  14. Two Core Systems of Dynamic Logic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-jun; LI Ke-sheng; HAO Yi-jiang

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic Logic (DL) is a formal system for reasoning on the input/output behaviors of programs. Hoare Logic (HL) is the precursor of all dynamic logics known today. Two core systems of DL are Propositional Dynamic Logic (PDL) and Quantificational Dynamic Logic (QDL). PDL is an extension of propositional logic with programs and is the appropriate place to begin investigating DL. QDL can be viewed as the first-order version of PDL. Predicate Dynamic Logic (DPL) is a subsystem of QDL and can be regarded as the most basic of a hierarchy of formulas-as-programs languages. These systems constitute the main topic of this essay. The authors’ elaboration here is very brief and sketchy and with the aim of providing the readers with only the most essence of the topic on the basis of other researchers’ works. The last part is the important one in which the authors summarize the approaches of extending Dynamic Logic. The conclusions are as follows: variants of DL are obtained by reinterpreting some constructs as something else, and/or by adding rules or operators, and/or by restricting or extending or revising some constructs, and/or combining a kind of logic with another one, and/or using a comprehensive way which insights from other disciplines according to its application in various domains. In all these cases, the authors give examples to illustrate the conclusion. It is generally proposed that sometimes the introduction of a new operator or rule or construct, or the introduction of reinterpretation or restriction or extension or revision of some constructs will increase expressive power and sometimes not; sometimes it has effect on the complexity of deciding satisfiability and sometimes not. Finally, the authors sum up major aspects which we should consider during investigating a specific variant of DL. The researchers should focus on the well-formed expressions and on the validity of expressions about it with respect to standard, non-standard and syntactically

  15. Massive Quiescent Cores in Orion: Dichotomy in the Dynamical Status of Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, Thangasamy; Goldsmith, P. F.; Li, D.; Langer, W. D.; Pineda, J. L.; Peng, R.

    2009-01-01

    To study the evolution of high mass cores we have searched for evidence of collapse motions in a large sample of starless cores in the Orion molecular cloud. We used the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory telescope to obtain spectra of the optically thin (H13CO+) and optically thick (HCO+) high density tracer molecules in 27 cores with masses > 1 MO. The red- and blue-asymmetries seen in the line profiles of the optically thick line with respect to the optically thin line indicate that 2/3 of these cores are not static and we interpret these as evidence for inward or outward motions in 19 cores. We present RATRAN radiative transfer models of these cores that support the interpretation of inward and outward motion consistent with the observed spectral asymmetries. Thus we detect infall (inward motions) in 9 cores and outward motions for 10 cores, suggesting a dichotomy in the kinematic state in this sample. This population of massive molecular cloud cores is in general likely to be dynamic, out-of-equilibrium structures, rather than quasi-hydro/magneto-static structures. Our results provide an important observational constraint on the fraction of collapsing (inward motions) versus non-collapsing (re-expanding) cores for comparison with model simulations. This work was performed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Research at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory is supported by NSF grant AST-0229008.

  16. Dynamics of dissipative multifluid neutron star cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haskell, B.; Andersson, N.; Comer, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    We present a Newtonian multifluid formalism for superfluid neutron star cores, focusing on the additional dissipative terms which arise when one takes into account the individual dynamical degrees of freedom associated with the coupled "fluids." The problem is of direct astrophysical interest as the

  17. Mechanisms and Geochemical Models of Core Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Rubie, David C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the Earth's core is a consequence of planetary accretion and processes in the Earth's interior. The mechanical process of planetary differentiation is likely to occur in large, if not global, magma oceans created by the collisions of planetary embryos. Metal-silicate segregation in magma oceans occurs rapidly and efficiently unlike grain scale percolation according to laboratory experiments and calculations. Geochemical models of the core formation process as planetary accretion proceeds are becoming increasingly realistic. Single stage and continuous core formation models have evolved into multi-stage models that are couple to the output of dynamical models of the giant impact phase of planet formation. The models that are most successful in matching the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle, based on experimentally-derived element partition coefficients, show that the temperature and pressure of metal-silicate equilibration must increase as a function of time and mass accreted and so m...

  18. Dynamic Musical Communication of Core Affect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole eFlaig

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Is there something special about the way music communicates feelings? Theorists since Meyer (1956 have attempted to explain how music could stimulate varied and subtle affective experiences by violating learned expectancies, or by mimicking other forms of social interaction. Our proposal is that music speaks to the brain in its own language; it need not imitate any other form of communication. We review recent theoretical and empirical literature, which suggests that all conscious processes consist of dynamic neural events, produced by spatially dispersed processes in the physical brain. Intentional thought and affective experience arise as dynamical aspects of neural events taking place in multiple brain areas simultaneously. At any given moment, this content comprises a unified scene that is integrated into a dynamic core through synchrony of neuronal oscillations. We propose that 1 neurodynamic synchrony with musical stimuli gives rise to musical qualia including tonal and temporal expectancies, and that 2 music-synchronous responses couple into core neurodynamics, enabling music to directly modulate core affect. Expressive music performance, for example, may recruit rhythm-synchronous neural responses to support affective communication. We suggest that the dynamic relationship between musical expression and the experience of affect presents a unique opportunity for the study of emotional experience. This may help elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying arousal and valence, and offer a new approach to exploring the complex dynamics of the how and why of emotional experience.

  19. Dynamic musical communication of core affect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaig, Nicole K; Large, Edward W

    2014-01-01

    Is there something special about the way music communicates feelings? Theorists since Meyer (1956) have attempted to explain how music could stimulate varied and subtle affective experiences by violating learned expectancies, or by mimicking other forms of social interaction. Our proposal is that music speaks to the brain in its own language; it need not imitate any other form of communication. We review recent theoretical and empirical literature, which suggests that all conscious processes consist of dynamic neural events, produced by spatially dispersed processes in the physical brain. Intentional thought and affective experience arise as dynamical aspects of neural events taking place in multiple brain areas simultaneously. At any given moment, this content comprises a unified "scene" that is integrated into a dynamic core through synchrony of neuronal oscillations. We propose that (1) neurodynamic synchrony with musical stimuli gives rise to musical qualia including tonal and temporal expectancies, and that (2) music-synchronous responses couple into core neurodynamics, enabling music to directly modulate core affect. Expressive music performance, for example, may recruit rhythm-synchronous neural responses to support affective communication. We suggest that the dynamic relationship between musical expression and the experience of affect presents a unique opportunity for the study of emotional experience. This may help elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying arousal and valence, and offer a new approach to exploring the complex dynamics of the how and why of emotional experience.

  20. On the internal dynamics of starless cores: stability of starless cores with internal motions and collapse dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Seo, Young Min; Shirley, Yancy L

    2013-01-01

    In order to understand the collapse dynamics of observed low-mass starless cores, we revise the conventional stability condition of hydrostatic Bonnor-Ebert spheres to take internal motions into account. Because observed starless cores resemble Bonnor-Ebert density structures, the stability and dynamics of the starless cores are frequently analyzed by comparing to the conventional stability condition of a hydrostatic Bonnor-Ebert sphere. However, starless cores are not hydrostatic but have observed internal motions. In this study, we take gaseous spheres with a homologous internal velocity field and derive stability conditions of the spheres utilizing a virial analysis. We propose two limiting models of spontaneous gravitational collapse: the collapse of critical Bonnor-Ebert spheres and uniform density spheres. The collapse of these two limiting models are intended to provide the lower and the upper limits, respectively, of the infall speeds for a given density structure. The results of our study suggest tha...

  1. Geodynamo Modeling of Core-Mantle Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Wei-Jia; Chao, Benjamin F.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Angular momentum exchange between the Earth's mantle and core influences the Earth's rotation on time scales of decades and longer, in particular in the length of day (LOD) which have been measured with progressively increasing accuracy for the last two centuries. There are four possible coupling mechanisms for transferring the axial angular momentum across the core-mantle boundary (CMB): viscous, magnetic, topography, and gravitational torques. Here we use our scalable, modularized, fully dynamic geodynamo model for the core to assess the importance of these torques. This numerical model, as an extension of the Kuang-Bloxham model that has successfully simulated the generation of the Earth's magnetic field, is used to obtain numerical results in various physical conditions in terms of specific parameterization consistent with the dynamical processes in the fluid outer core. The results show that depending on the electrical conductivity of the lower mantle and the amplitude of the boundary topography at CMB, both magnetic and topographic couplings can contribute significantly to the angular momentum exchange. This implies that the core-mantle interactions are far more complex than has been assumed and that there is unlikely a single dominant coupling mechanism for the observed decadal LOD variation.

  2. The Dynamics and Chemistry of Massive Starless Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, J. C.; Kong, S.; Butler, M. J.; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.

    2013-10-01

    How do massive stars form? They may be born from massive pre-stellar gas cores that are much more massive than the Jeans mass. The Turbulent Core Accretion model invokes such cores as being in approximate virial and pressure equilibrium with their surrounding clump medium. Their internal pressure is provided by a combination of turbulence and magnetic fields. On the other hand, the Competitive Accretion model requires strongly sub-virial initial conditions that then lead to extensive fragmentation to the thermal Jeans scale, with high-mass stars later forming by competitive Bondi-Hoyle accretion. To test these models, we have identified four prime examples of massive (˜ 100 M⊙) clumps from mid-infrared (MIR) extinction mapping of Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs). At ˜16″ resolution, we found high deuteration fractions of N2H+ in these objects, consistent with them being starless. We then observed these 4 clumps with ALMA in Cycle 0 to probe the N2D+(3-2) line at ˜2″ resolution, finding 6 N2D+ cores. Their observed velocity dispersions and sizes are broadly consistent with the predictions of the Turbulent Core model of virialized, magnetized (with Alfvén Mach number mA ˜ 1), self-gravitating cores that are bounded by the high pressures of their surrounding clumps. However, the most massive core with ˜ 60 M⊙, appears to require moderately enhanced magnetic fields to be in virial equilibrium, implying mA ≃ 0.3. If confirmed, this suggests magnetic fields play a greater role than turbulence in setting the initial conditions of massive star formation. In this case the timescale for the core to be assembled may be significantly longer than a local dynamical or free-fall time. This is consistent with astrochemical modeling of the deuteration ages of the cores, which indicates a core age similar to the ambipolar diffusion time.

  3. Automating the generation of finite element dynamical cores with Firedrake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, David; Mitchell, Lawrence; Homolya, Miklós; Luporini, Fabio; Gibson, Thomas; Kelly, Paul; Cotter, Colin; Lange, Michael; Kramer, Stephan; Shipton, Jemma; Yamazaki, Hiroe; Paganini, Alberto; Kärnä, Tuomas

    2017-04-01

    The development of a dynamical core is an increasingly complex software engineering undertaking. As the equations become more complete, the discretisations more sophisticated and the hardware acquires ever more fine-grained parallelism and deeper memory hierarchies, the problem of building, testing and modifying dynamical cores becomes increasingly complex. Here we present Firedrake, a code generation system for the finite element method with specialist features designed to support the creation of geoscientific models. Using Firedrake, the dynamical core developer writes the partial differential equations in weak form in a high level mathematical notation. Appropriate function spaces are chosen and time stepping loops written at the same high level. When the programme is run, Firedrake generates high performance C code for the resulting numerics which are executed in parallel. Models in Firedrake typically take a tiny fraction of the lines of code required by traditional hand-coding techniques. They support more sophisticated numerics than are easily achieved by hand, and the resulting code is frequently higher performance. Critically, debugging, modifying and extending a model written in Firedrake is vastly easier than by traditional methods due to the small, highly mathematical code base. Firedrake supports a wide range of key features for dynamical core creation: A vast range of discretisations, including both continuous and discontinuous spaces and mimetic (C-grid-like) elements which optimally represent force balances in geophysical flows. High aspect ratio layered meshes suitable for ocean and atmosphere domains. Curved elements for high accuracy representations of the sphere. Support for non-finite element operators, such as parametrisations. Access to PETSc, a world-leading library of programmable linear and nonlinear solvers. High performance adjoint models generated automatically by symbolically reasoning about the forward model. This poster will present

  4. Influence of core sand properties on flow dynamics of core shooting process based on experiment and multiphase simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-jiang Ni

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of core sand properties on flow dynamics was investigated synchronously with various core sands, transparent core-box and high-speed camera. To confirm whether the core shooting process has significant turbulence, the flow pattern of sand particles in the shooting head and core box was reproduced with colored core sands. By incorporating the kinetic theory of granular flow (KTGF, kinetic-frictional constitutive correlation and turbulence model, a two-fluid model (TFM was established to study the flow dynamics of the core shooting process. Two-fluid model (TFM simulations were then performed and a areasonable agreement was achieved between the simulation and experimental results. Based on the experimental and simulation results, the effects of turbulence, sand density, sand diameter and binder ratio were analyzed in terms of filling process, sand volume fraction (αs and sand velocity (Vs.

  5. Inferring internal properties of Earth's core dynamics and their evolution from surface observations and a numerical geodynamo model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aubert

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, direct three-dimensional numerical modelling has been successfully used to reproduce the main features of the geodynamo. Here we report on efforts to solve the associated inverse problem, aiming at inferring the underlying properties of the system from the sole knowledge of surface observations and the first principle dynamical equations describing the convective dynamo. To this end we rely on twin experiments. A reference model time sequence is first produced and used to generate synthetic data, restricted here to the large-scale component of the magnetic field and its rate of change at the outer boundary. Starting from a different initial condition, a second sequence is next run and attempts are made to recover the internal magnetic, velocity and buoyancy anomaly fields from the sparse surficial data. In order to reduce the vast underdetermination of this problem, we use stochastic inversion, a linear estimation method determining the most likely internal state compatible with the observations and some prior knowledge, and we also implement a sequential evolution algorithm in order to invert time-dependent surface observations. The prior is the multivariate statistics of the numerical model, which are directly computed from a large number of snapshots stored during a preliminary direct run. The statistics display strong correlation between different harmonic degrees of the surface observations and internal fields, provided they share the same harmonic order, a natural consequence of the linear coupling of the governing dynamical equations and of the leading influence of the Coriolis force. Synthetic experiments performed with a weakly nonlinear model yield an excellent quantitative retrieval of the internal structure. In contrast, the use of a strongly nonlinear (and more realistic model results in less accurate static estimations, which in turn fail to constrain the unobserved small scales in the time integration of the

  6. The dynamical core, physical parameterizations, and basic simulation characteristics of the atmospheric component AM3 of the GFDL global coupled model CM3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, L.J.; Wyman, B.L.; Hemler, R.S.; Horowitz, L.W.; Ming, Y.; Zhao, M.; Golaz, J.-C.; Ginoux, P.; Lin, S.-J.; Schwarzkopf, M.D.; Austin, J.; Alaka, G.; Cooke, W.F.; Delworth, T.L.; Freidenreich, S.M.; Gordon, C.T.; Griffies, S.M.; Held, I.M.; Hurlin, W.J.; Klein, S.A.; Knutson, T.R.; Langenhorst, A.R.; Lee, H.-C.; Lin, Y.; Magi, B.I.; Malyshev, S.L.; Milly, P.C.D.; Naik, V.; Nath, M.J.; Pincus, R.; Ploshay, J.J.; Ramaswamy, V.; Seman, C.J.; Shevliakova, E.; Sirutis, J.J.; Stern, W.F.; Stouffer, R.J.; Wilson, R.J.; Winton, M.; Wittenberg, A.T.; Zeng, F.

    2011-01-01

    The Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) has developed a coupled general circulation model (CM3) for the atmosphere, oceans, land, and sea ice. The goal of CM3 is to address emerging issues in climate change, including aerosol-cloud interactions, chemistry-climate interactions, and coupling between the troposphere and stratosphere. The model is also designed to serve as the physical system component of earth system models and models for decadal prediction in the near-term future-for example, through improved simulations in tropical land precipitation relative to earlier-generation GFDL models. This paper describes the dynamical core, physical parameterizations, and basic simulation characteristics of the atmospheric component (AM3) of this model. Relative to GFDL AM2, AM3 includes new treatments of deep and shallow cumulus convection, cloud droplet activation by aerosols, subgrid variability of stratiform vertical velocities for droplet activation, and atmospheric chemistry driven by emissions with advective, convective, and turbulent transport. AM3 employs a cubed-sphere implementation of a finite-volume dynamical core and is coupled to LM3, a new land model with ecosystem dynamics and hydrology. Its horizontal resolution is approximately 200 km, and its vertical resolution ranges approximately from 70 m near the earth's surface to 1 to 1.5 km near the tropopause and 3 to 4 km in much of the stratosphere. Most basic circulation features in AM3 are simulated as realistically, or more so, as in AM2. In particular, dry biases have been reduced over South America. In coupled mode, the simulation of Arctic sea ice concentration has improved. AM3 aerosol optical depths, scattering properties, and surface clear-sky downward shortwave radiation are more realistic than in AM2. The simulation of marine stratocumulus decks remains problematic, as in AM2. The most intense 0.2% of precipitation rates occur less frequently in AM3 than observed. The last two decades of

  7. The Dynamics of Massive Starless Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jonathan; Caselli, P.; Fontani, F.; Kong, S.; Butler, M. J.

    2012-05-01

    Progress towards resolving a decade-long debate about how massive stars form can be made by determining if massive starless cores exist in a state of near virial equilibrium. These are the initial conditions invoked by the Core Accretion model of McKee & Tan (2003). Alternatively, the Competitive Accretion model of Bonnell et al. (2001) requires sub-virial conditions. We have identified 4 prime examples of massive ( 50 Msun) cores from mid-infrared (MIR) extinction mapping (Butler & Tan 2009, 2012) of Infrared Dark Clouds. We have found spectacularly high deuterated fractions of N_2H+ of 0.5 in these objects with the IRAM 30m telescope (Fontani et al. 2011). Thus N_2D+ is expected to be an excellent tracer of the kinematics of these cold, dark cores, where most other molecular tracers are thought to be depleted from the gas phase. We report on ALMA Cycle 0 Compact Configuration Band 6 observations of these 4 cores that probe the N_2D+(3-2) line on scales from 9" down to 2.3", well-matched to the structures we see in MIR extinction and discuss their implications for massive star formation theories.

  8. Introducing the Core Probability Framework and Discrete-Element Core Probability Model for efficient stochastic macroscopic modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calvert, S.C.; Taale, H.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution the Core Probability Framework (CPF) is introduced with the application of the Discrete-Element Core Probability Model (DE-CPM) as a new DNL for dynamic macroscopic modelling of stochastic traffic flow. The model is demonstrated for validation in a test case and for computationa

  9. PMMA/PMMA core-shell particles with ellipsoidal, fluorescent cores: accessing rotational dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Matthias K; Klinkenberg, Nele; Schuetter, Stefan; Saenger, Nicolai; Pfleiderer, Patrick; Zumbusch, Andreas

    2015-03-10

    For several decades, nonaqueous dispersions of PMMA particles have played an important role in colloid research. They have found application as colloidal model systems, which are used to probe glassy dynamics or to explore crystal nucleation. To date, most research has focused on spherical particles, in which only translational motion can be investigated. Recently, however, there has been a surge of interest in analyzing also rotational dynamics. In this contribution, we introduce a new class of core-shell particles, which can be used as rotational probes. The colloids described herein are composed of shape anisotropic, fluorescent cores covered with nonfluorescent PMMA shells. The core-shell particles are built up in four steps. In a first step, we produce fluorescent and photo-cross-linkable PMMA colloids. In the second step, these particles are thermomechanically elongated and fixed in defined ellipsoidal shapes by photo-cross-linking. Subsequently, we cover the cross-linked, fluorescent core with a nonfluorescent PMMA shell. The shape of the resulting core-shell colloids is tunable between the initial anisotropic and perfect spherical shape. For shaping, we apply a simple solvent swelling procedure. As one option, this method yields perfect PMMA spheres with ellipsoidal, fluorescent centers. We also report morphological particle characterization using various fluorescence microscopy techniques. Finally, we demonstrate that the rotational dynamics of individual colloids can be tracked and analyzed.

  10. Vertical Scan (V-SCAN) for 3-D Grid Adaptive Mesh Refinement for an atmospheric Model Dynamical Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronova, N. G.; Vandenberg, D.; Oehmke, R.; Stout, Q. F.; Penner, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    One of the major building blocks of a rigorous representation of cloud evolution in global atmospheric models is a parallel adaptive grid MPI-based communication library (an Adaptive Blocks for Locally Cartesian Topologies library -- ABLCarT), which manages the block-structured data layout, handles ghost cell updates among neighboring blocks and splits a block as refinements occur. The library has several modules that provide a layer of abstraction for adaptive refinement: blocks, which contain individual cells of user data; shells - the global geometry for the problem, including a sphere, reduced sphere, and now a 3D sphere; a load balancer for placement of blocks onto processors; and a communication support layer which encapsulates all data movement. A major performance concern with adaptive mesh refinement is how to represent calculations that have need to be sequenced in a particular order in a direction, such as calculating integrals along a specific path (e.g. atmospheric pressure or geopotential in the vertical dimension). This concern is compounded if the blocks have varying levels of refinement, or are scattered across different processors, as can be the case in parallel computing. In this paper we describe an implementation in ABLCarT of a vertical scan operation, which allows computing along vertical paths in the correct order across blocks transparent to their resolution and processor location. We test this functionality on a 2D and a 3D advection problem, which tests the performance of the model’s dynamics (transport) and physics (sources and sinks) for different model resolutions needed for inclusion of cloud formation.

  11. Construction of an Eulerian atmospheric dispersion model based on the advection algorithm of M. Galperin: dynamic cores v.4 and 5 of SILAM v.5.5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sofiev

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents dynamic cores v.4 and v.5 of the System for Integrated modeLling of Atmospheric coMposition SILAM v.5.5 based on the advection algorithm of Michael Galperin. This advection routine, so far weakly presented in international literature, is non-diffusive, positively defined, stable with regard to Courant number significantly above one, and very efficient computationally. For the first time, we present a rigorous description of its original version, along with several updates that improve its monotonicity and allow applications to long-living species in conditions of complex atmospheric flows. The other extension allows the scheme application to dynamics of aerosol spectra. The scheme is accompanied with the previously developed vertical diffusion algorithm, which encapsulates the dry deposition process as a boundary condition. Connection to chemical transformation modules is outlined, accounting for the specifics of transport scheme. Quality of the advection routine is evaluated using a large set of tests. The original approach has been previously compared with several classic algorithms widely used in operational models. The basic tests were repeated for the updated scheme, along with demanding global 2-D tests recently suggested in literature, which allowed positioning the scheme with regard to sophisticated state-of-the-art approaches. The model performance appeared close to the top of the list with very modest computational costs.

  12. Structural modeling of sandwich structures with lightweight cellular cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, T.; Deng, Z. C.; Lu, T. J.

    2007-10-01

    An effective single layered finite element (FE) computational model is proposed to predict the structural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels having two dimensional (2D) prismatic or three dimensional (3D) truss cores. Three different types of cellular core topology are considered: pyramidal truss core (3D), Kagome truss core (3D) and corrugated core (2D), representing three kinds of material anisotropy: orthotropic, monoclinic and general anisotropic. A homogenization technique is developed to obtain the homogenized macroscopic stiffness properties of the cellular core. In comparison with the results obtained by using detailed FE model, the single layered computational model can give acceptable predictions for both the static and dynamic behaviors of orthotropic truss core sandwich panels. However, for non-orthotropic 3D truss cores, the predictions are not so well. For both static and dynamic behaviors of a 2D corrugated core sandwich panel, the predictions derived by the single layered computational model is generally acceptable when the size of the unit cell varies within a certain range, with the predictions for moderately strong or strong corrugated cores more accurate than those for weak cores.

  13. Structural modeling of sandwich structures with lightweight cellular cores

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Liu; Z. C. Deng; T. J. Lu

    2007-01-01

    An effective single layered finite element (FE) computational model is proposed to predict the structural behavior of lightweight sandwich panels having two dimensional (2D) prismatic or three dimensional (3D) truss cores.Three different types of cellular core topology are considered: pyramidal truss core (3D), Kagome truss core (3D) and corrugated core (2D), representing three kinds of material anisotropy: orthotropic, monoclinic and general anisotropic. A homogenization technique is developed to obtain the homogenized macroscopic stiffness properties of the cellular core. In comparison with the results obtained by using detailed FE model, the single layered computational model cangive acceptable predictions for both the static and dynamic behaviors of orthotropic truss core sandwich panels. However, for non-orthotropic 3D truss cores, the predictions are not so well. For both static and dynamic behaviors of a 2D corrugated core sandwich panel, the predictions derived by the single layered computational model is generally acceptable when the size of the unit cell varies within a certain range, with the predictions for moderately strong or strong corrugated cores more accurate than those for weak cores.

  14. On the Dynamics of Edge-core Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahm,T.S.; Diamond, P.H.; Lin, Z.; Rewoldt, G.; Gurcan, O.; Ethier, S.

    2005-08-26

    One of the nagging, unresolved questions in fusion theory is concerned with the extent of the edge. Gyrokinetic particle simulations of toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence spreading using the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) [Z. Lin et al., Science 281, 1835 (1998)] and its related dynamical model have been extended to a system with radially varying ion temperature gradient, in order to study the inward spreading of edge turbulence toward the core plasma. Due to such spreading, the turbulence intensity in the core region is significantly enhanced over the value obtained from simulations of the core region only, and the precise boundary of the edge region is blurred. Even when the core gradient is within the Dimits shift regime (i.e., dominated by self-generated zonal flows which reduce the transport to a negligible value), a significant level of turbulence can penetrate to the core due to spreading from the edge. The scaling of the turbulent front propagation speed is closer to the prediction from a nonlinear diffusion model than from one based on linear toroidal coupling.

  15. The dynamics of massive starless cores with ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Jonathan C. [Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Kong, Shuo; Butler, Michael J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Caselli, Paola [School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Fontani, Francesco [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo Enrico Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy)

    2013-12-20

    How do stars that are more massive than the Sun form, and thus how is the stellar initial mass function (IMF) established? Such intermediate- and high-mass stars may be born from relatively massive pre-stellar gas cores, which are more massive than the thermal Jeans mass. The turbulent core accretion model invokes such cores as being in approximate virial equilibrium and in approximate pressure equilibrium with their surrounding clump medium. Their internal pressure is provided by a combination of turbulence and magnetic fields. Alternatively, the competitive accretion model requires strongly sub-virial initial conditions that then lead to extensive fragmentation to the thermal Jeans scale, with intermediate- and high-mass stars later forming by competitive Bondi-Hoyle accretion. To test these models, we have identified four prime examples of massive (∼100 M {sub ☉}) clumps from mid-infrared extinction mapping of infrared dark clouds. Fontani et al. found high deuteration fractions of N{sub 2}H{sup +} in these objects, which are consistent with them being starless. Here we present ALMA observations of these four clumps that probe the N{sub 2}D{sup +} (3-2) line at 2.''3 resolution. We find six N{sub 2}D{sup +} cores and determine their dynamical state. Their observed velocity dispersions and sizes are broadly consistent with the predictions of the turbulent core model of self-gravitating, magnetized (with Alfvén Mach number m{sub A} ∼ 1) and virialized cores that are bounded by the high pressures of their surrounding clumps. However, in the most massive cores, with masses up to ∼60 M {sub ☉}, our results suggest that moderately enhanced magnetic fields (so that m{sub A} ≅ 0.3) may be needed for the structures to be in virial and pressure equilibrium. Magnetically regulated core formation may thus be important in controlling the formation of massive cores, inhibiting their fragmentation, and thus helping to establish the stellar IMF.

  16. Can the mantle control the core?: Energetics and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, T.

    2011-12-01

    The sustainability of magnetic field generation is discussed from a coupled model of numerical mantle convection simulation and core energetics theory. The pattern of geomagnetic field could be also controlled as a consequence of mantle convection [e.g. Amit and Choblet, 2009]. Our previous studies have suggested that the best-fit scenario for explaining both sustainability of magnetic field generation caused by dynamo actions and the size of inner core would be strongly controlled by the heat transfer of mantle convection with strongly compositional heterogeneities [Nakagawa and Tackley, 2004; Nakagawa and Tackley, 2010]. Here we investigate effects of initial mantle temperature and radioactive heat source in a convecting mantle with extremely high initial temperature at the core-mantle boundary that has been suggested from the hypothesis of early Earth [Labrosse et al., 2007] for checking how the mantle can control the thermal evolution of the core. Main consequence is that the amount of heat production rate and initial mantle temperature are not very sensitive to the thermal evolution of Earth's core but the convective vigor seems to be sensitive to the results. For the mantle side, the Urey ratio is not very good constraint for understanding thermal evolution of the whole Earth. In addition, we also show an example of numerical dynamo simulations with both a stably stratified layer and lateral variation of heat flux across the core-mantle boundary (CMB), which expands a paper by Nakagawa [2011], evaluated from numerical mantle convection simulations for checking how the mantle can control the dynamics of the core, which checks dead or alive for the magnetic field generated by dynamo actions with strongly lateral variation of CMB heat flux.

  17. Secular variation and core-flow modelling with stable strafication at the top of the core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Richard; Buffett, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    Observed geomagnetic secular variation has been used for many years to provide an observational constraint on the dynamics of the core through the modelling of its surface flow. Recent results in both seismology and mineral physics provide strong evidence of a stably stratified layer at the top of the core, which has substantial implications for the calculation of such flows. It has been assumed for many years that the dynamic state at the core surface is close to tangentially geostrophic, and pure stable stratification also requires a flow to be toroidal. Combining these two conditions requires variations in flow that are completely zonal toroidal, which are known not to provide an adequate explanation of the observed secular variation. However, a stably stratified layer can support flow instabilities of a more general character. Buffett (2014) has recently provided a model in which zonal toroidal motions are associated with the excitation of a zonal poloidal instability. This model is able to explain the broad variation of the axial dipole over the past 100 years, and also to explain feature of geomagnetic jerks that cannot be explained by purely torsional motions. This model has inspired a new generation of core-flow models, with a substantial time-varying zonal poloidal component, something that is absent from most models of core surface flow. Here, we present these new models, and consider to what extent this flow structure can explain the details of secular variation. We also consider the implications for the connection between core-surface flow and length-of-day variation - a stably stratified layer has implications for the interpretation of core flow and the Earth's angular momentum budget. Finally, we consider the ability of core-surface flow models to probe the structure of the stably- stratified layer. Buffett (2014). Geomagnetic fluctuations reveal stable stratification at the top of the Earth's core, Nature 507, 484-487, doi:10.1038/nature13122

  18. Modeling of Pulsed Transformer with Nanocrystalline Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Baktash

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently tape wound cores, due to their excellent properties, are widely used in transformers for pulsed or high frequency applications. The spiral structure of these cores affects the flux distribution inside the core and causes complication of the magnetic analysis and consequently the circuit analysis. In this paper, a model based on reluctance networks method is used to analyze the magnetic flux in toroidal wound cores and losses calculation. A Preisach based hysteresis model is included in the model to consider the nonlinear characteristic of the core. Magnetic losses are calculated by having the flux density in different points of the core and using the hysteresis model. A transformer for using in a series resonant converter is modeled and implemented. The modeling results are compared with experimental measurements and FEM results to evaluate the validity of the model. Comparisons show the accuracy of the model besides its simplicity and fast convergence.

  19. Structure and dynamics of core-periphery networks

    CERN Document Server

    Csermely, Peter; Wu, Ling-Yun; Uzzi, Brian

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies uncovered important core/periphery network structures characterizing complex sets of cooperative and competitive interactions between network nodes, be they proteins, cells, species or humans. Better characterization of the structure, dynamics and function of core/periphery networks is a key step of our understanding cellular functions, species adaptation, social and market changes. Here we summarize the current knowledge of the structure and dynamics of "traditional" core/periphery networks, rich-clubs, nested, bow-tie and onion networks. Comparing core/periphery structures with network modules, we discriminate between global and local cores. The core/periphery network organization lies in the middle of several extreme properties, such as random/condensed structures, clique/star configurations, network symmetry/asymmetry, network assortativity/disassortativity, as well as network hierarchy/anti-hierarchy. These properties of high complexity together with the large degeneracy of core pathways e...

  20. From cusps to cores: a stochastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Zant, Amr A.; Freundlich, Jonathan; Combes, Françoise

    2016-09-01

    The cold dark matter model of structure formation faces apparent problems on galactic scales. Several threads point to excessive halo concentration, including central densities that rise too steeply with decreasing radius. Yet, random fluctuations in the gaseous component can `heat' the centres of haloes, decreasing their densities. We present a theoretical model deriving this effect from first principles: stochastic variations in the gas density are converted into potential fluctuations that act on the dark matter; the associated force correlation function is calculated and the corresponding stochastic equation solved. Assuming a power-law spectrum of fluctuations with maximal and minimal cutoff scales, we derive the velocity dispersion imparted to the halo particles and the relevant relaxation time. We further perform numerical simulations, with fluctuations realized as a Gaussian random field, which confirm the formation of a core within a time-scale comparable to that derived analytically. Non-radial collective modes enhance the energy transport process that erases the cusp, though the parametrizations of the analytical model persist. In our model, the dominant contribution to the dynamical coupling driving the cusp-core transformation comes from the largest scale fluctuations. Yet, the efficiency of the transformation is independent of the value of the largest scale and depends weakly (linearly) on the power-law exponent; it effectively depends on two parameters: the gas mass fraction and the normalization of the power spectrum. This suggests that cusp-core transformations observed in hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy formation may be understood and parametrized in simple terms, the physical and numerical complexities of the various implementations notwithstanding.

  1. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  2. Evaluation for Core Competence of Private Enterprises in Xuchang City Based on an Improved Dynamic Multiple-Attribute Decision-Making Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jian-min Shen; Yao-guo Dang; Wei-jie Zhou; Xue-mei Li

    2015-01-01

    Because Deng’s grey relational degree is inconspicuous, Deng’s relational degree with an exponential function is first presented. Then, we demonstrate that improved Deng’s relational degree is more conspicuous than the original model. Then, we construct a multiple-attribute decision-making model, based on improved Deng’s relational degree with multiple stages, and a method for determining the weight of the index is also developed. Finally, the core competence of private enterprises in Henan p...

  3. Buckling and dynamic analysis of drill strings for core sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziada, H.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-05-15

    This supporting document presents buckling and dynamic stability analyses of the drill strings used for core sampling. The results of the drill string analyses provide limiting operating axial loads and rotational speeds to prevent drill string failure, instability and drill bit overheating during core sampling. The recommended loads and speeds provide controls necessary for Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) programmatic field operations.

  4. Evaluation for Core Competence of Private Enterprises in Xuchang City Based on an Improved Dynamic Multiple-Attribute Decision-Making Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-min Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Because Deng’s grey relational degree is inconspicuous, Deng’s relational degree with an exponential function is first presented. Then, we demonstrate that improved Deng’s relational degree is more conspicuous than the original model. Then, we construct a multiple-attribute decision-making model, based on improved Deng’s relational degree with multiple stages, and a method for determining the weight of the index is also developed. Finally, the core competence of private enterprises in Henan province is analyzed, illustrating the validity and feasibility of the improved model.

  5. A seismologically consistent compositional model of Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, James; Côté, Alexander S; Brodholt, John P

    2014-05-27

    Earth's core is less dense than iron, and therefore it must contain "light elements," such as S, Si, O, or C. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to calculate the density and bulk sound velocity in liquid metal alloys at the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's outer core. We compare the velocity and density for any composition in the (Fe-Ni, C, O, Si, S) system to radial seismological models and find a range of compositional models that fit the seismological data. We find no oxygen-free composition that fits the seismological data, and therefore our results indicate that oxygen is always required in the outer core. An oxygen-rich core is a strong indication of high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of core differentiation in a deep magma ocean with an FeO concentration (oxygen fugacity) higher than that of the present-day mantle.

  6. Dynamico, an Icosahedral Dynamical Core Designed for Consistency and Versatility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubos, T.

    2014-12-01

    The design of the icosahedral-hexagonal dynamical core DYNAMICO is presented. DYNAMICO solves the multi-layer rotating shallow-water equations, a compressible variant of the same equivalent to a discretization of the hydrostatic primitive equations (HPE) in a Lagrangian vertical coordinate, and the HPE in a hybrid mass-based vertical coordinate. In line with more general lines of thought known as physics-preserving discretizations and discrete differential geometry, kinematics and dynamics are separated as strictly as possible. This separation means that the transport of mass, scalars and potential temperature uses no information regarding the specific momentum equation being solved. This disregarded information includes the equation of state as well as any metric information, and is used only for certain terms of the momentum budget, written in Hamiltonian, vector-invariant form. The common Hamiltonian structure of the various equations of motion (Tort and Dubos, 2014 ; Dubos and Tort, 2014) is exploited to formulate energy-conserving spatial discretizations in a unified way. Furthermore most of the model code is common to the three sets of equations solved, making it easier to develop and validate each piece of the model separately. This design permits to consider several extensions in the near future, especially to deep-atmosphere, moist and non-hydrostatic equations. Representative academic three-dimensional benchmarks are run and analyzed, showing correctness of the model (Figure : time-zonal statistics from Held and Suarez (1994) simulations). Hopefully preliminary full-physics results will be presented as well. References : T. Dubos and M. Tort, "Equations of atmospheric motion in non-Eulerian vertical coordinates : vector-invariant form and Hamiltonian formulation", accepted by Mon. Wea. Rev. M. Tort and T. Dubos, "Usual approximations to the equations of atmospheric motion : a variational perspective" accepted by J. Atmos. Sci T. Dubos et al., "DYNAMICO

  7. Nonlinear Light Dynamics in Multi-Core Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-27

    be generated in continuous-discrete optical media such as multi-core optical fiber or waveguide arrays; localisation dynamics in a continuous...space and time that can be generated in continuous-discrete optical media such as multi-core optical fiber or waveguide arrays; localisation dynamics in...gives another practical possibility to localize and control light both in space and time. The combination of these two features leads to a rich variety

  8. Forward modeling of δ18O in Andean ice cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, J. V.; Vuille, M.; Hardy, D. R.

    2016-08-01

    Tropical ice core archives are among the best dated and highest resolution from the tropics, but a thorough understanding of processes that shape their isotope signature as well as the simulation of observed variability remain incomplete. To address this, we develop a tropical Andean ice core isotope forward model from in situ hydrologic observations and satellite water vapor isotope measurements. A control simulation of snow δ18O captures the mean and seasonal trend but underestimates the observed intraseasonal variability. The simulation of observed variability is improved by including amount effects associated with South American cold air incursions, linking synoptic-scale disturbances and monsoon dynamics to tropical ice core δ18O. The forward model was calibrated with and run under present-day conditions but can also be driven with past climate forcings to reconstruct paleomonsoon variability. The model is transferable and may be used to render a (paleo)climatic context at other ice core locations.

  9. Microwave-induced dynamic switching of magnetic skyrmion cores in nanodots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bin; Kuch, Wolfgang, E-mail: kuch@physik.fu-berlin.de [Institut für Experimentalphysik, Freie Universität Berlin, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Wang, Weiwei; Beg, Marijan; Fangohr, Hans [Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-09

    The nonlinear dynamic behavior of a magnetic skyrmion in circular nanodots was studied numerically by solving the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation with a classical spin model. We show that a skyrmion core reversal can be achieved within nanoseconds using a perpendicular oscillating magnetic field. Two symmetric switching processes that correspond to excitations of the breathing mode and the mixed mode (combination of the breathing mode and a radial spin-wave mode) are identified. For excitation of the breathing mode, the skyrmion core switches through nucleation of a new core from a transient uniform state. In the mixed mode, the skyrmion core reverses with the help of spins excited both at the edge and core regions. Unlike the magnetic vortex core reversal, the excitation of radial spin waves does not dominate the skyrmion core reversal process.

  10. The dynamical fingerprint of core scouring in massive elliptical galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J.; Saglia, R. P.; Bender, R.; Erwin, P.; Fabricius, M., E-mail: jthomas@mpe.mpg.de [Max Planck-Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, P.O. Box 1312, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany)

    2014-02-10

    The most massive elliptical galaxies have low-density centers or cores that differ dramatically from the high-density centers of less massive ellipticals and bulges of disk galaxies. These cores have been interpreted as the result of mergers of supermassive black hole binaries, which depopulate galaxy centers by gravitationally slingshotting central stars toward large radii. Such binaries naturally form in mergers of luminous galaxies. Here, we analyze the population of central stellar orbits in 11 massive elliptical galaxies that we observed with the integral field spectrograph SINFONI at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope. Our dynamical analysis is orbit-based and includes the effects of a central black hole, the mass distribution of the stars, and a dark matter halo. We show that the use of integral field kinematics and the inclusion of dark matter is important to conclude on the distribution of stellar orbits in galaxy centers. Six of our galaxies are core galaxies. In these six galaxies, but not in the galaxies without cores, we detect a coherent lack of stars on radial orbits in the core region and a uniform excess of radial orbits outside of it: when scaled by the core radius r{sub b} , the radial profiles of the classical anisotropy parameter β(r) are nearly identical in core galaxies. Moreover, they quantitatively match the predictions of black hole binary simulations, providing the first convincing dynamical evidence for core scouring in the most massive elliptical galaxies.

  11. Retention Models on Core-Shell Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandera, Pavel; Hájek, Tomáš; Růžičková, Marie

    2017-07-13

    A thin, active shell layer on core-shell columns provides high efficiency in HPLC at moderately high pressures. We revisited three models of mobile phase effects on retention for core-shell columns in mixed aqueous-organic mobile phases: linear solvent strength and Snyder-Soczewiński two-parameter models and a three-parameter model. For some compounds, two-parameter models show minor deviations from linearity due to neglect of possible minor retention in pure weak solvent, which is compensated for in the three-parameter model, which does not explicitly assume either the adsorption or the partition retention mechanism in normal- or reversed-phase systems. The model retention equation can be formulated as a function of solute retention factors of nonionic compounds in pure organic solvent and in pure water (or aqueous buffer) and of the volume fraction of an either aqueous or organic solvent component in a two-component mobile phase. With core-shell columns, the impervious solid core does not participate in the retention process. Hence, the thermodynamic retention factors, defined as the ratio of the mass of the analyte mass contained in the stationary phase to its mass in the mobile phase in the column, should not include the particle core volume. The values of the thermodynamic factors are lower than the retention factors determined using a convention including the inert core in the stationary phase. However, both conventions produce correct results if consistently used to predict the effects of changing mobile phase composition on retention. We compared three types of core-shell columns with C18-, phenyl-hexyl-, and biphenyl-bonded phases. The core-shell columns with phenyl-hexyl- and biphenyl-bonded ligands provided lower errors in two-parameter model predictions for alkylbenzenes, phenolic acids, and flavonoid compounds in comparison with C18-bonded ligands.

  12. A Core Language for Separate Variability Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iosif-Lazăr, Alexandru Florin; Wasowski, Andrzej; Schaefer, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Separate variability modeling adds variability to a modeling language without requiring modifications of the language or the supporting tools. We define a core language for separate variability modeling using a single kind of variation point to define transformations of software artifacts in object...... hierarchical dependencies between variation points via copying and flattening. Thus, we reduce a model with intricate dependencies to a flat executable model transformation consisting of simple unconditional local variation points. The core semantics is extremely concise: it boils down to two operational rules...

  13. Gas dynamics in Massive Dense Cores in Cygnus-X

    CERN Document Server

    Csengeri, T; Schneider, N; Motte, F; Dib, S

    2010-01-01

    We study the kinematic properties of dense gas surrounding massive protostars recognized by Bontemps et a. (2010) in a sample of five Massive Dense Cores in Cygnus-X. We investigate whether turbulent support plays a major role in stabilizing the core against fragmentation into Jeans-mass objects or alternatively, the observed kinematics could indicate a high level of dynamics. We present IRAM 30m single-dish (HCO+ and H13CO+) and IRAM PdBI high angular-resolution observations of dense gas tracers (H13CO+ and H13CN) to reveal the kinematics of molecular gas at scales from 0.03 to 0.1 pc. Radiative transfer modeling shows that H13CO+ is depleted within the envelopes of massive protostars and traces the bulk of material surrounding the protostars rather than their inner envelopes. H13CN shows a better correspondence with the peak of the continuum emission, possibly due to abundance anomalies and specific chemistry in the close vicinity of massive protostars. Analyzing the line-widths we show that the observed li...

  14. Core-shell colloidal particles with dynamically tunable scattering properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guangnan; Manoharan, Vinothan N; Perro, Adeline

    2017-09-27

    We design polystyrene-poly(N'-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylic acid) core-shell particles that exhibit dynamically tunable scattering. We show that under normal solvent conditions the shell is nearly index-matched to pure water, and the particle scattering is dominated by Rayleigh scattering from the core. As the temperature or salt concentration increases, both the scattering cross-section and the forward scattering increase, characteristic of Mie scatterers. The magnitude of the change in the scattering cross-section and scattering anisotropy can be controlled through the solvent conditions and the size of the core. Such particles may find use as optical switches or optical filters with tunable opacity.

  15. Processor core model for quantum computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Man-Hong; Benjamin, Simon C; Bose, Sougato

    2006-06-09

    We describe an architecture based on a processing "core," where multiple qubits interact perpetually, and a separate "store," where qubits exist in isolation. Computation consists of single qubit operations, swaps between the store and the core, and free evolution of the core. This enables computation using physical systems where the entangling interactions are "always on." Alternatively, for switchable systems, our model constitutes a prescription for optimizing many-qubit gates. We discuss implementations of the quantum Fourier transform, Hamiltonian simulation, and quantum error correction.

  16. Two dimensional dynamic analysis of sandwich plates with gradient foam cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Lin; Xiao, Deng Bao; Zhao, Guiping [State Key Laboratory for Mechanical structure Strength and Vibration, School of AerospaceXi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Cho, Chong Du [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Inha University, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Present investigation is concerned about dynamic response of composite sandwich plates with the functionally gradient foam cores under time-dependent impulse. The analysis is based on a model of the gradient sandwich plate, in which the face sheets and the core adopt the Kirchhoff theory and a [2, 1]-order theory, respectively. The material properties of the gradient foam core vary continuously along the thickness direction. The gradient plate model is validated with the finite element code ABAQUS®. And the results show that the proposed model can predict well the free vibration of composite sandwich plates with gradient foam cores. The influences of gradient foam cores on the natural frequency, deflection and energy absorbing of the sandwich plates are also investigated.

  17. Core Challenges in Autism. Teaching dynamic thinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nason B.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Bill Nason, an American clinical psychologist who has been working with autistic people for more than 30 years has undergone his own evolution from a strict behavioral approach to humanism. In his two books «The Autism Discussion Page» he successively describes the difficulties people on the spectrum have to face. Bill Nason seems to be speaking on behalf of them: what they feel, experience, see, sense when the external world is pressing them with all its speed and chaos and their loved ones are constantly trying to modify their behavior in accordance to social norms. In the part below Bill Nason offers advice on how to help autistic people who experience problems with so-called dynamic thinking which requires fast evaluation of the changing situation and effective dealing with it. By practicing this technique we strengthen weak neuropathways. The author suggests talking through situations that have different options of resolving, making a worksheet, keeping a journal — doing everything to make our intuitive behavior to become clear as a chain of sequential acts for an autistic child.

  18. Using the UM dynamical cores to reproduce idealised 3D flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mayne, N J; Acreman, David M; Smith, Chris; Wood, Nigel; Amundsen, David Skålid; Thuburn, John; Jackson, David R

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that both the current (New Dynamics), and next generation (ENDGame) dynamical cores of the UK Met Office global circulation model, the UM, reproduce consistently, the long-term, large-scale flows found in several published idealised tests. The cases presented are the Held-Suarez test, a simplified model of Earth (including a stratosphere), and a hypothetical tidally locked Earth. Furthermore, we show that using simplifications to the dynamical equations, which are expected to be justified for the physical domains and flow regimes we have studied, and which are supported by the ENDGame dynamical core, also produces matching long-term, large-scale flows. Finally, we present evidence for differences in the detail of the planetary flows and circulations resulting from improvements in the ENDGame formulation over New Dynamics.

  19. Dynamic Latent Classification Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Shengtong; Martínez, Ana M.; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    as possible. Motivated by this problem setting, we propose a generative model for dynamic classification in continuous domains. At each time point the model can be seen as combining a naive Bayes model with a mixture of factor analyzers (FA). The latent variables of the FA are used to capture the dynamics...... in the process as well as modeling dependences between attributes....

  20. Coupled-cluster methods for core-hole dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picon, Antonio; Cheng, Lan; Hammond, Jeff R.; Stanton, John F.; Southworth, Stephen H.

    2014-05-01

    Coupled cluster (CC) is a powerful numerical method used in quantum chemistry in order to take into account electron correlation with high accuracy and size consistency. In the CC framework, excited, ionized, and electron-attached states can be described by the equation of motion (EOM) CC technique. However, bringing CC methods to describe molecular dynamics induced by x rays is challenging. X rays have the special feature of interacting with core-shell electrons that are close to the nucleus. Core-shell electrons can be ionized or excited to a valence shell, leaving a core-hole that will decay very fast (e.g. 2.4 fs for K-shell of Ne) by emitting photons (fluorescence process) or electrons (Auger process). Both processes are a clear manifestation of a many-body effect, involving electrons in the continuum in the case of Auger processes. We review our progress of developing EOM-CC methods for core-hole dynamics. Results of the calculations will be compared with measurements on core-hole decays in atomic Xe and molecular XeF2. This work is funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  1. Dynamical core polarization of two-active-electron systems in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Zengxiu

    2013-01-01

    The ionization of two-active-electron systems by intense laser fields is investigated theoretically. In comparison with time-dependent Hartree-Fock and exact two electron simulation, we show that the ionization rate is overestimated in SAE approximation. A modified single-active-electron model is formulated by taking into account of the dynamical core polarization. Applying the new approach to Ca atoms, it is found that the polarization of the core can be considered instantaneous and the large polarizability of the cation suppresses the ionization by 50% while the photoelectron cut-off energy increases slightly. The existed tunneling ionization formulation can be corrected analytically by considering core polarization.

  2. A New Global Core Plasma Model of the Plasmasphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, D. L.; Comfort, R. H.; Craven, P. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Core Plasma Model (GCPM) is the first empirical model for thermal inner magnetospheric plasma designed to integrate previous models and observations into a continuous in value and gradient representation of typical total densities. New information about the plasmasphere, in particular, makes possible significant improvement. The IMAGE Mission Radio Plasma Imager (RPI) has obtained the first observations of total plasma densities along magnetic field lines in the plasmasphere and polar cap. Dynamics Explorer 1 Retarding Ion Mass Spectrometer (RIMS) has provided densities in temperatures in the plasmasphere for 5 ion species. These and other works enable a new more detailed empirical model of thermal in the inner magnetosphere that will be presented.

  3. Core muscle activation during dynamic upper limb exercises in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnanen, Sami P; Siekkinen, Kirsti M; Häkkinen, Arja H; Mälkiä, Esko A; Kautiainen, Hannu J; Ylinen, Jari J

    2012-12-01

    Although several everyday functions and sporting activities demand controlled use of the abdominal and back muscles while working with the upper limbs, the activity of core muscles during dynamic upper limb exercises in the standing position has not been studied extensively. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine abdominal and back muscle activity during dynamic upper limb exercises while standing and to evaluate whether dynamic exercises are appropriate for strengthening muscles. The activation of the rectus abdominis, obliquus externus abdominis, longissimus, and multifidus muscles during dynamic bilateral or unilateral shoulder exercises with or without fixation of the pelvis was measured in 20 healthy women using surface electromyography. Trunk muscle activation during isometric maximum contraction was used as a comparative reference. With bilateral shoulder extension and unilateral shoulder horizontal adduction, abdominal muscle activity was >60% of activity during reference exercises. With unilateral shoulder horizontal abduction and shoulder extension exercises, back muscle activity was >60% of the activity level reference exercise. Muscle activation levels were 35-64% lower during shoulder horizontal adduction and abduction without fixation compared with exercises with fixation. The results indicate that upper limb exercises performed in the standing position are effective for activating core muscles. Bilateral and unilateral shoulder extension and unilateral shoulder horizontal abduction and adduction with the pelvis fixed elicited the greatest activity of the core muscles.

  4. Earth's Inner Core dynamics induced by the Lorentz force

    CERN Document Server

    Lasbleis, M; Cardin, P; Labrosse, S

    2015-01-01

    Seismic studies indicate that the Earth's inner core has a complex structure and exhibits a strong elastic anisotropy with a cylindrical symmetry. Among the various models which have been proposed to explain this anisotropy, one class of models considers the effect of the Lorentz force associated with the magnetic field diffused within the inner core. In this paper we extend previous studies and use analytical calculations and numerical simulations to predict the geometry and strength of the flow induced by the poloidal component of the Lorentz force in a neutrally or stably stratified growing inner core, exploring also the effect of different types of boundary conditions at the inner core boundary (ICB). Unlike previous studies, we show that the boundary condition that is most likely to produce a significant deformation and seismic anisotropy is impermeable, with negligible radial flow through the boundary. Exact analytical solutions are found in the case of a negligible effect of buoyancy forces in the inne...

  5. Enhanced Core Noise Modeling for Turbofan Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, James R.; Krejsa, Eugene A.; Clark, Bruce J.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes work performed by MTC Technologies (MTCT) for NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 15. MTCT previously developed a first-generation empirical model that correlates the core/combustion noise of four GE engines, the CF6, CF34, CFM56, and GE90 for General Electric (GE) under Contract No. 200-1X-14W53048, in support of GRC Contract NAS3-01135. MTCT has demonstrated in earlier noise modeling efforts that the improvement of predictive modeling is greatly enhanced by an iterative approach, so in support of NASA's Quiet Aircraft Technology Project, GRC sponsored this effort to improve the model. Since the noise data available for correlation are total engine noise spectra, it is total engine noise that must be predicted. Since the scope of this effort was not sufficient to explore fan and turbine noise, the most meaningful comparisons must be restricted to frequencies below the blade passage frequency. Below the blade passage frequency and at relatively high power settings jet noise is expected to be the dominant source, and comparisons are shown that demonstrate the accuracy of the jet noise model recently developed by MTCT for NASA under Contract NAS3-00178, Task Order No. 10. At lower power settings the core noise became most apparent, and these data corrected for the contribution of jet noise were then used to establish the characteristics of core noise. There is clearly more than one spectral range where core noise is evident, so the spectral approach developed by von Glahn and Krejsa in 1982 wherein four spectral regions overlap, was used in the GE effort. Further analysis indicates that the two higher frequency components, which are often somewhat masked by turbomachinery noise, can be treated as one component, and it is on that basis that the current model is formulated. The frequency scaling relationships are improved and are now based on combustor and core nozzle geometries. In conjunction with the Task

  6. Studying the effects of dynamical parameters on reactor core temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Khodabakhsh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase productivity, reduce depreciation, and avoid possible accidents in a system such as fuel rods' melting and overpressure, control of temperature changes in the reactor core is an important factor. There are several methods for solving and analysing the stability of point kinetics equations. In most previous analyses, the effects of various factors on the temperature of the reactor core have been ignored. In this work, the effects of various dynamical parameters on the temperature of the reactor core and stability of the system in the presence of temperature feedback reactivity with external reactivity step, ramp and sinusoidal for six groups of delayed neutrons were studied using the method of Lyapunov exponent. The results proved to be in good agreement with other works

  7. Simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the CRBR Upper-Core Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, D.; Starkovich, V.S.; Chapyak, E.J.

    1982-09-01

    The results of a simulant-material experimental investigation of flow dynamics in the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) Upper Core Structure are described. The methodology used to design the experimental apparatus and select test conditions is detailed. Numerous comparisons between experimental data and SIMMER-II Code calculations are presented with both advantages and limitations of the SIMMER modeling features identified.

  8. Dynamic usage of transcription start sites within core promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kawaji, Hideya; Frith, Martin C; Katayama, Shintaro

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mammalian promoters do not initiate transcription at single, well defined base pairs, but rather at multiple, alternative start sites spread across a region. We previously characterized the static structures of transcription start site usage within promoters at the base pair level......, based on large-scale sequencing of transcript 5' ends. RESULTS: In the present study we begin to explore the internal dynamics of mammalian promoters, and demonstrate that start site selection within many mouse core promoters varies among tissues. We also show that this dynamic usage of start sites...

  9. Conceptual Models Core to Good Design

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    People make use of software applications in their activities, applying them as tools in carrying out tasks. That this use should be good for people--easy, effective, efficient, and enjoyable--is a principal goal of design. In this book, we present the notion of Conceptual Models, and argue that Conceptual Models are core to achieving good design. From years of helping companies create software applications, we have come to believe that building applications without Conceptual Models is just asking for designs that will be confusing and difficult to learn, remember, and use. We show how Concept

  10. Influence of dynamical equatorial flattening and orientation of a triaxial core on prograde diurnal polar motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rong; Shen, WenBin

    2016-04-01

    The noise floor of empirical models of diurnal Earth Rotation could reach as low as 1μas as shown by several recent studies. In another aspect, the differences between these empirical models with the theoretical model predictions given by IERS Convention (2010) for certain diurnal frequencies are more than 10 μas (e.g. K1). The traxiality of the core is ignored in the theoretical model given by IERS Convention (2010) because it is highly uncertain. To explain the difference between the empirical model and theoretical model, we consider the possible influence of a triaxial core. We use the difference between empirical models and theoretical model predictions given by IERS Convention (2010) as input to invert the traxiality parameter of the core. In the inversion, we assume the ocean tide response obeys the admittance theory. So extra six admittance parameters are introduced to model the difference between smooth responses inferred from empirical models and that given by theoretical model predictions from IERS Convention (2010). The results show that adding core triaxiality into the theoretical model could narrow the difference between empirical model and theoretical model at diurnal frequencies. The residual of amplitude becomes smaller. For a set of tide components consisting of seven diurnal frequencies (Q1, O1, M1, P1, K1, J1, Oo1), the root mean square of the residual of this set have decreased from more than 10μas to 2˜3μas for most of the empirical models. As for the dynamical equatorial flattening of the core, estimates inverted based on different empirical models are consistent within standard deviation. The results also suggest that the principal axes of the triaxial core does not coincidence with the principal axes of the whole Earth. This study is supported by National 973 Project China (grant No. 2013CB733305), NSFC (grant Nos. 41174011, 41210006, 41504019).

  11. NMR imaging of fluid dynamics in reservoir core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, B A; Yamanashi, W S

    1988-01-01

    A medical NMR imaging instrument has been modified to image water and oil in reservoir rocks by the construction of a new receiving coil. Both oil and water inside the core produced readily detectable proton NMR signals, while the rock matrix produced no signal. Because of similar T2 NMR relaxation times, the water was doped with a paramagnetic ion, Mn+2, to reduce its T2 relaxation time. This procedure enhanced the separation between the oil and water phases in the resulting images. Sequential measurements, as water imbibed into one end and oil was expelled from the other end of a core plug, produced a series of images which showed the dynamics of the fluids. For water-wet Berea Sandstone a flood front was readily observed, but some of the oil was apparently left behind in small, isolated pockets which were larger than individual pores. After several additional pore volumes of water flowed through the plug the NMR image indicated a homogeneous distribution of oil. The amount of residual oil, as determined from the ratio of NMR intensities, closely approximated the residual oil saturation of fully flooded Berea samples measured by Dean-Stark extraction. A Berea sandstone core treated to make it partially oil-wet, did not show a definitive flood front, but appeared to channel the water around the perimeter of the core plug. The relative ease with which these images were made indicates that NMR imaging can be a useful technique to follow the dynamics of oil and water through a core plug for a variety of production processes.

  12. Models for Dynamic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    be applied to formulate, analyse and solve these dynamic problems and how in the case of the fuel cell problem the model consists of coupledmeso and micro scale models. It is shown how data flows are handled between the models and how the solution is obtained within the modelling environment....

  13. Dynamic Responses of the Earth's Outer Core to Assimilation of Observed Geomagnetic Secular Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Weijia; Tangborn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Assimilation of surface geomagnetic observations and geodynamo models has advanced very quickly in recent years. However, compared to advanced data assimilation systems in meteorology, geomagnetic data assimilation (GDAS) is still in an early stage. Among many challenges ranging from data to models is the disparity between the short observation records and the long time scales of the core dynamics. To better utilize available observational information, we have made an effort in this study to directly assimilate the Gauss coefficients of both the core field and its secular variation (SV) obtained via global geomagnetic field modeling, aiming at understanding the dynamical responses of the core fluid to these additional observational constraints. Our studies show that the SV assimilation helps significantly to shorten the dynamo model spin-up process. The flow beneath the core-mantle boundary (CMB) responds significantly to the observed field and its SV. The strongest responses occur in the relatively small scale flow (of the degrees L is approx. 30 in spherical harmonic expansions). This part of the flow includes the axisymmetric toroidal flow (of order m = 0) and non-axisymmetric poloidal flow with m (is) greater than 5. These responses can be used to better understand the core flow and, in particular, to improve accuracies of predicting geomagnetic variability in future.

  14. Prerouted FPGA Cores for Rapid System Construction in a Dynamic Reconfigurable System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver TimothyF

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of constructing prerouted FPGA cores, which lays the foundations for a rapid system construction framework for dynamically reconfigurable computing systems, is presented. Two major challenges are considered: how to manage the wires crossing a core's borders; and how to maintain an acceptable level of flexibility for system construction with only a minimum of overhead. In order to maintain FPGA computing performance, it is crucial to thoroughly analyze the issues at the lowest level of device detail in order to ensure that computing circuit encapsulation is as efficient as possible. We present the first methodology that allows a core to scale its interface bandwidth to the maximum available in a routing channel. Cores can be constructed independently from the rest of the system using a framework that is independent of the method used to place and route primitive components within the core. We use an abstract FPGA model and CAD tools that mirror those used in industry. An academic design flow has been modified to include a wire policy and an interface constraints framework that tightly constrains the use of the wires that cross a core's boundaries. Using this tool set we investigate the effect of prerouting on overall system optimality. Abutting cores are instantly connected by colocation of interface wires. Eliminating run-time routing drastically reduces the time taken to construct a system using a set of cores.

  15. The dynamical fingerprint of core scouring in massive elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, J; Bender, R; Erwin, P; Fabricius, M

    2013-01-01

    The most massive elliptical galaxies have low density centers or cores that differ dramatically from the high-density centres of less massive ellipticals and bulges of disk galaxies. These cores have been interpreted as the result of mergers of supermassive black hole binaries, which depopulate galaxy centres by gravitationally slingshotting central stars towards large radii. Such binaries naturally form in mergers of luminous galaxies. Here we analyse the population of central stellar orbits in 11 massive elliptical galaxies that we observed with the integral-field spectrograph SINFONI at the ESO-VLT. Our dynamical analysis is orbit-based and includes the effects of a central black hole, the mass distribution of the stars and a dark-matter halo. We show that the use of integral-field kinematics and the inclusion of dark matter is important to conclude upon the distribution of stellar orbits in galaxy centers. Six of our galaxies are core galaxies. In these six galaxies, but not in the galaxies without cores,...

  16. Dynamic term structure models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Martin Møller; Meldrum, Andrew

    This paper studies whether dynamic term structure models for US nominal bond yields should enforce the zero lower bound by a quadratic policy rate or a shadow rate specification. We address the question by estimating quadratic term structure models (QTSMs) and shadow rate models with at most four...

  17. Geomagnetic Core Field Secular Variation Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillet, N.; Lesur, V.; Olsen, Nils

    2010-01-01

    We analyse models describing time changes of the Earth’s core magnetic field (secular variation) covering the historical period (several centuries) and the more recent satellite era (previous decade), and we illustrate how both the information contained in the data and the a priori information...... highlight the difficulty of resolving the time variability of the high degree secular variation coefficients (i.e. the secular acceleration), arising for instance from the challenge to properly separate sources of internal and of external origin. In addition, the regularisation process may also result...

  18. Core-oscillator model of Caulobacter crescentus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandecan, Yves; Biondi, Emanuele; Blossey, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Caulobacter crescentus is a powerful model organism for studies of bacterial cell cycle regulation. Although the major regulators and their connections in Caulobacter have been identified, it still is a challenge to properly understand the dynamics of its circuitry which accounts for both cell cycle progression and arrest. We show that the key decision module in Caulobacter is built from a limit cycle oscillator which controls the DNA replication program. The effect of an induced cell cycle arrest is demonstrated to be a key feature to classify the underlying dynamics.

  19. Multiscale modeling of pedestrian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cristiani, Emiliano; Tosin, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    This book presents mathematical models and numerical simulations of crowd dynamics. The core topic is the development of a new multiscale paradigm, which bridges the microscopic and macroscopic scales taking the most from each of them for capturing the relevant clues of complexity of crowds. The background idea is indeed that most of the complex trends exhibited by crowds are due to an intrinsic interplay between individual and collective behaviors. The modeling approach promoted in this book pursues actively this intuition and profits from it for designing general mathematical structures susceptible of application also in fields different from the inspiring original one. The book considers also the two most traditional points of view: the microscopic one, in which pedestrians are tracked individually, and the macroscopic one, in which pedestrians are assimilated to a continuum. Selected existing models are critically analyzed. The work is addressed to researchers and graduate students.

  20. Discrete dynamical models

    CERN Document Server

    Salinelli, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the analysis of discrete dynamical systems. The content is presented by an unitary approach that blends the perspective of mathematical modeling together with the ones of several discipline as Mathematical Analysis, Linear Algebra, Numerical Analysis, Systems Theory and Probability. After a preliminary discussion of several models, the main tools for the study of linear and non-linear scalar dynamical systems are presented, paying particular attention to the stability analysis. Linear difference equations are studied in detail and an elementary introduction of Z and Discrete Fourier Transform is presented. A whole chapter is devoted to the study of bifurcations and chaotic dynamics. One-step vector-valued dynamical systems are the subject of three chapters, where the reader can find the applications to positive systems, Markov chains, networks and search engines. The book is addressed mainly to students in Mathematics, Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Biology and Economic...

  1. The Dynamics of Massive Starless Cores with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Jonathan C; Butler, Michael J; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    How do stars that are more massive than the Sun form, and thus how is the stellar initial mass function (IMF) established? Such intermediate and high-mass stars may be born from relatively massive pre-stellar gas cores, which are more massive than the thermal Jeans mass. The Turbulent Core Accretion model invokes such cores as being in approximate virial equilibrium and in approximate pressure equilibrium with their surrounding clump medium. Their internal pressure is provided by a combination of turbulence and magnetic fields. On the other hand, the Competitive Accretion model requires strongly sub-virial initial conditions that then lead to extensive fragmentation to the thermal Jeans scale, with intermediate and high-mass stars later forming by competitive Bondi-Hoyle accretion. To test these models, we have identified four prime examples of massive (~100 Msun) clumps in Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs). Fontani et al. found high deuteration fractions of N2H+ in these objects, which are consistent with them be...

  2. Modeling dynamic swarms

    KAUST Repository

    Ghanem, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes the problem of modeling video sequences of dynamic swarms (DSs). We define a DS as a large layout of stochastically repetitive spatial configurations of dynamic objects (swarm elements) whose motions exhibit local spatiotemporal interdependency and stationarity, i.e., the motions are similar in any small spatiotemporal neighborhood. Examples of DS abound in nature, e.g., herds of animals and flocks of birds. To capture the local spatiotemporal properties of the DS, we present a probabilistic model that learns both the spatial layout of swarm elements (based on low-level image segmentation) and their joint dynamics that are modeled as linear transformations. To this end, a spatiotemporal neighborhood is associated with each swarm element, in which local stationarity is enforced both spatially and temporally. We assume that the prior on the swarm dynamics is distributed according to an MRF in both space and time. Embedding this model in a MAP framework, we iterate between learning the spatial layout of the swarm and its dynamics. We learn the swarm transformations using ICM, which iterates between estimating these transformations and updating their distribution in the spatiotemporal neighborhoods. We demonstrate the validity of our method by conducting experiments on real and synthetic video sequences. Real sequences of birds, geese, robot swarms, and pedestrians evaluate the applicability of our model to real world data. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. From cusps to cores: a stochastic model

    CERN Document Server

    El-Zant, Amr; Combes, Francoise

    2016-01-01

    The cold dark matter model of structure formation faces apparent problems on galactic scales. Several threads point to excessive halo concentration, including central densities that rise too steeply with decreasing radius. Yet, random fluctuations in the gaseous component can 'heat' the centres of haloes, decreasing their densities. We present a theoretical model deriving this effect from first principles: stochastic variations in the gas density are converted into potential fluctuations that act on the dark matter; the associated force correlation function is calculated and the corresponding stochastic equation solved. Assuming a power law spectrum of fluctuations with maximal and minimal cutoff scales, we derive the velocity dispersion imparted to the halo particles and the relevant relaxation time. We further perform numerical simulations, with fluctuations realised as a Gaussian random field, which confirm the formation of a core within a timescale comparable to that derived analytically. Non-radial colle...

  4. 2D dynamics of the radiative core of low mass stars

    CERN Document Server

    Hypolite, Delphine; Rieutord, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the internal rotation of low mass stars all along their evolution is of primary interest when studying their rotational dynamics, internal mixing and magnetic field generation. In this context, helio- and asteroseismology probe angular velocity gradients deep within solar type stars at different evolutionary stages. Still the rotation close to the center of such stars on the main sequence is hardly detectable and the dynamical interaction of the radiative core with the surface convective envelope is not well understood. For instance, the influence of the differential rotation profile sustained by convection and applied as a boundary condition to the radiation zone is very important in the formation of tachoclines. In this work, we study a 2D hydrodynamical model of a radiative core when an imposed, solar or anti-solar, differential rotation is applied at the upper boundary. This model uses the Boussinesq approximation and we find that the shear induces a cylindrical differential rotation associa...

  5. Rotating, hydromagnetic laboratory experiment modelling planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Douglas H.

    2009-10-01

    This dissertation describes a series of laboratory experiments motivated by planetary cores and the dynamo effect, the mechanism by which the flow of an electrically conductive fluid can give rise to a spontaneous magnetic field. Our experimental apparatus, meant to be a laboratory model of Earth's core, contains liquid sodium between an inner, solid sphere and an outer, spherical shell. The fluid is driven by the differential rotation of these two boundaries, each of which is connected to a motor. Applying an axial, DC magnetic field, we use a collection of Hall probes to measure the magnetic induction that results from interactions between the applied field and the flowing, conductive fluid. We have observed and identified inertial modes, which are bulk oscillations of the fluid restored by the Coriolis force. Over-reflection at a shear layer is one mechanism capable of exciting such modes, and we have developed predictions of both onset boundaries and mode selection from over-reflection theory which are consistent with our observations. Also, motivated by previous experimental devices that used ferromagnetic boundaries to achieve dynamo action, we have studied the effects of a soft iron (ferromagnetic) inner sphere on our apparatus, again finding inertial waves. We also find that all behaviors are more broadband and generally more nonlinear in the presence of a ferromagnetic boundary. Our results with a soft iron inner sphere have implications for other hydromagnetic experiments with ferromagnetic boundaries, and are appropriate for comparison to numerical simulations as well. From our observations we conclude that inertial modes almost certainly occur in planetary cores and will occur in future rotating experiments. In fact, the predominance of inertial modes in our experiments and in other recent work leads to a new paradigm for rotating turbulence, starkly different from turbulence theories based on assumptions of isotropy and homogeneity, starting instead

  6. Identification of GCM Uncertainty of Dynamical Cores and Physical Parameterizations by Object-Based Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorgun, M. S.; Rood, R. B.

    2012-12-01

    The behavior of atmospheric models is sensitive to the algorithms that are used to represent the equations of motion. Typically, comprehensive models are conceived in terms of the resolved fluid dynamics (i.e. the dynamical core) and subgrid, unresolved physics represented by parameterizations. There are model uncertainties inherent to both components. In this study, we investigate the role of the dynamical core as the source of uncertainty in simulation of orographic precipitation by different models. As a concrete example, we focus on analyzing how the choice of dynamical core impacts the representation of precipitation in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, Western Canada, and Alaska; this brings attention to the interaction of the resolved and the parameterized components of the model. Two dynamical cores are considered within the Community Atmosphere Model. These are the Spectral (Eulerian), which relies on global basis functions and the Finite Volume (FV), which uses only local information. We aim to identify and quantify the relationship between the model uncertainty and the numerical scheme as well as other model parameters such as the treatment of topography, SST etc. We also focus on the evolution of the uncertainty as a function of model resolution. In order to evaluate model uncertainty through validation against observations we introduce the concept of "meteorological realism" that is, do local representations of large-scale phenomena, for example, fronts and orographic precipitation, look like the observations? Our approach to quantify meteorological realism employs objective pattern recognition methods using semantic lists for isolated features to define their characteristics. We seek to develop model evaluation strategies that identify like "objects" - coherent systems with an associated set of measurable parameters. This makes it possible to evaluate processes and assess the sources of uncertainty in models without needing to reproduce the

  7. Earth's deformation due to the dynamical perturbations of the fluid outer core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐建桥; 孙和平

    2002-01-01

    The elasto-gravitational deformation response of the Earth's solid parts to the perturbations of the pressure and gravity on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the solid inner core boundary (ICB), due to the dynamical behaviors of the fluid outer core (FOC), is discussed. The internal load Love numbers, which are formulized in a general form in this study, are employed to describe the Earth's deformation. The preliminary reference Earth model (PREM) is used as an example to calculate the internal load Love numbers on the Earth's surface, CMB and ICB, respectively. The characteristics of the Earth's deformation variation with the depth and the perturbation periods on the boundaries of the FOC are also investigated. The numerical results indicate that the internal load Love numbers decrease quickly with the increasing degree of the spherical harmonics of the displacement and depend strongly on the perturbation frequencies, especially on the high frequencies. The results, obtained in this work, can be used to construct the boundary conditions for the core dynamics of the long-period oscillations of the Earth's fluid outer core.

  8. Two-fluid models of superfluid neutron star cores

    CERN Document Server

    Chamel, N

    2008-01-01

    Both relativistic and non-relativistic two-fluid models of neutron star cores are constructed, using the constrained variational formalism developed by Brandon Carter and co-workers. We consider a mixture of superfluid neutrons and superconducting protons at zero temperature, taking into account mutual entrainment effects. Leptons, which affect the interior composition of the neutron star and contribute to the pressure, are also included. We provide the analytic expression of the Lagrangian density of the system, the so-called master function, from which the dynamical equations can be obtained. All the microscopic parameters of the models are calculated consistently using the non-relativistic nuclear energy density functional theory. For comparison, we have also considered relativistic mean field models. The correspondence between relativistic and non-relativistic hydrodynamical models is discussed in the framework of the recently developed 4D covariant formalism of Newtonian multi-fluid hydrodynamics. We hav...

  9. Dynamic causal modelling revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, K J; Preller, Katrin H; Mathys, Chris; Cagnan, Hayriye; Heinzle, Jakob; Razi, Adeel; Zeidman, Peter

    2017-02-17

    This paper revisits the dynamic causal modelling of fMRI timeseries by replacing the usual (Taylor) approximation to neuronal dynamics with a neural mass model of the canonical microcircuit. This provides a generative or dynamic causal model of laminar specific responses that can generate haemodynamic and electrophysiological measurements. In principle, this allows the fusion of haemodynamic and (event related or induced) electrophysiological responses. Furthermore, it enables Bayesian model comparison of competing hypotheses about physiologically plausible synaptic effects; for example, does attentional modulation act on superficial or deep pyramidal cells - or both? In this technical note, we describe the resulting dynamic causal model and provide an illustrative application to the attention to visual motion dataset used in previous papers. Our focus here is on how to answer long-standing questions in fMRI; for example, do haemodynamic responses reflect extrinsic (afferent) input from distant cortical regions, or do they reflect intrinsic (recurrent) neuronal activity? To what extent do inhibitory interneurons contribute to neurovascular coupling? What is the relationship between haemodynamic responses and the frequency of induced neuronal activity? This paper does not pretend to answer these questions; rather it shows how they can be addressed using neural mass models of fMRI timeseries. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamics of axial torsional libration under the mantle-inner core gravitational interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, B. F.

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this paper are (i) formulating the dynamics of the mantle-inner core gravitational (MICG) interaction in terms of the spherical-harmonic multipoles of mass density. The modeled MICG system is composed of two concentric rigid bodies (mantle and inner core) of near-spherical but otherwise heterogeneous configuration, with a fluid outer core in between playing a passive role. We derive the general equation of motion for the vector rotation but only focus on the polar component that describes the MICG axial torsional libration. The torsion constant and hence the square of the natural frequency of the libration is proportional to the product of the equatorial ellipticities of the mantle and inner-core geoid embodied in their multipoles (of two different types) of degree 2 and order 2 (such as the Large Low-Shear-Velocity Provinces above the core-mantle boundary) and (ii) studying the geophysical implications upon equating the said MICG libration to the steady 6 year oscillation that are observed in the Earth's spin rate or the length-of-day variation (ΔLOD). In particular, the MICG torsion constant is found to be Γ>˜z = CIC σz2 ≈ 6.5 × 1019 N m, while the inner core's (BIC - AIC) ≈ 1.08 × 1031 kg m2 gives the inner core triaxiality (BIC - AIC)/CIC ≈ 1.8 × 10-4, about 8 times the whole-Earth value. It is also asserted that the required inner-core ellipticity amounts to no more than 140 m in geoid height, much smaller than the sensitivity required for the seismic wave travel time to resolve the variation of the inner core.

  11. Structure, Dynamics and Deuterium Fractionation of Massive Pre-Stellar Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Goodson, Matthew D; Tan, Jonathan C; Heitsch, Fabian; Caselli, Paola

    2016-01-01

    High levels of deuterium fraction in N$_2$H$^+$ are observed in some pre-stellar cores. Single-zone chemical models find that the timescale required to reach observed values ($D_{\\rm frac}^{{\\rm N}_2{\\rm H}^+} \\equiv {\\rm N}_2{\\rm D}^+/{\\rm N}_2{\\rm H}^+ \\gtrsim 0.1$) is longer than the free-fall time, possibly ten times longer. Here, we explore the deuteration of turbulent, magnetized cores with 3D magnetohydrodynamics simulations. We use an approximate chemical model to follow the growth in abundances of N$_2$H$^+$ and N$_2$D$^+$. We then examine the dynamics of the core using each tracer for comparison to observations. We find that the velocity dispersion of the core as traced by N$_2$D$^+$ appears slightly sub-virial compared to predictions of the Turbulent Core Model of McKee & Tan, except at late times just before the onset of protostar formation. By varying the initial mass surface density, the magnetic energy, the chemical age, and the ortho-to-para ratio of H$_2$, we also determine the physical a...

  12. Improvement of core degradation model in ISAAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Ha; Kim, See Darl; Park, Soo Yong

    2004-02-01

    If water inventory in the fuel channels depletes and fuel rods are exposed to steam after uncover in the pressure tube, the decay heat generated from fuel rods is transferred to the pressure tube and to the calandria tube by radiation, and finally to the moderator in the calandria tank by conduction. During this process, the cladding will be heated first and ballooned when the fuel gap internal pressure exceeds the primary system pressure. The pressure tube will be also ballooned and will touch the calandria tube, increasing heat transfer rate to the moderator. Although these situation is not desirable, the fuel channel is expected to maintain its integrity as long as the calandria tube is submerged in the moderator, because the decay heat could be removed to the moderator through radiation and conduction. Therefore, loss of coolant and moderator inside and outside the channel may cause severe core damage including horizontal fuel channel sagging and finally loss of channel integrity. The sagged channels contact with the channels located below and lose their heat transfer area to the moderator. As the accident goes further, the disintegrated fuel channels will be heated up and relocated onto the bottom of the calandria tank. If the temperature of these relocated materials is high enough to attack the calandria tank, the calandria tank would fail and molten material would contact with the calandria vault water. Steam explosion and/or rapid steam generation from this interaction may threaten containment integrity. Though a detailed model is required to simulate the severe accident at CANDU plants, complexity of phenomena itself and inner structures as well as lack of experimental data forces to choose a simple but reasonable model as the first step. ISAAC 1.0 was developed to model the basic physicochemical phenomena during the severe accident progression. At present, ISAAC 2.0 is being developed for accident management guide development and strategy evaluation. In

  13. Quantifying the Relationship between Dynamical Cores and Physical Parameterizations by Object-Based Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorgun, M. S.; Rood, R. B.

    2011-12-01

    The behavior of atmospheric models is sensitive to the algorithms that are used to represent the equations of motion. Typically, comprehensive models are conceived in terms of the resolved fluid dynamics (i.e. the dynamical core) and subgrid, unresolved physics represented by parameterizations. Deterministic weather predictions are often validated with feature-by-feature comparison. Probabilistic weather forecasts and climate projects are evaluated with statistical methods. We seek to develop model evaluation strategies that identify like "objects" - coherent systems with an associated set of measurable parameters. This makes it possible to evaluate processes in models without needing to reproduce the time and location of, for example, a particular observed cloud system. Process- and object-based evaluation preserves information in the observations by avoiding the need for extensive spatial and temporal averaging. As a concrete example, we focus on analyzing how the choice of dynamical core impacts the representation of precipitation in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, Western Canada, and Alaska; this brings attention to the interaction of the resolved and the parameterized components of the model. Two dynamical cores are considered within the Community Atmosphere Model. These are the Spectral (Eulerian), which relies on global basis functions and the Finite Volume (FV), which uses only local information. We introduce the concept of "meteorological realism" that is, do local representations of large-scale phenomena, for example, fronts and orographic precipitation, look like the observations? A follow on question is, does the representation of these phenomena improve with resolution? Our approach to quantify meteorological realism starts with identification and isolation of key features of orographic precipitation that are represented differently by Spectral and FV models, using objective pattern recognition methods. Then we aim to quantitatively compare

  14. On the coupling of fluid dynamics and electromagnetism at the top of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic approach to short-term geomagnetism has recently been based upon pre-Maxwell frozen-flux electromagnetism. A complete dynamic theory requires coupling fluid dynamics to electromagnetism. A geophysically plausible simplifying assumption for the vertical vorticity balance, namely that the vertical Lorentz torque is negligible, is introduced and its consequences are developed. The simplified coupled magnetohydrodynamic system is shown to conserve a variety of magnetic and vorticity flux integrals. These provide constraints on eligible models for the geomagnetic main field, its secular variation, and the horizontal fluid motions at the top of the core, and so permit a number of tests of the underlying assumptions.

  15. On the coupling of fluid dynamics and electromagnetism at the top of the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R.

    1985-01-01

    A kinematic approach to short-term geomagnetism has recently been based upon pre-Maxwell frozen-flux electromagnetism. A complete dynamic theory requires coupling fluid dynamics to electromagnetism. A geophysically plausible simplifying assumption for the vertical vorticity balance, namely that the vertical Lorentz torque is negligible, is introduced and its consequences are developed. The simplified coupled magnetohydrodynamic system is shown to conserve a variety of magnetic and vorticity flux integrals. These provide constraints on eligible models for the geomagnetic main field, its secular variation, and the horizontal fluid motions at the top of the core, and so permit a number of tests of the underlying assumptions.

  16. Corruption dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malafeyev, O. A.; Nemnyugin, S. A.; Rylow, D.; Kolpak, E. P.; Awasthi, Achal

    2017-07-01

    The corruption dynamics is analyzed by means of the lattice model which is similar to the three-dimensional Ising model. Agents placed at nodes of the corrupt network periodically choose to perfom or not to perform the act of corruption at gain or loss while making decisions based on the process history. The gain value and its dynamics are defined by means of the Markov stochastic process modelling with parameters established in accordance with the influence of external and individual factors on the agent's gain. The model is formulated algorithmically and is studied by means of the computer simulation. Numerical results are obtained which demonstrate asymptotic behaviour of the corruption network under various conditions.

  17. Dynamic Systems Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Dan ŞANDOR

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available System Dynamics was introduced by Jay W. Forrester in the 1960s. Since then the methodology was adopted in many areas of natural or social sciences. This article tries to present briefly how this methodology works, both as Systems Thinking and as Modelling with Vensim computer software.

  18. Quantifying the Relationship between Dynamical Cores and Physical Parameterizations by Geostatistical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorgun, M. S.; Rood, R. B.

    2010-12-01

    The behavior of atmospheric models is sensitive to the algorithms that are used to represent the equations of motion. Typically, comprehensive models are conceived in terms of the resolved fluid dynamics (i.e. the dynamical core) and subgrid, unresolved physics represented by parameterizations. Deterministic weather predictions are often validated with feature-by-feature comparison. Probabilistic weather forecasts and climate projects are evaluated with statistical methods. We seek to develop model evaluation strategies that identify like “objects” - coherent systems with an associated set of measurable parameters. This makes it possible to evaluate processes in models without needing to reproduce the time and location of, for example, a particular observed cloud system. Process- and object-based evaluation preserves information in the observations by avoiding the need for extensive spatial and temporal averaging. As a concrete example, we focus on analyzing how the choice of dynamical core impacts the representation of precipitation in the Pacific Northwest of the United States, Western Canada, and Alaska; this brings attention to the interaction of the resolved and the parameterized components of the model. Two dynamical cores are considered within the Community Atmosphere Model. These are the Spectral (Eulerian), which relies on global basis functions and the Finite Volume (FV), which uses only local information. We introduce the concept of "meteorological realism" that is, do local representations of large-scale phenomena, for example, fronts and orographic precipitation, look like the observations? A follow on question is, does the representation of these phenomena improve with resolution? Our approach to quantify meteorological realism starts with methods of geospatial statistics. Specifically, we employ variography, which is a geostatistical method which is used to measure the spatial continuity of a regionalized variable, and principle component

  19. Dynamic modelling of windmills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akhmatov, Vladislav; Knudsen, Hans

    1999-01-01

    An empirical dynamic model of windmills is set up based on analysis of measured Fourier spectra of the active electric power from a wind farm. The model is based on the assumption that eigenswings of the mechanical construction of the windmills excited by the phenomenon of vortex tower interaction...... will be transferred through the shaft to the electrical generator and result in disturbances of the active electric power supplied by the windmills. The results of the model are found to be in agreement with measurements in the frequency range of the model that is from 0.1 to 10 Hz....

  20. Dynamic Network Models

    CERN Document Server

    Armbruster, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    We analyze random networks that change over time. First we analyze a dynamic Erdos-Renyi model, whose edges change over time. We describe its stationary distribution, its convergence thereto, and the SI contact process on the network, which has relevance for connectivity and the spread of infections. Second, we analyze the effect of node turnover, when nodes enter and leave the network, which has relevance for network models incorporating births, deaths, aging, and other demographic factors.

  1. Core Collapse Supernova Models For Nucleosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Jordi; Frohlich, C.; Perego, A.; Hempel, M.

    2014-01-01

    Type II supernova explosions are the product of the collapse of massive stars (M > 8-10 Msun), which explode with a kinetic energy release of 1e51 erg. While sophisticated multi-dimensional models can reveal details of the explosion mechanism (role of convection, fluid instabilities, etc.), they are computationally too expensive for nucleosynthesis studies. However, precise nucleosynthesis predictions are needed to understand the supernova contribution to the heavy elements and the abundances observed in metal-poor stars. We have modeled the core collapse, bounce and subsequent explosion of massive stars assuming spherical symmetry with the code Agile-IDSA (Liebendoerfer et al. 2009) combined with a novel method to artificially trigger the explosion (PUSH). The code also includes the Hempel EOS, which uses a modern non-NSE to cover the entire nucleosynthesis duration. In our simulations, based on the neutrino-delayed explosion mechanism, the explosion sets in by depositing a small amount of additional energy (from mu and tau neutrinos) to revive the stalled shock. Our results show that the code Agile-IDSA combined with PUSH is very robust and can successfully reproduce an explosion with a more reliable treatment of the crucial quantities involved in nucleosynthesis (i.e., the electron fraction). Here, we present a detailed isotopic abundance study for a wide variety of progenitors, as well as an analysis of the explosion properties, such as the explosion energies, remnant masses or compactness of the progenitor models.

  2. Dynamical analysis of innovative core designs facing unprotected transients with the MAT5 DYN code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmet, G.; Massara, S. [EDF R and D, 1 avenue du general de Gaulle, 92140 Clamart (France)

    2012-07-01

    Since 2007, advanced Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) are investigated by CEA, AREVA and EDF in the framework of a joint French collaboration. A prototype called ASTRID, sets out to demonstrate progress made in SFR technology, is due to operate in the years 2020's. The modeling of unprotected transients by computer codes is one of the key safety issues in the design approach to such SFR systems. For that purpose, the activity on CATHARE, which is the reference code for the transient analysis of ASTRID, has been strengthened during last years by CEA. In the meantime, EDF has developed a simplified and multi-channel code, named MAT5 DYN, to analyze and validate innovative core designs facing protected and unprotected transients. First, the paper consists in a description of MAT5 DYN: a code based on the existing code MAT4 DYN including major improvements on geometry description and physical modeling. Second, two core designs based on the CFV core design developed at CEA are presented. Then, the dynamic response of those heterogeneous cores is analyzed during unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) transient and unprotected transient of power (UTOP). The results highlight the importance of the low void core effect specific to the CFV design. Such an effect, when combined with a sufficient primary pump halving time and an optimized cooling group scheme, allows to delay (or, possibly, avoid) the sodium boiling onset during ULOF accidents. (authors)

  3. Design of Gas-phase Synthesis of Core-Shell Particles by Computational Fluid - Aerosol Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesser, B; Pratsinis, S E

    2011-11-01

    Core-shell particles preserve the bulk properties (e.g. magnetic, optical) of the core while its surface is modified by a shell material. Continuous aerosol coating of core TiO2 nanoparticles with nanothin silicon dioxide shells by jet injection of hexamethyldisiloxane precursor vapor downstream of titania particle formation is elucidated by combining computational fluid and aerosol dynamics. The effect of inlet coating vapor concentration and mixing intensity on product shell thickness distribution is presented. Rapid mixing of the core aerosol with the shell precursor vapor facilitates efficient synthesis of hermetically coated core-shell nanoparticles. The predicted extent of hermetic coating shells is compared to the measured photocatalytic oxidation of isopropanol by such particles as hermetic SiO2 shells prevent the photocatalytic activity of titania. Finally the performance of a simpler, plug-flow coating model is assessed by comparisons to the present detailed CFD model in terms of coating efficiency and silica average shell thickness and texture.

  4. Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics using soft-core interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hritz, Jozef; Oostenbrink, Chris

    2008-04-14

    To overcome the problem of insufficient conformational sampling within biomolecular simulations, we have developed a novel Hamiltonian replica exchange molecular dynamics (H-REMD) scheme that uses soft-core interactions between those parts of the system that contribute most to high energy barriers. The advantage of this approach over other H-REMD schemes is the possibility to use a relatively small number of replicas with locally larger differences between the individual Hamiltonians. Because soft-core potentials are almost the same as regular ones at longer distances, most of the interactions between atoms of perturbed parts will only be slightly changed. Rather, the strong repulsion between atoms that are close in space, which in many cases results in high energy barriers, is weakened within higher replicas of our proposed scheme. In addition to the soft-core interactions, we proposed to include multiple replicas using the same Hamiltonian/level of softness. We have tested the new protocol on the GTP and 8-Br-GTP molecules, which are known to have high energy barriers between the anti and syn conformation of the base with respect to the sugar moiety. During two 25 ns MD simulations of both systems the transition from the more stable to the less stable (but still experimentally observed) conformation is not seen at all. Also temperature REMD over 50 replicas for 1 ns did not show any transition at room temperature. On the other hand, more than 20 of such transitions are observed in H-REMD using six replicas (at three different Hamiltonians) during 6.8 ns per replica for GTP and 12 replicas (at six different Hamiltonians) during 8.7 ns per replica for 8-Br-GTP. The large increase in sampling efficiency was obtained from an optimized H-REMD scheme involving soft-core potentials, with multiple simulations using the same level of softness. The optimization of the scheme was performed by fast mimicking [J. Hritz and C. Oostenbrink, J. Chem. Phys. 127, 204104 (2007)].

  5. Modal aerosol dynamics modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitby, E.R.; McMurry, P.H.; Shankar, U.; Binkowski, F.S.

    1991-02-01

    The report presents the governing equations for representing aerosol dynamics, based on several different representations of the aerosol size distribution. Analytical and numerical solution techniques for these governing equations are also reviewed. Described in detail is a computationally efficient numerical technique for simulating aerosol behavior in systems undergoing simultaneous heat transfer, fluid flow, and mass transfer in and between the gas and condensed phases. The technique belongs to a general class of models known as modal aerosol dynamics (MAD) models. These models solve for the temporal and spatial evolution of the particle size distribution function. Computational efficiency is achieved by representing the complete aerosol population as a sum of additive overlapping populations (modes), and solving for the time rate of change of integral moments of each mode. Applications of MAD models for simulating aerosol dynamics in continuous stirred tank aerosol reactors and flow aerosol reactors are provided. For the application to flow aerosol reactors, the discussion is developed in terms of considerations for merging a MAD model with the SIMPLER routine described by Patankar (1980). Considerations for incorporating a MAD model into the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Regional Particulate Model are also described. Numerical and analytical techniques for evaluating the size-space integrals of the modal dynamics equations (MDEs) are described. For multimodal logonormal distributions, an analytical expression for the coagulation integrals of the MDEs, applicable for all size regimes, is derived, and is within 20% of accurate numerical evaluation of the same moment coagulation integrals. A computationally efficient integration technique, based on Gauss-Hermite numerical integration, is also derived.

  6. Modelling sea ice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawski, Jens; Kleine, Eckhard

    2017-04-01

    Sea ice remains one of the frontiers of ocean modelling and is of vital importance for the correct forecasts of the northern oceans. At large scale, it is commonly considered a continuous medium whose dynamics is modelled in terms of continuum mechanics. Its specifics are a matter of constitutive behaviour which may be characterised as rigid-plastic. The new developed sea ice dynamic module bases on general principles and follows a systematic approach to the problem. Both drift field and stress field are modelled by a variational property. Rigidity is treated by Lagrangian relaxation. Thus one is led to a sensible numerical method. Modelling fast ice remains to be a challenge. It is understood that ridging and the formation of grounded ice keels plays a role in the process. The ice dynamic model includes a parameterisation of the stress associated with grounded ice keels. Shear against the grounded bottom contact might lead to plastic deformation and the loss of integrity. The numerical scheme involves a potentially large system of linear equations which is solved by pre-conditioned iteration. The entire algorithm consists of several components which result from decomposing the problem. The algorithm has been implemented and tested in practice.

  7. Dynamic Response of Soft Core Sandwich Beams with Metal-Graphene Nanocomposite Skins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. R. Loja

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich structures are able to provide enhanced strength, stiffness, and lightweight characteristics, thus contributing to an improved overall structural response. To this sandwich configuration one may associate through-thickness graded core material properties and homogeneous or graded properties nanocomposite skins. These tailor-made possibilities may provide alternative design solutions to specific problem requisites. This work aims to address these possibilities, considering to this purpose a package of three beam layerwise models based on different shear deformation theories, implemented through Kriging-based finite elements. The viscoelastic behaviour of the sandwich core is modelled using the complex method and the dynamic problem is solved in the frequency domain. A set of case studies illustrates the performance of the models.

  8. The dynamics of collapsing cores and star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Keto, Eric; Rawlings, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Low-mass stars are generally understood to form by the gravitational collapse of the dense molecular clouds known as starless cores. Continuum observations have not been able to distinguish among the several different hypotheses that describe the collapse because the predicted density distributions are the almost the same, as they are for all spherical self-gravitating clouds. However, the predicted contraction velocities are different enough that the models can be discriminated by comparing the velocities at large and small radii. This can be done by observing at least two different molecular line transitions that are excited at different densities. For example, the spectral lines of the H2O (110 - 101) and C18O (1-0) have critical densities for collisional de-excitation that differ by 5 orders of magnitude. We compare observations of these lines from the contracting starless core L1544 against the spectra predicted for several different hypothetical models of contraction including the Larson-Penston flow, t...

  9. Dynamic wake meandering modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Gunner C.; Aagaard Madsen, H.; Bingoel, F. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    We present a consistent, physically based theory for the wake meandering phenomenon, which we consider of crucial importance for the overall description of wind turbine loadings in wind farms. In its present version the model is confined to single wake situations. The model philosophy does, however, have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture a stochastic model of the downstream wake meandering is formulated. In addition to the kinematic formulation of the dynamics of the 'meandering frame of reference', models characterizing the mean wake deficit as well as the added wake turbulence, described in the meandering frame of reference, are an integrated part the model complex. For design applications, the computational efficiency of wake deficit prediction is a key issue. Two computationally low cost models are developed for this purpose. The character of the added wake turbulence, generated by the up-stream turbine in the form of shed and trailed vorticity, has been approached by analytical as well as by numerical studies. The dynamic wake meandering philosophy has been verified by comparing model predictions with extensive full-scale measurements. These comparisons have demonstrated good agreement, both qualitatively and quantitatively, concerning both flow characteristics and turbine load characteristics. Contrary to previous attempts to model wake loading, the dynamic wake meandering approach opens for a unifying description in the sense that turbine power and load aspects can be treated simultaneously. This capability is a direct and attractive consequence of the model being based on the underlying physical process, and it potentially opens for optimization of wind farm topology, of wind farm operation as

  10. Dynamic wake meandering modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Madsen Aagaard, Helge; Bingöl, Ferhat;

    , are an integrated part the model complex. For design applications, the computational efficiency of wake deficit prediction is a key issue. Two computationally low cost models are developed for this purpose. The character of the added wake turbulence, generated by the up-stream turbine in the form of shed......We present a consistent, physically based theory for the wake meandering phenomenon, which we consider of crucial importance for the overall description of wind turbine loadings in wind farms. In its present version the model is confined to single wake situations. The model philosophy does, however......, have the potential to include also mutual wake interaction phenomenons. The basic conjecture behind the dynamic wake meandering model is that wake transportation in the atmospheric boundary layer is driven by the large scale lateral- and vertical turbulence components. Based on this conjecture...

  11. Modeling earthquake dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Arthur; Durand, Marilou

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we investigate questions arising in Parsons and Geist (Bull Seismol Soc Am 102:1-11, 2012). Pseudo causal models connecting magnitudes and waiting times are considered, through generalized regression. We do use conditional model (magnitude given previous waiting time, and conversely) as an extension to joint distribution model described in Nikoloulopoulos and Karlis (Environmetrics 19: 251-269, 2008). On the one hand, we fit a Pareto distribution for earthquake magnitudes, where the tail index is a function of waiting time following previous earthquake; on the other hand, waiting times are modeled using a Gamma or a Weibull distribution, where parameters are functions of the magnitude of the previous earthquake. We use those two models, alternatively, to generate the dynamics of earthquake occurrence, and to estimate the probability of occurrence of several earthquakes within a year or a decade.

  12. The dynamic interplay between appraisal and core affect in daily life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eKuppens

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Appraisals and core affect are both considered central to the experience of emotion. In this study we examine the bidirectional relationships between these two components of emotional experience by examining how core affect changes following how people appraise events and how appraisals in turn change following how they feel in daily life. In an experience sampling study, participants recorded their core affect and appraisals of ongoing events; data were analyzed using cross-lagged multilevel modeling. Valence-appraisal relationships were found to be characterized by congruency: The same appraisals that were associated with a change in pleasure-displeasure (motivational congruency, other-agency, coping potential, and future expectancy, changed themselves as a function of pleasure-displeasure. In turn, mainly secondary appraisals of who is responsible and how one is able to cope with events were associated with changes in arousal, which itself is followed by changes in the future appraised relevance of events. These results integrate core affect and appraisal approaches to emotion by demonstrating the dynamic interplay of how appraisals are followed by changes in core affect which in turn change our basis for judging future events.

  13. Construction and utilization of linear empirical core models for PWR in-core fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okafor, K.C.

    1988-01-01

    An empirical core-model construction procedure for pressurized water reactor (PWR) in-core fuel management is developed that allows determining the optimal BOC k{sub {infinity}} profiles in PWRs as a single linear-programming problem and thus facilitates the overall optimization process for in-core fuel management due to algorithmic simplification and reduction in computation time. The optimal profile is defined as one that maximizes cycle burnup. The model construction scheme treats the fuel-assembly power fractions, burnup, and leakage as state variables and BOC zone enrichments as control variables. The core model consists of linear correlations between the state and control variables that describe fuel-assembly behavior in time and space. These correlations are obtained through time-dependent two-dimensional core simulations. The core model incorporates the effects of composition changes in all the enrichment control zones on a given fuel assembly and is valid at all times during the cycle for a given range of control variables. No assumption is made on the geometry of the control zones. A scatter-composition distribution, as well as annular, can be considered for model construction. The application of the methodology to a typical PWR core indicates good agreement between the model and exact simulation results.

  14. Signatures of core perturbations in geomagnetic field dynamics - preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bury, Agata; Mizerski, Krzysztof

    2017-04-01

    Earth's magnetic field is continuously evolving in time. Research is carried out in order to understand it's characteristics and also to describe types of perturbations which can exist in the Earth's liquid core. The aim of this work is to analyze the geomagnetic ground observatory data for the occurrence of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves described in literature traveling at the top of the Earth's liquid core. Hourly means data from 150 observatories collected from the World Data Center for Geomagnetism (WDC) were used in this work. Local topocentric magnetic field components: X (East), Y (North), Z (vertical), and also spherical coordinates: Br, Bθ, BΦ were analyzed. Hourly means were averaged to one day means and to one month means, missing values were interpolated by different methods. Fourier analysis and Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) method were applied to extract periods of oscillations visible in datasets. Similar analysis was also made for data generated from the IGRF12 model for comparison. The times associated with peaks within these data were identified for all components and plotted versus colatitude and longitude to find possible travelling perturbations. Possible candidates of MHD waves for future investigation will be presented.

  15. The Deuterium Fraction in Massive Starless Cores and Dynamical Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Shuo; Caselli, Paola; Fontani, Francesco; Pillai, Thushara; Butler, Michael J; Shimajiri, Yoshito; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Sakai, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    We study deuterium fractionation in two massive starless cores C1-N and C1-S in Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) G028.37+00.07, first identified by Tan et al. (2013) with ALMA. Line emission from multiple transitions of $\\rm N_2H^+$ and $\\rm N_2D^+$ were observed with the ALMA, CARMA, SMA, JCMT, NRO 45m and IRAM 30m telescopes. By simultaneously fitting the spectra, we estimate the excitation conditions and deuterium fraction, $D_{\\rm frac}^{\\rm N_2H^+} \\equiv [\\rm N_2D^+]/[N_2H^+]$, with values of $D_{\\rm frac}^{\\rm N_2H^+} \\simeq 0.2$--$0.7$, several orders of magnitude above the cosmic [D]/[H] ratio. Additional observations of o-H$_2$D$^+$ are also presented that help constrain the ortho-to-para ratio of $\\rm H_2$, which is a key quantity affecting the degree of deuteration. We then present chemodynamical modeling of the two cores, exploring especially the implications for the collapse rate relative to free-fall, $\\alpha_{\\rm ff}$. In order to reach the high level of observed deuteration of $\\rm N_2H^+$, we find...

  16. Towards an energy-conserving quasi-hydrostatic deep-atmosphere dynamical core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tort, Marine; Dubos, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Towards an energy-conserving quasi-hydrostatic deep-atmosphere dynamical core Marine Tort1 & Thomas Dubos1 1 Laboratoire Météorologique Dynamique, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, FRANCE Atmosphere dynamics of our planet is quite well described by traditional primitive equations based on the so-called shallow-atmosphere approximation. Thus, the model is dynamically consistent (in the sense that it possesses conservation principles for mass, energy, potential vorticity and angular momentum) when certain metric terms and the cosφ Coriolis terms are neglected (Phillips, 1966). Nevertheless, to simulate planetary atmospheres, the shallow-atmosphere approximation should be relaxed because of the low planet radius (such as Titan) or the depth of their atmospheres (such as Jupiter or Saturne). Non-traditional terms have some dynamical effects (Gerkema and al., 2008) but they are little-known and rarely integrated into general circulation dynamical cores (Wood and Staniforth, 2002). As an example, the french GCM of the Laboratoire Météorologique Dynamique (LMD-Z) integrates the traditional primitive equations discretized from their curl (vector-invariant) form based on a finite different scheme whose conserves exactly potential vorticity (Sadourny, 1975a,b). We considered an orthogonal curvilinear system and we first derived a curl form of global, deep-atmosphere quasi-hydrostatic model in which prognostic variable is absolute axial momentum instead of relative velocity vector. Given the close relationship between the curl form and Hamiltonian formulation of the previous equations, we generalized Sadourny's energy-conserving formulation by discretizing the Poisson bracket and the energy themselves (Salmon, 1983; Gassmann, 2013). The substantial computing infrastructure of the dynamical core is the same but the modification of the hydrostatic balance requires a mass-based vertical coordinate (Wood and Staniforth, 2003). The new discretization has been implemented into

  17. Unlocking the Physiochemical Controls on Organic Carbon Dynamics from the Soil Pore- to Core-Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. P.; Tfaily, M. M.; Bond-Lamberty, B. P.; Todd-Brown, K. E.; Bailey, V. L.

    2015-12-01

    The physical organization of soil includes pore networks of varying size and connectivity. These networks control microbial access to soil organic carbon (C) by spatially separating microorganisms and C by both distance and size exclusion. The extent to which this spatially isolated C is vulnerable to microbial transformation under hydrologically dynamic conditions is unknown, and limits our ability to predict the source and sink capacity of soils. We investigated the effects of shifting hydrologic connectivity and soil structure on greenhouse gas C emissions from surface soils collected from the Disney Wilderness Preserve (Florida, USA). We subjected intact soil cores and re-packed homogenized soil cores to simulated groundwater rise or precipitation, monitoring their CO2 and CH4 emissions over 24 hours. Soil pore water was then extracted from each core using different suctions to sample water retained by pore throats of different sizes and then characterized by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry. Greater respiration rates were observed from homogenized cores compared to intact cores, and from soils wet from below, in which the wetting front is driven by capillary forces, filling fine pores first. This suggests that C located in fine pores may turn over via diffusion processes that lead to the colocation of this C with other resources and microorganisms. Both the complexity and concentration of soluble-C increased with decreasing pore size domains. Pore water extracted from homogenized cores had greater C concentrations than from intact cores, with the greatest concentrations in pore waters sampled from very fine pores, highlighting the importance of soil structure in physically protecting C. These results suggest that the spatial separation of decomposers from C is a key mechanism stabilizing C in these soils. Further research is ongoing to accurately represent this protection mechanism, and the conditions under which it breaks

  18. Structural dynamic modifications via models

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T K Kundra

    2000-06-01

    Structural dynamic modification techniques attempt to reduce dynamic design time and can be implemented beginning with spatial models of structures, dynamic test data or updated models. The models assumed in this discussion are mathematical models, namely mass, stiffness, and damping matrices of the equations of motion of a structure. These models are identified/extracted from dynamic test data viz. frequency response functions (FRFs). Alternatively these models could have been obtained by adjusting or updating the finite element model of the structure in the light of the test data. The methods of structural modification for getting desired dynamic characteristics by using modifiers namely mass, beams and tuned absorbers are discussed.

  19. Analysis of the effect of core structure upon dineutron correlation using antisymmetrized molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, Fumiharu

    2015-01-01

    We extend the method of antisymmetrized molecular dynamics to investigate dineutron correlation. We apply this method to $^{10}$Be as an example and investigate the motion of two neutrons around a largely deformed $^8$Be core by analyzing the two-neutron overlap function around the core. We show that the core structure plays an important role in dineutron formation and expansion from the core and that the present framework is effective for the studies of dineutron correlation.

  20. Eddy viscosity of core flow inferred from comparison between time evolutions of the length-of-day and a core surface flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, M.

    2016-12-01

    Diffusive processes of large scales in the Earth's core are dominated not by the molecular diffusion but by the eddy diffusion. To carry out numerical simulations of realistic geodynamo models, it is important to adopt appropriate parameters. However, the eddy viscous diffusion, or the eddy viscosity, is not a property of the core fluid but of the core flow. Hence it is significant to estimate the eddy viscosity from core flow models. In fact, fluid motion near the Earth's core surface provides useful information on core dynamics, features of the core-mantle boundary (CMB), and core-mantle coupling, for example. Such core fluid motion can be estimated from spatial and temporal distributions of the geomagnetic field. Most of core surface flow models rely on the frozen-flux approximation (Roberts and Scott, 1965), in which the magnetic diffusion is neglected. It should be noted, however, that there exists a viscous boundary layer at the CMB, where the magnetic diffusion may play an important role in secular variations of geomagnetic field. Therefore, a new approach to estimation of core surface flow has been devised by Matsushima (2015). That is, the magnetic diffusion is explicitly incorporated within the viscous boundary layer, while it is neglected below the boundary layer at the CMB which is assumed to be a spherical surface. A core surface flow model between 1840 and 2015 has been derived from a geomagnetic field model, COV-OBS.x1 (Gillet et al., 2015). Temporal variations of core flows contain information on phenomena in relation with core-mantle coupling, such as the LOD (length-of-day), and spin-up/spin-down of core flows. In particular, core surface flows inside the viscous boundary layer at the CMB may reveal an interesting feature in relation with Earth's rotation. We have examined time series of the LOD and vorticity derived from the core surface flow model. We have found a possible correlation between the LOD and the axial component of global vorticity

  1. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the core material influences armour stability, wave run-up and wave overtopping. The main problem related to the scaling of core materials in models is that the hydraulic gradient and the pore velocity are varying in space and time. This makes it impossible to arrive at a fully...... correct scaling. The paper presents an empirical formula for the estimation of the wave induced pressure gradient in the core, based on measurements in models and a prototype. The formula, together with the Forchheimer equation can be used for the estimation of pore velocities in cores. The paper proposes...... that the diameter of the core material in models is chosen in such a way that the Froude scale law holds for a characteristic pore velocity. The characteristic pore velocity is chosen as the average velocity of a most critical area in the core with respect to porous flow. Finally the method is demonstrated...

  2. Dynamics of Hydrophobic Core Phenylalanine Residues Probed by Solid-State Deuteron NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vugmeyster, Liliya; Ostrovsky, Dmitry; Villafranca, Toni; Sharp, Janelle; Xu, Wei; Lipton, Andrew S.; Hoatson, Gina; Vold, Robert L.

    2015-11-03

    We conducted a detailed investigation of the dynamics of two phenylalanine side chains in the hydrophobic core of the villin headpiece subdomain protein (HP36) in the hydrated powder state over the 298–80 K temperature range. We utilized static deuteron NMR measurements of longitudinal relaxation and line shapes supplemented with computational modeling. The temperature dependence of the relaxation times reveals the presence of two main mechanisms that can be attributed to the ring-flips, dominating at high temperatures, and small-angle fluctuations, dominating at low temperatures. The relaxation is non- exponential at all temperatures with the extent of non-exponentiality increasing from higher to lower temperatures. This behavior suggests a distribution of conformers with unique values of activation energies. The central values of the activation energies for the ring-flipping motions are among the smallest reported for aromatic residues in peptides and proteins and point to a very mobile hydrophobic core. The analysis of the widths of the distributions, in combination with the earlier results on the dynamics of flanking methyl groups (Vugmeyster et al., J. Phys. Chem. 2013, 117, 6129–6137), suggests that the hydrophobic core undergoes concerted fluctuations. There is a pronounced effect of dehydration on the ring-flipping motions, which shifts the distribution toward more rigid conformers. The cross-over temperature between the regions of dominance of the small-angle fluctuations and ring-flips shifts from 195 K in the hydrated protein to 278 K in the dry one. This result points to the role of solvent in the onset of the concerted fluctuations of the core and highlights aromatic residues as markers of the protein dynamical transitions.

  3. Construction of linear empirical core models for pressurized water reactor in-core fuel management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okafor, K.C.; Aldemir, T. (The Ohio State Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering Program, 206 West 18th Ave., Columbus, OH (US))

    1988-06-01

    An empirical core model construction procedure for pressurized water reactor (PWR) in-core fuel management problems is presented that (a) incorporates the effect of composition changes in all the control zones in the core of a given fuel assembly, (b) is valid at all times during the cycle for a given range of control variables, (c) allows determining the optimal beginning of cycle (BOC) kappainfinity distribution as a single linear programming problem,and (d) provides flexibility in the choice of the material zones to describe core composition. Although the modeling procedure assumes zero BOC burnup, the predicted optimal kappainfinity profiles are also applicable to reload cores. In model construction, assembly power fractions and burnup increments during the cycle are regarded as the state (i.e., dependent) variables. Zone enrichments are the control (i.e., independent) variables. The model construction procedure is validated and implemented for the initial core of a PWR to determine the optimal BOC kappainfinity profiles for two three-zone scatter loading schemes. The predicted BOC kappainfinity profiles agree with the results of other investigators obtained by different modeling techniques.

  4. Comparing models of Red Knot population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Conor

    2015-01-01

    Predictive population modeling contributes to our basic scientific understanding of population dynamics, but can also inform management decisions by evaluating alternative actions in virtual environments. Quantitative models mathematically reflect scientific hypotheses about how a system functions. In Delaware Bay, mid-Atlantic Coast, USA, to more effectively manage horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) harvests and protect Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) populations, models are used to compare harvest actions and predict the impacts on crab and knot populations. Management has been chiefly driven by the core hypothesis that horseshoe crab egg abundance governs the survival and reproduction of migrating Red Knots that stopover in the Bay during spring migration. However, recently, hypotheses proposing that knot dynamics are governed by cyclical lemming dynamics garnered some support in data analyses. In this paper, I present alternative models of Red Knot population dynamics to reflect alternative hypotheses. Using 2 models with different lemming population cycle lengths and 2 models with different horseshoe crab effects, I project the knot population into the future under environmental stochasticity and parametric uncertainty with each model. I then compare each model's predictions to 10 yr of population monitoring from Delaware Bay. Using Bayes' theorem and model weight updating, models can accrue weight or support for one or another hypothesis of population dynamics. With 4 models of Red Knot population dynamics and only 10 yr of data, no hypothesis clearly predicted population count data better than another. The collapsed lemming cycle model performed best, accruing ~35% of the model weight, followed closely by the horseshoe crab egg abundance model, which accrued ~30% of the weight. The models that predicted no decline or stable populations (i.e. the 4-yr lemming cycle model and the weak horseshoe crab effect model) were the most weakly supported.

  5. Toward a Standard Model of Core Collapse Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Mezzacappa, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss the current status of core collapse supernova models and the future developments needed to achieve significant advances in understanding the supernova mechanism and supernova phenomenology, i.e., in developing a supernova standard model.

  6. A Petascale Non-Hydrostatic Atmospheric Dynamical Core in the HOMME Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tufo, Henry [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The High-Order Method Modeling Environment (HOMME) is a framework for building scalable, conserva- tive atmospheric models for climate simulation and general atmospheric-modeling applications. Its spatial discretizations are based on Spectral-Element (SE) and Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) methods. These are local methods employing high-order accurate spectral basis-functions that have been shown to perform well on massively parallel supercomputers at any resolution and scale particularly well at high resolutions. HOMME provides the framework upon which the CAM-SE community atmosphere model dynamical-core is constructed. In its current incarnation, CAM-SE employs the hydrostatic primitive-equations (PE) of motion, which limits its resolution to simulations coarser than 0.1 per grid cell. The primary objective of this project is to remove this resolution limitation by providing HOMME with the capabilities needed to build nonhydrostatic models that solve the compressible Euler/Navier-Stokes equations.

  7. Probing photoluminescence dynamics of colloidal CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Gurvir; Tripathi, S.K., E-mail: surya@pu.ac.in

    2014-11-15

    The paper presents the synthesis of thiol capped CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanoparticles with CdSe core and ZnS shell. The thickness of the ZnS shell has been controlled by the regulating the amount of Zn/S precursors for reaction. The steady and transient photoluminescence properties substantiate the growth of ZnS shell over the CdSe cores. High resolution transmission electron microscope and the X-ray diffraction patterns reveal nanocrystalline particles of an average size 3.4 nm packed in wurtzite lattice. Photoluminescence excitation spectra as well as the excitation–emission matrix of CdSe and CdSe/ZnS evidence the growth of ZnS for Type I hetero-junction without interfering the energy states of core. By this method, ZnS layer of 8.84 Å is optimum for fluorescence enhancement of the core/shell quantum dots. The multiexponential fluorescence decay of the quantum dots represents independent radiative recombinations with overlapped energies. It is revealed that the average fluorescence lifetimes of quantum dots decreased with increase in ZnS shell, which is due to the enhanced contribution from initially populated excitonic recombination and the reduction in the surface trap states with shell growth. - Highlights: • Synthesis of MAA capped CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs with different shell thicknesses. • Shell thickness has been controlled by the amount of shell precursors added. • ZnS shell significantly enhanced the fluorescence quantum yield of QDs. • Superposition of quantum confinement energy model employed for shell thickness. • Probed the fluorescence dynamics of QDs by time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy.

  8. Comparing different dynamic stall models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holierhoek, J.G. [Unit Wind Energy, Energy research Centre of the Netherlands, ZG, Petten (Netherlands); De Vaal, J.B.; Van Zuijlen, A.H.; Bijl, H. [Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-07-16

    The dynamic stall phenomenon and its importance for load calculations and aeroelastic simulations is well known. Different models exist to model the effect of dynamic stall; however, a systematic comparison is still lacking. To investigate if one is performing better than another, three models are used to simulate the Ohio State University measurements and a set of data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames experimental study of dynamic stall and compare results. These measurements were at conditions and for aerofoils that are typical for wind turbines, and the results are publicly available. The three selected dynamic stall models are the ONERA model, the Beddoes-Leishman model and the Snel model. The simulations show that there are still significant differences between measurements and models and that none of the models is significantly better in all cases than the other models. Especially in the deep stall regime, the accuracy of each of the dynamic stall models is limited.

  9. Dynamic Linear Models with R

    CERN Document Server

    Campagnoli, Patrizia; Petris, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    State space models have gained tremendous popularity in as disparate fields as engineering, economics, genetics and ecology. Introducing general state space models, this book focuses on dynamic linear models, emphasizing their Bayesian analysis. It illustrates the fundamental steps needed to use dynamic linear models in practice, using R package.

  10. Modification of Core Model for KNTC 2 Simulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.K.; Lee, J.G.; Park, J.E.; Bae, S.N.; Chin, H.C. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    KNTC 2 simulator was developed in 1986 referencing YGN 1. Since the YGN 1 has changed its fuel cycle to long term cycle(cycle 9), the data such as rod worth, boron worth, moderator temperature coefficient, and etc. of the simulator and those of the YGN 1 became different. To incorporate these changes into the simulator and make the simulator more close to the reference plant, core model upgrade became a necessity. During this research, core data for the simulator was newly generated using APA of the WH. And to make it easy tuning and verification of the key characteristics of the reactor model, PC-Based tool was also developed. And to facilitate later core model upgrade, two procedures-`the Procedures for core characteristic generation` and `the Procedures for core characteristic modification`-were also developed. (author). 16 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robida, François; Wächter, Joachim; Tulstrup, Jørgen; Lorenz, Henning; Carter, Mary; Cipolloni, Carlo; Morel, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Geological data and models are important assets for the EPOS community. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS is being designed and will be implemented in an efficient and sustainable access system for geological multi-scale data assets for EPOS through the integration of distributed infrastructure components (nodes) of geological surveys, research institutes and the international drilling community (ICDP/IODP). The TCS will develop and take benefit of the synergy between the existing data infrastructures of the Geological Surveys of Europe (EuroGeoSurveys / OneGeology-Europe / EGDI) and of the large amount of information produced by the research organisations. These nodes will offer a broad range of resources including: geological maps, borehole data, geophysical data (seismic data, borehole log data), archived information on physical material (samples, cores), geochemical and other analyses of rocks, soils and minerals, and Geological models (3D, 4D). The services will be implemented on international standards (such as INSPIRE, IUGS/CGI, OGC, W3C, ISO) in order to guarantee their interoperability with other EPOS TCS as well as their compliance with INSPIRE European Directive or international initiatives (such as OneGeology). This will provide future virtual research environments with means to facilitate the use of existing information for future applications. In addition, workflows will be established that allow the integration of other existing and new data and applications. Processing and the use of simulation and visualization tools will subsequently support the integrated analysis and characterization of complex subsurface structures and their inherent dynamic processes. This will in turn aid in the overall understanding of complex multi-scale geo-scientific questions. This TCS will work alongside other EPOS TCSs to create an efficient and comprehensive multidisciplinary research platform for the Earth Sciences in Europe.

  12. Scaling of Core Material in Rubble Mound Breakwater Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, H. F.; Liu, Z.; Troch, P.

    1999-01-01

    correct scaling. The paper presents an empirical formula for the estimation of the wave induced pressure gradient in the core, based on measurements in models and a prototype. The formula, together with the Forchheimer equation can be used for the estimation of pore velocities in cores. The paper proposes...

  13. Plumes and Earth's Dynamic History : from Core to Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtillot, V. E.

    2002-12-01

    the order of 10 Ma or less, often resulting in continental breakup; the bulk of the volume actually erupted in 1 Ma or less. This makes LIPs the remnants of major geodynamic events, with fluxes possibly matching, over short time scales, the crustal production of mid-ocean ridges. The correlation between trap ages, extinctions and oceanic anoxia events proposed over a decade ago has improved steadily, to the point that trap ages may form much of the underlying structure of the geological time scale. The five largest mass extinctions in the last 260 Ma coincide with five traps, making a causal connection between the two unavoidable. The plume hypothesis provides a useful and exciting complement to the now conventional plate tectonics paradigm, and can provide a unified underlying mechanism to explain the few, key times when Earth's dynamics behaved in a rather catastrophic way, of which our current world bears the memory. Plumes may express couplings between the Earth's very different envelopes. They are a singular mode in which the Earth's engine liberates its heat when normal plate tectonics do not suffice. They may modulate the intensity of many global phenomena, from reversal frequency generated in the liquid core to major continental breakup and finally to mass extinctions. The remarkably rich, diverse and exciting geophysical disciplines of geomagnetism and paleomagnetism, which are the lecturer's main practical tools, have provided many of the key observations that have led to this view.

  14. Three-dimensional simulations of stellar core collapse in full general relativity: Nonaxisymmetric dynamical instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Shibata, M; Shibata, Masaru; Sekiguchi, Yu-ichirou

    2005-01-01

    We perform fully general relativistic simulations of rotating stellar core collapse in three spatial dimension. A parametric equation of state is adopted following Dimmelmeier et al. The early stage of the collapse is followed by an axisymmetric code. When the stellar core becomes compact enough, we start a 3-dimensional simulation adding a bar-mode nonaxisymmetric density perturbation. In the axisymmetric simulations, it is clarified that the maximum value of $\\beta \\equiv T/W$ achieved during the stellar collapse and depends sensitively on the velocity profile and total mass of the initial core, and equations of state. It is also found that for all the models with high degree of differential rotation, a funnel structure is formed around the rotational axis after the formation of neutron stars. For selected models in which the maximum value of $\\beta$ is larger than $\\sim 0.27$, 3-dimensional simulations are performed. It is found that the bar-mode dynamical instability sets in for the case that the followin...

  15. Dynamical Widom-Rowlinson Model and Its Mesoscopic Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelshtein, Dmitri; Kondratiev, Yuri; Kutoviy, Oleksandr; Oliveira, Maria João

    2015-01-01

    We consider the non-equilibrium dynamics for the Widom-Rowlinson model (without hard-core) in the continuum. The Lebowitz-Penrose-type scaling of the dynamics is studied and the system of the corresponding kinetic equations is derived. In the space-homogeneous case, the equilibrium points of this system are described. Their structure corresponds to the dynamical phase transition in the model. The bifurcation of the system is shown.

  16. Extension of the AMBER molecular dynamics software to Intel's Many Integrated Core (MIC) architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Perri J.; Bhuiyan, Ashraf; Walker, Ross C.

    2016-04-01

    We present an implementation of explicit solvent particle mesh Ewald (PME) classical molecular dynamics (MD) within the PMEMD molecular dynamics engine, that forms part of the AMBER v14 MD software package, that makes use of Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors by offloading portions of the PME direct summation and neighbor list build to the coprocessor. We refer to this implementation as pmemd MIC offload and in this paper present the technical details of the algorithm, including basic models for MPI and OpenMP configuration, and analyze the resultant performance. The algorithm provides the best performance improvement for large systems (>400,000 atoms), achieving a ∼35% performance improvement for satellite tobacco mosaic virus (1,067,095 atoms) when 2 Intel E5-2697 v2 processors (2 ×12 cores, 30M cache, 2.7 GHz) are coupled to an Intel Xeon Phi coprocessor (Model 7120P-1.238/1.333 GHz, 61 cores). The implementation utilizes a two-fold decomposition strategy: spatial decomposition using an MPI library and thread-based decomposition using OpenMP. We also present compiler optimization settings that improve the performance on Intel Xeon processors, while retaining simulation accuracy.

  17. Modelling dynamic roughness during floods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paarlberg, Andries; Dohmen-Janssen, Catarine M.; Hulscher, Suzanne J.M.H.; Termes, A.P.P.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present a dynamic roughness model to predict water levels during floods. Hysteresis effects of dune development are explicitly included. It is shown that differences between the new dynamic roughness model, and models where the roughness coefficient is calibrated, are most

  18. Dynamic causal modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friston, K J; Harrison, L; Penny, W

    2003-08-01

    In this paper we present an approach to the identification of nonlinear input-state-output systems. By using a bilinear approximation to the dynamics of interactions among states, the parameters of the implicit causal model reduce to three sets. These comprise (1) parameters that mediate the influence of extrinsic inputs on the states, (2) parameters that mediate intrinsic coupling among the states, and (3) [bilinear] parameters that allow the inputs to modulate that coupling. Identification proceeds in a Bayesian framework given known, deterministic inputs and the observed responses of the system. We developed this approach for the analysis of effective connectivity using experimentally designed inputs and fMRI responses. In this context, the coupling parameters correspond to effective connectivity and the bilinear parameters reflect the changes in connectivity induced by inputs. The ensuing framework allows one to characterise fMRI experiments, conceptually, as an experimental manipulation of integration among brain regions (by contextual or trial-free inputs, like time or attentional set) that is revealed using evoked responses (to perturbations or trial-bound inputs, like stimuli). As with previous analyses of effective connectivity, the focus is on experimentally induced changes in coupling (cf., psychophysiologic interactions). However, unlike previous approaches in neuroimaging, the causal model ascribes responses to designed deterministic inputs, as opposed to treating inputs as unknown and stochastic.

  19. Computer simulation of hard-core models for liquid crystals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, D.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented of computer simulations of liquid crystal systems. It will be shown that the shape of hard-core particles is of crucial importance for the stability of the phases. Both static and dynamic properties of the systems are obtained by means of computer simulation.

  20. Solid charged-core model of ball lightning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. B. Muldrew

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, ball lightning (BL is assumed to have a solid, positively-charged core. According to this underlying assumption, the core is surrounded by a thin electron layer with a charge nearly equal in magnitude to that of the core. A vacuum exists between the core and the electron layer containing an intense electromagnetic (EM field which is reflected and guided by the electron layer. The microwave EM field applies a ponderomotive force (radiation pressure to the electrons preventing them from falling into the core. The energetic electrons ionize the air next to the electron layer forming a neutral plasma layer. The electric-field distributions and their associated frequencies in the ball are determined by applying boundary conditions to a differential equation given by Stratton (1941. It is then shown that the electron and plasma layers are sufficiently thick and dense to completely trap and guide the EM field. This model of BL is exceptional in that it can explain all or nearly all of the peculiar characteristics of BL. The ES energy associated with the core charge can be extremely large which can explain the observations that occasionally BL contains enormous energy. The mass of the core prevents the BL from rising like a helium-filled balloon – a problem with most plasma and burning-gas models. The positively charged core keeps the negatively charged electron layer from diffusing away, i.e. it holds the ball together; other models do not have a mechanism to do this. The high electrical charges on the core and in the electron layer explains why some people have been electrocuted by BL. Experiments indicate that BL radiates microwaves upon exploding and this is consistent with the model. The fact that this novel model of BL can explain these and other observations is strong evidence that the model should be taken seriously.

  1. Modelling the core magnetic field of the earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, C. G. A.; Carle, H. M.

    1982-01-01

    It is suggested that radial off-center dipoles located within the core of the earth be used instead of spherical harmonics of the magnetic potential in modeling the core magnetic field. The off-center dipoles, in addition to more realistically modeling the physical current systems within the core, are if located deep within the core more effective at removing long wavelength signals of either potential or field. Their disadvantage is that their positions and strengths are more difficult to compute, and such effects as upward and downward continuation are more difficult to manipulate. It is nevertheless agreed with Cox (1975) and Alldredge and Hurwitz (1964) that physical realism in models is more important than mathematical convenience. A radial dipole model is presented which agrees with observations of secular variation and excursions.

  2. Relationship between Core Stability Muscle Endurance and Static and Dynamic Balance in Basketball Players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farzaneh saki

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Balancing is the most basic function of the neuromuscular system in performing all simple and complex activities that contribute to health-related physical fitness. Core stability may be a contributing factor to static and dynamic balance. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between core stability muscle endurance and static and dynamic balance in basketball players. Methods: 100 basketball players (50 female and 50 male players were selected randomly based on the including criteria.To evaluate core stability muscle strength, a set of tests from core stability exercises was used. Static and dynamic balance were evaluated by Bass Stick and Y balance test respectively. Normality of the data was evaluated using the Kolmogorov Smirnoff test. Data analysis was performed by Spearman product moment coefficient test and independent samples t test. Significant level of p&le0/05 was used in all statistical analyses. Results: Results of t-test showed no significant difference between static balance in boys and girls, while significant differences were observed between dynamic balance and core stability in males and females. In other words, core stability and dynamic balance in boys were more than girls. Also, the results of correlation analysis showed a significant relationship between core stability and dynamic balance (p=0.00 However, no significant relationship was observed between core stability and static balance (p=0.451. Conclusion: Due to the correlation between muscle endurance and dynamic balance in the present study, it can be implied that core stability exercises can improve balance.

  3. Core formation, evolution, and convection - A geophysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of the earth's core, which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo, is proposed. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al-26. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long-lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  4. Core formation, evolution, and convection: A geophysical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Anderson, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    A model is proposed for the formation and evolution of the Earth's core which provides an adequate energy source for maintaining the geodynamo. A modified inhomogeneous accretion model is proposed which leads to initial iron and refractory enrichment at the center of the planet. The probable heat source for melting of the core is the decay of Al. The refractory material is emplaced irregularly in the lowermost mantle with uranium and thorium serving as a long lived heat source. Fluid motions in the core are driven by the differential heating from above and the resulting cyclonic motions may be the source of the geodynamo.

  5. Relationship between Core Stability Muscle Endurance and Static and Dynamic Balance in Basketball Players

    OpenAIRE

    farzaneh saki; masumeh Baghban

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Balancing is the most basic function of the neuromuscular system in performing all simple and complex activities that contribute to health-related physical fitness. Core stability may be a contributing factor to static and dynamic balance. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between core stability muscle endurance and static and dynamic balance in basketball players. Methods: 100 basketball players (50 female and 50 male players) were selected randomly bas...

  6. An Otto Engine Dynamic Model

    OpenAIRE

    Florian Ion Tiberiu Petrescu; Relly Victoria Virgil Petrescu

    2016-01-01

    Otto engine dynamics are similar in almost all common internal combustion engines. We can speak so about dynamics of engines: Lenoir, Otto, and Diesel. The dynamic presented model is simple and original. The first thing necessary in the calculation of Otto engine dynamics, is to determine the inertial mass reduced at the piston. One uses then the Lagrange equation. Kinetic energy conservation shows angular speed variation (from the shaft) with inertial masses. One uses and elastic constant of...

  7. The Dynamics of Dense Cores in the Perseus Molecular Cloud II: The Relationship Between Dense Cores and the Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Kirk, Helen; Johnstone, Doug; Goodman, Alyssa

    2010-01-01

    We utilize the extensive datasets available for the Perseus molecular cloud to analyze the relationship between the kinematics of small-scale dense cores and the larger structures in which they are embedded. The kinematic measures presented here can be used in conjunction with those discussed in our previous work as strong observational constraints that numerical simulations (or analytic models) of star formation should match. We find that dense cores have small motions with respect to the 13CO gas, about one third of the 13CO velocity dispersion along the same line of sight. Within each extinction region, the core-to-core velocity dispersion is about half of the total (13CO) velocity dispersion seen in the region. Large-scale velocity gradients account for roughly half of the total velocity dispersion in each region, similar to what is predicted from large-scale turbulent modes following a power spectrum of P(k) ~ k^{-4}.

  8. Towards an efficient multiphysics model for nuclear reactor dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obaidurrahman K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Availability of fast computer resources nowadays has facilitated more in-depth modeling of complex engineering systems which involve strong multiphysics interactions. This multiphysics modeling is an important necessity in nuclear reactor safety studies where efforts are being made worldwide to combine the knowledge from all associated disciplines at one place to accomplish the most realistic simulation of involved phenomenon. On these lines coupled modeling of nuclear reactor neutron kinetics, fuel heat transfer and coolant transport is a regular practice nowadays for transient analysis of reactor core. However optimization between modeling accuracy and computational economy has always been a challenging task to ensure the adequate degree of reliability in such extensive numerical exercises. Complex reactor core modeling involves estimation of evolving 3-D core thermal state, which in turn demands an expensive multichannel based detailed core thermal hydraulics model. A novel approach of power weighted coupling between core neutronics and thermal hydraulics presented in this work aims to reduce the bulk of core thermal calculations in core dynamics modeling to a significant extent without compromising accuracy of computation. Coupled core model has been validated against a series of international benchmarks. Accuracy and computational efficiency of the proposed multiphysics model has been demonstrated by analyzing a reactivity initiated transient.

  9. Geomagnetic core field models in the satellite era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesur, Vincent; Olsen, Nils; Thomson, Alan W. P.

    2011-01-01

    After a brief review of the theoretical basis and difficulties that modelers are facing, we present three recent models of the geomagnetic field originating in the Earth’s core. All three modeling approaches are using recent observatory and near-Earth orbiting survey satellite data. In each case...... the specific aims and techniques used by the modelers are described together with a presentation of the main results achieved. The three different modeling approaches are giving similar results. For a snap shot of the core magnetic field at a given epoch and observed at the Earth’s surface, the differences...... only up to degree 8 or 9. For higher time derivatives of core field models, only the very first degrees are robustly derived....

  10. Non-linear Dynamic Analysis of Steel Hollow I-core Sandwich Panel under Air Blast Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Vatani Oskouei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the non-linear dynamic response of novel steel sandwich panel with hollow I-core subjected to blast loading was studied. Special emphasis is placed on the evaluation of midpoint displacements and energy dissipation of the models. Several parameters such as boundary conditions, strain rate, mesh dependency and asymmetrical loading are considered in this study. The material and geometric non-linearities are also considered in the numerical simulation. The results obtained are compared with available experimental data to verify the developed FE model. Modeling techniques are described in detail. According to the results, sandwich panels with hollow I-core allowed more plastic deformation and energy dissipation and less midpoint displacement than conventional I-core sandwich panels and also equivalent solid plate with the same weight and material.

  11. Measurement of noise associated with model transformer cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snell, David [Cogent Power Ltd., Development and Market Research, Orb Electrical Steels, Corporation Road, Newport, South Wales NP19 OXT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: Dave.snell@cogent-power.com

    2008-10-15

    The performance of a transformer core may be considered in terms of power loss and by the noise generated by the core, both of which should be minimised. This paper discusses the setting up of a suitable system for evaluation of noise in a large model transformer core (500 kV A) and issues associated with noise measurement. The equivalent continuous sound pressure level (LAeq) was used as a measure of the A-weighted sound level and measurements were made in the range 16 Hz-25 kHz for various step lap core configurations. The selection of optimum sound insulation materials between core and ground support and for enclosing the transformer is essential for minimisation of background noise. Core clamping pressure must be optimised in order to minimise noise. The use of two laminations per layer instead of one leads to an increase in noise arising from the core. Provided care is taken in building the core, good reproducibility of results can be obtained for analysis.

  12. Multi-core and/or symbolic model checking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, van Tom; Laarman, Alfons; Pol, van de Jaco; Luettgen, G.; Merz, S.

    2012-01-01

    We review our progress in high-performance model checking. Our multi-core model checker is based on a scalable hash-table design and parallel random-walk traversal. Our symbolic model checker is based on Multiway Decision Diagrams and the saturation strategy. The LTSmin tool is based on the PINS arc

  13. Update to Core reporting practices in structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, James B

    2016-07-21

    This paper is a technical update to "Core Reporting Practices in Structural Equation Modeling."(1) As such, the content covered in this paper includes, sample size, missing data, specification and identification of models, estimation method choices, fit and residual concerns, nested, alternative, and equivalent models, and unique issues within the SEM family of techniques.

  14. Summary of multi-core hardware and programming model investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Suzanne Marie; Pedretti, Kevin Thomas Tauke; Levenhagen, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    This report summarizes our investigations into multi-core processors and programming models for parallel scientific applications. The motivation for this study was to better understand the landscape of multi-core hardware, future trends, and the implications on system software for capability supercomputers. The results of this study are being used as input into the design of a new open-source light-weight kernel operating system being targeted at future capability supercomputers made up of multi-core processors. A goal of this effort is to create an agile system that is able to adapt to and efficiently support whatever multi-core hardware and programming models gain acceptance by the community.

  15. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  16. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  17. Modelling line emission of deuterated H3+ from prestellar cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipilä, O.; Hugo, E.; Harju, J.; Asvany, O.; Juvela, M.; Schlemmer, S.

    2010-01-01

    Context. The depletion of heavy elements in cold cores of interstellar molecular clouds can lead to a situation where deuterated forms of H3+ are the most useful spectroscopic probes of the physical conditions. Aims: The aim is to predict the observability of the rotational lines of H2D+ and D2H+ from prestellar cores. Methods: Recently derived rate coefficients for the H3+ + H2 isotopic system were applied to the “complete depletion” reaction scheme to calculate abundance profiles in hydrostatic core models. The ground-state lines of H2D+(o) (372 GHz) and D2H+(p) (692 GHz) arising from these cores were simulated. The excitation of the rotational levels of these molecules was approximated by using the state-to-state coefficients for collisions with H2. We also predicted line profiles from cores with a power-law density distribution advocated in some previous studies. Results: The new rate coefficients introduce some changes to the complete depletion model, but do not alter the general tendencies. One of the modifications with respect to the previous results is the increase of the D3+ abundance at the cost of other isotopologues. Furthermore, the present model predicts a lower H2D+ (o/p) ratio, and a slightly higher D2H+ (p/o) ratio in very cold, dense cores, as compared with previous modelling results. These nuclear spin ratios affect the detectability of the submm lines of H2D+(o) and D2H+(p). The previously detected H2D+ and D2H+ lines towards the core I16293E, and the H2D+ line observed towards Oph D can be reproduced using the present excitation model and the physical models suggested in the original papers.

  18. Geomagnetic core field models in the satellite era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lesur, Vincent; Olsen, Nils; Thomson, Alan W. P.

    2011-01-01

    After a brief review of the theoretical basis and difficulties that modelers are facing, we present three recent models of the geomagnetic field originating in the Earth’s core. All three modeling approaches are using recent observatory and near-Earth orbiting survey satellite data. In each case ...... only up to degree 8 or 9. For higher time derivatives of core field models, only the very first degrees are robustly derived.......After a brief review of the theoretical basis and difficulties that modelers are facing, we present three recent models of the geomagnetic field originating in the Earth’s core. All three modeling approaches are using recent observatory and near-Earth orbiting survey satellite data. In each case...... the specific aims and techniques used by the modelers are described together with a presentation of the main results achieved. The three different modeling approaches are giving similar results. For a snap shot of the core magnetic field at a given epoch and observed at the Earth’s surface, the differences...

  19. Computer Modelling of Dynamic Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Rybakin

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of numerical modeling of dynamic problems are summed in the article up. These problems are characteristic for various areas of human activity, in particular for problem solving in ecology. The following problems are considered in the present work: computer modeling of dynamic effects on elastic-plastic bodies, calculation and determination of performances of gas streams in gas cleaning equipment, modeling of biogas formation processes.

  20. Dynamic Scheduling Model of XEN Virtual Machine in Multi-core System%多核平台下XEN虚拟机动态调度算法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄漾

    2014-01-01

    The virtual machine scheduling algorithm doesn’t fully consider the execution efficiency of parallel applica-tion.Modern processors have multiple available computing core,so that concurrent execution of multiple virtual machines become a reality.In this paper,a parallel multicore platform virtual machine scheduling problems,Presents a task-based Virtual Machine CON-Credit scheduling algorithm.The algorithm in the scheduling of parallel tasks,Dynamically allocated using a computer core,using the traditional virtual machine scheduling algorithm to perform common tasks allocated virtual machines;Using custom synchronization algorithm to perform parallel tasks assigned virtual machine.Related experiments show,CON-Credit scheduling algorithm can significantly improve the efficiency of the parallel task execution.%虚拟机调度算法对并行任务的执行效率考虑不够充分。现代处理器平台具备了多个可用的计算核心,使多个虚拟机并发执行成为了现实。针对多核平台下的并行虚拟机调度优化问题,提出一种基于任务特征虚拟机CON-Credit调度算法。该算法在调度并行任务时,使用动态方式对计算机核心进行分配,采用传统的虚拟机调度算法为执行普通任务的虚拟机进行分配;采用定制的同步算法给执行并行任务的虚拟机分进分配。相关实验显示,CON-Credit调度算法能显著提高并行任务的执行效率。

  1. Core dissolution and the dynamics of massive stars in young stellar clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnell, I A

    2003-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical effects of rapid gas expulsion from the core of a young stellar cluster. The aims of this study are to determine 1) whether a mass-segregated core survives the gas expulsion and 2) the probable location of any massive stars that have escaped from the core. Feedback from massive stars is expected to remove the gas from the core of the cluster first, as that is where most massive stars are located. We find that gas expulsion has little effect on the core for a core star formation efficiency, of greater than 50%. For lower values of star formation efficiency down to 20%, a reduced core survives containing the majority of the massive stars while some of them are dispersed into the rest of the cluster. In fact we find that ejected stars migrate from radial to tangential orbits due to stellar encounters once they leave the core. Thus, the location of massive stars outside of the core does not exclude their forming in the dense cluster core. Few massive stars are expected to remain in th...

  2. Modeling of Core Competencies in the Registrar's Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikowsky, Reta

    2009-01-01

    The Office of the Registrar at the Georgia Institute of Technology, in cooperation with the Office of Human Resources, has been engaged since February 2008 in a pilot project to model core competencies for the leadership team and the staff. It is the hope of the office of Human resources that this pilot will result in a model that can be used…

  3. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of core bypass flow and crossflow in a prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor based on a two-layer block model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huhu, E-mail: huhuwang@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Dominguez-Ontiveros, Elvis, E-mail: elvisdom@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Hassan, Yassin A., E-mail: y-hassan@tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, 3133 TAMU, College Station, TX 77840 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A and M University, 3123 TAMU, College Station, TX 77840 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • A CFD model was built based on a two-layer block experimental facility at Texas A and M University. • The coolant characterizations within the uniform and wedge-shaped crossflow gap regions were investigated. • The influence on the coolant distribution from the bypass flow gap width was studied. • Discretization and iterative errors involved in the simulations were quantified. - Abstract: The very high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (VHTR) has been designated as one of the promising reactors that will serve for the Next Generation (Generation IV) Nuclear Plant. For a prismatic VHTR core, the bypass flow and crossflow phenomena are important design considerations. To investigate the coolant distribution in the reactor core based on the two-layer block facility built at Texas A and M University, a three-dimensional steady-state CFD analysis was performed using the commercial code STAR-CCM+ v6.04. Results from this work serve as a guideline and validating source for the related experiments. A grid independence study was conducted to quantify related errors in the simulations. The simulation results show that the bypass flow fraction was not a strong function of the Reynolds number. The presence of the crossflow gap had a significant effect on the distribution of the coolant in the core. Uniform and wedge-shape crossflow gaps were studied. It was found that a significant secondary flow in the crossflow gap region moved from the bypass flow gap toward coolant holes, which resulted in up to a 28% reduction of the coolant mass flow rate in the bypass flow gap.

  4. Launch Vehicle Dynamics Demonstrator Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1963-01-01

    Launch Vehicle Dynamics Demonstrator Model. The effect of vibration on launch vehicle dynamics was studied. Conditions included three modes of instability. The film includes close up views of the simulator fuel tank with and without stability control. [Entire movie available on DVD from CASI as Doc ID 20070030984. Contact help@sti.nasa.gov

  5. Crystallization in Micellar Cores: confinement effects and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Reidar; Zinn, Thomas; Willner, Lutz; Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo Team; Forschungszentrum Jülich Collaboration

    It is well known that liquids confined to small nanoscopic pores and droplets exhibit thermal behavior very different from bulk samples. Here we demonstrate that n-alkanes forming 2-3 nm small micellar cores are considerably affected by confinement in analogue with hard confined systems. We study micelles form by self-assembly of a series of well-defined n-Alkyl-PEO polymers in aqueous solutions. By using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), densiometry and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), we show that n-alkane exhibit a first-order phase transition i.e. melting. Correlating the structural and thermodynamic data, we find that a melting depression can be accurately described by the Gibbs-Thomson equation. ∖f1 The effect of core crystallinity on the molecular exchange kinetics is investigated using time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering (TR-SANS). We show that there are considerable entropic and enthalpic contributions from the chain packing that affect the kinetic stability of micelles. ∖pard

  6. Generative models of conformational dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmead, Christopher James

    2014-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of the conformational dynamics of proteins can be performed using either Molecular Dynamics or Monte Carlo procedures. The ensembles of three-dimensional structures produced during simulation can be analyzed in a number of ways to elucidate the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of the system. The goal of this chapter is to review both traditional and emerging methods for learning generative models from atomistic simulation data. Here, the term 'generative' refers to a model of the joint probability distribution over the behaviors of the constituent atoms. In the context of molecular modeling, generative models reveal the correlation structure between the atoms, and may be used to predict how the system will respond to structural perturbations. We begin by discussing traditional methods, which produce multivariate Gaussian models. We then discuss GAMELAN (GRAPHICAL MODELS OF ENERGY LANDSCAPES), which produces generative models of complex, non-Gaussian conformational dynamics (e.g., allostery, binding, folding, etc.) from long timescale simulation data.

  7. Fractal Models of Earthquake Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Pathikrit; Kamal,; Samanta, Debashis

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of earthquakes is based on the theory of plate tectonics. Earthquake dynamics is the study of the interactions of plates (solid disjoint parts of the lithosphere) which produce seismic activity. Over the last about fifty years many models have come up which try to simulate seismic activity by mimicking plate plate interactions. The validity of a given model is subject to the compliance of the synthetic seismic activity it produces to the well known empirical laws which describe the statistical features of observed seismic activity. Here we present a review of two such models of earthquake dynamics with main focus on a relatively new model namely The Two Fractal Overlap Model.

  8. Dynamic programming models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Denardo, Eric V

    2003-01-01

    Introduction to sequential decision processes covers use of dynamic programming in studying models of resource allocation, methods for approximating solutions of control problems in continuous time, production control, more. 1982 edition.

  9. Building dynamic spatial environmental models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karssenberg, D.J.

    2003-01-01

    An environmental model is a representation or imitation of complex natural phenomena that can be discerned by human cognitive processes. This thesis deals with the type of environmental models referred to as dynamic spatial environmental models. The word ‘spatial’ refers to the geographic domain whi

  10. Dynamical models of the Galaxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McMillan P.J.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available I discuss the importance of dynamical models for exploiting survey data, focusing on the advantages of “torus” models. I summarize a number of applications of these models to the study of the Milky Way, including the determination of the peculiar Solar velocity and investigation of the Hyades moving group.

  11. Validated dynamic flow model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Torben

    2011-01-01

    The purpose with this deliverable 2.5 is to use fresh experimental data for validation and selection of a flow model to be used for control design in WP3-4. Initially the idea was to investigate the models developed in WP2. However, in the project it was agreed to include and focus on a additive...... model turns out not to be useful for prediction of the flow. Moreover, standard Box Jenkins model structures and multiple output auto regressive models proves to be superior as they can give useful predictions of the flow....

  12. Solid-liquid phase equilibria of the Gaussian core model fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausbach, Peter; Ahmed, Alauddin; Sadus, Richard J

    2009-11-14

    The solid-liquid phase equilibria of the Gaussian core model are determined using the GWTS [J. Ge, G.-W. Wu, B. D. Todd, and R. J. Sadus, J. Chem. Phys. 119, 11017 (2003)] algorithm, which combines equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. This is the first reported use of the GWTS algorithm for a fluid system displaying a reentrant melting scenario. Using the GWTS algorithm, the phase envelope of the Gaussian core model can be calculated more precisely than previously possible. The results for the low-density and the high-density (reentrant melting) sides of the solid state are in good agreement with those obtained by Monte Carlo simulations in conjunction with calculations of the solid free energies. The common point on the Gaussian core envelope, where equal-density solid and liquid phases are in coexistence, could be determined with high precision.

  13. Predictive models of forest dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Drew; Pacala, Stephen

    2008-06-13

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) have shown that forest dynamics could dramatically alter the response of the global climate system to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide over the next century. But there is little agreement between different DGVMs, making forest dynamics one of the greatest sources of uncertainty in predicting future climate. DGVM predictions could be strengthened by integrating the ecological realities of biodiversity and height-structured competition for light, facilitated by recent advances in the mathematics of forest modeling, ecological understanding of diverse forest communities, and the availability of forest inventory data.

  14. COLD-SAT dynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Neil S.; Bollenbacher, Gary

    1992-01-01

    This report discusses the development and underlying mathematics of a rigid-body computer model of a proposed cryogenic on-orbit liquid depot storage, acquisition, and transfer spacecraft (COLD-SAT). This model, referred to in this report as the COLD-SAT dynamic model, consists of both a trajectory model and an attitudinal model. All disturbance forces and torques expected to be significant for the actual COLD-SAT spacecraft are modeled to the required degree of accuracy. Control and experimental thrusters are modeled, as well as fluid slosh. The model also computes microgravity disturbance accelerations at any specified point in the spacecraft. The model was developed by using the Boeing EASY5 dynamic analysis package and will run on Apollo, Cray, and other computing platforms.

  15. Numerical models of the Earth’s thermal history: Effects of inner-core solidification and core potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S. L.; Peltier, W. R.; Costin, S. O.

    2005-09-01

    Recently there has been renewed interest in the evolution of the inner core and in the possibility that radioactive potassium might be found in significant quantities in the core. The arguments for core potassium come from considerations of the age of the inner core and the energy required to sustain the geodynamo [Nimmo, F., Price, G.D., Brodholt, J., Gubbins, D., 2004. The influence of potassium on core and geodynamo evolution. Geophys. J. Int. 156, 363-376; Labrosse, S., Poirier, J.-P., Le Mouël, J.-L., 2001. The age of the inner core. Earth Planet Sci. Lett. 190, 111-123; Labrosse, S., 2003. Thermal and magnetic evolution of the Earth's core. Phys. Earth Planet Int. 140, 127-143; Buffett, B.A., 2003. The thermal state of Earth's core. Science 299, 1675-1677] and from new high pressure physics analyses [Lee, K., Jeanloz, R., 2003. High-pressure alloying of potassium and iron: radioactivity in the Earth's core? Geophys. Res. Lett. 30 (23); Murthy, V.M., van Westrenen, W., Fei, Y.W., 2003. Experimental evidence that potassium is a substantial radioactive heat source in planetary cores. Nature 423, 163-165; Gessmann, C.K., Wood, B.J., 2002. Potassium in the Earth's core? Earth Planet Sci. Lett. 200, 63-78]. The Earth's core is also located at the lower boundary of the convecting mantle and the presence of radioactive heat sources in the core will affect the flux of heat between these two regions and will, as a result, have a significant impact on the Earth's thermal history. In this paper, we present Earth thermal history simulations in which we calculate fluid flow in a spherical shell representing the mantle, coupled with a core of a given heat capacity with varying degrees of internal heating in the form of K40 and varying initial core temperatures. The mantle model includes the effects of the temperature dependence of viscosity, decaying radioactive heat sources, and mantle phase transitions. The core model includes the thermal effects of inner core

  16. A convection model to explain anisotropy of the inner core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenk, H.-R. [Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley (United States); Baumgardner, J. R. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States); Lebensohn, R. A. [CONICET, Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, University of Rosario, Rosario, (Argentina); Tome, C. N. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico (United States)

    2000-03-10

    Seismic evidence suggests that the solid inner core of the Earth may be anisotropic. Several models have been proposed to explain this anisotropy as the result of preferred orientation of crystals. They range from a large annealed single crystal, growth at the melt interface, to deformation-induced texture. In this study texture development by deformation during inner core convection is explored for {epsilon}-iron (hcp) and {gamma}-iron (fcc). Convection patterns for harmonic degree two were investigated in detail. In the model it is assumed that traces of potassium are uniformly dispersed in the inner core and act as a heat source. Both for fcc and hcp iron, crystal rotations associated with intracrystalline slip during deformation can plausibly explain a 1-3% anisotropy in P waves with faster velocities along the N-S axis and slower ones in the equatorial plane. The effect of single crystal elastic constants is explored. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  17. Accurate Modeling of Buck Converters with Magnetic-Core Inductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astorino, Antonio; Antonini, Giulio; Swaminathan, Madhavan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a modeling approach for buck converters with magnetic-core inductors is presented. Due to the high nonlinearity of magnetic materials, the frequency domain analysis of such circuits is not suitable for an accurate description of their behaviour. Hence, in this work, a timedomain...... model of buck converters with magnetic-core inductors in a SimulinkR environment is proposed. As an example, the presented approach is used to simulate an eight-phase buck converter. The simulation results show that an unexpected system behaviour in terms of current ripple amplitude needs the inductor core...

  18. DYNAMICO, an icosahedral hydrostatic dynamical core designed for consistency and versatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dubos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The design of the icosahedral dynamical core DYNAMICO is presented. DYNAMICO solves the multi-layer rotating shallow-water equations, a compressible variant of the same equivalent to a discretization of the hydrostatic primitive equations in a Lagrangian vertical coordinate, and the primitive equations in a hybrid mass-based vertical coordinate. The common Hamiltonian structure of these sets of equations is exploited to formulate energy-conserving spatial discretizations in a unified way. The horizontal mesh is a quasi-uniform icosahedral C-grid obtained by subdivision of a regular icosahedron. Control volumes for mass, tracers and entropy/potential temperature are the hexagonal cells of the Voronoi mesh to avoid the fast numerical modes of the triangular C-grid. The horizontal discretization is that of Ringler et al. (2010, whose discrete quasi-Hamiltonian structure is identified. The prognostic variables are arranged vertically on a Lorenz grid with all thermodynamical variables collocated with mass. The vertical discretization is obtained from the three-dimensional Hamiltonian formulation. Tracers are transported using a second-order finite volume scheme with slope limiting for positivity. Explicit Runge–Kutta time integration is used for dynamics and forward-in-time integration with horizontal/vertical splitting is used for tracers. Most of the model code is common to the three sets of equations solved, making it easier to develop and validate each piece of the model separately. Representative three-dimensional test cases are run and analyzed, showing correctness of the model. The design permits to consider several extensions in the near future, from higher-order transport to more general dynamics, especially deep-atmosphere and non-hydrostatic equations.

  19. Dynamics of lipid droplets induced by the hepatitis C virus core protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyn, Rodney K. [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada); Kennedy, David C.; Stolow, Albert; Ridsdale, Andrew [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Pezacki, John Paul, E-mail: john.pezacki@nrc.ca [Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences, National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Canada K1A 0R6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, Ottawa (Canada)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} Hepatitis C virus uses lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind. {yields} HCV core proteins on LDs facilitate viral particle assembly. {yields} We used a novel combination of CARS, two-photon fluorescence, and DIC microscopies. {yields} Particle tracking experiments show that core slowly affects LD localization. {yields} Particle tracking measured the change in speed and directionality of LD movement. -- Abstract: The hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a global health problem, with limited treatment options and no vaccine available. HCV uses components of the host cell to proliferate, including lipid droplets (LD) onto which HCV core proteins bind and facilitate viral particle assembly. We have measured the dynamics of HCV core protein-mediated changes in LDs and rates of LD movement on microtubules using a combination of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), two-photon fluorescence (TPF), and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopies. Results show that the HCV core protein induces rapid increases in LD size. Particle tracking experiments show that HCV core protein slowly affects LD localization by controlling the directionality of LD movement on microtubules. These dynamic processes ultimately aid HCV in propagating and the molecules and interactions involved represent novel targets for potential therapeutic intervention.

  20. The effects of core stabilization exercise on dynamic balance and gait function in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eun-Jung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2013-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of core stabilization exercise on dynamic balance and gait function in stroke patients. [Subjects] The subjects were 16 stroke patients, who were randomly divided into two groups: a core stabilization exercise group of eight subjects and control group of eight subjects. [Methods] Subjects in both groups received general training five times per week. Subjects in the core stabilization exercise group practiced an additional core stabilization exercise program, which was performed for 30 minutes, three times per week, during a period of four weeks. All subjects were evaluated for dynamic balance (Timed Up and Go test, TUG) and gait parameters (velocity, cadence, step length, and stride length). [Results] Following intervention, the core exercise group showed a significant change in TUG, velocity, and cadence. The only significant difference observed between the core group and control group was in velocity. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest the feasibility and suitability of core stabilization exercise for stroke patients.

  1. Mode coupling dynamics and communication strategies for multi-core fiber systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Florence Y M; Lau, Alan Pak Tao; Tam, Hwa-Yaw

    2012-02-13

    The propagation dynamics of 7-core multi-core fibers (MCFs) with identical and three-types of cores are analytically derived based on the coupled-mode theory. The mode coupling dynamics can be aperiodic with transmission distance for MCF with identical cores. For MCFs with heterogeneous cores, it is found that even though signals from different core groups will not couple with each other, the coupling within their own group is significantly affected by the presence of other core groups. Joint signal processing techniques to mitigate mode coupling induced-cross-talks such as least mean square (LMS) algorithm and maximum likelihood (ML) detection are investigated and corresponding transmission performance are determined for coherent as well as intensity modulated formats. It is shown that aperiodic mode coupling in intensity modulated systems induces cross-talks that are difficult to eliminate through signal processing. The analytical insights may help in optimizing MCF designs and corresponding signal processing techniques for future high capacity MCF transmission systems.

  2. Testing the HTA core model: experiences from two pilot projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasternack, Iris; Anttila, Heidi; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2009-01-01

    coordination in timing and distribution of work would probably help improve applicability and avoid duplication of work. CONCLUSIONS: The HTA Core Model can be developed into a platform that enables and encourages true HTA collaboration in terms of distribution of work and maximum utilization of a common pool...

  3. Gray Models of convection in core collapse supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Swesty, F D

    1998-01-01

    One of the major difficulties encountered in modeling core collapse supernovae is obtaining an accurate description of the transport of neutrinos through the collapsed stellar core. The behavior of the neutrino distribution function transitions from an LTE distribution in the center of the core to a non-LTE distribution in the outer regions of the core. One method that has been recently employed in order to model the flow of neutrinos in 2-D models is the gray approximation. This approximation assumes that the neutrino distribution can be described by a function that is parameterized in terms of a neutrino temperature and a neutrino chemical potential. However, these parameters must be assumed. Furthermore, the parameters will also differ between the LTE and NLTE regions. Additionally, within the gray approximation the location at which the neutrino distribution function transitions from LTE to NLTE must be assumed. By considering a series of models where the LTE/NLTE decoupling point is varied we show that t...

  4. Dynamic Boolean models

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, van den, Aad; Meester, R.; White, Damien

    1997-01-01

    Consider an ordinary Boolean model, that is, a homogeneous Poisson point process in Rd, where the points are all centres of random balls with i.i.d. radii. Now let these points move around according to i.i.d. stochastic processes. It is not hard to show that at each xed time t we again have a Boolean model with the original distribution. Hence if the original model is supercritical then, for any t, the probability of having an unbounded occupied component at time t equals 1. We show that unde...

  5. Latest Developments With the Cubed-Sphere Finite-Volume Dynamical Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, W. M.; Lin, S.

    2008-12-01

    The hydrostatic finite-volume (FV) dycore [Lin (2004)] has been implemented on the cubed-sphere geometry [Putman and Lin (2007)]. This implementation was intended to address the scalability limitations of the original FV dycore developed for the latitude-longitude grid. The improved parallelism of the cubed-sphere dynamical core has poised the FV dycore to efficiently address high-resolution climate, weather and data- assimilation problems on today's emerging peta-scale computing platforms. In addition, the FV dycore has been extended to the fully compressible non-hydrostatic flow (essentially the un-approximated Euler equations on the sphere) [Lin (2008)]. We will provide an overview of the current state of development, and implementation within parent models at NOAA/GFDL and NASA/GMAO, including shared use of modeling frameworks including the Flexible Modeling System (FMS) at NOAA and the Earth System Modeling Framework at NASA. Further science enhancements to the FV dycore will be discussed, including high-order scale selective explicit diffusion options and vertical remapping options from the floating Lagrangian to Eulerian reference coordinates. Results will be based on idealized baroclinic tests, aqua-planet and AMIP simulations.

  6. Accurate modelling of fabricated hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokoua, Eric Numkam; Sandoghchi, Seyed Reza; Chen, Yong; Jasion, Gregory T; Wheeler, Natalie V; Baddela, Naveen K; Hayes, John R; Petrovich, Marco N; Richardson, David J; Poletti, Francesco

    2015-09-07

    We report a novel approach to reconstruct the cross-sectional profile of fabricated hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers from scanning electron microscope images. Finite element simulations on the reconstructed geometries achieve a remarkable match with the measured transmission window, surface mode position and attenuation. The agreement between estimated scattering loss from surface roughness and measured loss values indicates that structural distortions, in particular the uneven distribution of glass across the thin silica struts on the core boundary, have a strong impact on the loss. This provides insight into the differences between idealized models and fabricated fibers, which could be key to further fiber loss reduction.

  7. Dynamic model of Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaidyanathan, G., E-mail: vaidya@igcar.gov.i [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Kasinathan, N.; Velusamy, K. [Fast Reactor Technology Group, Indira Gandhi Center for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2010-04-15

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is a 40 M Wt/13.2 MWe sodium cooled reactor operating since 1985. It is a loop type reactor. As part of the safety analysis the response of the plant to various transients is needed. In this connection a computer code named DYNAM was developed to model the reactor core, the intermediate heat exchanger, steam generator, piping, etc. This paper deals with the mathematical model of the various components of FBTR, the numerical techniques to solve the model, and comparison of the predictions of the code with plant measurements. Also presented is the benign response of the plant to a station blackout condition, which brings out the role of the various reactivity feedback mechanisms combined with a gradual coast down of reactor sodium flow.

  8. Modelling group dynamic animal movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langrock, Roland; Hopcraft, J. Grant C.; Blackwell, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Group dynamic movement is a fundamental aspect of many species' movements. The need to adequately model individuals' interactions with other group members has been recognised, particularly in order to differentiate the role of social forces in individual movement from environmental factors. However......, to date, practical statistical methods which can include group dynamics in animal movement models have been lacking. We consider a flexible modelling framework that distinguishes a group-level model, describing the movement of the group's centre, and an individual-level model, such that each individual...... makes its movement decisions relative to the group centroid. The basic idea is framed within the flexible class of hidden Markov models, extending previous work on modelling animal movement by means of multi-state random walks. While in simulation experiments parameter estimators exhibit some bias...

  9. Heat Pipe Reactor Dynamic Response Tests: SAFE-100 Reactor Core Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2005-01-01

    The SAFE-I00a test article at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was used to simulate a variety of potential reactor transients; the SAFEl00a is a resistively heated, stainless-steel heat-pipe (HP)-reactor core segment, coupled to a gas-flow heat exchanger (HX). For these transients the core power was controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. This type of non-nuclear test is expected to provide reasonable approximation of reactor transient behavior because reactivity feedback is very simple in a compact fast reactor (simple, negative, and relatively monotonic temperature feedback, caused mostly by thermal expansion) and calculations show there are no significant reactivity effects associated with fluid in the HP (the worth of the entire inventory of Na in the core is .model was based on core thermal expansion via deflection measurements. It was found that core deflection was a strung function of how the SAFE-100 modules were fabricated and assembled (in terms of straightness, gaps, and other tolerances). To remove the added variable of how this particular core expands as compared to a different concept, it was decided to use a temperature based feedback model (based on several thermocouples placed throughout the core).

  10. Development of a core-stability model: a delphi approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewski-Schrage, Tricia; Evans, Todd A; Ragan, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Despite widespread acceptance, there is currently no consensus on the definition, components, and the specific techniques most appropriate to measure and quantify core stability. To develop a comprehensive core-stability model addressing its definition, components, and assessment techniques. Delphi technique. University laboratory. 15 content experts from United States and Canada, representing a variety of disciplines. The authors distributed an open-ended questionnaire pertaining to a core-stability definition, components, and assessment techniques specific to each expert. They collected data over 2 rounds of telephone interviews. They concluded data collection once a consensus was achieved that equated with 51% agreement among respondents. The authors developed a working definition of core stability as the ability to achieve and sustain control of the trunk region at rest and during precise movement. Eighty-three percent of the experts considered the definition satisfactory. Therefore, the definition was accepted. Furthermore, the experts agreed that muscles (14/15 = 93.3%) and neuromuscular control (8/12 = 66.7%) were components of core stability. Assessment techniques were identified and inconsistencies were highlighted; however, no consensus was established. A consensus core-stability definition was created and 2 components were identified. However, of the initial definitions provided by the experts, no 2 were identical, which revealed the inconsistencies among experts and the importance of this study. Nonetheless, the goal of obtaining a consensus definition was obtained. Although a consensus for the assessment techniques of core stability could not be reached, it was a beneficial starting point to identify the inconsistencies that were discovered among the content experts.

  11. Modeling Cultural Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gabora, Liane

    2008-01-01

    EVOC (for EVOlution of Culture) is a computer model of culture that enables us to investigate how various factors such as barriers to cultural diffusion, the presence and choice of leaders, or changes in the ratio of innovation to imitation affect the diversity and effectiveness of ideas. It consists of neural network based agents that invent ideas for actions, and imitate neighbors' actions. The model is based on a theory of culture according to which what evolves through culture is not memes or artifacts, but the internal models of the world that give rise to them, and they evolve not through a Darwinian process of competitive exclusion but a Lamarckian process involving exchange of innovation protocols. EVOC shows an increase in mean fitness of actions over time, and an increase and then decrease in the diversity of actions. Diversity of actions is positively correlated with population size and density, and with barriers between populations. Slowly eroding borders increase fitness without sacrificing diver...

  12. Accelerating Atmospheric Modeling Through Emerging Multi-core Technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Linford, John Christian

    2010-01-01

    The new generations of multi-core chipset architectures achieve unprecedented levels of computational power while respecting physical and economical constraints. The cost of this power is bewildering program complexity. Atmospheric modeling is a grand-challenge problem that could make good use of these architectures if they were more accessible to the average programmer. To that end, software tools and programming methodologies that greatly simplify the acceleration of atmospheric modeling...

  13. Swimmers’ Collective Dynamics Modelization

    OpenAIRE

    Ferré Porta, Guillem

    2011-01-01

    English: We describe a new model in order to study the properties of collections of self-propelled particles swimming in a two-dimensional fluid. Our model consist in two types of particles, the first interacting with each other with a soft potential and thus representing the fluid while the second type are self-propelled particles of biological nature capable of changing its orientation following the velocity field of the fluid. The results of the simulations show how a super-diffusive regim...

  14. Mineral vein dynamics modelling (FRACS II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urai, J.; Virgo, S.; Arndt, M. [RWTH Aachen (Germany); and others

    2016-08-15

    The Mineral Vein Dynamics Modeling group ''FRACS'' started out as a team of 7 research groups in its first phase and continued with a team of 5 research groups at the Universities of Aachen, Tuebingen, Karlsruhe, Mainz and Glasgow during its second phase ''FRACS 11''. The aim of the group was to develop an advanced understanding of the interplay between fracturing, fluid flow and fracture healing with a special emphasis on the comparison of field data and numerical models. Field areas comprised the Oman mountains in Oman (which where already studied in detail in the first phase), a siliciclastic sequence in the Internal Ligurian Units in Italy (closed to Sestri Levante) and cores of Zechstein carbonates from a Lean Gas reservoir in Northern Germany. Numerical models of fracturing, sealing and interaction with fluid that were developed in phase I where expanded in phase 11. They were used to model small scale fracture healing by crystal growth and the resulting influence on flow, medium scale fracture healing and its influence on successive fracturing and healing, as well as large scale dynamic fluid flow through opening and closing fractures and channels as a function of fluid overpressure. The numerical models were compared with structures in the field and we were able to identify first proxies for mechanical vein-hostrock properties and fluid overpressures versus tectonic stresses. Finally we propose a new classification of stylolites based on numerical models and observations in the Zechstein cores and continued to develop a new stress inversion tool to use stylolites to estimate depth of their formation.

  15. Model of THz Magnetization Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocklage, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Magnetization dynamics can be coherently controlled by THz laser excitation, which can be applied in ultrafast magnetization control and switching. Here, transient magnetization dynamics are calculated for excitation with THz magnetic field pulses. We use the ansatz of Smit and Beljers, to formulate dynamic properties of the magnetization via partial derivatives of the samples free energy density, and extend it to solve the Landau-Lifshitz-equation to obtain the THz transients of the magnetization. The model is used to determine the magnetization response to ultrafast multi- and single-cycle THz pulses. Control of the magnetization trajectory by utilizing the THz pulse shape and polarization is demonstrated. PMID:26956997

  16. Modeling Internet Topology Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haddadi, H.; Uhlig, S.; Moore, A.; Mortier, R.; Rio, M.

    Despite the large number of papers on network topology modeling and inference, there still exists ambiguity about the real nature of the Internet AS and router level topology. While recent findings have illustrated the inaccuracies in maps inferred from BGP peering and traceroute measurements, exist

  17. Dynamic Effects in Core Electron Impact Excitation of Lanthanum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuroh, Kofi

    2000-05-01

    Experimental data of inelastic electron scattering exciting inner3d-shell of metallic lanthanum show strong dependence on the projectile electron energy.^1 Calculations based on an atomic physics description of the triply ionized free atom are made. The large spin-orbit coupling constant of the 3d-hole leads to an approximate jK-coupling. The resulting excitation strength is formulated in terms of the Born approximation including resonant contributions. The intensity is folded with a Lorentzian broadening with full width at half maximum (FWHM) parameter Γ. This parameter is considered to be dependent on the projectile electron energy so that the dynamic effects found in experimental electron-energy-loss-spectra (EELS) may be addressed. The systematic variation of the relative intensities of the spin-orbit doublet structures with exciation energy found in experiment is generally accounted for as Γ is varied from the experimentally measured values of 0.7eV - 0.5eV and beyond^2 ^1J. Kanski and G. Wendin, Phys. Rev.B24, 1981 (4977). ^2K. Nuroh, Physica Scripta 61, 2000(in press).

  18. Transient LOFA computations for a VHTR using one-twelfth core flow models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Yu-Hsin, E-mail: touushin@gmail.com [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Ferng, Yuh-Ming, E-mail: ymferng@ess.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Johnson, Richard W., E-mail: rwjohnson@cableone.net [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chieng, Ching-Chang, E-mail: ccchieng@cityu.edu.hk [Dept of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Investigation of flow and heat transfer for a 1/12 VHTR core model using CFD. • The high performance computing using ∼531 M sufficient refined mesh. • LOFA transient calculations employ both laminar and turbulence models to characterize natural convection. • The comparisons with small models suggest the need of large flow model. - Abstract: A prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR) is being developed under the next generation nuclear program. One of the concerns for the reactor design is the effects of a loss of flow accident (LOFA) where the coolant circulators are lost for some reason, causing a loss of forced coolant flow through the core. In the previous studies, the natural circulation in the whole reactor vessel (RV) was obtained by segmentation strategies if the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis with a sufficiently refined mesh was conducted, due to the limits of computer capability. The computational domains in the previous studies were segmented sections which were small flow region models, such as 1/12 sectors, or a combination of a few number of the 1/12 sector (ranging from 2 to 15) using geometric symmetry, for a full dome region. The present paper investigates the flow and heat transfer for a much larger flow region model, a 1/12 core model, using high performance computing. The computation meshes for 1/12 sector and 1/12 reactor core are of 7.8 M and ∼531 M, respectively. Over 85,000 and 35,000 iterations for steady and transient (100 s) calculations are required to achieve convergence, respectively. ∼0.1 min CPU time was required using 192 computer cores for the 1/12 sector model and ∼1.3 min CPU time using 768 cores in parallel for the 1/12 core model, for every iteration, using ALPS, Advanced Large-scale Parallel Superclusters. For the LOFA transient condition, this study employs both laminar flow and different turbulence models to characterize the phenomenon of natural convection. The

  19. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q. [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Cizek, J. [Nuclear Research Institute, Prague, (Czech Republic)

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  20. Vehicle dynamics modeling and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Schramm, Dieter; Bardini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine in detail the fundamentals and mathematical descriptions of the dynamics of automobiles. In this context different levels of complexity will be presented, starting with basic single-track models up to complex three-dimensional multi-body models. A particular focus is on the process of establishing mathematical models on the basis of real cars and the validation of simulation results. The methods presented are explained in detail by means of selected application scenarios.

  1. Kinetic modeling of exciton migration in photosynthetic systems. 3. Application of genetic algorithms to simulations of excitation dynamics in three-dimensional photosystem I core antenna/reaction center complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkunas, G; Holzwarth, A R

    1996-07-01

    A procedure is described to generate and optimize the lattice models for spectrally inhomogeneous photosynthetic antenna/reaction center (RC) particles. It is based on the genetic algorithm search for the pigment spectral type distributions on the lattice by making use of steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic input data. Upon a proper fitness definition, a family of excitation energy transfer models can be tested for their compatibility with the availability experimental data. For the case of the photosystem I core antenna (99 chlorophyll + primary electron donor pigment (P700)), three spectrally inhomogeneous three-dimensional lattice models, differing in their excitation transfer conditions, were tested. The relevant fit parameters were the pigment distribution on the lattice, the average lattice spacing of the main pool pigments, the distance of P700 and of long wavelength-absorbing (LWA) pigments to their nearest-neighbor main pool pigments, and the rate constant of charge separation from P700. For cyanobacterial PS I antenna/RC particles containing a substantial amount of LWA pigments, it is shown that the currently available experimental fluorescence data are consistent both with more migration-limited, and with more trap-limited excitation energy transfer models. A final decision between these different models requires more detailed experimental data. From all search runs about 30 different relative arrangements of P700 and LWA pigments were found. Several general features of all these different models can be noticed: 1) The reddest LWA pigment never appears next to P700. 2) The LWA pigments in most cases are spread on the surface of the lattice not far away from P700, with a pronounced tendency toward clustering of the LWA pigments. 3) The rate constant kP700 of charge separation is substantially higher than 1.2 ps-1, i.e., it exceeds the corresponding rate constant of purple bacterial RCs by at least a factor of four. 4) The excitation transfer

  2. VERA-CS Modeling and Simulation of PWR Main Steam Line Break Core Response to DNB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salko, Robert K [ORNL; Sung, Yixing [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township; Kucukboyaci, Vefa [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township; Xu, Yiban [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township; Cao, Liping [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township

    2016-01-01

    The Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications core simulator (VERA-CS) being developed by the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) includes coupled neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, and fuel temperature components with an isotopic depletion capability. The neutronics capability employed is based on MPACT, a three-dimensional (3-D) whole core transport code. The thermal-hydraulics and fuel temperature models are provided by the COBRA-TF (CTF) subchannel code. As part of the CASL development program, the VERA-CS (MPACT/CTF) code system was applied to model and simulate reactor core response with respect to departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) at the limiting time step of a postulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) main steamline break (MSLB) event initiated at the hot zero power (HZP), either with offsite power available and the reactor coolant pumps in operation (high-flow case) or without offsite power where the reactor core is cooled through natural circulation (low-flow case). The VERA-CS simulation was based on core boundary conditions from the RETRAN-02 system transient calculations and STAR-CCM+ computational fluid dynamics (CFD) core inlet distribution calculations. The evaluation indicated that the VERA-CS code system is capable of modeling and simulating quasi-steady state reactor core response under the steamline break (SLB) accident condition, the results are insensitive to uncertainties in the inlet flow distributions from the CFD simulations, and the high-flow case is more DNB limiting than the low-flow case.

  3. A model for core formation in the early Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.; Drake, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two basic types exogenous models were proposed to account for siderophile and chalcophile element abundances in the Earth's upper mantle. The first model requires that the Earth be depleted in volatiles and that, after a core formation event which extracted the most siderophile elements into the core, additional noble siderophile elements (Pt, Ir, Au) were added as a late veneer and mixed into the mantle. The second model postulates a reduced Earth with approximately CI elemental abundances in which a primary core forming event depleted all siderophile elements in the mantle. The plausibility of models which require fine scale mixing of chondritic material into the upper mantle is analyzed. Mixing in liquids is more efficient, but large degrees of silicate partial melting will facilitate the separation of magma from residual solids. Any external events affecting the upper mantle of the Earth should also be evident in the Moon; but siderophile and chalcophile element abundance patterns inferred for the mantles of the Earth and Moon differ. There appear to be significant physical difficulties associated with chondritic veneer models.

  4. Dynamical friction in constant density cores: a failure of the Chandrasekhar formula

    CERN Document Server

    Read, J I; Moore, B; Pontzen, A P; Lake, J S G; Goerdt, Tobias; Moore, Ben; Lake, Joachim Stadel & George

    2006-01-01

    Using analytic calculations and N-body simulations we show that in constant density (harmonic) cores, sinking satellites undergo an initial phase of very rapid (super-Chandrasekhar) dynamical friction, after which they experience no dynamical friction at all. For density profiles with a central power law profile of log-slope, $-\\alpha$, the infalling satellite heats the background and causes $\\alpha$ to decrease. For $\\alpha < 0.5$ initially, the satellite generates a small central constant density core and stalls as in the $\\alpha = 0$ case. We discuss some astrophysical applications of our results to decaying satellite orbits, galactic bars and mergers of supermassive black hole binaries. In a companion paper we show that a central constant density core can provide a natural solution to the timing problem for Fornax's globular clusters.

  5. Modal dynamics in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers with elliptical veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, Amit; Leviatan, Yehuda

    2005-08-08

    Modal characteristics of hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers with elliptical veins are studied by use of a recently proposed numerical method. The dynamic behavior of bandgap guided modes, as the wavelength and aspect ratio are varied, is shown to include zero-crossings of the birefringence, polarization dependent radiation losses, and deformation of the fundamental mode.

  6. Dynamic Characteristics and Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Vibration levels of flooring-systems are generally difficult to predict. Nevertheless an estimate may be needed for flooring-systems that are prone to vibrate to actions of humans in motion (e.g. grandstands, footbridges or long-span office floors). One reason for the difficulties...... and the paper therefore looks into this mechanism which is done by carrying out controlled modal identification tests on a test floor. The paper describes the experimental investigations and the basic principles adopted for modal identification. Since there is an interest in being able to model the scenario...

  7. Effect of core strength training on dynamic balance and agility in adolescent badminton players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Tarik; Aydogmus, Mert

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate effect of core strength training (CST) on core endurance, dynamic balance and agility in adolescent badminton players. Twenty adolescent (age = 10.8 ± 0.3 years; height = 140.6 ± 4.4 cm, weight = 33.9 ± 5.8 kg) badminton players were randomly divided into two groups as training group (TG) and control (CG) group. All subjects were evaluated with Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), Illinois Agility Test, and the core endurance tests. The TG completed CST twice a week, for 6 weeks. There were significant increases in (p  0.05). The CST resulted in significant gains in directions of the SEBT and core endurances in adolescent badminton players, but not in agility.

  8. The validity and reliability of a dynamic neuromuscular stabilization-heel sliding test for core stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Young Joo; Lee, Jae Jin; Kim, Do Hyun; You, Joshua Sung H

    2017-07-21

    Core stabilization plays an important role in the regulation of postural stability. To overcome shortcomings associated with pain and severe core instability during conventional core stabilization tests, we recently developed the dynamic neuromuscular stabilization-based heel sliding (DNS-HS) test. The purpose of this study was to establish the criterion validity and test-retest reliability of the novel DNS-HS test. Twenty young adults with core instability completed both the bilateral straight leg lowering test (BSLLT) and DNS-HS test for the criterion validity study and repeated the DNS-HS test for the test-retest reliability study. Criterion validity was determined by comparing hip joint angle data that were obtained from BSLLT and DNS-HS measures. The test-retest reliability was determined by comparing hip joint angle data. Criterion validity was (ICC2,3) = 0.700 (pcore stability measures. Test-retest reliability was (ICC3,3) = 0.953 (pcore stability measures. Test-retest reliability data suggests that DNS-HS core stability was a reliable test for core stability. Clinically, the DNS-HS test is useful to objectively quantify core instability and allow early detection and evaluation.

  9. Badlands: A parallel basin and landscape dynamics model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Salles

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over more than three decades, a number of numerical landscape evolution models (LEMs have been developed to study the combined effects of climate, sea-level, tectonics and sediments on Earth surface dynamics. Most of them are written in efficient programming languages, but often cannot be used on parallel architectures. Here, I present a LEM which ports a common core of accepted physical principles governing landscape evolution into a distributed memory parallel environment. Badlands (acronym for BAsin anD LANdscape DynamicS is an open-source, flexible, TIN-based landscape evolution model, built to simulate topography development at various space and time scales.

  10. Minimal model for dynamic bonding in colloidal transient networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krinninger, Philip; Fortini, Andrea; Schmidt, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    We investigate a model for colloidal network formation using Brownian dynamics computer simulations. Hysteretic springs establish transient bonds between particles with repulsive cores. If a bonded pair of particles is separated by a cutoff distance, the spring vanishes and reappears only if the two particles contact each other. We present results for the bond lifetime distribution and investigate the properties of the van Hove dynamical two-body correlation function. The model displays crossover from fluidlike dynamics, via transient network formation, to arrested quasistatic network behavior.

  11. Global/Local Dynamic Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeffer, A; Das, S; Lawless, D; Ng, B

    2006-10-10

    Many dynamic systems involve a number of entities that are largely independent of each other but interact with each other via a subset of state variables. We present global/local dynamic models (GLDMs) to capture these kinds of systems. In a GLDM, the state of an entity is decomposed into a globally influenced state that depends on other entities, and a locally influenced state that depends only on the entity itself. We present an inference algorithm for GLDMs called global/local particle filtering, that introduces the principle of reasoning globally about global dynamics and locally about local dynamics. We have applied GLDMs to an asymmetric urban warfare environment, in which enemy units form teams to attack important targets, and the task is to detect such teams as they form. Experimental results for this application show that global/local particle filtering outperforms ordinary particle filtering and factored particle filtering.

  12. Growth Dynamics of Celosia cristata Grown in Cocopeat, Burnt Rice Hull and Kenaf Core Fiber Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Awang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Understanding the growth dynamics of short-lived plant could be critical as it would complete its life cycle in a short time period. It does not normally has much time to adjust to hostile environmental condition. This study provides a detail account on growth dynamics of Celosia cristata grown in five growing media for the production of high quality flowers. Approach: Celosia cristata plants were grown on five growing media (v/v: 100% Cocopeat (CP; 70% CP: 30% Burnt Rice Hull (BRH; 70% CP: 30% perlite; 70% CP: 30% Kenaf Core Fiber (KCF and 40% CP: 60% KCF. To explore the dynamics of plant growth and development, data on plant height and canopy diameter were regressed against Days After Transplanting (DAT by using the equation y = A/(1+be-cx while its derivative [dy/dx = (Abce-cx/(1+be-cx2] was used to estimate the growth rate of the parameter. The variation in leaf number, flower length and flower diameter were modeled using an exponential function of y = Aebx and their rate of change was derived using dx/dy = Abebx. Results: The growth rates of plant height, canopy diameter and leaf number of plants grown in media containing 100% CP, 70% CP: 30% BRH, 70% CP: 30% perlite, 70% CP: 30% KCF were higher than those grown on media containing 40% CP: 60% KCF. The growth rates of stem and canopy of the plants grown in the later media tended to be higher at the end of the growth cycle. This, however would not be sufficient to compensate their early losses, since the rate of growth in leaf number did not increase concurrently. Negative effects of media containing KCF were also detected in flower size. Conclusion: Overall results showed that CP is an excellent growing media for the production of Celosia cristata. Replacing 30% of CP with BRH, perlite and KCF did not affect the growth and flowering of the plants.

  13. A dynamical model of terrorism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firdaus Udwadia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a dynamical model of terrorism. We consider the population in a given region as being made up of three primary components: terrorists, those susceptible to both terrorist and pacifist propaganda, and nonsusceptibles, or pacifists. The dynamical behavior of these three populations is studied using a model that incorporates the effects of both direct military/police intervention to reduce the terrorist population, and nonviolent, persuasive intervention to influence the susceptibles to become pacifists. The paper proposes a new paradigm for studying terrorism, and looks at the long-term dynamical evolution in time of these three population components when such interventions are carried out. Many important features—some intuitive, others not nearly so—of the nature of terrorism emerge from the dynamical model proposed, and they lead to several important policy implications for the management of terrorism. The different circumstances in which nonviolent intervention and/or military/police intervention may be beneficial, and the specific conditions under which each mode of intervention, or a combination of both, may be useful, are obtained. The novelty of the model presented herein is that it deals with the time evolution of terrorist activity. It appears to be one of the few models that can be tested, evaluated, and improved upon, through the use of actual field data.

  14. Modelling of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Incorporating Core-loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Suthamno

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a dq-axis modelling of a Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor (PMSM with copper-loss and core-loss taken into account. The proposed models can be applied to PMSM control and drive with loss minimization in simultaneous consideration. The study presents simulation results of direct drive of a PMSM under no-load and loaded conditions using the proposed models with MATLAB codes. Comparisons of the results are made among those obtained from using PSIM and SIMULINK software packages. The comparison results indicate very good agreement.

  15. On the thermodynamic properties of the generalized Gaussian core model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.M.Mladek

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results of a systematic investigation of the properties of the generalized Gaussian core model of index n. The potential of this system interpolates via the index n between the potential of the Gaussian core model and the penetrable sphere system, thereby varying the steepness of the repulsion. We have used both conventional and self-consistent liquid state theories to calculate the structural and thermodynamic properties of the system; reference data are provided by computer simulations. The results indicate that the concept of self-consistency becomes indispensable to guarantee excellent agreement with simulation data; in particular, structural consistency (in our approach taken into account via the zero separation theorem is obviously a very important requirement. Simulation results for the dimensionless equation of state, β P / ρ, indicate that for an index-value of 4, a clustering transition, possibly into a structurally ordered phase might set in as the system is compressed.

  16. Computational Models of Stellar Collapse and Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Ott, C D; Burrows, A; Livne, E; O'Connor, E; Löffler, F

    2009-01-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are among Nature's most energetic events. They mark the end of massive star evolution and pollute the interstellar medium with the life-enabling ashes of thermonuclear burning. Despite their importance for the evolution of galaxies and life in the universe, the details of the core-collapse supernova explosion mechanism remain in the dark and pose a daunting computational challenge. We outline the multi-dimensional, multi-scale, and multi-physics nature of the core-collapse supernova problem and discuss computational strategies and requirements for its solution. Specifically, we highlight the axisymmetric (2D) radiation-MHD code VULCAN/2D and present results obtained from the first full-2D angle-dependent neutrino radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the post-core-bounce supernova evolution. We then go on to discuss the new code Zelmani which is based on the open-source HPC Cactus framework and provides a scalable AMR approach for 3D fully general-relativistic modeling of stellar col...

  17. Experimental Modeling of Dynamic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Morten Haack

    2006-01-01

    An engineering course, Simulation and Experimental Modeling, has been developed that is based on a method for direct estimation of physical parameters in dynamic systems. Compared with classical system identification, the method appears to be easier to understand, apply, and combine with physical...

  18. Development of Dynamic Ellipsometry for Measurements or Iron Conductivity at Earth's Core Conditions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, Sean Campbell [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Ao, Tommy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Davis, Jean-Paul [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dolan, Daniel H. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Seagle, Christopher T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lin, Jung-Fu [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Bernstein, Aaron [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The CHEDS researchers are engaged in a collaborative research project to study the properties of iron and iron alloys under Earth’s core conditions. The Earth’s core, inner and outer, is composed primarily of iron, thus studying iron and iron alloys at high pressure and temperature conditions will give the best estimate of its properties. Also, comparing studies of iron alloys with known properties of the core can constrain the potential light element compositions found within the core, such as fitting sound speeds and densities of iron alloys to established inner- Earth models. One of the lesser established properties of the core is the thermal conductivity, where current estimates vary by a factor of three. Therefore, one of the primary goals of this collaboration is to make relevant measurements to elucidate this conductivity.

  19. Nonlinear Dynamic Model Explains The Solar Dynamic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuman, Maria

    Nonlinear mathematical model in torus representation describes the solar dynamic. Its graphic presentation shows that without perturbing force the orbits of the planets would be circles; only perturbing force could elongate the circular orbits into ellipses. Since the Hubble telescope found that the planetary orbits of other stars in the Milky Way are also ellipses, powerful perturbing force must be present in our galaxy. Such perturbing force is the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy with its heavy Black Hole and leftover stars, which we see orbiting around the center of our galaxy. Since observations of NASA's SDO found that magnetic fields rule the solar activity, we can expect when the planets align and their magnetic moments sum up, the already perturbed stars to reverse their magnetic parity (represented graphically as periodic looping through the hole of the torus). We predict that planets aligned on both sides of the Sun, when their magnetic moments sum-up, would induce more flares in the turbulent equatorial zone, which would bulge. When planets align only on one side of the Sun, the strong magnetic gradient of their asymmetric pull would flip the magnetic poles of the Sun. The Sun would elongate pole-to-pole, emit some energy through the poles, and the solar activity would cease. Similar reshaping and emission was observed in stars called magnetars and experimentally observed in super-liquid fast-spinning Helium nanodroplets. We are certain that NASA's SDO will confirm our predictions.

  20. Design of homogeneous trench-assisted multi-core fibers based on analytical model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, Feihong; Tu, Jiajing; Saitoh, Kunimasa

    2016-01-01

    is the quasi-optimum core layout starting from an one-ring structured 12-core fiber. Based on the analytical model, a square-lattice structured 24-core fiber and a 32-core fiber are designed both for propagation-direction interleaving (PDI) and non-PDI transmission schemes. The proposed model provides...

  1. Experimental determination of a LMFBR seismic equivalent core model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buland, P.; Fegeant, O.; Fontaine, B.; Gantenbein, F.

    1995-12-31

    Seismic analysis of pool type LMFBR requires to perform a finite element calculation of the reactor. Because of fluid structure interaction and non-linearities due to the presence of gaps between subassemblies, it is impossible to include in the reactor vessel finite elements model the real behaviour of the core. It is therefore required to find a linear equivalent core model (LECM) which will give for the reactor vessel the same results. The design of the LECM is based on an experimental test program conducted with the core mock-up RAPSODIE on Vesuve shaking table located at CEA/Saclay center. The tests permitted to validate a linear equivalent model, which characteristics correspond to the modal parameters of the mock-up (masses, elevations, frequencies...). These characteristics were estimated in air and in water, for different level of excitation. They permitted to quantify the added mass ratio (about 15%) which is in a rather good agreement with the computation when the free surface effect is correctly taken into account. (authors). 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 photo.

  2. An Otto Engine Dynamic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Ion Tiberiu Petrescu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Otto engine dynamics are similar in almost all common internal combustion engines. We can speak so about dynamics of engines: Lenoir, Otto, and Diesel. The dynamic presented model is simple and original. The first thing necessary in the calculation of Otto engine dynamics, is to determine the inertial mass reduced at the piston. One uses then the Lagrange equation. Kinetic energy conservation shows angular speed variation (from the shaft with inertial masses. One uses and elastic constant of the crank shaft, k. Calculations should be made for an engine with a single cylinder. Finally it makes a dynamic analysis of the mechanism with discussion and conclusions. The ratio between the crank length r and the length of the connecting-rod l is noted with landa. When landa increases the mechanism dynamics is deteriorating. For a proper operation is necessary the reduction of the ratio landa, especially if we want to increase the engine speed. We can reduce the acceleration values by reducing the dimensions r and l.

  3. Business model dynamics and innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalcante, Sergio Andre; Kesting, Peter; Ulhøi, John Parm

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to discuss the need to dynamize the existing conceptualization of business model, and proposes a new typology to distinguish different types of business model change. Design/methodology/approach – The paper integrates basic insights of innovation, business process...... and routine research into the concept of business model. The main focus of the paper is on strategic and terminological issues. Findings – The paper offers a new, process-based conceptualization of business model, which recognizes and integrates the role of individual agency. Based on this, it distinguishes...... and specifies four different types of business model change: business model creation, extension, revision, and termination. Each type of business model change is associated with specific challenges. Practical implications – The proposed typology can serve as a basis for developing a management tool to evaluate...

  4. DYNAMIC TEACHING RATIO PEDAGOGIC MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jiaying

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines an innovative pedagogic model, Dynamic Teaching Ratio (DTR Pedagogic Model, for learning design and teaching strategy aimed at the postsecondary technical education. The model draws on the theory of differential learning, which is widely recognized as an important tool for engaging students and addressing the individual needs of all students. The DTR model caters to the different abilities, interest or learning needs of students and provides different learning approaches based on a student’s learning ability. The model aims to improve students’ academic performance through increasing the lecturer-to-student ratio in the classroom setting. An experimental case study on the model was conducted and the outcome was favourable. Hence, a large-scale implementation was carried out upon the successful trial run. The paper discusses the methodology of the model and its application through the case study and the large-scale implementation.

  5. DYNAMIC MODELING OF METAMORPHIC MECHANISM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The concept of metamorphic mechanism is put forward according to the change of configurations from one state to another. Different configurations of metamorphic mechanism are described through the method of Huston lower body arrays. Kinematics analyses for metamorphic mechanism with generalized topological structure, including the velocity, angular velocity, acceleration and angular acceleration, are given. Dynamic equations for an arbitrary configuration, including close-loop constraints, are formed by using Kane's equations. For an arbitrary metamorphic mechanism, the transformation matrix of generalized speeds between configuration (*)and(*)+1 is obtained for the first time. Furthermore, configuration-complete dynamic modeling of metamorphic mechanism including all configurations is completely established.

  6. Stochastic Model of Microtubule Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hryniv, Ostap; Martínez Esteban, Antonio

    2017-10-01

    We introduce a continuous time stochastic process on strings made of two types of particle, whose dynamics mimics that of microtubules in a living cell. The long term behaviour of the system is described in terms of the velocity v of the string end. We show that v is an analytic function of its parameters and study its monotonicity properties. We give a complete characterisation of the phase diagram of the model and derive several criteria of the growth (v>0) and the shrinking (v<0) regimes of the dynamics.

  7. Dynamic Analysis of Three-Layer Sandwich Beams with Thick Viscoelastic Damping Core for Finite Element Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Cortés

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the dynamic behaviour of constrained layer damping (CLD beams with thick viscoelastic layer. A homogenised model for the flexural stiffness is formulated using Reddy-Bickford’s quadratic shear in each layer, and it is compared with Ross-Kerwin-Ungar (RKU classical model, which considers a uniform shear deformation for the viscoelastic core. In order to analyse the efficiency of both models, a numerical application is accomplished and the provided results are compared with those of a 2D model using finite elements, which considers extensional and shear stress and longitudinal, transverse, and rotational inertias. The intermediate viscoelastic material is characterised by a fractional derivative model, with a frequency dependent complex modulus. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors are obtained from an iterative method avoiding the computational problems derived from the frequency dependence of the stiffness matrices. Also, frequency response functions are calculated. The results show that the new model provides better accuracy than the RKU one as the thickness of the core layer increases. In conclusion, a new model has been developed, being able to reproduce the mechanical behaviour of thick CLD beams, reducing storage needs and computational time compared with a 2D model, and improving the results from the RKU model.

  8. Core-Collapse Supernovae: Modeling between Pragmatism and Perfectionism

    CERN Document Server

    Janka, H T; Kitaura Joyanes, F S; Marek, A; Rampp, M

    2004-01-01

    We briefly summarize recent efforts in Garching for modeling stellar core collapse and post-bounce evolution in one and two dimensions. The transport of neutrinos of all flavors is treated by iteratively solving the coupled system of frequency-dependent moment equations together with a model Boltzmann equation which provides the closure. A variety of progenitor stars, different nuclear equations of state, stellar rotation, and global asymmetries due to large-mode hydrodynamic instabilities have been investigated to ascertain the road to finally successful, convectively supported neutrino-driven explosions.

  9. Effective Field Theory and the No-Core Shell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stetcua I.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In finite model space suitable for many-body calculations via the no-core shell model (NCSM, I illustrate the direct application of the effective field theory (EFT principles to solving the many-body Schrödinger equation. Two different avenues for fixing the low-energy constants naturally arising in an EFT approach are discussed. I review results for both nuclear and trapped atomic systems, using effective theories formally similar, albeit describing different underlying physics.

  10. Dynamical Modelling of Meteoroid Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David; Wiegert, P. A.

    2012-10-01

    Accurate simulations of meteoroid streams permit the prediction of stream interaction with Earth, and provide a measure of risk to Earth satellites and interplanetary spacecraft. Current cometary ejecta and meteoroid stream models have been somewhat successful in predicting some stream observations, but have required questionable assumptions and significant simplifications. Extending on the approach of Vaubaillon et al. (2005)1, we model dust ejection from the cometary nucleus, and generate sample particles representing bins of distinct dynamical evolution-regulating characteristics (size, density, direction, albedo). Ephemerides of the sample particles are integrated and recorded for later assignment of frequency based on model parameter changes. To assist in model analysis we are developing interactive software to permit the “turning of knobs” of model parameters, allowing for near-real-time 3D visualization of resulting stream structure. With this tool, we will revisit prior assumptions made, and will observe the impact of introducing non-uniform cometary surface attributes and temporal activity. The software uses a single model definition and implementation throughout model verification, sample particle bin generation and integration, and analysis. It supports the adjustment with feedback of both independent and independent model values, with the intent of providing an interface supporting multivariate analysis. Propagations of measurement uncertainties and model parameter precisions are tracked rigorously throughout. We maintain a separation of the model itself from the abstract concepts of model definition, parameter manipulation, and real-time analysis and visualization. Therefore we are able to quickly adapt to fundamental model changes. It is hoped the tool will also be of use in other solar system dynamics problems. 1 Vaubaillon, J.; Colas, F.; Jorda, L. (2005) A new method to predict meteor showers. I. Description of the model. Astronomy and

  11. Dynamic Model of Mesoscale Eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovikov, Mikhail S.

    2003-04-01

    Oceanic mesoscale eddies which are analogs of well known synoptic eddies (cyclones and anticyclones), are studied on the basis of the turbulence model originated by Dubovikov (Dubovikov, M.S., "Dynamical model of turbulent eddies", Int. J. Mod. Phys.B7, 4631-4645 (1993).) and further developed by Canuto and Dubovikov (Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: I. General formalism", Phys. Fluids8, 571-586 (1996a) (CD96a); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: II. Sheardriven flows", Phys. Fluids8, 587-598 (1996b) (CD96b); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S., Cheng, Y. and Dienstfrey, A., "A dynamical model for turbulence: III. Numerical results", Phys. Fluids8, 599-613 (1996c)(CD96c); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Dienstfrey, A., "A dynamical model for turbulence: IV. Buoyancy-driven flows", Phys. Fluids9, 2118-2131 (1997a) (CD97a); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: V. The effect of rotation", Phys. Fluids9, 2132-2140 (1997b) (CD97b); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Wielaard, D.J., "A dynamical model for turbulence: VI. Two dimensional turbulence", Phys. Fluids9, 2141-2147 (1997c) (CD97c); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "Physical regimes and dimensional structure of rotating turbulence", Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 666-669 (1997d) (CD97d); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Dienstfrey, A., "Turbulent convection in a spectral model", Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 662-665 (1997e) (CD97e); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A new approach to turbulence", Int. J. Mod. Phys.12, 3121-3152 (1997f) (CD97f); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "Two scaling regimes for rotating Raleigh-Benard convection", Phys. Rev. Letters78, 281-284, (1998) (CD98); Canuto, V.M. and Dubovikov, M.S., "A dynamical model for turbulence: VII. The five invariants for shear driven flows", Phys. Fluids11, 659-664 (1999a) (CD99a); Canuto, V.M., Dubovikov, M.S. and Yu, G., "A dynamical model for turbulence: VIII. IR and UV

  12. Cycle length maximization in PWRs using empirical core models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okafor, K.C.; Aldemir, T.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of maximizing cycle length in nuclear reactors through optimal fuel and poison management has been addressed by many investigators. An often-used neutronic modeling technique is to find correlations between the state and control variables to describe the response of the core to changes in the control variables. In this study, a set of linear correlations, generated by two-dimensional diffusion-depletion calculations, is used to find the enrichment distribution that maximizes cycle length for the initial core of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). These correlations (a) incorporate the effect of composition changes in all the control zones on a given fuel assembly and (b) are valid for a given range of control variables. The advantage of using such correlations is that the cycle length maximization problem can be reduced to a linear programming problem.

  13. Dynamic modeling, simulation and control of energy generation

    CERN Document Server

    Vepa, Ranjan

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses the core issues involved in the dynamic modeling, simulation and control of a selection of energy systems such as gas turbines, wind turbines, fuel cells and batteries. The principles of modeling and control could be applied to other non-convention methods of energy generation such as solar energy and wave energy.A central feature of Dynamic Modeling, Simulation and Control of Energy Generation is that it brings together diverse topics in thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, heat transfer, electro-chemistry, electrical networks and electrical machines and focuses on their appli

  14. Self-consistent ice-sheet properties: ice dynamics, temperature, accumulation, delta-age and chronologies for ice cores and radar isochrones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, J.; Waddington, E. D.; Conway, H.

    2011-12-01

    Ice sheet behavior has not previously been modeled to force self-consistency, to determine histories of accumulation, temperature, and ice dynamics that incorporate the ice-age/gas-age offset (delta-age) and sparse depth-age measurements from ice cores. An iterative scheme is used to combine several modular components into one self-consistent model. The goal is to determine a suite of histories constrained by the depth-age data from ice cores and ice radar that are part of a physically self-consistent ice sheet. The model is tested using a synthetic data set resembling WAIS divide. Using synthetic data provides proof of concept that histories of accumulation, temperature and ice dynamics can be recovered by the self-consistent model, and that the depth-age from ice cores and ice radar can be matched. Results from synthetic data show we can recover the ice-sheet properties used to generate the data and we can improve the depth-age chronologies by interpolating with an ice-flow model where data are sparse. When this self-consistent model can be applied to field data, results will (1) improve chronologies for ice cores and radar layers, (2) determine histories of accumulation for GCM modelling, and (3) improve estimates of past ice sheet configurations, incorporating data from ice cores and ice radar.

  15. Dynamic queuing transmission model for dynamic network loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raovic, Nevena; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a new macroscopic multi-class dynamic network loading model called Dynamic Queuing Transmission Model (DQTM). The model utilizes ‘good’ properties of the Dynamic Queuing Model (DQM) and the Link Transmission Model (LTM) by offering a DQM consistent with the kinematic wave theory...... and allowing for the representation of multiple vehicle classes, queue spillbacks and shock waves. The model assumes that a link is split into a moving part plus a queuing part, and p that traffic dynamics are given by a triangular fundamental diagram. A case-study is investigated and the DQTM is compared...

  16. Testing a new Free Core Nutation empirical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Santiago; Ferrándiz, José M.; Heinkelmann, Robert; Nilsson, Tobias; Schuh, Harald

    2016-03-01

    The Free Core Nutation (FCN) is a free mode of the Earth's rotation caused by the different material characteristics of the Earth's core and mantle. This causes the rotational axes of those layers to slightly diverge from each other, resulting in a wobble of the Earth's rotation axis comparable to nutations. In this paper we focus on estimating empirical FCN models using the observed nutations derived from the VLBI sessions between 1993 and 2013. Assuming a fixed value for the oscillation period, the time-variable amplitudes and phases are estimated by means of multiple sliding window analyses. The effects of using different a priori Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP) in the derivation of models are also addressed. The optimal choice of the fundamental parameters of the model, namely the window width and step-size of its shift, is searched by performing a thorough experimental analysis using real data. The former analyses lead to the derivation of a model with a temporal resolution higher than the one used in the models currently available, with a sliding window reduced to 400 days and a day-by-day shift. It is shown that this new model increases the accuracy of the modeling of the observed Earth's rotation. Besides, empirical models determined from USNO Finals as a priori ERP present a slightly lower Weighted Root Mean Square (WRMS) of residuals than IERS 08 C04 along the whole period of VLBI observations, according to our computations. The model is also validated through comparisons with other recognized models. The level of agreement among them is satisfactory. Let us remark that our estimates give rise to the lowest residuals and seem to reproduce the FCN signal in more detail.

  17. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems,

  18. Quasispecies dynamics in main core epitopes of hepatitis B virus by ultra-deep-pyrosequencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maria Homs; Maria Buti; David Tabernero; Josep Quer; Alex Sanchez; Noelia Corral; Rafael Esteban

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the variability of the main immunodominant motifs of hepatitis B virus (HBV) core gene by ultra-deep-pyrosequencing (UDPS).METHODS:Four samples (2 genotype A and 2 genotype D) from 4 treatment-naive patients were assessed for baseline variability.Two additional samples from one patient (patient 4,genotype D) were selected for analysis:one sample corresponded to a 36-mo treatment-free period from baseline and the other to the time of viral breakthrough after 18 mo of lamivudine treatment.The HBV region analyzed covered amino acids 40 to 95 of the core gene,and included the two main epitopic regions,Th50-69 and B74-84.UDPS was carried out in the Genome Sequencer FLX system (454 Life Sciences,Roche).After computer filtering of UDPS data based on a Poisson statistical model,122 813 sequences were analyzed.The most conserved position detected by UDPS was analyzed by site-directed mutagenesis and evaluated in cell culture.RESULTS:Positions with highest variability rates were mainly located in the main core epitopes,confirming their role as immune-stimulating regions.In addition,the distribution of variability showed a relationship with HBV genotype.Patient 1 (genotype A) presented the lowest variability rates and patient 2 (genotype A) had 3 codons with variability higher than 1%.Patient 3 and 4 (both genotype D) presented 5 and 8 codons with variability higher than 1%,respectively.The median baseline frequencies showed that genotype A samples had higher variability in epitopic positions than in the other positions analyzed,approaching significance (P =0.07,sample 1 and P =0.05,sample 2).In contrast,there were no significant differences in variability between the epitopic and other positions in genotype D cases.Interestingly,patient 1 presented a completely mutated motif from amino acid 64 to 67 (E64LMT67),which is commonly recognized by T helper cells.Additionally,the variability observed in all 4 patients was particularly associated with the E64

  19. On the structure of Ce-containing silicophosphate glasses: a core-shell molecular dynamics investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambuzzi, Elisa; Pedone, Alfonso

    2014-10-21

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the local and medium range structure of Ce-containing silicophosphate glasses widely used in optical and photonic devices because of their enhanced UV absorption and radiation damage resistance properties. New Ce(3+)-O and Ce(4+)-O parameters for a force-field based on the core-shell model were developed by fitting on the crystalline structures of Ce-containing crystal phases, and used to get insights into the structure of five silicophosphate glasses with increasing Ce2O3 and P2O5 content. An excellent agreement between experimental and computational data was found for the local environment around cerium ions and network former cations. The Ce(3+)-O bond lengths are generally longer than Ce(4+)-O, which shows higher coordination numbers. Both P and Si are four-fold coordinated; their allocation in the network is not uniform: the increasing Ce content leads to the formation of silica-rich domains and phosphate-rich domains, which entrap Ce cations increasing their solubility in the glass. We found that both the Q(n) distributions of phosphorous and Ce clustering depend on the Ce/P ratio in the glass. In particular, Ce clustering begins for Ce/P ratios between 0.17 and 0.29 in the glass series investigated.

  20. CFC+: Improved dynamics and gravitational waveforms from relativistic core collapse simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Cerdá-Durán, P; Dimmelmeier, H; Font, J A; Ibáñez, J M; Müller, E; Schäfer, G

    2004-01-01

    Core collapse supernovae are a promising source of detectable gravitational waves. Most of the existing (multidimensional) numerical simulations of core collapse in general relativity have been done using approximations of the Einstein field equations. As recently shown by Dimmelmeier et al (2002a,b), one of the most interesting such approximation is the so-called conformal flatness condition (CFC) of Isenberg, Wilson and Mathews. Building on this previous work we present here new results from numerical simulations of relativistic rotational core collapse in axisymmetry, aiming at improving the dynamics and the gravitational waveforms. The computer code used for these simulations evolves the coupled system of metric and fluid equations using the 3+1 formalism, specialized to a new framework for the gravitational field equations which we call CFC+. In this approach we add new degrees of freedom to the original CFC equations, which extend them by terms of second post-Newtonian order. The corrections for CFC+ ar...

  1. Efficient Parallelization of Short-Range Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Many-Core Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, R

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an algorithm for the parallelization of molecular-dynamics simulations with short-range forces on many-core systems with shared-memory. The algorithm is designed to achieve high parallel speedups for strongly inhomogeneous systems like nanodevices or nanostructured materials. In the proposed scheme the calculation of the forces and the generation of neighbor lists is divided into small tasks. The tasks are then executed by a thread pool according to a dependent task schedule. This schedule is constructed in such a way that a particle is never accessed by two threads at the same time. Results from benchmark simulations show that the described algorithm achieves excellent parallel speedups above 80 % per processor core for different kinds of systems and all numbers of cores. For inhomogeneous systems the speedups are strongly superior to those obtained with spatial decomposition.

  2. Using archaeomagnetic field models to constrain the physics of the core: robustness and preferred locations of reversed flux patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terra-Nova, Filipe; Amit, Hagay; Hartmann, Gelvam A.; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.

    2016-09-01

    Archaeomagnetic field models cover longer timescales than historical models and may therefore resolve the motion of geomagnetic features on the core-mantle boundary (CMB) in a more meaningful statistical sense. Here we perform a detailed appraisal of archaeomagnetic field models to infer some aspects of the physics of the outer core. We characterize and compare the identification and tracking of reversed flux patches (RFPs) in order to assess the RFPs robustness. We find similar behaviour within a family of models but differences among different families, suggesting that modelling strategy is more influential than data set. Similarities involve recurrent positions of RFPs, but no preferred direction of motion is found. The tracking of normal flux patches shows similar qualitative behaviour confirming that RFPs identification and tracking is not strongly biased by their relative weakness. We also compare the tracking of RFPs with that of the historical field model gufm1 and with seismic anomalies of the lowermost mantle to explore the possibility that RFPs have preferred locations prescribed by lower mantle lateral heterogeneity. The archaeomagnetic field model that most resembles the historical field is interpreted in terms of core dynamics and core-mantle thermal interactions. This model exhibits correlation between RFPs and low seismic shear velocity in co-latitude and a shift in longitude. These results shed light on core processes, in particular we infer toroidal field lines with azimuthal orientation below the CMB and large fluid upwelling structures with a width of about 80° (Africa) and 110° (Pacific) at the top of the core. Finally, similar preferred locations of RFPs in the past 9 and 3 kyr of the same archaeomagnetic field model suggest that a 3 kyr period is sufficiently long to reliably detect mantle control on core dynamics. This allows estimating an upper bound of 220-310 km for the magnetic boundary layer thickness below the CMB.

  3. Influence of permanent dipole and dynamic core-electron polarization on tunneling ionization of polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van-Hung; Zhao, Song-Feng; Le, Van-Hoang; Le, Anh-Thu

    2017-02-01

    We present a detailed theoretical investigation on strong-field ionization of polar (CO and NO) as well as nonpolar molecules (N2, O2, and CO2). Our results indicate that accounting for the Stark correction in the molecular tunneling ionization theory leads to overall fairly good agreements with numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Furthermore, we show that the effect of dynamic core-electron polarization, in general, has a weak influence on the angle-dependent ionization probability. However, in the case of CO we confirm the recent finding by B. Zhang, J. Yuan, and Z. Zhao [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 163001 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.163001] that accounting for dynamic core-polarization is crucial to achieving an overall good agreement with experiments.

  4. Dynamical Behavior of Core 3 He Nuclear Reaction-Diffusion Systems and Sun's Gravitational Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Jiulin; SHEN Hong

    2005-01-01

    The coupling of the sun's gravitational field with processes of diffusion and convection exerts a significant influence on the dynamical behavior of the core 3He nuclear reaction-diffusion system. Stability analyses of the system are made in this paper by using the theory of nonequilibrium dynamics. It is showed that, in the nuclear reaction regions extending from the center to about 0.38 times of the radius of the sun, the gravitational field enables the core 3He nuclear reaction-diffusion system to become unstable and, after the instability, new states to appear in the system have characteristic of time oscillation. This may change the production rates of both 7Be and 8B neutrinos.

  5. The Relationship of Core Strength with Static and Dynamic Balance in Children with Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarvin Salar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Autism represents a disorder of neural development characterized by 3 features including deficit in social communication, inflexibility of speech and behavior, and stereotyped movements. The prevalence of this disorder has been reported about 1.5 per 100 individuals in Iran. Individuals with ASDs are susceptible to weakness in balance and stability and also postural deformities. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between core strength and balance in children with autism. The subjects included 32 boys with ASDs aged 6-10 (mean and standard deviation of 8.16 ± 1.16 years, 124.81 ± 11.56 cm in height, 33.02± 7.72 kg weight and body mass index 21.12 ± 3.14 kg/m2. They were selected according to available sampling method. In order to assess the maximum isometric strength of hip abduction and external rotation, manual muscle test dynamometer was used. Static and dynamic balance were also tested by modified stork standing test and walking heel to toe test, respectively. The results showed that there is no correlation between core strength and static balance in dominant and non-dominant leg, but there is a significant correlation between dynamic balance and core strength. According to the results, it is recommended that development of parameters related to the core body strength to be emphasized for improving balance in such children.

  6. A Global Model for Circumgalactic and Cluster-core Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, G. Mark; Meece, Greg; Li, Yuan; O'Shea, Brian W.; Bryan, Greg L.; Donahue, Megan

    2017-08-01

    We provide an analytic framework for interpreting observations of multiphase circumgalactic gas that is heavily informed by recent numerical simulations of thermal instability and precipitation in cool-core galaxy clusters. We start by considering the local conditions required for the formation of multiphase gas via two different modes: (1) uplift of ambient gas by galactic outflows, and (2) condensation in a stratified stationary medium in which thermal balance is explicitly maintained. Analytic exploration of these two modes provides insights into the relationships between the local ratio of the cooling and freefall timescales (i.e., {t}{cool}/{t}{ff}), the large-scale gradient of specific entropy, and the development of precipitation and multiphase media in circumgalactic gas. We then use these analytic findings to interpret recent simulations of circumgalactic gas in which global thermal balance is maintained. We show that long-lasting configurations of gas with 5≲ \\min ({t}{cool}/{t}{ff})≲ 20 and radial entropy profiles similar to observations of cool cores in galaxy clusters are a natural outcome of precipitation-regulated feedback. We conclude with some observational predictions that follow from these models. This work focuses primarily on precipitation and AGN feedback in galaxy-cluster cores, because that is where the observations of multiphase gas around galaxies are most complete. However, many of the physical principles that govern condensation in those environments apply to circumgalactic gas around galaxies of all masses.

  7. Dynamics Modeling of Heavy Special Driving Simulator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Based on the dynamical characteristic parameters of the real vehicle, the modeling approach and procedure of dynamics of vehicles are expatiated. The layout of vehicle dynamics is proposed, and the sub-models of the diesel engine, drivetrain system and vehicle multi-body dynamics are introduced. Finally, the running characteristic data of the virtual and real vehicles are compared, which shows that the dynamics model is similar closely to the real vehicle system.

  8. Feasibility analysis of real-time physical modeling using WaveCore processor technology on FPGA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstraelen, Math; Pfeifle, Florian; Bader, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    WaveCore is a scalable many-core processor technology. This technology is specifically developed and optimized for real-time acoustical modeling applications. The programmable WaveCore soft-core processor is silicon-technology independent and hence can be targeted to ASIC or FPGA technologies. The W

  9. Models of ungulate population dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Eberhardt

    1991-10-01

    Full Text Available A useful theory for analyzing ungulate population dynamics is available in the form of equations based on the work of A. J. Lotka. Because the Leslie matrix model yields identical results and is widely known, it is convenient to label the resulting equations as the "Lotka-Leslie" model. The approach is useful for assessing population trends and attempting to predict the outcomes of various management actions. A broad list of applications to large mammals, and two examples specific to caribou are presented with a simple spreadsheet approach to calculations.

  10. Modeling quantum fluid dynamics at nonzero temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berloff, Natalia G.; Brachet, Marc; Proukakis, Nick P.

    2014-03-01

    The detailed understanding of the intricate dynamics of quantum fluids, in particular in the rapidly growing subfield of quantum turbulence which elucidates the evolution of a vortex tangle in a superfluid, requires an in-depth understanding of the role of finite temperature in such systems. The Landau two-fluid model is the most successful hydrodynamical theory of superfluid helium, but by the nature of the scale separations it cannot give an adequate description of the processes involving vortex dynamics and interactions. In our contribution we introduce a framework based on a nonlinear classical-field equation that is mathematically identical to the Landau model and provides a mechanism for severing and coalescence of vortex lines, so that the questions related to the behavior of quantized vortices can be addressed self-consistently. The correct equation of state as well as nonlocality of interactions that leads to the existence of the roton minimum can also be introduced in such description. We review and apply the ideas developed for finite-temperature description of weakly interacting Bose gases as possible extensions and numerical refinements of the proposed method. We apply this method to elucidate the behavior of the vortices during expansion and contraction following the change in applied pressure. We show that at low temperatures, during the contraction of the vortex core as the negative pressure grows back to positive values, the vortex line density grows through a mechanism of vortex multiplication. This mechanism is suppressed at high temperatures.

  11. Task-based core-periphery organization of human brain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Danielle S; Wymbs, Nicholas F; Rombach, M Puck; Porter, Mason A; Mucha, Peter J; Grafton, Scott T

    2013-01-01

    As a person learns a new skill, distinct synapses, brain regions, and circuits are engaged and change over time. In this paper, we develop methods to examine patterns of correlated activity across a large set of brain regions. Our goal is to identify properties that enable robust learning of a motor skill. We measure brain activity during motor sequencing and characterize network properties based on coherent activity between brain regions. Using recently developed algorithms to detect time-evolving communities, we find that the complex reconfiguration patterns of the brain's putative functional modules that control learning can be described parsimoniously by the combined presence of a relatively stiff temporal core that is composed primarily of sensorimotor and visual regions whose connectivity changes little in time and a flexible temporal periphery that is composed primarily of multimodal association regions whose connectivity changes frequently. The separation between temporal core and periphery changes over the course of training and, importantly, is a good predictor of individual differences in learning success. The core of dynamically stiff regions exhibits dense connectivity, which is consistent with notions of core-periphery organization established previously in social networks. Our results demonstrate that core-periphery organization provides an insightful way to understand how putative functional modules are linked. This, in turn, enables the prediction of fundamental human capacities, including the production of complex goal-directed behavior.

  12. Numerical study of air-core vortex dynamics during liquid draining from cylindrical tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathew, Sam; Patnaik, B S V [Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, Department of Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Tharakan, T John, E-mail: bsvp@iitm.ac.in [Flow and Acoustics Group, Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre, Indian Space Research Organization, Trivandrum 695547 (India)

    2014-04-01

    An air core is often formed during liquid draining from cylindrical tanks. An understanding of the mechanism behind its formation and the parameters that accentuate its growth is central to the development of an air-core vortex suppression strategy. In the present study, liquid draining from a cylindrical tank is investigated with the aid of computational fluid dynamics tools. A qualitative and a quantitative comparison of the temporal variation of critical height against available experiments is reported. A systematic investigation has revealed that, drain port shape, size, pressurization, initial rotation, etc, play a vital role in the formation of an air core vortex and its growth. These variables were also observed to influence critical height and total drain time, both of which are of engineering interest. Towards the development of a gas-core suppression strategy, the circular drain port is modified to either a stepped or a bell mouth shape. Although the new drain port shapes have delayed the gas-core from entering the drain-port, they were found to be only marginally advantageous. (paper)

  13. Dynamical model of brushite precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Cristina; Georgieva, Petia; Rocha, Fernando; Ferreira, António; Feyo de Azevedo, Sebastião

    2007-07-01

    The objectives of this work are twofold. From academic point of view the aim is to build a dynamical macro model to fit the material balance and explain the main kinetic mechanisms that govern the transformation of the hydroxyapatite (HAP) into brushite and the growth of brushite, based on laboratory experiments and collected database. From practical point of view, the aim is to design a reliable process simulator that can be easily imbedded in industrial software for model driven monitoring, optimization and control purposes. Based upon a databank of laboratory measurements of the calcium concentration in solution (on-line) and the particle size distribution (off-line) a reliable dynamical model of the dual nature of brushite particle formation for a range of initial concentrations of the reagents was derived as a system of ordinary differential equations of time. The performance of the model is tested with respect to the predicted evolution of mass of calcium in solution and the average (in mass) particle size along time. Results obtained demonstrate a good agreement between the model time trajectories and the available experimental data for a number of different initial concentrations of reagents.

  14. Core competency model for the family planning public health nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Caroline M; Roye, Carol; Gebbie, Kristine M

    2014-01-01

    A core competency model for family planning public health nurses has been developed, using a three stage Delphi Method with an expert panel of 40 family planning senior administrators, community/public health nursing faculty and seasoned family planning public health nurses. The initial survey was developed from the 2011 Title X Family Planning program priorities. The 32-item survey was distributed electronically via SurveyMonkey(®). Panelist attrition was low, and participation robust resulting in the final 28-item model, suggesting that the Delphi Method was a successful technique through which to achieve consensus. Competencies with at least 75% consensus were included in the model and those competencies were primarily related to education/counseling and administration of medications and contraceptives. The competencies identified have implications for education/training, certification and workplace performance. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Computational modeling for hexcan failure under core distruptive accidental conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawada, T.; Ninokata, H.; Shimizu, A. [Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes the development of computational modeling for hexcan wall failures under core disruptive accident conditions of fast breeder reactors. A series of out-of-pile experiments named SIMBATH has been analyzed by using the SIMMER-II code. The SIMBATH experiments were performed at KfK in Germany. The experiments used a thermite mixture to simulate fuel. The test geometry of SIMBATH ranged from single pin to 37-pin bundles. In this study, phenomena of hexcan wall failure found in a SIMBATH test were analyzed by SIMMER-II. Although the original model of SIMMER-II did not calculate any hexcan failure, several simple modifications made it possible to reproduce the hexcan wall melt-through observed in the experiment. In this paper the modifications and their significance are discussed for further modeling improvements.

  16. Dynamic pricing models for electronic business

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y Narahari; C V L Raju; K Ravikumar; Sourabh Shah

    2005-04-01

    Dynamic pricing is the dynamic adjustment of prices to consumers depending upon the value these customers attribute to a product or service. Today’s digital economy is ready for dynamic pricing; however recent research has shown that the prices will have to be adjusted in fairly sophisticated ways, based on sound mathematical models, to derive the benefits of dynamic pricing. This article attempts to survey different models that have been used in dynamic pricing. We first motivate dynamic pricing and present underlying concepts, with several examples, and explain conditions under which dynamic pricing is likely to succeed. We then bring out the role of models in computing dynamic prices. The models surveyed include inventory-based models, data-driven models, auctions, and machine learning. We present a detailed example of an e-business market to show the use of reinforcement learning in dynamic pricing.

  17. Glacial-interglacial dynamics of Antarctic firn columns: comparison between simulations and ice core air-δ15N measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mulvaney

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Correct estimate of the firn lock-in depth is essential for correctly linking gas and ice chronologies in ice cores studies. Here, two approaches to constrain the firn depth evolution in Antarctica are presented over the last deglaciation: output of a firn densification model and measurements of δ15N of N2 in air trapped in ice core. Since the firn densification process is largely governed by surface temperature and accumulation rate, we have investigated four ice cores drilled in coastal (Berkner Island, BI, and James Ross Island, JRI and semi coastal (TALDICE and EPICA Dronning Maud Land, EDML Antarctic regions. Combined with available δ15N measurements performed from the EPICA Dome C (EDC site, the studied regions encompass a large range of surface accumulation rate and temperature conditions. While firn densification simulations are able to correctly represent most of the δ15N trends over the last deglaciation measured in the EDC, BI, TALDICE and EDML ice cores, they systematically fail to capture BI and EDML δ15N glacial levels, a mismatch previously seen for Central East Antarctic ice cores. Using empirical constraints of the EDML gas-ice depth offset during the Laschamp event (~ 41 ka, we can rule out the existence of a large convective zone as the explanation of the glacial firn model-δ15N data mismatch for this site. The good match between modelled and measured δ15N at TALDICE as well as the lack of any clear correlation between insoluble dust concentration in snow and δ15N records in the different ice cores suggest that past changes in loads of impurities are not the only main driver of glacial-interglacial changes in firn lock-in depth. We conclude that firn densification dynamics may instead be driven mostly by accumulation rate changes. The mismatch between modelled and measured δ15N may be due to inaccurate reconstruction of past accumulation rate or underestimated influence of accumulation rate in firnification models.

  18. Ultrafast vortex core dynamics investigated by finite-element micromagnetic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gliga, Sebastian

    2010-07-01

    The investigations carried out in this thesis concern the ultrafast dynamics of a fundamental micromagnetic configuration: the vortex. Over the past decade, a detailed understanding of the dynamic and static properties of such magnetic nanostructures has been achieved as a result of close interplay between experiments, theory and numeric simulations. Here, micromagnetic simulations were performed based on the finite-element method. The vortex structure arises in laterally-confined ferromagnets, in particular in thin-film elements, and is characterized by an in-plane curling of the magnetic moments around a very stable and narrow core. In the present study, a novel process in micromagnetism was found: the ultrafast reversal of the vortex core. The possibility of easily switching the core orientation by means of short in-plane field pulses is surprising in view of the very high stability of the core. Moreover, the simulations presented here showed that this reversal process unfolds on a time scale of only a few tens of picoseconds, which leads to the prediction of the fastest and most complex micromagnetic reversal process known to date. Indeed, the vortex core is not merely switched: it is destroyed and recreated in the immediate vicinity with an opposite direction. This is mediated by a rapid sequence of vortex-antivortex pair creation and annihilation subprocesses and results in a sudden burst-like emission of spin waves. Equally fascinating is the ultrafast dynamics of an isolated magnetic antivortex, the topological counterpart of the vortex. The simulations performed here showed that the static complementarity between vortices and antivortices is equally reflected in their ultrafast dynamics, which leads to the reversal of the antivortex core. A promising means for the control of the magnetization on the nanoscale consists in exploiting the spin-transfer torque effect. The study of the current-induced dynamics of vortices showed that the core reversal can be

  19. Shrinking core models applied to the sodium silicate production process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The sodium silicate production process, with the molar ratio SiO2/Na2O = 2, for detergent zeolite 4A production, is based on quartz sand dissolving in NaOH aqueous solution, with a specific molality. It is a complex process performed at high temperature and pressure. It is of vital importance to develop adequate mathematical models, which are able to predict the dynamical response of the process parameters. A few kinetic models were developed within this study, which were adjusted and later compared to experimental results. It was assumed that SiO2 particles are smooth spheres, with uniform diameter. This diameter decreases during dissolving. The influence of particle diameter, working temperature and hydroxide ion molality on the dissolution kinetics was investigated. It was concluded that the developed models are sufficiently correct, in the engineering sense, and can be used for the dynamical prediction of process parameters.

  20. Modelling of the Manifold Filling Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Elbert; Chevalier, Alain Marie Roger; Jensen, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Mean Value Engine Models (MVEMs) are dynamic models which describe dynamic engine variable (or state) responses on time scales slightly longer than an engine event. This paper describes a new model of the intake manifold filling dynamics which is simple and easy to calibrate for use in engine con...

  1. Recent Developments in No-Core Shell-Model Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navratil, P; Quaglioni, S; Stetcu, I; Barrett, B R

    2009-03-20

    We present an overview of recent results and developments of the no-core shell model (NCSM), an ab initio approach to the nuclear many-body problem for light nuclei. In this aproach, we start from realistic two-nucleon or two- plus three-nucleon interactions. Many-body calculations are performed using a finite harmonic-oscillator (HO) basis. To facilitate convergence for realistic inter-nucleon interactions that generate strong short-range correlations, we derive effective interactions by unitary transformations that are tailored to the HO basis truncation. For soft realistic interactions this might not be necessary. If that is the case, the NCSM calculations are variational. In either case, the ab initio NCSM preserves translational invariance of the nuclear many-body problem. In this review, we, in particular, highlight results obtained with the chiral two- plus three-nucleon interactions. We discuss efforts to extend the applicability of the NCSM to heavier nuclei and larger model spaces using importance-truncation schemes and/or use of effective interactions with a core. We outline an extension of the ab initio NCSM to the description of nuclear reactions by the resonating group method technique. A future direction of the approach, the ab initio NCSM with continuum, which will provide a complete description of nuclei as open systems with coupling of bound and continuum states is given in the concluding part of the review.

  2. A numerical strategy for modelling rotating stall in core compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahdati, M.

    2007-03-01

    The paper will focus on one specific core-compressor instability, rotating stall, because of the pressing industrial need to improve current design methods. The determination of the blade response during rotating stall is a difficult problem for which there is no reliable procedure. During rotating stall, the blades encounter the stall cells and the excitation depends on the number, size, exact shape and rotational speed of these cells. The long-term aim is to minimize the forced response due to rotating stall excitation by avoiding potential matches between the vibration modes and the rotating stall pattern characteristics. Accurate numerical simulations of core-compressor rotating stall phenomena require the modelling of a large number of bladerows using grids containing several tens of millions of points. The time-accurate unsteady-flow computations may need to be run for several engine revolutions for rotating stall to get initiated and many more before it is fully developed. The difficulty in rotating stall initiation arises from a lack of representation of the triggering disturbances which are inherently present in aeroengines. Since the numerical model represents a symmetric assembly, the only random mechanism for rotating stall initiation is provided by numerical round-off errors. In this work, rotating stall is initiated by introducing a small amount of geometric mistuning to the rotor blades. Another major obstacle in modelling flows near stall is the specification of appropriate upstream and downstream boundary conditions. Obtaining reliable boundary conditions for such flows can be very difficult. In the present study, the low-pressure compression (LPC) domain is placed upstream of the core compressor. With such an approach, only far field atmospheric boundary conditions are specified which are obtained from aircraft speed and altitude. A chocked variable-area nozzle, placed after the last compressor bladerow in the model, is used to impose boundary

  3. Core surface flow modelling from high-resolution secular variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, R.; Olsen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    -flux hypothesis, but the spectrum of the SV implies that a conclusive test of frozen-flux is not possible. We parametrize the effects of diffusion as an expected misfit in the flow prediction due to departure from the frozen-flux hypothesis; at low spherical harmonic degrees, this contribution dominates...... the expected departure of the SV predictions from flow to the observed SV, while at high degrees the SV model uncertainty is dominant. We construct fine-scale core surface flows to model the SV. Flow non-uniqueness is a serious problem because the flows are sufficiently small scale to allow flow around non......-series of magnetic data and better parametrization of the external magnetic field....

  4. DYNAMICAL MODEL OF ELECTROMAGNETIC DRIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trunev A. P.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the dynamic model of the rocket motor electromagnetic type, consisting of a source of electromagnetic waves of radio frequency band and a conical cavity in which electromagnetic waves are excited. The processes of excitation of electromagnetic oscillations in a cavity with conducting walls, as well as the waves of the YangMills field have been investigated. Multi-dimensional transient numerical model describing the processes of establishment of electromagnetic oscillations in a cavity with the conducting wall was created Separately, the case of standing waves in the cavity with conducting walls been tested. It is shown that the oscillation mode in the conducting resonator different from that in an ideal resonator, both in the steady and unsteady processes. The mechanism of formation of traction for the changes in the space-time metric, the contribution of particle currents, the Yang-Mills and electromagnetic field proposed. It is shown that the effect of the Yang-Mills field calls change the dielectric properties of vacuum, which leads to a change in capacitance of the resonator. Developed a dynamic model, which enables optimal traction on a significant number of parameters. It was found that the thrust increases in the Yang-Mills field parameters near the main resonance frequency. In the presence of thermal fluctuations and the Yang-Mills field as well the traction force changes sign, indicating the presence of various oscillation modes

  5. Reliability and Practicality of the Core Score: Four Dynamic Core Stability Tests Performed in a Physician Office Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Jason; Brakke, Rachel; Akuthota, Venu; Sullivan, William

    2017-07-01

    Pilot study to determine the practicality and inter-rater reliability of the "Core Score," a composite measure of 4 clinical core stability tests. Repeated measures. Academic hospital physician clinic. 23 healthy volunteers with mean age of 32 years (12 females, 11 males). All subjects performed 4 core stability maneuvers under direct observation from 3 independent physicians in sequence. Inter-rater reliability and time necessary to perform examination. The Core Score scale is 0 to 12, with 12 reflecting the best core stability. The mean composite score of all 4 tests for all subjects was 9.54 (SD, 1.897; range, 4-12). The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 1,1) for inter-rater reliability for the composite Core Score and 4 individual tests were 0.68 (Core Score), 0.14 (single-leg squat), 0.40 (supine bridge), 0.69 (side bridge), and 0.46 (prone bridge). The time required for a single examiner to assess a given subject's core stability in all 4 maneuvers averaged 4 minutes (range, 2-6 minutes). Even without specialized equipment, a clinically practical and moderately reliable measure of core stability may be possible. Further research is necessary to optimize this measure for clinical application. Despite the known value of core stability to athletes and patients with low back pain, there is currently no reliable and practical means for rating core stability in a typical office-based practice. This pilot study provides a starting point for future reliability research on clinical core stability assessments.

  6. Baryon-Baryon Interactions ---Nijmegen Extended-Soft-Core Models---

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, T. A.; Nagels, M. M.; Yamamoto, Y.

    We review the Nijmegen extended-soft-core (ESC) models for the baryon-baryon (BB) interactions of the SU(3) flavor-octet of baryons (N, Lambda, Sigma, and Xi). The interactions are basically studied from the meson-exchange point of view, in the spirit of the Yukawa-approach to the nuclear force problem [H. Yukawa, ``On the interaction of Elementary Particles I'', Proceedings of the Physico-Mathematical Society of Japan 17 (1935), 48], using generalized soft-core Yukawa-functions. These interactions are supplemented with (i) multiple-gluon-exchange, and (ii) structural effects due to the quark-core of the baryons. We present in some detail the most recent extended-soft-core model, henceforth referred to as ESC08, which is the most complete, sophisticated, and successful interaction-model. Furthermore, we discuss briefly its predecessor the ESC04-model [Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044007; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, Ph ys. Rev. C 73 (2006), 044008; Th. A. Rijken and Y. Yamamoto, nucl-th/0608074]. For the soft-core one-boson-exchange (OBE) models we refer to the literature [Th. A. Rijken, in Proceedings of the International Conference on Few-Body Problems in Nuclear and Particle Physics, Quebec, 1974, ed. R. J. Slobodrian, B. Cuec and R. Ramavataram (Presses Universitè Laval, Quebec, 1975), p. 136; Th. A. Rijken, Ph. D. thesis, University of Nijmegen, 1975; M. M. Nagels, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. D 17 (1978), 768; P. M. M. Maessen, Th. A. Rijken and J. J. de Swart, Phys. Rev. C 40 (1989), 2226; Th. A. Rijken, V. G. J. Stoks and Y. Yamamoto, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 21; V. G. J. Stoks and Th. A. Rijken, Phys. Rev. C 59 (1999), 3009]. All ingredients of these latter models are also part of ESC08, and so a description of ESC08 comprises all models so far in principle. The extended-soft-core (ESC) interactions consist of local- and non-local-potentials due to (i) one-boson-exchanges (OBE), which are the members of nonets of

  7. Eigenvalue dynamics for multimatrix models

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Koch, Robert; Gossman, David; Nkumane, Lwazi; Tribelhorn, Laila

    2017-07-01

    By performing explicit computations of correlation functions, we find evidence that there is a sector of the two matrix model defined by the S U (2 ) sector of N =4 super Yang-Mills theory that can be reduced to eigenvalue dynamics. There is an interesting generalization of the usual Van der Monde determinant that plays a role. The observables we study are the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield operators of the S U (2 ) sector and include traces of products of both matrices, which are genuine multimatrix observables. These operators are associated with supergravity solutions of string theory.

  8. Eigenvalue Dynamics for Multimatrix Models

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Robert de Mello; Nkumane, Lwazi; Tribelhorn, Laila

    2016-01-01

    By performing explicit computations of correlation functions, we find evidence that there is a sector of the two matrix model defined by the $SU(2)$ sector of ${\\cal N}=4$ super Yang-Mills theory, that can be reduced to eigenvalue dynamics. There is an interesting generalization of the usual Van der Monde determinant that plays a role. The observables we study are the BPS operators of the $SU(2)$ sector and include traces of products of both matrices, which are genuine multi matrix observables. These operators are associated to supergravity solutions of string theory.

  9. Modelling of the PELE fragmentation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreault, J.

    2014-05-01

    The Penetrator with Enhanced Lateral Effect (PELE) is a type of explosive-free projectile that undergoes radial fragmentation upon an impact with a target plate. This type of projectile is composed of a brittle cylindrical shell (the jacket) filled in its core with a material characterized with a large Poisson's ratio. Upon an impact with a target, the axial compression causes the filling to expand in the radial direction. However, due to the brittleness of the jacket material, very little radial deformation can occur which creates a radial stress between the two materials and a hoop stress in the jacket. Fragmentation of the jacket occurs if the hoop stress exceeds the material's ultimate stress. The PELE fragmentation dynamics is explored via Finite-Element Method (FEM) simulations using the Autodyn explicit dynamics hydrocode. The numerical results are compared with an analytical model based on wave interactions, as well as with the experimental investigation of Paulus and Schirm (1996). The comparison is based on the mechanical stress in the filling and the qualitative fragmentation of the jacket.

  10. Bayesian Estimation of Categorical Dynamic Factor Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Nesselroade, John R.

    2007-01-01

    Dynamic factor models have been used to analyze continuous time series behavioral data. We extend 2 main dynamic factor model variations--the direct autoregressive factor score (DAFS) model and the white noise factor score (WNFS) model--to categorical DAFS and WNFS models in the framework of the underlying variable method and illustrate them with…

  11. Dynamical models of NGC 3115

    CERN Document Server

    Emsellem, E; Bacon, R; Emsellem, Eric; Dejonghe, Herwig; Bacon, Roland

    1998-01-01

    We present new dynamical models of the S0 galaxy N3115, making use of the available published photometry and kinematics as well as of two-dimensional TIGER spectrography. We first examined the kinematics in the central 40 arcsec in the light of two integral f(E,J) models. Jeans equations were used to constrain the mass to light ratio, and the central dark mass whose existence was suggested by previous studies. The even part of the distribution function was then retrieved via the Hunter & Qian formalism. We thus confirmed that the velocity and dispersion profiles in the central region could be well fit with a two-integral model, given the presence of a central dark mass of ~10^9 Msun. However, no two integral model could fit the h_3 profile around a radius of 25 arcsec where the outer disc dominates the surface brightness distribution. Three integral analytical models were therefore built using a Quadratic Programming technique. These models showed that three integral components do indeed provide a reasona...

  12. Molecular dynamics study of crater formation by core-shell structured cluster impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Takaaki; Seki, Toshio; Matsuo, Jiro

    2012-07-01

    Crater formation processes by the impacts of large clusters with binary atomic species were studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Argon and xenon atoms are artificially organized in core-shell cluster structures with various component ratios and irradiated on a Si(1 0 0) target surface. When the cluster has Xe1000 core covered with 1000 Ar atoms, and impacts at a total of 20 keV, the core Xe cluster penetrates into the deep area, and a crater with a conical shape is left on the target. On the other hand, in the case of a cluster with the opposite structure, Ar1000 core covered with 1000 Xe atoms, the cluster stops at a shallow area of the target. The incident cluster atoms are mixed and tend to spread in a lateral direction, which results in a square shaped crater with a shallower hole and wider opening. The MD simulations suggest that large cluster impacts cause different irradiation effects by changing the structure, even if the component ratio is the same.

  13. Benchmarking spin-state chemistry in starless core models

    CERN Document Server

    Sipilä, O; Harju, J

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We aim to present simulated chemical abundance profiles for a variety of important species, with special attention given to spin-state chemistry, in order to provide reference results against which present and future models can be compared. Methods. We employ gas-phase and gas-grain models to investigate chemical abundances in physical conditions corresponding to starless cores. To this end, we have developed new chemical reaction sets for both gas-phase and grain-surface chemistry, including the deuterated forms of species with up to six atoms and the spin-state chemistry of light ions and of the species involved in the ammonia and water formation networks. The physical model is kept simple in order to facilitate straightforward benchmarking of other models against the results of this paper. Results. We find that the ortho/para ratios of ammonia and water are similar in both gas-phase and gas-grain models, at late times in particular, implying that the ratios are determined by gas-phase processes. We d...

  14. Development of an automated core model for nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop an automated package of computer codes that can model the steady-state behavior of nuclear-reactor cores of various designs. As an added benefit, data produced for steady-state analysis also can be used as input to the TRAC transient-analysis code for subsequent safety analysis of the reactor at any point in its operating lifetime. The basic capability to perform steady-state reactor-core analysis already existed in the combination of the HELIOS lattice-physics code and the NESTLE advanced nodal code. In this project, the automated package was completed by (1) obtaining cross-section libraries for HELIOS, (2) validating HELIOS by comparing its predictions to results from critical experiments and from the MCNP Monte Carlo code, (3) validating NESTLE by comparing its predictions to results from numerical benchmarks and to measured data from operating reactors, and (4) developing a linkage code to transform HELIOS output into NESTLE input.

  15. Model uniform core criteria for mass casualty triage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    There is a need for model uniform core criteria for mass casualty triage because disasters frequently cross jurisdictional lines and involve responders from multiple agencies who may be using different triage tools. These criteria (Tables 1-4) reflect the available science, but it is acknowledged that there are significant research gaps. When no science was available, decisions were formed by expert consensus derived from the available triage systems. The intent is to ensure that providers at a mass-casualty incident use triage methodologies that incorporate these core principles in an effort to promote interoperability and standardization. At a minimum, each triage system must incorporate the criteria that are listed below. Mass casualty triage systems in use can be modified using these criteria to ensure interoperability. The criteria include general considerations, global sorting, lifesaving interventions, and assignment of triage categories. The criteria apply only to providers who are organizing multiple victims in a discrete geographic location or locations, regardless of the size of the incident. They are classified by whether they were derived through available direct scientific evidence, indirect scientific evidence, expert consensus, and/or are used in multiple existing triage systems. These criteria address only primary triage and do not consider secondary triage. For the purposes of this document the term triage refers to mass-casualty triage and provider refers to any person who assigns primary triage categories to victims of a mass-casualty incident.

  16. CoDCon Dynamic Modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cipiti, Benjamin B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The Co-Decontamination (CoDCon) Demonstration project is designed to test the separation of a mixed U and Pu product from dissolved spent nuclear fuel. The primary purpose of the project is to quantify the accuracy and precision to which a U/Pu mass ratio can be achieved without removing a pure Pu product. The system includes an on-line monitoring system using spectroscopy to monitor the ratios throughout the process. A dynamic model of the CoDCon flowsheet and on-line monitoring system was developed in order to expand the range of scenarios that can be examined for process control and determine overall measurement uncertainty. The model development and initial results are presented here.

  17. Characterizing and modeling citation dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Eom, Young-Ho; 10.1371/journal.pone.0024926

    2011-01-01

    Citation distributions are crucial for the analysis and modeling of the activity of scientists. We investigated bibliometric data of papers published in journals of the American Physical Society, searching for the type of function which best describes the observed citation distributions. We used the goodness of fit with Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics for three classes of functions: log-normal, simple power law and shifted power law. The shifted power law turns out to be the most reliable hypothesis for all citation networks we derived, which correspond to different time spans. We find that citation dynamics is characterized by bursts, usually occurring within a few years since publication of a paper, and the burst size spans several orders of magnitude. We also investigated the microscopic mechanisms for the evolution of citation networks, by proposing a linear preferential attachment with time dependent initial attractiveness. The model successfully reproduces the empirical citation distributions and accounts...

  18. Dynamic Model of Linear Induction Motor Considering the End Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. Hairik

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the dynamic behavior of linear induction motor is described by a mathematical model taking into account the end effects and the core losses. The need for such a model rises due to the complexity of linear induction motors electromagnetic field theory. The end affects by introducing speed dependent scale factor to the magnetizing inductance and series resistance in the d-axis equivalent circuit. Simulation results are presented to show the validity of the model during both no-load and sudden load change intervals. This model can also be used directly in simulation researches for linear induction motor vector control drive systems.

  19. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and contr...

  20. Experimental determination of LMFBR seismic equivalent core model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, B.; Buland, P.; Fegeant, O.; Gantenbein, F. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1995-12-31

    The main phenomena which influence an LMFBR core seismic response are the fluid structure interaction and the impacts between subassemblies. To study the core behaviour seismic tests and calculations have been performed on the core mock-up RAPSODIE in air or in water and for different excitation levels. (author). 2 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Coupling-induced cooperative behaviour in dynamic ferromagnetic cores in the presence of a noise floor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulsara, Adi R. [Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center San Diego, Code 2363, 53560 Hull Street, San Diego, CA 92152-5001 (United States)]. E-mail: bulsara@spawar.navy.mil; Lindner, John F. [Physics Department, College of Wooster, Wooster, OH 44691 (United States); In, Visarath [Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center San Diego, Code 2363, 53560 Hull Street, San Diego, CA 92152-5001 (United States); Kho, Andy [Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center San Diego, Code 2363, 53560 Hull Street, San Diego, CA 92152-5001 (United States); Baglio, Salvatore [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Sacco, Vincenzo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Ando, Bruno [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, Viale A. Doria 6, 95125 Catania (Italy); Longhini, Patrick [Nonlinear Dynamics Group, Department of Mathematics, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Palacios, Antonio [Nonlinear Dynamics Group, Department of Mathematics, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Rappel, Wouter-Jan [Physics Department, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 929093 (United States)

    2006-04-17

    Recently, we have shown the emergence of oscillations in overdamped undriven nonlinear dynamic systems subject to carefully crafted coupling schemes and operating conditions. Here, we summarize experimental results obtained on a system of N=3 coupled ferromagnetic cores, the underpinning of a 'coupled-core fluxgate magnetometer' (CCFM); the oscillatory behaviour is triggered when the coupling constant exceeds a threshold value (bifurcation point), and the oscillation frequency exhibits a characteristic scaling behaviour with the 'separation' of the coupling constant from its threshold value, as well as with an external target DC magnetic flux signal. The oscillations, which can be induced at frequencies ranging from a few Hz to high-kHz, afford a new detection scheme for weak target magnetic signals. We also present the first (numerical) results on the effects of a (Gaussian, exponentially correlated) noise floor on the spectral properties of the system response.

  2. Effects of interactions on dynamic correlations of hard-core bosons at finite temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauseweh, Benedikt; Uhrig, Götz S.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate how dynamic correlations of hard-core bosonic excitation at finite temperature are affected by additional interactions besides the hard-core repulsion which prevents them from occupying the same site. We focus especially on dimerized spin systems, where these additional interactions between the elementary excitations, triplons, lead to the formation of bound states, relevant for the correct description of scattering processes. In order to include these effects quantitatively, we extend the previously developed Brückner approach to include also nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-nearest neighbor (NNN) interactions correctly in a low-temperature expansion. This leads to the extension of the scalar Bethe-Salpeter equation to a matrix-valued equation. As an example, we consider the Heisenberg spin ladder to illustrate the significance of the additional interactions on the spectral functions at finite temperature, which are proportional to inelastic neutron scattering rates.

  3. Thermal Stability of Co-Pt and Co-Au Core-Shell Structured Nanoparticles: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yu-Hua; Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2017-09-07

    Co-Pt and Co-Au core-shell nanoparticles were heated by molecular dynamics simulations to investigate their thermal stability. Two core structures, that is, hcp Co and fcc Co, have been addressed. The results demonstrate that the hcp-fcc phase transition happens in the hcp-Co-core/fcc-Pt-shell nanoparticle, while it is absent in the hcp-Co-core/fcc-Au-shell one. The stacking faults appear in both Pt and Au shells despite different structures of the Co core. The Co core and Pt shell concurrently melt and present an identical melting point in both Co-Pt core-shell nanoparticles. However, typical two-stage melting occurs in both Co-Au core-shell nanoparticles. Furthermore, the Au shell in the hcp-Co-core/fcc-Au-shell nanoparticle exhibits a lower melting point than that in the fcc-Co-core/fcc-Au-shell one, while the melting points are closely equal for both hcp and fcc Co cores. All of these observations suggest that their thermal stability strongly depends on the structure of the core and the element of the shell.

  4. Control of vertebrate core planar cell polarity protein localization and dynamics by Prickle 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Mitchell T; Wallingford, John B

    2015-10-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is a ubiquitous property of animal tissues and is essential for morphogenesis and homeostasis. In most cases, this fundamental property is governed by a deeply conserved set of 'core PCP' proteins, which includes the transmembrane proteins Van Gogh-like (Vangl) and Frizzled (Fzd), as well as the cytoplasmic effectors Prickle (Pk) and Dishevelled (Dvl). Asymmetric localization of these proteins is thought to be central to their function, and understanding the dynamics of these proteins is an important challenge in developmental biology. Among the processes that are organized by the core PCP proteins is the directional beating of cilia, such as those in the vertebrate node, airway and brain. Here, we exploit the live imaging capabilities of Xenopus to chart the progressive asymmetric localization of fluorescent reporters of Dvl1, Pk2 and Vangl1 in a planar polarized ciliated epithelium. Using this system, we also characterize the influence of Pk2 on the asymmetric dynamics of Vangl1 at the cell cortex, and we define regions of Pk2 that control its own localization and those impacting Vangl1. Finally, our data reveal a striking uncoupling of Vangl1 and Dvl1 asymmetry. This study advances our understanding of conserved PCP protein functions and also establishes a rapid, tractable platform to facilitate future in vivo studies of vertebrate PCP protein dynamics.

  5. Understanding the dynamics of photoionization-induced solitons in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Saleh, Mohammed F

    2011-01-01

    We present in detail our developed model [Saleh et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107] that governs pulse propagation in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled by an ionizing gas. By using perturbative methods, we find that the photoionization process induces the opposite phenomenon of the well-known Raman self-frequency red-shift of solitons in solid-core glass fibers, as was recently experimentally demonstrated [Hoelzer et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107]. This process is only limited by ionization losses, and leads to a constant acceleration of solitons in the time domain with a continuous blue-shift in the frequency domain. By applying the Gagnon-B\\'{e}langer gauge transformation, multi-peak `inverted gravity-like' solitary waves are predicted. We also demonstrate that the pulse dynamics shows the ejection of solitons during propagation in such fibers, analogous to what happens in conventional solid-core fibers. Moreover, unconventional long-range non-local interactions between temporally distant solitons, unique of...

  6. Preliminary Thermal Hydraulic Analyses of the Conceptual Core Models with Tubular Type Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Hee Taek; Park, Jong Hark; Park, Cheol

    2006-11-15

    A new research reactor (AHR, Advanced HANARO Reactor) based on the HANARO has being conceptually developed for the future needs of research reactors. A tubular type fuel was considered as one of the fuel options of the AHR. A tubular type fuel assembly has several curved fuel plates arranged with a constant small gap to build up cooling channels, which is very similar to an annulus pipe with many layers. This report presents the preliminary analysis of thermal hydraulic characteristics and safety margins for three conceptual core models using tubular fuel assemblies. Four design criteria, which are the fuel temperature, ONB (Onset of Nucleate Boiling) margin, minimum DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) and OFIR (Onset of Flow Instability Ratio), were investigated along with various core flow velocities in the normal operating conditions. And the primary coolant flow rate based a conceptual core model was suggested as a design information for the process design of the primary cooling system. The computational fluid dynamics analysis was also carried out to evaluate the coolant velocity distributions between tubular channels and the pressure drop characteristics of the tubular fuel assembly.

  7. Dynamical Modeling of Mars' Paleoclimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark I.

    2004-01-01

    This report summarizes work undertaken under a one-year grant from the NASA Mars Fundamental Research Program. The goal of the project was to initiate studies of the response of the Martian climate to changes in planetary obliquity and orbital elements. This work was undertaken with a three-dimensional numerical climate model based on the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) Skyhi General Circulation Model (GCM). The Mars GCM code was adapted to simulate various obliquity and orbital parameter states. Using a version of the model with a basic water cycle (ice caps, vapor, and clouds), we examined changes in atmospheric water abundances and in the distribution of water ice sheets on the surface. This work resulted in a paper published in the Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets. In addition, the project saw the initial incorporation of a regolith water transport and storage scheme into the model. This scheme allows for interaction between water in the pores of the near subsurface (<3m) and the atmosphere. This work was not complete by the end of the one-year grant, but is now continuing within the auspices of a three-year grant of the same title awarded by the Mars Fundamental Research Program in late 2003.

  8. The ICON-1.2 Hydrostatic Atmospheric Dynamical Core on Triangular Grids - Part 1: Formulation and Performance of the Baseline Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Hui; Giorgetta, Marco; Zangl, Gunther; Restelli, Marco; Majewski, Detlev; Bonaventura, Luca; Frohlich, Kristina; Reinert, Daniel; Ripodas, Pilar; Kornblueh, Luis; Forstner, J.

    2013-06-05

    A hydrostatic atmospheric dynamical core is developed for the purpose of global climate modelling. The model applies a finite difference method to discretize the primitive equations on spherical icosahedral grids, using C-type staggering with triangles as control volume for mass. This paper documents the numerical method employed in the baseline version of this model, discusses its properties, and presents results from idealized test cases. The evaluation shows that the new dynamical core is able to correctly represent the evolution of baroclinic eddies in the atmosphere and their role in meridional heat and momentum transport. The simulations compare well with the reference solutions, and converge as the horizontal resolution increases. First results from two aqua planet experiments are also presented, in which the equatorial wave spectra derived from tropical precipitation agree well with those simulated by a spectral transform model. The new dynamical core thus provides a good basis for further model development. Certain aspects of the model formulation that need further investigation and improvement are also pointed out.

  9. The ICON-1.2 hydrostatic atmospheric dynamical core on triangular grids – Part 1: Formulation and performance of the baseline version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A hydrostatic atmospheric dynamical core is developed for the purpose of global climate modelling. The model applies finite-difference methods to discretize the primitive equations on spherical icosahedral grids, using C-type staggering with triangles as control volumes for mass. This paper documents the numerical methods employed in the baseline version of the model, discusses their properties, and presents results from various idealized test cases. The evaluation shows that the new dynamical core is able to correctly represent the evolution of baroclinic eddies in the atmosphere as well as their role in heat and momentum transport. The simulations compare well with the reference solutions, and show a clear trend of convergence as the horizontal resolution increases. First results from two aqua-planet simulations are also presented, in which the equatorial wave spectra derived from tropical precipitation agree well with those simulated by a spectral transform model. The new dynamical core thus provides a good basis for further model development. Certain aspects of the model formulation that need further investigation and improvement are also pointed out.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF NUMERICAL MODELS TO REPRESENT THE STIFFNESS OF LAMINATED ROTOR CORES IN ELECTRICAL MACHINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HIDERALDO L. V. SANTOS

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Usually, electrical machines have a metallic cylinder made up of a compacted stack of thin metal plates (referred as laminated core assembled with an interference fit on the shaft. The laminated structure is required to improve the electrical performance of the machine and, besides adding inertia, also enhances the stiffness of the system. Inadequate characterization of this element may lead to errors when assessing the dynamic behavior of the rotor. The aim of this work was therefore to evaluate three beam models used to represent the laminated core of rotating electrical machines. The following finite element beam models are analyzed: (i an “equivalent diameter model”, (ii an “unbranched model” and (iii a “branched model”. To validate the numerical models, experiments are performed with nine different electrical rotors so that the first non-rotating natural frequencies and corresponding vibration modes in a free-free support condition are obtained experimentally. The models are evaluated by comparing the natural frequencies and corresponding vibration mode shapes obtained experimentally with those obtained numerically. Finally, a critical discussion of the behavior of the beam models studied is presented. The results show that for the majority of the rotors tested, the “branched model” is the most suitable

  11. The source of the Earth's long wavelength geoid anomalies: Implications for mantle and core dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, B. H.; Richards, M. A.; Oconnell, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    The long wavelength components of the Earth's gravity field result mainly from density contrasts associated with convection in the mantle. Direct interpretation of the geoid for mantle convection is complicated by the fact that convective flow results in dynamically maintained deformation of the surface of the Earth, the core mantle boundary (CMB), and any interior chemical boundaries which might exist. These boundary deformations effect the geoid opposite in sign and are comparable in magnitude to those of the interior density contrasts driving the flow. The total difference of two relatively large quantities.

  12. High frequency, high temperature specific core loss and dynamic B-H hysteresis loop characteristics of soft magnetic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieserman, W. R.; Schwarze, G. E.; Niedra, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Limited experimental data exists for the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loops for soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high frequency and high temperature. This experimental study investigates the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop characteristics of Supermalloy and Metglas 2605SC over the frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz and temperature range of 23 to 300 C under sinusoidal voltage excitation. The experimental setup used to conduct the investigation is described. The effects of the maximum magnetic flux density, frequency, and temperature on the specific core loss and on the size and shape of the B-H loops are examined.

  13. Sulfur chemistry: 1D modeling in massive dense cores

    CERN Document Server

    Wakelam, V; Herpin, F

    2011-01-01

    The main sulfur-bearing molecules OCS, H2S, SO, SO2, and CS have been observed in four high mass dense cores (W43-MM1, IRAS 18264, IRAS 05358, and IRAS 18162). Our goal is to put some constraints on the relative evolutionary stage of these sources by comparing these observations with time-dependent chemical modeling. We used the chemical model Nahoon, which computes the gas-phase chemistry and gas-grain interactions of depletion and evaporation. Mixing of the different chemical compositions shells in a 1D structure through protostellar envelope has been included since observed lines suggest nonthermal supersonic broadening. Observed radial profiles of the temperature and density are used to compute the chemistry as a function of time. With our model, we underproduce CS by several orders of magnitude compared to the other S-bearing molecules, which seems to contradict observations, although some uncertainties in the CS abundance observed at high temperature remain. The OCS/SO2, SO/SO2, and H2S/SO2 abundance ra...

  14. CFD modeling of the IRIS pressurizer dynamic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz, Ronny R.; Montesinos, Maria E.; Garcia, Carlos; Bueno, Elizabeth D.; Mazaira, Leorlen R., E-mail: rsanz@instec.cu, E-mail: mmontesi@instec.cu, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu, E-mail: leored1984@gmail.com [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas (InSTEC), La Habana (Cuba); Bezerra, Jair L.; Lira, Carlos A.B. Oliveira, E-mail: jair.lima@ufpe.br, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.br [Universida Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    Integral layout of nuclear reactor IRIS makes possible the elimination of the spray system, which is usually used to mitigate in-surge transient and also help to Boron homogenization. The study of transients with deficiencies in the Boron homogenization in this technology is very important, because they can cause disturbances in the reactor power and insert a strong reactivity in the core. The detailed knowledge of the behavior of multiphase multicomponent flows is challenging due to the complex phenomena and interactions at the interface. In this context, the CFD modeling is employed in the design of equipment in the nuclear industry as it allows predicting accidents or predicting their performance in dissimilar applications. The aim of the present research is to model the IRIS pressurizer's dynamic using the commercial CFD code CFX. A symmetric tri dimensional model equivalent to 1/8 of the total geometry was adopted to reduce mesh size and minimize processing time. The model considers the coexistence of four phases and also takes into account the heat losses. The relationships for interfacial mass, energy, and momentum transport are programmed and incorporated into CFX. Moreover, two subdomains and several additional variables are defined to monitoring the boron dilution sequences and condensation-evaporation rates in different control volumes. For transient states a non - equilibrium stratification in the pressurizer is considered. This paper discusses the model developed and the behavior of the system for representative transients sequences. The results of analyzed transients of IRIS can be applied to the design of pressurizer internal structures and components. (author)

  15. Kinetic modeling of exciton migration in photosynthetic systems. 3. Application of genetic algorithms to simulations of excitation dynamics in three-dimensional photosystem I core antenna/reaction center complexes.

    OpenAIRE

    Trinkunas, G.; Holzwarth, A R

    1996-01-01

    A procedure is described to generate and optimize the lattice models for spectrally inhomogeneous photosynthetic antenna/reaction center (RC) particles. It is based on the genetic algorithm search for the pigment spectral type distributions on the lattice by making use of steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic input data. Upon a proper fitness definition, a family of excitation energy transfer models can be tested for their compatibility with the availability experimental data. For the ...

  16. Improvement in dynamic balance and core endurance after a 6-week core-stability-training program in high school track and field athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrey, Michelle A; Mitzel, Jonathan G

    2013-11-01

    Core training specifically for track and field athletes is vague, and it is not clear how it affects dynamic balance and core-endurance measures. To determine the effects of a 6-week core-stabilization-training program for high school track and field athletes on dynamic balance and core endurance. Test-retest. High school in north central West Virginia. Thirteen healthy high school student athletes from 1 track and field team volunteered for the study. Subjects completed pretesting 1 wk before data collection. They completed a 6-wk core-stabilization program designed specifically for track and field athletes. The program consisted of 3 levels with 6 exercises per level and lasted for 30 min each session 3 times per week. Subjects progressed to the next level at 2-wk intervals. After 6 wk, posttesting was conducted The subjects were evaluated using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) for posteromedial (PM), medial (M), and anteromedial (AM) directions; abdominal-fatigue test (AFT); back-extensor test (BET); and side-bridge test (SBT) for the right and left sides. Posttest results significantly improved for all 3 directions of the SEBT (PM, M, and AM), AFT, BET, right SBT, and left SBT. Effect size was large for all variables except for PM and AM, where a moderate effect was noted. Minimal-detectable-change scores exceeded the error of the measurements for all dependent variables. After the 6-wk core-stabilization-training program, measures of the SEBT, AFT, BET, and SBT improved, thus advocating the use of this core-stabilization-training program for track and field athletes.

  17. Geomagnetic secular variation as a window on the dynamics of Earth's core (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A.

    2010-12-01

    One of the forefront questions of planetary geophysics is to understand how magnetic fields can be spontaneously created by so-called dynamo action. Giant strides have been taken in recent years in understanding the theory of convectively driven dynamos; yet equally important is the marriage between theory and observation. I will argue that we are on the cusp of a new level of understanding brought about by new methods for incorporating observations and theory. In 1950 Sir Edward Bullard wrote an influential paper entitled "The westward drift of the Earth's magnetic field", with coauthors C Freedman, H Gellman and J Nixon. A comprehensive study of observations was tied together with the then nascent dynamo theory to infer properties of the dynamics of the core. Sixty years on, we have a much enriched understanding of the theory of convectively driven dynamos, and an even more comprehensive database of observations stretching back several centuries. Equally important are the new satellite observations that provide global coverage with unprecedented accuracy over the last decade. In this talk I will try to show how the interplay between theory and observation can lead to understanding of force balances in the core, and interactions between the core and the overlying mantle.

  18. Formation and Collapse of Quiescent Cloud Cores Induced by Dynamic Compressions

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez, Gilberto C; Shadmehri, Mohsen; Vázquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2007-01-01

    We present numerical hydrodynamical simulations of the formation, evolution and gravitational collapse of isothermal molecular cloud cores induced by generic turbulent compressions in spherical geometry. A compressive wave is set up in a constant sub-Jeans density distribution. As the wave travels through the simulation grid, a shock-bounded layer is formed. The inner shock of this layer reaches and bounces off the center, leaving behind a central core with an initial almost uniform density distribution, surrounded by an envelope consisting of the material in the shock-bounded shell, with a power-law density profile with index close to -2 even in non-collapsing cases. The resulting density structure resembles a quiescent core of radius < 0.1 pc, with a Bonnor-Ebert-like (BE-like) profile, although it has significant dynamical differences: it is initially non-self-gravitating and confined by the ram pressure of the infalling material, and consequently, growing continuously in mass and size. With the appropi...

  19. Flexible core masking technique for beam halo measurements with high dynamic range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egberts, J [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Welsch, C P, E-mail: Carsten.Welsch@quasar-group.co [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Science and Innovation Campus, WA4 4AD Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    A thorough understanding of halo formation and its possible control is highly desirable for essentially all particle accelerators. Particles outside the beam core are not only lost for further experiments, they are also likely to hit the beam pipe, and activate this, as well as accelerator and experimental components in close proximity, which makes work on the accelerator costly and time consuming. Well established techniques for transverse beam profile measurements of electron or high energy hadron beams are the observation of synchrotron radiation, optical transition radiation or the like. A particular challenge, however, is the detection of particles in the tail regions of the beam distribution in close proximity of the very intense beam core. Results from laboratory measurements on two different devices are presented that might form the technical base of a future beam halo monitor: the novel SpectraCam XDR camera system which has an intrinsically high dynamic range due to its unique pixel design, and a flexible masking technique based on a DMD micro mirror array which allows for a fast mask generation to blank out the central core.

  20. Dynamic optical resource allocation for mobile core networks with software defined elastic optical networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongli; Chen, Zhendong; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Xinbo

    2016-07-25

    Driven by the forthcoming of 5G mobile communications, the all-IP architecture of mobile core networks, i.e. evolved packet core (EPC) proposed by 3GPP, has been greatly challenged by the users' demands for higher data rate and more reliable end-to-end connection, as well as operators' demands for low operational cost. These challenges can be potentially met by software defined optical networking (SDON), which enables dynamic resource allocation according to the users' requirement. In this article, a novel network architecture for mobile core network is proposed based on SDON. A software defined network (SDN) controller is designed to realize the coordinated control over different entities in EPC networks. We analyze the requirement of EPC-lightpath (EPCL) in data plane and propose an optical switch load balancing (OSLB) algorithm for resource allocation in optical layer. The procedure of establishment and adjustment of EPCLs is demonstrated on a SDON-based EPC testbed with extended OpenFlow protocol. We also evaluate the OSLB algorithm through simulation in terms of bandwidth blocking ratio, traffic load distribution, and resource utilization ratio compared with link-based load balancing (LLB) and MinHops algorithms.

  1. Modeling of molecular clouds with formation of prestellar cores

    CERN Document Server

    Donkov, Sava; Veltchev, Todor V

    2012-01-01

    We develop a statistical approach for description of dense structures (cores) in molecular clouds that might be progenitors of stars. Our basic assumptions are a core mass-density relationship and a power-law density distribution of these objects as testified by numerical simulations and observations. The core mass function (CMF) was derived and its slope in the high-mass regime was obtained analytically. Comparisons with observational CMFs in several Galactic clouds are briefly presented.

  2. Spatial Differentiation In Industrial Dynamics: A Core-Periphery Analysis Based On The Pavitt-Miozzo-Soete Taxonomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Capasso, M.; Cefis, E.; Frenken, K.

    We compare the industrial dynamics in the core, semi-periphery and periphery in The Netherlands in terms of firm entry-exit, size, growth and sectoral location patterns. The contribution of our work is to provide the first comprehensive study on spatial differentiation in industrial dynamics for all

  3. A Study of the Speedups and Competitiveness of FPGA Soft Processor Cores using Dynamic Hardware/Software Partitioning

    CERN Document Server

    Lysecky, Roman

    2011-01-01

    Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) provide designers with the ability to quickly create hardware circuits. Increases in FPGA configurable logic capacity and decreasing FPGA costs have enabled designers to more readily incorporate FPGAs in their designs. FPGA vendors have begun providing configurable soft processor cores that can be synthesized onto their FPGA products. While FPGAs with soft processor cores provide designers with increased flexibility, such processors typically have degraded performance and energy consumption compared to hard-core processors. Previously, we proposed warp processing, a technique capable of optimizing a software application by dynamically and transparently re-implementing critical software kernels as custom circuits in on-chip configurable logic. In this paper, we study the potential of a MicroBlaze soft-core based warp processing system to eliminate the performance and energy overhead of a soft-core processor compared to a hard-core processor. We demonstrate that the soft-c...

  4. The CERN antiproton target: hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV/c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 {\\deg}C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of...

  5. CERN antiproton target: Hydrocode analysis of its core material dynamic response under proton beam impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Claudio Torregrosa; Perillo-Marcone, Antonio; Calviani, Marco; Muñoz-Cobo, José-Luis

    2016-07-01

    Antiprotons are produced at CERN by colliding a 26 GeV /c proton beam with a fixed target made of a 3 mm diameter, 55 mm length iridium core. The inherent characteristics of antiproton production involve extremely high energy depositions inside the target when impacted by each primary proton beam, making it one of the most dynamically demanding among high energy solid targets in the world, with a rise temperature above 2000 °C after each pulse impact and successive dynamic pressure waves of the order of GPa's. An optimized redesign of the current target is foreseen for the next 20 years of operation. As a first step in the design procedure, this numerical study delves into the fundamental phenomena present in the target material core under proton pulse impact and subsequent pressure wave propagation by the use of hydrocodes. Three major phenomena have been identified, (i) the dominance of a high frequency radial wave which produces destructive compressive-to-tensile pressure response (ii) The existence of end-of-pulse tensile waves and its relevance on the overall response (iii) A reduction of 44% in tensile pressure could be obtained by the use of a high density tantalum cladding.

  6. Neutron dynamics of fast-spectrum dedicated cores for waste transmutation; Etude et amelioration du comportement cinetique de coeurs rapides a la transmutation de dechets a vie longue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massara, S

    2002-04-01

    Among different scenarios achieving minor actinide transmutation, the possibility of double strata scenarios with critical, fast spectrum, dedicated cores must be checked and quantified. In these cores, the waste fraction has to be at the highest level compatible with safety requirements during normal operation and transient conditions. As reactivity coefficients are poor in such critical cores (low delayed neutron fraction and Doppler feed-back, high coolant void coefficient), their dynamic behaviour during transient conditions must be carefully analysed. Three nitride-fuel configurations have been analysed: two liquid metal-cooled (sodium and lead) and a particle-fuel helium-cooled one. A dynamic code, MAT4 DYN, has been developed during the PhD thesis, allowing the study of loss of flow, reactivity insertion and loss of coolant accidents, and taking into account two fuel geometries (cylindrical and spherical) and two thermal-hydraulics models for the coolant (incompressible for liquid metals and compressible for helium). Dynamics calculations have shown that if the fuel nature is appropriately chosen (letting a sufficient margin during transients), this can counterbalance the bad state of reactivity coefficients for liquid metal-cooled cores, thus proving the interest of this kind of concept. On the other side, the gas-cooled core dynamics is very badly affected by the high value of the helium void coefficient (which is a consequence of the choice of a hard spectrum), this effect being amplified by the very low thermal inertia of particle-fuel design. So, a new kind of concept should be considered for a helium-cooled fast-spectrum dedicated core. (authors)

  7. Wind Farm Decentralized Dynamic Modeling With Parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soltani, Mohsen; Shakeri, Sayyed Mojtaba; Grunnet, Jacob Deleuran;

    2010-01-01

    Development of dynamic wind flow models for wind farms is part of the research in European research FP7 project AEOLUS. The objective of this report is to provide decentralized dynamic wind flow models with parameters. The report presents a structure for decentralized flow models with inputs from...

  8. Alanine scan of core positions in ubiquitin reveals links between dynamics, stability, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shirley Y; Pullen, Lester; Virgil, Daniel J; Castañeda, Carlos A; Abeykoon, Dulith; Bolon, Daniel N A; Fushman, David

    2014-04-03

    Mutations at solvent-inaccessible core positions in proteins can impact function through many biophysical mechanisms including alterations to thermodynamic stability and protein dynamics. As these properties of proteins are difficult to investigate, the impacts of core mutations on protein function are poorly understood for most systems. Here, we determined the effects of alanine mutations at all 15 core positions in ubiquitin on function in yeast. The majority (13 of 15) of alanine substitutions supported yeast growth as the sole ubiquitin. Both the two null mutants (I30A and L43A) were less stable to temperature-induced unfolding in vitro than wild type (WT) but were well folded at physiological temperatures. Heteronuclear NMR studies indicated that the L43A mutation reduces temperature stability while retaining a ground-state structure similar to WT. This structure enables L43A to bind to common ubiquitin receptors in vitro. Many of the core alanine ubiquitin mutants, including one of the null variants (I30A), exhibited an increased accumulation of high-molecular-weight species, suggesting that these mutants caused a defect in the processing of ubiquitin-substrate conjugates. In contrast, L43A exhibited a unique accumulation pattern with reduced levels of high-molecular-weight species and undetectable levels of free ubiquitin. When conjugation to other proteins was blocked, L43A ubiquitin accumulated as free ubiquitin in yeast. Based on these findings, we speculate that ubiquitin's stability to unfolding may be required for efficient recycling during proteasome-mediated substrate degradation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dynamical model for virus spread

    CERN Document Server

    Camelo-Neto, G

    1995-01-01

    The steady state properties of the mean density population of infected cells in a viral spread is simulated by a general forest fire like cellular automaton model with two distinct populations of cells ( permissive and resistant ones) and studied in the framework of the mean field approximation. Stochastic dynamical ingredients are introduced in this model to mimic cells regeneration (with probability {\\it p}) and to consider infection processes by other means than contiguity (with probability {\\it f}). Simulations are carried on a L \\times L square lattice considering the eight first neighbors. The mean density population of infected cells (D_i) is measured as function of the regeneration probability {\\it p}, and analyzed for small values of the ratio {\\it f/p } and for distinct degrees of the cell resistance. The results obtained by a mean field like approach recovers the simulations results. The role of the resistant parameter R (R \\geq 2) on the steady state properties is investigated and discussed in com...

  10. Characterizing and modeling citation dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ho Eom

    Full Text Available Citation distributions are crucial for the analysis and modeling of the activity of scientists. We investigated bibliometric data of papers published in journals of the American Physical Society, searching for the type of function which best describes the observed citation distributions. We used the goodness of fit with Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics for three classes of functions: log-normal, simple power law and shifted power law. The shifted power law turns out to be the most reliable hypothesis for all citation networks we derived, which correspond to different time spans. We find that citation dynamics is characterized by bursts, usually occurring within a few years since publication of a paper, and the burst size spans several orders of magnitude. We also investigated the microscopic mechanisms for the evolution of citation networks, by proposing a linear preferential attachment with time dependent initial attractiveness. The model successfully reproduces the empirical citation distributions and accounts for the presence of citation bursts as well.

  11. Mechanical behavior of a sandwich with corrugated GRP core: numerical modeling and experimental validation

    OpenAIRE

    Tumino, D; T. Ingrassia; V. Nigrelli; G. Pitarresi; V. Urso Miano

    2014-01-01

    In this work the mechanical behaviour of a core reinforced composite sandwich structure is studied. The sandwich employs a Glass Reinforced Polymer (GRP) orthotropic material for both the two external skins and the inner core web. In particular, the core is designed in order to cooperate with the GRP skins in membrane and flexural properties by means of the addition of a corrugated laminate into the foam core. An analytical model has been developed to replace a unit cell of this s...

  12. Investigation of geomagnetic field forecasting and fluid dynamics of the core. [determination of the bundary between the core and mantle of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, E. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Progress in the use of MAGSAT data to confirm that the radius of the Earth's core-mantle boundary can be accurately determined magnetically is reported. The MAGSAT data was used in conjunction with a high quality manfield model for epoch 1965. The unsigned flux linking the core and mantle of the Earth is considered to be a legitimate invariant for a span of time. The value from MAGSAT of this constant is 16.056 GWb (gigawebers).

  13. On-line core monitoring system based on buckling corrected modified one group model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, Fernando S., E-mail: freire@eletronuclear.gov.br [ELETROBRAS Eletronuclear Gerencia de Combustivel Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear power reactors require core monitoring during plant operation. To provide safe, clean and reliable core continuously evaluate core conditions. Currently, the reactor core monitoring process is carried out by nuclear code systems that together with data from plant instrumentation, such as, thermocouples, ex-core detectors and fixed or moveable In-core detectors, can easily predict and monitor a variety of plant conditions. Typically, the standard nodal methods can be found on the heart of such nuclear monitoring code systems. However, standard nodal methods require large computer running times when compared with standards course-mesh finite difference schemes. Unfortunately, classic finite-difference models require a fine mesh reactor core representation. To override this unlikely model characteristic we can usually use the classic modified one group model to take some account for the main core neutronic behavior. In this model a course-mesh core representation can be easily evaluated with a crude treatment of thermal neutrons leakage. In this work, an improvement made on classic modified one group model based on a buckling thermal correction was used to obtain a fast, accurate and reliable core monitoring system methodology for future applications, providing a powerful tool for core monitoring process. (author)

  14. Relating structure and dynamics in organisation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, C.M.; Treur, J.

    2008-01-01

    To understand how an organisational structure relates to dynamics is an interesting fundamental challenge in the area of social modelling. Specifications of organisational structure usually have a diagrammatic form that abstracts from more detailed dynamics. Dynamic properties of agent systems, on t

  15. Modelling the dynamics of youth subcultures

    CERN Document Server

    Holme, P; Holme, Petter; Gronlund, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    What are the dynamics behind youth subcultures such as punk, hippie, or hip-hop cultures? How does the global dynamics of these subcultures relate to the individual's search for a personal identity? We propose a simple dynamical model to address these questions and find that only a few assumptions of the individual's behaviour are necessary to regenerate known features of youth culture.

  16. Hoyle state and rotational features in Carbon-12 within a no-core shell-model framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyfuss, Alison C., E-mail: adreyf1@lsu.edu [Keene State College, Keene, NH 03435 (United States); Launey, Kristina D.; Dytrych, Tomáš; Draayer, Jerry P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Bahri, Chairul [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670 (United States)

    2013-12-18

    By using only a fraction of the model space extended beyond current no-core shell-model limits and a many-nucleon interaction with a single parameter, we gain additional insight within a symmetry-guided shell-model framework, into the many-body dynamics that gives rise to the ground state rotational band together with phenomena tied to alpha-clustering substructures in the low-lying states in {sup 12}C, and in particular, the challenging Hoyle state and its first 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} excitations. For these states, we offer a novel perspective emerging out of no-core shell-model considerations, including a discussion of associated nuclear deformation and matter radii. This, in turn, provides guidance for ab initio shell models by informing key features of nuclear structure and the interaction.

  17. Experimental earth tidal models in considering nearly diurnal free wobble of the Earth's liquid core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Based on the 28 series of the high precision and high minute sampling tidal gravity observations at 20 stations in Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) network, the resonant parameters of the Earth's nearly diurnal free wobble (including the eigenperiods, resonant strengths and quality factots) are precisely determined. The discrepancy of the eigenperiod between observed and theoretical values is studied, the important conclusion that the real dynamic ellipticity of the liquid core is about 5% larger than the one under the static equilibrium assumption is approved by using our gravity technique. The experimental Earth's tidal gravity models with considering the nearly diurnal free wobble of the Earth's liquid core are constructed in this study. The numerical results show that the difference among three experimental models is less than 0.1%, and the largest discrepancy compared to those widely used nowdays given by Dehant (1999) and Mathews (2001) is only about 0.4%. It can provide with the most recent real experimental tidal gravity models for the global study of the Earth's tides, geodesy and space techniques and so on.

  18. Addressing the challenges of standalone multi-core simulations in molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaya, R. O.; Terblans, J. J.

    2017-07-01

    Computational modelling in material science involves mathematical abstractions of force fields between particles with the aim to postulate, develop and understand materials by simulation. The aggregated pairwise interactions of the material's particles lead to a deduction of its macroscopic behaviours. For practically meaningful macroscopic scales, a large amount of data are generated, leading to vast execution times. Simulation times of hours, days or weeks for moderately sized problems are not uncommon. The reduction of simulation times, improved result accuracy and the associated software and hardware engineering challenges are the main motivations for many of the ongoing researches in the computational sciences. This contribution is concerned mainly with simulations that can be done on a "standalone" computer based on Message Passing Interfaces (MPI), parallel code running on hardware platforms with wide specifications, such as single/multi- processor, multi-core machines with minimal reconfiguration for upward scaling of computational power. The widely available, documented and standardized MPI library provides this functionality through the MPI_Comm_size (), MPI_Comm_rank () and MPI_Reduce () functions. A survey of the literature shows that relatively little is written with respect to the efficient extraction of the inherent computational power in a cluster. In this work, we discuss the main avenues available to tap into this extra power without compromising computational accuracy. We also present methods to overcome the high inertia encountered in single-node-based computational molecular dynamics. We begin by surveying the current state of the art and discuss what it takes to achieve parallelism, efficiency and enhanced computational accuracy through program threads and message passing interfaces. Several code illustrations are given. The pros and cons of writing raw code as opposed to using heuristic, third-party code are also discussed. The growing trend

  19. Pore - to - Core Modeling of Soil Organic Matter Decomposition in 3D Soil Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, R. E.; Battaia, G.; Baveye, P.; Otten, W.

    2013-12-01

    There is a growing body of literature supporting the need for microbial contributions to be considered explicitly in carbon-climate models. There is also overwhelming evidence that physical protection within aggregates can play a significant role in organic matter dynamics. Yet current models of soil organic matter dynamics divide soil organic matter into conceptual pools with distinct turnover times, assuming that a combination of biochemical and physical properties control decay without explicit description. Albeit robust in their application, such models are not capable to account for changes in soil structure or microbial populations, or accurately predict the effect of wetness or priming. A spatially explicit model is presented that accounts for microbial dynamics and physical processes, permitting consideration of the heterogeneity of the physical and chemical microenvironments at scales relevant for microbes. Exemplified for fungi, we investigate how micro-scale processes manifest at the core scale with particular emphasis on evolution of CO2 and biomass distribution. The microbial model is based upon previous (Falconer et al, 2012) and includes the following processes: uptake, translocation, recycling, enzyme production, growth, spread and respiration. The model is parameterised through a combination of literature data and parameter estimation (Cazelles et al., 2012).The Carbon model comprises two pools, particulate organic matter which through enzymatic activity is converted into dissolved organic matter. The microbial and carbon dynamics occur within a 3D soil structure obtained by X-ray CT. We show that CO2 is affected not only by the amount of Carbon in the soil but also by microbial dynamics, soil structure and the spatial distribution of OM. The same amount of OM can result in substantially different respiration rates, with surprisingly more CO2 with increased clustering of OM. We can explain this from the colony dynamics, production of enzymes and

  20. Core cooling by subsolidus mantle convection. [thermal evolution model of earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, G.; Cassen, P.; Young, R. E.

    1979-01-01

    Although vigorous mantle convection early in the thermal history of the earth is shown to be capable of removing several times the latent heat content of the core, a thermal evolution model of the earth in which the core does not solidify can be constructed. The large amount of energy removed from the model earth's core by mantle convection is supplied by the internal energy of the core which is assumed to cool from an initial high temperature given by the silicate melting temperature at the core-mantle boundary. For the smaller terrestrial planets, the iron and silicate melting temperatures at the core-mantle boundaries are more comparable than for the earth; the models incorporate temperature-dependent mantle viscosity and radiogenic heat sources in the mantle. The earth models are constrained by the present surface heat flux and mantle viscosity and internal heat sources produce only about 55% of the earth model's present surface heat flow.

  1. Exact solutions of the high dimensional hard-core Fermi-Hubbard model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘峰; 戴连荣

    2001-01-01

    A simple algebraic approach to exact solutions of the hard-core Fermi-Hubbard model is proposed. Excitation energies and the corresponding wavefunctions of the hard-core Fermi-Hubbard model with nearest neighbor hopping cases in high dimension are obtained by using this method, which manifests that the model is exactly solvable in any dimension.

  2. Physics input for modelling superfluid neutron stars with hyperon cores

    CERN Document Server

    Gusakov, M E; Kantor, E M

    2014-01-01

    Observations of massive ($M \\approx 2.0~M_\\odot$) neutron stars (NSs), PSRs J1614-2230 and J0348+0432, rule out most of the models of nucleon-hyperon matter employed in NS simulations. Here we construct three possible models of nucleon-hyperon matter consistent with the existence of $2~M_\\odot$ pulsars as well as with semi-empirical nuclear matter parameters at saturation, and semi-empirical hypernuclear data. Our aim is to calculate for these models all the parameters necessary for modelling dynamics of hyperon stars (such as equation of state, adiabatic indices, thermodynamic derivatives, relativistic entrainment matrix, etc.), making them available for a potential user. To this aim a general non-linear hadronic Lagrangian involving $\\sigma\\omega\\rho\\phi\\sigma^\\ast$ meson fields, as well as quartic terms in vector-meson fields, is considered. A universal scheme for calculation of the $\\ell=0,1$ Landau Fermi-liquid parameters and relativistic entrainment matrix is formulated in the mean-field approximation. ...

  3. Dislocation climb models from atomistic scheme to dislocation dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiaohua; Luo, Tao; Lu, Jianfeng; Xiang, Yang

    2017-02-01

    We develop a mesoscopic dislocation dynamics model for vacancy-assisted dislocation climb by upscalings from a stochastic model on the atomistic scale. Our models incorporate microscopic mechanisms of (i) bulk diffusion of vacancies, (ii) vacancy exchange dynamics between bulk and dislocation core, (iii) vacancy pipe diffusion along the dislocation core, and (iv) vacancy attachment-detachment kinetics at jogs leading to the motion of jogs. Our mesoscopic model consists of the vacancy bulk diffusion equation and a dislocation climb velocity formula. The effects of these microscopic mechanisms are incorporated by a Robin boundary condition near the dislocations for the bulk diffusion equation and a new contribution in the dislocation climb velocity due to vacancy pipe diffusion driven by the stress variation along the dislocation. Our climb formulation is able to quantitatively describe the translation of prismatic loops at low temperatures when the bulk diffusion is negligible. Using this new formulation, we derive analytical formulas for the climb velocity of a straight edge dislocation and a prismatic circular loop. Our dislocation climb formulation can be implemented in dislocation dynamics simulations to incorporate all the above four microscopic mechanisms of dislocation climb.

  4. Inertial waves in a laboratory model of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Santiago Andres

    2011-12-01

    A water-filled three-meter diameter spherical shell built as a model of the Earth's core shows evidence of precessionally forced flows and, when spinning the inner sphere differentially, inertial modes are excited. We identified the precessionally forced flow to be primarily the spin-over inertial mode, i.e., a uniform vorticity flow whose rotation axis is not aligned with the container's rotation axis. A systematic study of the spin-over mode is carried out, showing that the amplitude dependence on the Poincare number is in qualitative agreement with Busse's laminar theory while its phase differs significantly, likely due to topographic effects. At high rotation rates free shear layers concentrating most of the kinetic energy of the spin-over mode have been observed. When spinning the inner sphere differentially, a total of 12 inertial modes have been identified, reproducing and extending previous experimental results. The inertial modes excited appear ordered according to their azimuthal drift speed as the Rossby number is varied.

  5. On-Line Core Thermal-Hydraulic Model Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    In, Wang Kee; Chun, Tae Hyun; Oh, Dong Seok; Shin, Chang Hwan; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Seo, Kyung Won

    2007-02-15

    The objective of this project is to implement a fast-running 4-channel based code CETOP-D in an advanced reactor core protection calculator system(RCOPS). The part required for the on-line calculation of DNBR were extracted from the source of the CETOP-D code based on analysis of the CETOP-D code. The CETOP-D code was revised to maintain the input and output variables which are the same as in CPC DNBR module. Since the DNBR module performs a complex calculation, it is divided into sub-modules per major calculation step. The functional design requirements for the DNBR module is documented and the values of the database(DB) constants were decided. This project also developed a Fortran module(BEST) of the RCOPS Fortran Simulator and a computer code RCOPS-SDNBR to independently calculate DNBR. A test was also conducted to verify the functional design and DB of thermal-hydraulic model which is necessary to calculate the DNBR on-line in RCOPS. The DNBR margin is expected to increase by 2%-3% once the CETOP-D code is used to calculate the RCOPS DNBR. It should be noted that the final DNBR margin improvement could be determined in the future based on overall uncertainty analysis of the RCOPS.

  6. Dynamic stall model for wind turbine airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, J.W.; Nielsen, S.R.K.; Krenk, Steen

    2007-01-01

    A model is presented for aerodynamic lift of wind turbine profiles under dynamic stall. The model combines memory delay effects under attached flow with reduced lift due to flow separation under dynamic stall conditions. The model is based on a backbone curve in the form of the static lift...... conditions, nonstationary effects are included by three mechanisms: a delay of the lift coefficient of fully attached flow via a second-order filter, a delay of the development of separation represented via a first-order filter, and a lift contribution due to leading edge separation also represented via...... during dynamic stall conditions. The proposed model is compared with five other dynamic stall models including, among others, the Beddoes-Leishman model and the ONERA model. It is demonstrated that the proposed model performs equally well or even better than more complicated models and that the included...

  7. Core-concrete molten pool dynamics and interfacial heat transfer. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Theoretical models are derived for the heat transfer from molten oxide pools to an underlying concrete surface and from molten steel pools to a general concrete containment. To accomplish this, two separate effects models are first developed, one emphasizing the vigorous agitation of the molten pool by gases evolving from the concrete and the other considering the insulating effect of a slag layer produced by concrete melting. The resulting algebraic expressions, combined into a general core-concrete heat transfer representation, are shown to provide very good agreement with experiments involving molten steel pours into concrete crucibles.

  8. Dynamics of blueshifted floating pulses in gas filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Facao, M

    2013-01-01

    Frequency blueshifting was recently observed in light pulses propagating on gas filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers where a plasma has been produced due to photoionization of the gas. One of the propagation models that is adequate to describe the actual experimental observations is here investigated. It is a nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation with an extra term, to which we applied a self-similar change of variables and found its accelerating solitons. As in other NLS related models possessing accelerating solitons, there exist asymmetrical pulses that decay as they propagate in some parameter region that was here well defined.

  9. Modelling landslide dynamics in forested landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The research resulting in this thesis covers the geological, geomorphological and landscape ecology related themes of the project 'Podzolisation under Kauri (Agathis australis): for better or worse?' supported by theNetherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The general objective of this thesis is to investigate landscape, soil and vegetation dynamics in theWaitakereRangesRegionalParkon the North Island of New Zealand, where also all the fieldwork was carried out. The main core o...

  10. Experimental studies into the fluid dynamic performance of the coolant flow in the mixed core of the Temelin NPP VVER-1000 reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Dmitriev

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of studies into the interassembly coolant interaction in the Temelin nuclear power plant (NPP VVER-1000 reactor core. An aerodynamic test bench was used to study the coolant flow processes in a TVSA-type fuel assembly bundle. To obtain more detailed information on the coolant flow dynamics, a VVER-1000 reactor core fragment was selected as the test model, which comprised two segments of a TVSA-12 PLUS fuel assembly and one segment of a TVSA-T assembly with stiffening angles and an interassembly gap. The studies into the coolant fluid dynamics consisted in measuring the velocity vector both in representative TVSA regions and inside the interassembly gap using a five-channel pneumometric probe. An analysis into the spatial distribution of the absolute flow velocity projections made it possible to detail the TVSA spacer, mixing and combined spacer grid flow pattern, identify the regions with the maximum transverse coolant flow, and determine the depth of the coolant flow disturbance propagation and redistribution in adjacent TVSA assemblies. The results of the studies into the interassembly coolant interaction among the adjacent TVSA assemblies are used at OKBM Afrikantov to update the VVER-1000 core thermal-hydraulic analysis procedures and have been added to the database for verification of computational fluid dynamics (CFD codes and for detailed cellwise analyses of the VVER-100 reactor cores.

  11. Model dynamics for quantum computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakin, Frank

    2017-08-01

    A model master equation suitable for quantum computing dynamics is presented. In an ideal quantum computer (QC), a system of qubits evolves in time unitarily and, by virtue of their entanglement, interfere quantum mechanically to solve otherwise intractable problems. In the real situation, a QC is subject to decoherence and attenuation effects due to interaction with an environment and with possible short-term random disturbances and gate deficiencies. The stability of a QC under such attacks is a key issue for the development of realistic devices. We assume that the influence of the environment can be incorporated by a master equation that includes unitary evolution with gates, supplemented by a Lindblad term. Lindblad operators of various types are explored; namely, steady, pulsed, gate friction, and measurement operators. In the master equation, we use the Lindblad term to describe short time intrusions by random Lindblad pulses. The phenomenological master equation is then extended to include a nonlinear Beretta term that describes the evolution of a closed system with increasing entropy. An external Bath environment is stipulated by a fixed temperature in two different ways. Here we explore the case of a simple one-qubit system in preparation for generalization to multi-qubit, qutrit and hybrid qubit-qutrit systems. This model master equation can be used to test the stability of memory and the efficacy of quantum gates. The properties of such hybrid master equations are explored, with emphasis on the role of thermal equilibrium and entropy constraints. Several significant properties of time-dependent qubit evolution are revealed by this simple study.

  12. An immune based dynamic intrusion detection model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Tao

    2005-01-01

    With the dynamic description method for self and antigen, and the concept of dynamic immune tolerance for lymphocytes in network-security domain presented in this paper, a new immune based dynamic intrusion detection model (Idid) is proposed. In Idid, the dynamic models and the corresponding recursive equations of the lifecycle of mature lymphocytes, and the immune memory are built. Therefore, the problem of the dynamic description of self and nonself in computer immune systems is solved, and the defect of the low efficiency of mature lymphocyte generating in traditional computer immune systems is overcome. Simulations of this model are performed, and the comparison experiment results show that the proposed dynamic intrusion detection model has a better adaptability than the traditional methods.

  13. Disentangling the dynamic core: a research program for a neurodynamics at the large-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Van Quyen, Michel

    2003-01-01

    My purpose in this paper is to sketch a research direction based on Francisco Varela's pioneering work in neurodynamics (see also Rudrauf et al. 2003, in this issue). Very early on he argued that the internal coherence of every mental-cognitive state lies in the global self-organization of the brain activities at the large-scale, constituting a fundamental pole of integration called here a "dynamic core". Recent neuroimaging evidence appears to broadly support this hypothesis and suggests that a global brain dynamics emerges at the large scale level from the cooperative interactions among widely distributed neuronal populations. Despite a growing body of evidence supporting this view, our understanding of these large-scale brain processes remains hampered by the lack of a theoretical language for expressing these complex behaviors in dynamical terms. In this paper, I propose a rough cartography of a comprehensive approach that offers a conceptual and mathematical framework to analyze spatio-temporal large-scale brain phenomena. I emphasize how these nonlinear methods can be applied, what property might be inferred from neuronal signals, and where one might productively proceed for the future. This paper is dedicated, with respect and affection, to the memory of Francisco Varela.

  14. Workflow-Based Dynamic Enterprise Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄双喜; 范玉顺; 罗海滨; 林慧萍

    2002-01-01

    Traditional systems for enterprise modeling and business process control are often static and cannot adapt to the changing environment. This paper presents a workflow-based method to dynamically execute the enterprise model. This method gives an explicit representation of the business process logic and the relationships between the elements involved in the process. An execution-oriented integrated enterprise modeling system is proposed in combination with other enterprise views. The enterprise model can be established and executed dynamically in the actual environment due to the dynamic properties of the workflow model.

  15. Dynamical model of the kinesin protein motor

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterov, Alexander I; Ramírez, Mónica F

    2016-01-01

    We model and simulate the stepping dynamics of the kinesin motor including electric and mechanical forces, environmental noise, and the complicated potentials produced by tracking and neighboring protofilaments. Our dynamical model supports the hand-over-hand mechanism of the kinesin stepping. Our theoretical predictions and numerical simulations include the off-axis displacements of the kinesin heads while the steps are performed. The results obtained are in a good agreement with recent experiments on the kinesin dynamics.

  16. A simplified model of software project dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Carreira, Mercedes; Ramos Román, Isabel; Toro Bonilla, Miguel

    2001-01-01

    The simulation of a dynamic model for software development projects (hereinafter SDPs) helps to investigate the impact of a technological change, of different management policies, and of maturity level of organisations over the whole project. In the beginning of the 1990s, with the appearance of the dynamic model for SDPs by Abdel-Hamid and Madnick [Software Project Dynamics: An Integrated Approach, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1991], a significant advance took place in the field of p...

  17. Explicit models for dynamic software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosloper, Ivor; Siljee, Johanneke; Nijhuis, Jos; Nord, R; Medvidovic, N; Krikhaar, R; Khrhaar, R; Stafford, J; Bosch, J

    2006-01-01

    A key aspect in creating autonomous dynamic software systems is the possibility of reasoning about properties of runtime variability and dynamic behavior, e.g. when and how to reconfigure the system. Currently these properties are often not made explicit in the software architecture. We argue that

  18. Explicit models for dynamic software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosloper, Ivor; Siljee, Johanneke; Nijhuis, Jos; Nord, R; Medvidovic, N; Krikhaar, R; Khrhaar, R; Stafford, J; Bosch, J

    2006-01-01

    A key aspect in creating autonomous dynamic software systems is the possibility of reasoning about properties of runtime variability and dynamic behavior, e.g. when and how to reconfigure the system. Currently these properties are often not made explicit in the software architecture. We argue that h

  19. Ekofisk chalk: core measurements, stochastic reconstruction, network modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, Saifullah

    2002-07-01

    This dissertation deals with (1) experimental measurements on petrophysical, reservoir engineering and morphological properties of Ekofisk chalk, (2) numerical simulation of core flood experiments to analyze and improve relative permeability data, (3) stochastic reconstruction of chalk samples from limited morphological information, (4) extraction of pore space parameters from the reconstructed samples, development of network model using pore space information, and computation of petrophysical and reservoir engineering properties from network model, and (5) development of 2D and 3D idealized fractured reservoir models and verification of the applicability of several widely used conventional up scaling techniques in fractured reservoir simulation. Experiments have been conducted on eight Ekofisk chalk samples and porosity, absolute permeability, formation factor, and oil-water relative permeability, capillary pressure and resistivity index are measured at laboratory conditions. Mercury porosimetry data and backscatter scanning electron microscope images have also been acquired for the samples. A numerical simulation technique involving history matching of the production profiles is employed to improve the relative permeability curves and to analyze hysteresis of the Ekofisk chalk samples. The technique was found to be a powerful tool to supplement the uncertainties in experimental measurements. Porosity and correlation statistics obtained from backscatter scanning electron microscope images are used to reconstruct microstructures of chalk and particulate media. The reconstruction technique involves a simulated annealing algorithm, which can be constrained by an arbitrary number of morphological parameters. This flexibility of the algorithm is exploited to successfully reconstruct particulate media and chalk samples using more than one correlation functions. A technique based on conditional simulated annealing has been introduced for exact reproduction of vuggy

  20. Comparative dynamics in a health investment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenring, C

    1999-10-01

    The method of comparative dynamics fully exploits the inter-temporal structure of optimal control models. I derive comparative dynamic results in a simplified demand for health model. The effect of a change in the depreciation rate on the optimal paths for health capital and investment in health is studied by use of a phase diagram.

  1. Dynamic Heat Transfer Model of Refrigerated Foodstuff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cai, Junping; Risum, Jørgen; Thybo, Claus

    2006-01-01

    their temperature relation. This paper discusses the dynamic heat transfer model of foodstuff inside the display cabinet, one-dimensional dynamic model is developed, and the Explicit Finite Difference Method is applied, to handle the unsteady heat transfer problem with phase change, as well as time varying boundary...

  2. System dynamics modelling of situation awareness

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oosthuizen, R

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available . The feedback loops and delays in the Command and Control system also contribute to the complex dynamic behavior. This paper will build on existing situation awareness models to develop a System Dynamics model to support a qualitative investigation through...

  3. The Challenges to Coupling Dynamic Geospatial Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, N

    2006-06-23

    Many applications of modeling spatial dynamic systems focus on a single system and a single process, ignoring the geographic and systemic context of the processes being modeled. A solution to this problem is the coupled modeling of spatial dynamic systems. Coupled modeling is challenging for both technical reasons, as well as conceptual reasons. This paper explores the benefits and challenges to coupling or linking spatial dynamic models, from loose coupling, where information transfer between models is done by hand, to tight coupling, where two (or more) models are merged as one. To illustrate the challenges, a coupled model of Urbanization and Wildfire Risk is presented. This model, called Vesta, was applied to the Santa Barbara, California region (using real geospatial data), where Urbanization and Wildfires occur and recur, respectively. The preliminary results of the model coupling illustrate that coupled modeling can lead to insight into the consequences of processes acting on their own.

  4. Fluorescence relaxation dynamics of CdSe and CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Gurvir; Kaur, Harmandeep [Centre of Advanced Study in Physics, Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Tripathi, S. K., E-mail: surya@pu.ac.in [Centre of Advanced Study in Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh- 160014 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Time-resolved fluorescence spectra for colloidal CdSe and CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots have been investigated to know their electron relaxation dynamics at the maximum steady state fluorescence intensity. CdSe core and CdSe/CdS type I core-shell materials with different shell (CdS) thicknesses have been synthesized using mercaptoacetic acid as a capping agent. Steady state absorption and emission studies confirmed successful synthesis of CdSe and CdSe/CdS core-shell quantum dots. The fluorescence shows a tri-exponential decay with lifetimes 57.39, 7.82 and 0.96 ns for CdSe quantum dots. The lifetime of each recombination decreased with growth of CdS shell over the CdSe core, with maximum contribution to fluorescence by the fastest transition.

  5. Hydration dynamics near a model protein surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Daniela; Hura, Greg; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2003-09-01

    The evolution of water dynamics from dilute to very high concentration solutions of a prototypical hydrophobic amino acid with its polar backbone, N-acetyl-leucine-methylamide (NALMA), is studied by quasi-elastic neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation for both the completely deuterated and completely hydrogenated leucine monomer. We observe several unexpected features in the dynamics of these biological solutions under ambient conditions. The NALMA dynamics shows evidence of de Gennes narrowing, an indication of coherent long timescale structural relaxation dynamics. The translational water dynamics are analyzed in a first approximation with a jump diffusion model. At the highest solute concentrations, the hydration water dynamics is significantly suppressed and characterized by a long residential time and a slow diffusion coefficient. The analysis of the more dilute concentration solutions takes into account the results of the 2.0M solution as a model of the first hydration shell. Subtracting the first hydration layer based on the 2.0M spectra, the translational diffusion dynamics is still suppressed, although the rotational relaxation time and residential time are converged to bulk-water values. Molecular dynamics analysis shows spatially heterogeneous dynamics at high concentration that becomes homogeneous at more dilute concentrations. We discuss the hydration dynamics results of this model protein system in the context of glassy systems, protein function, and protein-protein interfaces.

  6. Melting of iron at the Earth's core conditions by molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. N. Wu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available By large scale molecular dynamics simulations of solid-liquid coexistence, we have investigated the melting of iron under pressures from 0 to 364 GPa. The temperatures of liquid and solid regions, and the pressure of the system are calculated to estimate the melting point of iron. We obtain the melting temperature of iron is about 6700±200K under the inner-outer core boundary, which is in good agreement with the result of Alfè et al. By the pair analysis technique, the microstructure of liquid iron under higher pressures is obviously different from that of lower pressures and ambient condition, indicating that the pressure-induced liquid-liquid phase transition may take place in iron melts.

  7. Dynamics of optical solitons in dual-core fibers via two integration schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnous, A. H.; Mahmood, S. A.; Younis, M.

    2017-06-01

    This article studies the dynamics of optical solitons in dual-core fibers with group velocity mismatch, group velocity dispersion and linear coupling coefficient under Kerr law nonlinearity via two integration schemes, namely, Q-function scheme and trial solution approach. The Q-function scheme extracts dark and singular 1-soliton solutions, along with the corresponding existence restriction. This scheme, however, fails to retrieve bright 1-soliton solution. Moreover, the trial solution approach extracts bright, dark and singular 1-soliton solutions. The constraint conditions, for the existence of the soliton solutions, are also listed. Additionally, a couple of other solutions known as singular periodic solutions, fall out as a by-product of this scheme. The obtained results have potential applications in the study of solitons based optical communication.

  8. Assessment of water hammer effects on boiling water nuclear reactor core dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bousbia-Salah Anis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex phenomena, as water hammer transients, occurring in nuclear power plants are still not very well investigated by the current best estimate computational tools. Within this frame work, a rapid positive reactivity addition into the core generated by a water hammer transient is considered. The numerical simulation of such phenomena was carried out using the coupled RELAP5/PARCS code. An over all data comparison shows good agreement between the calculated and measured core pressure wave trends. However, the predicted power response during the excursion phase did not correctly match the experimental tendency. Because of this, sensitivity studies have been carried out in order to identify the most influential parameters that govern the dynamics of the power excursion. After investigating the pressure wave amplitude and the void feed back responses, it was found that the disagreement between the calculated and measured data occurs mainly due to the RELAP5 low void condensation rate which seems to be questionable during rapid transients. .

  9. The ICON-1.2 hydrostatic atmospheric dynamical core on triangular grids – Part 1: Formulation and performance of the baseline version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available As part of a broader effort to develop next-generation models for numerical weather prediction and climate applications, a hydrostatic atmospheric dynamical core is developed as an intermediate step to evaluate a finite-difference discretization of the primitive equations on spherical icosahedral grids. Based on the need for mass-conserving discretizations for multi-resolution modelling as well as scalability and efficiency on massively parallel computing architectures, the dynamical core is built on triangular C-grids using relatively small discretization stencils. This paper presents the formulation and performance of the baseline version of the new dynamical core, focusing on properties of the numerical solutions in the setting of globally uniform resolution. Theoretical analysis reveals that the discrete divergence operator defined on a single triangular cell using the Gauss theorem is only first-order accurate, and introduces grid-scale noise to the discrete model. The noise can be suppressed by fourth-order hyper-diffusion of the horizontal wind field using a time-step and grid-size-dependent diffusion coefficient, at the expense of stronger damping than in the reference spectral model. A series of idealized tests of different complexity are performed. In the deterministic baroclinic wave test, solutions from the new dynamical core show the expected sensitivity to horizontal resolution, and converge to the reference solution at R2B6 (35 km grid spacing. In a dry climate test, the dynamical core correctly reproduces key features of the meridional heat and momentum transport by baroclinic eddies. In the aqua-planet simulations at 140 km resolution, the new model is able to reproduce the same equatorial wave propagation characteristics as in the reference spectral model, including the sensitivity of such characteristics to the meridional sea surface temperature profile. These results suggest that the triangular-C discretization provides a

  10. Hydrographical and dynamical reconstruction of the Warm Core Cyprus Eddy from gliders data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Anthony; Testor, Pierre; Hayes, Dan; Ruiz, Simon; Mauri, Elena; Charantonis, Anastase; d'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Mortier, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    In the 80s, the POEM (Physical Oceanography of the Eastern Mediterranean) cruises in the Levantine Basin first revealed the presence of a very pronounced dynamical structure off Cyprus: The Cyprus Warm Core Eddy. Since then, a large amount of data have been collected thanks to the use of autonomous oceanic gliders (+8000 profiles since 2009). Part of those profiles were carried out in the upper layers down to 200 m, and we take benefit of a novel approach named ITCOMP SOM that uses a statistical approach to extend them down to 1000 m (see [1] for more details). This dataset have a particularly good spatio-temporal coverage in 2009 for about a month, thanks to simultaneous deployments of several gliders (up to 6). In this study, we present a set of 3D reconstruction of the dynamical and hydrographical characteristics of the Warm Core Cyprus Eddy between 2009 and 2015. Moreover, chlorophyll-a fluorescence data measured by the gliders give evidence to strong vertical velocities at the edge of the eddy. We discuss possible mechanisms (frontogenesis, symmetric instability) that could generate such signals and provide an assessment of the role of this peculiar circulation feature on the circulation and biogeochemistry of the Levantine basin. Reference: [1] Charantonis, A., P. Testor, L. Mortier, F. D'Ortenzio, S. Thiria (2015): Completion of a sparse GLIDER database using multi-iterative Self-Organizing Maps (ITCOMP SOM), Procedia Computer Science, 51(1):2198-2206. DOI: 10.1016/j.procs.2015.05.496

  11. Dynamic Factor Models for the Volatility Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Wel, Michel; Ozturk, Sait R.; Dijk, Dick van

    The implied volatility surface is the collection of volatilities implied by option contracts for different strike prices and time-to-maturity. We study factor models to capture the dynamics of this three-dimensional implied volatility surface. Three model types are considered to examine desirable...... features for representing the surface and its dynamics: a general dynamic factor model, restricted factor models designed to capture the key features of the surface along the moneyness and maturity dimensions, and in-between spline-based methods. Key findings are that: (i) the restricted and spline......-based models are both rejected against the general dynamic factor model, (ii) the factors driving the surface are highly persistent, (iii) for the restricted models option Delta is preferred over the more often used strike relative to spot price as measure for moneyness....

  12. Comprehensive Survey on Dynamic Graph Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aya Zaki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the critical real-world networks are con-tinuously changing and evolving with time. Motivated by the growing importance and widespread impact of this type of networks, the dynamic nature of these networks have gained a lot of attention. Because of their intrinsic and special characteristics, these networks are best represented by dynamic graph models. To cope with their evolving nature, the representation model must keep the historical information of the network along with its temporal time. Storing such amount of data, poses many problems from the perspective of dynamic graph data management. This survey provides an in-depth overview on dynamic graph related problems. Novel categorization and classification of the state of the art dynamic graph models are also presented in a systematic and comprehensive way. Finally, we discuss dynamic graph processing including the output representation of its algorithms.

  13. Modelling the dynamics of turbulent floods

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, Z; Li, Z; Li, Zhenquan

    1999-01-01

    Consider the dynamics of turbulent flow in rivers, estuaries and floods. Based on the widely used k-epsilon model for turbulence, we use the techniques of centre manifold theory to derive dynamical models for the evolution of the water depth and of vertically averaged flow velocity and turbulent parameters. This new model for the shallow water dynamics of turbulent flow: resolves the vertical structure of the flow and the turbulence; includes interaction between turbulence and long waves; and gives a rational alternative to classical models for turbulent environmental flows.

  14. Development of 3D ferromagnetic model of tokamak core with strong toroidal asymmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovič, Tomáš; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Ďuran, Ivan;

    2015-01-01

    Fully 3D model of strongly asymmetric tokamak core, based on boundary integral method approach (i.e. characterization of ferromagnet by its surface) is presented. The model is benchmarked on measurements on tokamak GOLEM, as well as compared to 2D axisymmetric core equivalent for this tokamak...

  15. Flapping Wing Flight Dynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    von Karman, T. and Burgers, J. M., Gerneral Aerodynamic Theory - Perfect Fluids , Vol. II, Julius Springer , Berlin, 1935. [24] Pesavento, U. and Wang...L., Methods of Analytical Dynamics , McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1970. [34] Deng, X., Schenato, L., Wu, W. C., and Sastry, S. S., Flapping...Micro air vehicle- motivated computational biomechanics in bio ights: aerodynamics, ight dynamics and maneuvering stability, Acta Mechanica

  16. Toward a detailed description of the thermally induced dynamics of the core promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boian S Alexandrov

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Establishing the general and promoter-specific mechanistic features of gene transcription initiation requires improved understanding of the sequence-dependent structural/dynamic features of promoter DNA. Experimental data suggest that a spontaneous dsDNA strand separation at the transcriptional start site is likely to be a requirement for transcription initiation in several promoters. Here, we use Langevin molecular dynamic simulations based on the Peyrard-Bishop-Dauxois nonlinear model of DNA (PBD LMD to analyze the strand separation (bubble dynamics of 80-bp-long promoter DNA sequences. We derive three dynamic criteria, bubble probability, bubble lifetime, and average strand separation, to characterize bubble formation at the transcriptional start sites of eight mammalian gene promoters. We observe that the most stable dsDNA openings do not necessarily coincide with the most probable openings and the highest average strand displacement, underscoring the advantages of proper molecular dynamic simulations. The dynamic profiles of the tested mammalian promoters differ significantly in overall profile and bubble probability, but the transcriptional start site is often distinguished by large (longer than 10 bp and long-lived transient openings in the double helix. In support of these results are our experimental transcription data demonstrating that an artificial bubble-containing DNA template is transcribed bidirectionally by human RNA polymerase alone in the absence of any other transcription factors.

  17. Performance modeling and analysis of parallel Gaussian elimination on multi-core computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi N. Sibai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gaussian elimination is used in many applications and in particular in the solution of systems of linear equations. This paper presents mathematical performance models and analysis of four parallel Gaussian Elimination methods (precisely the Original method and the new Meet in the Middle –MiM– algorithms and their variants with SIMD vectorization on multi-core systems. Analytical performance models of the four methods are formulated and presented followed by evaluations of these models with modern multi-core systems’ operation latencies. Our results reveal that the four methods generally exhibit good performance scaling with increasing matrix size and number of cores. SIMD vectorization only makes a large difference in performance for low number of cores. For a large matrix size (n ⩾ 16 K, the performance difference between the MiM and Original methods falls from 16× with four cores to 4× with 16 K cores. The efficiencies of all four methods are low with 1 K cores or more stressing a major problem of multi-core systems where the network-on-chip and memory latencies are too high in relation to basic arithmetic operations. Thus Gaussian Elimination can greatly benefit from the resources of multi-core systems, but higher performance gains can be achieved if multi-core systems can be designed with lower memory operation, synchronization, and interconnect communication latencies, requirements of utmost importance and challenge in the exascale computing age.

  18. An analytical model for the evolution of starless cores - I. The constant-mass case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattle, K.

    2016-07-01

    We propose an analytical model for the quasi-static evolution of starless cores confined by a constant external pressure, assuming that cores are isothermal and obey a spherically symmetric density distribution. We model core evolution for Plummer-like and Gaussian density distributions in the adiabatic and isothermal limits, assuming Larson-like dissipation of turbulence. We model the variation in the terms in the virial equation as a function of core characteristic radius, and determine whether cores are evolving towards virial equilibrium or gravitational collapse. We ignore accretion on to cores in the current study. We discuss the different behaviours predicted by the isothermal and adiabatic cases, and by our choice of index for the size-linewidth relation, and suggest a means of parametrizing the magnetic energy term in the virial equation. We model the evolution of the set of cores observed by Pattle et al. in the L1688 region of Ophiuchus in the `virial plane'. We find that not all virially bound and pressure-confined cores will evolve to become gravitationally bound, with many instead contracting to virial equilibrium with their surroundings, and find an absence of gravitationally dominated and virially unbound cores. We hypothesize a `starless core desert' in this quadrant of the virial plane, which may result from cores initially forming as pressure-confined objects. We conclude that a virially bound and pressure-confined core will not necessarily evolve to become gravitationally bound, and thus cannot be considered pre-stellar. A core can only be definitively considered pre-stellar (collapsing to form an individual stellar system) if it is gravitationally unstable.

  19. Emergence of cluster structures and collectivity within a no-core shell-model framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launey, K. D.; Dreyfuss, A. C.; Draayer, J. P.; Dytrych, T.; Baker, R.

    2014-12-01

    An innovative symmetry-guided concept, which capitalizes on partial as well as exact symmetries that underpin the structure of nuclei, is discussed. Within this framework, ab initio applications of the theory to light nuclei reveal the origin of collective modes and the emergence a simple orderly pattern from first principles. This provides a strategy for determining the nature of bound states of nuclei in terms of a relatively small fraction of the complete shell-model space, which, in turn, can be used to explore ultra-large model spaces for a description of alpha-cluster and highly deformed structures together with the associated rotations. We find that by using only a fraction of the model space extended far beyond current no-core shell-model limits and a long-range interaction that respects the symmetries in play, the outcome reproduces characteristic features of the low-lying 0+ states in 12 C (including the elusive Hoyle state and its 2+ excitation) and agrees with ab initio results in smaller spaces. This is achieved by selecting those particle configurations and components of the interaction found to be foremost responsible for the primary physics governing clustering phenomena and large spatial deformation in the ground-state and Hoyle-state rotational bands of 12 C. For these states, we offer a novel perspective emerging out of no-core shell-model considerations, including a discussion of associated nuclear deformation, matter radii, and density distribution. The framework we find is also extensible to negative-parity states (e.g., the 3-1 state in 12C) and beyond, namely, to the low-lying 0+ states of 8Be as well as the ground-state rotational band of Ne, Mg, and Si isotopes. The findings inform key features of the nuclear interaction and point to a new insight into the formation of highly-organized simple patterns in nuclear dynamics.

  20. Diverse Melting Modes and Structural Collapse of Hollow Bimetallic Core-Shell Nanoparticles: A Perspective from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability.

  1. Diverse Melting Modes and Structural Collapse of Hollow Bimetallic Core-Shell Nanoparticles: A Perspective from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rao; Shao, Gui-Fang; Zeng, Xiang-Ming; Wen, Yu-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Introducing hollow structures into metallic nanoparticles has become a promising route to improve their catalytic performances. A fundamental understanding of thermal stability of these novel nanostructures is of significance for their syntheses and applications. In this article, molecular dynamics simulations have been employed to offer insights into the thermodynamic evolution of hollow bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles. Our investigation reveals that for hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle, premelting originates at the exterior surface, and a typical two-stage melting behavior is exhibited, similar to the solid ones. However, since the interior surface provides facilitation for the premelting initiating at the core, the two-stage melting is also observed in hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle, remarkably different from the solid one. Furthermore, the collapse of hollow structure is accompanied with the overall melting of the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle while it occurs prior to that of the hollow Au-core/Pt-shell nanoparticle and leads to the formation of a liquid-core/solid-shell structure, although both of them finally transform into a mixing alloy with Au-dominated surface. Additionally, the existence of stacking faults in the hollow Pt-core/Au-shell nanoparticle distinctly lowers its melting point. This study could be of great importance to the design and development of novel nanocatalysts with both high activity and excellent stability. PMID:25394424

  2. Little Earth Experiment: an instrument to model planetary cores

    CERN Document Server

    Aujogue, Kelig; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  3. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  4. Modeling Mitochondrial Bioenergetics with Integrated Volume Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Bazil, Jason N.; Buzzard, Gregery T.; Ann E Rundell

    2010-01-01

    Author Summary Mathematically modeling biological systems challenges our current understanding of the physical and biochemical events contributing to the observed dynamics. It requires careful consideration of hypothesized mechanisms, model development assumptions and details regarding the experimental conditions. We have adopted a modeling approach to translate these factors that explicitly considers the thermodynamic constraints, biochemical states and reaction mechanisms during model devel...

  5. Dynamical CP violation in composite Higgs models

    OpenAIRE

    Hashimoto, S.; Inagaki, Tomohiro; Muta, Taizo

    1993-01-01

    The dynamical origin of the CP violation in electroweak theory is investigated in composite Higgs models. The mechanism of the spontaneous CP violation proposed in other context by Dashen is adopted to construct simple models of the dynamical CP violation. Within the models the size of the neutron electric dipole moment is estimated and the constraint on the $\\varepsilon$-parameter in K-meson decays is discussed.

  6. Pattern formation with repulsive soft-core interactions: Discrete particle dynamics and Dean-Kawasaki equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfau, Jean-Baptiste; Ollivier, Hélène; López, Cristóbal; Blasius, Bernd; Hernández-García, Emilio

    2016-10-01

    Brownian particles interacting via repulsive soft-core potentials can spontaneously aggregate, despite repelling each other, and form periodic crystals of particle clusters. We study this phenomenon in low-dimensional situations (one and two dimensions) at two levels of description: by performing numerical simulations of the discrete particle dynamics and by linear and nonlinear analysis of the corresponding Dean-Kawasaki equation for the macroscopic particle density. Restricting to low dimensions and neglecting fluctuation effects, we gain analytical insight into the mechanisms of the instability leading to clustering which turn out to be the interplay among diffusion, the intracluster forces, and the forces between neighboring clusters. We show that the deterministic part of the Dean-Kawasaki equation provides a good description of the particle dynamics, including width and shape of the clusters and over a wide range of parameters, and analyze with weakly nonlinear techniques the nature of the pattern-forming bifurcation in one and two dimensions. Finally, we briefly discuss the case of attractive forces.

  7. Probing charge transfer dynamics in self-assembled monolayers by core hole clock approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zharnikov, Michael, E-mail: Michael.Zharnikov@urz.uni-heidelberg.de

    2015-04-15

    This article reviews recent progress in the application of core hole clock approach in the framework of resonant Auger electron spectroscopy to the monomolecular assembles of alkyl, oligophenyl, and oligo(phenylene–ethynylene) based molecules on Au(1 1 1) substrates, referring mostly to the work by the author et al. The major goal was to study electron transfer (ET) dynamics in these systems serving as prototypes of molecular electronics (ME) devices. The ET pathway to the conductive substrate was unambiguously defined by resonant excitation of the nitrile tailgroup attached to the molecular backbone. Characteristic ET times within the femtosecond domain were determined, along with the attenuation factors for the ET dynamics, analogous to the case of the static transport. The above parameters were found to exhibit strong dependence on the character of the molecular orbital which mediates the ET process. In addition, certain spectral features, which can be associated with an inverse ET from the molecular backbone to the excitation site, were observed upon exchange of the nitrile group by strongly electronegative nitro moiety. The reported results represent a valuable input for theory and a certain potential for applications such as ME devices where optimization of ET can have significant technological impact.

  8. Molecular dynamics estimates for the thermodynamic properties of the Fe-S liquid cores of the Moon, Io, Europa, and Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuskov, O. L.; Belashchenko, D. K.

    2016-05-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is performed for the physical and chemical properties of solid and liquid Fe-S solutions using the embedded atom model (EAM) potential as applied to the internal structure of the Moon, Io, Europa, and Ganymede under the assumption that the satellites' cores can be described by a two-component iron-sulfur system. Calculated results are presented for the thermodynamic parameters including the caloric, thermal, and elastic properties (specific heat, thermal expansion, Grüneisen parameter, density, compression module, velocity of sound, and adiabatic gradient) of the Fe-S solutions at sulfur concentrations of 0-18 at %, temperatures of up to 2500 K, and pressures of up to 14 GPa. The velocity of sound, which increases as pressure rises, is weakly dependent on sulfur concentration and temperature. For the Moon's outer Fe-S core (~5 GPa/2000 K), which contains 6-16 at % (3.5-10 wt %) sulfur, the density and the velocity of sound are estimated at 6.3-7.0 g/cm3 and 4000 ± 50 m/s, respectively. The MD calculations are compared with the interpretation of the Apollo observations (Weber et al., 2011) to show a good consistency of the velocity of P-waves in the Moon's liquid core whereas the thermodynamic density of the Fe-S core is not consistent with the seismic models with ρ = 5.1-5.2 g/cm3 (Garcia et al., 2011; Weber et al., 2011). The revision the density values for the core leads to the revision of its size and mass. At sulfur concentrations of 3.5-10 wt %, the density of the Fe-S melt is 20-30% higher that the seismic density of the core. Therefore, the most likely radius of the Moon's outer core must be less than 330 km (Weber et al., 2011) because, provided that the constraint on the Moon's mass and moment of inertia is satisfied, an increase in the density of the core must lead to a reduction of its radius. For Jupiter's Galilean moons Io, Europa, and Ganymede, constraints are obtained on the size, density, and sound velocity of

  9. Very Large System Dynamics Models - Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob J. Jacobson; Leonard Malczynski

    2008-10-01

    This paper provides lessons learned from developing several large system dynamics (SD) models. System dynamics modeling practice emphasize the need to keep models small so that they are manageable and understandable. This practice is generally reasonable and prudent; however, there are times that large SD models are necessary. This paper outlines two large SD projects that were done at two Department of Energy National Laboratories, the Idaho National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes the models and then discusses some of the valuable lessons learned during these two modeling efforts.

  10. A model for large-amplitude internal solitary waves with trapped cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Helfrich

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Large-amplitude internal solitary waves in continuously stratified systems can be found by solution of the Dubreil-Jacotin-Long (DJL equation. For finite ambient density gradients at the surface (bottom for waves of depression (elevation these solutions may develop recirculating cores for wave speeds above a critical value. As typically modeled, these recirculating cores contain densities outside the ambient range, may be statically unstable, and thus are physically questionable. To address these issues the problem for trapped-core solitary waves is reformulated. A finite core of homogeneous density and velocity, but unknown shape, is assumed. The core density is arbitrary, but generally set equal to the ambient density on the streamline bounding the core. The flow outside the core satisfies the DJL equation. The flow in the core is given by a vorticity-streamfunction relation that may be arbitrarily specified. For simplicity, the simplest choice of a stagnant, zero vorticity core in the frame of the wave is assumed. A pressure matching condition is imposed along the core boundary. Simultaneous numerical solution of the DJL equation and the core condition gives the exterior flow and the core shape. Numerical solutions of time-dependent non-hydrostatic equations initiated with the new stagnant-core DJL solutions show that for the ambient stratification considered, the waves are stable up to a critical amplitude above which shear instability destroys the initial wave. Steadily propagating trapped-core waves formed by lock-release initial conditions also agree well with the theoretical wave properties despite the presence of a "leaky" core region that contains vorticity of opposite sign from the ambient flow.

  11. A Stochastic Cobweb Dynamical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Brianzoni

    2008-01-01

    _,__0__1, and the forward predictor with probability (1−, so that the expected price at time is a random variable and consequently the dynamics describing the price evolution in time is governed by a stochastic dynamical system. The dynamical system becomes a Markov process when the memory rate vanishes. In particular, we study the Markov chain in the cases of discrete and continuous time. Using a mixture of analytical tools and numerical methods, we show that, when prices take discrete values, the corresponding Markov chain is asymptotically stable. In the case with continuous prices and nonnecessarily zero memory rate, numerical evidence of bounded price oscillations is shown. The role of the memory rate is studied through numerical experiments, this study confirms the stabilizing effects of the presence of resistant memory.

  12. Modeling the Dynamics of an Information System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Unold

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The article concentrates on the nature of a social subsystem of an information system. It analyzes the nature of information processes of collectivity within an IS and introduces a model of IS dynamics. The model is based on the assumption that a social subsystem of an information system works as a nonlinear dynamic system. The model of IS dynamics is verified on the indexes of the stock market. It arises from the basic assumption of the technical analysis of the markets, that is, the index chart reflects the play of demand and supply, which in turn represents the crowd sentiment on the market.

  13. Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    34 D FILE COPY AD-A198 053 *.CC Technical Report 1009 Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot "DTIC SELEC T E 0 Alfonso Garcia Reynoso MIT...COVERED Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot technical report G. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUM9ER 7. AUTHO0R(@) S. CONTRACT On GRANT NUMSER...8217 %S S Structural Dynamics Model of a Cartesian Robot by Alfonso Garcia Reynoso BSME Instituto Tecnol6gico de Veracruz (1967) MSME Instituto Tecnol6gico

  14. Equivalent dynamic model of DEMES rotary joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianwen; Wang, Shu; Xing, Zhiguang; McCoul, David; Niu, Junyang; Huang, Bo; Liu, Liwu; Leng, Jinsong

    2016-07-01

    The dielectric elastomer minimum energy structure (DEMES) can realize large angular deformations by a small voltage-induced strain of the dielectric elastomer (DE), so it is a suitable candidate to make a rotary joint for a soft robot. Dynamic analysis is necessary for some applications, but the dynamic response of DEMESs is difficult to model because of the complicated morphology and viscoelasticity of the DE film. In this paper, a method composed of theoretical analysis and experimental measurement is presented to model the dynamic response of a DEMES rotary joint under an alternating voltage. Based on measurements of equivalent driving force and damping of the DEMES, the model can be derived. Some experiments were carried out to validate the equivalent dynamic model. The maximum angle error between model and experiment is greater than ten degrees, but it is acceptable to predict angular velocity of the DEMES, therefore, it can be applied in feedforward-feedback compound control.

  15. Modeling microbial growth and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Daniel S; Leveau, Johan H J; Meyer, Katrin M

    2015-11-01

    Modeling has become an important tool for widening our understanding of microbial growth in the context of applied microbiology and related to such processes as safe food production, wastewater treatment, bioremediation, or microbe-mediated mining. Various modeling techniques, such as primary, secondary and tertiary mathematical models, phenomenological models, mechanistic or kinetic models, reactive transport models, Bayesian network models, artificial neural networks, as well as agent-, individual-, and particle-based models have been applied to model microbial growth and activity in many applied fields. In this mini-review, we summarize the basic concepts of these models using examples and applications from food safety and wastewater treatment systems. We further review recent developments in other applied fields focusing on models that explicitly include spatial relationships. Using these examples, we point out the conceptual similarities across fields of application and encourage the combined use of different modeling techniques in hybrid models as well as their cross-disciplinary exchange. For instance, pattern-oriented modeling has its origin in ecology but may be employed to parameterize microbial growth models when experimental data are scarce. Models could also be used as virtual laboratories to optimize experimental design analogous to the virtual ecologist approach. Future microbial growth models will likely become more complex to benefit from the rich toolbox that is now available to microbial growth modelers.

  16. Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE) Microgrid: Models & Tools (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-07-01

    This brochure describes Continuously Optimized Reliable Energy (CORE), a trademarked process NREL employs to produce conceptual microgrid designs. This systems-based process enables designs to be optimized for economic value, energy surety, and sustainability. Capabilities NREL offers in support of microgrid design are explained.

  17. Multiscale model of global inner-core anisotropy induced by hcp-alloy plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardin, P.; Deguen, R.; Lincot, A.; Merkel, S.

    2016-12-01

    The Earth's solid inner core exhibits a global seismic anisotropy of several percents. It results from a coherent alignment of anisotropic Fe alloy crystals through the inner-core history that can be sampled by present-day seismic observations. By combining self-consistent polycrystal plasticity, inner-core formation models, Monte-Carlo search for elastic moduli, and simulations of seismic measurements, we introduce a multiscale model that can reproduce a global seismic anisotropy of several percents aligned with the Earth's rotation axis. Conditions for a successful model are an hexagonal close packed structure for the inner-core Fe alloy, plastic deformation by pyramidal slip, and large-scale flow induced by a low-degree inner-core formation model. For global anisotropies ranging between 1 and 3%, the elastic anisotropy in the single crystal ranges from 5 to 20% with larger velocities along the c axis.

  18. A Dynamic Pore-Scale Model of Imbibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Kristian; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    1998-01-01

    could not incorporate long-range correlations among pore and throat sizes in our network, but were limited to small-range correlations. Consequently, the gradual suppression of snap-off occurs within one order of magnitude of the capillary number. At capillary numbers around l0- to l0-, snap-off has......We present a dynamic pore-scale network model of imbibition, capable of calculating residual oil saturation for any given capillary number, viscosity ratio, contact angle and aspect ratio. Our goal is not to predict the outcome of core floods, but rather to perform a sensitivity analysis...

  19. Study on the judgment model of dyeing and weaving corporation's core competence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the dyeing and weaving corporations' characters, this paper put forward the dimensionality and index system to analyze the core competence. This paper divided the core competence into three layers and gave out the Dimensional-Hierarchical structure of core competence through combining the analysis dimensionalities with the competence layers. The model was described to evaluate, analyze and judge the dyeing and weaving corporation's competence.

  20. Organizational Models for Non-Core Processes Management: A Classification Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto F. De Toni

    2012-12-01

    The framework enables the identification and the explanation of the main advantages and disadvantages of each strategy and to highlight how a company should coherently choose an organizational model on the basis of: (a the specialization/complexity of the non‐core processes, (b the focus on core processes, (c its inclination towards know‐how outsourcing, and (d the desired level of autonomy in the management of non‐core processes.

  1. Forecasting house prices in the 50 states using Dynamic Model Averaging and Dynamic Model Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, Lasse; Møller, Stig Vinther

    2015-01-01

    We examine house price forecastability across the 50 states using Dynamic Model Averaging and Dynamic Model Selection, which allow for model change and parameter shifts. By allowing the entire forecasting model to change over time and across locations, the forecasting accuracy improves...

  2. Phone Routing using the Dynamic Memory Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Claus Nicolaj; Krink, Thiemo

    2002-01-01

    In earlier studies a genetic algorithm (GA) extended with the dynamic memory model has shown remarkable performance on real-world-like problems. In this paper we experiment with routing in communication networks and show that the dynamic memory GA performs remarkable well compared to ant colony o...

  3. System Dynamics Modelling for a Balanced Scorecard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen; Nielsen, Erland Hejn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose - To construct a dynamic model/framework inspired by a case study based on an international company. As described by the theory, one of the main difficulties of BSC is to foresee the time lag dimension of different types of indicators and their combined dynamic effects. Design/methodology...

  4. Nonlinear dynamic phenomena in the beer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik; Laugesen, Jakob Lund

    2007-01-01

    The production-distribution system or "beer game" is one of the most well-known system dynamics models. Notorious for the complex dynamics it produces, the beer game has been used for nearly five decades to illustrate how structure generates behavior and to explore human decision making. Here we...

  5. Exciton dynamics in GaAs/(Al,Ga)As core-shell nanowires with shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfdir, Pierre; Küpers, Hanno; Lewis, Ryan B.; Flissikowski, Timur; Grahn, Holger T.; Geelhaar, Lutz; Brandt, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamics of excitons in GaAs/(Al,Ga)As core-shell nanowires by continuous-wave and time-resolved photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy. Strong Al segregation in the shell of the nanowires leads to the formation of Ga-rich inclusions acting as quantum dots. At 10 K, intense light emission associated with these shell quantum dots is observed. The average radiative lifetime of excitons confined in the shell quantum dots is 1.7 ns. We show that excitons may tunnel toward adjacent shell quantum dots and nonradiative point defects. We investigate the changes in the dynamics of charge carriers in the shell with increasing temperature, with particular emphasis on the transfer of carriers from the shell to the core of the nanowires. We finally discuss the implications of carrier localization in the (Al,Ga)As shell for fundamental studies and optoelectronic applications based on core-shell III-As nanowires.

  6. A new dynamics model for traffic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    As a study method of traffic flow, dynamics models were developedand applied in the last few decades. However, there exist some flaws in most existing models. In this note, a new dynamics model is proposed by using car-following theory and the usual connection method of micro-macro variables, which can overcome some ubiquitous problems in the existing models. Numerical results show that the new model can very well simulate traffic flow conditions, such as congestion, evacuation of congestion, stop-and-go phenomena and phantom jam.

  7. Effectiveness of core muscle strengthening for improving pain and dynamic balance among female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevidikunnan, Mohamed Faisal; Al Saif, Amer; Gaowgzeh, Riziq Allah; Mamdouh, Khaled A

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] Patellofemoral pain syndrome is a frequent musculoskeletal disorder, which can result from core muscles instability that can lead to pain and altered dynamic balance. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of core muscle strengthening on pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty female patients with age ranging from 16 to 40 years with patellofemoral pain syndrome were divided into study (N=10) and control (N=10) groups. Both groups were given 4 weeks of conventional physical therapy program and an additional core muscle strengthening for the study group. The tools used to assess the outcome were Visual Analogue Scale and Star Excursion Balance Test. [Results] The results of the study show that participants in the study group revealed a significantly greater improvement in the intensity of pain and dynamic balance as compared to the control group. [Conclusion] Adding a core muscle-strengthening program to the conventional physical therapy management improves pain and dynamic balance in female patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome.

  8. A STRONGLY COUPLED REACTOR CORE ISOLATION COOLING SYSTEM MODEL FOR EXTENDED STATION BLACK-OUT ANALYSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Haihua [Idaho National Laboratory; Zhang, Hongbin [Idaho National Laboratory; Zou, Ling [Idaho National Laboratory; Martineau, Richard Charles [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-03-01

    The reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system in a boiling water reactor (BWR) provides makeup cooling water to the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) when the main steam lines are isolated and the normal supply of water to the reactor vessel is lost. The RCIC system operates independently of AC power, service air, or external cooling water systems. The only required external energy source is from the battery to maintain the logic circuits to control the opening and/or closure of valves in the RCIC systems in order to control the RPV water level by shutting down the RCIC pump to avoid overfilling the RPV and flooding the steam line to the RCIC turbine. It is generally considered in almost all the existing station black-out accidents (SBO) analyses that loss of the DC power would result in overfilling the steam line and allowing liquid water to flow into the RCIC turbine, where it is assumed that the turbine would then be disabled. This behavior, however, was not observed in the Fukushima Daiichi accidents, where the Unit 2 RCIC functioned without DC power for nearly three days. Therefore, more detailed mechanistic models for RCIC system components are needed to understand the extended SBO for BWRs. As part of the effort to develop the next generation reactor system safety analysis code RELAP-7, we have developed a strongly coupled RCIC system model, which consists of a turbine model, a pump model, a check valve model, a wet well model, and their coupling models. Unlike the traditional SBO simulations where mass flow rates are typically given in the input file through time dependent functions, the real mass flow rates through the turbine and the pump loops in our model are dynamically calculated according to conservation laws and turbine/pump operation curves. A simplified SBO demonstration RELAP-7 model with this RCIC model has been successfully developed. The demonstration model includes the major components for the primary system of a BWR, as well as the safety

  9. Dynamics of laser-imploded core plasmas observed by ultrafast two-dimensional x-ray imaging with animation display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heya, Manabu; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Kyoko; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Takabe, Hideaki; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko; Mima, Kunioki [Osaka Univ., Inst. of Laser Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    1999-05-01

    In order to observe time-resolved, two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of x rays emitted from core plasmas at the final stage of the implosion, we have developed a multi-imaging x-ray streak camera (MIXS) and a multi-channel MIXS (McMIXS) methods as new ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging techniques. The observed time-resolved 2D x-ray and electron-temperature images of core plasmas, which are sequentially changing with time, have been displayed by using an animation method. Temporal evolutions of nonuniform structures, including shape, size, and movement of core plasmas can be observed instinctively with the animated display. The ultrafast 2D x-ray imaging with the animation display is a new powerful tool for understanding the dynamics of laser-imploded core plasmas. (author)

  10. MODELING MICROBUBBLE DYNAMICS IN BIOMEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAHINE Georges L.; HSIAO Chao-Tsung

    2012-01-01

    Controlling mierobubble dynamics to produce desirable biomedical outcomes when and where necessary and avoid deleterious effects requires advanced knowledge,which can be achieved only through a combination of experimental and numerical/analytical techniques.The present communication presents a multi-physics approach to study the dynamics combining viscousinviseid effects,liquid and structure dynamics,and multi bubble interaction.While complex numerical tools are developed and used,the study aims at identifying the key parameters influencing the dynamics,which need to be included in simpler models.

  11. A core stochastic population projection model for Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Michael C.; Sanders-Reed, Carol A.; Fonnesbeck, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    A stochastic, stage-based population model was developed to describe the life history and forecast the population dynamics of the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) in four separate regions of Florida. This population model includes annual variability in survival and reproductive rates, demographic stochasticity, effects of changes in warm-water capacity, and catastrophes. Further, the model explicitly accounts for uncertainty in parameter estimates. This model is meant to serve as a flexible tool for use in assessments relevant to management decision making, and was used in the State of Florida's recent biological status review. The parameter estimates and model structure described herein reflect our understanding of manatee demography at the time that this status review was completed. In the Northwest and Upper St. Johns regions, the model predicts that the populations will increase over time until warm-water capacity is reached, at which point growth will taper off. In the Atlantic region, the model predicts a stable or slightly increasing population over the next decade or so, and then a decrease as industrial warm-water capacity is lost. In the Southwest region, the model predicts a decline over time, driven by high annual mortality in the short-term and exacerbated by loss of industrial warm-water winter refuges over the next 40 years. Statewide, the likelihood of a 50% or greater decline in three manatee generations was 12%; the likelihood of a 20% or greater decline in two generations was 56%. These declines are largely driven by the anticipated loss of warm-water capacity, especially in the Atlantic and Southwest regions. The estimates of probability of extinction within 100 years were 11.9% for the Southwest region, 0.6% for the Northwest, 0.04% for the Atlantic, and manatees. Analyses of sensitivity and variance contribution highlight the importance of reducing uncertainty in some life-history parameters, particularly adult survival

  12. Airship dynamics modeling: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwen; Nahon, Meyer; Sharf, Inna

    2011-04-01

    The resurgence of airships has created a need for dynamics models and simulation capabilities adapted to these lighter-than-air vehicles. However, the modeling techniques for airship dynamics have lagged behind and are less systematic than those for fixed-wing aircraft. A state-of-the-art literature review is presented on airship dynamics modeling, aiming to provide a comprehensive description of the main problems in this area and a useful source of references for researchers and engineers interested in modern airship applications. The references are categorized according to the major topics in this area: aerodynamics, flight dynamics, incorporation of structural flexibility, incorporation of atmospheric turbulence, and effects of ballonets. Relevant analytical, numerical, and semi-empirical techniques are discussed, with a particular focus on how the main differences between lighter-than-air and heavier-than-air aircraft have been addressed in the modeling. Directions are suggested for future research on each of these topics.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics modeling in yarn engineering

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Patanaik, A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This chapter deals with the application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling in reducing yarn hairiness during the ring spinning process and thereby “engineering” yarn with desired properties. Hairiness significantly affects the appearance...

  14. Molecular dynamics model of dimethyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, B.; Halley, W.J. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-11-02

    We report a molecular dynamics model of the monomeric liquid dimethyl ether. The united atom approach is used to treat CH{sub 3} groups as point source centers. Partial charges are derived from the experimental dipole moment. Harmonic force constants are used for intramolecular interactions, and their values are so chosen that the model`s fundamental frequencies agree with experimental results. Because we are interested in solvation properties, the model contains flexible molecules, allowing molecular distortion and internal dynamical quantities. We report radial distribution functions and the static structure factors as well as some dynamical quantities such as the dynamical structure factor, infrared absorption, and Raman scattering spectra. Calculated results agree reasonably well with experimental and other simulation results. 25 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Research on the equivalence between digital core and rock physics models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xingyao; Zheng, Ying; Zong, Zhaoyun

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the elastic modulus of 3D digital cores using the finite element method, systematically study the equivalence between the digital core model and various rock physics models, and carefully analyze the conditions of the equivalence relationships. The influences of the pore aspect ratio and consolidation coefficient on the equivalence relationships are also further refined. Theoretical analysis indicates that the finite element simulation based on the digital core is equivalent to the boundary theory and Gassmann model. For pure sandstones, effective medium theory models (SCA and DEM) and the digital core models are equivalent in cases when the pore aspect ratio is within a certain range, and dry frame models (Nur and Pride model) and the digital core model are equivalent in cases when the consolidation coefficient is a specific value. According to the equivalence relationships, the comparison of the elastic modulus results of the effective medium theory and digital rock physics is an effective approach for predicting the pore aspect ratio. Furthermore, the traditional digital core models with two components (pores and matrix) are extended to multiple minerals to more precisely characterize the features and mineral compositions of rocks in underground reservoirs. This paper studies the effects of shale content on the elastic modulus in shaly sandstones. When structural shale is present in the sandstone, the elastic modulus of the digital cores are in a reasonable agreement with the DEM model. However, when dispersed shale is present in the sandstone, the Hill model cannot describe the changes in the stiffness of the pore space precisely. Digital rock physics describes the rock features such as pore aspect ratio, consolidation coefficient and rock stiffness. Therefore, digital core technology can, to some extent, replace the theoretical rock physics models because the results are more accurate than those of the theoretical models.

  16. Stochastic population dynamic models as probability networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.E. and D.C. Lee. Borsuk

    2009-01-01

    The dynamics of a population and its response to environmental change depend on the balance of birth, death and age-at-maturity, and there have been many attempts to mathematically model populations based on these characteristics. Historically, most of these models were deterministic, meaning that the results were strictly determined by the equations of the model and...

  17. System Identification by Dynamic Factor Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Heij (Christiaan); W. Scherrer; M. Destler

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThis paper concerns the modelling of stochastic processes by means of dynamic factor models. In such models the observed process is decomposed into a structured part called the latent process, and a remainder that is called noise. The observed variables are treated in a symmetric way, so

  18. Damping mechanisms and models in structural dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, Steen

    2002-01-01

    Several aspects of damping models for dynamic analysis of structures are investigated. First the causality condition for structural response is used to identify rules for the use of complex-valued frequency dependent material models, illustrated by the shortcomings of the elastic hysteretic model...

  19. Bayesian semiparametric dynamic Nelson-Siegel model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Cakmakli

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes the Bayesian semiparametric dynamic Nelson-Siegel model where the density of the yield curve factors and thereby the density of the yields are estimated along with other model parameters. This is accomplished by modeling the error distributions of the factors according to a Diric

  20. Towards Core Modelling Practices in Integrated Water Resource Management: An Interdisciplinary View of the Modelling Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakeman, A. J.; Elsawah, S.; Pierce, S. A.; Ames, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    The National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC) Core Modelling Practices Pursuit is developing resources to describe core practices for developing and using models to support integrated water resource management. These practices implement specific steps in the modelling process with an interdisciplinary perspective; however, the particular practice that is most appropriate depends on contextual aspects specific to the project. The first task of the pursuit is to identify the various steps for which implementation practices are to be described. This paper reports on those results. The paper draws on knowledge from the modelling process literature for environmental modelling (Jakeman et al., 2006), engaging stakeholders (Voinov and Bousquet, 2010) and general modelling (Banks, 1999), as well as the experience of the consortium members. We organise the steps around the four modelling phases. The planning phase identifies what is to be achieved, how and with what resources. The model is built and tested during the construction phase, and then used in the application phase. Finally, models that become part of the ongoing policy process require a maintenance phase. For each step, the paper focusses on what is to be considered or achieved, rather than how it is performed. This reflects the separation of the steps from the practices that implement them in different contexts. We support description of steps with a wide range of examples. Examples are designed to be generic and do not reflect any one project or context, but instead are drawn from common situations or from extremely different ones so as to highlight some of the issues that may arise at each step. References Banks, J. (1999). Introduction to simulation. In Proceedings of the 1999 Winter Simulation Conference. Jakeman, A. J., R. A. Letcher, and J. P. Norton (2006). Ten iterative steps in development and evaluation of environmental models. Environmental Modelling and Software 21, 602-614. Voinov, A

  1. A Kinetic Vlasov Model for Plasma Simulation Using Discontinuous Galerkin Method on Many-Core Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddell, Noah

    Advances are reported in the three pillars of computational science achieving a new capability for understanding dynamic plasma phenomena outside of local thermodynamic equilibrium. A continuum kinetic model for plasma based on the Vlasov-Maxwell system for multiple particle species is developed. Consideration is added for boundary conditions in a truncated velocity domain and supporting wall interactions. A scheme to scale the velocity domain for multiple particle species with different temperatures and particle mass while sharing one computational mesh is described. A method for assessing the degree to which the kinetic solution differs from a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution is introduced and tested on a thoroughly studied test case. The discontinuous Galerkin numerical method is extended for efficient solution of hyperbolic conservation laws in five or more particle phase-space dimensions using tensor-product hypercube elements with arbitrary polynomial order. A scheme for velocity moment integration is integrated as required for coupling between the plasma species and electromagnetic waves. A new high performance simulation code WARPM is developed to efficiently implement the model and numerical method on emerging many-core supercomputing architectures. WARPM uses the OpenCL programming model for computational kernels and task parallelism to overlap computation with communication. WARPM single-node performance and parallel scaling efficiency are analyzed with bottlenecks identified guiding future directions for the implementation. The plasma modeling capability is validated against physical problems with analytic solutions and well established benchmark problems.

  2. Probabilistic Modeling in Dynamic Information Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Sloan, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic modeling is used to design systems that are adaptive to their changing environment and is currently poorly understood in information retrieval systems. Common elements in the information retrieval methodology, such as documents, relevance, users and tasks, are dynamic entities that may evolve over the course of several interactions, which is increasingly captured in search log datasets. Conventional frameworks and models in information retrieval treat these elements as static, or only...

  3. Precessional states in a laboratory model of the Earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, S. A.; Zimmerman, D. S.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2012-04-01

    A water-filled three-meter diameter spherical shell, geometrically similar to the Earth's core, shows precessionally forced flows. The precessional torque is supplied by the daily rotation of the laboratory by the Earth. We identify the precessionally forced flow to be primarily the spin-over inertial mode, i.e., a uniform vorticity flow whose rotation axis is not aligned with the sphere's rotation axis. A systematic study of the spin-over mode is carried out, showing that the amplitude depends on the ratio of precession to rotation rates (the Poincaré number), in marginal qualitative agreement with Busse's (1968) laminar theory. We find its phase differs significantly though, likely due to topographic effects. At high rotation rates, free shear layers are observed. Comparison with previous computational studies and implications for the Earth's core are discussed.

  4. Stability of core-shell nanowires in selected model solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalska-Szostko, B.; Wykowska, U.; Basa, A.; Zambrzycka, E.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the studies of stability of magnetic core-shell nanowires prepared by electrochemical deposition from an acidic solution containing iron in the core and modified surface layer. The obtained nanowires were tested according to their durability in distilled water, 0.01 M citric acid, 0.9% NaCl, and commercial white wine (12% alcohol). The proposed solutions were chosen in such a way as to mimic food related environment due to a possible application of nanowires as additives to, for example, packages. After 1, 2 and 3 weeks wetting in the solutions, nanoparticles were tested by Infrared Spectroscopy, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-ray diffraction methods.

  5. Identification and Modelling of Linear Dynamic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Kocur

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available System identification and modelling are very important parts of system control theory. System control is only as good as good is created model of system. So this article deals with identification and modelling problems. There are simple classification and evolution of identification methods, and then the modelling problem is described. Rest of paper is devoted to two most known and used models of linear dynamic systems.

  6. A model for the internal structure of molecular cloud cores

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, D E; McLaughlin, Dean E; Pudritz, Ralph E

    1996-01-01

    We generalize the classic Bonnor-Ebert stability analysis of pressure-truncated, self-gravitating gas spheres, to include clouds with arbitrary equations of state. A virial-theorem analysis is also used to incorporate mean magnetic fields into such structures. The results are applied to giant molecular clouds (GMCs), and to individual dense cores, with an eye to accounting for recent observations of the internal velocity-dispersion profiles of the cores in particular. We argue that GMCs and massive cores are at or near their critical mass, and that in such a case the size-linewidth and mass-radius relations between them are only weakly dependent on their internal structures; any gas equation of state leads to essentially the same relations. We briefly consider the possibility that molecular clouds can be described by polytropic pressure-density relations (of either positive or negative index), but show that these are inconsistent with the apparent gravitational virial equilibrium, 2U + W = 0 of GMCs and of ma...

  7. Discussion about modeling the effects of neutron flux exposure for nuclear reactor core analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1986-04-01

    Methods used to calculate the effects of exposure to a neutron flux are described. The modeling of the nuclear-reactor core history presents an analysis challenge. The nuclide chain equations must be solved, and some of the methods in use for this are described. Techniques for treating reactor-core histories are discussed and evaluated.

  8. Rapid core field variations during the satellite era: Investigations using stochastic process based field models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Gillet, Nicolas

    . We report spherical harmonic spectra, comparisons to observatory monthly means, and maps of the radial field at the core-mantle boundary, from the resulting ensemble of core field models. We find that inter-annual fluctuations in the external field (for example related to high solar-driven activity...

  9. Rapid core field variations during the satellite era: Investigations using stochastic process based field models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Gillet, Nicolas

    We present a new ensemble of time-dependent magnetic field models constructed from satellite and observatory data spanning 1997-2013 that are compatible with prior information concerning the temporal spectrum of core field variations. These models allow sharper field changes compared to traditional....... We report spherical harmonic spectra, comparisons to observatory monthly means, and maps of the radial field at the core-mantle boundary, from the resulting ensemble of core field models. We find that inter-annual fluctuations in the external field (for example related to high solar-driven activity...

  10. Setting up The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service for EPOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grellet, Sylvain; Häner, Rainer; Pedersen, Mikael; Lorenz, Henning; Carter, Mary; Cipolloni, Carlo; Robida, François

    2017-04-01

    Geological data and models are key assets for the EPOS community. The Geological information and modelling Thematic Core Service of EPOS is being designed as an efficient and sustainable access system for geological multi-scale data assets for EPOS through the integration of distributed infrastructure components (nodes) of geological surveys, research institutes and the international drilling community (ICDP/IODP). The TCS will develop and take benefit of the synergy between the existing data infrastructures of the Geological Surveys of Europe (EuroGeoSurveys / OneGeology-Europe / EGDI) and of the large amount of information produced by the research organisations. These nodes will offer a broad range of resources including: geological maps, borehole data, borehole associated observations (borehole log data, groundwater level, groundwater quality…) and archived information on physical material (samples, cores), geological models (3D, 4D), geohazards, geophysical data such as active seismic data and other analyses of rocks, soils and minerals. The services will be implemented based on international standards (such as INSPIRE, IUGS/CGI, OGC, W3C, ISO) in order to guarantee their interoperability with other EPOS TCS as well as their compliance with INSPIRE European Directive or international initiatives (such as OneGeology). We present the implementation of the thematic core services for geology and modelling, including scheduling of the development of the different components. The activity with the OGC groups already started in 2016 through an ad-hoc meeting on Borehole and 3D/4D and the way both will be interlinked will also be introduced. This will provide future virtual research environments with means to facilitate the use of existing information for future applications. In addition, workflows will be established that allow the integration of other existing and new data and applications. Processing and the use of simulation and visualization tools will

  11. An experimental investigation into the trapping model core pillars with reinforced fly ash composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, M.K. [National Inst. of Technology, Rourkela (India); Karanam, U.M. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Kharagpur (India)

    2008-06-15

    This paper presented details of a study which examined the use of fly ash composite materials for backfilling mine voids in room-and-pillar mining techniques. The study examined the load deformation characteristics of model core pillars confined by wire mesh reinforced fly ash composite materials. Anhydrous chemical-grade lime and gypsum were added in various quantities to class F fly ash samples. The model core pillars were 57 mm in diameter and 200 mm in length. The engineering properties of the model core pillars were then determined using unconfined compressive strength and Brazilian indirect tensile strength tests. The experimental investigations showed that the percentage increases in the strength of the trapped model core pillars varied with the different types of composite materials, and was also influenced by the length of the curing period and the ratio of the annular thickness of the fill area to the model core pillar radius. Results demonstrated that the addition of excess lime to fly ash composites was not beneficial. Maximum strength gains of 14 per cent were achieved with model cores of a cement-sand ratio of 1:2.5 for fly ash composites containing 15 per cent lime and 5 per cent gypsum. It was concluded that suitable fly ash composites reinforced with wire ropes can enhance the strength of the load bearing element and alter the post-peak characteristics of trapped cores.

  12. A stochastic model of human gait dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazy, Yosef; M. Hausdorff, Jeffrey; Ch. Ivanov, Plamen; Eugene Stanley, H.

    2002-12-01

    We present a stochastic model of gait rhythm dynamics, based on transitions between different “neural centers”, that reproduces distinctive statistical properties of normal human walking. By tuning one model parameter, the transition (hopping) range, the model can describe alterations in gait dynamics from childhood to adulthood-including a decrease in the correlation and volatility exponents with maturation. The model also generates time series with multifractal spectra whose broadness depends only on this parameter. Moreover, we find that the volatility exponent increases monotonically as a function of the width of the multifractal spectrum, suggesting the possibility of a change in multifractality with maturation.

  13. Integration of Dynamic Models in Range Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardina, Jorge; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2004-01-01

    This work addresses the various model interactions in real-time to make an efficient internet based decision making tool for Shuttle launch. The decision making tool depends on the launch commit criteria coupled with physical models. Dynamic interaction between a wide variety of simulation applications and techniques, embedded algorithms, and data visualizations are needed to exploit the full potential of modeling and simulation. This paper also discusses in depth details of web based 3-D graphics and applications to range safety. The advantages of this dynamic model integration are secure accessibility and distribution of real time information to other NASA centers.

  14. Long-term dynamics simulation: Modeling requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morched, A.S.; Kar, P.K.; Rogers, G.J.; Morison, G.K. (Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada))

    1989-12-01

    This report details the required performance and modelling capabilities of a computer program intended for the study of the long term dynamics of power systems. Following a general introduction which outlines the need for long term dynamic studies, the modelling requirements for the conduct of such studies is discussed in detail. Particular emphasis is placed on models for system elements not normally modelled in power system stability programs, which will have a significant impact in the long term time frame of minutes to hours following the initiating disturbance. The report concludes with a discussion of the special computational and programming requirements for a long term stability program. 43 refs., 36 figs.

  15. Uncertainty and Sensitivity in Surface Dynamics Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettner, Albert J.; Syvitski, James P. M.

    2016-05-01

    Papers for this special issue on 'Uncertainty and Sensitivity in Surface Dynamics Modeling' heralds from papers submitted after the 2014 annual meeting of the Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System or CSDMS. CSDMS facilitates a diverse community of experts (now in 68 countries) that collectively investigate the Earth's surface-the dynamic interface between lithosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, and atmosphere, by promoting, developing, supporting and disseminating integrated open source software modules. By organizing more than 1500 researchers, CSDMS has the privilege of identifying community strengths and weaknesses in the practice of software development. We recognize, for example, that progress has been slow on identifying and quantifying uncertainty and sensitivity in numerical modeling of earth's surface dynamics. This special issue is meant to raise awareness for these important subjects and highlight state-of-the-art progress.

  16. The future dynamic world model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Thomas J.

    2014-10-01

    Defense and security forces exploit sensor data by means of a model of the world. They use a world model to geolocate sensor data, fuse it with other data, navigate platforms, recognize features and feature changes, etc. However, their need for situational awareness today exceeds the capabilities of their current world model for defense operations, despite the great advances of sensing technology in recent decades. I review emerging technologies that may enable a great improvement in the spatial and spectral coverage, the timeliness, and the functional insight of their world model.

  17. High dynamic range VLA observations of eight core-dominated quasars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollgaard, R.I.; Wardle, J.F.C.; Roberts, D.H. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    The Very Large Array has been used at 5 GHz to make high dynamic range observations of eight quasars with prominent cores. All exhibit one-sided jets, and all but one show evidence of diffuse halos. The luminosity of the extended emission by itself is sufficient for these to be Fanaroff-Riley Class II radio sources. This interpretation is confirmed by the polarization of the extended structure: the inferred magnetic field is parallel to the jet axis in all cases, and in all but one instance turns to be nearly perpendicular to the jet at its outer end. These latter structures are identified as classical terminal hot-spots. Both the total intensity data and especially the polarization data strongly support the notion that these quasars are similar to the classical lobe-dominated quasars, but are oriented with jet axes close to the line of sight. If this is so, then the relatively high degrees of polarization observed in the terminal hotspots appear to require that the downstream fluid velocities in the hotspots are mildly relativistic, in the range v/c = 0.2 - 0.8. This, in turn, implies that the jets are at least moderately relativistic over their entire length. 53 refs.

  18. Understanding the core of RNA interference: The dynamic aspects of Argonaute-mediated processes

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Lizhe

    2016-10-05

    At the core of RNA interference, the Argonaute proteins (Ago) load and utilize small guide nucleic acids to silence mRNAs or cleave foreign nucleic acids in a sequence specific manner. In recent years, based on extensive structural studies of Ago and its interaction with the nucleic acids, considerable progress has been made to reveal the dynamic aspects of various Ago-mediated processes. Here we review these novel insights into the guide-strand loading, duplex unwinding, and effects of seed mismatch, with a focus on two representative Agos, the human Ago 2 (hAgo2) and the bacterial Thermus thermophilus Ago (TtAgo). In particular, comprehensive molecular simulation studies revealed that although sharing similar overall structures, the two Agos have vastly different conformational landscapes and guide-strand loading mechanisms because of the distinct rigidity of their L1-PAZ hinge. Given the central role of the PAZ motions in regulating the exposure of the nucleic acid binding channel, these findings exemplify the importance of protein motions in distinguishing the overlapping, yet distinct, mechanisms of Ago-mediated processes in different organisms.

  19. GCFR Coupled Neutronic and Thermal-Fluid-Dynamics Analyses for a Core Containing Minor Actinides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Castelliti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problems about future energy availability, climate changes, and air quality seem to play an important role in energy production. While current reactor generations provide a guaranteed and economical energy production, new nuclear power plant generation would increase the ways and purposes in which nuclear energy can be used. To explore these new technological applications, several governments, industries, and research communities decided to contribute to the next reactor generation, called “Generation IV.” Among the six Gen-IV reactor designs, the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR uses a direct-cycle helium turbine for electricity generation and for a CO2-free thermochemical production of hydrogen. Additionally, the use of a fast spectrum allows actinides transmutation, minimizing the production of long-lived radioactive waste in an integrated fuel cycle. This paper presents an analysis of GCFR fuel cycle optimization and of a thermal-hydraulic of a GCFR-prototype under steady-state and transient conditions. The fuel cycle optimization was performed to assess the capability of the GCFR to transmute MAs, while the thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed to investigate the reactor and the safety systems behavior during a LOFA. Preliminary results show that limited quantities of MA are not affecting significantly the thermal-fluid-dynamics behavior of a GCFR core.

  20. Atmospheric Transport and Mixing linked to Rossby Wave Breaking in GFDL Dynamical Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.; Barnes, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric transport and mixing plays an important role in the global energy balance and the distribution of health-related chemical constituents. Previous studies suggest a close linkage between large-scale transport and Rossby wave breaking (RWB). In this work, we use the GFDL spectral dynamical core to investigate this relationship and study the response of RWB-related transport in different climate scenarios. In a standard control run, we quantify the contribution of RWB to the total transport and mixing of an idealized tracer. In addition, we divide the contribution further into the two types of RWB - anticyclonic wave breaking (AWB) and cyclonic wave breaking (CWB) -- and contrast their efficiency at transport and mixing. Our results are compared to a previous study in which the transport ability of the two types of RWB is studied for individual baroclinic wave life-cycles. In a series of sensitivity runs, we study the response of RWB-related transport and mixing to various states of the jet streams. The responses of the mean strength, frequency, and the efficiency of RWB-related transport are documented and the implications for the transport and mixing in a warmer climate are discussed.

  1. Dynamics of multi-cored magnetic structures in the quiet Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Requerey, Iker S; Rubio, Luis R Bellot; Pillet, Valentín Martínez; Solanki, Sami K; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    We report on the dynamical interaction of quiet-Sun magnetic fields and granular convection in the solar photosphere as seen by \\textsc{Sunrise}. We use high spatial resolution (0\\farcs 15--0\\farcs 18) and temporal cadence (33 s) spectropolarimetric Imaging Magnetograph eXperiment data, together with simultaneous CN and Ca\\,\\textsc{ii}\\,H filtergrams from \\textsc{Sunrise} Filter Imager. We apply the SIR inversion code to the polarimetric data in order to infer the line of sight velocity and vector magnetic field in the photosphere. The analysis reveals bundles of individual flux tubes evolving as a single entity during the entire 23 minute data set. The group shares a common canopy in the upper photospheric layers, while the individual tubes continually intensify, fragment and merge in the same way that chains of bright points in photometric observations have been reported to do. The evolution of the tube cores are driven by the local granular convection flows. They intensify when they are "compressed" by sur...

  2. Creating Innovators through setting up organizational Vision, Mission, and Core Values : a Strategic Model in Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Aithal, Sreeramana

    2016-01-01

    Vision, mission, objectives and core values play major role in setting up sustainable organizations. Vision and mission statements describe the organization’s goals. Core values and core principles represent the organization’s culture. In this paper, we have discussed a model on how a higher education institution can prosper to reach its goal of ‘creating innovators’ through its vision, mission, objectives and core values. A model for the core values required for a prospective ...

  3. Brand Equity Evolution: a System Dynamics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Crescitelli

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in brand management lies in monitoring brand equity over time. This paper aimsto present a simulation model able to represent this evolution. The model was drawn on brand equity concepts developed by Aaker and Joachimsthaler (2000, using the system dynamics methodology. The use ofcomputational dynamic models aims to create new sources of information able to sensitize academics and managers alike to the dynamic implications of their brand management. As a result, an easily implementable model was generated, capable of executing continuous scenario simulations by surveying casual relations among the variables that explain brand equity. Moreover, the existence of a number of system modeling tools will allow extensive application of the concepts used in this study in practical situations, both in professional and educational settings

  4. Dynamic stiffness model of spherical parallel robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarata, Alessandro; Caliò, Ivo; D`Urso, Domenico; Greco, Annalisa; Lacagnina, Michele; Fichera, Gabriele

    2016-12-01

    A novel approach to study the elastodynamics of Spherical Parallel Robots is described through an exact dynamic model. Timoshenko arches are used to simulate flexible curved links while the base and mobile platforms are modelled as rigid bodies. Spatial joints are inherently included into the model without Lagrangian multipliers. At first, the equivalent dynamic stiffness matrix of each leg, made up of curved links joined by spatial joints, is derived; then these matrices are assembled to obtain the Global Dynamic Stiffness Matrix of the robot at a given pose. Actuator stiffness is also included into the model to verify its influence on vibrations and modes. The latter are found by applying the Wittrick-Williams algorithm. Finally, numerical simulations and direct comparison to commercial FE results are used to validate the proposed model.

  5. Stirling Engine Dynamic System Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakis, Christopher G.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermo-Mechanical systems branch at the Glenn Research Center focuses a large amount time on Stirling engines. These engines will be used on missions where solar power is inefficient, especially in deep space. I work with Tim Regan and Ed Lewandowski who are currently developing and validating a mathematical model for the Stirling engines. This model incorporates all aspects of the system including, mechanical, electrical and thermodynamic components. Modeling is done through Simplorer, a program capable of running simulations of the model. Once created and then proven to be accurate, a model is used for developing new ideas for engine design. My largest specific project involves varying key parameters in the model and quantifying the results. This can all be done relatively trouble-free with the help of Simplorer. Once the model is complete, Simplorer will do all the necessary calculations. The more complicated part of this project is determining which parameters to vary. Finding key parameters depends on the potential for a value to be independently altered in the design. For example, a change in one dimension may lead to a proportional change to the rest of the model, and no real progress is made. Also, the ability for a changed value to have a substantial impact on the outputs of the system is important. Results will be condensed into graphs and tables with the purpose of better communication and understanding of the data. With the changing of these parameters, a more optimal design can be created without having to purchase or build any models. Also, hours and hours of results can be simulated in minutes. In the long run, using mathematical models can save time and money. Along with this project, I have many other smaller assignments throughout the summer. My main goal is to assist in the processes of model development, validation and testing.

  6. Haptics-based dynamic implicit solid modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Jing; Qin, Hong

    2004-01-01

    This paper systematically presents a novel, interactive solid modeling framework, Haptics-based Dynamic Implicit Solid Modeling, which is founded upon volumetric implicit functions and powerful physics-based modeling. In particular, we augment our modeling framework with a haptic mechanism in order to take advantage of additional realism associated with a 3D haptic interface. Our dynamic implicit solids are semi-algebraic sets of volumetric implicit functions and are governed by the principles of dynamics, hence responding to sculpting forces in a natural and predictable manner. In order to directly manipulate existing volumetric data sets as well as point clouds, we develop a hierarchical fitting algorithm to reconstruct and represent discrete data sets using our continuous implicit functions, which permit users to further design and edit those existing 3D models in real-time using a large variety of haptic and geometric toolkits, and visualize their interactive deformation at arbitrary resolution. The additional geometric and physical constraints afford more sophisticated control of the dynamic implicit solids. The versatility of our dynamic implicit modeling enables the user to easily modify both the geometry and the topology of modeled objects, while the inherent physical properties can offer an intuitive haptic interface for direct manipulation with force feedback.

  7. Synaptic dynamics: linear model and adaptation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Ali; Dibazar, Alireza A; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-08-01

    In this research, temporal processing in brain neural circuitries is addressed by a dynamic model of synaptic connections in which the synapse model accounts for both pre- and post-synaptic processes determining its temporal dynamics and strength. Neurons, which are excited by the post-synaptic potentials of hundred of the synapses, build the computational engine capable of processing dynamic neural stimuli. Temporal dynamics in neural models with dynamic synapses will be analyzed, and learning algorithms for synaptic adaptation of neural networks with hundreds of synaptic connections are proposed. The paper starts by introducing a linear approximate model for the temporal dynamics of synaptic transmission. The proposed linear model substantially simplifies the analysis and training of spiking neural networks. Furthermore, it is capable of replicating the synaptic response of the non-linear facilitation-depression model with an accuracy better than 92.5%. In the second part of the paper, a supervised spike-in-spike-out learning rule for synaptic adaptation in dynamic synapse neural networks (DSNN) is proposed. The proposed learning rule is a biologically plausible process, and it is capable of simultaneously adjusting both pre- and post-synaptic components of individual synapses. The last section of the paper starts with presenting the rigorous analysis of the learning algorithm in a system identification task with hundreds of synaptic connections which confirms the learning algorithm's accuracy, repeatability and scalability. The DSNN is utilized to predict the spiking activity of cortical neurons and pattern recognition tasks. The DSNN model is demonstrated to be a generative model capable of producing different cortical neuron spiking patterns and CA1 Pyramidal neurons recordings. A single-layer DSNN classifier on a benchmark pattern recognition task outperforms a 2-Layer Neural Network and GMM classifiers while having fewer numbers of free parameters and

  8. Dynamics modeling and simulation of flexible airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuwen

    The resurgence of airships has created a need for dynamics models and simulation capabilities of these lighter-than-air vehicles. The focus of this thesis is a theoretical framework that integrates the flight dynamics, structural dynamics, aerostatics and aerodynamics of flexible airships. The study begins with a dynamics model based on a rigid-body assumption. A comprehensive computation of aerodynamic effects is presented, where the aerodynamic forces and moments are categorized into various terms based on different physical effects. A series of prediction approaches for different aerodynamic effects are unified and applied to airships. The numerical results of aerodynamic derivatives and the simulated responses to control surface deflection inputs are verified by comparing to existing wind-tunnel and flight test data. With the validated aerodynamics and rigid-body modeling, the equations of motion of an elastic airship are derived by the Lagrangian formulation. The airship is modeled as a free-free Euler-Bernoulli beam and the bending deformations are represented by shape functions chosen as the free-free normal modes. In order to capture the coupling between the aerodynamic forces and the structural elasticity, local velocity on the deformed vehicle is used in the computation of aerodynamic forces. Finally, with the inertial, gravity, aerostatic and control forces incorporated, the dynamics model of a flexible airship is represented by a single set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The proposed model is implemented as a dynamics simulation program to analyze the dynamics characteristics of the Skyship-500 airship. Simulation results are presented to demonstrate the influence of structural deformation on the aerodynamic forces and the dynamics behavior of the airship. The nonlinear equations of motion are linearized numerically for the purpose of frequency domain analysis and for aeroelastic stability analysis. The results from the latter for the

  9. Ultrafast Transient Absorption Spectroscopy Investigation of Photoinduced Dynamics in Novel Donor-Acceptor Core-Shell Nanostructures for Organic Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strain, Jacob; Jamhawi, Abdelqader; Abeywickrama, Thulitha M.; Loomis, Wendy; Rathnayake, Hemali; Liu, Jinjun

    2016-06-01

    Novel donor-acceptor nanostructures were synthesized via covalent synthesis and/or UV cross-linking method. Their photoinduced dynamics were investigated with ultrafast transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. These new nanostructures are made with the strategy in mind to reduce manufacturing steps in the process of fabricating an organic photovoltaic cell. By imitating the heterojunction interface within a fixed particle domain, several fabrication steps can be bypassed reducing cost and giving more applicability to other film deposition methods. Such applications include aerosol deposition and ink-jet printing. The systems that were studied by TA spectroscopy include PDIB core, PDIB-P3HT core-shell, and PDIB-PANT core-shell which range in size from 60 to 130 nm. Within the experimentally accessible spectra range there resides a region of ground state bleaching, stimulated emission, and excited-state absorption of both neutrals and anions. Control experiments have been carried out to assign these features. At high pump fluences the TA spectra of PDIB core alone also indicate an intramolecular charge separation. The TA spectroscopy results thus far suggest that the core-shells resemble the photoinduced dynamics of a standard film although the particles are dispersed in solution, which indicates the desired outcome of the work.

  10. The Earth's free core nutation: Formulation of dynamics and estimation of eigenperiod from the very-long-baseline interferometry data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, B. F.; Hsieh, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The free-core nutation (FCN) is a rotational normal mode of the Earth's outer core. We derive the equations of motion for FCN w.r.t. both the inertia space F0 and the uniformly rotating frame FΩ, and show that the two sets of equations are invariant in form under the reference frame transformation, as required by physics. The frequency-domain formulation describes the FCN resonance (to nearby tidal signals), which has been exploited to estimate the complex eigenfrequency of FCN, or its eigenperiod P and quality factor Q. On the other hand, our time-domain formulation in terms of temporal convolution describes the response of the free FCN under a (continual) excitation. The convolution well explains the dynamic behaviors of FCN in the observed very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) data (in F0), including the undulation of the FCN amplitude and the apparent fluctuations in the period and phase over time, as well as the temporal concurrence of a large phase jump with the near-zero amplitude during ∼ 1998- 2000, in complete analogy to the observed behavior of the Chandler wobble (in FΩ). The reverse, deconvolution process is further exploited to yield optimal estimates for FCN's eigenfrequency using the VLBI data, following the approach of Furuya and Chao (1996) of locating minimum excitation power. While this method is found to be insensitive to Q owing to the short timespan of the data, we obtain the estimate of P = 441 ± 4.5 sidereal days (sd) where the 1-sigma uncertainty is assessed via extensive Monte Carlo simulations. This value is closer to the theoretical value of ∼460 sd predicted by Earth models assuming hydrostatic equilibrium than do the prior estimates (425-435 sd) by the resonance method. The deconvolution process also yields the excitation function as a by-product, the physical sources of which await further studies.

  11. Protein film voltammetry and co-factor electron transfer dynamics in spinach photosystem II core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Magdaong, Nikki; Frank, Harry A; Rusling, James F

    2014-05-01

    Direct protein film voltammetry (PFV) was used to investigate the redox properties of the photosystem II (PSII) core complex from spinach. The complex was isolated using an improved protocol not used previously for PFV. The PSII core complex had high oxygen-evolving capacity and was incorporated into thin lipid and polyion films. Three well-defined reversible pairs of reduction and oxidation voltammetry peaks were observed at 4 °C in the dark. Results were similar in both types of films, indicating that the environment of the PSII-bound cofactors was not influenced by film type. Based on comparison with various control samples including Mn-depleted PSII, peaks were assigned to chlorophyll a (Chl a) (Em = -0.47 V, all vs. NHE, at pH 6), quinones (-0.12 V), and the manganese (Mn) cluster (Em = 0.18 V). PFV of purified iron heme protein cytochrome b-559 (Cyt b-559), a component of PSII, gave a partly reversible peak pair at 0.004 V that did not have a potential similar to any peaks observed from the intact PSII core complex. The closest peak in PSII to 0.004 V is the 0.18 V peak that was found to be associated with a two-electron process, and thus is inconsistent with iron heme protein voltammetry. The -0.47 V peak had a peak potential and peak potential-pH dependence similar to that found for purified Chl a incorporated into DMPC films. The midpoint potentials reported here may differ to various extents from previously reported redox titration data due to the influence of electrode double-layer effects. Heterogeneous electron transfer (hET) rate constants were estimated by theoretical fitting and digital simulations for the -0.47 and 0.18 V peaks. Data for the Chl a peaks were best fit to a one-electron model, while the peak assigned to the Mn cluster was best fit by a two-electron/one-proton model.

  12. [Construction of the addiction prevention core competency model for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Sook; Jung, Sun Young

    2013-12-01

    This study was done to provide fundamental data for the development of competency reinforcement programs to prevent addictive behavior in adolescents through the construction and examination of an addiction prevention core competency model. In this study core competencies for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents through competency modeling were identified, and the addiction prevention core competency model was developed. It was validated methodologically. Competencies for preventing addictive behavior in adolescents as defined by the addiction prevention core competency model are as follows: positive self-worth, self-control skill, time management skill, reality perception skill, risk coping skill, and positive communication with parents and with peers or social group. After construction, concurrent cross validation of the addiction prevention core competency model showed that this model was appropriate. The study results indicate that the addiction prevention core competency model for the prevention of addictive behavior in adolescents through competency modeling can be used as a foundation for an integral approach to enhance adolescent is used as an adjective and prevent addictive behavior. This approach can be a school-centered, cost-efficient strategy which not only reduces addictive behavior in adolescents, but also improves the quality of their resources.

  13. Core-shell particles as model compound for studying fouling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Troels Bach; Andersen, Morten Boel Overgaard;

    2008-01-01

    Synthetic colloidal particles with hard cores and soft, water-swollen shells were used to study cake formation during ultrafiltration. The total cake resistance was lowest for particles with thick shells, which indicates that interparticular forces between particles (steric hindrance...... and electrostatic repulsion) influenced cake formation. At low pressure the specific cake resistance could be predicted from the Kozeny-Carman equation. At higher pressures, the resistance increased due to cake compression. Both cake formation and compression were reversible. For particles with thick shells...... the permeate flux could be enhanced by lowering the pressure. Hence, the amount of water-swollen material influences both cake thickness and resistance....

  14. Model Reduction of Nonlinear Fire Dynamics Models

    OpenAIRE

    Lattimer, Alan Martin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the complexity, multi-scale, and multi-physics nature of the mathematical models for fires, current numerical models require too much computational effort to be useful in design and real-time decision making, especially when dealing with fires over large domains. To reduce the computational time while retaining the complexity of the domain and physics, our research has focused on several reduced-order modeling techniques. Our contributions are improving wildland fire reduced-order mod...

  15. Improvement of Axial Reflector Cross Section Generation Model for PWR Core Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Cheon Bo; Lee, Kyung Hoon; Cho, Jin Young [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    This paper covers the study for improvement of axial reflector XS generation model. In the next section, the improved 1D core model is represented in detail. Reflector XS generated by the improved model is compared to that of the conventional model in the third section. Nuclear design parameters generated by these two XS sets are also covered in that section. Significant of this study is discussed in the last section. Two-step procedure has been regarded as the most practical approach for reactor core designs because it offers core design parameters quite rapidly within acceptable range. Thus this approach is adopted for SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced Reac- Tor) core design in KAERI with the DeCART2D1.1/ MASTER4.0 (hereafter noted as DeCART2D/ MASTER) code system. Within the framework of the two-step procedure based SMART core design, various researches have been studied to improve the core design reliability and efficiency. One of them is improvement of reflector cross section (XS) generation models. While the conventional FA/reflector two-node model used for most core designs to generate reflector XS cannot consider the actual configuration of fuel rods that intersect at right angles to axial reflectors, the revised model reflects the axial fuel configuration by introducing the radially simplified core model. The significance of the model revision is evaluated by observing HGC generated by DeCART2D, reflector XS, and core design parameters generated by adopting the two models. And it is verified that about 30 ppm CBC error can be reduced and maximum Fq error decreases from about 6 % to 2.5 % by applying the revised model. Error of AO and axial power shapes are also reduced significantly. Therefore it can be concluded that the simplified 1D core model improves the accuracy of the axial reflector XS and leads to the two-step procedure reliability enhancement. Since it is hard for core designs to be free from the two-step approach, it is necessary to find

  16. Forecasting with Dynamic Regression Models

    CERN Document Server

    Pankratz, Alan

    2012-01-01

    One of the most widely used tools in statistical forecasting, single equation regression models is examined here. A companion to the author's earlier work, Forecasting with Univariate Box-Jenkins Models: Concepts and Cases, the present text pulls together recent time series ideas and gives special attention to possible intertemporal patterns, distributed lag responses of output to input series and the auto correlation patterns of regression disturbance. It also includes six case studies.

  17. The use of CORE model by metacognitive skill approach in developing characters junior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dahlia; Yaniawati, Poppy; Kusumah, Yaya Sukjaya

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to analyze the character of students who obtain CORE learning model using metacognitive approach. The method in this study is qualitative research and quantitative research design (Mixed Method Design) with concurrent embedded strategy. The research was conducted on two groups: an experimental group and the control group. An experimental group consists of students who had CORE model learning using metacognitive approach while the control group consists of students taught by conventional learning. The study was conducted the object this research is the seventh grader students in one the public junior high schools in Bandung. Based on this research, it is known that the characters of the students in the CORE model learning through metacognitive approach is: honest, hard work, curious, conscientious, creative and communicative. Overall it can be concluded that CORE model learning is good for developing characters of a junior high school student.

  18. Ab Initio Study of 40Ca with an Importance Truncated No-Core Shell Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, R; Navratil, P

    2007-05-22

    We propose an importance truncation scheme for the no-core shell model, which enables converged calculations for nuclei well beyond the p-shell. It is based on an a priori measure for the importance of individual basis states constructed by means of many-body perturbation theory. Only the physically relevant states of the no-core model space are considered, which leads to a dramatic reduction of the basis dimension. We analyze the validity and efficiency of this truncation scheme using different realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions and compare to conventional no-core shell model calculations for {sup 4}He and {sup 16}O. Then, we present the first converged calculations for the ground state of {sup 40}Ca within no-core model spaces including up to 16{h_bar}{Omega}-excitations using realistic low-momentum interactions. The scheme is universal and can be easily applied to other quantum many-body problems.

  19. Mechanical reaction-diffusion model for bacterial population dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ngamsaad, Waipot

    2015-01-01

    The effect of mechanical interaction between cells on the spreading of bacterial population was investigated in one-dimensional space. A nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation has been formulated as a model for this dynamics. In this model, the bacterial cells are treated as the rod-like particles that interact, when contacting each other, through the hard-core repulsion. The repulsion introduces the exclusion process that causes the fast diffusion in bacterial population at high density. The propagation of the bacterial density as the traveling wave front in long time behavior has been analyzed. The analytical result reveals that the front speed is enhanced by the exclusion process---and its value depends on the packing fraction of cell. The numerical solutions of the model have been solved to confirm this prediction.

  20. Brain Dynamics An Introduction to Models and Simualtions

    CERN Document Server

    Haken, Hermann

    2008-01-01

    Brain Dynamics serves to introduce graduate students and nonspecialists from various backgrounds to the field of mathematical and computational neurosciences. Some of the advanced chapters will also be of interest to the specialists. The book approaches the subject through pulse-coupled neural networks, with at their core the lighthouse and integrate-and-fire models, which allow for the highly flexible modelling of realistic synaptic activity, synchronization and spatio-temporal pattern formation. Topics also include pulse-averaged equations and their application to movement coordination. The book closes with a short analysis of models versus the real neurophysiological system. The second edition has been thoroughly updated and augmented by two extensive chapters that discuss the interplay between pattern recognition and synchronization. Further, to enhance the usefulness as textbook and for self-study, the detailed solutions for all 34 exercises throughout the text have been added.

  1. Online Learning of Industrial Manipulators' Dynamics Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polydoros, Athanasios

    2017-01-01

    The robotics industry has introduced light-weight compliant manipulators to increase the safety during human-robot interaction. This characteristic is achieved by replacing the stiff actuators of the traditional robots with compliant ones which creates challenges in the analytical derivation...... of the dynamics models. Those mainly derive from physics-based methods and thus they are based on physical properties which are hard to be calculated.  In this thesis, is presented, a novel online machine learning approach  which is able to model both inverse and forward dynamics models of industrial manipulators...

  2. A stochastic evolutionary model for survival dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fenner, Trevor; Loizou, George

    2014-01-01

    The recent interest in human dynamics has led researchers to investigate the stochastic processes that explain human behaviour in different contexts. Here we propose a generative model to capture the essential dynamics of survival analysis, traditionally employed in clinical trials and reliability analysis in engineering. In our model, the only implicit assumption made is that the longer an actor has been in the system, the more likely it is to have failed. We derive a power-law distribution for the process and provide preliminary empirical evidence for the validity of the model from two well-known survival analysis data sets.

  3. Cellular automata modeling of pedestrian's crossing dynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晋; 王慧; 李平

    2004-01-01

    Cellular automata modeling techniques and the characteristics of mixed traffic flow were used to derive the 2-dimensional model presented here for simulation of pedestrian's crossing dynamics.A conception of "stop point" is introduced to deal with traffic obstacles and resolve conflicts among pedestrians or between pedestrians and the other vehicles on the crosswalk.The model can be easily extended,is very efficient for simulation of pedestrian's crossing dynamics,can be integrated into traffic simulation software,and has been proved feasible by simulation experiments.

  4. Dynamical modelling of coordinated multiple robot systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, Samad

    1987-01-01

    The state of the art in the modeling of the dynamics of coordinated multiple robot manipulators is summarized and various problems related to this subject are discussed. It is recognized that dynamics modeling is a component used in the design of controllers for multiple cooperating robots. As such, the discussion addresses some problems related to the control of multiple robots. The techniques used to date in the modeling of closed kinematic chains are summarized. Various efforts made to date for the control of coordinated multiple manipulators is summarized.

  5. Stochastic transition model for pedestrian dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Schultz, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The proposed stochastic model for pedestrian dynamics is based on existing approaches using cellular automata, combined with substantial extensions, to compensate the deficiencies resulting of the discrete grid structure. This agent motion model is extended by both a grid-based path planning and mid-range agent interaction component. The stochastic model proves its capabilities for a quantitative reproduction of the characteristic shape of the common fundamental diagram of pedestrian dynamics. Moreover, effects of self-organizing behavior are successfully reproduced. The stochastic cellular automata approach is found to be adequate with respect to uncertainties in human motion patterns, a feature previously held by artificial noise terms alone.

  6. Quantum Dynamics of the HMF Model

    OpenAIRE

    Plestid, Ryan; Mahon, Perry; O'Dell, Duncan

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of the quantized Hamiltonian Mean Field (HMF) model assuming a gas of bosons in the large N limit. We characterize the full set of stationary states, and study the dynamics of the model numerically focussing on competition between classical and quantum effects. We make contact with the existing literature on the HMF model as a classical system, and stress universal features which can be inferred in the semi-classical limit.In particular we show that the characteristic ch...

  7. Towards Disaggregate Dynamic Travel Forecasting Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Moshe Ben-Akiva; Jon Bottom; Song Gao; Haris N. Koutsopoulos; Yang Wen

    2007-01-01

    The authors argue that travel forecasting models should be dynamic and disaggregate in their representation of demand, supply, and supply-demand interactions, and propose a framework for such models.The proposed framework consists of disaggregate activity-based representation of travel choices of individual motorists on the demand side integrated with disaggregate dynamic modeling of network performance,through vehicle-based traffic simulation models on the supply side. The demand model generates individual members of the population and assigns to them socioeconomic characteristics. The generated motorists maintain these characteristics when they are loaded on the network by the supply model. In an equilibrium setting, the framework lends itself to a fixed-point formulation to represent and resolve demand-supply interactions. The paper discusses some of the remaining development challenges and presents an example of an existing travel forecasting model system that incorporates many of the proposed elements.

  8. Mathematical Model for Growth of Inclusion in Deoxidization on the Basis of Unreacted Core Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Su-zhou; ZHANG Jiong-ming

    2008-01-01

    Controlling inclusion composition,from the point of view of thermodynamics,only explains the probability and limit of reaction.However,kinetics makes the nucleation and the velocity of growth of inclusions clear,and these kinetic factors arc very important to the quality of slab.The basic kinetic theory of unreacted core model was used to build the mathematical model for the growth of inclusions and the concerned software was developed through Visual Basic 6.0.The time that different radius inclusions attain saturation was calculated to determine the controlling step of reaction between steel and inclusions.The time for the growth of inclusion obtained from the model was in good agreement with the data measured by Japanese Okuyama G,which indicated that the model is reasonable.

  9. Dynamical effects of overparametrization in nonlinear models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Luis Antonio; Billings, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is concemed with dynamical reconstruction for nonlinear systems. The effects of the driving function and of the complexity of a given representation on the bifurcation patter are investigated. It is shown that the use of different driving functions to excite the system may yield models with different bifurcation patterns. The complexity of the reconstructions considered is quantified by the embedding dimension and the number of estimated parameters. In this respect it appears that models which reproduce the original bifurcation behaviour are of limited complexity and that excessively complex models tend to induce ghost bifurcations and spurious dynamical regimes. Moreover, some results suggest that the effects of overparametrization on the global dynamical behaviour of a nonlinear model may be more deleterious than the presence of moderate noise levels. In order to precisely quantify the complexity of the reconstructions, global polynomials are used although the results are believed to apply to a much wider class of representations including neural networks.

  10. Dynamic optimization deterministic and stochastic models

    CERN Document Server

    Hinderer, Karl; Stieglitz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    This book explores discrete-time dynamic optimization and provides a detailed introduction to both deterministic and stochastic models. Covering problems with finite and infinite horizon, as well as Markov renewal programs, Bayesian control models and partially observable processes, the book focuses on the precise modelling of applications in a variety of areas, including operations research, computer science, mathematics, statistics, engineering, economics and finance. Dynamic Optimization is a carefully presented textbook which starts with discrete-time deterministic dynamic optimization problems, providing readers with the tools for sequential decision-making, before proceeding to the more complicated stochastic models. The authors present complete and simple proofs and illustrate the main results with numerous examples and exercises (without solutions). With relevant material covered in four appendices, this book is completely self-contained.

  11. MODELS FOR NETWORK DYNAMICS - A MARKOVIAN FRAMEWORK

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LEENDERS, RTAJ

    1995-01-01

    A question not very often addressed in social network analysis relates to network dynamics and focuses on how networks arise and change. It alludes to the idea that ties do not arise or vanish randomly, but (partly) as a consequence of human behavior and preferences. Statistical models for modeling

  12. Dynamic modeling of the INAPRO aquaponic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karimanzira, Divas; Keesman, Karel J.; Kloas, Werner; Baganz, Daniela; Rauschenbach, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The use of modeling techniques to analyze aquaponics systems is demonstrated with an example of dynamic modeling for the production of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicon) using the innovative double recirculating aquaponic system ASTAF-PRO. For the management and

  13. Dynamic spatial panels : models, methods, and inferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elhorst, J. Paul

    This paper provides a survey of the existing literature on the specification and estimation of dynamic spatial panel data models, a collection of models for spatial panels extended to include one or more of the following variables and/or error terms: a dependent variable lagged in time, a dependent

  14. A Discrete Dynamical Model of Signed Partitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chiaselotti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a discrete dynamical model with three evolution rules in order to analyze the structure of a partially ordered set of signed integer partitions whose main properties are actually not known. This model is related to the study of some extremal combinatorial sum problems.

  15. A system dynamics model for communications networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awcock, A. J.; King, T. E. G.

    1985-09-01

    An abstract model of a communications network in system dynamics terminology is developed as implementation of this model by a FORTRAN program package developed at RSRE is discussed. The result of this work is a high-level simulation package in which the performance of adaptive routing algorithms and other network controls may be assessed for a network of arbitrary topology.

  16. Concept-Oriented Modeling of Dynamic Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breedveld, P.C.; Borutzky, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    This chapter introduces the reader to the concept-oriented approach to modeling that clearly separates ideal concepts from the physical components of a system when modeling its dynamic behavior for a specific problem context. This is done from a port-based point of view for which the domain-independ

  17. An analytical model for the evolution of starless cores I: The constant-mass case

    CERN Document Server

    Pattle, Kate

    2016-01-01

    We propose an analytical model for the quasistatic evolution of starless cores confined by a constant external pressure, assuming that cores are isothermal and obey a spherically-symmetric density distribution. We model core evolution for Plummer-like and Gaussian density distributions in the adiabatic and isothermal limits, assuming Larson-like dissipation of turbulence. We model the variation in the terms in the virial equation as a function of core characteristic radius, and determine whether cores are evolving toward virial equilibrium or gravitational collapse. We ignore accretion onto cores in the current study. We discuss the different behaviours predicted by the isothermal and adiabatic cases, and by our choice of index for the size-linewidth relation, and suggest a means of parameterising the magnetic energy term in the virial equation. We model the evolution of the set of cores observed by Pattle et al. (2015) in the L1688 region of Ophiuchus in the 'virial plane'. We find that not all virially-boun...

  18. Model to Study Resin Impregnation Process of Premix Made of Friction Spun Core Yarn

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁辛; 吴学东

    2001-01-01

    A model was deveIoped to investigate impregnation behavior of thermoplastic resin into filament bundle based on Darcy's law. Consolidation processes of unidirectional laminate were performed to evaluate the validity of the model. Friction spun core yarns were used in the experiments with polypropylene fiber sheath and glass filament core. The processing conditions, such as temperature and pressure, and filament parameters were taken into consideration. A good agreement was found between theoretical prediction and experiment data.

  19. A dynamical model for the Utricularia trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Coraline; Argentina, Médéric; Bouret, Yann; Marmottant, Philippe; Vincent, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    We propose a model that captures the dynamics of a carnivorous plant, Utricularia inflata. This plant possesses tiny traps for capturing small aquatic animals. Glands pump water out of the trap, yielding a negative pressure difference between the plant and its surroundings. The trap door is set into a meta-stable state and opens quickly as an extra pressure is generated by the displacement of a potential prey. As the door opens, the pressure difference sucks the animal into the trap. We write an ODE model that captures all the physics at play. We show that the dynamics of the plant is quite similar to neuronal dynamics and we analyse the effect of a white noise on the dynamics of the trap. PMID:22859569

  20. Adaptation dynamics of the quasispecies model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kavita Jain

    2008-08-01

    We study the adaptation dynamics of an initially maladapted population evolving via the elementary processes of mutation and selection. The evolution occurs on rugged fitness landscapes which are defined on the multi-dimensional genotypic space and have many local peaks separated by low fitness valleys. We mainly focus on the Eigen’s model that describes the deterministic dynamics of an infinite number of self-replicating molecules. In the stationary state, for small mutation rates such a population forms a quasispecies which consists of the fittest genotype and its closely related mutants. The quasispecies dynamics on rugged fitness landscape follow a punctuated (or step-like) pattern in which a population jumps from a low fitness peak to a higher one, stays there for a considerable time before shifting the peak again and eventually reaches the global maximum of the fitness landscape. We calculate exactly several properties of this dynamical process within a simplified version of the quasispecies model.

  1. Adaptation dynamics of the quasispecies model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Kavita

    2009-02-01

    We study the adaptation dynamics of an initially maladapted population evolving via the elementary processes of mutation and selection. The evolution occurs on rugged fitness landscapes which are defined on the multi-dimensional genotypic space and have many local peaks separated by low fitness valleys. We mainly focus on the Eigen's model that describes the deterministic dynamics of an infinite number of self-replicating molecules. In the stationary state, for small mutation rates such a population forms a {\\it quasispecies} which consists of the fittest genotype and its closely related mutants. The quasispecies dynamics on rugged fitness landscape follow a punctuated (or step-like) pattern in which a population jumps from a low fitness peak to a higher one, stays there for a considerable time before shifting the peak again and eventually reaches the global maximum of the fitness landscape. We calculate exactly several properties of this dynamical process within a simplified version of the quasispecies model.

  2. Replicator-dynamics models of sexual conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Mariko; Ihara, Yasuo

    2009-09-07

    Evolutionary conflict between the sexes has been studied in various taxa and in various contexts. When the sexes are in conflict over mating rates, natural selection favors both males that induce higher mating rates and females that are more successful at resisting mating attempts. Such sexual conflict may result in an escalating coevolutionary arms race between males and females. In this article, we develop simple replicator-dynamics models of sexual conflict in order to investigate its evolutionary dynamics. Two specific models of the dependence of a female's fitness on her number of matings are considered: in model 1, female fitness decreases linearly with increasing number of matings and in model 2, there is an optimal number of matings that maximizes female fitness. For each of these models, we obtain the conditions for a coevolutionary process to establish costly male and female traits and examine under what circumstances polymorphism is maintained at equilibrium. Then we discuss how assumptions in previous models of sexual conflict are translated to fit to our model framework and compare our results with those of the previous studies. The simplicity of our models allows us to consider sexual conflict in various contexts within a single framework. In addition, we find that our model 2 shows more complicated evolutionary dynamics than model 1. In particular, the population exhibits bistability, where the evolutionary outcome depends on the initial state, only in model 2.

  3. Cosmological model with dynamical curvature

    CERN Document Server

    Stichel, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    We generalize the recently introduced relativistic Lagrangian darkon fluid model (EPJ C (2015) 75:9) by starting with a self-gravitating geodesic fluid whose energy-momentum tensor is dust-like with a nontrivial energy flow. The corresponding covariant propagation and constraint equations are considered in a shear-free nonrelativistic limit whose analytic solutions determine the 1st-order relativistic correction to the spatial curvature. This leads to a cosmological model where the accelerated expansion of the Universe is driven by a time-dependent spatial curvature without the need for introducing any kind of dark energy. We derive the differential equation to be satisfied by the area distance for this model.

  4. Modeling hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoni, Alessandro; Filippetti, Alessio; Caddeo, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    The topical review describes the recent progress in the modeling of hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics simulations. Hybrid perovskites and in particular methylammonium lead halide (MAPI) have a tremendous technological relevance representing the fastest-advancing solar material to date. They also represent the paradigm of an organic-inorganic crystalline material with some conceptual peculiarities: an inorganic semiconductor for what concerns the electronic and absorption properties with a hybrid and solution processable organic-inorganic body. After briefly explaining the basic concepts of ab initio and classical molecular dynamics, the model potential recently developed for hybrid perovskites is described together with its physical motivation as a simple ionic model able to reproduce the main dynamical properties of the material. Advantages and limits of the two strategies (either ab initio or classical) are discussed in comparison with the time and length scales (from pico to microsecond scale) necessary to comprehensively study the relevant properties of hybrid perovskites from molecular reorientations to electrocaloric effects. The state-of-the-art of the molecular dynamics modeling of hybrid perovskites is reviewed by focusing on a selection of showcase applications of methylammonium lead halide: molecular cations disorder; temperature evolution of vibrations; thermally activated defects diffusion; thermal transport. We finally discuss the perspectives in the modeling of hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics.

  5. Modeling hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattoni, Alessandro; Filippetti, Alessio; Caddeo, Claudia

    2017-02-01

    The topical review describes the recent progress in the modeling of hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics simulations. Hybrid perovskites and in particular methylammonium lead halide (MAPI) have a tremendous technological relevance representing the fastest-advancing solar material to date. They also represent the paradigm of an organic-inorganic crystalline material with some conceptual peculiarities: an inorganic semiconductor for what concerns the electronic and absorption properties with a hybrid and solution processable organic-inorganic body. After briefly explaining the basic concepts of ab initio and classical molecular dynamics, the model potential recently developed for hybrid perovskites is described together with its physical motivation as a simple ionic model able to reproduce the main dynamical properties of the material. Advantages and limits of the two strategies (either ab initio or classical) are discussed in comparison with the time and length scales (from pico to microsecond scale) necessary to comprehensively study the relevant properties of hybrid perovskites from molecular reorientations to electrocaloric effects. The state-of-the-art of the molecular dynamics modeling of hybrid perovskites is reviewed by focusing on a selection of showcase applications of methylammonium lead halide: molecular cations disorder; temperature evolution of vibrations; thermally activated defects diffusion; thermal transport. We finally discuss the perspectives in the modeling of hybrid perovskites by molecular dynamics.

  6. Dispersive models describing mosquitoes’ population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, W. M. S.; Takahashi, L. T.; Chapiro, G.

    2016-08-01

    The global incidences of dengue and, more recently, zica virus have increased the interest in studying and understanding the mosquito population dynamics. Understanding this dynamics is important for public health in countries where climatic and environmental conditions are favorable for the propagation of these diseases. This work is based on the study of nonlinear mathematical models dealing with the life cycle of the dengue mosquito using partial differential equations. We investigate the existence of traveling wave solutions using semi-analytical method combining dynamical systems techniques and numerical integration. Obtained solutions are validated through numerical simulations using finite difference schemes.

  7. Induction generator models in dynamic simulation tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Hans; Akhmatov, Vladislav

    1999-01-01

    . It is found to be possible to include a transient model in dynamic stability tools and, then, obtain correct results also in dynamic tools. The representation of the rotating system influences on the voltage recovery shape which is an important observation in case of windmills, where a heavy mill is connected......For AC network with large amount of induction generators (windmills) the paper demonstrates a significant discrepancy in the simulated voltage recovery after fault in weak networks when comparing dynamic and transient stability descriptions and the reasons of discrepancies are explained...

  8. Dynamics of the supermarket model

    CERN Document Server

    MacPhee, I M; Vachkovskaia, M

    2010-01-01

    We consider the long term behaviour of a Markov chain \\xi(t) on \\Z^N based on the N station supermarket model. Different routing policies for the supermarket model give different Markov chains. We show that for a general class of local routing policies, "join the least weighted queue" (JLW), the N one-dimensional components \\xi_i(t) can be partitioned into disjoint clusters C_k. Within each cluster C_k the "speed" of each component \\xi_j converges to a constant V_k and under certain conditions \\xi is recurrent in shape on each cluster. To establish these results we have assembled methods from two distinct areas of mathematics, semi-martingale techniques used for showing stability of Markov chains together with the theory of optimal flows in networks. As corollaries to our main result we obtain the stability classification of the supermarket model under any JLW policy and can explicitly compute the C_k and V_k for any instance of the model and specific JLW policy.

  9. Multi-Core Programming Design Patterns: Stream Processing Algorithms for Dynamic Scene Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    image retrieval applications. Several integral histogram kernels using CUDA optimizations for many core GPUs were investigated. The integral histogram...subwindow sizes using Compute Unified Device Architecture ( CUDA ) for many core Graphics Processing Units ( GPU ) with various kernel optimizations. The...developed, for the multicore Cell/B.E. and many core GPU using CUDA . The Cell/B.E. implementation using cross-weave scan and 16 bins for a 640x480 image

  10. A Global Model For Circumgalactic and Cluster-Core Precipitation

    CERN Document Server

    Voit, G M; Li, Y; O'Shea, B W; Bryan, G L; Donahue, M

    2016-01-01

    We provide an analytic framework for interpreting observations of multiphase circumgalactic gas that is heavily informed by recent numerical simulations of thermal instability and precipitation in cool-core galaxy clusters. We start by considering the local conditions required for the formation of multiphase gas via two different modes: (1) uplift of ambient gas by galactic outflows, and (2) condensation in a stratified stationary medium in which thermal balance is explicitly maintained. Analytic exploration of these two modes provides insights into the relationships between the local ratio of the cooling and freefall time scales (i.e., t_cool / t_ff), the large-scale gradient of specific entropy, and development of precipitation and multiphase media in circumgalactic gas. We then use these analytic findings to interpret recent simulations of circumgalactic gas in which global thermal balance is maintained. We show that long-lasting configurations of gas with 5 < t_cool / t_ff < 20 and radial entropy pr...

  11. Quasi-exactly solvable relativistic soft-core Coulomb models

    CERN Document Server

    Agboola, Davids

    2013-01-01

    By considering a unified treatment, we present quasi exact polynomial solutions to both the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations with the family of soft-core Coulomb potentials $V_q(r)=-Z/\\left(r^q+\\beta^q\\right)^{1/q}$, $Z>0$, $\\beta>0$, $q\\geq 1$. We consider cases $q=1$ and $q=2$ and show that both cases are reducible to the same basic ordinary differential equation. A systematic and closed form solution to the basic equation is obtain using the Bethe ansatz method. For each case, the expressions for the energies and the allowed parameters are obtained analytically and the wavefunctions are derive in terms of the roots of a set of Bethe ansatz equations.

  12. Intermittent rainfall in dynamic multimedia fate modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertwich, E G

    2001-03-01

    It has been shown that steady-state multimedia models (level III fugacity models) lead to a substantial underestimate of air concentrations for chemicals with a low Henry's law constant (H multimedia models are used to estimate the spatial range or inhalation exposure. A dynamic model of pollutant fate is developed for conditions of intermittent rainfall to calculate the time profile of pollutant concentrations in different environmental compartments. The model utilizes a new, mathematically efficient approach to dynamic multimedia fate modeling that is based on the convolution of solutions to the initial conditions problem. For the first time, this approach is applied to intermittent conditions. The investigation indicates that the time-averaged pollutant concentrations under intermittent rainfall can be approximated by the appropriately weighted average of steady-state concentrations under conditions with and without rainfall.

  13. Mathematical Model for Thermal Processes of Single-Core Power Cable

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Zalizny

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a mathematical model for thermal processes that permits to calculate non-stationary thermal processes of core insulation and surface of a single-core power cable in real-time mode. The model presents the cable as four thermal homogeneous bodies: core, basic insulation, protective sheath and internal environment. Thermal processes between homogeneous bodies are described by a system of four differential equations. The paper contains a proposal to solve this system of equations with the help of a thermal equivalent circuit and the Laplace transform. All design ratios for thermal parameters and algorithm for calculating temperature of core insulation and temperature of power cable surface. These algorithms can be added in the software of microprocessor devices. The paper contains results of experimental investigations and reveals that an absolute error of the mathematical model does not exceed 3ºС.

  14. Understanding the dynamics of photoionization-induced nonlinear effects and solitons in gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mohammed F.; Biancalana, Fabio

    2011-12-01

    We present the details of our previously formulated model [Saleh , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.203902 107, 203902 (2011)] that governs pulse propagation in hollow-core photonic crystal fibers filled by an ionizable gas. By using perturbative methods, we find that the photoionization process induces the opposite phenomenon of the well-known Raman self-frequency redshift of solitons in solid-core glass fibers, as was recently experimentally demonstrated [Hölzer , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.203901 107, 203901 (2011)]. This process is only limited by ionization losses, and leads to a constant acceleration of solitons in the time domain with a continuous blueshift in the frequency domain. By applying the Gagnon-Bélanger gauge transformation, multipeak “inverted gravitylike” solitary waves are predicted. We also demonstrate that the pulse dynamics shows the ejection of solitons during propagation in such fibers, analogous to what happens in conventional solid-core fibers. Moreover, unconventional long-range nonlocal interactions between temporally distant solitons, unique of gas plasma systems, are predicted and studied. Finally, the effects of higher-order dispersion coefficients and the shock operator on the pulse dynamics are investigated, showing that the conversion efficiency of resonant radiation into the deep UV can be improved via plasma formation.

  15. Dynamic exponents for potts model cluster algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, Paul D.; Baillie, Clive F.

    We have studied the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff cluster update algorithms for the Ising model in 2, 3 and 4 dimensions. The data indicate simple relations between the specific heat and the Wolff autocorrelations, and between the magnetization and the Swendsen-Wang autocorrelations. This implies that the dynamic critical exponents are related to the static exponents of the Ising model. We also investigate the possibility of similar relationships for the Q-state Potts model.

  16. The dynamic model of enterprise revenue management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsel, A. A.; Kataev, M. Yu; Kozlov, S. V.; Korepanov, K. V.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the dynamic model of enterprise revenue management. This model is based on the quadratic criterion and linear control law. The model is founded on multiple regression that links revenues with the financial performance of the enterprise. As a result, optimal management is obtained so as to provide the given enterprise revenue, namely, the values of financial indicators that ensure the planned profit of the organization are acquired.

  17. Feature Extraction for Structural Dynamics Model Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [Yokohama University; Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stull, Chris [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Chonnam Univesity; Cornwell, Phil [Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology; Figueiredo, Eloi [Universidade Lusófona; Luscher, D. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worden, Keith [University of Sheffield

    2016-01-13

    As structural dynamics becomes increasingly non-modal, stochastic and nonlinear, finite element model-updating technology must adopt the broader notions of model validation and uncertainty quantification. For example, particular re-sampling procedures must be implemented to propagate uncertainty through a forward calculation, and non-modal features must be defined to analyze nonlinear data sets. The latter topic is the focus of this report, but first, some more general comments regarding the concept of model validation will be discussed.

  18. A Dynamic Model for Energy Structure Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Energy structure is a complicated system concerning economic development, natural resources, technological innovation, ecological balance, social progress and many other elements. It is not easy to explain clearly the developmental mechanism of an energy system and the mutual relations between the energy system and its related environments by the traditional methods. It is necessary to develop a suitable dynamic model, which can reflect the dynamic characteristics and the mutual relations of the energy system and its related environments. In this paper, the historical development of China's energy structure was analyzed. A new quantitative analysis model was developed based on system dynamics principles through analysis of energy resources, and the production and consumption of energy in China and comparison with the world. Finally, this model was used to predict China's future energy structures under different conditions.

  19. Dynamic Model Identification for Industrial Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngoc Dung Vuong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a systematic procedure for identifying the dynamics of industrialrobots is presented. Since joint friction can be highly nonlinearwith time varyingcharacteristics in the low speed region,a simple and yet effective scheme has been used toidentify the boundary velocity that separates this “dynamic” friction region from its staticregion. The robot’s dynamic model is then identified in this static region, where thenonlinnear friction model is reduced to the linear-in-parameter form. To overcome thedrawbacks of the least squares estimator, which does not take in any constraints, anonlinear optimization problem is formulated to guarantee the physical feasibility of theidentified parameters. The proposed procedure has been demonstrated on the first fourlinks of the Mitsubishi PA10 manipulator, an improved dynamic model was obtained andthe the effectiveness of the proposed identification procedure is demonstrated.

  20. Dynamic Model for Life History of Scyphozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congbo Xie

    Full Text Available A two-state life history model governed by ODEs is formulated to elucidate the population dynamics of jellyfish and to illuminate the triggering mechanism of its blooms. The polyp-medusa model admits trichotomous global dynamic scenarios: extinction, polyps survival only, and both survival. The population dynamics sensitively depend on several biotic and abiotic limiting factors such as substrate, temperature, and predation. The combination of temperature increase, substrate expansion, and predator diminishment acts synergistically to create a habitat that is more favorable for jellyfishes. Reducing artificial marine constructions, aiding predator populations, and directly controlling the jellyfish population would help to manage the jellyfish blooms. The theoretical analyses and numerical experiments yield several insights into the nature underlying the model and shed some new light on the general control strategy for jellyfish.